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The Weather INSIDE

The prison system seems intent on ensuring that a man convicted of stealing $264 in 1981 dies in jail. BY COLBY FRAZIER


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CWCONTENTS COVER STORY UN-COMMUTED

In 1981, Rolf Kaestel stole $264 from an Arkansas taco hut. He now rots in a Sanpete County jail. Cover illustration by Trent Call

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COLBY FRAZIER

Cover story, p. 18 Armed with nothing but a flipphone, a trucker hat and an insatiable need to tell relevant, under-reported stories, Frazier revisits a former subject in this week’s issue. In Kaestel’s gripping journey, he sees “the possibility that the same circumstances could happen to any one of us.”

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SOAP BOX

COMMENTS@CITYWEEKLY.NET @SLCWEEKLY

@CITYWEEKLY

@SLCWEEKLY

The Ocho, Sept. 22 “8 Ways the candidates might get out of the Sept. 26 presidential debate”

And Salt Lake Meekly is covering the governors [sic] race …

MICHAEL JAMES STONE

are wearing on TV. I know the feminists will object. I’m not a militant feminist. Just an old lady tired of being lied to.

STEPHANIE MARANHAO, Ogden

Cartoon, “Gotta Love Utah Valley”

No, you really don’t have to love Utah Valley … like, at all.

Via Facebook @Bill_Frost left @DavidBowieReal off of Celebrity Afterlife Island®.

@STEVEJERMAN

CHRIS MONTGOMERY Via Facebook

Via Twitter

@CHUBBYDUSTBUNNY Via Instagram

Straight Dope, Sept. 22 “Down with DNA”

Absolutely, a nation of risk takers, unfortunately, the risks now have a much greater implication.

CHRISTINA MUELLER

What about missionary attire and conservative talk radio?

@801MILQUETOAST Via Instagram Or plastic surgery!

Via Facebook

SARINA KAY SINCLAIR Via Facebook

Drink, Sept. 22 “Uniquely Utah Liquor”

Yep, that’s the first thing I thought of

[Five Wives vodka] is what I buy for my husband. The flavor is great and, most important, it is gluten-free. We also like the thought of supporting local business.

PAULA GORMAN

KAT AUDETTE-LUEBKE Via Facebook

It’s not a pyramid scheme … It’s just shaped like one.

@SALTJAKESCITY

Via Facebook

Via Instagram

These are Max Hall’s wives, correct?

ROBERT JENSEN Via Facebook

Well, I guess I won’t ask you to try my new supplements.

THOMAS CUTLER Via Facebook

On feminism and media

Why did Univision discontinue Sueño de Amor soap opera? I liked it. Why are they complaining about porn? Back in the 1960s, I had a husband exposed to porn and I objected, too. Home-wreckers ... And who brought all those women here to Utah in the first place? I like the dresses and jewelry the girls

His rant revealed much more than “foot-inmouth.” He lacks true Christian compassion.

@FOLSOM8K

Truth.

Via Twitter

Blog, Sept. 30, “‘I Hope They Can Forgive Me’: Senate hopeful Jason Christensen on the viral response to his antiLGBTQ comments”

I’m gonna company.

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TIFFANY YOUNG Via Facebook Better than Cavalia every 30 feet.

@NICK_HANSEN13

Having lost a son to suicide, I know the pain this kind of loss brings. His apology is not an apology. Being a purportedly practicing member of the LDS church, he might want to review what they teach about those who die this way. I am angry at how heartless he is, I ache for the family whose grief he has added to. However, no matter how angry I am, I hope this is something he will never need to have first-hand experience with to understand just what he has done.

MELISSA LAMBERT HANSON

WADE HASKELL

Via CityWeekly.net

Via Facebook

He’s backing down because he thought he’d have more backup and when they didn’t show, he had his “Oh, shit” moment and tried to clean up the hate-filled vomit he projected onto the internet. It doesn’t clean up that easy. You can’t erase “horrible human” if you don’t mean it.

JORDAN ANDERSON STREBEL Via Facebook

Via Facebook

There’s a difference between not thinking and using your asinine imaginary friend as justification for dancing on a child’s grave. There [are] few times I wish there’s a God of some kind. But for this Shkrelilevel sociopath, I hope this judgemental, evil God exists, because no punishment is good enough.

MIKE ZAUNER

He typed the words. That disease doesn’t even apply. I thought Christians believed God was to be the only one to judge? What an insensitive jerk.

PAMELA STEVENS

Via Instagram

An apology was the decent thing to do. You can’t get that from Trump, so Jason has that going for him. I wish the world could be rid of hatred and hateful poisonous rhetoric like this. It helps no one, but it hurts everyone.

Via Facebook Did you know that if you commit political suicide, it’s still murder?

STEVEN DAY

Via CityWeekly.net

STAFF Publisher JOHN SALTAS Editorial

Editor ENRIQUE LIMÓN Arts &Entertainment Editor SCOTT RENSHAW Music Editor RANDY HARWARD Senior Staff Writer STEPHEN DARK Staff Writers COLBY FRAZIER, DYLAN WOOLF HARRIS Copy Editor ANDREA HARVEY Proofers SARAH ARNOFF, LANCE GUDMUNDSEN

Dining Listings Coordinator MIKEY SALTAS Editorial Interns HILLARY REILLY, RHETT WILKINSON Contributors CECIL ADAMS, KATHARINE BIELE, ROB BREZSNY, BABS DE LAY, KYLEE EHMANN, BILL FROST, MARYANN JOHANSON, BILL KOPP, STAN ROSENZWEIG, TED SCHEFFLER, GAVIN SHEEHAN, CHUCK SHEPHERD, ERIC D. SNIDER, ALEX SPRINGER, BRIAN STAKER, BRYAN YOUNG

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Art Director DEREK CARLISLE Graphic Artists CAIT LEE, SUMMER MONTGOMERY, JOSH SCHEUERMAN

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Circulation Manager LARRY CARTER

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Accounting Manager CODY WINGET

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Marketing

Marketing Manager JACKIE BRIGGS

Marketing/Events Coordinator NICOLE ENRIGHT Street Team STEPHANIE ABBOTT, SHAUNTEL ARCHULETTA, BEN BALDRIDGE, MATT ENRIGHT, TYLER GRAHAM, ADAM LANE, ANDY ROMERO, LAUREN TAGGE, MIKAYLA THURBUR, STEVEN VARGO

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Salt Lake City Weekly is published every Thursday by Copperfield Publishing Inc. The Salt Lake City Weekly is an independent publication dedicated to alternative news and news sources, and serves as a comprehensive entertainment guide. 50,000 copies of the Salt Lake City Weekly are free of charge at more than 1,800 locations along the Wasatch Front, limit one copy per reader. Additional copies of the paper may be purchased for $1 (Best of Utah and other special issues, $5) payable to the Salt Lake City Weekly in advance. No person, without expressed permission of Copperfield Publishing Inc., may take more than one copy of any Salt Lake City Weekly issue. No portion of the Salt Lake City Weekly may be reproduced in whole or part by any means, including electronic retrieval systems, without the written permission of the Publisher. Third-Class postage paid at Midvale, UT. Delivery may take one week. All Rights Reserved. ®

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OPINION

Solving Homelessness

Mayor Biskupski, Mayor McAdams and Governor Herbert are between a rock and a hard place—not as hard a place as the hundreds of homeless are in, but it’s still a pretty hard rock. For the city and county mayors, the problem is the ugly visual reminder on our streets that many citizens cannot afford a place to live. For the governor, add the reality that the impending death of coal south of here could soon turn much of Carbon County into Appalachia West with even more potential joblessness and homelessness. In Duchesne and Uintah counties, employment and business is depressed because energy from the ground is no longer fueling growth. Simply building more shelters without solving the real problem prolongs homelessness that will continue to outstrip the capacity to add bunks. Officialdom cites statistics showing that Utah homelessness has been reduced by 91 percent in recent years. They say the problem has been statistically solved. But, in May of this year, Deseret News ran a story headlined “Utah’s big drop in homelessness is ‘fiction,’ economist says.” Those who data-dive into those official stats, like folks at The Washington Post, Huffington Post and The Guardian, find that the main reason for the 91-percent reduction is that Utah is no longer counting everyone like it used to. The takeaway is that beds from new shelters will be filled by an ever-growing homeless population and Road Home overcrowding will continue. Addressing the symptom does not solve the problem. Without more affordable places to live, where else do you think people will go besides shelters? Here’s a solution to reducing homelessness in a two-word phrase: “living wage.” A living wage is defined as sufficient earned weekly pay to be able to buy food, take care of medical needs, pay rent and utilities and still have enough money to afford transportation to get to the job that keeps

B Y S TA N R O S E N Z W E I G

the process going. We live within an area where a lot of our fellow citizens, many with families, just cannot earn a living wage no matter how many jobs they juggle. The governor, Legislature and others, constantly tout that we are No. 1 for business in Utah. Yet, there are not enough living-wage jobs for those on the bottom who will end up in our shelters. Many (not most, but enough to be a problem) become despondent, feel hopeless and turn to drugs and crime, requiring us to budget more for police, courts and jails. Enable a living wage for the lowest 3 percent, and we reduce the need to spend millions of tax dollars on public safety, in addition to warehousing, feeding and medical care for homeless people— because they won’t be homeless. The path to eliminating Utah’s homeless problem was revealed in a recent article in The Wall Street Journal that America’s potential new manufacturing jobs cannot be created, because worker training is so bad that, in spite of all the unemployed homeless folks, we aren’t producing enough trained workers to fill skilled manufacturing jobs. The Manufacturing Institute of the National Association of Manufacturers projects there will be 2 million unfilled American jobs within 10 years. Let’s look at how business is solving this problem overseas. In Germany, half of high school graduates no longer decide to go to college, but enter apprenticeship programs that are public-private partnerships between manufacturers and public vocational schools. After these schools, these students end up in great paying jobs and German manufacturing is rocking it. Here in the U.S., German companies like Siemens and Volkswagen are working with state government funding (although not in Utah, it appears) to put less-educated people through training and apprenticeship programs to create enough of a skilled workforce to expand their production, grow U.S. manufacturing and reduce the need for

THE MAIN REASON FOR THE 91-PERCENT REDUCTION IS THAT UTAH IS NO LONGER COUNTING EVERYONE LIKE IT USED TO.

Want to sell your company? Utah Business Consultants is the premier business brokerage in Utah, where we’ve been operating since 1989. Give me a call and we’ll chat about the options. 801-424-6300 office 801-440-3176 cell George@UBCUtah.com www.UBCUtah.com

local government to cover housing, medical and policing costs associated with the hopelessness and helplessness of being homeless. There are really two things that we can do to create a living wage and eliminate homelessness in Utah. First, we can recognize that any gross income of less than $290 per week—that’s 40 hours of work at our $7.25 per hour (Utah minimum wage)—sustains nobody. We need to support political candidates who agree to raise that minimum wage to a living wage. Secondly, we need to elect candidates who push not only shelters, but real housing that falls within the budgets of those families who are now out on the street. America’s “best state in the nation for business” should do both: provide vocational training and build more affordable houses. Nonprofit Salt Lake Habitat for Humanity just broke ground on a 20-home tract in Kearns, but it took three years of fundraising and dealing with planning commissions, zoning boards, etc. The nonprofit Community Development Corporation of Utah cites significantly greater affordable home building success, but, without legislative help, it takes too long and is only a drop in the bucket. So, let’s build more affordable housing and train our people into good jobs and out of poverty to eliminate our need to fund shelters, reduce food insecurity and perhaps even reduce the punishing overload at emergency rooms for treating cases of the uninsured that ERs were never intended to serve. Let’s strengthen our workforce and make Utah appealing to manufacturing throughout the state so that even our friends and relatives in Carbon County will no longer fear losing those disappearing coal-mining jobs. “Best for business” Utah is pretty crappy about its willingness to leave lots of folks behind. Help the Legislature improve Utah’s business success for all. Return your by-mail ballot as soon as you get it. CW Send feedback to comments@cityweekly.net

STAFF BOX

Readers can comment at cityweekly.net

How close is SLC to solving the homelessness problem? Nicole Enright: Not at all. Take a stroll down Main Street.

Jeremiah Smith: I keep hearing that we have solved it. But it seems, by the looks of things, that isn’t really the case. Lots more work needs to be done.

Mikey Saltas: I’d say about as close as Donald Trump minority vote.

is

to

winning

the

Scott Renshaw: The

“homelessness problem” is a mental-health problem, a social-services problem, a family compassion problem and a political ideology problem, and that’s just for starters. So I’m gonna go with “not remotely close.”

Randy Harward: Problem? Phooey. We have an embarrassment of riches in that department.

Tyeson Rogers: How close are we to winning the war on terror, or the war on drugs, or the war on poverty? There is no such thing as a homelessness problem. Being homeless is about two things: mental and decisions.

Pete Saltas: As close as Elon Musk is to colonizing Mars. He wants to do it. But just doesn’t seem likely for the next 15-20 years. Lisa Dorelli: Considering the continuously spreading population on 4th West and 5th South, in addition to the rest of the city, my guess is it’s failing miserably. Then again, there will always be a society of homeless folks in every “big” city. Reality, I suppose. Derek Carlisle: About as close as Biskupski is to having straight hair.


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VISIT ANY WED. @ 6 EASTHOLLYWOOD.ORG

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@kathybiele

Endorsements? Blah

As readers anticipate newspaper endorsements for this presidential year, you can probably bet The Salt Lake Tribune won’t be favoring Donald Trump. But it likely won’t matter. Presidential endorsements have been around for a century, and according to Nate Silver, the winner of most editorial approvals has lost only three times since 1972. But times have changed, and Brigham Young University journalism professor Joel Campbell states in his recently published research, “In the era of social media, the endorsement of those within one’s circle of friends is likely to carry much more weight than that of a news organization.” In other words, voters are listening mostly to people they agree with. Campbell, not a fan of endorsements, worries mostly about the ethics. Voters distrust the media already, and endorsements simply feed into that.

More Booze Missteps

There’s plenty of research on underage drinking and how alcohol affects the adolescent brain, but nothing on how watching someone mix a drink translates into alcoholic behavior. That makes no difference to the Utah Legislature, which is now responsible for the idiotic and costly construction of a “Zion Ceiling” at the new Eccles Theater downtown. Fox 13 noted the noncompliance not long after it ran a story on the Hive Winery’s Zion Curtain—a piece of tapestry with the words “Utah Doing as Bishop Commands” rather than Utah Department of Beverage Control. Hive and other wineries have to put a surcharge on tastings, too, although DABC conducted its own tasting recently to better educate its staff, The Salt Lake Tribune reported. Alcohol just sends shivers up the spines of legislators, perhaps because they have never been educated about it themselves.

Hitting Homelessness

It’s not like Salt Lake City isn’t aware of the poverty on its front porch. Far from it, actually. The city council is “unanimous” in wanting to disperse the criminal element near the Rio Grande, according to their op-ed in The Salt Lake Tribune. They are shocked and appalled by the lack of affordable rentals in the city, and everyone’s anxious about the many kids in intergenerational poverty. The Deseret News notes that there are almost no vacancies and that the average cost of renting keeps climbing. It’s one thing to build—and there’s plenty of that going on—but it’s another to build affordable housing. Where and how to do that is going to be the city’s biggest challenge over the next year.

DEREK CARLISLE

ent is m l l o r n Open E over! almost a head r child rt. u o y e Giv making a start in

It’s always good to see one of our own thrive. In the case of City Weekly Arts & Entertainment Editor Scott Renshaw, his longtime fascination with Disneyland has now taken the form of a book titled Happy Place: Living the Disney Parks Life. As a destination, it turns out, it can be a oncein-a-lifetime vacation for some and a daily relaxation spot for others. Renshaw highlights some of these stories in his book—including one of a man who has been to Disneyland for 1,000 days in a row—as well as the ever-evolving relationship he and others have with the park.

How did a 40-something film critic from Utah become Disneyland-obsessed?

I am a California native, who after moving here 20-ish years ago found that I still had a lot of this emotional attachment from going there as a kid. It was really after going there with my own kids that I sort of rediscovered what was so fascinating to me. I was in the moment, and my thoughts are so jumbled that I am rarely ever in the moment. For some people, Disneyland becomes a place where they get tense and annoyed, but for me it is one of the most relaxing places in the world.

Disneyland is so often seen as a children’s paradise, but it appears that the place doesn’t lose it’s magic for many adults. Is that right?

Well that certainly applies to the people I interviewed. There are people—for a lot of different reasons—that continue their attachment. Some of it is nostalgic, some of it is that they build relationships with other people who go or with the cast members there, or they may have fallen in love with someone there. Like with any fan relationship, I think there are as many different ways someone becomes fans of Disney parks as much as there are ways to become fans of sports teams, a television show or anything.

Who are the people you highlight in your book? How did you find them?

The first fans I found were because I perused Disney fan websites as my way to get a fix when I couldn’t go every year because I live in Utah with kids. So that’s when I found the first couple of stories of two guys; one was approaching his 1,000th day in a row visiting Disneyland, and another that had gone for a year straight as well. I had a sense there were more stories like that, so applying all of my journalistic research skills, plus the skills of my librarian wife, I began to search message boards to find some of these stories. People did scavenger hunts through the park, or turned it into a job on a website or some other avenue, and there were more stories than I could even fit into a book like this.

How has your perspective of the parks changed?

People would always ask, ‘Is it possible for you to enjoy it anymore? Are you overthinking it? Can you just relax?’ I realized that the people that go there so much of the time aren’t thinking they have to go to every single ride and do so many things in that one day. They have time to relax and appreciate the atmosphere, the theme, people-watch—things someone on vacation who may go their once in a lifetime, feels that pressure making sure that no one is unhappy and it is the perfect trip. When you develop a relationship with the park, it’s not all about the rides. It’s more about the experience of being there.

-MIKEY SALTAS comments@cityweekly.net Renshaw reads from his book at Weller Book Works on Tuesday, Oct. 11 at 7 p.m. For a longer version of this interview, visit CityWeekly.net.


