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LETTERS Citing Brewvies a Grand Embarrassment

The decision made by the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control to cite Brewvies Cinema Pub for serving alcohol to customers who were viewing the sexually explicit film Deadpool is completely outrageous and without merit [“Dead Porn,” Private Eye, April 21, City Weekly]. In a state where politicians regularly decry the federal government’s intrusion into our affairs, this kind of draconian, moralistic action is incredible. It seems antithetical to the notion of keeping “big government” from micromanaging our existence. Last time I checked, Utah had not become an extension of North Korea or the former Soviet Union. This is the United States of America, and as such, we have certain rights under the First Amendment. This decision flies in the face of those rights. Frankly, this whole situation is nothing but a grand embarrassment. Once again, Utah’s a laughingstock to the outside world. If that isn’t something to be concerned about, I don’t know what is.

RYAN D. CURTIS Salt Lake City

Honor Code Demeans Women

Recent revelations regarding the insertion of BYU Honor Code inquiries into investigations of rapes and assaults on female students is a violation of the due process of law. The LDS-controlled school, whether private institution

WRITE US: Salt Lake City Weekly, 248 S. Main, Salt Lake City, UT 84101. Email: comments@cityweekly.net. Fax: 801-575-6106. We reserve the right to edit for length and clarity. Preference will be given to letters that are 300 words or less and sent uniquely to City Weekly. Full name, address and phone number must be included, even on emailed submissions, for verification purposes. or not,has stepped over the line involving personal rights and the need, sans any outside interference, to respond to such horrific acts on women that too often are hidden or minimized by colleges all over the country. Women are being demeaned and subjected to the insidious obstructionism by holier-than-thou religious fanatics. No female should ever be put through that type of inappropriate inquisition and threatened with suspension of their right to attend classes which they paid for in advance. This is a form of doctrinal demagoguery too often practiced by the LDS.

JIM OSHUST

Salt Lake City

Suppport Revenue-Neutral Carbon Fees

Newsweek, in its January 1970 special issue “The Ravaged Environment,” cautioned readers about the threat of global warming. Yet even after 20 million Americans participated in the first Earth Day in 1970, we’ve continued to burn coal. If we had stopped burning coal that year, we would have all been able to burn as much gas and oil as we could get our greedy hands on, and we’d still not have over 350 ppm of carbon dioxide in our thin atmosphere. We didn’t stop burning coal, and we’ve got over 400 ppm now. But the world is finally transitioning to cleaner energies. There is understandable fear that we can drive our economy without burning the fuels that got us through world wars and to the quality of life that we have now.

Putting a price on greenhouse gas emissions is the most effective and efficient solution, according to scores of leading economists, climate activists, politicians and even the Pope. In the United States, Citizens’ Climate Lobby is a rapidly growing group of volunteers from modest beginnings in 2007 to over 35,000 activists today. We are actively working to build the political will for a revenue-neutral carbon fee and dividend that will put a modest, but steadily increasing fee on fossil fuels at mines, wellheads and ports-of-entry to provide a consistent predictable market signal toward cleaner and more efficient homes, vehicles and businesses. Revenue neutrality is important so that the fee wouldn’t fill government and/or big business coffers. Thus, we want all of the collected fees to be returned evenly to every adult American to help them afford to purchase net-zero homes and solar panels to charge their electric cars or, if they ride bikes, they could spend it on beer.

KEVIN LEECASTER Salt Lake City

STAFF Business/Office

Publisher JOHN SALTAS

Accounting Manager CODY WINGET Associate Business Manager PAULA SALTAS Office Administrator CELESTE NELSON Technical Director BRYAN MANNOS

Editorial

Editor JERRE WROBLE Managing Editor ENRIQUE LIMÓN Arts &Entertainment Editor SCOTT RENSHAW Music Editor RANDY HARWARD Senior Staff Writer STEPHEN DARK Staff Writer COLBY FRAZIER Copy Editor ANDREA HARVEY Proofreader LANCE GUDMUNDSEN Social Media Coordinator GAVIN SHEEHAN Dining Listings Coordinator MIKEY SALTAS Editorial Interns MATTHEW KUNES, AMEDA TARR

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Contributors CECIL ADAMS, KATHARINE BIELE, ROB BREZSNY, AIMEE L. COOK, BABS DE LAY, ERIC ETHINGTON, BILL FROST, MARC HANSON, MARYANN JOHANSON, MICHELLE LARSON, DAN NAILEN, JOHN RASMUSON, STAN ROSENZWEIG, TED SCHEFFLER, GAVIN SHEEHAN, CHUCK SHEPHERD, ZAC SMITH, ERIC D. SNIDER, BRIAN STAKER, BRIAN YOUNG

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Salt Lake City Weekly is published every Thursday by Copperfield Publishing Inc. The Salt Lake City Weekly is an independent publication dedicated to alternative news and news sources, and serves as a comprehensive entertainment guide. 50,000 copies of the Salt Lake City Weekly are free of charge at more than 1,800 locations along the Wasatch Front, limit one copy per reader. Additional copies of the paper may be purchased for $1 (Best of Utah and other special issues, $5) payable to the Salt Lake City Weekly in advance. No person, without expressed permission of Copperfield Publishing Inc., may take more than one copy of any Salt Lake City Weekly issue. No portion of the Salt Lake City Weekly may be reproduced in whole or part by any means, including electronic retrieval systems, without the written permission of the Publisher. Third-Class postage paid at Midvale, UT. Delivery may take one week. All Rights Reserved. ®

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My OSH

My first class at the University of Utah was Econ 101. I arrived early, fashionably dressed in a long-sleeved Gant shirt, chinos and polished Weejuns loafers. I carried a briefcase as everyone did. I was determined to do well. I had been a middling student in high school and I regretted it. It was 1963. Tuition was $75 a quarter, and if you wanted a student deferment from the Vietnam draft, you had to register for at least 15 credits. Freshmen were required to take classes in physical education, composition and speech. By the end of the year, I had committed to a degree in English. The offices of the English Department were on the third floor of Orson Spencer Hall (OSH) in a space resembling a converted attic. The hallway was poorly lit but redolent of books and tobacco. The lower two floors, comprising 33 classrooms, accommodated 20,000 students a year. Most undergrads had at least one class there. Ruth Watkins, senior vice president of academic affairs, called OSH “literally and figuratively the heart of the campus.” I have spent hundreds of hours there over the years. OSH was built in phases on a treeless expanse next to the Union Building. It was finished about the time the Soviet Union launched the world’s first satellite into orbit in 1957. Its “ultramodern” utilitarian design won no architectural prizes. It was built mainly using brick, metal, terrazzo and glass. Not many trees died for the sake of OSH. Now, decades later, the building is decrepit. At the “Farewell to OSH” event last Friday, I sidestepped water from four leaking urinals in one of the men’s restrooms. It will be razed this summer. Given my decades-long association, you might think I would have an emotional attachment to OSH, that I would mourn its loss as people do Saltair, the Dead Goat Saloon and the Zephyr Club. But I don’t mourn. For me, OSH is a locus of memories not unlike the house I grew up in. Some of the memories, like these, are indelible, however:

BY JOHN RASMUSON

n On November 22, 1963, after a volleyball class, I walked out of the showers to where Wilf Marwedel was handing out towels from a Dutch door in the locker room. “They shot the president,” he said grimly. I dressed and walked to OSH. It was a cold, gray day. The campus was deserted. A few OSH classrooms were equipped with black-and-white television sets suspended from the ceiling. I sat down to watch Walter Cronkite and the reports from Dallas. Stunned students drifted in and out. No one seemed to know what to do. After a long time, I went home. n That same year, KNAK—Salt Lake City’s premiere, Top40 radio station—was featuring the surf music of the Beach Boys. My second-quarter composition course was in OSH. Art Butler, a high-school friend, was in it. He walked in one day and portentously pulled a record album out of his briefcase to show me. It was Meet the Beatles! I had heard “I Want to Hold Your Hand” on the radio, but the album cover was my first look at John, George, Paul and Ringo. A few Sunday nights later, I watched them on The Ed Sullivan Show singing before an audience of screaming girls. For five years, I maintained a student draft deferment, but the ink wasn’t dry on my diploma when I was dragooned into the Army. Another five years slipped by before I returned to graduate school at the U as a teaching assistant. I shared an OSH office with a gaggle of TAs. Most of us taught freshman composition. Our desks were arranged like bumper cars in an unused classroom. In the years I had been away, styles had changed. Backpacks, Earth Shoes and Levi cords were “in.” Briefcases, Weejuns, chinos and Gants were “out.” (As were bras.) Puffy down vests from L.L. Bean were de rigueur. While my memory of those days is fading like wallpaper in a

6 | APRIL 28, 2016

sunny room, I do recall: n a class in OSH taught by Phil Sullivan, a pony-tailed Ph.D. who brought his dog to class every day. English majors are too intellectual, he opined, and he required nonverbal responses to assigned texts. One woman responded with a batch of cookies. We ate them on the spot. n Harold Moore, who looked like “The English Professor” from central casting. I read Ernest Hemingway’s novels under his tutelage. I also took a fiction workshop from him in an OSH classroom. We sat in a circle, smoked cigarettes and dissected each other’s stories heartlessly. One day, Moore confided that he had sold a short story about the Marlboro Man to Esquire. We were so envious. n Shelby Steele, now a prolific author, filmmaker and senior scholar at Stanford University’s Hoover Institution. He introduced me to AfroAmerican literature and the Harlem Renaissance in an OSH classroom. Steele was a smart, genial man who had visited exiled Black Panther Eldridge Cleaver in Algeria. He soon moved to California to escape the racism he and his wife endured in Salt Lake City. Friday’s “Farewell to OSH” was a satisfying event—more a wake than a funeral. There was food to eat, lemonade to drink, commemorative bricks to buy, nostalgia to share—even a video to watch. The latter featured former Salt Lake City Mayor Ted Wilson musing that buildings shaped by us have the capacity to reciprocate. My experience bears him out in that OSH was a place where gifted teachers like J.D. Williams, Waldemar Reed, Bill Mulder and Jack Adamson practiced their art. I just feel lucky to have been there to listen. CW

I DON’T MOURN. FOR ME, OSH IS A LOCUS OF MEMORIES NOT UNLIKE THE HOUSE I GREW UP IN.

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OPINION

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STAFF BOX

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Is there a particular building at the U of U that brings back memories? John Saltas: I spent my first five years on campus in the Union Building. The Huddle, Crimson Commons, the pinball room and the pool hall. I smoked lots of cigarettes in that dear place and flunked 27 credit hours to show for it.

Colby Frazier: I dig the library. But in the decade since I howled at the moon on that campus, most of my haunts have fallen victim to the wrecking-ball progress. Jeremiah Smith: I loved the old Natural History Museum. As a kid, I thought the dinosaurs were so impressive. Even a few years back, when all the exhibits were way out of date, I loved it—mothball smell and all. Pete Saltas: The new Eccles business building is a reminder of the University I didn’t attend. Biz students today never got to experience the glory of the FAMB building.

Michelle Pino: The Union Building brings back fond memories. When I was about 7 years old, my mom was a U student. Occasionally, I’d go to school with her and we’d always have lunch in the Union Building. Jerre Wroble: The Olpin Union den. My sociology professor, who moonlighted as a shaman (or vice versa). Sage burning. A group of people with drums and rattles. All of us on a shamanic journey. Higher education achieved. Mikey Saltas: The Huntsman Center is my quasi Colossus of Rhodes, beckoning me onto campus every day. It’s the site where NBA legends Magic Johnson and Larry Bird squared off in the NCAA Tournament. Thanks to the resurgence of Utah basketball, I got to witness the likes of Delon Wright and Jakob Poeltl. There is no other college venue as historic or rowdy.


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BY KATHARINE BIELE

8 | APRIL 28, 2016

FIVE SPOT

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Public Land Disputes

Starry Nights Ahead

Re-Imagine Lighting

KSL Channel 5 is peering into the state of dark skies in Utah this week, lest we forget. Way back in the Rocky Anderson administration, the city began a dark skies initiative. How successful it was, is up for debate. Some neighborhoods simply refused to embrace the light fixture caps that directed light down instead of up toward the sky. According to StarryNightsUtah.org, Ogden Valley has a dark skies initiative, and, “At least 18 states, including Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, California and Texas, and over 300 cities and counties have adopted dark-sky lighting regulation.” It’s about saving energy as well as preserving the night skies. The University of Utah is working on it. So should everyone else.

State of Denial

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When did pornography become the issue of the hour? Oh, it was probably about the time that transsexual bathroom habits became a public topic. But neither of these issues rises to the level of concern that Utah’s bad air does. The latest American Lung Association report puts Salt Lake City as No. 6 in short-term particle pollution. Cities in the West experienced more of this because of drought and heat, fires and wood burning as a heat source. And then there’s industrial pollution, which Utah seems to embrace despite Californians balking at our transporting coal to their state. The Salt Lake Tribune’s George Pyle made a reasoned argument that the state is simply in denial about the future of energy. Don’t be like the Trib and the newspaper industry in general. If you wait too long to grasp reality, reality will grasp you.

STAN ROSENZWEITG

You really have to wonder about the state of a nation that touts the rule of law, but has no respect for the government that embodies that rule. Utah is just one of those. A Utah Policy poll shows that 60 percent of Utahns want to sue to take control of federal lands. The reasons are unclear—except for disdain of the feds. The Utah Republican Party, which apparently knows more about the state Constitution than the state high court, refuses to comply with a Utah Supreme Court ruling saying it must recognize candidates who gather signatures. The Salt Lake Tribune wrote about Rep. Mike Noel, R-Kanab, calling audience members selfish and greedy during a meeting on the Bears Ears monument proposal. Noel, of course, wants local control over public lands. You know; ATVs, coal mining and all that good stuff.

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HITS&MISSES

How can somebody apply the capitalist business skills and philosophy he has acquired through an MBA from The Wharton School of Business, while maintaining his Boston-bred progressive values to help alleviate homelessness and improve the daily lives of the poor, many of whom live today in substandard housing? Sandy resident Tim Fluetsch has found the path. Fluetsch is vice president of acquisitions and is a low-income affordable-housing developer in the Western United States for Dawson Holdings Inc.

How did you find you way into the for-profit world of low-income, affordable housing?

Around 18 years ago, I was working for a Boston company where business was slow, so my boss sent me out to find something new to do. I found a market-maker in low-income housing tax credits. We worked with them for a while, and then I decided that I would rather move from the financial side to the developer side, concentrating on affordable housing.

What is the value proposition for being able to keep rental rates down and stay in business?

It’s not easy. We leverage subsidies, tax credits and other assistance programs. We lower operating costs through energy-efficient construction and design, and we reduce long-term capital costs. That allows us to make it work with enough income to support our operations.

How are you better for the community than nonprofits in the affordablehousing space?

We do similar things as many nonprofits that also have to support staff, structure and overhead. We work with nonprofits like senior-citizens groups and property developers. When there is a mutual need, we work together on projects, and we have in-house expertise. We encourage nonprofits to engage with us.

How did it work out for you?

We have grown and have developed more than 5,500 units of family housing throughout California, Arizona, Texas, Montana and we are just starting here in Utah. We have found a niche to enable us to expand creativity and lower the bottom line to bring the best possible housing experience at a price people can afford. We are heavily into rehabilitating substandard structures. Our goal is to make them livable and affordable.

What does it take to rehab a Salt Lake County property to make it affordable?

We look for good value-added opportunities, property that we can buy at a price that will enable us to make the property much better. Right now, it’s a tough time for us to buy. We need [financial] room to be able to give up rent, but be every bit as functional and desirable as you would want your kids to live in. We strive to provide a property you can tell your mother, “I own that.”

