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UNEASY RIDERS Revelrous Mad Max-esque gathering aims to put Utah motorcycle culture on the map.

By Westin Porter


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CWCONTENTS COVER STORY HELLO, MOTO!

Dubbed as “the worst moto campout ever!” Motos in Moab provided cold beer, warm rain and hot fire. Cover photo by Tyson Call

16

CONTRIBUTOR

4 LETTERS 6 OPINION 8 NEWS 21 A&E 27 DINE 33 CINEMA 36 TRUE TV 37 MUSIC 51 COMMUNITY

WESTIN PORTER

Cover story, p. 16 This skateboarder and motorcycle junkie contributes regularly to City Weekly’s music section. Although his bike broke down on the way to Moab, and his friend sliced open his hand, he says the overall experience of producing this week’s cover story was “a blast.”

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COMMENTS@CITYWEEKLY.NET @SLCWEEKLY

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News, July 14, “Lands of Luxury”

Cover story, July 14, “I Will Be Mrs. Utah 2016”

We need to change this shit.

These may very well be intelligent women, but I still believe pageants feed into portraying women as a commodity. Imagine having men on stage, dressed up in suits and swimwear and then being judged? It would be mocked by most people … but somehow we continue to accept it as normal for women. There are fitness competitions, but both genders participate.

Money flows into government accounts by the truckload. It’s a never-ending river of cash. Of course they’re going to spend it wastefully. It’s not like the money will ever run out.

BECKY JOHNSON Via Facebook

Three “hot” blondes from Utah … brains, beauty and world peace. Oh, the humanity. What a struggle they must have gone through. @BRAINDETERGENT Via Twitter

Ugh!

MRIDI KUMATHE Via Facebook

JOHNATHON AARON HITLALL Via Facebook

ROBIN BULLOCK Via Facebook

A closer look

So, our state leaders, from the governor on down, have decided to take 14 million of our tax dollars to try and pull off the biggest illegal land grab in U.S. history. This is the same group that justpassed a bill to allow giant billboards all along our beautiful scenic byways, all over the state. The same people who think that huge coal mines are just fine all over southern Utah. The same people who think there is nothing wrong with frackingfor natural gas all over our national parks. (See what this has done for Pennsylvania and West Virginia.) The same people who love the idea of oil wells scattered all over our

Publisher JOHN SALTAS

Editorial

Editor ENRIQUE LIMÓN Arts &Entertainment Editor SCOTT RENSHAW Music Editor RANDY HARWARD Senior Staff Writer STEPHEN DARK Staff Writer COLBY FRAZIER Copy Editor ANDREA HARVEY Proofreader LANCE GUDMUNDSEN Dining Listings Coordinator MIKEY SALTAS Editorial Interns DASH ANDERSON, JORDAN FLOYD, CASEY KOLDEWYN, KATHLEEN STONE

Contributors CECIL ADAMS, KIMBALL BENNION, KATHARINE BIELE, ROB BREZSNY, AIMEE L. COOK, BABS DE LAY, BILL FROST, MARYANN JOHANSON, MICHELLE LARSON, KATHERINE PIOLI, WESTIN PORTER, STAN ROSENZWEIG, TED SCHEFFLER, CHUCK SHEPHERD, ZAC SMITH, ERIC D. SNIDER, ALEX SPRINGER, BRIAN STAKER

red rock trails.The same people who don’t care what any of this will do to the water, air or land. The same ones who don’t care much about what is left for our children and grandchildren, as long as there is enough money in it. The same ones who have lied, over and over again to the farmers, ranchers, cattlemen, Native Americans and environmentalists. Is this group of state leaders the ones we really want in control of the most beautiful, unique public lands in the U.S.? Really? I don’t think so. TONY PIGNANELLI Salt Lake City

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Salt Lake City Weekly is published every Thursday by Copperfield Publishing Inc. The Salt Lake City Weekly is an independent publication dedicated to alternative news and news sources, and serves as a comprehensive entertainment guide. 50,000 copies of the Salt Lake City Weekly are free of charge at more than 1,800 locations along the Wasatch Front, limit one copy per reader. Additional copies of the paper may be purchased for $1 (Best of Utah and other special issues, $5) payable to the Salt Lake City Weekly in advance. No person, without expressed permission of Copperfield Publishing Inc., may take more than one copy of any Salt Lake City Weekly issue. No portion of the Salt Lake City Weekly may be reproduced in whole or part by any means, including electronic retrieval systems, without the written permission of the Publisher. Third-Class postage paid at Midvale, UT. Delivery may take one week. All Rights Reserved. ®

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OPINION

Driving with no helmet

I went out on our deck the other day to clean a bit so that we might relax in the summer afternoon and perhaps eat dinner outside. We have two garden tables with holes in the middle and large umbrellas sticking out of them to shield us from the sun. I keep them folded up when we’re not outside to minimize damage from the strong morning wind coming down Big Cottonwood Canyon. So, this particular morning I went out to clean the tables and on one, at the base of the umbrella, was a bird about 9 inches long, beak to tail, healthy looking at first glance, with full breast and smooth feathers, but it was dead. I stood there watching it, trying to figure out why it was there and why it was dead. I am no Sherlock Holmes, so it took a while before I noticed three small drops of blood near its head which had hardened to crust on the glass tabletop. I looked around, up and back to the house and saw a smudge on an otherwise clean window about 15 feet up. It looked like this young, healthy, energetic bird was swooping down toward what looked like a pathway to free sky, but which actually was a window reflection of said sky, until smack! And, of course, like many motorcyclists we see coming down the canyon from time to time, it wasn’t wearing a helmet. Now we all think we are doing slightly courageous things occasionally, and most of the time, we get away with taking liberty with the driving speed limit when nobody is watching, “just making it” through a traffic light when it turns yellow (not quite red, as we later recall to the officer), having large fries with our Big Mac, pleased with ourselves for living on the edge. Really? Firefighters who run into burning buildings are courageous. Taking traffic chances and eating cholesterol-busting meals are acting more like the two to three guys

B Y S TA N R O S E N Z W E I G

who fall from the rim of the Grand Canyon annually. Our “Watch this dude” mentality increases accidental deaths each year, showing that stupid is not courageous. Some covet courage without deadly risk through politics. Look at how many citizens boost their adrenaline by running for office. Some 22 started in this year’s GOP Presidential contest alone. Then there are the Dems, the lesser known parties, the independents and literally thousands of down-ballot candidates. Many haven’t any chance. Yet, 2016 primaries and elections will cost both rich benefactors and more modest on-line contributors billions on losing races. Winning political office in times of crowded rhetorical turmoil has extemely long odds and most candidates do not end up more successful than those ill-fated Grand Canyon rim walkers. But then, sometimes, against the odds, you actually win. Jackie Biskupski beat the odds and won the SLC mayoralty. U.S. Representative Mia Love lost in her first race and then tried again and won against first-time candidate Doug Owens. Recently, I asked Owens, a successful local attorney with roots in Panguitch, why in the world would he want to get involved in politics and, more incredulously, run as a Democrat in a very Republican state after losing once before? He answered that his dad not only was a Democrat elected several times to serve Utah in Washington, but was known as a champion of that lost art of reaching across the aisle to pass historic compromise legislation that benefited our citizenry. In the last election, with less than 50 percent name recognition, Owens lost by only a few percentage points. This time, he feels that Utah will choose someone with his bipartisan spirit of compromise. So, he’s back in the contest. In Utah’s governor’s race, Gov. Gary Herbert, aka Available Jones, has raised a

needed ton of money from lobbyists to battle Overstock.com Board Chairman Jonathan E. Johnson III, who only needs to be “available” to Overstock company founder and CEO Patrick M. Byrne. Byrne put up the better part of a million dollars, if you believe him, with no quid pro quo. The GOP gubernatorial primary winner must continue raising more millions to run against Mike Weinholz, who, himself, has announced kicking in close to a million of his own money. Why? I ask again, do all these folks feel the need to raise and spend so much? Weinholz, proud of his business record of creating and running one of Forbes’ 100 best companies in America to work for, says that employee autonomy and compassion, “putting people before profits,” is what made him rich and is what he will do to make Utah an even better place. I believe him and everyone else who is campaigning against each other’s party, and who campaigned against other candidates within each party. Yet, look at all that money spent. Then look around at the homeless people on the street and the jobless who bring their kids to hospital emergency rooms because they don’t have health care, and the lack of funding to support our troops and former troops. This cycle, Americans will spend between 5 and 10 billion dollars on our presidential race and up to $100 billion on all races. Don’t the misplaced priorities of all these billions of dollars in campaign spending seem sad to you? It does to me. I feel like we are those dudes walking recklessly on the rim of the Grand Canyon, or helmetless motorcycling down Big Cottonwood Canyon, or carelessly flying like that bird that ended up on my deck, swooping, feeling the wind in our feathers, rushing toward the concussion-smacking slap of reality, instead of the cleansed mirrored imaginings of what we think reality should be. CW

OUR “WATCH THIS DUDE” MENTALITY INCREASES ACCIDENTAL DEATHS EACH YEAR.

STAFF BOX

Readers can comment at cityweekly.net

When you think about the current election cycle, what image comes to mind? Paula Saltas: Hitler. Nick Sasich: Whoopee cushion. Jeremiah Smith: Wag the Dog, Idiocracy and then deep, deep despair. Mason Rodrickc: A donkey in a pantsuit and a Cheetoned elephant locked in a cashtossing fight. Casey Koldewyn: All thought is blocked by a dark, giant, stormy, nebulous cloud, from which no light escapes and past which nothing can be seen. I’d like to think this is a needless fear, that the future could be better, and then I hear something Trump has recently said. The cloud grows. Pete Saltas: A rock … and a hard place. Tyeson Rogers: Violence and all that comes with it. People being killed by the police and more importantly, people killing people. No matter their title or job or nationality, people are killing each other. John Saltas: Dorothy inside her house spinning above Oz. And then, splat.

Randy Harward: The Reptilians. The Bilderbergs. The Queen, the Vatican, the Gettys, the Rothschilds … and Colonel Sanders before he went tits-up. I always hated the Colonel, with his wee beady eyes.

Derek Carlisle:

Statler sans Waldorf hollering down, “You’re doing it wrong,” as Miss Piggy and Fozzy Bear bounce useless rhetoric off each other’s souless shells.

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Here’s the irony, Utah. If you want nuclear power, you might just have to sacrifice your beloved coal. And we know how you—and Donald Trump—love coal. So don’t get too giddy over the recent court thumbs-up for the Green River nuclear plant. The Utah Court of Appeals ruled that it’s OK to divert 53,600 acrefeet of the river’s precious water for the planned Blue Castle nuclear project, the daily newspapers reported. But hey, that doesn’t mean the plant is feasible. It has a long way to go to attract investment. A Yale University report notes that the economic viability of existing plants is worsening because of cheap natural gas and more wind energy production. Meanwhile, the only way to help nuclear might be through a carbon tax or carbon trading. So which is it, Utah? And where’s the push for alternative energy?

No Home for Homeless Shelters

Salt Lake City Council Chairman James Rogers knows the cruel truth: No neighborhood is going to welcome a homeless shelter. The city’s Homeless Services Site Evaluation Commission has recommended that shelters—one for single men and one for single women—house up to 250 residents. The Deseret News talked to council members who spoke to the obvious NIMBY factor. The Salt Lake Tribune reminded the public of the dust-up over citing the Inn Between, a homeless hospice. And if you’re scared of dying people, well, how will you feel about healthy homeless folks? The plan remains an excellent one—to segregate populations and reduce the numbers of homeless in one location. Some sites would require a zoning change, but however it’s done, the council is feeling heartburn from the inevitable resident protests. All this while the nation is being fed fear and loathing, too.

Boy Scout Troubles

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The Boy Scouts of America. Enough said. Well, maybe not enough. The LDS Church did some real soul-searching after the national BSA decided to welcome gay kids into the fold. There were threats that Mormons—the Boy Scouts’ biggest supporters—would leave the fold. As it turns out, all’s well. Both daily papers ran an Associated Press story about how the BSA is stronger now than ever. The Salt Lake Tribune ran an inside story on Sunday, with some local contribution. It talked about an LGBT Scout leader who has returned now that the rules have changed. And the church seems OK with gay adults as long as they don’t act on their “samesex attraction.” Interestingly, the Deseret News ran the AP story on its front page— on Pioneer Day.

Lawyer and former mayor of Salt Lake City from 2000-2008, Ross “Rocky” Anderson continues to play a part in the city’s growth. In 2011, he founded the Justice Party—a political party alternative to what he sees as the duopoly of the two major political parties—that focuses on economic growth, aggressive climate reform and social justice issues. Anderson also founded High Road for Human Rights in 2008, an organization that advocates grassroots activism to address issues such as torture, genocide, slavery, the death penalty and the human rights implications of global climate change.

How has the city changed since you took office and when you left in 2008? What’s lacking?

Main Street and downtown have shown tremendous growth. When the City Creek Center was built, I saw the fruits of a lot of labor fulfilled by Utahns trying to energize downtown Salt Lake City. City Creek has so much to offer and places have developed around it—housing, restaurants, great local businesses that set us apart from other cities. Missing from Salt Lake City is a great live music venue. [I’d also like to see a] revival of places like Zephyr or Port O’Call. A city our size should have a lot more.

You are still heavily involved in progressive politics. What are some of your efforts to encourage people to sway from the two-party system?

In 2011 I co-founded the Justice Party. We’re very hopeful that we can invigorate the Justice Party and state organizations. We offer a choice. America has been disparaged by wars, low-income, climate change, nuclear proliferation. The vast majority of people need to come together and accept that there are going to be differences of opinions, but focus on the fundamentals of growing a strong economy—building instead of sending away jobs, away with a sense of empire that has driven us into so many disastrous wars. Especially after the Bernie Sanders candidacy, there is a real sense of betrayal by the Republican and Democrat parties and we need a real choice other than that duopoly.

The millennial generation surpasses baby boomers in terms of population size, yet baby boomers vastly outnumber millennials when it comes to voting. What message do you have for young voters heading into this year’s election cycle?

Young people that are involved can make all of the difference. This attitude that one vote doesn’t matter is so lazy and self-centered. I think that more and more people are realizing that we can come together and that it is up to every one of us to make change. The failure to do that is simply declaring defeat to the forces of greed, and the consequences are going to be felt by millennials and their children. Change is only going to come about by young people becoming active. Voting is only the first step: Once people are in office, we must still be tenacious activists if we are really going to see anything change.”

Salt Lake City is Democratic for the most part, yet Republicans have a tight grip on the two Senate seats in Washington. Do you foresee a time when a Democrat might win a Senate seat?

I don’t necessarily think it’ll be a Democrat, but a third choice like the Justice Party which focuses on fundamental issues, then we could get beyond the one party system we have in Utah. If you take a look at positions of Justice Party, in almost every area, we represent what the majority of Americans support, while Republicans do not. The majority of Americans don’t want to see an incarceration state, hundreds of new prisons built each year, proliferation of the death penalty, tax breaks for the wealthy, slavishness to Wall Street, illegal and aggressive wars, and all of those areas. The majority of people want something different. The same can be said statewide. Year in and year out, [people want to see] campaign finance reports, gifts [disclosure] by lobbyists—yet, Republicans know they have the power no matter what happens. We won’t see much change from the status quo until we get away from party partisan politics.

—MIKEY SALTAS comments@cityweekly.net


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In the wake of Prince’s death, I’ve read a lot of magazine special editions dedicated to him, and each contains pictures of hundreds of gifts left at his home by fans as memorials. Something like this seems to happen whenever a major celebrity dies. What happens to these items? Does the family take the stuff? Do other fans eventually take it? Does the city? Or is there possibly some foundation that deals with such things? —Trina High Any parent of an all-too-prolifically creative child can sympathize with the dilemma facing the custodians of a celebrity memorial site. Think of when an offspring’s lovingly finger-painted or magic-markered artworks have papered the entirety of the refrigerator and threaten to consume all available wall space in the house. Then even the most doting patron has to make a decision: store these masterpieces lovingly away, or surreptitiously trash them and hope the artist never asks where they went. In the case of Prince, who died April 21, that’s pretty much the task that fell to Bremer Trust, a Minnesota-based bank that’s been appointed temporary administrator of the superstar’s estate while the court determines his rightful heirs. As you note, fans had decorated the chain-link fence surrounding Paisley Park, Prince’s home and studio outside Minneapolis, with flowers, balloons, and all sorts of homemade tributes. These clearly couldn’t stay up forever. Rather than throw the stuff out, though, the bank’s representatives undertook a fairly heroic preservation process, and like the industrious midwesterners they are, they did so quickly. Just one month after Prince’s death, multiple curators from four local history societies, working as volunteers under the supervision of a Bremer archivist, gathered up the accumulated items. The dead flowers and rotten food got tossed, but everything else was documented and archived according to standard museum procedures. The most sunbleached and rain-soaked poster boards, their valedictory messages however illegibly smeared or faded, have been stored away in an environmentally controlled space, possibly for future public exhibition. That’s not always how it happens. If, for instance, you’ve crafted a special item to commemorate the life of John Lennon that you’d like preserved for posterity, don’t leave it behind at Strawberry Fields. That site, located in New York City’s Central Park and dedicated to the late Beatle, considers items left behind at the end of the day abandoned property and disposes of them accordingly. Imagine no possessions and all that, I suppose. There is a middle ground, of course, between storing every item as a treasure and binning it all as trash. Elvis Presley’s Graceland, in Memphis, Tennessee, is the granddaddy of all celebrity shrines, attracting 500,000 visitors per year—many of whom leave some token of admiration behind.

BY CECIL ADAMS SLUG SIGNORINO

STRAIGHT DOPE Fan Tribute Storage

Though Graceland didn’t open as a tourist attraction until 1982, fans were using the site to communicate with Elvis while he was still living: Cut off from their increasingly isolated idol, they started scrawling messages to him on the wall surrounding his mansion. Groundskeepers scrubbed the graffiti away for years, but after the King’s death in 1977 the task grew too great, and now they only zap the off-color material. Graffiti, though, doesn’t create storage issues. The objects left behind at Elvis’s grave are another story. The Graceland archivists are world-renowned—in fact the Paisley Park team adopted some of their techniques from those used by the Presley preservationists. But unlike the Paisley Park curators, the caretakers at Graceland are highly selective about what they keep—only creations deemed of particular artistic merit or ingenuity get stored away in the archives. Interestingly, one institution that served as an example for those diligent Minnesotans doesn’t honor celebrities at all. The Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C. was dedicated the same year that Graceland was opened to the public. And as with Graceland, visitors to the memorial, colloquially known as “the Wall,” started leaving items behind immediately: The National Park Service estimates that 400,000 items have been left as remembrances and tributes—one group from Wisconsin even left a motorcycle. Currently these tributes—every last nonperishable one of them—go into the Vietnam Veterans Memorial collection, which is warehoused in a Maryland facility. Looking ahead, however, the Park Service admits there won’t always be room for everything, and it’s planned to limit the scope of the collection to items directly related to the Vietnam War. Someday, whoever inherits Bremer Trust’s responsibility for Paisley Park’s upkeep may have to make similar decisions, particularly if the site becomes a Graceland-style museum that attracts hundreds of thousands of tourists bearing gifts. Right now, though, Bremer faces more pressing concerns. Since Prince died intestate, the administrator expects that the IRS and the state of Minnesota may gobble up more than half his estate’s value next year. Should some future reader ever wonder “Why should I leave a will?” I may simply direct them to the messy story of Prince’s probate woes, which is just beginning. n Send questions to Cecil via StraightDope.com or write him c/o Chicago Reader, 350 N. Orleans, Chicago 60654.


