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TYESON ROGERS

Retail Account Executive One of the fresher members of our sales force, Murraybred Rogers’ childhood memories are “pretty State Street heavy.” He says the street makes him “think about football practice, Take Five—a greasy spoon restaurant that used to be by the library—and the Show Club, with its huge neon sign.”

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Cover Story, Aug. 4, “Click Mates”

KAY BLACK

JILL GOMEZ

“[T]he majority of the Jordan River’s water is treated wastewater,” and Utah is allowing substandard wastewater treatment plants to operate. Yuck. Utah is not capable of managing its land, air or water. So sad …

Treasure house of real, right, relevant. Fun to read! Via Facebook

News, Aug. 4, “Toxic Times”

Dear City Weekly, This is a good piece. You’re missing another story altogether, though (maybe this could be a weekly column: What Poison Comes Next From Utah Lake?). Riverton’s secondary water has been shut off (the only city to have water cut off) due to this issue, while we keep Jordanelle full for Salt Lake secondary water. Water politics are benefitting one segment of the population over another.

KATE MOWER Via Facebook

It was a turd blossom? I did not know this about Utah Lake but had heard the Jordan River was a toxic cesspool. Utah has a penchant for making it to the news, and not in a good way. Keep voting Republican, Utah! Not.

Via Facebook

CATHERINE MILLER Via Facebook

Hits & Misses, Aug. 4, “Liquor Lawmakers”

The Utah legislator can solve anything. They solved homeless, they solved homophobia, poverty, the health care crisis. All of these things were solved by the Utah legislator, in a little place called fantasy land.

ERIN BAIN

Via Facebook Parent time can help, but we got parents working 40-plus hours at the demand of their employers due to understaffed or single

parents working 2-plus jobs to afford housing. Fix the underlying issues before moving onto the symptoms.

ASHLEY BOWDEN

Dining, Aug. 4, Chef Gao

Oh great, now the secret is out.

TOM GREENE Via Facebook

Via Facebook Utah law makers, aka the Mormons, treat Utahns like they’re children.

SCOTT FRANDSEN Via Facebook

I can’t believe it’s 2016 and they’re still trying to legislate morality. Oh, wait … yes I can.

GREG HACKNEY

I’ve had such a variation in experiences there, and I’ve ordered the same thing every time. Ordered the kung pao seven times; twice it was good, once it was amazing, four times it was plain bad. I wish it was great every time.

BRYAN ORVIS Via Facebook

Movie review, Aug. 4, Suicide Squad

Via Facebook I believe [stopping underage drinking] starts in the home. Teaching our children responsibility on every level should begin early and continue through the growing years. We cannot keep blaming society for everything.

SUSAN-JOE CRUZ Via Facebook

Ummm false. I’m a die-hard DC fan, and it was amazing! Critics have no idea what they are doing nowadays.

@DRTDIRT26 Via Twitter

I saw it … and it was really awful. Even for a superhero movie.

JEFF STAKER

Straight Dope, Aug. 4, “Bulk Cargo Carcasses”

The chances of me having an ugly conex in my yard are precisely zero.

ALLEN REESE

Via Facebook We’ll just wait out the ad campaign for the DVD release, and soon this will be all behind us.

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Publisher JOHN SALTAS

Editorial

Editor ENRIQUE LIMÓN A&E Editor SCOTT RENSHAW Music Editor RANDY HARWARD Senior Staff Writer STEPHEN DARK Staff Writer COLBY FRAZIER Copy Editor ANDREA HARVEY Proofers SARAH ARNOFF, LANCE GUDMUNDSEN Dining Listings Coordinator MIKEY SALTAS Editorial Interns DASH ANDERSON, JORDAN FLOYD, CASEY KOLDEWYN, KATHLEEN STONE

Contributors

CECIL ADAMS, KIMBALL BENNION, KATHARINE BIELE, ROB BREZSNY, AIMEE L. COOK, BABS DE LAY, BILL FROST, MARYANN JOHANSON, JOHN RASMUSON, STAN ROSENZWEIG, TED SCHEFFLER, CHUCK SHEPHERD, ZAC SMITH, ALEX SPRINGER, BRIAN STAKER, ANDREW WRIGHT

STAFF Circulation

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Production

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Accounting Manager CODY WINGET Associate Business Manager PAULA SALTAS Business Department Administrator ALISSA DIMICK Office Administrator CELESTE NELSON Technical Director BRYAN MANNOS

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OPINION

Etiquette

“Unruled letter paper, white or creamwhite, with envelope to match, is used for social correspondence. Ink should be black or dark blue. Do not use a typewriter or a pencil.” —Hints of Etiquette

In a box of stuff that belonged to my grandfather, I found a book titled Hints of Etiquette. Its yellowing pages attested to the year it was published—1924. The title reminded me that I hadn’t thought much about etiquette since the days my mother objected to elbows on the dinner table. The prospect of a time-capsule glimpse of the Roaring ’20s—a decade I associate with speakeasies, the Charleston, Duke Ellington and the Harlem Renaissance—drew me in. If the twenties was indeed a tumultuous decade, I found no evidence of it in the book. Instead, its pages evoked an age as quaint as a curtsy in which decorum held sway. The book’s atmospherics were more Jane Austen than F. Scott Fitzgerald or Langston Hughes. Judge for yourself: “A woman joins a group of men in an elevator. Instantly, nearly every man’s hat comes off. A few retain the hats. It is not to these few that the woman’s heart is warmed.” (Even more warmed by a handwritten letter on cream-white paper, I surmise.) “Social correspondence” has morphed into “social media” in the 21st century. Fountain pens and stationery have yielded to smartphones, tablets and laptops. Americans spend about 10 and a half hours a day on digital devices. We check our phones every seven minutes. However, whether you compose a letter or a text, the underlying social transactions are the same. My grandfather’s book lays out rules of etiquette for letters—no “blots, erasures, evidences of carelessness and haste”—so I presume there are rules governing texts and emails. I don’t know for certain because I don’t use social media. But I have gleaned one cardinal rule: Use your phone

BY JOHN RASMUSON

whenever you want, even if driving a car, sitting on a toilet, dining in a restaurant or playing with your kids. Curious about other rules, I turned to Reclaiming Conversation, a book by Sherry Turkle, an eminent MIT professor who is an expert on digital culture. As the title suggests, our obsession with phones is eroding “the most human—and humanizing—thing we do,” face-to-face conversation. The result? “Without conversation, studies show that we are less empathic, less connected, less creative and fulfilled,” Turkle writes. In the 1920s, conversation was a cultivated pastime. Women hosted “at- home days” dedicated to receiving visitors. “The customary time for calls is between 3:30 and 4:30 p.m.,” the etiquette book stipulates. “This avoids conflicting with the tea hour at 5. No one but intimates should drop in at tea time.” We moderns are reluctant conversationalists, Turkle observes. We prefer a crafted message to the immediacy of face-to-face talk. If a conversation holds no promise after seven minutes, Turkle describes a “sevenminute rule” that permits you to reach for the phone. On the other hand, “phubbing” is as problematical as the glow of a phone in a darkened theater. To phub is to snub the one you’re with by engaging with a phone. A considerate person leaves the room when the phone rings. In texting, punctuation demands a deft touch. The right punctuation is very important, writes Turkle, because it “expresses all the information that tone of voice and body posture conveys in face-to-face conversation.” What’s the right punctuation? As Justice Potter Stewart said about pornography, you know it when you see it!!!  Emoticons are to texts what Ivanka is to the Trumpster. That a post or a message must be answered immediately is the 11th commandment. But there are those who deviate in order to seem

nonchalant. Their rule: Wait a day to reply on Facebook. Their rationale: If you respond too eagerly, you imply your life outside of social media is as colorless as concrete. The most inviolate of the rules is: Don’t use a text or email to break up. Nothing good will come of it. In the aggregate, the conventions Turkle describes leave me uneasy. “We sense that new social rules allow us to check our phones almost all the time,” she writes, “but we also sense that on some human level these rules don’t feel right.” It didn’t feel right at a chamber-music concert at Westminster College. At the end of an impressive performance, the pianist—dressed in a lacy, black gown—left the stage and found an empty seat in the audience. After the intermission, as her colleagues played Shubert to an approving crowd, she played her iPhone to a disapproving one. It didn’t feel right watching University of Utah students walk out of class while the professor was talking. It happened so often in so many classes I wondered if Inelastic Bladder Disorder was endemic. Not so. Turkle explained that it was not the urge to pee that caused them to interrupt the class, it was the urge to text. Even the phone-addicted will admit to reservations. “No phones allowed” meetings are more common, as is the Cell Phone Tower challenge in restaurants. Diners pile their phones in a tower on the table as they sit down. The phones are “on,” but the first person to touch his phone buys dinner for all. The story of the tower will raise a smile of incredulity in 2024. By then, the iPhone will be tracking VCRs into the museum. Parents will be hiring empathy coaches for their kids, and boys will learn to warm girls’ hearts with a handwritten note on cream-white paper. Let’s hope. CW

“WITHOUT CONVERSATION ... WE ARE LESS EMPATHATIC, LESS CONNECTED, LESS CREATIVE.”

STAFF BOX

Readers can comment at cityweekly.net

What’s been your worst etiquette faux pas? Mason Rodrickc: Sometimes I make really bad jokes and hit “reply all.” Ivy Watrous: Every time someone orders pizza “to share,” I end up eating the whole thing by myself.

Scott Renshaw: Probably unfriending an immediate family member on Facebook because of politics-related ranting, rather than quietly removing from my timeline. And then openly referring to it in this way.

Lisa Dorelli: Well, this is embarrassing. I was at a quaint beer tasting for Red Rock Brewery, among the high-class folks in the industry. While biting into a small appetizer, I accidentally bit right through the plastic fork I was using. All of my friends at the table we were standing at saw. Fork pieces in mouth, I was super “klassy.” Sierra Sessions: Falling asleep during a conversation—only I’m standing and my eyes are open, so nobody can ever tell. Andrea Harvey: Back in the early years of Snapchat, I screenshotted my friends’ ugliest selfies they privately sent me, and then made a series of collages with them on Instagram. Some of them were pretty pissed about it and told me it was a violation of Snapchat etiquette.

Randy Harward: I once deeply offended the leader of an isolated indigenous tribe by refusing to drink ayahuasca from my companion’s skull. When I pantomimed that I simply preferred my BPA-free Nalgene bottle, everything was cool. And the barbeque was amazing.

Send feedback to comments@cityweekly.net

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BY KATHARINE BIELE

FIVE SPOT

RANDOM QUESTIONS, SURPRISING ANSWERS

STAN ROSENZWEIG

HITS&MISSES @kathybiele

Poor Ol’ Phil

What is it about the Deseret News and Phil Lyman? Once again on Sunday, the D-News featured the convicted scofflaw on its front page, and said he “doesn’t believe” he broke the law. Isn’t that rich? If only we could all break laws and simply say, hey, we didn’t “think” we did anything wrong. Instead, the paper has chosen to cloak Lyman with a hero’s robe, humbled and reading “Hamilton” in his cell next to a drug addict. That was during his “grueling” 10 days in jail for an illegal all-terrain vehicle ride on protected federal lands. There is no comparison between him and Tim DeChristopher, who got two years in prison and a $10,000 fine for faking a bid on 22,000 acres of land destined for energy development. Lyman will have to be happy with three years probation, and a newspaper keeping the myth alive.

A Lifted Letter

Of course, Utah GOP Chair James Evans didn’t return KUTV’s calls. Nobody likes to be called a plagiarist—not even Melania Trump. That’s because plagiarism is a serious breach of someone else’s intellectual property. Just ask Brigham Young University’s Joel Campbell, who said, “In my journalism/PR class any student who would do this would fail the assignment and possibly the class.” But then you have to know Evans’ sense of humor. He obviously wanted to make fun of his counterpart, Democrat Peter Corroon, who was bemoaning the Utah governor’s decision to support Donald Trump’s presidential bid. As Trump has said: “I was obviously being sarcastic … but not that sarcastic, to be honest with you.” So Evans took Corroon’s letter and, ahem, plagiarized it with a Republican bent. Whether you believe Trump will be a disaster or not, KUTV gets kudos for taking the campaign seriously—and for running the letter through a plagiarism checker.

Waterworld

Here in Utah, water is always an issue. On the other hand, it seems like an issue that doesn’t resonate. Recently, there was the Blue Castle ruling to allow a future nuclear facility to use 53,000 acre-feet of Green River water. Now it looks like West Jordan is considering major tax breaks for a Facebook facility that will require 5.3 million gallons of water per day. The Salt Lake Tribune said no community opposition was apparent, while the Deseret News said residents were concerned about costs. But then there’s Salt Lake County Mayor Ben McAdams’ Facebook post: “This just seems like a colossally bad deal for the taxpayers of West Jordan and Salt Lake County, and we’re about to get locked in for 20 years to the tune of $240 million (plus a state tax incentive) and a legal commitment of 4.8 million gallons of water (per day!)”

Salt Lake City resident Benjamin Luks-Morgan started out life as girl named Sarah, in small conservative Wasau, Wis. Finally true to himself after realizing he identified as male, he decided to start testesterone therapy, and transitioned to become Benjamin.

How and when did you determine that your sexual orientation was different?

I didn’t know from day one, but I knew I was uncomfortable as a kid. I started to feel gay at puberty. Identity is complicated. Identity is fluid. It moves. I sort of grappled with my sexuality in high school and early college. Part of that process is gender self-expression. One of my issues was I had to wear a dress, and it felt wrong, so for a while I identified as a butch woman, because it was a comfortable middle ground. I always had an uncomfortable relationship with my body.

Was there one defining moment you recall?

In high school, I spent a semester at an exchange program in Israel. I remember walking on a beach in Tel Aviv. In the background was a group of beautiful Israeli women folk-dancing, and I remember thinking, with sudden and complete clarity, ‘Oh God, I’m a lesbian.’

When did you determine you were transgender?

I grappled with it since college. It is important to come out publicly, but more so to yourself. You can be closeted and, even in your private moments, you say, ‘I don’t want to be it, so I will fight it’. I came out to myself as transgender only about two years ago. I started testosterone therapy six months ago. I didn’t expect how much I would love it.

Are you happy?

I am happy. I feel like my body feels like it’s supposed to. There had always been such awkwardness in the real world. It is now wonderful. My favorite part has been the way the world that I move in is like, ‘OK, you’re Ben.’ That’s been great. There are lots and lots and lots of people who paved the way before me so that I came out and I am able to teach religious school, and no one bats an eye.

When you moved to Salt Lake City, were you apprehensive about living your life openly?

When we came here, we told our friends and family that we were moving to Utah. Reactions ranged from bemused befuddlement to complete freak-outs. I had one colleague warn me that it would be dangerous to move here because there would be no rainbow stickers on cars, and people would know that we were the only gays in the neighborhood. As you know, that’s not how it is here.

—STAN ROSENZWEIG comments@cityweekly.net


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Why do so many Americans dislike Hillary Clinton? It seems to predate her time as secretary of state or even as senator. Does it have something to do with her husband’s two terms in the White House? —Jonathan Pearce In 1964, Barry Goldwater quipped about nuking the Kremlin men’s room and equated Medicare to giving old folks free resort vacations, cigarettes and beer. Just before Lyndon Johnson strolled to victory that November, Gallup found that 46 percent of Americans viewed his Republican opponent unfavorably, with 26 percent of respondents into the “highly unfavorable” camp. For five decades, Goldwater's been the most unpopular major-party presidential candidate ever—a record that seemed unbreakable. Well, they used to think nobody would ever hit 62 home runs in a season either. By Gallup’s latest reckoning, back in June, exactly half the American public views Hillary Clinton unfavorably, 33 percent highly so. But Hillary Clinton and mass unpopularity are old pals. The first major attempt to suss out the source of the antipathy, Henry Louis Gates’ “Hating Hillary,” appeared in The New Yorker in 1996—meaning this idea is now old enough to vote. The thing is, though, Clinton’s popularity numbers have never stayed put. She wrapped up her secretary of state gig in 2013 with a 64 percent favorability rating, and even that wasn’t peak Hillary—in 1998, at the kickoff of Bill’s impeachment, 67 percent of Americans were on her side. Now, we’re a polarized people. A third of Americans will always approve of Hillary Clinton, while another third forever will be ready to holler “Lock her up!” But what’s with that middle that can’t make up its mind? Clinton’s spin on her fluctuating favorability is that she’s a wooden campaigner whose numbers dip during the election cycle, but a hard worker who forges her way back into our hearts with her sturdy competence. As she said at the Democratic convention of her career in public service, “The service part has always come easier to me than the public part.” Fine, she’s no natural politician. But a charisma deficit alone isn’t enough to turn half a nation against you. What about ethical concerns? Knowing full well the scrutiny they’re under, the Clintons have often seemed oddly unworried about appearing too chummy with big donors to their campaigns and charitable work, and a fog of impropriety clings to Hillary even when specific claims are disproven. Certainly no presidential candidate has faced so much congressional scrutiny immediately prior to an election: Republican-controlled committees have been hammering away at Clinton for three years now, first on Benghazi, then on her email usage. And that kind of shelling from the opposition is nothing new—in the ’90s, Bill and Hillary Clinton were accused of everything from real-estate shenanigans to outright murder. Hillary might have chosen a less

BY CECIL ADAMS

SLUG SIGNORINO

STRAIGHT DOPE What the Hill?

dramatic-sounding phrase to describe the well-financed network of conservative operatives who had coordinated their messages against the Clintons than her muchridiculed “vast right-wing conspiracy.” But their detractors—whether politicians, news commentators or your relatives on Facebook—have shared a singleness of purpose that’s unquestionable even if you believe its cause is righteous. And it’s come from both sides: Mainstream liberals like The New York Times’ Howell Raines and Maureen Dowd were dogged critics of the Clintons’ ethical lapses, real or perceived. And yet Bill Clinton has emerged from the battles of the past unscathed: As recently as 2014, his favorability polled at 64 percent. Meanwhile, Hillary suffers the scorn of a reinvigorated left that’s retroactively critical of her support for her husband’s policies—adopted in the aftermath of the Reagan years, when Democrats were stumbling over each other in their efforts not to appear too liberal. How did Hillary get stuck holding the bag? Let’s not dance around the obvious: Hillary Clinton is a woman. Surely it’s a double standard that allows Bill to seem like a charming rapscallion who just cuts a few corners, while Hillary is cast as a shady crime boss. Back in the ’90s, as the first working woman to serve as first lady, Clinton initially took a lead role in healthcare policymaking but hit massive turbulence from D.C. traditionalists who thought she’d misread her job description. Such paleo-anti-feminist rancor—and an accompanying rap as presumptuous and pushy—is something that more recently prominent female politicians, like Elizabeth Warren, have largely been spared. None of this is to make excuses for her— politics is a tough game, and a better operator might have handled things more deftly. As that 1996 New Yorker piece suggests, Hillary’s always just rubbed plenty of people the wrong way. Then again, “Why doesn’t anyone like you?” is a hell of a question for even the savviest politician to field continuously for 25 years. However, friends, we live in wondrous times, and in 2016, Hillary’s not even our least popular presidential candidate. Gallup again: 59 percent of Americans don’t like Donald Trump, including 42 percent who can’t stand him. Fortunately, nobody’s writing in to wonder why—I’d never get it all in a single column. n Send questions to Cecil via StraightDope.com or write him c/o Chicago Reader, 350 N. Orleans, Chicago 60654.


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12 | AUGUST 18, 2016

NEWS Fire Starter

Former UFA Chief Michael Jensen makes resignation official. BY COLBY FRAZIER cfrazier@cityweekly.net @ColbyFrazierLP

COLBY FRAZIER

W

ith a walnut buttstock engraved with firefighting scenes, a maltese cross-etched into the metal of the receiver and the words “The American Firefighter” on the forestock, the Henry H009B .30-30 long gun is a firearm that any firefighter would be proud to own. Or, in the case of former Unified Fire Authority Chief Gaylord Scott, this weapon and its smaller sibling, a .22 caliber rifle with similar flair, would be ideal to donate to charity. And so on March 5, 2012, Scott whipped out his taxpayer-funded credit card and plunked down $2,335 for the pair of limited-edition guns. The weapons, UFA credit card receipts obtained by City Weekly through an open records request show, were to be donated to the University of Utah Health Care’s Burn Camp and auctioned off, the proceeds used to help burn victims through the healing process. But these guns never did make it to the Burn Camp for auction. They were among tens of thousands of dollars in camera equipment, Apple electronics and, oddly, 19 printer ink cartridges that were in Scott’s possession and returned to the fire department after he abruptly resigned in July. Scott’s conspicuous consumption— all bankrolled by taxpayers—was prolific. Over the past five years, he charged $110,440 to his UFA credit card, while racking up an additional $28,800 to his UFA-issued gas card. Revelation of these expenditures, as well as a bonus structure that gave Scott and three other top UFA officials more than $100,000 each in extra pay over the past five years, has sparked a pair of audits, one by the State Auditor’s Office and another by the UFA board. Scott’s departure is one of three that has occurred since City Weekly began an investigation of the UFA’s finances in early July. In addition to Scott, Michael Jensen, who had been chief of the UFA for the past seven years, resigned on Tuesday, Aug. 16—four days after saying that he and the board were hammering out a “mutual separation.” Jensen’s top aide at UFA, and clerk of the Unified Fire Service Area (UFSA), which is a conglomerate of communities that utilize UFA for fire and emergency services,

Former UFA Chief Michael Jensen (center) at a July 19 closed-session meeting. resigned on Aug. 10. UFA Assistant Chief Mike Watson has been named interim chief. That same Tuesday, the UFA board announced that the scope of its audit would include the credit cards, also known as “p-cards,” used by Jensen and Scott. The agency’s audit, says Eagle Mountain Mayor Christopher Pengra, who is acting as a spokesman for the board, will also include travel expenses and gas card use by the two chiefs. Pengra declined to discuss any specific purchases or gas expenditures made by Jensen and Scott saying that the audit will be “telling.” “At this point it’s important still that we as a board go through this process and identify what happened and why and perform that audit before I’m comfortable making any determinations about what exactly was appropriate and what is not,” Pengra says. It is clear, though, that a vacuum of accountability has existed for years at the upper tiers of the UFA, which is the largest fire department in the state and provides fire and emergency services for nine cities and towns as well as unincorporated areas of Salt Lake County. For example, when it came to approval of credit card and travel plans, Scott’s invoices were approved by Jensen, and Jensen’s were approved by Scott, Pengra says. Neither Jensen nor Scott returned phone calls seeking comment. Jensen and Scott’s credit cards and gas cards shows that the latter enjoyed years of spendy steak dinners, highpriced electronics and long stays in ho-

tels, all paid for by the public. Among Scott’s credit card receipts are dozens and dozens of meals—many of which are with Jensen and Perry— where the topic of the discussion was vague, like “District Budget Discussion.” During one budget talk in June 2011, Scott picked up the tab for eight $21 prime rib dinners, a pair of $28 shrimp platters and a mess of Diet Cokes at Market Street Grill. While the bill shows that 10 meals were purchased, only eight people were listed on the back of the receipt, including Jensen, Perry and Scott. The total came to $241.84, and after a $50 tip, crested $290. While both men used their UFA credit and gas cards frequently, Scott wildly outspent his boss. To keep his UFA take-home vehicle on the road, Jensen pumped $16,600 in gas over the past five years. Scott’s vehicle guzzled $12,200 more during the same period. Jensen also only amassed $51,157 in credit card expenses—less than half of that accumulated by Scott. Both men were paid handsomely by UFA, especially after tacking on their bonuses, which until late 2015, were approved and paid out in a hushed manner by whomever was the chair of the UFSA board. The bonuses, which Jensen insisted were “incentives,” were for work that he said he, Scott, UFA legal counsel Karl Hendrickson and former CFO Shirley Perkins, deserved for extra work they were performing for members of the fire district. When the full board was made aware of the bonuses in 2015, steps were taken to remedy the secretive nature of the payments, which in the past five years,

topped $400,000 between these four individuals alone. In 2015, each of these managers received $34,000, a steep climb from the more modest $4,000 in bonuses they received in 2011. All told, Jensen, who is seeking his fifth four-year term on the Salt Lake County Council and is paid $51,000 in that role, received $260,488 in total compensation for being the fire chief. Scott took home $242,154. As the amount of the bonuses escalated in recent years, UFA employees say morale at the fire department plumeted. And support for Jensen and Scott, which was nearly unanimous just a couple of months ago when a new structure for paying the bonuses was approved, deteriorated rapidly as City Weekly’s investigation brought to light how the men wielded their taxpayerfunded resources. One example involves travel expenses incurred by Scott, who routinely stayed up to seven nights when he traveled across the country to attend various fire-related conferences. In some years, he left town nearly every month. In 2013 alone, he spent 30 nights in hotels, including a seven-night stay in Chicago, seven nights in Indianapolis, six nights in Phoenix, four nights at the Canyons Resort in Park City, three in Maryland, one in downtown Salt Lake City and two in St. George. When cross-referencing some of Scott’s traveling days with his gas card use, at least one anomaly exists. On March 4, 2013, the day he left for Phoenix, where his receipts show that he “toured” that city’s fire stations for six days, Scott put 31.2 gallons, or $108,