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STRAIGHT DOPE Has the United States ever had a presidential candidate who said things as outrageous as Donald Trump has this year? I’d imagine we’ve had some wild accusations hurled in the past, but have any candidates stooped to the levels we’re hearing today? —Marie Wilson Some of you might recall that in a column last year about why someone would mount a long-shot campaign for president, I basically laughed off the possibility that Donald Trump had a chance in 2016. My thinking, like a lot of people’s (not that it lets any of us off the hook), was: Sure, the political process had gotten pretty gruesome, but come on— we couldn’t be that far gone. As it turned out, of course, we were. Now we’re about to find out if the road to the White House runs lower than anyone ever dreamed. Still, let’s not be naive. Mudslinging is as old as the two-party system, and trashtalk helped get many of our most prominent statesmen into the history books. In the infamous campaign of 1800, Thomas Jefferson had on his payroll a guy named James Thomson Callender, a newspaperman, pamphleteer and specialist in what we now call opposition research. Having already helped scupper Alexander Hamilton’s career in public office by exposing an adulterous dalliance (and alleging corruption), Callender now went to work on President John Adams, calling him “mentally deranged” and a “hideous hermaphroditic creature.” His Adams-bashing got Callender locked away for a spell under the Sedition Act. Afterward, when the newly elected Jefferson didn’t reward him as he’d hoped, Callender went to press with the story that the president’s slave Sally Hemings had borne Jefferson several little Jeffersons, as supported by DNA testing two centuries later. For their part, Adams’ Federalist allies had long been muttering about Hemings and (later sources suggest) supposed irregularities in Jefferson’s own parentage, though they didn’t think to demand his birth certificate. Given our nation’s dismal track record on issues of race, it’s no shocker that a lot of such smear jobs involved claiming a candidate might have some nonwhite relatives. In 1828 Andrew Jackson complained about backers of his opponent, John Quincy Adams, dragging family into it—saying Jackson’s mom had been a prostitute and that he had a black half-brother sold into slavery. None of this was true, but the pro-Adams faction got closer to the mark when they called Old Hickory’s wife, Rachel, a bigamist: The Jacksons had eloped before Rachel’s first husband actually obtained the divorce he’d filed for. She took the public shaming hard and, shortly after the election, died suddenly, apparently of a heart attack; her embittered Andy forever cursed his foes as murderers. With the presidency on the line, political operatives have tried saying anything and everything. In 1928, Republicans circulated photos of Democratic candidate Al

Smith at the mouth of a tunnel (it was actually the Holland Tunnel, under the Hudson River), accompanied by text explaining that Smith, a Catholic, had constructed a subAtlantic passageway to the Vatican through which he could report to the Pope for his orders. And you thought the Obama’s-asecret-Muslim stuff was a stretch. And yet, one reasonably objects, in these cases the candidates themselves remained presidentially above the fray and let surrogates do the uglier work. Here’s where Trump—his id seemingly hooked straight up to the public record via video feed and smartphone—might indeed be a groundbreaker. Has any high-profile candidate been more personally outrageous? Needless to say, many have supported positions that would seem outright loopy now but were within the political mainstream at the time—the most unabashedly racist candidate today would hardly defend chattel slavery; the primmest teetotaler wouldn’t argue for prohibition. Third-party candidates have perhaps been more inclined to unpredictable talk: In the last days of the 1992 race, H. Ross Perot told reporters that President George H.W. Bush’s dirty-tricks team planned to target his daughter by shopping doctored photos to tabloids and disrupting her wedding. The nearest thing to what we’re seeing now, though, might have been a sitting president whose public statements were so wild he didn’t even get a shot at re-election. During maybe the worst speaking tour in U.S. history, Andrew Johnson in 1866 suggested that divine Providence itself might have taken out Abraham Lincoln to get the right man in charge of the Union, routinely compared himself to Jesus, and went way off script in response to hecklers, at one point proposing that a congressional adversary be hanged. In Indianapolis, he was shouted down entirely by an unruly and ultimately riotous crowd. Johnson, to quote the articles of impeachment later filed against him, “did … make and deliver with a loud voice certain intemperate, inflammatory and scandalous harangues, and therein utter loud threats and bitter menaces as well against Congress as the laws of the United States duly enacted thereby, amid the cries, jeers and laughter of the multitudes then assembled and in hearing.” Yes, there was a time when being a provocative blowhard could be considered an impeachable offense for a president. Now, I grimly note, a sizable chunk of the electorate considers it a qualification for office. n Send questions to Cecil via StraightDope.com or write him c/o Chicago Reader, 350 N. Orleans, Chicago 60654.


Balk the Vote

Nonprofit sets sights on re-energizing young voters. BY DYLAN WOOLF HARRIS dwharris@cityweekly.net @DylantheHarris

L

deadline it hopes will pass with the greatest number of participants in the democratic process, particularly among voters who are traditionally underrepresented. Meanwhile, millennials might sit this one out—again. This demographic has a notorious reputation for its ballot-box apathy. It’s a story told each time an election cycle looms over the horizon: A hoard of young voters could significantly move the political needle—but instead stay home. It’s not from a lack of trying on the part of groups like Voterise. On a drizzly weekday morning, University of Utah freshman Constance Caparas sits studying under a table umbrella near the campus store. Between college activists and social media, she explains, students are deluged with get-out-the-vote messages. Caparas says her philosophy professor offhandedly encouraged students to register. “It was a good reminder for anybody that didn’t know.” Buzz surrounding the presidential election is impossible to avoid, though, and it was the first much- Millennials like Emily Higgins and Nadija Demic represent candidates’ most sought-after demo. discussed debate alienated by the ugliness of the presiprimarily affect us.” that spurred Caparas dential race. “The most common thing The numbers don’t lie, though. And, to sign up. we hear,” Hilman says, “is, ‘For what?’ on the whole, young people continue to Registering is the initial or ‘Are you kidding?’” So while Higtrail in registration totals. step, but casting a ballot is gins and Demic cited their disapproval The Utah Lieutenant Governor’s Ofthe essential part. Caparas of Republican presidential candidate fice, which supervises elections, providwavered on whether she Donald Trump as their reason to jump ed data from this June that broke voting would vote, admitting she into the political discourse, plenty of roles into five age categories, with 18- to might not if she couldn’t others are turning away from politics 25-year-olds representing the smallfind the polling location or because of the presidential choices. est group at 180,414. The next-lowest get her hands on a mail-in By narrowly focusing on the top of group is made up of folks 66 and older at ballot. the ticket, Hilman argues, citizens are 254,871 registered voters. Sitting several tables running away from important downWith all the steam behind organiznorth, an undeclared ballot races. “It’s up to us to educate the ers trying to turn dispersed millennisophomore at the U, community about what those races look als into a voting block, the question reAnnika Goodman, suslike up and down the ticket,” she says. mains: Why don’t they? pects procrastination, “Because we know that when you have Judi Hilman, Voterise executive dimore than apathy, has kept that broader civic engagement, you’re rector, has been zipping around the her peers off the voting part of a discussion about values and state, scrutinizing registration tacrolls, though she, too, was policy decisions in your community.” tics in an effort to better understand slow to sign up. At the beUtah’s lopsided party demographics why some groups still aren’t making hest of her mother, Goodalso play a large role in apathy across it to the polls and—more lofty yet—reman registered. the state. move those obstacles. The organization Freshmen Emily HigThe biggest slice of active voters in formed this year and is making longgins and Nadija Demic Utah is made up of Republicans, at term plans for subsequent elections. agree that the broad idea about 644,000. The next-largest beVoterise, in partnership with the Utah of apathetic millennials longs to those voters who aren’t affiliCampus Compact, will continue to host unfairly lumps those who ated with any party, around 486,000, campus events from now until Novemdo care about the politifollowed by Democrats at 142,000, creber, including several at the U and Salt cal process with those who ating more than a 4-to-1 advantage for Lake Community College campuses. don’t. the majority party. “Everywhere we go amongst the Higgins says plenty of Hilman says she is often told this glargroups that have been pounding on her friends care about the ing party discrepancy is a demotivator. this, there’s just so much frustration in November results. “That could describe the apathy on the sense of almost giving up,” she says. “It’s not like we’re suboth sides of the aisle,” she says. “On “This is a nut we feel we want to crack.” per naive or unopinionthe right, it’s easy to take for granted The reasons for millennials’ lack ated about it,” she says. what’s going to happen.” CW of engagement is varied. Many feel “The next president will

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DW HARRIS

University of Utah freshman Constance Caparas.

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ike a doomsday clock, Voterise is displaying a countdown on its webpage that’s ticking off the seconds, minutes, hours and days until the Nov. 8 general election. Listen to bloviations from the national punditry, and you might believe that these two things—the election of our next president and the end of the world—will share a resigned spot in history, fueling tough talk from both sides of the political spectrum threatening to expatriate to Canada should their candidate lose. But elections do have consequences. Voterise, a newly formed nonpartisan nonprofit, sees election day as a

“This is a nut we feel we want to crack.” — Voterise’s Judi Hilman DW HARRIS

NEWS

ELECTIONS


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THE LIST OF EIGHT

BY BILL FROST

@Bill _ Frost

CITIZEN REVOLT In a week, you can CHANGE THE WORLD PRIDE WEEK EVENT

In a grand finale to Pride Week at the U, Sky Cubacub hosts a performance of her clothing creations, Rebirth Garments Fashion Performance and Talk-Back. She is the founder and designer of a line of gender-nonconforming wearables for people on the full spectrum of gender, size and ability. Cubacub’s designs are guided by the assertion that trans communities and people with disabilities have very particular clothing needs. Spencer Fox Eccles Business Building, Child Family Community Hall, University of Utah, 1655 Campus Center Drive, 801-5873342, Thursday, Oct. 6, 6 p.m., free, Bit.ly/2cPJMHm

12 | OCTOBER 6, 2016

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HOMELESS SUMMIT

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There’s been a lot of activity around homelessness lately—“Operation Diversion” to arrest and sometimes treat drug offenders at local shelters, for instance. So, it’s pretty timely that the Department of Workforce Services is sponsoring a Homeless Summit to explore housing, supportive services and workable solutions. You’ll hear about the “state of homelessness” from Lt. Gov. Spencer Cox, and learn about efforts to move the homeless into housing. Local leaders can coordinate resources and strengthen partnerships, as well as get up to date on ever-changing funding requirements. Sheraton Hotel, 150 W. 500 South, 801-468-0148, Wednesday, Oct. 12, 7:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m., $35, Bit.ly/2d0bkHO

SUSTAINABLE SEAFOOD PANEL

We don’t usually think of Utah as a seafood destination, but here’s a chance for Salt Lake City to become the first sustainable seafood city in the United States. The Global High Seas Marine Preserve is holding a panel discussion, “Saving the Oceans One City at a Time,” about banning industrial fishing in international waters and educating consumers about purchasing seafood products from sustainable sources. GHSMP was founded by local attorney and author Danny Quintana, whose book, titled Space & Ocean Exploration: The Alternative to the Military-Industrial Complex, inspired this movement. Cathedral Church of St. Mark, 231 E. 100 South, 801-209-5850, Friday, Oct. 14, 7 p.m., free, SaveOceanLife.com

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Foul-Feathered Friends In September, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, noting a recent uptick in cases of “live-poultryassociated salmonella,” repeated its earlier (apparently largely ignored) alert that people should not be kissing chickens (or ducks or turkeys). CDC noted the recent popularity of urban egg farming, but reminded “hipster” farmers and faddish pet patrons that cuddling the animals, or bringing the little darlings into the home (even those that appear clean and friendly), can spread dangerous bacteria for which humans are unprepared. Suspicions Confirmed A recent working paper by two Louisiana State University economists revealed that the state’s juvenile court judges dole out harsher sentences on weeks following a loss by the LSU football team (among those judges who matriculated at LSU). The differences in sentences were particularly stark in those seasons that LSU’s team was nationally ranked. (All sentences from 1996 to 2012 were examined, for first-time juvenile offenders, except for murder and aggravated-rape cases.)

n The NCAA’s two-year probation handed to Georgia Southern University’s football program in July included a note that two football players were given “impermissible” inside help to pass a course. It turns out that even though GSU’s former assistant director of student-athlete services stealthily wrote five extracredit assignments for each of the players, still, neither player was apparently in good enough shape to pass the course.

Awkward A paramedic with the St. Louis Fire Department discovered on Aug. 4 that his car, in the station’s parking lot, had been broken into and was missing various items. Minutes after he filed a police report, the station received an emergency call about a pedestrian hit by a car, and the paramedic and crew rushed to the scene. As he was helping the victim, the paramedic noticed that his own gym bag and belongings were strewn about the scene and concluded that the man he was attending to was likely the man who had broken into his car. The paramedic continued to assist the man, and police told the St. Louis Post-Dispatch that they would arrest the man as soon as he was discharged from the hospital. n Raylon Parker, doing his duty in August on a grand jury in Halifax County, N.C., listened to a prosecutor lay out a case, and to Parker’s apparent surprise, the case was against Raylon Parker (for assault with a deadly weapon with intent to kill). Still, he voted on the indictment, which passed (though, due to grand jury secrecy, we do not know which way he voted). One possibility: He voted to indict, assuming a judge would toss it out, tainting the prosecutor’s case. However, Parker’s judge said the indictment—signifying “probable cause”—was still valid and that she would not inquire how Parker had voted.

Bright Ideas Business is booming for Lainey Morse, the owner of No Regrets Farm in Albany, Ore., and the founder of “Goat Yoga”—an outdoor regimen of relaxation carried out among her wandering goats. “Do you know how hard it is to be sad and depressed when there are baby goats jumping around?” she asked, proudly noting that she is booked up right now, with a waiting list of 500. One problem has surfaced, though (as she told a Canadian Broadcasting Corp. reporter): Naive baby goats try to eat flower designs on yoga mats, leading Morse to permit only mats of solid colors. n Wesley Autrey, 42, was arrested by Scranton, Pa., detectives in September in a drug bust with five bags of heroin and four of cocaine (along with $3,083 cash) and charged with dealing. Autrey (street name, for some reason: “Newphew”) wet his pants during the arrest, which police said he did under the mistaken impression that heroin would dissolve when exposed to urine.

n Although India’s sacred Ganges River remains ridiculously polluted, it retains holy credibility for Hindus, who consume and bathe in it regularly for salvation. Since reaching the Ganges can be difficult for India’s poor, the country’s postal service (with 155,000 offices) began recently to offer home delivery of the Ganges, in bottles, for the equivalent of about 22 to 37 cents. (Tip: Water bottled in the small town of Gangotri, which is near the origin of the river, is likely cleaner; the other bottler, in the city of Rishikesh, which is holier but located farther down the river, likely presents worshippers a stronger test of faith.) n “Clitoris activism is hot in France right now,” reported London’s The Guardian in August, highlighted by the introduction in school sex education of a 3-D model of the organ—demonstrating, by the way, that it more resembles a “wishbone” or a “high-tech boomerang” than the “small, sensitive” “bud” of dictionary description. French clitoris scholars emphasize that most of the several-inch-long organ is internal and just as highly excitable as its male counterpart, and their wide-ranging societal campaign includes a magazine whose title translates to “The Idiot’s Guide to the Clit.”

Recurring Themes Emma Marsh of Kuraby, Australia, shelled out $500 in September for her goldfish’s emergency medical care to remove the pebble stuck in poor Conquer’s throat. (Brisbane’s CourierMail noted that the $500 could have bought 40 replacements— that $500 is about what an actual bar of gold of Conquer’s weight would cost.) n Elsewhere Down Under, researchers from Murdoch University in Perth said in August they were working on a goldfish-control program after learning that one species dumped in the nutrientrich Vasse River in Western Australia could grow to 4 pounds— and the size of a football.)

Updates Music researcher David Teie announced in September that he had landed a deal with major label Universal Music to distribute his “Music for Cats” (touted in News of the Weird in February). The music, with Teie accompanying on the cello, includes painstakingly timed “purring” and “sucking” sounds designed to relax kitties, and he reiterated plans to move on to special music for other animals. In a similar vein, artists led by Dominic Wilcox staged a brief August show in London of exhibits and paintings of scenes that Wilcox thought would appeal to dogs, and would, he said, garner “tail wags.” One interactive exhibit, for example, featured an open car window simulator hosting an array of scents. The Passing Parade Hippie grandmother Shawnee Chasser, 65, who has lived in a tree since 1992, is under siege by county officials in Miami who plan to tear down her tree house by December unless she brings her property up to code. It’s a full-featured, well-appointed tree house—and she owns the land underneath, but prefers the “heaven” of her high perch, especially when it rains. n Six times since 2004, cars have left New Hope Road in Raleigh, N.C., and crashed into the home of Carlo Bernarte, and in September he desperately sought help from traffic officials— and indicated that it might be time to move. (He suggested the state install a barrier, but apparently that would block drivers’ line of sight.)

Thanks this week to Rob Boyden, Michael Brozyna, Russell Bell, Edgar Pepper and the News of the Weird Board of Editorial Advisors.


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The Weather Inside The prison system seems intent on ensuring that a man convicted of stealing $264 in 1981 dies in jail. By Colby Frazier

cfrazier@cityweekly.net

I

n summer, when the alfalfa sits in perfectly raked heaps in the fields of the Sanpete Valley and the sun plots its ruthless course across a wide blue sky, it can be counted on that Rolf Kaestel, Utah State inmate No. 137752, is doing what he can to feel the sunlight on his skin. And in winter, when snowstorms bear down on the remote town of Gunnison, Utah, home to the branch of Utah State Prison where Kaestel lives, it is likely that he is taking it all in from a small concrete silo open to the sky, marveling at the table scraps of nature he is allowed, and listening to the silence of the storm as snowflakes collide and melt on his bald head. To Kaestel, who in 1981 was convicted of aggravated robbery after stealing $264 from an Arkansas taco shop, nature has become a sacred part of his life behind bars. In Arkansas, where he served the first 19 years of his life-withoutparole sentence, Kaestel says he found the energy to remain behind bars by lying in the clover grass, listening to the insects. But nothing beats the sun. “To me, the feeling of the sun on my skin is the best thing in the world,” Kaestel says. Now 66, Kaestel remembers the days he ran for five miles around the prison yard, allowing the sun to sap the salt from his body. He loved pulling on his shirt after a run, feeling it crinkle against the salt on his skin.

It is the weather, and nature, that Kaestel and I often jaw about in letters, and when we meet in a white painted cinderblock cafeteria in the prison. Visits last two hours, there are soda pop and candy machines, and if Kaestel must rise to use the restroom, or stands for any reason, the visit is over. Since 2014, when I wrote a cover story for City Weekly about Kaestel, we have exchanged dozens of letters. And during his 17 years in Utah, he has had three visitors, all named Colby Frazier. For nearly a year now, Kaestel and anyone who knows about him have been grappling with the news that Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson denied the man’s most recent request for clemency. This means that Kaestel will be in his 70s before he can reapply for freedom. His hopes of seeing the seasons change without razor wire obscuring the view blur with each day he spends behind bars. It occurs to me that this should not bother me like it does; it does not seem to bother anyone outside of a handful of individuals who have come into contact with Kaestel over the years. But there is something about this man—specifically, about the fiction-like circumstances that led to his nearly 40-years-and-counting of incarceration, and the seemingly unbeatable forces that keep him in prison—that is just plain bothersome. Mara Leveritt, an Arkansas writer who has chronicled politics and criminal justice for more than 30 years, says that for her, Kaestel’s story is unforgettable because his continued incarceration speaks to a part of our humanity—our collective vengeance—that most people do their best to ignore. Even now as six Arkansas governors have come and gone over the years, all of them failing to address the continued imprisonment of Kaestel, the man himself has greeted the reality that he might at last perish in prison with a level of grace and forgiveness that, under the circumstances, seems preposterous. “Needless to say, it stings deeply once again but it is not an entirely unexpected thing,” Kaestel wrote in a letter postmarked Dec. 21, 2015, of the denial of his clemency request. “Admittedly, this time around the denial of clemency brings with it a new kind of reality, and one which generally has caused me to take a couple of months ‘out’ to reassess the overall situation and to see if or how I should implement a new life direction. I’ll now be in my 70s before I’m eligible to reapply for clemency again—and with average life expectancy in the low 70s nowadays—well, it’s not looking all too hopeful that I’ll ever be outside again. Or perhaps not as a free or healthy man.”


Wild Youth

Vengeance

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Rolf Kaestel did bad things, and he says that he knows he deserved to pay a price. But if the legitimacy of the justice system rests at all on the axiom that a punishment ought to fit a crime, then legitimacy is a fleeting word in Kaestel’s case. By way of comparison, Brian David Mitchell, who was convicted of abducting and raping Elizabeth Smart, received a life sentence in the federal prison system. Kaestel’s lone hope has long rested on the shoulders of Arkansas governors, beginning with Bill Clinton, Frank D. Right, then Bill Clinton again and on to Jim Guy Tucker, Mike Huckabee, Mike Beebe and now, Asa Hutchinson.