—STAN ROSENZWEIG comments@cityweekly.net


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BY CECIL ADAMS SLUG SIGNORINO

STRAIGHT DOPE Bison Wars Did the U.S. government intentionally starve the American Indians to death by slaughtering the bison? Is there official documentation to support this claim? I’ve read a variety of accounts about the slaughter of the American bison—food, sport, shits and giggles. —Feeling Buffaloed in Texas

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One thing’s for sure: The latter half of the 19th century wasn’t such a hot time to be an American bison. The animals’ numbers, in the tens of millions when Europeans arrived on the continent, plunged to fewer than 400 before the end of the 1800s, with the worst of it coming between 1870 and 1883. There were, as you suggest, a number of reasons the bison took such a bad turn. A new tanning technology made the processing of hides more efficient; more extensive rail lines made transporting them easier; a burgeoning market thus inspired more buffalo hunters. And then there’s the claim you’ve heard, Buffaloed: that the U.S. government—finding its westward expansion policies unwelcome to the people who, you know, already lived out there—made it a policy to slaughter the bison, not necessarily to starve the Native people to death, but to pressure them onto reservations. Certainly there was recent precedent for such a tactic: Beginning in 1863, Colonel Kit Carson brought to near extinction the breed of sheep called the churro as part of an overall campaign to destroy the Navajos’ livelihood in the southwest and thus pacify them. As regards the eradication of the bison, however, and its role in the Plains Wars in the 1860s through 1880s, things were a little less explicit. A persuasive case comes in a 1994 paper by David D. Smits in Western History Quarterly. Smits reminds us, first, just who happened to be prosecuting the campaign against the Plains Indians: generals William Tecumseh Sherman and Philip Sheridan, who’d enjoyed great success in laying waste to the Confederacy during the Civil War. They’d learned from that experience, Smits argues, that it’s not enough to fight the enemy on the battlefield; you’ve got to destroy his resources, as Sherman famously did on his March to the Sea. It’s true that Smits is working with thin official documentation—a notarized letter from President Ulysses S. Grant sure would help a historian out in this situation, but no one’s yet dug such a thing up. There’s plenty of other evidence to go around, though: n The simple fact is that, for whatever ultimate reason, the army killed a hell of a lot of bison, as shooting practice or as part of army-sponsored civilian hunts. And it was easier than fighting Native people on their own turf. Sometimes military commanders equated the two; Smits quotes Colonel George Custer alerting his men to “a chance for a great victory over that bunch of redskins the other side of the hill.” Custer was referring to bison. n In 1869, the Army Navy Journal

reported that Sherman had floated what Smits calls a “trial balloon”: he’d “remarked, in conversation … that the quickest way to compel the Indians to settle down to civilized life was to send ten regiments of soldiers to the plains, with orders to shoot buffaloes until they became too scarce to support the redskins.” In Smits’ view, this proposal was accepted tacitly if not publicly. n In an 1868 letter to Sherman, Sheridan wrote, “The best way for the government is to now make [resisting Plains warriors] poor by the destruction of their stock, and then settle them on the lands allotted to them”; Smits takes “stock” to include bison as well as horses. n The growing hide market brought hunters to buffalo grounds in Texas that had been set aside for Native people; seeking admission anyway, the hunters approached a local military commander, Colonel Dodge, who at the least didn’t discourage them and seems to have suggested they could hunt in Indian territory without interference. Smits relates an earlier quote from Dodge: “Every buffalo dead is an Indian gone.” All told, Smits believes (as do other historians) the dots connect sufficiently to reveal a government policy, however unspoken—he notes Sheridan’s “tendency, when dealing with contentious or potentially embarrassing matters, to issue oral rather than written commands.” Smits’ article occasioned a rebuttal from another academic, one William A. Dobak, whose arguments frankly strike me as weak. (Taking issue with Smits’ use of private journals as sources, Dobak reminds us that “memoirists are not under oath”—as if historians should rely on sworn testimony and nothing less.) Still, they illuminate the void at the center of this question, where some paper evidence would, ideally, be. So, was there an “official” policy? I’m not convinced it particularly matters. We know the army enthusiastically slaughtered bison; we know it encouraged others to do so; we know that the men directing the campaign viewed this as an important front in the Indian wars. Official or no, the actions were deliberate, and the outcome devastating for any people or animals not lucky enough to be affiliated with the U.S. Army. Sheridan and Sherman really couldn’t have hoped for any better. CW Send questions to Cecil via StraightDope.com or write him c/o Chicago Reader, 350 N. Orleans, Chicago 60654.


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ATHENS, NAXOS, SANTORINI!

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The Science of Brewing...

NEWS P R I S O N A N D J U S T I C E Prison ‘Skype’ Replaces Visitation Uintah County Jail enforces new video-chat program. BY ERIC ETHINGTON eethington@cityweekly.net @EricEthington

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rittany Stoddard’s boyfriend, Levi Copeland, is in jail serving up to a year-long sentence for drug possession. While at the Duchesne County Jail awaiting trial, he was then moved to the state prison in Draper post-conviction and later to the Central Utah Correctional Facility in Gunnison, before ending up at the Uintah County Jail in Vernal a few weeks ago. That last move was through the Inmate Placement Program, which allows the Utah Department of Corrections to relocate inmates to county facilities to address bed shortages. Stoddard has done her best to keep in touch with Copeland, 25, visiting him at the various facilities as often as she can to help him feel a connection to home. But when he was moved to Uintah County, Stoddard was stunned to find out that the jail in Vernal no longer allows in-person visitation, and if she wanted to see Copeland she would have to pay for a video chat service. Uintah County Jail commander Irene Brown declined to be interviewed for this story. Uintah County Sheriff Vance Norton and Public Information Officer Brian Fletcher did not return repeated calls for comment. Uintah County has contracted with a national company called GettingOut, which provides video conference services between inmates and their family and friends. If you want to video call with an inmate, you can either download the software to call from home (if you have high-speed Internet access), or you can visit the jail in Vernal and use the company’s kiosk. A 15-minute call costs $7.50 at the on-site kiosk or just over $10 if you call from home. But it’s not a flat rate; the company also charges additional fees for using the service. According to GettingOut’s customer service, if you pre-pay for the call at the on-site kiosk, the $7.50 call will turn out to be closer to $12.50. If you pre-pay directly through the company by calling them, that same $7.50 call will cost you closer to $15. Stoddard works as a housekeeper at a nursing home, and brings home $9.50 per hour. “This is just torture,” she says. “I can’t afford to be making all these calls.” Molly Prince, president of the Utah Prisoner Advocate Network (UPAN), says forcing visitors to pay is exploitative. “If [video calls] are provided as an option,” Prince says, “that can be great, because it allows family members who can’t physically get to Vernal a way to still connect with their

Formerly cost-free, inmate visits at the Uintah County Jail now incur a fee.

loved ones. But to completely take away contact visits discriminates against people who do not have the money to afford it.” Prince, who is not only the president of UPAN, but is also a licensed clinical social worker, says that in-person visits are critical to an inmate’s ability to successfully transition back into the real world once they’re released. “The research shows that contact visits, and being able to hold someone’s hand, helps soothe people who are incarcerated and helps manage moods—thus reducing anger,” she says. Prince says services like GettingOut’s video software are just the latest in a long line of high costs for the families of inmates. “Even basic phone calls can cost anywhere from $3.50 to $15 for a 15-30 minute call,” Prince says. “Inmate communication providers exploit the needs of prisoners and their families. The impact of a child to not be able to see their father or mother except on a little phone or computer screen is enormous.” After the Uintah County Jail told Stoddard she was required to use the paid video calls to visit with Copeland, she contacted the American Civil Liberties Union of Utah. “This is a big problem,” says Anna Brower, strategic communications manager at ACLU of Utah. “Video interaction is a very poor substitute for in-person visits. And not just in this situation. If you think of a parent on a business trip trying to video chat with a child, it’s just not the same. But beyond that, we’re talking about [in-person visits] that used to be free, and we already know that quality visitation leads to lower recidivism which the state of Utah ostensibly cares quite a bit about. So, it shocked us to hear about this, because it excludes a whole class of low-income people who just don’t have the money to use such an expensive service.” Brower says that while it doesn’t appear thus far that a jail ceasing all in-person visitations is illegal, “it’s just plain wrong,” and puts even more of a burden on families who already have to figure out the new policies and procedures every time their inmate family member is moved, because the local county sheriffs control the rules over each facility. CW


S NEofW the

BY CHUCK SHEPHERD

WEIRD

The Internet’s Promise Fulfilled (for Men, Anyway) Japan’s Tenga toy company appears to be first on the market with a virtual reality bodysuit (for use with the Oculus Rift “Sexy Beach Premium Resort” 3-D game) containing a genital stimulator and the sensation of “groping” breasts—sending “impulses all over the wearer’s body to make it feel like another human being is touching them,” according to one reviewer (who expressed dismay that the bodysuit might put sex workers out of business). Said Tenga’s CEO, “In the future, the virtual real will become more real than actual real sex.” Because of societal pressures, women are expected to be a lessrobust market for the device than men. Grown-Ups In March, one District of Columbia government administrative law judge was charged with misdemeanor assault on another. Judge Sharon Goodie said she wanted to give Judge Joan Davenport some files, but Davenport, in her office, would not answer the door. Goodie said once the door finally opened, an enraged Davenport allegedly “lunged” at her, “aiming” her thrust at Goodie’s neck.

n During its first 33 years (through 2012), the U.S. government’s applications for secret search warrants to the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court have been approved all but 11 times out of 33,900 cases. (FISC defenders say that is because all requests are finely honed by guidance from the judges, but of course, both the Chinese and U.S. numbers, and reasoning, are, by designation, unverifiable.)

n Ellis Battista, 24, was arrested for the February break-in at Bradley’s convenience store in Las Cruces, N.M., in which he took only a pack of cigarettes—for which he left $6 on the counter. (However, he also damaged the door getting in.)

Undignified Deaths A 69-year-old man was killed on March 17 while awaiting emergency care at Vidant Medical Center in Greenville, N.C. He had been seriously injured in an earlier accident and was in the waiting room when a 59-year-old driver’s car crashed through the hospital doors and fatally struck him. n A 55-year-old man was killed in Memphis, Tenn., on March 23 when a 15-foot trailer came loose and crashed into him on a sidewalk. The deceased, who had a lengthy criminal record for sexual assault, might have avoided the trailer if he had not been distracted by watching pornography on his phone as he walked.

Least Competent Criminals Amanda Schweickert, 28, was charged with a felony and three driving offenses in March in Springville, N.Y., when deputies noticed that her rear license plate was just a piece of cardboard painted to sort of resemble a New York plate (but more likely suggesting the work of an elementary school art class). (New York also requires a front plate, but Schweickert had not gotten around to that yet.)

Thanks this week to Steve Dunn, Neb Rodgers and Larry Neer, and

APRIL 28, 2016 | 13

n Among the names chosen for Internet start-up ventures

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n New Jersey is a big state, but when just one man decided to move away, the state legislature’s budget office director warned that the loss of that man’s taxes might lead to state revenue problems. Billionaire hedge-fund manager David Tepper evidently pays a bundle, and the budget office director pointed out that the state’s reliance on personal income taxes means that even a 1 percent drop in anticipated tax could create a gap of $140 million under forecasts.

n Britain’s annual Boring Conference (this year, July 5 at Conway Hall in London) brings together those who celebrate the mundane (previous topics include sneezing, toast, vending machine sounds, yellow lines, barcodes), and in anticipation, a BBC News commentator interviewed Peter Willis of the Letter Box Study Group. Willis, 68, was excited at having recently acquired access to a database of all 115,000 mailboxes served by U.K.’s Royal Mail and hopes, with the help of “splendid” mapping software, to visit and photograph each one, to examine the different styles. No doubt speaking for all members, Willis said the lay version of “boring” implies inactivity, but the obsessives in his study group (and in attendance at the Boring Conference) lead active lives, with a wide range of interests. (The conference, by the way, is sold out.)

Leading Economic Indicators “Who’s a Good Dog?/Yes, You Are”: Some are just blessed with doggy charisma, say owners who showcase their pet’s charm on “personal” social media accounts, and now specialized marketers scour those sources to match the most popular pooches with advertisers seeking just the right four-legged companion for their image. As The Wall Street Journal reported in April, entrepreneurial dog owners have rushed to create popular Instagram accounts and Facebook posts (and now, even to put their photogenic pups on a live-streaming app called Waggle) to catch agents’ eyes (and, they hope, lead to four- and five-figure paydays from such advertisers as Nikon, PetSmart, Residence Inn and Heinz).

Police Report According to surveillance video, a man broke into a Five Guys restaurant in Washington, D.C., in the middle of the night on March 18, cooked himself a cheeseburger and fled.

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Awesome Governments! Chinese courts (according to figures reported by Amnesty International in March) dispense justice so skillfully that more than 99.9 percent of cases result in convictions (1,039 acquittals in 1.2 million cases last year).

The Job of the Researcher Researchers already knew that masked birch caterpillars “rub hairs on their rear ends against a leaf to create vibrations,” according to an April National Geographic report, but a forthcoming article by Carleton University biologists describes that “drumming” as actually part of their “sophisticated signaling repertoire” to attract others—not for mating but for assistance in spinning their protective silk cocoons. The researchers’ “laser vibrometer” detects sound likely inaudible to humans, but when the caterpillars feed, it’s clearly, said one researcher, “Chomp, chomp, chomp, anal scrape. Chomp, chomp, chomp, anal scrape.”

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n Tennessee state Rep. Jeremy Durham has such a reputation as a “dog” around women working at the capitol that the house speaker issued a directive in April relocating Durham’s office to a less-populated building across the street. Further, Durham is allowed access only to certain legislative meetings and to certain staff (i.e., no free-ranging among female staff members). After interviewing 34 people, the state attorney general said he believed that Rep. Durham’s unwanted sexual approaches and commentaries were impeding legislative business.

Houzz (home design and remodeling), Kabam (online interactive game company, formerly “Watercooler Inc.”), Klarna (e-commerce company that pays the store for your purchases and then collects from you), MuleSoft (makes software to integrate applications) and Kabbage (makes smallbusiness loans online). Wired magazine reported in February that those ventures, and two dozen other inexplicably named startups, are all “unicorns”—with investors pledging at least $1 billion to each one.