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On Oct. 20, 2014, he spent $248 at an Apple Store. Ten days later, he purchased a phone charger at Best Buy, and the following day spent another $482 at an Apple Store. The next month, he again visited an Apple Store, this time spending $185. When the Apple Watch hit shelves in 2015, Scott turned up the heat. Starting in January of that year, he spent $124 on Apple gear, and in March dropped $180 at a Best Buy on iPhone and iPad supplies. In April, he bought $370 at an Apple Store and in June, he purchased two Apple Watches for $2,455. In July, he spent $4,824 on a pair of Apple computers, assorted cases, four Apple Watch charging cables and a 16-gigabyte hard drive. Along with the firearms returned by Scott to the UFA was a gaggle of Apple products, including two iPads, an iPad Mini, and iPhone 6, seven iPhone cases, two Bluetooth keyboards, one Apple iPad keyboard, one iMac computer, one MacBook Pro, five iPhone docking stations, one CD drive, an Apple watch and several other products. Scott also appears to have had an interest in photography and film. In addition to a pair of high-definition video cameras and a GoPro, he purchased and returned to the UFA two Nikon DSLR cameras, seven lenses and a pair of flashes. This expansive list of items does not include what is in Scott’s office. UFA officials say this inventory is expected to occur in the coming days. As for the decorative firearms that would have been donated to benefit burn victims, they either adorned walls of Scott’s home, or they languished in their boxes. UFA Assistant Chief Marty Slack, who oversaw the inventory of the belongings Scott returned, says the weapons have never been fired. CW

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in his gas tank. He then parked a car at the airport, incurring a $63 fee. About eight hours after Scott returned to Salt Lake City shortly after midnight on March 11, he put 20 more gallons in his tank, with the odometer entry showing that he had driven 380 miles. While it’s difficult to know exactly how Scott burned so much more gasline that his peers over the past five years, Jensen, prior to resigning, explained that Scott used his UFA vehicle to shuttle his children to and from a charter school in American Fork. At the time, Jensen said that he, Scott and other top UFA commanders had received permission from the UFA board chair to take their automobiles pretty much anywhere, even out of state. With the exception of a six-night stay for a conference in Denver that Scott drove to in August 2012, and extended slightly by laying over on the way back to Utah at the Little America Hotel near Rock Springs, Wyo., the two chiefs almost exclusively flew when traveling. But in December 2014, gas and credit card records show that both Jensen and Scott drove their UFA vehicles to a convention in Anaheim, Calif. While there, both men filled their tanks using a UFA gas card, along with various stops along Interstate 15, like Mesquite, Nev., and St. George. In Anaheim, Jensen billed taxpayers $614 in hotel charges at a Marriott, and another $1,035 at a Hilton. Scott stayed five nights at a Marriott for a total of $907. While the credit card invoices show that Scott had a penchant for steak dinners, and extended stays at hotels, the man also appears to have developed a love for Apple products. In November 2012, Scott spent $659 on Apple hard drives, and a few days later, shelled out $334 for other assorted products.


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14 | AUGUST 18, 2016

THE

NUEVE

THE LIST OF NINE

BY MASON RODRICKC & MICHELLE L ARSON

@MRodrickc

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Nine sights you can’t miss on State Street:

9. A variety of the world’s best

legal councils and pawn-brokers staying under what is most definitely not a Pizza Hut.

8.

Pigeons who can play parking lot soccer better than you or anyone you know.

7. The incredible three-block-

stretch where more than 50 percent of the periodic table can be collected whether you meant to or not.

6.

Entertain your senses with every underpass as they naturally produce what’s called “Mother Nature’s Chloroform.”

5. Hop on the 200 bus to

catch our fine city’s “Smells of the world” exhibit.

4.

Experience “The Gauntlet of Unwise but Obtainable Car Loans” as you traverse the valley.

3.

Visit the “Museum of Condemned by the Health Department.”

2.

The state’s finest salt licks on this side of the Great Salt Lake.

1. Play a round of “Slang or Gibberish.”

CITIZEN REVOLT In a week, you can

CHANGE THE WORLD

INTERNATIONAL FOOD FEST

You thought the Wasatch Front was pretty white-bread? Think again, and come to the Wasatch International Food Festival where you can sample the delicious ethnic foods from across the Wasatch Front. The event features local food vendors, a specialty foods market, a family fun zone, live music, a beer garden, a community mural project and food demonstrations. West Valley City, Utah’s second largest, is a dynamic blend of ethnicities and cultural groups, and reflects the area’s rich cultural tapestry. Proceeds benefit the thousands of students, families and communities that participate in arts and cultural programs at the Utah Cultural Celebration Center. Utah Cultural Celebration Center Festival Grounds, 1355 W. 3100 South, West Valley City, 801965-5110, Friday, Aug. 19-Saturday, Aug. 20, $5, VIP $25, under 12 free, FoodFestUtah.org

CULTURAL CORE OPEN HOUSE

Here’s a way to help ensure the future of the arts in Utah. Come to an open house to meet people who are making this happen, to voice your opinions and to hear where these ideas are headed. The Cultural Core—a venture between the city and county—provides resources to increase audience participation, and market the variety of arts and culture venues and programs in the downtown area. Central Utah Art Center, 177 E. 200 South, Tuesday, Aug. 23, 4-6:30 p.m.; The Rio Gallery, 300 S. Rio Grande St., Wednesday, Aug. 24, 9-11:30 a.m., 801-535-6006, free, open to public, Bit.ly/2bnCkkB

AUTHOR READINGS

From family matters to fantasy, you can join book lovers to hear two authors read and sign their newest books. Local author Bonnie Glee will read from Invisible Son, an adopted boy’s journey from one mother to another. Later in the week, author S. R. Atkinson reads from and signs her new book, Surface Tension, the second in The Siren anthology, which “combines the hidden-world immersive experience of Harry Potter with the underwater adventures of The Little Mermaid.” Experience the personal vibes of the authors themselves as they read the words they wrote. Weller Book Works, 607 Trolley Square, 801328-2586, Invisible Son, Saturday, Aug. 20, 3 p.m., Surface Tension, Tuesday, Aug. 23, 6:30 p.m., free, WellerBookworks.com

—KATHARINE BIELE

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2016

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2016

AUGUST 18, 2016 | 15

7 1 . v o n

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BEST

of


S NEofW the

Designer Leather The late fashion designer Alexander McQueen (who dabbled in macabre collections, himself), might appreciate the work of acolyte Tina Gorjanc: She will grow McQueen’s skin (from DNA off his hair) in a lab, add his tattoos and from that make leather handbags and jackets. Gorjanc, a recent graduate of McQueen’s fashion school alma mater, bills the project mainly as showcasing the meager legal protections for abandoned bits of human DNA—and fears industrial use of such DNA on a much larger scale.

n Samuel Oliphant, 35, was arrested on various charges in Scottsdale, Ariz., in June after police were called to a house to investigate a “strong and unusual” odor (which cops suspected to be drugs). Inside, they found a “laboratory,” necessitating use of their “hazmat protocols” because Oliphant had allegedly built a “complex and elaborate” system apparently for the purpose of enhancing marijuana smoking.

WEIRD

g akin ol M Film Scho lic e Pub ion Fre t Tui

War Is Hell Jihadists had a rough year militarily and now suffer further from an array of field reports (such as a new book by retired Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn) that their most sensitive laptop computers captured in battle by U.S. forces seemed always to be loaded with pornography—including “vile” material involving kids and animals. (Initially, said one analyst, there was so much porn that U.S. intelligence figured its purpose was only to disguise tactical messages within the sex-scene pixels.) n On the other hand, jihadists can claim one victory, in that the actor Michael Caine said recently the terrorist-caused airport discomforts had finally convinced him to legally change his name to “Michael Caine”—after tiring of explaining to screeners why he had (his birth name) Maurice Micklewhite’s passport.

Awkward Flirtations Patrick Marsh, 59, was charged with indecent exposure in Woodward Township, Pa., in July after he rang the doorbell of a 30-year-old female neighbor seeking, as he told police, “courtship.” He greeted the woman naked, “with his genitals in his hands.”

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16 | AUGUST 18, 2016

BY CHUCK SHEPHERD

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n In Florida’s The Villages senior community, Howard Sparber, 69, faces several charges after having, in June, fired 33 9-mm rounds into the home of a woman who had been declining his sexual overtures. (The lady was away.) n John Taylor, 57, said he was just lonely and wanted to meet women when a court sentenced him in Shirley, England, in July, for a three-month spree of furtively slipping men’s underwear through various women’s house letterboxes.

Compelling Explanations In June, Dieter Uchtdorf, a high official in the Mormon Church, said the historic narrative of Mormon founder Joseph Smith’s use of a “seer stone” to translate the “golden plates” that gave Smith ultimate worldly knowledge has been authenticated, basically, by the 2007 invention of the iPhone. “I can get the collected knowledge of the world through a few little inputs,” said Uchtdorf, and thus it is likelier than ever that God gave Smith something like a smartphone in 1823. n Geoffrey Fortier, 23, was arrested in Craighead County, Ark., in July and charged with video voyeurism of a woman he had allowed to shower in the home occupied by Fortier and his girlfriend. After the woman stepped out of the shower, she noticed a logged-on iPad propped against a wall. Fortier informed deputies that it was all a misunderstanding—that he had earlier recorded himself urinating in order to sell the video to a urination-fetish website, and he simply forgot to remove the device.

Scientific Breakthroughs Plastics are well-known to decompose slowly, but the most difficult is the polyethylene used for containers such as the omnipresent water bottles, and despite recycling, tens of millions of metric tons wind up in landfills, where the plastic’s strong polymer bonds resist breakdown. Recently, however, two Japanese researchers, after tedious trial-and-error, identified a bacterium that views the polyethylene terephthalate as an efficient, tasty meal. A colleague of the two said further tweaking is necessary before using the bacteria industrially.

Awesome! Rapper Kasper Knight apparently shot himself in the cheek with a revolver on July 17 in Indianapolis—as part of a staged music video—according to raw footage of the incident posted on his Facebook page (and then, of course, seen by almost 2 million people). Knight, seen bleeding afterward, said he tried to recruit a shooter, but when no one volunteered, shot himself, anticipating (as in previous times he had been shot by other people) “like a 4 out of 10 on the pain scale.” The Passing Parade The Belton (Texas) Early Childhood (pre-kindergarten) School staged an “Enchanted Evening” prom in May and posted many photos on its Facebook page of little toddlers arrayed in tuxedos, gowns, corsages and of course, for some, limousines. (A Kansas City Star reporter suggested that this was just the beginning of an expensive parental trend.) n The village of Trecon was inducted recently into the club of French towns with silly names. “Tres con,” translated, is “very stupid.” Mayor Georges Leherle accepted the town’s membership, joining 38 incumbent members including “Monteton” (“My Nipple”) and “Mariol” (“Dumbass”).

Least Competent Criminals The men who tried an armed carjacking at the Oasis car wash in Shreveport, La., on July 20 were sent running by the car owner Michael Davis, who was holding a high-pressure hose at the time and casually directed the stream to one potential thief’s face while swinging a metal wand at the other. Recurring Themes An ambulance was called in July when jockey Chris Meehan was kicked in the face by a horse and knocked out cold after he fell during a race in Merano, Italy, but the arriving ambulance accidentally backed over his leg. He is recovering. n At England’s premier agricultural event (the Great Yorkshire Show), a winning show cow was stripped of her title, suspected of having artificially “enhanced” udders. The runner-up, of course, was promoted.

The Classic Middle Name Arrested recently and charged with murder: Cody Wayne Fish (Norman, Okla., August); Curtis Wayne Trexler (Salisbury, N.C., July); Daryl Royston Wayne Cook (Hobart, Australia, July); James Wayne Rodgers Jr. (Dallas, May); Bruce Wayne Cameron (St. Louis County, Minn., June 2015). Fugitive murder arrest warrant issued: Vernon Wayne King (Harrisburg, Pa., August). Pleaded guilty to murder: Stacy Wayne Brown (Wilmington, N.C., July). Sentenced for murder: Christopher Wayne Hill (Harlan County, Ky., June). Killed himself resisting arrest for murder: David Wayne Campbell (Mason County, Wash., February). Granted new sentencing hearing: convicted murderer Michael Wayne Norris (Houston, June). Committed suicide in prison: convicted murderer Flint Wayne Harrison (Farmington, Utah, July). Executed for murder: John Wayne Conner (Jackson, Ga., July).

Thanks this week to Frederick Fisher, Eric Lindinger, Chris Bailey, Robert Skinner and Mr. and Mrs. “Ted” Henderson, and to the News of the Weird Board of Editorial Advisors.


ENTERTAINMENT PICKS AUGUST 18-24, 2016

Complete Listings Online @ CityWeekly.net

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ESSENTIALS

the

The tail end of fall means the beginning of fair season—and the 80th annual Salt Lake County Fair offers plenty of events, activities, food and fun. Competitive exhibits and blue-ribbon competitions make this event a great place for folks to showcase their magnificent livestock, as well as products and talents. Come hungry and enjoy more than 15 varieties of foods, in addition to the good ol’ fair foods like funnel cakes, corn dogs and fried Oreos. While you’re eating your hand-held favorites, visit more than 60 different vendors selling their wares. No fair would be complete without live entertainment, including country singers Darryl Worley and Stephanie Quayle on opening night; grab your free tickets at any Burt Brothers locations, Z104 offices or the Salt Lake County Equestrian Park. On Thursday night (and new to the fair this year), you can catch the Monster Truck Racing League, as seen on Monster Jam. Jacked-up and lifted four-wheel drive trucks will entertain audiences as they race, crawl and fly over mounds of dirt and obstacles. Stick around for a little demolition derby action as well, set to take place on both Friday and Saturday. (Separate additional paid admission for these events) Also, be sure to save some time for a go on the Ferris wheel. Fair rides are as much a tradition as cotton candy. Kids will also enjoy the extensive petting zoo—and one that’s a bit outside the norm, as Noah’s Ark Petting Zoo features mini horses, chickens and exotic goats. (Aimee L. Cook) Salt Lake County Fair @ Salt Lake Equestrian Center, 2100 W. 11400 South, Aug. 17-20, opening hours vary, closes daily at 10 pm., free admission, parking $10 per vehicle. SLCFair.com

When you’re a regular cast member on a popular TV sitcom, you’ve probably hit the lottery in terms of being recognized for the rest of your life. But while Craig Robinson might have become a household name as a result of his role as warehouse foreman Darryl Philbin on The Office, he clearly hasn’t left behind his beginnings performing stand-up in his hometown of Chicago. Not that screen gigs—of both the big and small variety—don’t continue to keep Robinson in the public eye. On television, he graduated from The Office to headlining his own short-lived NBC sitcom Mr. Robinson in 2015. And while he might be best-known in movies for his roles in ensemble comedies like Hot Tub Time Machine and This Is the End, he has also show the ability to stretch his acting muscles in dramatic parts, including his acclaimed supporting role as an expatriate single parent in the 2016 Sundance drama Morris from America (opening locally on Aug. 26). But as he visits Wiseguys this week for five performances, it’s all about his live stand-up— which he typically performs accompanied by his electric keyboard. The one-time public school music teacher folds his musical talents into his act, which once included his duo with fellow comedian Jerry Minor as “L. Witherspoon and Chuckie.” The many talents of Craig Robinson— comedian, musician, actor—mean you might not have seen every side of a performer you think you know. There’s more to Craig Robinson than Darryl Philbin. (SR) Craig Robinson @ Wiseguys Salt Lake City, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, Aug. 18, 7:30 p.m., Aug. 19-20, 7 & 9:30 p.m., $30. WiseguysComedy.com

Craig Robinson

AUGUST 18, 2016 | 17

John Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath might be the story most closely associated with the Oklahoma “Dust Bowl” of the 1930s, but that doesn’t mean it’s the only story that can be found in that setting. And as one-time Utah resident Rae Meadows demonstrates in her novel I Will Send Rain, a setting doesn’t define a story when its themes are more generally about the way different members of the same family can respond to the same crisis. In the Oklahoma panhandle town of Mulehead circa 1934, that crisis is the drought slowly draining the people of hope. As the first dust storms begin sweeping across the plains, the members of the Bell family cling to what they can as their farm fails. Fifteen-year-old Birdie has her first love with a boy on a neighboring farm; her mother, Annie, has a flirtation with the town’s mayor. And her husband, Samuel has his faith, bringing him dreams that he interprets as the coming punishment from an angry God. Meadows’ crisp prose paints a vivid portrait of her setting, from the thin layer of grit that covers everything, to the home abandoned by a family that has fled for California, and which becomes something both haunted and a sign of possibility. But she’s even better at developing her flawed, striving characters as people shaped by their circumstances and their culture, yet always reaching toward a future that they have to believe will be different. Join the author for this week’s reading and signing event. (Scott Renshaw) Rae Meadows: I Will Send Rain @ The King’s English, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-4849100, Aug. 18, 7 p.m., free. KingsEnglish.com

The future of art, as everything else, is ultimately in the hands of youth, and Artists of Utah’s 35x35 celebrates local artists 35 years old and under. The fourth occurrence of this tri-annual event coincides with the nonprofit’s 15th anniversary. This year’s 35x35 includes an intriguing mix of newcomers and artists who have been on the local scene for a while. Mary Toscano has exhibited her drawings frequently, and her style—blending humor with an ardent sense of narrative in her lines (“Storyteller” is pictured)— should be familiar to local art enthusiasts, just like the works of Steven Stradley and Justin Wheatley, who both explore the urban experience. Painter Cody Chamberlain, whose art takes inspiration from desert landscapes, recalls the visions of western vagabond Everett Reuss. God Hates Robots hosted Nancy Rivera’s Herbarium Obscura: Shadow of Nature earlier this year; she’s also a one-time gallery manager at CUAC, and former intern at Utah Museum of Contemporary Art and Utah Museum of Fine Arts. Newcomers include recent Utah State University graduate Sommer Baisch, who casts a critical eye on roles of women in society, and photographer Jamie Kyle, whose MFA exhibit at the University of Utah was held last year. The artistic sensibilities of this cadre of artists are enormously diverse, offering an encouraging picture for the future of local art. In addition to the artist reception this week, exhibition awards and winners of the Artists of Utah 15th anniversary celebration will be announced Friday, Sept. 16, 6-9 p.m., during the September gallery stroll. (Brian Staker) 35x35 @ Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, 801-596-5000, through Sept. 23; artist reception Aug. 19, 6-9 p.m. SaltLakeArts.org

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SATURDAY 8.20

Salt Lake County Fair

FRIDAY 8.19

35x35

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FRIDAY 8.19

Rae Meadows: I Will Send Rain

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THURSDAY 8.18


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18 | AUGUST 18, 2016

News from the geeks. what’s new in comics, games, movies and beyond.

LITERATURE

For the Books

A&E ENRIQUE LIMÓN

BIG SHINY ROBOT!

Choose your own adventure at these downtown bookstores. BY CASEY KOLDEWYN comments@cityweekly.net

exclusively on

cityweekly.net -cityweekly.net/bigshinyrobot-

D

espite digital alternatives, the oldfashioned book hasn’t yet gone out of style. Neither have a few of the bookstores that sell them, even when those wares have been appreciated by others before ending up on their shelves. Four used bookstores—all stocking the new and the rare as well—can be found in downtown Salt Lake City. Each is unique in its selections, making them interesting enough to spend hours wandering their spaces. As far as organization goes, Weller Book Works (607 Trolley Square, 801-3282586, WellerBookWorks.com) has it down. Everything has a place and, even better, those places will make sense to the average customer. Initially called Zions Bookstore when Gustav Weller first opened it in 1929, the place has retained its family ties. “[Gustav Weller] was my husband’s grandfather,” says Katherine Weller, a book-buyer at the store and wife of Tony Weller, the store’s current owner. “So it went from Gus Weller, to Sam Weller, to Tony Weller. And we are still family owned and operated, so this is a three-generation family business,” she continues. “We aim to provide a variety of books for a variety of readers.” Though titles here range anywhere from brand-new to decades-old, the overall vibe is bright and shiny. Perhaps as a result, most selections cost about what they would at a mainstream chain store. However, there are a few collections placed outside the first floor doors that are significantly discounted, some priced at $1 each. You’ll know Utah Book & Magazine (327 S. Main, 801-359-4391) by the slightly creepy (especially until you realize it’s not human) figurine just outside the entrance, surrounded by VHS movies for sale. Inside the cluttered opening, you’re drawn down a long, narrow passageway with occasional offshoots and an ever-looming stack of items—mostly publications—surrounding you on all sides. The emphasis here is definitely old: Old chairs sit above possibly older books near the likely even-older magazines. Given its legacy, this shouldn’t be surprising. “Been in business 100 years—[since] 1916, when my grandfather started all of this,” Peter Marshall, the store’s current owner, says. “I’ve been doing this since I was about 8, I’m about 60 years old, if that tells you anything,” he says. His grandfather’s store was called Utah Coin & Antique, and was located on 100 South and State.

Today, Utah Book & Magazine offers a significant selection, and the surroundings lean toward a pleasantly spooky atmosphere. Vast, a little wild and amazingly extensive, Eborn Books (254 S. Main, 801359-0460, EbornBooks.com)—occupying the space that was previously home to Sam Weller Books—is nothing if not an adventure. “We’re in our 27th year, but we’ve only been in this location for just over four years,” Bret Eborn, the store’s founder and owner, says. “When [Weller] moved out, we had six small stores from Ogden to Provo.” Four of those six were combined to make the Eborn Books near Gallivan Plaza, but, Eborn says, “Now we’re back to four stores again anyway … but this is the big one.” Eborn’s extensive collection is separated into categories: Western, religious, local, novels, etc. Within those sections, the books are not organized alphabetically, or by any other easily identifiable system. However, what Eborn Books does have, that many other bookstores do not, is a complete online inventory from which you can order specific titles. While it takes a lot of work to maintain the shop’s inventory, Eborn says it’s worth the effort, since “probably half of our sales are online.” Plus, “We put them on there so we know we have them,” he adds. Paperbacks and hardbacks range in price, depending on their condition and style, and come in nearly every genre. “We buy and sell everything,” Eborn says. “That’s how we take care of our customers.” Volumes of all sorts greet customers through the windows from racks on the east wall of Ken Sanders Rare Books (268 S.

