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MAKING FUN TIMES OUT OF YOUR SUN TIMES

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N0. 5

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ME

R G RE REAT SOME MO


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CWCONTENTS COVER STORY SUMMER GUIDE 2016

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4 | JUNE 9, 2016

LETTERS Get over it

I am writing in response to Douglas Cotant’s “Trax rules need to be enforced” [Letters, May 19, City Weekly]. Where to begin? If I understand Mr. Cotant correctly, he would like to declare military rule because a few scofflaws are smoking and skateboarding at Trax stations. Really? Has he even thought about this? This is not Nazi Germany. What does he propose the armed enforcers do when they find someone skateboarding on a platform? Oh, my! He probably wants them summarily shot. I think Mr. Cotant needs to man up. These things are not the end of the world.

DAVE BUDDEN Sandy

Draft this

The Stan Rosenzweig opinion piece “The Draft” [May 19, City Weekly] touches on several important issues, but skirts a couple more. Rosenzweig worries that Utah Senator Mike Lee is grandstanding over inconsequential issues: women in combat (women are already fighting and doing just fine), and potential resurrection of the military draft (the draft is outmoded and won’t come back). First, a small fact correction: The earliest American military draft came during the Civil War, not W WI. Lincoln had to move an army to New York City to put down the mass protests there. That was when America was still a republic. Republican theory says people should believe in a war

WRITE US: Salt Lake City Weekly, 248 S. Main, Salt Lake City, UT 84101. Email: comments@cityweekly.net. Fax: 801-575-6106. We reserve the right to edit for length and clarity. Preference will be given to letters that are 300 words or less and sent uniquely to City Weekly. Full name, address and phone number must be included, even on emailed submissions, for verification purposes. strongly enough that they would volunteer for it, or else they should not be forced to fight. A military draft places a large standing army at the disposal of the U.S. president. Since the Korean War, presidents have started foreign wars at their own pleasure in disregard of law and long democratic tradition. Issue No. 1: Why should women or men be forced into a situation where the people they want to defend have no say so in the nation’s war policies? Issue No. 2: What do the non-stop foreign wars started unilaterally by the U.S. executive branch have to do with protecting the homeland? The homeland has not been invaded by a foreign government for over 200 years, since 1812. Our current foreign conflicts seem to encourage a great deal of anger against our people and government and thus accomplish the opposite of protection. Perhaps 9/11 would not have happened if we had not stationed so many U.S. troops on Arab soil. I wonder how you and I would feel about Salt Lake City parks housing Chinese infantry and tanks in order to help ensure Chinese-style democracy in our fair city?

KIMBALL SHINKOSKEY Woods Cross

Remembering Burt

Dear John, thanks once again for enlightening readers and sharing your past (some of my past, too) [“All Pride Aside,” June 2, City Weekly]. I knew Burt also, but I didn’t meet him until junior high school, and didn’t really get to know him until high school. If you recall, there was a group of us kids who didn’t quite fit in with the majority of the other kids, like sports guys, and scholars. We were in art and music classes. Burt was one of the members of our loosely defined group. He was a very special person that shined brightly in any situation, even the bad ones. I lost track of him after high school, but never forgot him. I am saddened to hear of his passing, but I knew he must have lead a troubled life. Never stop writing, my friend, we all need your input.

LYNN LARSEN BHS Alum

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6 | JUNE 9, 2016

OPINION

Yesterday

“Eighty percent of success is showing up.” —Woody Allen I am a student of fly-fishing. I take my lessons on the Provo River between the Jordanelle and Deer Creek reservoirs. It is a popular stretch of water as the worn path along the bank attests. No matter what time of day you arrive, guys are fishing, thigh-deep in water, throwing arcs of line or fiddling with a feathered hook like a squirrel with a nut. Some of them fish the Provo almost every day. They have favored places—a sweep of current hard by a deep pool—where they stand for hours, casting. Walking to the river, I spend a few minutes watching them from a distance. There is an aesthetic of fly-casting, as graceful as Roger Federer’s groundstrokes, but it’s better to focus on the river where dimples on the surface betray hungry trout. If I don’t see fish feeding, I approach a fisherman. “Anything going on?” I ask. Most are forthcoming. I have even had guys give me flies that had fooled fish that day. The conversation often turns to what the riverine insects are doing. At that point, I often hear a mostdispiriting sentence: “You should have been here yesterday.” What that generally means is that the day before, a multitude of bottom-dwelling bugs had swarmed to the surface and the trout had fed on them voraciously. It is called a hatch, and it is amazing to watch. So many insects take to the surface that it can be hard to discern an artificial bug floating among thousands of real ones, but I have watched with envy as a skilled fisherman hooked a fish with every cast. Such opportunities are easily missed, however: From start to finish, the duration of an insect hatch is measured in minutes. There is a word for those of us whose arrival at an ephemeral event is ill-timed. It is the verb, azaleate. Billy Collins, one of my favorite poets, credits another poet, the late Howard Nemerov, for coining it. I was azaleated last summer in Glacier

BY JOHN RASMUSON

National Park. At one of the visitors’ centers, I was drawn into a conversation with a ranger standing next to a telescope. The chitchat led me to disclose that reading The Littlest Reindeer as a child had left me with a life-long desire to see the northern lights. To which he replied: “You should have been here last night.” Ribbons of green light shimmered in the late-night sky, he said. No telescope required. I have been azaleated by driving to Albion Basin too early for the wildflowers. I have missed the peak autumn foliage in the White Mountains of New Hampshire, and I have arisen before dawn to watch the Perseid meteor shower only to find it was an off-night for shooting stars. The desert in bloom? This was a banner year in Death Valley thanks to El Niño, but I missed it. I missed it because I was 600 miles away, casting flies on the Provo River and playing pickleball at the Holladay Lions Recreation Center. That unassailable fact of time and space is an integral part of a poem Collins wrote called “The Sandhill Cranes of Nebraska.” It begins with this stanza: Too bad you weren’t here six months ago, was a lament I heard on my visit to Nebraska. You could have seen the astonishing spectacle of the Sandhill Cranes, thousands of them, feeding and even dancing on the shores of the Platte River. Because it was physically impossible for me to see Death Valley’s flowers or for Collins to watch the cranes dance along the Platte, it is pointless—perhaps even impolite—to bring it up. What benefit accrues from knowing what was missed and can’t be reclaimed? To be azaleated by a should-

have-been-here-yesterday remark is to be drawn into an awkward exchange in which Collins advises you to affect “a look of mild disappointment / if only to be part of the commiseration.” In so doing you acquiesce to a pivot—from birds to words, in Collins’ case—that leads to dissembling. You end up saying, in effect, “I am sorry that you are sorry that I missed watching Sandhill Cranes six months ago.” There is nothing like being in the right place at the right time. “Showing up is 80-percent of life,” Woody Allen said in the original version of the quotation. I may have missed countless insect hatches on the Provo River, but I have seen the flowering of a night-blooming cereus and a bloom of bioluminescent plankton transforming the Red Sea into a glowing, blue blanket under a midnight sky. And I walked the Spiral Jetty before it was left high and dry by the drought-shrunk Great Salt Lake. I have twice taken out-of-town visitors to the Spiral Jetty. On the first trip I found it lived up to its artsy reputation. I was impressed by the contrasting colors: redtinted water, curves of black rock traced in whitish salt, a vaulted blue sky. Returning a few years later, I found the lake had retreated, as it did from Saltair in the 1930s, leaving the jetty surrounded by an ugly mudflat. I was so disappointed, I azaleated my friends thoughtlessly: You should have seen it when the lake was high. I don’t want to play the azaleation game when the Green Drake mayflies begin to hatch on the Provo River in early July. When the feeding frenzy begins, I hope to be in the right place at the right time, reeling in fish after fish. CW

“I AM SORRY THAT YOU ARE SORRY THAT I MISSED WATCHING SANDHILL CRANES SIX MONTHS AGO.”

Send feedback to comments@cityweekly.net

STAFF BOX

Readers can comment at cityweekly.net

What activity SCREAMS summer in Salt Lake City to you? Paula Saltas: That fun drinking activity which is mojitos at Gracie’s. Jeremiah Smith: For me, summer always means yard work (not fun) and outdoor concerts (super fun), and this year’s offerings are top-notch.

Lindsay Larkin: I think of surviving on rosé and AC and praying for fall because it’s so darn hot!

Scott Renshaw: Utah Arts Festival, more than anything else. It’s hard to imagine that there was a time before I lived here, and it wasn’t something I could plan on to get a concentrated blast of so much amazing art.

Casey Koldewyn: Aside from the mindnumbing heat, events like Utah Foster Care’s Chalk Art Festival at the Gateway are what make summer feel official.

Tyeson Rogers: I think Pride sets the tone and then Twilight Concert Series is the signal to let the games begin!

Randy Harward: Road trips with my family and Tuesday night disc golf doubles with all of my friends at Creekside Park. Mason Rodrickc: Sneaking up on strangers in the dark at Gilgal Gardens and doing that super fun squeeze-grab to just above their knees—that one that feels halfway like pain, halfway like a tickle— and then look at them confused and ask, “What’d you do with my babies?” and then just walk away. This is the breath of summer. Sierra Sessions: You scream, I scream, we all scream because it’s so damn hot—at BBQs, kiddie pools, in the mountains, in some lake. Just screaming everywhere.


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JUNE 9, 2016 | 7


HITS&MISSES BY KATHARINE BIELE

RANDOM QUESTIONS, SURPRISING ANSWERS

@kathybiele

A Hazy Dispute

Fight Fair

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No one should delight in a lawsuit being filed, but the public should feel vindicated that city officials from Provo and Orem are being punished for their attempts to stymie petition gatherers. The two officials have been using their city email accounts to lobby the public against a transit project, The Salt Lake Tribune reported. Haven’t they learned anything from Hillary Clinton’s email predicament? You know—official vs. unofficial? The Utah County clerk-auditor calls the pushback political, and state law lets residents overturn new city laws if they get enough signatures within 45 days of passage. Citizens don’t seem to like a $190 million “bus rapid transit” and road-improvement project, although the officials say their actions are administrative, so citizens have no say. In fact, Utah has long made citizen referendums difficult and rare.

Skyline Control

Jobs Rentals ll Buy/Se Trade post your free online classified ads at

Any time you hear the word “unlimited,” beware. Salt Lake County is requesting an unlimited height zoning request from Salt Lake City for a Salt Lake Convention Center hotel. If you think height doesn’t matter in an urban downtown setting, think again. Much of the condo-building for a 2020 population boom is happening there, and residents are rightly concerned about being boxed in from sunlight and vistas. Several sites are being considered and for one, Councilman Derek Kitchen seems open to adjusting height limits, according to the Deseret News. He just wants “appearance and continuity with downtown” to be considered. Residents of 99 West are worried about their property values and that the structure might dwarf Abravanel Hall. Maybe this is the risk you take living downtown. On the other hand, light and breathing room are always good.

JORDAN FLOYD

It’s not enough that we’re spending taxpayer dollars on a quixotic quest to take over public lands in Utah. It’s not enough that Utah wants to join a multi-state effort to deprive transgender people bathroom privileges. It’s not enough that the state places coal above people. The minute that the EPA announced it would require additional pollution controls on two Utah coal plants, out came the big guns. Rocky Mountain Power is considering legal action to stop the evil feds, and the Utah Department of Environmental Quality is “disappointed,” according to the Deseret News. DEQ thinks it’s working on “sound science” and all’s well. But haze-producing pollution affects not only visibility but health. No doubt, the governor disagrees. He has already joined 27 other states challenging the Clean Power Plan in court.

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8 | JUNE 9, 2016

FIVE SPOT

Sabina Sandoval helped found the Liberty Park drum circle 22 years ago. She now runs the nonprofit organization Free to Be Me, which puts on drumming-themed events for school children, hospital patients, prison inmates and others. Sandoval displayed her passion for drumming during her interview with City Weekly. Partway through—at which point Sabina was sitting on the ground—she shot up to her feet, exclaimed, “I got to get on that rhythm—I hope you don’t mind,” and ran back to the drum circle to play.

How did you get your start as a drummer?

I was born a drummer. I know that for sure. I was in foster care as a kid—I was born into hell, literally. When I returned out of foster care, my mother was dating a drummer. At the age of 8, I walked into the home they had for us and there was a drum set right there. That was no accident and I know it in my heart. He would let me play, but he never really showed me anything. I never took lessons because we didn’t have the money. Once that relationship was over with, he owed my mom money, and so she said, leave the drum set for my daughter and we’ll call it even. Everywhere I went I played that drum set—even in an apartment building with 200 units, no one ever said anything. I felt like I was guided to play everywhere I went.

What makes a good drum circle?

When people are listening. When they aren’t trying to stay in their own head, and they are listening to each other like a band. If one band member is out, he can break them. One instrument can make or break that circle.

Can you describe your idea of the “pocket” as it relates to drumming?

It’s God without religion. It’s an everyday quest. It’s the perfection that’s natural. Not the one that is competitive—that’s the ego-perfect—this one is the natural-perfect. Your heartbeat has this, your car has this, your clock has this and your integrity has this. If you are lying or cheating, you are out. It’s an everyday quest to be in that pocket.

Generally speaking, drum circles and those who attend carry a certain stigma— what do you have to say to that?

It’s not a hippy drug-infested place. It’s ‘free to be me,’ but with responsibility. It’s that native dancing and celebration of each other without worrying about what people think of you. Freedom of expression—that’s the circle. The opposite of that would be drunkenness, smoking, drugs, frivolous rhythm and not keeping it sacred, which is just thinking, ‘Look at me, I’m cool over here.’

If anything, what would you change about the Liberty Park drum circle?

They need to police it more. There’s no police there. They come and they leave. When there is that many people you need to have police there, or some type of security. These people need to know what the circle is about. And to leave their crap outside the gate—add to [the circle], help the circle and contribute to it. Don’t do anything to help the chaos of the world. Don’t add to the issues, especially in a sacred place like that.

—JORDAN FLOYD

jfloyd@cityweekly.net


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In news footage of President Obama in Havana, you could see him holding his own umbrella while walking in the rain. I remember reading somewhere that world leaders never hold their own umbrella for fear of identification with Neville Chamberlain, the umbrella-carrying British prime minister who opted for appeasement in dealing with Hitler, with spectacularly unsuccessful results. Was there ever such an unwritten rule? Did Obama not get the memo? Or is he a secret Chamberlain fan? —George Mannes Are you kidding? Of course he’s a secret Chamberlain fan. You’re talking about the guy who (to hear some leading political thinkers tell it) embarked on an international “apology tour” in his first term, who “led from behind” in Libya, who introduced a policy of “appeasement”—that’s the term Jeb Bush used—with respect to Iran, and who practically gave away the store to Raul Castro. “The Neville Chamberlain of our time,” said Bush’s co-failed presidential candidate Lindsey Graham. Why, it’s almost as if, thanks to his rolling over for foreign foes, it’s Obama (and not, say, the GOP itself) who’s laid the groundwork for the rise to power of a nativist, proto-fascist demagogue who— Sorry, just got caught up in the heat of the campaign for a moment. Histrionics notwithstanding, you are indeed correct, George, that Obama was spotted holding his own umbrella during his recent visit to Cuba. Stateside, this counted as the second-most significant umbrella-related event of Barry’s administration, the first being the time in 2013 when he caught guff on conservative websites for asking two marines to hold umbrellas over the Turkish prime minister during a rainy visit. (Subsequent perusal of regulations revealed that while Corps members must assist the president as requested, umbrella-holding included, uniformed marines may not shelter themselves with umbrellas—if they’re male; female marines, though, are allowed to exercise common sense in the rain.) By contrast, the Cuban Umbrella Incident didn’t raise many eyebrows—besides yours, I mean—at home. In China, though, it was sort of a big deal: Citizens expressed admiration that a world leader, unlike the local apparatchiks, would so humbly carry his own umbrella. They’re not unschooled on the political symbolism of the umbrella, either, which harks back to Chamberlain. It seems that for Sir Neville, the umbrella was a bit of an affectation. He carried it everywhere, including when he disembarked the plane in London after his infamous 1938 meeting with Hitler: peace agreement in one hand, brolly in the other, his hapless fate sealed. Hereafter the British opposition party, whenever Chamberlain traveled, made a display of umbrellas, to symbolize the PM’s appeasement. Even Hitler mocked Chamberlain’s accessory, according to an MI5 report; one British diplomat quoted the Führer saying: “If ever that silly old man

BY CECIL ADAMS SLUG SIGNORINO

STRAIGHT DOPE Umbrella Politics

comes interfering again with his umbrella, I’ll kick him downstairs and jump on his stomach in front of the photographers.” Thus did the umbrella grow geopolitical legs. By the 1950s, American right-wingers had adopted it as a symbol of American appeasement of foreign powers, such that Richard Nixon, as Eisenhower’s vice president, forbade his aides from carrying any. (This backfired when Ike himself got caught in the rain during a speech because nobody had anything on-hand to shelter him with.) Historian Edward R. Miller has compiled some midcentury umbrella-related highlights: Campaigning against Adlai Stevenson, Eisenhower’s opponent in 1952 and 1956, Nixon declared, “If the umbrella is the symbol of appeasement, then Adlai Stevenson must go down in history as the Umbrella Man of all time.” When the Berlin Wall was constructed in 1961 and President Kennedy did not send American troops to tear it down, German students, as well as many Americans, sent him umbrellas. Upon returning home after having established new cultural and commercial ties with China in the 1970s, President Richard Nixon was met with umbrella-wielding students, who shared William F. Buckley’s assertion that Nixon had “sold out” by meeting with the leaders of the Communist dictatorship. Another umbrella man, a guy named Louie Witt, appears, prominently raising his piece, in the Zapruder film of Kennedy’s assassination. Is he sending a signal? Is he an Oswald associate? As with every other element of the assassination, this one’s been debated to death, but Witt’s own explanation before a congressional hearing remains as good as any: he was just a “conservative-type fellow” who was still upset about Chamberlain’s capitulation in Munich. He wasn’t even protesting JFK; he was protesting JFK’s dad, Joseph P. Kennedy, who back in ‘38 had been ambassador to Britain. In the modern era, umbrellas have acquired a new symbolic role in Hong Kong, representing resistance not against appeasement, but against the Chinese government. What started out as protesters shielding themselves from police tear gas has morphed, according to a 2014 NPR dispatch, into the emblem for a movement—it’s known as the “Umbrella Revolution.” In U.S. politics, any political symbolism associated with umbrellas has been all but forgotten—such that the current president’s carrying one is the rare gesture that doesn’t draw cries of Chamberlainism. One suspects that if Obama’s critics were slightly more historically literate, they would’ve been all over it. n Send questions to Cecil via StraightDope.com or write him c/o Chicago Reader, 350 N. Orleans, Chicago 60654.


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A woman’s search for sobriety ends in a downtown SLC parking lot. BY COLBY FRAZIER cfrazier@cityweekly.net @ColbyFrazierLP

B

ack in Olathe, Kan., Bill and Janice Pollman have a China cabinet full of ceramic bowls that were made by their daughter, Brittany Anne Pollman. The younger of two adopted daughters, Brittany also played four instruments, the oboe, clarinet and the alto and tenor saxophone. “She was quite good on the oboe,” Bill Pollman says, recalling that at a concert during her junior year in high school, “she played all four before the night was over.” All of that youthful talent and potential met a tragic end on April 4, 2016, when a private investigator hired by Brittany’s family found the woman dead inside her blue Ford Focus, which had been parked in the Red Lion Hotel parking lot at 161 W. 600 South in Salt Lake City. Bundled with Brittany’s talents was a drug addiction that ultimately claimed her life. Inside Brittany’s car, Salt Lake City police officers found drug paraphernalia consistent with heroin use. But it’s what police failed to find inside the car that alarmed Brittany’s family: her phone. Even when Brittany, 25, was using drugs, family and friends say, she sent prolific text messages and posted frequently to social media. And so on March 25, when Brittany drove away from a sober living facility in Riverton and was never heard from again, her people in Kansas and Utah got worried. A missing persons report was filed with the Unified Police Department on March 27. An officer contacted several people who knew Brittany, but when adults disappear from the radar, police are limited to the scope with which they can search. After a few days of making phone calls to police, Brittany’s family contacted Jason Jensen, a Salt Lake Citybased private investigator. Knowing that Brittany had a history of heroin use, Jensen says he began his search at the homeless shelter on 200 South and Rio Grande Street, and from there worked outward in a circle. Jensen wasn’t on the job long. It took him just an hour to find her.

“It was a play on common sense,” Jensen says. “If you’re looking for an addict or a user in Salt Lake, that’s where you start at, Rio Grande, and then go farther out. You wouldn’t start in Provo for sure.” Brittany’s untimely death at once shocked her loved ones, and was also a testament to how firm a grip drug addiction can have on a person. Hours before Brittany went missing, she posted a selfie on her Facebook page with the words: “I love that I am looking like myself again :))))))) 39 days!” And on March 26, the day after Brittany went missing, Bill Pollman was due to visit Utah. “She was really excited about it,” says Nikki Wiarda, Brittany’s sister. “She was really homesick and she had written out an itinerary of things they were going to do that weekend while he was there.” Wiarda says it was a love for the mountains, and an inner peace her sister felt in Utah, that led her to the state. In 2009, Wiarda says Brittany met a woman on the internet, and the two lived in Utah. For 18 months, Wiarda says her sister was happy and sober. But when Brittany broke up with her girlfriend, Wiarda says her sister feared she would relapse, and returned home to Kansas. For five strenuous years, Wiarda says Brittany battled her drug addiction—a fight that culminated with a decision in January 2016 to escape her routine and a cast of characters who were bad influences in Kansas and return to Utah. “She felt like if she was going to have a shot at her sobriety for real, she was going to have to get out of Dodge as it were,” Wiarda says, remembering hearing her sister say: “If I’m going to make it, the only place I can make it is out there.” During Brittany’s first 18 months in Utah, she quickly found the Alano Club in Murray, where Narcotics- and Alcoholics Anonymous meetings are held. Misty Mulkey, a recovering addict who attends meetings at the club, became Brittany’s sponsor. When Brittany set out for Utah a second time, she had her sights set on Mulkey’s home. But when Brittany arrived, Mulkey learned that her friend had relapsed on the drive, and was once again using drugs. “But I was eager to help because I thought I could,” Mulkey says. “I thought I could get her sober again. I know in my head that nobody can get another person sober, but with her, my heart kind of said that I could.” After living at Mulkey’s house for about a month, Brittany found a spot in MentorWorks, a transitional housing program in Riverton. Joe Petersen, an assistant case manager at MentorWorks, says Brittany had spent five weeks at the treatment center and was complying with the housing requirements, including attending five recovery meetings per week, completing five hours of community service

KRIS DRENT

A Daughter Lost

ADDICTION

KRIS DRENT

NEWS

Clockwise from top left: The last photo taken of Brittany Pollman; her senior year portraits. and working for a temporary employment agency when she went missing. “She was talking about how she was excited her dad was coming to visit. It just seemed like she had a hope that she didn’t have when she first came in. She had hope for the future. I’m not sure what happened the night she left,” Petersen says. “She just made one poor decision after a month of making good decisions and that, unfortunately, led to her demise.” Though not from Utah, Brittany’s death will be added to the growing list of people who die from drug-related deaths in the Beehive State. According to the Utah Department of Health, 300 people died in 2014 from prescription opioid overdoses, a number that ranks Utah No. 4 in the nation. Officials say many who end up addicted to heroin start out abusing prescription drugs. For Brittany, though, it was simply falling in with the wrong crowd and dabbling with substances often viewed with little concern, like marijuana, that eventually led to her heroin use. Wiarda says her sister began dabbling in drugs at age 15 and, like many addicts, bounced in and out of rehabilitation clinics. Bill and Janice were both teachers in Olathe, a suburb of Kansas City, and they raised their daughters in a trailer until they were around 12, when the family had saved up enough money to pay cash for a new home. “We never lacked anything, we never wanted anything,” Wiarda says. “My parents took really good care of us. I think my parents just tried everything that they could to help her; to make her be sober.” After burying Brittany in Kansas, in a plot she had picked out years earlier

next to her grandfather, the Pollmans visited the Alano Club on April 24 for a memorial service. A group of the Sober Riders Motorcycle Club, patches sewn to their jean vests beaming their allegiance, mingled with others dressed in their Sunday best. Whether or not they knew the girl in the photographs with the bright smile and sparkling eyes, most present shared the addiction that ran roughshod across much of Brittany’s life. Pollman recalled how his daughter worried that her parents needed to enjoy their lives, and Wiarda remembered how the two would attend each other’s respective musical concerts. Brittany was also the maid of honor at Wiarda’s wedding. “I wouldn’t have wanted anyone else standing by my side,” she said. For the Pollman family, many questions surrounding Brittany’s death might never be answered. How could anyone have managed to pry her beloved telephone from her grasp? And for a ravenous smoker, who was known to put down a pack of cigarettes per day, how is it possible that she didn’t make a withdrawal from her bank account later than March 27? In cold facts, a Salt Lake City police report outlines the grim procession of a call from a private investigator reporting the spot where Brittany’s body had rested for an unknown number of days. This bothers Patrice Pollman, just as it would nag at any mother of any child, drug addict, criminal or sinner, be damned. “I hate to think of my child dying alone in a parking lot and nobody calling it in or anything. Nobody,” she says. “It’s hurtful. It shouldn’t be happening to anybody.” CW


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THE

NUEVE

THE LIST OF NINE

BY MASON RODRICKC & MICHELLE L ARSON

@MRodrickc

CITIZEN REVOLT In a week, you can

CHANGE THE WORLD

‘CRAPPY’ FATHER’S DAY

Just think what an expression of love and devotion this would be. Here’s the perfect gift for Dad: his name on one of the Utah Arts Festival’s 80 on-site portapotties. This makes Dad an official Utah Arts Festival Friend Who Gives a Crap. Along with the personalized porta-potty, donors receive two tickets to the June 23-26 Utah Arts Festival and a mini commemorative porta-potty that doubles as a stress ball. All donations go to support the festival’s artistic programs. Library and Washington Squares, 200 E. 400 South, 801-322-2428, Thursday, June 23-Sunday, June 26, noon-11 p.m., $75 donation, UAF.org/Potty

KIDS EAT FREE PROGRAM

Nine ways to stay cool in the city this summer:

9.