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HOUSING

So It Goes

Majestic Meadows mobile home park residents struggle with unexpected rent increases. BY JORDAN FLOYD comments@cityweekly.net @JordanFloyd17

T

he walls in Chris Stafford’s home are covered with picture frames, displaying what he calls “wood collages.” He made the three-dimensional images out of wood scraps and carefully matched the grains of each piece of wood to those surrounding it— mirroring, he says, the flow of life. Each is elaborate and abstract. Their significance for Stafford, though, is poignant. After 15 years in the Taylorsville Majestic Meadows mobile home park, Stafford says he is leaving. And with him he is taking all that he has: the tangled wooden masses hung on his wall and stowed in piles around his home. “I carry it with me,” he says. “It’s the only thing I have with me that’s me—my art forms.” His exodus alongside many other Majestic Meadows residents was spurred by recent conflicts between residents and the park’s corporate owners, Kingsley Management Corp. (KMC). “A rent increase of $35 per lot was applied, as well as a huge raise in gas rates. There was also an unexplained previous balance listed, even though April statements had been paid in full,” a Majestic Meadows HOA rent-increase notice that was given to residents, says. “[Residents] were informed by the manager that the previous balance was for an undercharge gas error in March. Another error was made by KMC’s utility department in January so residents were now being charged a higher gas rate to make up for their mistake.” To many, the amount might seem like a nuisance, even negligible, but for Majestic Meadows residents—many of whom are living on low or fixed incomes—the miss-billing was crippling. “I’m a Vietnam vet one step away from being homeless,” resident Chris Stafford says. Every year, the rents are raised, he says, and it’s becoming too much. On a fixed Social Security income, he “just can’t afford it.” KMC’s Doug Black did not respond to City Weekly’s requests for comment. He did, however, respond to the Majestic Meadows HOA release in an email sent to residents, stating, “As you know, we undercharged for gas in January. We

JORDAN FLOYD

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NEWS

Chris Stafford, Majestic Meadows resident, says he’s “one step away” from becoming homeless. apologize for making this mistake. The June bills will reflect the total back owing. If anyone needs payments plans set up, please work with the community manager. Management will make every effort to send future bills earlier in the month.” The turmoil at Majestic Meadows is not something Connie Hill, the president of the Utah Coalition of Manufactured Homeowners, sees as out of the ordinary. In fact, it happens all throughout the state. “Mobile home owners don’t have the same rights a renter does,” she says. “What you’ve got is a homeowner who should have all the rights of a homeowner, and then you have a landowner who should have all landowner rights. It raises all different kind of issues that come up and pit two owners against each other. And sometimes there is no meeting in the middle.” In 2007, City Weekly published a story about the Park Hill mobile park and its residents’ struggles with the park’s owners attempting to sell and develop the land on which the residents’ homes sat. Then, the concerns were over the threat of eviction. Now roughly two months after the missbilling issue at Majestic Meadows, residents in Murray’s Winchester Estates are frantic after learning their park’s owner put the property up for sale. Land ownership, for Park Hill nine years ago and

more recently with Majestic Meadows and Winchester Estates, is at the forefront of the problems for mobile-home park residents. As part of her job, Hill interacts frequently with mobile-home residents and park owners. Because mobilehome residents don’t own the land their home sits on, park residents like those at Majestic Meadows are especially subject to ever-increasing rents. “We went back and did a full-scope look at rent increases,” she says. “When I moved here into my community 15 years ago, my rent was $330 a month—my rent is now $574. Compared to apartment rents, it is hugely unfair. Apartment rents will go up and then they will come back down as the economy adjusts.” Mobile home rents, she says, “constantly go up” at about 5-6 percent each year, which is well above the 4.6 percent average increase for apartment rents, The Wall Street Journal reported in January. Why don’t tenants up and move to apartments, then? Mobile homes are more convenient for elderly residents. “Because we are a part of the senior group, doing stairs is just not an option. It’s tough to do stairs, which makes mobile homes—being all on one level—a good option,” Hill says. “Some of the issues lead people to believe it’s not an ideal situation, but it’s a lifestyle choice

for a lot of people.” As with any housing option, prices are driven by the housing market. Many residents, Hill says, still feel the way park owners like KMC determine prices are unfair and exploitative of mobilehome residents. “We see corporations like Kingsley raising their rents because they can say it’s market-driven” Hill says. “There’s not a way, in my opinion, to be able to check the [rent] figures. We don’t know what they are really using.” “They are not driven by the market; they are driven by the bottom line,” she continues. “When they say marketdriven, what they are comparing it to is other mobile home communities and not the housing economy as a whole.” Hill says there have been some states that “passed laws where if a senior has been in their home in the park for 10 years, at the 10-year mark, their rent caps.” “That would be something to look at in the future,” she says. “Any kind of rent stabilization in our legislation has not gained any kind of traction.” Northern California’s Sonoma County, for instance, has a mobile-home rent-stabilization program in place that only allows park owners to increase rent by a maximum of 100 percent of the Consumer Price Index (CPI). The CPI is set by the U.S. Department of Labor by completing a “complex review


JORDAN FLOYD

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tiche sea shell collages, furniture draped in tapestries, the spirit man sculpture on the backside of his home and the rest of the ornate items strewn throughout the trailer. But inevitably, the end has come for Stafford, and he’s not alone. The Majestic Meadows HOA Vice Chair Ted Ottinger says 11 residents are attempting to sell their homes because of the miss-billings and rent increase. “Residents who rely totally on Social Security retirement or disabilities are being stretched to the limit,” Ottinger says. “As rents go up, more and more homeowners will be forced out of their homes. Sadly, few of these people have any ideas as to where they can go.” Stafford’s destination after Majestic Meadows is uncertain. He says he has family in Idaho and Colorado that he may see, and all the while he’ll be living out of his truck. “I might just go cruising around and look for another place to live,” he says. “Put my stuff and furniture in storage and just kind of travel around.” He jokes that he used to call Majestic Meadows “Magic Meadows” but it has slowly turned into “Miserable Meadows.” It was a place of inspiration for him. Though, he’ll have to find another outlet as he hits the road, falling victim to the turmoils of mobile home ownership that persist in one form or another, year after year. CW

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JORDAN FLOYD

of the changes in the cost of goods and services,” protecting renters from unlivable rent increases. Currently, one of the only pieces of legislation in effect that deals with rent increase is in Section 5 of Utah’s Mobile Home Park Residency Act, which requires park owners to notify residents of a rent increase 60 days in advance. “They’ve been incorporated in [District] 5 for a long time,” Sen. Karen Mayne, D-West Valley City, says. “It has always been an issue and it is an issue because the people that own the home, they don’t own the dirt.” Mayne points to property rights as the biggest hurdle for any type of protective legislation. The answers for mobile home residents lay in the Legislature, but private property rights are an issue, Mayne says. No less, she notes that she and her cohorts are working “to do what we can with the tools with we have.” Still, Mayne notes, using legislative advances to help residents like those in Majestic Meadows is a “Catch 22 on a good day.” Despite the difficulties, each resident’s mobile home is, after all, their home, which comes with the same sentiment any homeowner would feel toward their residence. Stafford made his home undoubtedly his own. He had a lot of fun there, he says, and it’s evident to see by the wood and pas-

Majestic Meadows mobile home park


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CITIZEN REVOLT In a week, you can CHANGE THE WORLD

THE

NUEVE

THE LIST OF NINE

BY MASON RODRICKC & MICHELLE L ARSON

@MRodrickc

! T O B O R Y N BI G SHI News from the geeks. Nine things surprisingly missing from the DNC:

9.

Bernie Sanders’ perfectly timed “wardrobe malfunction.”

what’s new in comics, games, movies and beyond.

8. Michelle Obama coming

7. Protests being protested by even more protesters.

6.

Another leak disturbing convention-goers (this one going from the bathroom to the buffet).

5. Bill Clinton getting in trouble for asking guests if they want to blow on his sax.

4. Debbie Wasserman Schultz 3. A Wikileaks story on how the

exclusively on cityweekly.net

2.

1. A worldwide spike in pantsuit sales.

MEDICAID EXPANSION DISCUSSION

MOVIE UNDER THE STARS

convention is a hotspot for rare Pokémon only available to people with no moral compass.

BuzzFeed News polling DNCgoers on whose side they’re on in the TSwift/Kimye feud.

No, it’s not January, so you probably think air quality is just fine. Take a deep breath, and join all the efforts on clean air now. Utah Clean Air has a July challenge you can join to learn about using electric tools, taking transit and more. Also, think about going to one of several Clean Air Community Meetings, being sponsored by HEAL Utah, Utah Moms for Clear Air and the Utah Physicians for a Healthy Environment. This problem won’t fix itself. Learn how you can help. Provo City Library, 550 N. University Ave., 801-355-5055, Monday, Aug. 1, 6 p.m.; Weber County Library Southwest Branch, 2039 W. 4000 South, Roy, 801-355-5055, Tuesday, Aug. 2, 6 p.m., free, HealUtah.org

You don’t need to be a member of the Coalition of Religious Communities to find out What Next on Medicaid Expansion in Utah and how to move it along. Before the November elections, you will want to see where the candidates for governor and other state offices stand on the issue. CORC, a coalition of 15 different religious communities, can help you during these final three months. One of CORC’s priorities this year is to expand Medicaid to cover parents (and others) living under the poverty level, so that medical emergencies don’t lead to families becoming homeless. St. Mark’s Cathedral, 231 E. 100 South, 801-364-7765, Thursday, Aug. 4, 8:30-9:30 a.m., free, Home. Utah.edu/~u0371791/CUC/CORC.html

clean about President Obama’s college nickname, “O’Bummer.”

having her mask pulled off on live TV to reveal she’s actually a Scooby-Doo villain.

CLEAN AIR MEETINGS

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Looking for something to do on a hot summer night? You and your family can help celebrate 100 years of Utah’s beautiful Captiol building by attending a free summer movie event—Disney’s recently remade classic, Cinderella. During Movie Under the Stars, you can listen to a local band and partake in food available for purchase. Or you can bring your own picnic. Hey, even pets are allowed, but be sure to clean up after them. You’ll need your own blankets and chairs because, well, it’s a picnic! Utah State Capitol, 2350 N. State, 801-410-0011, Friday, July 29, 7:30-11 p.m., free, bit.ly/2a6fU8G

—KATHARINE BIELE Send events to revolt@cityweekly.net


S NEofW the

WEIRD

Weird Numbers Making the News Recently The Transportation Security Administration announced in May that it had collected $765,000 in loose change left behind in airport scanner trays during 2015—an average “haul” for the agency of $2,100 a day (numbers assuming, of course, that TSA personnel turn in all of the money they find). Los Angeles and Miami airports contributed $106,000 of the total. n CEO Michael Pearson told a Senate committee in April that he “regret(s)” the business model he instituted in 2015 for Valeant Pharmaceuticals—the one that, for example, allowed a drug (Cuprimine) that treats liver failure and formerly cost a typical user out-of-pocket about $3 a pill (120 per month, $366) to, overnight, cost the user $15 a pill. (The insurance company’s and Medicare’s cost went overnight from about $5,000 per 100 tablets to $26,000.) (A Deutsche Bank analysis of the industry tallied Valeant’s all-drug average price spike at more than five times the average of any competitor’s.) Pearson told the senators he had no idea that such a pricing strategy would turn out to be so controversial.

The Power of Prayer A 28-year-old woman, unnamed in news reports, veered off the road and into a house in the Florida panhandle town of Mary Esther on July 7. She apparently was free of drug or alcohol influence, but readily explained to police that she must have gone through a stop sign and left the road when she closed her eyes to pray as she drove. (The house was damaged, but no one was injured.) Recurring Themes: Fernando Estrella, 41, was arrested in Franklin County, Vt., in March and charged with making the foolish error of running a stop sign while carrying a heroin haul. Estrella was rectally packing three condoms stuffed with enough heroin, said police, to fill 1,428 street-retail-size baggies. n Esteysi Sanchez Izazaga, 29, was arrested for DUI, hitand-run and vehicular manslaughter in Oceanside, Calif., in June after driving three-fourths of a mile (3,960 feet) with a pedestrian’s corpse firmly lodged in her windshield after she struck the man. (The drive ended up at her home, where her horrified husband noticed the body and called police.) n As typical of many pervert suspects in News of the Weird, Roger Marsh, 65, of Cowling, England, was a prodigious collector/hoarder of his indecent images. He was caught with a camera attached to his shoe following skirted women around an Ikea store, and in May was ordered to jail for 18 months by Leeds Crown Court, covering six offenses. However, police had also discovered a trove of 709,376 images and videos at his home, and preliminary perusal of the collection showed 1,600 live files of voyeurism and about 9,000 indecent images of children.

Thanks this time to Thomas Wyman and Felix Toledo, and to the News of the Weird Board of Editorial Advisors.

Want to sell your company? Utah Business Consultants is the premier business brokerage in Utah, where we’ve been operating since 1989. Give me a call and we’ll chat about the options. 801-424-6300 office 801-440-3176 cell George@UBCUtah.com www.UBCUtah.com

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Wait, How Many Fell for This? In May, the federal government finally shut down a longrunning international scam that had sold psychic assurances (prosperity! winning lottery numbers!) to more than a million Americans. In personalized form letters, two French psychics had guaranteed success and riches to clients if they would only buy their $50 books (and massive upselling usually followed). The Justice Department estimated that during the spree, the

n The family of a Virginia Tech student missing since 1998 was notified in March that the man’s remains and ID had been found in a wooded ravine 700 feet below the New River Gorge bridge near Beckley, W. Va.—in an area the man’s vehicle tracker had long identified for potential searching. A West Virginia State Police sergeant told reporters that in the years since the student disappeared, the remains of 48 other bodies had been found underneath the bridge.

Edward Kinley Amphitheater in Layton Food • Fun • Activities Vendors • Luau Dinner & Show Doors open: 4:30 | Dinner 5:30-6:30 | Show 7:00-9:00 Kids Under 5 Free

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n Austrian Hans Heiland vowed in June to assist a needy family in Oberholz by donating to a charity fundraiser sponsored by the local fire department. He has been collecting bottle tops through the years and figures he could sell his “treasure” now, as scrap metal, to help the family. He has at least 10,000, no, make that 10 million caps, weighing “several tons.”

n A recent study by a Harvard University data scientist estimated that the government of China funds the creation of at least 488 million bogus social-media posts a year. The report refers to a rumored government-sponsored arrangement that pays people the equivalent of 8 U.S. cents per post of “news” for the purpose of distracting social-media users and channeling them to subjects preferred by the government (such as successes of the Communist Party).

FRIDAY, JULY 29TH

The Passing Parade Mark Herron, 49, of Sunderland, England, was arrested again in May—his 448th arrest on alcohol-related charges. The year started “well” for Herron, with only 14 collars through March, and he cleaned up briefly before a “family bereavement” sent him spiraling downward again. His current lawyer admitted that his client has been in court more often than he himself has.

n In a June verdict still reverberating through the telemarketing industry, a jury in Utah found that three companies run by Forrest Baker III had illegally made 99 million phone calls to consumers on the Do Not Call Registry and an additional 18 million calls telling people they were merely doing surveys when the purpose was hawking their family-friendly movies. Both charges are violations of the Federal Trade Commission’s Telemarketing Sales Rule. Although the total fine and damages have not been decided, the law provides that the most serious offenders could be assessed $16,000 per phone call (for a maximum of almost $1.9 trillion).

14TH ANNUAL LAYTON CITY FESTIVAL & SCHOLARSHIP BENEFIT

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Neck and Back Support The Japanese branch of the intimate apparel maker Genie is currently advertising, in Japanese and English, a handy guide for bras that emphasizes the hardship women bear by having to lug around breasts of certain sizes in ill-fitting garments. The Genie chart reveals weight in ounces of typical A-cup chests (11.5 ounces) through F-cup (41.7 ounces, or 2.6 pounds). To assist any innumerate Japanese shoppers, the chart also shows practical comparisons, such as A-cup pairs weighing as much as “two chipmunks,” C-cups as “one newborn polar bear cub,” and F-cups as “one 3-month-old Persian kitten.”

sellers earned upward of $180 million on at least 56 million pieces of postal mail.

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Take Your Word for It Scientists at the University of Cambridge, writing in May in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, claimed to have figured out how to construct a “motor” a “million times” smaller than an ant. (It apparently involves lasers, gold particles and “van der Waals forces,” and the object is to bind the gold particles and then cause them to automatically “snap” apart with, according to author Jeremy Baumberg, “10 to a hundred times more force per-unit than any known other machine.”)

ALOHA!

BY CHUCK SHEPHERD


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16 | JULY 14, 2016

Revelrous Mad Max-esque gathering aims to put Utah motorcycle culture on the map. By Westin Porter photos by Tyson Call

comments@cityweekly.net

I

t’s a mid-spring morning in Moab. The rust-colored canyon walls radiate with heat, as grass shoots, emerald and not yet parched from the too-hot summer, throw fractured rainbows among its leaves in the spectrum of morning dew. The locals are cleaning their shop windows, looking up and down the streets already filling as farmers might look at the sky in hopes for rain. This place, some 230 miles from Salt Lake City, is unlike any other, and for years cyclists, climbers, Jeep enthusiasts and rafters have made the trek here for the otherworldly natural beauty and recreation it has to offer. In 2015, a new bunch crested the I-70 skyline, crashed down in a flash of lightning and thundered on the town, washing along the canyon walls like the flash floods known to visit the area. It was a storm of motorcyclists from all over the United States and beyond. It was the first Motos in Moab. Since that maiden weekend campout—a tide of rain, 100 or so dirty bikers pitching tarp tents in the mud for a hip-shot of an event—Motos in Moab has become a global event, hosting those from as far as Australia, quickly morphing itself into the new motorcyclist’s Zion. The event, humbly referred to as “a motorcycle campout” by its founders, Rev Clark and Juan Coles, was conceived over cold beer in Salt Lake City nearly a year and a half ago. “It literally just started with me and Juan having a beer and were, like, ‘You want to go to Moab and camp?’” Clark says. The founders met at what was then Miller Motorsports Park and gravitated toward each other through everything the other was not. Clark, who sports a slight build and full beard, speaks softly and muses on the details of things. Coles, a self-proclaimed leader and community organizer, speaks in parables with a voice that booms low and clear. “I don’t want to speak to fatalism,” Coles says. “But I’d say people call other people into existence when they need them. When you’re open to a certain thing, people will appear. We both were a good fit

for each other. We’re very different from one another, [but] we both have one big common ground and that’s motorcycles.” Coles and Clark planned the campout to be just that. Experienced riders themselves, the pair sought out to stage something that would be for everyone, and from the start, both were determined not to replicate other bike events such as the Handbuilt Motorcycle Show in Austin, Born-Free in Los Angeles or even the fabled Sturgis Motorcycle Rally in South Dakota. Their event was not to be a marketplace, swap-meet or fashion show of fabricated steel, rakedout front ends and chrome motors. It was to be what one camper described as “the place that those vendors come just to hang out.” The plan was set, and an intimate campout for a few friends and their bikes the Memorial Day weekend followed. “We weren’t, like, ‘Let’s have this campout with tons of people and turn it into something.’ It was just, like, ‘You wanna go fucking camping?’” Clark says. “Then we started talking to people and inviting them. Then we went down to the Handbuilt Motorcycle Show and met a lot of people from out of town. Once it started gaining speed after we got back from Austin, that’s when we kind of looked at each other, like, ‘Fuck, what are we doing?’” Next came a series of events dealt like a cooler from a stacked deck, destined to keep anyone on a motorcycle from returning to Moab. As Clark and Coles and 100 others embarked on the trek from Salt Lake City, storm clouds rolled and washed against the Wasatch Front. Rain began to fall and, at 90 mph, the drops became steel beads that stung sharp and cold, freezing hands and locking knees. But, group by group, the exodus marched on. When they finally arrived in Moab, they checked in at their campsite—an RV park in Pack Creek with yellow signs that read “slow down,” and “5 MPH” lining the dirt road that snaked between pickup trucks, motorhomes and trailers painted with an acrylic sunset sky over a 1-800-Rent-Me number. “It was set up to fail,” Coles says.


