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C I T Y W E E K LY. N E T O C T O B E R 2 0 , 2 0 1 6 | V O L . 3 3 N 0 . 2 4

Ghostly welcome parties, chatty spirits, haunted dolls: Mediums, spirit guides and morticians tell all. By Carolyn Campbell


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CWCONTENTS COVER STORY THEY SEE DEAD PPL

Morticians, spirit guides, mediums and a token atheist talk death. Cover photo illustration by Derek Carlisle

15 4 LETTERS 6 OPINION 8 NEWS 19 A&E 25 DINE 31 CINEMA 35 TRUE TV 36 MUSIC 49 COMMUNITY

CONTRIBUTOR DYLAN W. HARRIS

News, p. 12 Prior to writing a story on a local pedicab ordinance, Harris, the newest member of our editorial team, had never taken a ride in one. “Pedicab drivers are a varied bunch,” he says, sharing tales of starving students and even a pedi-marriage proposal. “All of them seemed to be united by one thing, though. They all said they enjoy the company of the riders.”

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OCTO

BER 6 , 2016

@SLCWEEKLY

Cover Story, Oct. 6 “The Weather Inside”

I am so happy to hear someone is sharing his story.

SHANTELLE PERRY ARGYLE Via Facebook

Opinion, Oct. 6 “Solving Homelessness”

This is not an issue only impacting the homeless. I work a good job and in any other area could afford to buy a house. In SLC I can only afford to share a small condo. It’s sad I could live in California cheaper than SLC. Something is seriously wrong here.

PAUL DEBOCK Via CityWeekly.net

Blog, Sept. 30 “Animal Testing Death at U Sparks Federal Warning”

.NET

In this article, the University of Utah’s veterinarian actually claimed, “Many of the animals that are kept as pets have much tougher lives than the animals we care for here.” This is strange to hear since I’ve never known one person who’s ever kept their companion animals in a cage, cut their skulls open, placed them in restraint chairs unable to move, deprived them of water or food, drugged them, infected them with artificial disease, poisoned them with chemicals, etc., and then killed them. Typically, when a violation of the Animal Welfare Act is brought to light by the media, the laboratory’s talking heads always claim they love their animals dearly and that all their research is approved and overseen by this or that federal agency, but I’ve never heard a spokesperson utter such a blatant lie as this. In 2016 alone, I have exposed over 30 se-

rious violations of the Animal Welfare Act at laboratories all over the U.S. I could spend all day finding numerous noncompliances due to negligence, disregarding regulations and quite possibly, lack of empathy. There are not nearly enough USDA inspectors to cover the thousands of laboratories (and other businesses that use and confine animals) to make sure those entrusted with animal care are following the rules and handling with compassion. One or two inspections a year simply will not protect the millions of animals in laboratories. Yet, animal experimenters continually try to sell the argument to the public that these animals, who were unfortunate enough to be born into vivisection, are well cared for. Finally, regardless if animals in labs were treated well, many are wild animals subjected to living in cold, metal boxes and when they are no longer of use to the school, they are killed. So, when I hear vivisectors profess how great lab animals have it, it’s incredibly difficult to believe them.

JODIE WIEDERKEHR, FOUNDER OF CENTER FOR ETHICAL SCIENCE Via CityWeekly.net

Blog, Oct. 14, “SLC Council to Take on Homelessness, Affordable Housing”

Interesting! I work for the state and I certainly don’t make enough to afford housing according to this. I’m glad this topic is getting attention. I look forward to hearing the outcome.

BRITTNEY HEMINGWAY Via Facebook

A&E, Oct. 6, “A Strange Primer”

I know next to nothing about Dr. Strange, but I’m excited for the movie and your article added to my interest.

@WYDERWALDRONDDS Via Twitter

Straight Dope, Oct. 6, “Has the United States ever had a presidential candidate who said things as outrageous as Donald Trump has this year?”

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COMMENTS@CITYWEEKLY.NET

p.16

There sure has been. Those candidates are Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton in recent years.

The We INSIDE ather

@KL0IF Via Twitter

Free Will Astrology, Oct. 6 “Psychological Achievements”

The pri so man co n system see nvicted m of stea s intent on e n ling $2 64 in 1 suring that a 981 die s in jail . BY CO LBY FR AZIER

Hi. Astrology isn’t real.

@CLARKJDAVIS Via Twitter “Going out on enough dates with yourself?” You gotta know who you are and what you want.

@MARGARETOFG Via Twitter

SLCPD’s Failures

Stephen Dark’s reporting on Salt Lake City Police Department (SLCPD) officer Dax Shane [“Street Justice,” Sept. 29, City Weekly] exposes not just shocking behavior by the officer himself, but also a deeply inadequate culture at the SLCPD. Officer Shane testified in court that he spread a false rumor that a homeless man was a police informant in hopes that the homeless man would be assaulted by other men in the homeless community. Is Officer Shane truly incapable of beating

up a simple vagrant? Law enforcement officers across the country assault, injure and even kill people far more able to defend themselves every single day! Officer Shane should be ashamed of himself for failing to personally settle any scores he might have with the citizens of Salt Lake City. Furthermore, as cities across the country look with pride on police forces that deliver the pain to drug dealers, drug users, people who look like they might be drug users and a fair number of random citizens, Mr. Dark’s reporting makes clear that the SLCPD doesn’t even try to systematically commit and cover up murder by its force. Salt Lake City might never be able to match Chicago or Los Angeles in terms of corruption and violence, but surely our police and the elected officials who oversee them have a duty to at least try. For shame, SLCPD; for shame.

J’MYLE KORETZ, Salt Lake City

STAFF Publisher JOHN SALTAS Editorial

Editor ENRIQUE LIMÓN Arts &Entertainment Editor SCOTT RENSHAW Music Editor RANDY HARWARD Senior Staff Writer STEPHEN DARK Staff Writers COLBY FRAZIER, DYLAN WOOLF HARRIS Copy Editor ANDREA HARVEY Proofers SARAH ARNOFF, LANCE GUDMUNDSEN

Dining Listings MIKEY SALTAS Editorial Interns HILLARY REILLY, RHETT WILKINSON Contributors CECIL ADAMS, KIMBALL BENNION, KATHARINE BIELE, ROB BREZSNY, BABS DE LAY, KYLEE EHMANN, BILL FROST, MARYANN JOHANSON, KATHERINE PIOLI, DAVID RIEDEL, STAN ROSENZWEIG, TED SCHEFFLER, GAVIN SHEEHAN, CHUCK SHEPHERD, ERIC D. SNIDER, BRIAN STAKER, ANDREW WRIGHT, LEE ZIMMERMAN

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Art Director DEREK CARLISLE Graphic Artists CAIT LEE, SUMMER MONTGOMERY, JOSH SCHEUERMAN

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Associate Business Manager PAULA SALTAS Business Department Administrator ALISSA DIMICK Technical Director BRYAN MANNOS

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Street Team STEPHANIE ABBOTT, SHAUNTEL ARCHULETTA, BEN BALDRIDGE, TYLER GRAHAM, ADAM LANE, ANDY ROMERO, LAUREN TAGGE, MIKAYLA THURBUR, STEVEN VARGO

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PRIVATE EY Be True

Since my first visit in 2003, I’ve been lucky enough to travel to Greece eight times. After one such visit, I came home to an envelope that didn’t include a return address, just a typewritten address to me, John Saltas, publisher. Inside was a plain piece of white paper with what I still interpret to be the handwriting scrawl of an elderly person (or a not-so-clever antagonist) who wrote me these motivating words: Dear John Saltas Please stay in Greece. Thank you.

I wish I could, I wish I could. Barely two weeks ago, I returned home after a very successful City Weekly tour of Greece, sponsored by this newspaper. We had 36 travelers, of which I’m pretty sure 26 would go back tomorrow if they could. For many, it was the trip of a lifetime. For all, it was a laugh-a-minute good time, interspersed with views of jaw-dropping historical Greek and Roman relics (“Why do so many statues have their breasts and penises chopped off?”); visits to Byzantine Churches (“Wow, these are older than the Salt Lake Temple!”); walks through back alleys tasting the iconic foodstuffs of Athens (“Yum!” “Ick!”); ferry rides across the blue Aegean Sea (“Do these things ever sink?”); driving ATVs all over the island of Naxos into hidden villages (“You stupid Germans!”) and remote beaches (“Has anyone seen my Cubbies hat?”); then finally to Santorini for what is arguably the world’s most stunning sunset (“Oh! My! God!”) high upon the caldera rim at the village of Imerovigli. Yeah, I’d stay in Greece if I could. Enroute, I couldn’t get the in-flight music to work. I ended up having to choose between listening to classical music or AC/ DC. With apologies to Angus Young, I chose classical. However, there was only one, 90-minute classical track. After a gentle

45-minute massage of violins and flutes, an unnamed tenor began belting out something to the tune of “Danny Boy.” I loved it, though I’d never heard it before. So I tried to play it again only to have the music loop back to the start. It took 45 minutes to hear the song again. I washed, rinsed and repeated that process for nine hours. I forgot about it until a few days ago, when I typed the few lyrics I remembered into Google. Stranger things have happened, but for a guy like me who sees messages in lawn clippings, I thought the broken song loop was trying to tell me something. It was telling me, “You’re OK, John. Relax. Here’s a hall pass.” And wouldn’t you know it? The song is “I Would Be True,” a well-known Christian hymn. I presume it’s well-known. I assure you it has never been sung during a Greek Orthodox liturgy, so bound are we to hipster Byzantine words and music. Nor, as it turns out, did my Mormon friends know of it, busy as they are singing their own playlist. Nope, this hymn belongs to those other Christians. That’s fine with me. It’s a great hymn mixing a perfect blend of feel-good lyrics with a lullaby melody that begs for a hearing in a time of crisis or need—as it was during its playing at the funeral for Princess Diana. The version I heard somewhere over the North Atlantic, was strong without being syrupy. But, I can’t find it. The artist was a male tenor who sang so beautifully I listened to the song seven times, each time suffering through the aforementioned 45 minutes of violin and flutes before it played again. The versions on YouTube—as often as not by children choirs—utterly fail compared to the version still playing in my head. It’s just not the same. I interpret that as a cosmic sign that I can interpret the

STAFF BOX

B Y J O H N S A LTA S

Readers can comment at cityweekly.net

@johnsaltas

song however I wish. So, here it is. I think all this means it’s time for me to come clean: “I would be true, for there are those that trust me. I would be pure, for there are those that care. I would be strong, for there is much to suffer. I would be brave, for there is much to dare. I would friend of all, the foe, the friendless. I would be giving, and forget the gift. I would be humble, for I know my weakness. I would look up, and laugh, and love and live.” With that prayer out of the way, I think that Gary Herbert should not be re-elected governor of Utah and The Salt Lake Tribune endorsement of him was a telling big, fat kiss; that Donald Trump is gaming all of us and is a very, very dangerous man; that I’m no Hillary fan, but what choice do sane people have? Johnson? Stein? Not for me. I’m going to go with that Evan McMullin guy, basically because he’s younger than me, he’s growing his hair in, he seems brave and there’s much to dare. That’s plenty for me in this election where Trump should not be handed Utah, where his history, proclivities and cynicism should be given no quarter from anyone, especially the LDS. A vote for McMullin is not a throwaway—it’s not going to cost Hillary, who won’t win Utah, and who won’t need this state to throw her over the top anyway. Be honest, Utah still won’t matter to her or anyone in D.C. unless the down ballot Dems also win—and by the looks of things, they won’t. So, I’m looking forward to Nov. 9 and to the next City Weekly trip to Greece (please come!), where we can all laugh, and love and live—and where, if we want, we can tune into Trump TV, because that’s what he really wants. CW

I’M GOING TO GO WITH THAT EVAN MCMULLIN GUY ... HE SEEMS BRAVE AND THERE’S MUCH TO DARE.

What’s been your most recent case of ear worm? Nicole Enright: I always get the Full House theme song in there. Especially when someone says “Whatever happened to …”

Tyeson Rogers: Drake & Future. Pete Saltas: I recently hooked up a record player at the house. Then, on Saturday I found Pink Floyd’s The Wall at Randy’s Records and it’s been nonstop.

Lisa Dorelli: I don’t know if it’s because I’ve been in a nostalgic mood, fed up with humans or talking about these guys a lot lately, but “I Saw Your Mommy” by Suicidal Tendencies is my ear worm. I had to ask a 21-year-old what that phrase meant, by the way.

Lindsay Larkin: “Shout Out to My Ex” by Little Mix is so catchy and so scathing and warms my ice-cold teen and 20-something heart. I have an awful ex from long ago whose tattoo dedicated to me could only be covered by a giant black square, so I assume he lives with it. Way to permanently suckerpunch yourself, kid.

Jeremiah Smith: Recently it was “(They Long to Be) Close to You” by The Carpenters. Andrea Harvey: This morning while walking to work, it was the Backstreet Boys’ “Shape of My Heart.” I have no idea why.

Randy Harward: My mind is infested with ear worms. Different songs for different states of mind. The most insidious are snippets on a loop. One is from a song I hate by a band I love. It lasted nine days back in June. I was homicidal. Sierra Sessions:

“Rock You Like a Hurricane.” More like ear-Scorpions, amirite?

Send feedback to comments@cityweekly.net

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8 | OCTOBER 20, 2016

HITS&MISSES BY KATHARINE BIELE

RANDOM QUESTIONS, SURPRISING ANSWERS

@kathybiele

Zephyr Dust-Up

What with Donald Trump and all the electronic inaccuracies on social media, some people think the First Amendment has gone too far. But wait. Don’t confuse tweeters with real journalists—the kind who are in the field risking their reputations and their livelihoods. Now, what has happened in North Dakota is happening in Utah. The big issue involves Deia Schlosberg, Amy Goodman and Shailene Woodley who’ve been arrested while covering demonstrations against the Dakota Access Pipeline. But closer to home is the lawsuit against The Canyon Country Zephyr, Jim Stiles and four others. Moab’s city manager, who has since been fired, accused the bimonthly magazine of “defamation, intentional infliction of emotional distress” and “intentional interference with economic relationships” of Tayo Inc. and its co-founder Tara Smelt, according to the Moab Times-Independent. Long story short, The Zephyr is a small publication that since 1989 has been digging at the establishment whose deep pockets ease any attempt to stifle free speech.

Pot and the Pulpit

Marijuana is back in local news after the LDS Church wrote a letter to oppose pro-marijuana and pro-assisted-suicide ballot initiatives in Western states. Of course, Utah isn’t looking to legalize recreational pot, but it is moving toward approving medical marijuana—a second attempt, according to Sen. Brian Shiozawa. “The dangers of marijuana to public health and safety are well documented,” the letter says. That is less than true as there has been little research on the drug because of its classification. However, a University of Michigan study found that patients using medical marijuana for chronic pain reported a 64 percent reduction in opioid use. Shouldn’t the church be seeking a ban on opioids, which the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services calls an epidemic?

You Be the Judge

Email resume to: jbriggs@cityweekly.net

FIVE SPOT

Thanks to The Salt Lake Tribune for pointing out the only judge whose retention is iffy in the upcoming election. The Utah Judicial Performance Evaluation Commission has come up with its assessment of about 90 judges you’re supposed to study before checking “yes” or “no” on your ballot. Well, the truth is that judges rarely get booted from the bench and typically score favorable percentages in the high 70s or low 80s, according to Ballotpedia. Only when there’s some public outcry or in this case a bad rating will a judge lose out. There were several colleagues speaking in favor of the hapless aforementioned judge, but frankly most voters have no idea whether judges are worth retaining. Perhaps the idea of voting on them is what’s worth scrapping.

STAN ROSENZWEIG

EVENT COORDINATOR COORDINATOR

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FULL TIME TIME FULL

Cree McNulty dropped out of high school at age 15, had an epiphany at age 21, went back to school, got involved in activist politics and is now out to make the world a better place.

How did you get from being a high school drop-out to becoming gainfully employed and nearing completion of your bachelor’s degree?

I grew up in the Ball Park area of Salt Lake and went to school in Glendale. My grandparents raised me half the time because my parents worked hard. We’re Chicano. My school was refugee youth. I grew up with Muslim friends, Christian friends, everything you can think of. Dad passed away unexpectedly from a workplace safety accident when I was 15 and I stopped going to school. I started working at 16 to do whatever I could to get by. Turning 21, I thought I should do something. Getting a GED worked out well, so I enrolled at Salt Lake Community College. That high-school [diploma] gave me confidence. Then I met a professor who made me feel as though the individual choices I make could be part of something bigger.

So, have your choices made you part of something bigger?

Yes. With my SLCC associates degree, I enrolled at the U of U, majoring in political science. I come from a family of strong women with a progressive background. One night in 2014, I called the County Dems and ended up at Rep. Angela Romero’s. She was welcoming and she said, “Let’s do something.” They haven’t been able to get rid of me since.

What have you been doing in politics?

The U of U Hinkley Institite of Politics sent me to Bedford, U.K., just outside of London, where I worked for the Conservative Party in their last election. It was insane—so fun. In Utah, I moved into County Democratic Party leadership, became legislative chair for my district and Angela’s campaign manager. I am Secretary of the Salt Lake County Democratic Party and chair of the technology committee.

How has your experience been as the chair of the technology committee?

It’s been really great to see how social media can be positive for the world, other than how people can be really shitty to each other. Some of the most useful stuff in controlling a social media platform is that you learn to double-check your work and not immediately post in the heat of the moment. I am learning from Donald Trump; I hope children learn from him how not to behave in public. It’s better being nice to other people and make their lives a little easier.

What’s next for you?

I got engaged in London. It was really cool. Like everyone in their 20s, I want to make the world a better place. I want to be a functioning adult in the world, doing good things for other people.