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“That’s why he’s in your state. They removed a problem. And it wasn’t to get him closer to family. It hasn’t got to do anything but get him out of their hair.”

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If the purpose of prison is to punish, then punish it has done. Kaestel entered prison in 1981—a year before I was born—at the brash age of 29. He has no idea if his parents are alive, nor if he has any relatives—distant or close—to whom he could call family. Born in Germany in 1950, Kaestel remembers little of his early childhood. For him, the memories begin around age 6 or 7, in a German orphanage, when a woman in a black sedan arrives and brings him candy. The man in the car does not bother to get out. A short time later, the woman, whom he assumes but is not certain is his biological mother, arrives and takes Kaestel away for good. The family moved to Alabama, where the trouble-prone Kaestel blossomed into what he said in a 2014 interview was a “true juvenile delinquent.” By seventh grade, Kaestel had put school behind him, and his family returned to Germany where young Kaestel found trouble with ease. Upon the family’s return to the United States, Kaestel says he and his parents parted ways. He never saw them again. Over the next decade, Kaestel found trouble at will, serving stints in prison in Alabama, and two years for robbery in New Mexico. He stole cars to visit girlfriends in other towns, and then stole cars to return home. Once, he says, he broke a store window and carried a gumball machine out into the street. He then smashed the machine, “just to watch all the bubble gum roll down the street.” Kaestel’s string of bad behavior took its final gust of breath in the free world in 1981. As he hitchhiked across the country, he ended up in a vehicle with four people, none of whom had any money. By this time a cunning robber, Kaestel shouldered the weight, siphoning gas from cars and committing robberies. During robberies, Kaestel said in 2014 that his methods were simple and nonviolent: He would ask a store clerk for cash and receive it. If no one was manning the register, he would remove the money and leave. But at a Bob’s Taco Hut in Fort Smith, Ark., Kaestel, armed with a water gun he’d purchased at a toy store, flashed the gun at the cashier and walked away with $264. He was arrested that same evening and charged by Sebastian County’s ambitious and proud prosecutor at the time, Ron Fields, with aggravated robbery. At trial, Kaestel opted to represent himself. Despite his shortcomings in the classroom, he held his ground in court. In 2014, a clerk at the Sebastian County Courthouse told City Weekly that Kaestel’s file is stuffed with around 400 pages of hand-written motions, including one asking for a separate trial from the other defendants, another seeking release of evidence from prosecutors and many more asking the judge to suppress evidence. In the end, though, a jury found Kaestel guilty and handed down a punishment that is often reserved for murderers and serial rapists: life without the possibility of parole. Once condemned to prison, Kaestel plotted a scholarly path toward a paralegal certificate. He filed scores of lawsuits against the notorious Arkansas prison system, which in the 1970s had been designated by federal courts as being cruel and inhumane. Along with

winning some of his suits against the prison, Kaestel advocated for prisoners’ rights, quickly becoming a problem child—the kind that manifests itself in articulately written legal briefs—for prison officials. “Rolf was a very informed prisoner when he was in Arkansas,” Leveritt says. “He studied the law, he helped other inmates, he became a thorn in their side, I think, of the establishment—the prison department in particular.” One of the Arkansas prison system’s misdeeds Kaestel witnessed involved a blood-plasma donation program. Kaestel himself donated plasma—a way he and other inmates could make a couple of bucks. But Kaestel noticed health concerns with the blood plasma program, including lack of testing for hepatitis C and HIV. He began collecting documents on the plasma program and even appeared in a documentary film, Factor 8: The Arkansas Prison Blood Scandal, released in 2005. It begins with Kaestel—already with 18 years of prison under his belt—saying on camera in front of a prison official that the Arkansas prison system is ripe with “graft, corruption and money making.” In 1999, a short time after being interviewed for the film, Kaestel was hauled out of the breakfast line, loaded into a van and moved to Utah. No one in the Utah prison system knows why state taxpayers spend roughly $28,000 per year to warehouse a man who has no connection to this place. In Arkansas, the only official explanation City Weekly has ever received says only that Kaestel was moved because of “noncompliance with the Arkansas system.” Leveritt, though, says she has some idea why Kaestel was spirited out of the South and deposited in a land where he did not know a soul. “Kaestel’s lawsuits and activism—all perfectly legal—antagonized state officials, no –Mara Leveritt doubt about it,” Leveritt says. “That’s why he’s in your state. They removed a problem. And it wasn’t to get him closer to family. It hasn’t got to do anything but get him out of their hair.”


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Kaestel estimates that he has applied for clemency 10 times during his 35 years in prison, and has been recommended for release by seven different parole boards—five in Arkansas and two in Utah. Granting of executive clemency in Arkansas is not unheard of. When Hutchinson denied Kaestel’s most recent request, he pardoned nine people. Most were drug offenders, while one was convicted of negligent homicide in 1990. Along with the denial of Kaestel’s application, 41 others were also turned down. Clemency has, as it seems to at the conclusion of any presidential term, been receiving attention. So far in 2016, President Barack Obama has granted clemency to more than 100 federal prisoners, and there are efforts afoot to encourage the president to set many more men and women free before the end of his term. In June, dozens of legal scholars, law professors and prisoner advocates penned a letter to Obama, urging him to begin granting clemency to the more than 1,000 people estimated by the U.S. Justice Department to be eligible. At the time the letter was written, Obama had granted clemency to 348 prisoners. One of the letter’s signees was Carissa Byrne Hessick, a former University of Utah law professor who is now the Anne Shea Ransdell and William Garland “Buck” Ransdell Jr. Distinguished Professor of Law at the University of North Carolina. Hessick says that while federal clemency receives much of the attention, Americans should not lose sight of the fact that the vast majority of prisoners—like Kaestel—are serving time for state crimes, in state prisons, where governors are their only hope for mercy. “People who care about clemency need to start paying attention to clemency in the states,” Hessick says. “At the end of the day, the people who make these decisions are elected by voters, and voters need to care about these decisions.” Of course, politics, or the protection of one’s political future, is often in play when clemency and pardons are discussed. If a governor grants clemency to a prisoner who then reoffends and

COURTESY UTAH DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

COURTESY ARKANSAS DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

Rolf Kaestel as he looked when he arrived in Utah 17 years ago.

Kaestel, now 66, in his most recent prison photo. commits a terrible crime, it garners massive attention and can have political reverberations. For this reason, politicians are undoubtedly cautious when granting clemency. But Hessick says that the thought process should not solely focus on the possibility of a person committing more crime when they are free, but also take into consideration whether or not an injustice is occurring by failing to pardon. In Kaestel’s case, blame for his continued incarceration lies squarely on the proud shoulders of the Natural State’s governors, who have

“I see now that all of my life has flowed toward this end. And that’s a very peaceful awareness.”

–Rolf Kaestel

neglected to take the advice of multiple parole boards that have all insisted that Kaestel is prime for release. In 2012, Don Blanchard, a former member of Utah’s Board of Pardons, conducted an interview with Kaestel, the results of which were forwarded to former Arkansas Gov. Beebe. “I believe the ends of justice have been served in this case, and urge both the Arkansas Parole Board and the governor to grant clemency and a release,” Blanchard wrote. In 2013, Beebe declined to take action on Blanchard’s letter, and on Kaestel’s application for clemency. This left the door open for him to reapply. But the next time Kaestel’s paperwork ended up on an Arkansas governor’s desk, Hutchinson—a Republican and former federal prosecutor—was in office. For reasons that neither he nor any of his staff have agreed to address, Hutchinson took Kaestel’s request a step further than some other governors by denying it, ensuring that Kaestel will remain im-

prisoned for at least another half decade. It is easy to forget—perhaps by design—that society’s collective human collateral is impounded away someplace distant, safe and secure. But the more life we all live, a nugget of wisdom which sounds almost Christ-like, and might well be, becomes true: A measure of how great, prosperous, kind and true a society is can be tabulated by taking a long look at how it treats its most disenfranchised classes. And so it is that in every dime spent to keep Kaestel and every other man, woman and child locked away in America, I can see my own face. If there is injustice in the continued imprisonment of Kaestel, each and every one of us are responsible, complicit and financing parties to the injustice. And in Kaestel’s case, this injustice compounds at an ever rapid rate, with every day of his life that he continues to pay for that $264. “The fact that nobody in the legal system is willing to address that, to even acknowledge that the problem exists, it just perpetuates and continues the problem,” Leveritt says. “And every day that goes by makes it worse. Every day that he is kept in prison makes our own responsibility for this that much greater.”

Justice Reform

In Utah and elsewhere around the country, there has been much talk in recent years about the unsustainable number of Americans locked in prisons, and the mountains of money it requires to keep them there. Utah’s answer to the problem came in 2015 and was a carrot of sorts to convince the public that the main branch of the Utah State Prison in Draper should be moved elsewhere to pave the way for large-scale development. The result was House Bill 348, known as the Justice Reinvestment Initiative. According to the Pew Charitable Trusts, which tracks justice reform, Utah’s efforts will eliminate prison growth over the next 20 years by installing a number


Faith

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There might not be many more chances for Kaestel to even file the paperwork necessary to ask an Arkansas governor to set him free. This is not lost on Kaestel, who after being denied clemency last November, says he took a short time to reassess his priorities. Priority No. 1, he says, is his writing. To date, he has penned roughly 400 pages. Much of the writing details Kaestel’s religious philosophies (he is a devout Christian, who can write for pages and pages about his beliefs). He is also writing about his life—his wild times as a criminal, his lawsuits with the Arkansas prison system, his conversion and his time in prison. “These writings are my purpose—my legacy— and I will give myself to that completely,” Kaestel wrote in a February 2016 letter. “I see now that all of my life has flowed toward this end. And that’s a very peaceful awareness.” Evident in Kaestel’s letters is a calm that, for my impatient mind, is maddening. For nearly three years, I have wrestled with the memory of this man. If I speed southward from Salt Lake City, I can be at his razor-wired gates in two hours. Even so, I have managed to make the trip only once per year. Kaestel assures me, and I know that he has assured others, that we need not fret for his well being. When I visit, he tells me he appreciates the gesture, as well as my company, but that I should not worry too much about making the trek. Visit and write when time allows, he says. None of his statements make me feel any better. In fact, it is possible that whatever Kaestel has learned in prison—his humility, his faith and his patience—makes his condition weigh even heavier on my mind. Kaestel also is not angry, and does not harbor animosity toward his keepers. As a Christian, he says he is a witness to the gospel, and a reflector, or mirror, of that truth. As such, he writes, “Given this spiritual truth, when any hard-hearted souls have pointed their fingers at me to say, in effect, ‘You are not worthy of mercy or to be set free,’ then it was not my reflection they were pointing at, but their own. So, as their own judgments have determined it to be, so let it be.” Kaestel continues: “Besides this, I can never complain about the hand that I have been dealt, for

at least two solemn reasons. First, had I not attempted to stack the deck in my own favor and to have played by my own twisted rules, then perhaps things would have been different. However, even though I truly did repent of my sins long ago, I know that even my conversion does not entitle me to be excused from even extreme punishment—a fact which is brought home by the execution of the repentant thief who was still executed alongside Christ, despite his faith. I also do not shy from that truth.” With a hint of autumn in the air, Kaestel is no doubt looking to get outside, waiting patiently for the first blizzard to blow snow into his own private sliver of sky. And with the holidays on the way, he has, for several years now, looked forward to a bingo tournament, at which he always places high, winning popcorn and soda, and representing the senior citizens of the Central Utah Correctional Facility. In a letter that he gave City Weekly permission to publish, Kaestel makes a plea, of sorts, to us all. “If anyone indeed does believe that I have suffered unjustly, then be absolutely assured that there are tens if not hundreds of thousands of prisoners in these United States who are much more unjustly punished to extremes than was I, and who are much more worthy of your sympathies, compassion and support.” Leveritt says that it is important to ask ourselves whether or not we are capable of forgiveness. When it comes to Kaestel, whom she calls the “walking, talking example of ‘You will not be forgiven,’” it is easy to conclude that, collectively, we Americans are not. And yet, Kaestel himself appears to have forgiven the society that, around every bend, seems intent on ensuring that he is never set free. “You can be a person on the outside world and be a prisoner of yourself, or you can be a relatively free person within the confines of prison,” Leveritt says. “I wish he were out; he should be out. But as a man who has been imprisoned for a long, long time, and unfairly, which is a different kind of burden to bear, I think he has found a level of personal freedom on the inside that many people on the outside have never discovered. I think he may understand forgiveness better than the people who are keeping him in prison.” CW

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of measures, including downgrading first- and second-time drug possession charges from felonies to misdemeanors. Additionally, tens of millions of dollars will fund programs to help reduce recidivism. As the Utah Legislature contemplated its bill, it wasn’t unusual to hear politicians talk proudly about how they could save taxpayers money and lessen the burden on the criminal justice system by reducing unreasonable sentences and, ideally, preventing people from entering the prison system to begin with. Kelly Duda, who directed the Factor 8 film and interviewed Kaestel in Arkansas, says that it is hard for him to have any faith in the criminal justice system while Kaestel, who he says is a “poster boy for rehabilitation,” is left to rot in prison. “The whole notion of rehabilitation is a farce,” Duda says of Kaestel’s case. “In religion, there’s the idea of being saved, or being forgiven or redeeming yourself, and a prison system without a notion of redemption is just a write-off.” As is the case with Leveritt, the name Rolf Kaestel never drifts too far from the thoughts of Duda, who loosely maintains a “Free Rolf” Facebook page. Because he has no sense of what it’s like to spend his life behind bars, Duda says he has never considered himself a close friend to Kaestel. And when he interviewed him for the film, he says he did so with a level of trepidation not unfamiliar to many journalists, who must weigh the truthfulness and credibility of their sources. And prisoners—whether imagined or real—have a massive credibility handicap for no other reason than that they were convicted of a crime. Still, though, there was something about Kaestel that Duda could not let go, and for 17 years now, he has not been able to escape the knowledge he has about the man’s plight. “I think the person I met was a changed man who cared about others and actually cared about the system; who saw his wrongs and tried to right them and who saw other wrongs and wanted to right them,” Duda says of Kaestel.

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Gunnison Prison


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Guillermo Galindo: Sonic Border

Award-winning Mexican composer Guillermo Galindo’s works blur the borders between finding objects to utilize as instruments, and composing the musical work itself. A child’s shoe, a broken comb, a doll’s head, a shotgun shell—all these items, found near the United States-Mexico border, become part of musicmaking devices. It’s not just music; it’s an attempt to channel the spirit of these objects and commune with the people who once owned them. The sounds he elicits from them give a kind of voice to their history and the realities of their existence. He has described his compositions as “an imaginary story that each object has and carries within itself.” His musical scores are just as innovative, using unconventional notation. In the first artist talk at the Utah Museum of Fine Arts since it closed earlier this year for remodeling, Galindo presents his musical performance, titled “A la deriva/Adrift” at 7 p.m., followed by a talk about his work and a Q&A with the audience. After the presentation, he’ll sign copies of his collaborative book project Border Cantos, produced with photographer Richard Misrach. “Galindo and Misrach’s project doesn’t attempt to take a political side, but instead uses art to illuminate certain aspects about human migration and borders that may not be visible to the general public,” says Mindy Wilson, UMFA director of marketing and public relations. (Brian Staker) Guillermo Galindo: Sonic Border @ Dumke Auditorium, Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Drive, University of Utah, Oct. 6, 7 p.m., free. UMFA.Utah.edu/Artlandish

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THURSDAY 10.6

ENTERTAINMENT PICKS OCT. 6-12, 2016

FRIDAY 10.7

SATURDAY 10.8

Living in the future is awesome—and scary. Never mind the constant barrage of stories warning us about always looking at our phones these days; that’s only a piece of the technological pie. Streaming media, immersive video games, the emergence of refined VR—we’ve basically become a plugged-in nation 24/7. So it shouldn’t shock anyone that we’re close to finding ourselves in the kind of society depicted in Good Company Theatre’s latest production, Jennifer Haley’s The Nether. The play features a cyberspace detective combing through a heavily protected virtual getaway called “The Hideaway,” where people’s most secret desires can be lived without consequence. But as the detective pushes forward to find the true identity of its creator, she, too, is consumed its pleasures, and escape begins to look bleak. “One of the things that stood out the most about The Nether is the believability of this future,” GCT’s co-director Camille Washington says. “Haley crafts a plausible future in which people are even more immersed in their digital lives. Plus, the story had fantastic noir elements, and is a true thriller—something that is nice to find in such a contemporary piece.” The play mixes themes of escapism from Philip K. Dick’s A Scanner Darkly, online fulfillment as depicted in Ghost in the Shell, and the futuristic paranoia of Black Mirror—all wrapped into a modern thriller that explores whether our desires are stronger than our morals. It’s cyber-punk drama at its best. (Gavin Sheehan) The Nether @ Good Company Theatre, 260 25th St., Ogden, Oct. 7-22, ThursdaySaturday, 8 p.m.; Sunday, 4 p.m., $17. GoodCoTheatre.com

What is it that makes Bizet’s Carmen not only perhaps the most popular opera ever written, but also one of the few whose music has crossed over into mainstream culture? Could it be the torrid romance between Don José and the titular Carmen? Or is it the musical’s score that has so permeated popular culture that most are able to hum along with opera from the second it begins? With its return to the Capitol Theatre’s stage and to the Utah Opera, local audiences have a chance to judge for themselves what exactly has kept this show in the spotlight. The story follows Don José, who gives up both his job as a soldier and his original love to be with the fiery, dangerous Carmen. As he sinks deeper into their love affair, she drifts away toward the more glamourous bullfighter, Escamillo—and the end result is as tragic as you’d expect for everyone involved. Last staged by Utah Opera in 2010, this production features traditional 16th-century Spanish costumes, giving viewers an authentic experience of the original. The show runs roughly three hours long with two intermissions. For those a little daunted about seeing a performance entirely in French, the show includes English supertitles—translated lyrics projected on a screen during the performance. Utah Opera’s education and community outreach department also offers a “learn before you go” series, which provides more information on the opera’s plots and origins. Find it at UtahOpera.org/OnlineLearning. (Kylee Ehmann) Utah Opera: Bizet’s Carmen @ Capitol Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, 801-355-2787, Oct. 8, 10, 12 & 14, 7:30 p.m.; Oct. 16, 2 p.m., $21-$110. UtahOpera.org

Good Company Theatre: The Nether

MARTHA ROMERO

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SATURDAY 10.8

Latin American Dance Spectacular

Since 2000, the Utah Hispanic Dance Alliance has been promoting the ethnic folk-dance traditions of Latin America throughout the state—and even beyond, including an invitation to represent Utah at the second inaugural parade for President Obama in 2013. But the biggest annual showcase of the year is the Latin American Dance Spectacular, which brings its 17th performance to the Rose Wagner Center with Origins: A Latin Musical Journey. The show’s focus, according to UHDA spokesperson Shawn Salazar, is “how the traditional folklórico dances of most Latin American countries draw their origins from a variety of cultural influences.” Performers showcase a range of styles representing Mexico, Central and South America, accompanied by musical talent like Son Sor y Luna, a Montreal-based group playing in the traditional Veracruz musical style of jarocho (violinist Yamin Alvarado Zamora is pictured). Salazar sees a program like this as one that might be particularly important during a year in which the political discourse has often focused on racial and ethnic divisions, and hostility toward a multicultural American identity. “Like the United States, Latin America is an ethnic mix of a wide variety of indigenous tribes, European colonizers, African people brought against their will, as well as Asian immigrants,” Salazar says. “Our own unique origins are most often drawn from a pool fed by many different streams. … It’s our hope that the audience, like us, will see that interaction is inherently positive, and that our common cultural similarities outweigh any differences.” (Scott Renshaw) Latin American Dance Spectacular @ Rose Wagner Performing Arts Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801-355-2787, Oct. 8, 7 p.m. UHDA.org, ArtSaltLake.ArtTix.org