Eborn Books

200 East, 801-521-3819, KenSandersBooks. com) before its doors are even opened, hinting at the collections within. The store itself, while relatively small, contains a unique filing system. “We have sections here you wouldn’t find in an ordinary bookstore,” owner Ken Sanders says. Take the “It Can’t Happen Here” display, containing multiple dystopian novels, a few books on Nazism and some on what it means to be evil. Though no proper name is featured at the top of this display, the image of a red baseball cap should make it clear which public figure this area is referring to. Sanders has owned this store since he opened it with his daughter, Melissa, in 1997. “The Ivory Company owns this whole corner now. It’s not much time before it comes down and they put up a high-rise,” Sanders says of the current location. “I’ve successfully signed a three-year lease … but in two and a half years, I don’t have any idea what we’re going to do.” Generally, prices are reasonable, and most volumes are impressively inexpensive. The 10,000 paperbacks lining the outer walls are priced $3-$10—easily affordable by the college students and teens who find their way in. Many of the books for sale have a basis in Sanders’ style; “A bookstore evolves out of your own personal taste,” he says. However, there’s also more to it than that: “Everyone that comes in the door … contributes to the DNA of the store.” CW


Deadline for voting August 29th

cityweekly.net/bestofutaharts

Performing Arts

ONLINE

Dance Production Theater Production  The Count of Monte Cristo [Pioneer Theatre Company]  The Nijinsky Revolution [Ballet West]  The Kreutzer Sonata [Plan-B Theatre Company/ Nova Chamber  Revere [Repertory Dance Theatre] Music Series]  They Reminisce [Bboy Federation]  Stupid F**king Bird [SLAC] Dance Choreography  Stephen Brown, sNaked [SB Dance] Theater Original Play  Shawn Fisher, Streetlight Woodpecker [SLAC]  Daniel Charon, Together Alone [Ririe-Woodbury]  Elaine Jarvik, Based on a True Story [Plan-B Theatre Company]  Garret Smith, If We Linger/10,000 Hours [Salt Contemporary  Javen Tanner, Sleeping Beauty’s Dream [Sting & Honey] Dance] Theater Performance  April Fossen, Stage Kiss [Wasatch Theatre Company]  Teresa Sanderson, Wit [Wasatch Theatre Company]  Aaron Swenson, Buyer & Cellar [Pygmalion Productions]

L

Comedy Improv Troupe

 Crowdsourced Comedy

VOTING ONLY

Vote for your favorites now and help support our local art community. Online votes will be automatically entered to win a pair of tickets from a variety of arts groups.

 QuickWits  Toy Soup

Theater Touring Production [write-in]__________________________________ Opera/Classical Music Performance or Production [write-in] __________________________________

LiterAry Arts Fiction Book  Dream House on Golan Drive, by David Pace  Hour of the Bees, by Lindsay Eagar  Summerlost, by Ally Condie

Non-Fiction Book Poetry Collection  All Better Now, by Emily Wing Smith  Blue Patina, by Nancy Takacs  The Mirror Test: America at War in Iraq and  Flicker, by Lisa Bickmore Afghanistan, by J. Kael Weston  Flight, by Katharine Coles  The Three-Year Swim Club, by Julie Checkoway

Illustrated Book/Graphic Novel/Zine  The Princess in Black series, by Shannon Hale, Dean Hale & LeUyen Pham  Purge Worlds, by Chris Black and Josh Oman  Super, by Joshua Todd Crowther

VisuAL Arts & CrAfts

Fashion Design

 Simone Gordon, Hoodlands & Co.  McQuiston Marié

 Nyssa Pack, Sapphire Coast Swim

 Steve Tippetts, Ironclad Tattoo/Anchor Ink Tattoo

Photography Exhibition

 Laurel Caryn: History of Photography (Alice Gallery)  Willy Littig: Vecinos (Mestizo Gallery)

 Utah Travels (Utah Cultural Celebration Center)

Short Film

 B + A, directed by Connor Rickman

 Hammer Suite, directed by Lincoln Hoppe  Papá, directed by Danny Russon

Jewelry Design  Tiffany Blue, Peach Treats  Zell Lee, Asana Natural Arts  Nick Burke & Magen Mitchell, Obake Style

#BOUArts Deadline: Monday, August 29, 2016, midnight.

Best Local Instagram [write-in] __________________________________ What Did We Miss/Outside These Categories [write-in] __________________________________

RECOGNIZING THE FINEST IN

SALT LAKE’S ARTS COMMUNITY COMING SEPTEMBER 15, 2016

RULES

Rule No. 1: Keep it local Rule No. 2 You must vote in at least 3 categories for your ballot to be counted. Rule No. 3: Include your real full name and contact info to be eligible to win prizes. Rule No. 4: One ballot per person. If you enter more than once, all ballots will be eliminated! Rule No. 5: Online voting only. No paper ballots.

AUGUST 18, 2016 | 19

Vote at cityweekly.net/bestofutaharts

Public Art/Graffiti Art [write-in] __________________________________

| CITY WEEKLY |

Nominees in selected categories were chosen by City Weekly arts & entertainment staff and freelance contributors. Write-in nominees may be submitted in all categories, including those for which nominees are provided.

 CJ Fishburn, Cathedral Tattoo

Touring/Non-Local Exhibition  The British Passion for Landscape: Masterpieces from National Museum Wales (Utah Museum of Fine Art)  Treasures of British Art 1400-2000:  The Berger Collection (BYU Museum of Art)  Jennet Thomas: The Unspeakable Freedom Device (Utah Museum of Contemporary Art)

Mixed Media/Sculpture/Interactive Exhibition  David Brothers: Rolithica (Utah Museum of Contemporary Art)  Scott Filipiak (Mod a Go Go, January 2016)  Jim Jacobs, Josh Winegar & Paul Crow: Raw and Cooked (Rio Gallery)

Tattoo Artist

 Sarah de Azevedo, Oni Tattoo

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

Painting Exhibition  Firelei Baez:Patterns of Resistance (Utah Museum of Contemporary Art)  Hadley Rampton, Maung Maung Tinn & Nyan Soe: On the Border (Art Access Gallery)  Kevin Red Star (Modern West Fine Art)

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V

Individual Dancer  Emily Adams [Ballet West]  Efren Corado Garcia [Repertory Dance Theatre]  Lorin Hansen [Samba Fogo]

Stand-up Comedian  Abi Harrison  Christian Pieper  Alex Velluto


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COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE @ CITYWEEKLY.NET

Susan Makov’s premiere solo exhibition, featuring works exploring the idea of trees (“Fog” is pictured), is on display at “A” Gallery (1321 S. 2100 East, 801-583-4800, AGalleryOnline.com) through Sept. 3.

PERFORMANCE THEATER 110 in the Shade Brigham’s Playhouse, 25 N. 300 West, Building C1, Washington, Aug. 20-Sept. 17, Thursday-Saturday, 7 p.m.; Saturday matinee 2 p.m., BrighamsPlayhouse.com Arsenic & Old Lace Beverly’s Terrace Plaza Playhouse, 99 E. 4700 South, Ogden, 801393-0070, through Sept. 17, Monday, Friday & Saturday, 7:30 p.m., TerracePlayhouse.com Disney’s Beauty and the Beast Hale Center Theatre, 3333 S. Decker Lake Drive, West Valley City, 801-984-9000, through Oct. 1, MondayFriday, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday, 12:30 p.m., 4 p.m. & 7:30 p.m., HCT.org EYT: Li’l Abner Empress Theatre, 9104 W. 2700 South, Magna, 801-347-7373, through Aug. 20, varying days and times, EmpressTheatre.com La Cage aux Folles The Ziegfeld Theater, 3934 Washington Blvd., Ogden, 855-944-2787,

Aug. 19-Sept. 3, Fridays, 7:30 p.m.; Saturdays, 2 & 7:30 p.m., Sunday, Aug. 28, 7:30 p.m., TheZiegfeldTheater.com Perfect Pitch Desert Star Theatre, 4861 S. State, Murray, 801-266-2600, through Aug. 20, varying days and times, DesertStar.biz Pirated! Good Company Theatre, Ogden Amphitheatre, 343 25th St., through Aug. 22, Thursday-Saturday & Monday, GoodCoTheatre.com Saturday’s Voyeur Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, 801-363-7522, through Aug. 28, Wednesday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Sunday, 1 & 6 p.m., SaltLakeActingCompany.org Shrek: The Musical Draper Historic Theatre, 12366 S. 900 East, Draper, through Sept. 3, Friday, Saturday & Monday, 7 p.m., DraperTheatre.org Transmorfers: Mormon Meets the Eye The Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, 801-355-4628, through Sept. 10, Monday, Friday & Saturday, 7:30 p.m., TheOBT.org

DANCE

Utah Summer Dance Festival: Passport to

20 | AUGUST 18, 2016

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moreESSENTIALS

SEPTEMBER 9TH-11TH

WWW.SALTLAKEGREEKFESTIVAL.COM


is looking for editorial interns for the fall 2016 term. Do you love media, want to be part of a thriving newsroom and have a desire to hone your writing chops? We’re on the hunt for hard workers to assist in the inputting of online events and writing of blurbs/articles for our award-winning weekly paper and daily website. Requirements: • Be available 10-12 hours a week starting Wednesday, Aug. 24. • An interest in pursuing journalism as a career is a must. • As is a strong desire to add to City Weekly’s established, alternative voice. • You think outside the box, know how to take direction and pay attention to detail. • Ability to get along with others and keep your cool while working on deadline is nonnegotiable. Please send résumé and no more than three published pieces to elimon@cityweekly.net by Tuesday, Aug. 16.

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AUGUST 18, 2016 | 21


moreESSENTIALS Dance Viridian Events Center, 8030 S. 1825 West, West Jordan, Aug. 20, 11 a.m.-9 p.m., UtahSummerDanceFestival.com

CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY CHECK OUT ALL OF OUR EVENT PHOTOS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET/PHOTOS

CRAFT LAKE CITY 8.12-8.14

COMEDY & IMPROV

Aaron Woodall Sandy Station, 8925 S. Harrison St., Sandy, 801-255-2078, Aug. 19, 8:30 p.m., SandyStation.com Comedy for a Cause Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Salt Lake City, 801-532-5233, Aug. 21, 7 p.m., WiseguysComedy.com Craig Robinson Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Salt Lake City, 801-532-5233, Aug. 18, 7:30 p.m.; Aug. 19-20, 7 & 9:30 p.m., WiseguysComedy.com (see p. 17) Hasan Minhaj: Homecoming King The State Room, 638 S. State, Salt Lake City, 801-5963560, Aug. 24, 8 p.m., TheStateRoom.com Quickwits Improv Summer League Semifinals Midvale Performing Arts Center, 695 W. Center St., Midvale, 801-824-0523, Aug. 20 & 27, 10 p.m., QWComedy.com Open Mic Night Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Salt Lake City, 801-532-5233, every Wednesday, 7:30 p.m., WiseguysComedy.com Shawn Paulsen Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., Ogden, 801-622-5588, Aug. 19-20, 8 p.m., WiseguysComedy.com Throwing Shade Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, Salt Lake City, Aug. 19, 6:30 p.m., TheUrbanLoungeSLC.com

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22 | AUGUST 18, 2016

Laura Osnes & Mark Masri with the Utah Valley Symphony SCERA Shell Outdoor Theatre, 745 S. State St., Aug. 20, 8 p.m., SCERA.org

LITERATURE AUTHOR APPEARANCES

UPCOMING EVENTS

ROOM TWILIGHT CONCERT:

GET GA UTAH BEER FESTIVAL PUSHA-T & DIGABLE PLANETS TICKETS FOR ONLY $15

THURSDAY, AUGUST 18

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GET GA UTAH BEER FESTIVAL TICKETS FOR ONLY $15

21ST ANNUAL MARK MILLER SUBARU CHARITY GOLF CLASSIC

8-10PM

7AM-3PM

SATURDAY, AUGUST 20

AT GRACIE’S!

SUNDAY, AUGUST 21

AT STONEBRIDGE GOLF CLUB

Bonnie Glee: Invisible Son Weller Book Works, 607 Trolley Square, 801-328-2586, Aug. 20, 3 p.m., WellerBookWorks.com Mark Beauregard: The Whale: A Love Story The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, Aug. 19, 7 p.m., KingsEnglish.com Rae Meadows: I Will Send Rain The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-4849100, Aug. 18, 7 p.m., KingsEnglish.com (see p. 17) S.R. Atkinson: Surface Tension Weller Book Works, 607 Trolley Square, 801-328-2586, Aug. 23, 6:30 p.m., WellerBookWorks.com Lisa F. Smith: Girl Walks Out of a Bar The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801484-9100, Aug. 24, 7 p.m., KingsEnglish.com

SPECIAL EVENTS FARMERS MARKETS

9th West Farmers Market International Peace Gardens, 1000 S. 900 West, Salt Lake City, Sundays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., through October, 9thWestFarmersMarket.org Harvest Market Gallivan Center, 239 S. Main, Tuesdays, 4-8:30 p.m., through Oct. 18, SLCFarmersMarket.org Park City Farmers Market The Canyons Resort, 1951 Canyons Resort Drive, Park City, Wednesdays, noon-6 p.m., through Oct. 26, ParkCityFarmersMarket.com Park Silly Sunday Market 600 Main St., Park City, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., through Sept. 18, ParkSillySundayMarket.com

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE @ CITYWEEKLY.NET

Sugar House Farmers Market Fairmont Park, 1040 E. Sugarmont Ave., Salt Lake City, through Oct. 26, Wednesdays, 5-8 p.m., SugarHouseFarmersMarket.org Downtown Farmers Market Pioneer Park, 300 S. 300 West, Salt Lake City, through Oct. 22, Saturdays, 8 a.m.-2 p.m., SLCFarmersMarket.org

FESTIVALS & FAIRS

Salt Lake County Fair Salt Lake County Equestrian Park & Event Center, 2100 W. 11400 South, through Aug. 20, SLCFair.com (see p. 17) Wasatch International Food Festival Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W. 3100 South, West Valley City, Aug. 19, 5-10 p.m.; Aug. 20, noon-10 p.m., GA $5, FoodFestUtah.org The Color Run Library Square, 200 E. 500 South, Aug. 20, 9 a.m., TheColorRun.com

VISUAL ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

Andrew Rice: (Re)structured Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-3284201, through Oct. 8, UtahMOCA.org Architecture of Place Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, 801-236-7555, through Sept. 9, VisualArts.Utah.gov Artists of Utah 35 x 35 Exhibition Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, 801-596-5000, through Sept. 23, SaltLakeArts.org (see p. 17) A Beautiful Wall CUAC, 175 E. 200 South, 385215-6768, through Sept. 9, CUArtCenter.org Berna Reale: Singing in the Rain Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, Aug. 19-Nov. 5, UtahMOCA.org Carol Bold Red Butte Garden, 300 Wakara Way, Aug. 19-Sept. 11, RedButteGarden.org Composition of Elements: New Paintings by Chris Hayman Julie Nester Gallery, 1280 Iron Horse Drive, Park City, 435-649-7855, through Aug. 30, JulieNesterGallery.com David Sharp: Primitive Spirit Salt Lake City Chapman Library, 577 S. 900 West, 801-5948623, through Aug. 25, SLCPL.org DemoGraphics Rio Gallery, 300 S. Rio Grande St., 801-245-7272, through Sept. 2, Heritage.Utah.gov Jim Williams: 265 I...Home As Self-Portrait Utah Musuem of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through Sept. 24, UtahMOCA.org Jennifer Seely: Supporting Elements Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through Sept. 24, UtahMOCA.org Love Letters: A Gallery of Type Marriott Library, 295 S. 1500 East, Salt Lake City, 801-585-6168, through Sept. 30, Lib.Utah.edu Magical Thinking CUAC, 175 E. 200 South, 385-215-6768, through Sept. 9, CUArtCenter.org Nancy Swanson Art at the Main, 210 E. 400 South, 801-363-4088, through Sept. 11, ArtAtTheMain.com Sibylle Szaggars Redford: Summer Rainfall Kimball Art Center, 1401 Kearns Blvd., Park City, 435-649-8882, through Sept. 25, KimballArtCenter.org Susan Makov A Gallery, 1321 S. 2100 East, 801583-4800, through Sept. 3, AGalleryOnline.com (see p. 20) Summertime Utah Artist Hands Gallery, 163 E. 300 South, 801-355-0206, through Sept. 10, UtaHands.com Tess Cook Mountain West Hard Cider, 425 N. 400 West, Aug. 19-Sept. 14, MountainWestCider.com


Jobs Rentals ll e S / y u B Trade

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AUGUST 18, 2016 | 23


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24 | AUGUST 18, 2016

BEER, WINE & SPIRITS

State Street Suds

The Bayou has an app for that. BY TED SCHEFFLER comments@cityweekly.net @critic1

T

here is no shortage of watering holes on State, ranging from downtown Salt Lake City all the way to Draper. For beer lovers, however, there is only one “beervana,” and it’s called The Bayou. It’s hard to believe that I first wrote about it back in 2003, after the doors opened on the Louisiana-style gastropub. In some ways, it was an extension of founder Mark Alston’s The Beer Nut, a home-brewing (and winemaking) supply shop that I frequented as early as 1994. It seemed natural that the growing community of Utah beer connoisseurs and home-brewers would support a place like this, which back then offered what I termed a “mind-boggling array of suds: some 120 bottled beers with dozens more on tap.” Flash forward 13 years and, as of this writing, The Bayou offers 427 different beers—mostly in bottles, but a good selection on tap, as well. How do I know this? Well, I downloaded the restaurant’s nifty app, which was designed by Alston and is pretty useful (if you’re into beer, that is). Every single brew available there is listed on the app. Click on one, and a page will pop up, detailing its country of origin, size, alcohol level, bitterness and price. You can click on another tab which will transport you to RateBeer.com, providing an even more in-depth description. Another cool feature is a dice icon that randomly selects a beer for you. I did so, and came up with something called Santa’s Helper, brewed by Denmark’s Mikkeller. A 750-milliliter bottle of this Belgian strong dark

DRINK

ale (at 10.9 percent alcohol by volume) will set you back $23.50. RateBeer says it should be served in a Trappist, tulip or tumbler glass, and assigns it an overall 88-percent rating from voters. All of that info and more is available with a few clicks. If you don’t own a smartphone, no worries. The barkeeps and servers are so fluent in the language of beer that you can feel confident putting yourself in their capable hands. Wondering which of 81 IPAs to try? Ask a server or pull out your phone. Not surprisingly, India pale ales represent the second-largest category of brews available here, surpassed only by local brands, of which there are 99 offered at present. By the way, the app is said to reflect the restaurant’s real-time inventory. A friend of mine was complaining recently about the lack of ciders available in our state. She’ll be pleasantly surprised to know that there are plenty to choose from here, ranging from the local Hive Winery’s raspberry jalapeño cider to California’s Ace pear cider. Eight gluten-free brews are currently offered, along with 10 different barley wines, 24 draft beers, 10 seasonal selections, 44 light lagers, 49 stouts and porters and one pumpkin. But that’s just scratching the surface. To get seriously into the suds, you’ll need to visit for yourself and take time to celebrate their tremendous selection—not to mention a vast array of delicious grub and live music to go with it. It’s our State Street stateof-the-art beer emporium. CW

THE BAYOU

645 S. State 801-961-8400 UtahBayou.com

B

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P EER

IZZA & GOOD TIM ES!

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Breakfast

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801.266.4182

MON-SAT 11:30-2:30

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AUGUST 18, 2016 | 25


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26 | AUGUST 18, 2016

Serving American Comfort Food Since 1930 -CREEKSIDE PATIO-86 YEARS AND GOING STRONG-BREAKFAST SERVED DAILY UNTIL 4PM-DELICIOUS MIMOSAS & BLOODY MARY’S-LIVE MUSIC SAT & SUN 11AM-2PM-

“In a perfect world, every town would have a diner just like Ruth’s” -CityWeekly

AS SEEN ON “ DINERS, DRIVE-INS AND DIVES”

“Like having dinner at Mom’s in the mountains” -Cincinnati Enquirer

now serving breakfast

4160 EMIGRATION CANYON ROAD | 801 582-5807 WWW.RUTHSDINER.COM

@

2005 E. 2700 SOUTH, SLC FELDMANSDELI.COM FELDMANSDELI OPEN TUES - SAT TO GO ORDERS: (801) 906-0369

bagels, bagel beignets corned beef hash blintzes fried egg & taylor ham sandwiches from 8:00 am - 10:30 am

Delicious Food, Great Atmosphere!

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Summer is here...

Bröst!

20 W. 200 S. SLC

(801) 355-3891 • siegfriedsdelicatessen.biz


FOOD MATTERS BY TED SCHEFFLER @critic1

authentic

Mexican Food & cantina Since 1997

Beer & Ballet

Ballet West is gearing up for another round of Beer & Ballet at the Rose Wagner Performing Arts Center (138 W. 300 South). On Saturday, Sept. 10, from 6-9:30 p.m., audience members can get a special sneak preview of Ballet West’s Works from Within program, as well as craft beers from Epic Brewing and light appetizers. The ticket price—$50 in advance or $60 at the door—includes three free drinks, and non-alcoholic beverages will also be available. To purchase advance tickets, visit BalletWest.org or call 801-869-6938.

Tuesday Harvest Market

BlueIguanaRestaurant.net

165 S. West Temple • SLC

Below Benihana and across from the Salt Palace

801-533-8900

255 Main St • Park City Treasure Mountain Inn (Top of Main)

435-649-3097

AUGUST 18, 2016 | 27

Food Matters 411: tscheffler@cityweekly.net

d w it h N o t v a li f fe r e oth r o /5/16 Exp. 09

| CITY WEEKLY |

Quote of the week: “When one has tasted watermelons, one knows what angels eat. It was not a Southern watermelon that Eve took; we know it because she repented.” —Mark Twain

e urchas P h t i W trees o f 2 E n any

This year’s Park City Area Restaurant Association’s Summer Cocktail Contest was won by the Silver Star Café (1825 Three Kings Drive, Park City, 435655-3456, TheSilverStarCafe.com) with their “LaBounty bourbon ice bomb”—a port- and bourbon-based cocktail created by mixologist Jeff LaBounty. The drink blew away the competition, receiving an average 10 out of 10 rating from 265 voters who cast ballots online. “Jeff’s cocktail is really just so much fun,” café owner Lisa Ward says in a press release. “It’s whimsical, it’s creative, it’s surprising and it’s totally different than just about anything you’ve seen.” All Cocktail Contest entries and recipes can be found on the PCARA website at ParkCityRestaurants.com.

EER E FAPR PETIZ

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Bombs Away

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The seventh season of the Tuesday Harvest Farmers Market is in full swing, happening every Tuesday through Oct. 18, from 4 p.m.-dusk at the Gallivan Center (239 S. Main). A bit more laid-back than the Saturday Downtown Farmers Market, it typically features about 20 vendors and fewer attendees than on weekends, making shopping and parking a little more convenient. “The Tuesday Market offers farmers an additional opportunity to connect with local shoppers during a time of the year when farms are producing at their height,” market manager Alison Einerson says. It’s “the perfect way for both residents and commuters to pick up farmfresh produce and locally produced food before heading home.” For additional details, visit SLCFarmersMarket.org.


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28 | AUGUST 18, 2016

OPEN LATE FRI & SAT TO 3:00AM

GOODEATS Complete listings at CityWeekly.net

W NOPEN O Japanese shabu-shabu Japanese style hot-pot

Even Stevens Sandwiches free broth & appetizers w/ purchase of a meal

MON-FRI 4:30-10PM S AT 1 2 - 1 0 P M • S U N 1 2 - 8 : 3 0 P M

35 West Broadway 801.961.7077• siciliapizza.net

9460 S Union Square #106, Sandy

The message is simple: “A sandwich shop with a cause.” For every gourmet sandwich purchased, the essentials to make sandwiches (bread, meat, cheese, lettuce) are donated to one of four nonprofits. They are currently rolling out with the Good Samaritan Program, the Rescue Mission, the YWCA and the Volunteers of America Homeless Youth Outreach. If the ethicality weren’t enough to keep you coming back, the sandwiches themselves surely will. The “JP grilled cheese” is made with spicy jalapeños and melted white cheddar, and you can even add bacon to the mix. Multiple Locations, EvenStevens.com

Lone Star Taquería

Our Philosophy has always been to take the finest ingredients and do as little to them as possible. Classic Italian techniques used to make artisan pasta, homemade cheeses and hand tossed Pizza.

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Featuring dining destinations from buffets and rooms with a view to momand-pop joints, chic cuisine and some of our dining critic’s faves.

