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CWCONTENTS COVER STORY BOO-HIVE STATE OF MIND

It dices! It slices! It secretly wants to kill you! It’s our annual Halloween issue. Cover illustration by Nicholas McPherson

15 4 LETTERS 6 OPINION 8 NEWS 25 A&E 32 DINE 39 CINEMA 42 TRUE TV 43 MUSIC 58 COMMUNITY

CONTRIBUTOR ZAC SMITH

Cover story, p. 16 “Since seeing a ghostthemed episode of Unsolved Mysteries, when I was probably 3 years old, I’ve had an interest in the occult,” Smith says of his ghostly obsession. “Researching this piece was a lot like re-watching that episode: familiar, intriguing and a bit frightening.”

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SOAP BOX

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Best of ut ah ballot

COMMENTS@CITYWEEKLY.NET @SLCWEEKLY

E E K LY

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BE R 29 , 20 16 | V O L. 33 N 0

@SLCWEEKLY 32

Cover Story, Sept. 29 ,“Trans in Utah” Thank you.

KED KIRKHAM

being a girl! I Love all you clean souls. God bless you all, and thank you from the bottom of my heart!

ELAINE TRUJILLO

Via CityWeekly.net

Via CityWeekly.net

Great article! Well done.

Five Spot, Sept. 29 “The ‘Burger King’ John Gutz”

DOMINIQUE STORNI Via CityWeekly.net

Thanks for your boldness @CityWeekly

I know a guy who drank water every day for 47 years.

ROBERT HYRUM HIRSCHI

@TYLERINACOMA

Via Facebook

Via Twitter

Opinion, Sept. 29, “Blaine Preserve”

Chris Lee, you’re amazing. Keep up your visions. As a child growing up on the west side, I would always find projects to clean up as you did. I would form a group of children, and before they knew what hit them, we were cleaning up areas near the Jordan River walkway before it was even thought of to be that. As I grew and purchased different properties, I envisioned the real need for cleanliness and my community efforts to clean my surrounding areas, for reasons like having others take notice to the beautification and believing we as citizens can’t expect the city to do it all. Down the road I worked on one of my buildings to create Juliano’s Coffee House & Deli. That was 20 years ago. I envisioned it and made it happen; that was across the street from the baseball park, the ending era of Derks Field. Sadly I had to move on. I moved to Ogden Canyon. I would walk to the canyons every day no matter what weather, [pick up] garbage, then lounge in the hot tub. I just learned recently they closed it; I heard it was for repairs, but it was really a way to stop the pure simple joy. Anyway, I am still working on the old adage “cleanliness is next to godliness.” My name is Elaine Trujillo; this is my town, my neighborhood, and I’m back. So if you see a strange girl picking up garbage, it’s me. I sing to myself “The Boys are Back in Town” ’cause I do a man’s job, but enjoy

Meet the newest patient on Lipitor.

@VIRGILGLASS Via Twitter

I was thinking the same thing. Check that man’s cholesterol.

@KIDMAN_JESSICA

I cannot also argue about the good choice of cast (Anthony Hopkins and Goran Visnjic). I personally am a fan of both Hopkins and Visnjic, so this is a big plus in my book. The productions also seem solid, as these series do not feel mass-produced upon watching the trailers, but only time can tell this. IMO Luke Cake is like reaching the end of a barrel that was filled with Daredevil and Jessica Jones already. But, hey, this might FOR M ANY, L IVING also surprise me. A LIFE TRUE T O THE I have no comment BY CAR OLYN C MSELVES IS AMPBE A DAIL about Conviction and LL Y STRU GGLE. No Tomorrow.

TRANS IN UTA

H

EMMA DREW

Via Twitter

Via CityWeekly.net

Drink, Sept. 29 “Utah Wine Economics 101”

… Why is 3.2 beer so damn expensive? And Tequila? Vodka is the only thing cheap.

@VIRGILGLASS

And then there are people that can’t afford to help their own pets. Like, I would really like to fix my cat’s broken leg.

Movie review, Sept. 29 Deepwater Horizon

DONNA K. BRADSHAW

So is it a drama or an apologist cheerfest for poor, misunderstood BP?

Via Twitter

@JOHNMERRICK7

My fave restaurant when I used to live in Dallas charged $2.50 per-person corkage fee, which I found very reasonable. There is no shortage of competition for wines in Dallas.

Raise your hand if you’re tired of these played-out Mark Wahlberg movies.

Via Twitter

AZIM MIZA

Via CityWeekly.net

NATE SORENSEN

We pay more for liquor than most because the state is greedy.

TRAVIS RIX

Via Facebook

Blog, Sept. 30, “Animal Testing Death at U Sparks Federal Warning”

True TV, Sept. 29, “Power, Man”

I am completely sold for Westworld and Timeless. Both draw their main inspirations from science-fiction topics that are completely interesting to me.

Via Facebook

Let’s put you in a freezer then warm you up with a blowtorch and see how you like it.

CHELC DIZZLE Via Facebook

Blog, Sept. 30, “‘I Hope They Can Forgive Me’: Senate hopeful Jason Christensen on the viral response to his anti-LGBTQ comments”

Utah has such a high youth suicide rate. With men like this I can’t imagine why.

Via Facebook Just got back from watching it. I liked it.

SCOTT FRANDSEN

Via Facebook

ANNA BUHNAHNAH Via Facebook

There are two issues here: what he believes and what he said. He believed what he was saying so you can’t claim “foot-in-mouth disease.” He should not have expressed his hurtful views on that post. The larger issue is that he wants to become a part of the state leadership and create laws. His views are archaic, homophobic and extreme.

CHRIS RICHARDS Via Facebook

STAFF Publisher JOHN SALTAS Editorial

Editor ENRIQUE LIMÓN Arts &Entertainment Editor SCOTT RENSHAW Music Editor RANDY HARWARD Senior Staff Writer STEPHEN DARK Staff Writers COLBY FRAZIER, DYLAN WOOLF HARRIS Copy Editor ANDREA HARVEY Proofers SARAH ARNOFF, LANCE GUDMUNDSEN

Dining Listings Coordinator MIKEY SALTAS Editorial Interns HILLARY REILLY, RHETT WILKINSON Contributors CECIL ADAMS, KATHARINE BIELE, MISSY BIRD, ROB BREZSNY, BABS DE LAY, DARBY DOYLE, BILL FROST, MARYANN JOHANSON, BILL KOPP, JOHN KUSHMA, KATHERINE PIOLI, DAVID RIEDEL, TED SCHEFFLER, CHUCK SHEPHERD, ZAC SMITH, ERIC D. SNIDER, ALEX SPRINGER, BRIAN STAKER, LEE ZIMMERMAN

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Art Director DEREK CARLISLE Graphic Artists CAIT LEE, SUMMER MONTGOMERY, JOSH SCHEUERMAN

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OPINION

Trick-or-Treat Election

The 2016 presidential race will forever be known as the “Trick-or-Treat Election.” The trick is on us, and the treat goes to whichever candidate tricks us into electing them president of the United States. It almost seems that we are at the end of the road here in America; the end of an era. Or at least, at a fork in the road. Our government system of checks and balances has worn down like an old brake drumlining and we are rolling forward, downhill, out of control without any brakes. How is it that our system has produced two such despicable frontrunner candidates like Hillary Clinton and, especially, Donald Trump—both voted the most unfavorable, disliked, mistrusted, incompetent, corrupt individuals to ever stand behind a podium in public, and in front of the American flag? Honestly, this is about us, not them. They are who they are and who they will always be: Halloween monsters and goblins hiding behind their masks of gold and the flags of our fathers. I mean, really, how much of this can we put up with? The system dishes it out, big media feeds it to us, we choke it down and we’re loving every second. We seem to be mixing our insatiable appetite for entertainment with the serious business of running the country. It’s scary. This has all become an international joke, and the joke’s on us. Trick or treat! In a joint poll by The Washington Post and SurveyMonkey published last month, Trump led in the Beehive State with 34 percent over Clinton’s 27, but that could change given Trump’s latest “locker room banter.” Mark Button, political science department chair at the University of Utah, notes an “aggregate measure of Republican

STAFF BOX

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BY JOHN KUSHMA

dissatisfaction” regarding Trump. He continues, “While it is suddenly conceivable to think that the belated Republican abandonment of Trump might produce a narrow electoral victory for Hillary Clinton ... I hope that Utah’s importance in this presidential election cycle will extend beyond election day by helping a once proud and dignified Republican party find its lost moral center of gravity.” See Trump is right about “law and order” in America and perhaps our over-the-top desire for political correctness. He’s right about our crumbling infrastructure and lucrative government contracts that feed both the politicians and big business. He is correct about certain immigration issues and all the other problems in our country he points out. I don’t care that he talks off the top of his head; he is expressing real emotions and concerns. If you listen between the lines, he has something to say. The only problem is that he is a thinskinned 6-year-old in grown-up clothing, and spends as much time on business as he does on sex, lies and hateful tweets—maybe more. This is not good. I don’t care how right he is about some of the problems in our country; I don’t trust that he’ll be consistent and focused enough on correcting them. Hillary is correct in her righteous mantra of caring for people. The social issues of poverty, unemployment, opportunity and immigration are all evident and understandable. The next president must be sensitive to these problems and must act in the tradition of American empathy to address these topics with intelligence, sympathy and fairness. But I can see and understand these issues for myself; I don’t need someone continually reiterating these observations

and making a living off talking about it; I expect a president to actually do something about it. Clinton’s experience in public office has hurt her more than helped her. I don’t see that she has really accomplished much. She appears to be on the government payroll for life, and that’s easy street. It’s easy to fake it on easy street, and on Wall Street as well. Just keep talking, smiling and chalking up those air miles. Bill is an issue, even though it’s his wife running. The Clinton Foundation is a problem. Benghazi is a problem. The emails are a problem. They all point to arrogance, privilege, bad judgement and dishonesty. Trick or treat! Here’s the real trick: It’s all constitutional, legal and politically correct. It’s sponsored by corporate America, promoted by the media and sanctioned by the government. So, where do we go from here? Do we take the road less traveled, or go down the same old path? Three weeks from now, we have an election decision to make as a country—our free country—and no one is happy with the choices. A tie is not a decision; it’s a cancellation. But is it truly a tie if 50 percent of the population isn’t voting? No. So, the key is for all Americans to get out and vote. It’s your only chance. It has to be done with decisive action on your part. Even if you write in a candidate, your vote says something and counts toward the ultimate winner. It will be the undecided and the apathetic who will turn the vote and influence the outcome. It’s the only way we can beat the system at its own game. Trick or treat! CW

THEY ARE WHO THEY ARE AND WHO THEY WILL ALWAYS BE: HALLOWEEN MONSTERS AND GOBLINS.

John Kushma is a Logan-based communication consultant. Send feedback to: comments@cityweekly.net

What has been the scariest part of this election cycle? Pete Saltas: The fact that even M. Night Shyamalan couldn’t have written a worse script for how it’s playing out.

Lindsay Larkin: There is rarely a time in politics when you are not choosing between the lesser of two evils. It is absurd that people are using this phrase as if it’s novel to this election. But the scariest part, is that there are people who think Trump is the lesser or that Gary Johnson is any more qualified than the former. Jeremiah Smith: That I am afraid if people in the media say Trump’s name in the media three times in a row, he will appear. Wait that’s one … no one else say anything, K? PLEASE.

Enrique Limón:

Trump’s abhorrent comments about women and Mexicans. Well, that, and his glowing jack-o’lantern hue.

Ivy Watrous: The Purge just so happened to come out with an election movie this year with the slogan “Keep America Great.” That isn’t sketchy at all, right? Trump is like the instigator of the first purge. We are doomed if that loony somehow gets into office. Side note: I plan on stealing a bunch of puppies if that happens, and barricading myself inside Costco. You have to know the secret password to get in.

Scott Renshaw:

Realizing how many Americans don’t actually consider it scary.

Randy Harward: It hasn’t happened yet. I predict that, during a future debate, Trump will tear off Hillary’s face, revealing her reptilian countenance. In turn, she will rip Trump’s comb-over out by its root, revealing a portal to hell. Then, realizing they’re mutually hideous and worthless, they’ll make sweet love. And we’ll elect Drake.

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HITS&MISSES BY KATHARINE BIELE @kathybiele

FIVE SPOT

RANDOM QUESTIONS, SURPRISING ANSWERS

Trust-Falling

This week the local news was all about trust—or lack of it. Blame it on the election, or on a population of conspiracy theorists. The Salt Lake Tribune ran a passel of antitrust news, starting with national forests. Indeed, federal land managers can’t even update a 30-year-old plan without fears of the liberal, environmentalist agenda. In other words, they think the feds are writing a plan to restrict access, designate wilderness and limit grazing. Never mind that things are changing—more ATVs, less coal, more beetles and fewer aspen trees. Then there’s the survey that shows respondents distrust schools and administrators. They think that 25 percent of public school funding goes to administration, when it’s actually less than 10 percent. Finally, there’s the election survey, in which the Trib asked people about angst. The results showed everyone was highly anxious, and again, misinformed. All in all, people need to spend more time with the facts.

School Lunch Programs

So much for the “Don’t eat at your desk” admonition. At Wilson Elementary, it’s encouraged. Utah has long had a school lunch program, and some breakfasts, but the state ranks last in participation in the breakfast programs. Maybe it’s due to the hassle of getting to school so early, or the hassle of signing up. Besides the added physical activity and anti-obesity elements, a 2015 study by Cardiff University showed that kids are twice as likely to have grades that are higher than average if they eat a good breakfast. Now, Deseret News reports, Granite School District and about 70 schools statewide are starting to offer breakfast to classrooms after school has started. It takes the stigma out of sitting alone in the cafeteria and gives everyone a chance to chow down in class. Grants are available, but the Legislature might want to throw in some money for the future brains of the state.

Land Management

Well, the feds aren’t always right, are they? The Bureau of Land Management in 2012 approved a natural gas project on the Green River along the Upper Desolation Canyon. The Gasco Natural Gas Development Project would have allowed 1,300 new oil and gas wells in the region—except that the courts have sent it all back to start over. It was proposed to be a 16-well project, which the Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance noted was heavily criticized by congressional and environmental leaders, as well as the outdoor industry. That’s because some places are just too wild to be drilled. A federal court said the BLM cannot view the environmental impacts of drilling these 16 wells in isolation because the region could be impacted by the drilling of more than 28,000 wells in the next 10 years.

THOMAS AHERN

Open Enrollment is almost over! Give your child a head start in making art.

Classical violinist Gerald Elias is well known in Utah music circles as a performer, conductor and composer. Director of the Vivaldi by Candlelight series, he’s been associate concertmaster of the Utah Symphony, taught at the University of Utah and was a member of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. He’s also a veteran mystery writer. His latest novel, Playing With Fire, was published this month—the fifth in a series of Daniel Jacobus mysteries.

Describe Daniel Jacobus, the novel’s protagonist.

Jacobus is crusty. He’s an old, blind, cantankerous violin teacher who yearns for seclusion. Deep down—way deep down at times—he has a heart of gold and an uncanny Holmesian knack for ferreting out nefarious criminals of the classical music world.

What’s the mystery Jacobus tackles in Playing With Fire?

In the high-stakes world of multi-milliondollar violin dealing, buyers and sellers are occasionally led down the path of temptation. In the novel, a small-time violin repairman goes missing—and his shop is burned to the ground. It’s up to Jacobus and his pals to figure out what happened. Without giving anything away, it ain’t good.

Is Jacobus patterned after anyone you’ve known?

The visual image is based partly upon the late, great violinist and chamber musician Alexander Schneider with whom I worked long ago as an impressionable student. Jacob’s extraordinary ability to live as a blind person is based upon an amazing, dear friend, Myra Ross. His crotchetiness is based upon myself after a student shows up unprepared for a lesson.

How have your earlier mysteries been received?

Though I haven’t made it—yet—to The New York Times best-sellers list, I’ve developed

a dependable following who regularly email me with their comments. Critically, the books have all done well. Devil’s Trill, my first book, was a Barnes & Noble ‘Great New Writers’ selection. Dance Macabre won Book of the Year in Fiction by the Utah Humanities Council.

As a child growing up in New York State, did you dream of being a musician or a writer?

Actually, I dreamed of playing first base on the Yankees, and still do. But when Mr. Steinbrenner didn’t call, I was compelled to bring home the bacon by other means.

You’re a busy performer, director and composer. How do you find time to write novels?

Mainly by cutting back on watching football. Also, I’m no longer a full-time orchestral musician—though I still play annually with the Boston Symphony at their Tanglewood summer music festival.

What’s more tricky: Writing a novel or composing a concerto?

When writing a novel, I have the benefit of working with an editor who keeps me honest. Some composers—Mahler, for instance—wold have benefitted from a good editor. A composer is on his own to make sure every single note is just right. Some of the music I hear these days seems to fly in the face of that comment.

Would you consider making Utah the locale of another yet-to-be written novel?

There have been some scenes in my previous books that take place in Salt Lake City and Antelope Island. Now I’m thinking of a mystery centered around a music festival, which may turn out to be in Utah.

—LANCE GUDMUNDSEN comments@cityweekly.net


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10 | OCTOBER 13, 2016

BY CECIL ADAMS SLUG SIGNORINO

STRAIGHT DOPE Opium Bomb Why haven’t we bombed the poppy fields in Afghanistan, wiping out the world’s largest source of opium and blocking the exportation of heroin that’s killing so many Americans? —Billy from Philly Hearts and minds, Billy, hearts and minds. We can’t just go around unloading death from above on everyone and everything we don’t like. Or at least we shouldn’t. True, our nonlethal attempts over the past 15 years to curb Afghan opium-poppy production—which accounts for about 90 percent of the world’s supply—have come up short. And it’s not like we’ve been stingy with air strikes generally: U.S. forces hit Afghanistan with more than 140 in the first seven months of 2016 alone. But simply obliterating a nation’s most lucrative crop just might cheese off a hard-working farmer or two, and that’s a bad plan when a fundamentalist militia stands ready to hand out Kalashnikovs to the disgruntled and dispossessed. Total war, in fact, helped make Afghanistan the world poppy-growing champ in the first place. Among many dubious accomplishments during their 10-year occupation of the country, Soviet troops tore up orchards, destroyed irrigation systems and generally flattened the Afghan agricultural infrastructure. But farmers gotta farm, so they turned to a hardy plant that doesn’t require much intervention to thrive, and also happens to net its cultivators stacks and stacks of cash. The Cold War ended: Out went the Russkies, and in rushed the Taliban. For a spell, Mullah Omar and his cronies taxed poppy production, but in 2000 they shifted gears and implemented a total ban—less, seemingly, out of Islamic principle (though of course that was the local spin) than as a PR move, to get in good with the U.N. and gain international recognition for Afghanistan’s pariah government. (And just maybe, more conspiracy-minded sorts mused, to tighten the heroin market and drive up prices.) The Taliban is bad at lots of things—teaching little girls to read, for instance—but apparently they were very good at terrifying their constituents into abandoning the drug trade. Afghan poppy cultivation dropped 91 percent; the opium supply worldwide took a 65 percent plummet. Afghanistan had temporarily won its war on drugs. After 9/11, though, Omar stuck by his buddy Osama, and the U.S. swooped in. We basically trampled the Afghan economy in the process, though to be fair the Taliban’s prohibition effort had already brought it to the brink of collapse. The farmers who’d been terrorized out of the drug biz resumed planting poppies, and the U.S. military pretty much ignored them. (Ever reliable, those conspiracy-minded sorts will tell you the “real reason” for the war was that the CIA needed to jump-start the heroin trade.) There was a country to be rebuilt from scratch, after all—oh, and did I mention that the Northern Alliance warlords helping us keep the peace had a little drug hustle going on the side?

It wasn’t till 2006 that the Bush administration tried a no-poppies policy of its own, where we went beyond targeting drug traffickers and processors and got into crop eradication. This was a strictly groundlevel campaign of plowing and burning— not only weren’t we bombing anything, we weren’t even doing as much aerial spraying as we’d have liked. Such self-restraint came at the insistence of Afghan president Hamid Karzai: Spraying from the air would alienate farmers and imperil his government, he argued, though critics noted that many of Karzai’s supporters were cashing in on the opium trade themselves. Meanwhile the U.S. assisted poppy farmers in planting alternative crops like almonds or wheat, but this was a bit like telling a successful American street dealer he should really look into managing an Arby’s instead. The drug trade offered tastier carrots than we did, and the Taliban, whose protection the farmers sought out, wielded bigger sticks. And those Taliban insurgents were now profiting off the opium market themselves. Violence flared up, and expectations were soon adjusted accordingly: “American officials hope that Afghanistan’s drug problem will someday be only as bad as that of Colombia,” The New York Times reported in 2007. Obama ended the Bush crop-eradication plan in ’09. “The poppy farmer is not our enemy,” declared special representative Richard Holbrooke. “The Taliban are.” Economic stability in Afghanistan, the current reasoning goes, is more important than stemming the heroin tide. Counternarcotics efforts have continued, but U.S. soldiers aren’t even allowed to trespass in poppy fields nowadays. Eradication is left to the Afghans, who collect $250 from the U.S. per hectare knocked out—though corruption has led to selective enforcement, with farmers who cozy up to local officials keeping their fields in flower. The U.N. reported a slight dip in Afghan poppy cultivation for 2015, the first downturn in six years. But it sure wasn’t cheap: As of 2014, the U.S. had sunk $7.6 billion into curtailing Afghanistan’s drug trade. I know, I know—that sure could have bought a lot of air strikes, right? With demand showing no signs of going away, the poppies would likely just have been planted again. Afghanistan has enough broken eggs for its omelet already, thank you very much. n

Send questions to Cecil via StraightDope.com or write him c/o Chicago Reader, 350 N. Orleans, Chicago 60654.