CITIZEN REVOLT In a week, you can

CHANGE THE WORLD CHECK OUT ALL OF OUR EVENT PHOTOS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET/PHOTOS

UTAH PIZZA PARTY 4/23

NUEVE

THE LIST OF NINE

BY MASON RODRICKC & MICHELLE L ARSON

@MRodrickc

Don’t give up on Brewvies yet, even with its legal woes. It’s still the best place to see notable film over a glass of beer. No, you won’t be watching Deadpool, but here’s a chance to expand your mind. Diller Scofidio + Renfro: Reimagining Lincoln Center and the Line shows how this interdisciplinary design studio challenged the boundary between public and private in a rebirth of urban spaces. The project transformed New York’s prestigious Lincoln Center and the industrial High Line for new and unexpected participation in space. The film also profiles Diller Scofidio + Renfro, known first for its audacious art installations. Brewvies Cinema Pub, 677 S. 200 West, 801532-7500, April 28, 6:30 p.m., free, no registration required, UtahCFA.org

ARTS CENTER WALKING TOUR

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You might feel like you’ve been there already, what with all the publicity surrounding the new Eccles Performing Arts Center. But now you’ll have a chance to see it close up and personal. A Free Walking Tour of Utah’s Premier Performing Arts Centers gets you inside the minds of the architects who not only met demanding technical requirements, but managed to embody the art of architecture and contribute to the urban fabric. You’ll learn about the design and impact of the Rose Wagner Performing Arts Center, J.L. Quinney Capitol Theatre, the new Eccles Performing Arts Center and iconic Abravanel Hall. Rose Wagner Performing Arts Center, 138 W. Broadway, 801-532-1727, April 29, 11 a.m.-1 p.m., free, register at Conta. cc/1TmebdD

SPY HOP BENEFIT

UPCOMING EVENTS

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14 | APRIL 28, 2016

FILM SCREENING

THE

TOUR DE BREWTAH

SATURDAY, APRIL 30

1:30 - 6:30 PM

AT THE GALLIVAN CENTER

CRAFT SABBATH

SUNDAY, MAY 1

2 - 6PM

AT THE SUGAR SPACE

In its 2016 Annual Benefit: Make Believe, Utah’s only youth media arts organization highlights how anything is possible in the world of creativity. To showcase its programs, students will present stories on the impact Spy Hop has made in their lives. The Musicology program’s band, Midnight Paper Heist, will be performing a set of live original music. Four new films about self-discovery and overcoming tremendous odds, either physically or emotionally will be shown from Spy Hop’s PitchNic film program. All proceeds raised during the silent auction and live giving opportunities go directly to supporting the young people who attend Spy Hop’s programs in film, audio, music and design. Rose Wagner Performing Arts Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801-532-7500, April 28, 6:30-9:30 p.m., $75, 21+ only, SpyHop.org

—KATHARINE BIELE Send events to editor@cityweekly.net

Nine drinking games to play during this season of Game of Thrones:

9. Kings’s Cup: Ring of Dragon Fire edition.

8. Drink every time your girlfriend feels weird.

7. Chug a beer every time Jorah

Mormont comes on a bit too strong.

6.

Take a shot for every scene you think could have definitely used a dragon.

5. Drink every time your sister feels weird.

4.

Chug half a beer every time you have to Google something to remember why you’re upset.

3. Play Power Hour from the

time the show is supposed to air until HBO GO actually streams it.

2.

Drink twice every time you think of Joffrey and get the feels.

1. Drink for every nipple dis-

played—man, woman or beast.


Billi naire

ACNUE M S T S E N U R

HTO THE

RESCUES NEWSPAPER!

TRIB

REG

UNE

AIN S VO ICE

WHAT NEW OWNERSHIP MEANS FOR THE EMBATTLED DAILY. BY COLBY FRAZIER cfrazier@cityweekly.net @ColbyFrazierLP

I

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APRIL 28, 2016 | 15

f a bid by Utah’s most prominent family to purchase The Salt Lake Tribune is officially consecrated on May 1, it will register as a meaningful cosmic slap up the side of the head for any Tribune reporter or editor who had a hand in writing the book, Mormon Rivals: The Romneys, the Huntsmans and the Pursuit of Power. That book, characterized in a subsequent letter to the Tribune editor written by family matriarch Karen Huntsman as “nothing short of supermarket tabloid trash,” was published May 1, 2015. While Utahns who still read newspapers digested the news on April 20 that the Tribune, Utah’s most widely distributed and prominent daily paper of record, was being bought by the Huntsman family, the above facts, and any slivers of potential meaning gouged beneath the surface, were swiftly communicated in the following day’s paper without near so many words as has been necessary here. On Page A16 of the Tribune’s Thursday, April 21, edition, Pat Bagley, the Tribune’s editorial page cartoonist, sketched a photo of a trim Huntsman boy—probably Paul Huntsman, one of Jon Huntsman Sr.’s nine children, and the one whose name was listed as the buyer—arm wrapped around a hefty Tribune reporter. While Huntsman is beaming a white smile, outstretched arm clutching a smartphone in selfie mode, the Tribune reporter, eyes peering over spectacles, has his back turned as he takes notes, a copy of Mormon Rivals protruding from a coat pocket. This intrigue—how the Huntsmans will behave as newspaper owners and caretakers of an institution that many view as being about as important to the survival of democracy in Utah as a temple marriage is to a celestial-bound Mormon—made quick material for debate when the purchase became public. But those who counseled Huntsman on the wisdom of buying the paper say the family’s desires for the Tribune are pure, cemented upon the principle that preserving an independent voice—a counterweight to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints-owned Deseret News—is well worth their money. This is also the tone that came from Paul Huntsman, who in a news release announcing the sale, said: “We are honored to be stewards of The Salt Lake Tribune. It is important that The Salt Lake Tribune continues in its indispensable role for our community and to be locally owned. We hope to ensure the Tribune’s independent voice for future generations and are thrilled to own a business of this quality and stature.” One of the newspaper insiders who the news release says advised the Huntsmans on the purchase is Dean Singleton, who owned the Tribune for a decade, roughly between 2000 and 2010. Singleton says he’s been close friends with Jon Huntsman Sr. for three decades and that—as a lover of newspapers in general, and The Salt Lake Tribune, in particular—he has complete confidence that the Huntsmans will be every bit the proud, local caretakers of the paper that they claim to be. “They are a very important family in Utah and to have them own the Tribune, in my opinion, is one of the best things that has ever happened to the Tribune,” Singleton says.


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16 | APRIL 28, 2016

Businessman David Keith and U.S. Sen. Thomas Kearns

Full Circle

With shrinking circulation, falling revenue and years of deep budget cuts and newsroom layoffs, purchasing a newspaper might not rank high on an investment banker’s to-do list. But then again, starting a newspaper in 1870, when The Salt Lake Tribune was founded as the Mormon Tribune, probably wasn’t advisable, at least not if money was all one cared about. Like many newspapers across the country, the Tribune took its turn as a rag used for communicating the opinions of its owners. In 1873, a trio of Kansas businessmen bought the Tribune and turned it into an anti-Mormon newspaper. In 1901, U.S. Sen. Thomas Kearns and local businessman David Keith—both mining magnates—purchased the Tribune. Presumably, the aim in the early era of the paper wasn’t so much to make fortunes through newspapering, but to own the state’s crown jewel of information and influence. Money is one thing that both men, and their successive generations, including the McCarthey family, were never short on. Newspapers, though, did end up making vaults of money for their owners, turning annual profit gains of 7 percent between 1950 and 1999, according to the Pew Research Center on Journalism and Media. And, importantly, even as the digital revolution began to herd classified advertising and other revenues onto the Internet, newspapers posted annual profit jumps of 0.5 percent through 2006. Nestled somewhere in these numbers was Singleton, 65, who bought his first newspaper in Texas at 21, and went on to start MediaNews Group Inc. in 1983, growing the company into the second-largest newspaper chain in America. The fat times for newspapers, Singleton says, made them ideal for consolidation. Wall Street, Singleton remembers, was eager to throw money at acquiring newspapers—often owned by local families—that were routinely posting robust profits. “The newspaper business of 30 years ago was the perfect business to consolidate,” Singleton says. While Singleton, who retired as the head of MediaNews Group in 2013, says that if he could do it all over again and be alive and kicking 40 years ago, he wouldn’t change much about the way his company came to own more than 50 daily newspapers, including The Denver Post, The Detroit News, the Los Angeles Daily News and the St. Paul Pioneer Press in Minnesota. But as he looks back on a life as a newspaper magnate, Singleton says two of his newspapers may have fared slightly better than the rest: The Denver Post and The Salt Lake Tribune. In 1984, Singleton bought a home in Utah. And in 1986, he purchased the Park Record newspaper in Park City. While splitting his time between Utah and Colorado, Singleton says he came to appreciate the unique position

Dean Singleton

Paul Huntsman

the Tribune plays in keeping tabs on the state’s power brokers. And in Utah, hovering someplace near the tippy-top of the power tree, is the LDS Church. “The Tribune has always been what [former Tribune publisher] Jack Gallivan once described as the ‘balancing wheel,’” Singleton says. “With the church owning the Deseret News and one of the largest TV stations in the market, it’s crucially important that there be an independent voice for news coverage and for editorial comment.” And for the better part of a decade, as the Tribune changed hands, and dozens and dozens of newsroom employees have been purged, the future of this voice grew increasingly uncertain. It is at about this point—in fact, right at this very moment for The Salt Lake Tribune—where the business model of Singleton and his newspaper-collecting peers has at last shattered to pieces, sending the Tribune, The Boston Globe and other hobbled metropolitan daily newspapers back into the hands of locals with bulging bank accounts. Singleton doesn’t disagree, and says the Tribune—like many other daily newspapers—has come full circle. In a keynote speech at a newspaper conference in 2009, Singleton says he gave an abridged history of newspapers, saying that “newspapers were originally owned by the people in a local community who had a stake in their community, and money wasn’t the big issue, it was serving their community,” he recalls. “I think we are going full circle, where a newspaper is

“They are a very important family in Utah and to have them own the Tribune, in my opinion, is one of the best things that has ever happened to the Tribune.” —Dean Singleton

best owned by a local person who cares about the community and the newspaper and how they affect each other,” Singleton says.

Dark Business

As much as the Tribune and other newspapers tout the power and reach of the Internet and other digital forms of delivery, few of these newfangled modes of news delivery have been kind to the paper business. A mere decade ago, if a Utahn were looking for work, he or she turned to the robust classified advertising pages of the Tribune, Deseret News or City Weekly. But seemingly overnight—or about as quickly as the iPhone became a defacto anatomical extension of the human hand— Craigslist and other free classified advertising platforms gutted this important source of newspaper revenue. Then, as newspapers promoted their free products on the Internet, while simultaneously relying on paid print subscriptions to sell print advertising, most anyone with a basic understanding of economics asked then, and continues to ask themselves, why they should pay money for a product that pulsates for free on their smartphone screens? As the Tribune weathered these dilemmas—decreasing circulation, fleeing advertising revenue and owners eager for profits—a shadowy deal unfolded in the autumn of 2013 that many believed would at long last bring The Salt Lake Tribune to its knees. Earlier in 2013, Singleton retired. And, after a 2010 bankruptcy that allowed MediaNews Group to shed hundreds of millions in debt in exchange for a takeover by investors, the company—by name, at least—wasn’t really around, at least on paper. The Tribune and many of Singleton’s papers were now being managed by Digital First Media, which was controlled by a New York City hedge fund, Alden Global Capital. The hedge fund proceeded to do what hedge funds do: make money, or at least try. And the quickest way to see cash spew from the Tribune was to hock its assets, including its stake in the printing presses it co-owned with the Deseret News. Shedding brick-and-mortar assets to satisfy immediate cash needs is one thing. But Digital First also offered the Deseret News the lion’s share of the Tribune’s future print profits—a move that was either the ballsiest bet ever dreamed up on the yet-to-be-realized fortunes from advertising allegedly available on the Internet, or a very purposeful execution. Since 1952, the Tribune and Deseret News have been business partners, sharing a controlled interest in the printing presses and the advertising and sales departments. This relationship is known as a Joint Operating Agreement (JOA). A JOA gives a pair of newspapers in the same town the ability to join forces, collude and create an advertising monopoly that, without permission from the government, would be a violation of antitrust laws.


RICARDO CALADO

LUKE HANSEN

The Deseret News office building at 55 N. 300 West

APRIL 28, 2016 | 17

At the height of their popularity, 26 JOAs were entered into between newspapers in two-newspaper

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A Two-Paper Town

t ha l y t n a a of eric loca w no n Am to its lt k a i t ’ ,” on aper rtant The S tah d “I wsp po as o U ton t m y s e i n as gle nit e i is mmu ribun n Sin a co ke T De a — L

Dean Singleton

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his present boss at Digital First, he says he does have “beef with John Paton, the former CEO, who along with [former Deseret News CEO] Clark Gilbert, made this deal happen.” Neither Paton nor Gilbert responded to a request for comment. “At best,” Orme says, the JOA is, “extremely shortsighted and poorly thought-out. And that’s at best. At worst, I think it was purposely injurious to us. I don’t know what their motives were here—only they can address their motives—but I think that was a very bad, shortsighted move.” Just as Orme was taking the helm of the paper, its future seemed less certain than it ever had. Even with 58 percent of the print advertising profits, which still represent the majority of revenues at newspapers across the country, the Tribune had cut, slashed and gutted its staff from a high of 178 in 2006 to 87. Orme says the newsroom is currently 85 strong, and he hasn’t had to make a layoff since that day in 2013. Had Orme been asked to hand a pink slip to another employee, he says he would have resigned. Shock from the new JOA prompted a lawsuit by a nonprofit, Citizens for Two Voices, the leader of which, Joan O’Brien, a former Tribune reporter and daughter of former Tribune publisher, Jerry O’Brien, helped petition the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) to investigate the circumstances behind the new JOA. O’Brien says the purpose of the lawsuit has always been to prove that the 2013 JOA agreement was entered into illegally because it would hobble the Tribune until the newspaper limped into the grave. And, according to O’Brien, her attorneys have been told that a condition of the Tribune’s sale by Digital First to the Huntsmans is contingent on the lawsuit being dropped and the DOJ halting its investigation. So long as the JOA is renegotiated to give the Tribune a fair share of the print profits, O’Brien says she’ll drop her suit. “You could achieve the aim through a lawsuit, or you could achieve it through a negotiated JOA, so we’ll be satisfied, presuming there is a JOA,” O’Brien says. “We really don’t want to do anything to stand in the way of a transaction that lands the Tribune in the hands of a benevolent local owner.” Though Orme says he knows few details surrounding the terms of the sale, he says he’d put good money on the fact that the Huntsmans have found a way to renegotiate the JOA. “I’m going to assume that the JOA is being renegotiated and that that’s part of it,” Orme says. “The JOA is fundamentally bad and wrong and it seems like that’s the starting point of creating a viable future for The Salt Lake Tribune. That’s kind of Job 1.”