Everything is fresh at this inexpensive, funky eatery— from the tortillas and salsas to the tamales and tacos. The Lone Star Taquería has been around longer than most, and looks like a taco shack on a Baja beach. The mahi-mahi fish tacos with cilantro aioli are wildly popular at the Lone Star, as well as the zippy jalapeño-spiked guacamole. 2265 E. Fort Union Blvd., Cottonwood Heights, 801-944-2300

16 WINNER

Feldman’s Deli

Welcome to a New York City-style deli specializing in Jewish soul food. With restaurant favorites like matzoball soup, spinach knishes and overstuffed corned-beef and pastrami sandwiches, you’ll feel like you’ve been transported to the Big Apple. Make sure to try the salami sandwich with garlicky, all-beef salami and provolone cheese. And bring your appetite: These sandwiches are huge. Other authentic treats include french fries, bagels, rich housemade kishke and much more. 2005 E. 2700 South, Salt Lake City, 801-906-0369, FeldmansDeli.com

Flatbread Neapolitan Pizzeria

With a menu that boasts more than 20 pies, plus a craftyour-own option, there is something for everyone here, including salads, sandwiches and gluten-free options. The restaurant prides itself on using only the finest milled flour, San Marzano tomatoes and all-natural fresh yeast, mozzarella and basil. Top off your charredto-perfection pie with a glass of wine and you’ve got a delizioso meal. 2121 S. McLelland St. East, Salt Lake City, 801-467-2180, FlatbreadPizza.com

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catering • delivery• dine-in 2121 s. McClelland Street (850 east) 801.467.2130 I couscousgrillexpress.com

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89 THE

Issue

How old Hwy. 89 has survived, thrived and stayed alive.

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Summer heat have you down? Break out the galoshes and relive the great flood of ’83 (p. 32). While you’re at it, give a standing O to the folks behind South Salt Lake’s Children’s Theatre (p. 48), and hear the stories of some State Street characters straight from the horse’s mouth (p. 42). At the bottom of each page, you’ll also find a timeline highlighting Great Moments in State Street History—from JFK to KFC. Speaking of which, if all that reading has made you hungry, and you want to travel around the world in 80 plates, State Street has you covered (and so does our food reviewer). Read his picks of under-the-radar bests on p. 50. And what about local car culture? From being the current home of endless dealerships, auto body shops and garages to cruising and drag racing, many think State is synonymous with the rev of a 1969 Camaro. Chances are, depending on your age, that a muscle car is the first image that comes to mind when hearing the name of the defiant stretch. Many fights, lifelong friendships and, in the case of Bountiful mechanic Lee Whittaker (p. 30), marriages were started there. Keep your flashiness, U.S. Route 20. We have heartfelt bragging rights all our own.

—Enrique Limón

AUGUST 18, 2016 | 29

hen it comes to roads that impress based on colossal length alone, U.S. Route 20 has all the rest of them beat with its 3,365 miles of breathtaking asphalt. Even with the mighty U.S. Route 89 helping out girth-wise, State Street pales in comparison; but in its 17.3 miles—spanning from the Capitol building to Draper—the story of Salt Lake City is contained. State Street’s reach, however, goes far beyond that. Take for instance Salt Lake Community College, which in total is responsible for helping mold the future of 61,000 students a year; Impact Hub, which encompasses 13,000 square feet of entrepreneurial coworking space; or Little World Chinese Restaurant, where I have never been judged when ordering a large house special chow mein (for one) on an idle Thursday at 9:45 p.m. From its deep-running history to its ingrained seediness, Salt Lake City’s essence calls State Street home. A few years shy of turning 100, State Brass Foundry is a relic of American industrialization. Check out the family-run business’ story on p. 34. Have you ever noticed that one building with a sign outside reading “Christian School”? Get hip to the journey of its other-worldly tenant on p. 38. Speaking of signs, we also pay homage to great displays old and new (p. 40) in this special issue.


HOT ROD PICS BY TYSON SPRAWLINGS

The rise and fall of State Street’s cruising culture. By Alex Springer

were two cruising-related homicides and nearly 1,000 assaults in the downtown area from 1997-1998. In an April 2004 article for Car and Driver titled “The End of Cruising,” author Steve Gofman’ calls out a University of Utah professor named Ken Larsen who actively protested the passage of these laws in the year 2000. Larsen affixed signs decrying police brutality to his ‘79 Ford Thunderbird and drove back and forth through State’s traffic-control point, eventually leading to a ticket from the police. He fought the ticket in court, using the legal battle as a platform to publicly ridicule the local law. Larsen’s suit, it turns out, made it all the way to the Utah Supreme Court, but that’s where his fight ended. Sixteen years later, we still have pockets of community members who’d like to recapture the cruising culture’s glory days. Christine Suriano started a Facebook page as a way to generate support for repealing the anti-cruising laws. “I feel like the fun we had on State Street was innocent fun,” Suriano says. “It wasn’t like today where there’s so much hiding behind a computer.” While there’s no doubt that anti-cruising laws impacted the culture as a whole, the fact that they coincided with the rise of the personal computer and widespread internet access makes it hard to pin all of the blame on lawmakers. Cruising culture was definitely a youth culture, but it was a car culture as well. A car was essentially a pipeline to the downtown social scene, so teenagers built a scene around maintaining and driving their automobiles. Since teens today don’t have to rely on a car as a means of interaction, taking care of cars has become more of a niche hobby among today’s youth. “I know a lot of kids that don’t even want their driver’s licenses,” Whittaker says. “They don’t have that passion anymore because they can meet and socialize online.” Anti-cruising laws are still on the books, and since their creation, legislators have added a provision that allows police to set up traffic control points wherever they deem necessary, which begs one simple question: When was the last time this was necessary? According to Detective Cody Lougy of the Salt Lake Police Department, there aren’t a lot of cruisers around anymore. Lougy, who was a downtown police officer when anti-cruising regulations took effect, says that culture has died with the advent of social media. “We haven’t really seen much cruising in the past decade,” Lougy says. “Kids used to cruise to socialize, but now it’s all done online.” For city councilman Derek Kitchen who was elected in 2015, cruising isn’t even a blip on his radar, but he says he’s keeping an open mind about it. “I haven’t heard complaints either way about the ordinance,” he says. “I am willing to listen to anyone who thinks it should change.” Whether ordinances change or not, cruising State Street might have to simply be relegated to the cultural time capsule that is the final resting place for hair grease, poodle skirts and cheap gas. Either way, State Street has certainly seen some action. “You never knew what you were getting into—that’s what was fun about it,” Whittaker reminisces. “What you saw was what you got.” CW

STATE STREET HISTORICAL TIMELINE - Compiled by Jordan Floyd

13000 B.C.

The strip of land that will eventually become State Street is entirely submerged in the waters of Lake Bonneville.

Fall of 1849

❱ ❱

Ebenezer Brown, the son of Scottish immigrants, brings cattle to graze the tall grass fed by mountain streams in the “unsettled” area then known as South Willow Creek. Five years later, the town was renamed Draperville.

1852

Social Hall, Utah’s first theater, is built on 35 S. State St.

1854

Brigham Young’s adobe-andsandstone Beehive House is constructed on State adjacent to Temple Square.

1856

Young’s Lion House is constructed for his large polygamist family to live in. Roar!

1859

State Street’s Eagle Gate is erected as the entrance to Young’s estate, which was located across from City Creek Canyon.

UTAH HISTORICAL SOCIETY

I

t’s a Saturday night in the summer of 1975. The sun has set behind the mountains, streaking the sky with lazy strokes of orange and purple. The sound of rumbling engines mingles with laughing teenagers as music from the Bee Gees and the Eagles blares from the speakers of every hi-fi system within earshot. Clusters of jocks, greasers and hippies strike a cautious neutrality as they gather at the local Wienerschnitzel for chili dogs before setting out for an evening of drag racing, dodging cops or perhaps meeting the love of their life. This last sentiment rang true for Lee Whittaker, a mechanic from Bountiful, who met his wife of 40 years while cruising Salt Lake City’s central vein in the ’70s. “I was cruising State, and I saw this girl that I knew in her car, so I started hanging out the window and waving at them.” Whittaker recalls. “There was this cute girl that I had never seen in the passenger seat, and I just had to get to know her. “They drove around with each other that night, eventually learning that they both went to Viewmont High School. “She recognized me and my loud ‘55 Chevy Bel Air,” he says. “We went together through high school and got married in ‘79. She’s still my best friend—two people couldn’t get along better.” I’d wager that a good chunk of readers grew up in a world without high-speed internet connection and endless social media outlets, and they’d be able to tell you what cruising was. Hell, I dabbled in it myself as a bored teenager in the late ’90s. For those of you who are more adept at socializing online, there was a time, before Facebook— before MySpace even—when young people who wanted to meet other contemporaries had to drive around downtown and socialize. “Your car was your social network,” Whittaker says. “Kids struggled to get a car because that’s how you met people.” Back then, if you didn’t have a car, or at least a friend with a car, you were considered a social pariah (and probably one of the people that was using their IBMs to lay the groundwork for the online sprawl of social media that we now enjoy). Regardless of whether you remember cruising State Street, the fact of the matter is that it’s not really a thing anymore. On a given weekend, State Street looks less like American Graffiti and more like … well, regular graffiti. Based on the souped-up engines that I hear screaming past my place on Foothill Drive on most weekends, and a few articles that I dug up about local car accidents, I can surmise that Salt Lake City still has a street-racing scene—”It’s moved onto the freeway, but there are some racing groups that still set things up,” Whittaker says. But cruising down State doesn’t seem to contain the cultural gravitas it once did. Some blame this on the anti-cruising ordinances the Salt Lake City Council created in the late ’90s. Essentially, these laws made it illegal for the same car to pass between a traffic control checkpoint more than twice between the hours of 11 p.m.-4 a.m. Utah wasn’t the only state that had implemented this kind of ordinance—it became a nationwide legal trend throughout the 1990s and most cities passed these laws in an effort to combat gang activity, which was the city’s rationale. According to Salt Lake City Code, there

UTAH HISTORICAL SOCIETY

30 | AUGUST 18, 2016

Cruise Control

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AUGUST 18, 2016 | 31


Runs Through It

The State Street flood of ‘83 was the talk of the town. By Lance S. Gudmundsen

1869

Billy Morgan builds the state’s first smelter on 5189 S. State St., marking the start of a longstanding mining industry in Utah.

Circa 1870

State Street runs parallel to Utah’s “red-light” district on Commercial Street (now Regent Street). Sin is only a right or left turn away.

Oct. 17, 1885

Two nurses stand outside the Salt Lake County General Hospital on 2001 State St. The County purchased the property in 1885 and built the hospital shortly after. It is now the site of the Government Center building.

UTAH HISTORICAL SOCIETY

Pony Express Station No. 9—named “Traveler’s Rest”—near modern-day 6200 S. State St. serves as a rest-stop for riders.

UTAH HISTORICAL SOCIETY

Circa 1860

million—to propel water into the West Desert, where it evaporated. They haven’t been used since. Derided by critics as “Bangerter’s Folly,” the pumps still are maintained. The 1983 flood scenario began the previous year as record rainfall saturated soil throughout northern Utah. Reservoir levels swelled. Winter again brought recordshattering snowfall. Parley’s Summit, for example, recorded 700 inches. Most of May was colder than normal, impeding snowmelt, but Memorial Day weekend temperatures climbed into high 80s, triggering the deluge. Before the State Street flood, a gargantuan mudslide had blocked the Spanish Fork River in Utah County, inundating the town of Thistle and causing $200 million damage. And to the north, slides caused widespread damage in Davis and Weber counties. After declaring a state of emergency, Gov. Scott M. Matheson was widely quoted as quipping: “It’s a hell of a way to run a desert.” The Reagan White House also inked an emergency declaration. Of course, there’s the question: Could history repeat itself if the Wasatch Front were to face another maelstrom? Laura Briefer, director of Salt Lake City Department of Public Utilities, says: “The city learned from the ‘83 experience and put new capacity into the system.” She adds, “We had very similar weather conditions in 2010201l” and drainage infrastructure performed as designed. On a scale of 1-10, “If we have similar conditions to ‘83, we’re a 10 in terms of preparedness.” CW

UTAH HISTORICAL SOCIETY

[of the Madeleine] and every other church in the phone book.” Recalls the former mayor: “It was like building a pyramid in one day.” City front loaders and dump trucks brought in tons of sand. In all, thousands of volunteers filled 860,000 sandbags—some estimates ran as high as a million—along the 13-block-long stretch of State. As an artificial stream bed, crews laid countless rolls of rubberized membrane to channel the flow. It all was damp, dirty and exhausting work. In the days that followed, however, State Street took on the flavor of a festival. Shoppers became sightseers. A couple of enterprising restaurants moved tables onto the sidewalk with signs like, “You hook ‘em, we cook ‘em.” Denizens of smoke-filled barrooms, restricted by Utah liquor laws, stayed indoors and swapped stories over 3.2 draft beer and mini-bottles. The river became less of a nuisance and more of a novelty. Cameras (these were the days before smartphones, remember) were de rigueur accessories. Photographers captured a helmeted 18-year-old high-school student paddling his kayak upstream near the “Alta Club Rapids.” Other watercraft—including inner tubes, makeshift rafts and an occasional skiff—were spotted on the new waterway. All that water, of course, had to end up some place: the Great Salt Lake. Already cresting to historically high levels, the inland sea continued to rise. Four years later, during the administration of Gov. Norman H. Bangerter, the state installed three massive pumps—costing $60

UTAH HISTORICAL SOCIETY

toward 1300 South, which already had been sandbagged to direct the record runoff from three canyon streams toward the Jordan River—which itself was brimming. The muddy State Street torrent mostly was contained at 800 South where it emptied into storm drains. Later, volunteers and city crews linked the canal into the one at 1300 South. The old Derks Field baseball stadium, now Smith’s Ballpark, became a giant retention basin. Costing $30,000 each, two wooden pedestrian walkways sprung up overnight to bridge the 30-foot-wide river—half the actual width of State and 2 feet deep at places—at 100 and 300 South. Later, earthen viaducts were built at 500 and 600 South to connect with freeways. Sunday morning, at the height of the crisis, Mayor Ted L. Wilson placed a call to Mormon Church headquarters, explaining the need for additional manpower. Gordon B. Hinckley, then a counselor in the LDS First Presidency, initially was hesitant to turn worshipers’ focus from scripture to sandbags. Wilson reminded him “the water will come down City Creek, and your basement computers [in the Church Office Building] will be the first targets.” “Now I’m interested,” the churchman responded, later telling the mayor, “Well, the ox is in the mire,” a Mormon euphemism for breaking the sabbath. So for the first time in memory, Sunday services were canceled, chapels emptied and an estimated 10,000 Mormons and nonMormons alike galvanized to save the downtown area. Wilson also “called the Cathedral

UTAH HISTORICAL SOCIETY

E

very Salt Laker over a certain age, it seems, has memories of the floods of 1983, which for 13 days transformed State Street into a little slice of Venice—minus the gondolas. Hector Ahumada doesn’t recall precisely how he heard about “the river.” It might have been from neighbors in his apartment building on 200 South or maybe the television news. “And I thought, ‘Holy shit!’” So on the Memorial Day weekend of 1983, the 35-year-old Chile native found himself part of a human chain, passing sandbags as thousands of volunteers stood shoulder-toshoulder trying to contain a swift-moving torrent along State Street. After seeing “a couple of guys with fishing poles,” Ahumada decided to try his luck. “I ran back to the apartment, grabbed my gear and got some night-crawlers from the refrigerator.” After 15 minutes, he gave up. “The water was running too fast.” The “fish story” isn’t apocryphal. A Salt Lake Tribune lensman, in fact, captured an iconic picture of a beaming “unidentified businessman” displaying a trout he’d grabbed from the churning brown waters. State Street became a river after mud, boulders and debris clogged an underground conduit carrying City Creek. Upstream in Memory Grove, it leapt its banks. At first, the waters sloshed at the LDS Church Office Building and walls around Temple Square, moving onto the then-Hotel Utah and some downtown businesses. City emergency-management officials decided to divert the stream down State

UTAH HISTORICAL SOCIETY

32 | AUGUST 18, 2016

ARIVER

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Tucked away on State, foundry holds key to city history. Story and photos by Colby Frazier

Jessie VaineoHurst puts the finishing touches on a brass bearing

A group of Freemasons build the Salt Lake City and County building. Its architecture is meant to rival that of the Salt Lake City Temple. Thoughts?

1897

Originally nonMormon Alta Club building was built on the corner of 100 E. South Temple.

1904 UTAH HISTORICAL SOCIETY

1891-1894

These pumps, he says, are designed to carry live fish and water from one area to another while feeding them through the pump head first. If they go in backward, their gills are damaged and they die. Archer says he ships three to four of the pump housings each week to places as far flung as Norway and Sweden. While little has changed at the foundry over the decades, the area surrounding the business has changed, and in Archer’s opinion, it hasn’t been for the better. On the same Tuesday morning that his 18 employees were busy making the new pump housing, Archer says that when he showed up for work at 5 a.m., he caught sight of a prostitute performing oral sex on a customer in the parking lot of the Wasatch Inn. Each morning, foundry employees find the parking lot littered with hypodermic needles. A full beer can flew through a foundry window a couple of days before this story was published, and breakins, Archer says, especially when the price of copper, brass and aluminum are high, are frequent. Don Archer, who started working at the foundry full-time at the age of 18, says he was exposed to the wonders and the sins of the world on State Street. “If you can imagine somebody doing something, I’ve seen it done out here,” he says. “You see things that you shouldn’t see and it’s getting worse around our neighborhood.” But crime and prostitution are only part of the issues with the street that his business calls home. As Salt Lake City has morphed, and heavy manufacturing jobs have fled to the city’s outskirts, State Brass Foundry has remained, the smoke rising from its vent stacks and the pile of spent silica sand out front, standing out amid the convenience stores, fast food joints and hotels. The business’ uniqueness, Kim Archer says, has attracted the ire of city officials who are concerned about air pollution and wastewater quality. But while Archer does what he needs to do to keep his business alive in Salt Lake City, he says he would like to see something done about the cottage

The Ladies Literary Society promotes tax to build The Salt Lake Public Library. The library was built on 15 S. State St.

Ray Peterson manning the machines

Steve Kump heats up a new mold

April 1904

Utah mining legend and the namesake of Snowbird’s Regulator Johnson ski run, John S. Johnson, purchases a plot of land between State and Main Street. Johnson resides in his home on 2906 S. State St. until his death in 1925.

UTAH HISTORICAL SOCIETY

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ome children have vivid first memories of playing with a favorite toy, being strapped into a hated car seat or learning to ride a bike. For Don Archer, life’s inaugural slice of existence has its roots at 1400 S. State inside the brass foundry that his great-grandfather built there in 1922. The State Brass Foundry & Machine takes its name from the street it sits on, and in this era of oppressive technology, the gray masonry building that has housed the foundry for 94 years still stands. Inside, bearded men in denim overalls pour molten metal into casts large and small to keep society’s industrial machines running smoothly. Chains and pulleys hang from the ceiling, shiny brass ovals are carved to precision inside computerized cutting machines, a conduction furnace melts metal and new casts are formed from wood cutouts and silica sand. Though some jobs are repetitive, Don Archer, the fourth-generation of Archer men to work at the foundry, says part of the job’s charm is solving problems and often getting to do something different. “It’s unique,” Archer says, noting that the position of “foundryman” is becoming an increasingly rarefied title. “I like to say that it’s different every day. There’s always something coming in the door that’s new, that’s a challenge that you have to figure out to make it new for the customer.” His father, Kim Archer, whose first name derives from his great-grandfather and early Church of Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints apostle Heber C. Kimball, began working at the foundry in 1972. One of the first accounts that Kim Archer secured, he remembers, was manufacturing brass bearings for FMC Jetway, now JBT Corp., in Ogden. Shining brass gears made on State Street are the guts of thousands of jetways around the world, Kim Archer says. While State Brass Foundry performs jobs small and large, Kim Archer says some of his largest customers run fish farms around the world. On the morning of Aug. 9, the foundry crew had just poured nearly 1,000 pounds of molten metal into a cast that would become a roughly 6-foot-tall pump housing for an aquaculture company.

UTAH HISTORICAL SOCIETY

34 | AUGUST 18, 2016

HEAVY METAL 89


AUGUST 18, 2016 | 35

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industries of drugs and prostitution that thrive at nearby motels. The nature of his business, and the combination of the perception that the city isn’t doing enough to crack down on crime in the area, he says, has resulted in a mutual dislike. He says the city hates him “probably because I put out a little smoke and I am what I am downtown,” while “I hate the city because [it] isn’t doing anything with the problems we’ve got here on State Street.” And while heavy manufacturing jobs sometimes appear to be a fading relic of American industrialism, the State Brass Foundry is thriving. Short on space and needing to expand, Archer says he has purchased a pair of buildings on 2.5 acres at the old Tooele Army Depot. There, he says, they can expand the business. Eventually, Archer says he hopes to move the bulk of his foundry operations to Tooele, but current plans have the machine shop remaining on State. As he walks from room to room in the ancient building, its walls blackened with soot, he points out the old gas-fired furnaces that

lie dormant beneath the building, and veteran employees like Steve Kump, who has worked at the foundry for 40 years, and was busy handling a flame-thrower. While the world outside the foundry walls changes, bits and pieces of that world are fabricated inside. From the beehives that grace the south entrance of the Utah State Capitol, to the Pioneer-era map of Salt Lake City imbedded in the floor of the City Creek Center bridge above Main Street, and to the names on gravestones that fill the state’s cemeteries, one is never too far from a brass fixture crafted on State Street. And a fifth generation of Archers is waiting in the wings. Don Archer says one of his sons wants to be a physician, while the younger of the two enjoys lending a hand at the foundry, where he, like his father, grandfather, great-grandfather and greatgreat-grandfather, will be able to say he’s a foundryman. “It’s a unique thing,” Don Archer says of being able to tell people, “I pour molten metal for a living. There’s not a lot of people who can say they do that.” CW

Kim Archer began working at his family’s foundry in 1972

801.266.3388

5473 S. State Street 1905

The Orpheum Theater, Salt Lake’s first solely vaudeville theater, is built in 1905 on 132 S. State St.

Circa 1910 UTAH HISTORICAL SOCIETY

36 | AUGUST 18, 2016

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CITY WEEkLY

Architect Richard K.A. Kletting designs the Utah State Capitol. The original structure is built between 1912-1916.


AUGUST 18, 2016 | 37


the

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FIXER

In a city dominated by religion, Ralph Plescia’s State Street studio testifies to a singular passion. Story and photos by Stephen Dark

Dec. 26, 1912 The Capitol Commission and other Utah dignitaries break ground on the Capitol building.

Plescia also rescued a number of damaged cellos after a fire savaged the former Summerhays’ store on Main Street. He plucks out several notes from half a cello he salvaged, using his ingenuity to fashion an internal bridge that would replicate the missing half of the instrument. “If it survived as far as it did, I should put it back together to make it play,” he says. “Just because it ought to be done.” Homespun Plescia has always made do with little. “In my life I have had no money, so I have to fix things.” In 1976 he repaired the weather-beaten stone lions in front of the Utah Capitol built by Gavin Jacks in 1914. Amusement park Lagoon subsequently took two of them for its fairground. In one of the lions, Plescia placed a heart stitched together by his daughter Tammy, who died of a brain aneurism in 2009. What dominates Plescia’s studio, though, is his unique religious vision, fashioned from all he learned responding to a challenge by an Episcopal minister in 1983 to come up with his own theory of creation. In Revelation 12, Plescia says, he discovered references to a woman who he believes is the heavenly mother. She’s part of the curb garden, “clothed in her radiance,” he says, with baby Jesus in her arms. “Sometimes you get to thinking it ought to be done and then you do it,” he says. Ask Briant Summerhays for his thoughts on Plescia’s striking religious statues and he references Michaelangelo’s Sistine Chapel for context. “I don’t think Ralph has his artistic talent,” he says, “but you might say he has some of his creative yearnings.” Compared to the rush of traffic on the street, inside the studio there’s a slight chill in the air, and a dusty silence. The first spectacle that greets you is the Garden of Eden, Eve climbing on the serpent’s back and reaching for forbidden fruit. Plescia then leads you upstairs to a second floor where he has fashioned a ceiling mural in the form of a cross on which are painted the faces of his loved ones who have preceded him to whatever awaits after death. “There is an afterlife, and we are going to it,” he says. These celestial renderings boast eyes fiery-bright and wild white locks, keeping him company from heaven as he works on 10-foot high banners bearing Christ’s anguished face beneath a crown of thorns. Plescia carries the banners each Holy Friday in the Community Ecumenical walk through the city, marking the stations of the cross. Plescia is largely self-taught as an artist. “After seventh grade, I never had an art teacher who taught me anything,” he says. His philosophy is if you ask questions, people will point you in the right direction. So he studied art books at libraries and watched artists at work, like a magpie, forever picking up ideas.