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ENRIQUE LIMÓN

NEWS Thanks for Nothing

The tragic details of a young man’s suicide in a Utah prison cell are brought back to life by his grandma’s lawsuit. BY COLBY FRAZIER cfrazier@cityweekly.net @ColbyFrazierLP

T

he send-off for Brock Tucker published on Oct. 3, 2014, in The Salt Lake Tribune told of the 19-yearold’s suicide, the attempt by prison guards to revive the young man and a casual listing of the transgressions that landed him behind bars. Stories like these are commonplace when inmates kill themselves or each other. But in the case of Tucker, who suffered from diminished mental capacity and, as a result, bounced in and out of juvenile facilities and jail since his early teens, the stories that accompanied his death did not venture into the difficult question of exactly how a 19-year-old comes to kill himself in prison. These details, outlined in a 40-page civil suit filed in 3rd District Court on Oct. 3 by Tucker’s grandmother, Janet Crane, are outlined in a string of cold legalese. There is the boy’s near drowning at the age of 2, his mother and father’s subsequent drug addictions, the custody changes, the alleged physical abuse in juvenile detention facilities, the manipulation by street gangs and his eventual introduction to the Utah prison system at age 17, where he was tried and convicted as an adult in connection with a car theft. In sum, says former Salt Lake City Mayor Rocky Anderson, who filed the lawsuit on Crane’s behalf, it’s a snapshot of a ruthless prison system that, around every corner, punished and damaged Tucker until he decided to end his life. “I think it speaks to a society that has rage for punishment; a savage prison system that cares nothing about helping make things any better, and instead, treats people, especially those with mental illnesses, with utter disdain and hatred,” Anderson says of Tucker’s tragic life and death. Crane says that she began raising Tucker at age 4, when state child welfare officials removed the boy from the custody of first his mother, and then his father. As she raised Tucker, she says it became apparent that the boy suffered

Fighting back tears, Brock Tucker’s grandmother, Janet Crane, holds up a memento depicting happier times on Monday, Oct. 10. from developmental issues, which she believes, though does not know for certain, could be linked to the near drowning at age 2. But regardless of what might have caused Tucker’s learning disabilities, an insurmountable fact remained: His IQ was tested time and time again at 70, which went some distance at explaining why the boy couldn’t learn to spell, acted out and was wildly impressionable, succumbing to impulses and the promptings of whomever he happened to be around. The real trouble for Tucker, Crane says, started around age 14, the first time he stole a car. Crane remembers the judge asking Tucker what motivated him. Tucker replied, “Oh, judge, I love driving and I’m really good at it,” Crane recalls. “There was no shame,” Crane says of her grandson. “All of that was beyond him.” The lawsuit names as defendants several individuals who worked or oversaw juvenile detention and rehabilitation facilities. The suit alleges that Tucker, at several of these facilities, was physically beaten by staff. As the system itself took its toll on Tucker, his grandmother says she made a decision, one that is a “horror” she’ll have to live with for the rest of her life. In order to save up money to buy a home, she moved to the Rose Park neighborhood of Salt Lake where, she says, her impressionable grandson fell in with gangs. Gang members, Crane says, easily manipulated Tucker into doing whatever it was they wanted—theft being a common crime. “It might have worked out if Brock

hadn’t been mentally challenged,” she says of the rough neighborhood. Dr. David Nilsson, a clinical neuropsychologist who first evaluated Tucker as a child and maintained contact until his imprisonment, says he isn’t surprised that his patient ended up hanging from his neck in a jail cell. The young man’s plight, Nilsson says, is not unlike that of hundreds of young people he’s treated. The problem for Tucker and those like him, Nilsson says, is that as rules are broken and the criminal justice system responds with a heavy hand, people like Tucker do not respond in the manner that they are supposed to. He says Tucker clearly showed signs of suffering from a neurological brain injury— the kind that leads to mood disorders and overstimulation. The result, Nilsson says, is a person who has a massive handicap when it comes to evaluating appropriate behavior and avoiding dangerous situations. “Brock is without all the things that you and I enjoy to stay out of harm’s way, avoid confrontation, to please teachers, parents, people that we need to please in order to have them help us,” Nilsson says. If Tucker’s behavior caused him problems in the world, it most certainly earned him discipline in prison, where, according to the suit, he spent 154 days of one year in an isolation-like cell as punishment for his behavior. This means, Anderson explains, that Tucker was most likely released for only one hour per every 23-hour period. The boy entered prison without a tattoo on his body, Crane says. His autopsy

photos show that when he died, his body was littered with prison tattoos, many of which earned him stints in isolation cells, according to the lawsuit. A prison spokesman, citing the institution’s policies on not commenting on litigation, declined to answer questions about Tucker’s case. As these punishments stacked up for Tucker, Anderson says his mental condition worsened. “The punishments accumulate and it’s just this incredibly cruel and uncompassionate response to inmates who are in need of treatment,” he says. Compounding Tucker’s problems in prison, Crane says, was that due to disciplinary issues, she and other family members could not visit him as he served his time in the Central Utah Correctional Facility in Gunnison. Crane even says that some of her letters were returned. What Crane hopes to gain from the lawsuit are answers to some lingering questions. First off, she’d like to know more about an alleged argument that Tucker had with a prison guard on the night of his death. If any money is won from the suit, she says it will be spent to buy her grandson a gravestone. And lastly, “I just want answers,” she says, “I want to know what happened.” In addition to ending his life that evening in October, Tucker also left behind a suicide note that reflected sentiments that, if even a fragment of the allegations in the lawsuit are true, were likely from the bottom of his heart. “Send my love to my family and my ex’z!,” Tucker’s note read. “I’m better off gone since I’m already gone! Thanx for nothing!” CW


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@Bill _ Frost

In a week, you can

CHANGE THE WORLD

DISCUSSION ON MEDIA

In “What’s Happening to your News,” news critic, editor and publisher Roger Plothow speaks about who and what you can trust in the digital age today. In other words, how do we fact-check what we’re reading? He also touches on changes that Utah newspapers have been experiencing. A former journalist and Utahn, Plothow is now vice president of the Adams Publishing Group-Rockies and editor and publisher of four Idaho newspapers. Girl Scout Headquarters, 445 E. 4500 South, 801-272-8683, Thursday, Oct. 13, 5:30-8 p.m., free, LW VUtah.org

UTAH MUSIC FUNDRAISER

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CITIZEN REVOLT

The eight scariest Halloween costumes of 2016:

8. “Gary Johnson Voter”

7. “The October Surprise” 6. “Longboarding Baby Boomer” 5. “TED Talk Kanye West” 4. “Goth Jigglypuff” 3. “The Ghost of Bernie Sanders” 2. “Sexy Missionary” 1. “Gary Herbert’s Haunted Hairpiece”

Utah’s own Kate MacLeod is a regional artist whose original violin pieces inspired by local landscapes have received widespread acclaim. Aiming to raise money to take her music a step further, she’s hosting a “Landscape and Utah Music Fundraiser” this weekend. A song of hers was chosen as a theme song for the 20th anniversary of the Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument, and she is now creating music on the Colorado Plateau, which is expected to be released early next year. Garage on Beck, 1199 Beck St., 801580-6449, Sunday, Oct. 16, 6-9 p.m., $10, KateMacLeod.com

ARTIST TALK

He’s not who you’d expect an artist to be. Nathan Florence is both a designer and a surgeon, which you’ll discover at “From Pre-Med to Artist,” as he talks about his exhibition at Southern Utah University. “My definition of what it means to be an artist has expanded from traditional drawing and painting to include community activism and education, and is still expanding,” he says. Southern Utah Museum of Art, 13 S. 300 West, Cedar City, 435-586-5432, Thursday, Oct. 20, 7 p.m., free, Bit.ly/2dktwMr

LECTURE ON INTIMACY

Thomas Moore is coming to Salt Lake City for the Season 8 Opener of the Jung Society of Utah. The former monk, musician, university professor and psychotherapist has turned to lectures on holistic medicine, spirituality, psychotherapy and the arts. Moore is the author of the bestselling book Care of the Soul and 15 other books on deepening spirituality and cultivating soul. And who doesn’t need that? He talks about intimacy and separateness, and suggest that marriage is a sharing of differences. Salt Lake City Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-6568806, Friday, Oct. 21, 7-9 p.m., free, JungUtah.com

—KATHARINE BIELE Send tips to revolt@cityweekly.net

S NEofW the

Frontiers of Science Large kidney stones typically mean eyewatering pain and sudden urinary blockage until the stone “passes” (often requiring expensive sound-wave treatment to break up a large stone). Michigan State University urologist David Wartinger told The Atlantic in September that he had recently happened upon a pain-free—even exciting!—way to pass stones before they become problems: the centripetal force from a roller coaster ride. In a 200-trip experiment preparing for a validating “human” trial, he successfully passed stones in his hand-held, silicone model kidney (using his own urine) about two-thirds of the time when sitting in a rear seat at Disney World’s Big Thunder Mountain Railroad.

BY CHUCK SHEPHERD

Social Security Administration owed her sums that recently reached $100,000, and that she had documents to prove it. However, given her circumstances, most regarded her as just another luckless person confused by homeless life. In June, though, after social worker Julie Turner took a closer look and found, improbably, that Witter was indeed owed $100,000 and even more improbably, that all of her paperwork was carefully organized among the unimpressive possessions she hauled around daily, SSA paid her $999 on the spot, and the remaining balance arrived in August.

WEIRD

Perspective With about 30 states having adopted some form of “stand your ground” defense to assault (or murder) charges, five membership organizations, charging up to $40 a month, have signed up a half-million gun owners concerned that law enforcement treats them fairly should they someday be forced to shoot—providing instructions and a hotline to coach members on what to tell police, plus liability insurance and help getting a lawyer. Critics say such organizations are also useful to those who might be prone to shooting people and want advice on how best to get away with it. The U.S. Concealed Carry Association’s walletsized card, to give to police, asks that the shooter under suspicion be given the same consideration as the officers might give to their own colleagues under suspicion. n In a dozen recently released YouTube videos, Syria’s Tourism Ministry praised the country’s sandy, fun-filled beaches as ideal vacation spots and its many World Heritage Sites as renowned tourist exhibits—attempting to distract world travelers from the country’s daily bloodshed (and the wartime destruction of those priceless historical sites). Before civil war broke out in 2011, Syria was a fashionable, $8 billion-a-year destination, and the now-devastated city of Aleppo was known worldwide for its food.

Awesome! Diego the giant tortoise, believed to be more than 100 years old, now lives in semi-retirement on Santa Cruz Island in the Galapagos, but from 1976-2010, Diego brought an almostextinct species back to life by fathering about 800 babies in the captive breeding program on Española, another of the Galapagos Islands. Biologists did not realize Diego’s prowess until 2010 when DNA tests identified him as the father of 40 percent of all tortoises on the island. Even on Santa Cruz Island, Diego keeps busy, with a “harem” of six females. (Another Galapagos tortoise species did die out in 2012 when the last male, the centenarian Lonesome George, maintained his celibacy until death.) Compelling Explanations The New York City Council, grilling police officials in September about their practice of freely seizing money from detainees under suspicion, asked for a thorough accounting of that money (suspecting that innocent victims rarely get it back unless aided by high-powered lawyers). Though (in “crime-fighting” hyperbole) NYPD routinely boasts of its half-million annual seizures, an NYPD official told the council it would be “impossible” to account for everything—that keeping track of it all would cause its computers to crash. n The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power is bureaucratically at the epicenter of the state’s drought crisis, but in September KCBS-TV aired video of the department actually using sprinklers to water the artificial lawn at a substation in South Los Angeles. A DWP spokesperson said such watering is routine at substations to “clean” the plastic (and wash off any dog urine, for example).

Things You Thought Didn’t Happen Wanda Witter, 80, had been living on Washington, D.C., streets for 10 years, but insisting to anyone who would listen that the

Feel-Good Marketing One branch of the James Harper funeral homes, in Bromley, England, announced its latest promotion via a sign in a front window (reported by the Bromley News Shopper in September): “Wow! Free Child’s Battery Powered Vehicle With Every PrePaid Funeral Arranged This Month.” A Harper spokesperson said the purpose was to encourage residents to think ahead about funerals. n “Considering Cremation?” was the headline of the Aug. 7 advertising supplement to the Tampa Bay Times (and other Florida newspapers), appearing just below a snapshot of a mom, dad and three youngsters frolicking in the grass, seemingly overjoyed. Nothing about cremation appeared except dates and sites of free cremation seminars, sponsored by the National Cremation Society (whose website is thankfully more somber).

Recurring Themes The most recent immigrant family living high on the hog in the U.K. is Arnold Mballe Sube and his wife, Jeanne, both 33, who drew the equivalent of about $130,000 in government benefits last year, but are still feuding with the Luton Borough Council near London over its inability to find (free) housing adequate for them and their eight children. They turned down four- and fivebedroom homes, were housed temporarily in a Hilton hotel, and said they would be satisfied only with a six-bedroom residence. Mr. Sube, from Cameroon, emigrated to France at age 18, then came to England in 2012 to study nursing at the University of Bedfordshire. The Aristocrats! Thomas Morgan, 42, was charged in a May 7 incident at the University of Iowa’s Main Library when, using a men’s room urinal, he turned to reveal to a fellow user that he was “measuring” his penis with a hand-lettered cardboard “ruler.” n Thomas Warren, 49, was arrested in September near the Iowa City home that he, naked, had allegedly trespassed into minutes before. He was discovered passed out in the grass, though his clothes, car keys and driver’s license had been left on the doorstep (along with telltale evidence that he had used the doorstep as a toilet). Alcohol and a controlled substance were involved, said police.

The Passing Parade A woman was arrested on Sept. 7 at the Italian Pizza Kitchen restaurant in Washington, D.C. She was chatting up a police officer she did not know, then playfully took a french fry from his plate. He asked her to stop, but she took another, and when the exasperated officer issued an ultimatum, she took yet another. The arrest report for second-degree theft, cited by WUSA-TV, included “property stolen” as “three french-fried potato[es].” n At the 7-mile mark of the Allentown, Pa., marathon on Sept. 11, more than 100 runners were blocked off by an unanticipated, slow-moving train—causing the athletes one of their best chances to qualify for the gold-standard Boston Marathon (by posting fast times at Allentown). The train lingered for 10 minutes, though some runners climbed over couplings and continued on.

Thanks this week to Neb Rodgers, Teri Darcy and the News of the Weird Board of Editorial Advisors.


G

Issue

OCTOBER 13, 2016 | 15

—Enrique Limón

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sourced playlist (p. 24) that is sure to be a graveyard smash. We also tip our pointed hat to the star of many a 1980s nightmare, Don Shanks (p. 18), who gave new life to one of the classics of slasher cinema, Michael Myers. Speaking of movies, Camp Crystal Lake is open for business as we count down the Top 10 guaranteed to get you and your beau in the Netflix & Kill mood (p. 23). Need to take the edge off? Our list of spooky cocktails (p. 22) is sure to do the trick. So treat yourself to this special issue, avoid a creepy clown costume (unless you’re feeling super daring) and remember the All Hallows’ Eve golden rule: Only true monsters hand out candy corn.

ut-wrenching screeches, maniacal cackles, death stares, bloody back-stabbings and orange-colored goblins. Yes, this election cycle has been the stuff of true nightmares. Now more than ever, it seems, we need scares of the fictitious kind, and that’s where we come in. If Halloween is eerily magical across the country, the holiday is surely amplified in Utah. Salt Lake City and its environs light up in October, when house parties abound, local costume shops thrive and a slew of haunted house attractions dawn anew. Inside these blood-drenched pages (j/k, that’s just some strawberry Fanta I was sipping on during deadline), you’ll find a primer on undead SLC (p. 16), a conversation with a local who earlier this year received the Haunted Attraction Association’s lifetime achievement award (p. 20) and a locally

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Halloween

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the


By Zac Smith

There are two kinds of vampires: energy vampires and blood vampires. Energy vampires can, simply by laying their hands on a willing vessel, drink energy or life-force, making themselves stronger and the vessel weaker. Much the same happens with blood vampires, except they actually drink the blood. (Blood-borne illnesses, anyone?) According to VampireWebsite.net (highly original name) there are vampires among us, here in Salt Lake City, and they prefer virgin blood. If you are feeling daring or are just sick of lugging around all those heavy platelets, head over to Area 51’s Sanctuary room, where the goth ki—I mean, vampires, gather. Bella Swan, your Edward is calling. Area 51, 451 S. 400 West, Salt Lake City, Wednesday-Saturday, 9 p.m.-2 a.m., 18+, $7, Area51SLC.com.

Silly Teddy

Hey, remember that time an infamous serial killer prowled the streets of Salt Lake City wantonly killing, hiking and—uh—fondling? No, me neither; the ’70s were a long

time ago. But isn’t the internet a joy? With modern technology we can learn all there is to know about Ted Bundy’s short stint in Utah. Accepted to the University of Utah’s law program in 1974, Bundy left his home in Washington and relocated to SLC. Many believe that he lived in a small shack less than a mile up Emigration Canyon, and though the shack has since been demolished, the cellar remains—and some say that screams of his victims can be heard inside. The cellar story is romantic, for lack of a better word, but Bundy actually rented a room in the second story of an Avenues home—though, it’s likely that a few decapitated heads lined his dresser top there. Bundy was arrested in West Valley in August of ’75 for aggravated kidnapping and attempted criminal assault, but later released. He is known to have abducted and killed a girl from Viewmont High School, along with a girl from BYU. One of his victims was later found frozen in Provo Canyon. Bundy’s Cellar, 115 Burr’s Lane, Emigration Canyon, private property, closed to the public. Avenues home, 565 First Ave., Salt Lake City, private property, closed to the public. PHOTO ILLUSTRATION

On the east side of the Salt Lake City Cemetery, you’ll find two graves of considerable fame. The first, an obelisk of cement with an urn sealed inside, belongs to a Mr. Jacob E.

Vampire Lip Service

VIDOR

Dead and Famous

Moritz (1849-1910) or Emo for short. The story, as urban legend handed it to me, is that Emo was a lonely child who stumbled upon a book of black magic and signed his soul to the devil—cool, right? Shortly thereafter he was destined to burn at the stake for his crimes. In reality, Moritz was a German immigrant who came to Utah and became a successful brewer, entrepreneur and politician, with no known dark ties. To meet his spirit, walk around his grave repeating “Emo,” then look at the steel plate for a pleasant surprise. The second grave belongs to Lilly E. Gray (June 6, 1881-Nov. 14, 1958). Her headstone lies flat on the ground and is fairly nondescript, aside from the inscription, “Victim of the Beast 666.” Some say ol’ Lilly was working in her house, minding her own business, when the Devil popped up out of the ground and dragged her straight to hell—I mean, it’s probably not the worst way to go. Others, like historian Richelle Hawks, suggest that Lilly’s husband, Elmer L. Gray, was something of an asshole, and might have put that message there as a prank. Either way, if you visit her grave, it’s customary to leave a small trinket as a sign of solidarity for her pain in the here and hereafter. Salt Lake City Cemetery, 200 N. E St., Salt Lake City, Monday-Sunday, 8 a.m.-dusk, free.

VINCE CORAN

’ve seen some things—spooky things. I’ve walked 400 South and 400 West late at night. I’ve met the ghost of Joe Hill in the pale moonlight. Hell, I’ve even babysat 13 Mormon kids all at once. In a place like Utah, where things are pretty mundane even during the most riotous times, October stands out like Heavenly Father’s illegitimate child. As the winds start to cool and the leaves begin to change, various haunted attractions ascend from the depths, promising adrenaline rushes and a drained wallet. I have nothing against the valley’s various haunted house attractions (see p. 21 for a guide to those), but this year I’m after a real, lingering fear. I’m going out into the night, the woods; I’m looking for werewolves, witches, demons. Who’s with me? Behold this curated selection of mostly free (and barely legal) spook-spots—history lessons included, free of charge. Now, I’m not your mother, but be mindful of trespassing, curfews, and maybe bring some mace. Happy hauntings!

UTAH HISTORICAL SOCIETY

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The definitive guide to haunted SLC.

16 | OCTOBER 13, 2016

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I

Beehive Boo

Jacob E. Moritz

Area 51

Rooming house at 565 First Ave.

Memory Grove


Is the Witch in?

You’ll be glad to know that Salt Lake City is the most werewolf-friendly city in the United States—and to all my werewolf friends, I’m sorry, you’ve been outed. According to Christina Lavingia, in her article titled “The Definitive List of Werewolf-Friendly Cities,” SLC is the perfect place for werewolves to live for four reasons: First, it’s dog-friendly, with plenty of dog parks and trails; second, there are a low number of gun retailers and manufacturers, with only 0.5 per 10,000 people; third, the low presence of silver and silver production (silver bullets, you understand); and fourth, with a population density of 1,691.7 people per square-mile, a werewolf could navigate the landscape in near anonymity. This might go to explain, by extension, some Ute and Navajo stories of “Skinwalkers,” shape shifting creatures that are impervious to bullets, appearing as large wolves near Ballard, Utah. I see the bad moon arising. Sherman Ranch (Skinwalker Ranch), southeast of Ballard, private property, closed to the public. CW

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Memory Grove Park is a weird place, right? There is a meditation temple that’s never open, several war memorials scattered around, a wedding reception center, an altar to sacrifice the young and a crumbling cobblestone foundation commonly referred to as the Witches House or Witches Cabin. Before coming to the Witches House, one walks right by a stone altar sitting atop a set of grandiose stairs. There are no chairs or reasonably heighted benches surrounding the slab, so one can be sure it isn’t used for picnics—and with blood-colored markings on the top, I certainly wonder. A plaque next to the altar provides little insight, reading, “In memory of Captain James B. Austin, killed in action in Argonne Forest, Oct. 9, 1918, in the World War.” The Witches House, just a bit farther down the trail, isn’t covered in blood—thank God! There is no record of a witch actually occupying the space, and if she had, no doubt someone would have gotten rid of her Mountain Meadows Massacre-style. Visitors often report seeing disembodied lights and hearing voices near the house. Some see shadow figures, like brothers Skye and Kaden Garcia, recent visitors to the Witches House. “It rose out of the darkness, from the foundation, a tall silhouetted figure,” Kaden, a 16-year-old Roy resident, says. “I’ve never been so scared in my life,” older brother Skye, 18, adds. “We ran all the way back to the car.” Memory Grove Park, 375 N. Canyon Road, Salt Lake City, Sunday-Saturday, sunrisesunset, free.

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18 | OCTOBER 13, 2016

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Trick or Treat ... or Die Actor/stuntman Don Shanks, aka Michael Myers, revisits the set of Halloween 5.

ichael Myers! I know you!,” exclaims one of three little blond girls who’d wondered what the two strangers—packing masks, a machete and a flashlight—are doing taking pictures of their Avenues home. Don Shanks, the actor/stuntman who portrayed the glacial, stabby villain in Halloween 5: The Revenge of Michael Myers (1989), is gracious, not bothering to correct the girl. She and her sisters know a movie was filmed here, but they’ve never seen it. Their mother, despite having been an extra in the film, won’t allow it (yet). When the girls scamper away, Shanks and I adjourn to his pickup truck, parked at the home’s western curb. Around 16 years ago, as a cub reporter, I interviewed Shanks in the parking lot of a mortgage company. As a childhood fan of the Grizzly Adams films and television series, I was elated to meet the man who played Adams’ Crow friend, Nakoma. It was even cooler to hear Shanks, of Cherokee and Illini descent, talk about his adventures with wild animals on Grizzly. He told me the secret to catching rattlesnakes with your bare hands, and how to catch and put an alligator to sleep. I haven’t tried these things (yet), but I feel confident that Shanks’ tips are on the money (maybe that’s how I’ll die). Again, the stories flow; like the time, while working on Grizzly Adams, he was asked to help on another production. The scene involved being attacked by a cougar, then falling, with the cougar, into a lake. “When I surfaced, the cougar wanted to fight,” he recalls. Thrice he retreated underwater, trying to elude the big cat. Finally, gasping for air, Shanks decided to give him a fight. But “the cougar threw its arms around me and started purring; he just wanted someone to help him.” Things didn’t go as smoothly when Shanks, for the first Adams film, had to wrestle a bear—despite having no

By Randy Harward experience. Winging it, and thinking it was going well, he heard the bear’s trainer yell something: “You stupid sonofabitch, get out of there! It’s trying to kill you!” Stunts—performing and coordinating—have been Shanks’ bread-and-butter gig for 44 years, even since he studied theater at Weber State University. “Denny Arnold, the stunt coordinator on Grizzly Adams, told me, ‘You’ll make more money doing stunts than acting.’” So Shanks—who has experience with stage combat, including real weapons, and dance training from working with Ballet West—gave it a go. He grew up on a farm, so animal wrangling came naturally. “I used to take down steers,” he reminisces. In fact, while filming the made-for-TV movie Last of the Mohicans (1977), director James L. Conway told him that his method of distracting the serpent with one hand, dodging a strike, then snatching it with the other, “looked fake.” Conway asked him to pin its head with a stick. “That’s not good for the snake,” Shanks responded, but he carefully did as he was told. When Halloween 5 came along, he was hired as a stuntman. When he arrived on set, however, stunt coordinator Don Pike asked if Shanks would be OK meeting with the director, Dominique Othenin-Girard. Curious, Shanks asked what was up. “He said, ‘Well, we’re thinking of having you play Michael Myers.’” As an impromptu audition, Girard asked Shanks to “walk as though you are wood moving through water.” He did his best, and got the job. Since Myers takes so many falls and hits, it “was considered a stunt role,” Shanks says. Besides, the character—and the mask—offered little opportunity to convey emotion. So he relied on his combat and dance training, and the wood/water instruction, to make Michael a believable evil. It was difficult at times, he says, because of how the shots were blocked and framed. “Sometimes it was like trying to kill someone in a telephone booth.”