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A Strange Primer

Get to know Doctor Strange ahead of the new movie. BY BRYAN YOUNG comments@cityweekly.net @swankmotron

S

o far, Marvel Studios has given us a number of different lenses through which to view their cinematic universe: the technology of Iron Man, the gods of Asgard in Thor and the classic American patriot in Captain America. They took us a step further into something different with Guardians of the Galaxy, bridging their story into space and expanding their universe into the cosmos. Next month, Marvel Studios is adding magic into their cinematic universe, which is one more step outside of what we’re used to, with the new feature film adventure Doctor Strange. Doctor Strange was created in the pages of Strange Tales No. 110 in 1963 by Steve Ditko, and written in those early days by Stan Lee. Steven Strange was an arrogant neurosurgeon who lost the finer uses of his hands in an automobile accident and ended up training to become the Sorcerer Supreme. His comic books were constantly filled with his spiritual and magical battles with the beings of the underworld and other realms that wished to harm ours. The only thing keeping them at bay was the will and mastery of Doctor Strange and his allies. From the safety of his Sanctum Sanctorum, Doctor Strange leaves his body vulnerable in order to travel by projection into the astral plane and fight demons and threats in that dimension, keeping the world we all know and see safe. He’s one of my favorite characters in the Marvel mythos, even though he’s not as popular as, say, Captain America or Iron Man. He was the leader of a team called The Defenders, which consisted of him, Namor the Sub-Mariner, The Hulk and Silver Surfer. Given his title as Sorcerer Supreme, in the comics he naturally acted as a magical consultant for the other super-teams of the Marvel universe, including the Fantastic Four and the Avengers. He was also friends

big SHINY ROBOT

with many heroes, including Spider-Man. In an early encounter, Loki even tricked him into fighting Thor, before he pierced the veil of Loki’s deception and teamed up with Thor to defeat the trickster god. Seeing how entrenched he’s been in the Marvel Comics Universe for the last 60 years, it’s exciting to think that we’ll see him on screen. In the film, he’s being played by Benedict Cumberbatch. Can you imagine Tom Hiddleston as Loki trying to manipulate Cumberbatch into attacking Chris Hemsworth’s Thor? Or seeing him trade stories with Tom Holland’s SpiderMan or barbs with Robert Downey Jr.’s Iron Man? This thrills me to no end. But then again, I’ve been reading about the adventures of Doctor Strange for as long as I can remember. For those of you who might be new to the character, I have some comic recommendations for you. Then, perhaps, you’ll be as excited as I am. I’d start with Doctor Strange: Season One, written by Greg Pak and illustrated by Emma Rios. This is a modern retelling of the good doctor’s origin, and will give you an idea of what you’re in for with this upcoming origin film. Then, I’d recommend Doctor Strange: The Oath, a limited graphic novel series written by Brian K. Vaughan and drawn by Marcos Martin. It’s a great primer for the sort of weirdness you can expect, along with a thrilling mystery that unfolds in the comic’s pages. If you’re still excited about the Sorcerer Supreme after these, I’d dive into Doctor Strange Volume 1: The Way of the Weird. Written by Jason Aaron and drawn by the highly stylized Chris Bachalo, this will start you off on the Doctor’s current run of comics. Together, these three volumes take the surrealism Steve Ditko and Stan Lee originally brought to the character into the modern world. But, if you find you love Strange as much as I do, don’t hesitate to jump into the old mysticism of the original books. There are always great stories to be found there. Read all of these before the movie and you’ll be hoping, just as I am, that Cumberbatch will utter Strange’s classic catchphrase. “By the Hoary Hosts of Hoggoth!” indeed. CW MARVEL

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More than 20 regional artists representing eight different tribes showcase original handcrafted work for sale at the Natural History Museum of Utah’s Indian Art Market (Saturday-Sunday, Oct. 8-9, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., 301 Wakara Way, NHMU.Utah.edu).

PERFORMANCE

THEATER

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CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

Chamber Music Society of Salt Lake City presents The Danish String Quartet Libby Gardner Hall, 1375 E. Presidents Circle, 801-5187100, Oct. 10, 7:30 p.m., CMSofSLC.org Jason Hardink with Fry Street Quartet Rose Wagner Performing Arts Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801-355-2787, Oct. 7, 7 p.m., ArtSaltLake.ArtTix.org

COMEDY & IMPROV

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OCTOBER 6, 2016 | 25

Improv Broadway Brigham Larson Pianos, 1497 S. State, Orem, 909-260-2509, Saturdays, 8 p.m., ImprovBroadway.com Improv Comedy Ziegfeld Theater, 3934 Washington Blvd., Ogden, 435-327-8273, Saturdays, 9:30 p.m., OgdenComedyLoft.com Jacob Leigh Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Salt Lake City, 801-532-5233, Oct. 6, 7:30 p.m., WiseguysComedy.com Lady Bizness Sandy Station, 8925 Harrison St., Sandy, 801-255-2078, Oct. 7, 8:30 p.m., SandyStation.com Laughing Stock Improv The Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, Salt Lake City, 801-355-4628, Fridays & Saturdays, 10 p.m., LaughingStock.us Off the Wall Comedy Improv Draper Historic Theatre, 12366 S. 900 East, Draper, 801-572-4144, Saturdays, 10:30 p.m., DraperTheatre.org Open Mic Night Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Salt Lake City, 801-532-5233, every Wednesday, 7:30 p.m., WiseguysComedy.com

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Latin American Dance Spectacular Rose Wagner Performing Arts Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801-355-2787, Oct. 8, 7 p.m., ArtTix.ArtSaltLake.org (see p. 22) Thriller Covey Center for the Arts, 425 W. Center Street, Provo, 801-852-7007, Oct. 12-17, 7:30 p.m.; Oct. 15, 2 p.m., Provo.org Thriller Egyptian Theatre, 328 Main, Park City, 435-649-9371, through Oct. 9, Thursday, Friday & Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Sunday, 6 p.m., EgyptianTheatreCompany.org

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The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee Val A. Browning Center, 3950 W. Campus Drive, Ogden, Oct. 7-8 & 11-15, 7:30 p.m.; Oct. 15, 2 p.m., WeberStateTickets.com Bull Shark Attack Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, 801-363-7522, through Oct. 16, Tuesday-Sunday, varying times, SaltLakeActingCompany.org Catch Me If You Can Hale Center Theater Orem, 225 W. 400 North, Orem, 801-226-8600, Oct. 6-Nov. 19, HaleTheater.org Drack-Man vs. Superiorman Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, 801-355-4628, through Oct. 31, Friday-Saturday & Monday, TheOBT.org Ghostblasters Desert Star Theatre, 4681 S. State, Murray, 801-266-2600, through Nov. 5, varying days and times, DesertStar.biz Hunchback of Notre Dame Tuacahn Amphitheater, 1100 Tuacahn Drive, Ivins, 800-746-9882, through Oct. 15, varying days and times, Tuacahn.org Into the Woods Draper Theatre, 12366 S. 900 East, Draper, Oct. 7-29, Friday-Saturday & Monday, 7 p.m., DraperTheatre.org Jekyll & Hyde The Grand Theatre, 1575 S. State, Salt Lake City, 801-975-3322, Oct. 6-29, varying times, GrandTheatreCompany.com Kelly Alvarez and Artists Peery’s Egyptian Theater, 2415 Washington Blvd., Ogden, 801-689-8700, Oct. 8, 7:30-9:30 p.m., EgyptianTheaterOgden.com The King’s Men Sting & Honey Co., Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801-355-2787, through Oct. 15, Thursday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday matinee, 2 p.m., ArtSaltLake.ArtTix.org The Nether Good Company Theatre, 260 25th St., Ogden, Oct. 7-23, Thursday-Saturday, 8 p.m.; Sunday, 4 p.m., GoodCoTheatre.com (see p. 22) Tarzan Tuacahn Amphitheatre, 1100 Tuacahn Drive, Ivins, 800-746-9882, through Oct. 12, Monday-Saturday, 8:45 p.m., Tuacahn.org Utah Opera: Carmen Capitol Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, 801-355-2787, Oct. 8, 10, 12 & 14, 7:30 p.m.; Oct. 16, 2 p.m. UtahOpera.org (see p. 22) Utah Shakespeare Fest Randall L. Jones Theatre, 351 W. Center St., Cedar City, 435-586-7878, through Oct. 22, varying days and times, Bard.org

Winter Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, 801-363-7522, Oct. 12-Nov. 13, WednesdaySaturday, 7:30 p.m.; Sunday, 1 p.m. & 6 p.m., SaltLakeActingCompany.org


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Orny Adams Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Salt Lake City, 801-532-5233, Oct. 7 & 8, 7:30 & 9:30 p.m., WiseguysComedy.com Sasquatch Cowboy The Comedy Loft, 3934 Washington Blvd., Ogden, Saturdays, 9:30 p.m., OgdenComedyLoft.com

LITERATURE

We sell tickets!

AUTHOR APPEARANCES

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upcoming shows thriller

broadway divas brunch

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David Pace: Dream House on Golan Drive Pioneer Book, 450 W. Center St., Provo, Oct. 6, 5:30 p.m., PioneerBook.com Jennifer Holland: Unlikely Friendships: Dogs The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, Oct. 6, 7 p.m., KingsEnglish.com Lynn Kenneth Packer: Lying for the Lord Weller Book Works, 607 Trolley Square, 801-3282586, Oct. 10, 7 p.m., WellerBookWorks.com Scott Renshaw: Happy Place: Living the Disney Parks Life Weller Book Works, 607 Trolley Square, 801-328-2586, Oct. 11, 7 p.m., WellerBookWorks.com (see p. 8)

SPECIAL EVENTS FARMERS MARKETS

oct 10-27 kingsbury hall

monty alexander

9th West Farmers Market International Peace Gardens, 1000 S. 900 West, Salt Lake City, Sundays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., through Oct. 31, 9thWestFarmersMarket.org Harvest Market Gallivan Center, 239 S. Main, Tuesdays, 4-8:30 p.m., through Oct. 18, SLCFarmersMarket.org Park City Farmers Market The Canyons Resort, 1951 Canyons Resort Drive, Park City, Wednesdays, noon-6 p.m., through Oct. 26, ParkCityFarmersMarket.com Sugar House Farmers Market Fairmont Park, 1040 E. Sugarmont Ave., Salt Lake City, through Oct. 26, Wednesdays, 5-8 p.m., SugarHouseFarmersMarket.org Downtown Farmers Market Pioneer Park, 300 S. 300 West, Salt Lake City, through Oct. 22, Saturdays, 8 a.m.-2 p.m., SLCFarmersMarket.org

sun, oct 16 club x

35% Off!

winter

FESTIVALS & FAIRS

mon, oct 17 capitol theatre

oct 10 & nov 6 salt lake acting company

ragamala

New york five

35% Off!

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moreESSENTIALS

Utah Humanities Book Festival Utah Humanities, 202 W. 300 North, Salt Lake City, 801-359-9670, through Oct. 29, times and locations vary, UtahHumanities.org Indian Art Market Natural History Museum of Utah, 301 Wakara Way, Oct. 8-9, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., NHMU.Utah.edu (see p. 25) Oktoberfest Snowbird Resort, 9385 S. Snowbird Center Drive, 801-933-2222, through Oct. 9, Saturdays and Sundays, noon-6 p.m., Snowbird.com

TALKS & LECTURES

Stephen Prothero: Why Liberals Win the Culture Wars Salt Lake City Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, Oct. 6, 7 p.m., SLCPL.org

sat, nov 12 kingsbury hall

sat, nov 19 capitol theatre

FOR MORE SHOWS & EVENTS GO TO CITYWEEKLYTIX.COM

VISUAL ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

Andrew Alba: Rainbow Variance Mestizo Institute of Culture & Arts, 631 W. North Temple, Ste. 700, through Oct. 14, Facebook.com/MestizoArts Andrew Rice: (Re)structured Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-3284201, through Oct. 8, UtahMOCA.org

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE @ CITYWEEKLY.NET

Andy Nasisse: Badlands Southern Utah Museum of Art, 13 S. 300 West, Cedar City, through Oct. 31, SUU.edu/PVA/SUMA Anne Penrod: Water Ways SLC AndersonFoothill Library, 1135 S. 2100 East, 801-594-8611, through Oct. 6, SLCPL.org Art2Go and Stephanie Hock Art Access Gallery, 230 S. 500 West, 801-328-0703, through Oct. 14, AccessArt.org Art in the City Thomas S. Monson Center, 411 E. South Temple, 801-870-0956, Oct. 7, noon-8 p.m. Ben Kilbourne: Unresting Event SLC Marmalade Library, 280 W. 500 North, 801-5948680, through Oct. 28, SLCPL.org Benny van der Wal Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, 801-530-0547, through Nov. 19, SaltLakeArts.org Berna Reale: Singing in the Rain Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through Nov. 5, UtahMOCA.org Cara Krebs: Sehnsucht Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-3284201, through Oct. 14, UtahMOCA.org Desarae Lee: Expressions in Ink Salt Lake City Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through Oct. 9, SLCPL.lib.ut.us DesignArts ‘16 Rio Gallery, 300 S. Rio Grande St., through Oct. 21, Monday-Friday, ArtsandMuseums.Utah.gov Dick Jemison: Limelight Modern West Fine Art, 177 E. 200 South, 801-355-3383, through Oct. 12, ModernWestFineArt.com Discover Zaqistan: The Art of Adventure CUAC, 175 E. 200 South, 385-215-6768, through Oct. 14, CUArtCenter.org Fahimeh Amiri & students: Children’s Expression through Painting Salt Lake City Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through Oct. 13, SLCPL.org Guillermo Galindo: Sonic Border Dumke Auditorium, Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Drive, University of Utah, Oct. 6, 7 p.m., free, UMFA.Utah.edu/Artlandish (see p. 22) Iterations: Sue Martin and Nancy Vorm Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, through Nov. 11, Monday-Friday, VisualArts.Utah.gov J. Calhoun: High Places Make Me High Corinne and Jack Sweet Library, 455 F St., 801594-8651, through Oct. 22, SLCPL.lib.ut.us Lexi Rae Johnson: Wait Here Please Art Barn/ Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, through Nov. 18, SaltLakeArts.org Object[ed]: Shaping Sculpture in Contemporary Art Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-3284201, through Dec. 17, UtahMOCA.org Stephanie Hock: Savor the Small Art Access Gallery, 230 S. 500 West, Ste. 125, through Oct. 7, AccessArt.org Sue Martin and Nancy Vorm: Iterations Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, through Nov. 11, Monday-Friday, VisualArts.Utah.gov Terence K. Stephens: Greater Salt Lake SLC Sprague Library, 2131 S. 1100 East, 801-5948640, through Nov. 5, SLCPL.org Willamarie Huelskamp: A Peaceful Place Salt Lake City Chapman Library, 577 S. 900 West, 801-594-8623, through Oct. 27, SLCPL.org Zion Art Exhibition Anthony’s Fine Art, 401 E. 200 South, 801-369-8894, through Oct. 15, ZionArtSociety.org


All Grown Up

DINE

Cucina turns 21 with a new chef, wine selection and more. BY TED SCHEFFLER comments@cityweekly.net @critic1

2005 E. 2700 SOUTH, SLC Best of Utah FELDMANSDELI.COM 2015 OPEN TUES - SAT TO GO ORDERS: (801) 906-0369

@ FELDMANSDELI

B

COFFEE SHOP π BAKERY π DELI SERVING BREAKFAST ALL DAY

OPEN MIC EVERY WEDNESDAY 6:30 TO 9:00PM

Cucina’s meatloaf sandwich

1560 E 3300 S • 801.410.4696 DITTACAFFE.COM

Pasta for the People since 1968

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CUCINA

1026 Second Ave. 801-322-3055 CucinaDeli.com

italianvillageslc.com

5370 S. 900 E. / 801.266.4182 M O N -T HU 11a-11p / FR I-SA T 11a-12 a / SUN 3 p -10 p

OCTOBER 6, 2016 | 27

fiddleheads and mustard seeds. I’d never heard of polenta fries ($6), so naturally I had to try them. Somehow, Chef Ferran manages to get polenta mixed with fontina and Parmesan cheeses to coalesce enough to deep-fry rectangles of them. They come out looking like golden Jenga blocks, and are served with a zippy chili-spiked marinara. Call me a polenta fry convert. Another terrific small-plate option is the “Duck & Seeds” ($10). Fanned slices of smoked, boneless duck breast are served atop chili oil and greens, with a terrine of homemade sriracha mustard and another filled with toasted black and white sesame seeds alongside. The idea is to dunk the duck pieces into the mustard, then the seeds. The result is spectacular, elevating smoked duck into something ethereal. However, if there’s a single can’t-miss dish, I recommend Ferran’s stupendous orangeand honey-brined game hen, roasted to perfection and served with delectable einkorn wheat gnocchi, wild mushrooms and lemon-thyme jus. But wait, there’s more! At a recent wine dinner, Pierose told me that in addition to the almost-done new décor, he is “rebranding” Cucina as a wine bar. He’s got some 90 or so wines with around 50 of them available by the glass. And by the way, if you have the opportunity to attend one of their wine dinners, by all means do so. The informal, unstuffy affairs are a lot of fun, with great food, wine and lots of laughter. More than two decades into its run, this restaurant is more appealing than ever. CW

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me that the meatloaf was “amazing,” and so I tried it. I have to admit: It is as amazing as it is unconventional. Melted fresh mozzarella really works with the delicious homemade meatloaf, and the greens, vinaigrette and housemade ketchup helped moisten the flavor-packed creation. The caprese sandwich—fresh tomatoes, mozzarella, basil, greens and balsamic vinaigrette on focaccia—has become a goto item for my wife, and I’m partial to their gourmet panini, made with turkey, Swiss cheese and avocado, plus chipotle mayonnaise to impart a Southwestern snap. The only real miss I’ve encountered among the sandwiches is the Italian combo. The fillings are excellent: high-quality capicola, mortadella, Genoa salami, provolone, minced pepperoncinis, thin-sliced red onion, tomatoes and fresh greens with a delicious housemade vinaigrette. The problem is the bread. I expected something along the lines of a hoagie or sub roll. Instead, the it’s served on a fairly dense, rustic, seeded baguette that overpowers the fillings with sunflower seeds, cracked wheat, flax seeds, oats, barley and rye. Sometimes less is more. A few months ago, former Log Haven Sous Chef Joey Ferran joined the team and kicked things up a notch. Ferran has tons of talent, belying his young age. My prediction is that you’ll be hearing a lot about him. Pierose has largely let Ferran take over the dinner menu, which in turn has allowed Cucina to become more than just a deli. You can still get all of the tasty deli items in the evenings, but the nighttime dinner menu offers fine-dining flavors at less-than high-end prices. There’s a lengthy selection of small-plate offerings—some 14 or so—priced from $6$12. The small plates include such items as mini Rueben sandwiches made with braised pork belly, saffron risotto arancini with chorizo, pan-fried yakisoba noodles, ahi tuna poke, and baby heirloom beets with pickled