Take a dip in the bad water Raging Waters tosses in the dumpsters in the back.

8. Super secret, super cool tunnels underneath the city. 7. The drunk-tank floor can be quite soothing. 6. Stay cool by not following Gov. Herbert back on Twitter. 5. Wear sleeveless tops to church and take advantage of the icy sting of disapproval.

4.

Relax in the din of rotating strangers behind the porta-potties at the Twilight concerts.

3. Collect beads of sweat accumulated from watching the guber-

natorial election race and place into a mister fan.

2.

Use your college rejection letters to make an umbrella out of your dashed hopes.

1. Finally buy that curiously cheap deep-freezer off KSL.

Children 18 and under don’t need to go hungry during the summer months when school’s not in session. The Summer Food Program fills the food gap for many kids. No registration or application headaches—all you need to do is show up. Besides breakfast and lunch, the Utah Food Bank and Salt Lake Community Action and Head Start sponsor sites serve supper—and this year the Utah Food Bank is offering meals on Saturdays at select locations. Utahns Against Hunger, for the second year, is sponsoring a modest literacy program at three Summer Food sites in west Salt Lake City. Kids who attend the program at Jordan Park on Tuesdays, Sherwood Park on Wednesdays or Northwest Central Park on Thursdays will get a free book all summer long. Utah families can find nearby summer meal sites through the website, by texting FOOD to 877877, or by calling UAF. 200 locations in Utah, 1-800-453-3663, free, UAH.org/ Food-Assistance/Summer-Food

WATER-ISSUES PANEL

Sometimes, it seems like your elected officials are all about themselves—to hell with collaboration. Join Working with elected officials on water issues: What can collaboration bring to the table? to find out how you can open minds and conserve a precious resource. The panel includes former Salt Lake City Mayor Ralph Becker, Cache County water manager Bob Fotheringham and Utah Department of Environmental Quality executive director Alan Matheson. Facilitated small group discussions will help you participate in planning techniques. Sarah Hinners, acting director of the Ecological Planning Center at the University of Utah’s Department of City & Metropolitan Planning, will present an “open space” format for discussion of other environmental-disputeresolution topics. S.J. Quinney College of Law, Flynn Workshop Room (Level 6), 383 S. University St., 801-581-6833, Wednesday, June 15, 1-5 p.m., free and open to public/ registration required, Conta.cc/1ZjUlBW

—KATHARINE BIELE Send events to editor@cityweekly.net


S NEofW the

Cashing In By 2009, when Zimbabwe’s central bank gave up on controlling inflation, its largest currency was the 100 trilliondollar bill—barely enough for bus fare in Harare and not even worth the paper needed to print it. However, that 100 trillion-dollar note (that’s “1” plus 14 zeros) has turned out to be a great investment for several astute traders in London and New Zealand, who bought thousands of them at pennies on the trillion and now report brisk sales to collectors on eBay at US $30 to $40 a note—a six-year return on investment, according to a May report in London’s The Guardian, of nearly 1,500 percent.

WEIRD

Can’t Possibly Be True Long-divorced Henry Peisch, 56, has seven children, but only one is still living with his ex-wife (who had originally been awarded $581 monthly support for all seven). (Three children are now independent, and three others successfully petitioned courts to live with Henry.) The resultant hardship (the $581 remains in effect) caused Henry to ask the Bergen County, New Jersey, Family Court several times for a “hardship” hearing, which the court denied (thus even defying the New Jersey Supreme Court). On April 8, Family Court judge Gary Wilcox, noting Peisch’s appearance on a related matter, spontaneously “granted” him his “ability to pay” hearing (with thus no opportunity for witnesses or evidence-gathering)—and summarily jailed him for missing some $581 payments (because, the judge concluded, he did not “believe” Peisch’s hardship claims).

Nature 2, Florida 0 Nicole Bjanes, casually zipping along Interstate 4 in Volusia County around noon on May 9, saw a red-eared slider turtle come sailing through the air and crash into her windshield, sending her car off the road. The Florida Highway Patrol said the turtle had become airborne after being hit by another car. (It was apparently unhurt and swam away when a firefighter released it into a nearby pond.) n On May 10, police in Key West responded to a caller at the scene of a giant banyan tree (common to Florida and featuring vertical roots that thicken, spread and become entangled with the central trunk). A woman had attempted to climb the tree but had fallen among the vertical roots, making her barely visible. Said a proud police spokesperson, “They popped her out like a cork.”

Update In 2006, a court in Preston, England, apparently weary of Akinwale Arobieke’s repeatedly, unconsensually “touching” men’s biceps in public, issued a Sexual Offenses Prevention Order making any such future contact automatic offenses. Arobieke admitted a longtime fascination with buffed-up physiques and continued from time to time to find biceps irresistible, but in May 2016 he convinced a Manchester Crown Court judge to lift the SOPO based on his assurance that he wanted a “fresh start” and would behave himself. The judge seemed not quite sure, but noted that police could still arrest him under other sexual or assault statutes. Thanks this week to Chuck Hamilton and to the News of the Weird Board of Editorial Advisors.

JUNE 9, 2016 | 15

Unclear on the Concept Prolancia Turner, 26, was arrested on May 13 at Vero Beach (Florida) Outlets mall after she allegedly walked out of a Claire’s store with unpaid-for earrings tucked into her waistband. Police

Perspective The president of the New England Organ Bank told U.S. News & World Report recently that she attributes the enormous upsurge in donations in recent years to the opioid “epidemic” that has produced a similarly enormous upsurge in fatal overdoses. Now, one out of every 11 donated organs comes as a result of the overdosing that in 2014 claimed over 47,000 lives. (An organsharing organization’s chief medical officer reminds that all organ donations are carefully screened, especially those acquired from overdose deaths.)

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n In April, police in Broome (in Australia’s far northwest) on traffic patrol stopped a 27-year-old man whose “several” children, including one infant, were unrestrained in his car while “cartons of beer” were “buckled into car seats,” according to an Australian Broadcasting Corp. report. He faces several charges, including driving on a suspended license.

Birdbrains In a recent book, biologist Jennifer Ackerman noted the extraordinary intelligence of birds—attributed to the dense packing of neurons in their equivalent of humans’ cerebral cortex (according to an April Wall Street Journal review of Ackerman’s “The Genius of Birds”). For example, the New Caledonia crow, among others, knows how to make and use hooked tools to hide food (and retrieve it from tricky-to-reach places), and the blue jay and others, which store many thousands of seeds during autumn, also steal seeds from less-vigilant birds—and they even return to re-hide food if they sense they have been spotted storing it earlier. Additionally, of course, the birds’ equivalent of the human larynx is so finely tuned as to be regarded as the most sophisticated sound in all of nature.

Australia! Yahoo News Australia reported (with photos) a man in Tallebudgera Creek on the country’s Gold Coast swimming with his pet snake. The man, standing chest-deep in water, would toss the snake (apparently a carpet python) a few feet and, according to the videos, the snake would swim back to him each time. (In the man’s other hand, of course: beer.)

New World Order Ms. Jai Dara Latto, 23, won the title Miss Transgender UK last September in London, but in February organizers stripped her of the title as being insufficiently trans, passing the crown to Ms. Daisy Bell. Officials had spotted Latto (who has worked as a drag queen) in a BBC documentary wearing boxer shorts, and since switching underwear is usually such a crucial step for transgenders, officials concluded that Latto must not yet have made a sufficient-enough commitment to qualify for the title.

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Government In Action U.S. Sen. Jeff Flake of Arizona, in a May publication deriding the value of certain federally funded research, highlighted several recent National Institutes of Health and National Science Foundation projects, such as the $13 million for exploring musical preferences of monkeys and chimpanzees; the $1.1 million judging whether cheerleaders are more attractive seen as a squad than individually; the $390,000 to determine how many shakes a wet dog needs to feel dry; and the $5 million to learn whether drunk birds slur when they sing. (Also strangely included was the actually valuable study by Michael Smith of Cornell University ranking where on the human body a bee sting was most painful. He found, from personal testing, that “on the penis” was only the third worst—research that brought Smith a prestigious Ig Nobel prize last year.)

reported her “crying and angry” and complaining that, “Everyone steals from this store. Why are you picking on me?”

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n Magician and professional gambler Brian Zembic, 55, finally consulted surgeons recently about removing his historic C-cup breast implants, which he bore on a $100,000 bet in 1996 (with a rider of $10,000 annually for retaining them). (He also won a companion game of backgammon to determine who would pay for the original surgery.) He told news sources in May that he had intended to have them removed early on, but that they had “grown on” him and become “a normal part of my life.”

BY CHUCK SHEPHERD


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ESSENTIALS

the

THURSDAY 6.9

Liz Kay: Monsters: A Love Story For so many women, Stacey Lane would be living a fantasy—suddenly finding herself hobnobbing with Hollywood celebrities, and falling into bed with one of the most popular heartthrob actors in the world. But in Monsters: A Love Story—the debut novel from poet and one-time Ogdenite Liz Kay—that fantasy proves extremely messy and complicated. Stacey, as it happens, is a recently widowed mother with two young children, still trying to cope with the new normal of her life. It comes out of nowhere that her novel-in-verse Monsters in the Afterlife—a feminist spin on the Frankenstein story—might ever be considered for a film adaptation, and even more improbable that A-list badboy Tommy DeMarco would want to produce and star in it. And when she comes face-to-face with Tommy’s charms, she finds it hard to accept that a relationship with him could make any sense. Kay creates a collection of appealing, distinctively messed-up characters—including Tommy’s troubled teenage daughter—as she explores Stacey’s increasingly complicated life bouncing between her Nebraska home and California. While it would have been easy for this story to become a kind of show-biz farce, Monsters remains anchored in the collision between what Stacey’s keen intellect and her broken heart are trying to tell her, even as she struggles with life as a single parent. What path will give her a shot at her own happily ever after? Start your own discovery at this reading and signing with the author. (Scott Renshaw) Liz Kay: Monsters: A Love Story @ The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 E. 1500 South, 801-484-9100, June 9, 7 p.m. KingsEnglish.com

ENTERTAINMENT PICKS JUNE 9-15, 2016

Complete Listings Online @ CityWeekly.net

THURSDAY 6.9

FRIDAY 6.10

As part of the Broadway Across America ensemble, Disney’s Newsies is coming to Capitol Theatre. Known for its high-energy music and choreography, the story was originally inspired by the 1899 Newsboys Strike in New York City that left its mark on both the city and the industry, while also illustrating the way young, struggling newspaper sellers and the heartlessness of big business do not mix. Newsies, the theatrical production, was adapted from the 1992 musical film directed by Kenny Ortega in 1992, starring a very young Christian Bale. Playwright Harvey Fierstein first launched the stage production in September of 2011. Since then, the music created by Alan Menken and Jack Feldman has become a favorite of Broadway audiences. The energetic choreography along with the lyrics tell the story of the downtrodden newspaper boys living in New York, trying to support their families. When they discover they are paid a pittance for their hard work and in return are making the publisher wealthy, they rise up in an attempt to bring fairness and end the injustices of child laborers. Twelve original songs set the scenes and assist in telling the story, from “Seize the Day” to “High Times, Hard Times.” The journey is a serious one but is successfully portrayed with a light-hearted attitude and a zest for life. Due to popular demand, the production will also return in August. (Aimee L. Cook) Broadway Across America: Disney’s Newsies @ Capitol Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, 801-355-2787, June 7-12, Tuesday-Thursday, 7:30 p.m.; Friday-Saturday, 8 p.m.; Sunday, 6:30 p.m. ArtTix.ArtSaltLake.org

Unless some miracle occurs in the next couple weeks, we’re not getting Bernie Sanders running against Donald Trump for the presidency. We’re not, kids. We’re just not. Let that sink in. Comedians James Adomian (Comedy Bang Bang, Last Comic Standing) and Anthony Atamanuik (Broad City, College Humor), however, have put together Trump vs. Bernie as a mock debate between the two candidates. Adomian plays the crouching and hacking Sanders who knows how grass-roots his campaign is, while Atamanuik takes on Trump in exaggerated orange skin, terrible hair and penchant for saying the most offensive things possible. The duo has perfected their impressions of the polarizing candidates down to mannerisms, expressions, body language and even stumpspeech one-liners. Back in March, the two appear on Comedy Central’s @Midnight for an extended hour-long debate and absolutely killed it, with Chris Hardwick throwing material at both men to play off of, to amazing results. Now the comedians bring their show through SLC, where you’ll watch the two debate the biggest issues of the 2016 election season—partially scripted and partially improv, with a guest moderator who will barely be moderating the discussion. The show incorporates special guests from time-to-time who won’t be announced until they show up on stage to ask their question, along with the occasional audience interaction to help give the show some spontaneity. With a few exceptions on the jokes and the topics, you never get the same show twice from this duo. So the SLC show—with what will probably be a mostly Bernie-supporting crowd—is bound to be unique. (Gavin Sheehan) Trump vs. Bernie @ Wiseguys Salt Lake City, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, June 10, 7:30 p.m., $20, TrumpVsBernie.com

Broadway Across America: Disney’s Newsies

Trump vs. Bernie

FRIDAY 6.10

Utah Scottish Festival

SATURDAY 6.11

Utah Asian Festival This weekend will have a double-dose of culture festivals available to check out: the Utah Scottish Festival at Thanksgiving Point, followed by the Utah Asian Festival that will take over South Towne Expo. The Scottish are one of the prominent cultures to help settle Utah after the Mormons first arrived, and were actually vital to some of the infrastructure and labor that happened before it received statehood. So to celebrate their heritage in the Beehive State, they’ll be throwing their annual Highland Games in Lehi. The event will feature piping and drumming performances, highland dancing, athletic competitions (including the caber toss and throwing the hammer), dozens of vendors and performances from Wicked Tinkers and Molly’s Revenge. Be sure to grab a tartan before you leave. On Saturday, the 39th annual Asian Festival will give people the chance to check out over two-dozen cultures. Experience exhibits where you’ll be able to learn about the cultures on the world’s biggest continent and surrounding island nations from the Indian and Pacific Oceans. As always, there will be fantastic food, crafts, live performances and demonstrations, amazing art and interesting vendor booths you won’t find at other, bigger cultural events. The festival will feature local representation from the Cambodian, Chinese, Filipino, Hawaiian, Indian, Indonesian, Japanese, Korean, Laotian, Taiwanese, Thai, Tibetan and Vietnamese communities—all of it absolutely free. (GS) Utah Scottish Festival & Highland Games @ Thanksgiving Point, 3003 Thanksgiving Way, Lehi, June 10, 5-10 p.m.; June 11, 8 a.m.-10 p.m., $10-$15, kids 11 & under free. UtahScotts.org Utah Asian Festival @ South Towne Expo Center, 9575 S. State, Sandy, June 11, 10 a.m.-7 p.m., free. UtahAsianFestival.com


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PRESENTS:

VISUALART

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Unspeakable Practices

JAMES WALTON

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he 2016 American presidential election season has been even more surreal than usual, with unconventional characters, extreme ideologies, candidates under government investigation, negative campaigning, improbable promises and outlandish claims. The voting process itself has even come under question. In the middle of that context, British artist Jennet Thomas has created the film and multimedia installation The Unspeakable Freedom Device—which looks at today’s politics through a surrealist, distorted lens—currently on display at the Utah Museum of Contemporary Art. Its dystopian world resembles a medieval environment with futuristic technologies, centered around the persona of “The Blue Lady,” a stand-in for former British prime minister Margaret Thatcher. Although the topic is politics, in contrast to the realism of American political satire, the visual style is surrealist, in the tradition of Monty Python and A Clockwork Orange. “My work takes place in an alternate reality that operates under a kind of dream logic,” Thomas says via email. “It’s a world similar in some ways to ours, but the rules are different.” The democratic processes we take for granted, which have become subtly subverted by technology and bureaucracy, are more overtly frustrated here, as voting is outlawed, citizens are fed a sense of contentment by the Unspeakable Freedom Device technological instrument, and an Orwellian regime manifests itself. A Thatcher impersonator, as well as totemesque doll, both utter actual quotes from the Iron Lady. “This work is probably my most elaborate, and technically ambitious,” Thomas, who emerged during the experimental underground film and art scene of 1990s London, and was a co-founder of the Exploding Cinema Collective, says. “But my themes remain: anarchic play, ambiguity, rhetorics of power and belief explored through the weirdly comic.” One of the major themes at play is the political symbolism of the colors red, green and blue in British politics (red and blue are the reverse from the U.S.—red is Left and blue is Right) and the way they are combined in television. The biggest challenge

in presenting the work to an American audience became “translation,” in a sense: making it resonate with our political reality, which is decidedly different. The work was met with controversy in Blackpool—where the film’s scenes take place, and where Thatcher actually gave many notable speeches—and the film’s release there in 2015, shortly after her death, was postponed. The UMOCA presentation will be the first time the work has been shown in America. The show is part of UMOCA’s relatively new emphasis on politically charged artworks, most notably in the exhibit Ideologues. Show curator Becca Maksym notes, “I’ve always been interested in the Reagan/ Thatcher relationship, and how that era in both our and Britain’s history resonates with contemporary politics. Binaries of liberal/conservative, capitalism/socialism ... and so forth became underlying themes for my 2016 exhibition programming, as I wanted to engage with the animated climate of our presidential election year.” The sculptural elements of the show allow the aesthetic logic of the film world to spill out of the film frame into the physical space of the viewer. The 45-minute piece loops around, and walking in at any point, you can see how it repeats, like a strange dream—and that’s part of Thomas’ intent as well. It might be taken as symbolic of the way politics spills out into “everyday life,” as though that was something that was separate and detached from politics. The freedom, as symbolized by the device, also seems intended to compel the viewer to question not only the word’s use, but also its meaning. “In the film, that ‘Unspeakable Freedom device’ is a thing—it’s the device everyone is supposed to want,

Jennet Thomas’ The Unspeakable Freedom Device, installation at the UMOCA

that facilitates an enhanced state of being, a state of ultimate upgrade. You wear it around your neck. It wears you,” Thomas explains. “[But] ‘Freedom’ is a very contested, weasel word, much abused by politicians, particularly so historically in the U.S. Freedom from what? There is a darkness in the word ‘Unspeakable’ that is appropriate to the times we are living in, when the real forces and ideologies that control our lives are hardly spoken of, unexamined.” Thomas’ work shows that the reality of political experience is a psychological narrative revealing hidden control mechanisms of the human psyche, acting out dramas that fulfill emotional needs often more than intellectual. The political space is one in which the tools of manipulation are fully brought to bear on the human animal. “There is a new kind of savagery in the air,” Thomas believes, as “freedom” and other words used to describe our unspeakable longings, desires and fears—used, as Noam Chomsky put it, to “manufacture consent.” CW

JENNET THOMAS: THE UNSPEAKABLE FREEDOM DEVICE

Utah Museum of Contemporary Art 20 S. West Temple 801-328-4200 Through July 30 Art Talk Wednesday, June 22, 7 p.m. UtahMOCA.org


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FRIDAY 6.10

For more than 15 years, Stephen Brown’s SB Dance company has been creating original dance theater works that push the envelope of what might be expected from such productions in Utah. Tutus and tights can make for some fantastic explorations in movement, but sometimes a naked body is what is called for. And maybe, as has been the case in the past, it can be in the service of a story of bondage, or cannibalism. This year’s all-new production, SNaked, takes on a tale most of us think we know: Adam and Eve’s journey from innocence in the Garden of Eden to the knowledge that ultimately drives them out into the suffering of the world. Like other SB Dance creations, this one involves a full range of designers and multi-media components, in addition the potentially eyebrow-raising mature content. This is one temptation that might be worth giving in to. (Scott Renshaw) SB Dance: SNaked: The True Story of the Garden of Eden @ Rose Wagner Black Box Theater, 138 W. 300 South, 801-355-2787, June 10-11 & June 17-18, 8 p.m., $22.50. ArtTix.ArtSaltLake.org

PERFORMANCE THEATER

Arsenic and Old Lace Caine Lyric Theatre, 28 West Center, 435-797-8022, June 9-Aug. 5, varying days, 7:30 p.m.; July 23, 1 p.m., CCA.USU.edu con·temp·POE·rar·y Meat & Potato Theatre, Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801-355-2787, through June 12, ArtTix.ArtSaltLake.org The Curious Savage CenterPoint Legacy Theatre, 525 N. 400 West, Centerville, 801298-1302, June 10-July 2, Monday & ThursdaySaturday, 7 p.m., CenterPointTheatre.org Disney’s Newsies Capitol Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, 800-259-5840, June 7-9, 7:30 p.m.; June 10, 8 p.m.; June 11, 2 & 8 p.m.; June 12, 1 & 6:30 p.m., SaltLakeCity.Broadway.com (see p. 16) Disney’s The Little Mermaid SCERA Shell Outdoor Theatre, 699 S. State, Orem, 801-225-2787, June 3-18, Monday-Saturday, 8 p.m., SCERA.org Fiddler on the Roof Heritage Theatre, 2505 S. Highway 89, Perry, 435-723-8392, through June 25, Mondays, Fridays and Saturdays, 7:30 p.m.; June 11 & 18, 2 & 7:30 p.m., HeritageTheatreUtah.com High School Musical Jr. Timpanogos Valley Theater, 90 N. 100 West, Heber City, 435654-2125, June 10-18, Fridays & Saturdays, TimpValleyTheatre.com Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat Draper Amphitheater, 944 East Vestry Road, Draper, June 3-11, Friday, Saturday, & Monday, 8 p.m., DraperArtsCouncil.org The Man of La Mancha LaForge Encore Theatre Co., 328 N. Coleman, Tooele, 435-248-2048, June 15-25, 7 p.m., LaForgeEncore.org The Most Lamentable Roman Tragedy of Titus Andronicus Pinnacle Acting Co., Westminster College Dumke Auditorium, 1250 E. 1700 South, 801-810-5793, June 9 - 25, 7:30 p.m.; Friday-Saturday, 2 p.m. & 7:30 p.m., PinnacleActingCompany.org Noises Off! Egyptian Theatre, 328 Main, Park City, 435-649-9371, June 9-11, 8 p.m.; June 12, 6 p.m., EgyptianTheatreCompany.org Perfect Pitch Desert Star Theatre, 4861 S. State, Murray, 801-266-2600, June 9-Aug. 20, varying days/times Monday-Friday, DesertStar.biz

COURTESY SB DANCE CO.