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After being kicked out of the campground nearly upon arrival due to noise complaints, the group was forced to find a new home—on Moab’s busiest weekend of the year. The Grand County sheriff gave Coles and Clark the names of three property owners who might be willing and able to host the bikers for the long weekend. After visiting the first spot, a private campground nestled between the steep, red walls of Kane Creek Canyon along the shore of the Colorado River, they knew they had found the place. “We had a new home,” Coles reminisces. The sheriff then took the motorcyclists to the spot—Kane Springs Campground. Churning gravel and alkali dust behind them as they pulled away from their original host, the procession rumbled along Moab’s two-lane main road behind the red and blues of law enforcement usually found on the opposite end of groups like these. From the middle of town, the group snaked along the swift roll of the river, the guttural drone of thumping pistons reverberating off the steep canyon walls. When they finally arrived at the campsite—a luteous hayfield, shaded by riverbank salt cedar and cottonwoods—it was as if the juncture of the event with time and place struck a nerve with its surroundings. Sunshine washed over all. The rust-hued canyon walls jutted into sky and red dirt flung through the air in clumps, still wet as thick-treaded tires dug into the grass and earth. Whoops and laughter, beer foam, coughing carburetors, the rich scent of two-stroke gasoline, blistered palms and busted knuckles, along with the celebratory clamor of the pilgrimage finished, filled their surroundings. “We got all set up and everything was clicking and it started to rain,” Coles says. “And it started to rain harder, and within 15 minutes we were in a flash flood. There was six inches of water, people’s tents were floating away; it was like World War III. I was putting beer cans under kick stands because bikes were tipping over. It was the plagues of Egypt. I was praying for Moses, but he never came.” But the torrent did little to dampen their spirits. Tents popped up, beer spilled through sopping cardboard and motorcycles tipped motor down in the mud. Friends, blacktop comrades, survivors of the journey threw in a hand to help

one another set up camp, cover their bikes, pass a joint. The din and laughter grew louder still. This was the destination: the relentless quest of motorheads to kill themselves on the road to somewhere. Rain be damned, the destination is always sweet. And so it is in those moments—soaking wet, drunk and laughing—just how motorcycle culture was reborn to such unlikely bearers becomes clear. A generation of young people, scrutinized for living their lives through their computer and phone screens, reconnect with one another and with the world around them in the rawest way they know how: Hurdling themselves down canyons and around corners at breakneck speeds, willing their machines to somewhere. “It’s not the road we conquer, but ourselves,” muses MiM vanguard Anthony Magdaleno, who participated in the first campout. “We’ve forgotten what real, physical fun is. [It’s] just being in the moment. Going so fast that you’re thinking about everything and nothing at the same time, just concentrating on not dying. It’s like meditation.”

Gateway Rush

Utah’s part in the history of American motorcycle culture is small, but not insignificant. The Bonneville Salt Flats have long been the site of the land speed trials for motor sports. And in 1971, Steve McQueen starred in what would become a chopper cult classic, On Any Sunday, which featured the Widowmaker hill climb in Draper. The film, which was nominated for a Best Documentary Feature Academy Award in 1972, highlighted motorcyclists of all stripes and captured professional rider Mike Gibbons shooting up the 600-foot, 89-percent grade hill—the first ever to do it. Since the film was released and Gibbons conquered Widowmaker in 1972, few still had ascended the top before the event ended in 1988. One of the handful to do it, and on a ’74 Shovelhead customized specifically for the hill climb, was Utah’s own Caesar Boswell. Boswell owned and operated his own “Motorcycle Empire” in Draper for over a decade before passing away in 2013. The resurgence of motorcycles among young

people is as vibrant in Utah as anywhere else. Since the early 2000s, Salt Lake City has seen numerous motorcycle shops spring up in response to the rebirth of the love for two wheels. “It’s different than it has been in the past,” Rich Page of Widowmaker Cycles says. Page has been a part of the motorcycle community in northern Utah for over 30 years, beginning at Honda World in Provo when he was 15 years old. He then supported himself through college building and repairing bikes. “The thing that’s really cool about it right now is that somebody’s gotta get started somewhere,” he says. “Kids will go out nowadays, and it’s cool to buy a cheap bike and fix it up. It’s a gateway to keeping the industry moving forward.” The number of motorcycle registrations in the U.S. has risen by roughly 2 million from 2005-2012, according to a 2013 United States Department of Transportation report, and Utah has come out above average in registered riders per capita. While California keeps leading the pack, Beehive riders continue to take to the roads and mountain trails around them in the spring and summer months. “We need something like Motos in Moab to make people realize there is a lot going on right where you’re at,” Magdaleno says. “We didn’t even have to ride more than five hours to get here, and it’s the time of our lives. You don’t have to go all the way to California or Texas, there’s people that love what you love right where you’re at.” Magdaleno is short, built with wide shoulders, large nicked hands and curtains of curly brown hair. He bought his first bike just months after graduating high school—a ’94 Harley Sportster, salvaged by a bike builder who found it abandoned on the side of the road. Magdaleno taught himself to ride it on the iced and salted streets of West Bountiful the following winter. After purchasing his first bike, Magdaleno developed an insatiable hunger for motorcycles. While his peers chased the increasingly illusory dream of middle-class wages through college, Magdaleno saved enough money for gas one-way, and drove his Ford Taurus to North Dakota in search of work in the oil fields. A few seasons of bone-chilling weather and endless hours in machine shops was a small price to pay


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Where there was rain, eschewing hosts and aimless bikers the year prior, this year’s Motos is a sunburst. The exodus arrives in droves on Friday, engulfing the mile-wide campground from end to end—1,000plus wheeled bikes and campers and vans and motorhomes around one another. As the sun begins to dip behind the horizon, tents erected and campfires lit, the ocher canyon is alive and groaning for the night. The congregation gathers around a pyramid of hay bails, unlit and chalk-dry, beckoning flame in the center of the campsite. Like prayer, Hunter S. Thompson is evoked through recitation by camper Tyson Call. “Letting off now, watching for cops, but only until the next dark stretch and another few seconds on the edge …” The crowd surges, a bellow of shouting and cheers, the gypsy bunch breaking the illusion of reverence yet simultaneously stoking it as they pull from bottles, abuzz with the excitement of the weekend begun. “The edge … There is no honest way to explain it because the only people who really know where it is are the ones who have gone over.” The multitude erupts, and like cheat grass dances and comes alive with the wind, the words send a wave through the congregation. It’s electric. Reached, the destination, end of the line, bleary eyes burn from wind, alcohol and anticipation. “Yes!” yawps a shirtless man, lips shining with whiskey, thrusting a bottle into the air. This was it. Just a weekend in Moab—an intimate campout with 1,000 or so friends and their bikes. Some broke down along the way, ran out gas, even broke handlebars. One man even sliced his hand open repairing a friend’s bike along the way and was told by the doctor he would be unable to ride for at least a week. Three hours and a few painkillers later, he was back en route.

Echoing Magdaleno’s words, the rebirth of motorcycles among millennials is a throwback to generations past, a tribute to those bogged down by economic and collective identity crises before them, but it isn’t without its own flare. A wrinkle on this group’s philosophy is inclusivity—women on the fronts of bikes, rather than the backs. Harleys, Suzukis, Hondas and Triumphs slingshot down the road together, and while they aren’t necessarily singing “Kumbaya,” these are not the leathered, ball-peen-hammer-wielding bikers of decades past. The Litas, an all-female motorcycle club born in Salt Lake City in September 2015, is one example of the new wave biker. Founded by Washington native Jessica Haggett, the group embodies the liberation, empowerment and exhilaration of riding motorcycles.

Motos in Moab 2016

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Circuit Breakers

In less than a year, the club has reached 80 cities in 13 different countries around the world—from the States to Argentina to South Africa to New Zealand and beyond. “This is kind of a time for me to be able to see what I’ve created in action and meet these amazing, powerful, incredible women,” Haggett, one of the many Salt Lakers to make the trip to Moab, says. While motorcyclists have long been a fixture of counterculture, they haven’t been immune to politics, power struggles and marginalization. White men have dominated the ideal for virtually the entirety of its existence. But groups like the Litas are bucking the trend. “I met some kick-ass girls here,” Haggett says. “For me personally, starting the Litas, it’s a lot of me behind my computer. Which is not the reason I do it. I do it to connect with these women and give them an opportunity to meet other people.” One of her goals for the Litas was to create a worldwide community in which women felt welcome and empowered to connect with one another through motorcycles. “What we stand for is having a good time and meeting new people and supporting each other and being something positive where its all inclusive,” Haggett says. “I think that has helped to build a positive community and not just a community.” Utah might seem an unlikely wellspring to such a movement. Foregrounded by the heavy backdrop of patriarchy and the machinery of tradition and conservative values long heralded by the state, the emergence of ratty-braided viragos—trading the conventional roles expected of them for two wheels and open road—is heretical. But, as Haggett puts it, starting the Litas wasn’t about making a statement. “It’s not even a big deal, it’s just fun and we like hanging around good people,” she says.

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for his dream bike: the 2013 Harley Davidson Blackline he now rides. “Maybe every few decades something about humanity screams for change,” Magdaleno says of the rebirth of motorcycle culture. “We might not exactly know the path to get there, but someone wants to do something that makes them feel free. Whether it’s cliché or not, motorcycles make you feel fucking free.” Gazing into the campfire, boots crossed on a firestone, he passes a bottle to a girl slumped in a foldable chair next to him, and continues to grasp at what it is that makes the motorcycle ideal so attractive. “You never know what’s going to happen, but once you get here, you realize it’s a story to tell,” he says. “You might break a belt, you might run out of gas, you might have some bad plugs. It brings a camaraderie, it makes you realize that everyone else is trying to get there, and they’re willing to help each other get there.”


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20 | JULY 14, 2016

As Call finishes reciting from Thompson’s “Midnight on the Coast Highway” the west canyon wall swallows the sun and the evening sky swells a mauve bruise.

From the trees emerges Coles, faceless beneath a white helmet and tinted bubble shield. On his back a canister of fuel, and in his hands a flame-thrower. Around the structure he walks, casting blue flame on the hay pyramid. The tower ignites, a flaming mass mad with energy reaching for purple sky. The heat glows on sunburned faces and eyes glazed by the fireball. The moment is as tall as the obelisk canyon walls that frame it, and without a beat skipped, engines thrum on and the inferno becomes the center of an endless parade of motorcycles.

Mad Max in Moab

It isn’t set in stone what Motos in Moab as a future event will look like, however popular it has become in its two-year existence. The attendance boom of the campout from under 200 to roughly 1,200 the following year wasn’t exactly a shock to Clark and Coles. They project as many as 5,000 attendees next year, meaning the spontaneous and stripped-down nature of the gathering—the very nature that earned it so much popularity so quickly—could be the very thing that stunts its growth as well. “It has to be [spontaneous], but it’s impossible,” Clark says. “You get Year 3, 4, 5 and it’s not spontaneous anymore.” For attendees, the feeling is mutual. Returning campers lamented the event might have already lost its extemporaneous heart; that it gained so much buzz via social media and within the motorcycle community worldwide, that it was sure to soon be courted by vendors and sponsors. But Coles and Clark remain true to their original idea. While there were talks of multiple food trucks, beer stations and vendor booths for this year’s iteration, campers were greeted by a single food truck (the same one that served them bratwurst and beans, brisket and pulled pork last year). There were no booths, no gimmicky games for discounted merchandise, nor corporate entities scratching at the golden ticket target market of eager 20-somethings. There was the dirt track, lined with bales, the modest stage and acres of open land. But that’s not to say the event will continue to look like that.

While the moderately priced ticket ($60 early registration, $70 regular) left some grumbling that there was a lack of entertainment for the cost, Clark and Coles say they hemorrhaged funds both this year and last. After the several thousands spent on waste management, permits, land rental and taxes, the average cost per attendee equaled nearly $85. As the gathering likely continues to grow, so too will infrastructure and the cost thereof. While this year’s mass filled the plot of land rented from the local property owner, Clark and Coles plan to rent all of Kane Springs Campground next year to support the horde they expect. Campers have reveled in the feel of the small, DIY event so much so that it can no longer sustain itself as such—at least not without a clear vision and diligent planning. “I look at it as an ever-growing thing,” Coles says. “As [something] I can grow to 20-50,000 strong … I look to Burning Man.” He adds, however, that an event that size means that the expense of that grassroots feel, at least somewhat, is inevitable. “I don’t feel good about charging people $200, $300 a ticket, but I also don’t feel good about writing a $20,000 check out of my savings account,” he says. “If you can’t make the money up with big-name sponsors, then you pass the cost down to the end user. My hope is that it’s a blend.” This is, of course, if Moab continues to host the happening. Several locals took to the editorial page of the Moab Sun News to express their disdain for the event and its patrons. One writer even called it “Mad Max in Moab,” and said that Kane Springs Campground looked like “an upper-class refugee camp” during the gathering. Yet on the very same day that editorial ran, Sheriff Lt. Kim Neal was quoted by the same paper saying he received just two phone calls, and that the weekend overall “was quiet.” Motos is set to be reviewed by the Moab City Council soon, and Coles has requested letters of support from each event-goer. While there has been no decision made yet, the feeling that the event will return next year is lukewarm by the organizers. “What makes it special is that it’s raw,” Coles says, “and that it’s kind of spitting in the face of people that play too safe.” CW


ESSENTIALS

the

Fonts surround us on a daily basis. Some styles are more common than others, some are more pleasing than others (don’t even get me started on the atrocity that is Comic Sans), but though we rarely think about it, they all came from somewhere. The vast selection of fonts we take for granted, after a process in which handwriting developed into script, were preceded by typefaces, Luise Poulton, rare books managing curator at the University of Utah’s Marriott Library, says. It is here, on Levels 1, 4 and 5 that an entire exhibition, titled Love Letters: A Gallery of Type, is on display. “This exhibition is a celebration of type, typographers and printers, from Johann Gutenberg, who developed printing with movable type, to Bruce Rogers, an American typographer and book designer,” Poulton says. The exhibit is also meant to remind viewers that writing itself, whatever it may describe, can be art by showing how font fits that characterization. “Type has personality, flair and style that often matches the time and place. It can often age quickly, or it can become classic,” Poulton says. “Good type grabs our attention. Great type keeps our attention.” Wondering how the title fits in here? “Love Letters is a play on words,” Poulton says, where the “letters” in the title refers to the individual letterings of type, and “love” refers to the celebratory aspect of the exhibition. (Casey Koldewyn) Love Letters: A Gallery of Type @ Marriott Library, 295 S. 1500 East, Salt Lake City, 801-585-6168, through Sept. 30, free. Lib.Utah.edu

The internet age has birthed many unlikely online celebrities, who have turned DIY videos into a fan base. But few of those celebrities are as unlikely as Miranda, a nasal-voiced, loudly belching, lipstick-smeared woman whose videos find her doing atonal, blissfully un-self-aware covers of pop hits like “Shake It Off,” reacting to pop-culture phenomenon like Pokémon Go (“Did I just unlock a portal to making monsters live inside my freaking house?”), obsessing over fellow YouTube star Joey Graceffa or providing tutorials on how to be a model. Except that Miranda isn’t real. In 2008, actress/comedian Colleen Ballinger created Miranda as a scary-accurate parody of YouTube stars with no apparent sense of their lack of talent, screen presence or qualifications to comment on absolutely anything. More than one billion views of the “Miranda Sings” YouTube channel later—that’s “billion” with a B—the Andy Kaufman-esque long-con that is Miranda has taken on a life of her own, including a best-selling 2015 book titled Selp-Helf, in-character appearances on The Tonight Show and Jerry Seinfeld’s Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee, an upcoming Netflix original series with the title of her catch-phrase Haters Back Off and live performances around the world. She’ll be bringing the latter to Salt Lake City this week, as the Miranda Sings theatrical experience comes to the Capitol Theatre. The shows have typically included “musical” numbers, audience participation, magic tricks, readings from her hate mail and never-before-seen video material, all with that singular malapropping obliviousness that is Miranda. (Scott Renshaw) Miranda Sings @ Capitol Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, 801-355-2787, July 30, 8 p.m., $37.50. ArtSaltLake.ArtTix.org

Miranda Sings

JULY 28, 2016 | 21

SATURDAY 7.30

Love Letters: A Gallery of Type

| CITY WEEKLY |

It’s a given that visual artists all utilize their own idiosyncratic modes of expression combining the lexicon of paint and brush, as well as other materials. Each of the seven artists featured in the Rio Gallery’s DemoGraphics exhibit has developed their own visual idiom to create works that communicate to the viewer in their own discrete dialect, producing a community of local artists in microcosm. Liberty Blake’s collages are very much in the manner of early 20th century Dadaist works, combining a somewhat restrained, austere compositional sense with materials like industrial wrapping and newsprint. These works converse on the level of historical reference, and they evoke not only a unique period in the history of art but also geopolitical events at the time, like World War I. Rebecca Klundt’s paintings use reclaimed wood and other found materials that enforce their own compositional restrictions, sometimes resembling blocks of farmland as seen from an airplane, or walls of buildings, formed from pieces of irregular-size wood. A statement about environment and ecology is the result. Justin Wheatley’s oils use the rhetoric of architectural drawings, real estate photographs and landscape art to generate a discussion of the house as metaphor for its resident: Groups of houses seem to confer with each other. Other artists in the exhibit are Paige Anderson, Jenna von Benedikt, Linnie Brown and Joseph Ostraff. The works in DemoGraphics attempt to create a dialogue with the viewer and with each other as well, and demonstrate ways in which various visual languages don’t generate a cacophony, but can invite a deeper sense of engagement. (Brian Staker) DemoGraphics @ Rio Gallery, 300 South Rio Grande St. (455 West), 801-238-7555, through Sept. 2. Heritage.Utah.gov