1913

Construction begins on the new Jordan High School on 9351 South State St. The school opens for classes a year later.

1934

State Street in Salt Lake City is part of U.S. Highway 89, a highway that stretches 1,685 miles all the way from southern Arizona to the Canadian border.

INTERSTATE

89

A basement vision of hell

Eve reaching for the forbidden fruit

1938

The historic Murray Theater is built on 4961 S. State St. Originally a cinema, it has since hosted an array of plays, concerts and private parties.

UTAH HISTORICAL SOCIETY

W

hen Ralph Plescia (pronounced Plee-sha) graduated from West High School 60 years ago, he went down to his father’s store at 1324 S. State to start working there full-time. But while he had assumed he would join his wheelchair-bound, Navyveteran father working at Western Auto Parts Co., Theodore Plescia had other ideas. “Go out into the world of hard knocks,” he told his son, and learn about life. Much of the education Plescia received in the intervening six decades has been immortalized behind the brick façade that previously housed his father’s auto parts store, next to the gas station, on the southwestern corner of State and 1300 South. The only signs that an extraordinary vision lies behind the wall, are a curb garden protected by concrete crosses and a looming statue of a mother and child, and words painted in red on an adjoining door, “Christian School.” The latter resembles more a plague-like warning than the title of a religious institution. Plescia is a thin, sprightly 78-year-old with a head of vivid, electrified white hair, whose resemblance to a wild prophet in his own wilderness is belied by his quiet, gentlemanly charm and the understated passion he displays for religious self-expression as he shows a visitor around his studio. With cement and rebar, he’s fashioned life-size representations of what the former Mormon has discovered through studying different religions and their texts. “Everybody picks and chooses what they want to talk about,” he says. “I tell them about what they ignored.” There’s no doorbell, and it can be haphazard trying to find him. Knock loudly midday on Fridays or Sundays and chances are he’ll hear you and open the door. Plescia inherited the store after the tragic death of his father and 8-year-old daughter Maria in a car accident in Nevada in 1970. That said, even though he pays for its upkeep, he says he doesn’t own the building technically; it’s held in a trust and will go to Shriners Hospitals upon his death. Plescia’s held many jobs over his lifetime, from working as an apprentice embalmer at a mortuary in his early 20s, to singing in bands and repairing musical instruments. He’s worked on-and-off for Summerhays Music Center’s Briant Summerhays repairing instruments for close to 30 years. Summerhays describes Plescia as a “highly, highly creative guy.” Plescia, it turns out, invented a bridge for violins that the late Utah Symphony music director Joseph Silverstein lauded to the Deseret News as actually improving the sound violins make, but given the value of his instrument, chose not to adapt it.

UTAH HISTORICAL SOCIETY

38 | AUGUST 18, 2016

The heavenly queen in her second floor bedroom


The heavenly mother looks on as Plescia waters plants protected from trampling by a line of crosses Plescia then goes down into the bowels of the building, past dragon-like serpents, a 1931 Cadillac he bought when he was just 19, and then on down some steps to hell, where several figures reach yearningly up to be saved from a water-logged pit. At times, as you squeeze through labyrinth-like tunnels, it’s more akin to a Middle Eastern archaelogical dig than the basement of a forgotten building. Out in the back garden, the smell of jamsweet blackberries wafts up from years of sun-dried fruit underfoot. A tombstone dedicated simply to “Curtis” stands at the back of the garden. Plescia says it memorializes the son of a former owner of the neighbor-

ing gas station. “Curtis” was shot five times in the head and after surviving for years, finally died. He’s planted moonflowers beyond his fence in the back alley, which, he says, only bloom at night. “Something is going to grow,” he says, meaning weeds. “So you plant something so that doesn’t.” He’d like someone to take over the studio after him. His agenda, he says, is simple and, in a sense, seems almost a response to the fate of State Street itself, long forgotten in the rush to I-15 and the suburbs. “Teach what’s ignored,” he says. “Through art.” CW

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The Granite Tabernacle, which featured a 133-foot-tall tower and a dome that arched 75 feet over the assembly hall, is demolished after residing on 3300 S. State St. for 53 years.

Sept. 27, 1963

Almost a full month before his assassination, President John F. Kennedy travels along State Street during a visit to Utah.

1965

The Salt Lake City Public Library on 15 S. State St. becomes the Hansen Planetarium at the hands of Iowa architect Wesley Budd.

1971

Tom Shane founds jewelry business Shane Co. It’s your friend in the diamond business on the corner of 7200 South and State Street— if you didn’t already know.

Sept. 18, 1972

Stores inside Murray’s Fashion Place Mall open for business. Auerbach’s (now Nordstrom) was the first store to operate in the mall.

May 1, 1979

Former parts boy, Larry H. Miller opens Larry H. Miller Toyota in Murray.

Spring of 1980 Sound Warehouse, the “still young grandfather of the car stereo business” opens its State Street doors.

DEREK CARLISLE

1956

UTAH HISTORICAL SOCIETY

Kentucky’s own Colonel Harland Sanders stops in Utah to visit pal Pete Harman. While here, the colonel shares a fried chicken recipe, and a legend is born.

CECIL STOUGHTON

Shadowed by the newfangled gaspowered bus, the last SLC trolley runs.

Aug. 3, 1952

ENRIQUE LIMÓN

Aug. 19, 1945

UTAH HISTORICAL SOCIETY

ust like the age of a tree can be traced by its growth rings, so can the history of a stretch of land like this one via its signs—current or abandoned, vibrant or ghostly, wooden or equipped with that nifty invention by French engineer Georges Claude, neon. War-torn or shiny and new, signs abound—from Eagle Gate near the Capitol to Draper’s glorious In-N-Out yellow arrow (hey, you can take the boy outta California … )—each telling a story, holding special memories; a first date perhaps, and bearing silent witness to Salt Lake City’s expansion, as well as lending a pop of color to its personality. Quick, can you guess where all of these are located? —Enrique Limón

Memorial Day Weekend, 1983

The “State Street River” is created to prevent damage to businesses during the floods of 1983.

AUGUST 18, 2016 | 41

40 | AUGUST 18, 2016

Sign EVERYWHERE A


Dotted along State Street’s nearly 18 miles are motels, tattoo shops, schools, bars, mom-and-pop stores and millennial-owned ventures. Most importantly, though, there are people. These are their stories.

Story and photos by Kathleen Stone

Michael John Nikols, Owner, Coachmans Dinner & Pancake House 1301 State St. Coachmans has been part of Salt Lake City’s culture for more than five decades. Although it ran into trouble when police discovered a cocaine ring running from the kitchen back in the day, it recovered. Nowadays, oldies play in the restaurant while families enjoy their modestly priced meals. “We’ve been, in my opinion, a landmark and almost an institution when it comes to Salt Lake,” Nikols says. “Back then, you would drive [on State Street] through Draper, that was nothing back then, through Sandy, which was nothing back then again, then Murray, which was a little bit bigger, and then Salt Lake ... you’d keep going from city to city to city and you would get the chance to decide where you wanted to eat,” he says. “And guess what a big, I would say, decision-maker for people? That signage.”

Theresa Nielson, Students for a Democratic Society, Justice for Abdi Protest Salt Lake City and County Building 451 S. State St. Still within sight of the Capitol, a group of protestors stand outside of the City and County Building. Theresa Nielson has marched down State Street prompted by various movements, including denouncing Trump’s divisive rhetoric and demanding justice for Abdi Mohamed. “It’s just a very large road. It’s easy to march down, it’s a really prominent place in Salt Lake City,” she says. “Some people are, like, ‘Wait what’s the point of doing this? What actually are you changing? You know, I think one thing is it visualizes the issue. It shows this actually affects how public [offials] talk about things, how government officials talk about things. When you have thousands of people mobilizing on the street, it’s on the news, it gets people rallied up, and it continues the conversation around the issue.”

Murray City holds dedication of Murray Park’s “Chief Wasatch” sculpture. It honors Utah’s first native occupants, the Southern and Northern Ute, southern Shoshone, Goshute, Paiute and Navajo Tribes.

1986

Tattoo artist Don Brouse opens ASI Tattoo on 1136 S. State St. His shop is one of the first in the state.

June 8, 1988 DEREK CARLISLE

November 23, 1985

Matthew Allred, Communications Director Epic Brewing Co. 825 State St. Less than a decade ago, Epic was a small brewery looking to serve sustainable, full-strength beer to Salt Lake City. It now has more than 100 employees, an additional location in Colorado and a recently opened restaurant in Sugar House. “Originally, the building was a Mexican restaurant, and then after that it was an Asian restaurant … and then it was closed, fenced off and barricaded for about two years,” Allred says. “There was a terrible slate roof on top of it, and it had fences and the whole thing was overgrown with weeds. It was a really big eye-sore right here on the corner. We came in, and we built this brewhouse on the front of it, and it has these big picture windows so you can see the brewing operation on State Street, and that was a big point to really change the façade. Asked to pinpoint what he likes about State Street the most, he says, “there’s such a large variety of businesses. Some that have definitely been entrenched for, you know, 50 years. We have some of the hotels and momand-pop stuff, but I think what’s really great about State Street is there’s a really big emphasis on local. We’re 100 percent locally owned and operated, so I think we’re a great fit for the character of State Street.”

South High closes its doors. After four years of renovations, the building gets new life as Salt Lake Community College’s South City Campus.

DEREK CARLISLE

Christine Brandt, State Investment Officer Utah State Capitol 350 N. State St. Though she’s preparing to retire, memories of her 30 years working at the Capitol flood Brandt’s mind: A truck drove up the stairs inside the Capitol, children sang by the live Christmas tree in the rotunda and a tornado tore through the area. “Well, looking down State Street, nothing really has changed. The trees still line the streets,” she says. “We were here during the tornado. That was a big event. … We knew there had been an issue, but we didn’t actually know there had been an issue until we walked out. All of the trees had been uprooted, from the Capitol grounds all the way down State Street. They were laying across the streets. That’s actually what started the renovation of the Capitol.”

ENRIQUE LIMON

42 | AUGUST 18, 2016

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Troy Thompson, Owner 1st Cash Pawn 3130 State St. “Historically, a lot of the pawn shops have been on State Street. So when people think, ‘I need to find a pawn shop,’ State Street kind of comes to mind,” Thompson says. “We try to be really fair and friendly, and we try to be real aggressive in terms of how much money we give out. We try to give a little more than the other places. … More recently, gun sales have been really good for us. We’ve always done well with tools, electronics, you know, jewelry,” he finalizes. “Whether it’s mechanical shops or pawn shops or anything, you can just about find anything you want on State Street.”

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John Goldhardt, Principal Murray High School 5440 State St. “There’s benefits because you have a lot of visibility. It’s really easy to find the school. It stands out, so you notice it, and you remember Murray High,” Principal Goldhardt says. “Some of the challenges are traffic, getting in and out of the school … but for the most part it’s not bad. Kids are pretty good about not going into the street ... the overpass that has the walkway over State Street really helps.” Goldhardt thinks that Murray High School and its neighbors, the car lots, residents and restaurants, all benefit from each other. “We’re just part of the neighborhood. I think being here 100 years on State Street, if we weren’t, people would wonder what was going on.”

Local beers on Tap Wings, Burgers, BBQ & More, T.V.s in every corner

Luke Jensen, Co-owner Aloha Salt Lake Tattoos 6657 State St. Adding to State Street’s tattoo legacy, Jensen opened Aloha Salt Lake Tattoos, tucked back in a mini-mall in Murray in 2015. As the tattoo guns buzz, he explains that he enjoys being part of the State Street culture, and that the good traffic and community outweigh the occasional loiterer. “It’s kind of a no-brainer to have a tattoo shop on State Street,” he says. “I love State Street, whether it’s south or north, I just love [it]. There’s a lot of activity, generally there’s a lot of good people. He pauses, “We catch some good walk-ins, meet some interesting people.”

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The Desert Star Playhouse in Murray opens its doors. It has entertained Utahns on State Street with original musical comedies ever since.

Dec. 1995

After five years on Main, Barbary Coast Saloon moves into the neighborhood, bringing with ’em a dose of badassness.

NIKI CHAN

1989

DEREK CARLISLE

44 | AUGUST 18, 2016

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Marci Duvris, Owner Busy Bee Bar 2115 State St. Since 1948, Busy Bee has served good food and drinks to college students and retired friends. It’s famous for garlic burgers, and a popular spot for grabbing a beer and watching a game. “You meet a lot of really different kinds of people. I really like the atmosphere, and people that wander in on State Street are quite original,” Duvris says. Her husband, Dean, explains that there are customers who have been coming to Busy Bee for longer than he’s been alive. “It does get pretty crowded on the weekends, and lunchtime,” Marci intervenes. “Our main part is usually football season … a lot of sports things. I just really love working here. I enjoy my customers, I enjoy the people that come around here, I enjoy my job.”

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Peter Wolf Toth, “Chief Wasatch” sculptor Murray Park 5130 State St. Looking over State Street in Murray is “Chief Wasatch.” Toth used a cottonwood tree to create the statue to honor Utah’s Native American tribes. It’s part of his “Trail of the Whispering Giants” series, and is one of 74 statues that have found a home in each state and internationally. “[Chief Wasatch] is named after your wonderful mountains there. ... My work, in essence, honors people facing injustice. This is kind of a mission in life,” the Hungarian-born artist says. “I’ve been making these statues for most of 50 years. My work is a little more than just making a statue, and, you know, just leaving. I try to honor the indigenous people in every state and in different countries.”

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Jim Renne, Rossetti Design Principal Rio Tinto Stadium 9256 State St. During each Real game, thousands of people walk across State, converging at the Rio Tinto Stadium. Jim Renne, the design principal for the Detroit-based architecture firm Rossetti, oversaw the stadium’s design and construction. “Initially, we were very interested in creating a design that basically respects and then embraces the physical context of the site and in the region,” he recalls. “If you’re seated at the west side, you’re able to look at the background of the mountain range, and feel the connection between where you are sitting and the view that you have. That way you really connect with your surroundings.” “But even more than that, we also were looking at the area that we were locating the stadium,” he says. “We wanted to create a destination that was more than just a stadium, with natural features, outdoor space, you know, community areas, that might even encourage residential development. … The stadium is the anchor that draws thousands of people.”

July 9, 1999

University of Utah adjunct associate professor Kenneth Larsen receives the first cruising citation issued in Salt Lake City.

Right after

Larsen and fellow cruising advocates sue the city over the move to end cruising on State Street.

Aug. 11, 1999

Utah’s deadliest and most dangerous tornado to date rips through the city, passing over the Capitol on the northernmost end of State Street.


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Chase Hogenson, Event Coordinator All Star Bowling & Entertainment 12101 State St. Almost at the end of the street is All Star Bowling & Entertainment, where kids run around playing laser tag, and adults enjoy a beer while they bowl. “Well, with State Street culture, we fit in just great because it gives another thing to do, where you’ve got the movie theater, you got the water park right here, you know, you got the bar and grills, and we fit in just great,” Hogenson says. “It just adds to State Street’s total environment of, you know, ‘Hey, let’s go cruise down State Street, see what we can get into,’ and we’re just another thing out here to complement that.” “State Street has been really big to me since I lived in Utah my whole life. We’d always go down State and, you know, cruise State, have fun, and there’s always something to do on State Street,” he continues. “You’re gonna see lots of cool stores, lots of little, you know, local shops, local restaurants that you can enjoy, that’s not so franchised-out. That’s what I really like about State. … It stays local.” CW

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Arts

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ENRIQUE LIMÓN

By Scott Renshaw

September 2002

David and Shelli Morris purchase the home of the future Temple Bar: an Olde World Pub. After 14 public hearings, it opens as Piper Down (next time you’re there, ask why).

July 2, 2003

Legally Blonde 2: Red, White & Blonde debuts, featuring scenes filmed on State Street’s northern end at the state Capitol building.

July 14, 2004

The state of Utah officially becomes home to the 12th Major League Soccer team, Real Salt Lake. The team begins playing games in the 2005 season at Sandy’s Rio Tinto Stadium.

Parkers decided to launch their own company, which became Salt Lake Repertory Theatre (better known as City Rep). After several years of mounting productions in various venues as an itinerant company, City Rep took over the Utah Theatre on Main Street, where they were the last permanent tenants from 1988-1991. Children’s theater productions began in the upstairs space, and continued as the organization moved again to the other State Street locations. James Parker relocated back to Seattle with his wife and family in 2001, but returned in 2007 when Tom became too ill to continue running the theater. He officially organized Utah Children’s Theatre as a nonprofit rather than shut it down. When it came time to decide on a permanent home, he pulled the trigger on taking over the old Avalon. But what seems like a perfect space now was far from an obvious choice at the time. “When I moved here,” Parker recalls, “of all of the sites we were looking at … I had this building at the bottom of the stack, basically. I said, ‘I’ll never be able to get parents to bring kids out to South Salt Lake. There’s too much of a stigma.’ Then we saw [the theater] and felt that everything was right.” Whatever aprehention might have existed, Parker praises the city of South Salt Lake for its efforts at making a great home for the theater. He has also been pleasantly surprised to find that any anticipated concerns about the space haven’t really come to pass. “When we were in construction, we did get tagged in a couple of spots, back in the alley,” he says. “But really and truly, I wonder if people holding the spray can think, ‘Hey, it’s the Children’s Theatre, I can’t do it. I’ll pick another wall.’” He continues, “This might be a little cheesy, but the magic of State Street is, it really sort of deflates that possibility of danger.” The theater now has a chock-full schedule, offering both fixedterm summer camps and after-school programs, and providing family-friendly productions like this year’s Shakespeare Festival, employing abbreviated versions that Parker jokingly describes as “for kids, or adults, with short attention spans.” He’s careful on multiple occasions to emphasize that “children’s theater” doesn’t mean productions performed by children—although some of his students do take age-appropriate roles in their productions—but high-quality theater that is appropriate for children. As with any arts organization, it’s not always easy to keep things rolling. “You think, ‘Utah, Mormons, big families—children’s theater is a slamdunk,’” Parker says. “But it’s not. It’s a strange, strange thing. You’d think it would be a breeze, but it’s not.” In the meantime, Parker keeps Utah Children’s Theatre rolling, continuing a history that’s both personal as a family business, and part of the larger history of State Street as a home for theater. “The nice thing about us partnering up with this building on State Street—and South Salt Lake, to a certain degree—is that we’ve preserved something that really never looked great, and turned it into something that looks like it’s always been here,” he says. “And that’s special.” CW

June 20, 2008 ROSETTI DESIGNS

Children’s Theatre proudly keeps up the main drag’s performance tradition.

ames Parker, executive director of Utah Children’s Theatre, sits on a barstool inside an old-fashioned soda fountain adjacent to the theater space. Through the fulllength windows, traffic rolls by, past the South Salt Lake location that once housed Avalon Theater. It might not seem like the most obvious place for a children’s theater, but Parker has a different, more expansive vision of what his organization can be. “Children’s theater, you usually think of a park setting,” he says. “If you go to other cities—Seattle, Minneapolis—theirs tend to be in more rural areas. And I thought about that: ‘Wouldn’t it be great to be in a more rural area, and not on a busy street with the motorcycles going by?’” The lure of State Street, however, kicked in. “I think there’s something special with getting the visibility. And people tend to kind of think of theater as an urban event,” Parker says. “I’m sure we’ve had some parents or people who haven’t come to our theater think, ‘Oh, South Salt Lake. Where is this?’ But usually, as soon as they walked in the doors of the theater, they were like, ‘Oh, I get it. This is special. This is important. We want to be here.’” And it is a beautiful space, fully renovated with an art-deco feel between 2011-2012 when UCT relocated here. But just as much as he’s clearly proud of the new look, including that sodafountain-as-concession stand, Parker also loves sharing the quirky bits of history associated with the building as he walks me through it: a ground-floor barber shop that for years occupied the room UCT now rents out as a party venue; the upstairs space, now used for classes, that was once a private apartment next to the theater’s projection booth, with a window that would allow occupants to watch the movies shown when it was still an operating cinema. State Street has always been home to theater houses—from the Murray Theater (now used only as a rehearsal space for citysponsored arts events) to the still-vibrant home of Desert Star Theatre in Murray. That’s a tradition Parker seems proud to be part of, as he has moved the operation from previous temporary locations at 638 S. State (now the State Room music venue) and 237 S. State (currently undergoing redevelopment). “I think people will identify us with State Street,” Parker says. “And if you look at, as far as arts and entertainment, State Street, Main Street, West Temple, that’s where all the theaters were. … We can say, ‘Hey, it didn’t go away completely. We’re still here.’ That thing that was developed a long time ago—the dance halls and movie theaters—it still exists in some form.” The history of local Children’s Theatre itself dates back to the early 1980s, when Parker’s parents, Tom and Joanne, moved the family to Utah from the Seattle suburbs. Tom became general manager of Salt Lake City’s LDS Church-run Promised Valley Playhouse (which itself was previously the home of the Lyric Theater). After just three years, the church closed the theater—and rather than move the family back to Washington, the

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Shakespearean Festival

Intermountain Healthcare wins judicial battle that strips Southern Exposure on State Street in Murray of its right to lease the hospital-front property. So, too, goes the possibility of a post-ERtrip lap dance.


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Market State Street is delicious, from downtown to Murray.

AMF Ritz Classic Lanes closes its doors. Thankfully, it’s bowling-pinshaped sign still adorns State.

April 1, 2009

The State Room on 638 S. State St. in Salt Lake City opens and becomes a prominent mid-sized concert venue in the valley.

Nov. 19, 2009 DEREK CARLISLE

February 2009

Californian taste buds rejoice as Draper plays host to the Wasatch Front’s first In-NOut Burger.

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DEREK CARLISLE

be smart to shop here. I know my life wouldn’t be complete without Matouk’s Calypso Sauce. You’ll find everything from clothing and school supplies to hair extensions. La Pequeñita (2740 S. State, 801-484-2980, LaPequenitaMarket.com) After living in Brazil for some time, I’m grateful to have this local store—an international market that specializes in products from Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Peru, Uruguay and Venezuela. I tend to veer to the imported Brazilian items, such as farofa, guaraná, dende oil and suco de caju, but I can never pass up the Peruvian peppers or Inka Kolas, either. I have found that the yerba mate sets they sell make for an excellent and unexpected gift item. Tejeda’s Market (2963 S. State, 801-485-0667) Fabian Tejeda’s Mexican market offers fresh produce and spices for making moles, birria de res, sopas and just about any other south-of-the-border dish you’d like to try. But the main reason to visit is the meat selection. Low prices and friendly service make this place hard to beat, whether you’re in the market for thin-sliced beef or an entire rib-eye roast. Chinatown Supermarket (3390 S. State, Ste. 11, 801-9068788, ChinatownSupermarkets.com) When you visit, be sure you’ve left a big hole in your schedule. I find myself so dazzled by the array of items here that hours can pass before I’m finished shopping. You’ll find an amazing selection of fresh and frozen seafood, pork belly, mooncakes, an enormous noodle selection (fresh and dried), cooked whole ducks and virtually every spice or ingredient you could ever need to make your own Asian meal. There are more types of clams sold at Chinatown Supermarket than I even knew existed, and it’s one of the few local places I know where you can get live crabs, lobsters and head-on shrimp. Mediterranean Market & Deli (3942 S. State, 801-266-2011, MedMarketSLC.com) You can eat-in at this impressive food emporium, but it’s also a great place to load up on items for a late summer outing. Delicious deli selections like feta cheese, fresh imported olives, cured meats, made-to-order salads and some of the best paninis around will make you the star of your next outdoor concert or picnic. Be sure to grab some waffle cookies on your way out. Sprouts Farmers Market (6284 S. State, Murray, 801-2663566, Sprouts.com) It’s easy to eat well with the wholesome assortment of foods available at Sprouts. Natural grass-fed beef, organic free-range chicken and farm-fresh pork are just a few of the quality items available from the Old Tyme Butcher Shop, and fresh fish is delivered six days a week, featuring wildcaught and farm-raised specialties. Personally, my favorite part of the store is the bulk food section, which includes a dizzying assortment, including more than a dozen types of rice, and more nuts than you’d find at a Trump rally. CW

Mediterranean Market & Deli

June 11, 2010

The “Bring Back State Street Cruising” Facebook group is created. “Spread the word! Let’s go cruising!!!!” their first post reads.