SB Dance: SNaked: The True Story of the Garden of Eden

Peter Pan Hale Center Theatre Orem, 225 West 400 North, 801-226-8600, June 16-Aug. 6, Monday-Saturday 7:30 P.M., Saturday matinee 3 p.m., HaleTheatre.org Rock of Ages Ziegfeld Theater, 3934 S. Washington Blvd., Ogden, 855-944-2787, through June 25, Friday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m. & special sing-along June 12, 6 p.m.; June 18 & 25, 2 & 7:30 p.m., TheZiegfeldTheater.com Romeo & Juliet Heritage School’s Loveland Performing Arts Center, 5600 North Heritage School Drive, Provo, 801-226-2550, June 9-11 & 13; 7 p.m., SVAcademy.org Shrek the Musical Beverly’s Terrace Plaza Playhouse, 99 E. 4700 South, Ogden, 801-3930070, June 10-July 30, Mondays, Fridays & Saturdays, 7:30 p.m., TerracePlayhouse.com

DANCE

SLC Ballet Spring Gala 2016 Jeanne Wagner Theatre, 138 W. 300 South, 801-355-2787, June 10, 7:30 p.m.; June 11, 2:30 & 7:30 p.m., ArtSaltLake.org SNaked: The True Story of the Garden of Eden SB Dance, Rose Wagner Black Box, 138 W. 300 South, 801-355-2787, June 4, 10, 11, 17 & 18, 8 p.m., SBDance.com (see above)

CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

Tabernacle Organ Recitals Tabernacle, Temple Square, Salt Lake City, year-round, MondaySaturday, 12 p.m., MormonTabernacleChoir.org

COMEDY & IMPROV

Alex Velluto Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., Ogden, 801-622-5588, June 10, 8 p.m., WiseguysComedy.com Faux Pas Sandy Station, 8925 S. Harrison St., Sandy, 801-255-2078, June 10, 8:30 p.m., SandyStation.Yapsody.com Improv Broadway Dress Rehearsals Brigham Larsons Pianos, 1497 South State Street, Orem, 909-260-2509, every Monday, 8 p.m., free, ImprovBroadway.com Improv Broadway Brigham Larson Pianos, 1497 S. State, Orem, 909-260-2509, every Friday, 8 p.m., ImprovBroadway.com


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moreESSENTIALS COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE @ CITYWEEKLY.NET

Off the Wall Comedy Improv Draper Historic Theatre, 12366 S. 900 East, Draper, 801-5724144, Saturdays, 10:30 p.m., DraperTheatre.org Open Mic Night Wiseguys Salt Lake City, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, Wednesdays, 7:30 p.m., WiseguysComedy.com $5 Improv Comedy Spectacular Sugar Space Arts Warehouse, 132 W. 800 South, June 9, 7:30 p.m., TheSugarSpace.com Jackson Banks Sandy Station, 8925 S. Harrison St., Sandy, 801-255-2078, June 11, 8:30 p.m., SandyStation.com Keith Stubbs Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., Ogden, 801-622-5588, June 11, 8 p.m., WiseguysComedy.com Marcus Wiseguys Salt Lake City, 194 South 400 West, 801-532-5233, June 9, 7:30 p.m.; June 10, 9:30 p.m.; June 11, 7 p.m. & 9:30 p.m., $15, WiseguysComedy.com Trump vs. Bernie starring James Adomian & Anthony Atamanuik Wiseguys Salt Lake City, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, June 10, 7:30 p.m., WiseguysComedy.com (see p. 16) Laughing Stock Improv The Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, 801-355-4628, Fridays & Saturdays, 10 p.m., LaughingStock.us Quick Wits Comedy Midvale Performing Arts Center, 695 W. Center St., Midvale, 801-8240523, Saturday, June 11, 7:30 p.m. & 10 p.m., $6-8, QWComedy.com

LITERATURE AUTHOR APPEARANCES

Liz Kay: Monsters: A Love Story The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-4849100, June 9, 7 p.m., KingsEnglish.com (see p. 16) Alan Furst: A Hero of France The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-4849100, June 10, 7 p.m., KingsEnglish.com Kate Jarvik Birch: Tarnished Barnes & Noble Sugar House, 1104 E. 2100 South, 801-463-2610, June 11, 1 p.m., BarnesandNoble.com M. Thomas Gammarino: King of the Worlds Weller Book Works, 607 Trolley Square, 801-3282586, June 11, 2 p.m., WellerBookWorks.com Sarah Beard: Beyond the Rising Tide The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801484-9100, June 11, 7 p.m., KingsEnglish.com

SPECIAL EVENTS FESTIVALS & FAIRS

Park City Farmers Market The Canyons Resort, 1951 Canyons Resort Drive, Park City, Wednesdays, noon-6 p.m., through Oct. 26, ParkCityFarmersMarket.com Park Silly Sunday Market 600 Main Street, Park City, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., June 5-Sept. 18, ParkSillySundayMarket.com Sugar House Farmers Market Fairmont Park, 1040 E. Sugarmont, Salt Lake City, June 8-Oct. 26, Wednesdays, 5-8 p.m., SugarHouseFarmersMarket.org Downtown Farmers Market Pioneer Park, 300 S. 300 West, Salt Lake City, June 11-Oct. 22, Saturdays, 8 a.m.-2 p.m., SLCFarmersMarket.org

FESTIVALS & FAIRS

Utah Asian Festival South Towne Expo Center, 9575 S. State, June 11, 10 a.m.-7 p.m., free, UtahAsianFestival.com (see p. 16) Utah Scottish Festival & Highland Games Thanksgiving Point, 3003 Thanksgiving Way, Lehi, June 10, 5-10 p.m.; June 11, 8 a.m.-10 p.m., $10-$15, kids 11 & under free, UtahScotts.org (see p. 16)

TALKS & LECTURES

Christine McKinley: The Math and Science of a Smart Girl Life Utah State University ESLC, 1400 Old Main Hill, Logan, 435-797-3703, June 9, 7-8 p.m., CWG.USU.edu

VISUAL ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

Abstract Expressions Evolutionary Healthcare, 461 E. 200 South, 801-519-2461, through June 11, EvolutionaryHealthcare.com Art at the Main Spring Show Sugar Space Arts Warehouse, 132 S. 800 West, through June 25, ArtAttheMain.com Brian Snapp: House of My Brother/House of My Sister Finch Lane Gallery, 54 Finch Lane, 801596-5000, through June 10, SaltLakeArts.org Claire Taylor: The Inhabitants of the Salt Lake City Cemetery Marmalade Branch, 280 W. 500 North, 801-594-8680, through June 24, SLCPL.org


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News from the geeks.

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what’s new in comics, games, movies and beyond.

moreESSENTIALS COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE @ CITYWEEKLY.NET

Drips, Splashes & Puddles: Paintings by James Haymond Anderson-Foothill Library, 1135 S. 2100 East, 801-594-8611, through June 16, SLCPL.org Jennet Thomas: The Unspeakable Freedom Device Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through July 30, UtahMOCA.org (see p. 18) Jennifer Seely: Supporting Elements Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through Sept. 24, UtahMOCA.org Jim Jacobs: Append Finch Lane Gallery, 54 Finch Lane, 801-596-5000, through June 10, SaltLakeArts.org Joan Zone Art at the Main, 210 E. 400 South, 801-353-4088, through June 12, ArtAttheMain.com Lewis J. Crawford: Constructs Finch Lane Gallery, 54 Finch Lane, 801-596-5000, through June 10, SaltLakeArts.org Lucy Peterson Watkins: Textures of the Wasatch Red Butte Garden, 300 S. Wakara Way, 801-5850556, through June 19, 9 a.m.-9 p.m., $7-$12, children under 3 free, RedButteGarden.org Maryann Webster: Narrative Works Finch Lane Gallery, 54 Finch Lane, 801-596-5000, through June 10, SaltLakeArts.org

Michael Swearngin Modern West Fine Art, 177 E. 200 South, 801-385-3383, through June 11, ModernWestFineArt.com National Parks of the West: Celebrating 100 Years in the Parks David Dee Fine Arts, 1709 E. 1300 South, 801-583-8143, through June 10, DavidDeeFineArts.com Nic Courdy: Metaphornography Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801328-4201, through July 23, UtahMOCA.org Oonju Chun/Heidi Moller Somsen Phillips Gallery, 444 E. 200 South, 801-364-8293, through June 10, Phillips-Gallery.com The Painted Veil Rio Gallery, 300 S. Rio Grande, through July 8, VisualArts.Utah.gov Roberta Glidden Dibble Gallery, 444 E. 200 South, 801-364-8293, through June 10, PhillipsGallery.com Sarah May: Identity Retablos Mestizo Institute of Culture & Arts, 631 W. North Temple, Ste. 700, through June 10, Facebook.com/MestizoArts Whitney Bushman: The Greatest Joy Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, June 10-Aug. 6, UtahMOCA.org

24 | JUNE 9, 2016

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SUMMER GUIDE 2016

D

With weather already peaking at at triple digits (thanks Obama), and non-stop news coverage of the current presidential election cycle, we figured we’d put one more proverbial nail in the bipartisan coffin and give our biggest Summer Guide yet a political hue.

| CITY WEEKLY |

ust off the tank top collection and bust out the heavy artillery SPF, baby … summer is here! OK, we’re technically jumping the gun here as the first official day of summer isn’t till June 20, but can you blame us? No other season has the effect good ol’ summer has. Think about it, when was the last time you exclaimed, ‘Fuck yeah, autumn!’

Are you at your most American during firework displays? Our sunny candidate has you covered (see p. 28). You can also feast al fresco like a regular Kennedy (p. 50) and sip like a pro after checking out our Cocktail Caucus. Political pinkies up! Whatever party you swear allegiance to, one thing is for sure: ain’t no party like a summer party ’cause a summer party gets weird. Ditch the luau theme and check our our memorable suggestions instead (p. 32). We also catch up with some of SLC’s favorite politicos and ask them about their most memorable summer tales (p. 44). Scandal alert: One of them confesses to hoeing during his youth (though it’s probably not what you think). So go ahead, Make America Groove Again (or at least Salt Lake City) with a playlist built exclusively by local musical constituents (p. 64). Feel the burn (actual one coming from a raging fire) and ditch the barbecue in favor of something a little bit more continental for a memorable gathering (p. 48) and say #IStandWithHerds of hulking mammals at Antelope Island and beyond (p. 34). Inside these patriotic pages, you’ll also find a roundup of the best road trips (p. 40), theatre (p. 60) and outdoor music fests (p. 66) the season has to offer. Is staying in basking in the AC more your speed? Curl up with your favorite super delegate and binge-watch some good summer TV shows (p. 58) or chill to any of our politically tinged presidential films (p. 62).

-Enrique Limón

JUNE 6, 2016 | 25

So go head, pull a lever for democracy. Just don’t filibust all over the place.


MA

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2016

S U M M E R G REAT

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VOTE R SUMME M

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SUMMER GUIDE 2016

CONTENTS

SO

32

50

28 OFF WITH A BANG

The 411 on the Fourth of July

32 SIX PARTY SYSTEM

Half-baked ideas that could make or break the party

34 VOTE FUN

26 | JUNE 9, 2016

| CITY WEEKLY |

Your summer to-do list

40

ROADSIDE ODDITIES Utah road trips are more fun when they get weird

44

SUMMER POLITICS Want to know where local politicos bask in the sun?

66

48 A SONG OF RICE & FIRE

60 OH, THE DRAMA!

50 SUMMER BREEZES

62 FUNNING FOR OFFICE

52 COCKTAIL CAUCUS

64 MIGHTY SOULS

58 SUMMER TV 2016

66 SUMMER CONCERTS

Spice up your next BBQ with Spanish Paella

Patios, rooftops, gardens and decks for al fresco dining in SLC

The local buzz on summer’s favorite sips What’s returning in June, July and August

Leave the histrionics to the professionals Political flicks to distract you from this year’s presidential election

A locally sourced playlist for the end of the world

Your guide to gorging on music outdoors


SUMMER GUIDE 2016 | CITY WEEKLY |

JUNE 6, 2016 | 27


A ROUND-UP OF UTAH’S BIGGEST INDEPENDENCE DAY CELEBRATIONS.

BY SCOTT RENSHAW

MAGNA

PARK CITY

Activities begin with the 7:30 a.m. 5K Fun Run/Walk at Copper Park (8950 W. 2600 South), with check-in beginning at 6 a.m. Non-runners can enjoy the Lions Club Breakfast in the park (free, but donations accepted) from 7 a.m. to 11 a.m., with cannonade and flag ceremony at 7 a.m. Magna’s parade follows at noon on Main Street, with inflatables, games and other activities returning to Copper Park from 1:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. ($12 for unlimited ride wristband, 50 cent game tickets). Enjoy music in the park by Bad Feather from 8 a.m. to 10 p.m., wrapping up with fireworks at 10 p.m. MagnaUtah.org

MURRAY

July Fourth marks the culmination of Murray’s “Fun Days” which also includes a production of the musical 1776 at Murray Park Amphitheater. Independence Day activities begin with Rotary Club community breakfast (6:30 a.m.–10 a.m.), sunrise service with Murray Concert Band (7 a.m.) and 5K (8 a.m.) at Murray Park. Murray also hosts one of the earlier parades, beginning at 8:30 a.m. at Fashion Place Mall, continuing down State Street north to Vine Street and east to Murray

Park City’s annual Old-Fashioned Fourth of July Celebration begins with the traditional pancake breakfast at City Park (1354 Park Ave., 7 a.m.). Cole Sport Mountain Fun Run 5K begins at 8 a.m., with rugby games, live music, beer garden and barbecue at City Park 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The parade route heads down Main Street beginning at 11 a.m., with more than 70 floats celebrating local history. Enjoy a free concert at Park City Mountain Resort (1345 Lowell Ave., 7 p.m.–9:30 p.m.), with fireworks at dusk. Or get the weekend started early with Utah Symphony’s Patriotic Concert at Deer Valley Resort Snow Park Amphitheater on Saturday, July 2 (7:30 p.m.). PCLodge.com

PROVO

The state’s most elaborate red-white-andblue festivities take place in Utah Valley, including the Freedom Days activities July 1, 2 and 4 on Provo’s Center Street, featuring food, entertainment, arts and crafts vendors and carnival. The July Fourth Grand Parade— the state’s largest—begins at 9 a.m. at 960 N. University Ave., with the route proceeding south to 100 South, east to 200 East and north to Center Street, ending at 900 East. But the

The grounds at Thanksgiving Point

of July

big event, as usual, is the Stadium of Fire concert and fireworks show at BYU’s Lavell Edwards Stadium (1700 N. Canyon Road), scheduled this year for Saturday, July 2 at 8 p.m. Country star Tim McGraw headlines; tickets are $29-$175. FreedomFestival.org

DEREK CARLISLE

Park (no car access in or out of Murray Park between 7:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.). Activities at Murray Park throughout the day include food and game booths, coed volleyball tournament and plenty of kid-friendly games. Entertainment headliners include Slickrock Gypsies, Red Desert Ramblers and Charley Jenkins, culminating in fireworks at 10 p.m. Murray.Utah.gov

4

TH

RIVERTON

Riverton Town Days allow one of the opportunities for patriotic fun that avoids the Fourth of July crowds. The Town Days parade takes place on Friday, July 1 on a route that includes Redwood Road from 13400 South to 12800 South, ending at Riverton City Park (1452 W. 12600 South). Follow that up with a full day of activities on Saturday, July 2, including Riverton Country Mile 5K/10K/mile run and Tour De Riverton bike race, chuck wagon breakfast (7 a.m.–10 a.m.), games and vendors at Riverton City Park, and fireworks display (10 p.m.). RivertonCity.com

SANDY

The annual July Fourth festivities once again take place at the South Towne Promenade (172 W. 10000 South), with inflatables, Youth Arts Festival, vendors and 5050 BMX stunt shows throughout the day. Daytime entertainment includes Synergy Dance Group, The Middle Mountain, Acadamh Rince Irish Dance Group and Cinders before the parade (6 p.m.) around the festival grounds. Evening headliner The Salamanders (8 p.m.–10 p.m.) leads in to the fireworks “sky concert” at 10 p.m., with The Salamanders continuing a post-fireworks show. Sandy.Utah.gov

Fireworks over Sandy RICK CAVENDER

Thanksgiving Point’s Electric Park (just west of the Megaplex Theatres) hosts afternoon and evening activities on July 4, with concessions and vendors beginning at 4 p.m. Fireworks are scheduled to begin at 10 p.m., set off from the north side of the property. Admission is free. ThanksgivingPoint.org

LEHI

RICK CAVENDER

SUMMER GUIDE 2016 | CITY WEEKLY |

28 | JUNE 9, 2016

OFF WITH A BANG

Freedom Days in Provo


SUMMER GUIDE 2016 | CITY WEEKLY |

JUNE 6, 2016 | 29


SUMMER GUIDE 2016

4

TH RICK CAVENDER

of July

Independence Day at Snowbird

30 | JUNE 9, 2016

Celebrate Independence Day at the ’Bird with family-friendly rides and activities, live music and an all-you-can-eat pancake buffet on The Plaza Deck (9 a.m.–noon). Enjoy live music while you eat with the C.J. Santoro Dixieland Band. Snowbird.com

SOUTH SALT LAKE

Start your day with a hotcakes/waffle breakfast at Fitts Park (3050 S. 500 East) from 8:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. Parade begins 9:30 a.m. on the west side of the Columbus Center (2531 S. 400 East), continuing south on 400 East to 2700 South, turning right on 500 East to Fitts Park. Freedom Fest at Fitts Park (11 a.m.-2 p.m.) includes live music, food, entertainment, vendors, train ride, bounce house, games and more. SouthSaltLakeCity.com

SUGAR HOUSE

The Sugar House Arts Festival (2100 S. Highland Drive) begins at 10 a.m. on July 4, now officially combined with the fireworks

show at Sugar House Park (1330 E. 2100 South). Businesses are scheduled to set up stops in Hidden Hollow with games and other activities. Food trucks and vendors will be on the west side of Sugar House Park, while on the northeast side, War Scores will be setting up the game of Bubble Soccer; other music and entertainment still to be determined at press time. Fireworks are scheduled to begin at 10 p.m. SugarHouseChamber.org/ArtsFest

WEST JORDAN

West Jordan’s Independence Day Parade begins at 10:30 a.m., with a route from 7000 South to 8040 South on Redwood Road. For something a little different from the usual Independence Day festivities, the annual PRCA Rodeo Western Stampede (July 1, 2 and 4, 8035 S. 2200 West, $10-$17) offers a variety of roping and riding events. The Fourth of July program leads up to free evening events at Veterans Memorial Park (1985 W. 7800 South), including a family-friendly movie at 9 p.m. (still to be determined at press time) and fireworks at 10 p.m. CW WesternStampede.com

RICK CAVENDER

| CITY WEEKLY |

SNOWBIRD

Western Stampede


SUMMER GUIDE 2016

e.

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| CITY WEEKLY |

Save $3 e itemS: other Sal k 46 BourBon $3 off maker’S moadrka $4 off pinnacle vodka flavorS $4 off pinnacle vk BourBon $3 off knoB creek rye BourBon $3 off knoB creehoney BourBon $3 off ff Jim Beam ed Stag BourBon $3 o Jim Beam r

JUNE 6, 2016 | 31


SUMMER GUIDE 2016

SIX PARTY SYSTEM PLANNING A SLIP’N SLIDE RAGER? YAWN.

I

BY WESTIN PORTER

DEREK CARLISLE

t’s summer in Utah—the season of love, high pollen counts, construction, don’tdrive-air-quality days and, of course, summer parties. But for those of you who are tired of the same old BBQ, house party or bar, look no further than the City Weekly Stupid Summer Party Guide. Here, we’ll explore a few half-baked ideas that could either turn out to be the best summer party you’ve ever thrown, or a depressing reminder of how very few friends you have. We’ll shoot for the former.

SUMMER SLAM

32 | JUNE 9, 2016

| CITY WEEKLY |

Think you outgrew your love for professional wrestling along with your Jincos and Third Eye Blind CDs? Or perhaps you were always too sophisticated for such a mockery of true athletic feats. Either way, get over yourself. Reach deep into your bottom drawer of nostalgia for that plastic WWF Intercontinental Champion belt you purchased mostly ironically from Toys R Us, strap on your tightest spandex, (or better yet visit Pib’s Exchange and buy some that accentuate your package and/or cleavage,) pull on that blonde bowl-cut wig and get ready for Summer Slam 2016, hosted by you in your backyard, brother! The ’90s had a lot to offer, but the resurgence of professional wrestling toward the turn of the century was best. Whether you were into wrestling or not, there was a collective vaunting of the ridiculous sport and its accompanying pay-per-view viewing parties, early internet forum exchanges and even the oh-so-controversial “backyard wrestling” matches. Just make sure you and all of your friends have coordinated who will be dressing up as who, so that you don’t end up with 12 Stone Cold Steve Austins ... Or, better yet, just throw a Stone Cold Steve Austin party.

THE REDNECK RAGER

Whether you’re actually a redneck or not is not important for this party idea. If you are, think of it as your own little holiday on which you get to celebrate your blue-collar, country culture by swilling warm Busch, combining cowboy boots and shorts, having “biggest-dip of Copenhagen Long Cut” contests and eating a lot of red meat. If you aren’t a redneck, however, think of this as an opportunity to indulge in the behavior you so haughtily hold yourself above. Get a keg, throw a tarp in the back of your truck and fill it up with the garden hose for a true, redneck hot tub.

DONALD TRUMP MIGHT ACTUALLY BE PRESIDENT BLOWOUT

Remember Y2K? The parties people threw that were one-half celebratory, one-half scared shitless, all in the spirit of embracing possible doom? That’s the feel of this party idea. At this point, if we’re this close to actually electing Donald Trump president of the United States of America, aren’t we kind of already screwed? So buy some wine coolers, put on your baggiest Tommy Bahama, and be the first to host this sure-fire rager. And in true Trump fashion, to keep those unwanted party guests out, just put up a wall.

BEACH GAMES UTAH STYLE

What to do when the weather app reads triple digits for every foreseeable day in the forecast, without an ocean nearby and the nearest lake uninhabitable to everything but brine shrimp? Beach day, baby! That’s right, who says you need an actual beach for beach day? Find your old kiddie pool, procure two bags of sand, break out the volleyball net and invite the whole neighborhood. Just make sure not to eat at least 30 minutes before getting in the water to prevent cramps.

SUPER GARAGE BAND CONCERT SERIES

Look, we all love Twilight and the Red Butte Gardens Concert Series to bits, but sometimes we just can’t make it—whether it’s the crowds, the cover charges or maybe the D.D. fell through while you were pregaming and Uber is on surge pricing. When it happens, dust off the old Squire Strat (with the shredded stock strings), break out your little brother’s pawn shop drum kit with the cottage cheese drum heads and relearn the power chords to your favorite songs. Something about a lot of booze, basement acoustics and Sabbath covers brings out the party animal in all of us.

MILLENIAL PARTY

Selfie sticks, Bud Light Lime-A-Ritas, hashtags, hoverboards … we want to see all the stops pulled out for this one. Known for their ability to connect with masses from all over the globe all without the attention span and social awareness to maintain eye-contact during conversation, millenials will be sure to make this party look like the best place to be to everyone who isn’t there. Later on, host a doublefeature screening of The Lion King and Toy Story, serve Pop-Tarts and Otter Pops and post about the sweet, sweet nostalgia on your Myspace. CW


SUMMER GUIDE 2016 | CITY WEEKLY |

JUNE 6, 2016 | 33


BY MIKEY SALTAS

BEST HIKES

| CITY WEEKLY |

The ‘Living Room’ Hike

A classic Salt Lake City hike complete with stones arranged to form chairs to relax and take in the surrounding scenery. Bring enough water for you and your companions as there’s a 1,000-foot gain in elevation in just over a mile from the starting point. Rush hour on the trailhead is right before dusk in order to catch a glimpse of the setting sun over the valley, so plan accordingly. Start: From Foothill Drive, turn east onto Wakara Way, right onto Colorow Road. 383 S. Colorow Road Distance: 2.5 miles Dogs: on leash Level of Difficulty: moderate

The “Living Room” View

Morris Meadows Trailhead

One of the trailheads of the Bonneville Shoreline Trail—a series of trails along the Wasatch Mountains resulting from the recession of Lake Bonneville—Morris Meadows Trailhead offers a spectacular view of the city with just a moderate incline. Short, sweet and unbeknown to most, Morris Meadows is ideal for those looking for a quiet hike with room to roam for their furry companions. Start: North on I Street until it becomes Northhills Drive Distance 1.5 miles Dogs: yes Level of Difficulty: easy

Donut Falls Hiking Trail

Vastly popular during summer, fall and even the winter for snowshoe enthusiasts, Donut Falls unquestionably lives up to the hype as one of the area’s premiere spectacles. Unfortunately, no, there’s not a Banbury Cross donut stand at the end of the trail, although that’s the only accessory that could make this hike more splendid. Rather, a stream cascading into a “donut hole” will astonish trekkers of all ages. Start: Drive approximately 9 miles up Big Cottonwood Canyon to the signed Mill D Trailhead Distance: 3.5 miles Dogs: no Level of Difficulty: easy

Donut Falls

DEREK CARLISLE

U

tah summers are much like comets: We diligently wait for them for ages only to have them pass by in the blink of an eye without fully appreciating their beauty and radiance. Take advantage of these shortlived months—utilize trails and hikes otherwise covered in snow for much of the year, explore Utah’s hidden treasures, escape the dry heat and get soaked—all without breaking the bank. This summer bucket list will serve as your guide to getting the most out of your summer. But act fast—it’ll be Labor Day before you know it and the flash that is summer will be gone without so much as a warning.

34 | JUNE 9, 2016

DEREK CARLISLE

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DEREK CARLISLE

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Red Butte Garden

Explore the mystical fields of blooming bulbs that is Red Butte Garden. Operated by the University of Utah, the gardens house 450,000 plants that bloom at differing points of the seasons, resulting in a new experience in every nature walk. With themed gardens and great views of the valley, Red Butte is the perfect—and most breathtaking—place to decompress, enjoy a picnic or just take in the different sights and aromas. They also offer free Wi-Fi that allows people a serene environment to study or work. Price: $12 for non-members Location: 300 S. Wakara Way, Salt Lake City

Utah’s Hogle Zoo

Whether you’re 8 years old or 80, the diverse wildlife of Utah’s Hogle Zoo will leave a lasting impression for years to come. The zoo houses 800 different animals found in all parts of

the world ranging from imposing mammals, an aquatic section and other animals that come in all shapes and sizes. Exhibits currently include the African Savanna (African lion, giraffe, zebra), the Great Apes (orangutan, gorilla) and the Rocky Shores (bald eagle, grizzly and polar bears, various fish), among others. The wildlife truly needs to be seen in person, and Hogle Zoo offers that right in our own backyard. Price: $15 Location: 2600 E. Sunnyside Ave., Salt Lake City

DEREK CARLISLE

Dust off your camera: Bell Canyon is brimming with photogenic waterfalls and gorgeous reservoirs. This hike can be as easy or strenuous as you desire—the first reservoir is a half-mile above the trailhead and many about-face at this point. Two miles ahead (totaling about five miles) is the first and most impressive waterfall. After that, only experienced hikers should undertake the considerably more strenuous terrain to reach the upper reservoir—a trek totaling around 9.5 miles. Start: 10245 S. Wasatch Blvd. (clearly signed) Distance: 1-9.5 miles Dogs: no Level of Difficulty: easy-hard

Our candidate learns the tricks of barbecuing at Liberty Park

Tracy Aviary

Tracy Aviary shelters hundreds of birds from all corners of the globe. Did you know that of all bird species, 12 percent are considered endangered or threatened to become endangered, due to habitat loss, predation and illegal capture? Tracy Aviary offers refuge to these birds and contributions to the aviary help in conservation efforts across the world. The star of the show is the endangered Andean condor named Andy—a massive bird that has resided in Salt Lake City for nearly 60 years. Come for the birds, leave with new insight and memories to last a lifetime. Price: $10 Location: 589 E. 1300 South, Salt Lake City

Antelope Island State Park

There’s no shortage of activities at Antelope Island State Park. You can hike, mountain bike or horseback ride one of the numerous trails to vantage points overlooking the vast Great Salt Lake, or spend the night under the stars at one of the campsites. The 28,000-acre state park is also a great place to explore and observe wildlife as it is home to antelope, deer, bobcats, bighorn sheep and imposing herds of American bison. Price: $10 per vehicle Location: 4528 W. 1700 South, Syracuse

FUN IN THE SUN (FOR CHEAP) Shoot the Tube

Hogle Zoo

The “Tube” is an aqueduct that drains Parley’s Creek, and runs directly under I-215. The fun arises in damming the entrance of the aqueduct using old signs or tarps, wait for the water to build up on a tube or other floatation device, then remove the dam and race down the tunnel on a wave of water into a natural pool waiting on the other side of the Interstate. An attraction mostly known to native Salt Lakers, shooting the tube is almost like a rite of passage, coming out of the bottom as a full-fledged Salt Lake City “local.” Price: free Location: access through Parley’s Creek bike trail at the end of Wasatch Boulevard.