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Sen. Jim Dabakis, D-Salt Lake City, has been a vocal opponent of the renegotiated JOA, a loud proponent for the Tribune’s survival and, in mid April, said he and a group of multi-millionaires wanted to buy the paper. The JOA, Dabakis says, and the repercussions of any retooling of the deal, are important for the community to understand and support because at its simplest, the deal has allowed the Tribune and Deseret News to monopolize advertising, often at the expense of other media outlets. “They have enjoyed that; it has made a huge amount of money for the newspapers,” Dabakis says. “This community has sacrificed mightily over the years to keep those two papers alive. It has stifled competition, it has hurt other people in the newspaper business.” Under the Tribune and the Deseret News’ JOA, the two papers also shared advertising profits, which in 2013, had the Tribune receiving 58 percent of the profits and the Deseret News grabbing 42 percent. This balance had always favored the Tribune, since it had historically commanded the widest circulation, a statistic that would indicate that it also wrangled the most revenue. In 2012, the Alliance for Audited Media had the Tribune’s daily circulation pegged at 106,619 to the Deseret News’ 75,750. But in 2013, Digital First Media, led at the time by John Paton, executed a deal that seemingly no one wearing a Salt Lake Tribune badge had a clue about: Paton renegotiated the JOA, selling the Tribune’s interest in the printing presses, a majority stake on the MediaOne board (the agency that oversees the business and advertising operations of the two newspapers) and flipping the scale on the print advertising profits, halving the Tribune’s share to 30 percent and dishing the remaining 70 percent to the Deseret News, for an undisclosed heap of cash. On Oct. 1, 2013, Terry Orme, who started as a copyboy at the Tribune in 1977, took the reins as editor and publisher. His first duty was to lay off 19 newsroom employees—an otherworldly shitty day for all involved. It wasn’t until 18 days later, when some Tribune employees received a cryptic handwritten note indicating that the JOA had been fundamentally retooled, that Orme became aware of the invisible hands that were juking his and the paper’s future. While Orme says he has no problem with

NIKI CHAN

The former Tribune building at 143 S. Main Street


18 | APRIL 28, 2016

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JOHN KILBORNE

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NIKI CHAN

Mitt Romney and former Tribune editor Jay Shelledy

Tribune editor and publisher Terry Orme

Timeline 1870

The Salt Lake Tribune is founded under the name, the Mormon Tribune.

towns. Now, according to Rick Edmonds at the Poynter Institute for Media Studies, only five remain; one of which enjoins the Tribune to the Deseret News. Singleton knows a bit about JOAs. In addition to the Tribune’s JOA, the crown jewel of Singleton’s former newspaper empire, The Denver Post, had a longrunning JOA with the Rocky Mountain News, which folded in 2009. As it stands, two-newspaper towns have become increasingly rare. And while conventional wisdom holds that more newspapers equal more journalism, which spawns more information, more checks and balances, more well-told stories, better informed citizens and just better stuff all around, newspapers are businesses, susceptible to the whims of markets and the fiscal appetites of shareholders and executive titans. And, let’s be honest, with a phone in your pocket that knows more about you than your spouse, it’s hard to imagine the ever-important Millennial generation—or Wall Street, for that matter—entering a state of mourning each time a city loses a newspaper. This is especially true if that city still has another paper. Over the past two-and-a-half years, as Utahns like O’Brien have bemoaned the fact that the Tribune could disappear, she says she struggled to garner national attention. O’Brien says this could well be due to the fact that, from outside of Utah, anyone could gauge the situation and realize that, while the Tribune might die, remaining would be a newspaper just as old, just as storied and damned near as big as the Tribune. But the Deseret News is a far cry from an independent voice. Owned by the Mormon church, its website states that its “mission is to be a leading news brand for faith- and family-oriented audiences in Utah and around the world.” Any Utahn who still reads newspapers knows, and has witnessed, the marked difference between the Deseret News and the Tribune—a fact that struck Singleton when he began spending time in Utah in the 1980s. And, Singleton says, this dynamic makes the JOA in Salt Lake City vastly different from all the others. It also means that for the sake of Utah, Utahns and life here, The Salt Lake Tribune cannot wither away like the Rocky Mountain News. “I don’t know of any newspaper in America that is as important to its local community as The Salt Lake Tribune is to Utah,” Singleton says. On Denver’s JOA, Singleton says it was good for Colorado to have two different voices, but “while there were two different voices, it wasn’t as critical to have two different voices in Denver as it was in Salt Lake City. It’s important that there be two in Salt Lake City for cultural reasons and because the two newspapers have very, very separate readerships.” Had Singleton been calling the shots when the JOA was renegotiated in 2013, he says he would not have made the deal. But he says it was not his place to criticize the business moves made by Digital First Media, and adds that he has confidence that the company was doing what its hedge-fund owner wanted. “I’m sure they looked at what was the best financial situation for Digital First and they probably made the right financial move, but it certainly weakened the Tribune,” Singleton says, emphasizing that nothing can act as a substitute for knowing what the Tribune means

to Utah until a person has lived in Utah. “If you’ve never been to Salt Lake City, you might not know that.” Orme, too, says he has long realized that it’s difficult for a newspaper conglomerate, owning as Digital First once boasted 800 “multi-platform” media products, to consider all of the nuances of those myriad products. “When you’re one of 70 some-odd newspapers owned by a chain, they kind of treat you all the same; they kind of treat you as a formula,” Orme says. “They don’t really ever acknowledge your unique importance to a community. They don’t want to understand that. When you have a consolidation of a bunch of newspapers across the country, you’re in it for one reason, and that’s the bottom line. You don’t care about journalism, and I think that was the situation we were in.”

Local Control

Orme says the newsroom greeted the prospect of Huntsman purchasing the Tribune “positively,” and that the newsroom’s reaction was “very optimistic.” This general air of optimism was reflected by O’Brien, Singleton and former Tribune editor Jay Shelledy, who, along with Singleton, was named as having advised the Huntsmans on the purchase. For Orme and his stable of reporters, editors, copy editors and page designers, the past couple of years, operating under the knowledge that half of the profits that once filled the paper’s coffers are now flowing to the competition, and that the owner is a cash-hungry hedge fund, have been riddled with uncertainty. While any devoted newspaper lover in Utah could speculate for days about what the Huntsmans might do with their time-tested new toy, there are a few facts surrounding the sale that have Orme resting easy. The first involves what the Tribune is, what it has been and what he hopes it will long continue to be: an independent voice for Utah. “I do think they are buying something not because they want to mold it into something else,” Orme says. “They bought the Tribune because they like what it is and what it stands for. I’m feeling good, and I’m getting a sense that their motives are in our best interest and are genuine.” The second is the reality that the newspaper business, while not so profitable as it was during the bulk of the 20th century, is nevertheless still profitable. Orme cites the business pedigree of the Huntsman family, saying he imagines that they have realistic expectations about the newspaper business. A Huntsman spokesperson says the only comment from the family is the news release announcing the sale. From the day in 2013 that it became public that the JOA had been renegotiated, Tribune supporters trumpeted the importance for the newspaper to fall back into the hands of a local owner. Just one week before it was announced that Paul Huntsman, president and CEO of Huntsman Family Investments, a private equity fund, had entered into a “definitive agreement” to buy the paper, as the news release announcing the sale noted, Dabakis appeared on the Tribune’s web chat show, TribTalk, and said he was part of a group that was preparing to buy the Tribune. Dabakis says his group was, and is, “willing, Source: UtahNewspaperProject.org

1873

1901

Three businessmen from Kansas buy the Tribune, and for the next 10 years, publish anti-Mormon commentary.

Sen. Thomas Kearns and his mining magnate business partner, David Keith, buy the Tribune.

1918 David Keith and Thomas Kearns both die.

1919 Entirety of the Tribune is sold to the Kearns family.

1930-40 The Deseret News and Tribune engage in a classical newspaper war over advertising rates and circulation.

1952 The two papers form a JOA, and combine business operations.

1997

The Tribune approves a merger with Tele-Communications, Inc (TCI). The deal includes an option for the Kearns heirs, the McCarthey family, to buy back the paper after five years.

1999 AT&T buys TCI and quickly discovers the deal with the McCartheys, who are ultimately thwarted in their attempt to buy back the paper.

2000

2010

Dean Singleton’s MediaNews Group buys the Tribune.

MediaNews files for bankruptcy.

2011 Alden Global Capital takes control of Digital First Media, and the Tribune.

2013 The JOA is renegotiated, giving the Deseret News 70 percent of print profits, and the Tribune 30 percent. Critics of the deal say it could kill the Tribune.

2016 Paul Huntsman, son of Utah billionaire, Jon Huntsman Sr., announces his plan to purchase the Tribune.


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As all of this takes shape, though, it’s important to keep an eye on what Orme says local ownership, and deep pockets, can provide to make the Tribune a better paper: investment. During the Digital First era, Orme says there was only one message emanating from the company’s New York City headquarters: “Reduce, reduce, reduce.” Even as Digital First mandated its stated goals, implicit in its name, to harp on the importance of this magic digital revolution, Orme says there was no digital investment. The Tribune, Orme says, has created digital apps, retooled its website, created new platforms for iPhones and other digital devices, without a single penny of added funds. “No encouragement,” Orme says. “And we’ve had no investment, which is really needed.” “We have scraped those innovations we have had, we’ve had to scrape them within our own newsroom budget and resources with employees we have,” he continues. “It’s just been an added job for our people.” Singleton, who, if not the greatest consolidator of newspapers in American history, ranks high among them, realizes that he might sound like a hypocrite for espousing the beauty in local control of newspapers. Even as his company gobbled up papers from coast to coast, he says the robust financial realities for newspapers at the time allowed him and his lieutenants to operate the papers in a local manner, by ensuring that locals were running the shops. And in hindsight, Singleton says his close ties to Utah and to Colorado left both The Denver Post and the Tribune faring better than the other papers in his care. “Now that I can look back and I’m not involved anymore, the two newspapers that were in MediaNews that were local to me were probably better newspapers than some of the other group because we were making decisions based on local information and not just metrics,” Singleton says. As for any concern over what Paul Huntsman, or any member of his family, will do with their newspaper, Singleton says there isn’t a worried bone in his body. Sure, he says, the Huntsmans are Mormon. Sure, Jon Huntsman Jr. was the Republican governor of Utah. But what the Tribune needs more than anything else, and appears to be getting, is an owner that gives a damn about its survival, and its place within the local landscape. And Singleton says he can’t think of a better champion than Paul Huntsman and the Huntsman family. “To me, it was important to find that unique owner, who would be there to be the steward,” Singleton says. “Somebody that cares about that community needs to own the Tribune and that will happen now.” CW

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able—even anxious—to buy The Salt Lake Tribune.” Dabakis, a gay, unapologetically liberal politician who never seems too worried to stick his fingers in the eyes of the church, also says that maybe his threat of buying the Tribune forced the church to take a long, hard look at Huntsman’s proposal. “We were able to make Deseret News publishing look at it and say ‘We have to choose between Dabakis and his group, and Huntsman? Let’s go back to Huntsman and see what we can do,’” Dabakis says. While Dabakis is optimistic that the Huntsmans will be solid owners of the Tribune, he says a part of him is nervous about having a historically staunch Republican, and Mormon, family running the paper. “It’s important that the Huntsmans make a pledge that this is going to continue, [editorially], to be a progressive newspaper and a counterweight to our community, along with City Weekly, and that they make that announcement,” Dabakis says. If history has indeed swung full circle, and the Huntsmans are the perfect caretakers of their local paper partly because they aren’t starved for riches, then it’s hard to imagine that they won’t put their stamp on the paper like every other owner has. While Orme says he has no reason to believe the Huntsmans intend to lay their hands on the newsroom and begin manipulating coverage to suit their desires, he imagines the editorial pages will become the pages of those to whom they belong: Paul Huntsman. During his 40 years at the Tribune, Orme has had a front seat for the good times and bad, rising from among the lowliest positions at pre-Internet newspapers, to his current perch as editor and publisher, the highest position at the paper, squared. Having seen the paper in local hands before, Orme says it’s inevitable that conflicts of interest and fiery debates will arise as the Huntsmans, newsmakers in their own right, grapple with a newsroom that, in order to be a newsroom, must operate separately from the machinations of its owner. “This is a family that makes news, no question about it, and we’re going to have to cover them and that’s always a challenge,” Orme says. “There’s always some very hard discussions and negotiations that take place, and I think we’ll just take them as they occur and do our best to be as transparent to our readers and let them know when there is some potential conflict in what we’re doing and just be up front. I think the Huntsman family and Paul Huntsman would agree with that.” And then there is that matter of the “tabloid trash,” as Karen Huntsman called it, and the veteran political reporters, Thomas Burr and Matt Canham, who penned it. Orme points out that the publication of Mormon Rivals wasn’t the first time that the Huntsmans have taken issue with the Tribune’s coverage of them. And in the book’s case, Orme says he handled the situation just as he does with any reader, source or subject of a news story that takes issue with the newspaper’s coverage. “Mrs. Huntsman wrote a pretty strongly worded letter to the editor about Mormon Rivals,” Orme says. “We published it. I think we’ve moved on.”


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ESSENTIALS

the

ENTERTAINMENT PICKS APRIL 28-MAY 5, 2015

Complete Listings Online @ CityWeekly.net

FRIDAY 4.29

FRIDAY 4.29

FRIDAY 4.29

Casual fans may only know Brian Posehn from his time on Comedy Central’s The Sarah Silverman Program, where he played her gay neighbor for three seasons. But Posehn boasts a far more expansive career, with diverse influences. The writer/actor/comedian has been active for more than 20 years, gaining his first national exposure on Mr. Show With Bob and David (including its revival on Netflix), and then as a recurring role on the NBC comedy Just Shoot Me, all while touring the country as a stand-up comedian. Over the years, he’s been a guest voice on shows like Aqua Teen Hunger Force, Mission Hill and 3 South, as well as dozens of guest appearances in comedy shows and dramas. But his biggest contributions have come in the past decade, primarily to the nerdy comedy fan. First came his podcast, Nerd Poker, featuring comedians playing Dungeons & Dragons as they make fun of both the game and each other in a loving way that only D&D players could understand, but casual fans could love. He also served as the lead writer on the third volume of Marvel Comics’ Deadpool. If you loved this year’s hit movie version of Deadpool, you owe part of the attitude and humor of the character to Posehn. This Friday, Posehn rolls through Salt Lake City to perform two nights at Wiseguys, talking about his personal adventures of being a husband and father, along with his own distinctive array of geeky commentary and awkward moments. (Gavin Sheehan) Brian Posehn @ Wiseguys Salt Lake City, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, April 29-30, 7:30 & 9:30 p.m., $20, 21 and over. WiseguysComedy.com

When drag performer Kim Chi entered the set of Rupaul’s Drag Race, her tagline set the tone for what has proven to be one of the most memorable runs of the current season: “I came to chopsuey the competition!” Second to none when it comes to beating a face and coming up with insta-couture for the show’s various runway challenges, Kim Chi is enjoying the sudden spotlight. “It’s been amazing. Social media has been crazy,” she tells City Weekly from her Chicago home, adding that she now is recognized most everywhere she goes. “I’m like, ‘Ah … so this is what it’s like to be on television.’” On Friday, she brings that notoriety to Metro Bar during Glazed—a night of drag and doughnuts hosted by the Bad Kids Collective. Chi says this visit to Salt Lake City, her second, promises to be filled with “drama, tears, blood and confrontation … I’m just kidding!” Listing Marina Abramovic and K-pop as her main influencers, and self described as a “cultural hybrid with a preternatural understanding of style and conceptual fashion,” it came as a surprise to find out what she was wearing when the interview was happening—an old T-shirt and no bottoms. “I’m cleaning the bathroom right now, and I didn’t want my pants to get wet,” she says with a chuckle. A personal tidbit Chi revealed during the show is that she is still a virgin; a thing that could change after her visit to Salt Lake City. “If you’re tall and handsome, feel free to holler at me,” she says. (Enrique Limón) Glazed with Kim Chi @ Metro Bar, 615 W. 100 South, 801-520-6067, 9 p.m., $8. BrownPaperTickets.com

Prepare to be beamed-up into the intergalactic world of the iconic television show and feature films, Star Trek. On stage for one night at Kingsbury Hall, music from the past 50 years of Star Trek will be performed in concert by a live symphony orchestra led by renowned principal conductor/producer Justin Freer, accompanied by scenes highlighting the beloved characters and stories from those movies and TV episodes. Star Trek: The Ultimate Voyage brings the music to life in a concert experience while also projecting footage from the television shows and movies on a 40-foot-wide screen. The combination of live music and streamed images creates a unique interactive experience that both music fans and moviegoers will enjoy. Classic franchise pieces like Star Trek: The Original Series, Star Trek: The Motion Picture, Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan, Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home and Star Trek: Insurrection, along with many others, are on Friday’s program. Freer began his career playing the trumpet in wind ensembles, community orchestras and marching bands before turning to piano and composition. He has worked as a composer for several independent films as well as motion picture advertising for movies such as Avatar, The Day the Earth Stood Still and Aliens in the Attic. The sights and sounds created by Freer and the talented musicians are sure to delight even the most skeptical Trekkies. (Aimee L. Cook) Star Trek: The Ultimate Voyage National Concert Tour @ Kingsbury Hall, 1395 E. Presidents Circle, 801-581-7100, April 29, 8 p.m., $45-$65. Tickets.Utah.edu