THURSDAY 7.28

Her story is one of survival, strength, courage, horror and guilt. As one of the few survivors of the notorious Ted Bundy, Rhonda Stapley is speaking out about her horrific experience in her new book, I Survived Ted Bundy: The Attack, Escape & PTSD that Changed My Life at the Viridian Event Center, hosted by the Kings English Bookshop. Known for his good looks and charm, Bundy lured Stapley, a young Mormon virgin and University of Utah student, into his Volkswagen Beetle by offering her a ride as she waited for a bus that was running late. Soon after she got into the car, he said he was going to kill her. Bundy viciously attacked her in a Utah canyon in October 1974, and her astonishing escape leaves her one of the few to tell the tale of an encounter with one of America’s most infamous serial killers. Stapley hopes that her story will help save lives. She stayed silent for more than 40 years in fear that she would be judged and ridiculed as the girl that was raped. It was after another Utah girl was almost abducted by Bundy that she saw his photo on the news and realized it was the same man who had attacked her. She speaks to the guilt she felt over not having reported the assault sooner. Though she is still filled with regret of having accepted the ride from a stranger in the first place, she has worked hard to ensure her story has a happy ending. She has been able to move on, and is a wife, mother and a pharmacist. (Aimee L. Cook) Rhonda Stapley @ Viridian Events Center, 8030 S. 1825 West, West Jordan, 801-9487858, 7 p.m., free, books available for purchase. ViridianCenter.org

DemoGraphics

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Great Salt Lake Fringe Festival showcases out-ofthe-ordinary performing arts. BY KATHERINE PIOLI comments@cityweekly.net

M

ost people, at some point in their life, know what it feels like to not be invited to the party. Some of the best stories come from those people who went anyway. The Fringe Festival is one of those stories, about people who showed up when they weren’t invited, the things they did and how the thing they started caught on and spread halfway around the world, all the way to Salt Lake City. It all began in Scotland, in 1947, when eight theater companies showed up for an annual performing arts gathering called Edinburgh International Festival, even though they weren’t officially invited. They set up their performances in small, unofficial venues around the city and, taking advantage of the assembled crowds, put on their own shows. They ended up attracting quite a bit of attention from the main festival audience, and thus the Fringe Festival—a platform for original works of performance art—was born. Sixty years later, Fringe Festivals are events all to themselves—no more stealing audiences. And they’re found all over North America and Europe, and, as of last year, Salt Lake City’s Sugar House neighborhood. Dannielle Moriondo, a recent graduate of Westminster College and the director of communications for Great Salt Lake Fringe, was one of the founding members, and is currently putting the finishing touches on this year’s even larger event, which spans two weekends, July 29-August 7. “None of us were prepared for how hard it would be to organize something this big,” Moriondo says. She, along with a small group of founding volunteers, spent months creating a nonprofit entity for the festival, recruiting performers, finding venues, lining up stages and lighting, advertising and selling tickets. And somehow, after all that work, Moriondo and the Fringe crew decided to do it again. Why such dedication? “I love stories and believe in

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the power of storytelling,” she says. “I truly believe that it benefits people to be exposed to [these arts].” Members of the Fringe Festival Association organize their fests under four guiding principles: 1. Performances are selected on a first-come, first-served basis or lottery, and are not “selected” or “screened” by a jury. 2. All sales go directly to the artists. 3. Artistic expression is not censored (but in Salt Lake City, the performances are given a rating so audiences know ahead of time if the content is family-friendly or risqué). 4. Performances are easily accessible to both artists and audience (which means tickets are reasonably priced). While each fringe festival adheres to these precepts, each festival also reflects the flavor and personality of its own distinct community. Productions in this year’s Great Salt Lake Fringe, while full of the classical forms of theater, dance and spoken word, will also include more obscure performance arts—puppetry, aerial dance, circus acts and magic tricks—and acts that reflect our city’s rich but often hidden ethnic diversity. The local troupe ChitraKaavya Dance returns to the 2016 Fringe with some original interpretations of Bharatanatyam (pictured left), a many-centuries-old South Indian dance form that company founder Srilatha Singh likens to Western ballet. “It’s extremely technical work that takes lots of physical strength and years of training to learn,” she says. “We are telling a story with our face, our eyes, our neck and fingers.” TRILOK PRITHVI

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Edge of Glory

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22 | JULY 28, 2016

A&E

FRINGE

The work of choreographer Daniel Higgins

Another returning artist, Julie Leir-VanSickle, comes from Pocatello, Idaho, a sign that the Salt Lake Fringe is creating opportunities not just for local artists, but also those throughout the region. Though she says dance is her “home,” she prefers to call her art physical theater, a mesh of dance, text and acting. This year, Leir-VanSickle premieres Shutting Skin, inspired by her children’s boa constrictor. “I’m 42 years old, my kids are teens and leaving the nest soon, I have dear friends moving across the country,” Leir-VanSickle says. “It’s all got me thinking about that process of change and having to leave things behind.” For its size, Salt Lake City has a performing arts scene that’s healthy and growing. Undoubtedly, there remain artists out there still waiting for their chance to share their ideas, and audiences waiting to find them. That’s where Great Salt Lake Fringe comes in. Across the city and surrounding communities—and even states—this is the place where performers find and build their audience. This is where new art is made, even if only for a few days. It’s the kind of opportunity that excites even seasoned artist like Repertory Dance Theatre company dancer Daniel Higgins, who, for this year’s festival, is stepping into the shoes of choreographer and director for the first time. “It’s a fresh feeling,” Higgins says. “I’m not an experienced choreographer, and this opportunity is new and exciting.” CW

GREAT SALT LAKE FRINGE FESTIVAL

Various Sugar House venues July 29-31 & Aug. 3-7 11 a.m.-midnight $7-$10 GreatSaltLakeFringe.org


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moreESSENTIALS COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE @ CITYWEEKLY.NET

PERFORMANCE THEATER

Composition of Elements features new paintings by Chris Hayman (including “Hesychia,” pictured) at Julie Nester Gallery (1280 Iron Horse Drive), Park City, from July 29-Aug. 30.

Arsenic and Old Lace Caine Lyric Theatre, 28 West Center St., Logan, 435-797-8022, through Aug. 5, varying days, 7:30 p.m., CCA.USU.edu Baskerville: A Sherlock Holmes Mystery Caine Lyric Theatre, 28 West Center St., Logan, 435797-8022, through Aug. 6, varying days and times, CCA.USU.edu Chitty Chitty Bang Bang Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W. 3100 South, West Valley, July 29-Aug. 6, Wednesday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m., SmithsTix.com EYT: Li’l Abner Empress Theatre, 9104 W. 2700 South, Magna, 801-347-7373, July 29-Aug. 20, varying days and times, EmpressTheatre.com Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat Old Barn Community Theater, 3605 Bigler Road, Fielding, 435-458-2276, through Aug. 13, Monday, Friday & Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; July 30 & Aug. 6, 2:30 p.m. & 7:30 p.m., OldBarn.org The Music Man Ziegfeld Theater, 3934 S. Washington Blvd., Ogden, 855-944-2787, through Aug. 13, Mondays & Fridays, 7:30 p.m.; Saturdays, 2 & 7:30 p.m., TheZiegfeldTheater.com Neil Simon Festival Heritage Center Theatre, 105 N. 100 East, Cedar City, 435-267-0194, through Aug. 8, various days and times, SimonFest.org Oliver! Presented by ACT Covey Center for the Arts, 425 W. Center St., Provo, 801404-0736, through Aug. 8, Monday, Friday & Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Aug. 6, 2 p.m. & 7:30 p.m., AlpineCommunityTheater.org Oscar Wilde’s An Ideal Husband Little Theatre of Clearfield City’s Community Arts Center, 140 Center St., Clearfield, July 29-Aug. 8, Monday, Friday & Saturday, 7 p.m., NextStageProductions.org Perfect Pitch Desert Star Theatre, 4861 S. State, Murray, 801-266-2600, through Aug. 20, varying days and times, Monday-Friday, DesertStar.biz Peter Pan Hale Center Theatre Orem, 225 W. 400 North, 801-226-8600, through Aug. 6, Monday-Saturday, 7:30 P.M., Saturday matinee 3 p.m., HaleTheatre.org Peter Pan Utah Theatre, 18 W. Center St., Logan, 801-355-2787, through Aug. 4, varying days and times, ArtSaltLake.org Porgy & Bess Ellen Eccles Theatre, 43 S. Main St., Logan, 801-355-2787, through Aug. 6, varying days and times, ArtSaltLake.org Puccini’s Trilogy Ellen Eccles Theatre, 43 S. Main St., Logan, 801-355-2787, through July 28, varying days, 7:30 p.m., July 30 & Aug. 5, 1 p.m., ArtSaltLake.org Ragtime Ellen Eccles Theatre, 43 S. Main St., Logan, 801-355-2787, through Aug. 6, varying days and times, ArtSaltLake.org Rodger & Hammerstein’s South Pacific SCERA Shell Outdoor Theatre, 745 S. State St., Orem, 801-255-2787, July 29-Aug. 13, Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday & Saturday, 8 p.m., SCERA.org Saturday’s Voyeur Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, 801-363-7522, through Aug. 28, Wednesday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Sunday, 1 & 6 p.m., SaltLakeActingCompany.org Show Boat Ellen Eccles Theatre, 43 S. Main, Logan, 801-355-2787, through Aug. 5, varying days and times, ArtSaltLake.org Singin’ in the Rain Caine Lyric Theatre, 28 W. Center St., Logan, through Aug. 6, varying days and times, CCA.USU.edu

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TWILIGHT CONCERT SERIES WITH CHET FAKER 7.21

Jessica Day George, Dan Wells and Emily Wing Smith The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, July 30, 2 p.m., KingsEnglish.com Megan Wagner Lloyd: Finding Wild The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-4849100, July 30, 11 a.m.-12 p.m., KingsEnglish.com Serena Burdick: Girl in the Afternoon The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801484-9100, Aug. 3, 7 p.m., KingsEnglish.com

DANCE

SPECIAL EVENTS

CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

Beethoven Festival Concert Park City Community Church, 4501 N. Highway 224, Park City, July 28, 7:30 p.m.; Temple Har Shalom, 3700 N. Brookside Court, Park City, July 31, 3 p.m., PCMusicFestival.com Chamber Music in the Park City Park Bandstand, 13th St. & Sullivan Road, Park City, Aug. 1, 6 p.m., PCMusicFestival.com Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 9 St. Mary’s Church, 1505 White Pine Canyon Road, Park City, 801-355-2787, Aug. 3, 8 p.m., ArtSaltLake.org Simply Three and the Lyceum Music Festival Orchestra Ed Kenley Amphitheater, 403 N. Wasatch Dive, Layton, 801-546-8575, July 30, 8 p.m., DavisArts.org Steep Canyon Rangers with the Utah Symphony Deer Valley Amphitheater, 2250 Deer Valley Drive South, Park City, 801-355-2787, July 30, 7:30 p.m., ArtSaltLake.org DreamWorks Animation in Concert Utah Symphony, Deer Valley Snow Park Amphitheater, 2250 Deer Valley Drive, Park City, 801-355-2787, July 29, 7:30 p.m., ArtTix.ArtSaltLake.org

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The Three Musketeers Adventure Valley, 1811 W. 900 North, Lehi, July 29-Aug. 8, Monday, Friday & Saturday, 7 p.m., CobbCoTP.Wix.com Utah Shakespeare Festival Randall L. Jones Theatre, 351 W. Center St., Cedar City, 435-5867878, through Sept. 11, varying days and times, Bard.org You Can’t Take It With You Caine Lyric Theatre, 28 W. Center St., Logan, through Aug 5, varying days and times, CCA.USU.edu NOW-ID: Exodus Marriott Center for Dance, 330 S. 1500 East, Salt Lake City, 801-581-8231, through July 29, 7:30 p.m., NOW-ID.com

COMEDY & IMPROV

UPCOMING EVENTS

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COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE @ CITYWEEKLY.NET

Greg Hahn Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Salt Lake City, 801-532-5233, July 28, 7:30 p.m.; July 29-30, 7:30 & 9:30 p.m., WiseguysComedy.com Improv Comedy Ziegfeld Theater, 3934 Washington Blvd., Ogden, 435-327-8273, every Saturday, 9:30 p.m., OgdenComedyLoft.com Miranda Sings Capitol Theater, 50 W. 200 South, Salt Lake City, 801-355-2787, July 30, 8 p.m., $35.70, ArtSaltLake.ArtTix.org (see p. 22) Off the Wall Comedy Improv Draper Historic Theatre, 12366 S. 900 East, Draper, 801-572-4144, every Saturday, 10:30 p.m., DraperTheatre.org Quick Wits Improv Midvale Performing Arts Center, 695 W. Center St., Midvale, 801-8240523, through July 30, every Saturday, 10 p.m., QWComedy.com Rodney Norman Wiseguys Ogden, 262 25th St., Ogden, 801-622-5588, July 29-30, 8 p.m., WiseguysComedy.com Sasquatch Cowboy The Comedy Loft, 3934 Washington Blvd., Ogden, Saturdays, 9:30 p.m., OgdenComedyLoft.com Laughing Stock Improv The Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, 801-355-4628, Fridays & Saturdays, 10 p.m., LaughingStock.us

LITERATURE AUTHOR APPEARANCES

Rhonda Stapley: I Survived Ted Bundy: The Attack, Escape & PTSD that Changed My Life Viridian Events Center, 8030 S. 1825 W., West Jordan, 801-484-9100, July 28, 7 p.m., free, KingsEnglish.com (see p. 22)

FARMERS MARKETS

Park City Farmers Market The Canyons Resort, 1951 Canyons Resort Drive, Park City, Wednesdays, noon-6 p.m., through Oct. 26, ParkCityFarmersMarket.com Park Silly Sunday Market 600 Main St., Park City, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., through Sept. 18, ParkSillySundayMarket.com Sugar House Farmers Market Fairmont Park, 1040 E. Sugarmont Ave., Salt Lake City, through Oct. 26, Wednesdays, 5-8 p.m., SugarHouseFarmersMarket.org Downtown Farmers Market Pioneer Park, 300 S. 300 West, Salt Lake City, through Oct. 22, Saturdays, 8 a.m.-2 p.m., SLCFarmersMarket.org

FESTIVALS & FAIRS

Great Salt Lake Fringe Festival various venues, Sugar House, July 29-31 & August 3-7, 11 a.m.-12 a.m., $7-$10, GreatSaltLakeFringe.org (see p. 24)

VISUAL ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

The Abstracts of Brad Lloyd Teare Marmalade Branch, 280 W. 500 North, 801-594-8680, through Aug. 3, SLCPL.org Architecture of Place Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, 801-236-7555, through Sept. 9, VisualArts.utah.gov A Beautiful Wall CUAC, 175 E. 200 South, 385215-6768, through Sept. 9, CUArtCenter.org Colleen Ann Wooten: HeArt to Recover Anderson-Foothill Library, 1135 S. 2100 East, 801594-8611, through Aug. 12, SLCPL.org Colour Maisch and Gary Vlasic: Albedo Nigredo Art Barn/Finch Lane Gallery, 54 Finch Lane, 801596-5000, through Aug. 5, SaltLakeArts.org Composition of Elements: New Paintings by Chris Hayman Julie Nester Gallery, 1280 Iron Horse Drive, Park City, 435-649-7855, July 29-Aug. 30, JulieNesterGallery.com (see p. 24) Cori Redstone: The Women’s Association of Lecherous Treachery Charley Hafen Gallery, 1409 S. 900 East, 801-521-7711, through Aug. 12, CharleyHafen.com David Sharp: Primitive Spirit Salt Lake City Chapman Library, 577 S. 900 West, 801-5948623, through Aug. 25, SLCPL.org DemoGraphics Rio Gallery, 300 S. Rio Grande St., 801-245-7272, through Sept. 2, Heritage.Utah.gov (see p. 22) Ella Mendoza: My Illegal Body Sorenson Unity Center, 1383 S. 900 West, through July 31, 801535-6533, SorensonUnityCenter.com Elmer Presslee: Unprovoked Collaborations God Hates Robots, 314 W. Broadway, Ste. 250, through Aug. 12, GodHatesRobots.com Love Letters: A Gallery of Type Marriott Library, 295 S. 1500 East, Salt Lake City, 801-585-6168, through Sept. 30, Lib.Utah.edu (see p. 22)


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Surviving 16 sometimes challenging years, Stoneground grows up.