—STAN ROSENZWEIG comments@cityweekly.net


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BY CECIL ADAMS SLUG SIGNORINO

STRAIGHT DOPE Clowning Around Are there really clowns abducting people in North Carolina? —Bron When Georgia cops busted an 11-yearold girl in September for bringing a knife to school, she protested that she needed the blade in case a clown tried to snatch her. Most other years, that excuse might seem far-fetched, but in 2016 you can get why the poor kid was spooked. For months police have been wading through report after report of suspicious characters in white face paint, floppy shoes and the like lurking, peeping and accosting children. OK, now exhale—you won’t likely have to shiv some Bozo any time soon. Not one evil clown has thus far spirited away his supposed prey; it might yet turn out that most or even all of these circus rejects don’t actually exist. The current panic began this August in South Carolina, with a claim that some clowns were offering money to lure children to a house in the woods, and spread quickly through Alabama, Kentucky, Georgia and North Carolina. Before long, phantom clowns were sighted north of the Mason-Dixon line in Pennsylvania, and now it’s the rare state that hasn’t heard some account of clown activity. By press time, they might even be creeping across the Canadian border. America has suffered such infestations before. Back in 1981, police around the country—Boston, Kansas City, Pittsburgh—started hearing menacing-clown stories from kids, all ultimately unsubstantiated; similar waves crested in ’85 and ’91, with another mini-outbreak occurring just two years ago. And we’re hardly the only nation affected: For a full month in 2013, the good people of Northampton, England, tracked the movements of a mysterious clown who turned out to be a local filmmaker. France suffered its own plague of sightings the following year. There is, apparently, nothing illegal about publicly dressing up like a clown, though your outfit might not make you a lot of friends—as the Northampton clown learned, it might even earn you some death threats. In fact, the fear of clowns—coulrophobia, as it’s come to be called, is—seemingly so culturally deep-seated that some historians trace it back to the genesis of the modern clown itself. In her straightforwardly titled Smithsonian article “The History and Psychology of Clowns Being Scary,” Linda Rodriguez McRobbie notes that two 19th-century performers who established the contemporary clown’s costume de rigueur were uncomfortably dark fellows. Joseph Grimaldi, a pioneer in the use of whiteface, was an alcoholic whose torments became infamous after Charles Dickens edited his memoirs into a best-seller. And Pierrot, the French melancholy clown archetype, was in large part the creation of Jean-Gaspard Deburau,

who once walloped an urchin to death with his cane. Deburau was acquitted in court, bringing to mind a quote from one of America’s most notorious killers: “Clowns can get away with murder.” Thus spoke ’70s serial killer (you knew we’d get here eventually) John Wayne Gacy to police investigators. Gacy, who entertained at kids’ events in full clown regalia, supplied crucial DNA for what’s now our stock image of the demented, murderous clown. This was already in place for Stephen King to riff off in his 1986 novel It, and already a cliché by the time rap-rock goofballs Insane Clown Posse won their cult following. So, yes, clowns creep people out. That still doesn’t explain why they were more ubiquitous than Pokémon this past summer. Some suspected a marketing campaign for 31, a new creepy-clown flick from shock-rockerturned-horror-auteur Rob Zombie—after all, a clown roaming Green Bay, Wis., this year turned out to be an indie filmmaker’s promo stunt. But the movie’s distributor denied any connection. If only there was some simpler explanation. Maybe something like … people are big fat liars? Sure enough: A North Carolina man has already admitted that no, a clown hadn’t actually come a-rapping on his window one night, as he’d initially told police, and the inability of cops in other jurisdictions to scrape up even a trace of clown evidence suggests he’s not the only fibber. But the alleged sightings have apparently given people ideas: A crew of Alabama teens was arrested last month for impersonating clowns on Instagram and threatening to unleash violent mayhem on their school, and similar stunts have proliferated in recent weeks. What we seem to have here is a longstanding phenomenon given new oomph by social media. Every prank or hoax now hovers just a few gullible clicks from virality, with untold potential dupes and copycats alike waiting to pass it along. The credulous have been primed to believe themselves at constant risk from the most distant or mythical threats (terrorists being the old standby, but remember the “knockout game”?); trolls can smell this fear, and pounce accordingly. Really, though: Who’d don clown garb to steal a child anyway? Not to offer tips on abduction technique, but when your ends are nefarious, I’d figure conspicuously bright colors are a must to avoid. And kids are scared as hell of clowns. Might as well try to lure a tot into your windowless Econoline with promises of broccoli and extra homework. n Send questions to Cecil via StraightDope.com or write him c/o Chicago Reader, 350 N. Orleans, Chicago 60654.


S NEofW the

Extreme Hobbies John Weigel and Olaf Danielson are engaged in a frenzied battle of “extreme birdwatching,” each hoping to close out 2016 as the new North American champ of the American Birding Association, and a September Smithsonian piece had Weigel ahead, 763 to 759. Danielson is perhaps better known for doing much of his birding in the nude (and is the author of the provocatively titled volume, “Boobies, Peckers and Tits”—all common names of popular birds). The old oneyear record was 749, and the association attributes the larger numbers this year to El Niño, which has disrupted food supplies and driven birds into different locations.

WEIRD

Fine Points of the Law Senate bill 1342, passed in the Idaho Legislature earlier in 2016, authorizes schools to use the Bible as a reference in classrooms, despite the U.S. Supreme Court’s having specifically condemned a previous version of the bill ever since 1964. The bill’s sponsor, Rep. Sage Dixon, said he thought his law was nonetheless constitutional because “the little Supreme Court in my head says this is OK.” Even so, Gov. C.L. Otter vetoed the bill.

Fun With Pennies Robert Napolitan, 34, was arrested in Taylor, Pa., in September and charged with theft of a drum containing 300,000 pennies from his employer, Pyne Freight Lines. That steel drum weighs several tons and, of course, netted Napolitan only $3,000. By contrast, in New York City’s Diamond District in September, a brazen thief made off with a 5-gallon drum containing 86 pounds of something else—gold flakes, valued at more than $1 million—and is still at large.

Police Report The long-rap-sheeted Darren Clinton, 48, was in the process, according to Minneapolis police, of burglarizing a hotel room in September when an occupant returned and surprised him. Clinton, wielding a knife, escaped momentarily, but the occupant summoned his nearby roommates—the visiting University of Arizona men’s cross-country team—and after a chase, which included jumping several barriers, the runners steered a severely winded Clinton into the arms of a state trooper. n Kerry Johnson, 52, was arrested in August in Charleston, W.V., and charged with robbing a City National Bank branch. Police said Johnson had been gambling at the Mardi Gras Casino in nearby Nitro when he ran out of money at the blackjack table. He left a $25 chip to preserve his spot, excused himself, went to the bank and came back with more money.

NAACP Salt Lake Branch 97th Annual Life MEMBERSHIP

AND FREEDOM FUND BANQUET

People With Issues Based on recent convictions for indecent exposure, Anthony Hardison, 50, has a public masturbation habit, and it is apparently so bad that he engaged once again in August—while he was in the lobby of the sheriff’s office in Seattle, where he had reported to register as a sex offender. He was arrested.

The NAACP Salt Lake Branch cordially invites you to attend and support the 97th Annual Life Membership and Freedom Fund Banquet Theme: “Our Lives Matter, Our Votes Count”

The Passing Parade: Austrian Edition A massive, mile-long traffic jam on the Austrian A2 highway in October between Inzersdorf and Vosendorf was caused by a huge flock of starlings crashing into cars and falling to the road. Ornithologists told reporters that the birds must have earlier feasted en masse on fermented berries and were navigating under the influence.

Speaker Carlton T. Mayers II Policy Counsel Policing Reform NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, IND (LDF)

n In September, an unnamed woman was detained at the airport in Graz, Austria, because her suitcase held two plastic containers with her late husband’s intestines. She had come from Morocco seeking doctors’ opinions on whether he had been poisoned, but doctors told local media they would have to examine the entire body to determine that. Police said no laws had been broken.

Friday, October 21, 2016 Reception: 6:00 p.m. • Dinner: 7:00 p.m. Little America Hotel 500 South Main Salt Lake City

Thanks this week to Peter Swank, Deborah Rogers, Mel Birge, Pete, Sara Discenza and the News of the Weird Board of Editorial Advisors.

For banquet reservations email: jdwnaacp@att.net or call 801-250-5088

OCTOBER 20, 2016 | 11

Bright Ideas While other vehicle safety-control engineers work on actually slowing down cars and buses when a risk is detected on the road

Latest Religious Messages In 2014, British entrepreneur Azad Chaiwala, 33, created the matchmaking service Second Wife—because, just as men have trouble finding that special person, some fundamentalist Mormons, Muslims and others have at least as much trouble finding that special additional person. Most clients, he said, are in the United States and the United Kingdom, though bigamy is illegal in both places. The service was so successful that Chaiwala this year inaugurated Polygamy.com, which he adamantly defended as a moral alternative to adultery and one-night-stand services such as Tinder.

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Great Art! The 1,496-page German novel Bottom’s Dream, translated into (broken) English, more than twice as long as War and Peace, recently reached U.S. bookstores as a 13-pound behemoth, bound with a 14-inch spine that, based on a September Wall Street Journal description, will almost surely go unread. The story follows two translators and their teenage daughter over a single day as they try to interpret the works of Edgar Allen Poe, making for slow going for anyone not already conversant with Poe.

n Saudi Arabia switched to the 365-day Gregorian calendar on Oct. 2, in part to reduce government expenses. Bureaucrats had been using the Islamic lunar Hijri (354-day) calendar, but now must work a 3-percent-longer year for the same salaries.

n For some reason, according to a High Point, N.C., TV report, Larry Hall of Randolph County took seven-plus weeks out of his life recently and glued pennies to cover (except for windows and chrome) his 2000 Chevrolet Blazer (a total of 51,300 coins).

Simple As That British farmer Pip Simpson, who lost nearly 300 sheep to rustlers in recent years, recently sprayed his remaining herd of almost 800 sheep a bright luminous orange (harmless, he said, though the sheep’s opinions are unknown) to make them less attractive to thieves.

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n The Arizona Legislature passed a child-molestation law recently that made any adult contact with children’s genitals a criminal act, but unlike in other states’ similar laws, neglected to include a requirement that the outlawed contact be for “sexual” purposes. Consequently, in principle, parents may be criminally liable, for example, for bathing a baby or changing its diaper. The Arizona Supreme Court ruled in September that it is up to the Legislature to change the law, but some lawmakers professed indifference, confident that district attorneys will use good judgment about whom to prosecute.

ahead, one of Volvo’s recent innovations appears aimed merely at bullying pedestrians to get out of the way. According to a September report on Treehugger.com, the safety “control” for a Volvo bus consists of progressively louder horn-honking to scare off the pedestrian.

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n Nebraska voters in November will be asked whether to keep the state’s longstanding death penalty for murder—even though retaining it will require them to vote “repeal.” The legislature replaced death row last year with mandatory life sentences, and the referendum is to “repeal” or “retain” that legislation. Hence, to abolish the death penalty, voters must select “retain.” The state attorney general, and election officials, declined to challenge the confusing arrangement, instead suggesting that Nebraskans are smart enough to figure the whole thing out.

BY CHUCK SHEPHERD


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BUSINESS

ENRIQUE LIMÓN

Heavy Pedal

“Frankly, the City Council doesn’t give a fuck. They don’t care because they’ve got bigger fish to fry.” — Louis Gasper

Road to regulate bike taxis bumpy, protracted. BY DYLAN WOOLF HARRIS dwharris@cityweekly.net @DylantheHarris

B

almy autumn air and the sleepy emergence of Salt Lake City’s weekend crowd make a recent Friday afternoon as fitting as any to take an open-air ride through picturesque downtown. Setting sun smears the brick and glass on the taller highrises in amber light, and pedicabs— carriages for hire, pulled by sizable tricycles—are on the prowl. Business has been slow, however, so Crystal Price stops in a pizza joint and orders a slice with pepperoni. She had been cruising around the city on her dappled pink pedicab for about an hour and a half, but earned little money. Not to worry; the night is early yet. When Price finishes at the pizzeria—a place she patronizes because the staff allows drivers to use the restroom—she taps a Camel out of a near-full pack as another bike pulls up alongside her before the cigarette is lit. The two friends chew the fat for a bit. Price isn’t worried about snagging a customer at the moment. “It always picks up for bar scene,” she says, beginning around 10 p.m. “We’re usually out till about 2 or 3 in the morning.” Before long, a third pedicab rolls to a stop behind the first pair. A man with dreads hops off the passenger seat. His lift was free. The scene is familiar. Pedicabs, common in major U.S. cities, have become a staple here. Recent regulations passed by the City Council could make room for more. Louis Gasper, one in a consortium of owners with Salt City Cycle Cab, says the new rules erase a carriage cap on the company, which prior to the ordinance’s adoption was at 20. “For them to regulate me down to 20 [pedicabs], it’s like putting a tiger in a cage,” he says. But drivers, as opposed to owners, are of a different, unfettered breed. On a Saturday mid-morning a few blocks south of Rice-Eccles Stadium, two cab drivers, Scott Seibert and Wyoming Dave, lounge in wait for the tailgate fanbase hours before a University of Utah game kicks off. The men look relaxed. In a 20-minute window, a fourth and fifth pedicab bus customers in red Utes garb toward the party lot. Where there are crowds—large conventions, ballgames—sure enough there are transporters offering rides.

Tiger uncaged: Salt City Cycle Cab’s Louis Gasper says local pedicab ordinance process moves “slower than molasses.” The pregame fare is light. Money will be made after the contest’s final whistle. “Right before the game ends,” Dave says, “there will be a bunch of us lined up.” Many of the pedicab drivers had heard in the periphery the hammering out of new rules, but most weren’t versed on the specifics. And why should they be? These drivers don’t expect much to change on the streets, and as long as they can pedal around town, give lifts to tourists and take home a little cash, they aren’t bothered much by the pedicab decisions being made in City Hall. Prodded by an uptick in pedicab businesses, the city began to draft a document that would delineate regulations and free it from entering and renewing contracts with individuals. But the road to an agreeable ordinance has been bumpy and protracted, like the potholed blacktop on a city thoroughfare during construction season. The first iterations were objectionable, according to Gasper, and could have doomed his business. The pedicab ordinance serves as an example of the cumbersome, but oftentimes necessary regulatory process new businesses are required to navigate. In a city that’s both obligated and politically motivated to address pressing, highimpact issues, such as homelessness,

it’s easy for those grappling with the smaller stuff to feel overlooked. Gasper certainly did at times. “This thing has been in process for years. They’ve been slower than molasses trying to come out with this,” he says. “It’s because, frankly, the City Council doesn’t give a fuck. They don’t care because they’ve got bigger fish to fry.” Although relatively few people have paid any attention to the new ordinance, those who have did so with a vehement eye because they saw their livelihoods at stake. They wanted the city to get it right. For its part, the city wanted to get it right, too. Three pedicab companies were invited to the table, according to a city spokesperson. Drafts of the ordinance were reviewed by the City Attorney’s Office, the business-licensing office, as well as the Transportation Advisory Board and the Bicycle Advisory Committee.

The long road

Pedicabbers talk about the Salt Lake powers that be while Rocky Anderson occupied the mayor’s office in words usually reserved for totalitarian regimes, and a few assert that the city’s rules were deliberate tactics to stomp out business. Anderson says while some City

Council members at the time were hostile toward pedicabs, he’s long supported and enjoyed the support of owners and drivers. “I don’t know what they’re talking about. I love pedicabs!” he wrote in an email. This fondness, however, wasn’t enough to keep Anderson’s name from being listed as a defendant in a civil suit filed by Wasatch Pedicab Co., an industry grandfather in Salt Lake that first put bikes on the street in 2005. Barely afloat in a sea of regulations, Wasatch alleged city officials aimed to sink it. Initially, Wasatch was told it would have to be insured to the tune of $1 million in aggregate personal injury and $500,000 to cover property damage, according to legal documents. But before the contract was inked, the city upped the aggregate personal-injury coverage requirement to $2 million. The pedicab company claims city officials, including the mayor, promised that the steep insurance requirement would be reduced. Instead, Wasatch alleges, it was hit with the news its insurance requirement was going up to $3 million. In addition, the city threatened to put drivers through a slew of background checks: fingerprinting, fiveyear employment history reports and photographs taken at the police station, among them.


Closures

Bierce prefers growth at a gentle gradient; what he saw was an explosion. But for Gasper, he welcomed the pedicab boom and anticipated an ordinance that would lift Salt City Cycle Cab’s pedicab restriction. The pedicab people, laying eyes on a draft last year, found rules hemming their range to a limited space in downtown. “They were going to take away streets,” Gasper says. “Whole streets they were going to bar from our use, which is a step backwards as far as trying to make the city more bike-friendly and cleaner. They wanted to take away 400, 500, 600 South, 300 West, 700 East, North Temple for no reason at all. They wanted to take away streets from us that had bike lanes.” The group protested, and the ordinance was passed up the chain without road restrictions. Satisfied with the language of the law, Gasper and others waited for city officials to adopt the new ordinance. At a meeting this summer, City Council was ready to approve the document and up to four amendments, the most concerning of which would require drivers to strap on a helmet. In a state that doesn’t care whether motorcyclists careening down I-15 wear helmets, much less bicyclists in the city, Bierce found it ridiculous that they would be burdened with this protective measure. The argument against helmet use, as Gasper put it, is one of optics. The perception it sends to customers is that these things aren’t safe, he says.

Price of business

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The pedicab ordinance mandates drivers settle on costs before a trip begins. Rates are not fixed but dictated by economists’ time-honored supply-anddemand theory. Prices spike when crowds are vying for rides and fall again when things are slow, though a general guideline of $3 per block is understood in the community. Negotiating the price upfront is a practice SLC Bike Taxi has encouraged riders to do all along. Bierce heard rumor of drivers claiming to offer free rides. Once the carriage arrived at the destination, these drivers demanded $20 by arguing it was a standard tip amount. It’s the type of experience that leads to crippling online reviews and can poison the well for the entire industry. Gasper, who began as a pedaler, has witnessed

public opinion toward pedicabs improve. He used to endure jeers of “Why don’t you get a real job?” Bierce heard slurs hurled his way as well. Now each is a company owner that hands out dozens of contracts to hopeful drivers. Aside from offering rides and tours, Gasper says a city concerned with air quality should be thankful that each pedal stroke reduces the valley’s carbon footprint. The pedicab industry offers jobs to people who sometimes find other work hard to come by, he adds. The city says the new rules went into effect soon after the vote was cast. Neither Bierce nor Gasper, owners of the two most prominent pedicab businesses in the city, know that to be the case. Both have lingering concerns, though Gasper is much warmer to the ratified version than prior drafts. Bierce, whose company has eight cabs, says small electric motors to support pedal power—and which he blames for a hike in pedicab accidents—weren’t addressed. Drivers don’t have to be in possession of a Utah license, a deviation from the former rules, which Gasper worries could open the floodgates to out-of-state drivers. Bierce is already bothered by the pedicab swell. “I like how Salt Lake City was kind of growing slowly,” he says. “And then we were all of a sudden getting overrun by too many.” No system can satisfy every participant, though. Seibert, for example, calculates a net negative from the strip club ad plastered to the back of his pedicab, despite the $5 kickback drivers get for every customer brought to the establishment. But on the whole, business is good. “If anything, we make more money than we did a year ago,” he says. Seibert isn’t concerned about a possible increase in pedicabbers. There are times when the market demands more, he says. If the number were to double, however, without expansion into other parts of the city—Sugar House, most likely—it would be oversaturated. Each driver is an independent contractor, and in a sense, they are each other’s competitors as much as each other’s colleague. But instead of bickering or attempting to steal riders, the drivers collaborate. “We do compete in a way, that’s business,” Wyoming Dave says. “Also we network together. We’re comrades. We’re family.” CW

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Facing what it considered exorbitant insurance premiums and onerous background checks, Wasatch Pedicab Co. went belly-up in early 2007. It unsuccessfully sued the city, arguing a violation of the Equal Protection Clause. Wasatch lost a subsequent appeal, and a ruling handed down by the U.S. 10th Circuit Court of Appeals also sided with the defendants. Just like that, the nascent pedicab business vanished from Salt Lake’s downtown grid. A couple years later, though, two pedicabs resurfaced, one propelled by Jeff Bierce, co-founder of SLC Bike Taxi. Pedicabbers who describe past officials as unfriendly or iron-fisted, portray former Mayor Ralph Becker’s Salt Lake as laissez-faire. Under Becker’s watch, pedicabs roamed the streets uninhibited, Gasper says. The freedom allowed business to flourish but placed owners in a precarious position. In the course of three years, only one Salt City Cycle Cab rider had been cited by the cops, a near-immaculate track record that left Gasper incredulous. “They didn’t enforce a single damn rule for any of the contracts,” he says. “Pretty much, I was the only one policing my guys, which is not my job. My job is to be in the shop fixing shit.” Gasper started slapping his drivers with a $5 fine each time they were caught on the sidewalks, disciplinary action that cost him good riders and better friends. One day, fearful that negligent drivers would jeopardize his contract, Gasper made his way into an evening briefing at the police station before the night beat hit the streets. At that meeting, he says, he urged officers to bust cabs for traffic violations to force their hands into following the rules. “I couldn’t believe I was coming to them as a business owner asking them to ticket my riders. It was the wildest thing that I ever thought I’d be doing,” he says. Cody Loungy, Police Department public information officer, says emergency calls throughout the city are a priority. “Since there is a perpetual backlog of 911 calls,” he writes in an email, “our officers rarely do proactive enforcement.” The bike patrol has since begun ordinance education efforts. Licensing officials noted city contracts didn’t address specific law-enforcement regulations, another reason why creating an ordinance was prudent. A sample contract shared with City Weekly required pedicabs to follow state laws and city ordinances.