Brian Posehn

Kim Chi

Star Trek: The Ultimate Voyage

SATURDAY 4.30

Utah Museum of Fine Arts ARTLandish: Sun Tunnels Community Meet-Up While its building is closed for remodeling, the Utah Museum of Fine Arts is sponsoring several events for patrons. This week, the organization has planned a west-desert excursion to noted land artist Nancy Holt’s work, “Sun Tunnels.” The pieces, constructed of four large concrete cylinders laid on the ground in an “open X” configuration, was completed in 1976. The tunnels are arranged so that you can look through at sunrise and sunset during the solstice. Holes drilled in the tunnels are arranged to let in the light from the constellations Capricorn, Columba, Draco and Perseus. This unique work of art melds the experience of being grounded on Earth with the awareness of the planet’s existence in the cosmos, and, as Holt said, “brings the vast space of the desert back to human scale.” Activities planned for this field trip include art-making; educational projects; talks by UMFA curator of modern and contemporary art Whitney Tassie and visiting scholar Annika Schlitte, and live music performed by cellist Tessa Seymour. The museum says it’s a great opportunity for first-time visitors to the site, but stresses that its location is in the middle of the desert, with Wendover and its closest amenities several hours away, and recommends planning accordingly, as there are no bathrooms or other on-site services. The remote location is an essential part of the experience, and contemplating our place in the world and the universe, and the place of art as well. (Brian Staker) Utah Museum of Fine Arts ARTLandish: Sun Tunnels Meet-Up @ Highway 30 near Lucin, April 30, 1-4 p.m., free. UMFA.Utah.edu/Artlandish


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@CityWeekly

Heroic Call

Pop-culture fandom should be an inspiration for changing the world.

to support Equality Now. Star Trek veteran George Takei (pictured below) has taken a lead in promoting activism and equality for that group of fans. But donating money to charity or

BY BRYAN YOUNG comments@cityweekly.net @swankmotron

I

’ve been told before that pop-culture fandoms contribute to an infantilization of our culture—but I don’t think that’s the case. To me, that argument sounds like it comes from someone who hasn’t quite seen the potential for how fandom can transform the world. There is a debate to be had that fandom is inherently not serious, but I think that’s a position that can be easily dismissed. You’ve heard many times that comicbook heroes and sci-fi and fantasy epics are our modern myths. I don’t disagree with this. I learned more about how to live my life watching Star Wars and Star Trek, soliciting those funds for those charities reading Batman and consuming scienceisn’t exactly direct action or activism. How fiction and fantasy books than I ever did at can that enthusiasm for fandom be bent church. But how does a fan take that inspiinto something that does even more good? ration and those life lessons, and turn them Wherever you fall on the political specinto something positive and actionable? trum, I don’t think you can argue that Steve For all their great storytelling, the makRogers would be a passive participant and ers of all of our modern myths don’t genconsumer if he lived in our world. Would erally include explicit calls to action to be Luke Skywalker turn his back on fighting better people, or to help others. For the against the unnecessary use of the most part, the companies behind those Force? Would Harry Potter igstorytellers want that call to action to exnore calls to combat sexism? ist as a request that we send them more Would Bruce Wayne igmoney. Wait … maybe fandom doesn’t difnore the rampant abusfer from some religions after all. es of Wall Street or the The fact that someone doesn’t come out prison system? These at the end of the book or movie and explain are all characters to us exactly how we could use the lessons who have been delearned and change the world is probably fined by how they why someone could watch a movie like set out to change Captain America: The Winter Soldier and the world. Is think its fans are infantile, rather than see wearing their it as a cutting critique of government surfaces on our Tveillance and the Patriot Act as something shirts and unwe should fight against. After all, it’s just a derwear while comic-book movie about a bunch of guys in giving money to tights throwing shields and punching each charity really the other. b e s t The question remains, though: How do fans take the lessons from their fandom and apply them to the real world to make a difference? There are certainly examples of fans using their hobbies to raise money for charity. The 501st Legion and other Star Wars costuming clubs raise millions of dollars a year. As part of the publicity campaign for The Force Awakens, Lucasfilm lobbied fans to donate to Unicef. Fans of Firefly like Utah Browncoats A drunk Obi-Wan Kenobi (Nick Lang) discusses have spent a decade holding various topics related to Star Wars and politics in a screenings of Serenity (one is scheduled for May 21 at video series produced by the U.S. Rebel Alliance. Brewvies), using the proceeds

big SHINY ROBOT

way to honor the lessons they taught us? I don’t think so. There are definitely organizations out there trying to rally fans of genre fiction to switch from consumers to activists, the most successful of which might be the Harry Potter Alliance. It was launched by Andrew Slack in 2005, when he set his sights on rallying Harry Potter fans with campaigns to combat the unfair labor practices of Walmart and to raise awareness about the atrocities happening in Darfur (atrocities still occurring). Over the past decade, their ranks have swollen to more than 85 chapters around the world, which have tackled everything from LGBT rights and sexism to immigration reform and literacy. That organization is doing untold amounts of good on its own, wielding the enthusiasm of genre fans in a way that transcends the inherent consumerism one would normally associate with fandom. Slack has since moved on to create the U.S. Rebel Alliance, hoping to activate Star Wars fans in the same way. Their first target was getting dark money out of politics. This is something that’s increasingly interesting to me. I’m a fan who happens to have a platform for his opinion, and I can try to do some good that way, but that platform is not accessible to all fans. That’s why I’m grateful to people like Andrew Slack who can organize around something so exciting. Organizations like that are helping fans realize that they can love their hobbies and change the world while they do it. Can being a fan be trivial? Sure. Does it have to be? Absolutely not. That’s a hero’s journey we should all strive to take. CW

US REBEL ALLIANCE

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COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE @ CITYWEEKLY.NET

SATURDAY 4.30

Nihon Matsuri Japan Festival In the early 1900s, Salt Lake City was divided geographically, with culturally and ethnically specific businesses and houses of worship in neighborhoods much like you see in San Francisco and Manhattan. We once even had a prominent Japan Town, but, over time, the area shrank as people moved out, and eventually, in the mid-’60s, much of what remained was demolished to make way for the Salt Palace. All that remains of the area today is the Salt Lake Buddhist Temple and Japanese Church of Christ. Every spring, Utah residents of Japanese descent put on the Nihon Matsuri—Utah’s official Japan Festival—on Japantown Street where these two buildings remain. The festival is a chance for people to learn about Japanese culture, food, music and more. Expect cosplay contests, dozens of vendors and activities for all ages. This year, the festival will feature Taikoza, one of the world’s biggest Taiko drumming and dance groups, performing on genuine ancestral Japanese drums. (Gavin Sheehan) Nihon Matsuri @ Japantown Street, 100 South (between 200 and 300 West), April 30, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., free. NihonMatsuri.com

PERFORMANCE

6 p.m., SaltLakeActingCompany.org

THEATER

Brian Posehn Wiseguys Salt Lake City, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, April 29-30, 7:30 & 9:30 p.m., WiseguysComedy.com (see p. 20) Jay Whittaker Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., Ogden, 801-622-5588, April 29 & 30, 8 p.m., WiseGuysComedy.com Laughing Stock Improv The Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, 801-355-4628, Fridays & Saturdays, 10 p.m., LaughingStock.us Teresa Wyckoff Sandy Station, 8925 S. Harrison St., Sandy, 801-255-2078, April 29, 8:30 p.m., SandyStation.com Quick Wits Comedy 695 W. Center St., Midvale, 801-824-0523, Saturdays, 10 p.m., QWComedy.com

AUTHOR APPEARANCES

Tulip Festival Ashton Gardens, 3900 N. Garden Drive, Lehi, through May 7, 9 a.m.-8 p.m.,

APRIL 28, 2016 | 23

FESTIVALS & FAIRS

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SPECIAL EVENTS

Melanie Rae Thon/Eric Robertson Finch Lane Gallery, 54 Finch Lane, 801-596-5000, April 28, 7 p.m., SaltLakeArts.org Sarah Mlynowski: Genie in a Bottle The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-4849100, April 28, 6 p.m., KingsEnglish.com Siobhan Vivian: The Last Boy and Girl in the World The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, April 29, 7 p.m., KingsEnglish.com Jessica Poe: Everyday MOMents: Discovering Christ in the Details of Motherhood Barnes & Noble Gateway, 6 N. Rio Grande St., 801-4560100, April 30, 3 p.m., BarnesandNoble.com Maggie Stiefvater: The Raven King The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-4849100, May 2, 7 p.m., KingsEnglish.com Dan Wells: Over Your Dead Body Weller Book Works, 607 Trolley Square, 801-328-2586, May 3, 6 p.m., WellerBookWorks.com

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LITERATURE

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Appropriate Good Company Theatre, 260 25th St., Ogden, April 29-May 15, Thursday-Saturday, 8 p.m.; Sunday, 4 p.m., GoodCoTheatre.com Curtains CenterPoint Legacy Theatre, 525 N. 400 West, Centerville, 801-298-1302, through May 14, Monday-Saturday, 7:30; Saturday matinee, 2:30, CenterPointTheatre.org Ivanhoe Knight Fever The Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, 801-355-4628, April 29-June 4, Monday, Friday & Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday matinee, 2 p.m., TheOBT.org Murder on the Frontrunner Express Desert Star Theatre, 4861 S. State, Murray, 801-266-2600, through June 4, Monday, Wednesday, Thursday & Friday, 7:30 p.m.; Friday, 9:30 p.m.; Saturday, 11:30 a.m., 2:30 p.m., 6 p.m. & 8 p.m., DesertStar.biz Odysseo South Towne Mall, 10450 S. State, Sandy, 1-866-999-8111, through April 30, various dates and times, Cavalia.net Park City Follies Egyptian Theatre, 328 Main, Park City, 435-649-9371, through May 1, 8 p.m., EgyptianTheatreCompany.org Peter and the Starcatcher Hale Centre Theatre, 3333 S. Decker Lake Drive, West Valley, 801-9849000, through May 18, Monday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday matinees, 12:30 p.m. & 4:00 p.m., HCT.org Peter Pan Covey Center for the Arts, 425 West Center St., Provo, 801-852-7007, April 29-30, May 2, 4-7, 7 p.m.; May 7, 2 p.m., CoveyCenter.org The Pillowman The Hive Theatre Co., Sorensen Unity Center, 1383 S. 900 West, through April 30, Friday-Saturday, 8 p.m., HiveTheatre.com Remington & Weasel Pygmalion Theatre Co., Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801355-2787, through May 7, Thursday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Sunday, 2 p.m. & additional 2 p.m. matinee May 7, PygmalionProductions.org Stage Kiss Wasatch Theatre, Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 385-468-1010, April 30-May 14, Thursday-Saturday, 8 p.m.; Saturday & Sunday matinee, 2 p.m., ArtSaltLake.org Stupid F---ing Bird Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, 801-363-7522, through May 1, Wednesdays-Saturdays, 7:30 p.m.; Sundays, 1 &

COMEDY & IMPROV


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moreESSENTIALS ThanksgivingPoint.org Lantern Fest Miller Motorsports Park, 2901 Sheep Lane, Tooele, April 30, 3 p.m., $45-$50, TheLanternFest.com Nihon Matsuri Japan Festival Japantown St., 100 South (between 200 and 300 West), April 30, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., free, NihonMatsuri.com (see p. 23) SoulWorks Fair Dancing Cranes Imports,673 East Simpson Ave., 801-815-0588, April 30, 11 a.m.-5:30 p.m., BettyPNamaste.wix.com

TALKS & LECTURES

Of Wolves & Wilderness I.J. & Jeanne Wagner Jewish Community Center, 2 N. Medical Drive, May 3, 6:30 p.m., SUWA.org

VISUAL ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

A Call to Place: The First Five Years of the Frontier Fellowship Rio Gallery, 300 S. Rio Grande St., 801-245-7272, through May 30, VisualArts.Utah.gov A Real Rockwell?: Cover Art from the Saturday Evening Post Main Library Special Collections, Level 4, 210 E. 400 South, 801-5248200, through May 31, SLCPL.org Abstract Expressions Evolutionary Healthcare, 461 E. 200 South, 801-519-2461, through June 11, EvolutionaryHealthcare.com Ace Kvale: Himalayan Cataract Project Gallery MAR, 436 Main, Park City, 435-649-3001, April 29-May 13, GalleryMAR.com Aeron Roemer: A Place Far Away from Here Mestizo Institute of Culture and Arts, 631 W. North Temple, Ste. 700, through May 13, Facebook.com/MestizoArts Brian Snapp: House of My Brother/House of My Sister Finch Lane Gallery, 54 Finch Lane, 801596-5000, through June 10, SaltLakeArts.org Cara Despain: Seeing the Stone CUAC, 175 E. 200 South, 385-215-6768, through June 1, CUArtCenter.org Connie Borup/Don Athay Phillips Gallery, 444 E. 200 South, 801-364-8284, through May 13, Phillips-Gallery.com David Brothers: Rolithica Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-3284201, through April 30, UtahMOCA.org David Maestas: Peaceful Chaos Utah Artist Hands Gallery, 163 E. 300 South, 801-355-0206, through May 18, UTAHands.com

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE @ CITYWEEKLY.NET

Debbie Valline/Perda Atkinson Local Colors of Utah, 1054 E. 2100 South, 801-363-3922, through May 13, LocalColorsArt.com Fat Phobia Art Access Gallery, 230 S. 500 West, 801-328-0702, through May 11, AccessArt.org History of Photography: Recent Work by Laurel Caryn Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, 801-245-7272, through May 6, Heritage.Utah.gov Ian Booth: Kazakhstan: Tselina/Building the Virgin Lands Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through May 7, UtahMOCA.org I’m a Barbie Girl in a Barbie World: Dolls from the Collection of Betsy Contreras DayRiverside Library, 1575 W. 1000 North, 801-5948632, through April 30, SLCPL.org Jim Jacobs: Append Finch Lane Gallery, 54 Finch Lane, 801-596-5000, through June 10, SaltLakeArts.org Lewis J. Crawford: Constructs Finch Lane Gallery, 54 Finch Lane, 801-596-5000, through June 10, SaltLakeArts.org Linda Dalton-Walker: Roses & More Mod A-Go-Go, 242 E. South Temple, through May 13, ModAGoGo.com Mary Pusey Art at the Main, 210 E. 400 South, 801-363-4088, through May 15, ArtAtTheMain.com Maryann Webster: Narrative Works Finch Lane Gallery, 54 Finch Lane, 801-596-5000, through June 10, SaltLakeArts.org Michael Handley: Unfurling CUAC, 175 E. 200 South, 385-215-6768, through June 1, CUArtCenter.org Onward!: Illustrations by Habbenink God Hates Robots, 314 W. 300 South, Ste. 250, through May 13, GodHatesRobots.com Paul Crow: Here Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-3284201, through April 30, UtahMOCA.org Photographic Moose: Linden Waguespack Day-Riverside Library, 1575 W. 1000 North, 801594-8632, through May 6, SLCPL.org The Red Show Art Access II Gallery, 230 S. 500 West, 801-328-0703, through May 11, AccessArt.org The Seeing Eye: Woven Textiles by John Hess Gallery at Library Square, 210 E. 400 South, 801524-8200, April 30-June 17, SLCPL.org Tom Russell: An American Colorist Ken Sanders Rare Books, 268 S. 200 East, 801-5213819, May 1-31, KenSandersBooks.com Yoshua Okon: Oracle Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-3284201, through April 30, UtahMOCA.org