B

249 E. 400 South 801-364-1368 StonegroundSLC.com

e urchas P h t i W trees o f 2 E n any d w it h N o t v a li f fe r e oth r o /15/16 Exp. 08

BlueIguanaRestaurant.net

165 S. West Temple • SLC

Below Benihana and across from the Salt Palace

801-533-8900

255 Main St • Park City Treasure Mountain Inn (Top of Main)

435-649-3097

JULY 28, 2016 | 27

STONEGROUND KITCHEN

EER E FAPR PETIZ

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on to one of his favorite Italian wines, and it’s available at Stoneground: Maculan Pinot & Toi (a blend of pinot blanco and tocai) from Veneto. While sipping a glass of Pinot & Toi, an order of focaccino ($6) to nibble on is a must. There used to be a restaurant in Brooklyn (McCarthy is from back East) called Focaccino, so maybe that’s where they got the name; as far as I know, the word doesn’t exist in Italian. Anyway, think baked, slightly charred pizza dough that puffs up like Indian puri or a Mexican sopaipilla. It’s delivered to the table steaming before a server deflates it by cutting it into slices. The focaccino is lightly sprinkled with Adriatic sea salt, dried oregano and garlic oil, and served simply with an irresistible pomodoro sauce for dipping. It would make for a great bar snack if you just want to drop in for a drink. Another sensational starter is the Italian fish fry ($13), which is lightly crusted, deep-fried calamari, shrimp (or halibut cheeks when they’re in season) and anchovies sprinkled with fennel seed and served with citrus peel aioli. We’ve been lucky to have a top-notch server named Dillion (aka Dillicious) during a couple visits. He’s very knowledgeable, and shares his own food writing online at Dillicious.xyz. He recommended homemade black tagliatelle (made with cuttlefish ink) and it was spot-on: wide, flat pasta cooked perfectly al dente in a light chardonnay-cream sauce with lobster claw and knuckle meat, roasted mushrooms, scallions and red pepper flakes ($23). Other satisfying dishes I recommend include creste pasta Bolognese, chicken piccata with fresh linguine, the caprese salad and any of the thin-crust, artisan pizzas. Born in 2000, Stoneground Kitchen is maturing beautifully. I’m sure glad McCarthy didn’t pull the plug on his second-story eatery. CW

JOHN TAYLOR

Stoneground’s creste pasta Bolognese

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Chef Justin Shifflett

aren’t aware it exists—even when walking right past it. And then there were the years of financial losses during the period when the city virtually shut down 400 South, while the TRAX lines were being built. Still, he stuck it out. And now, Stoneground is better than it’s been at any time in those 16 years. It’s not a chef-driven restaurant in the way that, say, Metropolitan or Forage was. But McCarthy knows talent when he sees it, and he very smartly scooped up übertalented chef Justin Shifflett (formerly of Metropolitan) to oversee the menus and cooking at both Stoneground and the Garage. Not every chef can comfortably pivot with ease from funeral potatoes to halibut cheeks with morel mushrooms and vanilla bean saffron sauce. But Shifflett can. In addition to a terrific new chef, there’s another reason to visit Stoneground if you haven’t been there in a while, as I hadn’t. Gone are the pool table in the middle of the dining room and the pizza parlor atmosphere. It’s been given a major makeover, which includes a gorgeous upstairs patio and décor that is contemporary but feels homey, with lots of natural wood and stone (including the dining tables) and a color palette that is serene and soothing. I was blown away the first time I revisited in years. As you enter the restaurant, there’s a bar area on the right, and I recommend making time to have the bartender whip up one of his specialty cocktails—like the St. Julep, made with bourbon, St.-Germain Elderflower Liqueur and fresh mint. There’s seating at the bar and tables adjacent, if you prefer lounge-type atmosphere over the larger dining room. Entering the main dining space, you won’t be able to miss the big, imported pasta-making machine on the left; it’s about the size of a Mini Cooper. And, boy, does it produce perfect pasta. The wine selection also took me by surprise. It’s not the largest in town, but there’s a hearty all-Italian collection of wines from excellent producers such as Cusumano, Allegrini, Planeta, Marco Felluga, Alois Lageder, Pacherhof, Scaia and Argiolas, with most being available by the glass or bottle. Years ago, the chef/restaurateur/celebrity Mario Batali turned me

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

ob McCarthy sure has staying power. After his funky roadhouse Garage on Beck sustained extensive damage from a fire that erupted in an adjacent vacant lot a few years ago, the smart money said that he would walk away from the place. About the fire, he says on the Garage’s website, “It was like a punch in the gut. It was like a loved one getting hurt. It made you want to cry.” Though he might have cried, McCarthy didn’t walk away. He and co-owner Marsha Merrill stayed. They rebuilt. And today, the business is going stronger than ever, serving up excellent local and national live musical acts along with their Dixie-meetsUtah style of cuisine that includes funeral potatoes on the same menu as chicken and waffles. Running a restaurant—or working in one—requires nothing if not endurance. Again, McCarthy has it in spades. His Stoneground Kitchen has been open for 16 years, but it sure hasn’t been easy going. Most restaurateurs I know keep their thoughts pretty close to their vests. Not him. When I ran into him recently as I was leaving Stoneground, he confided, “If I had it all to do over again, I’d never open a second-floor restaurant.” Stoneground is located one story above the street on 400 South across from the Salt Lake Public Library, so a lot of people

JOHN TAYLOR

BY TED SCHEFFLER comments@cityweekly.net @critic1


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28 | JULY 28, 2016

FOOD MATTERS BY TED SCHEFFLER

Take A Bite

@critic1

Contemporary Japanese Dining

L U N C H • D I N N E R • C O C K TA I L S

18 MARKET STREET • 801.519.9595

Passing the Buck

Alamexo (268 S. State, 801-779-4747, Alamexo.com) is well-known for its outstanding, upscale, regional Mexican cuisine crafted by chef/owner Matt Lake. Well, on Thursdays taco lovers can indulge in Matt’s mouth-watering tacos at prices as low as—or even lower than—your favorite taco cart. Every Thursday in Alamexo’s entryway bar, a meat taco and a vegetarian taco are available for a mere $1 apiece. For that single dollar, bar guests are able to enjoy tacos such as carnitas y salsa verde cruda, tacos flor de calabaza y salsa frijoles y hoja Santa, tacos de bistek y salsa molcajete, and tacos hongos y salsa guajillo. Taco options will change weekly, and a featured bebida (beverage) will also be offered.

Breakfast Bagels and Blintzes

In addition to lunch and dinner, lovers of Feldman’s Deli (2005 E. 2700 South, 801906-0369, FeldmansDeli.com) now have another opportunity to indulge in Feldman’s authentic deli fare: breakfast. Tuesday through Saturday, from 8-10:30 a.m., guests can enjoy breakfast items such as bagels (with schmears and spreads), bagel beignets, corned beef hash, blintzes and fried egg sandwiches with Taylor ham for their morning meal. This calls for a hearty mazel tov!

out of your Dining Budget Use discount code 40SNACK for an additional 40% OFF on the following: GOOD THROUGH AUG 11TH.

Return of the Celebrity Chef

The James Beard Foundation’s “Celebrity Chef Tour” returns to Park City’s Riverhorse on Main (540 Main St., 435-649-3536, RiverHorseParkCity.com) on Sept. 24, featuring Chef Seth Adams and other renowned chefs—including a Top Chef fan favorite—who will be teaming up to create a star-studded dinner, with proceeds going to the James Beard Foundation. Confirmed featured chefs include: Seth Adams, co-owner and executive chef for the host restaurant; Bernard Guillas, executive chef of La Jolla Beach and Tennis Club; Tiffany Derry, Dallasbased chef and television personality; Jodie Rogers, director of food and beverage at Deer Valley Resort; Charlie Perry, owner of Eva and Eva’s Bakery and Robert Valaika, co-owner and executive chef of Shabu. Tickets are $225, and can be purchased by calling the Riverhorse. Quote of the week: “I don’t like spinach, and I’m glad I don’t, because if I liked it, I’d eat it, and I just hate it.” —Clarence Darrow

Food Matters 411: tscheffler@cityweekly.net

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Eat Right, Live Right, Fresh & Healthy! In The Heart Of Sugar House

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catering • delivery• dine-in 2121 s. McClelland Street (850 east) 801.467.2130 I couscousgrillexpress.com

Serving American Comfort Food Since 1930

“Like having dinner at Mom’s in the mountains”

“In a perfect world, every town would have a diner just like Ruth’s”

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Beer & Wine

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JULY 28, 2016 | 29

AND ASIAN GRILL

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A L L DA

FF O % 0 5 I H S U S ALL LS Y ! L O R & Y E V E RY DA

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-CityWeekly

AS SEEN ON “ DINERS, DRIVE-INS AND DIVES”

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-CREEKSIDE PATIO-86 YEARS AND GOING STRONG-BREAKFAST SERVED DAILY UNTIL 4PM-DELICIOUS MIMOSAS & BLOODY MARY’S-LIVE MUSIC SAT & SUN 11AM-2PM-


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30 | JULY 28, 2016

Perfect patio partners for summer sipping. BY TED SCHEFFLER comments@cityweekly.net @critic1

S

ummer seems to fly by so quickly, and before we know it, we’ll be bundled up in our winter wardrobes and thinking longingly of warm weather. For that reason, I’ve been working my way through a large stash of warm-weather wines. Of course, you could drink these wines at any time of year, but they are especially well-suited to patios, picnics, barbecues and the like. Some are from large producers and widely available; others are harder to find, but worth seeking out or ordering from your local supplier. Crisp, dry sauvignon is particularly tasty in summer, especially alongside cold or hot shellfish and seafood. Tom Gore is a second generation grape grower (he likes being

known as a farmer) from Sonoma County and his Tom Gore Vineyards 2015 Sauvignon Blanc ($15) is testament to his abilities. Crisp acidity and a hint of minerality balance out vivid tangerine, grapefruit and melon notes—a lovely wine for a picnic. Meanwhile, from Napa Valley comes Emmolo Sauvignon Blanc 2014 ($19.99), made from vines planted in the 1950s. Winemaker Jenny Wagner’s sauvignon blanc is less grassy and herbal than its New Zealand cousins, with lime and grapefruit flavors and pretty pear notes on the nose. Alto Adige is a personal favorite Italian wine region that produces wines that seem more Germanic than Italian. Tiefenbrunner Pinot Bianco Weissburgunder 2014 ($16) is oak-free, with a beautiful bouquet of tropical fruit and ripe apple, good acidity and minerality and a fine finish. And, while you might not normally associate chardonnay with Italy, Alois Lageder Chardonnay 2014 ($15.99)—also from Alto Adige—is a memorable one. It’s medium-bodied and unoaked with intense fruit flavors that would serve well as an aperitif or paired with seafood, chicken and light pasta dishes. Before leaving Italy, I’ll bring your attention to the very affordable Torre di Luna Pinot Grigio 2014 ($9.99). Hailing from Venezie, this is not a standard wimpy pinot grigio. It is dry and full-bodied, with sweet

DEREK CARLISLE

That Special Summer

DRINK

BEER, WINE & SPIRITS

pear aromas and would be a terrific partner for octopus, squid, clams, mussels and the like. Made from 40 percent Grechetto, 30 percent Procanico, and 30 percent Malvasia, La Carraia Orvieto Classico 2014 ($10.99) is quickly becoming one of my go-to summer sippers. This Orvieto sees no oak and is especially well-balanced. It was great at a recent dinner that featured seared scallops. Winemaker Joe Wagner’s Elouan Rosé 2015 ($19.99) comes in a clear glass bottle, all the better to enjoy its pale pink hues. Elouan is a Breton word meaning “good light,” which is what it takes to produce the pinot noir grape this rosé is made with. Open the plastic cap and aromas of strawberry and raspberry spring forth, followed by more berry fruit flavors on the tongue. Let’s not dismiss red wines for summer sipping, though. FVine Vinho Tinto Reserva ($9.99) from Portugal would be

welcome at any barbecue or cookout with its light berry flavors and citrusy finish—a good burger partner. When grilling, I also like to open a bottle of Luce’s Lucente ($29), a superb blend of merlot and sangiovese from Tuscany. Eastern Austrailia’s 19 Crimes 2015 ($10.99) is named after the 19 crimes that would result in British rogues being sentenced to live in Australia. It’s almost criminal how luscious this Aussie wine is. For heavy-duty grilled meats and barbecue, I really like 2011 Domaine du Théron Cuvée Prestige Malbec ($18), from Cahors in southwestern France. If you’ve forgotten how well the French do malbec, try this one. And, for a Bordeaux-style barbecue-friendly wine, I turn to Justin 2013 Cabernet Sauvignon ($27.77), a beautifully balanced wine brimming with black currant and black cherry flavors—a very good foil for a thick, grilled steak. CW

Delicacies OF INDIA & NEPAL Hours MONDAY: 11:30-9PM TUES-SAT: 11:30-10PM SUNDAY: 4-10PM JUMBO

All You Can Eat Buffet MON-SAT 11:30-2:30

Indian & Nepali Cuisine 3142 S. HIGHLAND DR. SLC | 801.466.3504 | www.thekathmandu.net GLUTEN FREE AND VEGAN OPTIONS AVAILABLE


GOODEATS Complete listings at CityWeekly.net The Bagel Project

Robb and Kim Abrams spent months figuring out how to replicate a genuine East Coast-style bagel. As it turns out, the secret is to use an old-world method. Their brick-and-mortar store a few blocks from Liberty Park grew out of this discovery after the bagels became popular at the Downtown Farmers Market. The Bagel Project also features the bagel’s sister pastry, the bialy (it’s baked unboiled and, instead of a hole in the center, it features a little thumbprint or impression). It’s just as delicious here in the Beehive State as on the East Coast. 779 S. 500 East, Salt Lake City, 801-9060698, BagelProject.com

Our Philosophy has always been to take the finest ingredients and do as little to them as possible. Classic Italian techniques used to make artisan pasta, homemade cheeses and hand tossed Pizza.

20

16 WINNER

249 East 400 South, SLC • (801) 364-1368 stonegroundslc.com

Christopher’s Prime Steakhouse & Grill

The Copper Onion

The shack is back!

Cucina

6213 South Highland Drive | 801.635.8190

Delicious Food, Great Atmosphere!

Ekamai Thai

NOW OPEN for Lunch and Dinner I 110 W. Broadway, SLC, UT | 385-259-0574 715 East. 12300 South. Draper, UT I 801-996-8155

JULY 28, 2016 | 31

At Ekamai you’ll find a wide range of Thai curries, made for folks in a hurry. Each day of the week brings new flavors: Massaman curry beef and pad basil chicken are featured on Mondays, along with other bold dishes; on Tuesday, you’ll find sweet and sour chicken and pad cashew nut beef. Don’t forget the mango with sticky rice for dessert. 1405 E. 2100 South, Salt Lake City, 801-906-0908; 336 W. 300 South, Ste. 102, Salt Lake City, 801-363-2717, EkamaiThai.com

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This quaint gourmet deli offers a wide selection of inventive pasta, fruit and veggie salads, fresh sandwiches and entrées including bourbon salmon and pepper steak. Among Cucina’s specialties are the Thai beef salad, chicken scaloppine, lamb burgers, linguini carbonara, crab cakes, confit duck tostada, and macaroni and cheese with roasted jalapeños and smoked bacon. 1026 E. Second Ave., Salt Lake City, 801322-3055, CucinaDeli.com

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At The Copper Onion, restaurant specialties include the “small plate” of sautéed chanterelles topped with crisp shoestring potatoes and a farm-fresh lightly fried egg—yolk properly quivering and ready to coat the savory flavors below. Other restaurant highlights are a perfectly balanced arugula salad with sherry vinegar, olives and Parmesan. Sautéed cod with a pale (but intensely flavored) lemon jam on kale and a side of pea shoots with golden raisins and pine nuts hits all the right notes—balance, texture, color. Oh, and the cheesecake? Just do it. It’s the lightest, creamiest, bestest. 111 E. 300 South, Salt Lake City, 801-355-3282, TheCopperOnion.com

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Christopher’s is known for its slow-roasted prime rib, but the Kansas City sirloin is a crowd-pleaser, too. And then there’s the classic Delmonico steak—a true center-cut rib-eye that weighs in at more than a pound. For seafood aficionados, line-caught wild sockeye salmon, cioppino and grilled Alaskan halibut are but a handful of the many appealing seafood selections available—all flown in fresh. And the portions at the restaurants are generous, to say the least. 134 W. Pierpont Ave., Salt Lake City, 801-519-8515, ChristophersSteakHouse.com


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32 | JULY 28, 2016

COFFEE SHOP π BAKERY π DELI SERVING BREAKFAST ALL DAY

REVIEW BITES

JOHN TAYLOR

Tradition... Tradition

A sampler of Ted Scheffler’s reviews

OPEN MIC EVERY WEDNESDAY 6:30 TO 9:00PM

COMEDY OPEN MIC EVERY OTHER FRIDAY 7:45 TO 9:00PM MON-SAT 7AM TO 9PM SUNDAY 9:30AM TO 4PM

1560 E 3300 S • 801.410.4696 DITTACAFFE.COM

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2005 E. 2700 SOUTH, SLC Best of Utah FELDMANSDELI.COM 2015 FELDMANSDELI OPEN TUES - SAT TO GO ORDERS: (801) 906-0369

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Catering available 20 W. 200 S. • (801) 355-3891 Open Mon-Wed: 9am-6pm Thu-Sat: 9am-9pm

Pleiku’s snowball shrimp Pleiku

The creators of Pipa Asian Tapas & Sake Bar have resurfaced downtown with Pleiku, named after a city in central Vietnam. The ambiance and décor is ultra-modern and chic, mostly in white and cream tones. While you peruse the eclectic Asian menu—with Vietnamese, Thai, Mongolian and Chinese dishes—you might want to enjoy one of many unusual libations, like the Hello Kitty (blood orange juice, passion fruit, lime and sake). The prices are surprisingly moderate, and you get a lot of food for your dollar; even the tapas menu features portions large enough to share. For those who enjoy pho, there are brisket, rare beef, beef balls, vegan and seafood versions. The tasty Shaken Steak Cubes tapa made the trip from Pipa to Pleiku: marinated and grilled crispy boneless sirloin beef served with veggie accompaniments like cucumber, greens, onions and cilantro. Bánh mì offerings include a “classic” with Vietnamese deli meats, one with caramelized pork, another featuring chicken teriyaki, and lemongrass tofu. It’s not the best around, but it’s still quite adequate if you have a bánh mì craving, especially for the price. Reviewed May 12. 264 S. Main, 801-359-4544, Facebook.com/Pleiku

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FILM REVIEW

Bourne Again

CINEMA

Jason Bourne is back, but it’s not clear why. BY MARYANN JOHANSON comments@cityweekly.net @maryannjohanson

I

Matt Damon in Jason Bourne movie—but what that turns out to be isn’t particularly thrilling, and it feels rather tacked on when it finally comes out in the end. The promise of the character of Nicky isn’t explored much, either, and she exits quickly, leaving Bourne without a humanizing companion such as he had in the first movie in Franka Potente’s Marie … or even as Jeremy Renner’s supersoldier had in Rachel Weisz in the 2012 spinoff The Bourne Legacy. Everything looks great on paper here: Damon’s brawny presence; the smartly staged action; the globehopping from Rome to Reykjavik, Berlin to London and beyond; the always cool Tommy Lee Jones as the CIA director; Alicia Vikander as a smooth, slippery CIA analyst; Vincent Cassel as yet another professional killer. And it’s not unfun. But it feels less black ops than old hat, like we’ve been here before. We have … and this visit ultimately disappears in a wisp of inconsequence. CW

JASON BOURNE

BB.5 Matt Damon Tommy Lee Jones Alicia Vikander Rated PG-13

The Bourne Ultimatum (2007) Matt Damon Julia Stiles Rated PG-13

The Bourne Legacy (2012) Jeremy Renner Rachel Weisz Rated PG-13

CITYWEEKLY.NET/UNDERGROUND

JULY 28, 2016 | 33

The Bourne Supremacy (2004) Matt Damon Franka Potente Rated PG-13

Long-long-long-read Interviews With Local Bands, Comedians, Artists, Podcasters, Fashionistas And Other Creators Of Cool Stuff Only On Cityweekly.net!