Downtown Farmers Market

RICK CAVENDER

SUMMER GUIDE 2016

Bell Canyon

The Downtown Farmers Market has gained popularity since its humble beginnings in the early ’90s. The market features local goods, as farmers from across Utah and bordering states (produce must be grown within 250 miles of Salt Lake City) converge on Pioneer Park to sell fresh fruit, vegetables and more every Saturday over the summer and fall months. Also included are various food trucks from across the valley, baked goods and arts and crafts vendors. Price: free Location: Pioneer Park, 300 S. 300 West, Salt Lake City

Liberty Park

Opened in 1882, Liberty Park is the oldest public park in Salt Lake City and perhaps the most vibrant. As an escape from the city—in the city—people can be seen running, biking, rollerblading or basking in the sun. Other amenities include a basketball court, public pool, playground for the children, bocce ball pits and terraces for picnics. Spend a morning enjoying all Liberty Park has to offer—and if the thought of being active terrifies you, the Park Cafe’s glorious bacon and eggs is right across the street. Location: 600 E. 900 South, Salt Lake City

Gilgal Sculpture Garden

Unknown to most, Gilgal Sculpture Garden is a small, quirky space that boasts 12 stone sculptures and more than 70 stones engraved with scriptures, quotes and poems. The visionary behind the garden is the late Thomas Child, an LDS bishop renowned for his advanced masonry techniques. The sculpture of the sphinx with the face of Mormon founder Joseph Smith has been nothing short of an urban myth in these parts, but can indeed be found in the collection. The garden had fallen victim to vandalism until the Friends of Gilgal Garden (FOGG) gained public and state support of former mayor Rocky Anderson and renovated and reopened the garden in 2000. If nothing else, Gilgal provides visitors a step back into Utah history, and is as abstract as it is mysterious. Price: free Location: 749 S. 500 East, Salt Lake City


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BEWARE THE SPLASH ZONE

38 | JUNE 9, 2016

| CITY WEEKLY |

Lagoon A Beach

Lagoon amusement park has tons of rides for everyone, from kids to hardcore thrill seekers (i.e., Cannibal, Wicked, Skycoaster). When riding the coasters gets too much in the summer heat, make your way to the park’s Lagoon A Beach, which boasts a six-acre space filled with all sorts of water slides, tubes and pools. Slides can reach nearly seven stories and range from straight drops to twisting and turning tubes—although those wishing to kick back and relax are able to rent tubes and drift on the lazy river. Price: $54 single day pass Location: 375 N. Lagoon Drive, Farmington

Seven Peaks Waterpark

Zipping and zooming on twisting and turning water slides is endless fun, and Seven Peaks Waterpark has it all. Conveniently located just minutes from downtown Salt Lake City (and another park in Provo), Seven Peaks has 13 water slides of all levels on the thrill spectrum as well as five pools. It also has a tidal wave pool—every few minutes, the waves increase in size, propelling swimmers around until the waves subside. Get a group together and soak in the summer sun at this classic Utah oasis. Price: $25 day pass Location: 1200 W. 1700 South, Salt Lake City

Slide the City, St. George

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Cowabunga Bay

Driving on I-15 near Draper, everyone’s eyes are drawn to the high-rising and colorful slides of Cowabunga Bay. They’re adorned with wacky structures, such as a giant dancing cow, sandcastles and even a retro Volkswagen bug. The main attraction is the slide called the Mondo—1,000 feet of tubing that maneuvers in utter darkness. Park-goers are also granted free parking, tubing and life jackets. Cowabunga Bay is fun for all ages and also has a safe toddler zone for those just getting their feet wet. Price: $20 day pass Location: 12047 S. State, Draper

“Slide the City”

Remember the 10-foot backyard Slip’N Slides of your youth? Now imagine a 1,000-foot slide running across North Temple in downtown Salt Lake City with hundreds of fellow thrill seekers. Pay for a wristband, grab a tube and race down the track that seems to never end. “Slide the City” tours the entire country with its giant contraption and is hugely popular among city dwellers looking forward to a day of zipping through the streets. Also enjoy live music, food, drinks and water. CW Price: $35 pre-order, $45 day-of When: Saturday, June 18 Location: North Temple and Main, Salt Lake City

SHANE MITHELL

SUMMER GUIDE 2016

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ROADSIDE ODDITIES OF UTAH ROAD TRIPS ARE A LOT MORE FUN WHEN THEY GET WEIRD.

BY RANDY HARWARD

I

don’t think I have to sell you, necessarily, on the appeal of the road trip. Jumping in the car with your family or friends and driving anywhere for as long as an hour or an entire day, with or without a particular place to go—well, that’s a blast. You eat terrible food, listen to great music, tell stories or just stare out the window and think—or not think at all. Sometimes, while you’re gazing through the safety glass, or hanging your head out the window, mouth open, wondering if your gaping gob creates enough drag to slow down the car (what, you don’t do that?), you see something—among all that nothing—that’d make your jaw drop, if it wasn’t already low. Something weird. Something awesome. What I’m sayin’: Road trips, whether short jaunts to Wendover or cross-country treks, appeal to our need to escape, to reboot our minds and activate our possibly dormant childlike sense of adventure and wonder. They make us feel alive again. (Or at the very least, provide us with Instagram fodder.) But they’re a lot more fun when random, crazy shit happens. Maybe you’re on Redwood Road and you spot someone riding an elephant—and then you see the big top for the traveling Mexican circus. (Caution: elephants, as my daughter pointed out, are covered in “poky” stubble.) You might spot Dancing Steve, the retired anesthesiologist, who wears purple velour outfits and dances and juggles at intersections in the Holladay area. Or, on westbound SR-201 east of Wendover, you’ll see this crazy structure with no immediately discernible point or purpose that appears to be the creation of a madman, but qualifies as art and makes you wonder what it means. (See “Metaphor: The Tree of Utah.”) Sometimes it’s a pile of mildly interesting junk, or a historical landmark you never knew existed—or could fathom existing. Like the following list of roadside oddities ripe for your to ogle. From downtown Salt Lake City to all six corners of Utah, there is an abundance of roadside oddities to ogle while thinking, “What does it mean?”

ROLLER MILLS

Everyone knows that the site of Kevin Bacon’s iconic dance-fit in the 1984 film Footloose is in or near Lehi (I think, exactly six degrees from wherever Kevin Bacon is currently breathing). But who, among us locals, ever goes there? Even if you don’t dance, why wouldn’t you go, if only to be that close to where the magic happened?

MOUNTED HEAD OF THE DOG

RICK CAVENDER

Located up north near Ogden, Huntsville ain’t all that big, but Buck—the St. Bernard whose gargantuan cranium is mounted in the Shooting Star, was once the largest of his breed according to the Guinness World Records. As of 1957, the giant pooch is chasing 18-wheelers in the Great Beyond—but they’re still using his carcass to make the Shooting Star’s famous burgers. (That’s a joke.) SHANE MITHELL

Trent Harris’s beloved cult film from 1991 was shot entirely in Utah. The desert scenes, where Rubin discovered he’s the “king of the Echo People,” were shot in Goblin Valley State Park in Green River. On Main Street in nearby Hanksville, you can visit the tiny gas station (called The Prod Pump & Rest in the film) where Rubin found his way out of the desert. The Fontenoy Inn, where Rubin (Crispin Glover) lived with his mother and dead cat, is actually the Mountain Courtyard Suites at 350 S. 300 East in downtown Salt Lake City. At 222 E. Broadway, you can walk down the alley where Rubin kicked his platform shoe at his tormentor. Also downtown, last we heard, is Trent Harris’ office, where the stuffed cat, named Thistle, sits on a shelf. But don’t show up there hoping to see it. Maybe just leave a watermelon at the door. If you’ve seen the film, you know why.

Buck

SUN TUNNELS

You’ll have to leave Utah, enter Nevada, then re-enter Utah, in order to access this astronomical work of art installed by the late artist/filmmaker/photographer Nancy Holt in 1976. The large concrete tunnels have holes bored into them in the shape of constellations, and they’re positioned so that Sun projects them onto the concave inner walls. A high-clearance vehicle is recommended for the dirt road leading to the tunnels. Bring water, too.

RICK CAVENDER

40 | JUNE 9, 2016

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It’s horror movie fodder, the idea that a group of territorial religious zealots, masquerading in redface as Native Americans, would slaughter scores of innocents and bury them in a mass grave. Standing at this monument, located off of Highway 18 in Central Utah, is good for a chill, or a couple of dozen whispered, WTFs.

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With a name sounding like it came straight from a 1970s blaxploitation flick, this little joint in Carmel, right outside of Zion National Park, also boasts that they serve “Ho-Made Pie.” I wonder if they also serve ho cakes. ’Cause, you know, hoes gotta eat, too. (John Witherspoon, Hollywood Shuffle, 1987)

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North of Moab, in Thompson, Papa Joe’s gas station has replicas of Lightning McQueen (from Pixar’s Cars) and the Mystery Machine, aka the “Scooby-Doo Van.” Tip: Don’t ask if you can hotbox the MM.

Say whaaaaaat? It’s true. The big monument off of Sunnyside and below Hogle Zoo isn’t the real place where Brigham Young and company decided, “Screw it, the mountains were a bitch to get over— let’s stay here.” The real spot is actually located over a half-mile away, marked by a tinier monument, which oughta be shaped like an asterisk.

DEREK CARLISLE

MOUNTAIN MEADOWS MASSACRE MASS GRAVE

Spiral Jetty

Oh, we Utahns love our carbonated beverages, don’t we? In Salina, somebody likes ’em so much that they painted giant storage tanks like Coke, Sprite, Diet Coke and Monster cans. There used to be a Pepsi product in there, so the neighboring Carl’s Jr. may have influenced the change.

Robert Smithson’s earthwork sculpture sits, since 1970, on the northeastern shore of the Great Salt Lake near Promontory. The 15-foot wide coil of mud, basalt and crystal reaches more than a quarter-mile into the lake and is sometimes obscured when the water is high. A high-clearance vehicle is mandatory, according to RoadsideAmerica.com, where you’ll find dozens more places to check out this summer. CW

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BY JORDAN FLOYD

T

he year 2016 might go down in history books as one of the strangest and most stressful times in all of American politics. In the summer before the big election, how, then, can a Utahn kick back and forget about a race that has featured the likes of the (possible) Zodiac Killer, a robot who tried to convince American youth she is “cool” by whipping and nae-naeing, Karl Marx reincarnate and seemingly the devil himself? City Weekly spoke with six local politicians to find out. From ultimate Salt Lake outdoor activities to favorite summertime drinks, these subjects seem to know how to spend a summer day relaxing and forgetting about the impending doom of November. After all, they are human, too. Karen Mayne (D), Utah State Senator, District 5 What is the ultimate Salt Lake City summer activity? I love to play golf. I love to play golf poorly. But I like it. Anywhere, with anyone—I don’t keep score, so if they don’t, I’m good. What’s your favorite summer memory? Spending time in Sun Valley with my family. We used to go there regularly. The best part of summer is: walking outside without having to wear jacket—I usually forget my jacket some places, so it saves a lot of wear and tear on me. KIRSTEN FRANKLY

| CITY WEEKLY |

Karen Mayne

44 | JUNE 9, 2016

DEREK CARLISLE

WANT TO KNOW WHERE LOCAL POLITICOS BASK IN THE SUN? READ ON.

Jim Dabakis (D), Utah State Senator, District 2 What is the ultimate Salt Lake City Summer activity? A Speedo walk along the beach at the Great Salt Lake with a can of Raid. What’s your favorite summer memory? I remember sitting back in Derks Field, [now Smith’s Ballpark,] and looking up in the mountains and enjoying the game and thinking that this is about as good a thing as someone could do. I used to do it when I was growing up at Red Sox games with my grandfather, my dad and myself. We could all sit there and watch the game and understand each other. What is your favorite summer drink? A beer at Brewvies while watching Deadpool. Jackie Biskupski (D), Salt Lake City Mayor What is the ultimate Salt Lake City summer activity? Definitely getting out on my mountain bike. Finding time for it will be a bit of a challenge now, but I’ll do my best to get out on the trails this summer. I’m also looking forward to bike riding with Archie, my 6-year-old son. He got his first two-wheeler last Christmas. We’ve been taking it easy while he gets a little more confidence on his bike, riding in school parking lots and around our neighborhood. I think next summer he’ll be ready for some longer rides. What’s your favorite summer memory? I grew up in Hastings, Minnesota—a town of about 24,000, and 30 miles southeast of the Twin Cities. Summers were warm and short. So when we were kids, we would sneak into huge cornfields around town and throw parties. We could hide in the cornstalks—by late July they were tall enough to get away with it. It’s just what we did. Great memories, those cornfield parties.

Ben McAdams (D), Salt Lake County Mayor What is the ultimate Salt Lake City summer activity? The ultimate summer activity for me and for my family is the Farmers Market and all the food booths at the summer street fairs. We love to sample the fresh produce and the unique menu offerings. What’s your favorite summer memory? My favorite summer memory is getting into the garden with my kids. We grow carrots, tomatoes, squash, but have failed with watermelon. What was your best and worst summer job? I worked several summers as a young teenager on a pumpkin farm. We worked in the heat of the summer days hoeing and

weeding long rows of pumpkin seedlings. It was hard work, but I loved the job. Once I turned 16 and could get a non-farm job, I rolled burritos at Taco Time. Smelling like day-old Mexi-fries wasn’t great, but working in air conditioning and employee discounts on soft tacos were worth it. NIKI CHAN

SUMMER GUIDE 2016

THE POLITICS OF SUMMER

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DEREK CARLISLE

SUMMER GUIDE 2016

Chris Stewart (R), United States Congressman, Utah’s Second Congressional District What is the ultimate Salt Lake City summer activity? Rock climbing the north face of Mt. Olympus. It’s a great day-hike and has a perfect view of the valley. It’s the best part about living on the Wasatch Front. What is your favorite summer memory? I have the best memories growing up on a farm. After we were finished hauling hay for the day, we would be hot and tired. We’d ride our motorcycles down to the flume, a place where the canal water would cross 50 feet above the road through a metal tube. We would float through the flume, which would cool us down and was always fun. A great adventure for a kid. Where were you during the summer of ’69? I turned 9 that summer, so I mostly just hung out with my family on the farm. My mom wouldn’t let me go to Woodstock. She said I was too young. But there was some great music that summer, and I was always listening to the radio. Jim Dunnigan (R), Majority Leader, State of Utah House of Representatives What is the ultimate Salt Lake City summer activity? My summer activity is the Taylorsville Days Festival. It’s the annual celebration of our city’s founding. It includes a lot of great free entertainment—a parade, a 5K, a car show, 30 different food booths and the best firework show in the valley. What is your favorite summer memory? When I was a kid, it was going on a road trip with my parents. They had a station wagon. They’d pack us five kids up and we’d go on an adventure. What is your favorite summer vacation spot? Christmas Meadows in the High Uintas. CW

GREG PATTERSON

Chris Stewart

Jim Dunnigan

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46 | JUNE 9, 2016

| CITY WEEKLY |

THE POLITICS OF SUMMER


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SUMMER GUIDE 2016

A SONG OF RICE AND FIRE

48 | JUNE 9, 2016

| CITY WEEKLY |

P

DITCH THE BBQ AND ENJOY SUMMER DEFINED IN WOOD SMOKE AND PAELLA.

aella, for the uninitiated, is an ancient dish from Valencia, Spain, which is cooked in a wide-based pan and is famous for its versatility, with ingredients, along with rice, that can focus only on seafood, meat or simply vegetables, or mixtures of all of the above. Paella lore demands that you wait for the guests to arrive before you add rice to your carefully crafted dish. The guests can wait for the rice, but the rice can’t wait for the guests, goes the philosophy. Throw in the rice on time for the scheduled meal, only for your guests to arrive late, and that means a ruined dish. Paella is nothing if not temperamental. There’s one element of making a paella that is oddly personal for me, which, for reasons I’ve never understood, I’ve always preferred to do alone. And that is making the sign of the cross with the rice. I learned about incorporating this curious superstition during my first and only visit to Spain. As a lapsed Protestant, I felt no particular religious drive to initially distribute the rice in this fashion. But the more time I’ve spent making paellas over the last few years, the more I’ve come to appreciate the oddly spiritual pleasure to be found in sharing this dish of dishes with family and friends. Part of that spiritual quality, I would wager, comes from the utensil I use to cook it in. While paella can be cooked all year round, for me it will always be a summer dish. I love to cook it over wood, and the only way I can do that is with a disco de arado. It’s essentially two earth tiller blades with a rim and three legs welded to one blade, a handle to the other, which I brought with me from Argentina over a decade ago. Paella and the disco are the perfect union. The flavor of the earth it moved for years in South America mixed with smoke and all the meals I’ve cooked on its dark, oval surface lends the disco, and the meals I prepare on it, a sense of reverence I’d be hard-pressed to find with, say, a frying pan. Paella is eminently adaptable and whether you buy a paella pan at World Market ($16.99) to use on a stove top, or

STORY AND PHOTOS BY STEPHEN DARK

have someone fashion your own outdoor paella dish, it’s a dish that defines the idea of gathering with family and friends. Indeed, in Spain, I believe, you gather around the finished meal and work away at it with a spoon. It’s the one plate I make where I always see guests returning to help themselves to more. Paella is essentially a dry-rice dish, but it’s also incredibly versatile, and while purists would undoubtedly quibble with some of my approaches to this dish—you don’t use onions, for example, because they make the rice moist—I’ve learned that the pleasure of paella is defining it within your own taste parameters. Key to flavor absorption is the quality of the rice, which should be short or medium grain, and preferably Spanish. I’ve found Bomba and Calasparra in Utah, both at World Market and, more recently, Smiths, which has kindly imported a variety of Spanish delicacies to embolden with a little more authenticity my paella journey. I have found one of the most flavorful paellas is a paella mixta, which requires both fish and meat. Whatever ingredients you want to cook with, as long as you have a well-flavored stock, the paella will deliver. The paella masters typically use twigs to cook with, but chopping up logs into kindling provides the heat I need, as long as I pay attention to the fire and keep it well fed, but not overbearing. I light the fire, throw in some oil and when it sizzles, brown pieces of chicken thighs and small squares of pork ribs. Once cooked, I removed those to a plate, and work on the sofrito, the aromatic vegetable paste that deepens the flavor of the rice. I throw in a little more oil, stir-fry the onions, garlic, carrots and red pepper, and after the vegetables are tender and to the point of sticking, I add a glass of white wine and scrape off the burned bits with a wooden spoon. Finally, I throw in some tomatoes, breaking them up and stirring, until I got a consistency of paste, before returning the chicken and meat to the dish. After letting the fire die down a little, I add the rice in a vertical, then horizontal gesture, pausing a moment to

drink in the curious nature of what I’ve just done. I add two pinches of saffron—crucial for color and flavor—and then stir the rice around until it’s both well-coated and evenly distributed, all the time maintaining a low fire. Now comes the stock, followed by some kindling to feed the fire until the paella bubbles. Don’t touch the dish. If there’s one cardinal rule, it’s this: You can’t stir the paella after you’ve added the stock. After 10 minutes or so, as the rice continues to absorb the stock, it’s time to add whatever fish you have: some shrimp perhaps, mussels, clams or calamari. Once all the stock has been absorbed, test the rice to make sure it’s al punto (cooked, separate grains). Always keep some stock handy in case you need more. If the rice is done, put some paper towels over the dish to let it breathe, wait five minutes, then call your guests. The mark of a truly successful paella is the socarrat—a deliciously crusty base that forms at the bottom of the pan, which some guests enjoy scraping off. For a dish that’s so laden with folklore and rituals, I’d nevertheless argue that the joy of paella is both its versatility and its individuality. Practice a few times before inviting people over to get a feel for the interplay between heat, pan and ingredients. Its pleasure is both its simplicity and the depth of history and taste that your guests will remember long after the fire has turned to ash. CW


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BY TED SCHEFFLER

DEREK CARLISLE

SUMMER GUIDE 2016 | CITY WEEKLY |

50 | JUNE 9, 2016

SUMMER BREEZES

PATIOS, DECKS, ROOFTOPS AND GARDENS FOR AL FRESCO DINING.

I

know a lot of Utahns who like to say that they came here for the winters but stayed for the summers. I’m one of them. I moved here during a February snowstorm and immediately fell in love with the incredible powder skiing, but later came to enjoy the glorious summers in the Beehive State just as much. The bountiful sun of Utah summers, combined with a mostly dry climate, makes this an ideal place to enjoy dining al fresco on our seemingly endless restaurant patios, decks, gardens, courtyards, rooftops and such. You’re probably already well-acquainted with some of our most coveted outdoor dining destinations like La Caille, Trio, Ruth’s Diner, Tuscany, Log Haven and Oasis Cafe. Here are some excellent al fresco eating spots that might be a little less familiar. To someone walking past downtown’s Green Pig Pub & Grill (31 E. 400 South, 801-532-7441, TheGreenPigPub.com), it might look like the last place you’d expect to bask in the sun. But, look up. When you do, chances are you’ll find the pub’s rooftop patio bustling with frolicking customers enjoying carne asada tacos, Cuban sandwiches, fish and chips or maybe the Kobe corned beef Reuben, along with libations served up by some of the best and friendliest bartenders in town. Similarly, if rooftop dining and imbibing is your thing, you’d be hard-pressed to find a more popular spot than Gracie’s (326 S. West Temple, 801-819-7565, GraciesSLC.com), an urban gastropub where the food and drink hit the same high notes that the rooftop patio does. Snack on poutine or pumpkin crab cakes before getting yourself outside of the marvelous pulled pork belly sandwich. In addition to killer cocktails like the mango mojito, Gracie’s also has an excellent wine and beer selection. Eva (317 S. Main, 801-359-8447, EvaSLC.com) is another downtown eatery—one specializing in tapas/small plates—that from the outside wouldn’t be an obvious choice for al fresco dining. But, tucked away behind the restaurant is a quiet little outdoor oasis which is perfect for enjoying a nosh in warm weather. Delicious, eclectic dishes such as lamb kibbeh, whole charred cauliflower with romesco sauce and guajillo-braised pork ribs will have you singing in the sunshine. A fun summer getaway would be to jump on the UTA Frontrunner and take it to Daybreak, where Porch restaurant (11274 Kestrel Rise Road, South Jordan, 801-679-1066, PorchUtah.com) is located. Walk from the train to SoDa Row and grab a sidewalk seat near one of the patio’s flower baskets. Porch is the creation of Jen Gilroy, who also owns SLC’s Meditrina and knows a thing or two about Southern-style hospitality. Settle in with a Red Beet and Pink Peppercorn Shrub cocktail—remember, you’re riding the train, so bottoms up—and nibble on iron skillet cornbread before indulging in Southern “brick” chicken with macaroni and cheese or homemade meatloaf. The comfort food here is definitely “down home,” but the ambiance is trendy and upscale. So, take a break in Daybreak. In Park City, Grappa’s (151 Main, 435-645-0636, GrappaRestaurant.com) terraced gardens and multi-level outdoor seating is the place to be in summer. Who could resist the lobster ravioli starter, with oyster mushrooms, fresh chervil and lobster cream whether dining inside or out? And, the pan-seared whole branzino is remarkable, as is Grappa’s classic slow-braised veal osso bucco. Don’t forget to toast to the summer with an after-dinner splash of grappa, of course. If it’s vast views of the horizon you’re hankering for, head down to Draper to the Cliff House (12234 Draper Gate Drive, 801-617-8600, CliffHouseGP.com), where the elevated terrace provides

Our Sunny contender enjoys a cocktail at Porcupine Grill’s patio

customers the opportunity to see for miles and miles. Grab a seat near the gastropub’s fire pit in case it gets cool in the evening, and enjoy people-watching; the deck is usually packed with partiers. There’s something for everybody on the wide-ranging menu, which covers the bases—from typical pub fare like artisanal pizzas, burgers and sandwiches—to tonkotsu ramen, short rib pappardelle Bolognese and even sushi. The Sunday brunch shrimp and grits are an especially good way to prepare for the week to come. Dining on the courtyard patio at Café Madrid (5244 S. Highland Drive, Holladay, 801-2730837, CafeMadrid.net) is like a summer getaway to España. You’ll feel as though you’ve dropped into a Spanish finca, especially when you taste the bacon-rolled shrimp tapa. Enjoy a carafe of cooling housemade sangría as you tuck into a classic Spanish dish like fideuà—thin vermicellistyle noodles with shrimp, calamari, clams and mussels in a saffron sauce. If you’re looking to avoid the crowds in downtown Sugar House, consider the patio dining at The Dodo (1355 E. 2100 South, 801-486-2473, TheDodoRestaurant.com). Despite having relocated a couple of times, Dodo dining has been a Salt Lake City staple for more than 30 years. Overlooking Sugar House Park, al fresco eating here offers great views while you enjoy classic Dodo dishes such as their honey-baked salmon filet, Cajun chicken Alfredo, beef Stroganoff and, of course, the ever-popular artichoke pie. Views of the city are unparalleled on the shaded patio at Em’s restaurant (271 N. Center St., 801-596-0566, EmsRestaurant.com), which feels like an escape from the very city you’re seeing. Emily Gassmann’s namesake eatery has always reminded me more of Portland or Berkeley than the Beehive, especially when I indulge in her famous goat cheese-stuffed tamales with chipotle crema. And, the artichoke, spinach, Havarti cheese and caramelized onion frittata at brunch is simply irresistible—especially on the patio. So there you have it. Hang up the apron, ditch the drive-thru and bask in some of the best outdoor culinary spots SLC has to offer. CW


SUMMER GUIDE 2016

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Sazerac

WHISKEY: Bourbon or rye? Sure, there are plenty of cocktails made with other international whiskies, but in this good ol’ American contest of booze purists, U.S.-made bourbon and rye are the clear front-runners, regardless of region. Try them in either of these classic frontrunners: The Manhattan: New York City may now bleed blue, but back in the day, this whiskey-based winner was solidly the preferred sipper of The Gilded Age’s Robber Barons. J. P. Morgan famously quaffed a Manhattan every day after stock trading closed. The 2:1:2 ratio of whiskey, sweet vermouth and double dashes of bitters stirred over cracked ice keeps the “class” in classic. Sazerac: This Big Easy staple embraces all that’s equally bold, boozy and ballsy about backroom political deals of centuries past. Arguably one of America’s first cocktails, this heady combo of whiskey and absinthe reminds us that while taverns are no longer America’s polling places, we sure wish more political arguments could be settled over a frosty glass.

