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C I T Y W E E K LY. N E T

SEPTEMBER 29, 2016 | VOL. 33 N0. 21

Best of utah ballot

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TRANS IN UTAH

FOR MANY, LIVING A LIFE TRUE TO THEMSELVES IS A DAILY STRUGGLE. BY CAROLYN CAMPBELL


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CWCONTENTS COVER STORY BEEHIVE TRANS

For many locals, living a life true to themselves is the biggest struggle. Cover photo by Niki Chan

17 4 LETTERS 6 OPINION 8 NEWS 22 A&E 28 DINE 37 CINEMA 40 TRUE TV 41 MUSIC 58 COMMUNITY

CONTRIBUTOR KATHARINE BIELE Pp. 8 & 14

Armed with a master’s degree from the Medill School of Journalism, Biele has been published in newspapers near and far—from the China Post to Ogden’s Standard-Examiner— and has contributed to City Weekly since 1992. Why? “[Writing] expresses me and helps me process the crazy world we live in,” she says.

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Cover Story, Sept. 15, “Best of Utah Arts 2016”

Thanks to @CityWeekly Readers who awarded us “Best Dance Production” in Utah last year for The Nijinsky Revolution!

Great choice with April Fossen and Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike!

@BALLETWEST1

Via CityWeekly.net

Thanks, @CityWeekly!!!! for naming #3YSC best nonfiction book of the year!

MICHAEL NIELSEN

Via Twitter

Yo! Thanks for giving the Wasatch Wordsmiths Best Alt Poetry! It sure means a lot to all the poets and organizers that help make our shows stand out!

@JULIECHECKOWAY

Via CityWeekly.net

@POLITICALSURF

RJ WALKER

Great job with the list! A lot of worthy mentions here! And it’s always a good thing when Shayne Smith gets some more love. He and the reader’s winner, Alex Velluto are great on stage.

BOB BEDORE

Via CityWeekly.net I’m glad the Green Loft got some deserved attention for the beautiful gallery space. This is one of my favorite buildings in SLC. I was disappointed, however, that the moving force behind these great exhibits, Kristina Lenzi, was not mentioned. Maybe City Weekly didn’t realize that. But she was tireless in her efforts in getting top artists known locally and beyond to show in a mortgage company. Great work, Kristina!

MARTI GRACE ASHBY Via Facebook

I won a @CityWeekly Best of Utah category this year! Thank you @TheGavinSheehan for the wonderful write up!

@LIONINTHETREES Via Twitter

Via Twitter

HELEN PICKETT

Via Twitter Thank you @CityWeekly for the nomination! What a great community!

@HEATHERLIME Via Twitter

City

Via CityWeekly.net Look at the options. Jenson is no longer unopposed. VoteJeffWhite.com.

Awwww, my heart is so full! Thank you @thegavinsheehan and @slcweekly for having @myriaddance’s Creator’s Grid win a Staff Pick Arty! Everyone involved; dancers, DJs, Metro, audience and the choreographers make that event special. Thank you for recognizing that. Salt Lake has such a vibrant dance community in various genres, and such incredible performers and unique choreographers live here. I am so happy I was able to cultivate an environment that celebrates the many different voices our community holds. Much love!

@TEMRIAAIRMET Via Instagram

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ly k e We

@APOEMGEB Via Twitter

Thanks, Obama.

CITYW

E E K LY

BEN EYRING

.NET

Via CityWeekly.net

The Ocho, Sept. 15, “Eight things Gov. Gary Herbert tells himself at bedtime” Taco trucks on every cloud!

JARED BOWDEN

Via Facebook

WARREN MITERKO

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Via Facebook And it closes at 6 P.M.

TRAVIS BARKER

The Exorcist is the only fall show I’m definitely watching. I’ll check out This Is Us but will probably wait and watch it over summer.

No mention of @TheStruts? Really?

@HASHITAN

@BRISKONER

Too bad it’s 3.2.

MICHAEL JAMES STONE

Via Facebook

Props to @CityWeekly for doing a write-up on Grand Master Flash.

Dine, Sept. 15, “Oktoberfest 2016”

Hmmmm.

CORY SKELTON

Music, Sept.15, “Flash Memories” Via Twitter

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True TV, Sept. 15, “4:20 Sharp”

News, Sept. 15, “Family Business” LYNN BERNIER

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BE R 15 , 20 16 | V O L. 33 N 0. 19

JEFF MCKEE

Congrats to @plan9crunch2 artist Steve D. Stones.

Hey, some people are genetically predisposed to suck smoke down their lungs. Good luck with that.

This is Great!! Yes.

They are Republicans, Obama is a Democrat. Nepotism and cronyism are the priorities of this department, Watson wrote the book on fixing tests to achieve these goals, who else could rate 60 percent of the men taking a captain’s test incompetent.

SE PT EM

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SOAP BOX

COMMENTS@CITYWEEKLY.NET

Via Facebook Oh Oktoberfest, how I miss you.

BRIT LIDDIARD Via Facebook

It actually sucks compared to Vail or Breckenridge, or any other place outside Utah.

@PHISHCOUG

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STAFF Publisher JOHN SALTAS Editorial

Editor ENRIQUE LIMÓN Arts &Entertainment Editor SCOTT RENSHAW Music Editor RANDY HARWARD Senior Staff Writer STEPHEN DARK Staff Writer COLBY FRAZIER Copy Editor ANDREA HARVEY Proofers SARAH ARNOFF, LANCE GUDMUNDSEN

Dining Listings Coordinator MIKEY SALTAS Editorial Interns HILLARY REILLY, RHETT WILKINSON Contributors CECIL ADAMS, KATHARINE BIELE, ROB BREZSNY, CAROLYN CAMPBELL, BABS DE LAY, KYLEE EHMANN, BILL FROST, MARYANN JOHANSON,BILL KOPP, KATHERINE PIOLI, JOHN RASMUSON, TED SCHEFFLER, CHUCK SHEPHERD, ERIC D. SNIDER, ALEX SPRINGER, BRIAN STAKER, LEE ZIMMERMAN

Production

Art Director DEREK CARLISLE Graphic Artists CAIT LEE, SUMMER MONTGOMERY, JOSH SCHEUERMAN

Circulation

Circulation Manager LARRY CARTER

Business/Office

Accounting Manager CODY WINGET

Associate Business Manager PAULA SALTAS Business Department Administrator ALISSA DIMICK Office Administrator CELESTE NELSON Technical Director BRYAN MANNOS

Marketing

Marketing Manager JACKIE BRIGGS

Marketing/Events Coordinator NICOLE ENRIGHT Street Team STEPHANIE ABBOTT, SHAUNTEL ARCHULETTA, BEN BALDRIDGE, MATT ENRIGHT, TYLER GRAHAM, ADAM LANE, ANDY ROMERO, KRISTINA STRONG, LAUREN TAGGE, MIKAYLA THURBUR, STEVEN VARGO

Sales

Director of Advertising, Magazine Division JENNIFER VAN GREVENHOF

Director of Advertising, Newsprint Division PETE SALTAS Digital Operations Manager ANNA PAPADAKIS Director of Digital Development CHRISTIAN PRISKOS Digital Sales LINDSAY LARKIN Senior Account Executives DOUG KRUITHOF, KATHY MUELLER Account Manager IVY WATROUS

Retail Account Executives LISA DORELLI, TYESON ROGERS, NICK SASICH, SIERRA SESSIONS, JEREMIAH SMITH Display Advertising 801-413-0936 National Advertising VMG Advertising 888-278-9866 VMGAdvertising.com

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Salt Lake City Weekly is published every Thursday by Copperfield Publishing Inc. The Salt Lake City Weekly is an independent publication dedicated to alternative news and news sources, and serves as a comprehensive entertainment guide. 50,000 copies of the Salt Lake City Weekly are free of charge at more than 1,800 locations along the Wasatch Front, limit one copy per reader. Additional copies of the paper may be purchased for $1 (Best of Utah and other special issues, $5) payable to the Salt Lake City Weekly in advance. No person, without expressed permission of Copperfield Publishing Inc., may take more than one copy of any Salt Lake City Weekly issue. No portion of the Salt Lake City Weekly may be reproduced in whole or part by any means, including electronic retrieval systems, without the written permission of the Publisher. Third-Class postage paid at Midvale, UT. Delivery may take one week. All Rights Reserved. ®

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OPINION

Blaine Preserve

Chris Lee owns a house on Glen Arbor Drive, the “Christmas Street” cul-de-sac off 1500 East near 1700 South. The lot backs up to Emigration Creek. The banks are too steep to cross over to Blaine Avenue, but there, on the south side, flanking the creek bed, lies a narrow, wooded space about an acre in size. In 2012, when Lee began to take an interest in it, “littered” and “overgrown” would have described it accurately. But Lee saw beyond the litter of beer cans and construction debris. He saw an uncommon, natural landscape, surrounded by houses, worth reclaiming from decades of neglect. Lee found that because it was city-owned land—technically speaking, a highly valued “riparian corridor”—there were grants available to improve it. He began knocking on the doors of his 46 neighbors. His ideas quickly took root. Eventually, the Blaine Hollow Restoration Group was chartered as a nonprofit corporation, and Lee submitted a grant application for $12,000. The shortterm plan was to clean up the site and replace invasive species with native plants. Neighborhood residents committed to doing the work needed to make the Blaine Hollow Nature Preserve a reality. The stewardship project was welcomed by the city, and Lewis Kogan, Salt Lake City’s Open Space Lands Program manager, enthusiastically supported the emergent, public-private partnership. On several Saturdays in 2014, 42 neighborhood residents showed up to work on their newly designated nature preserve. When all was said and done, they had loaded 5 tons of debris into dump trucks provided by Kogan. City employees cut back weeds and overhanging trees, spot-sprayed herbicide and re-seeded with wheatgrass. “We made good progress,” Lee says. “I felt wonderful.” Volunteers then planted 298 pots of dogwood, chokecherry, willow and other native shrubs, but despite efforts by some

STAFF BOX

BY JOHN RASMUSON

in the neighborhood to hand-carry water to them, almost half died within a year. “Several residents who were monitoring the success of the 2014 plantings were extremely distressed when a number of plantings began to struggle in the heat of summer,” Kogan’s final report states. “They felt the city had installed plants without adequate support and was walking away.” Dean Thomas, a longtime Blaine Avenue resident, was among the distressed. The dead plants were a predictable outcome of a flawed plan, he laments. “It ain’t rocket science.” Installation of an irrigation system should have preceded any planting. Kogan “reworked the budget” in 2015 to pay for a basic sprinkler system along 600 feet of the Blaine Avenue curb. Because neither water nor electricity was available on the site, the installation cost about $10,000. A solar cell powered the timer that turned the sprinklers on and off. “Lewis Kogan worked his butt off to make the sprinklers happen,” Lee says, but Thomas isn’t so complimentary. He feels the city ignored his concerns about water early on and then rebuffed him when he volunteered to be responsible for the operation of the sprinklers. City employees did a second planting of 135 shrubs in the fall of 2015. When I walked the site in August 2016, it looked to me like less than half of all the plants had survived. The ground was dry. Sunflowers were wilted. I asked a man walking his dog if the sprinklers worked. He said they did. He told me that on one occasion they were spraying water in the street and his call to the city brought an immediate response. Kogan’s final report concludes that the dying plants “caused much distress among members of the Blaine Hollow Restoration Group who had given substantial time and effort to plant the shrubs, and clearer and more frequent communication from the city through the summer of 2015 would have gone a long way in preventing this.”

Thomas’ distress has hardened into sharp-edged criticism. “I don’t sugarcoat it,” he says. “I speak my mind.” He complains that Lee and Kogan ignore his emails. Lee says that the drumbeat of criticism has a negative effect: “It only takes one loud voice to take the wind out of the sails.” Nevertheless, it is apparent that the Blaine Hollow Nature Preserve has few detractors, if any. No one wants the project to fail. “I love this place,” Thomas says. Kogan wrote about residents’ change in attitude “from looking at the Emigration Creek greenway as a nuisance or a dumping ground, to taking a special pride in the stream and feeling a sense of ownership for stewarding the neighborhood’s small section.” Lee says: “It adds immensely to an urban neighborhood.” What appeals to me about the Blaine Hollow Nature Preserve is that it is traceable to one guy. Lee had an idea and was willing to spend his time and money to garner support for it. That the city government responded with resources is faith-promoting, but most impressive is the fact that neighborhood residents got their hands dirty. More than 700 hours of work have been invested so far. Walking away now would be senseless. No one denies that there have been missteps along the way, but perseverating on them is a waste of time and energy. A better strategy is to focus on the future. Eroding stream banks, lack of sunshine in the understory, invasive elms—plenty of work remains. Going forward, the Blaine Hollow Nature Preserve needs Lee’s leadership, Kogan’s resources and Thomas’ support. As the landlord, Kogan’s interests would be served by delegating maintenance tasks to willing neighbors like Thomas. Lee remains optimistic. “We have done great stuff,” he says. “The way I see it, in the long term, we’re going to do just fine.” CW

“IT ONLY TAKES ONE LOUD VOICE TO TAKE THE WIND OUT OF THE SAILS.”

Readers can comment at cityweekly.net

What’s the last thing you did to beautify your neighborhood? Scott Renshaw: I took the hint from the neighbors frowning as they walked past our front yard, and started removing some of the dead things. Pete Saltas: My neighbor complained about the weeds in my front yard. I pulled them all and planted trees, shrubs and flowers. Now my yard looks better than his. #KeepUpWithTheJoneses

Tyeson Rogers: I pick up garbage in my front yard and go around in the dead of night pulling people’s Trump signs and stickers off. Then I burn them.

Lisa Dorelli: Well, I was dating someone who had one of the least attractive yards in the neighborhood, so I spent the entire afternoon planting gorgeous flowers, trimming the hedges, picking weeds and made it stunning. Then, I left him and it reverted back to a ghastly scene. Sorry, neighborhood … I tried.

Ivy Watrous: Moved here. Andrea Harvey: On Earth Day in 2008, I walked around my neighborhood and picked up trash. Since then, I think I can safely say that my Goodwill Christmas decorations, college parties and haggard-looking car have done the opposite of beautifying my neighbohood.

Randy Harward: I bedazzled all the feral cats.

Mikey Saltas: Nearly 20 years ago, the Saltas family moved in. Our neighborhood has never been more beautiful. Derek Carlisle: I took a 30-pack of PBR out to the front yard took my shirt off and chopped a cord of wood while eating a Carl’s Jr. bacon burger.

Send feedback to comments@cityweekly.net

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8 | SEPTEMBER 29, 2016

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Everyone loves polls—especially candidates who seem to live and die by them. But just what are they measuring, and isn’t it a journalist’s role to differentiate truth from opinion? The most recent poll conducted by The Salt Lake Tribune and the University of Utah’s Hinckley Institute of Politics shows some striking disconnects between the two presidential candidates, but also leaves something to the distorted imagination. This poll has 50 percent of respondents saying Donald Trump is the most honest candidate, while Hillary Clinton gets a measly 24 percent thumbs-up. A lot of issues are hard to assess, but not honesty. Data from Politifact, an independent fact-checking website, graded more than 50 statements from all candidates since 2007. The most trust-worthy? Hillary Clinton. But never mind the facts. In November last year, polls showed 59 percent of Republicans still believe Barack Obama is a Muslim.

More UTA Missteps

Whether you take public transit or not, you have to wonder about the people in charge of the Utah Transit Authority. Utah Transit Riders Union is once again calling for the board of the quasi-public agency to be elected rather than appointed. Why? Because the chairman, H. David Burton, messed up big time when, after a May promise to open all committee meetings to the public, he didn’t. The convoluted rationale was that committees had been disbanded, and board members were just meeting casually over the water cooler to parse decisions. You know the tired old excuse that they can’t talk openly in an open meeting. Did anyone tell them they are a sort-of public entity, and the public needs to be part of the conversation? This slip was yet another egregious misstep by an organization that has lost trust, and should be folded back under the government that funds it.

Inspiring New Fundraiser

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Of all the fundraisers (mostly political right now), a new one in town is particularly inspirational and heart-wrenching. The all-volunteer Paul Moore Foundation is helping only its second family after a year in existence. The nonprofit, based in Farmington, provides financial assistance to young parents diagnosed with terminal illnesses, according to a Deseret News report. The foundation raises money through 5K runs, silent auctions and small community events, so it’s not a huge money-maker. Still, it’s now trying to help a young couple who, with a newborn, are facing the mother’s terminal cancer. The website notes estimates of about 562,000 children living with a parent in the early stages of cancer each year.

MIKEY SALTAS

Presidential Polls

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HITS&MISSES

Back in spring, City Weekly ran a competition called “Burger Week,” calling all burger enthusiasts to try as many of the 38 participating local restaurants as they could. Only one person was able to eat at all of them—a man by the name of John Gutz, who found out about the event while browsing through the paper at his work, Brewvies Cinema Pub. Gutz was the grand-prize winner of a new grill, bike and cooler donated by Budweiser. Despite eating a burger for every meal of the day, Gutz enjoyed the contest because it introduced him to new favorites.

How did you hear about the contest, and what made you decide to do it?

I just saw it in the City Weekly and me and my friends were talking about it. I’m into contests, so I just said ‘I’m going to give it a shot’ and started for the lower prizes. Once I started getting into it more and more, it all sort of steamrolled from there.

You ate at every single burger joint in the competition. Do you remember your first and your last burger?

My first one, I went up to Habit and got a bag of burgers for me and my buddies and those were really good. My last one was over at Squatters, I know that one. That was a late night, mad rush to get all the final burgers in. I actually remember all the restaurants I went to and all the types of burgers I got from each.

To eat at 38 restaurants in three weeks, you had to average around three burgers every day in the two-week competition. What was your strategy?

I got a lot of them to-go and would eat them at home. I would wake up, go have one for breakfast, pick another one up to-go for lunch, then go out and have a burger for dinner so that would be my three. I had plenty of burgers for breakfast. But there were some days I had to cover like six per day to catch up and go to all of the places.

Did your health suffer at all in those two weeks?

I actually probably ate better then than I normally eat, so I felt pretty good. I was sweating burgers there for a while, but there were no adverse effects.

What was your favorite?

My favorite burger was surprisingly the Athenian from Apollo Burger. And I also really liked the chubby from Copper Creek out on 5600 West. The Athenian was awesome, it was fresh and had roasted peppers, some feta. I went in there thinking it would only be an average one, but when it was all said and done, it wound up probably being my favorite.

What did you enjoy most about the contest?

Winning the grill, bike and cooler for one. Also, just being able to get out and try places I had never thought of going to before. It felt good supporting local businesses and going around the city and finding new places I’d never think of going to before. I’d definitely do the competition again. Some places I’d never even heard of either. Britton’s and Copper Creek, I had never heard of those before, but their burgers ended up as my top three burgers and it was nice to add those places to my radar. I would recommend everyone participate next year, there’s a whole bunch of places that I would totally go to again because of the competition.