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TRY THESE The Bourne Identity (2002) Matt Damon Franka Potente Rated PG-13

ALL THE NEWS THAT WON’T FIT IN PRINT

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

directly addressing the global mess, and when they were—as in Ultimatum, the best of a standout bunch—it made for crackerjack pop filmmaking. Jason Bourne makes a few feints toward engaging with the spiraling disaster that is today’s zeitgeist, but it doesn’t do anything with them. It brings in a Julian Assange-esque internet whistleblower named Christian Dassault (Vinzenz Kiefer), but then almost instantly dismisses him. It touches on the privacy concerns that total surveilliance raise via tech wunderkind Aaron Kalloor (Riz Ahmed), but the movie cannot even decide what his “Deep Dream” project is about: First it’s a “new platform,” then it’s something to do with social networking. Greengrass, who wrote the script with Christopher Rouse, seems to think that it’s enough that the CIA wants a backdoor to peek in on Deep Dream’s users, but it’s all little more than a vague wave of the hand at a hot topic. That’s not enough. And I just can’t figure out why Bourne is back. His story was pretty much wrapped up after Ultimatum: He had regained his memory and was out of the professionalkiller game. Nicky Parsons (Julia Stiles), grown from the clumsy CIA functionary of Identity into someone genuinely dangerous, shows up here to convince him there’s more to learn—though her intriguing line “Remembering everything doesn’t mean you know everything,” so memorable from the trailer, doesn’t actually appear in the

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

t’s been nine years since we last saw Matt Damon racing around the world and beating people up as brainwashed assassin Jason Bourne … and the weight of those interim years rests heavily upon this fourth installment. Oh, it’s not that Damon, now 46, isn’t up to the physical demands of the role. In fact, his Bourne is significantly beefier here: bigger, more intimidating, just plain more dangerous in an all-muscle kind of way. (Bourne appears to have been scraping out a meager living since we last saw him as a bare-knuckle boxer in underground fights, which perhaps necessitated getting pumped up.) Damon stalks around as if he is just barely restraining Bourne’s power, and when he unleashes it, he owns the screen, simultaneously indulging the character’s menace and suggesting that he hasn’t yet let it fully uncoil. Nor has returning director Paul Greengrass lost his mojo. (Greengrass did not direct the first film, 2002’s The Bourne Identity, but did helm the second and third, 2004’s The Bourne Supremacy and 2007’s The Bourne Ultimatum.) He remains an absolute master of breathless nonstop action that, even as it embraces chaos, is never less than tightly controlled and supremely comprehensible. Whether it’s an exhausting motorcycle getaway from assassins through streets overrun by rioters in Athens, or a relentless demolition derby through ordinary traffic in Las Vegas, we are right in the middle of the mayhem, bombarded by thrills and terror while never losing track of what is actually happening. No one does this better than Greengrass. No, it’s that the world has moved on from the initial confusion and upheaval—geopolitical, cultural, technological—of the years just after 9/11, and Jason Bourne can’t keep up with how much darker and grimmer the world we’ve moved into is. It tries, but … Those early 2000s Bourne flicks had an urgency to them even when they weren’t


CINEMA CLIPS

MOVIE TIMES AND LOCATIONS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

NEW THIS WEEK Information is correct at press time. Film release schedules are subject to change. BAD MOMS [not yet reviewed] A trio of over-stressed mothers (Mila Kunis, Kristen Bell and Kathryn Hahn) let loose on a self-indulgence bender. Opens July 29 at theaters valleywide. (R)

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

CAFÉ SOCIETY BB.5 After nearly 50 years of making movies—and around half that long with a spotlight on unsavory aspects of his personal life—Woody Allen has become a filmmaker whose movies are psychoanalyzed for autobiographical subtext as much as they’re actually watched. His latest is another period piece, opening in 1930s Hollywood where recently arrived Bobby Dorfman (Jesse Eisenberg) finds work with his high-powered agent uncle (Steve Carell) and falls for his uncle’s secretary, Vonnie (Kristen Stewart). Romantic roundelays of “the heart wants what it wants” variety ensue—with strong performances by Stewart and Eisenberg, the latter of whom avoids obvious Woodysurrogate tics—alternating with life among the members of Bobby’s New York-based Jewish family, including his gangster brother (Corey Stoll). But while Allen’s own voice as narrator evokes the nostalgia of Radio Days, there’s a more acidic bite here in the story’s look at what people lose of their souls while pursuing what appears on the surface to be a successful life. It’s too uneven to be fully satisfying, but you don’t have to call it a mea culpa to find at least a little wisdom. Opens July 29 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)—Scott Renshaw HUNT FOR THE WILDERPEOPLE

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BBB.5

There’s virtually nothing in writer/director Taika Waititi’s (What We Do in the Shadows) rambunctious comedy that isn’t built on formula, but when a formula is this well-executed, it’s awfully hard to complain. In rural New Zealand, 13-year-old foster kid Ricky (Julian Dennison) gets what might be his last chance at a home when he’s taken in by Bella (Rima Te Wiata) and her crusty husband Hec (Sam Neill). But when Bella dies, Ricky and Hec are left alone—and improbably become fugitives when Hec is suspected of foul play in Bella’s death. Neill and Dennison make for a terrific pair, riffing off the familiar premise of a surly adult reluctantly (but ultimately gratefully) dragged into surrogate parenting. But it really soars thanks to Waititi’s off-beat sense of humor, like turning a child welfare agent into a relentless pseudo-Javert, comparing herself to The Terminator while also repeating the mantra “no child left behind.”

JASON BOURNE BB.5 See review p. 33. Opens July 29 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13) LIFE, ANIMATED BBB It’s rare to find a film about people with disabilities that allows them to be the stars of their own story, rather than an opportunity for growth in someone else’s. That’s a major strength of director Roger Ross Williams’ profile of Owen Suskind, a 23-year-old Massachusetts man with autism, and making his first tentative steps toward independent living. The narrative hook involves the way his parents, Ron and Cornelia, finally began to connect with Owen through his love of Disney animated features, and the film does an effective job of conveying the way those archetypal stories served as a bridge for Owen understanding his own world. But while the flashbacks to Owen’s youth are necessary to lay the foundation, they’re also a bit of a distraction from the presentday reality of Owen learning to deal with the business of being an adult that most of us take for granted—from getting a job to coping with heartbreak. The lovely animated interludes by Mac Guff might show how Owen saw himself as “protector of the sidekicks,” but here we get to see him as unique, fully human hero. Opens July 29 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (PG)—SR NERVE [not yet reviewed] Two people (Emma Roberts and Dave Franco) participate in an online game where players can send you on dangerous dares. Opens July 27 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13) ROSEANN FOR PRESIDENT [not yet reviewed] Documentary about the comedian’s iconoclastic but sincere run for the presidency in 2012. Opens July 29 at Tower Theatre; live Q&A with Roseanne at theater on Saturday, July 30. (NR)

SPECIAL SCREENINGS AKIRA At Tower Theater, July 29-30, 11 p.m. & July 31, noon (R) PRETTY WOMAN At Brewvies, Aug. 1, 10 p.m. (R)

CURRENT RELEASES

ABSOLUTELY FABULOUS: THE MOVIE BBB Did PR agent Edina Monsoon (Jennifer Saunders) mean to push fashion icon Kate Moss off a balcony and into the Thames to her apparent death? Sweetie! We who know Eddie well—from the 1990s BBC sitcom about her outrageous misadventures alongside her best friend, fashion editor Patsy (Joanna Lumley)— know better. Un-mellowed by time, the besties now take their pursuit of an endless Champagne-fueled good time to the south of France while on the lam. No knowledge of the show is required: Stand-alone send-ups of the emptiness of one-upwomanship and reflexive hedonism zing, and the celebrity cameos hit justright notes of clued-in ridiculousness. Best of all, it’s a triumph to see two older women—Saunders is 58, Lumley 70—being really funny onscreen, in all sorts of ways, from sly character satire to literal falling-down slapstick. (R)—MaryAnn Johanson

CAPTAIN FANTASTIC BBB It says something about the charm of Captain Fantastic that I could enjoy it despite rolling my eyes or frowning in disapproval at most of the protagonist’s parenting choices. He’s Ben (Viggo Mortensen), an off-the-grid survivalist who lives in the woods with his wife and their six children. When Mom dies, Ben must confront her parents, who resent him for taking their daughter and grandchildren into the boonies, while also grappling with his children’s emerging sense of independence. Without judgment, writer-director Matt Ross shows the good and bad of Ben’s parenting style—there are areas where the kids are objectively healthier and smarter than their brain-dead suburbanite cousins—while sympathetically depicting Ben’s regrets, fears and learning process. Mortensen gives a fully realized performance as a man with whom you may disagree, but whose heart is in the right place. (R)—Eric D. Snider

GHOSTBUSTERS BBB What if—bear with me—the thing that mattered was whether this movie was, you know, funny? Co-writer/director Paul Feig gathers Kristen Wiig, Melissa McCarthy, Leslie Jones and Kate McKinnon as the paranormal investigators, on their own unique (but kinda familiar) mission to save New York from apocalyptic post-mortem threats. When they’re on their game, this group delivers huge laughs, with McKinnon and Chris Hemsworth (as their dim eye-candy receptionist) nailing the best oddball moments. But, like the 1984 original, the third act largely becomes action spectacle, which feels considerably more tired and familiar when literally every modern blockbuster threatens The End of the World. Every time Feig stops to mimic or

more than just movies at brewvies

| CITY WEEKLY |

34 | JULY 28, 2016

It may be utterly weightless, and starts to drag a bit as its premise wears thin, but there’s always room in the world for something that nails effervescent silliness. Opens July 29 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (PG-13)—SR

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CINEMA

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pay homage to the original, he misses an opportunity to take these distinctive talents and make something that’s more concerned with right now than with 30 years ago. (PG-13)—SR ICE AGE: COLLISION COURSE B.5 There have been worse films in 2016, but this one ate at my gut because it’s not even about wringing the last drop from a oncegreat concept. It also feels like it was run through the contemporary blockbuster factory, threatening Manny (Ray Romano), Sid (John Leguizamo), Diego (Denis Leary) and company with an asteroid-crash End of the World. Like many other franchise placeholders, it doesn’t even have to tell a story, as long as stuff keeps happening for 90 or so minutes, maybe including an anachronistic joke where a character says “hashtag” and you just die a little inside. The acorn-obsessed Scrat’s segments are still the best thing about this series, but they also remind you that there’s no reason for it to exist if it’s mostly a delivery system for a character that belongs in a seven-minute short. (PG)—SR

undone by the need to create a backstory for his shadowy ghost and the troubled humans, and the mythology doesn’t have much internally-consistent logic. Attempts to include actual character arcs may be admirable, but they don’t entirely work, nor are the scares scary enough when the “rules” of the monster keep shifting. Sometimes an unsettling 2 ½-minute concept should remain an unsettling 2 ½-minute concept. (PG-13)—SR STAR TREK BEYOND BB.5 As attested by the four Fast and the Furious movies he made before Star Trek Beyond, director Justin Lin was never a big fan of gravity. Here he can abuse it with impunity, and some of the most exhilarating moments in this amiable, low-stakes sequel involve upended spaceships and artificial atmospheres, people running up walls and sliding down corridors. It’s fun to feel the ground fall out from under you in those moments, especially since everything else about the movie is so steady and unsurprising, with a villainof-the-week ordinariness to it. That villain is Krall (Idris Elba), a warlord who attacks the Enterprise in search of (what else?) an ancient artifact with which to conquer the galaxy. Chris Pine and company are comfortable in their iconic roles, and the film (written by Simon Pegg and Doug Jung) glides merrily through its paces. But it has no more urgency than a mid-season episode of a Trek TV show, and even less character development. If Lin’s keen visual sense were paired with a weightier, meatier story, he’d really be able to soar. (PG-13)—EDS

THEATER DIRECTORY Carmike 12 1600 W. Fox Park Drive, West Jordan 801-562-5760 Carmike.com

Broadway Centre Cinemas 111 E. 300 South 801-321-0310 SaltLakeFilmSociety.org

Cinemark 24 Jordan Landing 7301 S. Bangerter Highway 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

Century 16 South Salt Lake 125 E. 3300 South 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

Cinemark Valley Fair Mall 3601 S. 2700 West, West Valley City 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

Cinemark Sugar House 2227 S. Highland Drive 801-466-3699 Cinemark.com

Redwood Drive-In 3688 S. Redwood Road 801-973-7088

WEST VALLEY 5 Star Cinemas 8325 W. 3500 South, Magna 801-250-5551 RedCarpetCinemas.com

Cinemark Sandy 9 9539 S. 700 East, Sandy 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Megaplex Jordan Commons 9400 S. State, Sandy 801-304-INFO MegaplexTheatres.com Megaplex 20 at The District

DAVIS COUNTY AMC Loews Layton Hills 9 728 W. 1425 North, Layton 801-774-8222 AMCTheatres.com Cinemark Station Park 900 W. Clark Lane, Farmington 801-447-8561 Cinemark.com Cinemark Tinseltown USA 720 W. 1500 North, Layton 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Gateway 8 206 S. 625 West, Bountiful 801-292-7979 RedCarpetCinemas.com Megaplex Legacy Crossing 1075 W. Legacy Crossing Blvd., Centerville 801-397-5100 MegaplexTheatres.com WEBER COUNTY Cinemark Tinseltown 14 3651 Wall Ave., Ogden

UTAH COUNTY Carmike Wynnsong 4925 N. Edgewood Drive, Provo 801-764-0009 Carmike.com Cinemark American Fork 715 W. 180 North, American Fork 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Cinemark Movies 8 2230 N. University Parkway, Orem 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Cinemark Provo Town Center 1200 Town Center Blvd., Provo 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Cinemark University Mall 1010 S. 800 East, Provo 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Megaplex Thanksgiving Point 2935 N. Thanksgiving Way 801-304-INFO MegaplexTheatres.com Water Gardens Cinema 8 790 E. Expressway Ave. Spanish Fork 801-798-9777 WaterGardensTheatres.com

JULY 28, 2016 | 35

Tower Theatre 836 E. 900 South 801-321-0310 SaltLakeFilmSociety.org

Cinemark Draper 12129 S. State, Draper 801-619-6494 Cinemark.com

Redstone 8 Cinemas 6030 N. Market 435-575-0220 Redstone8Cinemas.com

Megaplex 13 at The Junction 2351 Kiesel Ave., Ogden 801-304-INFO MegaplexTheatres.com

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Megaplex 12 Gateway 165 S. Rio Grande St. 801-304-4636 MegaplexTheatres.com

SOUTH VALLEY Century 16 Union Heights 7800 S. 1300 East, Sandy 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

PARK CITY Cinemark Holiday Village 1776 Park Ave. 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

Water Gardens Cinema 6 1945 E. Murray-Holladay Road 801-273-0199 WaterGardensTheatres.com

Showcase Cinemas 6 5400 S. Redwood Road, Taylorsville 801-957-9032 RedCarpetCinemas.com

11400 S. Bangerter Highway 801-304-INFO MegaplexTheatres.com

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SALT LAKE CITY Brewvies Cinema Pub 677 S. 200 West 801-355-5500 Brewvies.com

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LIGHTS OUT BB Director David F. Sandberg expands a 2 ½-minute short to feature length, telling the story of a family—mentally ill widowed mother Sophie (Maria Bello) and her two children (Teresa Palmer and Gabriel Bateman)—tormented by a malevolent entity that can only take physical form in the dark. Sandberg does his best to maximize his premise, finding as many creative ways as possible for the protagonists to generate light when threatened. But he’s ultimately

MOVIE TIMES AND LOCATIONS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET


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BY B I L L F RO S T @bill_frost

Viva Shark Vegas

TV

Sharknado: The 4th Awakens hits Sin City; Squidbillies are ’Merica. Sharknado: The 4th Awakens Sunday, July 31 (Syfy)

Movie: Who’s joining Ian Ziering and Tara Reid (apparently, the #AprilLives campaign from Sharknado 3: Oh Hell No! worked) this time? David Hasselhoff (Baywatch), Gena Lee Nolin (also Baywatch), Alexandra Paul (again with the Baywatch), Gary Busey (snubbed Donald Trump VP candidate), Cheryl Tiegs (elderly model-shamer), Carrot Top (elderly prop comic), Stacey Dash (pretend Fox News “conservative”), Seth Rollins (W WE ’rassler), Duane Chapman (“Dog” the Bounty Hunter), Vince Neil (Mötley Crüe), Corey Taylor (Slipknot/Stone Sour), various “personalities” from Bravo reality shows and more from the “Is Pepsi OK?” department of central casting. After chomping on Los Angeles, New York City and Washington D.C., the next logical(?) locale to be hit with a Sharknado is, of course, Las Vegas (don’t fret, your town will probably get its turn by Sharknado 16), and now the story … doesn’t matter in the least, duh. [Join TV Tan Podcast for a free—and worth every penny—live screening of Sharknado: The 4th Awakens at Brewvies Cinema Pub, 677 S. 200 West, 21+, on Sunday, July 31 at 6 p.m.]

2016 Teen Choice Awards Sunday, July 31 (Fox)

Special: The Teen Choice Awards are voted by kiddies ages 13-17, so can anyone explain the nomination of Jennifer Lopez’ barely seen cop serial Shades of Blue for “Choice TV Drama”? Or geezers like Gwen Stefani and Blake Shelton in the music categories? Or R-rated Deadpool for, oh, everything? Technically speaking, these are not “teen” choices, nor are any other nominations recognizable to the writers, and readers, of publications such as this one—if it can’t be experienced at an outdoor amphitheater in a $200 camping chair with pinot, brie and a golden retriever within reach, it doesn’t exist. The YouTube and Vine “Star” categories, however, make complete sense—expect Nash Grier to clean up at the 2028 Teen Choice Awards for his dramatic work in Chicago A/V, produced by Dick Wolf Jr.

Bitchin’ Bomb Bag Your Face Squidbillies Sundays (Adult Swim)

New Season: Both Squidbillies and Duck Dynasty premiered for their respective 10th seasons this month, just a week ahead of the Republican National Convention. Coincidence? All three represent modern ’Merican (note, not necessarily American) values: God, guns, gumption, general rejection of science, facts and reality. But, while one is a tedious, worn-out, idea-depleted show about a crew of self-absorbed fakes who are only in it for the money, and so is Duck Dynasty, Squidbillies remains a vital, instructive window into the soul and “thoughts” of Redneckia, USA, whether it resides in the deep south, your neighborhood Walmart, or those “Hussein Obama” emails your parents keep forwarding. These characters are among us …

Ghost Hunters Wednesday, Aug. 3 (Syfy)

Season Premiere: … and they watch Ghost Hunters, guaranteed. This is the Season 11 premiere—11! Over a decade of finding no ghosts! Would you be able to keep your job if you produced zero results in that timespan? (No need to answer that, chiropractors and TV critics.) Like Finding Bigfoot (still not “found”) and Keeping Up with the Kardashians (nothing ever happens to “keep up with”), Ghost Hunters is an explicably long-running reality series that spawns even-worse imitators every year and … wait … did you hear that? I’m sensing something over there in the corner! Let me turn on my EMF

Sharknado: The 4th Awakens (SyFy)

meter … hmmm, it’s not picking up anything … BECAUSE GHOSTS DON’T EXIST! HUNT OVER! JUST! STAHP! Oh, this is the final season? I’m off to see my chiropractor, then.

Stranger Things Streaming (Netflix)

New Series: I could use the “There Are Too Many Shows” excuse yet again for letting the premiere of Stranger Things slip by me—but it stars Winona Ryder, so the whole incident is just unforgivable. This retro-creepy fright fest throws Steven Spielberg, Stephen King and a dizzyingly giddy amount ’80s horror-flick references into a blender and hits “purée,” becoming progressively scarier as episodes roll out. Ryder plays—and occasionally overplays, but NBD—a grief-stricken Indiana mom holding out hope that her missing son might be found, but Stranger Things isn’t just her story: There’s also a Goonies-worthy troupe of misfit kids, a telekinetic girl, a government conspiracy, a flesh-eating monster, a parallel dimension and … well, you should be all-in, or completely out, by now. Note that this will be the one and only time I’ll ever recommend ’80s revivalism.