The Halloween series now encompasses eight films and Rob Zombie’s two remakes. “I like his work,” Shanks says, mentioning The Devil’s Rejects in particular, “but I don’t care for his Halloween films. He tries to explain too much.” Shanks enjoys being part of an exclusive club of actors and stuntmen who’ve portrayed Michael, and although he’s forbidden to wear it in public, he got to keep the original mask from the film, along with the prototypes. He often attends fan conventions like Salt Lake Comic Con FanXperience and the Flashback Weekend Chicago, where he shares stories about the film and chats with fans. He also talks shop with his fellow Michaels: “We give each other tips on performing stunts.” Does he bring up the snakes, cougars and bears? “Yeah, but they don’t believe me.” Someone is creeping up on the truck. Shanks looks over his shoulder, and the creeper gasps. “It is Michael Myers!” It’s the girls’ mother—the erstwhile Halloween 5 extra. Shanks greets her warmly and she attempts to politely excuse herself and leave us to our business. I offer to take a photo of her with Shanks, so we do. Behind them, one of the girls asks, “Can I have your autograph?” “Do you have something for me to sign?” Shanks asks. The girl shakes her head and runs back inside, returning several minutes later with a paper plate. I wonder if he’ll write the same thing he wrote for me all those years ago: “To Randy, Trick or treat … or die!” He leaves that part out—on this as well as the notebooks and scraps of paper her sisters bring out afterward. Gotta keep it age-appropriate, you know? Originally, he was “kind of apprehensive” about signing autographs for youngsters. “Kids really shouldn’t be watching,” he says of the Halloween films. “But Michael’s the kind of character everybody knows, and they’re waiting until they’re old enough to see it. So it’s flattering.” CW


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OCTOBER 13, 2016 | 19


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By Alex Springer

Legendary producer Cydney Neil conjures the ghosts of Utah’s most memorable haunt.

n the early 2000s, I was a huge fan of Salt Lake City’s haunted house scene, but there was something undeniably classy about Rocky Point that set it apart from the rest. It was a sophisticated tapestry of small details—every tombstone seemed to have been crafted and painted with meticulous care, and every maniac that leapt out of the attraction’s collection of dark corners told some kind of tragically beautiful story. I knew that if I really wanted to impress a date during the Halloween season, I’d take her here. It was a strategy that totally paid off, by the way; Rocky Point was where my wife and I went on our first date. It didn’t really occur to me how much I’d missed it until I had the chance to sit down with Cydney Neil, the self-styled “Queen of Haunts” who was the beating heart behind the attraction for more than two decades, right up to its 2007 closure. Seeing her for the first time, I’m a bit intimidated by how effortlessly stunning she is—sporting platinum blond hair, black nail polish and a sleeveless Rocky Point T-shirt. After geeking out about some past memories, our conversation inevitably leads me to ask why she decided to close such a successful and revolutionary business. She considers the question, but it doesn’t take her long to answer. “From the beginning it was about serving a mission, and that mission played out inside a haunted house,” she says, “but I knew there would be a time when I would have to burn the house down.” It’s an ironic choice of words, considering the fact that the award-winning attraction originated from a fire that gutted an Ogden restaurant Neil’s father owned back in 1968. It was her brother who first had the idea of creating a haunted attraction, and, in 1979, he converted the building’s remains into a fledgling spook alley. In 1986, when she returned home after living in Arizona, she was shocked to see that the restaurant was now a haunted house being run by a local acting group called The Maniacs. Initially, she wasn’t happy with the turn of events. Her career as a model and fashion designer attracted her to the beautiful things of the world, and she had never expressed interest in anything that could be construed as horror. “I didn’t really want to do a haunted house,” Neil says with an exasperated

chuckle, “but I fully engaged in the mission until it was clearly, painfully complete.” Over time, she came to see the experience it as a blessing in disguise, citing it as a positive experience that brought a lot of good into the world. “There was a spirit about it because it had a purpose,” she says. For the next 20 years, Neil shaped Rocky Point into a much-lauded attraction that made waves on a national level. At the height of its popularity, people came from all over the country to be terrified and thrilled by the horrific landscapes and characters that populated the site. “We really pioneered this creative, purpose-driven business,” she says. “Not only was it this amazing place to go and see, but there was this heart to it.” In addition to becoming one of the most innovative haunted houses in the state, Rocky Point also established itself as philanthropic resource. Throughout its years of operation, Neil partnered up with charities like the Utah Special Olympics and the Boys and Girls Club. The decision to finally close the business didn’t come easily. Neil had attracted and inspired a loyal and hardworking crew that found a much-needed sanctuary within the walls of Rocky Point. “I wasn’t training kids to work in a haunted house,” she says. “I was training them to live their lives, fulfill their dreams and to create something that could give back, and so many of them have done that.” Over the past 10 years, Neil’s path has continued to intersect with the world of haunted attractions. After completing some work with a Hong Kong-based amusement park called Ocean Park, Disneyland Hong Kong contacted Neil to design and build a Haunted Main Street attraction for them. “I was the only woman outside of Disney Imagineering to design and build an attraction for Disneyland,” she says proudly. Upon finishing her work with Disney, she received national recognition from the Haunted Attraction Association (HAA), which presented her with a lifetime achievement award in March of this year. Away from the ghouls and goblins (at least temporarily), her current focus is a memoir titled No More Fear that chronicles her tenure as Rocky Point’s owner and operator, as well as a follow-up documentary to 2005’s 25 Years of Fear.

ALL PICTURES COURTESY CYDNEY NEIL

20 | OCTOBER 13, 2016

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I

Burning Down the House


320 W. 1300 South, Salt Lake City, 801-467-8100, NightmareOn13th.com Heading into its 26th year of operation in a 36,000-square-foot warehouse, Nightmare on 13th is known for being one of the longestlasting and biggest haunted attractions in the state. Employing an army of animatronic robots and live actors (or are they?) this year’s theme, “Phantasms,” celebrates all things ghostly. Who you gonna call? Your heart doctor, probably.

Haunted Forest

100 W. 6400 North, American Fork, 801-903-3039, HauntedUtah.com Leave your cutesy Hansel and Gretel expectations at the door. The Haunted Forest revolves around the tales of the haunting of a woman named Annie, betrothed to a man who died in an American Fork mine in 1913. The forest is made up of 5 acres of forest, dungeons, swamps and Annie’s old home, where she can be heard shrieking in grief for her lost love.

Asylum 49

Fear Factory

Strangling Brothers Utah Haunted Circus

Frightmares

Haunted Hollow

1550 S. 1900 West, Ogden, 801-603-2231, HauntedUtah.com Dubbed “the mother of all terrors” and owned by Tombstone Entertainment, which also oversees the Haunted Forest, Haunted Hollow is nearly three times bigger than its sister attraction. Explore—get this—13 acres of cursed trees, and beware of the monsters, ghouls and ghosts hiding in the crevices. Bring an extra set of underpants.

P.J. SNELLING

—Mikey Saltas

OCTOBER 13, 2016 | 21

7980 S. State, Midvale, 385-216-8915, CastleOfChaos.com The Castle has gone through a series of renovations in preparation for the 2016 scare season, including a “Chaos Escape Room,” where people are placed in rooms and must collect clues in order to escape the area before the “collector” returns to finish everyone off. And that’s just one of the areas in this year’s iteration. Check out the “Four Levels of Fear” … if you dare.

375 Lagoon Drive, Farmington, 801-451-8000, LagoonPark.com Worried that the little ones will get too scared in a regular haunted house, or that you’ll be bored at a child-oriented attraction? Lagoon Amusement Park understands the struggle and provides child-friendly mazes and walk-throughs as well as the lessrestrained Devil’s Nightwalk and the jailinspired Zombie Lockdown. Unlike the Utah Department of Corrections, the lockdown is sincere in offering the following warning on its website: “Once you enter this prison, you may never leave the same.”

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Castle of Chaos

632 E. 1500 South, American Fork, 801-850-8060, StranglingBrothers.com Every fall, the nationally acclaimed Strangling Brothers circus rolls into town, bringing with it frightening clowns—don’t shoot! Along with the Haunted Circus, there’s also the Zombie Hunt, where patrons can gear up and fight the army of the dead with glow-in-the-dark paintballs and paint guns.

666 W. 800 South, Salt Lake City, 801-692-3327, FearFactorySLC.com Fear resides in this 100-year-old abandoned cement factory turned haunted-house. Along with the expected thrills, there are extreme attractions such as a free-fall and zipline (as if the factory wasn’t scary enough). Actors here even recite scripts from a satanic bible—fitting for the eery building, whose street number is 666.

140 E. 200 South, Tooele, 435-224-6283, Asylum49.com Back in the ’70s, Provo-based Utah State Hospital debuted “spook alley,” an area of the mental-care facility that was set up by actual patients and billed as an attraction. Political correctness did away with the all-too-real experience, and Asylum 49 picks up where the institution left off. A “Things to Know” disclaimer warns that you might be touched, grabbed, separated from your group and even strapped to a metal bed.

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Cydney Neil

Nightmare on 13th

From forrest ghouls, to prison zombies and escaped mental patients, these area haunted houses offer beastly bang for your buck. Strangling Brothers

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Despite the fond memories that Rocky Point evokes, Neil looks back on her days in the haunted house industry with mixed feelings. “The industry did what I expected it to do; it’s gotten massive all over the world,” she says. “I’m very happy not to be involved with the industry; it’s gotten quite gory, and it wasn’t something I wanted to spend my life doing.” Ever the trailblazer, Neil’s efforts also addressed a scary issue felt across industries year-round: gender bias. “We were doing theme park numbers before the industry got started,” she points out, “and the group of boys didn’t want to see some woman be more successful than they were.” Still, the legacy lives on for those who were fortunate enough to count themselves as patrons. The haunted-house industry is huge in Utah; and many, if not all, of our local attractions owe a debt of gratitude to the unique, escapist realm that Rocky Point created. “If I do nothing else with my life—I really expect that I will—I will always feel honored and grateful,” Neil says. “I will miss it.” That makes two of us. Or 2 million. It’s tough to keep track. CW

PAUL BUDD

Get Your Fright On!


DARBY DOYLE

“The Hangman’s Tree”

Adam Albro’s “Jekyll & Hyde”

“Black Sabbath” Manhattan

Mahogany-hued Manhattans made with bittersweet amari instead of the typical vermouth are called “black Manhattans” by barkeeps. They’re a snap to make with just a few ingredients, giving you more time to dial in the costume and makeup sitch before shenanigans commence in earnest. To a mixing glass with cracked ice add: 1.5 ounces rye whiskey (Keep it local with Sugar House Distillery or High West). 0.75 ounces Averna (or other amaro). 2 generous dashes Bitters Lab Charred Cedar & Currant bitters. Stir with a barspoon for 50 revolutions, strain into a Morticia Addams-worthy goblet and garnish with a whiskey-soaked black cherry as dark as your soul.

The Rest/Bodega, 331 S. Main, Bodega331.com Ask anyone who’s ever worked in the spooky speakeasy-like space if they think the joint’s haunted, and nine out of 10 times you’ll get a wide-eyed, bobble-headed nod in reply. Keeping with this spot’s seriously clandestine vibe, owner Sara Lund shuts down the restaurant one night around Halloween to host her own private shindig, and it’s one of the hottest invites of the season. Lund’s theme this year is Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, for which barman Adam Albro has mixed up this sweet-tart of a treat to echo the absinthe-soaked world of Victorian-era England. With London dry gin, absinthe, housemade burnt sugar syrup and their own cherry-chocolate bitters blend, it’s a very grown-up steampunk cocktail that tastes like a boozy Good & Plenty—in the best possible way.

Chris Panarelli’s “The Rumkin”

Tracy Gomez’ “Creepy Crawlies”

East Liberty Tap House, 850 E. 900 South, EastLibertyTapHouse.com There’s nothing “fluffy” about this seriously boozy cocktail. Well, except for the locally made “lollipuff” coconut cotton candy gracing the top of ELTH’s spirituous concoction mixed up by bar manager Tracy Gomez with a wink and a devilish smile. Shaken up with local rum, lime, simple syrup, coconut milk and topped with Thai basil soda, it’s well worth the stroll to funky 9th & 9th to check it out. Instead of doling out sugar to the short set from home, why not turn down the lights, leave a big bowl of candy on the front porch to be DARBY DOYLE

O.P. Rockwell, 268 Main, Park City, OPRockwell.com Thursday nights at O.P. Rockwell mean tiki drinks, reggae music and one of the best local’s nights in PC. This year on the Thursday preceding Halloween, Panarelli and crew host an epic tiki-themed costume party, complete with dry-ice burbling Headless Horsemenstyle pumpkin heads to up the fab factor. Made with Bacardi eight-year rum, rye whiskey and a truly delish housemade Wasatch pumpkin beer syrup, “The Rumkin” is as delectable as it is diverting.

stolen by the neighborhood asshole kids, and sit by the tavern’s wide windows to watch the trick-or-treaters run by with their exhausted parents—while you order another cocktail. Win-win.

Michael Eccleston’s “The Hangman’s Tree”

Bar X, 155 E. 200 South, BeerBarSLC.com On Halloween night (yes, Monday), Under Current Bar, Copper Common and Bar X/Beer Bar are hosting a neighborhood “Blocktail” costume bar crawl. How’s it going to work? Go to the bars any time between open/close that night and tag yourself on Instagram for a chance to win prizes. Then the real fun starts; each bar picks winners in the following categories: best costume, best couple’s costume and best overall. And there’s live music er’rywhere, to boot. At Bar X, check out the eerie and elegant “Hangman’s Tree”—a powerful potion concocted by barman Michael Eccleston to resemble a spooky graveyard. It’s made with over-proof Wray and Nephews Jamaican rum, velvet falernum for a nice sweet note, a touch of tart lime and Batavia Arrack to add some grassy notes to the party. Eccleston stirs it up to order and flames a sprig of toasted rosemary, giving it a singularly smoky appeal.

Now, get to work on your costume, update your Uber app and stay safe out there, party people. CW

TRACY GOMEZ

Make this one at home:

DARBY DOYLE

ad the Puritans been bigger whiskey drinkers, the Salem Witch Trials might have never happened. Yeah, it’s a historical stretch of the imagination, but check it out: Behavioral psychologist Linnda Caporael linked the bizarre hallucinations, convulsions and skin-crawling sensations the accusers (most of whom were young women) experienced to ergotism—poisoning through the consumption of rye affected by a kind of fungus (Claviceps purpurea, aka ergot) that grows on grain in damp conditions—exactly the environment present during the rye harvest preceding the village hysteria of 1692. In modern times, ergot is used in useful things like ergotomine (a migraine medication) and is a component of lysergic acid, the drug also known as LSD. “If they’d distilled that rye to make whiskey, they would have been alright,” Sugar House Distillery owner James Fowler says. “The distillation process and resulting high alcohol levels remove all contaminants like fungi and bacteria.” Plus, who are we kidding? We’d rather drink rye whiskey than eat funked-up bread any day. Embracing the Halloween holiday spirit (get it?), here are some spooky sippers to try out on the town or stir up right at home with your own stash of (hopefully unadulterated) rye. After all, there’s something about Halloween that encourages even the tamest of tipplers to break out their freak flag and wave it high and proud. With Halloween on a Monday this year, that just means an extended weekend of costumes and cocktails galore. DARBY DOYLE

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By Darby Doyle

22 | OCTOBER 13, 2016

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H

Where to drink well to avoid the ultimate horror story—a Nov. 1 hangover.

“Black Sabbath” Manhattan

“The Rumkin”

“Jekyll & Hyde”

“Creepy Crawlies”


Horror, slasher and just plain creepy films: We tip our witch’s hat to you.

PARAMOUNT PICTURES

The Terrible

10

By David Riedel

I

t’s the time of year for apple-picking, flannel, mulled cider and getting your pants scared off by the things that go bump in the night. And, if you’re a character in any of the following 10 films, you’ll be turned to mincemeat by that thing that went bump. You’ll find some of the old favorites—your pal Jason Voorhees and his mother, for example—and some classics, and maybe a few pictures that you missed or have been lost to time. In any event, gather some friends, a big screen TV and turn off all the lights. There are scares afoot!

You’re Next (2014)

Suspiria (1977)

The Changeling (1980)

Trick ‘r Treat (2007)

Michael Dougherty’s anthology Halloween horror film went virtually unnoticed during its original release but has been the highlight of midnight festivals in years since. Little wonder: It stars Anna Paquin, Brian Cox, Leslie Bibb, Dylan Baker and the kid from Bad Santa. The four stories that make up this 82-minute shriekfest come together well, the acting is way above

Sleepaway Camp (1983)

After her family dies in an entirely preventable boat accident, Angela (Felissa Rose) is sent to live with her cousin and whackadoo aunt. Years later, Angela and cousin attend the aforementioned sleepaway camp, and a killer starts hacking the campers, counselors and owners to death. Is it Angela? Does a bear shit in the woods? The only surprises in this movie are the depths of its vulgarity. A camp cook labels prepubescents as “baldies” and the ending could probably be called transphobic if it were smarter and weren’t simply used as a shock twist. The fun comes when you realize this movie really takes itself seriously and that most of the deaths are, like the boat accident at the beginning, avoidable.

The year 1980 was a simpler time: There was no internet, no one had a cell phone and filmmakers were less likely to be called out for ripping off other, better films, as director Sean S. Cunningham and screenwriter Victor Miller did when they conned (a guess) respectable studio Paramount into producing a cheapo Halloween clone. The first Friday the 13th has none of Halloween’s skill or charm, but it does have a similar low budget and an admittedly bravura finale, in which Mrs. Voorhees (Betsy Palmer) comes forward to claim she killed Kevin Bacon et al. because he reminded her of someone who let her son, Jason, drown. And then Alice (Adrienne King) cuts her head off in slow motion. None of the plot-points of Friday the 13th matter, mostly because each subsequent film ignores or retcons what came before it. Looking for a movie mindfuck? Why is Jason an adult in Part II? And see if you can piece together the timeline of the events that take place over parts IV (The Final Chapter), V (A New Beginning), and VI (Jason Lives)—also notable because some of the characters seem to know they’re in a horror movie—and then wonder why Part VII (The New Blood) ignores most of Part VI. Lastly, the final film in this original grouping (Part VIII: Jason Takes Manhattan) feels like it was made on a completely different planet (a bad idea explored years later in the nearly unrelated Jason X), and also takes place for 80 of its 100 minutes on a boat. The Friday the 13th movies are dumb, but they deliver the kills slasher fans want and, for better or worse, no one makes them like this anymore. Honorable Mentions: The Burning (1981), in which a young Jason Alexander and actor pals are hacked to bits by a disfigured man with garden shears, and My Bloody Valentine (1981)—a movie so gory it was shorn of its gore, most of which has been restored on Blu-ray. Plus, the accents are Canadian. Happy Halloween, eh! CW

OCTOBER 13, 2016 | 23

A lot of people out there call Sam Raimi’s The Evil Dead a comedy. They must be confusing it with Evil Dead II: Dead by Dawn or Ash vs. Evil Dead. The original has its darkly humorous moments, but Raimi and company saved the larfs for the sequels. In this movie, there’s just amateurish acting, special effects so gory they demand a strong stomach and a terrifically unsettling tree molestation (it’s actually in poor taste—you’ve been warned). But it’s also groundbreaking in its use of space, camera work and bare-bones chills. Watch it with a friend or six.

The gore in this movie is so convincing director Ruggero Deodato was accused of making a snuff film. If you’re watching on DVD, you can see the making-of documentary that shows all the actors are quite alive, but that doesn’t stop Cannibal Holocaust from being the second-most disturbing movie on this list. (There are also scenes of real animal cruelty; I recommend you choose the version on the DVD that excises these scenes for you.) Plot-wise, it’s fairly simple: A group of dumb American filmmakers ventures into the Amazon to make a dumb documentary about cannibals and ends up the main course. There’s some tacked-on baloney at the end about whether the filmmakers are actually barbarians themselves, but really, that’s just Deodato taking a metaphorical shower after showering his audience with some of the most sickening footage ever assembled for a motion picture. Of note: Cannibal Holocaust is partly a found-footage movie, released two decades before The Blair Witch Project and its many imitators.

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The Evil Dead (1981)

Cannibal Holocaust (1980)

All the Friday the 13th films released by Paramount Pictures

This isn’t the movie with Angelina Jolie being told she’s going nuts because her child was kidnapped and replaced with another. This is the movie with a composer (George C. Scott) moving into a creepy old house after his wife and daughter are killed in an accident. The house is haunted, naturally, but director Peter Medak slowly increases the tension over the movie’s 107 minutes. Scott is great, and if you have the patience, The Changeling is scary as hell.

Three astronauts fly to Saturn, but before they get there, radiation kills two of them and turns the third into the ghoul of the title. How does he get from Saturn back to Earth? I don’t know, and neither do the filmmakers, but that doesn’t stop this movie from being a long, slow collection of scenes in which the incredible melting man melts and some guy named Dr. Ted Nelson searches for him, screaming his own name over and over (seriously). The Incredible Melting Man works better as unintentional comedy, but it features Rick Baker’s stupendously nasty special effects and some of the most bizarre acting and pacing choices of 1970s horror.

Do NOT watch this movie. I mean, WATCH IT. Who the hell am I to tell you what to do? Just be prepared— though nothing can prepare you for the absolute moral depravity at this film’s cold-blooded center. A Serbian Film is another movie you shouldn’t watch if you a) Have children, b) Like children, c) Were once a child yourself. I can’t even describe what goes on in this movie without breaking several decency laws. My God, there’s rape and necrophilia, and that’s literally not even close to the worst images on screen, and it all happens, horrifyingly, on screen. There is NO cutting away. Ugh, seriously, don’t watch this movie. In fact, my editors should delete it from this article.

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I hesitated to put this weirdo Italian giallo entry on the list because I assumed everyone and their mother (not mine, of course) had seen it, but some informal polling around the office proved otherwise. That’s great, because for shear scares, there aren’t many movies that’ll make you crap yourself more often than this one does. The story involves Suzy (Jessica Harper) traveling to Germany to study ballet. The only problem is that the school is also a witch’s coven. Was zur Hölle? Director Dario Argento has made many creepy movies that make no sense, and Suspira is the creepiest and makes the least sense. Still, there’s an unsettling sense of dread from its opening moments that ramps up to sheer terror by the conclusion. And watch out for that razor wire!

The Incredible Melting Man (1977)

A Serbian Film (2010)

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What happens when you take a horror subgenre (the homeinvasion story) and turn it on its head? You get You’re Next, a movie in which the invaders unknowingly storm a home that’s inhabited by someone who’s tougher than they are. It’s gory and smart, and filmmaker Joe Swanberg gets stabbed multiple times on camera. Who doesn’t want to see that?

average for a movie of this type and it has a lot of stabbings. It also kills multiple children, so if that isn’t your thing, steer clear.


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24 | OCTOBER 13, 2016

—In Your Own Backyard! Spooked It’sJuke 2016 locals-only for this year’s collection of spooky-ass songs.

By Randy Harward

H

orror is fun because the monster is trapped in celluloid or pixels, and can’t jump out of the screen to gnaw on our bellies. That distance lets us enjoy the illusion of safety, as though there aren’t monsters in our own backyard. Utah has seen its share: Ted Bundy, Mark Hacking, David Archuleta, Arthur Gary Bishop (freaky factoid: I used to deliver neighborhood grocery-store ads to that guy’s house, and I happened to be his type—a young boy). Some of our local musicians have written rather disturbing stuff, and it makes you wonder if some of ’em aren’t undercover Cenobites or serial killers. Eh, they’re probably just harmless, out-’n’-proud horror fans. But we’ll let you decide for yourselves.

DJ Shanty

“Megatheme” (feat. Red Sky Phenomenon) from Megatherium (DJShanty.Bandcamp.com) It surely wasn’t Shanty’s intention for this track to sound ominous, but it does. Hitting somewhere between Goblin’s Argento and Romero soundtracks and the ’80s sci-fi film scores (which are now a genre, thanks to guys like Shanty and bands like Conquer Monster, Lazerhawk, Powerglove and Kavinsky), it sets a fitting tone for a mix like this.