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MOTHER’S DAY

M is for Mom’s Meals

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Dine-out options for Mother’s Day in Salt Lake City BY TED SCHEFFLER comments@cityweekly.net @critic1

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277-9919, TuscanySLC.com) you have two shots to thrill your mom. They’ll be offering Mother’s Day brunch from 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. ($49 for adults; $25 for children ages 12 and under) and Mother’s Day “Grand Dinner” at 6 p.m. ($45 per person). The Tuscany brunch features Prime rib, carved ham and lamb, an omelet station, eggs Benedict, waffles, seafood, salads and pastries. Meanwhile, the set menu for the “Grand Dinner” includes items such as a spring spinach salad with feta cheese, baby heirloom tomatoes and sweet basil vinaigrette; filet mignon and poached lobster tail with saffron creamed potatoes, asparagus and garlic butter; plus a Tuscany dessert platter. Finally, you can treat Mom South American-style at a couple of local Brazilian eateries around town. At Rodizio Grill (600 S. 700 East, Trolley Square, 801220-0500, RodizioGrill.com), enjoy unlimited tableside carved meats, Brazilian hot and cold side dishes and salads, grilled salmon, brunch favorites and dessert for $29.99 per person (all moms receive a $15 gift certificate for a future visit). Too many moms will have to work on Mother’s Day. If that’s the case, Tucanos Brazilian Grill (162 S. 400 West, The Gateway, 801-456-2550, Tucanos.com) has them covered. On Friday, May 6, Tucanos will host Mother’s Day lunch from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. ($19.95), followed by an early Mother’s Day dinner ($29.95) on Friday, 3 p.m. to 11 p.m., and again on Saturday, May 7. Special Mother’s Day selections include center-cut bacon-wrapped sirloin, prime rib, grilled shrimp and hand-dipped chocolate Brazilian truffles, in addition to the full selection of churrasco meats, seafood and unlimited salads and sides. Happy Mother’s Day to all the moms out there, and thanks for all you do! CW

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$32.50 for kids ages 5-12) in The Grand Ballroom at The Grand America Hotel (555 S. Main, 801-258-6807, GrandAmerica.com), there’s also a special Afternoon Tea ($28 for adults and $20 for children ages 12 and under). It’s a traditional English tea service including an assortment of finger sandwiches, scones served with crème Chantilly and berry jam, a selection of pastries and premium loose-leaf teas (including caffeinefree selections) and hot chocolate. Cocktail service is also available. I’ll bet your mom loves pie. If so, how about a whole pie made from scratch by executive pastry chef Natalie Keller at Hub & Spoke Diner (1291 S. 1100 East, 801-4870698, HubAndSpokeDiner.com)? She’ll be baking pies like her malted milk and peanut butter pie, cookies and cream and more. You can place an order for a Mother’s Day pie by phone or online. Log Haven (6451 E. Millcreek Canyon Road, 801-272-8255, Log-Haven.com) will feature a Mother’s Day supper from noon to 5 p.m. with a special three-course menu created by chef Dave Jones. Among the options are spring asparagus soup, arctic char almondine, Aleppo-pepper lemon-pressed chicken breast, pea and baby shiitake mushroom risotto, grilled Duroc pork loin, homemade desserts and more. The cost is $47.95 for adults and $25.95 for children under 12. Oasis Café (151 S. 500 East, 801-322-0404, OasisCafeSLC.com) will offer a brunch buffet from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and will also be open for dinner service with its regular menu. In addition to a wide selection of salads, pastries and desserts, the buffet will feature hot and cold entrées such as carved Prime rib, cheese blintzes with blueberry sauce, crab cakes with mango salsa, French toast with buttermilk glaze, maple-mustard salmon, shrimp-filled enchiladas and much more. The cost for brunch is $35 for adults and $18 for kids ages 3-10. At Tuscany (2832 E. 6200 South, 801-

Breakfast · Lunch · Dinner · Beer & Wine

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ry not to think about the calories. But do think about all the hours your mom spent in the kitchen cooking for you, and all the meals you remember so fondly. (Well, OK, maybe they’re not all remembered fondly. You get the idea.) Isn’t it time to give your mother a break from the kitchen and cooking? And, especially if yours, like mine, wasn’t a particularly good cook, isn’t it time to get Mom out of the kitchen? As always, this Mother’s Day is on a Sunday (May 8). Many restaurants are closed on Sundays; others will be open serving their regular menus, so you might just want to treat Mom to her favorite meal at her favorite spot. Others, such as those eateries listed below, have created special Mother’s Day menus to help spoil your loving mother. She spoiled you, and now it’s time to repay her. Mother’s Day brunch on the patio at charming Caffe Niche (779 E. 300 South, 801-433-3380, CaffeNiche.com) would be a great choice for Mom. Niche is offering brunch from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., priced at $30 per person for adults and $15 for kids ages 3-9. Along with $5 mimosas, bellinis and bloody Marys, brunch includes a starter, entrée and dessert. Among the menu items are housemade biscuits and gravy, blackened fish tacos, Kobe beef corned hash, crab and avocado salad and verrine chocolate mousse. Finca (327 W. 200 South, 801-487-0699, FincaSLC.com) will host a “Día de la Madre” brunch buffet from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., priced at $42 for adults and $19 for kids ages 3-12. Buffet items range from a “Cold Sea Bar” with head-on prawns to breakfast paella with chorizo, rice, vegetables, eggs and pickled onions. There’s also a New York strip steak carving station, a dessert station, drink specials and much more to choose from at Finca. Mother’s Day brunch at Fleming’s Prime Steakhouse & Wine Bar (20 S. 400 West, The Gateway, 801-355-3704, FlemingsSteakHouse.com) runs from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. and features a bonus: The three-course brunch is $39.95 per person, but join Fleming’s for brunch or dinner on Mom’s Day and receive a $25 dining card for future use. Menu choices include savory potato-leek soup, eggs Benedict with filet mignon or smoked salmon, Fleming’s’ Brentone omelet, roast Prime rib and porcini-crust filet mignon, plus sides, desserts and signature cocktails. In addition to the opulent brunch from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. ($65 for adults and

THIS


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FOOD MATTERS BY TED SCHEFFLER @critic1

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It was just two weeks ago that I was mourning the closing of Fresco Italian Café. Well, good news, folks: Intrepid restaurateur and head of the Pago Restaurant Group, Scott Evans (along with partners Shannon Evans, Briant Stringham, Wendy Evans and Jameel Gaskins), has purchased the Fresco property and, after “a light face-lift,” will open Trestle Tavern at 15th & 15th. The Tavern adds to Evans’ eatery empire which includes Pago, Finca, Hub & Spoke Diner and East Liberty Tap House, and will feature 42 indoor seats and 50 more on the patio. The menu will offer casual Eastern pub-style food like chicken paprikash and pierogies, in addition to American fare such as fried chicken and burgers made with local beef. Beer, wine and cider on draft will be the featured libations. “We plan to open in 60 to 90 days,” Evans says, “but our opening date and final menu will be set once we build our team.”

Tour de Brewtah

The 2016 Tour de Brewtah—a Salt Lake City bicycle ride with several stops at local breweries—takes place this Saturday, April 30. For more info and to register for this bicycle brew bash go to Splore. EJoinMe.org/MyPages/TourDeBrewtah.

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French native Clement Gelas—one of the most talented chefs in the West, IMHO— has joined the Park City Culinary Institute to lead programs for corporate groups, using cuisine as a vehicle for facilitating team-building. Chef Gelas has served as executive chef at a number of prestigious Summit County restaurants including Wahso, Talisker on Main and Waldorf Astoria at The Canyons, and he remains club director of food and beverage for Talisker, in addition to taking on his new role with the culinary institute. “Learning how to cook as a team is great practice for improving employee communication, time management and problem solving skills,” Chef Gelas says. “We create culinary programming that serves as a fun way to build rapport between colleagues and develop leadership skills. Since just about everybody loves food, we use it as a way to inspire teamwork.” For additional information on the institute and its team-building programs, visit PCCulinary.com or phone 435-659-5075. Quote of the week: Violence is as American as cherry pie. —H. Rap Brown Food Matters 411: tscheffler@cityweekly.net

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28 | APRIL 28, 2016

BEER, WINE & SPIRITS

Dramatic Alto Adige Italy’s northernmost wine region BY TED SCHEFFLER comments@cityweekly.net @critic1

L

ike many other Italian wine enthusiasts, I relish the Italian white wines from Alto Adige. And so, I (and, I assume, others) am baffled by the lack of those wines in Utah. I could be wrong, but with a pretty thorough search of the Utah Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control website and product inventory, I could only find two producers of Alto Adige wines generally available here: Lageder and Tiefenbrunner, which I’ll get to later. You might be able to find Alto Adige wines in restaurants here and there, but if you really want to get to know these wines, you’ll have to special-order them. Italy’s Alto Adige wine-growing region is comparatively small—about 13,000 acres.

But the region is also one of the wine world’s most dramatic. Tucked away in northernmost Italy—just below Austria—you’ll find vineyards in Alpine valleys as high as 3,600 feet in elevation. The region is characterized by a mild, Alpine-continental climate, which boasts more than 300 days of sun per year and an average temperature of 64 degrees Fahrenheit. The Alps protect vineyards from cold winds, while air currents from the Mediterranean and Lake Garda help warm the wine-growing zones. German is the primary language spoken here, not Italian. And, like the language, the wines from Alto Adige are quite Germanic in character. Francis Fecteau, wine expert and owner of Libation Inc., recently shared an Alto Adige fun-fact with me: Despite the Alpine aspect of the area, it boasts wide (and wild) temperature swings. “Tropical plants grow on the valley floors while there are glaciers a few thousand feet up,” he said. The fun fact is that Alto Adige actually has the highest number of days in Italy where the temperature exceeds a certain point. “It’s a wonderful diurnal temperature swing.” Well, what about those wines? The most popular white wine varietals in Alto Adige are Pinot Grigio/Pinot Gris, Chardonnay, Pinot Blanc/Pinot Bianco, Gewürztraminer, Sauvignon Blanc and, to a lesser extent, Müller Thurgau, Kerner,

DRINK Veltliner, Sylvaner, Riesling and Moscato Giallo. Alois Lageder produces some of Alto Adige’s most ravishing wines, and has done so since 1823. You might not think of Pinot Grigio as “ravishing,” but many from Alto Adige are outstanding—and in my opinion, some of Italy’s very best. Flowery aromas and spicy notes accompany Alois Lageder Pinot G rigio 2014 ($15.99), a rich, powerful Pinot Grigio with a tinge of smoke. I’d drink it with lightly smoked fish or poultry dishes and appetizers. Alois Lageder Chardonnay 2014 ($15.99) has bracing acidity—a foodfriendly Chardonnay—with tropical fruit notes. It’s excellent with roasted chicken or just to sip by itself. Alois Lageder Pinot Bianco 2014 ($14.99) is light, fine and fruity, with peach and apple scents. It’s a versatile wine that pairs well with a range of lighter salads, seafood and pastas, and also

works well as an apéritif. Tiefenbrunner Pinot Grigio 2014 ($16.99) is a classic example of Northern Italy Pinot Grigio. It’s delicious just to enjoy on its own, but it also pairs exceedingly well with seafood and chicken dishes. The stony minerality of this medium-bodied wine would even lead me to sip it with raw oysters on the half-shell. I recently had the opportunity to taste my way through a trio of Kettmeir wines from Alto Adige, and was duly impressed. Steel-fermented Kettmeir Pinot Grigio 2014 ($20) was marvelously dry and a perfect companion to steamed mussels with chorizo, while Kettmeir Pinot Bianco 2014 ($20) reminded me that Italian Bianco can be bold, not bland. And for an out-of-the-box apéritif, serve your guests Kettmeir Müller Thurgau 2014 ($20), with gorgeous peach notes and hints of nutmeg. CW


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GOODEATS Complete listings at cityweekly.net Featuring dining destinations from buffets and rooms with a view to mom-andpop joints, chic cuisine and some of our dining critic’s faves. The Happy Sumo

Joe Morley’s Smoked Beef & Bar-B-Q

Indochine Vietnamese Bistro

Kosher on the Go

The Happy Sumo restaurant offers a traditional array of nigiri and maki sushi as well as the restaurant’s special rolls and vegetarian options such as the cucumber roll. At the far end of the subtlety spectrum is The Happy Sumo “Death Roll,” a spicy concoction of soft-shell crab, cucumber, radish, gobo root, sprouts and Happy Sumo’s “death paste.” In addition to sushi and extremely fresh sashimi, the restaurant offers typical cooked dishes like teriyaki chicken, ribs and salmon, as well as less typical entrées, like the heavenly macadamia nut-crusted sea bass or “Sumo Maguro,” which is albacore cooked with a wasabi crust and a teriyaki glaze. Multiple Locations, HappySumoSushi.com Nothing could be better on a cold winter day than chef Tuan Vu’s incendiary hot and spicy noodle soup. For more delicate palates, the pho is a great alternative. Also considerably mellower is an Indochine specialty of curried beef stew, which is absolutely delicious and served with a French baguette on the side. Equally enjoyable is the catfish filet, simmered in a clay pot until oh-so-tender and delivered hot and steaming to table in the same pot it was cooked in. In warm weather, enjoy the inviting sidewalk patio. 230 S. 1300 East, Salt Lake City, 801-582-0896

Joe Morley’s specializes in takeout barbecue, along with catering and banquets. Morley’s has been smoking barbecue since 1984, and it is one of the best smokehouses in the state. The chicken here is marinated for 24 hours, and then smoked over cherry wood for six more. Popular to-go items include barbecue sandwiches; sides such as kielbasa, hot wings and potato salad; and barbecue platters featuring baby back ribs, smoked beef brisket, chopped smoked pork, smoked chicken and pork spare ribs with Joe’s savory dry rub. For dessert, take home a mud pie (original or peppermint) or a hot-fudge sundae. 7720 S. 100 West, Midvale, 801-255-8928, JoeMorleys.com Kosher on the Go (Chabad of Salt Lake City) features New York City deli-style kosher sandwiches, salads and meals and a small (about three tables) setting. Stackedhigh meat sandwiches like corned beef, turkey and pastrami are a throwback to old world delicatessens and there’s also terrific, comforting matzo-ball soup. And, if you’re looking for challah bread, be smart and order it in advance. The restaurant also does kosher catering. 1575 S. 1100 East, Salt Lake City, 801-463-1786

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32 | APRIL 28, 2016

GREEN ROOM

Hardcore Values

CINEMA

Green Room packs a tense thriller with characters facing a truly edgy reality. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

W

hile Jeremy Saulnier’s Green Room is a movie so unsettling and brutal that it almost feels cruel to recommend it, one of the most nerve-wracking moments comes before all bloody hell breaks loose. Our protagonists are a Washington, D.C.-based punk quartet called The Ain’t Rights—Pat (Anton Yelchin), Sam (Alia Shawkat), Tiger (Callum Turner) and Reece (Joe Cole)—and they’re playing an impromptu gig at a rural skinhead bar in the Pacific Northwest after their original gig has fallen through. But, not content to take their money and get out of Dodge, they decide to poke their hosts—by playing a cover version of Dead Kennedys’ “Nazi Punks Fuck Off.” Green Room has gotten plenty of attention for Saulnier’s chops at manufacturing pure, lowdown genre intensity, and that attention is certainly deserved. Yet while he takes an approach to his characters that is in many ways minimalist, this isn’t exactly a movie where the warm bodies exist simply to be dispatched in creatively unpleasant ways. Buried in this crackling siege thriller is a story about kids posing at living on the edge, until they find themselves in a situation where they can see what the edge really looks like. And it looks pretty awful once the members of The Ain’t Rights make the mistake of walking back into the club’s green room, just in time to see that a member of another band has just been murdered. The club’s owner, Darcy (Patrick Stewart), isn’t about to have the club turned into a crime scene for a police investigation, since he’s running a heroin-dealing operation out of the basement. The witnesses—also including Amber (Imogen Poots), a member of another band—just can’t be allowed to complicate things.