COMEDY OPEN MIC EVERY OTHER FRIDAY 7:45 TO 9:00PM MON-SAT 7AM TO 9PM SUNDAY 9:30AM TO 4PM

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ack before you could find high-quality imported pastas, olive oils, vinegars, spices and the like in local supermarkets, there were a handful of specialty markets that I frequented for such foodstuffs. Granato’s, Caputo’s, Liberty Heights Fresh and Cucina were among them. Popular cookbook author and culinary educator Marguerite Marceau Henderson opened Cucina in the Avenues back in 1995 with her business partner, Eileen McPartland. It was both a deli and a café, in which Henderson operated the kitchen while McPartland ran the store and retail side. I remember going there when it was the only place in town selling fresh caviar. In 2001, Henderson and McPartland sold the business to then-manager Dean Pierose—and, to be frank, the quality of the food and service ebbed and flowed somewhat in subsequent years. But with the recent addition of a very talented young chef, the introduction of a tantalizing dinner menu and a schedule of monthly wine dinners, Cucina has turned a corner. Most people are probably familiar with Cucina as a deli/café. Since the beginning, from-scratch salads and sandwiches have been its mainstay. And, as the saying goes, “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.” Classic deli items like the slightly sweet, scrumptious curried chicken served over mesclun greens are so popular that customers would likely riot if they were ever 86’d from the menu. All of the specialty salads—including grilled Thai beef; tortellini with salmon; niçoise; caprese; grilled veggies and portobello; etc.—are priced at $8.94 each, which includes fresh bread from Stone Ground Bakery. Side salads come with a Stone Ground baci roll, and are available in 8- or 16-ounce portions for $3.29 and $5.99, respectively. The Mediterranean chicken salad with orzo, artichoke hearts, feta cheese, mint and sundried tomatoes drizzled with lemon dressing is wonderful. But my favorite of their salads is also one of the simplest: The Tuscan, featuring white cannellini beans tossed with tuna chunks, red onion and celery in a lemon-herb dressing. It’s divine. Sandwiches make up most of the balance of the daytime offerings, and include breakfast, made-to-order deli and an array of specialty sandwiches. I was skeptical, frankly, about the meatloaf sandwich ($8.48). After all, who ever heard of a meatloaf sandwich with mozzarella cheese, sliced tomatoes, fresh greens and vinaigrette on a kaiser roll? But an employee told

Tradition... Tradition

DEREK CARLISLE

RESTAURANT REVIEW


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28 | OCTOBER 6, 2016

Take A Bite

FOOD MATTERS BY TED SCHEFFLER

NIKI CHAN

@critic1

Jen Gilroy

Contemporary Japanese Dining LUNCH • DINNER • COCKTAILS

18 WEST MARKET STREET • 801.519.9595

Meditrina on the Move

Meditrina Small Plates & Wine Bar has moved from its location near Smith’s Ballpark to 165 W. Harvey Milk Blvd. (900 South). As they’ve always done, Chef/ Owner Jen Gilroy and her team serve up tempting tapas and a great wine selection with unique brunch, lunch and dinner menus. Popular dishes include Korean barbecued pork belly, shrimp and grits, oyster mushroom ceviche and albacore tartare. They also offer special early week deals such as Meditrina Mondays (happy hour all night, and five plates for $30), Tapas Tuesdays (endless tapas for $25 per person) and Wine Wednesdays ($8 build-your-own wine flights and a $20 bythe-bottle selection), plus monthly wine socials. MeditrinaSLC.com

PC Dine About

Park City’s annual Dine About, sponsored by the Park City Area Restaurant Association, runs through Sunday, Oct. 9, at 30 participating restaurants. Depending on the eatery, a two-course lunch during Dine About is priced at $10 or $15, with three-course dinners priced at $20 or $40. Restaurants participating in Park City’s Dine About include Sushi Blue, Grub Steak, Butcher’s Chop House, Tupelo, Red Rock Junction, 350 Main, Grappa, Handle, Shabu, Riverhorse and Silver Star Café. No coupons or punch cards are necessary, just ask your server for a Dine About menu. ParkCityRestaurants.com.

Chilihead Alert!

out of your Dining Budget Save up to

40% DAILY

Bake 360

Snowbird Resort’s annual Chili Bird Showdown runs Saturday and Sunday, Oct. 15-16, from noon-5 p.m. Snowbird’s top chefs compete for a People’s Choice Award, and on Sunday, amateur chili enthusiasts enter their homemade creations to compete for prizes in three categories: best red chili, best white chili and best vegetarian chili. I’ll be one of the judges sampling your delicious offerings. Additional activities include live music by Hearts of Steele, bonfires, face painting, a bungee trampoline, a corn hole tournament and a cooking demonstration by Lodge Bistro Chef R.J. Peterson. To register for the competition and cooking demo, visit Snowbird.com/ Events/Chili-Bird-Showdown.

CITY WEEKLY STORE

Quote of the week: “Chili concocted outside of Texas is usually a weak, apologetic imitation of the real thing.”

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SEGMENTS

GREENLAND

Athletes: Seth Wescott, Rob Kingwill Equipment: Snowboards, dogsleds Until they arrived in Greenland, snowboarders Seth Wescott and Rob Kingwill assumed it was “a desolate place, not meant for snowboarding.” But in eastern Greenland, approximately 6,500 vertical feet stem from an ice cap–dotted sea to host a lifetime of untapped terrain. The lack of infrastructure, the constant threat of polar bear encounters and the small population that inhabits the region add to the burliness of this trip. But amidst prime corn skiing, dogsledding and the warm, local people, Kingwill and Wescott find that an entire culture not only survives, but thrives here.

DEER VALLEY, UT

Athletes: Chris Anthony, Kaylin Richardson Equipment: Skis

Stein Eriksen mastered the sport of skiing early on, yet he never allowed himself to stop being a student. The strong relationship he held with the mountain lifestyle left a lasting impression on the skiing community and set the bar for passion as well as talent. For Stein, skiing was a fascination and a way of life where “everything is beautiful around you and you are inspired every minute of the day.” Today, Chris Anthony, Kaylin Richardson and other devotees of the sport pay homage to Stein, remembering what it truly means to “ski like Stein.”


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SEGMENTS

SWITZERLAND

Athletes: Jess McMillan, Grete Eliassen Equipment: Skis, Glacier Express Train

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Quaint mountain villages infused with a rich ski culture and an Alpine backdrop with infinite lines make Switzerland a skier’s paradise. Getting outside her comfort zone in these Swiss peaks, Grete Eliassen looks to Jess McMillan for bigmountain guidance. “There aren’t a lot of rules once you get into the mountains, other than take care of yourself and the crew that you’re with,” says McMillan, a pioneer in big-mountain skiing. For Jess, backcountry exploration has been a way of life for a long time, and Grete hopes to follow her tracks, on the mountain and in life.

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OCTOBER 6, 2016 | 31


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OPEN “Bright White Light” – The Crash Kings “Mountain at my Gates” – FOALS WESTERN MONTANA’S “Living in Awe” – Cloud Cult GLACIER COUNTRY “Through the Ages” – Cloud Cult “Distant Past” – Everything Everything “Electric Man” – Rival Sons “Keep on Running” – The Living End CORDOVA, AK “Atomic Ranch” – Orchestral Man “Helicopters” – Stop Light Observations “Way Down We Go” – Kaleo “The Mountain and I” – Grubby Mitts DEER VALLEY, UT “Global Concepts” – Robert DeLong “Waxy Moon Pie” – The Go Rounds “Let You Go (A-Trak Remix)” – The Chainsmokers ft. Great Good Fine OK FENWAY PARK – BOSTON, MA “Dante’s Inferno – The 8th Circle” – JeRule “Shampion Chip” – Bassnectar & QA “Mutant Brain (Extended Mix)” – Sam Spiegel & Ape Drums ft. Assassin CRESTED BUTTE, CO “Sailing the Solar Flares” – Dirtwire “That Did It” – Sleigh Bells ft. Tink “Back on the Streets Again” – Tower of Power “Kid Icarus” – Big Black Delta KICKING HORSE, BC “Black Coffee” – Rival Sons “Alternate World” – Son Lux “Up&Up” – Coldplay

T

SQUAW VALLEY “Waves” – Long Distance Calling ALPINE MEADOWS, CA “Had to Know (Personal)”- White Denim “Johnny” – Izabo “6 am” – Electric Eye “Banshee” – Santigold “Old Ties and Companions” – Mandolin Orange

Destinations

California – Colorado – Utah – Montana –British Columbia – Switzerland – Fenway Park– Alaska – Greenland

Athletes

JT Holmes – Jeremy Jones – Jonny Moseley – Ingrid Backstrom – Wendy Fisher – Aaron Blunck – Chris Anthony Kaylin Richardson –Tyler Ceccanti – Collin Collins – Keith Curtis – Jess McMillan – Grete Eliassen – Marcus Caston Matt Elliott – Ryland Bell – Morgan Hebert – Seth Wescott – Rob Kingwill– Daron Rahlves

GREENLAND “Deeper” – The Soft Moon “Attica” – Vessels “High Plains Drifter” – JeRule “Snookered” – Dan Deacon TAIL CRAWL “Longer Than You’ve Been Alive” – Old 97’s

OCTOBER 6, 2016 | 33

Narration by Jonny Moseley and featuring Warren Miller

SWITZERLAND “Sommarfågel (Bassnectar Remix)” – Bassnectar “Soul Manifest” – Mikael Seifu “Wanderlust” – Wild Beasts “Paracosm” – Bassnectar & The Glitch Mob STEAMBOAT, CO “The Fringe” – Sego

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his fall, Warren Miller releases its 67th film, Here, There & Everywhere. The 67th installment brings the thrill of action snowsports to enthusiasts everywhere, as the world’s most accomplished skiers and snowboarders scour the globe for untracked powder and the pursuit of adventure. Narration by Olympic gold medalist Jonny Moseley and on-screen interviews with the legendary Warren Miller deliver the nostalgia of skiing’s roots and a zeal for discovering new terrain. Venture with world-renowned athletes JT Holmes, Jeremy Jones, Seth Wescott, Jess McMillan, Ingrid Backstrom, Marcus Caston, Wendy Fisher, Tyler Ceccanti, Kaylin Richardson and others as they push the boundaries of their talent on snowcapped peaks, vast glaciers and towering, big-air jumps. Globe-trotting from the U.S. and Canadian Rockies to sparsely populated lands like Greenland and the Swiss Alps, these skiers and snowboarders prove that the joy of winter can be found wherever you seek it. Here, There & Everywhere opens the door to showcase a progressive side of snowsports, from fat biking, backcountry snowmobiling and hill-climb racing (featuring Polaris pro Keith Curtis) to dogsledding and the ever crowd-pleasing pond skimming. And, as with every annual tour, the film awakens our desires to hit the slopes and sparks excitement for the coming winter season. “This is a special year for Warren Miller Entertainment and the release of our 67th film, Here, There & Everywhere,” said Managing Director Andy Hawk. “For the first time in a dozen years, we are thrilled to return to the screen with the support and inclusion of the patriarch of winter stoke, Warren Miller. This year’s project has been an incredibly rewarding opportunity for the athletes, film crew and staff who were able to work directly with him again.” The annual, nationwide Warren Miller Film Tour for Here, There & Everywhere kicks off in Salt Lake City, Utah, on October 14, 2016, and will visit cities across the Pacific Northwest, California, the Rockies, the Southwest, the Midwest and the East Coast from October 2016 through January 2017. Dates and show times can be found at warrenmiller.com. As always, Warren Miller’s annual film signifies the coming of winter and ignites an untamable passion for skiers and riders everywhere. With the shared energy and comradery found at film screenings, attendees will enjoy exclusive lift ticket deals from local resorts, offers from local retailers, a chance to win ski vacations and gear from national partners, plus door prizes and the opportunity to rub elbows with the film’s featured athletes.

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! T O B O R Y N I H S BI G News from the geeks. what’s new in comics, games, movies and beyond.

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MARCUS CASTON Current favorite piece of gear? Why? My HH Odin Jacket. It’s so light weight but super wind and waterproof. A jacket I can use in rowdiest conditions from ski mountaineering in Iceland to shredding July slush bumps at Mt Hood. 1 jacket to do it all. How do you like spending your down days? I like to run around and pretend to be a 14 year old boy and do things like eat candy, play made up games, and annoy adults. Fondest memory from learning to ski or ride? Poaching Hot Tubs at Snowbird and Alta with my dad. Then driving down the canyon listening to the 5 o’clock song on KRCL dedicated to Marcus and Rosie. Mercy Mercy Mercy. What would your superpower be? Flying, thats an easy one. Spirit animal? Baloo from the Jungle Book. What career accomplishment are you most proud of? Being in my first Warren Miller movie! That whole process was a dream. Ted Ligety called me and asked if I would go to Alaska with him (WHAT???). It was my first time in a heli, first time skiing huge mountains, and first time filming, (WHAT???). Then sitting with my Mom and Dad at the world premier at home in Salt Lake where I grew up watching my heroes in WM (WHAT???). The whole thing the press conferences, signing posters, chatting with my heroes all night, and trying to keep my cool like I had done it before. It was just the absolute craziest. Any pre-riding or skiing rituals or superstitions? Expression Sessions! Before you ski take a deep breath and let yourself be overtaken by an emotion. I generally think about friends, things going on in my life, or just take in everything about that moment. Then I let it shine through my skiing.

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Do you have any pets? What are their names? I am not responsible enough for a pet, I can barely take care of myself! I eat candy for dinner sometimes. Can you speak any other languages? What other languages would you like to learn? I’m still working on English! I would love to be able to speak Spanish, Icelandic, and Norwegian. What is your biggest goal/something you hope to achieve in your ski career? My biggest goal is to take skiing back for the artists. Skiing has become this stunt where people just want to go bigger or spin faster. I want to show people that being crazy and being a good skier are two different things. I want people to watch me and say that kids a crazy good skier. Oh I also reallllllly want a Powder Magazine Photo Annual Cover.


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KAYLIN RICHARDSON

How do you like spending your down days? Eating a great meal followed by reading a great book.

Do you have any hidden talents? I can talk. A lot. But I fear that isn’t very hidden.

Spirit animal? Giraffe

What is your biggest goal/something you hope to achieve in your ski career? To continue skiing, for the rest of my days. I want to be a super eccentric, quick to cackle, often times inappropriate old lady that still skis at 95, cloaked in interesting anecdotes and tall tales- whether they are true or not is all part of the wrinkly mystique. I really hope to achieve that.

OCTOBER 6, 2016 | 35

What career accomplishment are you most proud of? I’m so lucky that I’ve been able to share my love of skiing with so many over the years via ski racing, the Olympics, and freeriding. What I believe I am most proud of though is inspiring people to be 100% themselves. Too often people try to be something they’re not or are told to be someone different than who they are. My proudest moments are when I’m told I encouraged a person to be their authentic self. It’s just the best.

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What would your superpower be? To be absolutely fluent in every language across the universe (reserving the right to speak with aliens). Think how amazing it would be to intimately communicate with every person, every culture in the world! I could be a part of so much growth and so much progress. It would be magnificent.

| WARREN MILLER 2016 |

Fondest memory from learning to ski or ride? Goofy (yes, the beloved Disney character- he must have been the ski school mascot) tried to carry my skis after my first lesson. I vividly remember twisting away and vehemently telling him, “I can do it MYSELF!” Poor guy. I was probably four, maybe five and he was just trying to help. But I recall feeling so tough. A super empowered skier chick before I could even turn!

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Current favorite piece of gear? Why? When it comes to gear I am all about versatility. I never want to lug around more than is necessary. That is why Helly Hansen’s ULLR Midlayer and Volkl’s Confession have quickly become my favorites! I wear the ULLR Midlayer all the time- it’s perfect for layering regardless of weather or activity because its LIFA baselayer technology keeps me dry and warm no matter the temperature. Plus it’s designed as a cute hoody so it transitions seamlessly from the mountains to the city- no need for a change of clothes, which has bailed me out more than once! T


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GOODEATS Complete listings at CityWeekly.net

Award Winning Vietnamese Cuisine

Featuring dining destinations from buffets and rooms with a view to mom-and-pop joints, chic cuisine and some of our dining critic’s faves. Hot Dynasty

Hidden away in the Chinatown Supermarket building, Hot Dynasty is upscale in appearance but not in price. With nearly 250 dishes to choose from, it’s hard to know where to begin, so here are some suggestions: Start with pan-fried dumplings, steamed mini pork buns or perhaps a noodle dish. The “Sichuan Cold Noodles,” thicker lo mein-type egg noodles served cold with a deliciously spicy peanut sesame sauce, is an excellent option. 3390 S. State, Salt Lake City, 801-809-3229, HotDynasty.com

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Pleiku, named after the capital of Gia Lai Province in central Vietnam, is located downtown on Main Street, in the space that formerly homed Cindy Lee Café. The ambiance and décor are ultra-modern and chic, with molded plastic chairs and a wall-length banquet, mostly done in white and cream tones. As far as the Asian fare goes, there is a tasty tapa that made the trip from Pipa to Pleiku: Shaken Steak Cubes. These are cubes of marinated and grilled crispy boneless sirloin beef served with veggie accompaniments like cucumber, greens, onions, cilantro and such. 264 S. Main, Salt Lake City, 801-359-4544

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OCTOBER 6, 2016 | 37

At the Avenues Proper spin-off, Proper Burger, burgers and brews are in abundance. The basic “Plain Jane” burger—the starting point of most burgers here but the vegetarian—has perfect flavor and texture, with brisket incorporated into the quarter-pound beef patty blend. But variations are plentiful, including the “Rising Sun” (with kimchi, miso aioli, cilantro, fried egg, sriracha and pickled cucumber) and the “Hipster” (featuring kale pesto, red onion jam, fresh herb cheese spread, garlic aioli and spinach). 865 S. Main, Salt Lake City, 801906-8604, ProperBurgerSLC.com

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Ocean City is your one-stop shop for fresh seafood, Asian food products and authentic international ingredients. Everything in the market is natural and imported from hard-to-reach corners of the earth. The seafood market imports spices that are necessary for Asian cooking but rarely found in SLC. They also carry a selection of imported teas and baked treats. 872 S. State, Salt Lake City, 801-953-1916, FreshSeafoodMarketInSaltLakeUT.com

THE OTHER PLACE RESTAURANT

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Since 1956, this New Jersey-based sandwich shop has been making gourmet wraps as well as hot and cold subs for its loyal customers. If you are looking for a hot and steamy type of sub, try their authentic Philly Cheesesteak. As far as cold subs go, you can’t go wrong with Jersey Shore’s Favorite—provolone, ham and capocollo. Jersey Mike’s offers catering services as well. 6985 S. Park Centre Drive, Cottonwood Heights, 801-255-9477, JerseyMikes.com


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38 | OCTOBER 6, 2016

BEER, WINE & SPIRITS

Cucina by the Glass

Avenues eatery ups the wine ante with sizeable selection. BY TED SCHEFFLER comments@cityweekly.net @critic1