-MIKEY SALTAS comments@cityweekly.net


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10 | SEPTEMBER 29, 2016

BY CECIL ADAMS SLUG SIGNORINO

STRAIGHT DOPE Pet Palate We’ve all seen the ads where pets experience visible joy when served an expensive brand of dog or cat food. But do dogs and cats discern flavors, and given the choice, would they prefer Alpo or Cesar to dog crap or dead rats? —Two Larrys Even the most doting pet parents can have a tough time maintaining the illusion they’re dealing with a refined sensibility. The high-end kibble might indeed disappear from your dog’s dish, but that doesn’t mean she can’t find room for a bird corpse or discarded diaper afterward. Yes, dogs and cats do apparently taste flavors, but no, the fancy brands don’t necessarily contain more of what gets them salivating than the cheap stuff, just as beluga caviar won’t necessarily trip human taste receptors more reliably than a bag of Doritos. Taste starts with the tongue, and the number of taste buds varies drastically among species—in some cases, pretty widely within species, too. Chickens have only about two dozen taste buds; humans tend to have somewhere between 2,000 and 10,000. A bigger number doesn’t automatically translate to a more sophisticated palate: Catfish have hundreds of thousands of external buds, meaning they’re constantly tasting the river-bottom muck as they swim through it. I’ll take the life of a chicken, thanks. As for dogs, they have just 1,700 taste buds; cats make do with a paltry 470. In both, you won’t be surprised to learn, many of these buds are particularly attuned to meats, fats and the chemicals therein. Beyond basic meatcentricity, though, we see some divergence. Sweet tastes, for instance, also make it onto dogs’ radar—their taste buds respond to a chemical called furaneol, found in various fruits. (Note that they go for chocolate, even though it’s toxic to them.) Cats, on the other hand, are alone among the mammals in having no ability to detect sweetness— which, given the personality of some cats I’ve known, seems poetically fitting. And it makes sense: Food-wise, one of the big differences between the two major pet blocs is that cats are wired to eat a lot more protein than dogs. In recent studies of macronutrient selection—where test animals had access to a buffet of variously high-protein, high-fat and high-carbohydrate foods and ate what they wanted— British pet nutritionists report that cats chose a nutrient balance of 52 percent protein, 36 percent fat and 12 percent carbohydrates, whereas dogs’ self-selected splits came out at 30 protein, 63 fat, 7 carbs. Why the gap? The researchers suggest that until not too long ago, humans weren’t setting aside much meat for cats, who were expected to make their nutritional numbers via mousing—and the small animals cats remain famous for hunting tend, in fact, to contain about 50 percent protein. Dogs, conversely, are descended from pack hunters, who could land bigger prey with more body fat; then, of course, they tossed

in their lot with people at least 15,000 years ago and have been eating our scraps ever since. (From a scavenging perspective, a dog’s occasional willingness to eat actual turds isn’t as nutty as it seems—who knows, it figures, maybe there’s still some good stuff in there.) Now, taste and smell are overlapping senses for most animals, and you and I aren’t even in our pets’ league when it comes to detecting scent. Humans have maybe six million olfactory receptors in our noses, where cats can have up to 80 million and dogs as many as 300 million. Dogs and cats are also among the many critters whose mouths connect to their nasal passages through something called the vomeronasal organ, or Jacobson’s organ, containing its own set of receptors to detect chemicals like pheromones. Scientists are still studying this organ’s role, but with what’s essentially a second olfactory system running alongside the first one, pets might encounter their food via a multisensory experience it’d be hard for us to even comprehend. With that said, there’s no solid evidence that dogs and cats are biologically predisposed to favor the flavor of a higher grade of meat, whether marketed as “organic” or “natural,” to the organs and byproducts processed into cheaper fare. In fact, some bargain-brand dog foods might please your pet more, because they’re highly sweetened. None of this means there aren’t nutritional benefits to the pricier stuff, but I have neither the time nor the space to moderate the countless disputes over proper pet diet that have been stirred up in the two millennia since the Roman scholar Marcus Terentius Varro advocated feeding sheepdogs milk-soaked bread and marrowbones. Then again, no dog ever lifted its muzzle from the trash to consider a more upscale dining alternative offered on television. Advertisers set their snares for the species that’s holding the credit card, and American humans are their willing prey, shelling out more than $20 billion on pet food annually. And it’s not like marketing types don’t know their psychology: According to a 2014 Cornell study, people will tend to believe that their own food tastes better the more they pay for it. Sometimes you have to wonder just how much smarter than our pets we actually are. n Send questions to Cecil via StraightDope.com or write him c/o Chicago Reader, 350 N. Orleans, Chicago 60654.


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NEWS Street Justice

“I think it’s particularly disturbing that someone who is a law enforcement officer would go to these lengths.” L AW E N F O R C E M E N T —Defense attorney Cara Tangaro

On the front lines of policing crime around the downtown shelter, a cop and a homeless addict repeatedly clash. BY STEPHEN DARK sdark@cityweekly.net

FILE/ANDY FILLMORE

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hen defense attorney Cara Tangaro asked Salt Lake City police officer Dax Shane on the stand whether he told a prosecutor—while giving him a ride home from 3rd District Court—that Rio Grande shelter-regular Anthony Lane was a police informant, he said yes. He also answered yes when she asked if he realized that being labeled as a “snitch” at the shelter was dangerous. The exchange took place during Lane’s August 2016 trial for aggravated assault. Under Tangaro’s questioning, Shane admitted to being frustrated with Lane, whom he had known for many years and with whom he had not seen eye-to-eye, he testified. That frustration led him to lie to Salt Lake County prosecutor Rick Pehrson, claiming he had told someone he found with drug paraphernalia that Lane had informed on them. Shane’s intention was that Lane, known as “Country” at the shelter, would be beaten—which he added in the car-conversation had transpired by the next day. On the stand, Shane claimed it was a fabrication designed to impress his passenger. “It never happened, something I completely made up,” he told the court about labeling Lane a snitch. Whether Shane’s conversation with Pehrson was, as SLCPD spokesman Greg Wilking says, an attempt to explain to a non-cop the hypothetical realities of working the drug- and crime-ridden streets around the shelter, or, as Lane’s attorney Tangaro says, an accurate statement of his actions, the ripple effect of that casual conversation has yet to abate for Shane or Lane. The saga of Shane and Lane’s dance as cop and homeless addict reflects as much on the challenges of policing the shelter as it does on the men’s problematic relationship. A controversial officer with a reputation among some defense attorneys for harassing the homeless, Shane was investigated by Internal Affairs and suspended for two days without pay. He now has to live with the possibility of his future testimony on cases being called into question. Shane declined an interview request. Police spokesman Wilking says Lane

Rampant crime near the homeless shelter poses significant challenges for both cops and those they police. is someone who’s known for drugs and fighting. “To me, he is a very active player in the drug trade around the shelter. He knows who has the drugs, he knows where to get drugs, he is very involved in that trade.” He describes him as a predator who uses force and intimidation to get what he wants. Lane went on trial for cutting a gang member’s face with a box-cutter. The DA’s office introduced two prior assault cases where Lane attempted or successfully wielded a knife or box-cutter against men he claimed were attacking him. In both cases, he claimed self-defense; the first led him to plead guilty on a reduced charge of a misdemeanor of attempted aggravated assault, the second to a jury finding him not guilty on the assault charge. But in this case, he was convicted, and faces up to 15 years in prison at his sentencing on Oct. 14. Each of the cases in 2012, 2015 and 2016, Lane says in a jailhouse interview, resulted from him having to defend himself after Shane spread the word that he was an informant. In the 2015 case, according to police body-camera footage played in court, a woman outside the shelter shouted at Lane: “You’re an informant. Everybody hates your ass.” Lane accuses Shane of lying on a 2014 drug case, where the cop rode up on his motorbike and, according to the probable cause statement, Lane put down a large container of drugs in front of him and walked away. That case was filed in 2014 but did not progress in the court system because a senior officer Lane worked with had it pulled. That drug case was subsequently re-filed by

Pehrson when Lane was prosecuted for assault the third time in 2016. The drug case was tossed out because of Shane’s off-duty statements to the prosecutor. Lane is angry when a reporter says Shane got a two-day suspension. “Wow,” he says, sitting back on the metal bench on the other side of a Perspex window in B pod. “Two days suspension for endangering a person’s life?”

SECOND CHANCES

As the ever-growing list of AfricanAmericans shot dead by police officers across the United States in highly questionable situations continues to be a defining issue in national and local politics, the allegation that a white officer sought street justice against a black man he did not like might well be seen by some to add more fuel to the fire. Tangaro notes the outrage that followed the shooting of a teen outside the shelter in late February 2016. “I think it’s particularly disturbing that someone who is a law enforcement officer would go to these lengths to harm someone like Anthony Lane. And I have no doubt that he actually did it,” she says. “I don’t believe for one second that it’s a made-up story.” In part, the conflict between Lane and Shane stems from different approaches to policing the burgeoning homeless and criminal elements that surround the shelter, sometimes, as with Lane, the line blurring between the two. Lane says Shane was critical of several officers who befriended him. Former SLCPD Officer Eric R. Moutsos rescued him from the shelter in 2008,

shortly after the Alabama-born Lane arrived in Salt Lake City. While patrolling Liberty Park and the shelter, Moutsos says he came to know Lane as a man of immense talent and one he came to love and respect. Moutsos worked parttime jobs to give money to Lane and, after consultation with his former LDS bishop, picked Lane up in his mini-van and tried to get him help. Moutsos baptized Lane, at the latter’s request, into the LDS faith, but Lane backslid into drug use and decided to leave the church rather than blemish it with his addiction. “They were so generous to me. But the addict side of me was not being treated.” Moutsos, he says, “was ahead of his time. He looked at me like one of his brothers. Now we’ve got an officer going around doing the opposite.” Moutsos sells solar panels now. He won’t comment on Shane, except to say, “He and I have completely different styles of policing; I believe in second chances and helping people.” Wilking characterizes Shane’s approach as seeking to disrupt drugdealing activity. “He knows the only way he can stop people from using is to arrest them.” Shane would advise addicts near the shelter that sooner or later they would get caught, jailed and hopefully get sober. “If I had a 100 officers like Dax that are working hard and telling people this, the drug dealers would know that’s not a place to do business,” Wilking says. Perceptions of Shane can be markedly different. Defense attorney Skye Lazaro represented Lane with Tangaro. For


IN HARM’S WAY

KATHY MOUTSOS

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February 2005. The incidents ranged from accidental car damage and poor driving to an improper search and, in 2015, an inappropriate use of force. Brown noted in his letter that whether Shane had branded Lane an informant or made up the story in a moment of boastful bravado, “the implication is the same in that your truthfulness remains in question.” He wrote that it appeared Shane hadn’t falsely identified Lane as an informant, but that “your remarks nevertheless were inappropriate, unacceptable and indicative of extremely poor judgment and a lack of professionalism and respect.” Shane requested and got a transfer to the east side. “He doesn’t want any part of [the shelter] anymore,” Wilking says. The amount of criminal activity there “puts you in harm’s way and under a microscope more often.” But while he can walk away from the shelter, he can’t walk away so easily from his “fishing tale.” Brady/Giglio are legal precedents that require the prosecution discloses to the defense information about officers that could impact their credibility. District Attorney Sim Gill says Shane “admitted in open court he lied to a prosecutor and that’s going to raise a Brady/Giglio issue always.” Even if Shane’s assertion that his story was fabricated is true, Tangaro says her concerns remain the same. “What level of integrity do we expect from law enforcement officers and if they are going to go down to that level, are they really someone we want wearing a badge and carrying a gun?” CW

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SLCPD spokesman Wilking says Shane told Pehrson shortly after the fateful ride home that he had made up labeling Lane as a snitch. Pehrson informed his superiors at the district attorney’s office and was conflicted off the case. He also informed SLCPD’s Internal Affairs. Shane told IA that Pehrson was correct and, according to a discipline letter by Chief Mike Brown, that he was embarrassed by what he had done and did not know why he had done it. Four months later, the DA’s office told Tangaro that Shane had fabricated what would be described in court as a “fishing tale” in a moment of stupidity. In late August 2016, Chief Brown suspended Shane without pay for 20 hours for conduct unbecoming. While Shane’s union rep told IA that Shane’s actions were a “bonehead thing to do,” he argued it would not impact Shane being able to testify in court. Brown disagreed. In his letter, he noted that Shane’s actions had meant the DA had to dismiss the drug case against Lane where Shane was the arresting officer. In total, according to a record request by City Weekly, in Shane’s 14 years at Salt Lake City Police Department, he’s been disciplined eight times, dating back to

Anthony Lane with then-SLCPD Officer Eric Moutsos at the former’s LDS baptism.

SEPTEMBER 29, 2016 | 13

FILE/ANDY FILLMORE

four years until spring 2016, she was a public defender at Salt Lake Legal Defenders. She recalls cases at LDA involving Shane that were “homeless people crimes,” such as misdemeanors for criminal trespass, standing on the sidewalk waiting for the shelter to open, or sleeping in the park. Shane would pick them up on such misdemeanors and they would sit in jail for several days unable to make bail, waiting to appear before Judge John Baxter at his homeless court near the shelter. Wilking says the perception that Shane harasses the homeless is incorrect. “It’s not the homeless so much as it’s the criminal element. He doesn’t want to see these people that are preying on others continue to carry out that activity.” Monte Hanks is a veteran client services director at the nonprofit Fourth Street Clinic, which provides extensive services for the downtown homeless. He has known Shane both professionally and personally for years. “I’ve been very happy with what he’s done regarding the homeless,” he says. “I’d have a hard time buying into him doing something like that,” namely labeling someone an informant.


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THE

OCHO

THE LIST OF EIGHT

BY BILL FROST

COUPLES

PLUS-SIZE

@Bill _ Frost

MEN’S

CO S T U M E S BY D R E A M G I R L PIBSEXCHANGE.COM

Eight more bold, fresh ideas coming from The Salt Lake Tribune after their local “Best of” Salt Awards:

WIGS

MAKE-UP

In a week, you can

CHANGE THE WORLD

HISTORY CONFERENCE ON RURAL UTAH

Whether you think of yourself as a history buff or not, the Utah State Historical Society’s Rural Utah, Western Issues, the 2016 annual State History Conference, should pique your interest. Why? Because Utah is spending your tax dollars in the ongoing public lands debate. First thing in the conference is “Historical Perspectives on the Public Lands Debate in the American West,” where you can hear about struggles to control access to natural resources. The keynote address, “Quicksand, Cactus and the Power of History in Polarized Times” covers life lessons from American cowboys. Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W. 3100 South, West Valley City, 801-245-7225, Friday, Sept. 30, 8 a.m.5 p.m., free, registration required, Bit.ly/2dakRke

1147 EAST ASHTON AVE, SLC • 801.484.7996 MON- SAT 11-9PM • SUN 1-5PM

WOMEN’S

CITIZEN REVOLT

8. “Beehive Boners: Examples of bad, stupid or funny local behavior.”

7. “Graphical Guffaws: Humorous short stories presented in cartoon form.”

6.

“It’s So Loud: Concert reviews written by our senior gardening correspondent.”

5. “Kiddie Kicks: In-depth,

intense, borderline-intrusive coverage of elementary-school soccer.”

4.

“Kirby or Not Kirby: Is this a new Robert Kirby column, or a reprint from 1998? You tell us!”

3. “LDS FYI: Occasional news

about Utah’s little-known religious faction, the Mormons.”

2.

“Choose Your Own Ender: Contest to find the conclusion to that ‘Continued’ print article.”

1. “Choose Your Own Migraine:

CREATE A PERSONAL MUSEUM

You don’t have to be a teacher to enjoy Evening for Educators. The event focuses on the importance of preservation, investigates the artwork of Joseph Cornell and talks about pocket galleries, collecting, documenting and saving important artifacts. Participants can embellish a personal museum-in-a-box as an enduring memento and receptacle for their own memories. These programs are offered to art teachers from around the state, SUU students and community members as well. There’s only space for 30 participants, so call now. Southern Utah Museum of Art (SUMA), 13 S. 300 West, Cedar City, 435-586-5425, Tuesday, Oct. 4, 6-9 p.m., free, open to public, call to reserve space, SUU.edu/PVA

HOMELESSNESS TOWN HALL

Be part of the #FutureOfCities weeklong event series across 15 North American cities to talk about the difficult and crucial issues of providing services to the homeless. At Salt Lake City’s event, Town Hall: Homelessness, you can meet key stakeholders and learn how to co-create solutions to help our community’s most vulnerable. In a panel discussion about economics, housing, mental health and more, David Litvack, deputy chief of staff at Salt Lake City, along with Bryson Garbett, founder and president of Garbett Homes, gives a perspective of the city and of the business and real estate development communities. Impact Hub, 150 S. State, Thursday, Sept. 29, 6-9 p.m., free, must RSVP, SaltLake.ImpactHub.net

—KATHARINE BIELE

Contest to find anything on SLTrib.com.”

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Can’t Possibly Be True Few U.S. forces in Afghanistan speak the native Pashto or Dari, and the war prospects would be dim were it not for courageous Afghan civilians who aid the U.S. as interpreters under promise of protection and future emigration to the U.S. However, the congressional battle over immigration policy has delayed entry for about 10,000 interpreters, who (along with their families) face imminent death if they remain in Afghanistan. Some in Congress also regard Afghans as riskier immigrants (despite the interpreters’ demonstrated loyalty).

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WEIRD

Insanity Defined Police and prosecutors in Dallas, appropriately sensitive at having been the site of the 1963 killing of President Kennedy, have apparently taken out their shame on assassination buff Robert Groden. As the Dallas Observer reported in September, Groden has been ticketed by police dozens of times for operating book sales booths near the “grassy knoll” (site of the alleged “second shooter” of the president)—and yet he prevails in court every single time (82 straight, and counting). (Tip for visitors from the Observer: Never publicly utter “grassy knoll” in Dallas, as it seems particularly to offend the police.)

The Continuing Crisis Stephen Mader, 25, native of Weirton, W. Va., and former Weirton police officer, is fighting to get his job back after being fired for not being quick enough on the trigger. When Ronald Williams Jr., in May, made a ham-handed attempt at “suicide by cop,” it was Mader who, rather than shooting, tried to talk Williams down (based on his Marine Corps and police academy training), but when Williams pointed his unloaded gun at two of Mader’s colleagues, and one of them quickly shot the man to death, police officials fired Mader for having been insufficiently aggressive.

Suspicions Confirmed Master baker Stefan Fischer filed a lawsuit recently against Bakery of New York for wrongful firing—because he refused to use “bug-infested” flour to make batches of bread. According to Fischer, when he informed management of the bugs in the facility’s 3,000-pound flour silo, he was told simply to make “multigrain” bread, which Fischer took to mean that fewer diners would complain if they heard “crunching” while eating it.

UPCOMING EVENTS TH

4 WEST OCTOBERFEST 9/30-10/2

AT MOUNTAIN WEST HARD CIDER 4THWESTOCTOBERFEST.EVENTBRITE.COM

WARREN MILLER’S

Leading Economic Indicators News Corporation Australia reported in September the enviable success of a 16-year-old British entrepreneur, Ms. Beau Jessup, who has so far earned about $84,000 with a simple online app to help rich Chinese parents select prosperous-sounding English names for their babies. Users choose among 12 personality traits they hope their baby to have, then receive three suggestions (including a list of famous people with those names). Jessup got the idea when living in China and noticing that some babies of the rich were given lame names, such as “Gandalf” and “Cinderella.” Chinese Management Techniques About 200 employees at a travel service in Shandong Province were fined the equivalent of $6.50 each recently for failing to comply with orders to “comment” (favorably, one supposes) on the general manager’s daily posts to the Twitter-like internet site Sina Weibo.

HERE, THERE & EVERYWHERE

n In June, a motivational trainer working with employees of the Changzhi Zhangze Rural Commercial Bank reportedly told the poor-performing bank personnel (among the 200 at the session) to “prepare to be beaten.” He then walked among the workers, whacking some with a stick, shaving the heads of the males and cutting the hair of the females.

7:30PM AT ABRAVANEL HALL WARREN MILLER.COM

Weird Science Trees talk to each other and recognize their offspring, according to Australian ecology researcher Suzanne Simard (most recently lecturing on the influential video series TED Talks). Trees are not

10/14- 10/14

BY CHUCK SHEPHERD

independent organisms but belong to arboreal “families” with characteristics identifying them to other family members. According to Dr. Simard, “mother” trees that ordinarily expand their roots wildly might hold back to give nearby “kinfolk” tree roots a chance to spread. Using “isotope tracing,” she learned of trees passing healthful carbon, via fungi, to neighboring family seedlings, which she said renders the seedlings more resistant to future stress. Can’t Stop Myself The lifelong pickpocket known as “Auntie Sato,” 83, who has spent nearly 30 years of her life behind bars, was sentenced again (two years, six months) in August for a purse-snatching from a traveler in Tokyo’s Ueno Station. “Why,” asked the judge, does Auntie Sato keep at it, especially since she also owns property and has rental income? Said she, “I thought about (stopping),” but “gave up.” “It’s hopeless.”

n Faisal Shaikh, awaiting his cellphone theft case to be called at the Thane sessions court in Mumbai, India, in August (one of several theft charges pending), wandered up to the court stenographer’s desk and swiped her cell phone. He was apprehended shortly afterward near the courthouse.

Oops! By August, Raymond Mazzarella was fed up with the tree in his neighbor’s yard in Pittston Township, Pa., as it was continuously dripping sap onto his car—and so grabbed a chainsaw, cut through the 36-inch-wide trunk, and (he thought) fixed the problem. However, the tree fell directly onto Mazzarella’s small apartment house, dispossessing five tenants and, ultimately, forcing inspectors to condemn the entire building. Recurring Themes A middle-aged man was reported in three incidents in the Aberdeen, Scotland, area in August and September to be approaching women and asking for piggyback rides. He was still at large. n In September, England’s Derby Crown Court sentenced Sanjeev Sandhu, 29, to six months in jail because of the “extreme” pornography on his phone. One image was of children having sex, but the judge also noted images featuring humans having sex with dogs, a donkey, a bull and in another case, a fish.