Much of what follows takes place in that room, as the terrified musicians come to realize that nothing good lies just outside their lockable door. Saulnier builds his claustrophobic horror in a manner reminiscent of movies from Assault on Precinct 13 and The Purge to this year’s 10 Cloverfield Lane, depending on false starts and bold risks to avoid a sense of stasis. He also knows how to use his wince-inducing bits of graphic violence for maximum impact, finding watch-through-your-fingers uses for machetes, box cutters and attack dogs. Saulnier also knows how to work the moments when he’s not shocking the audience, displaying filmmaking gifts that have grown since his 2013 indie breakout Blue Ruin. He demonstrates some ruthless narrative efficiency, like capturing the passage of time by cutting from the opening five seconds of a song on a vinyl record to that same record with the needle in the runout groove. He’s even bold enough to have Amber start talking about why she’s a white supremacist, yet let those words serve merely as background noise while others search for a way out of the room, understanding that her backstory doesn’t really matter. That last example is just a part of Green Room’s general approach to character development, which is unconventional to say the least. In some ways, the fact that the “villains” are white supremacists is irrelevant to the progression of the plot, except that Saulnier wants to make the antagonists scarily methodical rather than an ignorant, purely

Patrick Stewart (center) and goons in Green Room

physical threat. Stewart, at times, feels like an odd choice for the main heavy, proving less interesting than the club manager, Gabe (Blue Ruin’s Macon Blair), an enigmatic mix of true believer and pragmatist. Green Room probably works best, however, because of the characters Saulnier places in that room. From the opening scene in which we see their van having plowed through a corn field because the driver fell asleep at the wheel, to their guerrilla missions to siphon gas so they can keep their road trip rolling, it’s clear that The Ain’t Rights are living their idea of a punk life. They’ll tell an interviewer that their “desert-island bands” are Misfits and The Damned, but that’s not the same story they tell one another when they’re facing a terrifying new reality. Green Room excels as a horror movie that can jolt an audience out of their seats, but it’s also about the horror of realizing that, while you might try to convince the world you’re hardcore, there are things—and people—out there that are much harder. CW

GREEN ROOM

BBB.5 Anton Yelchin Patrick Stewart Imogen Poots Rated R

TRY THESE Assault on Precinct 13 (1976) Austin Stoker Darwin Joston Rated R

The Strangers (2008) Liv Tyler Scott Speedman Rated R

The Purge (2013) Ethan Hawke Lena Headey Rated R

Blue Ruin (2013) Macon Blair Devin Ratray Rated R


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SPECIAL SCREENINGS

Information is correct at press time. Film release schedules are subject to change.

GREEN ROOM BBB.5 See review p. 32. Opens April 29 at theaters valleywide. (R)

MOTHER’S DAY [not yet reviewed] Julia Roberts, Jennifer Aniston and Kate Hudson star in an ensemble dramedy about maternal relationships. Opens April 29 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13) RATCHET & CLANK [not yet reviewed] Animated science-fiction tale of an alien and a robot teaming up to save the universe. Opens April 29 at theaters valleywide. (PG)

PURPLE RAIN Tower Theatre, April 29-30, 11 p.m. (R)

CURRENT RELEASES BARBERSHOP: THE NEXT CUT BB.5 Malcolm D. Lee’s sequel to the Barbershop films from 2002 and 2004 covers much of the same ground as his cousin Spike’s Chi-Raq—Calvin (Ice Cube) makes his Chicago barbershop neutral ground for a gang ceasefire, while he and his employees and customers discuss the problems of black America—but in a congenial, non-confrontational way. Written by Kenya Barris (creator of TV’s Black-ish) and Tracy Oliver, the film raises tough questions honestly but only addresses them as deeply as its formula (Inoffensive Mainstream African-American Comedy) allows, yielding little insight. As well-meaning but insubstantial “issues” movies go, though, it’s a pleasant one, with a large, likable cast (including Cedric the Entertainer, Regina Hall, J.B. Smoove, Common, Nicki Minaj and New Girl’s Lamorne Morris) and a palpable respect for the community it represents. (PG-13)—Eric D. Snider ELVIS & NIXON BB.5 Here’s the kind of goofy, sometimes-entertaining mess you end up with when you start with a curious historical footnote—the real-life December 1970 meeting between President Richard Nixon (Kevin Spacey) and Elvis Presley (Michael Shannon)—but no clear sense of what it’s about. Director Liza Johnson explores it from a variety of directions, including Elvis’ few friendships, and Nixon aides trying to convince the president that the meeting is a good idea. But every time the narrative stumbles on a potentially interesting idea, it gets distracted by the next idea. While Shannon and Spacey prove interesting for taking radically different approaches to two of history’s most imitated men— Shannon nails the eccentricity that comes with mega-fame without actually mimicking The King—it’s hard for Elvis & Nixon to come together as anything more than a curious footnote itself. (R)—SR

A HOLOGRAM FOR THE KING BBB Tom Hanks—reunited with Cloud Atlas co-director Tom Tykwer, adapting Dave Eggers’ novel—pulls together this odd contraption about veteran businessman Alan Clay, who’s trying to resurrect his crumbling career by negotiating a sale of IT infrastructure to the King of Saudi Arabia. Surreal elements flit through the narrative, including the nature of a large lump in the middle of Alan’s back, as well as the bureaucracy of this would-be oasis. It could have—and probably even should have—played as little more than a sadsack mid-life crisis, given a little exoticism by Alan’s interactions with the locals. But Hanks sells it with his commitment to playing an old-school, “where ya from?” salesman in a new kind of world. There are times when watching him act is enough, even when he’s the only thing in this Hologram that feels real. (R)—SR THE HUNTSMAN: WINTER’S WAR B.5 The best thing about 2012’s not-very-good Snow White and the Huntsman was Charlize Theron’s evil queen Ravenna, with a backstory that suggested something promising if the story focused on her coming-of-witch. But Ravenna is already evil as Winter’s War opens, and she isn’t in much of the rest of the film, except for one big showdown with her sorcerous ice-queen sister (Emily Blunt). This is mostly the tale of the Huntsman (Chris Hemsworth), and mostly takes place after the events of Snow White, even ultimately negating much of what we learned in that film. Very little makes sense on even the most basic level, like how Snow White accidentally discovers that Ravenna’s magic mirror is, like, the One Ring or something. We don’t witness this, because Kristen Stewart hasn’t returned, but you would have loved how scary it was. Promise. (PG-13)—MaryAnn Johanson

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KEANU [not yet reviewed] A pair of cousins (Jordan Peele and Keegan-Michael Key) set out to recover a stolen kitten. Opens April 29 at theaters valleywide. (R)

THE PEOPLE VS. LARRY FLYNT At Brewvies, May 2, 10 p.m. (R)

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THE FIRST MONDAY IN MAY BBB.5 Is haute couture fashion a work of art, or is it a consumer product? Andrew Rossi takes a terrifically entertaining look at that question in a documentary that suggests how thin the line is between those two aspects. The focus is the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s annual spring fashion-themed exhibition—in this case, the 2015 China: Through the Looking Glass show—as curator Andrew Bolton works on the actual show and fashion industry icon Anna Wintour organizes the accompanying star-studded fundraiser. He finds fascinating material in both halves of the story, as Bolton wrestles with the logistics and the politics of his potentially problematic theme, while Wintour tries to convince entertainment headliner Rihanna to pare down her entourage because it’s, you know, a charity. But just as Frederick Wiseman was able to do in National Gallery, Rossi emphasizes the nuts-and-bolts reality of bringing any kind of art to the public, with all the complications and compromises that process entails. Leave aside some distracting tangents focusing on the already over-profiled Wintour, and First Monday captures that certain amount of flash that invariably helps the medicine of art go down. Opens April 29 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (PG-13)—Scott Renshaw

DOGTOWN REDEMPTION At Main Library, May 3, 7 p.m. (NR)

EVERYBODY WANTS SOME!! BBB.5 Richard Linklater shows off his unique gift for stories about brash young guys that also show compassion for their immature bravado, following freshman baseball player Jake (Blake Jenner) as he arrives on a Texas university campus in August 1980 and forms friendships with his new teammates. On its most basic level, this is a “hang-out movie,” finding its charm and humor in the characters’ episodic adventures. Linklater also bathes the story in its period setting, taking particular advantage of a funky musical crossroads before pop-culture narrowcasting. The decision to focus on college jocks feels as deliberate as the time frame; the perpetual battle to be the alpha dog among other alpha dogs can be both funny and sad, and it’s one of Linklater’s talents as a filmmaker that he can serve up the ideal balance between the two. (R)—SR


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CINEMA

CLIPS

MOVIE TIMES AND LOCATIONS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

THE JUNGLE BOOK BB.5 At first, it feels like director Jon Favreau is aiming for an actionadventure completely devoid of a kid-friendly tone—but that would be too much to ask. It hits all the familiar points from the Rudyard Kipling stories as filtered through Disney’s 1967 incarnation: “man-cub” Mowgli (Neel Sethi); his guardians Bagheera the panther (Ben Kingsley) and Baloo the bear (Bill Murray); the threat of tiger Shere Khan (Idris Elba). The straightforward 3-D action-adventure is thrilling when it focuses on Mowgli escaping Shere Khan in a stampeding wildebeest herd, but Favreau also keeps dropping in stuff that will make it seem like a spiritual cousin to the animated film—snippets of beloved songs, or goofy comic relief—despite all the potentially scary photorealistic CGI animals. It’s a movie that wants to be a blockbuster spectacle and a harmless diversion for kids. (PG)—SR

MILES AHEAD BB.5 Here’s a film biography of a musician that opts for a one-of-akind structure, but one that doesn’t actually make much sense. Don Cheadle directed, produced, co-scripted and stars as trumpeter Miles Davis, in a narrative that slides between 1979—as Davis emerges from a long hiatus—and 20 years earlier. The 1979-set material is weirdly entertaining, almost a buddy crime caper as a coked-up, gun-toting Davis and an eager journalist (Ewan McGregor) try to recover Davis’ stolen session tapes, and Cheadle definitely goes for the gusto visually. But it’s hard to latch on to any thematic connection between the two segments. What should be our take-away about Davis’ life, work and legacy? You get a stronger sense of who Don Cheadle is as an artist: someone who needs to work with a better screenwriter than Don Cheadle. (R)—SR


TRUE BY B I L L F RO S T @bill_frost

Dark Shadows

TV

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Penny Dreadful is back and creepy; Person of Interest, and maybe Maron, begin the end. Penny Dreadful Sunday, May 1 (Showtime)

Season Premiere: Showtime’s supernatural steampunk soap … whew … returns for Season 3 with Ethan (Josh Hartnett), Sir Malcolm (Timothy Dalton) and Dr. Frankenstein (Harry Treadaway) scattered about the globe, leaving a broken Vanessa (Eva Green) back in dreary old London with no one to confide in but an unorthodox therapist (Patti LuPone) and a sexy zoologist (Christian Camargo). For a dark fantasy series filled with vampires, witches and monsters, Penny Dreadful spools out plenty of deep character development and rich drama for players—particularly Vanessa; Green should be up for all of the awards—who could easily fall flat and camp-ridiculous. It’s also still in a dead heat for the title of Creepiest Period Show on TV with Salem (Netflix it, if you never want to sleep again).

Houdini & Doyle Monday, May 2 (Fox)

Series Debut: Back to the steampunking, would you believe a 1900s buddy-caper British-Canadian mystery series about Harry Houdini (Michael Weston) and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (Stephan Mangan)? On prime time network

Person of Interest Tuesday, May 3 (CBS)

Final Season Premiere: I’ll admit it; I unfairly labeled Person of Interest as just another CBS crime-procedural involving vague terrorist threats, high-tech intrigue and gun-waving speeches in dark alleys years ago. But come on—with a dead-dull name like Person of Interest, what else could it be? Turns out, it’s an unusually dark and canny (for CBS) treatise on the grey areas of profiling, surveillance and overreaching tech headlined by the hyper-odd pairing of Jim Caviezel and Michael Emerson (as a former CIA agent and a software supergenius, respectively). Ensuing seasons ratcheted up the tension, and the additions of Amy Acker and Sarah Shahi attracted a few more eyeballs, but Person of Interest was ultimately too smart to last; this

shortened fifth season will be the series’ last, blowing out two episodes a week through June. Another excellent candidate for Netflixing—just be prepared to go deep.

Maron Wednesday, May 4 (IFC)

Season Premiere: It’s not official, but Season 4 could be the last for Maron, as well—IFC moving it from Thursdays to Wednesdays doesn’t exactly instill confidence, either. After settling into an amusingly cranky groove for a couple of seasons, Marc Maron blew up Maron last year, breaking hard from the this-is-kinda-my-daily-life format by getting sober “Marc” hooked on Oxycontin. Now, Marc’s disheveled and destitute, having lost his house, cats and podcast (drugged, disheveled and destitute are prerequisites only for amateur podcasters, apparently). Next stop: Rehab—or, “a resort for people with no self-control.” If anyone can pull comedy from addiction recovery, it’s Maron, and he can’t fare any worse than Will Arnett did recently with the lazily downcast Flaked … can he? Damn, this might really be the end for Maron. Listen to Bill Mondays at 8 a.m. on X96 Radio From Hell, and on the TV Tan podcast via iTunes, Stitcher and BillFrost.tv.

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Season Premiere: Achievements in human intelligence since 2007, the year Keeping Up With the Kardashians launched its 12-season(!) run: The iPhone; space probes to Mercury and Pluto; the Large Hadron Collider; the discovery of exoplanets; artificial polymer arteries; the detection of water on the moon; the creation of robotic nano-spiders; the introduction of the hydrogen-powered car; the labgrown human heart; driverless cars; drones; wearable fitness trackers; the commercial 3-D printer; lab-grown hamburger meat (unrelated to the aforementioned heart); major breakthroughs in quantum computing; hashtags … #KardashianLivesDontMatter.

Penny Dreadful (Showtime)

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Keeping Up With the Kardashians Sunday, May 1 (E!)

television? Like Sleepy Hollow, Second Chance and Lucifer before it, Fox takes an intriguingly weird setup and turns it into yet another cop procedural, albeit one with a supernatural twist and an impressive suspenders and mustache-wax budget. Mangan and Weston are engagingly lively actors, and Houdini & Doyle’s run will be relatively short at just 10 episodes (the compromise point between British and ’Merican sensibilities), but Fox’s audience typically doesn’t go for shows that seem borrowed from PBS (see: Cosmos).