A

s I mentioned in this week’s “Dine” column (p. 27), Cucina Deli (1026 Second Ave., 801-322-3055, CucinaDeli.com) is morphing into a wine bar. The transition is about 80 percent complete. That’s good news, since wine bars are so few and far between in Utah. The dinner menu at Cucina—with its vast array of small-plate offerings, along with some really great entrées—is especially well-suited to wine. So I’m thrilled that owner Dean Pierose has built an underground, temperature-controlled wine cellar for his inventory. You’ll notice when you dine there that the wines are served at ideal temperatures. That’s rare even for many high-end restaurants in Utah, which tend to serve

white wines too cold and reds too warm. Kudos to Pierose for beefing up the wine list, which now presents guests with a choice of some 90 wines and about 50 available by the glass. There are plenty of affordable wines on the regular list, which ranges from Cestello di Querceto Chianti ($30 bottle/$8 glass) to Thibault LigerBelair Bourgogne “Les Grands Chaillots,” priced at $99 per bottle. For customers looking to sip something special, there’s also a small reserve list with wines priced in the $100-$200-per-bottle range. One wine on the list that caught my eye is the scrumptious Numanthia Toro Tempranillo from Spain. In addition to domestic wines and ones from Europe, the new wine selection features a nice array of bottles and glasses from Australia, New Zealand, Tasmania, Argentina and Chile. Pierose has a house in Chile and visits there regularly, so his wine choices from that country are particularly enticing. In addition to all those new wines and improved storage facilities, Pierose hosts regular wine dinners at Cucina. They normally occur monthly, although he’ll be taking November and December off from the dinners since there are so many other activities going on around the holidays. Later this month, the restaurant hosts a wine dinner featuring wines that scored

DRINK 93 points or higher in Wine Spectator. You can contact them for pricing and reservation information. About a week ago, my wife and I attended our first wine-pairing dinner here, called “Pigs ’n’ Pinot.” I have to confess: I avoid about 75 percent of the wine dinners I’m invited to, since all too many are lengthy, stuffy affairs that typically cause me to look for an escape route about halfway through. Not this one, however. Wine dinners here reflect Pierose’s mischievous sense of humor, and his notoverly precious love of wine. That is, guests aren’t inundated with mind-numbing minutiae meant for hardcore wine nerds—although, winery representatives and experts are usually on hand to answer

queries from individuals interested in such things. Chef Joey Ferran knocked it out of the park with his Pigs ’n’ Pinot menu, kicking off with a starter of prosciutto and cured pork loin with paper-thin slices of cantaloupe, and a luscious petite pecan Waldorf salad with lemon aioli. It was paired with a beautiful pinot gris called “The Expedition” from Walla Walla’s Canoe Ridge Vineyard. Tamarind-glazed pork belly with purple sticky rice followed, accompanied by Albert Bichot Bourgogne Vielles Vignes. There was also a tender, juicy bone-in wild chop with butternut orzotto and Willamette Valley Estate pinot noir. But the dish I can’t forget, and am dying to enjoy again, was sort of a freeform manicotti-type pasta called tortello stuffed with shredded pork shoulder in red chile pozole broth: absolutely spectacular. CW


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“Sabor” means flavor or taste in Spanish—an apt name for this new establishment, as its dishes are packed with robust flavors, even though there isn’t much on the menu that you’d actually find in Mexico. As at most MexicanAmerican eateries, they offer combination plates with a choice of one, two or three entrées, plus rice and beans. The shredded beef taco is not a street-style taco, but a large, soft corn tortilla brimming with juicy, tender shredded beef, tastier than anything I’ve put in my mouth in quite some time. The tamale, too, was delicious: masa stuffed with perfectly seasoned beef picadillo. Normally, camarones a la diabla is a devilishly spicy dish of shrimp bathed in a fiery chile sauce; at this restaurant, however, the un-traditional shrimp and mushrooms simmered in a creamy, fairly mild mojo de ajo sauce was quite delectable. A more authentic-tasting dish is the chicken mole: grilled boneless chicken in a sweet-and-spicy peanut and chocolate sauce that comes with rice, beans and grilled plantains on the side. If the food dished up at Cafe Sabor sounds appealing to you, it’s easy enough to hop the FrontRunner and disembark at Layton Station for a delicious Mexican-American meal. Reviewed Sept. 22. 200 S. Main, Layton, 385-245-1636, CafeSabor.com

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40 | OCTOBER 6, 2016

TED SCHEFFLER

A sampler of Ted Scheffler’s reviews

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FILM REVIEW

New Eyes

CINEMA

The story behind the story inevitably changes how you see The Birth of a Nation. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

I

Nate Parker (center) in The Birth of a Nation that she was attacked, the victims of these assaults aren’t the victims Parker is most concerned with. He’s worried about the men, now turned toward vengeance. Even more disturbing, however, is the reality that The Birth of a Nation’s central thematic idea is crippled by knowledge of Parker’s involvement in that rape case. This is fundamentally a narrative about a kind of revolutionary Christianity that sides with the afflicted against those who take advantage of their power to do harm. Nat turns to the idea that there is a moral authority higher than the temporal laws that might help prop up injustice—and when recent interviews with Parker have him focusing on his legal exoneration, rather than moral responsibility, it’s hard to take him seriously. Does it impact my shifting sense of The Birth of a Nation’s effectiveness that I’m white? That I’m a man? That I’m a husband and father? It’s impossible to know to what extent. But that hypothetical opening scene I described isn’t merely hypothetical. The movie might be the same, but I’m not. CW

THE BIRTH OF A NATION

RE & MO

Beyond the Lights (2014) Gugu Mbatha-Raw Nate Parker Rated PG-13

Selma (2014) David Oyelowo Carmen Ejogo Rated PG-13

SEND RESUMÉ TO: NENRIGHT@CITYWEEKLY.NET

OCTOBER 6, 2016 | 41

12 Years a Slave (2013) Chiwetel Ejiofor Michael Fassbender Rated R

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the Turner plantation, where he played with the owner’s young son Samuel, to adulthood in which Samuel (Armie Hammer) has become Nat’s master, occasionally renting Nat out to neighboring farms so he can preach a gospel of accepting their servitude to preempt any unrest. Parker’s a more accomplished actor than he is a writer or director, and his performance here effectively captures the shift in Nat’s perspective as he witnesses the mistreatment that his Scripture passages are being used to justify. The story structure is clearly meant to build up Nat as a hero figure—up to and including his stoic response to a whipping after daring to baptize a white man—and every music cue and lighting choice emphasizes that mythologizing quality. It might be un-subtle, but it works on a basic dramatic level. That dramatic punch—even leaving aside on-the-nose moments like using the haunting song “Strange Fruit” while literally showing the hanging bodies of lynched AfricanAmericans—carried my response when I first saw The Birth of a Nation at Sundance in January. But it’s harder now to watch some of the specific choices Parker makes to advance his plot. Specifically, he uses two separate assaults on women—slave-hunters attacking Nat’s own wife, Cherry (Aja Naomi King), and the wife (Gabrielle Union) of one of Nat’s friends (Colman Domingo) being pimped out by Samuel to one of his friends— as motivating incidents spurring Nat and his fellow slaves to action. While Cherry gets at least some opportunity to respond to the fact

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

magine the opening scene of an achronological movie narrative, something like Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind. Perhaps it starts with something innocuous, like a conversation between a husband and a wife. Then you learn more about the events leading up to that conversation—an extra-marital affair or a profound loss. And as the movie circles around to showing that original conversation again, the way in which you view it is completely different. The words, the performances, the staging, all are exactly the same. Only the information you bring to that scene has changed. This is the reality of wrestling with art. This is the reality of wrestling with The Birth of a Nation. Because between the January premiere of writer/director/star Nate Parker’s film at the Sundance Film Festival, and its wide release this week, the story behind the story shifted seismically. What had been the tale of selffinanced passion project about incendiary real-life events became more about the events of Parker’s own life—his role as defendant (along with Birth’s co-story-writer and Parker’s friend, Jean Celestin) in a rape case while he was a student at Penn State University. While Parker was found not guilty during the subsequent trial, the details were clearly more complicated than that. Once again, film journalists and average moviegoers were faced with the issue that swirls repeatedly around filmmakers like Woody Allen and Roman Polanski: How do we separate sometimes-repugnant facts and/or allegations around artists’ lives from their art? Or, more to the point, should we? Taken in isolation, there’s powerful material in the story of Nat Turner (Parker), the Virginia slave/preacher who eventually led a slave uprising in August 1831, in which several slave-owning families were killed. Parker follows Turner’s story from his childhood on


CINEMA CLIPS

MOVIE TIMES AND LOCATIONS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

NEW THIS WEEK

Information is correct at press time. Film release schedules are subject to change. THE BIRTH OF A NATION BB.5 See review p. 41. Opens Oct. 7 at theaters valleywide. (R) THE GIRL ON THE TRAIN [not yet reviewed] Adaptation of the best-seller about a troubled woman (Emily Blunt) caught up in another woman’s disappearance. Opens Oct. 7 at theaters valleywide. (R)

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THE GREASY STRANGLER BBB The makers of The Greasy Strangler likely won’t be offended when I say that it’s not a film so much as an endurance test—an intentionally offputting anti-comedy meant to try the patience even of people who like this sort of thing. It’s about Big Ronnie (Michael St. Michaels), a vulgar old man, and his oily loser son, Brayden (Sky Elobar), who finally gets a girlfriend (Elizabeth De Razzo) but has to compete with his dad for her affections. At night, Big Ronnie slathers himself up in Crisco and murders people. The film’s perverse, grotesque style recalls the tacky camp of John Waters, the absurd, low-budget non-humor of comedy duo Tim and Eric, and the thrift-store wardrobe and deadpan cast-your-friends-in-a-movie feel of Napoleon Dynamite. Add filthy nudity, comically fake penises, gross food, dialogue repeated to the point of annoyance then hilarity then annoyance again, and deeply committed performances by people who surely aren’t professional actors. Most of the humor derives from the aggressively depraved presentation, which is hard to sustain for 90 minutes. But as trashy, you-gotta-see-this provocations go … well, you gotta see it. Opens Oct. 7 at Tower Theater. (R)—Eric D. Snider MIDDLE SCHOOL: THE WORST YEARS OF MY LIFE [not yet reviewed] Kids launch a rebellion against their school’s restrictive administration. Opens Oct. 7 at theaters valleywide. (PG) SPIRIT OF THE GAME BB The inspirational sports drama is such a well-worn formula that you’d think it would be possible to master the rudimentary details of the sport. That’s only the most frustrating element in this fact-based story set in 1955-56, as former University of Utah basketball player and Mormon missionary DeLyle Condie (Aaron Jakubenko) leads a group of fellow elders helping the Australian national basketball team prepare for the upcoming Olympic Games in Melbourne. The low-key drama, such as it is, comes mostly from DeLyle recovering

SPECIAL SCREENINGS CIRCLE OF POISON At Main Library, Oct. 11, 7 p.m. (NR) DOCTOR JACK At Edison Street Events Silent Movies, Oct. 6-7, 7:30 p.m. (NR) RUIN AND ROSE At Park City Film Series, Oct. 7-8, 8 p.m.; Oct. 9, 6 p.m. (NR) WALK HARD: THE DEWEY COX STORY At Brewvies, Oct. 10, 10 p.m. (R)

CURRENT RELEASES

DEEPWATER HORIZON BB.5 The spectacle, melodrama and safe catharsis of disaster movies can be a complicated thing when the story is a true one. Director Peter Berg deals with the April 2010 events on the offshore oil-drilling rig that set off a massive fire and began an ecological tragedy, focusing on electronics technician Mike Williams (Mark Wahlberg). The filmmakers demonstrate an impressive willingness to drop viewers into this jargon-heavy world without much hand-holding orientation, creating an immediate sense of the complexity of this place. But structurally, the script resembles The Towering Inferno in its reliance on disaster-movie tropes like the dithering/callous authority figure and the separated family. It becomes hard to negotiate the collision between real-world facts and genre conventions. For all its intensity, the film seems uncertain when it’s permissible to be entertainment. (PG-13)—SR

MASTERMINDS BB The deadpan grotesquerie often favored by director Jared Hess sways precariously between “goofy” and “when will this be over”

more than just movies at brewvies

| CITY WEEKLY |

42 | OCTOBER 6, 2016

from a broken heart, trying to convince his mission president to give the program his approval and the usual hearts-and-minds struggles of missionary life. But there’s virtually nothing here beyond the bland uplift, including Kevin Sorbo as DeLyle’s father, who exists solely to be a wisdom-dispensing machine. And then it crumbles any time actual basketball—even the very-different-from-today world of 1950s basketball comes into play, including a climactic exhibition game between the “Mormon Yankees” and the French national team that fails to set up its big moments in any coherent way. Souls might have been saved; this story can’t be. Opens Oct. 7 at theaters valleywide. (PG)—Scott Renshaw

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in a loose adaptation of a real-life heist. Zach Galifianakis plays David, an armored car driver who’s cajoled by an ex-co-worker (Kristen Wiig) and her criminally minded friend (Owen Wilson) into stealing $17 million from his employer. The cast (also featuring Jason Sudeikis, Kate McKinnon and Leslie Jones) provides enough comedic firepower for at least a few inspired moments, but too often there’s an assumption that funny hair or funny voices will carry the story. And it’s never clear whether Hess wants to anchor the comedy in real-life facts or absurdist asides. While it might be worth a big laugh when Wiig serenades Galifianakis with nonsensical vocal runs, other setups can’t seem to manage more than a smile or a shrug. (PG-13)—SR MISS PEREGRINE’S HOME FOR PECULIAR CHILDREN BB.5 Tim Burton sheds some of his recent tendency toward visual overkill, wasted on something so familiar. This adaptation of Ransom Riggs’ novel follows teenager Jacob (Asa Butterfield) as he discovers his family history with a strange orphanage in Wales—headed by mysterious Miss Peregrine (Eva Green)— that houses children with unique abilities, living in a circa-1943 time loop. On its most basic level, the story provides satisfying adventure seasoned with a dollop of teen romance, all

given the macabre flavor of vintage Burton. But screenwriter Jane Goldman (X-Men movie series) mostly makes this orphanage feel like a European branch office of Xavier’s School for Gifted Youngsters. Every story beat feels lifted from some other younghero narrative or comic-book movie, with Green and a whiteeyed Samuel L. Jackson providing the only personality. A real Burton-saince will require some better material. (PG-13)—SR QUEEN OF KATWE BBB Based on a true story, this underdog drama follows the life of Phiona (Madina Nalwanga), a girl living in a Ugandan slum with her widowed mother (Lupita Nyong’o) when she discovers a special skill for chess after she learns the game from a missionary teacher (David Oyelowo). The script follows familiar rise-andfall-of-fortune patterns as it spans five years of Phiona’s developing abilities as a chess prodigy, but there’s a thoughtfulness here to the tension between parents who want more for their children and the distance that can grow between parents and children who get a chance to experience that “more.” Director Mira Nair can’t avoid a certain degree of Disney gloss in the portrayal of her impoverished characters, but she’s fundamentally respectful about the complications that emerge on a path out of poverty—even a feel-good path. (PG)—SR

THEATER DIRECTORY SALT LAKE CITY Brewvies Cinema Pub 677 S. 200 West 801-355-5500 Brewvies.com

SOUTH VALLEY Century 16 Union Heights 7800 S. 1300 East, Sandy 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

Megaplex Legacy Crossing 1075 W. Legacy Crossing Blvd., Centerville 801-397-5100 MegaplexTheatres.com

Broadway Centre Cinemas 111 E. 300 South 801-321-0310 SaltLakeFilmSociety.org

Cinemark Draper 12129 S. State, Draper 801-619-6494 Cinemark.com

Century 16 South Salt Lake 125 E. 3300 South 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

Cinemark Sandy 9 9539 S. 700 East, Sandy 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

WEBER COUNTY Cinemark Tinseltown 14 3651 Wall Ave., Ogden 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

Cinemark Sugar House 2227 S. Highland Drive 801-466-3699 Cinemark.com

Megaplex Jordan Commons 9400 S. State, Sandy 801-304-INFO MegaplexTheatres.com

Water Gardens Cinema 6 1945 E. Murray-Holladay Road 801-273-0199 WaterGardensTheatres.com

Megaplex 20 at The District 11400 S. Bangerter Highway 801-304-INFO MegaplexTheatres.com

Megaplex 12 Gateway 165 S. Rio Grande St. 801-304-4636 MegaplexTheatres.com

PARK CITY Cinemark Holiday Village 1776 Park Ave. 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

WEST VALLEY 5 Star Cinemas 8325 W. 3500 South, Magna 801-250-5551 RedCarpetCinemas.com

Gateway 8 206 S. 625 West, Bountiful 801-292-7979 RedCarpetCinemas.com

Cinemark University Mall 1010 S. 800 East, Provo 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Megaplex Thanksgiving Point 2935 N. Thanksgiving Way 801-304-INFO MegaplexTheatres.com Water Gardens Cinema 8 790 E. Expressway Ave. Spanish Fork 801-798-9777 WaterGardensTheatres.com Water Gardens Cinema 6 912 W. Garden Drive Pleasant Grove 801-785-3700 WaterGardensTheatres.com

OCTOBER 6, 2016 | 43

Cinemark Valley Fair Mall 3601 S. 2700 West, West Valley City 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

Cinemark Tinseltown USA 720 W. 1500 North, Layton 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

Cinemark Provo Town Center 1200 Town Center Blvd., Provo 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

| CITY WEEKLY |

Cinemark 24 Jordan Landing 7301 S. Bangerter Highway 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

Cinemark Station Park 900 W. Clark Lane, Farmington 801-447-8561 Cinemark.com

Cinemark Movies 8 2230 N. University Parkway, Orem 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

Cinemark 12 1600 W. Fox Park Drive, West Jordan 801-562-5760 Cinemark.com

DAVIS COUNTY AMC Loews Layton Hills 9 728 W. 1425 North, Layton 801-774-8222 AMCTheatres.com

Cinemark American Fork 715 W. 180 North, American Fork 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

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Tower Theatre 836 E. 900 South 801-321-0310 SaltLakeFilmSociety.org

Redstone 8 Cinemas 6030 N. Market 435-575-0220 Redstone8Cinemas.com

UTAH COUNTY Carmike Wynnsong 4925 N. Edgewood Drive, Provo 801-764-0009 Carmike.com

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Redwood Drive-In 3688 S. Redwood Road 801-973-7088

Megaplex 13 at The Junction 2351 Kiesel Ave., Ogden 801-304-INFO MegaplexTheatres.com


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

BY B I L L F RO S T @bill_frost

Love, Contractually

TV

4 | OCTOBER 6, 2016

Samantha Carrie Charlotte

SJP goes dark in Divorce; Supergirl is back (on a budget). Divorce Sunday, Oct. 9 (HBO)

Series Debut: Hopeless romantic Carrie Bradshaw is dead; meet Frances (Sarah Jessica Parker), a far-less-perky shadow of her former Sex & the City self. HBO’s new dark comedy Divorce delivers exactly what the title implies: 10 episodes of Frances and husband Robert (Thomas Haden Church) doing their damnedest to separate, or reconcile, or just figure out why and how they should do either. Like creator Sharon Horgan’s other series, cult British import Catastrophe, it’s as messy as it is funny, and Parker and Church are fantastically nimble at darting between emotional states and situations. Unlike similarly black-toabsurd-and-back comedy You’re the Worst, however, Divorce doesn’t always work when the focus is off the central pair: Molly Shannon and Tracy Letts don’t add much as Frances and Robert’s married friends (hell, Church’s mustache is a more fully developed character than either of them). Still, Divorce is unique, and potentially addictive—and as weirdly compatible with Westworld as anyone could imagine.