How to Tell If You’re Drunk Dave Little, 27, vacationing on the Mediterranean island of Ibiza, Spain—and partying hard, apparently—was at press time still haggling with eBay, trying to get out of his “successful” auction bid (blamed on a fingering misadventure on his phone) of 28,500 British pounds (about $37,000) for a Scania Irizar Century bus. eBay, of course, warns that bids are legally binding. Little believes that his dad had earlier searched bus information on the phone and that alcohol then affected his own navigation between screens. The Passing Parade A water line in Hood County, Texas, broke in August, 5 feet below ground on Andrea Adams’s property, but Acton Municipal District worker Jimmie Cox, 23, came to the rescue—which involved Cox briefly submerging himself in the mud, face down to his waist, to clamp the line. He said later, “In this line of work, [we] do it a lot.” n On Sept. 9, a man (who said later he somehow could not stop his car) drove off of a nine-story downtown parking garage in Austin, Texas. The SUV hung upside down (caught only by the garage guide wire that wrapped around one wheel) until passersby pulled him to safety.

Thanks this week to Gerald Sacks and to the News of the Weird Board of Editorial Advisors.


TRANS FOR MANY, LIVING A LIFE TRUE TO THEMSELVES IS A DAILY STRUGGLE.

IN

UTAH

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SEPTEMBER 29, 2016 | 17

that while those traits have held strong, she also helps him through the “struggle in his head” that constitutes gender dysphoria—the distress an individual feels about the mismatch between their gender identity and their assigned sex. “It’s usually over his body image or how clothes fit him and how he sees himself in the mirror,” she says. Alex intervenes. “While I didn’t feel it was the death of one identity and the birth of another, I still had to figure out how to integrate both of them.” He feels that because he was a woman for 30 years, his adjustment was greater than the increasing number of transgender teens who come out and transition earlier in life. By the time he was 16, Grayson Moore’s consistent panic attacks interrupted his ability to do school-work. His mother, Neca Allgood, recalls taking her son to a neurologist, fearing he might

have seizures or a brain tumor. Yet his symptoms were actually caused by gender dysphoria. Once the mother and son figured out that Moore was transgender, the distressing symptoms backed away. Allgood says that while it is common for parents of transgender youth to feel that they have “lost” the child who transitioned, “Grayson was struggling so much before we figured out that he was transgender, that [his transition] was like ‘getting my bright, happy, creative child back.’” Now 22 and a linguistics major at the University of Utah, Grayson expresses gratitude for his early transition. “Quite frankly, it was a life-or-death difference for me. Seeing the trajectory that my mental health was on, I might not have survived. I could have harmed myself.” Now he is in a much more positive space. “Once gender dysphoria wasn’t eating so much of my brain space, I had room to just be me and live my life and grow. There was room for other things, like writing a novel, doing half marathons and playing the piano.” For years, Allgood had seen masculine behavior from her then-daughter. Frequently, in public, Grayson, then Grace, was mistaken for a boy. “He liked it and it made him sad when a family member corrected the person who did that,” Allgood says. Moore transitioned midway through his junior year of high school, after he had already taken college classes and was a National Merit semi-finalist. Allgood says that they monitored his information carefully, to let

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hen Alex Florence became his true self, the change meant navigating a new identity at his job at Hill Air Force Base. Before, while he was female, engineers came into his cubicle and talked to his cis male cubicle-mate first. Now the roles are reversed. “The engineers come and talk to me first, even if it’s about something I’m not actually working on,” Florence says. “I’m not used to that; there are certain things I still struggle with socially.” He’s still becoming accustomed to looking another man in the eye while shaking hands. Or talking about cars and sports. “Their humor and banter I don’t really understand,” he confides. “I kind of handle it every day while trying to fit into the male world. I live in an outsider’s perspective. Sometimes there is a conflict of where I will fit in socially.” He says that he loves being who he is—a happily married person whose body and mind finally match. Still, he says, “Trying to see both sides of things sometimes puts me into a weird gray area. Sometimes, I’m a little bit lonely.” Florence wanted to keep the traits he prized as a woman—being understanding, compassionate and caring. “Some trans men go so drastically on the male gender side that they become a little bit aggressive,” he says. “I didn’t want that for myself.” Florence’s wife, Christy, says he’s always been very tender, caring and respectful, “more than I ever experienced in my previous marriage.” She adds

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Alex Florence National Merit officials know that although they might receive materials under two different names, Grace and Grayson were actually one person. The term “transgender” was coined by Columbia University psychiatrist John F. Oliven in 1965. At its simplest, it’s a term used to describe people whose gender identity differs from the sex stated on their birth certificate. Gender identity is a person’s internal, personal sense of being a man or a woman (or someone outside of that gender binary). For transgender people, the sex they were assigned at birth and their own internal gender identity do not match. According to the GLA AD.org website, trying to change a person’s gender identity is no more successful than trying to change a person’s sexual orientation— it doesn’t work. So most transgender folk seek to bring their bodies more into alignment with their gender identity. The term also describes anyone who deviates from the social norms of their biological gender, such as people who alter their bodies with surgery, hormones or both. Many transgender individuals take prescription hormones to change their bodies. Some undergo surgical procedures as well. But not all transgender people can or will take those steps, and being transgender is not dependent upon medical procedures. People in the transgender community might describe themselves using one or more of a wide variety of terms, including (but not limited to): transgender, transsexual and genderqueer. Intersex people, those born with ambiguous genitalia, are usually considered separate from transgender. Cross-dressers are people of one gender who wear clothing of the opposite sex. Contrary to popular belief, they don’t necessarily desire to be the opposite gender. When Sophia Hawes-Tingey, director of Judiciary Committee at Women’s State Legislative Council of Utah, moved to Salt Lake City in 2010, she discovered more transgender support groups here than she’d found living elsewhere, such as in Kentucky or Texas. She also feels that last year’s passage of Senate Bill 296, a non-discrimination bill which states that employers and people in various capacities having to do with the management or sale of residential property cannot discriminate

While I didn’t feel it was the death of one identity and the birth of another, I still had to figure out how to integrate both of them.” —Alex Florence

on the basis of gender identity and sexual orientation, has made it easier for people to be out and transition at work and be themselves. She adds that former athlete and Kardashian spouse Caitlyn Jenner’s transition “opened up a curiosity” about being transgender. In its July 2016 issue, Sports Illustrated described Jenner as the most famous transgender person in history, calling her an example to the 700,000 other transgender people living in the United States today. As part of her journey, Hawes-Tingey says she initially tried to decide what makeup and clothes were appropriate to wear to work and to wear after hours. “I went to Ross, which was open and accepting, to start looking for things,” she says. “Some

clothes made me look like a grandma. I really didn’t like the overly feminine, girly things. I preferred clothes that were more elegant and form-fitting. I’m a business-casual kind of person.” In the years following her transition, she has had three makeover sessions, bought a book on makeup and learned about makeup at belly dance lessons. “It’s a learning process, and you have to do it all over again,” she says. She began seeing a counselor in 2007 and underwent hormonal therapy a year later. She was out full-time on the job in 2010, working at Fort Knox in Kentucky. “At work, when my name-change was processed, the system couldn’t accept a change of first name. It seemed to imply that I was the first person to transition on a military installation since they had created the Army.mil website information system.” In 2011, she had surgery. Today, she says, her body has changed to the point where “Even in male clothes, I can still pass as female.” Candice Metzler, executive director of Transgender Education Advocates (TEA) of Utah, says that the state’s transgender community is both growing and broadening. “The transgender world is incredibly diverse in all the different ways that people claim and experience their gender. We are starting to understand what that all looks like,” she says, adding, “It’s exciting to see the transgender community growing and people increasingly getting out there and taking their lives new places.” The TEA organization participates in educational workshops for churches, schools, public offices, private employers and anyone who wants to learn more about human gender variance. They advocate for people who are experiencing difficulties in government, public offices, employment, housing and other areas of discrimination. Historically, Metzler says, many people have experienced much distress around their experience of transition. “Now we are seeing more and more people successfully finding ways to live their lives. There is a larger diversity of voice as far as people having different experiences, with descriptions such as genderfluid and genderqueer.” While Metzler points out the transgender community


The transgender world is incredibly diverse in all the different ways that people claim and experience their gender.” —Candice Metzler

two later, during a time when TEA was offering outreach and education, that changed. Woodhouse says some youth groups have come and gone, and an influx of Mormon transgender people have formed groups. “It’s much larger than when I transitioned, but we still have a long way to go. A lot of transgender youth still don’t know where to go, and there is no common knowledge that there is help out there for them,” she says. Over a decade into her transition, Woodhouse says it still remains hard to date, not just because she lives in Utah, but also because she hasn’t gone through gender-reaffirming surgery yet. “It sabotages any opportunity I have,” she says. “I’m not going to let it get too intimate. What if [a potential partner and I] get serious? If I enjoy a kissing situation, I still have a little stubble, because I haven’t had all of my electrolysis yet, and I worry about things like that.” She says she used to meet people by going to dances or clubs. “I had a profile on a trans dating website and every single person who contacted me said, ‘I’ve always wanted a girl with a little something extra. To me that is perverse. I don’t want you to be interested in that

part of me that I can’t stand, because I want it gone.” When she has dated, “it has always ended after one date and not been very productive,” she says. “I would love to be done with my surgery; I would be much more confident in going out and meeting people.” The experience was different for Hawes-Tingey. She says her current wife “started chasing me when we were both appearing in The Vagina Monologues. I thought she was flirting with everybody, but it turned out she really just wanted me,” she recalls. “Other trans people wanted to date me, but we decided we were actually good for each other and needed to be there to help each other.” While dating remains difficult, Woodhouse has never had a problem using the women’s dressing room or locker room. “What bothers me is the clothes don’t fit me like they should. It’s a constant reminder that my body is not what it should be. Someday, it will be. I hope, before I die.” Woodhouse currently teaches junior high. She has also taught at Salt Lake Community College and appeared in films. She says that her college students never bring up the fact that she is transgender, but if a

Sara Jade Woodhouse

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Parkin and her girlfriend, Hailey Smith

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has grown, “the hard part in making a statement like that is that a lot of the people were already there, but we didn’t know about them because they weren’t out yet,” she says. Metzler says there are stories of people being uprooted and needing to reclaim their lives. “For some folks, that goes pretty well and they have a general acceptance from people who are close to them,” she says, and adds that fewer young people are losing the connection with family and friends. “That aspect of life has gotten better.” She also says the opportunity to talk to older people has proven to be invaluable. “We still hear stories about people being arrested back in the ’90s for wearing the wrong clothing for their appropriate gender, for their clothes not matching the gender on their driver’s license. If you were walking down the street, you could be thrown in jail,” she says. “We don’t hear those stories anymore.” When Sara Jade Woodhouse transitioned in 2005, she felt there really wasn’t much of a trans community in Salt Lake City. “There was a drag community, largely composed of gay men and lesbian women who did drag,” she recalls. A year or

Ashlyn Parkin

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I get up in the morning and convince myself that I look OK and I’ve done everything I can to be feminine and go out in the world, and all it takes is for one person to misgender me to ruin the whole day.” —Sara Jade Woodhouse junior-high student does, “We need to address it. So I do, and we move on. I say, ‘That’s not my name. You can’t call me mister. I won’t answer to you.’” She says that for every student that is rude, 10 are her champions. “I have a Facebook page and a blog that anyone can access,” she says. “I’ve acted in films that people can see. I’m not a very private person.” She hesitates to speak for all trans women, but says, “Quite a few of us go the extra mile to express even more femininity; we have to be überfeminine. Some people, when they transition, go through a second puberty and buy clothes that don’t fit their age. When I first transitioned, I dressed way too young, wearing very short skirts. After about a year, I probably dressed my age.” Ashlyn Parkin first encountered the word “transgender” when she was 12. “As I read the term, I became more and more afraid. Everything that was in that term I directly related with,” she says. “When I was in puberty, I would look in the mirror and pick out features that were masculine and realize that I didn’t identify with them.” When Parkin was younger, she cross-dressed, trying on her sister’s clothing. “I never really got a sexual pleasure from it. Instead, I would feel at peace inside,” she says. Shopping in women’s stores, “I felt petrified that a woman would come up and ask, ‘Why are you here’? I was nervous that something would happen. Eventually, I bought stuff online, although it was hard to guess my size at first.” Like Woodhouse, Parkin says that trans women often hold themselves to a high beauty standard. “You are constantly clocking yourself, thinking, ‘My chin is so square,’ or ‘Am I walking correctly?’” She says that makeup was liberating,

Candice Metzler and Lucas Fowler “because I could change and contour my face into something I could view as feminine right off the bat. I still love wearing makeup and probably still put on a little too much eyeliner.” From the day he decided to transition in 2015, TEA board chair, Lucas Fowler, never again wore female clothing. He planned to save his women’s clothes for a clothing swap but, instead, put them in front of his house at the time of the neighborhood curbside cleanup. People took them before the official cleanup started. He was especially glad to stop carrying a purse. “I hated the fact that women’s clothes don’t have pockets,” he says. While transitioning, he bought cargo pants. “Pants go with you everywhere—you don’t leave them behind like a purse.” Fowler says that some trans men initially seek to achieve a flat chest by using Ace bandages which can cut off circulation. He confesses to wearing a binder. Some transgender men or gender-nonconforming individuals use binders, compression undergarments that look like spandex-y T-shirts, to bind the breasts to the body, creating a flatter chest. Speaking on her former wardrobe, Hawes-Tingey held a ceremony proclaiming, “These are my male

clothes for my male self—we are done,” she says. “I needed a clean shift. I maybe made room for a coat or tennis shoes, but still, practically everything I own is women’s wardrobe.” When Fowler recently needed a hysterectomy to treat endometriosis, he visited his gynecologist. “I’m the only guy in the gynecologist’s office who has an appointment. The other guys are all there with their wives,” he says. When he handed his ID to someone behind the desk, he remembers her saying, “We don’t need his ID, we need his wife’s ID.” Then someone else behind the desk understood the situation and took over. “That set the tone for all the other interactions—from that moment on, everyone tried to get everything right. They always called me Lucas, and what could have been a stressful situation became calm and straightforward.” While Fowler’s experience in seeking his hysterectomy eventually proceeded smoothly, HawesTingey says that seeking gender confirmation surgery remains difficult without insurance providers covering it. She’s seen people use GoFundMe accounts to pay for operations. “You can use health savings accounts; Thailand has offered loans for people to go have surgery,” she says. “As a software engineer, I borrowed from my retirement and have yet to pay it back.” She continues, “Medicare is working to provide coverage for people in this next round. I would like to work on legislation stating that insurance companies aren’t the final arbiter on what is medically necessary.” Fowler comments that some companies, such as Point5CC.com, a trans clothing company, offer scholarships for those seeking surgery, but all such stipends that he is aware of


We don’t ask the condition of other people’s genitals. Would you want someone to ask about yours?” —Neca Allgood

er places and make risky health decisions.” Many transgender individuals do not go through it for various reasons. Some cannot afford it and others don’t want to undergo procedures. Allgood and others interviewed for this story explain that asking whether someone has had surgery is akin to asking about a person’s private parts. Allgood says, “We don’t ask the condition of other people’s genitals. Would you want someone to ask about yours?” Fowler’s two children have been “raised around queer issues. They knew that my community is the queer community, and they have met transgender people and gone to the Pride parade.” Possibly because of this, his decision to transition didn’t affect them greatly. Today, they call him either Lucas or Mom. “At times—such as to a student from another school at my son’s debate tournament, they’ve introduced me as their Dad.” They switch back and forth on pronouns. “My older son might say, ‘I think Mom wants his phone back.’” Woodhouse says that people typically view her as a woman—except when she speaks. “My exterior is fine, but when I open my mouth, that’s when

they peg me. I was at Lowe’s the other day, looking for a specific type of lumber. The salesperson got on the phone and said, ‘He is looking for’ and ‘I will send him down,’ and I said ‘Her.’ It happened a number of times and she never acknowledged that I was correcting her.” She explains that all it takes is one instance like that to ruin her day. “I get up in the morning and convince myself that I look OK and I’ve done everything I can to be feminine and go out in the world, and all it takes is for one person to misgender me to ruin the whole day. You’d think that if someone shows up in front of your counter with long flat-ironed hair, a bra and obvious boobs, you wouldn’t call that person ‘him.’” Despite the challenges, the people interviewed for this article feel that their efforts have been worth it. “Some people say that changing one’s sex is very evil, but for me it was becoming at peace with myself and allowing me not to focus so much on myself anymore,” Parkin says. “It’s amazing that when you figure out your gender identity, which is an essential part of every human’s psyche, when you align that with your mind, you are finally able to be at peace.” CW

Sophia Hawes-Tingey

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Moore and his mother, Neca Allgood

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offer smaller amounts than the actual cost of the surgery. He adds that in places like the U.K., the health system covers the cost of procedures. “We’re talking about a lot of money out of pocket in a group that is discriminated against. Some of the surgeries are almost $100,000,” he says. “I’ve seen people use their artwork in trade or to sell at fundraisers.” Utah artist Noah Cherry is selling prints of his work to earn money for surgery. On August 18, Tabs Maclane Grantham hosted a fundraiser for his “top surgery,” “to help me reach my goal to have a boobectomy (removing these hellacious chesticles.)” His Facebook announcement stated that all money collected from admission, raffles and silent auctions would go to surgery savings, with the official goal of raising $7,500 to cover the procedure and living expenses during recovery. He says, “Any excess proceeds will be donated to the next guy waiting for top surgery.” The date was also his birthday, and he invited people to celebrate as well as becoming part of his transition. Fowler adds that in addition to these options, sometimes people who can’t afford it “will go oth-

Grayson Moore

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Andrew Alba: Rainbow Variance

The paintings of Andrew Alba occupy a space where race, ethnic identity, gender, sexual orientation and even immigrant status all intersect. These portraits share the theme of coping with various levels of exclusion from larger communities. They tell the stories of the manifold realities of life for Latinx (a gender-neutral term replacing Latino/Latina) individuals. Alba’s artistic style renders his subjects somewhat abstracted, yet expressive through vibrant color, gesture and facial expression. Some details are absent, which makes it appear as though the struggle for identity occurs on the very basic level of physical existence. It’s representative of the ways minorities are often viewed by white Americans—through the lens of stereotypes, instead of as complete, complex human beings. This artist’s work shows that identity is an intricate synthesis of many different elements, and you can’t reduce people to their surface characteristics. At the same time, this series acknowledges that we often must rely on initial perceptions—which can be manipulated to some degree. We can also play with language, whether it’s place names, given names or even on logos of sports teams; they all convey various clues about who we are, sometimes deceptively. The act of looking is also the act of reading and deciphering cultural symbols. It’s all very much a sign of the times. (Brian Staker) Andrew Alba: Rainbow Variance @ Mestizo Institute of Culture & Arts, 631 W. North Temple, Ste. 700, 801-361-5662, through Oct. 14. Facebook.com/MestizoArts

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Plenty of pop songwriters—from Rupert Holmes to Elton John—have attempted the transition from Top 40 to Broadway. And while results have been mixed, don’t be dissuaded by the notion that The Last Ship features songs written by Sting. This man knows how to write a musical. The story, too, comes from his experience, though John Logan and Brian Yorkey wrote the book based on Sting’s childhood in the English shipbuilding town of Wallsend. As the local economy collapses with the loss of shipyard jobs, town priest Father O’Brien (John Jellison) encourages the workers to occupy the shipyard and create one final vessel to salvage their collective pride. And this mission coincides with the return to town of prodigal son Gideon (Bryant Martin), who 15 years earlier left behind life in Wallsend, as well as Meg (Ruthie Stephens), the girl he once loved. The script tries to fashion a romantic triangle also involving Meg’s patient boyfriend Arthur (Paul Castree), but that subplot never finds a real emotional hook. It’s a much stronger story when focused on Father O’Brien’s radical ministry, and the rising and falling of the town’s collective spirits. But the real pleasant surprise is the terrific collection of songs, which recycles a couple of 1990s Sting solo hits, yet mostly shows an understanding of how those songs should function as both earworms and parts of the narrative. When the rousing production number “We Got Now’t Else” echoes through the theater, it’s impossible to keep the smile off your face that comes from a composer who’s doing his job well. (Scott Renshaw) The Last Ship @ Pioneer Theatre Co., 300 S. 1400 East, 801-581-6961, through Oct. 1, Thursday, 7 p.m.; Friday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m., $40-$62. PioneerTheatre.org