DARBY DOYLE

Gather ’round, ye members of the Cocktail Party! Our base is strong and our spirits mighty. In this caucus of classic cocktails, here are our picks for a very boozy primary in which all the choices are pretty delicious. Whether you stir ’em up at home or enjoy them at our favorite watering holes around town, this is one contest where we all come out winners.

Takashi’s martini

VODKA vs. GIN: Don’t wait for Super Tuesday to get the skinny. Vodka and Diet Soda: Clearly, calorie count means more than flavor or quality quaffing for this delegation. We understand the appeal, but quite frankly for the same number of Fitbit steps we’d prefer to ask for a really great martini to sip nice and slow. Local favorites for gin or vodka martinis? Try the always-solid sipper at Copper Onion, or the powerful and pretty potion stirred up at Takashi’s minimalist bar.

CAROLINE HARGRAVES

DARBY DOYLE

BY DARBY DOYLE

DARBY DOYLE

| CITY WEEKLY |

SUMMER GUIDE 2016

COCKTAIL CAUCUS THE LOCAL BUZZ ON SUMMER’S FAVORITE SIPS.

Provisions’ Negroni

NEGRONI: During the week of June 6-12, bartenders all over the damned globe pull out all the stops to create original variations of this classic 1:1:1 ratio of Campari, gin and sweet vermouth. At least $1 of every Negroni sold goes toward a charity of the bar’s choice (this year, the Beehive State’s Bartender’s Guild suggests supporting the Utah Rivers Council). The sky’s the limit on spin for this gorgeous bevvy, so check out NegroniWeek.com to search for locations near you and all over the world.


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ROOT FOR TEAM USA WITH US AT THE RIO OLYMPICS IN AUGUST!

DELTA HEAVY TIMMY TRUMPET COOKIE MONSTA DZEKO & TORRES GAZZO KYAU & ALBERT CHRIS LAKE HUCCI

| CITY WEEKLY |

MONDAYS: TUESDAYS: PING PONG PAINT NITE WEDNESDAYS: POKER & BEER PONG THURSDAYS GEEKS WHO DRINK FRIDAYS: POKER & DJ GODINA SATURDAYS: DJ BANGARANG

JUNE 9: JUNE 16: JUNE 23: JUNE 30: JULY 7: JULY 14: JULY 21: JULY 28:

SUMMER GUIDE 2016

SUMMERTIME’S FINE

THERAPY THURSDAYS


Provisions’ mimosa

DEREK CARLISLE

CAROLINE HARGRAVES

DEREK CARLISLE

SUMMER GUIDE 2016

Lucky 13’s bloody Mary

BRUNCH BATTLE: patio day-drinks FTW! Bloody Mary: It’s hard to beat this incumbent with a strong and diverse voting base. What a flip-flopper with the garnishes, though, right? Sometimes a minimalist celery stick, some places have everything in the garden and a whole fried chicken, too. We’re partial to Lucky 13’s spicy bloody with smoky bacon for patio sipping before catching a Bees baseball game. It’s America’s pastime, dontcha know? Mimosa: Light and refreshing, a minimalist mimosa hits all the mid-morning feels with a 1:1 ratio of citrus juice and bubbly. Go Green Party (get it?) on Zest’s sunny patio starting at 10 a.m. with their gorgeous Green Juice Mimosa. Or, at equally cheery Provisions in Millcreek, we love seeing this classic contender alongside its photogenic Italian-American running mate, the Aperol Spritz.

54 | JUNE 9, 2016

| CITY WEEKLY |

Zest’s Green Juice Mimosa


SUMMER GUIDE 2016 | CITY WEEKLY |

JUNE 6, 2016 | 55


SUMMER GUIDE 2016

Taco Taco Margarita

DEREK CARLISLE

O.P. Rockwell’s Daiquiri

TEQUILA: If your preferred method of “enjoying” tequila is the body shot, you’re either a Trump supporter “because he’s funny” or an under-21 college coed in Cabo over spring break. Either way? There’s a good chance you bellow “Hell Yeaaaahhh” while throwing fake gang signs after every drink and engage in staggering public urination. We’re hoping the party votes you out, but understand the train-wreck entertainment value. For the first few minutes, anyway. First step to enjoying some great tequila or mescal without the “Ta kill ya” hangover? Go to a place that treats good ingredients with the respect they deserve, like Taqueria 27 or Frida Bistro. These folks make superb versions of Classic Margaritas and curate a good selection of aged reposados and añejos for sipping, and give us even more reasons to believe that stupid wall between us and Mexico is a shitty idea for a million cultural, economic and especially culinary reasons.

Champagne Finance Reform

On Racks Now! Go to devourutah.com for pick up locations

RICK CAVENDER

56 | JUNE 9, 2016

DEREK CARLISLE

| CITY WEEKLY |

DARBY DOYLE

Dark ’n’ Stormy

RUM: Long a source of economic and political contention, much of early republic America’s trade relations and growth as a naval power depended on the rum trade, long before whiskey was produced on these shores. Whether fresh off the still or aged in barrels, rum was the original grog of the masses. Daiquiri: A traditionalist’s beverage, the daiquiri is pro-Cuba all the way. This classic concoction—when made the right way with only rum, sugar, lime juice and, for that Cubano flair, a titch of Maraschino liqueur—hits all the nostalgia buttons without the fear and loathing overtones of the Cold War. Big-arse cigar and straw hat optional. Dark ’n’ Stormy: sure, it’s a highball, but you’ve probably got the mixin’s for a classic DnS right in your cupboard; perfect for when the state liquor stores are closed on polling day: To a glass filled with cracked ice, add a few glugs of dark rum, fill the glass to the top with a spicy ginger beer and garnish with a lime wedge. Bonus: a couple dashes of lime bitters. WANT IT ALL? The clear third-party dark horse comes from The Ruin in Sugar House, if only for the cleverness of the name, alone. Check out the boozeforward and complex “Champagne Finance Reform” on The Ruin’s spring drinks menu. This potent combo hits good stuff: bourbon, rum, lemon, agave, orange bitters and a generous floater of bubbles. CW


SUMMER GUIDE 2016

Lighten Up!

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SUMMER GUIDE 2016

SUMMER TV 2016 [MOST] EVERYTHING DEBUTING AND RETURNING IN JUNE, JULY AND AUGUST.

RIDE WITH NORMAN REEDUS

(AMC; Sunday, June 12) Series Debut: The Walking Dead star gets his own motorcycle road-trip series because AMC sure as hell wasn’t going to tell him no. Ride works well enough as a biker-culture travelogue show, as long as Reedus isn’t called upon to talk too much (just like with Daryl Dixon).

GUILT

(Freeform; Monday, June 13) Series Debut: A London-set millennial murder-mystery soap about a young woman (Emily Tremaine, Vinyl) out to prove her sister’s innocence with the help of … Billy Zane?!

58 | JUNE 9, 2016

| CITY WEEKLY |

BRAINDEAD

(CBS; Monday, June 13) Series Debut: This government-is-stoopid political dramedy may have a killer cast (including Mary Elizabeth Winstead, Danny Pino and Tony Shalhoub) and the producers of The Good Wife, but CBS isn’t going to let them get away with anything close to House of Cards or Veep, because, CBS.

UNCLE BUCK

(ABC; Tuesday, June 14) Series Debut: ’Merica has rejected a TV version of the beloved 1989 movie before—but this one has an all-black cast, so at least give ABC (further) credit for chipping away at TV’s Whiteytown. But, yeah … Uncle Buck suuucks.

ANIMAL KINGDOM

(TNT; Tuesday, June 14) Series Debut: After his mom dies of a heroin overdose, “J” Cody moves in with his sketchy grandmother, “Smurf” Cody (Ellen Barkin), the matriarch of a sketchy SoCal crime family. Producer John Wells (Shameless) knows his way around dysfunctional clans, but Animal Kingdom just looks like Surfboards of Anarchy.

BY BILL FROST

WRECKED

(TBS; Tuesday, June 14) Series Debut: Another promising new comedy from TBS—words no one ever expected to utter. Like a mashup of Gilligan’s Island (Wiki it, kids) and Lost, Wrecked follows a clueless group of plane-crash survivors stranded on an island. It’s at least funnier than Fear the Walking Dead.

AMERICAN GOTHIC

(CBS; Wednesday, June 22) Series Debut: Compared to the long-lost 1995 American Gothic drama about a supernaturally evil small-town sheriff menacing the locals, the new American Gothic (posh Boston family has a secret serial killer among them) seems like a snooze. It is—with a recycled title, no less.

QUEEN OF THE SOUTH

(USA; Thursday, June 23) Series Debut: Teresa Mendoza (Alice Braga) flees to America from Mexico when her drugdealer boyfriend is “unexpectedly” murdered (come on—it’s a high-risk gig), then plots her bloody revenge upon the cartel that killed him. Queen of the South is flashier and pricier than the Telemundo series it was lifted from, therefore huger and better. Make American television great again!

ROADIES

(Showtime; Sunday, June 26) Series Debut: It’s Almost Famous: Backstage! Luke Wilson, Carla Gugino, Luis Guzmán, Imogen Poots and cameo bands galore star in Cameron Crowe’s ode to the grimy life behind the rock ’n’ roll fantasy. Unlike HBO’s dark Vinyl, Roadies is set in current times and more light-hearted. Don’t worry; there are still drugs.

The Get Down (Netflix)

Braindead (CBS) DEAD OF SUMMER

(Freeform; Tuesday, June 28) Series Debut: Pretty 20-somethings in a 1980 summercamp slasher flick that’s a weekly series! There’s a killer on the loose at Camp Stillwater, and if these kids can’t keep it in their pants, they’re all dead … so, yeah, they’re all pretty much dead.

THE GET DOWN

(Netflix; Friday, Aug. 12) Series Debut: Baz Luhrmann dramatizes the rise of rise of hip-hop in ’70s New York City in what will surely be a subtle, understated affair.

RETURNING IN JUNE:

Hell on Wheels (AMC; Saturday, June 11); The Last Ship (TNT; Sunday, June 12); Major Crimes (TNT; Monday, June 13); Another Period (Comedy Central; Wednesday, June 15); Aquarius (NBC; Thursday, June 16); Orange Is the New Black (Netflix; Friday, June 17); The Jim Gaffigan Show (TV Land; Sunday, June 19); Murder in the First (TNT; Sunday, June 19); The Fosters (Freeform; Monday, June 20); Pretty Little Liars (Freeform; Tuesday, June 21); Ray Donovan

Animal Kingdom (TNT)

(Showtime; Sunday, June 16); Zoo (CBS; Tuesday, June 28); Sex&Drugs&Rock&Roll (FX; Thursday, June 30).

RETURNING IN JULY:

Marco Polo (Netflix; Friday, July 1); Killjoys (Syfy; Friday, July 1); Dark Matter (Syfy; Friday, July 1); Tyrant (FX; Wednesday, July 6); Difficult People (Hulu; Tuesday, July 12); Suits (USA; Wednesday, July 13); Mr. Robot (USA; Wednesday, July 13); Power (Starz; Sunday, July 17); Ballers (HBO; Sunday, July 17); Bojack Horseman (Netflix; Friday, July 22); Survivor’s Remorse (Starz; Sunday, July 24).

RETURNING IN AUGUST:

Fear the Walking Dead (AMC; Sunday, Aug. 21); The Strain (FX; Sunday, Aug. 28); You’re the Worst (FXX; Wednesday, Aug. 31). CW

Listen to Bill Mondays at 8 a.m. on X96 Radio From Hell, and on the TV Tan podcast via Stitcher, iTunes, Google Play and BillFrost.tv.


SUMMER GUIDE 2016

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JUNE 6, 2016 | 59


BY SCOTT RENSHAW

con-tem-POE-rar-y Meat & Potato Theatre Co. Rose Wagner Center Studio Theatre Through June 12 MeatAndPotato.org Big River Hale Centre Theatre (West Valley) Through July 23 HCT.org

| CITY WEEKLY |

Newsies Broadway Across America-Utah Capitol Theatre Through June 12 & Aug. 25-27 Broadway-at-the-Eccles.com The Most Lamentable Roman Tragedy of Titus Andronicus Pinnacle Acting Co. Westminster College Dumke Auditorium June 9–25 PinnacleActingCompany.org Perfect Pitch Desert Star Theatre June 9–Aug. 20 DesertStar.biz Page to Stage Festival Wasatch Theatre Co. Rose Wagner Center Studio Theatre June 16–18 ArtTix.ArtSaltLake.org The Pirates of Penzance The Off Broadway Theatre June 17–July 23 TheOBT.org

Ghostblasters Desert Star Theatre Aug. 28–Nov. 5 DesertStar.biz

UTAH COUNTY Peter Pan Hale Center Theater (Orem) June 16–Aug. 6 HaleTheater.org See How They Run Hale Center Theater (Orem) Aug. 12–Sept. 24 HaleTheater.org

NORTHERN UTAH Rock of Ages Ziegfeld Theater (Ogden) Through June 25 TheZiegfeldTheater.com Arsenic and Old Lace Lyric Repertory Co. (Logan) June 9–Aug. 5 LyricRep.org Baskerville: A Sherlock Holmes Mystery Lyric Repertory Co. (Logan) June 16–Aug. 6 LyricRep.org Singin’ in the Rain Lyric Repertory Co. (Logan) June 23–Aug. 6 LyricRep.org

Saturday’s Voyeur 2016 Salt Lake Acting Co. June 22–Aug. 28 SaltLakeActingCompany.og

Peter Pan Utah Festival Opera & Musical Theatre (Logan) June 24–Aug. 4 UtahFestival.org

Once Upon a Mattress Empress Theatre (Magna) June 24–July 16 EmpressTheatre.com

You Can’t Take It With You Lyric Repertory Co. (Logan) June 30–Aug. 4 LyricRep.org

Motown: The Musical Broadway Across America-Utah June 28–July 3 Broadway-at-the-Eccles.com Li’l Abner Empress Theatre (Magna) July 29–Aug. 20 EmpressTheatre.com Transmorfers The Off Broadway Theatre Aug. 5–Sept. 10 TheOBT.org

Puccini’s Trilogy Utah Festival Opera & Musical Theatre (Logan) July 6–Aug. 5 UtahFestival.org Porgy and Bess Utah Festival Opera & Musical Theatre (Logan) July 7–Aug. 6 UtahFestival.org

Showboat Utah Festival Opera & Musical Theatre (Logan) July 8–Aug. 5 UtahFestival.org The Music Man Ziegfeld Theater (Ogden) July 9–Aug. 13 TheZiegfeldTheater.com Ragtime Utah Festival Opera & Musical Theatre (Logan) July 9–Aug. 6 UtahFestival.org It’s a Two-Bit Town Good Company Theatre (Ogden) July 15–24 GoodCoTheatre.com Pirated Good Company Theatre (Ogden) Aug. 12–22 GoodCoTheatre.com La Cage aux Folles Ziegfeld Theater (Ogden) Aug. 19–Sept. 3 TheZiegfeldTheater.com

PARK CITY Noises Off! Egyptian Theatre June 9–12 EgyptianTheatreCompany.org Rock of Ages Egyptian Theatre July 1–24 EgyptianTheatreCompany.org Brighton Beach Memoirs Egyptian Theatre Aug. 17–21 EgyptianTheatreCompany.org London Suite Egyptian Theatre Aug. 18–20 EgyptianTheatreCompany.org

SOUTHERN UTAH

SCOTT NELSON

SALT LAKE VALLEY

60 | JUNE 9, 2016

DEEN VAN MEER

LEAVE THE HISTRIONICS TO THE PROFESSIONALS.

Peter Pan Tuacahn Amphitheatre (Ivins) Through Oct. 14 Tuacahn.org Tarzan Tuacahn Amphitheatre (Ivins) Through Oct. 12 Tuacahn.org Much Ado About Nothing Utah Shakespeare Festival (Cedar City) June 27–Sept. 8 Bard.org Henry V Utah Shakespeare Festival June 28–Sept. 10 Bard.org The Three Musketeers Utah Shakespeare Festival June 29–Sept. 9 Bard.org The Cocoanuts Utah Shakespeare Festival July 1–Oct. 15 Bard.org Mary Poppins Utah Shakespeare Festival July 2–Sept. 3 Bard.org The Hunchback of Notre Dame Tuacahn Amphitheatre (Ivins) July 29–Oct. 15 Tuacahn.org

Utah Shakespeare Festival’s Mary Poppins

Julius Caesar Utah Shakespeare Festival July 29–Oct. 22 Bard.org Murder for Two Utah Shakespeare Festival Aug. 4–Oct. 22 Bard.org

JUSTIN SWABY

SUMMER GUIDE 2016

OH, THE DRAMA!

Newsies Broadway Across America-Utah


SUMMER GUIDE 2016 | CITY WEEKLY |

JUNE 6, 2016 | 61


DEREK CARLISLE

SUMMER GUIDE 2016 | CITY WEEKLY |

62 | JUNE 9, 2016

FUNNING FOR OFFICE POLITICAL MOVIES TO AMUSE, INSPIRE OR OTHERWISE DISTRACT FROM THE ELECTION YEAR.

S

ome day, believe it or not, the 2016 presidential campaign will end. There will actually be an election day, and for a few blessed months, we’ll return to a world where we aren’t reminded of the 24-hour circus that is American politics. But for now, while that circus is still sending in the clowns, perhaps the best you can do is find ways to laugh at it, or cling to the faint hope that something good and decent can emerge from those who wish to lead us. As a tonic against all the toxic, here’s a film festival of movies that have managed to extract laughs—though often bitter ones—from the craziness of our political life, and even a few with enough optimism to believe not every politician or aspiring politician is a walking horror-show.

The Best Man

BY SCOTT RENSHAW

GABRIEL OVER THE WHITE HOUSE (1933) Based on an anonymously published Depression-era novel, this has to rank among the most bizarre political films ever made. Walter Huston plays Judson Hammond, a justelected conservative whose let-them-eat-cake platform regarding America’s unemployed and homeless takes a 180-degree turn after he awakens from a coma with policy inspiration that may be heavenly. What follows is essentially an apologia for benevolent dictatorship, as Hammond proceeds to declare martial law and subtly threaten foreign countries in order to get what he thinks is right. While the script takes some appropriate shots at party-over-people politics, it never suggests that Hammond is anything but heroic in his principled shredding of the Constitution. If

In The Loop

nothing else, Gabriel encourages skepticism of uncompromising leaders who claim to be on a mission from God. MR. SMITH GOES TO WASHINGTON (1939) It’s been lumped in with the rest of director Frank Capra’s films as hopelessly corny, but like most of Capra’s movies, it’s spikier than advertised. James Stewart plays Jefferson Smith, the idealistic young scoutmaster appointed to a vacant Senate seat by his state’s corrupt political machine, under the assumption that he’ll be a patsy for their plans. Smith surprises them with his refusal to bend, of course, including an epic filibuster that builds to the film’s climax. But the heart of the story is Smith’s impact on those like his seen-it-all secretary (Jean Arthur) who start to believe that corruption may not be an inevitability. The most inspiring thing about Mr. Smith isn’t that one person can stand against the system, but that one person’s stand has the power to inspire so many more. THE BEST MAN (1964) Gore Vidal adapted his own 1960 stage play in this portrait of the contested convention of an unnamed American political party, where the two front-runners for the presidential nomination are flawed, conflicted Secretary of State William Russell (Henry Fonda) and cutthroat Communist-hunter Sen. Joe Cantwell (Cliff Robertson). Vidal peppers the dialogue with stingers that still feel relevant 50 years later, like the appeal of a wealthy candidate to voters because “they figure you’ve got so much money of your own, you won’t go stealing theirs,” or the need by candidates to “pour God over everything, like ketchup.” But as densely as director Franklin Schaffner textures this story with details of glad-handing and would-be king-makers, this is essentially a morality play, with terrific central performances by Fonda, Robertson, Lee Tracy (as a folksy but ruthlessly savvy expresident) and even comedian Shelley Berman in a study of what it might look like if someone valued his soul over winning an election. BEING THERE (1979) The political component is just one part of Jerzy Kosinski’s broader swipe at American life in the mass-media age, but it’s still indelible more than 30 years later. Peter Sellers’ performance as simple-minded, raised-ontelevision gardener Chance—who stumbles into the world of Washington, D.C. politicians and power brokers—was one for the ages, finding a heart in deadpan blankness. And as he obliviously rises to find himself on the cusp of being handed the reins of power, it’s hard to shake the contemporary relevance in both a woman who reluctantly admires Chance’s oratory (“Keeping it at a third-grade level, that’s what [the people] understand”) and the incredulous response of the African-

Mr. Smith Goes To Washington

American housekeeper who raised him (“All you got to be is white in America”).

THE AMERICAN PRESIDENT (1995) Writer Aaron Sorkin’s warm-up for The West Wing—including a role for Martin Sheen and dialogue-dense walk-and-talk scenes—was this romantic dramedy starring Michael Douglas as a widowed president whose reelection prospects run into trouble when his relationship with a lobbyist (Annette Bening) turns his “character” into an issue. Sorkin packs the narrative to the rotunda with policy details and trademark sermonizing, including a final speech that turns Douglas into an absurdly idealized version of progressive Chief Executive-ship. That makes it pretty impressive that the film works so well simply as a romance, built on the charm of two ultra-competent people finding themselves in a scenario that makes everyone involved uncomfortable. It may be sheer fantasy as politics, but if rom-coms don’t exist to be fantasy, what are they for?

WAG THE DOG (1997) Brutally funny and scathingly cynical, this ultra-loose adaptation of Larry Beinhart’s novel posited a premise that hardly even seems improbable now: What if the staff of an American president, faced with a potentially crippling election-year scandal, manufactured a war as a distraction for the American people? The details are hilariously unsettling—including faked footage of war crimes, and a “We Are the World”-style inspirational anthem—in a concept based on how easy it is for master manipulators of the media to twist public perception. But the unexpected soul comes from Dustin Hoffman’s phenomenal performance as the Hollywood producer whose unshakable “This is nothing” confidence in the face of every setback collides with his ego, and a lack of understanding that the show-biz in politics depends on those who can never take credit for it.

IN THE LOOP (2010) Armando Ianucci’s acidic perspective on the behind-the-scenes chaos in politics made the transition from The Thick of It toward Veep in one of the funniest scripts of the last decade. A low-level British minister’s on-air goof sets off a ripple effect of spin-controlling, ass-covering and turf-warring, much of it orchestrated by the Prime Minister’s foul-mouthed tornado of a communications director, Malcolm Tucker (the magnificent Peter Capaldi). What follows is a symphony of instantly iconic one-liners (changing meeting minutes to be “a more complete record of what should have been said”) and a look at how many of the world’s most crucial decisions might be based on infighting and dick-swinging. CW

Wag The Dog


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SUMMER GUIDE 2016

Photo Credit: Nina Tekwani

| CITY WEEKLY |

JUNE 6, 2016 | 63


SUMMER GUIDE 2016 | CITY WEEKLY |

64 | JUNE 9, 2016

MIGHTY SOULS

A LOCALLY SOURCED PLAYLIST FOR THE END OF THE WORLD.