Supergirl Monday, Oct. 10 (The CW)

Season Premiere: Moving to a smaller network and filming cheaper in Vancouver means we’ll see a lot less of Calista Flockhart’s charmingly abrasive media boss Cat Grant in the second season of CBS outcast Supergirl, but so what? They got a Superman! Clark Kent (Tyler Hoechlin) finally pays a visit to National City cousin Kara/Supergirl (Melissa Benoist) in the season opener and, fortunately, his Superman isn’t the broody bummer of the Zack Snyder movies; he’s more like Kara in terms of sunny temperament, if not faux eyewear. Really, other than moving the governmental D.E.O. from its cave HQ to a more Canadian above-ground space (no, not a hockey arena—enough with the stereotypes, eh?) and less Cat (and the CatCo offices), this is still the same Supergirl. Bring on the crossovers!

American Housewife Tuesday, Oct. 11 (ABC)

Divorce (HBO)

Series Debut: Enough with just defaulting to “American ” every time a network is stuck for a title (though Kiefer Sutherland’s clunkily named Designated Survivor probably would have worked better as American Political Hack Who Didn’t Get Blow’d Up). American Housewife was originally called The Second Fattest Housewife in Westport, but … yeah. Anyway: Katy Mixon (Mike & Molly, Eastbound & Down) stars as an average wife and mom dealing with the upper-crusters of Connecticut suburbia—which means American Housewife is yet another sunny-snarky ABC family sitcom with a killer cast (which also includes Diedrich Bader and Ali Wong), but little else to distinguish it from the pack. Except for maybe the burning question, “So who’s the first fattest housewife in Westport?”

Frequency Wednesdays (The CW)

New Series: A remake of the 2000 movie, this time with a female cop (Peyton List) connecting with her dead cop dad in the past through a ham radio (thanks for not updating it to a haunted Snapchat app, CW). As with NBC’s new Timeless—and, the most cautionary continuum-chaos tale of them all, Hot Tub Time Machine—screwing with the past can create serious consequences in the present, but daughter can’t stop herself from saving her father from an undercover sting operation gone bad back in 1996, hence, drama.

| CITY WEEKLY |

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TRUE

Frequency seemingly has plenty of material to work with within its police procedural plus overarching conspiracy framework (iZombie has pulled it off well for a couple of seasons now). But, there are no superheroes here, so …

Criminal Minds Wednesdays (CBS)

New Season: Thomas Gibson was booted from Criminal Minds, a series he’s starred in since 2005, over the summer, reportedly for being a dick—something I’d not previously considered a fireable offense in the creative field, but now has me very concerned. Tonight’s episode is the first filmed without his FBI team leader “Hotch,” but since CM has one of the best ensemble casts on TV, surviving more player departures and arrivals than Lynyrd Skynyrd and Donald Trump’s campaign combined, they’ll be fine. Plus, Gibson’s 86ing (as well as the cancellation of Fox’s Grandfathered) has cleared the way for the full-time return of fan-favorite Prentiss (Paget Brewster) to the Behavior Analysis Unit, so all is right in the world. Except for those missing and likely now-dismembered women the BAU is tracking, of course. Listen to Frost Mondays at 8 a.m. on X96 Radio From Hell, and on the TV Tan podcast via Stitcher, iTunes, Google Play and BillFrost.tv.

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original plan was to become a professional skateboarder, but those plans wiped out when Manning was injured twice in a row. “I got really depressed because I couldn’t skate and was having a hard time walking as well,” she says. “Everything just sucked right then.” During her recuperation, Manning discovered a latent affection for playing the guitar. “By the time I had recovered, I had really developed a love for music.” Signing with Chill Mega Chill provided Manning the impetus to take her show on the road. She kicked off her first tour in late spring while juggling a full schedule at Utah Valley University. “I was taking 18 credits and trying to book my first tour, which was crazy,” she says. “By the time we got on the road, it was great. I couldn’t have asked for a better first tour.” Her travels took her all over the Western U.S., playing gigs in her hometown of Phoenix, along with shows in San Francisco and Los Angeles before returning home to dig into a few shows in our neck of the woods. One of these shows is the release part for the second edition of SLC Pink, a zine dedicated to local female, trans and non-binary artists, co-founded by Elaine Sayer and Chloe Monson. GABI is only one of several musicians, spoken-word artists and comedians performing at the event. “I became friends with Elaine through seeing her at Kilby Court,” Manning says. “She and Chloe are hard-working, honest women, and they have the funniest ideas.” After wrapping up her tour, Manning plans to head back into the studio to record another album. “I have eight songs that I’m ready to beef up and use in the full band,” she says, adding that she hopes to release the record in January. Based on Manning’s musical trajectory thus far, the music world will have much more in store for her. “I’m so thankful and in awe of all of the support and help that everyone has given me,” she says. “I plan on doing it for a long time, but right now, I’m just excited that it’s happening.” CW

$

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OCTOBER 6, 2016 | 45

w/ GABI, Peach Dream, Strong Words, Alyce Carrier, Elaine Sayer, Jai Hamid Bashir, Amber Marie Thursday, Oct. 6, 7 p.m. Kilby Court 741 S. 330 West $10 All ages KilbyCourt.com

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

I

t’s been a hell of a year for Provo-based musician Gabi Manning, aka GABI. After she spent last winter writing an album’s worth of songs, the West Coast rep for Chill Mega Chill Records serendipitously reached out to her on Twitter. “He was looking for more female leads for their label. When he came across my music, he shot me an email asking if I was working on anything,” Manning recalls. “I sent him some demos and he said they’d love to have me.” After listening to her music, you can understand why GABI is right at home with Chill Mega Chill. Her new album Sea Glass is a collection of lo-fi tunes that have an uncanny ability to clear the cobwebs from an over-cluttered brain, imparting a feeling that can only be described as chill. Minus the drums on a few songs, she plays all the instruments herself. And she’s no slouch in the realm of post-production, recording, mixing and mastering the album in her apartment. Initially she was “stressed out” by such a daunting task, not to mention doing her songs justice; “When you’re live, it’s easy to look at someone and connect with them, but making a song powerful through recording can sometimes be hard,” she says. Ultimately, the project “felt very natural” as it progressed. Sea Glass is a bit of a musical anomaly, and therein lies the power that Manning is talking about. It combines melancholy vocals that strike a chord somewhere between Cat Power’s haunting wail and Jessica Lea Mayfield’s disarming croon, with unexpectedly upbeat lyrics that compare love to the smell of pancakes. When it all coalesces with the leisurely way that she strums her guitar, Sea Glass makes for a decidedly serene listening experience. As Chill Mega Chill prides itself on its throwback penchant for producing albums on vinyl and cassette, GABI’s signature sound is only enhanced after popping it into a tape deck and letting it unfold like a storybook. “Getting signed was a huge confidence boost,” Manning says. “When I got on the label, and found a group of people who wanted to invest in my creative ideas, I realized that it’s not just people being nice.” While her music career has definitely started on the right foot, Manning’s foray into the music world almost didn’t happen. Her

GABI

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On the Spot

Rhys Fulber creates in the moment as Conjure One. BY BILL KOPP @the_musoscribe comments@cityweekly.net

A

s a kid growing up in Vancouver, British Columbia, Rhys Fulber got to hang around many older musicians. His dad played in punk bands and owned a recording studio, so Fulber had access to a variety of music gear. Attracted mainly to electronic instruments, he got his start with synthesizers, writing music influenced by the somber tone of groups like Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark. That influence “is still in my music,” Fulber tells City Weekly in a telephone interview while driving to his studio in Van Nuys, Calif. The ambient electronic music Fulber plays in his current project, Conjure One, is a far cry from the music he made in his industrial group Front Line Assembly. It’s also not very much like his trance/dance project Delerium. While all three projects are built upon electronics, the lush soundscapes of Conjure One are decidedly more accessible, and better suited for headphones than a rave. His fourth album, Holoscenic (Armada Music, 2015), is warm and melodic, alternating between alluring instrumentals and evocative tunes that feature ethereal vocals from guests like Sinéad O’Connor and Poe. When not writing, recording or performing as Conjure One, Fulber spends much of his time in his studio, producing and remixing artists (mostly metal bands, but occasionally the likes of Josh Groban and Avril Lavigne). Taken as a whole, his body of work suggests an artist who’s driven by his muse. “I always have to be doing something creative,” he says, otherwise, “I don’t feel right.” Naturally, he enjoys crafting more challenging musical excursions that explore the improvisational potential of modular synthesizers, but favors a more song-based approach for Conjure One. “People want to hear … songs; they don’t want to see some free-form improvisation.” With Conjure One, Fulber’s live setup is straightforward: He plays keyboards and works with a number of effects and

Rhys Fulber

samples, and tours with only a vocalist. It’s a choice made for financial, rather than creative, reasons—taking a larger production on tour is prohibitively expensive. “I’m not playing with a lot of real instruments now,” he says. “I try to make it as live as I can within its context.” Fulber’s live configuration isn’t unusual in electronic music, where it’s common for an artist to be onstage alone. He thinks that approach is boring for the audience, and for the performer. Many electronic artists—especially within the EDM subgenre— “aren’t really doing that much [onstage],” he says. “Most guys don’t even have a keyboard or anything. They’re just turning filters, basically.” Fulber says he doesn’t want to be onstage looking at a laptop. “I want to be up there doing something I feel good about.” Touring light, however, makes a laptop a necessity when performing Conjure One’s multilayered music. So, to a point, Fulber surrenders to its advantages—but strives to not make the machine a focal point. “[I use it] more like a rackmount device. But I hate it,” he says. Still, he remains optimistic about the future of electronic music, saying he senses an overall shift toward more performance-oriented electronica: “It’s so much more exciting to be creating on the spot.” The current run of Conjure One shows is limited to seven dates, all in the western United States and Vancouver. Initially, Fulber scheduled a single Conjure One performance in Palmer Lake, Colo., but then decided that it made sense to add a few more: “I’m always up for shows.” He admits that his reputation for the harder-edged sounds of his earlier projects sometimes confuses people, especially since he generally sticks to only Conjure One music when he plays live. Because Conjure One fans are such a varied audience, the challenge is bringing it all together. To that end, he says, “I can drop a FLA tune as an encore if needed.” CW

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MUSIC PICKS

THURSDAY 10.6

Dweezil Zappa Plays Whatever the F@%k He Wants: The Cease & Desist Tour

OK, so Frank Zappa’s sons Dweezil and Ahmet, who once looked so chummy on the cover of their band Z’s album, Shampoohorn (Barking Pumpkin, 1994), are battling through their attorneys. Ahmet says Dweezil, a virtuoso guitarist just like their father, has no right to take his pop’s 50-year musical legacy on tour. You know, like he’s been doing—brilliantly—since 2006 with Zappa Plays Zappa, featuring former members of his father’s band. You know, while Ahmet executes the Zappa Family Trust—and, evidently, attempts the same with Frank’s legacy—while working with evil Disney. Rather than capitulate, Dweezil’s doin’ it anyway, celebrating the half-centennial of Freak Out!, the debut album by Frank’s band The Mothers of Invention. Since Frank Zappa was a rebel and a musical genius, he’s surely—in spite of the dismay he’d feel over his family fighting—looking down from the great Wowie Zowie in the sky with pride. (Randy Harward) The Depot, 400 W. South Temple, 8 p.m., $23 in advance, $28 day of, DepotSLC.com

FRIDAY 10.7

Thievery Corporation

Thievery Corporation was one of a number of units coming out of the club scene to expand dance music to include a rich mixture of ethnic and other stylistic influences, including acid jazz, Brazilian dance music, electronica, Indian classical, Middle Eastern and other music. Their very name

Thievery Corporation

JEFF DEAN

CABARET

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emphasized their tactic of borrowing prolifically, and they even wrote lyrics in numerous languages; their music, as a whole, is a kind of homage to musical traditions. The name also implies their at-times-controversial politics, speaking out for progressive issues. The collective is celebrating their 20th anniversary on this tour, and it’s remarkable both how the ‘90s don’t seem that long ago, and how their sound still feels fresh and innovative after so many have followed in their footsteps, making the cultural mix almost cliché. (Brian Staker) The Complex, 536 W. 100 South, 7:30 p.m., $38 in advance, $43 day of, TheComplexSLC.com

Squeeze

When Chris Difford and Glenn Tillbrook finally reconvened their new-wave/powerpop hit machine Squeeze in 2007, it was a beautiful thing. Just ask the huge crowd that saw the English band perform with the

Dweezil Zappa B-52s at Red Butte Garden in 2012. Difford and Tillbrook, along with three all-new members, started dropping new music in 2010, with a collection of re-recordings of their hits meant to circumvent the fact that a corporation owns the rights to the originals. These retreads are so good that they called the album Spot the Difference (XOXO, 2010). And the actual new tunes on Cradle to the Grave (Virgin/EMI, 2015) measure up to classics like “Tempted” and “Hourglass.” Naturally, the setlist is packed with hits and the obligatory new tune, along with Tom Waits and Tom T. Hall covers. Alas, they appear to have dropped “Black Coffee in Bed” from the set. Why, dudes? (RH) The Depot, 400 W. South Temple, 8 p.m., $30, DepotSLC.com

Squeeze

ROB O’CONNOR

VINCENT & BELLA PRODUCTIONS

48 | OCTOBER 6, 2016

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SUNDAY 10.9

Elizabeth Cook, Lee Harvey Osmond

Although it was her third album, firebrand country singer Elizabeth Cook made the biggest splash when she dropped Balls in 2007. The album, produced by Rodney Crowell, got slobbery raves from critics because Cook’s songwriting and performance demonstrated big, swinging gravitas—and that Cook wasn’t just another pretty face. Three years later, Welder, produced by venerated knobs-and-sliders guy Don Was (Rolling Stones, Bob Dylan) reiterated this and repeated the critical applause. You’d think that would’ve been a good thing, but as Cook enjoyed professional success, her personal life was heading in the opposite direction. Family members passed away, houses burned down and her marriage fell apart. That’s how she explains the six years between Welder and the heady, atmospheric Exodus of Venus (Thirty Tigers). In spite and because of what she went through, Venus resonates with even more guts and fire than her first two albums, and puts Cook in the same class as Lucinda Williams and Neko Case. Acid-folkie Lee Harvey Osmond, aka Tom Wilson of ‘90s Canadian alt-rockers Junkhouse, opens, touring behind his third album, Beautiful Scars (Latent Recordings). (RH) The State Room, 638 S. State, 8 p.m., $18, 21+, TheStateRoomSLC.com

Elizabeth Cook

TUESDAY 10.11 Phantogram

The number of musical entities that seemingly started yesterday but are actually celebrating some kind of anniversary— even a decade—is astounding. In 2007, the duo of Sarah Barthel and Josh Carter, also known as Phantogram, was formed in Greenwich, N.Y., with a style—”ghost pop,” you might call it—that draws upon dreamy soundscapes and synthetic beats, as well as nominally by the optical illusion of the same name. Their success is no trick, however, as their sophomore release, Voices, hit No. 3 on Billboard’s rock and alternative rock charts and, as Twilight Concert Series fans saw, they joined Big Boi (of Outkast) to form the supergroup Big Grams. Phantogram’s latest, Three (Republic Records), was released this week, with the notably melancholy refrain of the single, “You Don’t Get Me High Anymore.” It’s doubtful anyone would say that about the duo’s music, however. (BS) In the Venue, 219 S. 600 West, 7 p.m., $26 in advance, $28 day of, InTheVenueSLC.com

Phantogram

TIMOTHY SACCENTI

50 | OCTOBER 6, 2016

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LIVE


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MONDAY - FRIDAY

UT FIREFIGHTER CALENDAR MEET AND GREET FUNDRAISER

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

LIVE MUSIC N-U-ENDO

monday

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

THURSDAY


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

CD’s, 45’s, Cassettes, Turntables & Speakers

Cash Paid for Resellable Vinyl, CD’s & Stereo Equipment “UTAH’S LONGEST RUNNING INDIE RECORD STORE” SINCE 1978

TUE – FRI 11AM TO 7PM • SAT 10AM TO 6PM • CLOSED SUN & MON LIKE US ON OR VISIT WWW.RANDYSRECORDS.COM • 801.532.4413

THURSDAY 10.6

SATURDAY 10.8

LIVE MUSIC

LIVE MUSIC

Beartooth (Complex) Dweezil Zappa (The Depot) see p. 48 Mike Gao + AudioTreats + Aztek + Khensu (Urban Lounge) SLC Pink Edition 2 Release Party feat. GABI + Peach Dream + Strong Words + Alyce Carrier + Elaine Sayer + Jai Hamid Bashir + Amber Marie (Kilby Court) see p. 45 Twiddle + Kitchen Dwellers (The State Room)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Dueling Pianos (The Spur Bar & Grill) Jazz Jam Session (Sugar House Coffee) Reggae Thursday (The Royal) Therapy Thursdays feat. Bro Safari (Sky)

FRIDAY 10.7 LIVE MUSIC B R O A D W A Y

&

E D I S O N

S T R E E T

O P E N 7 DAYS A W E E K F R O M 5PM -1A M 801.355.0543 • COPPERCOMMON.COM

RO T N I

D

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Baker Street Blues Band + The Wednesday People + Giants in the Oak Tree + Rabbit (Kilby Court) Cymbals Eat Guitars + Field Mouse + Wildhoney (Metro Music Hall) Dubwise w/ Jantsen + Turtleboy + illoom (Urban Lounge) Festive People + Truman Brothers + Amber Lynn (Velour Live Music Gallery) Griffin House + Vanessa Peters (The State Room) Jimmy Eat World (Park City Live) Royal Bliss (Firehouse Bar & Grill) Squeeze (The Depot) see p. 48 Thievery Corporation (The Complex) see p. 48

52 | OCTOBER 6, 2016

Common Kings + Ballyhoo! + New Kingston + Sensamotion (The Depot) Space Venture Coalition (Velour Live Music Gallery) Conjure One (Billboard-Live!) see p. 46 Ghost (The Complex) IAMX + Cellars (Metro Music Hall) Jessica Hernandez & The Deltas + Tancred + The Hound Mystic (Kilby Court) Leona X + Heart Avail + Penrose (Barbary Coast Saloon) Maroon 5 + Tove Lo + Phases (The Vivint SmartHome Arena) Red Desert Ramblers (Feldman’s Deli) The Reverend Peyton’s Big Damn Band + Supersuckers + Jesse Dayton (Urban Lounge) see p. 53

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE DJ Latu (The Green Pig) Dueling Piano Show (Funk ‘n Dive Bar) Faux Pas Improv Comedy Show (Sandy Station; Vegas Room) Ja Rule (Park City Live)

Monday @ 8pm

breaking bingo

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Lady Bizness (Sandy Station; Vegas Room)

A RELAXED GENTLEMAN’S CLUB

| CITY WEEKLY |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

CITY WEEKLY’S HOT LIST

FOR THE WEEK RANDY'S RECORD SHOP CONCERTS & CLUBS VINYL RECORDS NEW & USED COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE @ CITYWEEKLY.NET

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SATURDAY 10.8

CONCERTS & CLUBS

RAY REDDING

The Reverend Peyton’s Big Damn Band, Supersuckers, Jesse Dayton

This Saturday is for fans of rough and rowdy roots music. The Reverend Peyton’s Big Damn Band, out of Brown County, Ind., pens paeans to down-home icons like “Mama’s Fried Potatoes.” Supersuckers are the supercharged, chrome-plated, overdriven entry in this trilogy of six-string troubadours. The Tucson, Ariz., trio is nearing their fourth decade, but Eddie Spaghetti and compadres show few signs of wear. And this kind of shindig wouldn’t feel complete without someone representing Texas. In addition to putting out several acclaimed solo albums, fronting the Road Kings and giving voice to the fictional band Banjo & Sullivan in The Devil’s Rejects, Beaumont native Jesse Dayton has played guitar on albums by The Supersuckers, Johnny Cash, Waylon Jennings and Willie Nelson, as well as filling in for Billy Zoom last year with X. Now that’s a party. Try not to slip on all the spilt beer. (Brian Staker) The Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 8 p.m., $16 in advance, $18 day of, 21+, TheUrbanLoungeSLC.com

SUMMER WITH US

Every 3rd Tuesday

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

Joe McQueen Quartet Next Showtime

Oct. 18

THURS:

FRI:

2014

2015

19 East 200 South | bourbonhouseslc.com

MORGAN SNOW

10.12 JOHN DAVIS TONY HOLIDAY & THE VELVETONES 10.13 MICHAEL DALLIN PIXIE & THE PARTYGRASS BOYS 10.14 MICHELLE MOONSHINE OPEN BLUES JAM HOSTED TRIO BY ROBBY’S BLUES EXPLOSION 10.15 TRIGGERS & SLIPS

3200 E BIG COTTONWOOD RD. | 801.733.5567 THEHOGWALLOW.COM

OCTOBER 6, 2016 | 53

10.06 10.07 10.08 10.10

150 Spirits • $5 House Whiskeys Famous Pickle Backs

We’d Love Your Vote!