Exploiting feminine fantasies as played out in clubs across the country, Magic Mike and its sequel brought hot-looking guys in skimpy shorts to big screens everywhere. Consequently, pelvic-thrusting, hip-shaking male strippers have become mainstream entertainment. Granted, guys have been busting their buns on and off the stage for decades now, but Magic Men Live takes the action to a new level of, ummm, arousal and enticement. Still, it’s apparently not enough to feature dancing dudes prancing around in outfits likely inspired by the same costume designs the Village People employed back in the day. Not when you’re competing with Fifty Shades of Grey and the other hints of soft-core porn readily available 24/7. So it’s wise that the Magic Men opted to turn up the heat by adding scripted stories, special effects and mega set designs to enhance the fantasy. It’s not Shakespeare, but the experience ought to be engaging enough to titillate an audience that’s already fairly frenzied, and then escalate that enthusiasm to near hysteria. Then again, there might be some attendees who claim they’re not enticed by striptease, and would rather experience the deeper drama that unfolds onstage. OK, that’s a joke. We know that the real attention-getters here are the abs, not the acting. As far as any real magic’s concerned, suffice it to say there’s nothing up their sleeves, because sleeves are fairly negligible. All that’s hidden are whatever’s sequestered inside those skivvies … and, be assured, only just barely. (Lee Zimmerman) Magic Men Live @ The Complex, 536 W. 100 South, Oct. 1, 8 p.m., $26-$124. TheComplexSLC.com

The month of spooky corn mazes, haunted houses and horror movies is upon us, and kicking it all off is the Utah Paranormal Festival. One of the first supernatural-themed events in Utah this October, this festival has everything for the true believer and questioning skeptic alike. Approximately 40 booths sell items from gemstones to handmade soap; panels address psychics and UFO sightings; guest speakers discuss topics including paganism and hauntings. Hosted by local paranormal investigation team Badass Spirit Outlaws, it’s a family-friendly affair, and children 12 and under get in free. Eva Lietz, cofounder of the group, says the festival’s broad array of topics and panel experts offer a chance for people to become familiar with the paranormal world. “There are so many people out there who are interested in the paranormal, or have activity in their homes or business that don’t know where to turn,” she says. “We hope to bring more awareness about the paranormal and spirit world … not only to educate, but to also let them see that there really is nothing to fear about the paranormal.” After the event closes, visitors can listen for the laughing and whispering of children in an after-hours ghost hunt at the Off Broadway Theatre (272 S. Main, midnight-4 a.m.). Proceeds from this separately ticketed event ($40 per person/$65 for two) fund the festival, and tickets are available via the “Off Broadway Theatre Investigation for 2016 Utah Paranormal Festival” Facebook page. (Kylee Ehmann) Utah Paranormal Festival @ Karen Gail Miller Conference Center, 9750 S. 300 West, Ste. 150E, Sandy, 801-502-7444, noon-9 p.m., $10/$15 at door, UtahParanormalFest. WixSite.com/UtahParanormalFest

Pioneer Theatre Co.: The Last Ship

Magic Men Live

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ver the course of a single week this September, a new dance was born. Eight Repertory Dance Theatre company members and one Israeli choreographer, Danielle Agami, came together for many hours—crammed into a few long days—to create, cut, edit and design costumes, set and lighting, all for one original piece. Titled “Theatre,” this roughly 20-minute piece is now ready for its world premiere this week, as one of three works in Élan, RDT’s 2016-17 season opening performance. It takes a daring act of confidence to create from nothing a complete work in such a short time-frame, and then place it before an audience where it will be interpreted and judged. But if anyone can stand up to that kind of creative gauntlet, it is dancer and choreographer Agami, who, at the age of 4, pointed to a dancer on television and told her parents, “I want to do that.” Her first dip into the dance world began, as it does for so many, in ballet class. In high school, she enrolled in the Jerusalem Academy of Music and Dance, but never expected it to become a career. “I was supposed to be doctor,” says Agami, who at the end of high school had fulfilled all the requirements to enter a medical program. “High school was done, my last school performance was over, and that felt painful,” she says. “I was addicted [to dance], and I still am.” So she attended an audition in Tel Aviv and, in 2002, at age 17, was invited to join the Batsheva Ensemble and later the Batsheva Dance Co. She also served as the company’s rehearsal director. In 2010, she left Batsheva and Israel and moved to Los Angeles, where she started her own company, Ate9. In terms of movement style, however, Agami never outgrew her Batsheva roots. Even six years later, her time under the tutelage of Batsheva artistic director Ohad Naharin is still distinctly present in her style, developed from years immersed in the daily practice of Gaga—a movement language innovated by Naharin and used almost exclusively as the movement training for Batsheva dancers. It is a language deeply seated into Agami’s bones. Gaga classes are a period of constant motion, during which the teacher guides students with verbal commands intended to reacquaint a mover with their body. Directions are open to interpretation: Imagine walking through honey; swim with your bones inside your skin. Given the chance to experiment physically with such sensual images, Gaga practitioners

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move with ecstatic energy, or as if in a trance, as though they were about to speak in tongues. In addition to its physical technique, it has a mystical philosophy. Gaga, Naharin describes in an interview with British organization Dance Consortium, is “about listening to something which is beyond the athletic side, about the soul, connecting to your demons, fantasy, passion: Learning to do more with less. Being able to grow old and still create magnificent moments. ... It is a lot to do with small gestures and delicacy but still being able to punch. It’s about thinking of movement as something which can heal.” Molded from this creative philosophy, it’s no surprise that Agami’s choreography earned a review earlier this year from an L.A. critic calling her work “not readily accessible.” But that’s not always a bad thing. Inaccessible can also be interesting. “One needs to crawl inside,” the reviewer continued, “think about, digest and revisit her work. It is intelligent and intense.” At the end of the first day of rehearsal for “Theatre,” the intensity of Agami’s choreography is already both visible and tangible. As she—in black Adidas athletic pants and a green pullover hoodie cut off at the waist—watches from the front of the room, dancers twitch and arch their way across the floor, looking alternately like animals, machines and people gone mad. Some sections bring the dancers so close

Danielle Agami

together, in such a frenzy of movement, that bodily harm seems possible. Yet Agami continues to push them. “You’re too slow, guys,” she says as they wipe sweat from their eyes. It’s tricky, she admits when we sit down together after the rehearsal, to be with a company for such a short amount of time and to try and make something compelling. “[The dancers] are working on tasting a new way of moving,” she says, “and they’re also creating a composition.” It is a nearly impossible task, but together they are doing it. Having a deadline helps, according to Agami. “Nothing ever feels like it’s done, but my art is done when the curtain closes,” she says. “We will have that moment and it will be gone. Hopefully it will be a pleasure and a joyful achievement.” CW

ÉLAN

Repertory Dance Theatre Rose Wagner Performing Arts Center 138 W. 300 South 801-355-2787 Sept. 29- Oct. 1, 7:30 p.m. $15-$35 ArtSaltLake.ArtTix.org


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Andy Nasisse explores the state’s arid environment in a series of photographs and sculptures (“Twin Towers” is pictured) in Badlands at the Southern Utah Museum of Art, 13 S. 300 West, Cedar City, through Oct. 31.

PERFORMANCE THEATER

Bull Shark Attack Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, 801-363-7522, through Oct. 16, Tuesday-Sunday, varying times, SaltLakeActingCompany.org Burn Sackerson Theater Co., Avenues Yoga, 64 E. K St., Sept. 30-Oct. 1, 8 p.m., Sackerson.org Disney’s Beauty and the Beast Hale Center Theatre, 3333 S. Decker Lake Drive, West Valley City, 801-984-9000, through Oct. 1, MondayFriday, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday, 12:30 p.m., 4 p.m. & 7:30 p.m., HCT.org Drack-Man vs. Superiorman Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, 801-355-4628, through Oct. 31, Friday-Saturday & Monday, TheOBT.org Ghostblasters Desert Star Theatre, 4681 S. State, Murray, 801-266-2600, through Nov. 5, varying days and times, DesertStar.biz Hunchback of Notre Dame Tuacahn Amphitheater, 1100 Tuacahn Drive, Ivins, 800-746-9882, through Oct. 15, varying days and times, Tuacahn.org The King’s Men Sting & Honey, Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801-355-2787, Sept. 30-Oct. 15, 7:30 p.m., ArtSaltLake.ArtTix.org The Last Ship Pioneer Theatre Co., 300 S. 1400 East, 801-581-6961, through Oct. 1, MondayThursday, 7 p.m.; Friday, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday, 2 p.m. & 7:30 p.m., PioneerTheatre.org (see p. 22) Nunsense The Ziegfeld Theater, 3934 S. Washington Blvd., Ogden, 855-944-2787, through Oct. 1, Friday & Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday matinee, 2 p.m., TheZiegfeldTheater.com Tarzan Tuacahn Amphitheatre, 1100 Tuacahn Drive, Ivins, 800-746-9882, through Oct. 12, Monday-Saturday, 8:45 p.m., Tuacahn.org Utah Shakespeare Festival Randall L. Jones Theatre, 351 W. Center St., Cedar City, 435-5867878, through Oct. 22, varying days and times, Bard.org

DANCE

Élan: Repertory Dance Theatre Rose Wagner Performing Arts Center, 138 W. 300 South, Salt Lake City, 801-534-1000, Sept. 29-Oct. 1, 7:30 p.m., RDTUtah.org (see p. 24)

Thriller: Odyssey Dance Theatre Egyptian Theatre, 328 Main, Park City, 435-649-9371, through Oct. 9, Thursday, Friday & Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Sunday, 6 p.m., EgyptianTheatreCompany.org Magic Men Live The Complex, 536 W. 100 South, Salt Lake City, Oct. 1, 8 p.m., $26-$124, TheComplexSLC.com (see p. 22)

CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

Salty Cricket: If It Ain’t Baroque Urban Arts Gallery, 137 S. Rio Grande St., Salt Lake City, Sept. 29, 7:30 p.m., SaltyCricket.org

COMEDY & IMPROV

Andy Gold Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., 801-622-5588, Sept.30-Oct. 1, 8 p.m., WiseguysComedy.com Improv Broadway Brigham Larson Pianos, 1497 S. State, Orem, 909-260-2509, Saturdays, 8 p.m., ImprovBroadway.com Improv Comedy Ziegfeld Theater, 3934 Washington Blvd., Ogden, 435-327-8273, every Saturday, 9:30 p.m., OgdenComedyLoft.com John Hilder Sandy Station (Vegas Room), 8925 Harrison St., Sandy, 801-255-2078, Sept. 30, 8:30 p.m., SandyStation.com Josh Blue Wiseguys SLC 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, Sept. 30, 7 p.m. & 9:30 p.m., WiseguysComedy.com Laughing Stock Improv The Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, Salt Lake City, 801-355-4628, Fridays & Saturdays, 10 p.m., LaughingStock.us Marcus & Guy Seidel Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, Oct. 1, 7 p.m. & 9:30 p.m., WiseguysComedy.com Open Mic Night Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Salt Lake City, 801-532-5233, every Wednesday, 7:30 p.m., WiseguysComedy.com Off the Wall Comedy Improv Draper Historic Theatre, 12366 S. 900 East, Draper, 801-572-4144, Saturdays, 10:30 p.m., DraperTheatre.org Sasquatch Cowboy The Comedy Loft, 3934 Washington Blvd., Ogden, Saturdays, 9:30 p.m., OgdenComedyLoft.com Shayne Smith Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, Sept. 29, 7:30 p.m., WiseguysComedy.com


moreESSENTIALS

LITERATURE AUTHOR APPEARANCES

Dan Flores: Coyote America: A Natural and Supernatural History The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, Sept. 29, 7 p.m., KingsEnglish.com Rebecca Campbell: The Potato Eaters Ken Sanders Rare Books, 268 S. 200 East, 801-5213819, Sept. 29, 7 p.m., KenSandersRareBooks.com Hank Shaw: Buck, Buck, Moose The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-4849100, Oct. 1, 2 p.m., KingsEnglish.com Jake Parker: Little Bot and Sparrow The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801484-9100, Oct. 1, 11 a.m., KingsEnglish.com Candice Millard: Hero of the Empire: The Boer War, a Daring Escape, and the Making of Winston Churchill The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, Oct. 3, 7 p.m., KingsEnglish.com Doug Rice: Here Lies Memory and Marc Anthony Richardson: The Year of the Rat Weller Book Works, 607 Trolley Square, 801-3282586, Oct. 3, 7 p.m., WellerBookWorks.com Jennifer Jenkins: Clanless The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, Oct. 4, 7 p.m., KingsEnglish.com Literary Death Match The State Room, 638 S. State, Oct. 4, 8:30 p.m., LiteraryDeathMatch.com

FARMERS MARKETS

FESTIVALS & FAIRS

VISUAL ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

ALL THE NEWS THAT WON’T FIT IN PRINT

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Andrew Alba: Rainbow Variance Mestizo Institute of Culture & Arts, 631 W. North Temple, Ste. 700, through Oct. 14, Facebook.com/ MestizoArts (see p. 22) Andrew Rice: (Re)structured Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-3284201, through Oct. 8, UtahMOCA.org Andy Nasisse: Badlands Southern Utah Museum of Art, 13 S. 300 West, Cedar City, through Oct. 31, SUU.edu/PVA/SUMA (see p. 26) Anne Penrod: Water Ways SLC AndersonFoothill Library, 1135 S. 2100 East, 801-594-8611, through Oct. 6, SLCPL.org Art2Go and Stephanie Hock Art Access Gallery, 230 S. 500 West, 801-328-0703, through Oct. 14, AccessArt.org Ben Kilbourne: Unresting Event SLC Marmalade Library, 280 W. 500 North, 801-5948680, through Oct. 28, SLCPL.org Benny van der Wal Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, 801-530-0547, Sept. 30-Nov. 19, SaltLakeArts.org Berna Reale: Singing in the Rain Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801328-4201, through Nov. 5, UtahMOCA.org Cara Krebs: Sehnsucht Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-3284201, through Oct. 14, UtahMOCA.org Desarae Lee: Expressions in Ink Salt Lake City Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through Oct. 9, SLCPL.lib.ut.us DesignArts ‘16 Rio Gallery, 300 S. Rio Grande St., through Oct. 21, Monday-Friday, ArtsandMuseums.Utah.gov Dick Jemison: Limelight Modern West Fine Art, 177 E. 200 South, 801-355-3383, through Oct. 12, ModernWestFineArt.com Discover Zaqistan: The Art of Adventure CUAC, 175 E. 200 South, 385-215-6768, through Oct. 14, CUArtCenter.org Fahimeh Amiri & students: Children’s Expression through Painting Salt Lake City Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through Oct. 13, SLCPL.org Iterations: Sue Martin and Nancy Vorm Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, through Nov. 11, Monday-Friday, VisualArts.Utah.gov J. Calhoun: High Places Make Me High Corinne and Jack Sweet Library, 455 F St., 801594-8651, through Oct. 22, SLCPL.lib.ut.us Object[ed]: Shaping Sculpture in Contemporary Art Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-3284201, through Dec. 17, UtahMOCA.org Stephanie Hock: Savor the Small Art Access Gallery, 230 S. 500 West, Ste. 125, through Oct. 7, AccessArt.org Sue Martin and Nancy Vorm: Iterations Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, through Nov. 11, Monday-Friday, VisualArts.Utah.gov Terence K. Stephens: Greater Salt Lake SLC Sprague Library, 2131 S. 1100 East, 801-5948640, through Nov. 5, SLCPL.org Zion Art Exhibition Anthony’s Fine Art, 401 E. 200 South, 801-369-8894, through Oct. 15, ZionArtSociety.org

Dark Arts Festival Area 51, 451 S. 400 West, Salt Lake City, through Oct. 2, 7 p.m.-midnight, Facebook.com/groups/DarkArtsFestivalofUtah DogFest Walk ‘N Roll Legacy Events Center, 151 S. 1100 West, Farmington, Oct. 1, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. CCI.org/DogFestWasatch Moab Pride Festival 241 W. Center St., Moab, Sept. 29-Oct. 1, see website for individual event schedule and pricing, MoabPride.org Snowbasin Beer Fest Snowbasin Resort, 3925 E. Snowbasin Road, Huntsville, 888-437-5488, Oct. 1, noon-6 p.m.; Oct. 2, noon-5 p.m.; Snowbasin.com Utah Humanities Book Festival Utah Humanities, 202 W. 300 North, Salt Lake City, 801-359-9670, through Oct. 29, times and locations vary, UtahHumanities.org Utah Paranormal Festival Karen Gail Miller Conference Center, 9750 S. 300 West, Ste. 150E, Sandy, Oct. 1, noon-9 p.m., UtahParanormalFest.wix.com (see p. 22)

ARTLandish: Spiral Jetty community meet-up Great Salt Lake, 801-581-7332, Oct. 1, 1-4 p.m., UMFA.Utah.edu/ARTLandish

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

9th West Farmers Market International Peace Gardens, 1000 S. 900 West, Salt Lake City, Sundays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., through Oct. 31, 9thWestFarmersMarket.org Harvest Market Gallivan Center, 239 S. Main, Tuesdays, 4-8:30 p.m., through Oct. 18, SLCFarmersMarket.org Park City Farmers Market The Canyons Resort, 1951 Canyons Resort Drive, Park City, Wednesdays, noon-6 p.m., through Oct. 26, ParkCityFarmersMarket.com Sugar House Farmers Market Fairmont Park, 1040 E. Sugarmont Ave., Salt Lake City, through Oct. 26, Wednesdays, 5-8 p.m., SugarHouseFarmersMarket.org Downtown Farmers Market Pioneer Park, 300 S. 300 West, Salt Lake City, through Oct. 22, Saturdays, 8 a.m.-2 p.m., SLCFarmersMarket.org

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Showtime!

Encore Bistro opens at the new Eccles Theater. BY TED SCHEFFLER comments@cityweekly.net @critic1

I

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DINE PHIL BLANC

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n case you haven’t heard, there’s a snazzy new performing arts venue in town: the George S. and Dolores Doré Eccles Theater. If you’ve been to other venues and arts events in the state, you’ve probably heard those names before. I was recently given a preview of the venue, and to say I was gobsmacked would be an understatement. It’s astonishing in its beauty, functionality, design, architecture and cutting-edge technology, such as the baffling sound system, über-modern lighting and sightlines. I’ll get back to the theater in a bit. But the reason I was there in the first place was to check out its all-new Encore Bistro dining spot. Following a national search, Salt Lake City’s own Cuisine Unlimited Catering & Special Events (CuisineUnlimited.com) was selected to be the exclusive providers for all food and beverage services at the new venue. That runs the gamut from providing concessions and catering for every event, group meeting and social gathering in the multiple venues within the theaters, to operation and management of the bistro. “You can imagine how thrilled we were to learn that we’d been chosen to provide food and beverage for the Eccles Theater,” Cuisine Unlimited’s Vicki Dunnington says as she shows me around the venue. Dunnington is the executive director of their operations at the Eccles—a big job, to say the least. It’s no small thing to provide food and drink to guests of the 2,500-seat Delta Performance Hall, which is just one of many performance and party spaces within the building. It also boasts a six-story grand lobby open to the public, an outdoor plaza and a galleria. The three separate stateof-the-art kitchens would be the envy of most restaurant chefs I know. Private event spaces are licensed to serve beer, wine and alcohol. But alas, the public places—such as the aforementioned hall—will be limited to concessions including 3.2-percent beer, with no wine or cocktails. Not very classy for such a classy place. Folks will be able to purchase cocktails, beer and wine at the bistro, however. That’s the good news. The bad news is that it must be consumed there; no sneaking your vino into the venues. Maybe you have no plans to attend an event at the Eccles Theater, per se. That doesn’t mean you can’t still enjoy a meal, snack or libation at Encore, because it’s one of the “public” spaces in the building, and it’s open to all for breakfast and lunch, plus dinners on performance evenings.