The Pagan Dead

“Gates of Hell” from Mors Ianva Vitae et Vita Ian (PaganDead.com) I was about 14 when I first saw Lucio Fulci’s City of the Living Dead, aka The Gates of Hell. Italian horror, or spaghetti-splatter, was new to me—and you will always remember your first foray into the genre. They’re like movies from another dimension, where everything about them keeps you off-balance: The cinematography, literally visceral violence, weirdly squishy scores and the odd acting, dialogue and awful English dub tracks, can be highly disconcerting. That is, until you get acclimated

and they become a source of laughs and scares. SLC’s premier black-metal/psychobilly mashup artists The Pagan Dead pay tribute to Gates in this tornado of squelchy riffs, beastly double-bass and drums that sound like a skeletal march at breakneck speed. And it contains a verse about the only scene to ever cause me to almost toss my cookies. I won’t spoil it for you, but here’s a hint: I learned a new word from this tune. “Offal” works on two levels.

VOUR

“Mummy” from VOUR (Rest30Records.Bandcamp.com) Until it was updated/redefined by a Brendan Fraser film a real fake wrassler, I never understood why a mummy was remotely terrifying. To me, it just looked tragically cute, like an extreme case of toilet paper sticking to your shoe. Cartoons, horror comedies and breakfast cereals sort of reinforced that belief: They very slowly chased stoners and their dogs. They were brittle—handle with care. And, on Saturday mornings, they were delicious. When I was studying mortuary sciences (for a whole semester), I learned a little bit of the inside-baseball of mummification. Like how they preserved the body in rags, seasoned it with spices and oils and beeswax and booze, and let him keep all of his loot and toys. So I still don’t get it. But I dig this groovy, jazz tune from David Payne and Dolan Lucero, released on Christmas 2011.

Zombiecock

“We Come” from Zombies Love Punk Rock (Zombiecock.Bandcamp.com) Do you really need a song? Isn’t the idea of a decaying, maggot-ridden, oozing knob knocking on your front, back (or side—diff’rent strokes, folks!) door terrifying enough? Well, this catchy li’l horrorpunk nugget seems appropriate. Even though it can’t last four minutes (winky face, mic drop!). Catchy tune, though.

The Osmonds

The Plan (MGM, 1973) Mormon rock. ’Nuff said? What if I told you it’s a concept album built on the LatterDay Saints’ Plan of Salvation? Proselytizing in music is only for the choir and impressionable Gentiles, and when the religious pander to the latter using the Hip Sounds of the Time, it’s comical. When you juxtapose the brilliant, immaculately white smiles of very happy young men from Utah County with L. Ron-esque lyrics, it’s creepy AF. (That’s some internet shorthand I picked up from my daughter—it stands for “as fuck.”) Here are some lyrics for ya: “Ever since we came to be/ with The Plan we learned to see/ we control infinity/ what more?”

Dark Lord

“Live @ Metro Bar” (YouTube) It used to be that a simple pentagram, inverted cross or invocation of Satan’s name was enough to put your bowels at Defcon 1 for fear of contracting a spiritually transmitted

disease (possess-orrhea, look it up). In this full set from last March at the Metro Bar (now Metro Music Hall), devilish doom trio Dark Lord float-strolls onstage in black robes, lighting candles among the aforementioned knickknacks while a spooky intro track plays. Then comes the rock and, not long into the set, a topless, cloven-hooved, black-furred beast with a swingin’ you-know-what. Grotesque. And oddly titillating.

Chinese Stars

“Turn Me on Dead Man” from Dirty CD-R from the Ground (Rest30Records.Bandcamp.com) Remember when everyone was all freaked out that Paul—you know, the guy from the Beatles—was dead because of backward messages on songs like “Revolution No. 9”? And now he’s the only living Beatle. Gotcha. That’s the scary part—for Beatles fans only. Otherwise, it’s just a Stooge-y anthem about necrophilia. Or something else entirely. Courtesy of local punk rock liability Dustin Yearby (Dead Bod).

Baby Gurl

“Birth Boner” from Incompoop (BabyGurl.Bandcamp.com) You’ve seen Rosemary’s Baby, right? That debbilbaby was messed up. So was the incorporeal voice (GEEHHHT OUUUUUT!) in The Amityville Horror. Now imagine this: The baby pops out, wild-eyed and sporting a turgid purple, uh, bass guitar string, which it plucks maniacally while looking you dead in the eye and saying, “Tsoputatuu says you gotta get out!/ … / get out!/ gehhhht ooouuuuut!” The rest of the lyrics introduce other demonicsounding entities like “Yusaysya,” “Eeraneyah” and “Idagaba,” and they’d all like you to vacate the premises. Baby Gurl’s Jordan Fairbanks says the lyrics to this song change with every performance, leading to the inevitable conclusion that Tsoputatuu and friends are legion. CW


KELLI BRAMBLE

Many of the country’s best ballet companies have a pre-professional group of dancers, waiting in the wings for their chance to join the main troupe. Ballet West II, created in 2004, is Ballet West’s two-year training program that gives a select group of young dancers the attention and performing opportunities they will need to make it in the dance world. Currently, 25 dancers in Ballet West’s main company have come out of this program. And while Ballet West II takes their talent to stages around the region, they have not been seen performing in Salt Lake City—until now. In a short, single-weekend run, Ballet West II will present Piece of My Heart, a program that showcases the range of styles executed by these young dancers. The title work, “Piece of My Heart”—set to music by Janis Joplin— comes from resident choreographer Nicolo Fonte, and magnifies the raw power of ballet with a rock ’n’ roll sensibility. As contemporary movement continues to find its way into more of ballet’s repertoire, mixing pirouettes with rock seems to be the art’s next level of avant-garde. Not that modern, rock-inspired dance is about to take over ballet completely; old works are still essential, and Ballet West II can perform the classics as well. This evening’s program includes “Tarantella” by the early 19thcentury Danish master August Bournonville, and a restaging the of the Minkus Pas de Trois from the 19th-century ballet Paquita. (KP) Ballet West II: Piece of My Heart @ Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801355-2787, Oct. 14-15, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday matinee, 2 p.m., $30. ArtSaltLake.ArtTix.org

Utah author James Dashner’s Maze Runner series has already inspired a movie franchise, and a fan base so devoted that they needed a prequel to feed their hunger after the original trilogy ended. Now, Dashner has provided a fifth book in the series, returning to the story of how a world dealing with the after-effects of an apocalyptic plague turned to children as their saviors. Specifically, that world turned to Thomas, Teresa and their other friends—the heroes of the original Maze Runner trilogy. But as the events in The Fever Code begin, they’re not yet the teenagers who are tested in a massive, potentially deadly maze. They’re merely pre-schoolers—most of them orphaned by the effects of the braindestroying disease known as “The Flare”—whose immunity makes them uniquely valuable. And as they are subjected to years of tests and training, Thomas and Teresa learn that they might have a particular talent even among the other immune children: They might be the ones who are actually tasked with designing the maze. While the process of writing a prequel might in some ways seem easier for a writer, Dashner notes by email that there were challenges to concluding this decade-long series. “I felt more pressure than ever, because the readership has grown so much. … Also, I had to end the series strongly, and I wanted everything to be consistent,” he says. “These characters have been in my head for over 10 years, and have become very real to me. Writing The Fever Code was the epitome of bittersweet.” (Scott Renshaw) James Dashner: The Fever Code @ The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, Oct. 18, 7 p.m. KingsEnglish.com

James Dashner: The Fever Code

OCTOBER 13, 2016 | 25

If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it. The motto seems to apply to Odyssey Dance Theater’s annual Halloween spectacular, Thriller, which in the last 20 years hasn’t received more than a minor tweak. Popular dances like River of Blood, Dem Bones, Jason Jam, The Lost Boys and Frankenstein & Frankenstein, have been part of the production for at least the past six years (maybe even from the beginning). But rehashing the same stuff year after year doesn’t keep audiences away; the current production will be showing in seven locations around the state through October (see website for details). And maybe people keep coming back year after year because it’s just that good. Thriller—including the number set to Michael Jackson’s hit song—calls on all your favorite spooks. There’s Bubbles the Clown, who turns from happy to psychotic at the switch of a red light and might be coming for someone in the audience. White ghosts fly through the air, and aliens await to make their entrance from inside a performer’s stomach. There are sexy, toothy, hissy vampires, tap-dancing skeletons, machete-wielding masked men … and every piece is danced with drill team-like precision. Who knew that zombies could do jump splits? If these guys were at a dance competition, no doubt they’d all come home with trophies. And the best part about Odyssey’s Thriller? It’s totally Utah-grade family-friendly. Anything scary eventually takes a comic turn. That masked man with the machete? He’s kind of a klutz. The Frankenstein? Totally hilarious. (Katherine Pioli) Odyssey Dance Theatre: Thriller @ Kingsbury Hall, 1395 E. Presidents Circle, 801-581-7100, through Oct. 29, 7:30 p.m., Saturday matinee, 2 p.m., $30-$50. Tickets.Utah.edu

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TUESDAY 10.18

Ballet West II: Piece of My Heart

SATURDAY 10.15

Odyssey Dance: Thriller

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Women playing men playing women: William Shakespeare might have approved, but England probably wasn’t ready for it in the Elizabethan era. Good thing it’s the 21st century now, where theatrical gender-bending is becoming a norm. Writer/director Javen Tanner brings this fantastic idea to the forefront in The King’s Men. Tanner utilizes the works of Shakespeare (brilliantly played by Susanna Florence Risser) to show how a man writes a woman’s character even though it’s played by a man. Set following the death of Queen Elizabeth (Kathryn Atwood), Shakespeare is caught between his home life in Stratford with his wife Anne (Colleen Baum, pictured) and daughter Susanna (Ali Kinkade) and the London playhouses. Except, no plays are being performed. That is until the new King Edward requests Shakespeare and the rest of Lord Chamberlain’s Men perform for him personally. They have the old standbys—The Taming of the Shrew and As You Like It—ready to go starring Richard Burbage (Susan Mauer Barry), John Heminges (Nova Calverley-Chase), Henry Condell (Michelle Lynn Thompson), Edward (Carlie Young) and Robert (Hannah Minshew). Following a dream, Shakespeare decides to write a play involving Queen Elizabeth that might or might not ever come to fruition. Tanner’s prose claims there is no moral or lesson to The King’s Men. However, it’s about perception—how men see women—and viceversa. It’s an interesting concept; one wrapped up in a delightful and refreshing original story. (Missy Bird) The Sting & Honey Co.: The King’s Men @ Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, through Oct. 15, Thursday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Oct. 15, 2 p.m., $18. StingAndHoney.org

FRIDAY 10.14

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THURSDAY 10.13

ENTERTAINMENT PICKS OCTOBER 13-19, 2016

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Between Heaven and Earth

Stephanie Leitch’s installation art in Interstices explores the space between things. FOLLOW US ON

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BY BRIAN STAKER comments@cityweekly.net @stakerized

I

t came like a bolt out of the blue: a contemporary artistic pioneer finding inspiration from a historical one. The germ of the idea—to project video onto rows of string suspended from a ceiling— had been at the back of Stephanie Leitch’s mind for quite a while before she was invited to exhibit at the Granary Art Center in Ephraim this year. But the project she envisioned took more shape as she considered the specific space in which she would present the work—an A-frame building designed for grain storage in 1876 by pioneer artist C.C.A. Christensen. Leitch, one of the foremost installation artists of the Mountain West, has often used local culture as a focal point of her work. Her Untitled Congregation at Nox Contemporary in spring 2013 suspended rows of string dripping water into LDS sacrament cups, and Untitled Apogee at the Utah Museum of Contemporary Art at the end of 2013 used fabric, string and video projections to create an inverted topographical map of all the Mormon churches in the Salt Lake Valley. Her Untitled Edifice at the same space in Ephraim in 2012—when it was home to the Central Utah Art Center—projected inverted images of the tabernacle onto the wall. Her more recent work, however, has played more with spaces in between objects, or negative space, like The Mote and the Beam at the City Library in 2014, which connected the walls of the exhibition space with string. For Interstices, her latest installation at the Granary Art Center, she is projecting video onto string, and it adds a whole new dimension, a sculptural element. The 34-year old graduate of the University of Utah says, “I liked the idea of abstracting specific imagery by projecting onto a discontinuous surface, and seeing the layers being distorted and expanded 3-dimensionally into the field as the distance increases from the projector.” Interstices found inspiration from Christensen in a second way: from his own artwork. One of the paintings from his Mormon Panorama series depicts a moment right after the assassination of Joseph

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Smith outside the Carthage Jail, in which the mob witnesses a man pulling back from wielding a knife at the fallen prophet, astonished as beams of light fall down from heaven. According to legend, an angel appeared and intervened, preventing Smith from further disfigurement. “The well-articulated lines in the painting hearken to the 3-dimensionally drawn lines of my work,” Leitch says, “as well as the way the projection path falls upon the form. I like the idea of taking that fleeting moment of light, when the heavens seem to be physically connected to the earth.” The video images used in the installation are found footage, but she has manipulated and animated them as sculptural objects. They change not only in time, like any video, but spatially, as you walk around and view them from different angles. The structure of this work suggests contemplation; the spaces beckon one to fill in conceptual blanks. It evokes a number of intellectual postulates about the relationship of the way we view the world to the nature of reality itself—from Gestalt psychology to quantum physics to media theory. The string is arranged in a matrix, or grid pattern, and instead of video creating the illusion of three dimensions on a 2-dimensional screen, Leitch adds a level of physicality, but also distance by the creation of what she calls its “field form.” The work isn’t complete without the viewer there, at a distance, adding another layer of depth by contributing her experience of the space, or particular moment. It’s similar to the feeling evoked by Christensen’s

Stephanie Leitch’s Interstices painting, when a space opens up—between heaven and Earth, between the artist and the viewer, between the idea and its realization. That gap is, perhaps, always there, but what was hidden is made manifest, fusing a connection between the two polarities. To Leitch, it’s all about heightening the viewer’s awareness; “I like to play with the desired but physically impenetrable field.” It’s not just about bringing into sharper relief what some consider “sacred space,” but about a reverence for all space. In college, she studied edifices like the pyramidal structures of Borobudur in Indonesia, with walkways that circumambulate the perimeter until they ultimately reach the apex, revealing a secret which turns out to be somewhat anticlimactic. “You can’t just shoot straight to the top; you’ve got to gain understanding of the thing as you gradually work your way around it,” she says. “I liked the way this lengthens the tension between the viewer and the elements. So I make things that people want to be inside of, but are physically forced to skirt the perimeter.” CW

STEPHANIE LEITCH: INTERSTICES

Granary Art Center 86 N. Main, Ephraim 435-283-3456 Through Jan. 27, 2017 GranaryArtCenter.org


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ALL THE NEWS THAT WON’T FIT IN PRINT Photographer Benny van der Wal explores the relationship between human-created waste and the environment in the exhibit Desert Trashscapes, on display at Finch Lane Gallery (54 Finch Lane, 801-596-5000, SaltLakeArts.org) through Nov. 18.

PERFORMANCE

THEATER

Piece of My Heart Ballet West II, Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, Salt Lake City, 801355-2787, Oct. 14-15, BalletWest.org (see p. 25) Thriller Covey Center for the Arts, 425 W. Center St., Provo, 801-852-7007, through Oct. 17, 7:30 p.m.; Oct. 15, 2 p.m., Provo.org Thriller Odyssey Dance Theatre, Kingsbury Hall, 1395 E. Presidents Circle, 801-581-7100, through Oct. 29, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday matinee, 2 p.m., $30-$50, Tickets.Utah.edu (see p. 25)

CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

OCTOBER 13, 2016 | 27

Alice Wetterlund Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Salt Lake City, 801-532-5233, Oct. 13, 7:30 p.m.; Oct. 14-15, 7:30 & 9:30 p.m.; WiseguysComedy.com Guy Seidel Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Salt Lake City, 801-532-5233, Oct. 14-15, 8 p.m., WiseguysComedy.com Off the Wall Comedy Improv Draper Historic Theatre, 12366 S. 900 East, Draper, 801-572-4144, Saturdays, 10:30 p.m., DraperTheatre.org

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NOVA Chamber Music Series: Terry Tempest Williams’ Refuge at 25 Utah Museum of Natural History, 301 Wakara Way, Oct. 16, 7 p.m., NOVASLC.org Orchestra at Temple Square: Dreams and Dances Tabernacle, 50 N. West Temple, Salt Lake City, Oct. 14-15, 7:30 p.m., LDS.org

Fashionistas And Other Creators Of Cool Stuff

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Bands, Comedians, Artists, Podcasters,

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The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee Val A. Browning Center, 3950 W. Campus Drive, Ogden, through Oct. 15, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday matinee, 2 p.m., WeberStateTickets.com Aida Hurricane Valley Theatrical Co., 92 S. 100 West, Salt Lake City, 435-668-9753, through Oct. 29, Monday, Friday & Saturday, 7 p.m.; Saturday matinee, 2 p.m., HurricaneTheatrical.com Bellwether Emma Eccles Jones Conservatory, Westminster College, 1840 S. 1300 East, Salt Lake City, 801-484-7651, Oct. 13-15 & 28-29, 7:30 p.m; Oct. 27, 8:30 p.m., WestminsterCollege.edu/Theatre Bull Shark Attack Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, 801-363-7522, through Oct. 16, TuesdaySunday, varying times, SaltLakeActingCompany.org Carmen Utah Opera, Capitol Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, 801-355-2787, Oct. 12 & 14, 7:30 p.m.; Oct. 16, 2 p.m., UtahOpera.org Catch Me If You Can Hale Center Theater Orem, 225 W. 400 North, Orem, 801-226-8600, through Nov. 19, HaleTheater.org Drack-Man vs. Superiorman Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, 801-355-4628, through Oct. 31, Friday-Saturday & Monday, TheOBT.org Feed the Arts! The Ziegfeld Theater, 3934 S. Washington Blvd., Ogden, 855-944-2787, Oct. 15, 6-10 p.m., TheZiegfeldTheater.com/ Fundraiser-Performance Ghostblasters Desert Star Theatre, 4681 S. State, Murray, 801-266-2600, through Nov. 5, varying days and times, DesertStar.biz Hunchback of Notre Dame Tuacahn Amphitheater, 1100 Tuacahn Drive, Ivins, 800-746-9882, through Oct. 15, varying days and times, Tuacahn.org Into the Woods Draper Theatre, 12366 S. 900 East, Draper, through Oct. 29, Friday-Saturday & Monday, 7 p.m., DraperTheatre.org Jekyll & Hyde The Grand Theatre, 1575 S. State, Salt Lake City, 801-975-3322, through Oct. 29, varying times, GrandTheatreCompany.com The King’s Men Sting & Honey Co., Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801-355-2787, through Oct. 15, Thursday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday matinee, 2 p.m., ArtSaltLake.ArtTix.org (see p. 25) Legally Blonde Jr. Hale Center Theater Orem, 225 W. 500 North, Orem, 801-226-8600, Wednesday-Saturday, through Oct. 14, 4:30 p.m.; Oct. 15, 11 a.m., HaleTheater.org

Little Shop of Horrors Hopebox Theatre, 1700 S. Frontage Road, Kaysville, 801-451-5259, Oct. 14-24, Friday-Saturday & Monday, HopeboxTheatre.com Little Shop of Horrors The Ziegfeld Theater, 3934 Washington Blvd., Ogden, 855-944-2787, Oct. 14-Nov. 5, Friday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday matinee, 2 p.m., TheZiegfeldTheater.com/Little-Shop The Nether Good Company Theatre, 260 25th St., Ogden, through Oct. 23, Thursday-Saturday, 8 p.m.; Sunday, 4 p.m., GoodCoTheatre.com Peter Pan Tuacahn Ampitheatre, 1100 Tuacahn Drive, Ivins, 435-652-3300, Oct. 14, 7:30 p.m., Tuacahn.org Utah Shakespeare Fest Randall L. Jones Theatre, 351 W. Center St., Cedar City, 435-586-7878, through Oct. 22, varying days and times, Bard.org Winter Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, 801-363-7522, through Nov. 13, WednesdaySaturday, 7:30 p.m.; Sunday, 1 p.m. & 6 p.m., SaltLakeActingCompany.org

Long-long-long-read Interviews With Local


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LITERATURE AUTHOR APPEARANCES

Jon Ogden: When Mormons Doubt Pioneer Book, 450 W. Center St., Provo, 801-225-2665, Oct. 15, 7 p.m. PioneerBook.com Scott Abbott: Immortal for Quite Some Time Ken Sanders Rare Books, 268 S. 200 East, 801-5213819, Oct. 15, 7 p.m., KenSandersRareBooks.com James Dashner: The Fever Code The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Salt Lake City, 801-484-9100, Oct. 17, 7-10 p.m., KingsEnglish.com (see p. 25)

SPECIAL EVENTS FARMERS MARKETS

9th West Farmers Market International Peace Gardens, 1000 S. 900 West, Sundays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., through Oct. 31, 9thWestFarmersMarket.org Harvest Market Gallivan Center, 239 S. Main, Tuesdays, 4-8:30 p.m., through Oct. 18, SLCFarmersMarket.org Park City Farmers Market The Canyons Resort, 1951 Canyons Resort Drive, Park City, Wednesdays, noon-6 p.m., through Oct. 26, ParkCityFarmersMarket.com Sugar House Farmers Market Fairmont Park, 1040 E. Sugarmont Ave., through Oct. 26, Wednesdays, 5-8 p.m., SugarHouseFarmersMarket.org Downtown Farmers Market Pioneer Park, 300 S. 300 West, through Oct. 22, Saturdays, 8 a.m.2 p.m., SLCFarmersMarket.org

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FESTIVALS & FAIRS

Utah Humanities Book Festival Utah Humanities, 202 W. 300 North, Salt Lake City, 801-359-9670, times and locations vary, through Oct. 29, UtahHumanities.org

TALKS & LECTURES

LaVonne Wells The Golden Braid, 151 S. 500 East, Salt Lake City, 801-322-1162, Oct. 13, 7 p.m., GoldenBraidBooks.com Making Sense of the 2016 Elections Olpin Union, Saltair Room, 200 Central Campus Drive, Oct. 17, 11 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Poli-Sci.Utah.edu

HALLOWEEN

Asylum 49 140 E. 200 South, Tooele, 435-2246283, Tuesday-Thursday, 7 p.m.-10 p.m.; FridaySaturday, 7 p.m.-midnight, Asylum49.com Castle of Chaos 7980 S. State, Midvale, 385216-8915, Monday-Sunday, see site for schedule, CastleofChaos.com Fear Factory 666 W 800 South, Salt Lake City, 801-692-3327, Monday-Thursday, 7 p.m.10 p.m.; Friday-Saturday, 7 p.m.-midnight, FearFactorySLC.com Haunted Forest 100 W. 6400 North, American Fork, 801-903-3039, weekdays, 7:30 p.m-10 p.m.; weekends, 7:30 p.m.-midnight, HauntedUtah.com Haunted Hollow 1550 S. 1900 West, Ogden, 801603-2231, weekdays, 7:30 p.m.-10 p.m.; weekends, 7:30 p.m.-midnight, HauntedUtah.com Shelly Brown: Ghostsitter Whitmore Library, 2197 E. Fort Union Blvd., 801-943-4646, Oct. 15, 2 p.m., SLCoLibrary.org/AuthorEvents Strangling Brothers Haunted Circus 632 E. 1500 South, American Fork, 801-850-8060,

daily except Sunday, through Oct. 31, 7:30 p.m., StranglingBrothers.com Paranormal Encounters Mystery Escape Room, 130 S. Rio Grande St., 385-322-2583, through Oct. 28, Friday-Saturday, 8:30 p.m., MysteryEscapeRoom.com Utah Halloween Expo and Show Sandy South Town Expo Center, 9575 S. State, Sandy, 801-871-5957, Oct. 14-16, Friday, 11 a.m.-9 p.m.; Saturday, 9 a.m.-9 p.m.; Sunday, 9 a.m.-6 p.m., UtahHalloweenExpo.com

VISUAL ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

Andrew Alba: Rainbow Variance Mestizo Institute of Culture & Arts, 631 W. North Temple, Ste. 700, through Oct. 14, Facebook.com/MestizoArts Andy Nasisse: Badlands Southern Utah Museum of Art, 13 S. 300 West, Cedar City, through Oct. 31, SUU.edu/PVA/SUMA Art2Go and Stephanie Hock Art Access Gallery, 230 S. 500 West, 801-328-0703, through Oct. 14, AccessArt.org Ben Kilbourne: Unresting Event SLC Marmalade Library, 280 W. 500 North, 801-594-8680, through Oct. 28, SLCPL.org Benny van der Wal: Desert Trashscapes Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, 801-530-0547, through Nov. 18, SaltLakeArts.org (see p. 27) Berna Reale: Singing in the Rain Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801328-4201, through Nov. 5, UtahMOCA.org Cara Krebs: Sehnsucht Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-3284201, through Oct. 14, UtahMOCA.org