SPIRITS • FOOD • GOOD COMPANY

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VDJ Birdman DJ Juggy SAT: DJ Handsome Hands

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COME SOAK UP THE LAST OF


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

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54 | OCTOBER 6, 2016

CONCERTS & CLUBS

CITY WEEKLY’S HOT LIST FOR THE WEEK

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE @ CITYWEEKLY.NET

Murrays ##1 New Tavern 4883 S State St.

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American Hitmen

Acoustic on the Patio October 7th @ 6:00pm $10

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Zam Trip

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+

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Andrew W.K. (Urban Lounge) Elizabeth Cook + Lee Harvey Osmond (The State Room) see p. 50 Halestorm + Lita Ford + Dorothy (The Complex) Matoma (The Complex)

MONDAY 10.10

New Expanded Hours for Rye: Monday-Friday from 9am-2pm Saturday and Sunday from 9am-3pm Friday and Sunday from 6pm-11pm

SUNDAYS • THURSDAYS • SATURDAYS

Free ticket Tuesday at Rye! 1 entree = 1 ticket at Urban Lounge (while supplies last)

Kikagaku Moyo + Lovely Noughts + Heavy Dose (Kilby Court) Okkervil River + Landlady (Urban Lounge)

www.ryeslc.com

OCT 7: 9PM DOORS

DUBWISE: JANTSEN

TUESDAY 10.11 LIVE MUSIC

Joyce Manor + The Hotelier + Crying (Kilby Court) Slayer + Anthrax + Death Angel (The Complex) see p. 55 Phantogram (In The Venue) see p. 50

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Open Mic (The Royal)

WEDNESDAY 10.12 LIVE MUSIC

LIVE MUSIC

Monday Night Blues Jam (The Royal) Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig)

UTAH VS ARIZONA - 8:00 PM

M O N DAYS

LIVE MUSIC

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

@

WASATCH POKER TOUR @ 8PM BONUS: SAT @ 2PM

SUNDAY 10.9

The Amity Affliction + Being As An Ocean + Hundredth + Trophy Eyes (The Complex) Liquid Stranger + Bleep Bloop + Shlump + Percolator (Urban Lounge) Metro Station + Palaye Royale + The Strive + Foreign Figures (In The Venue) White Fang + No Parents + The Birth Defects (Kilby Court)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

Alessia Cara + Ruth B + Nathan Sykes (The Depot) Cattle Decapitation + Ringworm + Exalt (Metro Music Hall)

DJ Birdman (Twist) DJ Kurtis Strange (Willie’s Lounge) Open Mic (Muse Music)

TURTLEBOY ILLOOM 9 PM DOORS

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OCT 9: 7PM DOORS

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EXES CVPITVLS

COMING SOON Oct 16: Kishi Bashi Oct 17: Deerhunter Oct 18: of Montreal Oct 19: The Felice Brothers / Heartless Bastards Oct 20: True Widow Oct 21: The Circulars Album Release Oct 22: The Ramones Trbute night

Oct 23: The Dillinger Escape Plan Oct 24: Loch Lomond Oct 25: Brooks’ Birthday Oct 26: SLUG Localized w/ Villian Oct 27: R.A. The Rugged Man Oct 28: Max Pain & The Groovies Oct 29: The Sword

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TUESDAY 10.11

CONCERTS & CLUBS

MARTIN HAUSLER

Slayer, Anthrax, Death Angel

I have two friends who once dared each other to shout, as Slayer fans are wont to do, “SLAAAAAAAYERRRRR!” in their wives’ faces at the peak of their lovemaking. They both wussed out, perhaps immediately losing their cred as fans of the legendary thrash metal pioneers. Not that I’ve done, or will do, that. A married man must have survival instincts so that we might live to enter the pit another day and exacerbate our back problems in the name of metal. Surely, risking injury—facing fucking danger—like that is enough to maintain probationary membership in Club Slayer? Better buy a copy of the band’s new album—Repentless (Nuclear Blast), their first since Exodus guitarist Gary Holt replaced fallen founding shredder Jeff Hanneman—just to be safe. (Randy Harward) The Complex, 536 W. 100 South, 6:30 p.m., $49.50 in advance, $55 day of, TheComplexSLC.com

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OCTOBER 6, 2016 | 55

FRIDAYS

NO COVER

| CITY WEEKLY |

FREE LINE DANCE LESSONS 7PM- NO COVER

THIRSTY THURSDAY STARTING THURSDAY, OCT 20 @ 7:30PM

STEIN WEDNESDAY

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

LEONA X HEART AVAIL PENROSE

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

8PM | 21+


PHOTOGRAPHERS WANTED

ADULT PHOTO

Jobs Rentals TAG YOUR PHOTOS ll #CWCOMMUNITY e S / y u B Trade OF THE WEEK

WEEKLY & SHARE YOUR PHOTOGRAPHS WITH CITY ING ISSUE GET A CHANCE TO BE FEATURED IN AN UPCOM

56 | OCTOBER 6, 2016

| CITY WEEKLY • ADULT |

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post your free online classified ads at

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CROSSWORD PUZZLE

© 2016

BREAK ROOM

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ACROSS

| CITY WEEKLY |

OCTOBER 6, 2016 | 57

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

Last week’s answers

SUDOKU

1. Kanga's kid in "Winnie-the-Pooh" 2. "Better Call Saul" airer 3. West of Hollywood 4. What Ashton Kutcher was on "Punk'd" 5. Bank statement data 6. Execute perfectly

52. Small hooter 53. "One should always be in love, that is why one should never marry" writer 55. TV planet that becomes one of its natives when an "M" is added to its front 57. MTV's early fan base 59. Pal 4 life 60. Versailles resident 61. Have bills 62. Tin Man's need 63. Brooks of "Spaceballs"

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

DOWN

7. Butt 8. Like early morning hours 9. Hewlett-Packard competitor 10. What a murder suspect needs 11. Razes 12. "The Iceman Cometh" playwright 13. Person who's not buying it? 18. "____ insist!" 21. Bob with the Silver Bullet Band 22. Where les enfants might play 23. Flooring calculation 24. Calculated thing 25. Has the ability to 26. 1970s dance craze 29. Norman of the Clinton and Bush cabinets 32. Austin Powers, e.g. 34. Mooring rope 35. Hat dance hats 37. More than capable 39. "Evolving the way the world moves" sloganeer 40. Prefix with vision or market 41. Some doñas: Abbr. 43. Abbr. on a copier tray 45. "The Thrill Is Gone" bluesman 46. Crave 47. Title six-year-old of literature 49. Dirty rat

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

1. Ratchet (up) 5. Freshly 9. "Tengo mucho ____" ("I am very hot," in Spanish) 14. Sharif of "Doctor Zhivago" 15. Not mad 16. Coeur d'____, Idaho 17. California city whose name describes its location 19. 1958 Best Actor David 20. Holiday-time song 21. "As you wish" 22. "Put your rear down!" 25. Bedspread fabric that's French for "caterpillar" 27. Fleischer and Onassis 28. "The Hobbit: The Desolation of ____" (2013 film) 30. 35mm camera option 31. Takes a breather 33. Photos within a photo, perhaps 36. What a baker might flip over 38. Auditions 42. ____ High ("Grease" school) 44. Glowing coal 45. "See ya!" 48. Diminutive endings 50. Banjoist Fleck 51. Like an eagle, e.g. 54. "The Maltese Falcon" actor Peter and others 56. Be positive 57. Richard of "Pretty Woman" 58. PBS anchor Gwen whose last name makes her sound like a good crossword solver 59. Office hangout for employees ... or this puzzle's theme 64. Searched (around) 65. Leather-jacketed "Happy Days" guy 66. Scraped knee, to a tot 67. Nine-time New York City Marathon winner ____ Waitz 68. Prix ____ (restaurant offering) 69. Hawk


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Ever find yourself wishing you had a freshly baked cupcake but not wanting to leave the house to buy one? Heaven Cupcake is here for you. Founded in 2010 by Erik and Cori Larsen, this bakery specializes in cupcakes and delivers them straight to your door. The original plan was to start a cupcake food truck, but the Larsens quickly realized the delivery-only business model was a better fit for them. Since then, they’ve competed three times on Food Network’s Cupcake Wars, and recently moved to India to start another bakery. But that doesn’t mean they’ve abandoned their first venture here in Salt Lake City. Local business is going strong, and they even have plans in the works to sell mixes online so anyone in the world can try their celestial confections. Creative director and head baker Ellie Madsen loves her job. “We work really hard to provide a valuable service,” she says. “We deliver so many birthday cupcakes to University of Utah students who are away from their families on their special day but still know they’re loved; we’ve delivered relationship apology cupcakes, baby announcement and gender-reveal cupcakes and so many more.” After three years with the company, she says one of her favorite parts of the gig is crafting custom orders. “We’ve made so many crazy and fun cupcakes, including building a cupcake replica of the Spiral Jetty for a Friends of the Great Salt Lake event,” she says. For bakers Jessica Mitton and Theresa Boswell, the best part is delivering their treats. “I love when they are surprised,” Mitton says. “No one is grumpy when you bring them cupcakes,” Boswell adds.

The new UTAH JOB CENTER brought to you by CITY WEEKLY is the best and last job board you will ever need to sign up for!

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Fellow baker Bonnie Mortensen enjoys the creative process. “We are making not only something delicious to the taste, but lovely to behold,” she says. And their ordering/delivery system couldn’t be easier. California resident Amanda Hill says her experience ordering a dozen cupcakes for a friend in Utah was above average. “Being out of state, this was important to me.” she says. “I actually messed something up during my initial order and they quickly got ahold of me and fixed it. Then I had to change my order— again—and they were so flexible and nice about it.” With standard flavors like cherry limeade, cinnamon, vanilla, chocolate, red velvet and peanut butter, there is something for everyone to love. At the moment, they have two delivery-only locations, including one in San Diego. They require at least 24hour advance notice before hand delivery, which is a flat $8 fee for anywhere in the Salt Lake Valley or northern San Diego. n

Heaven Cupcake 385-212-4077 Monday-Saturday: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. HeavenCupcake.com INSTAGRAM/@HEAVEN_CUPCAKE

PHOTO OF THE WEEK BY

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T BEA


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60 | OCTOBER 6, 2016

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY B Y R O B

B R E Z S N Y

ALL THE NEWS THAT WON’T FIT IN PRINT

Go to RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) “It isn’t normal to know what we want,” said psychologist Abraham Maslow. “It is a rare and difficult psychological achievement.” He wasn’t referring to the question of what you want for dinner or the new shoes you plan to buy. He was talking about big, long-term yearnings: what you hope to be when you grow up, the qualities you look for in your best allies, the feelings you’d love to feel in abundance every day of your life. Now here’s the good news, Libra: The next 10 months should bring you the best chance ever to figure out exactly what you want the most. And it all starts now.

thoughts turned to the adventures that have stoked my passion without causing pain, like the birth of my daughter, getting remarried to the woman I divorced and performing my music for excited audiences. I bring this up, Aries, because I suspect that you, too, will soon have experiences that refine and deepen your passion through pleasure rather than hardship. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) It’s the Frank and Focused Feedback Phase, Taurus—prime time to solicit insight about how you’re doing. Here are four suggestions to get you started. 1. Ask a person who loves and respects you to speak the compassionate truth about what’s most important for you to learn. 2. Consult a trustworthy advisor who can help motivate you to do the crucial thing you’ve been postponing. 3. Have an imaginary conversation with the person you were a year ago. Encourage the Old You to be honest about how the New You could summon more excellence in pursuing your essential goals. 4. Say this prayer to your favorite tree or animal or meadow: “Show me what I need to do in order to feel more joy.”

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Practitioners of the Ayurvedic medical tradition tout the healing power of regular self-massage. Creativity expert Julia Cameron recommends that you periodically go out on dates with yourself. Taoist author Mantak Chia advises you to visualize sending smiles and good wishes to your kidneys, lungs, liver, heart and other organs. He says that these acts of kindness bolster your vigor. The coming weeks will be an especially favorable time to attend to measures like these, Scorpio. I hope you will also be imaginative as GEMINI (May 21-June 20) you give yourself extra gifts and compliments and praise. Many of my readers regard me as being exceptionally creative. Over the years, they have sent countless emails praising me for SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) The coming weeks will be one of the best times ever for wrestling my original approach to problem-solving and art-making. But with God or tussling with fate or grappling with karma. Why do I say I suspect that I wasn’t born with a greater talent for creativity that? Because you’re likely to emerge triumphant! That’s right, you than anyone else. I’ve simply placed a high value on developing it, lucky, plucky contender. More than I’ve seen in a long time, you have and have worked harder to access it than most people. With that the potential to draw on the crafty power and unruly wisdom and in mind, I invite you to tap more deeply into your own mother resilient compassion you would need to be an unambiguous winner. lode of innovative, imaginative energy. The cosmic trends favor A winner of what? You tell me. What dilemma would you most like to it. Your hormones are nudging you in that direction. What resolve? What test would you most like to ace? At what game would projects could use a jolt of primal brilliance? What areas of your life need a boost of ingenuity? you most like to be victorious? Now is the time.

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OCTOBER 6, 2016 | 61

CANCER (June 21-July 22) Love wants more of you. Love longs for you to give everything you have and receive everything you need. Love is conspiring to bring you beautiful truths and poignant teases, sweet dispensations and confounding mysteries, exacting blessings and riddles that will take your entire life to solve. But here are some crucial questions: Are you truly ready for such intense engagement? Are you willing to do what’s necessary to live at a higher and deeper level? Would you know how to work with such extravagant treasure and wild responsibility? The coming weeks will be prime time to explore the answers to these questions. I’m not AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Do you believe that you are mostly just a product of social sure what your answers will be. conditioning and your genetic make-up? Or are you willing to entertain a different hypothesis: that you are a primal force of nature LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) on an unpredictable journey? That you are capable of rising above Each of us contains a multiplicity of selves. You might often your apparent limitations and expressing aspects of yourself that feel like there’s just one of you rumbling around inside your might have been unimaginable when you were younger? I believe psyche, but it’s closer to the truth to say that you’re a community the coming weeks will be a favorable time to play around with this of various characters whose agendas sometimes overlap and vision. Your knack for transcendence is peaking. So are your powers sometimes conflict. For example, the needy part of you that craves love isn’t always on the same wavelength as the ambito escape the past and exceed limited expectations. tious part of you that seeks power. That’s why it’s a good idea to periodically organize summit meetings where all of your selves PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) In one of your nightly dreams, Robin Hood might team up with can gather and negotiate. Now is one of those times: a favorPeter Pan to steal unused treasure from a greedy monster—and able moment to foster harmony among your inner voices and then turn the booty over to you. Or maybe you’ll meet a talking to mobilize them to work together in service of common goals. hedgehog and singing fox who will cast a spell to heal and revive one of your wounded fantasies. It’s also conceivable that you will VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) recover a magic seed that had been lost or forgotten, and attract Pike’s Peak is a 14,115-foot mountain in Colorado. It’s not a simple task to trek to the top. Unless you’re well-trained, you the help of a fairy godmother or godfather to help you ripen it. might experience altitude sickness. Wicked thunderstorms are a regular occurrence during the summer. Snow falls year-round. ARIES (March 21-April 19) At a recent party, a guy I hardly know questioned my authentic- But back in 1929, an adventurer named Bill Williams decided ity. “You seem to have had an easy life,” he jabbed. “I bet you the task of hiking to the summit wasn’t tough enough. He haven’t suffered enough to be a truly passionate person.” I sought a more demanding challenge. Wearing kneepads, he didn’t choose to engage him, but mused to myself, “Not enough spent 21 days crawling along as he used his nose to push a peanut suffering? What about the time I got shot? My divorce? My all the way up. I advise you to avoid making him your role model five-year-long illness? The manager of my rock band getting in the coming weeks, Virgo. Just climb the mountain. Don’t try killed in a helicopter crash?” But after that initial reaction, my to push a peanut up there with your nose, too. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Are you grunting and sweating as you struggle to preserve and maintain the gains of the past? Or are you smooth and cagey as you maneuver your way toward the rewards of the future? I’m rooting for you to put the emphasis on the second option. Paradoxically, that will be the best way to accomplish the first option. It will also ensure that your motivations are primarily rooted in love and enthusiasm rather than worry and stress. And that will enable you to succeed at the second option.

Waxing for everyBODY


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OCTOBER 6, 2016 | 63

AVENUES

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WEST VALLEY

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Don’t be a Jack-OLantern! Rent from Partlow!

I told you so. The home of the Utah Jazz will stay at the Vivint SmartHome Arena, rather than move to the burbs as many predicted. The oldest and smallest NBA arena in the country is getting a $125-million facelift just in time for the new season because folks behind the scenes have encouraged the Miller family to stay put, and the owners of the franchise are feeling good about it. We fans won’t see many of the changes this season, but work will begin ASAP. Solar panels will augment the draw from the Rocky Mountain Power substation across the street. There’s been talk of installing big screens around the exterior of the arena for people to watch from plazas surrounding the building. Overall, the remodel is about increasing fan experience, and includes the following updates: n All-new locker rooms for both teams. n A 12,000-square-foot atrium to help patrons get out of the weather as they move through security. n Fancier suites where high-rollers can party while watching the game. n More lounges. If you just drink $10 beer, there will be places for you. If you want a $20 cocktail, there will be places for you, too. n More food choices, including gourmet burgers and hand-tossed pizzas, and healthier options like salads. n New “chairback” seats in the lower and upper bowls. n High-speed internet inside the arena so you can watch the game on your phone (go figure), and other tech upgrades such as better mobile apps. The designers are planning to open up the four upper corners of the area to have casual gathering spaces where fans can watch the game away from their seats. Level 2 will house five “themed clubs” for pre-game dining. Utah-based Layton Construction will be the general contractor. They have done renovations at many sports venues around the country, including Madison Square Garden and the Forum in Los Angeles. The architects say that the bones of the building are solid, which means it doesn’t have to be torn down. The Utah Jazz plays its first game Oct. 25 in Portland, and its second at home on Oct. 28 against the Lakers. We’re not big enough (yet) to have a major football team here in the Beehive, but the Jazz and the Real keep sports fans pretty happy, considering the number of seats that sell each year. Props to the Millers for keeping our boys downtown. n


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City Weekly Oct 6th, 2016  

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City Weekly Oct 6th, 2016  

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