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OCTOBER 20, 2016 | 13

1147 EAST ASHTON AVE, SLC • 801.484.7996 • MON- SAT 11-9PM • SUN 1-5PM • PIBSEXCHANGE.COM

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THE

CITIZEN REVOLT In a week, you can

CHANGE THE WORLD

Trunk Show and Workshops by Carolyn Greenwood of Greenwood Fiberworks

Beautiful hand dyed and hand spun yarn! October 21st from 5pm to 8pm October 22nd from Noon to 5pm

The Wool Cabin 2020 East 3300 South Suite 11 SLC | 801.466.1811 Monday-Friday 10-6 Saturday 10-4

Like us on Facebook!

OCHO

THE LIST OF EIGHT

BY BILL FROST

HOW TO GET AWAY WITH MURDER

The University of Utah’s Department of Theatre explores true political theatre with the play Self Defense, or Death of Some Salesmen . Besides being good theater, the play sparks discussion and generates awareness about domestic violence, abuse and deviant behavior. The play explores the story of a hitchhiking highway prostitute who is turned into a nationwide celebrity when she is arrested for the murder of seven men. It’s inspired by the true story of Aileen Wuornos, a Florida serial killer who was executed in 2002. Experts will conduct a post-performance panel discussion on Oct. 22. Mature audiences only. University of Utah, Studio 115, Performing Arts Building, 240 S. 1500 East, 801-581-7100, Friday-Sunday, Oct. 2123 & Thursday-Sunday, Oct. 27-30, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday-Sunday, Oct. 29-30, 2 p.m., $8.50-$18, Tickets.Utah.edu

PARTY TO CURE PTSD

Want to help a veteran in need, a veteran who might be considering suicide? The White Party is an opportunity to learn about the realities of post-traumatic stress disorder treatment and how Vets Care 4 Vets is working for viable solutions. Your attendance and donations can help prevent the more than 20 veterans each day commit suicide due to PTSD. Ticket price ihncludes includes wine, beer, cocktails and dinner from the award-winning chefs at Cucina Toscana. Activities include dancing, a silent auction and a virtual reality demonstration. Cucina Toscana, 282 S. 300 West, 801-328-3463, Saturday, Oct. 22, 7 p.m.-midnight, $49.95 plus fees, VetsCare4Vets.org

MYSTERY BRUNCH

Was it Mrs. Peacock? If you’re up for a whodunit this Halloween season, the Salt Lake Soroptimist Club has one for you. Its Murder Mystery Theater Fundraiser is 1940s-themed, so dress accordingly. You are a gangster or dame employed by the “boss” who’s retiring. Who will be his successor? The brunch benefits the Single Moms’ Breakfast with Santa program, which helps single mothers working to improve their ability to support their families. The project supports 150 mothers and 350 children annually. Café Madrid, 5244 S. Highland Drive, Holladay, 801-916-4836, pre-register by Oct. 20 to reserve a spot, Sunday, Oct. 23, 11:30 a.m., $100 minimum donation for ticket, SISLC.org

—KATHARINE BIELE

Send tips to revolt@cityweekly.net

@Bill _ Frost

The eight indisputable rules of Rocktober, 2016 edition:

8. Rocktober takes precedence over any Trucktober-related matters.

7. And neither Glocktober nor

Woktober are things—knock it off, gun and stir-fry nuts.

6.

It’s acceptable to scream “SLAYER!!!” at all social gatherings and events.

5. Certain cultures may substitute “SCRIPTURE!!!” should they feel the spirit.

4.

Possession of a vape stick, tribal tattoo or jean shorts with a wallet chain will get you ejected from Rocktober.

3. Possession of all three, however, will help you transition nicely into Douchevember. Or South Salt Lake.

2. Thou Shalt Have No Other

Gods Before Lemmy.

1. Celebrate every Rocktober like it’s America’s last. This year, it may be true.


THE

By Carolyn Campbell Photos by Niki Chan

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OCTOBER 20, 2016 | 15

“She had gravity eyes, meaning that when she was lying down, her eyes would be closed,” he says. Yet when the doll lay on a table during film production, “her eyes opened by themselves, so hard and quickly that we heard her plastic eyelids smack against her skull.” They continued filming. One night, after asking the doll to give a sign of its presence, they caught on camera a full apparition that looked like a black, shadowy mass. Scary things began happening in Fedderson’s house. “A shoe went flying across the house and kitchen chairs were pulled away from the table in rage,” he says. When he planned to take the doll with him to travel to paranormal events, his car wouldn’t start. If he put the doll in his wife’s car, it wouldn’t start, either. Fedderson says his attitude and demeanor changed, and he became reclusive. When he kept the doll in a storage unit next to his neighbors’ house, they saw objects moving there. “Eventually, they asked their religious leader to come and bless

T

y ler Fedderson saw his first ghost at age 16. A neighbor asked him to watch her supposedly haunted house while she was away on a business trip. Resting after skateboarding, Fedderson and his brothers sat on the curb in front of the house. Suddenly, “an older man inside the house walked directly in front of the bay window, stared at my brothers and me and disintegrated. We all looked at each other and took off running.” Later, they all agreed they saw a ghost. Previously a skeptic, Fedderson “knew exactly what I was looking at. It was scary in the sense that I wondered what else was out there.” He tried to recreate that experience and have more. He later founded Ghostface Paranormal, and started documenting ghost hunts on camera. For his second documentary, he sought a haunted doll. Researching such dolls, he found a family who wanted to get rid of a 1950s doll they claimed was haunted.

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Ghostly welcome parties, chatty spirits, haunted dolls: Mediums, spirit guides and morticians tell all.

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DEAD


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Tyler Fedderson their house,” Fedderson recalls. He finally wrapped the doll in a towel and threw it in a dumpster, although he had heard that “if you don’t dispose of haunted objects properly, they might be vengeful. I started to feel that the situation was better, but not solved. There is still a lingering presence in my house.” Fedderson now believes that there is life after death. “It is ironic that I am living to find out what happens after you die,” he says of his career as a paranormal investigator and filmmaker. Death is indeed a great mystery. At any possible moment, a person can die. The scary part is they never know when—or, even scarier, how—it will happen. Throughout history, every major religion and philosophy has sought to explain the phenomenon of death. Death touches the lives of every man and woman. Rich and poor, black and white—all go to the grave. The entire human race is united under a cloud of mortality. Everyone will eventually leave the planet. But some spirits, paranormal investigators say, linger for a while. When people see a figure standing over their bed, or they have graphically violent dreams or their kids start seeing things, they might call WISPS, the Wasatch Investigative Society for Paranormal Studies. Gary Castle, WISPS director and lead investigator, focuses on houses that people fear are haunted. He’s seen full-body apparitions, had objects tossed at him and heard thousands of electronic voice phenomena (EVP). Playing back his audio recorder recently, he heard a woman’s voice answering his yes-or-no questions, along with a male voice saying, “Don’t tell him.” He says that most ghosts are spirits of people who have passed on, and that most places have them on some level. “While spirits are usually quiet and unobtrusive, some spirits of the dead are real jerks,” Castle says. “The rare spirits that have never had a body cause the most activity designed to target individuals and families and tear them apart.” With the darkest spirits, “we bring out a medium to tell us why the spirit is there and what it needs.” Sometimes, a long-lost loved one has already moved on, and once the spirit realizes that, the problem is resolved.

WISPS’ Gary Castle

actually telling the truth all the time, and when we reLike WISPS, Kathi Bulow of Spirit ’R’ Us conducts search and ask questions, there’s a sense of accomplishhome investigations free of charge. For everyday peoment when you find out the spirit is who you think it is. ple facing ghosts, she advises, “Your body is your best Then knowledge is passed on about that person.” equipment. If you walk by something and really get Since she became a spiritual medium in 1994, thougoosebumps and chills, it is your body’s response that sands of people have asked Deloris Beynon to contact you shouldn’t go in there.” Her daughter is a medium their dead relatives. Her customers—who range from whose abilities became apparent at 3 years old. “She reclawyers to mechanics to doctors—all come for differognized a picture of my mom who passed away when I ent reasons. “In a way, it’s like a criminal investigation. was 16,” Bulow says. “She started telling me things about Their interests are as individual as their fingerprints,” my childhood that she never should have known.” Today, Beynon says. Her clients want to put things in the past, or her daughter assists in paranormal investigations. resolve why someone committed suicide, or they feel like Jerry Hone, founder of Paranormal U, also has no doubt somebody has a message for them and they can’t quite that spirits exist. He takes groups on paranormal invesreceive it. Many are grieving the loss of a young child. tigations with his team. “Once you are the one doing the “Sometimes family members who have crossed over can chasing, it’s empowering,” he says. “Our guests who go be guides for those who are still here,” Beynon says. She with us are shocked to see how much fun they have.” He is an audio clairvoyant, meaning that she sees, hears and doesn’t believe in poltergeists or demons and says that knows the information the dead want to convey. Somehis investigations at sites such as Salt Lake City’s Boston times her clients want forgiveness from the person who Building and the Empress Theatre in Magna have yielddied or want to make up for the hard times that they gave ed lots of good energy. them. “It’s very hard to lose somebody to death, espe“When we investigated in those locations, we built a cially if you are really connected,” she says. Some clients relationship with those spirits to get them to work with visit Beynon within two weeks after a death, while othus well and put on presentations for customers,” Hone ers’ loved ones have been gone for 10 years. She says her says. “They know our intentions are good.” Instead of agwork is fulfilling and she has helped a lot of people. “If gressive, demanding encounters, he says, “Our focus is people are skeptical, they won’t get as good a reading as to find out why the spirits are there and what their pursomeone who is open to it.” pose is in staying.” She adds that sometimes spirPaul Wheeler, founder of its don’t know they are dead, Grimm Ghost Tours, says that or are confused about how after communicating with they died. “Sometimes spirits in a particular lothey don’t want to go into cation, they always seem the light because of their eager for his return. “Time beliefs that they will be hasn’t passed by for them punished for things they and it’s, like, they are just have done.” Beynon has waiting to continue the seen spirits her whole life. conversation.” He says that She originally thought evthey have told him their eryone did. She adds that names, and even brought if you are a medium, “a lot up problems they’re havof people will think you ing. One ghost at the Fear —Paranormal U’s Jerry Hone are crazy, but it can run in Factory site, which was families. My grandmother was housed in the Portland Cement this way and they put her in an Building, told Wheeler that his institution.” She says institutionalization happened to name was George Howe. Wheeler researched the name people who had “the gift” before it was popular or acand found that a man by that name had lost his life in cepted, and people like Sylvia Browne appeared on TV. that building. “Doing research helps to validate some of Still, even today, people will judge her, but she says, “It’s the things we are seeing,” he says. “Some spirits aren’t

“Our focus is to find out why the spirits are there and what their purpose is in staying.”


Deloris Beynon

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“I can’t think of a better time to cry ... We have to go through it step by step.”

OCTOBER 20, 2016 | 17

Fifty percent of Larkin’s clients come in and dress their loved ones prior to the funeral. “Nobody does that as much as we do in Utah, it’s much more common with the LDS faith,” he says. He adds that, while people are often told to maintain their composure and be strong for the family, “I can’t think of a better time to cry than at a funeral.” He adds that everyone grieves differently and people feel myriad of emotions. “We have to go through it step by step and teardrop by teardrop.” He adds that dealing with the complete relationship is important. Sometimes, he says, “there is enshrinement—saying ‘this person could never have done anything wrong.’” In cases when an abusive parent dies or there is a divorce, there could be “bedevilment—saying this person could never do anything right. Neither one is a true statement.” Sometimes, such as when a person is 100 years old and an adult child has cared for them for years, “the relative will feel relief, followed by overwhelming guilt. It’s OK to deal with the whole relationship,” Larkin says. Other times there is family estrangement, or thoughts of foul play—thinking one family member murdered another. “One of the best skills a funeral director can have is to help people communicate in a way that is appropriate, to put things on the shelf for the time being,” Larkin says. Shayneh Starks, owner of Starks Funeral Parlor, hosts many celebrations of life. “For a lot of people, it doesn’t resonate to have a sit-down funeral service,” she says. “Many people say they are not religious and the typical format of speaker, speaker, song doesn’t resonate with them.” She describes celebrations of life as a nurturing, a coming together and capturing of love. “We are breaking bread, eating, drinking, laughing and crying. It is like the rehearsal dinner before the wedding.” Starks and her husband moved to Utah from San Francisco, where there is much cultural diversity. As Catholics, they initially thought they would be the alternative funeral home. “We thought that LDS people probably wouldn’t come to us, but I was wrong. We’ve been honored to care for

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none of my business what other people think of me.” they were in their 20s.” Today, “some people are very Beynon feels she couldn’t teach another person to touchy. They hold their loved one’s hand, talk to them or kiss them. Other people don’t want to touch them at all. channel spirits, but, still, everyone has a sixth sense. Younger people are more weirded out.” “The more you listen to it and find it is right, the stronLarkin Mortuary has received bodies in every imaginger it will get.” She explains that while psychics often see able condition. “We’ve seen victims of car accidents, inpictures or “little movies” relating to a person’s life—mediums actually talk to the spirits. “If you see a spirit in dustrial accidents, burning accidents, lots of murders and front of you, it takes a lot of energy for that spirit to show suicides. People that have been isolated and haven’t been itself to you.” She says that spirits can haunt, but not all found for a long time,” Larkin says. He adds that even after gunshots or deformation following an accident, most bad spirits are going to harm you. “People should fear the living a lot more than the dead.” She once told a client bodies can be made viewable. He’s heard urban legends that her own house was full of spirits. “She laughed and of dead bodies moving, “but I’ve never known somebody said, ‘My husband’s family runs a mortuary and we live to pop up because of their nerves. When we receive them, there.’” Beynon says her gift of channeling the spirits “is they have passed on.” When young people die tragically—from a car acmy earth calling—what I came here to do. My service is to help people facilitate closing, so that they can go on with cident, suicide or murder, he says, “the grief is magnified greatly because it isn’t natural to die at that time. their lives.” It’s especially hard for the parents. No matter what your She says that people who need her always seem to find her, and adds that spirit communication is a double- age, your children are never supposed to precede you in death.” He adds that at the time of such a passing, “it’s edged sword. “You see the good and the bad. I don’t like to tell people when they are going to die; part of that is important to be able to say, ‘I’m sorry, this is terrible, this is tragic and I love you.’” God’s choice.” She wants people to be more comfortable He says he sees coincidences that seem to be messages with spirits and not always so afraid of them. If people from the dead, “all the time, even at the funeral service. want to contact spirits on their own, “they should do it through meditation and prayer,” she says. “Sometimes We were driving up to a cemetery up north, talking about this gentleman’s Native American heritage and the symyou will get a feeling that you need to call somebody and bol of the eagles. It was a beautiful tell them that you love them. Then you get all busy with life and that day. We had just finished with the dedication. All of a sudden, we person will pass away. Sometimes those feelings are looked out and saw two ealike God giving us an opgles flying. They flew down, portunity to tell that person kind of toward us.” On goodbye.” another occasion, a rainy Many people have said day, “it seemed like no one farewell to the dead at Larcould leave the graveside. kin Mortuary, which has The family was devastated been around since 1885. Evand really struggling. The eryone that Larkin’s COO/ skies opened up and there Vice President Spencer was a double rainbow. The Larkin has spoken to in the family said they could fifuneral industry believes in nally leave.” —Larkin Mortuary’s the afterlife. “When people He says that being able to Spencer Larkin are passing on, they call out to— see your loved one is an imporand even reach out to—their dead tant part of the grieving process, loved ones,” Larkin says. “As you grow older, you begin to to recognize the reality of death. “We embalm them imaccept the reality of death, yet seeing a dead body can be mediately and take special care to make them look natuvery hard for people.” He adds that “a couple of generaral and like themselves. We have a lot of techniques to tions back, people had seen 30 dead people by the time beautify them. Funeral directors are amazing artists.”


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Shayneh Starks very prominent LDS family members. We’ve had bishops recommend us and say, ‘You should come here and have a celebration of life.’” She adds that some people, “in their solid faith, will say, ‘I know I will see this person again’ and it’s a beautiful comfort. Others want us to show a scientific film and say ‘please don’t mention Jesus; no praying.’” Starks says, “I’m Catholic—part of me will say I believe in the afterlife and eternity, yet as a critical thinker, I don’t presume to say I know exactly what that looks like.” Still, she’s seen her share of signs and coincidences. She recalls a woman who came in when her mother died. Starks told the daughter, “‘Your mom has great legs.’ We were joking and laughing about that and she started telling me stories about her mother’s legs.” At another service two years later, the same woman approached Starks. She told her about a Las Vegas medium who called her up on stage, saying she had a message from her mom. It was, “I was so pleased that day when you were with the mortician. She made me laugh about how she wanted my legs.” Starks adds, “My gosh, how does that happen? A medium in Las Vegas?” When a family who was planning a funeral brought out their mother’s journal to choose a verse to be read at the service, Starks smelled a strong waft of gardenias. She asked if the mother wore gardenia perfume. “No, but she loved gardenias,” the family said, taking it as a sign that they needed to add gardenias to the funeral flowers.