Listen to Frost Mondays at 8 a.m. on X96 Radio From Hell, and on the TV Tan podcast via Stitcher, iTunes, Google Play and BillFrost.tv.

6 | JULY 28, 2016

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Nerdcore Superstars

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NERDCORE

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Cool nerds Dave Payne and Mark Dago work hard to ensure that geeks inherit Earth. BY RANDY HARWARD rharward@cityweekly.net

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JULY 28, 2016 | 37

w/ Jade Knight, Lord British, Mark Dago, VCR5, Timechimp, DJ Shanty Blue Copper Coffee Room 179 W. 900 South 385-222-7046 Saturday, July 30, 6-9 p.m. Free BlueCopperSLC.com

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(Numbs, Rotten Musicians). To explain, Payne says he and Dago’s careers are like a video game where “somethin’ special and crazy happens on every level.” “Special” and “crazy” definitely apply to nerdcore, a subgenre of hip-hop, where the rhymes are all about nerd stuff (sci-fi, video games), and the beats and bloops are generated with all kinds of gadgets. Dago performs solo, rhyming over retro video gameinspired beats created by his Rotten/Numbs bandmate, Fisch Loops. Most of his local peers specialize in instrumental nerdcore. Jade Knight/Lord British use iPhones with MIDI controllers (the keytar) and loop pedals. Timechimp does computer DJ-ing and sampling with synthesizers. VCR5 uses homemade DVD menus and audio compressors to generate glitchy techno. Other nerdcore artists play entire sets on a single modified Game Boy. “I describe it as a Level 10, artsy, synthesizer show,” Payne says, “besides Mark’s thing, which is like Level 10, fresh hip-hop that no one’s ever done.” They say, in spite of how Salt Lake City is deeply into geek culture (see our massive Comic Con), that the genre doesn’t have as much of a foothold as it should. The shows draw decent crowds, and the reaction is overwhelmingly positive, but it hasn’t translated to meaningful traction—unlike in Seattle, where Dago and Payne perform to larger crowds at the annual PAX West gaming festival. Hence, the series, which has two shows left (July and August). Their hope is that it’ll cause local nerdcore to blow up. To that end, they produced the 55-minute documentary Salt Lake City Nerdcore (see it on YouTube). While it’s no celluloid marvel like Revenge of the Nerds, it conveys the dedication of the musicians who continue to put one foot in front of the other. So clap your hands, everybody, and everybody clap your hands for Mark Dago, Lord British, et al.—our next nerdcore superstars. With their track record, it won’t be long. Mark my words. CW

First SUNDAY

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he closer you get to Dave Payne’s Federal Heights mansion, the easier it gets to compare the Salt Lake City nerdcore musician and his peer Mark Dago to the 1985 film Revenge of the Nerds. It’s quite close to the University of Utah campus. There’s a frat house nearby. My inner Booger points out a neighboring home numbered 69. And Payne’s home, incidentally, resembles the one that Lewis, Gilbert, Booger, et al., renovated in a montage, causing the percolating synthesizers from Bone Symphony’s “One Foot in Front of the Other” to auto-play on my cerebral radio. You’ve got to put one foot in front of the other … The sidewalk chalk on the porch snaps you out of it. Payne’s no college kid. He’s 40-something, a family man, the former principal of the Rock & Roll Academy and one of Salt Lake City’s most prolific musicians, leading one of the city’s longest-running—and best—bands, Red Bennies and playing in tons more. Dago’s also in his 40s, a family man and a high-volume creative. He’s one of the great minds behind two of Salt Lake’s best hip-hop acts, Numbs and Rotten Musicians, and respected under his own name (Kill Screen—woot!). Well, the chalk art isn’t from Payne’s kids, but other cool local musicians for whom Payne’s home is a creativity nexus. They’ve drawn geometric shapes that look like Photoshop warp grids, and scribbled colorful tags proclaiming, “Mañanero is Emperor” and “Dicks Out 4 Harambe!” (Dago: “Why would you do that?” Payne: “I didn’t write this!”) Then again, the 3-D design, the ironic expression of band-pride, the political dick-joke referencing the slain gorilla reveal the intelligence and puerility of, as Ogre bellows in the film, “NEEEEERRRRDS!” Also, this isn’t the ’80s. Nowadays, “nerds” are “geeks” and geek culture is pop culture. Any way you slice it, Payne and Dago are the cool kids—but with solid geek cred. Guitars hang on Payne’s living room wall, and a sitar sits near his fireplace. Some of these, he built—or at least modded in some fashion, like the extra-dorky white keytar. “I found a way to run it through my iPhone,” he says, proudly pointing out the Jobs-ian device serving as the instrument’s brain. Throughout the place are 15 vintage cabinet video games (like Ghosts ’n Goblins), seven repurposed as multi-game emulators. Dago, being a rapper, is a wordsmith, having penned 281 columns for Big Shiny Robot, including heady think-pieces on superheroes and interviews with folks like novelist Chuck Palahniuk (Fight Club). He’s also writing three novels of his own and learning to play a Stylophone retro pocket synth. “I’m trying to get good at it so I can rock it live,” he says. They exemplify what the nerds did in the film when they fixed up that house, and ultimately conquered the jocks: hard work, perseverance, creativity, critical thinking and aiming for excellence in everything they do. As you can see, they do a lot. Currently, they’re focused on their Nerdcore Summer Concert Series at Blue Copper Coffee Room. Funded by a grant from Salt Lake City’s ZAP (Zoo, Arts and Parks) program, the three-show series debuted in late June with performances by Jade Knight/ Lord British (Red Bennies drummer Halee Jean, Payne), Dago, Timechimp (Greg Midgely of Bronco, The Rubes) and DJ Shanty


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In the Twinkling of an Eye

MUSIC

The evolution of soft-tronica titans, Le Voir.

SIMONE LE VOIR

SAT, AUG 6, CHICAGO @ RSL SAT, AUG 20, DALLAS @ RSL WATCH ALL RSL AWAY GAMES AT A BAR NAMED SUE

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“I

wanted the name to contain an element of mystery,” says Le Voir writer, producer and multiinstrumentalist Gillian Chase, speaking with City Weekly at the bustling Coffee Garden on 9th and 9th. The words “le voir,” French for “to see,” in this case suggest not only looking deeper at oneself, others and events, but also the different perspectives people can have—notions that the band explores in their “soft-tronica.” Originally from Vermont, Chase began her music career in high school, writing songs on an acoustic guitar and covering Michelle Branch. Her first performance, naturally, was nerve-wracking. “I was so nervous. I stopped in the middle of the song and said, ‘Does that sound OK?’” Through practice and a love of performing, she found her artistic confidence and began playing bigger shows. In 2006, Chase came to Utah to attend college. “When I got out here, I was still doing the acoustic thing,” she says. “And after I graduated college, I made a decision to devote myself to music, professionally, if I could.” She stayed in Utah and over the next few years performed at various venues in Salt Lake City and Park City. Around 2014, she started to develop a taste for and a desire to make electronica, influenced by the likes of M83 and The Naked and Famous. During a fortuitous stint in Park City, she met musician Rob Lyons, who introduced her to the music production software Ableton Live, which she says “opened the doors for the electronic stuff that I do now.” Without a background in production, Chase started taking lessons from Derek Beck at Salt Lake DJ & Production. “Derek taught me the ins and outs of Ableton and what I needed to know about mixing, and how to make a good product,” she says. So was born Le Voir, and their dark, pop-influenced electronica. Over the next two years, Chase and Beck wrote and produced the band’s debut album, Dualities. With Chase providing lyrics, production and instrumentation, the album is an emotionally honest premiere statement. “I started writing Dualities at the beginning of a new relationship and it was super euphoric,” she says. “When the relationship ended, [the aftermath] was a mess, filled with contrasting emotions.” Listening to the record, one finds a definite

Le Voir

story arc: The beginning songs express a kind of euphoria, giving way to an introspective and melancholic middle section before the album culminates in an emotional rebirth. When it came time to gig, Chase says, “I knew I didn’t want [Le Voir’s live show] to be like a DJ set.” In order to provide a full-bodied live performance, she enlisted Lyons on guitar, and the pair recruited drummer Clifford Moon. With this lineup, and backing tracks provided by a computer, Le Voir played an album release show last March at The Complex, and proceeded to book more gigs. These performances led the band to conclude one of its members had to go. “We started to fight the computer, who is like a big brother watching over everybody,” Chase says. “We wanted to make electronic music organically, live.” This prompted the band to add bassist Alex Siciliano to round out the roster. Now, with all aspects of their music being performed live, Chase says they are “reinterpreting the songs as a band, kind of deconstructing the pop formality” inherent to the album. Looking toward the future, Chase says that Le Voir will release an acoustic version of Dualities in the fall, tentatively titled Dualities After Dark. They’re also mulling an album of new material—this time involving the full band. Touring is, of course, on the table. Her band has, to some degree, been a documentation of Chase’s growth, and her perception of that growth, from highschool singer-songwriter to production student, from brokenhearted songstress to commanding frontwoman. And as a full band, Le Voir’s story and perspective have expanded, becoming more illuminating with each passing day. CW

HALLOWEEN IN JULY

w/ Jeremy Dawson of Shiny Toy Guns, DJDC and Le Voir Metro Bar 615 W. 100 South 801-520-6067 Thursday, July 28, 7 p.m. $7 presale; $10 day of show Facebook.com/MetroBarSLC


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MUSIC PICKS

BY KIMBALL BENNION, RANDY HARWARD, BRIAN STAKER AND KATHLEEN STONE

THURSDAY 7.28

Béla Fleck and Abigail Washburn

Multiple-Grammy Award-winning banjo virtuoso Béla Fleck and his banjo pluckin’ wife, Abigail Washburn, have collaborated in the Sparrow Quartet for a number of years, but are just now releasing their self-titled debut duet album (due Oct. 7 on Concord). The album is seasoned with Fleck’s classical, jazz and world music influences, along with Washburn’s more traditional folk stylings, and the influence of her theatrical background. Recorded following the birth of their son, Juno, the twin banjos as sole instrumentation creates a sense of intimacy, but also a very rich sound, using seven different banjos. Hearing this family band perform live is sure to be a unique experience. (Brian Staker) Deer Valley Resort’s Snow Park Outdoor Amphitheater, 2250 S. Deer Valley Drive, Park City, 7 p.m., $40-$55 (youth and senior discounts available), DeerValley.com

Big Grams, Anderson .Paak & The Free Nationals, Burnell Washburn

Big Grams, a collaboration between altelectronic band Phantogram and Big Boi (Outkast), combines inventive electronics with rhymes on the supergroup’s selftitled EP. Hop on YouTube and check out the extended animated music video created by Awesome, Inc. (Adult Swim’s Squidbillies) for the tracks “Born to Shine”

Big Grams

JIM MCGUIRE

CABARET

LIVE

and “Run for Your Life,” where the trio fights bad guys in a seedy underworld setting and tries to escape a haunted house. On their album Malibu, Anderson .Paak & The Free Nationals mix the rhythm of boom-pap hip-hop with gospel, disco and a West Coast surfer vibe. Burnell Washburn, a staple in the Salt Lake City hip-hop scene, perform tracks from his 2014 album Gratitude, a feast of stripped-down raps and sick beats. (Kathleen Stone) Pioneer Park, 350 S. 300 West, 7 p.m., $5 advance/$10 day of show, TwilightConcerts.com

FRIDAY 7.29 Eve 6

When Eve 6 reunited their classic lineup in 2007, it would take them five years

Béla Fleck and Abigail Washburn to deliver their fourth album, Speak in Code (Fearless)—their first album since 2003. Their fans didn’t quibble, though, as the band toured fairly hard, playing the energetic, catchy alt-rock hits—like “Inside Out” that dominated radio in the late ‘90s/early 2000s. Fittingly, Speak was a total crowd-pleaser, packed with the anthemic tracks that made them radio darlings. On Friday, they’re headlining over four acts including tour mates Oz, singersongwriter Christina Holmes and locals HiFi Murder and Smile for the Captain (Randy Harward) Metro Bar, 615 W. 100 South, 8 p.m., $15 in advance, $20 day of show, Facebook.com/MetroBarSLC

»

TIMOTHY SACCENTI

40 | JULY 28, 2016

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In an effort to be the best for brunch in SLC, Rye has decided to focus on the AM hours. Going forward Rye will be open: Monday-Friday from 9am-2pm Saturday and Sunday from 9am-3pm. What this means for you: even more house-made breakfast and brunch specials, snappier service-same fresh, locally-sourced fixins. Come on in. www.ryeslc.com

RE - S P Y BU


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SATURDAY 7.30

Harvey Milk Boulevard Street Fest feat. Derrick Barry

Having a Salt Lake City street named civil rights leaders like for slain San Francisco gay rights hero Harvey Milk is cause to party in that very same street. Saturday’s celebration at Try-Angles—located on the western end of the honorary thoroughfare (900 South, stretching from 900 West to 1100 East) includes vendor booths, a dunk tank (alas, no Eagle Forum members will participate), Matrons of Mayhem bingo, an underwear show by Carnal Desires and drag shows by Salt Lake City’s own Those Bitches (8 p.m.) and Derrick Barry from Season 8 of RuPaul’s Drag Race (11:30 p.m., with an after-show meet-andgreet), one of the top Britney Spears impersonators in the world. Barry’s a dead ringer, in fact, for the pop diva—you know, before she was all tore up. (RH) Club Try-Angles, 251 W. 900 South, 2 p.m., $20, ClubTryAngles.com

The Church, The Psychedelic Furs

Since 1980, Australian psychedelic alt-rock quartet The Church was huge back home, but never quite as big in the States. Although they had a respectable following here, their biggest U.S. hits remain the sleepy-but-soaring “Metropolis” and the dark, dreamy “Under the Milky Way.” That’s a shame—their discography is deep and substantial. Another bummer is that guitarist/songwriter Marty Wilson-Piper quit the band in 2013,

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LIVE

Tacocat

leaving them to release their first album without him: Further/Deeper (Unorthodox) in 2014. The good news: F/D showed main frontman Steve Kilbey still has great songs to get out. Co-headliners, new wave/post-punk group The Psychedelic Furs, are responsible for many of your favorite songs from the ‘80s: “The Ghost in You,” “Heaven” and the theme from beloved John Hughes’ classic film Pretty in Pink. Siblings Richard and Tim Butler (vocals and bass, respectively) continue to lead the band, which plays a dynamic set crammed with songs you know by heart. (RH) The Complex, 536 W. 100 South, 7 p.m. (doors), $30 in advance, $35 day of show, TheComplexSLC.com

MONDAY 8.1

Tacocat, Big Baby, Peach Dream

Seattle, Wash., feminist punk-rock band Tacocat carries on the politically charged Riot grrrl tradition of Pacific Northwest bands like Sleater-Kinney, without the histrionic vocals, favoring a more pop-punk approach. Their latest release, Lost Time (Hardly Art) shows that a velvet voice can still convey anger in songs like “I Hate the Weekend.” Local lo-fi punk duo Big Baby entices with cassette and one-sided blue vinyl versions of their debut, If You’re Not a Baby, You’re Too Old (BigBabyBand.Bandcamp.com), which includes a sarcastic ode to local employer and internet giant, “Overstock Dot Com.” Provo combo Peach Dream adds vocal harmonies that are just peachy. (BS) Kilby Court, 741 S. 330 West, 7 p.m., $10 in advance, $12 day of show, KilbyCourt.com

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Hayes Carll

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32 Exchange Place • 801-322-3200 www.twistslc.com • 11:00am-1:00am

WHERE SOPHISTICATED MEETS CASUAL

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Holladay’s Premier Martini & Wine Bar

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Texas singer-songwriter Hayes Carll performs songs sad enough to be called country, but with a voice that argues that maybe sadness isn’t such a bad thing. Carll’s latest album, Lovers and Leavers (Thirty Tigers), tells plenty of sad stories about long highways, broke troubadours and doomed relationships. “We never go to bed angry because we never fight,” might sound like the description of a blissful relationship, but Carll’s voice reveals a growing malaise in “The Love That We Need.” Carll’s acoustic ballads don’t ask you to feel bad for him, just that you listen. Fortunately, listening to Hayes Carll—with a voice as smoky as a cigarette sigh and with wit as dry as an ashtray—is easy enough to do. (Kimball Bennion) The State Room, 638 S. State, 8 p.m., $23, TheStateRoomSLC.com

MONDAY: JAM! with Mark Chaney 7:00 TUESDAY: The art of ORIGINAL HOOLIGAN followed by Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck! WEDNESDAY: John Draper on the patio, then VJ Birdman on the big screen! THURSDAY: The amazing Terrance Hansen FRIDAY: DJ ChaseOne2 SATURDAY: DJ Sneeky Long AS ALWAYS, NO COVER!