Having tasted an array of foods prepared by Executive Chef Stacey Rosati, I predict that the bistro is going to attract a lot of downtown customers, and not just theatergoers. Her food is fresh, clean and creative, and I especially think that this is going to be a hot spot at lunchtime. But if you’re downtown in the morning and looking for a fast, economical and delicious breakfast, I highly recommend dropping by, as they serve breakfast from 7-11 a.m. I love Rosati’s unique take on the now-ubiquitous chicken and waffles. At the core of her waffle sandwich ($6) is scrumptious housemade chicken sausage, soft and airy scrambled eggs and Utah cheddar cheese, all encased in a maple-flavored waffle. Not interested in meat for breakfast? Rosati has you covered with her vegetarian breakfast wrap ($5) featuring roasted red peppers, green chiles, hash browns, caramelized onions, eggs and cheese in a spinach wrap. Daily quiche ($5), fresh fruit ($4) and Greek yogurt parfaits ($4.25) are served all day. Lunchtime offerings lean heavily toward salads, sandwiches and wraps. There’s an excellent “Power Salad” with kale, watercress, arugula and roasted beets tossed with grapefruit, blueberries, goat cheese, pistachios and balsamic vinaigrette ($11.50). I thought the most interesting salad, however, was the “Covent Garden” ($7): fresh mixed greens, radish, roasted baby carrots and cucumber sprinkled with spicy seed brittle and maple-raspberry vinaigrette. Guests can add grilled chicken to a salad for $4, or grilled salmon for $6. Encore has an eclectic array of sandwiches, sliders, paninis and wraps during lunch service. They range from a delightful Thai chicken wrap ($10) and slow-braised

Encore Bistro Executive Chef Stacey Rosati beef rib “Stage Left Sliders” ($10.50), to the “Understudy Panini” ($9.25) with houseroasted turkey, fontina cheese and cranberry relish on pumpernickel. I really enjoyed the “Grown-Up Grilled Cheese” ($9) with gooey boursin, Muenster and fontina cheeses plus bacon and tomato on toasted country-style white bread. Vegetable lovers will appreciate the “Diva Panini” ($9.50) with roasted red pepper, caramelized onions, portobello mushroom, spinach, grilled zucchini, havarti cheese and pesto on a ciabatta bun. Sandwiches, sliders, wraps and paninis all come with a choice of fresh greens or chips. Lunch is served from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. During performance evenings at the theater, dinner will be served with a menu that Dunningham said will be “cleverly tuned” to the theme of each performance. I’m not sure exactly what that means, but it will be interesting to find out. Will there be dark, sardonic food for the Morrissey concert? Funeral potatoes for The Book of Mormon? I did get a peek at the menu for Beautiful: The Carole King Musical, and it includes salmon and corn chowder, a winter roasted butternut squash salad, “kitchen clam bake,” and carrot cake with cream cheese frosting. What those dishes have to do with Carol King, I couldn’t tell you. But I bet they’ll make your taste buds do a standing O. CW

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FOOD MATTERS BY TED SCHEFFLER @critic1

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Over the past 15 years or so, one of the most talented and creative chefs on Utah’s food scene, in my opinion, was John Murcko. Michigan-born Murcko began working in Bill White Restaurant Group kitchens such as Grappa, Chimayo, Ghidotti’s and Wahso after his car broke down and he became stranded in Park City. Eventually, he would take over the kitchens at Talisker’s Tuhaye Table Café and then Talisker on Main, before winding up in charge of the formidable Canyons Resort restaurant The Farm. Losing Murcko’s talents to Idaho’s Sun Valley Resort a few years ago bummed me out. But I’m thrilled to be able to announce his return to Utah. He’s back, and he’s opening a new Park City restaurant called Firewood. It’ll be in the former Cisero’s location on Main Street, where he and his team are currently gutting the place. Firewood is slated to open in December and will feature—you guessed it—openflame cooking. Murcko is installing a crazy badass Grillworks Inc. oven in the kitchen; they run about $25,000. Openflame cooking has long been a passion of his. Welcome back, Murcko!

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NIGHTLIFE Best all-ages venue ————————————— Best craft cocktails ————————————— Best dance club ————————————— Best dive bar ————————————— Best drinks on a dime ————————————— Best gentleman’s club ————————————— Best girl’s night out ————————————— Best karaoke ————————————— Best lgbtq club —————————————

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1) Keep it local. Yes, we’re aware McDonald’s fries are awesome. 2) Ballots can be filled out online at CityWeekly.net/BestofUtah or hand-delivered by Monday, Oct. 17 to 248 S. Main St., Salt Lake City, 84101. 3) Only one ballot per person; don’t be sneaky. 4) You too can be a winner. Name, phone number and email address must be included in your ballot for validation and prize eligibility. 5) You must vote in at least ten categories for your ballot to be counted.


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Utah Wine Economics 101

Why we pay more for wine than Californians do. BY TED SCHEFFLER comments@cityweekly.net @critic1

M

ost metropolises in America are crawling with wine bars. I’m not just talking about places like New York City and San Francisco, but also Denver, Phoenix, Seattle, Portland, Dallas and others. Salt Lake City? Not so much. There are good reasons for the lack of wine bars in the Beehive. The most salient one is economics. It’s difficult to make a profit selling wine in Utah— be it in a wine bar or a restaurant—when the wines first have to be purchased from the state at retail prices. Unlike many other states, business owners and retail customers here cannot purchase wine at wholesale prices, nor receive bulk discounts they normally would in other states. Thus, restaurateurs and owners of wine bars are at a disadvantage. To make a profit, they must mark up their wine from a retail benchmark—which

34 | SEPTEMBER 29, 2016 | CITY WEEKLY |

DRINK

tends to make the prices look exorbitant. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve heard someone say of a bottle on a restaurant wine list: “$35? That wine sells for $12 at the wine store!” I’ve said the same thing myself. But in order to cover expenses and make a small profit, wines are typically marked up by about 200 percent, meaning that a $12 bottle will appear on a menu priced at $36. Highway robbery? Not really. Think about the utilities it takes to keep that wine at the correct temperature, and the storage facilities. Wine has around a 10 percent spoilage rate, meaning that the restaurateur has to “eat” the costs for bad wines. Storage isn’t cheap, especially temperature-controlled storage. And what about the staff that needs to be trained, and paid accordingly, in the ways of wine? There are dirty glasses to be bussed, washed, replaced when broken and so on. Corkage in restaurants here is a volatile subject. Personally, I’m somewhat of two minds about it. On one hand, I think it’s outrageous to charge a $35 per bottle corkage fee, as at least one SLC restaurant does. Who do they think they are? On the other hand, I understand the logic. The particular restaurant in question—OK, let’s not be coy; it’s Veneto— has a wine list composed mostly of wines that the owners went through the hassle to special order via the UDABC, and that’s a descent into a special circle of Dante’s hell. These wines can’t be returned if nobody buys them. They were selected specifically to complement the cuisine of the restaurant, so why should the owners just shrug when someone

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BEER, WINE & SPIRITS

brings in their favorite bottle of white zinfandel? The bottom line is that no one is forced to eat or purchase wine in any restaurant I know of. So, if some restaurateur chooses to impose a $35 corkage fee on customers who bring their own bottle, that’s their prerogative—and risk. The other side of my two-faced wine guy says, “Why have a corkage fee at all?” The reasoning goes: Encourage folks who love wine to come to the restaurant to make money on the food and put more butts in the seats than the guy across the street with high corkage fees. Certain restaurants, such as The Paris Bistro, have corkage-free evenings. Others, like New Yorker, impose no corkage fee at all—ever. So the economics of wines sales in restaurants and bars here is unique. This ain’t sunny California. But to quote a wine broker friend of mine: “Don’t be a douche.” If you’re going to bring your own wine into a restaurant, make it a good one, and share some with the staff. You’re not going to score any points with the sommelier with your BYOB Yellow Tail. CW

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2014

20 W. 200 S. • (801) 355-3891

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326 S. West Temple • Open 11-2am, M-F 10-2am Sat & Sun graciesslc.com • 801-819-7565

Open Mon-Wed: 9am-6pm Thu-Sat: 9am-9pm

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JOHN TAYLOR

REVIEW BITES A sampler of Ted Scheffler’s reviews

Bohemian Brewery’s pierogies

Award Winning Vietnamese Cuisine

Bohemian Brewery & Grill

6001 S. State St. Murray | 801-263-8889 cafetrangonline.com

*Gluten-free menu options available

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Much of the interior still has the rustic log décor and cozy, warm ambiance of Angelo Degenhardt’s original Hunters Lodge, but there have been updates, too, like the modern patio and wood-fired pizza oven. The restaurant is first and foremost about beer (particularly lagers); you’ll come for the brews and stay for the food. Their signature beer—the “Old School” 1842 Czech Style Pilsener—is the perfect partner for the Eastern European-style pierogies and bratwurst plate, topped with caramelized onions and bacon bits, with a dollop of dill sour cream on the side. Bohemian specializes in Old World continental fare like chicken or pork schnitzel, goulash and heavenly beef stroganoff. However, the one dish I simply can’t resist is their schweinshaxe—a beautiful Berkshire pork shank, slow-braised until the meat comes off the bone just by looking at it, topped with a dark, rich onion pan sauce and served with red cabbage and a choice of mashed potatoes or spätzle. When dessert beckons, you’ll be faced with a decision between German chocolate cake, rum-raisin bread pudding, Moravian apple strudel and more. I’d suggest heading straight for the Czech fruit dumplings with vanilla crème sauce. Reviewed Aug. 25. 94 E. Fort Union Blvd., Midvale, 801-566-5474, BohemianBrewery.com

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SEPTEMBER 29, 2016 | 35


GOODEATS

Eat Right, Live Right, Fresh & Healthy!

Complete listings at CityWeekly.net

In The Heart Of Sugar House

V

VG

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catering • delivery• dine-in 2121 s. McClelland Street (850 east) 801.467.2130 I couscousgrillexpress.com

OPEN MIC EVERY WEDNESDAY 6:30 TO 9:00PM

COMEDY OPEN MIC EVERY OTHER FRIDAY 7:45 TO 9:00PM MON-SAT 7AM TO 9PM SUNDAY 9:30AM TO 4PM

1560 E 3300 S • 801.410.4696 DITTACAFFE.COM

New Golden Dragon

Tradition... Tradition

Owned and operated by the renowned chef Xiao, New Golden Dragon—specializing in dim sum and Asian cuisine—has raised the bar for Chinese food in Utah. This restaurant’s kung pao shrimp is some of the best in Salt Lake City, and the black pepper pork chop and chicken lo mein are out of this world. They also do catering and deliver for free (on orders of $20 or more). 1716 S. State, Salt Lake City, 801-4879888, SLCNewGoldenDragon.com

Potbelly

At Potbelly, the motto is “Fresh. Fast. Friendly.” That’s exactly what you’ll get at this SLC sandwich stop, which serves up hot and steamy creations, including their signature “A Wreck” sandwich, with salami, roast beef, turkey, ham and Swiss cheese. Aside from delicious sandwiches, they also dish up fresh Mediterranean salad (grilled chicken, chickpeas, red peppers and feta) as well as savory soups and hearty chili. 2118 S. Highland Drive, Salt Lake City, 801-478-9977, Potbelly.com/SugarHouse

Book our food truck for your next corporate, private, or public event call 801.975.4052

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36 | SEPTEMBER 29, 2016 | CITY WEEKLY |

Featuring dining destinations from buffets and rooms with a view to mom-and-pop joints, chic cuisine and some of our dining critic’s faves.

COFFEE SHOP π BAKERY π DELI SERVING BREAKFAST ALL DAY

@

2005 E. 2700 SOUTH, SLC Best of Utah FELDMANSDELI.COM 2015 FELDMANSDELI OPEN TUES - SAT TO GO ORDERS: (801) 906-0369

Shawarma King Schedule of events can be found at apolloburgers.com 13 NEIGHBORHOOD LOCATIONS |

FA C E B O O K . C O M / A P O L L O B U R G E R

Start your day off right. Pick up the July/August issue of Devour Utah

Owner Ehsan Suhail makes his shawarma— rotisserie-grilled meat, often a combination of beef and lamb, cooked on a rotating vertical spit—from scratch, and the chicken shawarma in particular is tender, rich and juicy, served with housemade garlic-lemon sauce, tomato, lettuce and pickle slices. A favorite is the lamb koozi, a house specialty with chunks of lamb braised until they’re almost falling off the bone, and served on basmati rice seasoned with raisins, toasted almonds and onions. 725 E. 3300 South, Salt Lake City, 801-803-9434, SLCShawarmaKing.com

Yellowfinn vol. 2 no .7• sept embe r 20 16 • Di ne

It’s time to UnderRadar theEats p. 34

Located in the Commons at Sugar House in the space that was formerly home to Brookside Broiler, Yellowfinn serves an eclectic array of Asian and international cuisines. The main draw, however, is professionally prepared sushi and sashimi. Also on the menu are sliders, wings and salads. Be sure to stop in for “hammertime specials,” featuring discounted sushi rolls, appetizers, hot sake and Sapporo beer, served up in a cozy, contemporary ambiance. 1166 E. 2100 South, Salt Lake City, 801-466-2600, YellowfinnSushi.com

Yogurtland Hot Dog! p. 14 Dining Solo p. 24

Go to devourutah.com for pick up locations

Timing is Ev

erything p. 42 Devour

Utah •

Septem

ber 201

61

Boasted as “the place where you can make a bad day good and a good day great,” Yogurtland offers fro-yo made with organic, creamy California milk. Top it off with just about anything you can think of—sprinkles, chocolate, caramel, candy and more. No gluten? No problem. 2121 S. McClelland St., Salt Lake City, 385-222-7123, Yogurt-Land.com

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FILM REVIEW

Real Disaster

CINEMA

Deepwater Horizon feels trapped between tragic facts and genre conventions. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

T

Mark Wahlberg in Deepwater Horizon actual disaster, which cost 11 people their lives. Berg can bring a gritty physicality to his action sequences, as he did in Lone Survivor and The Kingdom, and here he creates several squirm-inducing moments showing the damage bodies took in this tragedy. It just becomes hard to negotiate the collision between real-world facts and genre conventions. Any cheering for the applause-moment heroism is blunted by the non-fiction roots. The weird part is that, on some level, it’s obvious that Berg understands this tension. For most of the final hour, which deals almost entirely with rescue efforts and the crew’s attempts to escape to lifeboats, Deepwater Horizon abandons almost all extraneous details, resulting in a climax that feels like an endurance test not just for the survivors, but for the audience. The denouement makes it clear that those survivors face the kind of traumatic aftermath we rarely see in conventional disaster epics. For all its intensity, the film seems uncertain when it’s permissible to be entertainment. CW

DEEPWATER HORIZON

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BB.5 Mark Wahlberg Kurt Russell Kate Hudson Rated PG-13

TRY THESE The Kingdom (2007) Jamie Foxx Chris Cooper Rated R

2012 (2009) John Cusack Thandie Newton Rated PG-13

Lone Survivor (2013) Mark Wahlberg Taylor Kitsch Rated R

SEPTEMBER 29, 2016 | 37

The Towering Inferno (1974) Paul Newman Steve McQueen Rated PG

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line might not be immediately decipherable—or even audible above the din of activity, whether everyday or catastrophic—the overall sense of the place becomes instantly apparent: This is a remarkably complicated piece of machinery, requiring a huge amount of careful inspection and maintenance, some of which it was not receiving. The problem is that structurally, the script doesn’t resemble a harrowing fact-based story like Berg and Wahlberg’s last collaboration, Lone Survivor, as much as it resembles something like The Towering Inferno in its reliance on disaster-movie tropes. Because such tales require a bureaucratic type whose dithering and/or callousness interferes with the people raising legitimate concerns, we get a group of BP executives—represented by John Malkovich, talking about the corporation’s interests in a Cajun purr that adds to the villainy—thwarting Mr. Jimmy’s efforts to do the right thing. To make sure there’s something at stake as the characters fight for their lives, we get backstory about Williams’ wife back home (Kate Hudson), who can worry and make anguished phone calls as news of the explosion begins to leak out. And there’s plenty of foreshadowing, from the bubbles Berg constantly shows ominously erupting from the ocean floor around the well, to the school presentation by Williams’ daughter about his work that sends cola blasting through a straw. Yet as much as Deepwater Horizon keeps preparing audiences for a Roland Emmerichstyle disaster yarn, this is the story of an

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

he disaster movie is a particularly curious beast in the always-curious history of movie genres. Like action movies, they’re built around the kind of spectacle that seems to demand a bigscreen experience. Like horror movies, they express a cathartic need to confront terrifying scenarios in a safe space. And like melodrama of all kinds, they’re about emotions writ large—love and hate, life and death— with little space for nuance or subtlety. But one of the most fundamental requirements doesn’t usually need to be expressed: They’re not about real people. Director Peter Berg smacks face-first into that rule in Deepwater Horizon, which deals with the April 2010 events on the offshore oil-drilling rig that made national headlines. The focal point of the story is Mike Williams (Mark Wahlberg), an electronics technician who is just starting a 21-day stint aboard the rig when trouble begins. The site’s supervisor, “Mr. Jimmy” Harrell (Kurt Russell), questions the way BP executives have taken shortcuts around safety tests as the creation of the well runs overbudget and behind schedule. And even after additional tests suggest the possibility of unsafe pressure building below the surface, operations continue—until a massive eruption of oil and gas leads to an explosion that threatens the lives of everyone on board. Berg, along with screenwriters Matthew Michael Carnahan and Matthew Sand, demonstrate an impressive willingness to drop viewers into the world of the Deepwater Horizon without much hand-holding orientation. The dialogue is heavy with jargon and technical terminology, addressing matters like the heavy mud used to keep oil from backflowing through the drill pipe, the various safety tests that were (or, tragically, weren’t) run, systems that were failing, and the individual entities responsible for different roles. While there are occasions when a specific


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NEW THIS WEEK Information is correct at press time. Film release schedules are subject to change. DEEPWATER HORIZON BB.5 See reviewon p. 37. Opens Sept. 30 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)

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DEMON BBB.5 There’s so much bubbling beneath the surface co-writer director Marcin Wrona’s supernatural drama that I feel confident in saying that one viewing wasn’t enough to fully absorb it—and for someone not intimately familiar with Polish World War II-era history, even a few more viewings might not be sufficient. On the eve of his wedding on the family property of his fiancée, Zaneta (Agnieszka Zulewska), Piotr (Itay Tiran) finds a human skeleton—and soon thereafter begins exhibiting strange behavior. The actual dybbuk possession takes a relatively small role in the story; this is far from a jump-scare thriller. Instead, it’s an insinuating tale of an attempt to bury the nation’s history connected to the persecution of Jews, set at a party where the bride’s father (Andrzej Grabowsk) seems extremely interested in making sure everyone stays drunk and dancing while Piotr freaks out. The manner in which Wrona skirts around the edges of the backstory, and who might know more than they’re letting on, could prove frustrating, yet there’s something relentlessly unsettling about the various characters’ individual responses to ghosts that refuse to stay conveniently buried. Opens Sept. 30 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (R)—Scott Renshaw

38 | SEPTEMBER 29, 2016 | CITY WEEKLY |

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THE DRESSMAKER BBB.5 Like a gunslinger riding into town, determined and dangerous: This is how Tilly Dunnage (the marvelous Kate Winslet) returns to her backwater Australian hometown. The year is 1951, and Tilly comes armed only with a Singer sewing machine, her Parisian-inspired haute-couture style, and a super-powered ache for revenge. Fashion becomes a tragicomic weapon in a witty, genre-busting dramedy that simmers with pathos, humor and calamity as Tilly brings elegant civilization to the middle of nowhere—and a muchneeded lift to the spirits of the downtrodden local women in a place seething with deceit, bigotry, hypocrisy and small-mindedness. Adapting Rosalie Ham’s novel, director Jocelyn Moorhouse pulls no punches depicting the distinct sort of soul-crushing women are subjected to, and turns fashion and beauty into outward expressions of the mustering of inner resources it takes to survive. The Dressmaker asks us to appreciate not how these women look, but how they feel about how they look—a uniquely fresh take in a medium dominated by the male gaze. It’s all so entertaining, so unexpected, so wonderfully oddball, so damn good. Opens Sept. 30 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (R)—MaryAnn Johanson