Dan Ellis

Starks’ father, it turns out, loved praying mantises. One day, when she had been thinking about him and was leaving her house, she walked outside and saw a praying mantis. She adds, “My husband’s little brother passed away tragically. We thought of the symbol of a feather, kind of symbolizing our feelings for him. One night, I had a dream about him, and the next day, there was a feather on a chair in our chapel. People all have their stories of moments when they feel like their loved one is there. I hope it’s true.” In her 20 years as a mortician, she says, “it’s just crazy the number of times that I’ve heard people say that their loved one’s room was filled with everyone who died before, to help escort them over. I’ve been in rooms where the person who is dying will look right past their family and start talking to their husband or wife who died 20 years ago.” Stark says she lives and works in an interesting vortex, a place of transition. “Families will come in and you get the sense that their loved one is is teetering between two worlds. It’s hard to deny some validity,” yet she also says she’s read the scientific books claiming that the idea of seeing or communicating with dead loved ones near the time of one’s own death, is a chemical release in the brain, and that communication with the dead isn’t real. “There are two sides. We really just don’t know.” As a skeptic, Dan Ellis, regional director in Utah for

American Atheists, finds the concept of ghosts to be very strange. He recently posted online 13 questions (because 13 is “spooky”) regarding ghost-related issues. Why are ghosts never naked, Ellis asks. With the knowledge that 99.9 percent of species no longer inhabit the earth, why do we only see ghosts of existing species? Why are there no T-rex ghosts? Why are ghosts so picky about who they reveal themselves to? Do they have social anxiety issues? “If they need to deliver a message, why don’t they walk right up to the camera?” Ellis asks. While he clarifies that atheist beliefs about the afterlife vary, he prefers to “find evidence in the things I choose to believe or not. I haven’t seen any good evidence to support the notion of an afterlife.” On Halloween, “there is nothing supernatural and nothing to be afraid of.” Starks says she is going out on a limb by saying, “I’ve heard enough stories that whatever happens after life, I definitely believe that we go to a place of love, life and happy feeling. The things that matter here don’t matter any more. In this place of full understanding and complete knowledge, there is an overwhelming sense of love, light, joy and just contentment. Grudges aren’t being held and there aren’t unresolved issues.” She continues, “People come in and say they dreamed about their family member, who told them they wouldn’t come back if they could. As soon as they feel that this warm happy life is taking them away, they go.” CW


Downtown Artist Collective is a new arts organization that isn’t just for artists; it’s by artists. Deserae Lee and Amy Leininger came up with the idea after a chance encounter. The two enlisted friends to help them put their vision together, and the grand opening is on Oct. 21. The collective aims to serve as a large umbrella, providing galleries, studio and learning space, support and mentoring for artists, as well as connecting with the public through outreach and educational opportunities. The opening will showcase 17 artists, including notables like Chris Bodily, Chris Madsen, Heather Romney, Jason Jones and Jenny Hambleton—a swath of challenging, refreshing styles that represents a great cross-section of local artwork. In addition to the gallery, visitors have the opportunity to meet the board and learn more about their vision, ask the artists about their work, sign up for classes and find out how to get involved. Refreshments will be available, and musicians The Bookends and Gillian Chase are set to perform. The fledgling organization hopes to apply for nonprofit status, and looks forward to adding their contribution to the local arts mix. With arts programs in schools underserved, and disadvantaged voices going unheard, they see a need. “While there are many wonderful organizations in Salt Lake that are helping to serve these communities,” Lee says, “we wanted to add our efforts to a field in which there will always be too many people to serve, and not enough resources to serve them all.” (BS) Downtown Artist Collective grand opening @ Downtown Arts Collective, 258 E. 100 South, Oct. 21, 6-9 pm., free. DowntownArtistCollective.org

Eccles Theater Grand Opening Weekend After more than two years of construction in downtown Salt Lake City, the George S. and Dolores Doré Eccles Theater is finally ready to open its doors to the public. But before Utah’s new home for touring Broadway musicals, plays and concerts begins its inaugural season, members of the public have the opportunity to explore its 2,500-seat performance hall, smaller box theater and a multitude of other areas dedicated to food and entertainment. Friday’s opening night features Tony Awardwinner Brian Stokes Mitchell (pictured), who recently appeared in the critically acclaimed musical, Shuffle Along, or, the Making of the Musical Sensation of 1921 and All That Followed, and Megan Hilty, whose Broadway career includes appearances in works such as Wicked. Accompanying this ticketed black-tie event are local performing groups including Ballet West and the University of Utah Department of Theatre. After the 90-minute performance, ticket-holders are invited to join a post-show party on Regent Street. The rest of the weekend offers a free, openhouse community arts celebration where anyone interested can tour the theater. Quick 15-minute, drop-in performances by local artists will populate the many performing spaces in the building on Saturday. These mini-shows will feature a cross-section of performing art disciplines, chosen by a review committee made up of representatives from the Salt Lake City Arts Council, the Eccles Theater and the artistic producers of the theater’s grand opening. The building will remain open to explore on Sunday, with a live broadcast of Music and the Spoken Word. (Kylee Ehmann) Grand Opening @ Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, 801-355-2200, Oct. 21, 7:30 p.m., $50-$200; Oct 22, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Oct. 23, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., free. EcclesTheaterOpening.com

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Women in a variety of endeavors have worked to make the world a better place. Utah Museum of Contemporary Art’s Artistic Director Jann Haworth has organized Work In Progress, a collaborative exhibit depicting women who have made a difference for the better. The 20-foot-wide by 8-foot-tall stencil collage—with its cavalcade of faces, some familiar and some not as well-known—is reminiscent of the Beatles’ Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band album cover, the work for which Haworth is best-known. Visages run the gamut from French filmmaker Agnes Varda to Dr. Elizabeth Blackwell—the first woman to receive a medical degree in the United States— to Frida, member of masked artistic group Guerilla Girls. For the past three months, Haworth and collage artist Liberty Blake (who also happens to be her daughter) have been collecting collages from more than 60 people, in workshops at the Leonardo and UMOCA’s Residency Studio, as well as BYU and Modern West Fine Art. The work was completed at the Leonardo, then transferred to UMOCA for its Oct. 7 opening. The exhibit is accompanied by Lynn Blodgett’s photographs of the contributors. Haworth notes that the time is especially ripe for such an exhibit, with many women ascending to leadership roles in politics, from Germany’s Chancellor Angela Merkel to Michelle Obama, and especially the election of Salt Lake City Mayor Jackie Biskupski. “The home race for mayor was so vivid and radical that, simply put, it was inspiring,” Haworth says. “At the base of it all was an energy that said, ‘Yes, let’s try for it.’” (Brian Staker) Work In Progress @ Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801328-4201, through Jan. 14, 2017; opening reception, Oct. 21, 7-9 p.m., free, $5 suggested donation. UtahMOCA.org

SATURDAY 10.22

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Sackerson is by far one of the most experimental theatre production companies we have in Utah. The group organizes short performances of material you don’t normally get from the independent groups and hosts them in unconventional settings. In September, the company started running Burn, which has been extended for another set of shows this weekend. Burn came from the company’s resident playwright, Morag Shepherd, who was inspired to write a tale of mental laceration through a random article passed onto her. “One of our producers Dave Mortensen came across an article about PMLE (a type of allergic reaction to sunlight) and mentioned it to Morag,” producer Alex Ungerman says. “She was inspired to use that as a starting point for examining light and illness as a metaphor for faith crises.” The piece explores the current life of Allison, who’s older daughter won’t stop questioning life while her younger daughter won’t stop running around. While Allison’s husband worries over her current condition in life, she repeatedly tells him not to, while fending off an exboyfriend. The play continues at Avenues Yoga, which aside from regular classes has utilized the space for special gatherings and even weddings, turning it into a small cultural hub. As to why Sackerson chose this location, Ungerman says they instantly fell in love with it. “It’s got an entire wall of windows, gorgeous wood floors and exposed brick,” he says. “Then, once we’d worked out an agreement with the venue, we designed all the elements of the show to fit that space.” (Gavin Sheehan) Sackerson Theater: Burn @ Avenues Yoga, 64 K St., Salt Lake City, Oct. 21-22, 8 p.m., $16-$20. Sackerson.org

Downtown Artist Collective

FRIDAY 10.21

Work In Progress

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FRIDAY 10.21

Sackerson Theater: Burn

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Sinners and Saints

SB Dance’s interactive All Saints Salon takes audience members on a spooky adventure. BY KATHERINE PIOLI comments@cityweekly.net

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hristmas is for joy; Valentine’s Day for affection. And as the veil between the worlds thins, Halloween becomes the time to indulge in a pure hedonistic, adrenaline rush of fear. Let go of control. Walk through that door. Is your heart beating faster? SB Dance sure hopes so. The Salt Lake City-based performing company has built quite a reputation with its sexy, naughty, acrobatic, genderbending, playful productions. With All Saints Salon—artistic and executive director Stephen Brown prefers to use the performance’s titillating acronym ASS— SB Dance drags their audience to hell and back, through a world filled with dancing lost souls, sirens (performed by the electro-pop duo MINX), video installation (by filmmaker Anson Fogel) and perhaps even the Devil herself. It’s not the first time the company has taken their audience to the underworld, but this time it won’t be metaphorical, and don’t expect a cozy seat. All Saints Salon joins a long theatrical tradition of immersive theater. “Mixing it up with theater-goers is an old device that you can trace from commedia dell’arte to the French enlighten-

ment salons to ’60s protest theater,” Brown says on his company website. “Once labeled ‘screwing around with the audience,’ this contrivance has been re-branded as ‘immersive’ theater.” Whether it’s Halloween or not, immersive theater has a bit of a haunted-house vibe. There’s no safe place or auditorium seat. Instead, the viewer enters a space— a warehouse or, in this case, a theater including the lobby, rehearsal rooms, halls and stairways—and travels through the various corners of the building, not knowing what they will find around the next corner, or when or how the experience will end. It’s unsettling, out-of-control—and totally fun. Luckily, for those who love SB Dance but can’t stomach a haunted house’s terror of the unknown, ASS strikes a balance between a total chose-your-own-adventure and a curated journey. Visitors, with drink in hand (bring your ID), enter the salon with three guides, Persephone and her two sisters—for those mythology nerds out there who say Persephone never had siblings, it’s a reference to a Sylvia Plath poem—who take the audience from room to room. Brown says it’s less of a museum, where you get to decide where you go and when, but each experience is unique. “There may be multiple things happening in a room at a single time. Where you stand and what you’re facing will determine the kind of experience you’re having,” he says. The Salon experience is intimate. Only 80 people go through at a time—the audience capacity for a normal sit-down performance in the theater auditorium is closer to 500— and, to keep everything running smoothly, each patron must agree to a strict code of

JOHN BRANDON

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conduct. “All Saints Salon surrounds, surprises and erupts within the audience. All patrons must agree to our Rules of Engagement,” reads the SB Dance website. As you might already suspect, these are not simply typical theater rules—like turning off your cell phones and not taking photos—though those exist as well. The first rule states that check-in begins 30 minutes prior to the performance, which begins promptly at the scheduled time. And don’t bother showing up late. Once the ship to Hades has sailed, no one will be admitted. There are explicit instructions to “refrain from physically touching performers unless they specifically ask you to do so” and to “please not speak.” And finally, there is the dress code. All patrons must wear black, along with the mask that will be provided at check-in. Brown admits there’s something a little Eyes Wide Shut about a group of strangers standing anonymously and silently together in a room, their faces covered by masks, watching the bodies of dancers in a state of half dress (if that). As for the nudity, how could it be considered an SB Dance production without showing a little skin? And the masks are essential. It turns out the covering the audience members’ faces is a common element in modern immersive theater. It’s one

Performers from the 2015 SB Dance All Saints Salon

way for everyone to know who is an audience member and who is a performer, in a place where it’s potentially easy to blur those lines. For Brown, the anonymity—and, yes, even the sexual tension—of the masks is an important element. By covering one’s face, he explains, the audience has permission to look without feeling self-conscious, or worrying more about who is standing next to you than what is happening in front of you. In the Greek myth, Persephone comes out of Hades alive and returns to Earth every spring. Brown isn’t saying who will come out alive at the end of his version, but at All Saints Salon no penance will save you—so you might as well put on that mask and enjoy the ride. CW

SB DANCE: ALL SAINTS SALON

Rose Wagner Center 138 W. 300 South 801-355-2787 Oct. 21-22, 7:30 & 9:30 p.m. $70 ArtSaltLakeArtTix.org


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The DREAMers Project—a group project by and about members of immigrant populations in Utah, including video by Stéphane Glynn, paintings by local artist Ella Mendoza and photography by Lynn Hoffman-Brouse (pictured)—opens with a reception at Art Access Gallery (230 S. 500 West, Ste. 125, 801-328-0703, AccessArt.org) on Oct. 21, 6-9 p.m.

PERFORMANCE THEATER

Aida Hurricane Valley Theatrical Co., 92 S. 100 West, Salt Lake City, 435-668-9753, through Oct. 29, Monday, Friday & Saturday, 7 p.m.; Saturday matinee, 2 p.m., HurricaneTheatrical.com Bellwether Emma Eccles Jones Conservatory, Westminster College, 1840 S. 1300 East, Salt Lake City, 801-484-7651, Oct. 28-29, 7:30 p.m; Oct. 27, 8:30 p.m., WestminsterCollege.edu/Theatre Catch Me If You Can Hale Center Theater Orem, 225 W. 400 North, Orem, 801-2268600, through Nov. 19, HaleTheater.org Drack-Man vs. Superiorman Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, Salt Lake City, 801-3554628, through Oct. 29, Friday, Saturday & Monday, 7:30 p.m., TheOBT.org Eccles Theater Grand Opening Open House & Arts Celebration 131 S. Main, Salt Lake City, 801-355-2200, Oct. 22, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., EcclesTheaterOpening.com (see p. 19) Ghostblasters Desert Star Theatre, 4681 S. State, Murray, 801-266-2600, through Nov. 5, varying days and times, DesertStar.biz The Glass Menagerie Pioneer Theatre Co., 300 S. 1400 East, Salt Lake City, 801-581-6961, Oct. 21-Nov. 5, Monday-Thursday, 7 p.m.; FridaySaturday, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday matinee, 2 p.m., PioneerTheatre.org Into the Woods Draper Theatre, 12366 S. 900 East, Draper, through Oct. 29, Friday-Saturday & Monday, 7 p.m., DraperTheatre.org Jekyll & Hyde The Grand Theatre, 1575 S. State, Salt Lake City, 801-975-3322, through Oct. 29, varying times, GrandTheatreCompany.com Little Shop of Horrors Hopebox Theatre, 1700 S. Frontage Road, Kaysville, 801-451-5259, through Oct. 24, Friday, Saturday & Monday, HopeboxTheatre.com Little Shop of Horrors The Ziegfeld Theater, 3934 Washington Blvd., Ogden, 855-944-2787, through Nov. 5, Friday & Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday matinee, 2 p.m., TheZiegfeldTheater.com/Little-Shop

The Nether Good Company Theatre, 260 25th St., Ogden, through Oct. 23, Thursday-Saturday, 8 p.m.; Sunday, 4 p.m., GoodCoTheatre.com Oklahoma! Brigham’s Playhouse, 25 N. 300 West, Washington, 435-251-8000, through Nov. 19, Thursday-Saturday, 7 p.m.; Saturday matinee, 2 p.m., BrighamsPlayhouse.com Sackerson Theater: Burn Avenues Yoga, 64 K St., Salt Lake City, Oct. 21-22, 8 p.m., Sackerson.org (see p. 19) Utah Shakespeare Fest Randall L. Jones Theatre, 351 W. Center St., Cedar City, 435-586-7878, through Oct. 22, varying days and times, Bard.org Winter Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, 801-363-7522, through Nov. 13, WednesdaySaturday, 7:30 p.m.; Sunday, 1 p.m. & 6 p.m., SaltLakeActingCompany.org

DANCE

Eccles Theater Grand Opening Premier Performance 131 S. Main, Salt Lake City, 801-355-2200, Oct. 21, 7:30-10:30 p.m., EcclesTheaterOpening.com (see p. 19) SB Dance: All Saints Salon Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801-355-2787, Oct. 21 & 22, 7:30 p.m. & 9:30 p.m., SBDance.com (see p. 20) Thriller Odyssey Dance Theatre, Kingsbury Hall, 1395 E. Presidents Circle, 801-581-7100, through Oct. 29, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday matinee, 2 p.m., $30-$50, Tickets.Utah.edu

CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

Zions Bank Presents Music and the Spoken Word George S. and Dolores Dore Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, Salt Lake City, 801-355-2200, Oct. 23, 9:30 a.m., free, EcclesTheaterOpening.com (see p. 19)

COMEDY & IMPROV

Abi Harrison Sandy Station, 8925 S. Harrison, Sandy, 801-255-2078, Oct. 21, 8:30 p.m., SandyStation.com Andy Gold Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Salt Lake City, 801-532-5233, Oct. 23, 7:30 p.m., WiseguysComedy.com


moreESSENTIALS

2-Minute Drill 8925 S. Harrison, Sandy, 801255-2078, Oct. 22, 8:30 p.m., SandyStation.com

LITERATURE AUTHOR APPEARANCES

Megan McCall: Alteration Weller Book Works, 607 Trolley Square, Salt Lake City, 801-3282586, Oct. 21, 7 p.m., WellerBookWorks.com Lindy West Salt Lake City Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, Salt Lake City, 801-524-8200, Oct. 22, 7 p.m., SLCPL.org Lindy West: Shrill Salt Lake City Library, Salt Lake City Library, 210 E. 400 South, Salt Lake City, Oct. 22, 7 p.m., KingsEnglish.com Calcaterra & Maloney: Girl Unbroken Wasatch Presbyterian Church, 1626 E. 1700 South, Salt Lake City, 801-484-9100, Oct. 22, 7 p.m., KingsEnglish.com Despain, Johansson & West: The Immortal Throne, The Row, & P.S. I Like You The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Salt Lake City, 801-484-9100, Oct. 25, 7 p.m., KingsEnglish.com Kristi Yamaguchi: Cara’s Kindness The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Salt Lake City, 801-484-9100, Oct. 26, 7 p.m., KingsEnglish.com Mary Ellen Hannibal: Citizen Scientist Marmalade Library, 280 W. 500 North, Salt Lake City, 801-484-9100, Oct. 26, 7 p.m., KingsEnglish.com

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Dan Cummins Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Salt Lake City, 801-532-5233, Oct. 21-22, 7:30 & 9:30 p.m., WiseguysComedy.com Improv Broadway Brigham Larson Pianos, 1497 S. State, Orem, 909-260-2509, Saturdays, 8 p.m., ImprovBroadway.com Improv Comedy Ziegfeld Theater, 3934 Washington Blvd., Ogden, 435-327-8273, Saturdays, 9:30 p.m., OgdenComedyLoft.com Laughing Stock Improv The Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, Salt Lake City, 801355-4628, Fridays & Saturdays, 10 p.m., LaughingStock.us Off the Wall Comedy Improv Draper Historic Theatre, 12366 S. 900 East, Draper, 801-5724144, Saturdays, 10:30 p.m., DraperTheatre.org Open Mic Night Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Salt Lake City, 801-532-5233, Wednesdays, 7:30 p.m., WiseguysComedy.com Sasquatch Cowboy The Comedy Loft, 3934 Washington Blvd., Ogden, Saturdays, 9:30 p.m., OgdenComedyLoft.com Save Bob’s Knees! Midvale Performing Arts Center, 695 W. Center St., Midvale, 801-8240523, Oct. 22, 10 p.m., QWComedy.com Shawn Paulsen Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., Ogden, 801-463-2909, Oct. 21-22, 8 p.m., WiseguysComedy.com Sina Amedson Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Salt Lake City, 801-532-5233, Oct. 20, 7:30 p.m., WiseguysComedy.com Jon Sue-Ho Sugar Space, 616 E. Wilmington Ave., Salt Lake City, 385-202-5504, Oct. 22, 2:45 p.m., TheSugarSpace.com