DesignArts ‘16 Rio Gallery, 300 S. Rio Grande St., through Oct. 21, ArtsandMuseums.Utah.gov Dick Jemison: Limelight Modern West Fine Art, 177 E. 200 South, 801-355-3383, through Oct. 15, ModernWestFineArt.com Discover Zaqistan: The Art of Adventure CUAC, 175 E. 200 South, 385-215-6768, through Oct. 14, CUArtCenter.org Iterations: Sue Martin and Nancy Vorm Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, through Nov. 11, Monday-Friday, VisualArts.Utah.gov J. Calhoun: High Places Make Me High Corinne and Jack Sweet Library, 455 F St., 801594-8651, through Oct. 22, SLCPL.lib.ut.us Lexi Rae Johnson: Wait Here Please Art Barn/ Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, through Nov. 18, SaltLakeArts.org Object[ed]: Shaping Sculpture in Contemporary Art Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-3284201, through Dec. 17, UtahMOCA.org Stephanie Leitch: Interstices Granary Art Center, 86 N. Main, Ephraim, 435-283-3456, through Jan. 27, 2017, GranaryArtCenter.org (see p. 26) Sue Martin and Nancy Vorm: Iterations Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, through Nov. 11, Monday-Friday, VisualArts.Utah.gov Terence K. Stephens: Greater Salt Lake SLC Sprague Library, 2131 S. 1100 East, 801-5948640, through Nov. 5, SLCPL.org Willamarie Huelskamp: A Peaceful Place Salt Lake City Chapman Library, 577 S. 900 West, 801-594-8623, through Oct. 27, SLCPL.org Zion Art Exhibition Anthony’s Fine Art, 401 E. 200 South, 801-369-8894, through Oct. 15, ZionArtSociety.org


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Best live music club ————————————— Best ogden club ————————————— Best open-mic ————————————— Best park city club ————————————— Best pool bar ————————————— Best sports bar ————————————— Best theme night ————————————— Best utah valley club —————————————

OUTDOORS & RECREATION Best advanced hiking trail ————————————— Best beginners hiking trail ————————————— Best bike shop ————————————— Best birdwatching ————————————— Best bowling alley ————————————— Best city park ————————————— Best community event/festival ————————————— Best fitness classes ————————————— Best outdoor supplies shop ————————————— Best poke stop ————————————— Best public golf course ————————————— Best recreation destination ————————————— Best skate shop ————————————— Best ski run ————————————— Best snowboarding ————————————— Best swimming ————————————— Best urban fishin’ hole ————————————— Best yoga studio —————————————

Vote Now! VOTING DEADLINE:

MONDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2016 AT MIDNIGHT MDT (Entered online, postmarked or dropped off in person)

Best of Utah issue date NOVEMBER 17, 2016

RESTAURANTS Best atmosphere ————————————— Best bakery ————————————— Best breakfast ————————————— Best brew pub ————————————— Best brunch spot ————————————— Best cheap date ————————————— Best chinese sit-down ————————————— Best chinese take-out ————————————— Best coffee house ————————————— Best desserts ————————————— Best downtown slc restaurant ————————————— Best first date restaurant ————————————— Best french ————————————— Best greek sit-down ————————————— Best greek take-out ————————————— Best indian ————————————— Best italian ————————————— Best japanese ————————————— Best korean ————————————— Best late-night grub ————————————— Best mexican sit-down ————————————— Best mexican take-out ————————————— Best middle-eastern ————————————— Best new restaurant ————————————— Best ogden restaurant ————————————— Best park city restaurant ————————————— Best patio —————————————

Best place to take mom ————————————— Best romantic spot ————————————— Best sale lake valley restaurant ————————————— Best thai ————————————— Best utah county restaurant ————————————— Best vegetarian ————————————— Best vietnamese —————————————

FOOD & DRINK Best bargain burger (under $10) ————————————— Best bbq ————————————— Best beer selection ————————————— Best burgers ————————————— Best burritos ————————————— Best cider ————————————— Best coffee ————————————— Best distillery ————————————— Best donuts ————————————— Best ethnic/specialty market ————————————— Best food truck ————————————— Best french fries ————————————— Best gyros ————————————— Best ice cream ————————————— Best pig-out ————————————— Best pizza ————————————— Best salads ————————————— Best sandwiches ————————————— Best seafood —————————————

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THE RULES

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GOODS & SERVICES Best barber shop ————————————— Best bookstore ————————————— Best boutique ————————————— Best comic-book store ————————————— Best fishing/hunting supplies ————————————— Best garden supply ————————————— Best hair salon ————————————— Best men’s shop ————————————— Best motorcycle repair ————————————— Best pet store ————————————— Best piercing studio ————————————— Best record shop ————————————— Best smoke shop ————————————— Best tattoo shop ————————————— Best thrift/consignment store ————————————— Best vape store —————————————

WRITE-IN Best thing we forgot and where to find it:

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Readers Ballot 2016

1) Keep it local. Yes, we’re aware McDonald’s fries are awesome. 2) Ballots can be filled out online at CityWeekly.net/BestofUtah or hand-delivered by Monday, Oct. 17 to 248 S. Main St., Salt Lake City, 84101. 3) Only one ballot per person; don’t be sneaky. 4) You too can be a winner. Name, phone number and email address must be included in your ballot for validation and prize eligibility. 5) You must vote in at least ten categories for your ballot to be counted.


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SLC NOODLES

Noodling Around

DINE

Ten sensational SLC pasta and noodle dishes. BY TED SCHEFFLER comments@cityweekly.net @critic1

M

y mom—bless her departed soul— was not a great cook. But she made two things really well: baseballsize dumplings, and what our family called “up-and-down noodles.” The egg noodles were homemade, thick and wide, and crafted with a fluted pasta/pastry cutter (hence the name). In Japan, our housekeeper occasionally made ramen for the family, and in Spain, fideuá sometimes appeared at the dinner table. The point being that from an early age I was raised on really good pasta preparations. Today, it would be my deserted-island dish if I were forced to choose one. There will be no low-carb diets for me. Over a couple of decades of reviewing restaurants in Utah, I’ve tasted hundreds of pasta and noodle dishes—ranging from kugel to cannelloni—and there are dozens I’d happily sing the praises of. For space considerations, I’ve distilled my favorites down to just 10 in SLC. Please try them, and tell us about your faves, as well. When I want to escape the dilemmas of the day, I sometimes opt for lunch at Cannella’s (204 E. 500 South, 801-3558518, Cannellas.com), a friendly, inviting spot that seems to be a throwback to simpler times. I especially like to pop in on Thursdays, when the lunch special is manicotti stuffed with creamy cheeses and a housemade meatball the size of my fist. It’s a fully satisfying lunch special that comes with soup or salad and garlic bread. Another excellent (if decadent) Italian pasta dish is the variation on classic cacio e pepe at Valter’s Osteria (173 W. 300 South, 801-521-4563, ValtersOsteria.com), where it’s reformulated as gorgonzola e pepe. Fresh, eggy fettuccine is bathed in a rich gorgonzola sauce with lots of tangy black pepper, and the resulting palate pleasure is undeniable. One of my favorite Chinese noodle dishes is Sichuan dandan noodles, and nobody locally does it better than Mom’s Kitchen (2233 S. State, 801-486-0092, MomsKitchenRestaurantSaltLakeCity.com). Called simply “Mom’s Cold Noodles” (get the spicy version), the perfectly cooked lo mein-style egg noodles are tossed in a silky, peanut-and-chili-oil sauce that just can’t be improved upon. If there is a pasta preparation more popular than good ol’ macaroni and cheese in this country, I’ve yet to find it.

JOHN TAYLOR

OPEN MIC EVERY WEDNESDAY 6:30 TO 9:00PM

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COFFEE SHOP π BAKERY π DELI SERVING BREAKFAST ALL DAY

The mac ’n’ cheese at Ruth’s Diner (4160 Emigration Canyon Road, 801-582-5807, RuthsDiner.com)— distinctive enough to be featured on Guy Fieri’s Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives—has a secret (and surprising) ingredient: cottage cheese. It also incorporates some other untraditional flavors such as onion, Monterey Jack cheese and bay leaves. Somehow, it just works. Japanese ramen is really all about the broth. And at Tosh’s Ramen (1465 S. State, 801-466-7000, ToshsRamen.com), owner and executive chef Toshio Sekikawa makes his from scratch, simmering bones overnight and even making broth on Mondays—his day off. The tonkatsu broth is nearly clear, served in a huge ramen bowl with a very generous helping of hearty wheat and egg noodles from Los Angeles’ Sun Noodle Co. It’s adorned with crunchy bean sprouts, thin-sliced pork belly, half a hard-cooked egg and minced scallions. This ramen is rockin’. Growing up on my mother’s homemade dumplings in broth, it didn’t take much for me to make the leap to classic Jewish matzo ball soup. For those unfamiliar, matzo balls are generally about handball-size or a little larger, and made with matzo meal, eggs, kosher salt, baking powder and oil or, preferably, melted schmaltz (rendered chicken fat). The balls are served in made-fromscratch chicken broth, which is the way Janet Feldman makes her matzo ball soup at Feldman’s Deli (2005 E. 2700 South, 801-906-0369, FeldmansDeli.com). One of the most delicious pasta dishes I’ve ever enjoyed anywhere wasn’t in Italy but in SLC: the bigoli con ragu di anatra at Veneto Ristorante Italiano (370 E. 900 South, 801-359-0708, VenetoSLC.com). This is a very common dish in the Veneto region of northern Italy: thick, homemade spaghetti-style pasta topped with a ground duck ragu. It’s drier than what you’d normally expect from a “sauce”: mirepoix (minced celery, onion and carrot) cooked

Japanese Curry Ramen at Tosh’s Ramen with tender ground duck and topped with grated Parmigiano-Reggiano. By the way, the “Mountain Gnocchi” at Veneto is equally amazing. There’s an abundance of eateries around town serving excellent versions of the Vietnamese noodle soup pho, but none better than La-Cai Noodle House (961 S. State, Salt Lake City, 801-322-3590, LaCaiNoodleHouse.com). The pho broth is rich and flavorful—with fragrant hints of cinnamon, clove and star anise—and the large, deep bowl is packed with perfectly cooked rice noodles. At La-Cai, the beef is added at the last possible instant to the pho and is delicately simmered in the steaming broth, literally on the way to the table. Germans aren’t exactly known for their culinary prowess, but I could eat späetzle—the tiny German egg-and-flour dumplings—on a daily basis. And so can you, by just visiting Siegfried’s Delicatessen (20 W. 200 South, Salt Lake City, 801-355-3891, SiegfriedsDelicatessen.com), where their homemade späetzle is a popular side dish. It’s served with (optional) glistening brown gravy and is the perfect partner for Siegfried’s sensational schnitzel. As much as I relish pad Thai, a noodle dish ubiquitous in American Thai restaurants and especially good at Skewered Thai (575 S. 700 East, 801-364-1144, SkeweredThai.com), I actually prefer their delectable “drunken noodles” ( pad kee mao). It is a large platter of wide, pan-fried rice noodles with a distinctively spicy mélange of tender shrimp, red bell pepper, mushrooms, broccoli, carrot, tomato, fresh chili, egg, onion and fragrant Thai basil, which nicely balances the heat of the chilies. I get a little tipsy just thinking about this delicious dish. I could go on, but I must go use my noodle. CW


authentic Mexican Food & cantina Since 1997

CELEBRATE Halloween BLUE IGUANA STYLE

BlueIguanaRestaurant.net

801-533-8900

255 Main St • Park City Treasure Mountain Inn (Top of Main)

435-649-3097

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165 S. West Temple • SLC

Below Benihana and across from the Salt Palace

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OCTOBER 13, 2016 | 33


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34 | OCTOBER 13, 2016

Serving American Comfort Food Since 1930

FOOD MATTERS BY TED SCHEFFLER @critic1

Times Go o d & a z B e e r , P iz

-CREEKSIDE PATIO-86 YEARS AND GOING STRONG-BREAKFAST SERVED DAILY UNTIL 4PM-DELICIOUS MIMOSAS & BLOODY MARY’S-LIVE MUSIC SAT & SUN 11AM-2PM-

“In a perfect world, every town would have a diner just like Ruth’s” -CityWeekly

AS SEEN ON “ DINERS, DRIVE-INS AND DIVES”

“Like having dinner at Mom’s in the mountains” -Cincinnati Enquirer

4160 EMIGRATION CANYON ROAD | 801 582-5807 WWW.RUTHSDINER.COM

PC Shot Ski

You might have seen shot skis in bars such as O’Shucks in Park City. It’s essentially a snow ski with shot glasses affixed to it. A group—typically four or five people—lift the ski up and drink liquor shots simultaneously; it’s a sort of bonding thing. Well, in an effort to break a world record currently held by Colorado’s Breckenridge Distillery, Park City hosts a shot-ski event on Saturday, Oct. 22 inside the Wasatch Brew Pub’s parking lot (250 Main, Park City, 435-649-0900, WasatchBeers.com). The goal is to enlist 1,000 participants to break the record for the longest continuous shot ski, which stands at 881. To get in on the recordbreaking action, anyone 21 and over can purchase a $15 ticket, with proceeds to benefit Park City Sunrise Rotary. The event takes place at 2 p.m. with a party and beer garden to follow, and will be in tandem with Wasatch Brewery’s 30th anniversary. Live music is provided by the Utah County Swillers. Advance tickets are required and can be purchased at WasatchBeers.com/ShotSki.

Sabor Latino

The third annual Taste of Latin American Festival, presented by the Latino Arts Foundation, takes place at Library Square (300 E. 500 South) on Oct. 2122, from 2-9 p.m. A tasty celebration of all things Central and South American, the festival features food, arts, crafts, cooking demonstrations and live music—and admission is free. Included in the exotic Latin American food offerings are ceviches, tacos, pupusas, arepas, empanadas, anticuchos, fried plantains, Brazilian sausages and much more.

2991 E. 3300 S.

801.528.0181

SCARY

SALE Use OCT50 for an additional

50% off your order

Not valid towards tickets Expires 10.31.16

Rye Returns

Rye Dinner & Drinks (239 S. 500 East, 801-364-4655, RyeSLC.com) co-owner Will Sartain contacted me to announce that, after taking a break to revamp a good portion of the menu, the restaurant is back open for dinner service on Friday and Saturday nights from 6-11 p.m. It’s still open seven days a week for breakfast and lunch as well.

Quote of the week: “My heart is a Latin American food stall and your love is a health inspector from Zurich.” —Tom Robbins Send tips to tscheffler@cityweekly.net

Always Local Always Discounted

certificates for dining, nightlife, wellness & more! This is not a coupon. Redeem offers at cityweeklystore.com


SHAWARMA KING Middle Eastern Cuisine

725 E. 3300 S. SLC (801) 803-9434 2223 S. Highland Dr. SLC (385) 415-2100

WWW.SLCSHAWARMAKING.COM

Award Winning Vietnamese Cuisine

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LUNCH • DINNER • COCKTAILS *Gluten-free menu options available

VOTE FOR US ON City Weekly’s Be s t o f U t ah 2016!

served

 Established 2004 

ALL DAY!

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BREAKFAST and LUNCH

18 MARKET STREET • 801.519.9595

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6001 S. State St. Murray | 801-263-8889

Contemporary Japanese Dining

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801-572-5148 | 7 Days a Week | 7am - 3pm

brittonsrestaurant.com

30 EAST BROADWAY, SLC (801) 322-1111

OCTOBER 13, 2016 | 35

694 East Union Square, SANDY


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36 | OCTOBER 13, 2016

BEER, WINE & SPIRITS

Bitter Harvest 2016 is shaping up to be a bust year for French Chablis. BY TED SCHEFFLER comments@cityweekly.net @critic1

F

rench Chablis is a very distinctive wine, and one that is growing in popularity among American winos. But if you’re a fan like me, you’d better start stocking your cellar. This year’s grape harvest in Chablis is nothing short of a disaster. So, what is Chablis? It’s both a place and a wine. The most northern subregion of Burgundy, Chablis is 60 miles north of the more famous Côte d’Or. The wine produced in Chablis is chardonnay, which is grown in vineyards that resemble rolling ocean waves. It’s stunningly beautiful scenery. And its wine is stunningly beautiful, too. But maybe not for every palate. Even though it’s made from 100 percent chardonnay grapes, Chablis is much more austere, crisp and acidic than its white Burgundy southern sister. Unlike Bourgogne blanc, it has little or no oak and

vanilla flavors, since it’s typically fermented in stainless steel or neutral wood casks. To some, that makes it less appealing than bigger, oaky chardonnays. One of my favorite aspects of this wine is the minerality. The French sometimes describe the unique flavor as “gunflint”: gout de pierre à fusil. Nice Premier or Grand Cru varieties often have those mineral gunflint notes along with sweet honeyed flavors. It’s the terroir—the unique soil—that gives it its special appeal. The soil in Chablis, which some 150 million years ago was a sea that evaporated, is composed mostly of limestone and fossils, sea shells, oysters and such, which gives it a distinctive briny taste. Some wine writers compare the taste to licking wet rocks or slate (something I’ve yet to try). Sadly, the 2016 Chablis harvest is pretty pathetic. The lucky growers will harvest about a third of the normal size this year. The unlucky ones will lose 90 percent or more of their crops. Some winemakers, like Christophe Ferrari, won’t harvest a single grape from his 9-acre plot. It’s the weather that’s causing such distress these days. In late April, an unexpected, winter-like frost that lasted three nights destroyed many of the promising grape buds. On top of that, many of the 750 winemakers’ vineyards were hit in May by a savage hail storm with howling winds.

DRINK In the space of a few minutes, entire vineyards were ruined; grapevines turned to nothing but barren twigs. The flooding that accompanied the springtime hail and frost didn’t help. In a story reported by Public Radio International, Frederic Gueguen, president of the Chablis Winegrowers Association, said, “I went inside the house and in a few seconds, I saw my vineyard going from a green leafy state with long twigs, to nothing, zero, with a thick layer of hail on the ground. I told myself it would never end, it was hitting so hard. The ground was white as in winter. It was very violent; you get hit in the face with this, you have tears in your eyes, and you feel lost.” To add insult to injury, the floods were followed by a killer fungus that destroyed much of what was left. And, the local winemakers say harvests are occurring earlier every year—some blame this on climate change—and freak

storms are happening with alarming frequency. In something sounding like science fiction or the Cold War Reagan-era Star Wars initiative, 40 “anti-hail” cannons will be set up next year in Chablis—the idea being that the cannons will shoot silver iodide into storm clouds with the hope of turning hail into rain instead. It’s a sign of just how desperate things have gotten in this region. CW


GOODEATS Complete listings at CityWeekly.net Featuring dining destinations from buffets and rooms with a view to mom-andpop joints, chic cuisine and some of our dining critic’s faves. Stanza Italian Bistro & Wine Bar

The same people behind the LaSalle and Trio restaurant groups now introduce Stanza Italian Bistro & Wine Bar, an upscale and stunning re-envisionment of Faustina in the same location. The contemporary menu is rooted in Italian classics and is complimented by the ultra-modern interior. The octopus and lamb carpaccio on the smallplates menu is superb, as well as the traditional gnocchi (with green garlic pesto, peas and asparagus) from the pasta section. Choosing a wine or spirit from their sizable list can be an ordeal, but beverage director and City Weekly’s “Best Booze Guy” (2013) James Santangelo has your back. For dessert, the port ice cream is sensational. 454 E. 300 South, Salt Lake City, 801-746-4441, StanzaSLC.com

Ruth’s Diner

If you’re in the market for wholesome, healthy, fresh food that’s also fast, you’re in luck. Mollie & Ollie is a new hightech fast-casual eatery specializing in hormone-free proteins and pesticide-free greens from purveyors such as Jones Dairy Farm, Purcell Mountain, Organic Valley and Miller Honey. Customers are encouraged to customize and create their own personalized dishes using specially designed touch-screens. It’s open for breakfast, lunch and dinner and offers breakfast scrambles, salads, sides, desserts and more. Stir-fry options include fresh-made egg noodles, brown rice or red quinoa with an array of veggies and proteins including honey-brined chicken, citrus-poached shrimp, slow-roasted turkey breast, tofu, baby spinach, roasted mushrooms, green beans, roasted summer squash, edamame and baby kale, plus various sauces. 159 S. Main, Salt Lake City, 801-328-5659, MollieAndOllie.com

Chedda Burger

OCTOBER 13, 2016 | 37

Catering available

bowtb

| CITY WEEKLY |

Open Mon-Wed: 9am-6pm Thu-Sat: 9am-9pm

chris orrock

20 W. 200 S. • (801) 355-3891

nt

@

2005 E. 2700 SOUTH, SLC FELDMANSDELI.COM FELDMANSDELI OPEN TUES - SAT TO GO ORDERS: (801) 906-0369

OCT 15TH OCT 22ND OCT 29TH

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Followers of Chef Nick Watts’ Chedda Truck, which he took to the streets of Salt Lake City in 2012, will be thrilled to know there’s now a full-blown restaurant. Watts’ fresh-ground, 100 percent natural Angus beef burgers are intended for the adventurous, with options like the “Silly Round Eye” (beef, pastrami, Swiss cheese, kimchi and fry sauce) or the “Kill Me Softly” (beef patty with blue cheese, bacon, arugula and cranberry sauce served on a Krispy Kreme doughnut). The less adventurous will like the “Old Faithful”: a just-greasy-enough beef patty with classic cheddar cheese, caramelized onions, ripe tomato slices, green leaf lettuce and fry sauce. 26 E. 600 South, Salt Lake City, 801-906-8779, CheddaWasted.com

S ItSessTen &GRU T DA estaura n Delica

Germa

now serving breakfast

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One of the oldest restaurants in Salt Lake City, Ruth’s opened in 1949 in a downtown trolley car that Ruth moved up Emigration Canyon. Erik and Tracy Nelson took over Ruth’s a few years back, and now you’ll find contemporary dishes like Erik’s raspberry chicken alongside classics such as liver and onions or tender, braised pot roast. Breakfast is served into late afternoon, so you can order the famous “Mile-High Biscuits” with country gravy for a late lunch. In warm weather, the sprawling patio is the place to be, as the restaurant also offers live music from local artists. 4160 E. Emigration Canyon Road, Salt Lake City, 801-582-5807, RuthsDiner.com

Mollie & Ollie


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38 | OCTOBER 13, 2016

Breakfast ·Lunch ·Dinner | Beer & Wine

REVIEW BITES

TED SCHEFFLER

Fresh Flavors, Ancient Secrets

A sampler of Ted Scheffler’s reviews

THE OTHER PLACE RESTAURANT OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK | MON - SAT 7AM - 11PM ● SUN 8AM - 10PM 469 EAST 300 SOUTH ● 521-6567

Celebrate Oktoberfest Weiner Schnitzel, Red Cabbage Beer Cheese Dip served w/ Pretzel Breadsticks Authentic German Bratwurst & Sauerkraut (To Stay or To Go) Traditional German Steins and Alpine Hats