DEREK CARLISLE

L

et’s not mince words: Much of the Salt Lake Valley’s storied State Street has little or no eye appeal. The Champs-Élysées it is not. But, if you love to cook and eat, it’s a treasure trove of specialty food markets, from closet-size ones to those you could park a Boeing 747 inside of. It would take most of these pages to list all of them, but here are a few—from north to south—of the marvelous markets on State that help keep my pantry full and exotic. Ocean City Seafood Market (872 S. State, 801-953-1916, FreshSeafoodMarketinSaltLakeUT.com) This aptly named market boasts a huge seafood selection, including fresh-caught Alaskan salmon and sushi-grade tuna, clams, oysters, several types of shrimp, crab legs and scallops. If it swims, they probably have it. But this is much more than just a seafood market. It also stocks Asian spices, sauces, groceries and such, including fresh veggies (like seasonal mushrooms), Chinese noodles and even Vegemite from Australia. Mahider Ethiopian Restaurant & Market (1465 S. State, Ste. 7, 801-975-1111, MahiderEthiopian.com) When dining here, you’ll be treated to delicious East African foods including sambusa—a very popular Somali appetizer of lightly crusted pastry dough stuffed with meats, veggies, potatoes or lentils— along with, injera, the spongy type of bread used as an edible tool to scoop foods. It anchors virtually every Ethiopian meal. If you’d care to take a crack at making sambusa and injera at home, Mahider includes a small market selling African ingredients such as teff flour for doing just that. With help from the International Rescue Committee and Salt Lake County via the Spice Kitchen Incubator, Burmese-born (now Myanmar) Haymar Janumonya and her husband were able to open Sonjhae (named after their young daughter). Here, you’ll find an array of items—ranging from smokes and Bud Light to hardto-find foods and ingredients from Myanmar and Thailand— not to mention Asian cookware and clothing. Be sure to try the amazing Thai tea drinks. Qaderi Sweetz ‘n’ Spicez (1785 S. State, 801-484-0265, QaderiSweetzandSpicez.com) As someone who loves to cook Indian food, I’d be lost without Qaderi. This sprawling market stocks a gazillion different Pakistani and Indian food items, along with all-natural Ayurvedic powders, pills, oils and ointments, and a big selection of halal meats. If you’d rather leave the cooking to them, they also offer fresh curries, biryani, kabobs, puri, chaat and more, to eat-in or take-out. Powerful African Market (2561 S. State, 801-972-2266, PowerfulAfricanMarket.com) The folks here are super friendly and helpful, so don’t be intimidated if you’re not too familiar with African foodstuffs. To be accurate, this market stocks much more than just items from Africa, although there are plenty. Anyone looking for ingredients for Caribbean dishes, for example, would

HELEN C.

By Ted Scheffler

ENRIQUE LIMON

50 | AUGUST 18, 2016

89

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FILM REVIEW

Go Quest, Young Man

CINEMA

Kubo and the Two Strings celebrates the power of storytelling. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

I

Beetle, Kubo and Monkey in Kubo and the Two Strings ity as something based on recognizing what pulls us together, and makes us want to fight for one another. It recognizes art—music, a paper figure, a tale of a long-ago warrior—as some of the most potent magic we have for defeating heartlessness and despair. If the description of a shamisen as a threestringed instrument seems confusing in light of the film’s title, rest assured that Kubo and the Two Strings handles that issue in a manner that’s almost unbearably heartbreaking. Like much of the rest of the story, it’s built on allegory and metaphor, but never in a way that feels like an academic lesson. In a landscape of animated films that rarely reach for more than franchise-building, wacky hijinks and pop-culture punch lines, this one has been crafted with soaring ambition. What better lesson to convey to children through a cinematic story than why we continue to tell stories at all, how transcendent they can be and how they allow us to share our attempts to understand the experiences— and people—that made us who we are. CW

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KUBO AND THE TWO STRINGS

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BBBB Charlize Theron Art Parkinson Matthew McConaughey Rated PG

TRY THESE Coraline (2009) Dakota Fanning Teri Hatcher Rated PG

ParaNorman (2012) Kodi Smit-McPhee Anna Kendrick Rated PG

The Boxtrolls (2014) Ben Kingsley Jared Harris Rated PG

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AUGUST 18, 2016 | 53

Fantastic Mr. Fox (2009) George Clooney Meryl Streep Rated PG

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accompanied only by the animated totem of a monkey (Charlize Theron) and a samurai who has been transformed into a man-sized beetle (Matthew McConaughey) and whose only vague human memories are of serving Kubo’s father. If Kubo had been nothing more than its unique style, it still would have been one of the year’s most remarkable films—not animated films, but films, period. Director Travis Knight—a Laika veteran animator with his first directing credit—oversees a production that features characters designed with a distinctive sharpness. The action sequences are magnificently choreographed, highlighted by a battle between our three protagonists and a massive creature made of bones, and a confrontation between Monkey and one of the evil sisters on a sinking ship built out of leaves. The comic relief, when it comes, is low-key and anchored in the characters. And individual shots are breathtakingly beautiful, none more so than a river covered in slowly moving lanterns, floating into the glowing sunset. The heart of Kubo, however, is in the skill with which its screenplay (by Marc Haimes and Chris Butler) allows us to invest in this specific story while building its thematic framework on a foundation much more expansive than this specific story. It explores our need to reach out to the generations that came before us for wisdom and guidance, and the way that myths and legends serve that need. It touches on the power of human-

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

n the central plaza of a seaside Japanese village many years in the past, a young one-eyed boy named Kubo (Art Parkinson) is surrounded by an enraptured audience. Playing on his magical shamisen—a three-stringed Japanese instrument—Kubo brings to life a succession of origami figures, part of an ongoing performance about a warrior on a quest who battles frightening monsters (and perhaps also a fire-breathing chicken). It’s an archetypal tale, nested inside another archetypal tale, a hero journey about bravery and the connections of family. Kubo isn’t just telling a story; he’s telling the story. The setting, both geographical and temporal, is in many ways incidental to Kubo and the Two Strings—the latest terrific feature from stop-motion animation studio Laika (Coraline)—although there’s a delightful specificity to this village and its inhabitants. Because like all of the greatest stories, this one is about something bigger and more broadly human than its surface narrative. This is movie-making of the most magical kind—not just an astonishing feat of visual imagination, but a resonant celebration of what stories themselves give to us. Kubo’s own quest involves many of the elements that are so familiar from the culture-spanning monomyth. Mystery and magic surrounds his parentage, as a prologue shows his sorceress mother bringing him across the sea to safety as an infant after the death of his father. Years later, his mother now mostly invalid and only sporadically lucid, Kubo finds himself again threatened by the same powers that stole his eye—his mother’s witchy sisters (Rooney Mara) and his own grandfather, the Moon King. Only three enchanted objects can protect him, and Kubo must set out to acquire them,


CINEMA CLIPS

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NEW THIS WEEK Information is correct at press time. Film release schedules are subject to change. BEN-HUR [not yet reviewed] Remaking the story of the Judean prince (Jack Huston) on a quest for redemption. Opens Aug. 19 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)

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DON’T THINK TWICE BBB In retrospect, it seems crazy that nobody thought of it before writer/ director Mike Birbiglia did: What better milieu than improvisation to look at adults fumbling with the way life hasn’t seemed to give them a script to work from? Birbiglia also co-stars as Miles, the de facto leader of a New York improv comedy troupe called The Commune—also including Jack (Keegan-Michael Key), Sam (Gillian Jacobs), Lindsay (Tami Sagher), Bill (Chris Gethard) and Allison (Kate Micucci)—as they face a crossroads when their home theater is sold. Birbiglia perfectly captures the world of insecure performers creating a surrogate family, and what happens to their mutually supportive dynamic when envy and ambition get in the way. But while the individual characters aren’t all given enough room to register as strongly as the focus on Miles, Jack and Sam, the story is strongest in its allegory for people reaching pivotal moments when they have to admit which of their dreams might never come true. Even when it feels somewhat thin, it’s a poignant reminder of how much we’re all just making it up as we go. Opens Aug. 19 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (R)—Scott Renshaw

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HELL OR HIGH WATER BBB.5 A pair of brothers (Chris Pine and Ben Foster) launch a two-bit bank robbery spree across the Southwest, with a creaky Texas Ranger (Jeff Bridges) clinging doggedly to their heels. Cookie-cutter though the premise might initially seem, Scottish director David Mackenzie and his cast deliver a fresh, vital spin on the material, with the story’s growing darkness grounded by some impressive central underplaying from Pine. Foster, an actor whose method-y tendencies can often be too much, is just perfect here, as a man ruefully aware of his own hair-trigger. Throw in a Nick Cave score and some sharply pungent dialogue, and you’ve got a tremendously entertaining winner. For all that, though, the movie really belongs to Bridges. Taking what’s on the page could be a re-do of Tommy Lee Jones in No Country for Old Men, but he makes it entirely his own, with his deceptively amiable presence shepherding this terrific film through some funny, savage and unexpectedly resonant places. As in many of the best crime sagas, all of the characters seem to have an idea about how things will ultimately turn out. Opens Aug. 19 at theaters valleywide. (R)—Andrew Wright

LO AND BEHOLD: REVERIES OF THE CONNECTED WORLD BBB Once again, Werner Herzog finds fascinating documentary subjects to which he can apply his plummy Teutonic-toned narration; this time around, he dives into a variety of subjects related to our now-perpetually-online world. Navigating his way from the birth of the internet through topics ranging from cyber-bullying to online addiction to the threat of solar flares wiping out connectivity, Herzog drops a few gems the way only he can: describing the UCLA basement where the primitive ARPANET was formed with “the corridors here look repulsive,” and expressing fascination with one gamer’s character of a “malevolent druid dwarf.” It’s all quite episodic, with some of Herzog’s interview subjects considerably more interesting than others, and perhaps he circles around too obviously to the loss of human contact endemic to modern society. But who else would know just how long to hold the bizarre image of one troubled family behind a table full of muffins, or give the same topic of cyber-warfare threats that drives Zero Days to a much more intriguing human face? Life in the 21st century might be strange indeed, but Herzog is willing to find it both beautiful and repulsive. Opens Aug. 19 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (PG-13)—SR WAR DOGS BB.5 Even after two Oscar nominations, it still feels as though we’re not taking Jonah Hill seriously enough as an actor—and he’s so good here that it only emphasizes how much better he is than the rest of the movie. The fact-based story follows a struggling Miami guy named David Packouz (Miles Teller) with a pregnant girlfriend (Ana de Armas) who joins his childhood best friend, Efraim Diveroli (Hill), in his new business filling government military contracts. Co-writer/director Todd Phillips (The Hangover) tries to focus on the logistics—and absurdity—of the system that allows Efraim and David to prosper, but he never feels like a good fit for what is ultimately a morality tale, as he turns nightmarish scenarios into comedic hijinks. And while the tension between David and his girlfriend becomes the primary emotional component, that allows attention to drift away from Hill, who brilliantly turns Efraim into an embodiment of sociopathic capitalism. His creepy, high, thin laugh practically becomes a character on its own, saying more than the entire rest of the film can muster about an insane system building profit out of death. Opens Aug. 19 at theaters valleywide. (R)—SR

SPECIAL SCREENINGS A CLOCKWORK ORANGE At Tower Theater, Aug. 19-20, 11 p.m. & Aug. 21, noon (R) THE GREATEST FILMS BY BLACK DIRECTORS At Broadway Centre Cinemas, through Sept. 1 (NR) HOOLIGAN SPARROW At Main Library, Aug. 23, 7 p.m. (NR) OVERBOARD At Brewvies, Aug. 22, 10 p.m. (PG)

CURRENT RELEASES ANTHROPOID BBB Co-writer/director Sean Ellis finds an effective angle on the fact-based story of a 1942 plot by Czech nationalists—including Josef (Cillian Murphy) and Jan (Jamie Dornan)—to assassinate high-ranking Nazi officer Reinhard Heydrich in occupied Prague. Ellis nails the centerpiece sequence as the plan is put into action, while the tension of waiting for the target turns a motorcycle backfire into a potential threat. But it’s also a story about the brutal realities of what freedom fighters sacrifice (including, fair warning, cringe-inducing sequences of torture), as the tentative romances begun by Josef and Jan collide with their mission. The climatic sequence involving a siege on the conspirators’ hiding place by the German army loses some character momentum as it lingers, but Anthropoid offers more than a historical footnote in its respect for the high cost of being a patriot. (PG-13)—SR FLORENCE FOSTER JENKINS BB.5 Jenkins, a real-life New York socialite who sang amateur operatics (terribly), died in 1944, but recordings of her “singing” live on (unfortunately). Alas, it’s tough to find any modern resonance here, as there was in Marguerite, the recent French film loosely inspired by Jenkins. Still, it’s amusing to watch a dowdied-up Meryl Streep as FFJ dodder around in apparently deliberate cluelessness about her lack of talent. And when the film sticks to the farce it starts out as, it works wonderfully in its charming silliness. But the longer it goes on, the more maudlin it gets. Hugh Grant finds a sort of sneaky chill as Jenkins’ husband, but his delicious ambiguity is eventually dismissed in the least plausible way possible. It all makes for an enjoyable trifle, but it doesn’t linger any longer than Jenkins’ high notes. (PG-13)—Mary Ann Johanson

more than just movies at brewvies

| CITY WEEKLY |

54 | AUGUST 18, 2016

KUBO AND THE TWO STRINGS BBBB See review p. 53. Opens Aug. 19 at theaters valleywide. (PG)

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GLEASON BBBB Over the course of nearly four years, director Clay Tweel follows ex-NFL player Steve Gleason after his diagnosis with ALS, coinciding with the discovery that his wife, Michel, is pregnant. The gradual deterioration of Steve’s physical abilities provides only one part of that scope, as Tweel turns his primary subjects into complex characters: Steve a former athlete trying to make peace with his new body, and Michel a free spirit grappling with her new role as “saintly” caretaker for both husband and child. And he digs into gut-wrenching issues of fathers and sons across generations, as Steve tries to reconcile his relationship with his own father even as he stockpiles video diaries for the child he might never see grow up. It’s an unfiltered, beautifully devastating portrait of a family confronting tragedy, bursting with love, frustration, hope and pain. (R)—SR

SAUSAGE PARTY BBB The sensibility of this animated comedy can be summed up by a car bearing a bumper sticker for “Dixar”: CGI formula filtered through raunch-comedy. In a suburban supermarket, hot dog Frank (Seth Rogen) and a bun named Brenda (Kristen Wiig) are among the foods who believe heaven awaits when human “gods” purchase them—and evidence of their real fate might be too much to accept. Turning this into an allegory about religion might be a bit ambitious for a movie determinedly built on vulgarity and broad stereotype, but it’s hard to resist the humor’s zero-fucks-given energy, which somehow melds dick jokes with glorious parody of Saving Private Ryan. Maybe five years from now, the irreverence will hold up as a mix of vintage Mel Brooks and South Park—or I’ll feel ashamed at how much I laughed for 90 minutes. (R)—SR

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INDIGNATION BBB.5 Veteran producer/Ang Lee collaborator James Schamus makes his feature directing debut adapting Philip Roth’s 1951-set 2008 novel, where Jewish New Jersey boy Marcus Messner (Logan Lerman) leaves home to attend a liberal-arts college in Ohio, and becomes obsessed with beautiful, troubled Olivia (Sarah Gadon). The notion of fate and unforeseen consequences hangs heavy over the story, but Messner’s background is just as crucial to the framework of this period piece about a Jew just trying to keep his head down; it almost plays like A Serious Man: The College Years. While the relationship between Marcus and Olivia provides solid material, the most electrifying sequence involves an extended meeting between Marcus and the college’s “Dean of Men” (Tracy Letts). Their battle of wills tells the tale of what faces anyone who risks bucking a system that only grudgingly includes them. (R)—SR

PETE’S DRAGON BBB Co-writer/director David Lowery takes the raw material of the original, lackluster 1977 Disney feature and shapes it into something utterly distinctive, telling the story of an orphaned boy named Pete (Oakes Fegley) raised in the woods for six years by a dragon he calls Elliot, until he’s discovered by a forest ranger (Bryce Dallas Howard). Lowery is allowed to work to his strengths, as the relationship between Pete and Elliot develops through playful, largely wordless sequences full of gentle magic. There’s also more than a whisper of E.T. in the story, which leads to an antagonist who never really makes much sense as he tries to capture the elusive dragon. Not even those plot contrivances, however, can spoil the charm and emotion built into this tale of family and friendship. Just this once, we’ll let this whole remake thing slide. (PG)—SR

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AUGUST 18, 2016 | 55


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

BY B I L L F RO S T @bill_frost

OK Computer

TV

CTRL ALT DEL

Halt and Catch Fire reboots for Season 3; The View turns 20 … somehow. Halt and Catch Fire Tuesday, Aug. 23 (AMC)

Two-Hour Season Premiere: AMC just can’t quit Halt and Catch Fire, a critical darling that hasn’t cracked 1 million viewers since its premiere in 2014, despite improving markedly over the course of two seasons (both available on Netflix, FYI). The ’80s-set drama chronicles the personalcomputer revolution more accurately than the—what?, 19?—Steve Jobs biopics cluttering the cultural landscape, and gives some long-overdue credit to women in the early days of PC tech; Season 2 really, ahem, caught fire when the story shifted focus to Cameron’s (Mackenzie Davis) and Donna’s (Kerry Bishé) Mutiny Co. startup struggles. Season 3 picks up in 1986, with Mutiny leaving Texas for Silicon Valley, a make-or-break play that leaves Donna’s engineer husband Gordon (Scoot McNairy) professionally, and emotionally, adrift. The trio are followed out west by ex-partner/antagonist/eyebrow creeper Joe (Lee Pace), because that’s how Joe do. Behind Better Call Saul, Halt and Catch Fire is AMC’s best capital-D Drama, even if it doesn’t generate zombie numbers. Halt and watch it, already.

You Can Do Better Tuesday, Aug. 23 (TruTV)

Series Debut: In most markets, this column runs under its given name, True TV, while some retitle it with drab monikers like “TV Reviews” or “On the Tube” (and you thought alternative weeklies were supposed to be “edgy”). One recently switched from a weekly publishing schedule to monthly and dropped this column because they couldn’t figure out how to present it in a monthly format, never mind that major American magazines have been running monthly TV-review columns for 30 years. Still, the loss of that beer-money stream is no match for the insult of TruTV, the former Court TV network that swiped my name in 2008 and got away with it because Time Warner Inc. has waaay more lawyers than I do. But: TruTV finally has a worthwhile offering in You Can Do Better, a guide series to “real-life” skills—first up being, how to get drunk more efficiently. They’re doing God’s work here.

Halt and Catch Fire (AMC)

Better Late Than Never Tuesday, Aug. 23 (NBC)

Series Debut: No, never would have been just fine. Geezers Henry Winkler, William Shatner, Terry Bradshaw and George Foreman are taken on a no-itinerary trip across Asia by comedian Jeff Dye … why? Because it worked on Korean television? If you’re curious about what else plays well in Korea, just Google “Korean TV Game Show” and wait for the porn filter to explode your computer.

The View: 20 Years in the Making Tuesday, Aug. 23 (ABC)

Special: Great panelist moments from The View that will likely be glossed over in the 20 Years in the Making anniversary special: Dangerous idiot Jenny McCarthy spews anti-vaccination nonsense for a full season; benign idiot Sherri Shepherd doubts the earth is round, claims Christians predate everything on this flat planet, and admits to never voting because she “didn’t know the dates” (and won an Emmy in the process); champion idiot Elisabeth Hasselbeck survives a full decade on the show with no discernible brain activity; comedian Michelle Collins is hired to bring some funny to The View, only to be fired after one season for making jokes; Libertarian journalist Jedediah Bila is promoted to a regular for the upcoming 2016 season, and will probably be canned by the end of it for being too smart for the panel and the audience … there’s more, but I have to go watch The Talk now.

Zoo Tuesdays (CBS)

Still On: Season 2 is almost over—have you even heard of Zoo, bro? Every network wants a sci-fi series; the best CBS could come up with was an “animal uprising,” based on a James Patterson book, no less. In Zoo, James Wolk plays (I can’t believe I’m about to type this) “renegade zoologist” Jackson Oz—the first to make the connection between an uptick in critter-on-people violence and his father’s “crazy” theories about human extinction at the paws of fed-up animals. In Season 2, the animals are making the planet uninhabitable for humans almost as quickly as the writers are making it unwatchable for humans. Zoo is just more stoopid, expensive-looking proof that CBS should stay the hell away from sci-fi, and yet it’s just been renewed for a third season … huh?

Listen to Frost Mondays at 8 a.m. on X96 Radio From Hell, and on the TV Tan podcast via Stitcher, iTunes, Google Play and BillFrost.tv.

6 | AUGUST 18, 2016

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w/ Pusha-T, Digable Planets Twilight Concert Series @ Pioneer Park 350 S. 300 West 801-596-5000 Thursday, Aug. 18 7 p.m. (gates open at 5 p.m.) $5 advance/$10 day of show TwilightConcerts.com

SUMMER GAMES CONTEST AND PARTY

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GRITS GREEN

SATURDAY

Dalton says. “We didn’t expect big things from it. It’s just music for our friends to party to,” he says. It’s also a love letter to Ogden: “I think almost every song was, in one way or another, written about our hometown.” Things are a little different now. Grits Green is recording an EP at Man vs Music and Shaw’s home studio, eyeing a winter release. Beal, through his studies at Berklee, has learned more about the music business, spending time on fan acquisition and “really working the new songs.” Dalton says they’re “thinking bigger, production-wise,” taking their time and adding bells and whistles they didn’t use on “Imagination, which was recorded live with no samples or extra anything.” In the more immediate future, they are looking forward to opening for Digable Planets at the Twilight Concert Series—their prize for winning “Best Hip-Hop/Rap Act” in City Weekly’s Best of Utah Music 2016. Their excitement is two-pronged: They’re big fans of DP, and they’re stoked to play for such a large crowd. They’ve even added a three-piece horn section for the occasion. “I want to show people what passion looks like,” Beal says. Then the pair, in unison, says, “We’re gonna bring some heat!” CW

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Grits Green members left to right: Jonny Knoder, Bobby Gilgert, Rha’gene Beal, Porter Dalton and Greg Shaw (center).