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FARMERS MARKETS 9th West Farmers Market International Peace Gardens, 1000 S. 900 West, Sundays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., through Oct. 31, 9thWestFarmersMarket.org Park City Farmers Market The Canyons Resort, 1951 Canyons Resort Drive, Park City, through Oct. 26, Wednesdays, noon-6 p.m., ParkCityFarmersMarket.com Sugar House Farmers Market Fairmont Park, 1040 E. Sugarmont Ave., through Oct. 26, Wednesdays, 5-8 p.m., SugarHouseFarmersMarket.org Downtown Farmers Market Pioneer Park, 300 S. 300 West, through Oct. 22, Saturdays, 8 a.m.-2 p.m., SLCFarmersMarket.org

FESTIVALS & FAIRS

Utah Humanities Book Festival Utah Humanities, 202 W. 300 North, Salt Lake City, 801-359-9670, times and locations vary, through Oct. 29, UtahHumanities.org

HALLOWEEN

exclusively on cityweekly.net

Asylum 49 140 E. 200 South, Tooele, 435-2246283, Tuesday-Thursday, 7 p.m.-10 p.m.; FridaySaturday, 7 p.m.-midnight, Asylum49.com Castle of Chaos 7980 S. State, Midvale, 385216-8915, Monday-Sunday, see site for schedule, CastleOfChaos.com Fear Factory 666 W. 800 South, Salt Lake City, 801-692-3327, Monday-Thursday, 7 p.m.10 p.m.; Friday-Saturday, 7 p.m.-midnight, FearFactorySLC.com Haunted Forest 100 W. 6400 North, American Fork, 801-903-3039, Monday-Thursday, 7:30 p.m-10 p.m.; Friday& Saturday, 7:30 p.m.-midnight, HauntedUtah.com Haunted Hollow 1550 S. 1900 West, Ogden, 801-603-2231, Monday-Thursday, 7:30 p.m.-10 p.m.; Friday & Saturday, 7:30 p.m.-midnight, HauntedUtah.com Strangling Brothers Haunted Circus 632 E. 1500 South, American Fork, 801-850-8060, daily except Sunday, through Oct. 31, 7:30 p.m., StranglingBrothers.com Paranormal Encounters Mystery Escape Room, 130 S. Rio Grande St., 385-322-2583, through Oct. 28, Friday-Saturday, 8:30 p.m., MysteryEscapeRoom.com

TALKS & LECTURES

Clint Halverson Wattis Business Building Smith Lecture Hall, Rooms 206/207, Weber State University, 1337 Edvalson St., Ogden, 801626-7307, Oct. 20, noon, Weber.edu/WSUToday Social Entrepreneurism: The New Face of American Innovation Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, Oct. 20, 3 p.m., THC.Utah.edu Society of Vertebrate Paleontology Public Lecture The Grand America Hotel, 555 S. Main, Salt Lake City, 801-581-6927, Oct. 25, 7-8 p.m., NHMU.Utah.edu

GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

Andy Nasisse: Badlands Southern Utah Museum of Art, 13 S. 300 West, Cedar City, through Oct. 31, SUU.edu/PVA/SUMA Ben Kilbourne: Unresting Event SLC Marmalade Library, 280 W. 500 North, 801594-8680, through Oct. 28, SLCPL.org Benny van der Wal: Desert Trashscapes Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, 801-5300547, through Nov. 18, SaltLakeArts.org Berna Reale: Singing in the Rain Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through Nov. 5, UtahMOCA.org DesignArts ‘16 Rio Gallery, 300 S. Rio Grande St., through Oct. 21, ArtsAndMuseums.Utah.gov Downtown Artist Collective Grand Opening Downtown Artist Collective, 258 E. 100 South, Oct. 21, 6-9 p.m., DowntownArtistCollective.org (see p. 19) Gini Pringle: Reflections: neon and photography reflected on metal Phillips Gallery, 444 E. 200 South, 801-364-8284, Oct. 21-Nov. 11, Phillips-Gallery.com The DREAMers Project Art Access Gallery, 230 S. 500 West, Suite No. 125, 801-328-0703, through Nov. 11; opening reception Oct. 21, 6-9 p.m., AccessArt.org (see p. 22) Heads in the Sand! Salt Lake City Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, Salt Lake City, 801363-4088, through Nov. 12; reception Oct. 21, 6-9 p.m., ArtAtTheMain.com Iterations: Sue Martin and Nancy Vorm Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, through Nov. 11, Monday-Friday, VisualArts.Utah.gov J. Calhoun: High Places Make Me High Corinne and Jack Sweet Library, 455 F St., 801594-8651, through Oct. 22, SLCPL.lib.ut.us Lexi Rae Johnson: Wait Here Please Art Barn/Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, through Nov. 18, SaltLakeArts.org Maureen O’Hara Ure: Love & Work Phillips Gallery, 444 E. 200 South, 801-364-8284, Oct. 21-Nov. 11, Phillips-Gallery.com Object[ed]: Shaping Sculpture in Contemporary Art Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801328-4201, through Dec. 17, UtahMOCA.org Stephanie Leitch: Interstices Granary Art Center, 86 N. Main, Ephraim, 435-283-3456, through Jan. 27, 2017, GranaryArtCenter.org Sue Martin and Nancy Vorm: Iterations Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, through Nov. 11, Monday-Friday, VisualArts.Utah.gov Terence K. Stephens: Greater Salt Lake SLC Sprague Library, 2131 S. 1100 East, 801-5948640, through Nov. 5, SLCPL.org Willamarie Huelskamp: A Peaceful Place Salt Lake City Chapman Library, 577 S. 900 West, 801-594-8623, through Oct. 27, SLCPL.org Work in Progress Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, Salt Lake City, Oct. 21, 6-9 p.m., UtahMOCA.org (see p. 19) Villains Art Show Watchtower Cafe, 1588 S. State, Oct. 21, 6-9 p.m., Watchtower-Cafe.com


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the company posts helpful how-to videos online, such as a simple technique for stripping collard greens leaves from their tough stems. They also assume that you have some basic supplies on hand, such as salt, pepper, water and olive oil. What appeals to me most about these recipes is that all of the meal ingredients are measured out in advance. I don’t have to buy a bunch of scallions when just a single scallion is called for, or a dozen eggs when only one is needed. Liquids come in small plastic bottles in the exact amount necessary, so there’s no food waste, and you don’t end up throwing out a bunch of celery because you only needed two ribs. (The amount of plastic packaging that winds up in the trash is another story.) I did some rudimentary math, and the ingredients for most of the meals I’ve made at home would cost about the same, or maybe a little more, if I were to have shopped for them myself. Given what my time is worth, I’m happy to have them do my shopping for me. The recipes are very well written and conceived, and I have to say that the results, so far, have been nothing less than delicious. We’re also eating more veggies and fewer calories than normal, since the packaged meals are high in nutrients and mostly low in fat. Whereas I’d normally eat french fries with a burger, Blue Apron’s burger side dish is wilted collard greens and carrot slaw. If nothing else, they’ve gotten me out of a recipe rut and forced me to cook foods that I normally don’t. That said, I don’t plan to stop frequenting local restaurants anytime soon. The company shares their recipes on their website, so even if you don’t care to spring for home-delivery, you can shop for the meal ingredients yourself, follow their excellent recipes and DIY. It’s a new way to cook at home. CW

Family Friendly!

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necessary to make a meal—all delivered in refrigerated boxes. I was excited to open my first package of meals; it was sort of like Christmas. Atop ice packs were the fixings for three meals: pimento cheeseburgers with collard greens and carrot slaw, seared cod and udon noodles with shiitake broth and togarashispiced cucumber, and crispy chicken milanese with warm Brussels sprouts and potato salad. The company sources products from partner providers around the country, such as 30-year-old Vermont Creamery (goat cheese), fourth-generation Reeves Farms in upstate New York (fresh produce) and Oregon’s Country Natural cooperative of cattle ranchers, specializing in humanely raised, antibiotics- and hormone-free cattle. It’s common to get exotic items like fairytale eggplants and Persian cucumbers, and the wild Pacific cod I received, like all of their fish and seafood, was sourced from sustainable fisheries in accordance with Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch (a program committed to ocean conservation and education). The quality of the ingredients I’ve used—from Sun Noodle Co.’s fresh udon to cage-free farm eggs and crisp collard greens—has been first-rate. There were three components to the meals I made. First, there is the main protein: chicken, fish, beef, etc. (there are also vegetarian and vegan options available). Second, there are the perishable goods like fresh veggies, cheese, breads, fruit and potatoes. And then there’s a packet for each meal called “Knick Knacks.” This is stuff like parmesan cheese, rice vinegar, sesame oil, whole grain Dijon mustard, dried shiitake mushrooms, panko breadcrumbs, Champagne vinegar and other seasonings or garnishes. These meals are not completely laborfree, however; shallots must be minced and celery sliced. Prep work is required. However, for a beginner or intermediate cook, the directions are crystal clear, and

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nyone unfamiliar with the recipe/ food delivery service Blue Apron might have become acquainted with the company a couple of weeks ago. That’s when NPR aired a story titled, “Meal Kits and Chaos,” based on a BuzzFeed investigation alleging violence in the Blue Apron workplace, as well as nine violations for unsafe working conditions following an inspection by California’s Division of Occupational Safety and Health. It wasn’t a good week for the company. I had become interested in Blue Apron after a number of food-loving friends and acquaintances sang the company’s praises. Since so many Utahns were jumping on the bandwagon, I thought I should try their goods myself. After all, readers of my columns care about the quality of meals in the restaurants I review, so why not turn my attention to an outfit that is supplying meals both locally and nationally? I signed up for the service and, a couple days after the NPR story aired, I was scheduled to receive my first meal shipment. What is Blue Apron? The company was formed in 2012 when co-founders Ilia Papas, Matt Salzberg and Matt Wadiak seized the idea of a business that would deliver fresh, wholesome foods to customers’ doorsteps with easy-to-follow recipes for complete, wholesome, home-cooked meals. Raising some $194 million in venture capital, it ballooned from being a startup with fewer than 100 employees in 2014 to what is now a company valued at $2 billion, according to The Wall Street Journal, and delivers some 8 million meals per month. Delivery/ membership is on a subscription basis— typically three two-person meals per week, priced at $60 including shipping. That works out to about $10 per meal per person, and customers can skip deliveries any time they wish. Given that the standard three-mealsper-week for two people is their bestselling subscription program, it’s fairly obvious that the target market is young professional couples without families and without a lot of time to shop for food and cook. The meals can be prepared from start to finish typically in less than 35 minutes. But they also appeal to a demographic like mine: My wife, Faith, and I are “empty-nesters,” and although I love to cook, I don’t always love to shop for food; Faith downright hates it. Blue Apron provides pre-measured portions of every ingredient


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Serving American Comfort Food Since 1930

FOOD MATTERS BY TED SCHEFFLER @critic1

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Now that Cafe Rio Mexican Grill (CafeRio.com) is so ubiquitous, it’s easy to forget that this was originally a Utah business—it started in St. George in 1997 as one of the nation’s first fast-fresh Mexican eateries. On Oct. 13, 2016, the chain opened its 100th location, in Lehi, with Gov. Gary Herbert and Lehi Mayor Bert Wilson in attendance. Also at the grand opening celebration was Utah Food Bank’s Ginette Bott, and Cafe Rio’s CEO/COO Dave Gagnon who announced a partnership with the Utah Food Bank by making a $2,500 donation to the nonprofit organization. “Utah Food Bank is incredibly grateful to Cafe Rio for joining us as a partner in fighting hunger statewide, and we look forward a successful longterm partnership with a fellow Utah institution,” Bott says via email. “With our ability to turn each dollar donated into $7.35 of goods and services, Cafe Rio’s support will go a long way in helping the 423,000 Utahns who face hunger.”

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The Beyond Burger

If you’re in the market for veggie-based burgers, Beyond Meat might have just the thing for you. The company just launched a new product called The Beyond Burger, and it’s currently only available at a select number of Utah Whole Foods locations: South Valley, Trolley Square, Sugar House, Park City and Cottonwood Heights. The plantbased burger contains 20 grams of pea protein and no soy, gluten or GMOs. And, it actually looks like a beef burger, which can be off-putting to some vegetarians. I had the opportunity to sample it. To be honest, it was hard for me to get past the smell, which reminded me of burning tires. A vegetarian foodie informant of mine warned, “The smell gets worse when you cook it.” Surprisingly, the No. 1 ingredient isn’t liquid smoke; it’s water. And my friend was correct, the smell does get worse when you cook it. However, the results are pretty surprising: This is the first veggie burger I’ve tried that had the texture and appearance of meat. It doesn’t exactly taste like beef, but is similar enough to satisfy vegetarians who are looking for a close alternative. BeyondMeat.com Quote of the week: “You can find your way across this country using burger joints the way a navigator uses stars.” —Charles Kuralt Send tips to: tscheffler@cityweekly.net

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LUNCH • DINNER • COCKTAILS

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Contemporary Japanese Dining


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BEER, WINE & SPIRITS

Row by Row Hopping it up in Midvale with 2 Row Brewing. BY TED SCHEFFLER comments@cityweekly.net @critic1

I

n a 2015 City Weekly interview, 2 Row Brewing founder Brian Coleman said that while researching possible names for his startup Midvale brewery, he discovered that “almost every name we came up with had a domain that was being used.” Seeing bags of two-row malt scattered around his garage gave him the idea for the name. “Every home-brewer in America has named their home brewery and has purchased the dot-com just in case they decide to go pro,” Coleman said. “I was very surprised the name 2 Row was available.” It refers to a type of barley used to make beer; the other type is six-row. The barley kernels are ground in either two- or six-row roller mills, hence the names. Most other countries use six-row for feeding livestock; in America, it’s used to brew beer. Most brewers say that two-row barley produces richer, maltier notes than six-row, whose

flavor tends to be grainier and huskier. Sixrow barley is only grown in North America, and is often used with adjuncts like corn and rice—think cheap, mass-produced American lagers. Two-row barley malt is favored by most home-brewers, as well as craft-brewers like 2 Row. Coleman’s business partner is his wife, DeDe, who handles finances and paperwork. The family’s small brewery uses a three-barrel system that runs practically nonstop. All of their beers—which are sold out of a fridge in the tiny Midvale bottle shop MondaySaturday—are full-strength, and come in in 12-ounce glass bottles for $2.25-$2.95 each. Mixing and matching is encouraged. On my last visit, I left with an assortment of 10, which totaled about $25. Coleman is a hophead. He loves India pale ales in particular, and makes a variety of them. Each is slightly distinctive in taste and

DRINK hops-to-malt ratio. Accelerator IPA offers up fruity, tropical aromas and restrained caramel flavors. It’s hoppy, but in a subtle way. By contrast, Random Double IPA contains a whopping 6 pounds of seven different hop varieties per barrel, yet this bit-

ter brew is eminently quaffable even at 8.5 percent ABV. Random Red Rye Double IPA is a dark, ruby-red beer that incorporates rye malt in the brewing process and has pine and anise notes along with roasted malt sweetness. One of my favorite 2 Row brews is Dangereux, a saison-style farmhouse ale. It’s made with American ingredients and fermented with saison yeast, weighing in at 9 percent ABV—hence the name. There are some bubblegum and banana ester flavors in this big, complex beer. Other temptations include The Shorter Porter, Nemesis Pale Ale and 24K Golden Ale. In addition, Coleman brews small limited release batches, allowing him to experiment with a range of brew styles that occasionally make their way into the permanent lineup. I’ve especially enjoyed Mikey’s Citra IPL (Limited Release No. 1) and Biere de Garde (Limited Release No. 2). For beer lovers, there’s magic being made here in Midvale. CW

2 ROW BREWING

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DEREK CARLISLE

REVIEW BITES A sampler of Ted Scheffler’s reviews

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With the recent addition of talented young chef Joey Ferran, a tantalizing menu and monthly wine dinners, Cucina has turned a corner. Since the beginning, from-scratch salads and sandwiches have been its mainstay—and, as the saying goes, “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.” Items like the slightly sweet, scrumptious curried chicken served over mesclun greens are so popular that customers would likely riot if they were ever 86’d from the menu. Sandwiches make up most of the daytime offerings, and include breakfast varieties, made-to-order deli options and an array of specialties. The meatloaf sandwich—with mozzarella cheese, sliced tomatoes, fresh greens and vinaigrette on a kaiser roll—is as amazing as it is unconventional. But Ferran’s dinner menu has allowed Cucina to become more than just a deli. The small plates include such items as mini Rueben sandwiches made with braised pork belly, pan-fried yakisoba noodles, ahi tuna poke, and baby heirloom beets with pickled fiddleheads and mustard seeds. However, if there’s a single can’t-miss dish, I recommend Ferran’s stupendous orange- and honey-brined game hen, roasted to perfection and served with delectable einkorn wheat gnocchi, wild mushrooms and lemon-thyme jus. Reviewed Oct. 6. 1026 Second Ave., Salt Lake City, 801-322-3055, CucinaDeli.com

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Bodaci Biscui ous ts p. 14 Utah’s CuisineGreek p. 32


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GOODEATS Complete listings at CityWeekly.net

Eat Right, Live Right, Fresh & Healthy! In The Heart Of Sugar House

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Featuring dining destinations from buffets and rooms with a view to mom-and-pop joints, chic cuisine and some of our dining critic’s faves. Alamexo

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Start your dinner or lunch at Alamexo with some spicy guacamole, which is prepared at your table and comes with chips and salsa. For appetizers, try the hearty tortilla soup or the crispy chicken taquitos. This restaurant makes choosing an entrée difficult, since there are so many delicious surf-andturf options. If you’re in the mood for seafood, try the salmón mancha manteles: The salmon is slowcooked and served with crispy bananas and pineapple salsa. Or, go with the costillas al piquín: braised beef short ribs that come with spicy poblano peppers in cream and salsa. In addition to the array of Mexican beers, there’s a wide variety of tequilas and Latininspired cocktails that will pair well with your meal. 268 S. State, Salt Lake City, 801-779-4747, Alamexo.com

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Amour Café

This quaint cafe near Liberty Park comes to us from John and Casee Francis, owners/founders of Amour Spreads, which makes award-winning jams and marmalades. The café offers espresso beverages and fresh, seasonal ingredients for in-house baked pastries, small plates, breakfast items, gelato and more. Need more motivation to visit? How about this: Pastry and dessert chef Amber Billingsley is in charge of the kitchen. 1329 S. 500 East, Salt Lake City, AmourSLC.com

Copper Kitchen

THE OTHER PLACE RESTAURANT OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK | MON - SAT 7AM - 11PM ● SUN 8AM - 10PM 469 EAST 300 SOUTH ● 521-6567

The newest venture from Ryan Lowder (owner/ chef of downtown’s Copper Onion and Copper Common) is located in the shiny new Holladay Village Plaza alongside new iterations of other locally owned restaurants and retail shops. Copper Kitchen in Salt Lake City has a boisterous brasserie feel to it—a big, bustling eatery featuring the type of food that has made so many so fond of Lowder’s other restaurants: steak frites, braised lamb shank, duck confit croquettes, beef bourguignon and noodles and lots more. 4640 S. 2300 East, Salt Lake City, 385-237-3159, CopperKitchenSLC.com

Itto Sushi

This cozy spot in Midvale is frequently filled with regular customers who can’t get enough of the top-quality sashimi and nigiri rolls. On Tuesdays and Wednesday nights, some rolls, like the fried jalapeño pepper roll, are half off. Bento boxes are available at lunch, and customers love the vampire, Grand Canyon and caterpillar rolls. Or put yourself in the hands of owner/chef Itto Takashi and let him make menu suggestions. 856 E. Fort Union Blvd., Midvale, 801-563-3337, IttoSushiUtah.com

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CINEMA

Fall Flicks

Our picks for the “awards season” movies most worth getting excited about.