Buy $30 Get $5 OFF

Coupon must be present. Limit one per customer. Exp: 10/31/ 16

Dutch, German & Scandinavian Delicatessen

2696 Highland Drive | 801-467-5052 | olddutchstore.com Open Monday - Friday 10am-6pm, Saturday 9am-5pm, Closed Sunday

Encore Bistro’s “Power Salad” Encore Bistro

While this restaurant might be located in the new George S. and Dolores Doré Eccles Theater in downtown Salt Lake City, it’s going to attract more than theater-goers with cuisine that is fresh, clean and creative. If you’re looking for a fast, economical and delicious breakfast, I highly recommend their unique take on the now-ubiquitous chicken and waffles, with scrumptious housemade chicken sausage, soft and airy scrambled eggs and Utah cheddar cheese, all encased in a mapleflavored waffle. Lunchtime offerings include the excellent “power salad” with kale, watercress, arugula and roasted beets tossed with grapefruit, blueberries, goat cheese, pistachios and balsamic vinaigrette. The eclectic array of sandwiches, sliders, paninis and wraps offered for lunch range from a delightful Thai chicken wrap to slow-braised beef rib sliders; vegetable lovers will appreciate the “diva panini” with roasted red pepper, caramelized onions, portobello mushroom, spinach, grilled zucchini, havarti cheese and pesto on a ciabatta bun. During performance evenings, dinner will be served with a menu tuned to the theme of each performance. I’m not sure exactly what that means, but I bet the food will make your taste buds do a standing O. Reviewed Sept. 29. 131 S. Main, 801-509-7871, EncoreBistroSLC.com

Eat Right, Live Right, Fresh & Healthy! In The Heart Of Sugar House

V catering • delivery• dine-in 2121 s. McClelland Street (850 east) 801.467.2130 I couscousgrillexpress.com

6213 South Highland Drive | 801.635.8190 Book our food truck for your next corporate, private, or public event call 801.975.4052

Schedule of events can be found at apolloburgers.com 13 NEIGHBORHOOD LOCATIONS |

FA C E B O O K . C O M / A P O L L O B U R G E R

VG

GF


CINEMA

MOVIE REVIEW

Making a Statement

American Honey offers a terrific slice of life, whenever it’s not trying too hard. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

A

Sasha Lane and Shia LaBeouf in American Honey Honey offers up at least two or three such scenes; when Jake and Star attempt a sale in one upper-class home, it becomes a set piece about an uptight Christian mother and her young daughter’s inappropriately sexy dance moves. The movie never feels ponderous at more than two-and-a-half hours, but its epic length—visiting of-themoment locations like North Dakota oil shale fields—still feels like part of a plan to give it an epic sense of consequence. Late in the film, Star and her friends share one of several sing-alongs that liven up their long drives through flat landscapes: Lady Antebellum’s “American Honey.” They sing lyrics about getting caught in the race of this crazy life, and remembering a simpler, innocent childhood time—a time which, for these kids, almost certainly never existed. Andrea Arnold does a fine enough job in American Honey of telling a story about that missing childhood innocence, without having to tell us that she’s been telling us. It can be about these people, in this place, and not have to be about America. CW

AMERICAN HONEY

BBB Sasha Lane Shia LaBeouf Riley Keough Rated R

| CITY WEEKLY |

TRY THESE Fish Tank (2010) Katie Jarvis Michael Fassbender Rated R

Spring Breakers (2012) Vanessa Hudgens James Franco Rated R

Heaven Knows What (2014) Arielle Holmes Caleb Landry Jones Rated R

OCTOBER 13, 2016 | 39

American Beauty (1999) Kevin Spacey Annette Bening Rated R

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runaways and other assorted misfits, like the Darth Vader-obsessed Pagan (Heaven Knows What’s Arielle Holmes). Arnold does a fine job of capturing the makeshift-family vibe of these kids, packed together and getting high on their road trip across the Great Plains in a way that feels even more constricted by Arnold’s use of the TV-square 4:3 ratio. American Honey is at its loosest and most satisfying when simply observing the crew’s day-to-day world, from motel rooms full to bursting, to their expertly tailored door-to-door—and sometimes truck door-to-truck door—sales. It’s also a phenomenal Star showcase for first-time actor Lane. This story plays as something of a spiritual companion piece to Arnold’s standout 2009 drama Fish Tank, which also followed a tough teen girl trying to imagine a better future for herself. The director understands how to navigate the character space between toughness and vulnerability, observing Lane’s watchful performance as she tries to interpret Jake’s feelings for her, or his relationship with the crew’s alpha-female boss, Krystal (Riley Keough). It’s only thanks to the defiant edge in her performance that scenes which could have come off as exploitative—like a house party with three cowboys that seems doomed to a bad end—instead crackle with Star’s determination to become a winner. It all might have added up to a transcendent piece of cinematic realism, if Arnold had demonstrated just a bit more trust in her audience. Not content with one scene in which Star’s gentle treatment of an animal conveys the soft center in her soul, American

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fter more than 20 years of writing about movies, I’ve accumulated a near-infinite list of advice that I would give to filmmakers—from actors they need to cast far more often, to scenes that I would be happy to never ever see again (I’m looking at you, “post-traumatic shame shower”). But one that seems so obvious to me continues to be a danger: You need to think long and hard before you start your film title with “American.” Clearly many such films have been popular and generally lauded over the years, from American Graffiti to American Beauty to American Sniper. It’s a risky proposition, however, because there’s a built-in assumption that you’re going to unfold a narrative that is in some way about The Way Things Are Today. Where you could (and probably should) simply be telling a story, throwing “American” at the front makes it feel like you’re trying to tell the story—the definitive statement. And that’s a burden that even a good movie doesn’t need. American Honey takes its title from a Lady Antebellum song—more about which later—and it’s fairly evident that it’s meant to describe Star (Sasha Lane), writer/director Andrea Arnold’s 18-year-old protagonist. Scraping together a desperate life in Muskogee, Okla.—dumpster-diving for food while living with her creepy father— she’s a fierce spirit staring down a life that looks as dead-end as the one that cost her meth-addict mother her life. So it’s easy to understand the appeal when she spots a wild young traveling “mag crew” of youths selling door-to-door magazine subscriptions, and is invited by their top salesman, Jake (Shia LaBeouf) to join them. And join them she does, loading herself into a van filled with fellow drifters,


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NEW THIS WEEK Information is correct at press time. Film release schedules are subject to change. THE ACCOUNTANT [not yet reviewed] Treasury Department investigators look into an autistic math savant (Ben Affleck) handling the books for criminal enterprises. Opens Oct. 14 at theaters valleywide. (R) AMERICAN HONEY BBB See review p. 39. Opens Oct. 14 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (R)

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ANTIBIRTH BB.5 Somewhere just sideways of our world—perhaps in the realm of Repo Man—perpetually wasted stoner chick Lou (Natasha Lyonne) wakes up one morning after a particularly weird night of partying and realizes that she’s pregnant. But not normal-pregnant: “I’m some kind of goddamn freakshow,” she complains to her best friend and cheerful fellow wastrel (Chloë Sevigny). And this punk Canadian body-horror grossout comedy is off down a bizarre yellow-brick road of conspiracy theories about alien abductions, military experiments and a fetus that is growing way too damn fast. What the hell is Lou going to give birth to? This first feature from video artist Danny Perez gives off a dementedly creepy vibe, and Lyonne and Sevigny are simply having a ball playing such delightful reprobates. (Meg Tilly is a scream in a small role as a crazy lady who might have an explanation for Lou’s predicament.) But Perez’ vision feels a bit more like a man’s idea about pregnancy than a woman’s experience, and the whole shebang plays like a 30-minute short padded out to feature length. Still, Perez is clearly a filmmaker to watch. Opens Oct. 14 at Tower Theatre. (NR)—MaryAnn Johanson

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CAMERAPERSON BBBB The term “monumental” feels like it must be hyperbole, but there’s really nothing else that captures what veteran documentary cinematographer Kirsten Johnson has achieved with an

KEVIN HART: WHAT NOW? [not yet reviewed] Concert film from the comedian’s sellout stadium tour. Opens Oct. 14 at theaters valleywide. (R) MAX STEEL [not yet reviewed] A teenager (Ben Winchell) and an alien entity form a bond to become one powerful superhero. Opens Oct. 14 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)

SPECIAL SCREENINGS AUDRIE & DAISY At Main Library, Oct. 18, 7 p.m. (NR) BELL, BOOK AND CANDLE At Tower Theatre, Oct. 14-15, 11 p.m.; Oct. 16, noon. (NR)

LIFE, ANIMATED At Park City Film Series, Oct. 14-15, 8 p.m.; Oct. 16, 6 p.m. (NR) TALLADEGA NIGHTS: THE BALLAD OF RICKY BOBBY At Brewvies, Oct. 17, 10 p.m. (PG-13)

CURRENT RELEASES

THE BIRTH OF A NATION BB.5 How do we separate sometimes-repugnant facts and/or allegations around artists’ lives—like the story of the rape case involving writer/director/star Nate Parker—from their art? Or should we? Taken in isolation, there’s powerful material in the story of Nat Turner (Parker), the Virginia slave/preacher who eventually led a slave uprising in 1831. Parker’s performance effectively captures Nat’s growing radicalization, while the choice to mythologize Parker provides dramatic punch. But it’s much harder now to watch some specific plot element, specifically using assaults on women as motivating incidents for his male protagonists. Even more disturbing, however, is the reality that the central thematic idea—of a moral authority higher than the letter of human laws that often protect the powerful—is crippled by this external knowledge. The movie might not have changed, but the experience of watching it has. (R)—SR

THE GIRL ON THE TRAIN BB Paula Hawkins’ thriller is one of those page-turners that should actually work better as a big dumb Hollywood adaptation; instead, the movie can’t even manage the book’s simple pleasures. Emily Blunt plays Rachel, an emotionally unsteady alcoholic who becomes obsessed with a seemingly perfect couple (Haley Bennett and Luke Evans) she sees regularly from her commuter train—and then gets caught up in the case when the woman disappears. The book offered a few satisfying swipes at gender roles, but mostly depended on its twisty, multiple-POV narrative structure. Director Tate Taylor tries to duplicate that vibe, but his plodding pace doesn’t help a script bogged down in narrated exposition. Only Blunt—physically miscast, but solid at conveying a woman with a shattered sense of self-worth—offers much of a reason to stick around and figure out whodunit. (R)—SR

THE GREAT GILLY HOPKINS BBB Another beloved children’s novel by Katherine Paterson (Bridge to Terabithia) comes to the big screen: a tough, simple story about a 12-year-old foster kid who dreams of the mother who abandoned her swooping in to take her away to a wonderful life. Sophie Nélisse (The Book Thief) is all sharp-edged angry sparks as Gilly, who plots

more than just movies at brewvies

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40 | OCTOBER 13, 2016

idea that sounds on the surface like a snooze: compiling snippets of footage from many of the films she’s shot over the course of 25 years, plus her own home movies. But what emerges in that footage is something that strips bare the idea of “objective” journalistic filmmaking to find the humanity in every work of artistic creation—the person behind the camera. And that person emerges here in ways both adorably small (a sneeze that shakes the camera, or a shadow on the sidewalk) to gaspinducingly huge (watching as Bosnian toddler tries to play with a hatchet lodged in a stump). The on-camera subjects are often fascinating all on their own, whether they’re survivors of genocide or Johnson’s own mother struggling with dementia. It’s the way these moments are put together, however—in one of the greatest works of film editing you’ll ever find—that results in an emotional bombshell about art and the simple experience of caring about other people. Opens Oct. 14 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (NR)—Scott Renshaw

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to run away from her latest foster home, which is managed by the effusive Trotter (Kathy Bates), whose kindness grates on the girl. But perhaps sympathy from a new teacher, Miss Harris (Octavia Spencer), might succeed where persistent warmth fails; the scene in which Harris pegs Gilly’s rage as the source of her power and her pain is extraordinary. Gilly is a real kid the likes of which we don’t often see onscreen, and her path to finding a family involves no platitudes, just bittersweet truth. (PG)—MAJ MIDDLE SCHOOL: THE WORST YEARS OF MY LIFE BB.5 As preteen fare goes, it’s better than its bland, glib title, with some heart and soul beneath its pour-paint-on-the-principal shenanigans. Rafe (Griffin Gluck), a budding artist with a wandering mind, transfers to a school run by clueless doofus anti-art Principal Dwight (Andy Daly). When Dwight destroys Rafe’s sketchbook, he and a friend aim to sow rebellion among students through pranks: trophy case turned into aquarium, school bell embellished with fart noise, etc. At home, Rafe and his sassy little sister (Alexa Nisenson) cope with the competitive man-child boyfriend (Rob Riggle) of their mom (Lauren Graham). There’s ultimately a tender side to the mildly satiric farce, which helps Rafe’s hijinks not seem bratty, and while the plot is resolved too tidily, the kids are sweet, and the adults—including Adam Pally as a think-outside-the-box teacher—occasionally funny in borderline self-aware fashion. (PG)—Eric D. Snider

SPIRIT OF THE GAME BB The inspirational sports drama is such a well-worn formula that you’d think it would be possible to master rudimentary details of the sport. This fact based story, set in 1955-56, follows Mormon missionary DeLyle Condie (Aaron Jakubenko) as he leads a group of fellow elders helping the Australian national basketball team prepare for the upcoming Olympic Games in Melbourne. The low-key drama comes mostly from DeLyle recovering from a broken heart, arguing with a stubborn mission president and the usual hearts-and-minds struggles of missionary life, but there’s virtually nothing here beyond the bland uplift. And then it crumbles any time actual basketball comes into play, including a climactic exhibition game between the “Mormon Yankees” and the French national team that fails to set up its big moments in any coherent way. Souls might have been saved; this story can’t be. (PG)—SR

SOUTH VALLEY Century 16 Union Heights 7800 S. 1300 East, Sandy 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

Megaplex Legacy Crossing 1075 W. Legacy Crossing Blvd., Centerville 801-397-5100 MegaplexTheatres.com

Broadway Centre Cinemas 111 E. 300 South 801-321-0310 SaltLakeFilmSociety.org

Cinemark Draper 12129 S. State, Draper 801-619-6494 Cinemark.com

Century 16 South Salt Lake 125 E. 3300 South 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

Cinemark Sandy 9 9539 S. 700 East, Sandy 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

WEBER COUNTY Cinemark Tinseltown 14 3651 Wall Ave., Ogden 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

Cinemark Sugar House 2227 S. Highland Drive 801-466-3699 Cinemark.com

Megaplex Jordan Commons 9400 S. State, Sandy 801-304-INFO MegaplexTheatres.com

Water Gardens Cinema 6 1945 E. Murray-Holladay Road 801-273-0199 WaterGardensTheatres.com

Megaplex 20 at The District 11400 S. Bangerter Highway 801-304-INFO MegaplexTheatres.com

Megaplex 12 Gateway 165 S. Rio Grande St. 801-304-4636 MegaplexTheatres.com

PARK CITY Cinemark Holiday Village 1776 Park Ave. 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

Tower Theatre 836 E. 900 South 801-321-0310 SaltLakeFilmSociety.org WEST VALLEY 5 Star Cinemas 8325 W. 3500 South, Magna 801-250-5551 RedCarpetCinemas.com

Cinemark Tinseltown USA 720 W. 1500 North, Layton 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Gateway 8 206 S. 625 West, Bountiful 801-292-7979 RedCarpetCinemas.com

Cinemark Provo Town Center 1200 Town Center Blvd., Provo 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Cinemark University Mall 1010 S. 800 East, Provo 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Megaplex Thanksgiving Point 2935 N. Thanksgiving Way 801-304-INFO MegaplexTheatres.com Water Gardens Cinema 8 790 E. Expressway Ave. Spanish Fork 801-798-9777 WaterGardensTheatres.com Water Gardens Cinema 6 912 W. Garden Drive Pleasant Grove 801-785-3700 WaterGardensTheatres.com

OCTOBER 13, 2016 | 41

Cinemark Valley Fair Mall 3601 S. 2700 West, West Valley City 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

Cinemark Station Park 900 W. Clark Lane, Farmington 801-447-8561 Cinemark.com

Cinemark Movies 8 2230 N. University Parkway, Orem 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

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Cinemark 24 Jordan Landing 7301 S. Bangerter Highway 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

DAVIS COUNTY AMC Loews Layton Hills 9 728 W. 1425 North, Layton 801-774-8222 AMCTheatres.com

Cinemark American Fork 715 W. 180 North, American Fork 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

Cinemark 12 1600 W. Fox Park Drive, West Jordan 801-562-5760 Cinemark.com

Redstone 8 Cinemas 6030 N. Market 435-575-0220 Redstone8Cinemas.com

UTAH COUNTY Carmike Wynnsong 4925 N. Edgewood Drive, Provo 801-764-0009 Carmike.com

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Redwood Drive-In 3688 S. Redwood Road 801-973-7088

Megaplex 13 at The Junction 2351 Kiesel Ave., Ogden 801-304-INFO MegaplexTheatres.com

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MISS PEREGRINE’S HOME FOR PECULIAR CHILDREN BB.5 Tim Burton sheds some of his recent tendency toward visual overkill, wasted on something so familiar. This adaptation of

Ransom Riggs’ novel follows teenager Jacob (Asa Butterfield) as he discovers his family history with a strange orphanage in Wales—headed by mysterious Miss Peregrine (Eva Green)— that houses children with unique abilities, living in a circa-1943 time loop. On its most basic level, the story provides satisfying adventure seasoned with a dollop of teen romance, all given the macabre flavor of vintage Burton. But screenwriter Jane Goldman (X-Men movie series) mostly makes this orphanage feel like a European branch office of Xavier’s School for Gifted Youngsters. Every story beat feels lifted from some other younghero narrative or comic-book movie, with Green and a whiteeyed Samuel L. Jackson providing the only personality. A real Burton-saince will require some better material. (PG-13)—SR

SALT LAKE CITY Brewvies Cinema Pub 677 S. 200 West 801-355-5500 Brewvies.com


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2 | OCTOBER 13, 2016

TRUE BY B I L L F RO S T @bill_frost

TV

Dream On

Falling Water is pretty, and pretty confusing; Goliath lays down the law. Falling Water Thursday, Oct. 13 (USA)

Series Debut: In the time of Too Many Shows, it’s almost suicidal to launch a new series that won’t get to the damned point by the middle of the first episode; hook ’em fast, because viewers have a dozen other choices tonight (except for Notorious, which still sucks). Falling Water follows three seemingly unrelated people (Lizzie Brocheré, David Ajala and Will Yun Lee) who come to realize that they’re all dreaming parts of the same dream, and said dream relates to “the fate of the world.” How? Annoyingly unclear, but the three are definitely dreaming—so much so that it’s impossible to tell what’s “real,” but at least the imagery is gorgeous (if you have access to 4K HD and “herbal” medication, you’ll probably enjoy this more than most). Falling Water has nine more episodes to establish a plot; otherwise, there likely won’t be more to come.

Goliath Friday, Oct. 14 (Amazon Prime)

Series Debut: Yes, I’ve been complaining about the glut of new legal dramas this season … However! The potential of the combo of David E. Kelley (finally venturing into the streaming realm) and Billy Bob Thornton (sorely missed from episodic TV since Fargo Season 1) is too rich to ignore. As beaten-down Los Angeles lawyer William McBride, Thornton more than delivers, and Goliath, set against the classic-noir backdrop of seedy L.A., is a stick-it-to-TheMan legal saga that echoes Better Call Saul and the late, great Terriers. McBride, on the edge of abandoning the legal system in favor of just drinking himself to death, is hell-bent on one last takedown—his former partner (William Hurt), a power-tripping shark using his corporate influence to cover up a murder and who-knows-what else. It’s a familiar trope, but Thornton and Kelley play it so well, it’s easy to forgive them for not using Goliath’s killer supporting cast (including Maria Bello, Molly Parker and Olivia Thirlby) to fuller effect.

W

Now Later Never Haters Back Off Friday, Oct. 14 (Netflix)

Falling Water (USA)

Series Debut: Depending upon your tolerance level for YouTube star Miranda Sings (Colleen Ballinger), Netflix’s Haters Back Off is either a brilliant, inevitable expansion of her digital reach, or an inexplicably annoying excuse for comedy (i.e. you’re old—go watch Longmire again). Ballinger’s Miranda character is a satire of self-absorbed, tone-deaf YouTube “singers” desperate for fame, so creating a backstory around her (which includes The Office’s Angela Kinsey as her mother and Eastbound & Down’s Steven Little as her far-too-supportive uncle) could bring the whole meta roof crashing down. Then again, there’s some undeniably funny writing here (“Are you an alto or a soprano?” “I’m American!”), and Ballinger dominates any size of screen she’s on, so it’s probably best not to overthink Haters Back Off. Besides, no Millennials are reading this, anyway … right?

Eyewitness Sunday, Oct. 16 (USA)

Series Debut: Since there are, as previously stated, Too Many Shows, do you really need a crime thriller about a pair of teenage boys trying to hide their taboo relationship and stay one step ahead of a murderer whom they witnessed in the act at a remote cabin? If Eyewitness were even half as intense as the Norwegian series it’s based upon, I’d be inclined to say, “kanskje.” But, as with umbrellas and black metal, some things are just done better in Norway.

, s d J t u ’ a s n t e o B S ell eD

• BEADS • BEADS S D A E B

Chance Wednesday, Oct. 19 (Hulu)

Series Debut: Hugh Laurie is back on TV (well, Hulu) as a doctor—but Dr. House, he ain’t. In Chance, he’s Dr. Eldon Chance, a forensic neuropsychiatrist whose treatment of a patient with possible multiple personalities (Gretchen Mol) becomes a bit too intimate for her abusive police detective husband’s (Paul Adelstein) liking. It sounds like the setup for a throwaway Lifetime movie, but Chance is a layered psychological thriller more in line with British imports like The Fall and Marcella, with even-seedier stories happening outside the margins and a surprisingly terrifying performance from ex-My Name is Earl goofball Ethan Suplee. It might (or might not) be wise to also mention that Chance comes from novelist/screenwriter Kem Nunn, the man who created HBO’s most divisive drama ever, John From Cincinnati … but there it is.

Listen to Frost Mondays at 8 a.m. on X96 Radio From Hell, and on the TV Tan podcast via Stitcher, iTunes, Google Play and BillFrost.tv.