MASTERMINDS [not yet reviewed] Employees at an armored car company (including Zach Galifianakis and Kristen Wiig) plot a heist. Opens Sept. 30 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13) MIA MADRE BB.5 Nanni Moretti (We Have a Pope) has a strange facility for taking a potentially resonant premise, and dunking it in oddball farce to the point that much of the emotional force is lost. Here he follows a veteran director named Margherita (Margherita Buy) who’s struggling to complete her latest film while dealing with personal crises like the end of a relationship and the failing health of her mother (Giulia Lazzarini). The story weaves effectively through layers of dreams and flashbacks, and Buy’s performance captures a woman realizing how much she’s missing in her personal life. But much of the plot focuses on her frustrating interaction with her leading man, a pompous American actor (John Turturro), and the comic relief built into his inability to memorize his Italian lines or his rambling stories about Kubrick pulls attention away from that key dynamic of Margherita confronting mortality. This might be an attempt at a contemporary, gender-swapped spin on Fellini’s 8 ½, but if not for the title, it might be easy to forget that this is supposed to be about Margherita’s mother. Opens Sept. 30 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (R)—SR MISS PEREGRINE’S HOME FOR PECULIAR CHILDREN BB.5 It’s wonderful to see Tim Burton shed some of his recent tendency toward visual overkill; it’s just a shame to see it wasted on something that feels so familiar. This adaptation of Ransom Riggs’ novel follows a teenager named Jacob (Asa Butterfield) as he discovers his grandfather’s family history with a strange orphanage in Wales—headed by the mysterious Miss Peregrine (Eva Green)—that houses children with unique abilities, living in a time loop in one day in 1943. On its most basic level, the story provides some satisfying adventure seasoned with a dollop of teen romance, all given the macabre flavor of vintage Burton. But screenwriter Jane Goldman also contributed to the X-Men movie series, and it’s easy to see the overlap: Miss Peregrine’s Home feels like nothing so much as a European branch office of Xavier’s School for Gifted Youngsters. Every story beat feels lifted from some other young-hero narrative of comic-book movie, with Green and a white-eyed Samuel L. Jackson (as the Big Bad) providing the only personality to a largely bland cast of characters. A real Burton-saince will require some better material. Opens Sept. 30 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)—SR

QUEEN OF KATWE BBB Underdog sports stories are a dime a dozen; this one takes its premise in enough interesting directions to provide more than formulaic uplift. Based on a true story, it follows the life of Phiona Mutesi (Madina Nalwanga), a girl living in a Ugandan slum with her widowed mother (Lupita Nyong’o) when she discovers a special skill for chess after she learns the game from missionary teacher Robert Katande (David Oyelowo). The script follows plenty of familiar rise-and-fall-of-fortune patterns as it spans five years of Phiona’s developing abilities as a chess prodigy, including the teacher who brings his own back-story of challenges to the relationship. But there’s a thoughtfulness here to the tension between parents who want more for their children (captured in Nyong’o’s richly layered performance), and the distance that can grow between parents and children who get a chance to experience that “more.” Director Mira Nair can’t avoid a certain degree of Disney gloss in the portrayal of her impoverished characters, but she’s fundamentally respectful about the complications that emerge on a path out of poverty—even a feel-good path. Opens Sept. 30 at theaters valleywide. (PG)—SR

SPECIAL SCREENINGS

CAPTAIN FANTASTIC At Park City Film Series, Sept. 30-Oct. 1, 8 p.m.; Oct. 2, 6 p.m. (R) SEED: THE UNTOLD STORY At Main Library, Oct. 4, 7 p.m. (NR) SPLINTERS OF A NATION At Rose Wagner Center, Oct. 5, 7 p.m. (NR)

CURRENT RELEASES

AUTHOR: THE JT LEROY STORY BBBB Like so many great documentaries, Jeff Feuerzig’s Author is fascinating in the surface story it reveals, and in what it reveals beneath that surface. The subject is literary sensation JT Leroy—a transgender survivor of sexual abuse, addiction and a prostitute single mother—who was eventually revealed to be middle-aged mother Laura Albert, with her sister-in-law posing as JT for years. Albert herself narrates most of the story, often punctuated by recorded phone conversations with “JT’s” many celebrity friends, revealing the preposterous logistics of keeping up the ruse. But Feuerzig also picks at the fetishizing of squalid survival narratives, while managing the neat trick of exploring Laura’s real-life pain without

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MOVIE TIMES AND LOCATIONS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

letting her off the hook. Author shows how much of what we come to accept as artistic genius involves our response to the stories behind those stories. (R)—SR BRIDGET JONES’S BABY BB Bridget Jones (Renée Zellweger) might have aged a decade, but the movie feels almost proudly stuck in the late 1990s/early 2000s. Still-single 40-something Bridget finds herself pregnant, with two possible dads for her baby: millionaire Jack (Patrick Dempsey), or on-again/off-again flame Mark (Colin Firth). Hugh Grant’s naughty spark from the first two films is much-missed here, as Dempsey and Firth play two basically decent guys bumping awkwardly against one another. In general, this movie is far less interested in offering new jokes than breaking out a tired greatesthits collection of stuff audiences might have once adored about the series. Zellweger still knows how to give the character an earthy appeal, but her life and problems belong in another era. We need more stories about women past the age of 40, but it helps if those stories don’t already feel obsolete. (R)—SR

SULLY BBB Director Clint Eastwood explores the story of Chesley “Sully” Sullenberger (Tom Hanks)—the airline pilot who executed a miraculously successful emergency landing on the Hudson River in January 2009. Screenwriter Todd Komarnicki gets risky with his structure weaving back and forth in time, only getting to the events of the fateful day itself after around the 30-minute mark. It’s a narrative that occasionally spends time with peripheral characters in a way that often comes off as padding. But Hanks navigates Sully’s struggles with post-traumatic stress, media celebrity and trying to defend himself against suggestions that his decisions were risky, all in a way that retains humanity rather than turning him into a statue. The taut procedural approach to the crash itself and Hanks’ gift for making earnestness compelling provide the foundation for a solid profile in just-doing-my-job heroism. (PG-13)—SR

Megaplex Legacy Crossing 1075 W. Legacy Crossing Blvd., Centerville 801-397-5100 MegaplexTheatres.com

Broadway Centre Cinemas 111 E. 300 South 801-321-0310 SaltLakeFilmSociety.org

Cinemark Draper 12129 S. State, Draper 801-619-6494 Cinemark.com

Century 16 South Salt Lake 125 E. 3300 South 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

Cinemark Sandy 9 9539 S. 700 East, Sandy 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

WEBER COUNTY Cinemark Tinseltown 14 3651 Wall Ave., Ogden 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

Cinemark Sugar House 2227 S. Highland Drive 801-466-3699 Cinemark.com

Megaplex Jordan Commons 9400 S. State, Sandy 801-304-INFO MegaplexTheatres.com

Water Gardens Cinema 6 1945 E. Murray-Holladay Road 801-273-0199 WaterGardensTheatres.com

Megaplex 20 at The District 11400 S. Bangerter Highway 801-304-INFO MegaplexTheatres.com

Megaplex 12 Gateway 165 S. Rio Grande St. 801-304-4636 MegaplexTheatres.com

PARK CITY Cinemark Holiday Village 1776 Park Ave. 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

Redwood Drive-In 3688 S. Redwood Road 801-973-7088 Tower Theatre 836 E. 900 South 801-321-0310 SaltLakeFilmSociety.org WEST VALLEY 5 Star Cinemas 8325 W. 3500 South, Magna 801-250-5551 RedCarpetCinemas.com

CITYWEEKLY.NET/UNDERGROUND

Cinemark Tinseltown USA 720 W. 1500 North, Layton 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Gateway 8 206 S. 625 West, Bountiful 801-292-7979 RedCarpetCinemas.com

Cinemark Movies 8 2230 N. University Parkway, Orem 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Cinemark Provo Town Center 1200 Town Center Blvd., Provo 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Cinemark University Mall 1010 S. 800 East, Provo 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Megaplex Thanksgiving Point 2935 N. Thanksgiving Way 801-304-INFO MegaplexTheatres.com Water Gardens Cinema 8 790 E. Expressway Ave. Spanish Fork 801-798-9777 WaterGardensTheatres.com Water Gardens Cinema 6 912 W. Garden Drive Pleasant Grove 801-785-3700 WaterGardensTheatres.com

SEPTEMBER 29, 2016 | 39

Long-long-long-read Interviews With Local Bands, Comedians, Artists, Podcasters, Fashionistas And Other Creators Of Cool Stuff. Only On Cityweekly.net!

Cinemark Valley Fair Mall 3601 S. 2700 West, West Valley City 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

Cinemark Station Park 900 W. Clark Lane, Farmington 801-447-8561 Cinemark.com

Cinemark American Fork 715 W. 180 North, American Fork 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

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ALL THE NEWS THAT WON’T FIT IN PRINT

Cinemark 24 Jordan Landing 7301 S. Bangerter Highway 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

DAVIS COUNTY AMC Loews Layton Hills 9 728 W. 1425 North, Layton 801-774-8222 AMCTheatres.com

UTAH COUNTY Carmike Wynnsong 4925 N. Edgewood Drive, Provo 801-764-0009 Carmike.com

Cinemark 12 1600 W. Fox Park Drive, West Jordan 801-562-5760 Cinemark.com

Redstone 8 Cinemas 6030 N. Market 435-575-0220 Redstone8Cinemas.com

Megaplex 13 at The Junction 2351 Kiesel Ave., Ogden 801-304-INFO MegaplexTheatres.com

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THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN BBB What if a remake simply served to give us a kind of movie we’ve forgotten how to appreciate? Director Antoine Fuqua’s new version changes the basics very little: Townspeople under siege from a ruthless bigshot (Peter Sarsgaard) hire gunmen (led by Denzel

STORKS BBB Ah, how much more satisfying an animated film can be when it sets out to be a comedy, rather than that mutt genre of “family-friendly CGI movie.” In a world where storks have given up their traditional role as baby-deliverers, stork Junior (Andy Samberg) and orphaned human Tulip (Katie Crown) reluctantly team up to fulfill the request of lonely only child Nate (Anton Starkman). The subplot involving Nate’s workaholic parents has a perfunctory Very Important Lesson feel, and the well-intentioned messages about expanded definitions of “family” often feel tacked-on. But the script by Nicholas Stoller is often flat-out hilarious, like a big action set-piece that has to keep quiet to avoid waking the baby. It’s OK if the makers of an animated film decide it has nothing to teach us except how well-crafted jokes can entertain viewers of all ages. (PG)—SR

SOUTH VALLEY Century 16 Union Heights 7800 S. 1300 East, Sandy 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

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THE HOLLARS BB Stop me if you’ve heard this one before: A Sundance dramedy about a mope who returns from the Big City to his hometown to deal with family issues, finding both hometown and family issues unchanged, yet somehow alien to him now. When Sally Hollar (Margo Martindale) is diagnosed with a tumor, son John (John Krasinski, who also directed) rushes home to Ohio, followed by his pregnant girlfriend (Anna Kendrick) for support. The clichés pile up: John’s dad (Richard Jenkins) has money problems; his trainwreck brother (Sharlto Copley) can’t let his ex-wife go; there’s contrived wackiness around John’s old girlfriend (Mary Elizabeth Winstead). The humor is often broad—like someone assuming an Asian doctor knows martial arts—while the drama is rudimentary and weightless, demanding emotions without earning them. Martindale and Jenkins give endearing performances that this by-the-numbers film doesn’t deserve. (PG-13)—Eric D. Snider

Washington and Chris Pratt) to protect them. There’s some charisma in individual performances, but in general this script isn’t much interested in character development, which is a problem in scenes built around life-or-death matters. Yet there’s a throwback vibe to the filmmaking that feels thematically appropriate: This is a story not just about Good Guys vs. Bad Guys, but about people standing up for justice. As Elmer Bernstein’s rousing theme plays over the closing credits, it doesn’t feel like a reminder of the movie you’re not seeing; it’s a reminder of ideals we wish didn’t seem so old-fashioned. (PG-13)—SR

SALT LAKE CITY Brewvies Cinema Pub 677 S. 200 West 801-355-5500 Brewvies.com


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0 | SEPTEMBER 29, 2016 | CITY WEEKLY |

TRUE BY B I L L F RO S T @bill_frost

Power, Man

TV

Marvel’s Luke Cage is another winner; Westworld transcends its cheese origins. Marvel’s Luke Cage Friday, Sept. 30 (Netflix)

Series Debut: No, I don’t know what the Netflix/Marvel release schedule is anymore, either—but here’s Luke Cage; Iron Fist, The Punisher, more Daredevil and Jessica Jones, and the long-teased Defenders will show up eventually. Luke “Power Man” Cage (Matt Colter) is now a few months removed from the events of Jessica Jones, relocated to Harlem and trying to lead as normal a life as a mega-strong, bullet-proof, street-level superhero can. He’s soon drawn into a soul-of-the-neighborhood battle with a charismatic gangster (Mahershala Ali, House of Cards), which only sounds like Daredevil’s debut season. Luke Cage was Marvel’s first-ever black headliner in the ’70s; appropriately, this series is the most ’70s, the most New York, and the most straight-up black entry into the modern Marvel Cinematic Universe yet. It’s also a worthy follow-up to Daredevil and Jessica Jones—you’re three for three, Netflix. Now don’t ruin Iron Fist, or whoever’s next.

Westworld Sunday, Oct. 2 (HBO)

Series Debut: HBO is spending a hell of a lot of money on what the network hopes—really, really hopes—is its next Game of Thrones, while anyone who actually remembers the original 1973 sci-fi cheeseball Westworld (and the lame 1976 sequel Futureworld, and the lamer 1980 TV series Beyond Westworld) is thinking “Uh, why?” This new Westworld is smarter, sleeker and more terrifying than its origin flick, setting up a near-future resort wherein tourists pay $40k a day to play frontier cowboy, knocking back whiskey at the saloon and riding horses on the range, as well as shooting up cyber-townsfolk in gunfights and generally abusing them for kicks (in case you needed a reminder, humans are just the worst). As Jurassic Park, Ex-Machina and countless robot-uprising tales have taught us, this won’t end well. Westworld is also as thoughtful as it is frightful, portraying the welling “humanity” and consciousness within the synth-slaves even better than AMC’s Humans did last year. Once past the pilot episode (which is somewhat long and slow; patience), you might not care about dragons anymore.

Binge Verge Purge Conviction Monday, Oct. 3 (ABC)

Series Debut: Glam lawyer and ex-First Daughter Hayes Morrison (Hayley Atwell, Marvel’s Agent Carter), to avoid jail time for a cocaine bust, casually takes a job turning over possible wrongful-conviction cases for the less-glam … because that’s totally how the legal system works. Will sparks fly with her sexy new boss (Eddie Cahill), her former courtroom nemesis? Will Hayes begin to—gasp!—care about people other than herself? Will Atwell ever master an American accent? Shaky dialect aside, Atwell’s a strong presence surrounded by solid players (including The Walking Dead’s Emily Kinney and The Following’s Shawn Ashmore), but Conviction is just another pretty legal drama that’s waaay beneath Peggy Carter.

Timeless Monday, Oct. 3 (NBC)

Series Debut: A scientist (Malcolm Barrett), a soldier (Matt Lanter) and a history professor (Abigail Spencer) chase a time-terrorist (Goran Visnjic) through the ages to stop him from altering the past and destroying present-day America (as for the rest of the world, who cares?). Timeless is really just a dumb-fun Syfy action-adventure series trying to pass itself off as a gravitas-laden drama delivering Important Historical Lessons (this country used to be even

Marvel’s Luke Cage (Netflix)

more racist, sexist, etc.); it works as long as you don’t take it too seriously. And no, the big event of the pilot episode isn’t a Led Zeppelin album-cover shoot—it’s the crash of the Hindenburg! See? You’re learning already.

No Tomorrow Tuesday, Oct. 4 (The CW)

Series Debut: Uptight Evie (Tori Anderson) falls for a free spirit, Xavier (Joshua Sasse), who believes the world is ending in eight months. Is he as crazy as he is dreamy? Does it really matter if Xavier can help Evie get her YOLO on through his … “apocolyst” … of stuff he wants to do before his maybe-imagined asteroid wipes out the planet? Sasse and Anderson are charming enough, and it’s nice to see that The CW hasn’t totally forgotten about the portion of its audience who don’t care about DC superheroes, but No Tomorrow doesn’t seem built for the long haul. If a final episode wherein the asteroid does destroy the earth has already been written, however, I’m absolutely onboard (did I mention that humans are just the worst?).

Listen to Frost Mondays at 8 a.m. on X96 Radio From Hell, and on the TV Tan podcast via Stitcher, iTunes, Google Play and BillFrost.tv.

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Singer-songwriter Lera Lynn’s rootsy noir leads to L.A. and True Detective.

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some bills.” That said, she’s impressively prolific, racking up three albums and an EP since 2011—including her latest long player, the aptly named Resistor (Resistor Music). Yet it was The Avenues, her 2014 sophomore set, that brought an acceleration of interest, winning her rave reviews and placement on several year-end lists—not to mention the True Detective thing. When City Weekly mentions that she’s been exceptionally productive in a relatively short span of time, Lynn demurs. To her, it’s a matter of perspective. “I guess that depends who you’re asking,” she says. “Some days I would agree, but most of the time I don’t.” She likes working, and has a good work ethic; success hasn’t gone to her head. “There’s a long way to go still. I think it’s a mistake to linger on that too much, because then you don’t keep moving forward.” Lynn says her life can be “exhausting,” citing the shock of going from periods of “nonstop motion” to idle time at home “where nothing is happening at all,” but “I’m always looking forward to the next thing.” As to what that might be, she’s happy to leave that to her muse. “I think it’s a mistake to make art with the intention of keeping up with perception,” she says, “or whatever your idea of success is. You have to follow inspiration; the greatest challenge is not to listen to outside noise. An artist needs to ignore that and just make their art.” CW

Reggae

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era Lynn makes no secret of her darker designs. Then again, given the unsettling and somewhat melancholy music she contributed to HBO’s hit series True Detective, it would probably be futile to deny it. Speaking by phone during a tour stop in New Orleans, the 31-year-old Nashville resident is so amiable and self-effacing, it’s difficult to mistake her for the sleazy, strung-out barfly songbird she portrayed on the show’s second season. Lynn insists she’s nothing like that sordid character. Listening to her music, however, makes one think that the chanteuse is a construct based on, and perhaps a personification of, Lynn’s own noir-ish, introspective songs. It was these tunes, after all, that producer T Bone Burnett, the show’s composer and music supervisor, found an ideal fit for the show’s unsettling style. Burnett invited Lynn to fly to Los Angeles and try her hand at collaborating on the True Detective score and, when series writer/producer Nic Pizzolatto heard Lynn sing, he decided to cast her in the recurring role, performing her own music. Lynn had never set foot on a film or television set. “They dressed me up like a junkie,” she says. “Half the people on the set that first day were probably asking, ‘Who the hell is she?’” But she found a quick chemistry with Burnett, saying he “was good at making me feel comfortable.” That didn’t immediately curtail Lynn’s fish-out-of-water anxieties, or ease the pressure of collaborating with someone of Burnett’s stature. He’s a singer-songwriter himself, and a critical darling. He’s produced albums by Elvis Costello and Willie Nelson, and is highly regarded in film and television, working as a music supervisor, producer, composer and archivist for series like Nashville and films like Walk the Line. He’s also a frequent Coen Brothers collaborator, working on four of their films—including The Big Lebowski and O Brother, Where Art Thou? So it’s understandable that Lynn was a bit anxious about her new writing/acting/ singing gig. On the plane to L.A., Lynn gave herself a pep talk. “It was like, ‘All right, Lera, you better get your shit together,’” she reminisces. “It was very intimidating.” Inspiration, she says, can be elusive. Sometimes she’ll wake up with a “whole song in my head that’s come to me from a dream,” and other times she’ll labor for months on a single tune, or write a lyric that goes unused for years. Writing for television, adhering to an often crazy production schedule, can be hectic. “I don’t have enough discipline to sit down and write every day, but I do try to keep my mind and heart open in case something comes along.” Lynn is drawn to a moody muse. Her songs have roots in Americana, but her somber sentiments make comparisons to Leonard Cohen and Joni Mitchell almost inevitable. “I find there’s a greater depth of beauty in sadness,” she says. “I’m not a sad person, but I think the point of music is to move and inspire people so they feel something. I have access to that emotion.” She nonetheless wishes she could write a happy pop song: “It certainly would help me pay

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Lost in the Waves

Still Corners takes a deep dive with Dead Blue. BY ALEX SPRINGER @captainspringer comments@cityweekly.net