V

MARYANN JOHANSON

OCTOBER 20, 2016 | 31

Marvel movies might have settled into an agreeable mass of regularly dispensed product, but the possibility of striking a rich vein of weirdness (à la Guardians of the Galaxy) still exists. Here’s hoping

| CITY WEEKLY |

ANDREW WRIGHT

Maybe this is cheating, but the movies I’m looking forward to are ones I’ve already seen. That’s the main reason critics go to film festivals: bragging rights. Elle is a French-language production from Dutch filmmaker Paul Verhoeven, who’s no stranger to stories about the complicated intersection of sex, feminism and violence. But Elle is less exploitative and over-the-top than Basic Instinct or Showgirls (thank goodness), being instead an audacious and sav v y dramatic mystery, tinged with dark comedy and bolstered by Isabelle Huppert’s champion performance as a woman who finds herself with complex feelings after being raped by a masked intruder. This film will inspire many passionate discussions—which is always (well, usually) a good thing. Toni Erdmann, meanwhile, will inspire conversations for different reasons. It’s a German comedy about an old prankster dad who tries to reconnect with his stern, workaholic daughter by enlivening her days with tomfoolery. It’s farcical, outrageous, a little melancholic—and 162 minutes long. Believe me, people will be talking. CW

Few things in film get my heart fluttering like a great musical, bursting with big songs and big emotions. So from the time the first teaser trailers appeared with dreamlike images and bold colors, and through some rapturous reception at fall festivals, La La Land (Dec. 16)—a Los Angeles-set romance between a musician (Ryan Gosling) and an actress (Emma Stone) from writer/director Damien Chazelle (Whiplash)—has had me giddy with anticipation. Another muchpraised romance finally arrives on local screens after its debut at the Cannes Film Festival in May: Jim Jarmusch’s Paterson (undated early January), with Adam Driver as an introverted New Jersey bus driver reluctant to share his poetry with the rest of the world. And attendees at Telluride and Toronto were wowed by Barry Jenkins’ Moonlight (Nov. 11), the coming-of-age tale of a gay African-American man. These are the small stories we can celebrate once the crash-bang of summer gives way to fall.

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SCOTT RENSHAW

ERIC D. SNIDER

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Are women in science—and in science fiction—about to have a moment? This autumn sees the landing of three films of varying degrees of prestige that put women front and center in onscreen arenas that have previously been mostly boys clubs. Arrival (Nov. 11), from director Denis Villeneuve (Sicario), gives us five-time Oscar nominee Amy Adams as a linguist enlisted to help make sure first contact with mysterious aliens goes smoothly; this one could help boost scifi as serious drama. Hidden Figures (Dec. 25), from director Theodore Melfi (St. Vincent), is the true tale of a team of female African-American mathematicians whose work was vital to NASA’s early efforts to put a (white) man into space, rectifying a shocking omission from the history of the agency, and from America’s great 20thcentury adventure. And then, of course, there’s the Star Wars spinoff Rogue One (Dec. 16), in which we’ll get the story of the badass woman who made the destruction of the Death Star possible. The Force may finally be with us gals.

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SUMMIT ENTERTAINMENT

ariations on the headline were all over movie websites this summer: Cinema was dead. Movies were worse than ever, and nobody wanted to see them. Of course, it’s easy to overreact to the franchise-heavy summer season, especially when distributors save up their best movies for release closer to the time when critics and professional groups are handing out year-end awards. Here are some of the titles we’re most jazzed to see heading toward the end of 2016.

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BY MARYANN JOHANSON, SCOTT RENSHAW, ERIC D. SNIDER & ANDREW WRIGHT comments@cityweekly.net

Benedict Cumberbatch and company on Doctor Strange (Nov. 4) can replicate at least some of the brain-crogglingly purple inventiveness of Steve Ditko and Stan Lee’s source material. (Having a chrome-domed Tilda Swinton on set feels like a good start.) If it can inspire kids to run down the street yelling “By the Hoary Hosts of Hoggoth!” so much the better. Meanwhile, the supremely rough-and-tumble trailer might try to obscure the fact, but the true war story Hacksaw Ridge (Nov. 4)—about a pacifist medic thrust into bloody conflict—is directed by Mel Gibson. (Pausing for a percentage of readers to, understandably, clear the room.) If you happen to feel that Gibson’s last film, 2006’s Apocalypto, was one of the most brilliantly kinetic movies of the past decade, this is very good news, indeed. Note: If you don’t know the story, try not to Google it until after seeing the movie. I mean, whew.

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NEW THIS WEEK Information is correct at press time. Film release schedules are subject to change. DENIAL BB.5 There’s a real cinematic challenge facing this fact-based legal drama: It’s based on a court case in which the entire strategy is not to provide anything built around big emotional catharsis. That’s the story of Deborah Lipstadt (Rachel Weisz), an Emory University faculty member and historian who is sued in British court in 1996 by Holocaust denier/self-styled historian David Irving (Timothy Spall) for libel for attacking his “scholarship”—and this being British libel law, it means the burden of proof is on Lipstadt. The bulk of the action, such as it is, involves Lipstadt’s legal team (led by Tom Wilkinson and Andrew Scott) trying to convince her to keep both herself and any Holocaust survivors off the stand, and make the case entirely about Irving’s credibility. The result is some intriguing tension between “proving there was a Holocaust” and “proving Irving a liar,” and the performances are strong enough in these scenes. There’s simply not much that makes for compelling movie viewing, notwithstanding an eerie research visit to the mistshrouded rubble of Auschwitz. David Hare’s adapted screenplay feels like a potentially fascinating stage play that missed its proper medium. Opens Oct. 21 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (PG-13)—Scott Renshaw DESIERTO BBB A cat-and-mouse thriller gets a contemporary sociopolitical spin—and it would have been even more effective if that spin had been spun out a bit more fully. Co-writer/director Jonás Cuarón (son of Alfonso) begins his story as a broken-down truck forces a group of Mexican immigrants to attempt their illegal border-crossing on foot across the Sonoran Desert badlands—and when one self-appointed American border guardian (Jeffrey Dean Morgan) begins killing them, it’s up to Moises (Gael García Bernal) to try to get the survivors to safety. Cuarón and co-writer Mateo Garcia do little to flesh out any of the characters—Moises is unfailingly altruistic, and Morgan’s whiskeyswilling sniper screams “It’s my home!” while flying a tattered Confederate flag on his truck—making it difficult for the story to hit home as anything more than a rudimentary morality play. But it still works as a simple genre tale, stripped down to just 87 minutes of hunter vs. hunted. The two leads keep things rolling with committed intensity, even when the script isn’t committed enough to making them more human. Opens Oct. 21 at theaters valleywide. (R)—SR

32 | OCTOBER 20, 2016

IN A VALLEY OF VIOLENCE BBB Writer/director Ti West appears to have no higher goal in mind than cranking out a B-picture Western revenge yarn—and to that extent, it’s hard to argue that he doesn’t succeed. Ethan Hawke plays Paul, a taciturn gunman traveling with just his horse and his dog who makes the mistake of riding through the crumbling mining town of Denton, and crossing paths with the hot-headed son (James Ransone) of the town’s marshal (John Travolta). West eventually digs a little bit into Paul’s backstory, and entangles him with a sympathetic young woman (Taissa Farmiga), but subtlety of emotional resonance isn’t the order of the day here. It’s a tale with bold music cues, surprisingly effective bursts of humor and a solid buildup to the final showdown. As with Hawke’s other current Western vehicle, The Magnificent Seven, it’s not about anything more than good guys with guns vs. bad guys with guns, but there are times when a man just has to admit the appeal of a story with a line like “Those men left me with nothing; I’m gonna leave them with less.” Opens Oct. 21 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (R)—SR JACK REACHER: NEVER GO BACK B.5 If 2012’s Jack Reacher was a forgettable episode of a bland TV show, Never Go Back is the episode that would convince you the show was about to be canceled, and rightfully so. This time, former military investigator Reacher (Tom Cruise, also producer for what is a superstar vanity project) stumbles onto a big crime within the Army, something to do with, maybe, decommissioned weapons from Afghanistan being sold on the black market. So he teams up with Maj. Susan Turner (an underutilized Cobie Smulders) to look into it. It’s a story with surprisingly low stakes for a would-be action blockbuster, requiring the addition of a tired cliché in the 15-year-old girl (Danika Yarosh) who might or might not be the daughter Reacher never knew he had, who can be threatening as a way to motivate him to Do the Plot. There isn’t anything here that isn’t lazy: It’s all shockingly rote and tired. The IMAX version is a particular insult to audiences: There’s nothing visually spectacular here to warrant paying a premium price for a ticket; there isn’t even anything remotely visually interesting. Opens Oct. 21 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)—MaryAnn Johanson KEEPING UP WITH THE JONESES BB.5 In Keeping Up with the Joneses, a mild, superfluous action comedy from Superbad director Greg Mottola and screenwriter Michael LeSieur (You, Me and Dupree), Zach Galifianakis and Isla Fisher play Jeff and Karen Gaffney, parochial suburbanites

who are enchanted by their exciting new cul-de-sac neighbors, Tim and Natalie Jones (Jon Hamm and Gal Gadot)—sophisticated jet-setters who might be spies. The Gaffneys are thus pulled into a formulaic espionage caper involving Jeff’s HR job at an aerospace company, alternately gee-whizzing at how sexy and confident the Joneses are and having their feelings hurt by their un-neighborly deception. The laughs are hit-or-miss, occasionally buoyed by Galifianakis’ random absurdity or a surprising sight gag but otherwise unremarkable. As a character, Jeff is more oblivious and stupid than my suspension of disbelief can withstand, and the Gaffneys and their friends are too often the subject of thinly veiled mockery over their provincial, rubelike attitudes. Hamm and Gadot are aces, though. The Joneses deserve better neighbors and a better movie. Opens Oct. 21 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)—Eric D. Snider

SPECIAL SCREENINGS

A MAN CALLED OVE BBB.5 Ove (Rolf Lassgård) is the kind of neighbor you want to punch in the face, but he’s a wonderful, deeply loyal friend if given a chance. It just takes a funny and, at times, dramatic series of events to bust the curmudgeon out of his shell. The shell-busters are Parvaneh (Bahar Pars) and her family, who recently moved into the neighborhood that Ove has spent his adult life overseeing. He’s a stickler for rules who diligently goes “on rounds,” but he’s also miserable, having recently been widowed and forcibly retired from his job. He’d love to kill himself—by hanging, or carbon monoxide poisoning, or shotgun—but Parvaneh keeps interrupting him. Such interruptions lead to friendship, albeit tentatively, and there’s nothing here that’s surprising or particularly fresh; imagine this like a bigger-budgeted Swedish version of The Station Agent. But the performances are dynamite; Lassgård’s angry face barely masks a deep pain, and Pars is a delight as the no-nonsense Parvaneh, who refuses to be intimidated by the grouch across the courtyard. Hannes Holm’s direction is assured, and you’ll cry at least twice before the credits roll. Opens Oct. 21 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (NR)—David Riedel

STEP BROTHERS At Brewvies, Oct. 24, 10 p.m. (PG-13)

OUIJA: ORIGIN OF EVIL [not yet reviewed] More supernatural shenanigans involving the creepy board game. Opens Oct. 21 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13) TYLER PERRY’S BOO! A MADEA HALLOWEEN [not yet reviewed] The tart-tongued matriarch fights off spookiness while chaperoning a group of teenagers. Opens Oct. 21 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)

DON’T THINK TWICE At Park City Film Series, Oct. 21-22, 8 p.m.; Oct. 23, 6 p.m. (R) THE PHANTOM OF THE OPERA (1925) At Edison Street Events, Oct. 19-21, 7:30 p.m. (NR) THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW At Tower Theatre, Oct. 21-22, 7:30 p.m. & 11:30 p.m. (NR) THE SILENCE OF MARK ROTHKO At UMFA, Oct. 26, 7 p.m. (NR)

CURRENT RELEASES THE ACCOUNTANT BBB Having already played Batman, Ben Affleck sets his sights on another vigilante superhero: The Accountant! In this tantalizing, mildly ludicrous action drama from director Gavin O’Connor (Warrior) and screenwriter Bill Dubuque (The Judge), Affleck plays Christian Wolff, a high-functioning autistic C.P.A. hired by a tech company to balance its books after a low-level analyst (Anna Kendrick) notices discrepancies. Meanwhile, the Department of the Treasury (repped by J.K. Simmons) puts a new agent (Cynthia Addai-Robinson) on the trail of an underworld figure known only as The Accountant, who cooks books for criminal enterprises but also, uh, kills criminals. Could The Accountant be our accountant? Flashbacks to Christian’s early life with a strict military father and a silent brother shed light, while other cryptic details (like a British woman’s voice giving Christian instructions over the phone) pique our interest. Affleck’s portrayal of autism is a surface-level impersonation, but the character and his quirks make for compelling entertainment—especially in the film’s second half, when numbers, bullets and fists fly furiously.—EDS AMERICAN HONEY BBB You need to think carefully before you start your film title with “American,” unless you want it to feel like you’re making a statement about The Way Things Are Today. Writer/director Andrea Arnold follows 18-year-old Star (newcomer Sasha Lane), who flees her miserable home life to hit the road with a “mag crew” of youth selling magazines door-to-door, including top salesman

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WARREN MILLER WORLD PREMIERE 10.14

CAMERAPERSON BBBB The term “monumental” feels like it must be hyperbole, but nothing else captures what veteran documentary cinematographer Kirsten Johnson has achieved by compiling snippets of footage from many of the films she’s shot over the course of 25 years, plus her own home movies. What emerges in that footage strips bare the idea of “objective” journalistic filmmaking, to find the humanity in every work of artistic creation—the person behind the camera. And that person emerges here in ways both adorably and gasp-inducingly huge. The on-camera subjects are often fascinating all on their own, whether they’re survivors of genocide

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Jake (Shia LaBeouf). Arnold expertly captures the makeshiftfamily vibe of these kids, and the film is at its loosest and most satisfying when it’s simply observing their day-to-day routine and allowing Lane’s charisma to carry Star’s story. But there are also moments when it feels like Arnold is pushing too hard for an epic sense of consequence. She does a fine enough job of telling us about missing childhood innocence, without having to tell us that she’s been telling us. (R)—SR

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or Johnson’s own mother struggling with dementia. The way these moments are compiled, however—a brilliant example of film editing—results in an emotional bombshell about art and the simple experience of caring about other people. (NR)—SR THE GIRL ON THE TRAIN BB Paula Hawkins’ thriller is one of those page-turners that should actually work better as a big dumb Hollywood adaptation; instead, the movie can’t even manage the book’s simple pleasures. Emily Blunt plays Rachel, an emotionally unsteady alcoholic who becomes obsessed with a seemingly perfect couple (Haley Bennett and Luke Evans) she sees regularly from her commuter train—and then gets caught up in the case when the woman disappears. The book offered a few satisfying swipes at gender roles, but mostly depended on its twisty, multiple-POV narrative structure. Director Tate Taylor tries to duplicate that vibe, but his plodding pace doesn’t help a script bogged down in narrated exposition. Only Blunt—physically miscast, but solid at conveying a woman with a shattered sense of self-worth—offers much of a reason to stick around and figure out whodunit. (R)—SR


TRUE BY B I L L F RO S T @bill_frost

Tech Your Head

TV

Black Mirror returns to troll your fears; Dirk Gently is sheer madness. Black Mirror Friday, Oct. 21 (Netflix)

Season Premiere: Charlie Brooker’s near-futuristic Black Mirror anthology series has been creeping out both technophobes and technophiles since 2011, kicking off with an episode wherein the British Prime Minister was forced to have sex with a pig on live TV (seems quaint in our own 2016 election cycle, doesn’t it?). The series’ third season is only slightly less pessimistic about today’s/tomorrow’s oversharing online society; one out of the six episodes actually highlights a positive, non-horrific application of smartphone tech, so that’s … something. Among the doomed digerati of Season 3 are Bryce Dallas Howard, James Norton, Mackenzie Davis, Alice Eve, Wyatt Russell and Hannah John-Kamen, starring in a swath of stories that subtly filter film genres through a Social-Media-Can-and-Will-Kill-You narrative. But at least there are no pigs this time around.

Dream Corp LLC Sunday, Oct 23 (Adult Swim)

Series Debut: Premiering after the Season 3(!!) return of the hilariously bizarre Your Pretty Face is Going to Hell (it’s Office Space in Hell, and the boss is Satan—yes, we’ve all been there), Adult Swim’s new Dream Corp LLC could the

Trash network’s most blatant “Let’s not pretend we’re not all watching this high at 3 a.m.” pitch yet. A wild-haired Jon Gries (Uncle Rico from Napoleon Dynamite!) stars as Dr. Roberts, head of the titular psychotherapeutic lab where he and his equally sketchy team analyze the traumatic dreams of patients. That’s essentially all of the plot; the rest of Dream Corp LLC is brain-twisting, hallucinogenic visual F/X rendered in rotoscope (animation over live-action film). It all makes about as much sense as USA’s dream-centric drama Falling Water, but gets it done in under 15 minutes.

Man With a Plan Monday, Oct. 24 (CBS)

Series Debut: Matt LeBlanc joins fellow former Friend Matthew Perry in CBS Sitcom Hell and, while nothing could be as mind-numbingly awful as Perry’s The Odd Couple or Kevin James’ Kevin Can Wait ( yes, 2 Broke Girls is now the Eyeball net’s smartest Monday comedy—this is where we are now, ’Merica), Man With a Plan is definitely a contender in the race to the bottom. In this laugh-tracked throwaway, LeBlanc plays a blue-collar dad who agrees to stay home with his children while his wife (Liza Snyder, replacing the wisely fled Jenna Fischer) returns to work. Guess what? The kids are a nightmare! Dad’s in over his head! Mom says, “Told ya so!” There’s not a joke here that can’t be seen coming from 85 miles away! Look up LeBlanc’s meta-funny Showtime series Episodes, instead; best to remember him that way.