Want to sell your company? Utah Business Consultants is the premier business brokerage in Utah, where we’ve been operating since 1989. Give me a call and we’ll chat about the options. 801-424-6300 office 801-440-3176 cell George@UBCUtah.com www.UBCUtah.com

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The Pie Pizzeria: The Ice Haüs: 1320 E. 200 South, 801-582-570, ThePie.com 7 E. 4800 South, 801-266-2127, IceHausBar.com Monday, October 17, 7 p.m. Friday, October 14, 8 p.m. Free, all ages $12.50, 21+ MikeMassé.com; GoFundMe.com/NoahPT MIKE MASSÉ

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Sim Gill). And in 2008, Massé began posting clips of his spot-on covers of U2, Pink Floyd and Radiohead, garnering real fans and out-of-state bookings—including a gig singing with former Boston guitarist and drummer Barry Goudreau and Sib Hashian. In 2014, Massé quit his 13-year job at the Salt Lake Legal Defenders Association to pursue music full-time. When Massé says people responded, it’s an understatement. “Let It Be” went viral, and was picked up by the Dutch viral video site Dumpert.nl. This went a long way toward raising the money needed for Noah, who, after two major surgeries and several months of chemotherapy, is now cancerfree. The only remaining hurdle was catching up developmentally; Noah didn’t walk or talk until he was 2 and a half. But after one four-hour session at the Intensive Physical Therapy Institute (IPTI) of Utah, Massé says, now fighting happy-tears, “Noah walked to me for the first time.” Noah’s treatment is ongoing and expensive, so Massé continues to raise money through GoFundMe.com. Of course, the uncanny quality of his music, and the increased exposure it received after “Let It Be,” continues to help Massé and his wife, Valia, with their bills. He’s developed a reputation as a world-class cover artist, with 125 videos, more than 151,000 subscribers and incredible view counts. “Let It Be” has nearly 850,000, and it’s only the 11th most popular video on the channel behind clips like Radiohead’s “Creep” (1.4 million), Simon & Garfunkel’s “The Sound of Silence” (1.7 million) and the big one, Toto’s “Africa,” a version so compelling that it’s nearing 7.4 million views. Massé now plays every weekend, often flying around the country—and the globe. In August, he was able to travel to the Netherlands to connect with his Dutch fans in person. Most importantly, it’s all enabled the couple to connect with their son. This week, Massé and Noah are in town so Noah can work more with IPTI. While here, Massé will perform two shows—including a return to The Pie. He encourages people to come early; “Last time, there was a line up the stairs and down the street.” CW

WHISKEY FISH

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s a singer, connecting with someone else’s lyrics isn’t always easy. For Mike Massé, it was easiest when life was hardest. That’s how he found himself at the piano, performing the Beatles’ “Let It Be.” When the first frame of Massé’s video comes up on YouTube, the look in his eyes is a suckerpunch. As he sits before a black backdrop, his red-rimmed eyes—piercing and light blue on an ordinary day—are dim. Shakily, he says, “About two weeks ago, my sweet baby, 11-month-old Noah, was diagnosed with a malignant brain tumor.” After a series of crossfading photos of Mike and Noah in happier times, Massé wishes Noah a happy first birthday, then begins to play. “When I find myself in times of trouble …” Speaking to City Weekly via telephone from Denver, where he moved in 2014, Massé breaks down. “Sorry,” he says. “I’m a baby.” Who wouldn’t be, in his shoes? The video was his way of fighting through the fear and pain by doing whatever he could to help Noah. Since the former Salt Lake City public defender surely couldn’t sue the tumor into remission, he turned to music. Massé chose “Let It Be” to acknowledge that he couldn’t control the situation, but it “allowed me to take back what control I could,” he says. Knowing that talking about Noah would affect his ability to get through the song, he performed before recording the introduction. “I steeled myself, knowing Noah needed it to be good,” he says. The final video is nonetheless composed of multiple takes, but “people responded, so it was good enough.” Now, Massé had an edge; he wasn’t just another cover artist. He had performed weekly at The Pie Pizzeria’s University of Utah location since 1993 in an acoustic duo with bassist/backing vocalist Jeff Hall (currently deputy district attorney under

Mike Massé

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The name is German, but the romantic, generally laid-back music evokes the Iberian Peninsula. Five-time Grammy Award-winning acoustic guitarist Ottmar Liebert is an international sensation; with 29 studio albums since his 1989 debut Marita: Shadows and Storms, Cologne-born Liebert’s brand of instrumental pop-jazzNew Age music is a recipe for success. His albums have earned 38 Gold and Platinum certifications in the U.S.; he’s a popular concert draw here in his adopted home country, as well as around the globe. Liebert’s most recent album with his group Luna Negra, 2015’s Waiting n Swan, adds reggae flavors to the more familiar Latin stylings, and features readings of several reggae standards including “I Shot the Sheriff,” “Jammin’” and “No Woman No Cry.” (Bill Kopp) The Egyptian Theatre, 328 Main, Park City, 8 p.m., $23-$45 ($5 fee if purchased within 30 minutes of showtime), EgyptianTheatreCompany.org

FRIDAY 10.14 honeyhoney

If ever a band opted for truth in advertising, then credit honeyhoney’s Suzanne Santo and Ben Jaffe for affirming their cushy handle. With their beguiling harmonies and gently nuanced delivery, they sound like a couple you’d like living next door to, given a back-porch approach that’s as snug as a tattered pair of jeans. But don’t let that homespun sound fool you. They boast some big name associations, from actor Kiefer Sutherland—

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MIKE LANE

Ottmar Liebert & Luna Negra

who signed them to his independent Ironworks label early on, then helmed one of their first music videos—to Grammy-winning Dave Cobb, producer of their latest album, 3, and the man behind the boards for such fabled clientele as Chris Stapleton, Lake Street Dive, Jason Isbell, the Oak Ridge Boys and many others. That suggests some sweet tidings indeed. (Lee Zimmerman) The State Room, 638 S. State, 9 p.m., $17, 21+, TheStateRoomSLC.com

SATURDAY 10.15 Alestorm, Nekrogoblikon, Aether Realm, Principium

The idea for the “Super Smashed Turbo Tour” is inspired. Headliner Alestorm hails from Scotland (or the Caribbean, if you believe their bio), and their keytar-playing singer performs in a pirate hat and kilt while fans bat around an inflatable shark and wave inflatable swords. They call

Ottmar Liebert their music “bacon-flavored pirate core,” which translates to a brew of folk and power metal with swashbucklin’ ditties called “Walk the Plank” and “Mead from Hell.” California’s Nekrogoblikon, fronted by an ugly green accountant with low self-esteem and a diabolical temper, plays melodic death metal with flashes of hiphop, EDM and even bluegrass. And then we have Aether Realm, a buzzy vikingmetal band from North Carolina. It’s unclear why they’ve chosen a bear to represent them on tour posters, but it’s a nice setup for a cheap Wizard of Oz reference. Pirates and goblins and bears, oh my! (Randy Harward) Metro Music Hall, 615 W. 100 South, 8 p.m., $20 in advance, $25 day of show, 21+, Facebook.com/ MetroMusicHall

Nekrogoblikon

RICK CRAFT

MARINA CHAVEZ

44 | OCTOBER 13, 2016

| CITY WEEKLY |

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PINKY’S THIS WEEK’S

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE CITYWEEKLY.NET


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OCTOBER 13, 2016 | 45


New Expanded Hours for Rye: Monday-Friday from 9am-2pm Saturday and Sunday from 9am-3pm Friday and Sunday from 6pm-11pm

Free ticket Tuesday at Rye! 1 entree = 1 ticket at Urban Lounge (while supplies last)

OCT 14: 8PM DOORS

QUIET OAKS ELDREN TAROT DEATH CARD BEACHMEN

OCT 15:

RACHAEL YAMAGATA PRESSING STRINGS

OCT 15:

ZOMBIECOCK EXES

7PM DOORS EARLY SHOW

9PM DOORS LATE SHOW

CVPITVLS

OCT 16:

KISHI BASHI BUSMAN’S HOLIDAY

OCT 17:

DEERHUNTER ALDOUS HARDING

7PM DOORS EARLY SHOW

8PM DOORS

Dizzy Wright

MICHELLE GRACE HUNDER

www.ryeslc.com

JOCK GANG

OCT 18: 8PM DOORS

OF MONTREAL TEEN

THE FELICE BROTHERS / ERIKA WENNERSTROM OCT 20: TRUE WIDOW NO SUN OCT 19: 8PM DOORS

8PM DOORS

OCT 21: 8PM DOORS

THE CIRCULARS THE NODS

ALBUM RELEASE

CHOIR BOY

OCT 22: 8PM DOORS

THE RAMONES BIRTHQUAKE

TRIBUTE NIGHT:

90S TELEVISION F@$% THE INFORMER KING TIIIGER DAN FLETCHER

OCT 23: 7PM DOORS EARLY SHOW

THE DILLINGER ESCAPE PLAN O’BROTHER CULT LEADER BENT KNEE

COMING SOON Oct 24: Loch Lomond Oct 25: Brooks’ Birthday Oct 26: SLUG Localized w/ Villian Oct 27: R.A. The Rugged Man Oct 28: Max Pain & The Groovies Oct 29: The Sword Oct 30: Madchild

Oct 31: Islands Nov 02: Nik Turner’s Hawkwind Nov 02: The Head & The Heart After Party Nov 03: Sweater Beats Nov 04: Roger Clyne Duo Nov 04: Dubwise 10 Year Anniversary Nov 05: Lydia

BEN ROUSE

SHERWIN LAINEZ

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

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| CITY WEEKLY |

46 | OCTOBER 13, 2016

LIVE

Ani DiFranco Ani DiFranco, Chastity Brown

Feminist hero. Alt-rock icon. Indie artist before it was cool. All of those labels apply to singer-songwriter-guitarist Ani DiFranco. Beginning with her self-titled 1990 debut, DiFranco asserted her creative identity. Her catalog includes 18 studio albums plus nearly 20 “official bootleg” live releases, and the output is remarkably consistent, with near-unanimous critical praise for the majority of her work. A ninetime Grammy nominee (with one win), DiFranco is a popular speaker on social and cultural topics, and has also published two books of poetry. She’s a keenly incisive observer of socio-political issues—she was even given the 2009 Woody Guthrie Award for being a voice of positive social change—but she rarely lets preachy lyrics get in the way of a rousing tune. (BK) The Depot, 400 W. South Temple, 9 p.m., $28 in advance, $35 day of, DepotSLC.com

of Montreal

SUNDAY 10.16

Dizzy Wright, Audio Push & Mark Battles, Demrick & T Dubz

Under the rallying cry, “Wisdom and Good Vibes,” Las Vegas-based rapper Dizzy Wright has blazed quite the trail since 2012, when he dropped Smokeout Conversations on Hopsin’s now-defunct Funk Volume label. At the time, he aimed to prove he’s a determined, motivated weed fiend, which he recalls in a recent tweet: “Told @DJHoppa in 2012 we gotta set a good example and be active stoners 4 years later we still going hard for that.” He’s likewise going hard, spittin’ rhymes on his new album, The Growing Process, for his new label, Warner Bros. In fact, he’s already followed it up with two EPs: the independently released Wisdom and Good Vibes and The 702 EP (Still Movin’), which find his flow both laid-back and, ironically, focused. Which means he’s probably puffin’ a hybrid. (RH) The Complex, 536 W. 100 South, 7 p.m., $20 in advance, $25 day of, TheComplexSLC.com

TUESDAY 10.18 of Montreal, TEEN

Let’s make one thing clear: It’s hard to get a handle on of Montreal. For one thing, they’re not of Montreal at all, but rather from Athens, Ga. Their name came about when founder Kevin Barnes was starting the band while lamenting his break-up with a woman “of Montreal.” For another, their often-quirky sound has steadily shifted over the years, from their effusive indie origins through flirtations with glam, funk, electronica, prog and punk. Little wonder, then, that the band resides well below the radar. Still, those in the know have come to appreciate the evolution that’s transpired over the course of 14 albums, 20 years and a nonstop parade of personnel. Unpredictable to a fault, the band can’t disguise the fact that they’re proud to be precocious. (LZ) The Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 8 p.m., $20, 21+, TheUrbanLoungeSLC.com


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| CITY WEEKLY |

OCTOBER 13, 2016 | 47


THURSDAY 10.13

CONCERTS & CLUBS

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

TRAVIS SHINN

Gojira, Tesseract

COME SOAK UP THE LAST OF

SUMMER WITH US

Every 3rd Tuesday

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

48 | OCTOBER 13, 2016

French metal foursome Gojira plays an epic and heady brew of doom, technical death and progressive metal, and even dips into groove on their sixth album, Magma (Roadrunner, 2016). I spoke to singer-guitarist Joe Duplantier for Guitar World, and he said that the album’s title track makes him especially proud as a guitarist, and his reply was as brainy as the band’s sound. “I’m limited by the reality of the pinch harmonic,” he says of his technique. “You can only get certain notes, so I came up with a melody that used those notes—and it’s a very, very challenging thing to play. I don’t know how I’m gonna pull it off live … yet.” It’s not on the setlist as of press time, but the album is on YouTube, so you can at least hear “Magma” there in all its ethereal, harmonic glory. But don’t fret; Gojira’s 16-song set has plenty of goodness in store. (Randy Harward) The Complex, 536 W. 100 South, 7 p.m., $27 in advance, $32 day of, TheComplexSLC.com

Joe McQueen Quartet Next Showtime

Oct. 18

VDJ Birdman DJ Juggy SAT: DJ Handsome Hands

THURS:

FRI:

150 Spirits • $5 House Whiskeys Famous Pickle Backs

We’d Love Your Vote!

SPIRITS • FOOD • GOOD COMPANY 10.13 10.14 10.15 10.17

2014

2015

19 East 200 South | bourbonhouseslc.com

MICHAEL DALLIN MICHELLE MOONSHINE TRIO TRIGGERS AND SLIPS OPEN BLUES JAM HOSTED BY ROBBY’S BLUES EXPLOSION

10.19 10.20 10.21 10.22

DYLAN ROE MICHELLE MOONSHINE STONEFED STONEFED

3200 E BIG COTTONWOOD RD. | 801.733.5567 THEHOGWALLOW.COM


OCTOBER 29 TH HALLOWEEN PARTY

AMAZING $8 LUNCH EVERY WEEKDAY! SATURDAY & SUNDAY BRUNCH MIMOSAS AND MARYS NFL SUNDAY TICKET THURSDAY: The music of Nathan Spenser

COSTUME CONTEST

SATURDAY:

1 ST PLACE $200 | 2 ND PLACE $100 | 3 RD PLACE $50

FRIDAY: DJ ChaseOne2

MONDAY:

DJ Sneeky Long

JAM! with Mark Chaney 7:00

TUESDAYS:

WEDNESDAY:

The art of ORIGINAL HOOLIGAN followed by Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck!

PIG-EON rocks, then VJ Birdman on the big screen!

FOOD & DRINK SPECIALS ALL NIGHT - NO COVER 16 BEERS ON TAP

32 Exchange Place • 801-322-3200 www.twistslc.com • 11:00am-1:00am

UTAH’S BIGGEST & BADDEST SPORTS BAR

Now Booking Holiday Parties!

6 110” PROJECTOR SCREENS • TV’S AT EVERY BOOTH

5-1!

UP NEXT:

G UT O ES !

UTAH @ OREGON STATE

| CITY WEEKLY |

Live Music Friday & Saturday 6pm - 9pm

DJ’s Friday & Saturday 9pm - Close

Full dining menu available from Cafe Trio

Reservations for special events / private parties

6405 S 3000 E | 888.991.8147 | ELIXIRLOUNGESLC.COM

OCTOBER 13, 2016 | 49

145 WEST PIERPONT AVE - 801.883.8714

SATURDAY, OCT 15 @ 2:00

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

GREAT FOOD • POOL • DARTS • FULL LIQUOR MENU 1520 W. 9000 S. WEST JORDAN | 801.566.2561 | THEBLACKSHEEPBARANDGRILL.COM

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

BLACK SHEEP Bar & Grill


SHOTS IN THE DARK BY JOSH SCHEUERMAN @scheuerman7

241 S 500 E / facebook.com SLC e g UrbanLoun

LIVE Music friday, october 14

SON OF IAN

saturday, october 15

DJ LATU UTAH @ OREGON STATE @ 2PM

Okkervil River

saturday, october 29

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

COSTUME CONTEST!

$500 1ST PLACE PRIZE

monday, october 31

SPOOKY BLUES!

Weeknights

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

monday

Jeremy Pearson, Spaceship

OUR FAMOUS OPEN BLUES JAM WITH WEST TEMPLE TAILDRAGGERS

tuesday

LOCAL NIGHTS OUT

wednesday

THE TRIVIA FACTORY 7PM

Every sunday ADULT TRIVIA 7PM

Great food

Alex Woodruff, Dave Combs

Will Sheff of Okkervil River

$

5.99 lunch special

| CITY WEEKLY |

50 | OCTOBER 13, 2016

kervil River Urban Lounge - Ok

MONDAY - FRIDAY $

10 brunch buffet

SATURDAYS FROM 11AM-2PM $

12 sunday funday brunch $3 BLOODY MARYS & $3 MIMOSAS FROM 10AM-2PM

31 east 400 SOuth • SLC

801-532-7441 • HOURS: 11AM - 2AM

THEGREENPIGPUB.COM

Erik Christiansen, Jim Ngo

Preston & Dylan Tait, Asad Sattar

Bailey & Westin Toolson


CONCERTS & CLUBS

CITY WEEKLY’S HOT LIST FOR THE WEEK

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE @ CITYWEEKLY.NET

THURSDAY 10.13

KARAOKE

LIVE MUSIC

Brantley Gilbert + Justin Moore + Colt Ford (Usana Amphitheatre) Brendan James + Paul Loren (Kilby Court) Brian Culbertson (The State Room) Ex-Cult + The Nods + Hot Vodka + Brain Bagz + DJ Nix Beat (Urban Lounge) Gilead7+Subtrax + Earthworm + CLËSH (Funk ’n’ Dive Bar) Giraffage (The Hotel & Elevate) Gojira + Tesseract (The Complex) see p. 48 Iron Kingdom + Them Evils + ToxicDose + Escher Case (Metro Music Hall) Ottmar Liebert & Luna Negra (The Egyptian Theatre) see p. 44 St. Lucia (The Depot) Stevie Stone + Andrew Boss + Sik Ville (Club X) Vanna + Capsize + To The Wind (The Loading Dock)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

FRIDAY 10.14 LIVE MUSIC

Breezeway + Glaciers in Pangeae + Eminence Front + Mome Wrath (The Loading Dock) Broke City + Transit Cast + Friendship Commander + American Youth (The Royal) Cute Is What We Aim For (Kilby Court) The Devil Makes Three + Lost Dog Street Band (The Depot) Hive Riot + Amzy (Velour Live Music Gallery) honeyhoney (The State Room) see p. 44 The Naughty Sweethearts (Piper Down Pub) Ottmar Liebert & Luna Negra (The Egyptian Theatre) see p. 44 Quiet Oaks + Eldren Beachmen + Tarot Death Card (Urban Lounge) Shota + Brooke Mackintos + Josaleigh Pollett + Mathew Lanier (Funk ’n’ Dive Bar)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE DJ Juggy (Downstairs)

&

E D I S O N

S T R E E T

O P E N 7 DAYS A W E E K F R O M 5PM -1A M 801.355.0543 • COPPERCOMMON.COM

Cash Paid for Resellable Vinyl, CD’s & Stereo Equipment

TUE – FRI 11AM TO 7PM • SAT 10AM TO 6PM • CLOSED SUN & MON LIKE US ON OR VISIT WWW.RANDYSRECORDS.COM • 801.532.4413

OCTOBER 13, 2016 | 51

“UTAH’S LONGEST RUNNING INDIE RECORD STORE” SINCE 1978

| CITY WEEKLY |

CD’s, 45’s, Cassettes, Turntables & Speakers

RANDY'S RECORD SHOP VINYL RECORDS NEW & USED

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

B R O A D W A Y

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Dueling Pianos (The Spur Bar & Grill) Jazz Jam Session (Sugar House Coffee) Reggae Thursday (The Royal)

Cowboy Karaoke (The Cabin) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Live Band Karaoke with TIYB (Club 90)


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

52 | OCTOBER 13, 2016

CONCERTS & CLUBS

CITY WEEKLY’S HOT LIST FOR THE WEEK

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE @ CITYWEEKLY.NET KARAOKE

Karaoke (Cheers to You SLC) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge)

WEDNESDAY

WEDNESDAYS 7PM-10PM Cover Charge LIVE JAZZ OCT. 12: MICHAEL BIGELOW QUARTET DINNER & DRINKS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE

FRIDAY / SATURDAY

LIVE MUSIC CHANNEL Z MONDAY

MONDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL $3.90 BURGER & FRIES $3.75 BUD + BUD LIGHT STEINS $3.50 LORD CALVERT & FIREBALL SHOTS

UPCOMING EVENTS

FRIDAY, OCT. 28

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE DJ Latu (The Green Pig)

SATURDAY 10.15

KARAOKE

LIVE MUSIC

SUNDAY 10.16

Aaron Gillespie + Vinnie Caruana (Billboard-Live!) Alestorm + Nekrogoblikon + Aether Realm + Principium (Metro Music Hall) see p. 44 Ani DiFranco + Chastity Brown (The Depot) see p. 46 Chanel West Coast (Club Elevate) Chief Keef (In The Venue) Garrett Klahn + Vincent Draper + Cub Country (Kilby Court) Getter (The Complex) The Interrupters + Bad Cop Bad Cop + Show Me Island + HiFi Murder (Club X) Mike Massé (The Ice Haüs) see p. 43 Ottmar Liebert & Luna Negra (The Egyptian Theatre) see p. 44 Rachael Yamagata + Pressing Strings (Urban Lounge) Royal Bliss + Vagablonde + Jack Wilkinson Band + Tim McNary (The Royal) Sego + Robert Loud + Conquer Monster (Velour Live Music Gallery) Shota (Piper Down Pub) Troubled Youth + Inside Job (Pat’s BBQ) This Wild Life (The Complex) Wired For Havoc + Harbor Patrol + Native Tongue (Muse Music) Zombiecock + Exes + CVPITVLS (Urban Lounge)

Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge)

LIVE MUSIC

Seven + Shaun Frank (The Hotel & Elevate) So This Is Suffering + The Thousands + Skyburial (The Loading Dock) Dizzy Wright (The Complex) see p. 46 Kishi Bashi + Busman’s Holiday (Urban Lounge)

KARAOKE

Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue on State) Karaoke (The Tavernacle) Superstar Karaoke w/ DJ Ducky (Club Jam)

MONDAY 10.17 LIVE MUSIC

Deerhunter + Aldous Harding + Jock Gang (Urban Lounge) Grouplove + Muna + Dilly Dally (The Complex) Mike Massé (The Pie Pizzeria/University of Utah) see p. 43 Skeletonwitch + Iron Reagan + Oathbreaker + Gatecreeper + Homewrecker (Metro Music Hall) Tory Lanez + Jacquees + Kranium + J.I.D. + Veecee (The Complex)

MURDERERS & MAYHEM PARTY

& COSTUME CONTEST

BIG REDD PROMOTIONS PRESENTS

OVER

$

500

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 14TH

MOOSE KNUCKLE THE PEDS

CASH & PRIZES

8PM | 21+

SATURDAY, OCT. 29

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15TH

MONKEY SHINE

A NIGHTMARE AT THE 90

8PM | 21+

PARTY AND COSTUME CONTEST

OVER 1,000 CASH & PRIZES $

PRIVATE SPACE FOR HOLIDAY PARTIES | MUST BE 21+ 150 W. 9065 S. • CLUB90SLC.COM• 801.566.3254

OPEN EVERY DAY OF THE WEEK

4242 S. STATE 801-265-9889

GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE at

GREAT

FOOD & DRINK

SPECIALS


Murrays ##1 New Tavern 4883 S State St.

Cody Robbins Is Back October 15th @ 8pm $5 NFL SUNDAY TICKET Every Game, Every Sunday

wednesdays @ 8pm

geeks who drink

live music sunday afternoons &evenings

2021 s. windsor st. (west of 900 east)

801.484.6692 I slctaproom.com

Starting at

I2999

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BY THE MAKERS OF

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

at Starting

breaking bingo

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Kicknitsportsgrill.com 801-448-6230 / to go orders welcome

Monday @ 8pm

| CITY WEEKLY |

4

DEPENDING ON VEHICLE AND FUNCTIONS, EXTRA PARTS, KEYS, MODULES OR LABOR MAY BE NEEDED

FREE LAYAWAY

10AM TO 7PM

MONDAY– SATURDAY CLOSED SUNDAY

SLC 2763 S. STATE: 485-0070

NO

CREDIT NEEDED

Se Habla Español

• OGDEN 2822 WALL AVE: 621-0086

Se Habla Español

90 OPTION

• OREM 1680 N. STATE: 226-6090

DAY PAYMENT

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MODEL CLOSE-OUTS, DISCONTINUED ITEMS AND SOME SPECIALS ARE LIMITED TO STOCK ON HAND AND MAY INCLUDE DEMOS. PRICES GUARANTEED THRU 10/19/16

OCTOBER 13, 2016 | 53

W W W. S O U N D WA R E H O U S E .C O M HOURS


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| CITY WEEKLY |

54 | OCTOBER 13, 2016

VENUE DIRECTORY

LIVE MUSIC & KARAOKE

A BAR NAMED SUE 3928 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-274-5578, Trivia Tues., DJ Wed., Karaoke Thurs. A BAR NAMED SUE ON STATE 8136 S. State, SLC, 801-566-3222, Karaoke Tues. ABG’S LIBATION EMPORIUM 190 W. Center St., Provo, 801-373-1200, Live music ALLEGED 205 25th St., Ogden, 801-990-0692 AREA 51 451 S. 400 West, SLC, 801-534-0819, Karaoke Wed., ‘80s Thurs., DJs Fri. & Sat. THE BAR IN SUGARHOUSE 2168 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-485-1232 BAR-X 155 E. 200 South, SLC, 801-355-2287 BARBARY COAST 4242 S. State, Murray, 801-265-9889 BIG WILLIE’S 1717 S. Main, SLC, 801-4634996, Karaoke Tues., Live music Sat. THE BAYOU 645 S. State, SLC, 801-961-8400, Live music Fri. & Sat. BOURBON HOUSE 19 E. 200 South, SLC, 801-746-1005, Local jazz jam Tues., Karaoke Thurs., Live music Sat., Funk & soul night Sun. BREWSKIS 244 25th St., Ogden, 801-394-1713, Live music CHEERS TO YOU 315 S. Main, SLC, 801-575-6400 CHEERS TO YOU MIDVALE 7642 S. State, 801-566-0871 CHUCKLE’S LOUNGE 221 W. 900 South, SLC, 801-532-1721 CIRCLE LOUNGE 328 S. State, SLC, 801-531-5400, DJs CISERO’S 306 Main, Park City, 435-6496800, Karaoke Thurs., Live music & DJs CLUB 48 16 E. 4800 South, Murray, 801-262-7555 CLUB 90 9065 S. Monroe St., Sandy, 801566-3254, Trivia Mon., Poker Thurs., Live music Fri. & Sat., Live bluegrass Sun. CLUB TRY-ANGLES 251 W. Harvey Milk Blvd., SLC, 801-364-3203, Karaoke Thurs., DJs Fri. & Sat. CLUB X 445 S. 400 West, SLC, 801-935-4267, DJs, Live music THE COMPLEX 536 W. 100 South, SLC, 801-528-9197, Live music CRUZRS SALOON 3943 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-272-1903, Free pool Wed. & Thurs., Karaoke Fri. & Sat. DAWG POUND 3350 S. State, SLC, 801261-2337, Live music THE DEPOT 400 W. South Temple, SLC, 801-355-5522, Live music DONKEY TAILS CANTINA 136 E. 12300 South, Draper, 801-571-8134. Karaoke Wed.; Live music Tues., Thurs. & Fri; Live DJ Sat. DOWNSTAIRS 625 Main, Park City, 435-615-7200, Live music, DJs ELIXIR LOUNGE 6405 S. 3000 East, Holladay, 801-943-1696 THE FALLOUT 625 S. 600 West, SLC, 801-953-6374, Live music THE FILLING STATION 8987 W. 2810 South, Magna, 801-981-8937, Karaoke Thurs.