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lates crash, glasses clink and people yell at the Green Pig Pub, where I meet with Rha’gene Beal and Porter Dalton of Ogden’s own funk-minded hip-hop band, Grits Green. We were supposed to meet at a coffee shop, but the bustling Pig better suits Beal, who sociably chats up every passerby while Dalton, calm and pensive, sips on a rum and Coke. The setting probably didn’t matter. These two are at home anywhere. Grits Green started with Ogden musician Jed Keipp, formerly of hyper-eclectic trio Jebu. “He wanted to start a hip-hop thing, asked me and Rha to be a part of it,” Dalton says, “and a month later, he moved to Virginia.” Beal and Dalton decided to keep the momentum going, taking MC titles—Rhagenetix and Porta D, respectively—and creating beats in the Reason production program. It wasn’t long before the software proved too limiting for their purposes, and the pair invited friend Greg Shaw to add bass to the recordings. “We asked him to come over … and he never left,” Dalton says with a laugh. Shaw suggested adding guitarist Jonny Knoder, and Dalton’s cousin, Curtis Stahl of Folk Hogan, manned the drum kit. When Stahl decided to focus on FH, Dalton says Grits Green filled the void with “the baddest dude around,” Bobby Gilgert. Each member has other projects—Beal attends the Berklee College of Music online and produces beats, Dalton recently reunited Spearit, Knoder (as J-Note) is dropping a solo album, Shaw works with producer Mike Sasich at Man vs Music and plays in Big Blue Ox and Shaky Trade, Gilgert performs with Pinetop Inferno and Joe McQueen. But “the energy never gets too far away from Grits Green,” Beal says. “We’re rhythm junkies.” Their addiction, filled almost daily now, began in childhood. Beal’s was a family of regular churchgoers: “Being a part of a congregation with singing and shouting, bass, organ and drums was a big deal to me.” Later, he discovered RUN-D.M.C. and the Beastie Boys, and realized that “music is an integral part of life.” Dalton, meanwhile, owes his very existence to music: “My dad was a traveling musician, playing country music, and that’s how he met my mom,” he says. His own style is influenced by everything from indie hip-hop label Rhymesayers Entertainment to Sublime to Michael Jackson. These influences share a common, communal vibe that helped shape the band’s good-time “people music” vibe. After garnering local acclaim through frequent shows and perseverance, Grits Green played the 10th (and so far final) Uncle Uncanny’s Music Festival in 2013. Fresh from their set, they were approached by trumpet player Willie Waldman (Banyan, Perry Farrell, Tupac Shakur). This led to an odyssey-like adventure to the home of Waldman’s friend, veteran engineer and producer Dave Aron, who recorded Sublime’s self-titled 1996 album and previously worked with Snoop Dogg, Wu-Tang Clan, U2 and Prince. The band played a gig at the L.A. House of Blues and tracked their debut album, Imagination in Motion (Reverbnation.com/GritsGreen, 2013). “We basically recorded the album live,” Dalton says. “We put in four 14-hour days, mixed it down and headed home.” Despite working with a big-name producer, Dalton and Beal say they never expected Imagination in Motion to break big. “When me and Rha got together, we decided we would make party music,”


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or a music fan, crate-diggin’ is spiritual. It’s like panning for gold with a real chance at eureka. Or praying and actually seeing results—assuming you’re not looking for specifics. My first record-shopping trips were to discount department stores like Kmart and Grand Central, or mall chains like Musicland—the places you’re forced to go with your mom, where the music section is an oasis in the vast, boring desert of clothes and toasters. This was satisfying when most music was new to me, but the radio, along with magazines like Creem and Rolling Stone, aroused in me a lust for music these stores didn’t stock. My mom is cool; I didn’t have to beg for her to take me to real record stores, the ones now quaintly referred to as indie/hipster/ boutique/brick-and-mortar/mom-and-pops. My favorites were Randy’s Records and Recycle Records. As I got older, I’d walk or take the bus from Sugar House to hit both joints. That’s where I developed a love for the dig. Walking into a record store, I feel like an explorer who’s crested a ridge and is surveying so much undiscovered country, high on possibilities. Then I put on my game face—a good adventurer has to stay sharp. Fellow shoppers are frenemies. We share a common passion, but we protect our territory from claim-jumpers and poachers. We guard our selections because we can be covetous, and we tend to overvalue our finds. One man’s The Gap Band V: Jammin’ is another’s butcher-cover copy of the Beatles’ Yesterday and Today. I keep a wish list but, knowing how wishing works, maintain reasonable expectations. That’s because, when I’m diggin’, surprise is the No. 1 item on my list. Buying something on a hunch and falling in love with it is as good, or better, than plugging holes in my collection or stumbling upon a valuable rarity. To me, a great find is something legitimately awesome or sublimely awful/weird. One of my best scores was Manic Street

Randy’s Records customers flip through boxes of LPs at the store’s $2 vinyl sale

Preachers’ 1991 bow, Generation Terrorists, weeks before its release, for 99 cents at Randy’s. Another was finding gay Christian punk artist Glen Meadmore’s Hot, Horny & Born Again for three bucks at Amoeba in Hollywood. I cherish them both, along with the “score” stories I can share with friends of similar proclivities. I used to have dreams of finding a new indie record store that just happened to be having a ridiculous sale on extant records I needed and albums by figments of my subconscious. I found such a sale in Tucson around 2003. Zia Records (Arizona’s version of Graywhale) was blowing out CDs for a dime apiece. I left with 125 discs. More than half of them were gambles, or extra copies of a great album I wanted to share with a friend. Some were collection-pluggers. I even found a copy of Detached by one-time Salt Lake City grunge juggernauts, The Obvious. Simultaneously, I boarded the rock-writer gravy train—my mailbox was stuffed with free CDs daily. Parallel to that, the internet took the dig virtual. Suddenly, all the music in the world was free. If I went to a record store, it was to sell the unwanted freebies that cluttered my house. Luckily, the train went digital a few years ago, and music subscription services like Spotify made it so I don’t even need to own physical copies of these albums. But I do, because nothing will replace the experience of holding the album art and reading liner notes and lyrics while listening. Lately, I’ve ventured back into record stores, but only where music is cheap and plentiful and largely unfamiliar. The wish list still exists; I add to it and sometimes even consult it and order something specific—online. The in-store experience is now all about the dig. I’ll spend hours looking for nothing in particular but finding plenty, while all around me is a symphony: The plastic clatter of cassette anti-theft devices and CD jewel cases, and the soft whapwhap-whap of LPs as my frenemies and I flip through them, alternately murmuring, sighing and, if we’re lucky, yelling, “Eureka!” CW

RANDY’S RECORDS $2 LP SALE

Randy’s Records 157 E. 900 South 801-532-4413 Friday, Aug. 19 , 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 20, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. RandysRecords.com


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THURSDAY 8.18 AND SUNDAY 8.21

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FRIDAY 8.19

Rebelution, Falling Into Place, The Green + J Boog, Stick Figure, Through the Roots, DJ Mackle

sure that’s a microaggression. (And if he’s Korean, uh … what comes between micro and macro?) Anyway, just like when you give enough monkeys typewriters and time— well, Rebelution, Stick Figure, et al., aren’t cranking out the complete works of Marley. And they haven’t divined the secret formula for Jamaica’s seven musical herbs (no spice, thank you; that shit’s for Juggalos). They have, however, been good students of reggae music and even innovated upon it, creating a perfectly valid subgenre that incorporates elements of roots, dub, calypso, jam, rock, electronic and hip-hop. (Randy Harward) The Complex, 536 W. 100 South, 5:30 p.m. (doors), $32.50 in advance, $35 day of show, TheComplexSLC.com

Bellamy Brothers, Rail Town

There was a time when I’d have verbally spanked a buncha reggae-playing (mostly) white boys for being culture-appropriating ninnies. Now I’m sicker of people who complain about cultural appropriation. What are we supposed to do, Lena Dunham? Politely ask a real-life Japanese dude to pack a Bento box with nigiri and Vegas rolls? ‘Cause I’m pretty

Bellamy Bothers

When a song transcends genre and crosses over to other audiences, that’s special. In the ‘70s, a few acts had their feet in both country and pop: Loggins & Messina, England Dan and John Ford Coley and the Bellamy Brothers. Take David and Howard Bellamy’s 1976 debut single, “Let Your Love Flow,” for example. To this day, the mellow anthem lands on pop and country playlists, blasting sunshine from every speaker. It remains one of their biggest hits, but there’s no shortage of goodness in the BB canon. There’s “Old Hippie,” a meditation on war and age. And “If I Said You Had a Beautiful Body,” even though it turned a classic Groucho Marx one-liner into a tired-ass pickup line that legions of doucheclowns picked up and ran with. Newer songs are, for better and

Rebelution worse, simpler. Whereas “Body” was somewhat subtle, “Boobs” cuts right to the point, and “Jalapeños” attempts political commentary but, unlike “Let Your Love Flow,” ends up rather one-sided. (RH) Outlaw Saloon, 1254 W. 2100 South, Ogden, 7 p.m., $20, OutlawSaloon.com

The Fixx

We’re seeing a lot of ‘80s acts coming through Salt Lake City this year—especially English or Australian bands that dwelled mostly outside of the Top 40 in the new wave/modern music realm. Howard Jones, OMD, Peter Murphy, The Church and Psychedelic Furs have already been through town, with Echo & the Bunnymen, Peter Hook and this group of U.K. hitmakers—who gave us “One Thing Leads to Another” and “Red Skies”—en route. This guy hopes that singer Cy Curnin and guitarist Jamie West-Oram will toss in one of their tracks from the Better Off Dead soundtrack. Wait. It’s the 21st century! The internet is preggers with spoilers! Googling Fixx setlist 2016. Damn. At least they’re playing a mix of hits, deep cuts and possibly new stuff from their upcoming album NeverEnding. (RH) The Fallout, 625 S. 600 West, 7 p.m., $20, TheFalloutSLC.com

»

The Fixx

LIZ LINDER

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GARLIC BURGER

Kilby Court hosts two local CD releases this week. Provo’s Batty Blue are finally getting their latest album, Peeling an Orange or Flattening a Sphere (BattyBlue.Bandcamp.com), out into the world. Peeling follows their strong 2015 debut Ekphrasis, a lyrically introspective record about the seriousness of faith crises. The single “HEDON,” a trippy electro-folk number that hews close to Metric or Blondie, sounds like Batty Blue had a little more fun this time around. (And Provo’s squeaky-clean music scene could use a few more bands willing to break the BYU honor code.) Speaking of bands we haven’t heard from in a good while, Salt Lake City’s Daisy & The Moonshines has a new EP, MOTORIK (Facebook.com/ DaisyAndTheMoonshines), which shows off a more structurally sound ensemble, sounding like new wave, with a little sludge thrown in as well. (Kimball Bennion) Batty Blue (Aug. 18), Daisy & The Moonshines (Aug. 21) Kilby Court, 741 S. 330 West, 7 p.m., $6, KilbyCourt.com

GUS BLACK

Batty Blue, Daisy & The Moonshines Album Release Shows

JARRETT GAZA

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DANIEL BOUD

Holladay’s Premier Martini & Wine Bar

LIVE

SATURDAY 8.20 Boris, Earth, Shitstorm

Live Music Friday & Saturday 6pm - 9pm

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Whether it’s porn, anything cute, or music, the Japanese seem to represent its most extreme form. In music, it’s the electro-punk noise of Melt Banana, the proto-girl band pop punk of Shonen Knife or the cosmic psychedelia of Acid Mothers Temple. Tokyo trio Boris, however, resists classification. With touches of avant-garde noise (they once said, “noise is the Japanese blues”) that are too lyrical and melodic to be sludge or stoner rock, their music careens around your skull, asserting Boris as one of the world’s preeminent and original purveyors of heavy music. This tour celebrates the re-release of their breakthrough 2005 album Pink (Sargent House), which comes with a bonus album, Forbidden Songs. Earth, out of Olympia, Wash., adds a layer of earthy sludge, while Miami, Fla., grindcore act Shitstorm renews the time-honored tradition of “We dare you to put our name on the marquee!” (Brian Staker) The Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 8 p.m., $18 in advance, $29 day of show, TheUrbanLoungeSLC.com

Boris

MONDAY 8.22

Old Crow Medicine Show, Dom Flemons

Old Crow Medicine Show—the answer to the question, “What would happen if Gram Parsons were reincarnated as an NPR tote bag?”—continues to enchant the old-timey wireless radios of people who enjoy talking about the televisions they don’t own. And that’s fine. The notion of Yankees appropriating the music of the American South is about as old as country music itself. You could even say the newgrass band is simply honoring a proud tradition. Look, if you got proficient enough at the banjo that you could entertain an audience of A Prairie Home Companion fans, don’t say you wouldn’t do the same thing. Sure, there are people funnier than Garrison Keillor, and better folk ensembles than Old Crow, but it might take some work to find them. And if you aren’t the seeking type, Old Crow Medicine Show thanks you. Have a mildly entertaining time. (KB) Red Butte Garden, 300 Wakara Way, 7:30 p.m., $36-$41, RedButteGarden.org

Old Crow Medicine Show LAURA E. PARTAIN

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WHERE SOPHISTICATED MEETS CASUAL


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THURSDAY 8.18 LIVE MUSIC

Batty Blue + My Fair Fiend + Candace (Kilby Court) see p. 60 Caleb Chapman Bands (Gallivan Center) David Halliday Band (Garage on Beck) Grace Potter + Con Brio (Red Butte Amphitheatre) John Davis (The Hog Wallow) Kevin Schereth (Muse Music) Khensu + Dumb Luck + Erasole James (Urban Lounge) Micky & the Motorcars (The State Room) The Night Caps (Gracie’s) Pusha T + Digable Planets + Grits Green (Pioneer Park) see p. 57 Terence Hansen (Twist)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Therapy Thursdays feat. Cookie Monsta Club Elevate) Reggae Thursday (The Royal)

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Cowboy Karaoke (The Cabin) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge)

FRIDAY 8.19 LIVE MUSIC

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CITY WEEKLY’S HOT LIST FOR THE WEEK

SATURDAY, AUGUST 20

BLACK SHEEP Bar & Grill

1520 W. 9000 S. WEST JORDAN 801.566.2561 | THEBLACKSHEEPBARANDGRILL.COM

150 CC + Good Bones + Rust (The Royal) Angel Lopez (Club Karamba) Archspire + Legion (The Loading Dock) The Atomics + DOE + Gabi (Kilby Court) The Badly Bent (O.P. Rockwell) Bellamy Brothers + Rail Town (The Outlaw Saloon) see p. 60 Bunko Bus (Muse Music) Collin Raye (Sandy Amphitheater) Daisy & The Moonshines + Beachmen + Flash & Flare (Urban Lounge) The Fixx (The Fallout) see p. 60 Gin Blossoms (DeJoria Center) God Module + Voicecoil (Area 51) Harlis Sweetwater + The Lovely Noghts (Garage on Beck) Periphery + Toothgrinder + Sikth + Chon (The Complex) see p. 65 Phoenix Rising (The Cabin) Pigeon (The Hog Wallow) Rebelution + The Green + J Boog + Stick Figure + Through The Roots + DJ Mackle (The Complex) see p. 60 Silkk the Shocker + MadStak (Kamikazes) Steve Miller Band (Deer Valley) Summers End Music Festival feat. Gray McKenzie + James Avery + Emrsn Kennedy + Illi Ave + Namkrow + M.C.C.A.E. (Infinity Event Center)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Chase One2 (Twist)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Cheers to You SLC) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge)

SATURDAY 8.20 LIVE MUSIC

The Ataris (Metro Bar) Boris + Earth + Shitstorm (The Urban Lounge) see p. 62 Brklyn (Sky) DeadPhish Orchestra (The State Room) Deftones + Code Orange (The Great Saltair) Downright Citizens (The Cabin) Hector Acosta “El Torito” + Big Boy (Infinity Event Center) Hockey Dad + Muuy Biien + Housewarming Party (Kilby Court) Jon Batiste and Stay Human (Deer Valley) Josh Groban + Sarah McLachlan (Usana Amphitheatre) Josh WaWa White (Infinity Event Center) Layne (Muse Music) Oh, Sleeper + The Ongoing Concept (Billboard Live!) Pouya + Germ + Ramirez + Shakewell (The Complex) Saving Abel (Liquid Joe’s) Son of Ian (The Hog Wallow) The Spazmatics (Liquid Joe’s) Tankerays (Garage on Beck) West Gate Rising + High Pressure Flash (The Royal)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE DJ Sneeky Long (Twist)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge)

SUNDAY 8.21 LIVE MUSIC

Daisy & The Moonshines + Strange Familia + Dream Slut (Kilby Court) Journey + The Doobie Brothers + Dave Mason (Usana Amphitheatre) Mike Rogers (Deer Valley) Pinkish Black + Pleasure Avalanche (Metro Bar)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE The Golden Pony (Sky)

KARAOKE

Karaoke with DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue State) Karaoke (The Tavernacle)


FRIDAY 8.19

CONCERTS & CLUBS

JEREMY SAFFR

Periphery, Sikth, Chon, Toothgrinder

Prog-metal wrecking crew Periphery returned last month with Periphery III: Select Difficulty (Sumerian/ Century Media). And if your ears aren’t ready to select “expert,” you’d better prepare them for a boss-level beating. Periphery has endured many lineup changes since it was founded by lead guitarist Misha Mansoor in 2005, but the core trio of Mansoor, singer Spencer Sotelo and drummer Matt Halpern has remained constant since their 2010 self-titled debut. The D.C. band has since developed a reputation for complex rhythm structures, cathartic screams and ratchet-tight drumming—all held together by Mansoor’s mesmerizing guitar work. If you’re not one to geek out over dissecting time signatures, Periphery often rewards listeners with a soaring chorus at the end of those twisting, turning tunnels. (Kimball Bennion) The Complex, 536 W. 100 South, 6 p.m. (doors), $20 advance, $25 day of show, TheComplexSLC.com

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AUGUST 18, 2016 | 65


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MONDAY 8.22 LIVE MUSIC

THURS: Terrance Hansen on the patio & DJ ChaseOne2 on the main floor FRI: DJ ChaseOne2 SAT: DJ Sneeky Long MON: JAM! with Mark Chaney 7:00 TUES: The art of ORIGINAL HOOLIGAN followed by Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck! WEDS: PIG-EON rocks the patio, then VJ Birdman on the big screen! AS ALWAYS, NO COVER!

32 Exchange Place • 801-322-3200 www.twistslc.com • 11:00am-1:00am

Oh, Jeremiah + Matthew and the Hope + Andrew Wiscombe (Kilby Court) Old Crow Medicine Show + Dom Flemons (Red Butte Garden Amphitheatre) see p. 62 Soulful Reflections (Liberty Park)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

Karaoke with DJ Thom (A Bar Named Sue on State) Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck (Twist)

WEDNESDAY 8.24

KARAOKE

LIVE MUSIC

Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue) Bingo Karaoke (The Tavernacle)

TUESDAY 8.23 LIVE MUSIC

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Fruition (The State Room) I Hear Sirens + Temples + Agatha Frisky + Sympathy Pain (Urban Lounge) Knockout Kid + Settle Your Scores + With Friends Like These (Billboard Live!) Lord Dying + Child Bite + Joel Grind of Toxic Holocaust + Deathblow + Darklord (Metro Bar) see p. 67 My2k Tour feat. 98 Degrees + O-Town + Dream + Ryan Cabrera (Maverik Center) Scott Stapp (The Complex)

KARAOKE

Jazz, Blues and Rock ‘N’ Roll Jam (Twist) Monday Night Blues Jam (The Royal) Open Blues Jam (The Hog Wallow) Open Mic (The Cabin)

23rd Army Band (Gallivan Center) The Atomics + Beachmen + Bancho (Kilby Court) Cool Ghouls + West America + Burmese Python (Diabolical Records)

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CITY WEEKLY’S HOT LIST FOR THE WEEK

Jackson Browne (Red Butte Garden Amphitheatre) Master + Sacrificial Slaughter + VX36 + The Black Order + Odium Totus + Bestial Karnage (Club X) Park City All-Star Jam (Deer Valley) Samantha Crain + Matthew Milia + Sarah Anne Degraw (Urban Lounge) Quiet Oaks + Steel Cranes + Andrew Goldring (Kilby Court)

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TUESDAY 8.23

CONCERTS & CLUBS

DANGER EHREN PHOTOGRAPHY

Lord Dying, Child Bite, Joel Grind, Deathblow, Darklord

Back in the early-aughts, local power-metal band Le Force (aka Le Fortress) was a force to reckon with, in no small part because of the guitar pyrotechnics of Erik Olson. Fast-forward a few years, and Olson has moved to Portland to wield his axe in sludge band Lord Dying, demonstrating something we didn’t hear in Le Force: The new band’s 2013 debut Summon the Faithless showed Olson also possesses the lung capacity to provide the genre’s requisite bellowing. Joel Grind of Toxic Holocaust produced LD’s sophomore album Poisoned Altars (Relapse, 2015), and is on tonight’s bill, as well, along with Detroit art-punks Child Bite and locals Deathblow and Darklord. (Brian Staker) Metro Bar, 615 W. 100 South, 8 p.m., $12, JRCSLC.com

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AUGUST 18, 2016 | 67

8.18 JOHN DAVIS 8.19 PIGEON 8.20 SON OF IAN 8.22 OPEN BLUES JAM HOSTED BY ROBBY’S BLUES EXPLOSION

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SPIRITS • FOOD • GOOD COMPANY


SHOTS OF SUMMER

BY JOSH SCHEUERMAN @scheuerman7

tr 239 S. Main S /craftlake facebook.com

LIVE Music thursday, august 18

MORGAN SNOW

friday, august 19

TENENCE HANSEN

Canyons 801 - canyonsmusic.com

Trevor Brady, Mia Lambson

Hillary Livingston

Samba Fogo

saturday, august 20

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Weeknights monday

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68 | AUGUST 18, 2016

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Abby Bodily, Rob Packer

Samba Fogo - sambafogo.com

Craft Lake City 2016

$

5.99 lunch special MONDAY - FRIDAY $

10 brunch buffet

SATURDAYS FROM 11AM-2PM $

12 sunday funday brunch $3 BLOODY MARYS & $3 MIMOSAS FROM 10AM-2PM

31 east 400 SOuth • SLC

801-532-7441 • HOURS: 11AM - 2AM

THEGREENPIGPUB.COM

Mike Murdoch- ultrasnazzy.com, Trent Call - swinj.com

Laurie Waller


NO R VE CO ER! EV

ival Craft Lake City Feeest t tr 239 S. Main S /craftlake facebook.com

4760 S 900 E, SLC 801-590-9940 | facebook.com/theroyalslc

www.theroyalslc.com

 Bar | Nightclub | Music | Sports 

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wednesday 8/17

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bingo & ultimate KARAOKE

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5

Reggae

1/2 off nachos & Free pool FRIDAY 8/19

Live Music

good bones rust

Live Music

west gate rising high pressure flash eminence front Tuesday 8/23

open mic night

YOU Never KNow WHO WILL SHOW UP TO PERFORM

COMING SOON

Kirsten Duke, Whitney Lamb Que Sera Clothing

8/26

STARTS @ 9PM

FREE TO PLAY ENTER TO WIN CASH & PRIZES

$2,550 CASH POT! GROOVE TUESDAYS

CODY BINX KESLO MICHAEL MIKE WEDNESDAY

DJ RUDE BOY BAD BOY BRIAN

9/28

Kirsten Tayor - kirstentaylorart.com

sons of texas ALL SHOW TICKETS AVAILABLE AT SMITHSTIX OR AT THE ROYAL

165 E 200 S SLC I 801.746.3334

AUGUST 18, 2016 | 69

shaman's harvest john wayne & the pain

FRIDAYS

| CITY WEEKLY |

9/19

MONDAY

american hitmen w/ wayland

8/28

WASATCH POKER TOUR @ 8PM BONUS: SAT @ 2PM

KARAOKE STARTS @ 9PM w/ october rage

8/27

SUNDAY&THURSDAY&SATURDAY

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saturday 8/20

AUGUST 20 @ 9PM

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5

liquid mary janes, amfs & long island iced teas

150 cc

andyjoychase.bigcartel.com whiskeyymouth.bigcartel.com

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burger & Fries, amfs & long island iced teas

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| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