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6405 S 3000 E | 888.991.8147 | ELIXIRLOUNGESLC.COM

JULY 28, 2016 | 43

BLACK SHEEP Bar & Grill

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CONCERTS & CLUBS THURSDAY 7.28 LIVE MUSIC

The Acacia Strain + Oceano + Knocked Loose + Culture Killer + To The Wind (In The Venue) Bela Fleck + Abigail Washburn (Deer Valley) see p. 40 Big Grams + Anderson .Paak & The Free Nationals + Burnell Washington (Pioneer Park) see p. 40 Echo Mind, + Now! + John Gold + Little Moon (Muse Music) Halloween in July feat. Jeremy Dawson of Shiny Toy Guns + DJ/DC + Le Voir (Metro Bar) see p. 38 Helvetia + The Circulars + Soft Limbs + DJ Nix Beat (Urban Lounge)

Jazz Joint Thursday with Mark Chaney and the Garage All Stars (The Garage) Like a Storm + OTEP + Righteous Vendetta + Cover Your Tracks + Fire From The Gods + Reloaded (The Complex) Marmalade Chill (Gracie’s) Proper Way (The Hog Wallow) Reckless Kelly (The Depot) Richie Furay (Egyptian Theatre) Whitney + Michael Rault (Diabolical Records) Willie Nelson & Family + Tony Holiday (Red Butte Amphitheatre) Yoni & Geti + Go Dark + Conquer Monster (Kilby Court)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Therapy Thursdays feat. Hucci (Club Elevate) Reggae Thursday (The Royal)

KARAOKE

Cowboy Karaoke (The Cabin)

Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge)

FRIDAY 7.29 LIVE MUSIC

The Brothers Comatose + I Draw Slow (O.P. Rockwell) Claudio Valenzuela + Dulce Sky + Cenizas Ajenas + Tepache Sound (Liquid Joe’s) DreamWorks Animation in Concert (Deer Valley) Dusk + Dumb Luck + Woodburn + Mike Skillz (Urban Lounge) see p. 45 Eve 6 + O2 + Christina Holmest + HiFi Murder + Smile for the Captain (Metro Bar) see p. 40 Florida Georgia Line + Kane Brown + The Cadillac Three + Cole Swindell (USANA Amphitheatre) Jason Boland & The Stragglers (In the Venue) Johanna Johanna + Rook Takes Queen

+ Small Lake City + The Cold Year (Kilby Court) Melissa Brooks & The Aquadolls (Billboard-Live!) The Oh Hellos (The Complex) Old Dominion + The Wayne Hoskins Band (Ogden Amphitheater) Pixie & the Partygrass Boys (The Hog Wallow) Richie Furay (Egyptian Theatre) Session One feat. Radius + IVIE + AZA + V.O. Musik (Club X) The Solarists + Grey Glass + Motion Coaster (Velour Live Music Gallery) Thousand Foot Krutch + Adelitas Way + Smashing Satellites + 3 Pill Morning (The Royal) Willie Waldman (Garage on Beck) Yarn + Eric Anderson & Scott Peterson of UNIPHI (The State Room)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE


Dusk, Dumb Luck, Woodburn, Mike Skillz (DJ set)

Dusk (aka Ryan Worwood) is dropping hisninth album, Can’t Stop the World. As one of the hardest working rappers to come out of SLC, Dusk has been integral to Utah’s local hip-hop scene for the past seven years. Not only is he one of the local scene’s godfathers, but his community involvement, skills as a visual artist and overall approachability make him one of our favorite local talents. Joining him for the evening are battle-rapper Dumb Luck, versatile wordsmith Woodburn and a DJ set by Mike Skillz. As Utah’s hip-hop scene continues to gain traction, performers like these keep that momentum going. (Alex Springer). The Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 8 p.m., $5 TheUrbanLoungeSLC.com

CONCERTS & CLUBS

BETHANY FISCHER

FRIDAY 7.29

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MICHAEL JOLLEY

CONCERTS & CLUBS

SATURDAY 7.30 Fictionist

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Every album and EP that local alt-rock heroes Fictionist releases is a suckerpunch to the toxic culture that the band dealt with as part of a major record label. It’s been two years since the group parted ways with Atlantic Records, but the experience has only made members Aaron Anderson, Robby Connolly, Brandon Kitterman and Stuart Maxfield stronger. Teaming up with local producer Nate Pyfer, Fictionist followed up their 2011 album with a self-titled LP that allowed them to push the envelope in ways that were unavailable to them during their time in the big leagues. Fictionist continues this tradition with their new EP Free Spirit, which comes out a day before this show. (AS). Kilby Court, 741 S. 330 West, 7 p.m., $10, KilbyCourt.com DJ Chase One2 (Twist) Z&Z (Sky)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Cheers to You SLC) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge)

SATURDAY 7.30 LIVE MUSIC

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Aaron Watson + Six Feet in the Pine (In The Venue) The Black Sheep Brothers + Joe Rock Show (Club X) The Boys’ Ranch + The Rifle + Lady Teeth + Primitive Programme (Muse Music) Cory Mon (Garage on Beck) Fictionist (Kilby Court) see above Harvey Milk Boulevard Street Fest feat. Derrick Barry (Club Try-Angles) see p. 42 Jammin’ in July feat. Opal Hill Drive + Transit Cast + Perfect Disorder + Reloaded + Bury the Wolf + Sevenpoint + Berlin Breaks (The Depot) Nerdcore Summer Concert Series Level 2 feat. Jade Knight + Lord British, Mark Dago, VCR5, Timechimp, DJ Shanty (Blue Copper Coffee) see p. 37 The Psychedelic Furs + The Church (The Complex) see p. 42

Richie Furay (Egyptian Theatre) RKDN + New Shack + Kindred Dead (Velour Live Music Gallery) Shawn Mendes (The Great Saltair) The Spazmatics (Liquid Joe’s) Steep Canyon Rangers with the Utah Symphony (Deer Valley) Vans Warped Tour feat. New Found Glory + Sum 41 + Falling in Reverse + We The Kings + The Maine + more (Utah State Fairgrounds) Westgate Rising + Outside Rising + Morrow Hill (The Royal) Will Baxter Band (The Hog Wallow) Yarn (O.P. Rockwell)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE All You Can Beat feat. Flash & Flare + Choice + Du Preea (Urban Lounge) DJ Sneeky Long (Twist)

SUNDAY 7.31 LIVE MUSIC

Blackbear (Urban Lounge) Gary Clark Jr. (Red Butte Amphitheatre) John Paul White (The State Room) Moonwalks + Hot Vodka + Burmese Python + Saline Lakes (Kilby Court) Talia Keys (Garage on Beck)


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KARAOKE

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MONDAY 8.1 LIVE MUSIC

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48 | JULY 28, 2016

CONCERTS & CLUBS

CITY WEEKLY’S HOT LIST FOR THE WEEK

Monday Night Blues Jam (The Royal) Open Blues Jam (The Hog Wallow)

KARAOKE

Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue) Bingo Karaoke (The Tavernacle)

TUESDAY 8.2 LIVE MUSIC

Adia Victoria + The Aces + Breezeway (Kilby Court) Harm’s Way + Villain + Communionist +

How It Works:

Die Off (The Loading Dock) Hayes Carll + Luke Bell (The State Room) see p. 43 Random Hero + Veridia + Ilia + Dream Collage (Hub801)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Open Mic (The Royal)

KARAOKE

Karaoke with DJ Thom (A Bar Named Sue on State) Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck (Twist) Karaoke with Spotlight Entertainment (Keys on Main) Karaoke (The Tavernacle)

WEDNESDAY 8.3 LIVE MUSIC

The Andy T and Nick Nixon Band (Deer Valley) Lincoln Durham + Daniel Pimentel (Kilby Court) Michelle Moonshine (The Hog Wallow) Miike Snow + Lewis Del Mar (The Depot) Roni Size + Johnny Law + Christ Wright + Darkside (Urban Lounge)

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Š 2016

EDIBLE

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ACROSS

1. Stare open-mouthed 2. Cookie that outcompeted Hydrox 3. Sharif of "Doctor Zhivago" 4. Corner office, e.g. 5. Blacken 6. Ginger ____ 7. Academy newbie 8. Numerical prefix 9. Event for Cinderella 10. Med school subj. 11. Soup served at a sushi bar 12. Interoffice email abbr.

55. Stole material 56. "____ Baby" (song from "Hair") 57. World Series qualifying matchup, briefly 59. Popeye's ____' Pea 60. Big name in video games 61. Falls behind 62. Lead-in to while 64. Fresh 65. "Yabba dabba ____!"

Last week’s answers

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

DOWN

14. Forest game 18. Start to unravel 19. "Let's call it ____" 23. She joined Bret and Chris to moderate Fox's first GOP presidential debate of 2015 24. Tennis great Navratilova or Hingis 25. Kind of alphabet 26. Three, proverbially 27. "Along ____ spider ..." 28. Baseball shoe feature 31. Messengers at Hogwarts 32. Mutual fund types: Abbr. 33. Half-sister of Absalom 34. "Oh, give it ____!" 35. Youngest "Pride and Prejudice" Bennet sister 37. Make yawn 39. "Hey, ump! He was ____ a mile!" 44. Davis who eulogized Malcolm X 48. Like puppies and kittens 51. Razz 52. Knitting loop 53. Bench press count 54. Jazz chanteuse Anita

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

1. Sticky stuff 5. Dance genre 8. First president to use "transgender" in a State of the Union address 13. Piece-keeping? 15. The works 16. "Zip your lip!" 17. Final words of King's "I Have a Dream" speech 20. Obese person, in slang 21. 1987 Barnes & Noble acquisition 22. Bumper car, at times 25. 1300, on a cornerstone 29. Assenting vote 30. From the heart? 36. Big name in dental hygiene 38. Tire 40. The "thou" in "Wherefore art thou?" 41. 2002 foreign film "____ Mama Tambien" 42. Treated the lawn, in a way 43. "Give me your word!" 45. East German secret police 46. Computer hookups? 47. Jimmy Fallon's home 49. Mex. miss 50. Ring in the new year on New Year's Eve, say 53. Birthplace of Elie Wiesel 58. Small fight 63. Tasteful bedclothes, so to speak ... or a hint to the grid's circled letters 66. Wall Street worry 67. Sci-fi character who takes the red pill rather than the blue one 68. Pantyhose brand 69. Star of the sitcom "Wanda at Large" 70. Wee hour 71. Middle ____

SUDOKU

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CROSSWORD PUZZLE


T BEA

PHOTO OF THE WEEK BY

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Bat Those Lashes

INSIDE / COMMUNITY BEAT PG. 51 INK PG. 52 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY PG. 53 UTAH JOB CENTER PG.54 POET’S CORNER PG.55 URBAN LIVING PG. 55

be successful,” Moore says. Luisa Chil, the director of business operations, loves working with a growing and expanding business. “It has been an exciting journey working with Jill and the rest of the Lash Bomb team as we see our products and trainings change the eyelash extension industry,” she says. “Jill is inspiring to all who meet her and is passionate about what she does and that passion extends to the rest of us as we learn more about the products we sell and the techniques we teach.” Moore loves the fast-paced and exciting environment of the business. The company supplies salons all over the country with their supplies, as well as local entrepreneurs. And twice a week, the shop offers “happy hour” specials—at the store and one online. n

Lash Bomb 47 East Fort Union Blvd., Midvale 801-707-7196 LashBomb.com

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JULY 28, 2016 | 51

Nikolette Moore and the Lash Bomb team are invested in the shop, having helped to lay the flooring and paint the walls themselves.

#CWCOMMUNITY

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Eyelash extensions are becoming all the rage—not only for customers who want something that not even the best mascara can give, but for estheticians seeking to diversify the services they offer. If you’re interested in the eyelash extension game, check out Lash Bomb. Open since spring of 2016, the company is not only a distributor for lash extension products, but also offers training for people who would like to become lash artists. “One of the things I love about Lash Bomb is that our mission is to empower women to start their own businesses and help them achieve success by providing the skills and product they need for their career,” sales and customer relations employee Nikolette Moore says. “I love to hear the success stories that come from the lash artists that have started with Lash Bomb.” The training is open to licensed estheticians and lasts all day, but at the end, students have enough product to do 70 full sets of extensions and the knowhow necessary to do them right. A class is $750 and includes hands-on practice and assistance. The team’s passion for female-driven enterprise is understandable, considering the company’s founding. Jill Kindall, owner and founder, was at the end of a divorce in 2010. According to Moore, Kindall was feeling low when she decided to go back to esthetics school. After learning about and excelling at the art of eyelash extensions, she realized that she could improve the industry by providing tools and training that would better meet the needs of estheticians and cosmetologists aspiring to be eyelash extension artists. “She had the vision to help others in situations similar to hers by giving them the skills they need to

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LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) For many years, my occupation was “starving artist.” I focused on improving my skills as a writer and musician, even though those activities rarely earned me any money. To ensure my survival, I worked as little as necessary at low-end jobs—scrubbing dishes at restaurants, digging ditches for construction companies, delivering newspapers in the middle of the night and volunteering for medical experiments. During the long hours spent doing tasks that had little meaning to me, I worked diligently to remain upbeat. One trick that worked well was imagining future scenes when I would be engaged in exciting creative work that paid me a decent wage. It took a while, but eventually those visions materialized in my actual life. I urge you to try this TAURUS (April 20-May 20) The people of many cultures have imagined the sun god as strategy in the coming months, Libra. Harness your mind’s eye possessing masculine qualities. But in some traditions, the in the service of generating the destiny you want to inhabit. Mighty Father is incomplete without the revitalizing energies of the Divine Mother. The Maoris, for example, believe that every SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) night the solar deity has to marinate in her nourishing uterine You have every right to celebrate your own personal bath. Otherwise he wouldn’t be strong enough to rise in the Independence Day sometime soon. In fact, given the current morning. And how does this apply to you? Well, you currently astrological omens, you’d be justified in embarking on a fullhave resemblances to the weary old sun as it dips below the scale emancipation spree in the coming weeks. It will be prime horizon. I suspect it’s time to recharge your powers through time to seize more freedom and declare more autonomy and an extended immersion in the deep, dark waters of the primal build more self-sufficiency. Here’s an important nuance to the work you have ahead of you: Make sure you escape the tyranny feminine. of not just the people and institutions that limit your sovereignty, but also the voices in your own head that tend to hinder GEMINI (May 21-June 20) An Interesting Opportunity is definitely in your vicinity. It may your flow. slink tantalizingly close to you in the coming days, even whisper your name from afar. But I doubt that it will knock on your door. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) It probably won’t call you seven times on the phone or flash you a Of all the forbidden fruits that you fantasize about, which one big smile or send you an engraved invitation. So you should make is your favorite? Among the intriguing places you consider to yourself alert for the Interesting Opportunity’s unobtrusive be outside of your comfort zone, which might inspire you to behavior. It could be a bit shy or secretive or modest. Once you redefine the meaning of “comfort”? The coming weeks will notice it, you may have to come on strong—you know, talk to it be a favorable time to reconfigure your relationship with these potential catalysts. And while you’re out on the frontier dreamsweetly or ply it with treats. ing of fun experiments, you might also want to flirt with other wild cards and strange attractors. Life is in the mood to tickle CANCER (June 21-July 22) It’s time to get more earthy and practical about practicing your you with useful surprises. high ideals and spiritual values. Translate your loftiest intentions into your most intimate behavior. Ask yourself, “How CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) does Goddess want me to respond when my co-worker pisses You have a special talent for accessing wise innocence. In some me off?” or “How would Goddess like me to brush my teeth ways you’re virginal, fresh and raw, and in other ways you’re and watch TV and make love?” For extra credit, get a T-shirt mature, seasoned and well-developed. I hope you will regard that says, “Goddess was my co-pilot, but we crash-landed in the this not as a confusing paradox but rather as an exotic strength. With your inner child and your inner mentor working in tandem, wilderness and I was forced to eat her.” you could accomplish heroic feats of healing. Their brilliant collaboration could also lead to the mending of an old rift. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Be alert for white feathers gliding on the wind. Before eating potato chips, examine each one to see if it bears a likeness of Rihanna or the AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Virgin Mary. Keep an eye out, too, for portents like robots wearing “Where is everybody when I need them?” Even if you haven’t dreadlocked wigs or antique gold buttons lying in the gutter or senior actually spoken those words recently, I’m guessing the voices citizens cursing at invisible Martians. The appearance of anomalies in your head have whispered them. But from what I can tell, like these will be omens that suggest you will soon be the recipient that complaint will soon be irrelevant. It will no longer match of crazy good fortune. But if you would rather not wait around for reality. Your allies will start offering more help and resources. chance events to trigger your good luck, simply make it your fierce They may not be perfectly conscientious in figuring out how to intention to generate it. Use your optimism-fueled willpower and be of service, but they’ll be pretty good. Here’s what you can your flair for creative improvisation. You will have abundant access do to encourage optimal results: 1. Purge your low, outmoded expectations. 2. Open your mind and heart to the possibility to these talents in the coming weeks. that people can change. 3. Humbly ask—out loud, not just in the privacy of your imagination—for precisely what you want. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) You have just begun your big test. How are you doing so far? According to my analysis, the preliminary signs suggest that PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) you have a good chance of proving the old maxim, “If it doesn’t Millions of Pisceans less fortunate than you won’t read this make you so crazy that you put your clothes on inside-out and horoscope. Uninformed about the rocky patch of Yellow Brick try to kiss the sky until you cry, it will help you win one of your Road that lies just ahead, they may blow a gasket or get a flat biggest arguments with Life.” In fact, I suspect we will ulti- tire. You, on the other hand, will benefit from my oracular foremately see you undergo at least one miraculous and certifiably shadowing, as well as my inside connections with the Lords of melodramatic transformation. A wart on your attitude could Funky Karma. You will therefore be likely to drive with relaxed dissolve, for example. A luminous visitation may heal one of caution, keeping your vehicle unmarred in the process. That’s your blind spots. You might find a satisfactory substitute for why I’m predicting that although you may not arrive speedily at the next leg of your trip, you will do so safely and in style. kissing the sky. ARIES (March 21-April 19) Free your body. Don’t ruminate and agonize about it. Free your body. Be brave and forceful. Do it simply and easily. Free your gorgeously imperfect, wildly intelligent body. Allow it to be itself in all of its glory. Tell it you’re ready to learn more of its secrets and adore its mysteries. Be in awe of its unfathomable power to endlessly carry out the millions of chemical reactions that keep you alive and thriving. How can you not be overwhelmed with gratitude for your hungry, curious, unpredictable body? Be grateful for its magic. Love the blessings it bestows on you. Celebrate its fierce animal elegance.


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Poets Corner

The morning you left

I awoke to a calmness the morning you left. I went to the beach; the air held its breath. The birds softly choired, time seemed to slow. The blue sky was empty; it was a perfect day to go. The sun was blood-violet, with your passion to rise. Through the light-headed silence, rain fell from our eyes. All it took was that look, your last blink toward the light, and you became that new sunrise...and the moon out tonight. You can feel the Earth dance, and I know you’re not gone. We’ll feel that void til we find you, but it won’t be too long.

Samantha Peters Send your poem (max 15 lines), to: Poet’s Corner, City Weekly, 248 South Main Street, SLC, UT 84101 or e-mail to poetscorner@cityweekly.net.

Published entrants receive a $15 value gift from CW. Each entry must include name and mailing address.

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just returned from a short trip to Beresford, S.D. My dad’s side of the family is from there, and I had a chance to see a whole bunch of relatives I’ve never met, or haven’t seen in 40 years, at a birthday party for my 80-yearold aunt. To get there, you f ly into Sioux Falls, the largest town in the whole state. Lemme tell you, it’s a tiny (but cute) city and the small airport had all of six gates. We took a surprisingly large plane there from Denver, but on the way back boarded a Barbie Dream Plane so small you had to crouch down to walk the aisle to your seat. While waiting to board, I chatted with an airline employee who told me that many f lights get canceled in Sioux Falls due to tornadoes or blizzards— depending on the season. What happens when your plane gets canceled and you’re stuck in Tiny Town for hours and hours? Why, you check yourself into the AeroStay Hotel connected to the airport, just for the day. The newest trend in airports is to allow people to rent for the day—as in check in at 11 a.m. and out by 6 p.m.—for $99 or less. Or you can spend the night like a regular guest. I know, you’re thinking there’s plenty of hourly rate hotels out there to get your naughty on, but this group isn’t out for that demographic. Sometimes you just need a day nap, a place to shower, work, eat and have that experience that’s closer than a cab ride to some dive on an airport row. Maybe Salt Lake City’s new airport will have such a feature when the new tenants are announced. Speaking of hotels, do take notice that the old Red Lion at 161 West and 600 South ( just east of the adult novelty store and Brew vies) has a whole new look and logo. The completely renovated business has new energy and is selling itself as a lifestyle boutique vacationing option dedicated to introducing travelers to local experiences. The tattered Red Lion sign is gone and now the initials RL are mounted on the wall. Guests will get bookoo info on where to go and what to do, access to bikes and local transportation options and a cleaned up, remodeled hotel just in time for the Outdoor Retailers Convention the first week of August, plus an onsite Tesla charging station. It’s pet-friendly at $15 extra per day (service animals are free). The Lion used to host a rooftop restaurant and bar that was all the rage in the 1980s, but that’s not a part of this refreshed building yet. There is, however, an onsite lounge in the lobby and diner open from 6 a.m.-10 p.m.n Content is prepared expressly for Community and is not endorsed by City Weekly staff.

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