FLANAGAN’S ON MAIN 438 Main, Park City, 435-649-8600, Trivia Tues., Live music Fri. & Sat. FOX HOLE PUB & GRILL 7078 S. Redwood Road, West Jordan, 801-566-4653, Karaoke, Live music FRANKIE & JOHNNIE’S TAVERN 3 W. 4800 South, Murray, 801-590-9316, Karaoke Tues., Live Music, DJs FUNK ’N DIVE BAR 2550 Washington Blvd., Ogden, 801-621-3483, Live music, Karaoke THE GARAGE 1199 Beck St., SLC, 801-521-3904, Live music GRACIE’S 326 S. West Temple, SLC, 801-819-7565, Live music, DJs THE GREAT SALTAIR 12408 W. Saltair Drive, Magna, 801-250-6205, Live music THE GREEN PIG PUB 31 E. 400 South, SLC, 801-532-7441, Live music Thurs.-Sat. HABITS 832 E. 3900 South, SLC, 801-2682228, Poker Mon., Ladies night Tues., ’80s night Wed., Karaoke Thurs., DJs Fri. & Sat. THE HIDEOUT 3424 S. State, SLC, 801-466-2683, Karaoke Thurs., DJs & Live music Fri. & Sat. HIGHLANDER 6194 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-277-8251, Karaoke THE HOG WALLOW PUB 3200 E. Big Cottonwood Canyon Road, SLC, 801-733-5567, Live music THE HOTEL/CLUB ELEVATE 149 W. 200 South, SLC, 801-478-4310, DJs HUKA BAR & GRILL 151 E. 6100 South, Murray, 801-281-4852, Reggae Tues., DJs Fri. & Sat ICE HAUS 7 E. 4800 South, Murray, 801-266-2127 IN THE VENUE/CLUB SOUND 219 S. 600 West, SLC, 801-359-3219, Live music & DJs JACKALOPE LOUNGE 372 S. State, SLC, 801-359-8054, DJs JAM 751 N. Panther Way, SLC, 801-382-8567, Karaoke Tues., Wed. & Sun.; DJs Thurs.-Sat. JOHNNY’S ON SECOND 165 E. 200 South, SLC, 801-746-3334, DJs Tues. & Fri., Karaoke Wed., Live music Sat. KARAMBA 1051 E. 2100 South, SLC, 801-696-0639, DJs KEYS ON MAIN 242 S. Main, SLC, 801363-3638, Karaoke Tues. & Wed., Dueling pianos Thurs.-Sat. KILBY COURT 741 S. Kilby Court (330 West), SLC, 801-364-3538, Live music, all ages THE LEPRECHAUN INN 4700 S. 900 East, Murray, 801-268-3294 LIQUID JOE’S 1249 E. 3300 South, SLC, 801-467-5637, Live music Tues.-Sat. THE LOADING DOCK 445 S. 400 West, SLC, 385-229-4493, Live music, all ages LUCKY 13 135 W. 1300 South, SLC, 801-487-4418, Trivia Wed. LUMPY’S DOWNTOWN 145 Pierpont Ave., SLC, 801-883-8714 LUMPY’S HIGHLAND 3000 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-484-5597

THE MADISON 295 W. Center St., Provo, 801-375-9000, Live music, DJs MAXWELL’S EAST COAST EATERY 357 Main, SLC, 801-328-0304, Poker Tues., DJs Fri. & Sat. METRO MUSIC HALL 615 W. 100 South, SLC, 801-520-6067, DJs THE MOOSE LOUNGE 180 W. 400 South, SLC, 801-900-7499, DJs NO NAME SALOON 447 Main, Park City, 435-649-6667 O.P. ROCKWELL 268 Main, Park City, 435-615-7000, Live music PARK CITY LIVE 427 Main, Park City, 435-649-9123, Live music PAT’S BBQ 155 W. Commonwealth Ave., SLC, 801-484-5963, Live music Thurs.-Sat., All ages PIPER DOWN 1492 S. State, SLC, 801-468-1492, Poker Mon., Acoustic Tues., Trivia Wed., Bingo Thurs. POPLAR STREET PUB 242 S. 200 West, SLC, 801-532-2715, Live music Thurs.-Sat. THE RED DOOR 57 W. 200 South, SLC, 801-363-6030, DJs Fri., Live jazz Sat. THE ROYAL 4760 S. 900 East, SLC, 801-590-9940, Live music SANDY STATION 8925 Harrison St., Sandy, 801-255-2078, DJs SCALLYWAGS 3040 S. State, SLC, 801-604-0869 SKY 149 W. Pierpont Ave., SLC, 801-883-8714, Live music THE SPUR BAR & GRILL 352 Main, Park City, 435-615-1618, Live music THE STATE ROOM 638 S. State, SLC, 800-501-2885, Live music THE STEREO ROOM 521 N. 1200 West, Orem, 714-345-8163, Live music, all ages SUGARHOUSE PUB 1992 S. 1100 East, SLC, 801-413-2857 THE SUN TRAPP 102 S. 600 West, SLC, 385-235-6786 THE TAVERNACLE 201 E. 300 South, SLC, 801-519-8900, Dueling pianos Wed.Sat., Karaoke Sun.-Tues. TIN ANGEL CAFE 365 W. 400 South, SLC, 801-328-4155, Live music THE URBAN LOUNGE 241 S. 500 East, SLC, 801-746-0557, Live music TWIST 32Exchange Place, SLC, 801-322-3200, Live music VELOUR 135 N. University Ave., Provo, 801-818-2263, Live music, all ages WASTED SPACE 342 S. State, SLC, 801-531-2107, DJs Thurs.-Sat. THE WESTERNER 3360 S. Redwood Road, West Valley City, 801-972-5447, Live music WILLIE’S LOUNGE 1716 S. Main, SLC, 760-828-7351, Trivia Wed., Karaoke Fri.-Sun., Live music ZEST KITCHEN & BAR 275 S. 200 West, SLC, 801-433-0589, DJs


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After more than 30 years, the Indigo Girls continue to mine a folk-rock pastiche defined by reassuring melodies, uplifting anthems and an unceasingly expressive approach. Consequently, it’s impressive to find they’ve stayed true to their template without succumbing to redundancy. While themes of love, loss, heartache and happiness retrace familiar terrain, their rabid fans never have reason to complain, thanks to a communal embrace and seamless harmonies which remain essential to their sound. Indeed, one would be challenged to name another duo that’s been so similarly compatible for so long. Simon & Garfunkel? Nope. The Everly Brothers? Not without break-ups and reconciliations. Hall & Oates? It’s commercial, not creative, impetus there. Consequently, there’s something to be said for consistency, and two women who offer reason to both rock and rejoice. (Lee Zimmerman) Park City Live, 427 Main, 9 p.m., $40-$85, 21+, ParkCityLive.net

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CROSSWORD PUZZLE

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GI TRACK

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ACROSS

Last week’s answers

OCTOBER 13, 2016 | 57

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

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Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

SUDOKU

1. Sweet plant often used to make molasses 2. Colony founded in 1587 only to be "lost" three years later 3. Small floor covering 4. "Hold on ____!" 5. Godot, in "Waiting for Godot"

48. Traditional frat party 49. Isolate, in a way 50. Suffix with real or surreal 56. Org. that provides handicaps 57. Cassini dubbed Jackie Kennedy's "Secretary of Style" 59. Valentine's Day flower 62. Be bedridden 63. Org. of concern to Edward Snowden

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DOWN

6. Like Swiss mountains 7. '50s White House inits. 8. Beer variety, familiarly 9. Dealer buster 10. Queen in "Frozen" 11. It's hard to understand 12. Appear gradually, on film 13. Clinton has one but Biden does not 21. Short smoke? 23. Slander 26. Quickly 27. "May I ____ favor?" 31. Michael Jackson's "Don't Stop ____ You Get Enough" 32. Geological span 34. 1914 Booth Tarkington novel 37. Seasonal beverage 38. Mined metal 39. VW or BMW 40. "This is the last straw!" 43. Draws out 44. Potentially dangerous 45. Die 46. Water or wind, e.g. 47. Fish-eating raptor

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1. Miss at a bullfight?: Abbr. 5. Literature Nobelist ____ Gordimer 11. Fluffy trio? 14. ____ and aahs 15. Friend since high school, say 16. "Uh-uh" 17. Atypical 18. Her 2009 song "3" is the shortest-titled #1 hit in Billboard history 19. Words before "You may kiss the bride" 20. Food whose name means "lumps" 22. Freeloader 24. "In what way?" 25. Region of ancient Greece 28. Give off, as vibes 29. Chernobyl's locale: Abbr. 30. Pop singer with a fragrance line called Harajuku Lovers 33. "Beam ____, Scotty!" 35. Director Kurosawa 36. Deli offering traditionally studded with white peppercorns 41. Like some stockings or smudge-proof mascara 42. Cusps 45. TV actor whose Twitter bio reads "Some know me as Mr. Sulu from Star Trek" 51. Cousin of a moose 52. Approximately 53. Uncorks 54. Hurry, old-style 55. Hall & Oates, e.g. 58. Alimentary canal, for short ... or a description of a stretch seen in 20-, 30-, 36- and 45-Across 60. '40s White House inits. 61. Jargons 64. Like some Keats works 65. Doctor's charge 66. Dr. Seuss's surname 67. Jedi foes 68. Attempt 69. Shining brightly 70. Crafty e-tailer


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INSIDE / COMMUNITY BEAT PG. 58 POETS CORNER PG.59 INK PG. 60 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY PG. 61 UTAH JOB CENTER PG. 62 URBAN LIVING PG. 63

T BEA

Funding Second Chances

Addiction can affect anyone; the Sobriety Optimization League (SOL) wants to help. A scholarship foundation that aids individuals in getting into a treatment facility, sober-living facility or rehabilitation center, SOL is committed to making sure everyone has a chance at long-term sobriety. “Working here has really opened my eyes,” Executive Director David Rosen says. “It’s not just the guy standing on a street corner, it’s people from all segments of the population who struggle with this.” The nonprofit is on a mission to provide financially disadvantaged individuals and families with the chance to achieve long-term, sustainable sobriety. The group collaborates with charitable donors and recovery services to provide education, resources and support. According to Rosen, drug and alcohol abuse results in more deaths than car accidents. The problem is particularly acute in Utah, which he says is now third in the nation for opioid overdose. “I run into it on a daily basis,” he says. Staffers work with therapists, interventions, treatment centers, sober-living centers and more to find the best possible plan for each individual. “The goal is long-term sobriety,” Rosen says, which requires specific tailoring, and to that end,

send leads to the Alta Club. the organization keeps track of what apFor those who want to support proaches different facilities are using and the cause in other ways, check what populations they are serving. out SOL’s website and Facebook Scholarships are available for those page for more opportunities. who either have no medical insurance or Rosen says the group periodiare underinsured—meaning, they have cally holds carwash fundraisinsurance but it won’t pay for drug or alers, training sessions at differcohol treatment. Application information ent facilities for family members is available on the organization’s website. of addicted individuals, and But the help doesn’t stop with funding. “Shred for Sobriety” outings on According to Rosen, most people facing Wednesday nights during ski addiction just don’t know where to begin. season at Brighton, where peoIn addition to scholarships, SOL provides ple can meet others who are also guidance and advice. in recovery. n “Someone calls and says, ‘I think my husband, my wife, my daughter, my son might be having addiction issues’; we try to steer them to the best possible resource for that particular person,” Rosen says. SOLScholarshipFoundation.com For example, he wouldn’t recommend the same facility to a 50-year-old alcoholic as he would a teenage drug addict. Right now, SOL is preparing for its fourth annual Teetotaler Speakeasy fundraiser on Friday, Oct. 14. Attendees will have the opportunity to dress up in their finest Roaring ’20s duds and compete in a blackjack tournament for the chance to win an allinclusive Costa Rica vacation, Jazz tickets, a Deer Valley vacation, and much more. Tickets are $200 per person or $300 per couple, and money goes toward SOL partners up with local businesses, scholarships. The event like the Sugar House Chevron. runs from 6:30-10 p.m. at

community@cityweekly.net The 2015 Teetotaler Speakeasy.

SOL Foundation

A snowboarder participating in “Shred for Sobriety.”


Poets Corner

The Minds War

Out of the pain and anger I feel the roar, These demons rise and begin to soar.

My angels take flight and begin to fight, But the darkness falls and they lose their sight.

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God hears their screams echo off canyon walls, As the last of my angels takes the fall. Will god ever show? Will my angels give in? Will the devil continue to dominate a war he’s not meant to win? Only one can stop him, Only he can set me free. That one isn’t god, That person is ME.

Quinton Case Send your poem (max 15 lines), to: Poet’s Corner, City Weekly, 248 South Main Street, SLC, UT 84101 or e-mail to poetscorner@cityweekly.net.

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY B Y R O B

B R E Z S N Y

Go to RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Most of us can’t tickle ourselves. Since we have conscious control of our fingers, we know we can stop any time. Without the element of uncertainty, our squirm reflex doesn’t kick in. But I’m wondering if you might get a temporary exemption from this rule in the coming weeks. I say this because the astrological omens suggest you will have an extraordinary capacity to surprise yourself. Novel impulses will be rising up in you on a regular basis. Unpredictability and spontaneity will be your specialties. Have fun doing what you don’t usually do!

ARIES (March 21-April 19) A study published in the peer-reviewed Communications Research suggests that only 28 percent of us realize when someone is flirting with us. I hope that figure won’t apply to you Aries in the coming weeks. According to my analysis of the astrological situation, you will be on the receiving end of more invitations, inquiries and allurements than usual. The percentage of these that might be worth responding to will also be higher than normal. Not all of them will be obvious, however. So be extra vigilant.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) During the final 10 weeks of 2016, your physical and mental health will flourish in direct proportion to how much outworn and unnecessary stuff you flush out of your life between now and Oct. 25. Here are some suggested tasks: 1. Perform a homemade ritual that will enable you to magically shed at least half of your guilt, remorse, and regret. 2. Put on a festive party hat, gather up all the clutter and junk from your home, and drop it off at a thrift store or the dump. 3. Take a vow that you will do everything in your power to kick your attachment to an influence that’s no damn good for you. 4. Scream nonsense curses at the night sky for as long as it takes to purge your sadness and anger about pain that no longer matters.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20) The ancient Greek sage Socrates was a founder of Western philosophy and a seminal champion of critical thinking. And yet he relied on his dreams for crucial information. He was initiated into the esoteric mysteries of love by the prophetess Diotima, and had an intimate relationship with a daimonion, a divine spirit. I propose that we make Socrates your patron saint for the next three weeks. Without abandoning your reliance on logic, make a playful effort to draw helpful clues from non-rational sources, too. (P.S. Socrates drew oracular revelations from sneezes. Please consider that outlandish possibility yourself. Be alert, too, for the secret meanings of coughs, burps, grunts, mumbles and yawns.) GEMINI (May 21-June 20) The Helper Experiment, Part One: Close your eyes and imagine that you are in the company of a kind, attentive helper—a person, animal, ancestral spirit or angel that you either know well or haven’t met yet. Spend at least five minutes visualizing a scene in which this ally aids you in fulfilling a particular goal. The Helper Experiment, Part Two: Repeat this exercise every day for the next seven days. Each time, visualize your helper making your life better in some specific way. Now here’s my prediction: Carrying out The Helper Experiment will attract actual support into your real life.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Has your world become at least 20 percent larger since Sept. 1? Has your generosity grown to near-heroic proportions? Have your eyes beheld healing sights that were previously invisible to you? Have you lost at least two of your excuses for tolerating scrawny expectations? Are you awash in the desire to grant forgiveness and amnesty? If you can’t answer yes to at least two of those questions, Aquarius, it means you’re not fully in harmony with your best possible destiny. So get to work! Attune yourself to the cosmic tendencies! And if you are indeed reaping the benefits I mentioned, congratulations—and prepare for even further expansions and liberations.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) It’s swing-swirl-spiral time, Leo. It’s ripple-sway-flutter time and flow-gush-gyrate time and jive-jiggle-juggle time. So I trust you will not indulge in fruitless yearnings for unswerving progress and rock-solid evidence. If your path is not twisty and tricky, it’s probably the wrong path. If your heart isn’t teased and tickled into shedding its dependable formulas, it might be an overly hard heart. Be an improvisational curiosity-seeker. Be a principled player of unpredictable games.

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VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Some English-speaking astronomers use the humorous slang term “meteor-wrong.” It refers to a rock that is at first thought PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Some astrologers dwell on your tribe’s phobias. They assume that to have fallen from the heavens as a meteorite (“meteoryou Pisceans are perversely drawn to fear; that you are addicted to right”), but that is ultimately proved to be of terrestrial origin. the strong feelings it generates. In an effort to correct this distorted I suspect there might currently be the metaphorical equivalent view, and in accordance with current astrological omens, I hereby of a meteor-wrong in your life. The source of some new arrival declare the coming weeks to be a Golden Age for Your Trust in Life. or fresh influence is not what it had initially seemed. But that It will be prime time to exult in everything that evokes your joy and doesn’t have to be a problem. On the contrary. Once you have excitement. I suggest you make a list of these glories, and keep add- identified the true nature of the new arrival or fresh influence, ing new items to the list every day. Here’s another way to celebrate it’s likely to be useful and interesting. the Golden Age: Discover and explore previously unknown sources of joy and excitement.

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CANCER (June 21-July 22) New rules: 1. It’s unimaginable and impossible for you to be obsessed with anything or anyone that’s no good for you. 2. It’s CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Now is a perfect moment to launch or refine a project that will gener- unimaginable and impossible for you to sabotage your stability ate truth, beauty, and justice. Amazingly enough, now is also an by indulging in unwarranted fear. 3. It’s imaginable and possible excellent time to launch or refine a long-term master plan that will for you to remember the most crucial thing you have forgotten. make you healthy, wealthy and wise. Is this a coincidence? Not at all. 4. It’s imaginable and possible for you to replace debilitating The astrological omens suggest that your drive to be of noble service self-pity with invigorating self-love and healthy self-care. 5. It’s dovetails well with your drive for personal success. For the foresee- imaginable and possible for you to discover a new mother lode of emotional strength. able future, unselfish goals are well-aligned with selfish goals.

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SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) A Buddhist monk named Matthieu Ricard had his brain scanned while he meditated. The experiment revealed that the positive emotions whirling around in his gray matter were super-abundant. Various publications thereafter dubbed him “the happiest person in the world.” Since he’s neither egotistical nor fond of the media’s simplistic sound bites, he’s not happy about that title. I hope you won’t have a similar reaction when I predict that you Sagittarians will be the happiest tribe of the zodiac during the next two weeks. For best results, I suggest you cultivate Ricard’s definitions of happiness: “altruism and compassion, inner freedom (so that you are not the slave of your own thoughts), senses of serenity and fulfillment, resilience, as well as a clear and stable mind that does not distort reality too much.”

FANTASTIC MASSAGE


| COMMUNITY | | CITYWEEKLY.NET |

62 | OCTOBER 13, 2016

CONTACT US NOW TO PLACE YOUR RECRUITMENT ADS 801-413-0947 or JSMITH@CITYWEEKLY.NET For more Employment Opportunities, go online to www.utahjobcenter.com

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Spooky Old Buildings

Every town has some old building that’s tagged with graffiti and either boarded up and in disrepair or about to fall over. The longer the structure stands abandoned, the more the weeds grow around the foundation, windows are broken out and the opportunity for mischief is rife. All towns have building ordinances and regulations, but they don’t guarantee ratty old buildings and “haunted” houses are eventually torn down. Why would a landowner want to keep a building boarded up for years? The insurance must be hell because of the possibility of vandalism. Look at what just happened in downtown Salt Lake City when the old Sizzler restaurant on 400 East and 400 South went up in smoke. My cop friends told me before it sizzled that transients had been climbing in from the roof and using it as a summer home. Unconfirmed rumors have it that the landowners were in the process of selling or had sold the property and it was to be demolished, but that hadn’t quite happened before the Aug. 12 fire. You and I could drive by blighted buildings in the Salt Lake Valley and in small towns across the state and find there’s a story behind every rickety old one of them. The most famous one in SLC is in a corner downtown where the owner keeping his ugly buildings as a middle-finger salute to officials until the city lets him put in a pay parking lot. He had applied in 2003 for the permit to pull the walls down but was foiled because ordinances do not allow more parking lots in the Central Business District. As long as he maintains a minimum exterior upkeep and pays his property taxes, the owner can pretty much never do anything with their piece of crap. Believe it or not, what an owner can do with their private property is a basic Bill of Rights and U.S. Constitution thing. Donald Trump is a fan of “taking” people’s properties under a law called eminent domain. In the first Republican presidential debate, he stated, “Without it, you wouldn’t have roads, you wouldn’t have hospitals, you wouldn’t have anything. ... You need eminent domain.” I don’t see Salt Lake City taking people’s property that’s blighted, but I do know that the city council and Mayor Jackie Biskupski want to speed up the process to force landlords to tear down crappy properties. We’ll see how successful the push is to pretty up SLC because, as of this writing, there’s no city council meeting set to discuss tweaking the rules to get rid of spooky old blighted buildings. n Content is prepared expressly for Community and is not endorsed by City Weekly staff.

Babs De Lay

Broker/Owner 801-201-8824 babs@urbanutah.com www.urbanutah.com

Selling homes for 32 years in the Land of Zion

Julie “Bella” Hall

Realtor 801-784-8618 bella@urbanutah.com

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Your home could be sold here. Call me for a free market analysis today.

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OCTOBER 13, 2016 | 63

Amazing 3 bdrm 3 bath single family home! GORGEOUS details, hardwood floors, canopied exterior living areas, so much space! $1995

r n e e d m n Wo Wo

| COMMUNITY |

HOLLADAY

G

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

AVENUES

URBAN L I V I N

We sell homes and loans to all saints, sinners, sisterwives &


The Democrat withdrew!

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City Weekly Oct 13, 2016  

The Halloween Issue

City Weekly Oct 13, 2016  

The Halloween Issue