Black Mirror (Netflix)

Rectify Wednesday, Oct. 26 (Sundance)

Season Premiere: The first three seasons of Rectify are currently available on Netflix; before this fourth and final run ends, I’d recommend starting there … patiently. Rectify follows the existential struggle of Daniel Holden (Aden Young), a man released after serving 19 years in prison for rape and murder. New DNA evidence got him out of the joint, though it’s still not clear whether he committed the crime or not—and it might never be revealed by the end, according to creator/producer Ray McKinnon. His small Georgia hometown has divergent, occasionally violent opinions, even those within his own family (including his stalwart-defender sister, fantastically played by Abigail Spencer, Rectify’s true heartbreaking center). Warning: Rectify moves ssslllooowwwly, and Daniel’s guilt or innocence isn’t the point of the story. Enjoy!

Listen to Frost Mondays at 8 a.m. on X96 Radio From Hell, and on the TV Tan podcast via Stitcher, iTunes, Google Play and BillFrost.tv.

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Series Debut: Even if you’ve read Douglas Adams’ (The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy) novels upon which Dirk Gently’s Holistic Detective Agency is based, there’s little explaining just what the hell’s going on here; “sheer madness with a chewy mystery in the middle” seems too simple, but it’s a start. American Ultra/Chronicle writer Max Landis brings the tale of kinda-detective Dirk Gently (Samuel Barnett, Penny Dreadful) and his certainly not-Watson partner Todd (Elijah Wood, Wilfred) to crackling, chaotic life—so much so that it seems the action might spin right off the screen at any moment. Unlike Black Mirror, Dirk Gently celebrates the connection of all people and things (hence, “holistic detective”), even when there’s danger afoot (hence, “holistic assassin”).

Tomorrow

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Dirk Gently’s Holistic Detective Agency Saturday, Oct. 22 (BBC America)

Today

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OCTOBER 20, 2016 | 35


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Talking Shop

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35 years together, 4760 S 900 E, SLC After U.K. synthpop duo Pet Shop 801-590-9940 | facebook.com/theroyalslc

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Boys continues to embrace opportunities for growth. BY LEE ZIMMERMAN comments@cityweekly.net

P

et Shop Boys are sometimes dismissed as nothing more than pop pundits, denizens of the dance scene, relics of another age or a combination of all the above. They’re certainly no strangers to the charts—“West End Girls,” “Go West,” “It’s a Sin” and a remarkable take on “Always on My Mind” are only a few of the songs that have made them radio staples for the past 35 years. And yet, their scores of other accomplishments have always elevated them far beyond the realm of anything ordinary. With sales of 50 million records, three Brit Awards, six Grammy nominations and the distinction of being the most successful British duo of all time, Neil Tennant (vocals, keyboards) and Chris Lowe (keyboards, vocals)—aren’t easily dismissed. “I like being thought of as a club band and as a pop band,” Tennant says. “We are those things. But it’s not all we are. There are a lot of different aspects to the Pet Shop Boys. You can like all of them or just one of them. Or maybe two or three of them.” Indeed, one of the band’s most distinctive elements is tied to its imagery, from the design of their record sleeves to their stunning live performances. The tour supporting their new album Super (x2/Kobalt), which brings them to Salt Lake City this week, originated as a one-off production at the Royal Opera House in London. Tennant describes it as a modern mesh of film, lasers, lights and music drawn from all phases of their career. It’s a desire to stay creative that still spurs the pair’s ambitions. “We always want to do something a bit different,” Tennant says. “We love writing songs. For us, that’s the fun part of the process. That’s something we would do anyway, even if we didn’t have a record deal. It’s an essential creative outlet for us. Plus, our shows are always changing. We simply try to come up with something that’s different and entertaining and sort of exciting.” Of course, like any outfit, they’re defined by their music—an interesting mix of original songs and unlikely covers that get a unique and often unexpected turn in their treatment. While Tennant is quick to acknowledge that success, he’s also eager to point out that the duo is often typecast in ways that belie the subtleties in their sound. “People think of us as four-on-the-floor dance music, but it’s not all that we are,” he says. “It’s more sensitive than that. The subject matter is not always typical of pop music. It’s often very beautiful and melodic.” After such a long partnership, Tennant and Lowe remain determined to keep moving forward and not allow their past success to overshadow any current efforts. Given the band’s past kudos and the high expectations they’ve inspired in their fans and followers, meeting and exceeding their own high bar can sometimes seem a daunting task. “We always have to rise to the challenge of our own quality control,” Tennant says. “If something isn’t good enough, it doesn’t get released. We have high standards. We’ve never coasted. We’ve never been retro. We’ve never done an ’80s tour. We’ve never stopped writing songs. And we’ve always embraced opportunities.”

Pet Shop Boys Of course, the ability to maintain a partnership through threeand-a-half decades is something of a marvel. There have been the occasional side projects—most notably Electronic, Tennant’s one-off collaboration with New Order vocalist Bernard Summer and former Smiths guitarist Johnny Marr—but for the most part, Tennant and Lowe’s collaboration has continued unimpeded. The rarity of such an association isn’t lost on Tennant. “Finding someone to write songs and make music with doesn’t come along very often. Plus, we enjoy each other’s company. We have a similar sense of humor. And when you’ve been through something that’s lasted 35 years, with all its history and absurdities, it gives you reason to laugh and reminisce.” Tennant also suspects they’re creatures of habit. In 1999, during a tour stop in Wales, poor sales and a nearly bankrupt promoter caused him to do some serious thinking. “I said to Chris, ‘Why don’t we just knock it on the head?’ Chris didn’t answer. So I just let it go and never brought it up again,” Tennant says. Their audience—one that now spans several generations—is obviously appreciative. “We attract different types of people to our shows,” Tennant says. “In America, we get an ’80s retro crowd, as well as those who come to hear an electronica concert. There’s also a big gay audience, and those people who want to dance. We think of the Pet Shop Boys as a culture all its own, and when you have a situation like that, people are naturally attracted to it.” CW

PET SHOP BOYS

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FutureSad/ LoveSounds John Louviere embraces the pain of the past on The Future Is Now. BY KIMBALL BENNION comments@cityweekly.net @kimballbennion

J

ohn Louviere has been writing and performing music in Salt Lake City for a long time—around 20 years. Despite his experience, something feels new on his latest album, The Future Is Now (JohnLouviere. Bandcamp.com). “I completely decided to talk to myself in this album,” he says. “I’ve never done anything like what I did this time.” This is his second release as a solo artist, the second since a series of life-altering events including the death of his mother and going through a divorce. He says he spent a lot of time mining the feelings that were still left inside, even the most painful ones, and describes writing the album as an almost torturous ritual of honest self-evaluation, agonizing over the truth of every last lyric. “It took hours to push through to finally say what I actually wanted to say,” he recalls. “When I’d find the lyric, sometimes it would just break me open, and I would just begin weeping.” There is certainly a sadness that permeates through much of the album, including its title track, which twists an optimistic phrase into a ballad for a past that he neglected. “Hold on to the ones you love/ Even though one day you’ll have to let them go/ Because you know what you’re building right now is a memory,” Louviere sings alongside mournful piano. His sweetly sincere voice is a nice callback to Todd Rundgren, Harry Nilsson and other singer-songwriters of AM radio past, and it fits well with The Future Is Now’s themes of loss—not just loss of time or love,

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but a loss of self. The track “Young Fighter” is a song for Louviere’s younger self. It comes from a painting his grandmother made of him as a 5-year-old, depicting him holding a toy horse and pistol in each hand, not quite knowing how lonely the ride ahead would be. “Young fighters fear, even to tears/ the day they’ve got to ride alone/ When the smoke is cleared, everyone I held dear/ was gone,” he sings. “I talk to my past selves a lot, only because there was no one there to help them,” he says. “I wrote it to defend that ‘me’ that really needed someone to stand up and defend him, and that just brings me to tears every time I think about it.” Louviere talks a lot about the tears he shed while making this album. While his songs have always been very personal, the emotions he unearthed in the process of making it were actually something he hadn’t experienced at that level before. “I was just purging something,” he says. “And I’m not a crier over my songs.” Even when he goes back and listens to the finished product, the conversations he’s having with himself hit him just as hard. “It hits home. I realize, ‘Wow. I think I wrote this for people who are broken.’” As painful as writing the music was, Louviere also found himself in new territory for

John Louviere

the recording process. Before, he was stubbornly protective of his songs and didn’t like people meddling with them. This time around, he enlisted the help of producer Andrew Goldring, who took Louviere’s songs and fleshed them out in the studio. Collaboration felt liberating. “I was ready,” he says. “I think when you grow sick of yourself enough … it’s nice to let someone else take over for a while.” Although he’s started playing live with a band, his objective at a concert remains the same as it always has—to open an audience, and himself, up. It’s worth the heartbreak, he says. “The response that I’m looking for is to just fucking shatter your heart. If I can create that environment where people are actually open to feeling, I’ll feel safe.” CW

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MUSIC PICKS

FRIDAY 10.21

Karl Blau, Lake, Andrew Shaw

It was only five months ago when singersongwriter Karl Blau played at Studio Studio Dada in Provo, promoting an album titled Introducing Karl Blau. I pointed out the irony of the title in a blurb about the show, citing his long résumé of noteworthy indie projects like K Records noise merchants The Microphones, doom-drone purveyors Earth and singer-songwriter Laura Veirs (lately of the incredible singersongwriter supergroup case/lang/veirs). All that, and his own 33-album solo discography (dude—put out an EP called 1/3, pronto!). So Introducing himself now—with a covers album? Perfect irony. We have so many questions for the guy, but he’s been scarce. That’s another irony because he’s usually so good on the deal, doing his own promo. And, of course, when you’re making an introduction, it’s customary to, y’know, be present. But all will be forgiven when Blau plays you some of the music you’ve heard before, and hopefully a bunch that you’ll wish you’d already heard. God willing, the merch table’s stocked! (Randy Harward) Kilby Court, 741 S. 330 West, 7 p.m., $10, KilbyCourt.com

Rasputina

The Circulars (Album Release), The Nods, Choir Boy

There’s a sound in ‘80s music that already has a name or three—new wave, shoegaze, dream pop. But you could almost call it Hughesadelia, as tribute to the great teenfilm auteur John Hughes, who stacked his soundtracks with bands of that ilk. On their eponymous 2013 debut EP and the 2014 full-length Ornamental, Salt Lake City’s The Circulars wove gauzy delights from the blueprints of bands like The Jesus and Mary Chain, and The Smiths. The new record, which City Weekly has yet to hear at press time (helloooo ..?), features an entirely new lineup except for co-founder Sam Burton. From what can be learned online, it sounds different, but the same. (RH) The Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 8 p.m., $5, 21+, TheUrbanLoungeSLC.com

SATURDAY 10.22

Rasputina, Vita and the Woolf

MELORA AND MOJICA

40 | OCTOBER 20, 2016

BY RANDY HARWARD

JASON QUIGLY

CABARET

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It was during either my first or second trip to Austin, Texas, for the annual South-bySouthwest Festival that I learned about Rasputina. They were playing an in-store at Waterloo Records, where some buzzy singersongwriter (Norah Jones or something) had also performed that year. As I saw them clad in corsets and tights, I wondered why they weren’t collapsing in the hot, humid weather—especially since three out of four members were packing cellos. (This is one instance where the drummer actually had it easy.) The band proceeded to demonstrate how the cello is so much more than a droning, moaning instrument for nerds who haven’t learned the joys of a good ol’ Fender

Karl Blau P-Bass. Granted, SXSW is a friendly climate for new, cool, strange music, but from the looks on everyone’s sweaty faces, they’d probably never conceived of such a dynamic sound coming from that many gargantuan violins, buttressed by rock-solid drumming and complemented by Melora Creager’s haunting, mellifluous vocals. And then they played a Pat Benatar cover. And here we are, 14 years later, and the band’s discography includes seven studio albums, eight EPs, three live records and two compilations. A sorta-new one, titled Ether? You’re Welcome, a redux of the band’s 1996 debut Thanks for the Ether (Columbia), is due this winter. (RH) O.P. Rockwell, 628 Main, Park City, 7 p.m., $18-$35, OPRockwell.com

MONDAY 10.24 Tool, 3Teeth

One of the best things about Tool is that they’re the type of band that, some say, appeals to tools. You know, the dim, closeted, double-Y chromosome set. The guys for whom “Prison Sex” (Undertow, 1993) is, on those tipsy late nights, kinda romantic—but they’d never tell the bros. The ones who prefer the LCD-comedy of Kevin Hart or Larry the Cable Guy to Bill Hicks’ hilarious truth-telling (who, before his death in 1994, befriended Tool singer Maynard James Keenan when both performed at Lollapalooza 1993). The guys who can’t fathom the complexity and nuances of the band’s signature variety of prog-metal. The guys who’d rather have another Bud Light Lime than check out Keenan’s wines—much less even consider »


Sometimes, being a white dude is embarrassing. Like when you’re seduced by the musicality of a foreign accent—in this case, the Jamaican one. It’s just that “mon” is so much more resonant and laid-back than a nasal, honking “man.” Or the “-tion” suffix, as in “72-hour liquida-SHON” or scintillating conversaSHON, mon. To be

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Tool fair, ragin’ Cajun Justin WilSON’s verSHON is almost as fun, but you know. As for the Meditations (See? Now you’re doin’ it, sans phonetics. You’re welcome.), they’ve been around since 1974 when the core trio of Danny Clarke, Winston Watson and Ansel Cridland got together, releasing singles attributed to individual members until 1976, when they dropped the single “Woman Is Like a Shadow,” leading to their first album Message From The Meditations (1977). In the ensuing 40 years, the band’s sweet harmonies and sunny songs made them one of roots reggae’s finest, if not commercially successful, acts. Only Cridland remains in the current lineup, but when you’re standing in front of the band, and they make you forget that about the chilly fall weather outside, you won’t care. (RH) The State Room, 638 S. State, 8 p.m., $17, 21+, TheStateRoomSLC.com

The Meditations

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OCT 20: TRUE WIDOW 8PM DOORS NO SUN

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COMING SOON Oct 30: Madchild Oct 31: Islands Nov 02: Nik Turner’s Hawkwind Nov 02: The Head & The Heart After Party Nov 03: Sweater Beats

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WEDNESDAY 10.26

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sitting through a documentary about them (the hilarious Blood into Wine, 2010). The guys who’ll go to this show to be cool, who have no idea what Keenan et al. have been up to over the past decade (Puscifer, people! Pusc-i-fer!). You know, the 10 years where Tool refused to release new music until they’d resolved their legal dispute with their former label. And then there are the real fans—the ones who get it— who will come to see Tool’s highly satisfying A/V spectacle, and who wait with bated breath for the band’s long-awaited new album, which will be as edifying as it is entertaining. And expensive—but, more than many overpriced arena shows, worth it. (RH) Maverik Center, 3200 S. Decker Lake Drive, 7:30 p.m., $72.50-$92.50, MaverikCenter.com

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42 | OCTOBER 20, 2016

Brittany Willden, Nichole Robinson, Bethany Duffey, Raven Slissold, Jen Unguichian

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THURSDAY 10.20

CONCERTS & CLUBS

STEPHANIE HAGEMAN

True Widow, No Sun

There’s a glut of bands in the stoner/doom/ sludge web, most of ‘em good to great. When they land on the latter end of that spectrum, it’s because they do something a little different. Texan trio True Widow puts a twangy, shoegaze-y twist on the monolithic sound, which might seem contradictory—but you know what they say about opposites. The band’s newly minted fourth album Avvolgere (Relapse) is more of the same: ethereal male and female vocals (the latter evoking Mazzy Star’s Hope Sandoval), big riffs and fuzzy atmospherics—just with a little more stank on it. Sometimes that’s all you need. (Randy Haward) Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 8 p.m., $12 in advance, $14 day of, 21+, TheUrbanLoungeSLC.com

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OCTOBER 20, 2016 | 43

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GOOD TIME

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FALL INTO A


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THURSDAY 10.20 LIVE MUSIC

Adakin + Messer + Freedom Before Dying + The Crooked Feathers (Club X) Bad Religion + Against Me! + Dave Hause (In The Venue) Gary Lewis & the Playboys (The Egyptian Theatre) see p. 45 Helio Sequence + Genders + Strong Words (Metro Music Hall) John Louviere + Andrew Goldring (The State Room) see p. 38 Officer Jenny + Lake Island + Little Barefoot (Velour Live Music Gallery) Salt in the Wounds + Melting Rain + Paradox Theory (Kilby Court) True Widow + No Sun (Urban Lounge) see p. 43

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Dueling Pianos (The Spur Bar & Grill) Jazz Jam Session (Sugar House Coffee) Therapy Thursdays feat. Borgore (Club Elevate) Reggae Thursday (The Royal)

FRIDAY 10.21 LIVE MUSIC

The Circulars + The Nods + Choir Boy (Urban Lounge) see p. 40 Dj Dolph + Dj Myze (Downstairs) Elle King (The Complex) The Fabulous Milf Shakes (ABG’s Bar) Gary Lewis & the Playboys (The Egyptian Theatre) see p. 45 Johnnyswim + Penny and Sparrow (The State Room) Karl Blau + Lake + Andrew Shaw (Kilby Court) see p. 40

44 | OCTOBER 20, 2016

SATURDAY 10.22 LIVE MUSIC

Book On Tape Worm + Stephanie Mabey (Velour Live Music Gallery) Bongzilla + Wizard Rifle (Club X) Gary Lewis & the Playboys (The Egyptian Theatre) see p. 45 Go For Broke + Heartflip + Return Radio (Why Sound) Green Jelly + Silence Protocol + Muckraker + Baby Gurl (Metro Music Hall) King Tiiiger + Dan Fletcher + DJ Nix Beat (Urban Lounge) Lake Effect ( The Spur Bar and Grill) Larusso + Attack the Sunset + Brickon + Johnny Price (Billboard-Live!) Margo Price + William Tyler (The State Room) Mark Chesnutt (DeJoria Center) Neff Halloween Party feat. Matty Mo + DJ DIZZ + AtL (Club Elevate) Metal Dogs (Brewskis)

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CONCERTS & CLUBS

Kix + Reloaded + Network + Tommy Love (Leatherheads Sports Bar) Melody Pulsipher (The Garage) Michelle and Moonshine & Company (The Spur Bar and Grill) Murphy & The Giant + Radiata + EvilLive (Club X) Mushroomhead + Sunflower Dead + Unsaid Fate (The Royal) Overtime + ZC3 + Hayde$ + Mr King + The Mechanics + Loyal Villains + Dj Coma (The Loading Deck) Parkway Drive + We Came As Romans + Counterparts (In The Venue) Warrior King (The Complex) Willie Gonzalez (Club Karamba) Spirit City + Motion Coaster + Solarists (Velour Live Music Gallery) Time Daniels Band + Rougues Among (Funk ’n’ Dive) Transit Cast + Rouges Among Us (Brewskis)