T

he origins of the London-based duo Still Corners are as enigmatic and wayward as the psychedelic dreampop they’ve been cultivating since 2007. When Austin native Greg Hughes finished school at the University of Texas, he decided to expatriate to England. “I was looking to go somewhere, and I had met an English girl and followed her out there,” says Hughes, who’s pulled over to speak with City Weekly from the roadside en route to the band’s next show in El Paso. “It didn’t work out, but I had built up a life there. I was just looking for a partner in crime, really.” One evening, Hughes found himself on a train traveling from Charing Cross to London Bridge. The train didn’t stop until he arrived on a lonely platform in Southeast London. There, he met Tessa Murray, a London native who happened to be on her way to meet with a choir group that had invited her to join. “It was quite dark, and not a very nice part of town, and we just got talking about music and books because it was a while before the next train,” Murray says. “It was really just a happy coincidence.” Since that serendipitous meeting, Murray and Hughes have collaborated on three albums, beginning with 2008’s self-released EP Remember Pepper. It’s a spooky little package, setting Murray’s ethereal voice loose to drift back and forth within a new-wave graveyard of giallo-inspired synth solos and psychedelic guitar riffs. Still Corners soon signed with Sub Pop, where they released Creatures of an Hour (2011) and Strange Pleasures (2013). Creatures clings to Pepper’s nostalgic underpinnings, but songs like “Endless Summer” and “The Twilight Hour” show a strippeddown, minimalistic side that pairs Murray’s vocals with arrangements that are more acoustic than electronic. Pleasures marked the band’s transition into a more futuristic sound, blending elements of synth-pop with melancholy guitar chords

Tessa Murray and Greg Hughes of Still Corners

that echo through space like the final transmissions of a dying satellite. Their newest album, Dead Blue, marks not only a new direction in the band’s aesthetic, but in their professional lives as well. After Pleasures, the band parted ways with Sub Pop, and started their own record label called Wrecking Light. “We thought, ‘Why don’t we try this ourselves instead of renegotiating?’” Hughes recalls. “We talked about it with our managers, and it seemed like a good time to try and experiment with something new.” As part of their journey into unfamiliar territory, the band recorded Dead Blue in Deal, a small town in Kent, on the English coast. “We went to check it out, and totally fell in love with the place. It’s really slow and everyone’s very friendly,” Murray says. “We went ahead and rented this house that was right on the beach and started working on the album there. It ended up being really inspirational to the music—every day we’d look out the window and see something different.” While the band’s previous albums flirted with expansive sonic landscapes, Dead Blue embraces its oceanic inspiration, creating a more sprawling narrative. “I think this record leans to a darker sound, and it came out of living by the ocean—I guess that’s where we got the title for the album,” Hughes says. They also wanted to experiment with “more sounds” and “more space … between instruments. I think we were going for that less put-forward sound.” When Still Corners hits Salt Lake City, they’ll only have a few shows of their North American tour under their belts. But Murray promises, “By the time we get to Salt Lake, we’ll be a well-oiled machine.” Attendees can expect an audio/visual spectacle that matches surreal visuals with the band’s breathtaking soundscapes. “We like to create an atmosphere and take you out of the present moment into a more dreamy kind of thing,” Hughes says. CW

STILL CORNERS

w/ Foxes in Fiction, Batty Blue Friday, Sep. 30, 7 p.m. Kilby Court 741 S. Kilby Court 801-364-3538 $12 in advance/ $15 day of show All ages KilbyCourt.com


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FRIDAY 9.30

People Power Punk Rock: SDS Fundraiser w/ All Systems Fail, Bancho, Cady Heron, Sympathy Pain, Hylian

If you know your ‘60s American history, you’re probably familiar with Students for a Democratic Society, the left-wing student activist group that organized protests against the war in Vietnam, and championed other progressive causes. The original SDS folded in 1969, but 10 years ago, a new group took up the banner, and the University of Utah branch is holding a fundraiser. Appropriately enough, the theme is punk rock, but the bands aren’t as narrowly niche-fied as that: All Systems Fail is described as “vintage kettlebell hardcore,” Bancho brings electro-pop with fruit on the menu, Cady Heron identifies as “cool mom-core/powerviolence,” Sympathy Pain slows things down with ambient/drone, and Hylian is post hardcore/pop-punk. The event also includes art, a raffle and treats. Donations support the chapter’s participation in an upcoming national conference. (Brian Staker) Diabolical Records, 238 S. Edison St., 8 p.m., $5 suggested donation, Facebook.com/DiabolicalRecords

MONDAY 10.3

Dinosaur Jr., Steve Gunn, Residual Kid

One of alternative rock’s greatest bands, Ohio’s Dinosaur Jr. should be bigger and, I dunno, more famouser (copy edit on Aisle 5!). But, considering the band’s— and especially co-frontman/songwriter/ guitar wizard J. Mascis’—slacker image, maybe we should just be happy they’re still around. Whereas many bands run out of juice after 10 years together, Dinosaur Jr.— after almost a quarter-century together (not counting their eight years apart)—

Dinosaur Jr.

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has kept putting out strong albums since reuniting in 2005. That’d be true to form for a bunch of ostensible lay-abouts, doing just enough to get by with solid C+ Metacritic average. Except, when you see the trio live, with Mascis both playing and looking like a (nerdy, stoned) wizard, and singing in his glorious signature whine-snore, with bassist Lou Barlow and drummer Murph propelling the band’s brand of loud-quiet-loud, you see that there’s some real work behind the music. They’re just so good at what they do, that it seems otherwise. Could that be why they’re calling their latest album for Jagjaguwar Give a Glimpse of What Yer Not? (Randy Harward) The Depot, 400 W. South Temple, 7:30 p.m., $25 advance/$30 day of, DepotSLC.com

TUESDAY 10.4

Neil Young & Promise of the Real

With the possible exception of Bob Dylan, Neil Young is arguably the world’s greatest living folk rocker. But he’s so much

Bancho more. Young is often spoken of in similar terms as Dylan: a voice that’s eccentrically emotive, but for some is like nails on chalkboard; a prolific and widely varied body of work; and an uncompromising dedication to his music. In some ways, the 70-year old Toronto, Canada, native has remained more contemporary. Recently, he’s become more politically active, especially in environmental causes, and his latest album, the live disc Earth (Reprise, 2016) includes the title track from last year’s stinging The Monsanto Years as well as a few old chestnuts like “After the Gold Rush” and “Human Highway.” A chance to witness a legend encapsulate such a career (with Willie Nelson offspring in backup band Promise of the Real, no less) doesn’t come along often. (BS) Usana Amphitheatre, 5150 S. 6055 West, 8 p.m., $36-$125, Usana-Amp.com

Neil Young

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Former Beach Boy Brian Wilson is on tour, performing an album he produced and released a half century ago. Though Pet Sounds was a commercial disappointment upon its 1966 release, it’s now recognized as a landmark album, encompassing classics like “Wouldn’t It Be Nice” and “God Only Knows,” along with eleven other tracks. And it’s effectively a Wilson solo project, stemming from his creative vision: “I had in my mind exactly what I wanted when I got to the studio,” he says in a recent interview with Pittsburgh City Paper. “I told the musicians what to play.” Wilson is often visibly uncomfortable on stage, but his stellar ensemble— featuring former Beach Boys Al Jardine and Blondie Chaplin—puts on a peerless show that includes Pet Sounds in its entirety, plus other Beach Boys favorites. The Pet Sounds tour is at least as much a show for Brian Wilson as it is by him—but the man has earned it. (Bill Kopp) Abravanel Hall, 123 W. South Temple, 8 p.m., $45-$125, ages 8+, ArtsSaltLake.org

Tengger Cavalry, Incite

The ancient Mongols—the people of the notorious emperor Genghis Khan—were metal before metal existed. They’re said to have been cannibals (albeit only occasionally, compared to some other accounts), killing one in 10 soldiers to ensure the other nine had happy tummies. Sometimes they’d even open their horses’ throats and drink deeply. New York City “nomadic folk metal” quintet Tengger Cavalry

Brian Wilson

adopted the look, but not the diet. They don’t even fake it for the show. Instead, they express their brutality through epic heavy metal with guttural and shrieky vox, austere riffs and rhythms just begging to drive an army into battle. All this, with embellishments like traditional folk instrumentation—like the Mongolian flute and the extra-metal horse-head fiddle— and throat singing, which sounds extra badass. Phoenix groove-metal outfit Incite opens. (RH) Metro Music Hall, 615 W. 100 South, 8 p.m., $15 adv./$18 day of, 21+, Facebook.com/MetroBarSLC

Tengger Cavalry

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THURSDAY 9.29 LIVE MUSIC

‘90s Television + The Artificial Flower Company + Tarot Death Card + Burmese Python (Urban Lounge) George Nelson (Hog Wallow) Kelsie Everson + Paul Travis + Haley Hendrickson + Derk Boss (Velour) My Fair Fiend + Westward + Bunko Bus (Muse Music) The Record Company + Amasa Hines (The State Room) Terence Hansen (Twist) Until Further Notice + The Blue Flames + Saline Lakes (Kilby Court) Wade Bowen (In The Venue)

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A Mac-DZ + Cory Mon + Josh & Gary (Funk n’ Dive) Atmosphere + Brother Ali + deM Atlas + Plain Ole Bill + Last Word (The Complex) Blind Guardian + Grave Digger (The Complex) Breezeway + Primal Static + The Arvos (Muse Music) Colt .46 (The Westerner) see p. 48 Danger 5 (Why Sound) Jake Johnson + A Lily Gray + Transit Cast (Club X) Joe Friday (Brewski’s) Kitty In A Casket + Just Another Monster + Dirtbomb Devils + HiFi Murder (Metro Music Hall) L.O.L. (Club 90) Lera Lynn + William Wild (The State Room) see p. 41 Luke Bryan + Little Big Town + Dustin Lynch (USANA Amphitheatre) Marian Hill + VÉRITÉ + SHAED (The Urban Lounge) Queen Nation (Liquid Joe’s) People Power Punk Rock: SDS Fundraiser feat. All Systems Fail,

Bancho, Cady Heron, Sympathy Pain, Hylian (Diabolical Records) see p. 45 River House (The Cabin) RX Bandits + And So I Watch You From Afar (In the Venue) Scoundrels (Hog Wallow) Sounds Like Teen Spirit (The Spur Bar & Grill) Still Corners + Foxes In Fiction + Batty Blue (Kilby Court) see p. 43 Three Bad Jacks + Hurricane Kings (ABG’s Libation Emporium) Tink Fu + Odix + Sultan + Out of Context (Kamikazes) Whistling Rufus (Sugar House Coffee)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Brisk (Downstairs) Chaseone2 (Twist) DJ Dolph (Park City Live) Dueling Pianos feat. Troy + Drew (The Tavernacle) Missy + Eric + Jed (Keys on Main)

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SATURDAY 10.1 LIVE MUSIC

American Hitmen + Betty Hates Everything + Whiskey Bravo (Metro Music Hall) Bogan Via + Luna Aura + AudioTreats (Kilby Court) Colt.46 (The Westerner) see p. 48 Cryptic Wisdom + Enkay 47 + T-ravill + Intre (The Loading Dock) Danny Brown + ZelooperZ + Maxo Kream (The Complex) Dead Winter Carpenters + Zach and Bridget (The State Room) Mr. Vandal + Hecka + Gravy.Tron + DJ Feral Williams + OTTR (Urban Lounge) Eric Hutchinson + Great Caesar (Billboard-Live!) Jenn Blosil + Grey Glass + Faith Johnson (Velour) Joy Spring Band (Sugar House Coffee) The Lacs + Hard Target + Crucifix (The Royal) LANY + Transviolet (The Depot) Luke Bryan + Little Big Town + Dustin Lynch (USANA Amphitheatre) NsF + Monkeys Lion (Urban Lounge) Serpentfoot + Coyote Vision Group (Diabolical Records) Telesomniac + No Robot + We Include Pluto + Salem Witch Doctors (Muse Music) Three Bad Jacks + Hurricane Kings (The Garage on Beck) Tony Holiday and the Velvetones (Johnny’s on Second)


FRIDAY 9. 30 & SATURDAY 10.1

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Colt .46

Ogden-based country band Colt .46 had a great year, winning Best Country Act in City Weekly’s Best of Utah Music 2016 and releasing their debut album, Hang Fire. Now they’re working on an EP, which frontman Dale Condie says should “hopefully be released in the first part of next year.” The band will also make an appearance on Comcast Entertainment Television’s local music program Studio Sessions this fall. This is all especially exciting, since the band purveys a type of country music that’s rare these days. They don’t subscribe to the Nashville pop-country model or try too hard to be hipster and “alt-country.” They cover universal themes, alienating no one without compromising their sound. (Randy Harward) The Westerner, 3360 S. Redwood, 9 p.m., $5 (ladies’ night), WesternerSLC.com

SUNDAY AFTERNOON

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SUNDAY 10.2 Avi Buffalo + The Kickback (The Loading Dock) L.A. Witch + The Hound Mystic + Super 78 + Season of the Witch (Urban Lounge) Palisades + It Lives It Breathes + Darke Complex + Blindwish (Billboard-Live!) Twiztid + Mac Lethal + Zodiac Mprint + Lex the Hex Master + Godz of Kaos (The Complex)

MR.VANDAL

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Oct 6: Oct 7: Oct 8: Oct 9:

Mike Gao DUBWISE Reverend Peyton’s Big Damn Band Andrew WK Presented by Este Pizza

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LIVE MUSIC

Oct 4:

6PM DOORS EARLY SHOW

DJ Juggy + DJ Stario (Downstairs) DJ Latu (The Green Pig) DJ Sneeky Long (Twist) Dueling Piano Show (Funk n’ Dive) Dueling Pianos feat. Troy + Jules + JD (The Tavernacle) George + Eric + Jed (Keys on Main)

MARIAN HILL

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CITY WEEKLY’S HOT LIST FOR THE WEEK

KARAOKE

Bingo Karaoke (The Tavernacle)

TUESDAY 10.4 LIVE MUSIC

Futuristic + Beez (The Complex) Lindsey Stirling (UCCU Center) Literary Death Match (The State Room) Machine Gun Kelly + Mod Sun (The Complex) Matt Hires + Volunteer (Urban Lounge) Matt Wertz + Cappa + Aaron Krause (Billboard-Live!) Neil Young + Promise of the Real (USANA Amphitheatre) see p. 45 Pennywise + Unwritten Law + Runaway Kids + Strung Out (The Depot) Ryley Walker + Circuit des Yeux + Sympathy Pain (Kilby Court) A Tribe Called Red (Urban Lounge)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Open Mic (The Royal)

KARAOKE

Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue on State) Karaoke (The Tavernacle) Superstar Karaoke w/ DJ Ducky (Club Jam)

Karaoke w/ DJ Thom (A Bar Named Sue on State) Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck (Twist) Karaoke w/ Spotlight Entertainment (Keys on Main) Karaoke (The Tavernacle)

MONDAY 10.3

WEDNESDAY 10.5

LIVE MUSIC

LIVE MUSIC

Delta Rae (In the Venue) Dinosaur Jr. + Steve Gunn + Residual Kid (The Depot) see p. 45 From Indian Lakes + Made Violent + Wild Wild Horses (Kilby Court) Quiet House + Aubrey Debauchery + Drew Danburry + Batty Blue + The Hulagans (Muse Music) The Weeks + Cold Fronts (Billboard-Live!) White Reaper + Primitive Programme + Mortigi Tempo + Kapix (Urban Lounge)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Monday Night Blues Jam (The Royal) Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig)

Brian Wilson (Abravanel Hall) see p. 47 The Cult (The Depot) GRiZ + Haywyre + Louis Futon (The Complex) see p. 50 Must Be the Holy Ghost + Burmese Python + Tarot Death Card (Kilby Court) Mr. Gnome + Cupidcome (Urban Lounge) Tech N9ne + Krizz Kaliko + JL (The Great Saltair) Tengger Cavalry + Incite (Metro Music Hall) see p. 47

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Detroit-based electronic musician GRiZ calls his latest album Good Will Prevail (All Good Records). Evidently, he means it. He gives away tons of his music on MyNameIsGRiZ. com and raises money for Little Kids Rock. His appearance is one of several shows happening in SLC leading up to the presidential election, where GRiZ and artists like Okkervil River, Ani DiFranco and Bad Religion partner with the non-partisan voter registration organization HeadCount and HelloVote, a company that enables registration via text or Facebook Messenger. On top of that, the man invented a new strain of weed (GRiZ Kush) that won the People’s Choice Award at the 2015 High Times Cannabis Cup. He truly is a man of the people. GRiZ 2016! (RH) The Complex, 536 W. 100 South, 7 p.m., $25 in advance, $30 day of show, TheComplexSLC.com

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

COME SOAK UP THE LAST OF

WEDNESDAY 10.5

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SEP 27 BOOKENDS (RICK GERBER & GILLIAN CHASE)

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SEPTEMBER 29, 2016 | 51

SEP SEP SEP OCT

OCT OCT OCT OCT

| CITY WEEKLY |

SPIRITS • FOOD • GOOD COMPANY


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

52 | SEPTEMBER 29, 2016 | CITY WEEKLY |

SHOTS OF SUMMER

BY JOSH SCHEUERMAN @scheuerman7

We sell tickets!

check us first! low or no fees

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SEPTEMBER 29, 2016 | 53

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| CITY WEEKLY |

MONDAY - FRIDAY

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| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

tuesday

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Emanon

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

FOLLOWED BY DJ LATU


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

54 | SEPTEMBER 29, 2016 | CITY WEEKLY |

VENUE DIRECTORY

LIVE MUSIC & KARAOKE

A BAR NAMED SUE 3928 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-274-5578, Trivia Tues., DJ Wed., Karaoke Thurs. A BAR NAMED SUE ON STATE 8136 S. State, SLC, 801-566-3222, Karaoke Tues. ABG’S LIBATION EMPORIUM 190 W. Center St., Provo, 801-373-1200, Live music ALLEGED 205 25th St., Ogden, 801-9900692 AREA 51 451 S. 400 West, SLC, 801-5340819, Karaoke Wed., ‘80s Thurs., DJs Fri. & Sat. THE BAR IN SUGARHOUSE 2168 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-485-1232 BAR-X 155 E. 200 South, SLC, 801-355-2287 BARBARY COAST 4242 S. State, Murray, 801-265-9889 BATTERS UP 1717 S. Main, SLC, 801-4634996, Karaoke Tues., Live music Sat. THE BAYOU 645 S. State, SLC, 801-9618400, Live music Fri. & Sat. BOURBON HOUSE 19 E. 200 South, SLC, 801-746-1005, Local jazz jam Tues., Karaoke Thurs., Live music Sat., Funk & soul night Sun. BREWSKIS 244 25th St., Ogden, 801-3941713, Live music CAROL’S COVE II 3424 S. State, SLC, 801-466-2683, Karaoke Thurs., DJs & Live music Fri. & Sat. THE CENTURY CLUB 315 24th St., Ogden, 801-781-5005, DJs, Live music CHEERS TO YOU 315 S. Main, SLC, 801575-6400 CHEERS TO YOU MIDVALE 7642 S. State, 801-566-0871 CHUCKLE’S LOUNGE 221 W. 900 South, SLC, 801-532-1721 CIRCLE LOUNGE 328 S. State, SLC, 801-5315400, DJs CISERO’S 306 Main, Park City, 435-6495044, Karaoke Thurs., Live music & DJs CLUB 48 16 E. 4800 South, Murray, 801262-7555 CLUB 90 9065 S. 150 West, Sandy, 801-5663254, Trivia Mon., Poker Thurs., Live music Fri. & Sat., Live bluegrass Sun. CLUB TRY-ANGLES 251 W. 900 South, SLC, 801-364-3203, Karaoke Thurs., DJs Fri. & Sat. CLUB X 445 S. 400 West, SLC, 801-9354267, DJs, Live music THE COMPLEX 536 W. 100 South, SLC, 801-528-9197, Live music CRUZRS SALOON 3943 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-272-1903, Free pool Wed. & Thurs., Karaoke Fri. & Sat. DAWG POUND 3350 S. State, SLC, 801-2612337, Live music THE DEERHUNTER PUB 2000 N. 300 West, Spanish Fork, 801-798-8582, Live music Fri. & Sat. THE DEPOT 400 W. South Temple, SLC, 801-355-5522, Live music