BY ALEX SPRINGER

T

here’s a melancholy vibe that settles in on a Sunday afternoon. You feel like you want to go all out and enjoy the rest of your freedom with a bang, but the responsibility of reality is weighing too heavily on your shoulders to do anything that you might regret in the morning. Kicking off summer 2016 in light of the upcoming presidential election feels like we’re entering the Sunday afternoon before the world comes crashing to an end. Since, by all accounts, we’re looking at the end of civilization as we know it come November, let’s forget about responsibility this summer. Let’s put the top down on the convertible, drink too much and wake up half-naked in a stranger’s water bed. To help aid in this process, I’ve enlisted the strength of Utah’s mightiest rock bands to craft a playlist that will go well with all manner of summer debauchery.

“Band of Mighty Souls” by Folk Hogan: Five minutes of banjo-shredding, mythological imagery and epic poetry is enough to get one psyched up for any grand summer adventure. Unfolding like a pub song crafted by a group of whiskey-fueled fantasy geeks, “Band of Mighty Souls” is perfect for rallying your pals together for a week-long right-winghating bender.

“Ghost Boyfriend” by Baby Ghosts: What’s summer without a little bit of paranormal, punk-pop heartbreak? On “Ghost Boyfriend,” the group’s harmonious shouting crafts a sincere look at the woes of falling in love as a disembodied spirit. It could also embody the agony of trying to pick between two presidential candidates who are both worthy of a hard left swipe. #TinderJoke “Touching & Moving” by Foster Body: Foster Body’s chaotic, Devo-esque song “Touching & Moving” is perfect for getting weird on the dance floor. Not so much the dancefloor at a club, but more like the dancefloor in your garage that you made out of flattened cardboard boxes and leftover Christmas tree tinsel. Excellent, weird punk rock that will help you to forget how badly democracy has failed us.

“Blooming” by JAWWZZ!!: I know, I know. At this point, JAWWZZ!! has officially retired, and the band formerly known as JAWWZZ!! is now known as Sculpture Club, but they were called JAWWZZ!! when they wrote this song so get off my back! Anyway, there’s something about “Blooming” that reminds me of early Joy Division, and it’s perfect for those summer days when you want to stick your head into your headphones and pump some garage goth straight into your earholes while staring into the abyss that has become the American dream.

“The Funeral” by Sammy Brue: At the ripe age of 15, Sammy Brue has already been recognized by Rolling Stone as a young Bob Dylan. His wistful, delicately heartbreaking song “The Funeral” should be set aside for that one day during the summer when the slow burn of an impending tragedy finally comes to collect. His lyrical insight and musical talent make me retroactively embarrassed at my 15-year-old self, whose biggest achievement was beating Final Fantasy VII for the first time. It’s a real shame that the world will end right before Brue can get a driver’s license.

“Samundar” by L’Anarchiste: My favorite thing about summer is driving fast on the freeway late at night with the windows down, and “Samundar” by L’Anarchiste is the perfect song for such an activity. Its slowly constructed musical arrangement makes each verse feel like a sunrise, and its lyrics rise and fall like the words of a traveling mystic. In an interview with NPR, lead vocalist Rob LeCheminant said, “Samundar was this dark, kind of mysterious place.” It’s the place where we find ourselves somewhere between midnight and 5 a.m., lost in the clutches of a summer night, driving with the windows down.

“Dungeon Master” by Visigoth: When having the best, most irresponsible summer of your life starts to get regulated and legislated by the angry, fist-shaking grandparents that make up our state Senate, it’s time to retreat to the basement for some Fifth Edition Dungeons & Dragons. Local metal gods Visigoth composed this lengthy ode to their many adventures through a world that has no electoral college. Excellent, riff-heavy metal to get any campaign started on the right greave.

“Crimson Sky” by The New Electric Sound: Any of the songs featured on these Provobased surf-rockers would be a home run on a summer playlist. I picked this one for many reasons—it’s got a solid, driving bass drum that sounds like a heartbeat on the verge of doing something magnificent, and Ben Zabriskie’s bounty of wild west guitar hooks conjures images of urban cowboys driving their Camaros into the sunset, searching for their destiny.

“Summer Nights” by Kaskade: This is the song that surges forth from the darkness to remind us that, no matter who gets elected president, dance parties in the middle of July will still be fun. The infectious beats that Kaskade throws down can summon even the most awkward of dancers to the middle of the club. It’s unbridled musical optimism, which is exactly what we need after hearing yet another inflammatory story about the psychos on Team Trump.

“Wonderwild” by Hive Riot: Now that we’re back to feeling good about the summer, let’s close the list off with this synth-pop gem from Hive Riot. Mindy Gledhill’s wispy vocals remind us that, at the end of the day, summer is about living in the moment and having no regrets. Well, some regrets might not be too bad. CW


SUMMER GUIDE 2016

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W W W. S O U N DWA R E H O U S E .C O M HOURS


YOUR GUIDE TO GORGING ON MUSIC THIS SUMMER.

DEREK CARLISLE

BY RANDY HARWARD

66 | JUNE 9, 2016

| CITY WEEKLY |

SUMMER GUIDE 2016

SUMMER CONCERT GUIDE

USANA AMPHITHEATRE

5150 S. 6055 West Usana-Amp.com June 9: Slipknot, Marilyn Manson, Of Mice & Men June 14: Steely Dan, Steve Winwood June 24: Jason Aldean, Thomas Rhett, A Thousand Horses, Dee Jay Silver June 25: Boston July 9: Bret Michaels of Poison, Ratt, Warrant, Dokken, Lita Ford July 10: G-Eazy, Logic, YG, Yo Gotti July 12: Pitbull, Prince Royce, Farruko July 16: The Piano Guys July 20: Rob Zombie, Korn and In This Moment July 21: Keith Urban, Brett Eldredge, Maren Moris July 26: Weezer, Panic! At the Disco, Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness July 29: Florida Georgia Line, Cole Swindell, The Cadillac Three, Kane Brown Aug. 20: Josh Groban, Sarah McLachlan, Foy Vance Aug. 21: Journey, Doobie Brothers, Dave Mason Aug. 26: 5 Seconds of Summer Aug. 29: The Rock Hall Three for All: Heart, Joan Jett and the Blackhearts, Cheap Trick Sept. 2: Dixie Chicks, Smooth Hound Smith

RED BUTTE GARDEN

300 Wakara Way RedButteGarden.org June 16: The Monkees June 20: Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros (sold out)

June 29: Ben Harper & The Innocent Criminals (sold out) July 6: Tears for Fears (sold out) July 8: case / lang / veirs July 13: Last Summer on Earth Tour: Barenaked Ladies, OMD, Howard Jones (sold out) July 14: JJ Grey & Mofro, Josh Ritter and honeyhoney July 19: Boz Scaggs July 26: The Avett Brothers (sold out) July 28: Willie Nelson & Family (sold out) July 31: Gary Clark, Jr. Aug. 5: “Weird Al” Yankovic (sold out) Aug. 7: Wheels of Soul 2016 Summer Tour: Tedeschi Trucks Band, Los Lobos, North Mississippi Allstars Aug. 8: Culture Club Aug. 9: Michael Franti & Spearhead (sold out) Aug. 11: Pablo Villegas performs Aranjuez with the Utah Symphony Aug. 14: Lake Street Drive, Gregory Alan Isakov Aug. 15: Ryan Adams Aug. 17: Pat Benatar & Neil Giraldo, Melissa Etheridge (sold out) Aug. 18: Grace Potter, Con Brio (sold out) Aug. 24: Jackson Browne (sold out) Aug. 30: Wilco (sold out)

MAVERIK CENTER

3200 South Decker Lake Drive MaverikCenter.com July 21: James Taylor Aug. 23: 98 Degrees, O-Town, Ryan Cabrera, Dream


400 W. South Temple DepotSLC.com June 12: Stephen Ragga Marley June 14: Caravan Palace, Beachmen June 16: Blue October, Danny Malone (sold out) June 18: Jim Norton June 21: Mac Sabbath June 26: The Growlers June 29-30: 311, DJ Jarvicious (sold out) July 1: Joe Russo’s Almost Dead July 11: Alice in Chains July 15: Olivia Holt July 16: Buckethead July 27: The Claypool Lennon Delirium Aug. 3: Miike Snow, Lewis Del Mar Aug. 6: Zoso Aug. 13: Eli Young Band

Aug. 16: Zakk Wylde—Book of Shadows II Aug. 20: Ghostface Killah & Raekwon Sept. 2: Fortunate Youth

SANDY AMPHITHEATER

1245 E. 9400 South SandyArts.com/Sandy-Amphitheater June 17: The Commodores June 20: Phillip Phillips, Matt Nathanson, Eric Hutchinson July 1: The Music of ABBA (Arrival from Sweden) July 14: Toad the Wet Sprocket Aug. 19: Collin Raye Aug. 27: Lost ’80s Live: A Flock of Seagulls, Wang Chung, Nu Shooz, Farrington and Mann (Original When in Rome UK), Naked Eyes, Cutting Crew, Animotion

Red Butte Garden

JOSH SCHEUERMAN

THE DEPOT

SUMMER GUIDE 2016

SUMMER CONCERTS

| CITY WEEKLY |

JUNE 6, 2016 | 67


SUMMER GUIDE 2016

SUMMER CONCERTS

RICK CAVENDER

The Complex

68 | JUNE 9, 2016

| CITY WEEKLY |

THE COMPLEX

ALEX BOYE

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536 W. 100 South TheComplexSLC.com July 10 (The Grand): Modern Baseball, Joyce Manor, Thin Lips July 10 (Rockwell): A$AP Ferg, Tony Lanez, EMRSN, DJ Juggy June 12: Authority Zero June 14: Lecrae, Switchfoot June 15: The Smokers Club Tour (Cam’ron, The Underachievers, G Herbo, Smoke DZA, Nyck Caution, Mobsquad Nard, G-Jet, Liam Tracy June 17: Snow Tha Product June 19: Tiger Army, The Bell Furies, The Pine Hill Haints June 22: Andy Black June 25 (The Grand): Too High to Riot Tour: BAS, The Hics, Ron Gilmore, Cozz, Earthgang June 25 (Rockwell) Hopsin, Burnell Washburn, MindBody&Beats, SEM June 30: Slightly Stoopid, SOJA, Zion I, The Grouch + Eligh July 1: Xavier Rudd, Dustin Thomas July 8: Cage the Elephant July 9: DeJ Loaf, Bonaphied, Lee Haze, Bezzel July 14: Howard Jones July 15: VanLadyLove, Festive People, more TBA July 18: Jon Bellion July 20: One Foot in the Grave 2016: Carcass, Ghoul, Crowbar, Night Demon July 23: letlive., Seahaven, Silver Snakes, Night Verses July 26: Belly July 28: Like A Storm, Reloaded July 29: The Oh Hellos July 30: The Psychedelic Furs, The Church Aug. 5: Summerland 2016: Sugar Ray,

Everclear, Lit, Sponge Aug. 6: The Summer Slaughter Tour: Cannibal Corpse, Nile, After the Burial, Suffocation, Carnifex, Revocation, Krisiun, Slaughter to Prevail, Ingested, more TBA Aug. 10: Marianas Trench Aug. 15: Trampled by Turtles, Lord Huron Aug. 16: Flume, Classixx, HWLS Aug. 17: DigiTour: Summer, Baby Ariel, Weston Koury, more TBA Aug. 19 (Rockwell) Rebelution, The Green + J Boog, Stick Figure, Through the Roots, DJ Mackie Aug. 19 (The Grand) Periphery, skiTh, Chon, Toothgrinder Aug. 31 Bayside, The Menzingers, Sorority Noise

VIVINT SMART HOME ARENA 301 W. South Temple VivintArena.com July 16: Twenty-One Pilots, Chef’Special Aug. 11: Demi Lovato, Nick Jonas, Mike Posner Aug. 31: Coldplay, Alessia Cara

IN THE VENUE

219 S. 600 West InTheVenueSLC.com June 11: Russ, TUT, Matt Burton, MindBody&Beats, Pete $un June 11: Jacob Whitesides & Shane Harper June 16: Zack Heckendorf July 8: Otherwise, Sons of Texas July 20: Eagles of Death Metal July 28: The Acacia Strain, Oceano, Knocked Loose, Culture Killer, To the Wind July 30: Aaron Watson, Six Feet in the Pine

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12408 West Saltair Drive TheSaltair.com June 28: Modest Mouse, Brand New July 7: Taste of Chaos: Dashboard Confessional, Taking Back Sunday, Saosin, The Early November July 30: Shawn Mendes Aug. 12: DAS Energi Festival Aug. 20: Deftones, Code Orange

SNOWBASIN BLUES, BREWS & BBQ (SNOWBASIN RESORT)

3925 Snowbasin Road, Huntsville Snowbasin.com/the-mountain/entertainment/blues-brews-bbq/ June 12: Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe, The Weekenders, Tony Holiday and the Velvetones June 19: MarchFourth!, Caliope Musicals, Star and Micey June 26: Band of Heathens, The Black Lillies,

The Johnny Utahs July 3: Ethan Tucker, Kris Lager Band, The Sextones July 10: Blitzen Trapper, Laney Jones and the Spirits, Satsang July 17: Sister Sparrow and the Dirty Birds, Todo Mundo, Tony Holiday and the Velvetones July 24: The Shook Twins, Wood and Wire, Gleewood July 31: Andy Frasco and the UN, Groovement, Pinetop Inferno August 7: James McMurtry, John Craigie, The Johnny Utahs August 14: Amy Helm and the Handsome Strangers, Paul Thorn, Tom Bennett August 21: Hot Buttered Rum, The Outer Vibe, Me Like Bees August 28: Jelly Bread, The Maw Band, Nate Robinson Sept. 4: Lukas Nelson and POTR, Coyote Union, Penrose, Michelle Moonshine, The Battlefield

JOSH SCHEUERMAN

THE GREAT SALTAIR

SUMMER GUIDE 2016

SUMMER CONCERTS

Twilight Concert Series

| CITY WEEKLY |

JUNE 6, 2016 | 69


Deer Valley Amphitheater

DEREK CARLISLE

SUMMER GUIDE 2016

SUMMER CONCERTS

70 | JUNE 9, 2016

| CITY WEEKLY |

TWILIGHT CONCERT SERIES (PIONEER PARK)

350 S. 300 West TwilightConcerts.com July 21: Chet Faker, Kaytranada, LOCAL July 28: Big Grams, Anderson Paak & the Free Nationals, LOCAL Aug. 4: Diplo, TBD, Sneeky Long Aug. 11: Jenny Lewis, Shannon & the Clams, The Aces Aug. 18: Pusha T. Digable Planets, Grits Green Aug. 25: Grimes, Jagwar Ma, LOCAL Sep. 1: Fitz & the Tantrums, Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue, The National Parks

DEER VALLEY RESORT SNOW PARK AMPHITHEATER

2250 S. Deer Valley Drive, Park City DeerValley.com DeerValleyMusicFestival.org July 3: Squirrel Nut Zippers July 8: Rock On! Hits from the ’70s & ’80s with the Utah Symphony July 9: The B-52s with the Utah Symphony July 14: Emmylou Harris July 15: Under the Streetlamp with the Utah Symphony July 16: Matthew Morrison with the Utah Symphony July 21: Chris Botti, Lucia Micarelli July 28: Bèla Fleck, Abigail Washburn July 30: Steep Canyon Rangers with the Utah Symphony Aug. 13: Brandi Carlile Aug. 19: Steve Miller Band

OGDEN TWILIGHT CONCERT SERIES (OGDEN AMPHITHEATER)

343 E. 25th St. OgdenTwilight.com June 9: Crystal Castles, James Supercave, RKDN June 16: Wild Belle, On and On, VanLadyLove June 23: Neon Indian, Lake, Coral Bones June 30: Peter, Bjorn & John, Jim Adkins of Jimmy Eat World, The National Parks

ED KENLEY AMPHITHEATER 403 N. Wasatch Dr., Layton DavisArts.org June 11: GENTRI June 23-24: The Beach Boys July 13: Chicago July 21: Marc Cohn Aug. 20: Collin Raye

SNOWBIRD EVENT CENTER

9600 Little Cottonwood Canyon Road Snowbird.com June 18-19: Snowbird Brewfest: Polyrhythmics, Cory Mon, Hectic Hobo June 25: Band of Heathens July 2: Head for the Hills, Scott Rogers July 9: The Sheepdogs, Nate Robinson July 16: Buckwheat Zydeco, Dan Weldon July 23: Sister Sparrow and the Dirty Birds, Andrew Cole July 30: The Deslondes, Judd Warrick

FESTIVALS UTAH ARTS FESTIVAL (LIBRARY SQUARE AND WASHINGTON SQUARE) 200 E. 400 South UAF.org June 23: Young Dubliners June 24: Beats Antique June 25: Elvin Bishop’s Big Fun June 26: Steep Canyon Rangers

CRUCIALFEST 6 (MULTIPLE VENUES)

Crucialfest.com June 15-18: Russian Circles, Valient Thorr, Form of Rocket, The New Transit Direction, Ether, Subrosa

UTAH BLUES FESTIVAL (GALLIVAN CENTER)

239 S. Main UtahBluesFest.org June 18: Bernard Allison, Ronnie Baker Brooks, Tony Holiday & the Velvetones, The Sister Wives, Jordan Young. CW


SUMMER GUIDE 2016 | CITY WEEKLY |

JUNE 6, 2016 | 71


SUMMER GUIDE 2016

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BE GOOD

Authentic Greek Specialties Breakfast · Lunch · Dinner · Beer & Wine

SLC Farmers Market Returns

The 25th season of the Downtown Farmers Market at Pioneer Park (300 S. 300 West) kicks off this Saturday, June 11. As always, the market features fresh foods and produce, baked goods, food vendors, arts and crafts, music, how-to sessions and more, and will operate on Saturdays from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. through Oct. 22. In addition, the market will open on Tuesdays, from Aug. 9 to Oct. 18, from 4 p.m. until dusk at the Gallivan Center (239 Main). SLCFarmersMarket.org.

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Quote of the week: One cannot think well, love well, sleep well, if one has not dined well. —Virginia Woolf Food Matters 411: tscheffler@cityweekly.net

JUNE 9, 2016 | 73

M ON -T HU 11a - 11p FRI-S AT 1 1 a - 12a / S UN 3 p-10p

| CITY WEEKLY |

5370 S. 900 E. MURRAY, UT

Park City’s biggest annual dinner party, Savor the Summit, takes place on Saturday, June 18, beginning at 6 p.m. Guests dine at a “Grande Table” that extends the entire length of Main Street in Park City’s Old Town—from top to bottom. No ticket is needed to attend the event; diners simply make reservations with their favorite participating restaurant, and prices vary depending upon the dining establishment. Participating restaurants include Bandits’ Grill & Bar, Bangkok Thai on Main, Bistro 412, Bodega on Main, Buona Vita, Butcher’s Chop House & Bar, Café Terigo, Chimayo, Cisero’s Ristorante, Cuisine Unlimited, Flanagan’s, Fletcher’s, Flying Sumo, Handle, High West Distillery, Purple Sage, Reef’s, Riverhorse on Main, Shabu, Tavern, The Bridge Café, Tupelo, Wasatch Brew Pub and Zoom. In addition, Stay Park City is offering special overnight lodging deals for Savor the Summit guests and Park City visitors. For more details, visit ParkCityRestaurants.com and StayParkCity.com.

Get your Italian on.

Savor the Summit

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

italianvillageslc.com

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

RESTAURANT OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

Don’t have a lot of time to browse the goods at your local farmers market? With Farmers Market Direct you can shop your favorite vendors online from the convenience of your couch. The goods you order will be packaged and ready for pick up at the market when you get there. Participants include the Salt Lake City Downtown Farmers Market, Sugar House Farmers Market, Wasatch Front Farmers Market and Park Silly Sunday Market. To find out more, visit Farmers-Market.direct.


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

74 |JUNE 9, 2016

BEER, WINE & SPIRITS

Summer in a Bottle Rosés reining in respect BY TED SCHEFFLER comments@cityweekly.net @critic1

I

am so pleased to see rosé wines inhabiting larger and larger sections of our local (and national) wine stores. I’ve been singing the praises of well-made rosé for at least 15 years now, and it finally seems to be getting some of the attention and respect it deserves. At the very least, most wine drinkers now know that it isn’t just White Zinfandel with a French name. For those not on the bandwagon yet, let’s just review the basics. Technically a red wine, rosé drinks more like a white. It’s made from red grapes—often Grenache, Mourvedre or Cinsault—but during production, the grape skins, which give color and tannins to wine, are left in contact with the grape juice for only a matter of hours (as opposed to days or even weeks as is the case for most red wine). That limited skin

contact results in the wine having a pinkish hue, but very little in the way of tannins. This makes it an easy-drinking, lower alcohol wine, and one that can (and should) be served lightly chilled, like its white counterpart. While rosés used to be almost exclusively from the Provençe region of France, today you’ll find them made around the world, including here in the United States, as well as countries like Spain, Italy, Argentina, Australia and Chile. In general, these wines just keep getting better and better now that winemakers are treating it with the seriousness it deserves. Having said that, I still think of them as wines to enjoy—especially in the summertime—rather than ponder. For me, rosé is synonymous with summer. Here are some interesting examples that I’ll be sipping this summer. One of my dependable, go-to summer rosés is Carol Shelton Wild Thing Rendezvous Rosé 2014 ($11.99). Hailing from Mendocino County, it’s made from sustainably grown Carignane grapes in a crisp, dry style with watermelon and strawberry notes, plus a great mineral backbone. It’s an excellent picnic and cookout wine. Also from Mendocino comes Atrea Skid Rosé 2015 ($15.99). I’m told that Atrea winemaker Alex MacGregor—one of the most knowledgeable and talented people in the wine world I know of—is particularly

DRINK proud of this wine. It’s an “irreverent tribute,” according to MacGregor, to the Malbec “Skid Row” vineyard where its grapes were grown. To give you an idea of how little time the skins for some rosés are in contact with the juice, the fruit for Skid Rosé was destemmed and pressed for a mere two-hour soak. It’s fabulous with a fresh Caprese salad. France’s Minervois region is home to Le Grand Noir Rosé 2014 ($11.99). This Grenache/Syrah blend is pale pink with spicy pepper notes to compliment red currant, raspberry and strawberry flavors. It’s a versatile food wine that can pair with everything from pizza to potstickers. Tenuta Sant Antonio Scaia Rosato 2015 ($12.99) from Italy’s Veneto region reminds me—in a good way—of my Hawaiian Punch days. It’s a whole lot of party in a bottle: passion

fruit, strawberry, Cavaillon melon and raspberry. Those are just some of the fab flavors in this fruitpacked drink. Cariñena and Garnacha go into making Torres de Casta Rosado 2015 ($13.99) from Catalunya, Spain. It’s a bigger, more intense rosé than most, and one that will fit in well at your next barbecue. Some other great summer rosés to be on the lookout for include Bucklin Old Hill Ranch Rosé 2015 ($16.99), Matthiasson Rosé 2015 ($18.99), Lorenza Rosé 2015 ($17.99), Cline Mourvedre Rosé 2015 ($11.95) and Le Cirque Rosé 2014 ($13.99). Those should get your sweaty summer started. CW


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

| CITY WEEKLY |

JUNE 9, 2016 | 75


@

2005 E. 2700 SOUTH, SLC FELDMANSDELI.COM FELDMANSDELI OPEN TUES - SAT TO GO ORDERS: (801) 906-0369

| CITY WEEKLY |

76 |JUNE 9, 2016

JOHN TAYLOR

open!