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THURSDAY-SATURDAY 10.20-22 Gary Lewis & the Playboys

You gotta wonder if Gary Lewis & the Playboys—looking and sounding clean-cut and 1950s-wholesome, but with a name referencing a magazine that folks in the mid-’60s would’ve thought signaled the end times—were proto-trolls. It’s unlikely, but it’s fun to imagine putting something past the morality police at the time. Almost as fun as reaching back to those selfsame simpler times when a good, clean song was also an instrument of backbeat-driven rebellion, but milkshakes and lollipops were milkshakes and lollipops (if you get my drift). And bling wasn’t bling, an empty symbol of entitlement, materialism and debt dripping with the blood of slave laborers. But while diamond rings don’t shine like they used to, Lewis’ biggest hit, “This Diamond Ring,” still distills a messy breakup into nice, clean imagery. Which, in more complicated times, is quaintly refreshing. (RH) The Egyptian Theatre, 328 Main, Park City, 8 p.m., $29-$55 ($5 more if purchased within 30 minutes of showtime), EgyptianTheatreCompany.org

LIBERTY RECORDS

Old Death Whisper + Tony Holiday (The Garage) Pentatonix ( Maverik Center) Pet Shop Boys (The Complex) see p. 36 Ramones Tribute feat. Breakers + Birthquake + 90s Television + Fuck The Informer + King Tiiiger + Dan Fletcher + DJ Nix Beat (Urban Lounge) Rasputina + Vita & the Woolf (O.P. Rockwell) see p. 40 Saving Samuel (American Fork Amphitheater) Soul Night + James The VIII + Ryan Innes + Joshy Soul (Audio West) DJ Soulman (Downstairs) Trash Talk + Antwon (Kilby Court)

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SUNDAY 10.23 LIVE MUSIC

The Dillinger Escape Plan + O’Brother + Cult Leader + Bent Knee (Urban Lounge) The Jackson Jills (The Garage) Stellar Corpses + Argyle Goolsby + The Roving Midnight + Spooky DeVille + Zombiecock (Metro Music Hall)

MONDAY 10.24 Live Music Nightly! See website for details $4 Tacos Every Tuesday & Thursday Craft Cocktails, Beer & Food

46 | OCTOBER 20, 2016

Dan Fletcher + Vincent Draper + Westing + American Mouth (Kilby Court) Loch Lomond + Little Barefoot + Hoofless (Urban Lounge) Tool + 3Teeth (Maverik Center) see p. 40

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Monday Night Blues Jam (The Royal) Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig)

TUESDAY 10.25

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Open Mic (The Royal)

WEDNESDAY 10.26 Eli & Fur (The Hotel & Elevate) Haybaby + Browser + Fossil Arms (Diabolical Records) Lewis Del Mar + Prinze George (Kilby Court) The Meditations (The State Room) see p. 41 Michale Graves + Die Monster Die + Ulteriors + Zombiecock (Metro Music Hall) Villain Burn Your World + The Wake of an Arsonist (Urban Lounge)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

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Five Finger Death Punch + Shinedown + Sixx: A.M. + As Lions (Maverik Center) Indigo Plateau + Primitive Programme + Burmese Python (Metro Music Hall)

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DEPENDING ON VEHICLE AND FUNCTIONS, EXTRA PARTS, KEYS, MODULES OR LABOR MAY BE NEEDED

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© 2016

GO TIME

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ACROSS

1. Arctic tern's pole-to-pole trip, e.g. 2. Suddenly 3. No small favor 4. Año part 5. Greet from a ways away, say 6. Utter 7. Smucker's container

49. Ten C-notes 50. Crabby sort 51. Something to do? 52. Pet welfare grp. 53. Following behind 57. Cookout discard 60. Texter's "... but that may just be me" 61. ____-la-la

Last week’s answers

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

DOWN

8. It may be served with chips 9. ____ salts 10. "As ____ per aspera" (Kansas' motto) 11. Passover month 13. Trio after Q 15. Key's longtime partner in sketch comedy 17. Societies: Abbr. 21. "____ a gun!" 23. Texans are part of it, for short 25. John Lennon's "Dear ____" 27. "Solve for x" subj. 30. "____ tree falls in the forest ..." 32. Slices of Americana? 33. Spies often don't use them 34. Rapper who has said Yeezus is his "God name" 37. Fully extended, as a ballerina 38. "Are you out ____?" 39. Media monitoring grp. 42. "I'm ready for your questions" 45. Droop 47. Of ____ (servicing) 48. ____ fuels

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

1. "Just the facts, ____" 5. Newspaper Rupert Murdoch acquired in 2007, for short 8. Lima, e.g. 12. Better to a rapper, worse to a patient 14. "Now I get it!" 15. Coke rival 16. Deal with superficially 18. Bridge positions 19. Backstabber 20. One leaving in the spring 21. Lady of la casa 22. Interoffice email abbr. 24. "Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy" star 26. Over the speed limit 28. "That's ____ haven't heard!" 29. Total 30. When doubled, a hit song of 1965 and 1989 31. Find a space 35. Mil. training academy 36. Waste time 40. Soup veggie 41. Indie rocker Case 43. Piece corps, briefly? 44. Network for political junkies 46. Afrobeat music pioneer Fela ____ 48. As the center of attention 50. British slang term for "monocle" that is also the title of a 1968 Beatles song 54. Wilder on screen 55. Fraternity hopeful 56. Tiny fraction of time: Abbr. 58. Part of the Iams logo 59. Prepare to transplant, as to the garden 60. "Let's do this thing!" (or, read a slightly different way, an apt title for this puzzle) 62. "Solid Gold" host Marilyn 63. "Surely not ME!?" 64. Quarterback Drew 65. Excellent, in 1990s slang 66. Night ____ 67. Helper: Abbr.

SUDOKU

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CROSSWORD PUZZLE


PHOTO OF THE WEEK BY

@starrynight0660 #CWCOMMUNITY

INSIDE / COMMUNITY BEAT PG. 49 INK PG. 51 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY PG. 52 UTAH JOB CENTER PG. 54 URBAN LIVING PG. 55 POETS CORNER PG. 55

promises three days of group rides, bike jousting, sprints and other biking activities, as well as social events like a meet-and-greet on Friday night. For more information, check out the event page on Facebook. n

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OCTOBER 20, 2016 | 49

Outdoors enthusiasts and fashion aficionados have likely already heard of Velo City Bags, a locally owned and operated business offering a broad range of options to those in the market for a sturdy, vegan product to store their stuff—including duff le bags, rucksacks, messenger bags, totes and more. If you haven’t heard of them, you really have to check them out. A reliable, classic bag is a must-have, whether you’re biking to work, walking to class or heading out on a hike. “I started Velo City Bags in November of 2008,” owner Nathan Larsen says. When Larsen first started making his bags, he was working out of his condo. “I was selling bags via a WordPress blog. People would contact me through email and I would send them a PayPal invoice. I didn’t really know what I was doing, but it was amazing. I had people from all parts of the country buying bags through that shitty blog.” Since those humble beginnings, Larsen has expanded operations, but

the small-business dedication to quality hasn’t wavered. Each product is vegan and handmade right here in Salt Lake City, so you never have to wonder if what you’re purchasing is ethical. “You can even come down to the shop and see the process firsthand,” he says. Velo City products are tough enough to survive Utah’s harsh climate, with a sleek, polished aesthetic. Larsen loves the process of designing and building his creations. “I love it when a customer purchases a bag and they let me know how great the bag is working out for them,” he says. “That makes me extremely happy and makes all the hard work I put into it totally worth it.” Additionally, he sells wallets, beanies, belts and pedal straps. His wife, Debbie, loves meeting new people at the company’s various events around town, including the downtown farmer’s market. “It’s great connecting and seeing how much fun everyone has,” she says. In fact, if you’re looking to connect with the local biking community and the folks at Velo City Bags, check out their annual urban cycling event, Velo Weekend, from Friday-Sunday, Oct. 21-23. Sponsored by various SLC businesses and institutions like the City Library, Vive Juicery, Blue Copper and more, the event

community@cityweekly.net

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On September 28, 2016, the United States District Court for District of Utah entered a Consent Order resolving a lawsuit brought by the United States against NALS Apartment Homes, LLC, et al., (“the Defendants”) concerning alleged housing discrimination at Pinnacle Highland Apartments, located at 7673 S. Highland Drive, Cottonwood Heights, Utah; Cobble Creek Apartments, located at 5251 Cobble Creek Road, Salt Lake City, Utah, Sky Harbor Apartments, located at 1876 North Temple Road, Salt Lake City, and Thornhill Park Apartments, located at 1680 Thornhill Drive, Salt Lake City, Utah (collectively “the Charged Properties”). The lawsuit alleged that the Defendants violated the Fair Housing Act at the Charged Properties by treating tenants with disabilities and prospective tenants with disabilities less favorably than tenants who do not have disabilities and by failing to provide reasonable accommodations as required by the Fair Housing Act for certain tenants with disabilities who sought to live with their assistance animals. The Consent Order also establishes a Settlement Fund to make payments to compensate persons who are victims of this type of alleged discrimination. You may be entitled to a monetary award from the Settlement Fund if you (I) are an individual with a disability; (2) have lived or sought to live at one of the Charged Properties; and (3) were denied the opportunity to live with your assistance animal, including a restricted breed animal, or received a substantially delayed decision in response to your request to live with your assistance animal, including a restricted breed animal. If you believe you may be a victim based on the above criteria, or if you have information about someone else whom you believe may qualify, please contact the United States Department of Justice no later than January 26, 2017, at: 1-800-896-7743 and select menu option 994. You may also send an email to: fairhousing@usdoj.gov or write to: United States Department of Justice Civil Rights Division Housing and Civil Enforcement Section 950 Pennsylvania Avenue Washington, D.C. 20530 Attn: DJ# 175-77-394 Your telephone message or letter must include your name, address, and, if possible, your e-mail address and at least TWO telephone numbers where you may be reached.


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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY B Y R O B

FRIENDSHIP MANOR IS HIRING B R E Z S N Y

Go to RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) In the course of her long career, Libran actress Helen Hayes won an Oscar, an Emmy, a Grammy and a Tony. Years before all that glory poured down on her, she met playwright Charles MacArthur at a party in a posh Manhattan salon. Hayes was sitting shyly in a dark corner. MacArthur glided over to her and slipped a few salted peanuts into her hand. “I wish they were emeralds,” he told her. It was love at first sight. A few years after they got married, MacArthur bought Hayes an emerald necklace. I foresee a metaphorically comparable event in your near future, Libra: peanuts serving as a promise of emeralds. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Welcome to the Painkiller Phase of your cycle. It’s time to relieve your twinges, dissolve your troubles and banish your torments. You can’t sweep away the whole mess in one quick heroic purge, of course. But I bet you can pare it down by at least 33 percent. (More is quite possible.) To get started, make the following declaration five times a day for the next three days: “I am grateful for all the fascinating revelations and indispensable lessons that my pain has taught me.” On each of the three days after that, affirm this truth five times: “I have learned all I can from my pain, and therefore no longer need its reminders. Goodbye, pain.” On the three days after that, say these words, even if you can’t bring yourself to mean them with complete sincerity: “I forgive everybody of everything.” SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) For the foreseeable future, you possess the following powers: to make sensible that which has been unintelligible, to find amusement in situations that had been tedious and to create fertile meaning where before there had been sterile chaos. Congratulations, Sagittarius! You are a first-class transformer. But that’s not all. I suspect you will also have the ability to distract people from concerns that aren’t important—to deepen any quest that has been too superficial or careless to succeed—and to ask the good questions that will render the bad questions irrelevant. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) In the past 11 months, did you ever withhold your love on purpose? Have there been times when you “punished” those you cared about by acting cold and aloof? Can you remember a few occasions when you could have been more generous or compassionate but chose not to be? If you answered yes to any of those questions, the next three weeks will be an excellent time to atone. You’re in a phase of your astrological cycle when you can reap maximum benefit from correcting stingy mistakes. I suggest that you make gleeful efforts to express your most charitable impulses. Be a tower of bountiful power. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) In 1415, a smaller English army defeated French forces at the Battle of Agincourt in northern France. Essential to England’s victory were its 7,000 longbowmen—archers who shot big arrows using bows that were 6 feet long. So fast and skilled were these warriors that they typically had three arrows flying through the air at any one time. That’s the kind of high-powered proficiency I recommend that you summon during your upcoming campaign. If you need more training to reach that level of effectiveness, get it immediately. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Let’s imagine your life as a novel. The most recent chapter, which you’ll soon be drawing to a close, might be called “The Redemption of Loneliness.” Other apt titles: “Intimacy with the Holy Darkness” or “The Superpower of Surrender” or “The End Is Secretly the Beginning.” Soon you will start a new chapter, which I’ve tentatively dubbed “Escape from Escapism,” or perhaps “Liberation from False Concepts of Freedom” or “Where the Wild Things Are.” And the expansive adventures of this next phase will have been made possible by the sweetand-sour enigmas of the past four weeks.

ARIES (March 21-April 19) In the 1980s, two performance artists did a project titled A Year Tied Together at the Waist. For 12 months, Linda Montano and Tehching Hsieh were never farther than eight feet away from each other, bound by a rope. Hsieh said he tried this experiment because he felt very comfortable doing solo work, but wanted to upgrade his abilities as a collaborator. Montano testified that the piece “dislodged a deep hiddenness” in her. It sharpened her intuition and gave her a “heightened passion for living and relating.” If you were ever going to engage in a comparable effort to deepen your intimacy skills, Aries, the coming weeks would be a favorable time to attempt it. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) In the coming weeks would you prefer that we refer to you as “voracious”? Or do you like the word “ravenous” better? I have a feeling, based on the astrological omens, that you will be extra super eager to consume vast quantities of just about everything: food, information, beauty, sensory stimulation, novelty, pleasure and who knows what else. But please keep this in mind: Your hunger could be a torment, or it could be a gift. Which way it goes may depend on your determination to actually enjoy what you devour. In other words, don’t get so enchanted by the hypnotic power of your longing that you neglect to exult in the gratification when your longing is satisfied. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) When the wind blows at 10 mph, a windmill generates eight times more power than when the breeze is 5 mph. Judging from the astrological omens, I suspect there will be a similar principle at work in your life during the coming weeks. A modest increase in effort and intensity will make a huge difference in the results you produce. Are you willing to push yourself a bit beyond your comfort level in order to harvest a wave of abundance? CANCER (June 21-July 22) Cuthbert Collingwood (1748-1810) had a distinguished career as an admiral in the British navy, leading the sailors under his command to numerous wartime victories. He was also a good-natured softie whose men regarded him as generous and kind. Between battles, while enjoying his downtime, he hiked through the English countryside carrying acorns, which he planted here and there so the “Navy would never want for oaks to build the fighting ships upon which the country’s safety depended.” (Quoted in Life in Nelson’s Navy, by Dudley Pope.) I propose that we make him your role model for the coming weeks. May his example inspire you to be both an effective warrior and a tender soul who takes practical actions to plan for the future. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Eighteenth-century musician Giuseppe Tartini has been called “the godfather of modern violin-playing.” He was also an innovative composer who specialized in poignant and poetic melodies. One of his most famous works is the Sonata in G Minor, also known as the Devil’s Trill. Tartini said it was inspired by a dream in which he made a pact with the Devil to provide him with new material. The Infernal One picked up a violin and played the amazing piece that Tartini transcribed when he woke up. Here’s the lesson for you: He didn’t actually sell his soul to the Devil. Simply engaging in this rebellious, taboo act in the realm of fantasy had the alchemical effect of unleashing a burst of creative energy. Try it! VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) The planets have aligned in a curious pattern. I interpret it as meaning that you have cosmic permission to indulge in more self-interest and self-seeking than usual. So it won’t be taboo for you to unabashedly say, “What exactly is in it for me?” or “Prove your love, my dear,” or “Gimmeee what I want.” If someone makes a big promise, you shouldn’t be shy about asking, “Will you put that in writing?” If you get a sudden urge to snag the biggest piece of the pie, obey that urge.

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CONTACT US NOW TO PLACE YOUR RECRUITMENT ADS 801-413-0947 or JSMITH@CITYWEEKLY.NET For more Employment Opportunities, go online to www.utahjobcenter.com

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Poets Corner

Halloween

Scary costumes, very rare. Nonexistent. Just aren’t there. Creative mix of clever... lame. Door to door to door the same. Open up, open wide. My sick and twisted darker side. Have some candy. Guess which one. A precious thing. becomes undone. And coverage of the Trump on news, Is shadowed by October blues.

Ken Corbett Send your poem (max 15 lines), to: Poet’s Corner, City Weekly, 248 South Main Street, SLC, UT 84101 or e-mail to poetscorner@cityweekly.net.

Published entrants receive a $15 value gift from CW. Each entry must include name and mailing address.

#cwpoetscorner

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My wife and I are Burners of 10-plus years. We love the annual big, dusty dance in the Northen Nevada desert for so many reasons—the art, the environment, our friends in camp, new friends and burning the man. We are also Guardians of the Temple. This past year, we worked nine straight days in this special place on the Playa. We hold space for the structure, the builders, volunteers and our fellow Burners, and watch over the spiritual home of our desert tribe so that the Temple isn’t damaged before it’s burned. We also help participants on their journeys, accepting and placing ashes and memorials while giving out a million hugs. Death and grieving are not anything most folks think about when they talk up Burning Man. Now fast-forward to Halloween—a time when many ancient and modern peoples believe the veil between life and death to be thin and fragile, and feel they can almost touch death and talk to those who’ve passed. That’s the basis for the ever-sopopular Día de los Muertos celebrations: Getting close and personal with the Grim Reaper and those beyond the grave. It just so happens that our friend Jorge Fierro is inviting all of us to come to a special alter he’s setting up on Nov. 5 to honor the dead in a more traditional way. We’re encouraged to bring photos of our own dearly departed to place on the alter during the party. You might know of Fierro. He owns Frida’s Bistro and Rico’s foods at 545 W. 700 South in Salt Lake City. This is the 14th year he’s thrown a muertos party for new and current friends. The event features a variety of festive food, live music, games and activities for kids like face painting, and Mexican art for sale. “Calavera, Calabaza y Comida!” takes place Saturday, Nov. 5, from 6-11 p.m. Admission is a small donation. Email info@ricobrand.com for more info. Proceeds go toward a charitable group called Race Swami to support a swim team made up of about 150 west side kids. In his free time, Fierro serves on the team’s board of directors. If you go to TeamUnif y.com, you can find out how to become a Swami. It’s a close-knit community of kids and adults based in Rose Park and Glendale, with kids welcome from virtually any west side neighborhood. Their goal is to empower youth to be champions in and out of the water. n

Content is prepared expressly for Community and is not endorsed by City Weekly staff.

Babs De Lay

Broker/Owner 801-201-8824 babs@urbanutah.com www.urbanutah.com

Selling homes for 32 years in the Land of Zion

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City Weekly Oct 20, 2016  

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