DEVIL’S DAUGHTER 533 S. 500 West, SLC, 801-532-1610, Karaoke Wed., Live music Fri. & Sat. DO DROP INN 2971 N. Hill Field Road (400 West), Layton, 801-776-9697. Karaoke Fri. & Sat. DONKEY TAILS CANTINA 136 E. 12300 South, Draper, 801-571-8134. Karaoke Wed.; Live music Tues., Thurs. & Fri; Live DJ Sat. DOWNSTAIRS 625 Main, Park City, 435226-5340, Live music, DJs ELIXIR LOUNGE 6405 S. 3000 East, Holladay, 801-943-1696 THE FALLOUT 625 S. 600 West, SLC, 801953-6374, Live music FAT’S GRILL 2182 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-484-9467, Live music THE FILLING STATION 8987 W. 2700 South, Magna, 801-250-1970, Karaoke Thurs. FLANAGAN’S ON MAIN 438 Main, Park City, 435-649-8600, Trivia Tues., Live music Fri. & Sat. FOX HOLE PUB & GRILL 7078 S. Redwood Road, West Jordan, 801-566-4653, Karaoke, Live music FUNK ’N DIVE BAR 2550 Washington Blvd., Ogden, 801-621-3483, Live music, Karaoke THE GARAGE 1199 Beck St., SLC, 801-5213904, Live music GRACIE’S 326 S. West Temple, SLC, 801819-7565, Live music, DJs THE GREAT SALTAIR 12408 W. Saltair Drive, Magna, 801-250-6205, Live music THE GREEN PIG PUB 31 E. 400 South, SLC, 801-532-7441, Live music Thurs.-Sat. HABITS 832 E. 3900 South, SLC, 801-2682228, Poker Mon., Ladies night Tues., ’80s night Wed., Karaoke Thurs., DJs Fri. & Sat. HIGHLANDER 6194 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-277-8251, Karaoke THE HOG WALLOW PUB 3200 E. Big Cottonwood Canyon Road, SLC, 801-733-5567, Live music THE HOTEL/CLUB ELEVATE 155 W. 200 South, SLC, 801-478-4310, DJs HUKA BAR & GRILL 151 E. 6100 South, Murray, 801-281-9665, Reggae Tues., DJs Fri. & Sat ICE HAUS 7 E. 4800 South, Murray, 801266-1885 IN THE VENUE/CLUB SOUND 219 S. 600 West, SLC, 801-359-3219, Live music & DJs JACKALOPE LOUNGE 372 S. State, SLC, 801-359-8054, DJs JAM 751 N. 300 West, SLC, 801-891-1162, Karaoke Tues., Wed. & Sun.; DJs Thurs.-Sat. JOHNNY’S ON SECOND 165 E. 200 South, SLC, 801-746-3334, DJs Tues. & Fri., Karaoke Wed., Live music Sat. KARAMBA 1051 E. 2100 South, SLC, 801696-0639, DJs KEYS ON MAIN 242 S. Main, SLC, 801-3633638, Karaoke Tues. & Wed., Dueling pianos Thurs.-Sat. KILBY COURT 741 S. Kilby Court (330 West), SLC, 801-364-3538, Live music, all ages KRISTAUF’S 16 W. Market St., SLC, 801943-1696, DJ Fri. & Sat. THE LEPRECHAUN INN 4700 S. 900 East, Murray, 801-268-3294 LIQUID JOE’S 1249 E. 3300 South, SLC, 801-467-5637, Live music Tues.-Sat. THE LOADING DOCK 445 S. 400 West, SLC, 385-229-4493, Live music, all ages LUCKY 13 135 W. 1300 South, SLC, 801487-4418, Trivia Wed.

LUMPY’S DOWNTOWN 145 Pierpont Ave., SLC, 801-938-3070 LUMPY’S HIGHLAND 3000 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-484-5597 THE MADISON/THE COWBOY 295 W. Center St., Provo, 801-375-9000, Live music, DJs MAXWELL’S EAST COAST EATERY 9 Exchange Place, SLC, 801-328-0304, Poker Tues., DJs Fri. & Sat. METRO BAR 615 W. 100 South, SLC, 801652-6543, DJs THE MOOSE LOUNGE 180 W. 400 South, SLC, 801-900-7499, DJs NO NAME SALOON 447 Main, Park City, 435-649-6667 THE OFFICE 122 W. Pierpont Ave., SLC, 801-883-8838 O.P. ROCKWELL 268 Main, Park City, 435615-7000, Live music PARK CITY LIVE 427 Main, Park City, 435649-9123, Live music PAT’S BBQ 155 W. Commonwealth Ave., SLC, 801-484-5963, Live music Thurs.-Sat., All ages THE PENALTY BOX 3 W. 4800 South, Murray, 801-590-9316, Karaoke Tues., Live Music, DJs PIPER DOWN 1492 S. State, SLC, 801-4681492, Poker Mon., Acoustic Tues., Trivia Wed., Bingo Thurs. POPLAR STREET PUB 242 S. 200 West, SLC, 801-532-2715, Live music Thurs.-Sat. THE RED DOOR 57 W. 200 South, SLC, 801-363-6030, DJs Fri., Live jazz Sat. THE ROYAL 4760 S. 900 East, SLC, 801590-9940, Live music SANDY STATION 8925 Harrison St., Sandy, 801-255-2078, DJs SCALLYWAGS 3040 S. State, SLC, 801604-0869 SKY 149 W. Pierpont Ave., SLC, 801-8838714, Live music THE SPUR BAR & GRILL 352 Main, Park City, 435-615-1618, Live music THE STATE ROOM 638 S. State, SLC, 800501-2885, Live music THE STEREO ROOM 521 N. 1200 West, Orem, 714-345-8163, Live music, All ages SUGARHOUSE PUB 1992 S. 1100 East, SLC, 801-413-2857 THE SUN TRAPP 102 S. 600 West, SLC, 385-235-6786 THE TAVERNACLE 201 E. 300 South, SLC, 801-519-8900, Dueling pianos Wed.-Sat., Karaoke Sun.-Tues. TIN ANGEL CAFE 365 W. 400 South, SLC, 801-328-4155, Live music THE URBAN LOUNGE 241 S. 500 East, SLC, 801-746-0557, Live music TWIST 32Exchange Place, SLC 801-3223200, Live music VELOUR 135 N. University Ave., Provo, 801818-2263, Live music, All ages WASTED SPACE 342 S. State, SLC, 801531-2107, DJs Thurs.-Sat. THE WESTERNER 3360 S. Redwood Road, West Valley City, 801-972-5447, Live music WILLIE’S LOUNGE 1716 S. Main, SLC, 760828-7351, Trivia Wed., Karaoke Fri.-Sun., Live music ZEST KITCHEN & BAR 275 S. 200 West, SLC, 801-433-0589, DJs

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CROSSWORD PUZZLE

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PAGE TURNERS

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ACROSS

Last week’s answers

| CITY WEEKLY |

SEPTEMBER 29, 2016 | 57

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

1. Spenser's "The ____ Queene" 2. Tack on 3. Two-time Grammy winner Kathy 4. Conks out 5. Snake in an Ogden Nash poem that features the word "Cleopatricide" 6. Screen partner 7. Sound of leaves

46. Sister of Peter Rabbit 47. WWII depth charge targets 48. "Tootsie" Oscar winner 50. Missouri city, informally 54. Quantities: Abbr. 55. Starz alternative 57. Actress Vardalos 59. Periodic table suffix

SUDOKU

DOWN

8. Quick round of tennis 9. Neurotic condition, for short 10. Killjoy 11. Many a Bach composition 12. Heavy hammer 13. Rude thing to drop 14. Tell a whopper 20. "Solve for x" subj. 24. Tar Heels' state: Abbr. 26. Not the sharing type 27. Opposite of post28. China's Sun ____sen 31. Quid pro ____ 33. Part of PG 34. Choice involving two options 35. President before GHWB 36. Maiden name indicator 37. Hollywood's Harris and Helms 38. Perceptible by touch 40. Less firm 41. Saudi neighbor 42. Victimized, with "on" 43. Wine or cheese stat 45. Country singer Tucker and others

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

1. Reunion grp. 4. Marx's "____ Kapital" 7. They're for the birds 13. One who's resigned 15. Dweebish 16. Sex symbol played by Gretchen Mol in a 2005 biopic 17. Beguile 18. Is a keynoter, e.g. 19. Gangsters' guns 21. Stamp for an incoming pkg. 22. Squeakers 23. In the 2007 movie "Juno," actress whose character says "I'm already pregnant, so what other kind of shenanigans could I get into" 25. End of a Grammy-winning Bobby McFerrin song title 29. Act precious (with) 30. Jordan neighbor 32. Smart ____ whip 33. Books you can't put down ... or this puzzle's theme 38. "I Ching" concept 39. Had a balance 40. He cofounded Google with Sergey Brin 44. Like sleep, ideally 49. They may come off a shelf 51. Jessica of "Sin City" 52. Any of the Andes: Abbr. 53. Track ____ 54. When some do lunch 56. 60s singer Gene 58. He's #3 behind Jimi Hendrix and Eric Clapton on Rolling Stone's list of the "100 Greatest Guitarists" 60. Mrs. Robinson's daughter 61. Chapter title in Gandhi's autobiography between the chapters "Preparation for England" and "In London at Last" 62. Installed anew, as flooring 63. Middle of summer? 64. The "S" in GPS: Abbr.


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Want a little pampering, without inhaling a lungful of incense? Check out Spa Bisou, which offers every spa service imaginable, with a vibe that feels like your best friend’s house. Opened in January, the spa offers permanent cosmetics, microblading, spray tans, waxing, eyelash extensions, facials and other skin-care services. They also provide classes that teach how to perform permanent cosmetics and microblading. Founder Clarissa Martinez always wanted to run her own business. With a background in art, multimedia and health, esthetics was a natural fit. “I used to do oil painting, but I realized that wasn’t ever going to feed me,” Martinez jokes. She went into it hoping it would be lucrative, and fell in love with it. Martinez opened the spa soon after, and business took off. When she got too busy, she reached out for help. Lindsey Slack, one of Martinez’ former esthetics instructors, helped as the spa was getting off the ground, and before long, Martinez made Slack her business partner. “I couldn’t live without her,” Martinez says. The feeling is mutual. “I love working with Clarissa,” Slack says, as well as the cozy, casual environment they have created. “We want people to feel at home, comfortable. We are not your typical fluff spa.” They specialize in a wide range of skin services, Martinez says, including “antiaging, acne, you name it.” And for customers who want it all, try the “Queen Package,” which includes dermaplaning, a chemical peel, paraffin treatment for hands and feet, a back treatment and a pedicure. But one of the most unique things about the spa is their classes. Martinez estimates that probably 30 percent of their business is from customers who come in for spray tans or facials, and the other 70

Spa Bisou’s boho chic vibe feels like the inside of your artsy best friend’s house

percent is teaching students to perform microblading and permanent cosmetics on their own. They offer financing for classes, continuing education, and Martinez estimates that her students earn back their tuition in their first month of practice. They also provide free space for people to bring in their own clients when they are starting their business. Unlike most beauty procedures, microblading and permanent cosmetics don’t require an esthetician’s license. “The state of Utah considers them tattooing,” Martinez says. That means anyone who is interested in learning this emerging cosmetic trend can sign up for training—as long as they’re over 18—though Martinez notes that trained estheticians will probably pick up the skills quicker. Microblading is a semi-permanent way of thickening, darkening or reshaping eyebrows. It uses different pigments than tattoo ink and only goes down to the epidermis—not the dermis layer, like a tattoo. The two-step process lasts 18 months to three years. And if you decide you don’t like your new brows, they can be removed. “We can even remove the old-school permanent eyebrow tattoos,” Martinez adds. n

Spa Bisou 2858 Highland Drive, Salt Lake City 801-652-2384 Monday- Saturday: 10 a.m.-7 p.m. SpaBisou.net

58 | SEPTEMBER 29, 2016

| COMMUNITY | | CITYWEEKLY.NET |

T BEA

Some of Martinez’ artwork is featured in the spa.

Former students service their own clients in one of the spa’s practice rooms.


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Poets Corner

I want you To go to the top of the pass. Taste the dry Feel the grit And step out Into the valley beyond. Beryl Smith

Send your poem (max 15 lines), to: Poet’s Corner, City Weekly, 248 South Main Street, SLC, UT 84101 or e-mail to poetscorner@cityweekly.net.

Published entrants receive a $15 value gift from CW. Each entry must include name and mailing address.

#cwpoetscorner

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY B Y R O B

B R E Z S N Y

Go to RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Thank you for all the entertainment you’ve provided in the past 12 months, Libra. Since shortly before your birthday in 2015, you have taken lively and gallant actions to rewrite history. You have banished a pesky demon and repaired a hole in your soul. You’ve educated the most immature part of yourself and nurtured the most neglected part of yourself. To my joyful shock, you have even worked to transform a dysfunctional romantic habit that in previous years had subtly undermined your ability to get the kind of intimacy you seek. What’s next? Here’s my guess: an unprecedented exemption from the demands of the past. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Are you able to expand while you are contracting, and vice versa? Can you shed mediocre comforts and also open your imagination to gifts that await you at the frontier? Is it possible to be skeptical toward ideas that shrink your world and people who waste your time, even as you cultivate optimism and innocence about the interesting challenges ahead of you? Here’s what I think, Scorpio: Yes, you can. At least for right now, you are more flexible and multifaceted than you might imagine.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you can expect an unlikely coincidence or two in the coming days. You should also be alert for helpfully prophetic dreams, clear telepathic messages and pokes from tricky informers. In fact, I suspect that useful hints and clues will be swirling in extra abundance, sometimes in the form of direct communications from reliable sources, but on occasion as mysterious signals from strange angels.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20) How will you deal with a provocative opportunity to reinvent and reinvigorate your approach to work? My guess is that if you ignore this challenge, it will devolve into an obstruction. If you embrace it, on the other hand, you will be led to unforeseen improvements in the way you earn money and structure your daily routine. Here’s the paradox: Being open to seemingly impractical considerations will ultimately turn out to be quite practical. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Is it possible that you’re on the verge of reclaiming some of the innocent wisdom you had as a child? Judging from the current astrological omens, I suspect it is. If all goes well, you will soon be gifted with a long glimpse of your true destiny—a close replica of the vision that bloomed in you at a tender age. And this will, in turn, enable you to actually see magic unicorns and play with mischievous fairies and eat clouds that dip down close to the earth. And not only that: Having a holy vision of your original self will make you even smarter than you already are. For example, you could get insights about how to express previously inexpressible parts of yourself. You might discover secrets about how to attract more of the love you have always felt deprived of. CANCER (June 21-July 22) I’m not asking you to tell me about the places and situations where you feel safe and fragile and timid. I want to know about where you feel safe and strong and bold. Are there sanctuaries that nurture your audacious wisdom? Are there natural sites that tease out your primal willpower and help you clarify your goals? Go to those power spots. Allow them to exalt you with their transformative blessings. Pray and sing and dance there. And maybe find a new oasis to excite and incite you, as well. Your creative savvy will bloom in November if you nurture yourself now with this magic. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) One of your old reliable formulas might temporarily be useless or even deceptive. An ally could be withholding an important detail from you. Your favorite psychological crutch is in disrepair, and your go-to excuse is no longer viable. And yet I think you’re going to be just fine, Leo. Plan B will probably work better than Plan A. Secondary sources and substitutes should provide you with all the leverage you need. And I bet you will finally capitalize on an advantage that you have previously neglected. For best results, be vigilant for unexpected help. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Attention! Warning! One of your signature fears is losing its chokehold on your imagination. If this trend continues, its power to scare you might diminish more than 70 percent by November 1. And then what will you do? How can you continue to plug away at your goals if you don’t have worry and angst and dread to motivate you? I suppose you could shop around for a replacement fear—a new prod to keep you on the true and righteous path. But you might also want to consider an alternative: the possibility of drawing more of the energy you need by feeding your lust for life.

SEPTEMBER 29, 2016 | 61

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) You know that inner work you’ve been doing with such diligence? I’m referring to those psycho-spiritual transformations you have been attending to in the dark … the challenging but oddly gratifying negotiations you’ve been carrying on with your secret self … the steady, strong future you’ve been struggling to forge out of the chaos? Well, I foresee you making a big breakthrough in the coming weeks. The progress you’ve been earning, which up until now has been mostly invisible to others, will finally be seen and appreciated. The vows you uttered so long ago will, at last, yield at least some of the tangible results you’ve pined for.

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CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) I believe that during the coming weeks you will have an extra amount of freedom from fate. The daily grind won’t be able to grind you down. The influences that typically tend to sap your joie de vivre will leave you in peace. Are you ready to take full advantage of this special dispensation? Please say, “Yes, yes, a thousand times yes!” Be alert for opportunities to rise above the lowest common denominators. Be aggressive about rejecting the trivial questions that trap everyone in low expectations. Here are my predictions: Your willpower will consistently trump your conditioning. You won’t have to play by the old rules, but will instead have extra sovereignty to invent the future.

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SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) You Sagittarians are famous for filling your cups so full they’re in danger of spilling over. Sometimes the rest of us find this kind of cute. On other occasions, we don’t enjoy getting wine splashed on our shoes. But I suspect that in the coming weeks, the consequences of your tendency to overflow will be mostly benign—perhaps even downright beneficial. So I suggest you experiment with the pleasures of surging and gushing. Have fun as you escape your niches and transcend your containers. Give yourself permission to seek adventures that might be too extravagant for polite company. Now here’s a helpful reminder from your fellow Sagittarian, poet Emily Dickinson: “You cannot fold a flood and put it in a drawer.”

ARIES (March 21-April 19) What’s the difference between a love warrior and a love worrier? Love warriors work diligently to keep enhancing their empathy, compassion and emotional intelligence. Love worriers fret so much about not getting the love they want that they neglect to develop their intimacy skills. Love warriors are always vigilant for how their own ignorance might be sabotaging togetherness, while love worriers dwell on how their partner’s ignorance is sabotaging togetherness. Love warriors stay focused on their relationship’s highest goals, while love worriers are preoccupied with every little relationship glitch. I bring this to your attention, Aries, because the next seven weeks will be an excellent time to become less of a love worrier and more of a love warrior.

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Low-Wagers

If you haven’t noticed, it’s election time. One of the biggest campaign issues is better wages for American workers. We love to hear about rich people, but how often does the harsh reality of the minimum-wage worker come across your news feed? According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Utah has some pretty crappy pay for good, working people out there. Below are the full-time jobs with the lowest average yearly wage in the state: n Ambulance drivers and attendants (excluding EMTs): $18,270 n Ushers, lobby attendants and tickettakers at movie theaters: $18,530 n Baggage porters and bellhops: $18,700 n Combined food preparation and servers, including fast-food: $18,740 n Dishwashers: $18,990 n Fast-food cooks: $19,040 n Hosts and hostesses at restaurants, lounges and coffee shops: $19,510 n Lifeguards, ski patrol and other recreational protective service workers: $19,680 n Umpires, referees and other sports officials: $19,810 n Dining room and cafeteria attendants and bartender helpers: $19,820 Those wages are yearly income for those jobs, and don’t include tips. If you’re a fulltime fast-food cook, you’re pulling in about $52 per day. Now let’s use that daily figure along with some estimated monthly living costs to see just how hard it can be for some of these Utahns: A one-bedroom apartment downtown is around $900 a month. And let’s say your utilities on said apartment, Wi-Fi and cell phone bill come out to $250; and car payment, including insurance, is $200. Groceries and other spending money are budgeted at $400. That totals $1,750 per month. Thirty day’s pay at an average of $52 per day is $1,560. That would leave you in the negative of about $190 each month. But, hey, maybe you get a roommate. Getting help with half the rent and utilities would save you maybe a few hundred, but these estimates are assuming you don’t have any other expenses, which is likely not the case. What about those with credit card debt, student loans or those with kids? Both major political parties want minimum wages raised. The $10 per-hour job, which brings in about $1,600 a month should be raised to $15 per month, which would give people a fighting chance at surviving on $2,400 per month. Michael Moore celebrated the fifth anniversary of Occupy Wall Street by telling the press that the historic movement has helped raise wages for workers in our country. This presidential election will maybe shed more light for the financial future of everyone … if everyone votes. n Content is prepared expressly for Community and is not endorsed by City Weekly staff.

F-ing Cancer

LeAnna Porter University of Utah Fan but Graduated Utah State University Loan officer Citywide Home Loans Landscape Designer Extraordinaire Domestic Partner of Julie Brizzee Mom to Aimee Beeby “Our friend with the big hair and big heart. Now OUR hearts are broken. Don’t worry kid, we’ll hide Julie’s keys for you.” Love, Babs and Bella

SEPTEMBER 29, 2016 | 63

WEST VALLEY

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City Weekly Sept 29, 2016  

Trans in Utah

City Weekly Sept 29, 2016  

Trans in Utah