A sampler of Ted Scheffler’s reviews

JUNE 18TH JUNE 25TH JULY 2ND

BOWTB Pat & Roy marc why jazz

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Pleiku’s snowball shrimp Pleiku

1 3 N E I G H B O R H O O D L O C AT I O N S FAC E B O O K . C O M / A P O L L O B U RG E R

The creators of Pipa Asian Tapas & Sake Bar have resurfaced downtown with Pleiku, named after a city in central Vietnam. The ambiance and décor is ultra-modern and chic, mostly in white and cream tones. While you peruse the eclectic Asian menu—with Vietnamese, Thai, Mongolian and Chinese dishes—you might want to enjoy one of many unusual libations, like the Hello Kitty (blood orange juice, passion fruit, lime and sake). The prices are surprisingly moderate, and you get a lot of food for your dollar; even the tapas menu features portions large enough to share. For those who enjoy pho, there are brisket, rare beef, beef balls, vegan and seafood versions. The tasty Shaken Steak Cubes tapa made the trip from Pipa to Pleiku: marinated and grilled crispy boneless sirloin beef served with veggie accompaniments like cucumber, greens, onions and cilantro. Bánh mì offerings include a “classic” with Vietnamese deli meats, one with caramelized pork, another featuring chicken teriyaki, and lemongrass tofu. It’s not the best around, but it’s still quite adequate if you have a bánh mì craving, especially for the price. Reviewed May 12. 264 S. Main, 801-359-4544, Facebook.com/Pleiku

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Pago

Pago is an intimate, farm-to-table restaurant in the bustling 9th & 9th neighborhood. Owner Scott Evans is committed to seeking out quality products from local growers, farms and artisans. Vibrant cinnamon-infused beets topped with Greek yogurt, crunchy granola, fresh greens and truffled honey are incredible. Ditto the bitesize, puffy potato pillows topped with crème fraîche, chives and American caviar. For lunch, give the superb Wagyu steak salad a try. 878 S. 900 East, Salt Lake City, 801-532-0777, PagoSLC.com

Red Butte Cafe

The Red Butte Cafe features an eclectic Southwestcontemporary menu. House specialties include pepitacrusted salmon, grilled sirloin with onion rings, falafel with saffron aioli, baby back ribs with hoisin barbecue glaze and trout with cumin-lime butter. If you have room after dinner, don’t forget the tempting dessert menu, with offerings like the orange chocolate mousse cake, three-layer chocolate cake and white chocolate raspberry cheesecake. The restaurant also provides microbrews from Desert Edge Brewery. 1414 S. Foothill Drive, Salt Lake City, 801-581-9498, TheRedButteCafe.com

R&R BBQ

Few are as loyal to the art of barbecue as the owners of R&R. BBQ-competition veterans Rod and Roger Livingston pride themselves on their smoke, fire and patience that can be displayed at this downtown restaurant. R&R offers pork spare ribs, pulled pork, beef brisket and chopped brisket, as well as burgers, smoked and deepfried wings, and traditional barbecue sides like baked beans, fried okra, hush puppies and coleslaw. Order an icecold beer, pull up a chair and prepare for authentic, slowcooked, finger-licking barbecue. 307 W. 600 South, Salt Lake City, 801-364-0443, RAndRBBQ.net

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Ogden Pizzeria has been family-owned and operated for 35 years. Pizza specialties include classics like chicken Alfredo, Hawaiian and meat lover’s. Or, customize your own from a variety of toppings. Additional menu choices include salads, breads and pasta dishes. You can also get pizzas to take and bake at home. 936 Odgen Blvd., Odgen, 801-393-3191, OdgenPizzeria.com

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Sake tasting • Sushi classes 2335 E. MURRAY HOLLADAY RD 801.278.8682 | ricebasil.com

The Oasis Cafe has long been a hub for people who care about what they eat. And the salads here are sophisticated greenery, to say the least. There’s the traditional spinach salad made wonderful with Gorgonzola cheese and candied pine nuts. The Mediterranean grilled salad combines Yukon gold potatoes, onions, olives, tomatoes, feta cheese and hummus with various fish or meat. But, to really impress yourself or others, order the roasted-beet tower topped with arugula and goat cheese. 151 S. 500 East, Salt Lake City, 801-3220404, OasisCafeSLC.com

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78 | JUNE 9, 2016

NOW YOU SEE ME 2

Sleight Improvement

CINEMA

Now You See Me 2 dodges some of the original’s infuriating problems. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

I

n the interest of brevity, and to avoid the spike in my blood pressure every time it comes up: The original 2013 Now You See Me was a bad movie. It was deceptive in its badness, because it offered a bunch of slick surface pleasures, building up to one of those finales where you can imagine everyone involved was smirking and thinking, “Betcha didn’t see that coming.” Which was true—because you couldn’t see “that” coming, because it was a twist built on a massive narrative cheat. And it’s profoundly dispiriting to see something stupid somehow convince a lot of people that it’s smart, simply because of how loudly and brashly it keeps insisting on it, despite lacking any substance for the claim. It was like the Donald Trump of movies. For this reason, the prospect of Now You See Me 2 was not a cause for rejoicing. Yet enough of the things that were painfully wrong in the original get fixed this time around that it’s actually not a chore to sit through. Hooray for the simple pleasures of watching incompetence graduate to mediocrity. The follow-up picks up around 18 months after the events of the first film, with Dylan Rhodes (Mark Ruffalo) still working for the FBI, keeping the authorities off the trail of his still-in-hiding fugitive magician cohorts known as The Horsemen. With Isla Fisher’s Henley having retired from the group, a newcomer named Lula (Lizzy Caplan) has been recruited to join Daniel (Jesse Eisenberg), Merritt (Woody Harrelson) and Jack (Dave Franco) in a new mission to take down a tech company whose new cell phone might be able to hijack users’ personal data. But the mission might be a trap—one that’s built on someone getting even with the Horsemen for Rhodes’ successful plot to avenge his dead father.

On its most basic strucJay Chou, Jesse Eisenberg, Woody Harrelson, Lizzy Caplan, tural level, NYSM2 improves Mark Ruffalo and Dave Franco in Now You See Me 2 upon the original simply by providing a story that’s actualThese are movies built on the promise that ly about the magicians. Where Now You See a metric ton of moving parts will come toMe spent most of its time with Rhodes and gether in a startling Big Reveal, one that will his Interpol partner as he fake-investigated seem like a brilliant culmination of clockthe quartet’s illusion-based crimes, turning work plotting. Ed Solomon’s script doesn’t The Horsemen into an almost completely pull nearly the same dirty tricks that he was personality-free bunch of pieces on a game guilty of the first time around, but he still board, this story allows them to remain cenpacks in way too many characters—includter stage. And they turn out to be a lot more ing Rhodes’ returning adversaries Thadfun—including a spark of energy from the deus Bradley (Morgan Freeman) and Arthur addition of Caplan—when they’re not just Tressler (Michael Caine), and even Harrelenigmatic cameo appearances. son playing an ill-conceived dual role as That’s largely because of one of the other Merritt’s evil twin—and payoffs that feel as key shifts in focus: It’s now a magical heist though they leap several dozen logical steps caper, rather than a procedural about into their conclusion. vestigating a magical heist. The central set It’s all moving along so quickly, that they piece finds the four magicians attempting hope you don’t care that the Horsemen to smuggle a powerful encryption-cracking are like superheroes who develop whatcell phone data card out of a secure facility, ever superpower is called for by the situarequiring a ton of nifty sleight-of-hand and tion at hand. But, hey, sometimes it’s okay physics-defying card-throwing to thwart to be satisfied by small blessings, like not the guards’ pat-downs. It’s clearly preposemerging actively pissed off at what you’ve terous, but it’s also kind of a blast, as direcjust seen. That was one trick I didn’t expect tor John M. Chu (G.I. Joe: Retaliation) lets this sequel to pull off. CW us in on every feint and dodge. Giving our heroes a clear goal against a single clear NOW YOU SEE ME 2 antagonist—a tech billionaire (Daniel Radcliffe) who has faked his own death—allows BB.5 for a focus that the original lacked, even Mark Ruffalo when the inevitable whiffs of a grand con- Jesse Eisenberg spiracy start to overtake things. Woody Harrelson That, unfortunately, is where Now You See Rated PG-13 Me 2 is most like its unpleasant predecessor.

TRY THESE The Prestige (2006) Hugh Jackman Christian Bale Rated PG-13

The Illusionist (2006) Edward Norton Jessica Biel Rated PG-13

G.I. Joe: Retaliation (2013) Dwayne Johnson Channing Tatum Rated PG-13

Now You See Me (2013) Mark Ruffalo Jesse Eisenberg Rated PG-13


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NEW THIS WEEK Information is correct at press time. Film release schedules are subject to change. ALMOST HOLY BB.5 The art of the documentary is an art of editing; no matter how fascinating the subject, the movie might not work if filmmakers can’t shape their footage into something resembling a narrative. Director Steve Hoover has a fascinating subject indeed in Gennadiy Mokhnenko, a Ukranian pastor who runs a youth rehab facility in the town of Mariupol. We see the feisty Mokhnenko in his activities rounding up street kids, removing children from the homes of unfit parents and threatening drug dealers and other predators, his sense of divine purpose rarely hindered by the fact that he’s basically a vigilante, doing the social work the shaky government is unable or unwilling to do. That dynamic alone could have made for a terrific story, but Hoover keeps bouncing back and forth between some of the individuals Mokhnenko is trying to help, then circling back to a speech he’s giving in a women’s prison, then intercutting snippets from a Davey and Goliath-esque Ukranian children’s TV program. By the time the film begins to focus on a violent rebellion against the Russianfriendly Ukranian government, Mokhnenko himself has begun to seem lost in the smoke. Opens June 10 at Tower Theatre. (NR)—Scott Renshaw

NOW YOU SEE ME 2 BB.5 See review p. 78. Opens June 10 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)

SPECIAL SCREENINGS ALIENS At Brewvies, June 13, 10 p.m. (R) FIGHT CLUB At Tower Theater, June 10-11, 11 p.m. & June 12, 12 p.m. (R) JURASSIC PARK At Main Library Plaza, June 10, dusk. (PG-13)

CURRENT RELEASES ME BEFORE YOU B Manic pixie totally-unqualified-to-do-her-job Lou (Emilia Clarke) meets-cute with hot rich young hunk Will (Sam Clafin), who is not adjusting well to life as a quadriplegic, and wants to die. Will she help restore his joie de vivre with her kooky wardrobe and adorableness? Based on Jojo Moyes’ novel, this miscalculated romantic dramedy wants us to pity the formerly athletic, once free-spirited Will, who has only Lou, his doting parents, a physical therapist and an apparently bottomless fortune to get by on. Sure, quadriplegia has its challenges, but no one is in a better position to cope with them than Will. The film is coy about the complex physical and psychological problems that someone in Will’s position might experience, but honest grittiness would interfere with the glossy romance. This couldn’t be more pathetically simplistic about morally complicated issues surrounding assisted suicide. (PG-13)—MaryAnn Johanson

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MAGGIE’S PLAN BB.5 Somewhere lurking in the background of writer/director Rebecca Miller’s movie is a more openly acidic portrait of a certain brand of contemporary New Yorker, but it’s repeatedly smacked down by a whimsical tone. The high-concept premise finds 30-something academic Maggie (Greta Gerwig) making the oh-so-modern decision to have a baby on her own via artificial insemination, which coincides inconveniently with her budding relationship with a married writer (Ethan Hawke). Miller seasons her story with great background details—a girl hula-hooping during a cell phone conversation; a Shakespearean busker in the park— that establishes a world of hyper-literate eccentrics seemingly unaware of how bizarre they would seem to the rest of the world. That might have made for great subtext as the romantic roundelays ensue—including a Teutonically accented Julianne Moore as Hawke’s wife—yet there’s no real attempt to skewer their selfabsorption. And considering how infrequent the actual punch lines are, aside from the too-rare moments featuring Bill Hader as Maggie’s best pal, it’s not funny enough to make up for the fact that Miller seemingly wants us to see them all as charming, rather than kind of pathetic. Opens June 10 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (R)—SR

WARCRAFT [not yet reviewed] Action fantasy based on the popular video game. Opens June 10 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)

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THE CONJURING 2 BBB The sequel to the scariest movie of 2013 covers a lot of the same ground—but it wets a lot of the same pants, too, if you know what I mean. Director James Wan and writers Chad and Carey W. Hayes deliver another smooth, confident, meat-andpotatoes horror film based on the files of real-life paranormal investigators Ed and Lorraine Warren, played with surprising tenderness by Patrick Wilson and Vera Farmiga. It’s 1977, and an impoverished north London family—divorced Peggy (Frances O’Connor) and her four children—are bedeviled by a malevolent spirit that tears apart their dingy house and possesses 11-year-old Janet (Madison Wolfe). Since we know up-front what kind of movie this is, Wan skips the “maybe there’s another explanation” formalities and gets right to scaring us with unambiguously supernatural events. An expert with the camera, he makes frightening use of the story’s familiar haunted-house tropes, and even finds room for a few nice family moments. Not that the movie world needs more franchises, but the thought of the Warrens’ case files bursting with creepy stories for James Wan to adapt indefinitely is very appealing. Opens June 10 at theaters valleywide. (R)—Eric D. Snider

DHEEPAN BBB Jacques Audiard finds a unique approach to exploring the immigrant refugee experience, yet he almost loses that uniqueness in a narrative that’s both over-stuffed and overly conventional. To escape civil war in Sri Lanka, an ex-rebel soldier named Sivadhasan (Jesuthasan Anthonyhasan) pretends to be a dead man named Dheepan, and recruits strangers to pose as his wife Yalini (Kalieaswari Srinivasan) and 9-year-old daughter Illayaal (Claudine Vinasithamby) so they can emigrate to France as a “family.” Audiard delivers some subtly emotional moments in the dynamics within the phony family, as they seek some kind of familiarity and stability in the gang-ridden housing project where Dheepan gets a job as custodian. Then the Green Card-esque scenario develops predictable complications, and at times it feels as though Audiard can’t quite decide which of these characters is the center of the story. Great character beats collide with a climax that’s almost baffling in the way that it feels designed for the expectations of an American remake. I’d rather focus on the complexities of assimilation than wonder what it will look like when Dheepan is played by Liam Neeson. Opens June 10 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (R)—SR

TEENAGE MUTANT NINJA TURTLES: OUT OF THE SHADOWS B The original ‘80s Turtles were intended as a parody of superhero comics. But this sequel to 2014’s reboot is just one more samey-same blockbuster that apes everything from Ghostbusters to The Avengers, and cannot hope to distinguish itself in such company. It’s too long and confusing for children, yet its plot about an alien that wants to take over Earth plays like it was written by an 8-year-old. Indeed, the creepy anthromophorized turtles—with the minds of doofy adolescents, the bodies of adult bodybuilders and the CGI faces of sluggish reptiles— come across as a child’s idea of what adulthood must be like, namely non-stop pizza parties and hanging out in a cool secret underground clubhouse, when you’re not fighting aliens with faux martial arts. It would be an insult to cartoons to call this cartoonish. (PG-13)—MAJ

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Beloved Salt Lake City mathprog-noise band Form of Rocket reconstitutes for Crucialfest, vinyl re-issues. BY BRIAN STAKER comments@cityweekly.net @getstakerized

F

orm of Rocket singer/sometimesguitarist Curtis Jensen, who’s now living in Sandpoint, Alaska, was already planning to be in Salt Lake City for his bachelor party, so Jarom Bischoff’s invitation to play for Crucialfest was serendipitous. Especially for local music fans. For most of the early 2000s, FoR was a crucial part of the local music scene, and they haven’t performed together since 2012. The group grew out of the band Power of Means, in which bassist Ben Dodds had been playing with guitarist Eric Bliss. After several years of unstable lineups, that group folded out of frustration. Bliss switched to drums, and the pair wrote songs and advertised for guitarists. Jensen and Peter Makowski were among the first to respond. “Within a year, we were touring—Form of Rocket was born,” Dodds says in an interview at their Downtown Music practice space. Bliss left in 2001, replaced behind the kit by Tyler Smith. After an EP and 7-inch, Form of Rocket dropped the Andy Pattersonproduced Se Puede Despedir a Todos (self-released) later that year. They toured, attracting attention from indie labels and, in 2003, ultimately signed with New York City-based Some Records, the label co-founded by Walter Schreifels of noteworthy bands Youth of Today, Gorilla Biscuits, Quicksand and Rival Schools. Incidentally, Some Records also signed FoR’s SLC peers The New Transit Direction, who’ll also play Crucialfest. FoR released Lumber and toured extensively for a year before experiencing more lineup fluctuation. Jensen left for school. Bliss returned to replace him, sharing vocals with Makowski, and they added a fifth member, guitarist Gentry Densley (known for his work with Iceburn and now, with Smith, the two-piece doom-drone band Eagle Twin). When Bliss left again, Densley would split vox with Makowski. Then, just before recording their third album, Men, Jensen returned, and Form of Rocket toured the U.S. as a quintet. Form of Rocket’s sound is almost as complicated as their membership history, in their willingness to fiddle with the rock genre, and push the hardcore idiom with the addition of odd time signatures and melodic excursions. City Weekly ventured the comparison of The Jesus Lizard mixed with progressive rock, and they concur. Densley says the Midwestern, Jesus Lizard/Shellac influence is his “bread and butter,” but that FoR’s sound is collaborative, so he suppressed his proclivities in service of the band. “When everyone adds their own influences in, it becomes a totally different thing,” he says. “There are elements of … math rock, but I always thought [our sound] had more natural scales, served a more acoustic sound, almost like AC/DC taken to the next step, or Jesus Lizard, [if you] add a little Birthday Party.” There’s more to Form of Rocket than complex configurations. They’re also known for their acerbic wit in songs like “Keep Smiling Ed Smart,” about the father of kidnap victim Elizabeth Smart, and “Peter Makowski Had an Aneurysm” (originally titled “Peter Makowski Was Having Sex and Hit His Head on the Wall While Having an Orgasm”). There’s also a subtle social—and sociocultural—dynamic. “We

LUKE ISOM

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Form of Rocket were into bands like Fugazi and Drive Like Jehu—our interplay was important—and also, typical chord progressions were sidelined,” notes Jensen. “On top of that, we grew up in Utah, so we wanted to freak people out a little bit.” Shortly after touring Men, Form of Rocket cooled their engines. They won’t say they broke up, or even went on hiatus. Rather, life and other musical projects happened. Dodds and Makowski formed Accidente; Densley and Smith’s Eagle Twin project took off. Jensen joined the Peace Corps, attended graduate school in Brooklyn, then took a job teaching in an Alaskan village—amounting to a break from music altogether. The Se Puede lineup of Form of Rocket—Jensen, Smith, Makowski and Dodds—will play two shows in conjunction with Crucialfest 6. First is Crucial Warm-Up Part 1 at Kilby Court on Saturday, where they’ll play Se Puede start-to-finish, along with tracks from Lumber. They’ll also have limited-edition T-shirts and posters for sale—and the vinyl debut of Se Puede, which Patterson remastered, resequenced and edited in order to fit the two-side format. Jensen says the band is working with local promoter/musician Tyler “Froburn” Coburn to release Lumber and Men on wax within the next 18 months, pending a licensing deal with Some Records. The second show—co-headlining Crucialfest proper—happens at The Urban Lounge on June 17, with Densley joining the band for a few songs. The band will also appear on Circus Brown’s Not a Side Show on KRCL Radio on June 10. Just like they object to the words “breakup” and “hiatus,” Form of Rocket likewise rejects “reunion.” These gigs, Jensen says, “are just a set of shows we could make happen around the release of the LP.” The band, now in their late-to-mid 30s and 40s, has experienced the crazy touring life. They feel—considering they’re adults, with adult responsibilities—that they’re lucky to be able to assemble in the same place. But musically, Jensen says Form of Rocket now sounds tighter, fuller and “more like we know what we’re doing.” CW

FORM OF ROCKET

Crucialfest Warm-Up, Pt. 1 w/ Baby Gurl, Worst Friends Kilby Court 741 S. 330 West Saturday, June 11, 6 p.m. $12 in advance, $15 day of show All ages 801-364-3538

Crucialfest 6 w/ Elephant Rifles, Cicadas The Urban Lounge 241 S. 500 East Friday, June 17, 9 p.m. $12 in advance, $15 day of show 21+ 801-746-0557 Crucialfest.com


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Any Major Dude Will Tell You …

… Steely Dan is the coolest. BY RANDY HARWARD rharward@cityweekly.net

M

y first Steely Dan show happened within an hour of my first lap dance. It was in Las Vegas, and my friend Deane Chadburn—then the proprietor of the now-shuttered Recycle CD across from Sears and Burt’s Tiki Lounge on 800 South and State—facilitated both events. A massive fan, Deane had planned a weeklong jaunt, hitting every date of Steely Dan’s “Rent Party” shows in L.A., and one in Vegas. The tickets were $240, and Deane gave me one. I hadn’t loved them my whole life; for me, Steely Dan was an acquired taste. I first heard them on Rock 103.5 (now The Arrow) when I was 10. That’s way too young for Steely Dan. I mean, if you’re that age and you dig ’em—for the reasons they deserve to be dug— then good for you, kid. But I wasn’t ready. The band just wasn’t age-appropriate. There’s a reason kids only want to eat candy when they’re young: It tastes good. They don’t want complexity, a symphony of flavors to parse and savor. Steely Dan was a wasabi Kit-Kat, and I could only handle Hershey’s. They gave me pianos, horns and jazz chords when I wanted loud guitars, big choruses, simple lyrics: “Back in black/ I hit the sack.” That’s the stuff. Not this shit about some guy so worried about Rikki losin’ his digits. I didn’t care about old-ass Aretha Franklin, and I had no idea why Cuervo Gold and fine Colombian made tonight a wonderful thing. These damned songs by the nerdily named Donald Fagen and Walter Becker were interrupting morning show host Jon Carter’s super-funny “Timmy” sketches. Even the revelation that the band was named for a dildo mentioned in a book called Naked Lunch failed to pique my pre-pubescent puerility. It’s hard to pinpoint the moment when my head popped outta my butt and I really heard Steely Dan. There is no landmark event in my physical or emotional development, no

Steely Dan

single epiphany. It was gradual. I like to think I picked up on the vibe, first—that laid-back feel that belies the music’s degree of difficulty and genius. It suffuses even the peppier Dan songs, like the mile-a-minute, be-bopping “Bodhisattva,” or the freewheeling “Reelin’ in the Years,” but is most apparent in tunes like the slinky “Hey Nineteen.” It’s the sound of cool. As I grew older, and experienced life, the songs revealed themselves to me. When I’d figured out why I should care about ’Retha, I understood why the protagonist of “Hey Nineteen” was dismayed by the ignorance of the 19-year-old object of his lust. I felt the sad smile behind the “Deacon Blues” line, “They got a name for all the winners in the world/ I want a name when I lose.” And then I saw how the music and the words dovetailed to give depth and personality to the songs. Like in “Cousin Dupree,” where the loping backbeat and Becker’s simple, funky guitar—even without the lyrics— evokes the image of an idle D-bag with designs on “a downhome family romance.” Or how, on “Do It Again,” shakers, conga drums, a Yamaha organ and a sitar can link seemingly disparate verses about revenge, regret and desperation. And somehow, Fagen’s stonedbut-soulful voice suits these losers and antiheroes who try to win by losing, indulge base urges, bang a sweet young (unrelated) thing, connect with someone, divorce another, contemplate one’s obsolescence or go gunnin’ for the man who stole their water. Steely Dan mixes a wicked intellect and sense of humor, balancing serious points with plain goofiness. Each listen, whether it’s a song on the radio or an album side, rewards you with something to think about long after the needle scrapes the label. That’s why, that night in Vegas, the crowd stood through the entire show and why we all, eventually, listen so attentively to Steely Dan—and, at least in my case, don’t recall much about that lap dance. CW

STEELY DAN

w/ Steve Winwood Usana Amphitheater 5150 S. 6055 West Tuesday, June 14, 7 p.m. $29.50-$125 801-417-5343 Usana-Amp.com


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FRIDAY 6.10 Yardsss, Wrtch

Since Albatross Recordings & Ephemera’s recent move to the corner of 1300 South and 900 East, the concern has really come into its own. In contrast to Diabolical’s focus on punk/garage music, Albatross favors more experimental music, from ambient to outsider DJs to obscure ‘70s-’80s movie soundtracks. So it just seems natural that Albatross hosts a visit from two bands on (mostly) Italian metal label SG (Self Group) Records. Portland combo Yardsss—Krist Krueger and compadres—are more ephemeral than anything resembling metal, conducting (according to their bio) not shows but “performance case studies,” with drone-y orchestrations that reference literary figures like Kurt Vonnegut, in whose work they found the title of their newest album, Granfalloons. Seattle’s Wrtch, led by Ambrosia Bartosekulva, also uses piano to evoke impressionistic images. It’ll be very fitting to witness both musical enterprises in a space devoted to vinyl, once seen as an ephemeral medium. (Brian Staker) Albatross Recordings & Ephemera, 1305 S. 900 East, 7 p.m., $5 donation suggested, Twitter.com/AlbatrossRecSLC

Orgone

Los Angeles ensemble Orgone has more than a decade’s worth of playing together, first as a tightly knit band backing hip-hop acts such as the Pharcyde and Tone-Loc during the ‘90s, then later as their own unit fronted first by charismatic frontwoman Fanny Franklin and, now, Adryon de León. The powerful chemistry of band and singer is apparent in Orgone’s deep roster of funk, soul and Afro-beat originals and covers. Orgone still kills it as a live instrumental band, helped by crisp horns, Ethan Philips’ generous bass grooves and mesmerizing

Orgone

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deep funk licks from Sergio Rios’ guitar. The band’s latest single, “Do What You Came to Do,” melds classic Memphis soul with a hint of Reggae for a supremely listenable—and danceable—brew. And if those aren’t your bag, just wait a bit for something like “Sweet Feet,” a Chaka Khaninspired ‘80s dancefloor tune that’s fresh while remaining a spot-on tribute to its influences. (Kimball Bennion) O.P. Rockwell, 628 Main, Park City, 9:30 p.m. (doors), $15, OPRockwell.com

FRIDAY-SATURDAY 6.10-11 Bonanza Campout: Big Gigantic, Cold War Kids, Joywave

Given the fact that Utah has a wide variety of outdoor concert venues (see p. 66), it was only a matter of time before a twoday campout/concert festival emerged. This weekend, the inaugural Bonanza Campout will descend upon Rivers Edge, a resort at the base of Jordanelle Dam in Heber City. Headliners include hip-hop/jazz fusion group Big Gigantic and indie-rock band Cold War Kids, who will be leading a lineup that includes Joywave, JR JR, Emancipator and Savoy—not to mention locals Quiet Oaks, Joel Pack & the Pops, Scenic Byway and Daisy & the Moonshines. In addition to two days of live music from 32 bands spanning a variety of genres, attendees can treat themselves to samples of local beer and food, along with other outdoorsy activities. As an all-ages show where camping overnight is encouraged, it will be a great weekend getaway for all natureloving music fans (Alex Springer)

Yardsss Rivers Edge @ Deer Park, 7000 Old Highway 40, Heber City, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., $75 for weekend pass, $40 for singleday pass, BonanzaCampout.com