70 | AUGUST 18, 2016

VENUE DIRECTORY

A RELAXED GENTLEMAN’S CLUB

LIVE MUSIC & KARAOKE

A BAR NAMED SUE 3928 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-274-5578, Trivia Tues., DJ Wed., Karaoke Thurs. A BAR NAMED SUE ON STATE 8136 S. State, SLC, 801-566-3222, Karaoke Tues. ABG’S LIBATION EMPORIUM 190 W. Center St., Provo, 801-373-1200, Live music ALLEGED 205 25th St., Ogden, 801-9900692 AREA 51 451 S. 400 West, SLC, 801-5340819, Karaoke Wed., ‘80s Thurs., DJs Fri. & Sat. THE BAR IN SUGARHOUSE 2168 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-485-1232 BAR-X 155 E. 200 South, SLC, 801-355-2287 BARBARY COAST 4242 S. State, Murray, 801-265-9889 BATTERS UP 1717 S. Main, SLC, 801-4634996, Karaoke Tues., Live music Sat. THE BAYOU 645 S. State, SLC, 801-9618400, Live music Fri. & Sat. BOURBON HOUSE 19 E. 200 South, SLC, 801-746-1005, Local jazz jam Tues., Karaoke Thurs., Live music Sat., Funk & soul night Sun. BREWSKIS 244 25th St., Ogden, 801-3941713, Live music CAROL’S COVE II 3424 S. State, SLC, 801-466-2683, Karaoke Thurs., DJs & Live music Fri. & Sat. THE CENTURY CLUB 315 24th St., Ogden, 801-781-5005, DJs, Live music CHEERS TO YOU 315 S. Main, SLC, 801575-6400 CHEERS TO YOU MIDVALE 7642 S. State, 801-566-0871 CHUCKLE’S LOUNGE 221 W. 900 South, SLC, 801-532-1721 CIRCLE LOUNGE 328 S. State, SLC, 801-5315400, DJs CISERO’S 306 Main, Park City, 435-6495044, Karaoke Thurs., Live music & DJs CLUB 48 16 E. 4800 South, Murray, 801262-7555 CLUB 90 9065 S. 150 West, Sandy, 801-5663254, Trivia Mon., Poker Thurs., Live music Fri. & Sat., Live bluegrass Sun. CLUB TRY-ANGLES 251 W. 900 South, SLC, 801-364-3203, Karaoke Thurs., DJs Fri. & Sat. CLUB X 445 S. 400 West, SLC, 801-9354267, DJs, Live music THE COMPLEX 536 W. 100 South, SLC, 801-528-9197, Live music CRUZRS SALOON 3943 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-272-1903, Free pool Wed. & Thurs., Karaoke Fri. & Sat. DAWG POUND 3350 S. State, SLC, 801-2612337, Live music THE DEERHUNTER PUB 2000 N. 300 West, Spanish Fork, 801-798-8582, Live music Fri. & Sat. THE DEPOT 400 W. South Temple, SLC, 801-355-5522, Live music

DEVIL’S DAUGHTER 533 S. 500 West, SLC, 801-532-1610, Karaoke Wed., Live music Fri. & Sat. DO DROP INN 2971 N. Hill Field Road (400 West), Layton, 801-776-9697. Karaoke Fri. & Sat. DONKEY TAILS CANTINA 136 E. 12300 South, Draper, 801-571-8134. Karaoke Wed.; Live music Tues., Thurs. & Fri; Live DJ Sat. DOWNSTAIRS 625 Main, Park City, 435226-5340, Live music, DJs ELIXIR LOUNGE 6405 S. 3000 East, Holladay, 801-943-1696 THE FALLOUT 625 S. 600 West, SLC, 801953-6374, Live music FAT’S GRILL 2182 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-484-9467, Live music THE FILLING STATION 8987 W. 2700 South, Magna, 801-250-1970, Karaoke Thurs. FLANAGAN’S ON MAIN 438 Main, Park City, 435-649-8600, Trivia Tues., Live music Fri. & Sat. FOX HOLE PUB & GRILL 7078 S. Redwood Road, West Jordan, 801-566-4653, Karaoke, Live music FUNK ’N DIVE BAR 2550 Washington Blvd., Ogden, 801-621-3483, Live music, Karaoke THE GARAGE 1199 Beck St., SLC, 801-5213904, Live music GRACIE’S 326 S. West Temple, SLC, 801819-7565, Live music, DJs THE GREAT SALTAIR 12408 W. Saltair Drive, Magna, 801-250-6205, Live music THE GREEN PIG PUB 31 E. 400 South, SLC, 801-532-7441, Live music Thurs.-Sat. HABITS 832 E. 3900 South, SLC, 801-2682228, Poker Mon., Ladies night Tues., ’80s night Wed., Karaoke Thurs., DJs Fri. & Sat. HIGHLANDER 6194 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-277-8251, Karaoke THE HOG WALLOW PUB 3200 E. Big Cottonwood Canyon Road, SLC, 801-733-5567, Live music THE HOTEL/CLUB ELEVATE 155 W. 200 South, SLC, 801-478-4310, DJs HUKA BAR & GRILL 151 E. 6100 South, Murray, 801-281-9665, Reggae Tues., DJs Fri. & Sat ICE HAUS 7 E. 4800 South, Murray, 801266-1885 IN THE VENUE/CLUB SOUND 219 S. 600 West, SLC, 801-359-3219, Live music & DJs JACKALOPE LOUNGE 372 S. State, SLC, 801-359-8054, DJs JAM 751 N. 300 West, SLC, 801-891-1162, Karaoke Tues., Wed. & Sun.; DJs Thurs.-Sat. JOHNNY’S ON SECOND 165 E. 200 South, SLC, 801-746-3334, DJs Tues. & Fri., Karaoke Wed., Live music Sat. KARAMBA 1051 E. 2100 South, SLC, 801696-0639, DJs KEYS ON MAIN 242 S. Main, SLC, 801-3633638, Karaoke Tues. & Wed., Dueling pianos Thurs.-Sat. KILBY COURT 741 S. Kilby Court (330 West), SLC, 801-364-3538, Live music, all ages KRISTAUF’S 16 W. Market St., SLC, 801943-1696, DJ Fri. & Sat. THE LEPRECHAUN INN 4700 S. 900 East, Murray, 801-268-3294 LIQUID JOE’S 1249 E. 3300 South, SLC, 801-467-5637, Live music Tues.-Sat. THE LOADING DOCK 445 S. 400 West, SLC, 385-229-4493, Live music, all ages LUCKY 13 135 W. 1300 South, SLC, 801487-4418, Trivia Wed.

LUMPY’S DOWNTOWN 145 Pierpont Ave., SLC, 801-938-3070 LUMPY’S HIGHLAND 3000 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-484-5597 THE MADISON/THE COWBOY 295 W. Center St., Provo, 801-375-9000, Live music, DJs MAXWELL’S EAST COAST EATERY 9 Exchange Place, SLC, 801-328-0304, Poker Tues., DJs Fri. & Sat. METRO BAR 615 W. 100 South, SLC, 801652-6543, DJs THE MOOSE LOUNGE 180 W. 400 South, SLC, 801-900-7499, DJs NO NAME SALOON 447 Main, Park City, 435-649-6667 THE OFFICE 122 W. Pierpont Ave., SLC, 801-883-8838 O.P. ROCKWELL 268 Main, Park City, 435615-7000, Live music PARK CITY LIVE 427 Main, Park City, 435649-9123, Live music PAT’S BBQ 155 W. Commonwealth Ave., SLC, 801-484-5963, Live music Thurs.-Sat., All ages THE PENALTY BOX 3 W. 4800 South, Murray, 801-590-9316, Karaoke Tues., Live Music, DJs PIPER DOWN 1492 S. State, SLC, 801-4681492, Poker Mon., Acoustic Tues., Trivia Wed., Bingo Thurs. POPLAR STREET PUB 242 S. 200 West, SLC, 801-532-2715, Live music Thurs.-Sat. THE RED DOOR 57 W. 200 South, SLC, 801-363-6030, DJs Fri., Live jazz Sat. THE ROYAL 4760 S. 900 East, SLC, 801590-9940, Live music SANDY STATION 8925 Harrison St., Sandy, 801-255-2078, DJs SCALLYWAGS 3040 S. State, SLC, 801604-0869 SKY 149 W. Pierpont Ave., SLC, 801-8838714, Live music THE SPUR BAR & GRILL 352 Main, Park City, 435-615-1618, Live music THE STATE ROOM 638 S. State, SLC, 800501-2885, Live music THE STEREO ROOM 521 N. 1200 West, Orem, 714-345-8163, Live music, All ages SUGARHOUSE PUB 1992 S. 1100 East, SLC, 801-413-2857 THE SUN TRAPP 102 S. 600 West, SLC, 385-235-6786 THE TAVERNACLE 201 E. 300 South, SLC, 801-519-8900, Dueling pianos Wed.-Sat., Karaoke Sun.-Tues. TIN ANGEL CAFE 365 W. 400 South, SLC, 801-328-4155, Live music THE URBAN LOUNGE 241 S. 500 East, SLC, 801-746-0557, Live music TWIST 32Exchange Place, SLC 801-3223200, Live music VELOUR 135 N. University Ave., Provo, 801818-2263, Live music, All ages WASTED SPACE 342 S. State, SLC, 801531-2107, DJs Thurs.-Sat. THE WESTERNER 3360 S. Redwood Road, West Valley City, 801-972-5447, Live music WILLIE’S LOUNGE 1716 S. Main, SLC, 760828-7351, Trivia Wed., Karaoke Fri.-Sun., Live music ZEST KITCHEN & BAR 275 S. 200 West, SLC, 801-433-0589, DJs

DA I LY L U N C H S P E C I A L S POOL, FOOSBALL & GAMES

In an effort to be the best for brunch in SLC, Rye has decided to focus on the AM hours. Going forward Rye will be open: Monday-Friday from 9am-2pm Saturday and Sunday from 9am-3pm. What this means for you: even more house-made breakfast and brunch specials, snappier service-same fresh, locally-sourced fixins. Come on in. www.ryeslc.com

AUG 18: SLUG LOCALIZED 9PM DOORS FREE SHOW

AUG 19: 6:30 PM DOORS

DUMB LUCK ERASOLE JAMES

NO

COVER E VER!

KHENSU

THROWING SHADE

275 0 SOU T H 3 0 0 W ES T · (8 01) 4 67- 4 6 0 0 11: 3 0 -1A M M O N - S AT · 11: 3 0 A M -10 P M S U N

EARLY SHOW

AUG 19: DAISY & THE MOONSHINES 9:30 PM ALBUM RELASE BEACHMEN FLASH & FLARE

$3

BORIS AUG 23: I HEAR SIRENS TEMPLES AUG 20: 8PM DOORS $20

8PM DOORS FREE SHOW

AUG 24: 8PM DOORS

EARTH

AGATHA FRISKY SYMPATHY PAIN

Monday @ 8pm

SAMANTHA CRAIN

breaking bingo

MATHEW MILIA SARAH ANNE DEGRAW

THE BEE SEATED EVENT AUG 25: NOER THE BOY ZOTTI AUG 25:

6PM DOORS EARLY SHOW

9:30 PM DOORS FREE SHOW LATE SHOW

100 DAY DELAY

AUG 26: URBAN LOUNGE 15 YEAR ANNIV.

8PM DOORS FREE SHOW

AUG 27: FREE BEFORE 10:30 PM $4 AFTER 9PM

MAX PAIN & THE GROOVIES THE HOUND MYSTIC HOT VODKA BEACHMEN

wednesdays @ 8pm

geeks who drink

TRASH BASH WITH MATTY MO COMING SOON

Aug 30: Scenic Byway Album Sept 1: Lost The Artist Sept 2: Kinks Tribute Night Release Sept 3: Juliette Lewis Aug 31: Car Seat Headrest

live music sunday afternoons &evenings

2021 s. windsor st. (west of 900 east)

801.484.6692 I slctaproom.com

RANDY'S RECORD SHOP

SUMMER $2 VINYL SALE FRIDAY AUG 19TH & SATURDAY AUG 20TH Most LP's valued @ $2 - $7, some $8 - $10 Over 1500 LP's added on both Fri & Sat @ 10:00 AM “UTAH’S LONGEST RUNNING INDIE RECORD STORE” SINCE 1978

TUE – FRI 11AM TO 7PM • SAT 10AM TO 6PM • CLOSED SUN & MON LIKE US ON OR VISIT WWW.RANDYSRECORDS.COM • 801.532.4413


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AUGUST 18, 2016 | 71


ADULT Call to place your ad

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CROSSWORD PUZZLE

Š 2016

PORKY

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ACROSS

| CITY WEEKLY |

AUGUST 18, 2016 | 73

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

Last week’s answers

SUDOKU

1. What a myrmecologist studies and a myrmecophobe fears 2. Santa's favorite snack cake? 3. "Fifty Shades of Grey" protagonist 4. Singers Newman and Travis 5. Sch. with a Phoenix campus 6. What a brat might throw

50. Failed to follow through, in slang 51. Rubber-stamp 52. Actress Birch of "American Beauty" 53. Fruit of the Loom competitor 54. What Horton hatched 55. Boutonniere site 59. Beefeater and Bombay 60. 5'4", 6'1", etc.: Abbr. 62. Alternative to JFK 64. ____-Ida (frozen potato brand) 65. "When 2 ____ Love" (1988 Prince song)

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

DOWN

7. Mall cop's weapon 8. Word before pie or kiss 9. Only major river that flows both north and south across the Equator 10. Grecian subject of a Keats poem 11. Inflicted upon 12. Violin master Zimbalist 13. Department of ____ 18. "Wiseguy" actor Ken 22. Stick up 25. Give up 26. Tennis star Mandlikova 27. Any day now 28. Subj. line alert 29. Architect Ludwig Mies van der ____ 33. Bush press secretary Fleischer 35. Is strong enough for 36. Undercover? 37. Some loaves 39. Food package meas. 40. "Promise?" 41. Double ____ Oreos 42. NFL Hall of Famer Marchetti 47. Like many a Western bandit 48. Barrister's deg.

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

1. "Of course!" 4. "Cast Away" vessel 8. Piano exercises 14. Oui's opposite 15. Its southernmost mainland point is the tip of the Malay Peninsula 16. Short ____ 17. Take the pecans and almonds out of the freezer? 19. Wilkinson of reality TV's "The Girls Next Door" 20. "Disappointing" 21. "South Park" boy 23. Lunar New Year in Vietnam 24. Genetic structure that hath the power to determine gender? 28. Body of water between Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan 30. Frontman who performs close to the Edge 31. Talking-____ 32. Part of a forensic database 34. Accomplish lots of things 38. It's going to be an obese life from here on out? 43. "Boss!" 44. "What was ____ was saying?" 45. Wide shoe spec 46. Robert of HBO's "Arli$$" 49. Opens a map, say 52. Closing title card in most Looney Tunes cartoons 56. Solo pilot? 57. Sue Bird's sports org. 58. Charlie Brown's cry when Lucy pulls the football away before he can kick it 61. What flamingos often stand on 63. Famous deliverer of a line that starts with each opening digraph at 17-, 24- and 38-Across before finishing with 52-Across 66. Ska kin 67. Lake at one end of the Niagara River 68. Big bang producer 69. Odin's realm 70. Libraries do it 71. Covert WWII org.


send leads to

@the.roasted.cafe #CWCOMMUNITY

INSIDE / COMMUNITY BEAT PG. 74 POETS CORNER PG. 75 INK PG. 76 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY PG. 77 UTAH JOB CENTER PG. 78 URBAN LIVING PG. 79

Most people in Salt Lake City have probably heard of O.C. Tanner, but think it’s just a jewelry store. In fact, it is also one of the largest employee-recognition firms in the industry, helping companies all over the world find the perfect way to honor their high achievers and loyal performers. Currently, the company is manufacturing commemorative rings for donation to members of the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Teams. Back when the 2002 Olympics were headed to Salt Lake City, the United States Olympic Committee sought a local vendor to make the medals. O.C. Tanner was the natural choice, which led to an alliance between the two. “We love our partnership with the U.S. Olympic Committee,” Sandra Christensen, vice president of awards, says. “Being able to ensure every U.S. Olympic athlete leaves the games with a piece of gold is meaningful to us. We’re a company that encourages the appreciation of greatness in workplaces, and being able to recognize the greatness of our U.S. Olympians and Paralympians is important to us.” It’s no wonder the committee turned to them when it needed a way to recognize all athletes, regardless of who had won a medal. Thousands of businesses—including almost a third of Fortune’s 100 Best Places to Work—use O.C. Tanner’s technology, tools, awards and education services to engage talent, increase performance and help employees strive for greatness. The company is headquartered in Salt Lake City, but has offices in Canada, the United Kingdom, India, Germany, Mexico, China, Singapore, Japan and Australia. These awards can be used to recognize significant corporate milestones, product launches, growth accomplishments or specific events like holidays and Employee Appreciation Day. Yearsof-service and retirement programs can help celebrate the contributions

COURTESY O.C. TANNER

O.C. Tanner has been crafting Team USA’s rings since 2010.

of team members over time, improving morale individually and team-wide. And if plaques or pins aren’t your thing, they also offer unique products such as personalized yearbooks. The business was founded in 1927 as a jewelry store, and still maintains two retail locations, which tie back into the company’s roots of crafting recognition pins. These stores carry some of the finest pieces in the state, including necklaces, watches and more. Just like a member of Team USA, you too can have a piece that ref lects the company’s quality and artistr y. n

O.C. Tanner Headquarters: 1930 S. State Jewelry Store: 15 S. State OCTanner.com COURTESY O.C. TANNER

PHOTO OF THE WEEK BY

community@cityweekly.net

Going for Gold

COURTESY O.C. TANNER

| COMMUNITY | | CITYWEEKLY.NET |

74 | AUGUST 18, 2016

T BEA

An local employee manufactures a piece at headquarters.


Poets Corner

Let it go

Pour it out, breathe it in. You’ll be gone soon, long enough. Let it go, and you’ll begin to see the poison in your precious stuff. Every thing is so sentimental,

down to every dusty picture frame. Don’t you know your body is a rental? You and the dust become one in the same. Will all your secrets be worth the trouble, once you die and they’re sorting through your life? When your treasures become thrift shop rubble, what do you think they’re gonna find?

~Samantha Peters~ Send your poem (max 15 lines), to: Poet’s Corner, City Weekly, 248 South Main Street, SLC, UT 84101 or e-mail to poetscorner@cityweekly.net.

Published entrants receive a $15 value gift from CW. Each entry must include name and mailing address.

#cwpoetscorner

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY B Y R O B

Women’s Brazilian Wax from Tina at

B R E Z S N Y

Go to RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) In my opinion, you need to bask in the glorious fury of at least one brainstorm—preferably multiple brainstorms over the course of the next two weeks. What can you do to ensure that happens? How might you generate a flood of new ideas about how to live your life and understand the nature of reality? Here are some suggestions: Read books about creativity. Hang around with original thinkers and sly provocateurs. Insert yourself into situations that will strip you of your boring certainties. And take this vow: “I hereby unleash the primal power of my liberated imagination.” VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) When you were a child, did you play with imaginary friends? During your adolescence, did you nurture a fantasy relationship with a pretend boyfriend or girlfriend? Since you reached adulthood, have you ever enjoyed consorting with muses or guardian angels or ancestral spirits? If you answered yes to any of those questions, you are in a good position to take full advantage of the subtle opportunities and cryptic invitations that are coming your way. Unexpected sources are poised to provide unlikely inspirations in unprecedented ways.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) I suspect that, in the coming months, you will be drawn to wandering through the frontiers and exploring the unknown. Experimentation will come naturally. Places and situations you have previously considered to be off-limits may be downright comfortable. In fact, it’s possible that you will have to escape your safety zones in order to fully be yourself. Got all that? Now, here’s the kicker: In the coming weeks, everything I just described will be especially apropos for your closest relationships. Are you interested in redefining and reconfiguring the ways that togetherness works for you? PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) If you’re playing the card game known as Bridge, you’re lucky if you are dealt a hand that has no cards of a particular suit. This enables you, right from the beginning, to capture tricks using the trump suit. In other words, the lack of a certain resource gives you a distinct advantage. Let’s apply this metaphor to your immediate future, Pisces. I’m guessing that you will benefit from what might seem to be an inadequacy or deficit. An absence will be a useful asset.

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ARIES (March 21-April 19) Can you imagine feeling at-home in the world, no matter where you are? If you eventually master this art, outer circumstances won’t distort your relationship with yourself. No matter how crazy or chaotic the people around you might be, you will remain rooted in your unshakable sense of purpose; you will respond to any given situation in ways that make you both calm and alert, amused and curious, compassionate for the suffering of others and determined to do what’s best for you. If you think these are goals worth seeking, you can make dramatic progress toward them in the coming weeks.

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801-364-6864 salonnvslc.com

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| COMMUNITY |

AUGUST 18, 2016 | 77

CANCER (June 21-July 22) Have you been drinking a lot of liquids? Are you spending extra time soaking in hot baths and swimming in bodies of water that rejuvenate you? Have you been opening your soul to raw truths that dissolve your fixations and to beauty that makes you cry and to love that moves you to sing? I hope you’re reverently attending to these fluidic needs. I hope you’re giving your deepest yearnings free play and your freshest emotions lots of room to unfold. Smart, well-lubricated intimacy is a luxurious necessity, my dear. Stay very, very wet.

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LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) When you were born, you already carried the seeds of gifts you would someday be able to provide—specific influences or teachings or blessings that only you, of all the people who have ever lived, could offer the world. How are you doing in your quest to fulfill this potential? Here’s what I suspect: Your seeds have been ripening slowly and surely. But in the coming months, they could ripen at a more rapid pace. Whether they actually do or not might depend on your willingness to take on more responsibili- TAURUS (April 20-May 20) ties—interesting responsibilities, to be sure—but bigger than As I tried to meditate on your horoscope, my next-door neighbor was wielding a weed-whacker to trim her lawn, and the voices in my head you’re used to. were shouting extra loud. So I decided to drive down to the marsh to get some high-quality silence. When I arrived at the trail head, SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) I suspect that you will soon be culminating a labor of love you’ve I found an older man in ragged clothes leaning against the fence. been nurturing and refining for many moons. How should you Nearby was a grocery cart full of what I assumed were all his earthly celebrate? Maybe with some Champagne and caviar? If you’d belongings. “Doing nothing is a very difficult art,” he croaked as like to include bubbly in your revels, a good choice might be I slipped by him, “because you’re never really sure when you are 2004 Belle Epoque Rosé. Its floral aroma and crispy mouth- done.” I immediately recognized that his wisdom might be useful to feel rouse a sense of jubilation as they synergize the flavors you. You are, after all, in the last few days of your recharging process. of blood orange, pomegranate and strawberry. As for caviar: It’s still a good idea for you to lie low and be extra calm and vegetate Consider the smooth, aromatic and elegant roe of the albino luxuriously. But when should you rise up and leap into action again? beluga sturgeon from the unpolluted areas of the Caspian Sea Here’s my guess: Get one more dose of intense stillness and silence. near Iran. But before I finish this oracle, let me also add that a better way to honor your accomplishment might be to take the GEMINI (May 21-June 20) money you’d spend on Champagne and caviar, and instead use it My readers have a range of approaches for working with the counsel I offer. Some study the horoscopes for both their sun as seed money for your next big project. signs and rising signs, then create do-it-yourself blends of the two. Others prefer to wait until the week is over before consultSAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Some species of weeds become even more robust and ing what I’ve written. They don’t want my oracles to influence entrenched as they develop resistances to the pesticides that are their future behavior, but enjoy evaluating their recent past in designed to eradicate them. This is one example of how fighting light of my analysis. Then there are the folks who read all 12 of a problem can make the problem worse—especially if you attack my horoscopes. They refuse to be hemmed in by just one foretoo furiously or use the wrong weapons. I invite you to consider cast, and want to be free to explore multiple options. I encourthe possibility that this might be a useful metaphor for you to age you to try experiments like these in the coming days. The contemplate in the coming weeks. Your desire to solve a knotty moment is ripe to cultivate more of your own unique strategies dilemma or shed a bad influence is admirable. Just make sure for using and interpreting the information you absorb—both from me and from everyone else you listen to. you choose a strategy that actually works. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Your assignment, if you choose to accept it, is to compose an essay on at least one of the following themes: 1. How I Fed and Fed My Demons Until They Gorged Themselves to Death. 2. How I Exploited My Nightmares in Ways That Made Me Smarter and Cuter. 3. How I Quietly and Heroically Transformed a Sticky Problem into a Sleek Opportunity. 4. “How I Helped Myself by Helping Other People. For extra credit, Capricorn— and to earn the right to trade an unholy duty for a holy one— write about all four subjects.

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City Weekly August 18, 2016  

The State Street Issue

City Weekly August 18, 2016  

The State Street Issue