SATURDAY 6.11

Black Mountain, Malcom Jack

About 10 years ago, it seemed like Black was the new Jesus, as far as new band names were concerned—The Black Keys, Black Lips, Black Angels, etc. Of course, anyone can jump on a bandwagon, but how many can carry a tune? Perhaps the most direct musical descendant of the heavy psychedelic proto-Black band, Black Sabbath, is

Big Gigantic

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Joe Purdy’s threadbare folk songs are made for close listening. The Arkansas-raised singer/songwriter makes music reminiscent of Amos Lee or Ray LaMontagne, but he adds a hint of twang in his voice—although not enough to be distracting—and he’s often at his best with nothing more than a guitar, singing barely above a whisper. Even though it’s been almost two years since Purdy released his latest record, Eagle Rock Fire (MC), the prolific songwriter has more than enough material to work with. Purdy is still

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best known for his 2004 breakout Julie Blue, which included the songs “I Love the Rain the Most,” and “Wash Away,” but he has lately made some enjoyable forays into country and Americana that, as longtime followers of his work know, demonstrate his varied folk palate and skill for communicating the subtle tragedies of love and life. Acclaimed singersongwriter Garrison Starr opens. (KB) The State Room, 638 S. State, 8 p.m., $25, TheStateRoomSLC.com

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With his origins firmly rooted within the foundation of modern reggae music, Stephen “Ragga” Marley is continuing his Grammy-winning solo career with a summer tour. After the success of Marley’s 2011 release Revelation Part I: The Root of Life (Universal/Tuff Gong), he’s finalizing production on Revelation Part II: The Fruit of Life, which is due July 22. Based on the single “Scars on My Feet,” which features Atlantabased rapper Waka Flocka, the album will further explore Marley’s ability to blend elements of reggae, hip-hop and pop, while featuring an impressive roster of collaborators such as Rakim and DJ Khaled. Summer evenings were made to enjoy live reggae music—spend this one with a member of reggae royalty. (AS) The Depot, 400 W. South Temple, 8 p.m., $22 in advance, $27 day of show, DepotSLC.com

Joe Purdy

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Vancouver’s Black Mountain. They add some atmospheric vocals and synth, but, at heart, it’s all about the Mountain as a rock symbol for a dark repository of arcane secrets. Black Mountain’s latest album, IV (Jagjaguwar, 2016) hearkens back in more than just its title to that other hard rock band that used to get its “Misty Mountain Hop” on from time to time. (BS) The Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 8 p.m., $15, TheUrbanLoungeSLC.com

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Tuesday 6/14

Crystal Castles + James Supercave + RKDN (Ogden Amphitheater) The Grow Wild Tour feat. Round2 Crew + Will Jay + Bad Feelings + Dylan Holland + Zach Matari + Ben Hazlewood + The House On Cliff + Rivers Monroe + James Barre (Kilby Court) John Flanders Quartet (Garage on Beck) Mythic Valley + Kimber Packer + Brian Bingham (Muse Music) Slipknot + Marilyn Manson + Of Mice and Men (USANA) The Smites (Urban Lounge) We Dream Dawn (The Hog Wallow)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

Reggae Thursday (The Royal) Therapy Thursdays feat. Gondwana + Nattali Rize + Smilling Souls feat. Jan from Natural Roots + Makisi Musik + Misi from Bludgeon Muffin and Sayloo + DJ Nizzle (Club Elevate)

KARAOKE

Cowboy Karaoke (The Cabin) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge)

FRIDAY 6.10 LIVE MUSIC

Animal Liberation Orchestra + Talia Keys (SKY) see p. 88 A$AP Ferg + Tory Lanez (The Complex) Bonanza Campout (Rivers Edge) see p. 84 Breakers + Hot Vodka + The Nude Party + Heavy Dose (Urban Lounge) Devil’s Club (The Hog Wallow)

5.99 lunch special MONDAY - FRIDAY

SATURDAY 6.11 LIVE MUSIC

Barsie + Breezeway + Red Yeti (Muse Music) Big Bonanza Campout (Rivers Edge) see p. 84 Black Mountain + Malcom Jack (Urban Lounge) see p. 84 The Crook & the Bluff (Garage on Beck) Crucialfest Warm-up Pt. 1 feat. Form of Rocket + Baby Gurl + Worst Friends (Kilby Court) see p. 80 Jacob Whitesides + Shane Harper (In the Venue) Kaustik + Charlatan + The Politician + ToxicDose (Metro Bar) Michelle Moonshine Trio (The Hog Wallow) Russ + TUT + Matt Burton + MindBody&Beats + Pete $un (In the Venue)

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Harbor Patrol + The Couch Bombs + American Mouth + All of Us at the Zoo (Muse Music) John Allred + Drew Danburry (Velour Live Music Gallery) Kevin Morby + Jaye Bartell (Kilby Court) Kutt Calhoun + Whitney Peyton + Sincerely Collins (Metro Bar) Modern Baseball + Joyce Manor + Thin Lips (The Complex) Orgone (O.P. Rockwell) see p. 84 Tony Holiday (Garage on Beck) Queen Nation (Liquid Joe’s) Yardsss + Wrtch (Albatross Recordings & Ephemera) see p. 84

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Crucialfest 6 Warm-Up Shows, Pts. 1 and 2

It’s best to stretch before exercising, and a similar maxim applies to the four-day, threevenue, 50-band shindig called Crucialfest. So rehearse your mosh moves and prime your eardrums at these pre-event events. You’ve already got the deets for Crucial Warm-Up Pt. 1 (see p. 81), so here’s the poop on Pt. 2: Since 2000, North Carolina’s Valient Thorr has made the loudest, fastest and face-meltingest rock music they can, leading a devoted following of “Thorriors.” They’re joined by New Jersey thrashers Hammer Fight, whose relentless Profound and Profane (Napalm) was released in March, as well as locals Accidente and Barlow. (RH, KB) Metro Bar, 615 W. 100 South, 8 p.m., $10, JRCSLC.com

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6.9 WE DREAM DAWN

6.17 STONEFED

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6.18 STONEFED

3200 E BIG COTTONWOOD RD. | 801.733.5567 THEHOGWALLOW.COM

JUNE 9, 2016 | 87

6.11 MICHELLE MOONSHINE TRIO STARTING 6.20 – MONDAY NIGHT’S OPEN BLUES JAM HOSTED BY 6.15 MICHELLE MOONSHINE ROBBY’S BLUES EXPLOSION 6.16 DYLAN ROE

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ALO, Talia Keys

The first ALO song I ever heard was “Barbeque.” I was playing disc golf, alone, and decided to take a break. In the cool shade, escaping a vicious sun, I let Zach Gill’s electric piano notes and lyrics cascade over me like cool water. He sang of long, winding roads with twists, turns, colorful subplots and sunburns, and fake-out endings, saying to set your dreams ablaze—accept that they may never come true. Instead, see them as dangling possibilities and, if one happens to come true? Well, bonus. Dig into the California jam band’s eight-album discography, if you haven’t already. Happy birthday to opener Talia Keys, a fine songsmith in her own right. (Randy Harward) Sky, 149 Pierpont Ave., 9:30 p.m., $20 in advance, $25 day of show, SkySLC.com

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KARAOKE STARTS @ 9PM

Stonebreed + Transit Cast + Roll The Bones (Leatherheads Sports Bar)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) In an effort to be the best for brunch in SLC, Rye has decided to focus on the AM hours. Going forward Rye will be open: Monday-Friday from 9am-2pm Saturday and Sunday from 9am-3pm. What this means for you: even more house-made breakfast and brunch specials, snappier service-same fresh, locally-sourced fixins. Come on in. www.ryeslc.com

JUNE 8: 8PM DOORS JUNE 9: 8PM DOORS

LOCAL H THE SMITES (THE SMITHS TRIBUTE BAND) HUMAN LEATHER

JUNE 10:BREAKERS 8PM DOORS FREE SHOW

HOT VODKA THE NUDE PARTY HEAVY DOSE

JUNE 11:BLACK MOUNTAIN 8PM DOORS

MALCOLM JACK

JUNE 12:ILL NINO 7PM DOORS

SUNDAY 6.12 LIVE MUSIC

Authority Zero (The Complex) Crucialfest Warm-up Pt. 2 feat. Valient Thorr + Hammer Fight + Accidente + Barlow (Metro Bar) see p. 87 Fernando Viciconte + Austin Lucas (Heavy Metal Shop) Ill Nino + Bobaflex + Terror Universal (Urban Lounge) Stephen “Ragga” Marley (The Depot) see p. 85

KARAOKE

Karaoke with DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue State) Karaoke (The Tavernacle)

BOBA FLEX TERROR UNIVERSAL A BALANCE OF POWER POON HAMMER

JUNE 13:PETYR

MONDAY 6.13

JUNE 14:DINE KREW

LIVE MUSIC

8PM DOORS FREE SHOW

UFO TV RED DOG REVIVAL

8PM DOORS ISAAC SAWYER FREE SHOW IVY LOCAL SAMEYEAM

JUNE 15:PANSIES

8PM DOORS 90S TELEVISION FREE SHOW THE ARTIFICIAL FLOWER COMPANY

Broncho + Billy Changer + Winter (Kilby Court) Eli “Paperboy” Reed + DJ Feral Cat A RELAXED GENTLEMAN’S CLUB

TAROT DEATH CARD

FRIDAYS

DJ RUDE BOY BAD BOY BRIAN

JUNE 16: SLUG LOCALIZED: 8PM DOORS FREE SHOW

DA I LY L U N C H S P E C I A L S POOL, FOOSBALL & GAMES

SOFT LIMBS MAGIC MINT MAÑANERO

JUNE 17: CRUCIAL FEST: 9PM DOORS

FORM OF ROCKET

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COMING SOON June 18: Crucial Fest June 19: Blackalicious June 21: Big Business June 22: Metalachi

165 E 200 S SLC I 801.746.3334

June 23: June 24: June 25: June 28:

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Monday Night Blues Jam (The Royal)

BAD BOY BRIAN JUNE 11 9PM

SUNDAY&THURSDAY&SATURDAY

(The State Room) Petyr + UFO TV + Red Dog Revival (Urban Lounge)

CloZee Dirt First Beach Party Le Voir

NO

COVER E VER!

Bingo Karaoke (The Tavernacle) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue)

TUESDAY 6.14 LIVE MUSIC

Caravan Palace + Beachmen (The Depot) Chris Cohen + Giants in the Oak Tree + The Boys Ranch (Kilby Court) Dine Krew + Isaac Sawyer + Ivy Local + SameEyeAm (Urban Lounge) LECRAE + Switchfoot (The Complex) Steely Dan + Steve Winwood (Usana Amphitheater) see p. 82

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Open Mic (The Royal)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (The Tavernacle) Karaoke with DJ Thom (A Bar Named Sue on State) Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck (Twist) Karaoke with Spotlight Entertainment (Keys on Main)

WEDNESDAY 6.15 LIVE MUSIC

Crucialfest feat. SubRosa + Wizard Rifle + InAeona + Sol + Moon of Delerium + Darklord (Metro Bar) Joe Purdy + Garrison Starr (The State Room) see p. 85 Kip Winger (Liquid Joe’s) Michelle Moonshine (The Hog Wallow) Myka Relocate + Light Up The Sky + Out Came The Wolves (Billboard-Live!) Nothing + Culture Abuse + Wrong + Mrs. Magician (Kilby Court) Pansies + 90s Television + The Artificial Flower Company + Tarot Death Card (Urban Lounge) The Smokers Club Tour feat. Cam’ron + The Underachievers + G Herbo + Smoke DZA + Nyck Caution + Mobsquad Nard + G-Jet + Liam Tracy (The Complex)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE DJ Birdman (Twist) DJ Kurtis Strange (Willie’s Lounge) Open Mic (Muse Music)

KARAOKE 275 0 SOU T H 3 0 0 W ES T · (8 01) 4 67- 4 6 0 0 11: 3 0 -1A M M O N - S AT · 11: 3 0 A M -10 P M S U N

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Š 2016

RAW SIENNA

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ACROSS

1. Fashion's Chanel and others 2. Defeatist's words 3. What many Stephen Curry shots are worth 4. Connecting strips of land 5. Fair-minded 6. From the start 7. "The Farm" painter, 1921 8. Label on an amplifier knob 9. Eyeballed

or Federer (or, if you like punny clues, see 20-, 37- and 53-Across) 55. Cry of achievement 56. Dis 57. Daytime ____ 58. Yoko who married John 59. Horror film effect 60. The works

Last week’s answers

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

DOWN

10. Kind of tape 11. Chest muscle, for short 12. ____-pitch softball 15. Light brown 21. "____ thee late a rosy wreath": Ben Jonson 22. God, in Italian 25. Gives close attention to 26. Prefix with violet 27. Country singer Rimes 29. "Not ____ shabby!" 30. Ghastly 31. Soup stock 32. Bolognese bride 33. Composition for nine musicians 35. Kitchen pest 38. "Don't sweat it" 39. Rock's ____ Speedwagon 40. Diamond flaw 45. "Deal!" 46. Suffix with serpent 48. Dancer Ailey and others 51. Food-spoiling bacteria 52. Inexperienced with 54. Offering from Nadal

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

1. New York's ____ Field 5. Pickle 8. Replies to an invitation 13. Phil who sang "Draft Dodger Rag" 14. The "U" of "Law & Order: SVU" 16. One of the Barrymores 17. Amazon icon 18. Lab fluids 19. Explorer ____ da Gama 20. 1993's "Macarena," for example ... or an apt clue for 54-Down 23. Florists' cuttings 24. Angry 28. Michelangelo masterpiece 31. He said "Elizabeth's back at the Red Cross and I'm walking the dog" after losing the 1996 presidential election 32. Lead-in to Balls or Caps 34. Peacenik's protest sign 36. Court records 37. You can't go back from it ... or an apt clue for 54-Down 41. ____ occasion (never) 42. Say 43. Word in many California city names 44. What a judge might do during a hearing 47. Greek goddesses of the seasons 49. Part of an email address 50. Either of the twin child stars of "Full House" 53. What one hopes to receive from a waiter ... or an apt clue for 54-Down 58. Old enough 61. Unruffled 62. "____ pronounce you husband and wife" 63. "For real!" 64. Cheese named after a town in Holland 65. The "She" in Spike Lee's "She's Gotta Have It" 66. Eyeballed 67. Adams of "American Hustle" 68. Bad mood

SUDOKU

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The State of Beehives

first season.” Shane Somers, Peter’s brother, is the shop’s only other employee. A skilled woodworker and knowledgeable beekeeper, Shane Somers is fascinated by bees and motivated to help them thrive. “I couldn’t do it without him,” Peter Somers says of his brother. The Honey Stop also has a woodworking shop on site to build hives and do honey extractions. “We’re not fancy,” Somers says. “We’re glad you’re in the store, and want you to feel comfortable and leave satisfied. Without our customers, we have nothing. So it’s all about supplying the demand for real honey and ensuring the success of backyard beekeepers.” For seasoned beekeepers, the shop fills custom orders for hives and equipment and offers all levels of support—from hive relocation to full service apiary management. The Honey Stop manufacturers beehives, offers classes and instruction as well as honey extraction services, and provides on-site hive assistance and colony health assessments. “A customer of The Honey Stop has a partner in beekeeping,” Somers says. “Our priority is to help them succeed.” n

The Honey Stop 1314 S. 500 East 385-888-2521 Wednesday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Sunday, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. TheHoneyStop.com

JUNE 9, 2016 | 91

Honey jars and other accessories are available for sale.

| COMMUNITY |

The shop also sells bee pollen, a natural supplement.

The Honey Stop offers samples of different honeys so you can try before you buy.

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Experiencing truly raw honey has traditionally been the privilege of those with a connection to a beekeeper. But thanks to the folks at Salt Lake City’s The Honey Stop, local honey is now available to the general public. “The honey we offer is as close as it gets to honey from your own backyard without having to be a beekeeper,” owner Peter Somers says. He believes there is a clear difference when honey is sourced from residential urban gardens and totally unprocessed. Somers opened his store in December 2012 and recently moved to his new space near Liberty Park in January of this year. “I needed a whole new career,” Somers says of his decision to start his own business. He cashed out his 401K and went allin on a small honey shop. “I’d been to a few such stores in other cities and it seemed a good fit for Utah.” His shop offers “varietal” honeys, or honeys whose color, flavor and even aroma vary depending on the particular plants the bees were pollinating. Radish, carrot and cotton honeys have unique flavors. “Radish honey tastes like candy corn,” Somers says. While it wasn’t his dream initially to be a beekeeper, Somers eventually became enthralled with the process. “A customer asked me to partner up on some hives and wouldn’t take ‘no’ for an answer,” he says. He expanded the operation from simply selling honey and honey products to offering beekeeping equipment. So if you want to get into beekeeping yourself, The Honey Stop offers supplies, service and support. “We offer complimentary on-site assistance to beginner beekeepers that are installing their bees for the first time,” the shop owner says. “And we remain available all year to help guide them through their


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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY B Y R O B

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ARIES (March 21-April 19) Mythologist Joseph Campbell analyzed fairy tales for clues about how the human psyche works. For example, he said that a fairy tale character who’s riding a horse is a representation of our relationship with our instinctual nature. If that character drops the reins and lets the horse gallop without guidance, he or she is symbolically surrendering control to the instincts. I bring this to your attention because I suspect you may soon be tempted to do just that that—which wouldn’t be wise. In my opinion, you’ll be best served by going against the flow of what seems natural. Sublimation and transcendence will keep you much stronger than if you followed the line of least resistance. Homework: Visualize yourself, as you ride your horse, keeping a relaxed but firm grasp of the reins.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) “The road reaches every place, the shortcut only one,” says aphorist James Richardson. In many cases, that’s not a problem. Who among us has unlimited time and energy? Why leave all the options open? Shortcuts can be valuable. It’s often smart to be ruthlessly efficient as we head toward our destination. But here’s a caveat: According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you’re now in a phase when taking shortcuts may be counterproductive. To be as well-seasoned as you will need to be to reach your goal, you should probably take the scenic route. The long way around might, in this instance, be the most efficient and effective.

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JUNE 9, 2016 | 93

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) “Truth is like the flu,” says poet James Richardson. “I fight it off, but it changes in other bodies and returns in a form to which I am not immune.” In the coming days, Scorpio, I suspect you will TAURUS (April 20-May 20) I will provide you with two lists of words. One of these lists, experience that riddle first hand—and probably on more than but not both, will characterize the nature of your predominant one occasion. Obvious secrets and wild understandings that you experiences in the coming weeks. It will be mostly up to you have fought against finding out will mutate in just the right way to which emerges as the winner. Now read the two lists, pick the sneak past your defenses. Unwelcome insights you’ve been trying one you like better, and instruct your subconscious mind to lead to ignore will finally wiggle their way into your psyche. Don’t worry, you in that direction. List 1: gluttony, bloating, overkill, padding, though. These new arrivals will be turn out to be good medicine. exorbitance. List 2: mother lode, wellspring, bumper crop, gold SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) mine, cornucopia. According to Guinness World records, the most consecutive hours spent riding on a roller coaster is 405 hours and 40 minutes. But I GEMINI (May 21-June 20) In his poem “Interrupted Meditation,” Robert Hass blurts out suspect that during the next 15 months, a Sagittarian daredevil may the following exclamation: “I give you, here, now, a magic key. exceed this mark. I have come to this conclusion because I believe What does it open? This key I give you, what exactly does it your tribe will be especially adept and relatively comfortable at hanopen?” How would you answer this question, Gemini? What dling steep rises and sudden dips at high speeds. And that won’t door or lock or heart or treasure box do you most need opened? be the only rough talent you’ll have in abundance. I’m guessing you Decide today. And please don’t name five things you need could also set new personal bests in the categories of most frequent opened. Choose one, and one only. To do so will dissolve a changes of mind, most heroic leaps of faith and fastest talking. mental block that has up until now kept you from finding the CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) real magic key. Whether we like to admit it or not, all of us have acted like puppets. Bosses and teachers and loved ones can manipulate us CANCER (June 21-July 22) The following excerpt from Wendell Berry’s poem “Woods” even if they’re not in our presence. Our conditioned responses captures the essence of your current situation: “I part the out- and programmed impulses may control our behavior in the thrusting branches and come in beneath the blessed and the present moment even though they were formed long ago. That’s blessing trees. Though I am silent there is singing around me. the bad news. The good news is that now and then moments Though I am dark there is vision around me. Though I am heavy of lucidity blossom, revealing the puppet strings. We emerge there is flight around me.” Please remember this poem at least from our unconsciousness and see that we’re under the spell of three times a day during the next two weeks. It’s important for influential people to whom we have surrendered our power. This you to know that no matter what murky or maudlin or mysteri- is one of those magic times for you, Capricorn. ous mood you might be in, you are surrounded by vitality and AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) generosity. A few weeks ago you undertook a new course of study in the art of fun and games. You realized you hadn’t been playing LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) A half-dead blast from the past is throttling the free flow of your hard enough, and took measures to correct the problem. After imagination. Your best possible future will be postponed until you refamiliarizing yourself with the mysteries of innocent joy, you agree to deal more intimately with this crumbled dream, which raised the stakes. You began dabbling with more intensive you have never fully grieved or surrendered. So here’s my advice: forms of relief and release. Now you have the chance to go Summon the bravest, smartest love you’re capable of, and lay even further: to explore the mysteries of experimental delight. your sad loss to rest with gentle ferocity. This may take a while, so Exuberant escapades may become available to you. Amorous be patient. Be inspired by the fact that your new supply of brave, adventures could invite you to explore the frontiers of liberated love. Will you be brave and free enough to meet the challenge of smart love will be a crucial resource for the rest of your long life. such deeply meaningful gaiety? Meditate on this radical possibility: spiritually adept hedonism. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Five times every day, devout Muslims face their holiest city, Mecca, and say prayers to Allah. Even if you’re not Muslim, PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) I recommend that you carry out your own unique version of Poet Sharon Dolin compares artists to sunflowers. They create this ritual. The next three weeks will be a favorable time to “a tall flashy flower that then grows heavy with seeds whose cultivate a closer relationship with the inspirational influence, small hard shells you must crack to get to the rich nut meat.” the high ideal or the divine being that reigns supreme in your As I contemplate the current chapter of your unfolding story, I life. Here’s how you could do it: Identify a place that excites see you as being engaged in a similar process, even if you’re not your imagination and provokes a sense of wonder. Five times a literally an artist. To be exact, you’re at the point when you are day for the next 21 days, bow in the direction of this treasured producing a tall flashy flower. The seeds have not yet begun to spot. Unleash songs, vows and celebratory expostulations that form, but they will soon. Later this year, the rich nut meat inside deepen your fierce and tender commitment to what you trust the small hard shells will be ready to pluck. For now, concentrate on generating your gorgeous, radiant flower. most and love best.


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Poets Corner

LIVE WELL

Slap the entire world upside the head and say Be kind to one another! Be tolerant, be generous Give more than you take and trust that it will all work out in the end Do this and it will all be good Thank you Grandma Thank you Grandpa Thank you Mom & Dad Thank you brother I love you son Live well!

Kenneth Corbett Send your poem (max 15 lines), to: Poet’s Corner, City Weekly, 248 South Main Street, SLC, UT 84101 or e-mail to poetscorner@cityweekly.net.

Published entrants receive a $15 value gift from CW. Each entry must include name and mailing address.

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Birth of a City

I’m pretty sure none of you have ever built a city except maybe one made out of Lincoln Logs, Legos or via a computer game. Our forebearers built camps, pueblos, forts, towns and cities. And now we’re on the verge of building another one: Millcreek City. I know you’re probably thinking, “We’ve got a Millcreek—that’s where I go to walk my dog. It’s already there!” Hold on tight, my geography buffs. Millcreek for now is still a township—a combination of neighborhoods that include Millcreek, East Millcreek, Canyon Rim and Mount Olympus, with a population of more than 62,000 and a land area of 13.7 square miles within the Salt Lake Valley. Nestled on the east side between Salt Lake City and South Salt Lake—and Murray and Holladay on the south—it was settled in 1848 by Mary Fielding Smith (the widow of Hyram Smith) and her children. Locals love to live in Millcreek because it’s a 5-minute drive to freeway ramps, Tanner dog park and dogfriendly Mill Creek Canyon. Home lots are large and there are plenty of local shops and restaurants to satisfy urbanistas. Millcreekers are an opinionated bunch. You could watch the barbs fly across the snoozy streets of the suburbs there just a few years ago when folks tried to incorporate the township into Salt Lake County’s 17th-largest city. Many didn’t want to be saddled with county rules and regulations that favored other areas of the valley and face an inescapable whirlpool of over-taxation and underrepresentation. That ballot measure failed by a 60-40 percent margin. In 2015, however, proponents won, and voila!—a city was born. New Millcreek City residents will be electing a mayor and four city council members this November. Those officials will then make decisions on where the town will get its planners and services. At least 20 hopefuls have stepped up and registered as candidates. In the meantime, the fledgling city is already built. The infrastructure is there: streets, homes, hospitals, churches, shops, etc. What’s missing, though, is Millcreek City Hall, a place for the new city officials. Speculators and developers have been eyeing 3300 South and 2300 East as the obvious choice for a town center. But no plans can be made until those elected get into office and find out how much money is available to build their new town. And they’ll have about two months after the election to cut the umbilical cord from Salt Lake County and fly on their own. n

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City Weekly June 9, 2016  

Making Fun Times Out Of Your Sun Times Summer Guide 2016

City Weekly June 9, 2016  

Making Fun Times Out Of Your Sun Times Summer Guide 2016