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After more than three decades, Violent Femmes’ sound remains utterly their own. BY DAN NAILEN comments@cityweekly.net @dannailen

F

or the Violent Femmes, there has to be a certain frustration that comes with the fact the first song on their first album remains the one tune most people associate with the band. Don’t get me wrong. There’s good reason the first notes of “Blister in the Sun” are still enough to fill the dance floor at house parties of music fans of a certain age (ahem), and that cover bands include the song in their sets for everything from frat-house ragers to weddings more than three decades after it arrived on the band’s 1983 debut. The song has the loud-soft-loud dynamic later worked to death by the Pixies and Nirvana, but in the Femmes’ hands, it’s delivered via acoustic instruments and singer Gordon Gano’s laconic vocal stylings that veer from smirk-filled yelps to spoken-word recitations/raps to conspiratorial whispers. The song introduced a vibrant new band to the ’80s college-rock scene that would eventually grow into the commercial “alternative” genre you can still hear on several stations in Salt Lake City. (Go ahead and turn one on right now—you might hear “Blister” between Depeche Mode and The Offspring tunes.) Their sound was rooted in acoustic instrumentation and jokey (sometimes too jokey) lyrics delivered by Gano, bass man Brian Ritchie and original drummer Victor DeLorenzo—a trio originally discovered, as the story goes, busking outside a Pretenders show in Milwaukee, with Chrissie Hynde tapping them to do a quick opening set that night. The Violent Femmes’ sound proved so utterly distinct on their first album and those that followed—even as they incorporated an expanded, horn-laden live lineup (all hail the Horns of Dilemma!) or dabbled with synthesizers on albums like The Blind Leading the Naked—that they became one of those bands that are impossible to copy. Everyone from Led Zeppelin to Nirvana, Tupac to Tool has seen a slew of wannabe sound-alikes follow in their path, trying to steal a little of the original artists’ success. The Violent Femmes’ sound is so original (some would say weird) that they’re pretty much incapable of being ripped off—at least musically speaking. “Blister in the Sun” pushed their self-titled debut to platinum sales (a mere eight years after its release) and became a cultural touchstone used in movies like Grosse Pointe Blank and TV shows like My So-Called Life and, more recently, Netflix’s Love. It also led to the most dramatic schism in the band when Gano licensed the song for a Wendy’s commercial in 2007, apparently without telling Ritchie. Lawsuits, breakups and the seeming demise of the band ensued. Of course, there’s nothing like big money to heal old wounds. When Coachella made the band a too-good-to-refuse offer to reunite at the SoCal festival in 2013, they accepted. That gig led to the ongoing reunion (albeit one with a rotating cast in the drummer’s seat currently filled by John Sparrow) that resulted in the new album We Can Do Anything (PIAS America).

EBRU YILDIZ

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VIOLENT FEMMES

Violent Femmes Although it’s the Femmes’ first full-length in 16 years, it recalls the raucous, raw songs on the band’s debut and its killer followup, 1984’s Hallowed Ground. Like most of the band’s albums, We Can Do Anything features a few immediately appealing songs that seem destined to become staples of the Femmes’ live shows (“Holy Ghost,” “Foothills,” “Memory”) and some tunes that fall short. But it is further proof of what the rabid Violent Femmes fans have known for years: The band is far more than “Blister in the Sun.” Many of those rabid fans are Utahns, who gobble up the quirky pop-rock ear candy delivered by bands like They Might Be Giants, King Missile, Soul Coughing, Eels and the like. The Violent Femmes’ combo of off-kilter instrumentation (horns! xylophones!) and laugh-laced lyrics hits Utah in the sweet spot of a few different audiences: the band geeks intrigued by the band’s musicianship; the rebels who embrace everything “alternative” (if a multi-platinum band can be considered alternative), and, now, the middle-aged fans who aim to recapture a youthful memory of past Femmes gigs at the Utah State Fairpark or Kingsbury Hall. That’s why the Violent Femmes fed Utahns a steady diet of shows through the years, and local radio stations continue to play songs beyond “Blister in the Sun,” like “American Music,” “Kiss Off,” “Nightmares” and their cover of Culture Club’s “Do You Really Want to Hurt Me?” In fact, you could fill out a pretty awesome set-list of Femmes songs without even touching “Blister in the Sun.” But that would be madness. The band isn’t that weird. CW

VIOLENT FEMMES

w/ Jake Prebes The Depot 400 W. South Temple Monday, May 2, 8 p.m. 801-355-5522 Sold out DepotSLC.com


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Holladay’s Premier Martini & Wine Bar

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Working for the Weekend

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BY BRIAN STAKER comments@cityweekly.net @stakerized

T

he Weekenders just might be the best local rock & roll band you’ve never heard. But maybe that’s because they are hard to pigeonhole. It’s certainly not for lack of gigging. Vocalist/guitarist Rob Reinfurt started the band in 2009 and, on his own, recorded a debut album, Don’t Plan On, in 2012. After several lineup changes, and feeling that the release’s sound could use improvement, he met guitarist/studio wiz Mike Sasich (whom you can’t swing the proverbial cat and not hit in the local music scene), who mixed and mastered the album. Later, the band solidified with the addition of bassist Mike Torgerson and drummer Shaun Thomas. While they haven’t received a lot of attention in the local press, they perform consistently, especially at The State Room. What’s more, they’ve opened for some interesting national acts, including The Budos Band; Blitzen Trapper and Freeman, a solo project of Aaron Freeman (aka Gene Ween of the band Ween). The Weekenders don’t really sound like any of those, and Reinfurt says it’s awkward. “A lot of times, people have trouble fitting us into a bill because a lot of bands are quite softer,” he says. “And then the bands that are heavier are usually on the metal side, and that’s not what we are at all.” The band releases its second album, Bright Silence of Night, on April 29 with two sets at The State Room (one accompanied by modern dancers, with choreography by Erica Womack). Sasich notes that the new songs came together easily. “With this group,” he says, “songs just kind of happen; we don’t go through the music with a fine pick. It just kind of happens, and I think that’s the beauty of playing with people that you have good chemistry with.” That’s how they chose their name, which comes from a line in Lou Reed’s “Perfect Day”: “Just a perfect day/ problems left all alone/ weekenders on our own/ it’s such fun.” Reminiscent of 1970s hard rock, before

LG TAWINSKI

WHERE SOPHISTICATED MEETS CASUAL

The Weekenders

heavy metal came and pushed everything into screaming, The Weekenders slog away in sheer sonic tumult, creating a sound that is updated for the Pro Tools/GarageBand generation: more refined, but still rough. The album opener, “Escape,” starts with an ominous-sounding, slow and steady kick drum. Reinfurt’s arching vocal, that at times reaches into falsetto, and Sasich’s retro guitar pyrotechnics combine in an awe-inspiring blend, that’s mind-bending without being psychedelic, heavy without being leaden. Reinfurt sings, “You can let your guard down, baby,” but it’s the music that really entices. “New York Bound” would be perhaps an indie-rock Led Zeppelin blues merchant, letting the listener ride its groove. The trebly guitar sound places this music as somewhere outside the ’70s, but its heredity leads surely back there, bell-bottoms and all. “Cherokee Rose” is the outlier of the bunch, muted guitar lines as sure as the carefully delineated portrait of the title character, once again with ties to similar ’70s subjects. Sasich’s playing is as controlled as always, though at times on the album he really stretches out, as does Reinfurt with his vocals. That’s perhaps the most surprising thing about the album: It’s such a work of art. The Hendrix-isms of “Every Night As A Slave,” the indictment of the fashion followers on “Monkey See” and the stately intro to “Blue Hill Bay” all maintain a kind of precision that bucks the myth of hard rock as a kind of anti-genre more defined by the excesses of its practitioners—at least in its original manifestation, more than simply bearing sonic similarities. There is a kind of effortlessness and unself-conscious energy to the album, and the band—such that their name really fits. Although they completed the album moments before we spoke, they don’t seem to realize how good it is. “When I have been working on something, and am really close to it, I don’t really get to hear it, in a sense, until later,” Sasich says. “Sometimes it’s not being able to see the forest for the trees.” CW

THE WEEKENDERS ALBUM RELEASE

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FRIDAY 4.29 Rumba Libre

In 2008, after spending a decade and a half singing with Utah’s highest-profile purveyors of Latin music—we’re talkin’ about Salsa Brava, Mambo Jumbo, Ritmo Caliente and Orquesta Latinos—not to mention internationally famous acts like Gloria Estefan, Lalo Rodríguez and Poncho Sanchez, Coco Garcia formed Rumba Libre. His intent was to create his own style of music—a blend of salsa, Latin jazz and Afro-Cuban music. “I put together an all-star band,” Garcia writes on RumbaLibreBand.com, “combining the best players in Salt Lake City with an exciting and unique style that delivers the best salsa and Latin jazz music in the … Utah, Idaho and Wyoming region.” The group, he says, is “very versatile … we can also play from a full 10-piece salsa band to a jazz quintet or trio.” The band demonstrates this on their CD, Salsa Fever (available on the band’s website), but they really shine onstage, moving audiences to dance in their own saucy, febrile fits. (Randy Harward) Peery’s Egyptian Theater, 2415 Washington Blvd., Ogden, 7:30 p.m., $13.50 (adults), $10.50 (student/military), $8.50 (kids), EgyptianTheaterOgden.com

Napalm Death, Melvins, Melt Banana

From the moment they released their debut, Scum (Earache), in 1987 to 2015’s Apex Predator-Easy Meat (Century Media), Napalm Death has been redefining heavy. Known for pioneering grindcore metal, the British band increased the already ridiculous speed of thrash and death metal, dialed up the raw factor and made it relevant thanks to the progressive sociopolitical themes viciously barked out by vocalist Barney Greenway. Napalm Death is one of the few heavy bands

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that is right at home in metal, hardcore, punk and crust scenes. Joining them on this tour is the equally influential band Melvins. Before they came along, the Seattle scene was starting to fizzle after the success of Heart and Queensryche started to wane. Buzz Osbourne’s doomy chug and unparalleled riff mastery goosed the scene right in the ass, as Melvins dropped a heavy slab of sludge alongside the grunge-y sounds of Soundgarden, Nirvana and, to a lesser, more pretentious extent, Pearl Jam. Napalm Death and Melvins are your reward if you survive the ear-lacerating onslaught of Tokyo noise merchants, Melt Banana. Like Napalm Death did with heavy metal, Melt Banana did with noise rock, ratcheting up the noise and energy and, if you can perceive it through the chaos, adding some strong hooks. Their live performances push everything right to the point where it sounds like things will fall apart. That’s what makes them so much fun. (Marc Hanson) The Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 8 p.m., $23 in advance, $25 day of show, TheUrbanLoungeSLC.com

Napalm Death

Rumba Libre

SATURDAY 4.30

Mojave Nomads, Panther Milk, Rumble Gums, Westward

In a fine-tuned experiment of gritty indie-leaning vocals laid over smooth jazz- and soul-influenced instrumentals, Ogden’s Mojave Nomads have created a sound that is as unique as it is alluring. With the release of their 2015 Black Sheep EP, Tyler Harris (vocals/guitar), Colter Hill (lead guitar), Bryton Bell (bass), Cole Eisenhour (percussion), Mason Hill (keyboards/synthesizers) have gained a strong following both in Salt Lake City and up north. Upon each listen, a new movement and a new melody seem to emerge—definitely a band to watch. Loganborn mad scientists Panther Milk present a wonderfully odd mixture of folk and psychrock. With releases such as 2015’s Totem and 2014’s Orion EP, Nick Porath, Benton Wood, Jake Hurst, Josh Mikesell, Nicholas Lilly »

Mojave Nomads

MATT CLAYTON

KEVIN ESTRADA

40 | APRIL 28, 2016

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This is NOT A Lounge Act! os Our Dueling Pian T O H g are Smokin

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Tuesdays at 9 - Karaoke that doesn’t suck! Quality drinks at an affordable price Saturday and Sunday Brunch til 3:00 Great food daily 11am - 12:15am Music Wednesday thru Saturday

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APRIL 28, 2016 | 41

32 Exchange Place • 801-322-3200 www.twistslc.com • 11:00am-1:00am

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TOBIAS HUTZLER

LIVE

and Dan Fields sound something like an acoustic and more reigned-in Wavves. Additional support provided by the hip-hop and rock infused Rumble Gums and cowboy space-rockers Westward. (Zac Smith) Kilby Court, 741 S. 330 West, 7 p.m., $6, KilbyCourt.com

Pony Time, Secret Abilities, Muzzle Tung

42 | APRIL 28, 2016

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Are Luke Beetham and Stacy Peck, aka Seattle garage rockers Pony Time, another incarnation of Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks? The title of their latest album, Rumours 2: The Rumours Are True (self-released) might lead you to that conclusion. Alas, it’s more of a loose tribute in the sense that the songs are not by, or even redolent of, Fleetwood Mac. They claim, however, that Rumours 2 was recorded “in the same style of Fleetwood Mac’s classic album, replacing the copious amounts of cocaine with Gatorade and tumultuous love affairs with trips to Arby’s.” Sports drinks plus nitrate-laden fast food do, however, give you a pretty good idea where Pony Time comes from: a land of fuzztones, reverb, handclaps and spunk are as beguiling as Stevie Nick’s white witch. Local awk-rawkers Secret Abilities and sleepy post-punks Muzzle Tung open. (RH) Diabolical Records, 238 S. Edison St., 8 p.m., $5 donation, Facebook.com/DiabolicalRecords

sound warehouse product liquidation

WEDNESDAY 5.4 ZHU

Steven Zhu, better known as the electronic and house producer ZHU, began his music career in self-imposed anonymity, desiring to be judged by his musical abilities alone. With the release of the track “Moves Like Miss Jackson”—an innovative mash-up of Outkast’s “The Way You Move,” “So Fresh, So Clean” and “Ms. Jackson,” public demand was so overwhelming that Zhu was forced to reveal himself. Since then, Zhu released two EPs, The Nightday in 2014 (Mind of a Genius/Columbia) and Genesis Series in 2015 (Columbia)—each acclaimed by specialized outlets such as Rolling Stone, Pitchfork and Complex, as well as a number of singles, like “In the Morning” and “Working for It,” a collaboration with Skrillex and THEY. Zhu’s Neon City Tour will include new production by the artist and a featurelength film to which Zhu will provide the score. (ZS) The Depot, 400 W. South Temple, 8 p.m., $25.50 in advance, $29 day of show, TheDepotSLC.com

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rubber ducky river race for charity

5/21

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Jack wilkinson vagablonde | cold bear shasta and the second stones

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1/2 off nachos & Free pool


LOGO

RuPaul’s Drag Race: Battle of the Seasons

If reality television competitions give you explosive, uh, you know, you may find relief in RuPaul’s Drag Race. Although it has the same old manufactured drama and lame catch phrases of any reality show, it’s a lot more fun and surprisingly uplifting. Plus, the zippy oneliners, crazy costumes and lip-sync battles are just good TV. Tonight’s show is hosted by Michelle Visage and features Pearl performing an opening DJ set with performances by past winners, runners-up and fan favorites Adore Delano, Alaska Thunderfuck, Courtney Act, Ginger Minj, Miss Fame, Phi Phi O’Hara and Violet Chachki (left)—who performed at Metro Bar last December. (Randy Harward) The Depot, 400 W. South Temple, 9 p.m., $37.50 (VIP tickets: $199-299), DepotSLC.com

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Margaritas • Palomas • Corona Familiar Tacos • DJ Street Jesus • No Cover Win Tickets to RSL vs. Portland and New York

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44 | APRIL 28, 2016

SATURDAY 4.30

CONCERTS & CLUBS

SPIRITS • FOOD • GOOD COMPANY 4.28

JOHN DAVIS

5.04

GEORGE NELSON

4.29

RICK GERBER &

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5.06

PIXIE & THE PARTYGRASS BOYS

YOU TOPPLE OVER

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MICHELLE MOONSHINE TRIO

4.30

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19 East 200 South | bourbonhouseslc.com


CONCERTS & CLUBS

CITY WEEKLY’S HOT LIST FOR THE WEEK

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE @ CITYWEEKLY.NET

THURSDAY 4.28 OPEN MIC, SESSION & PIANO LOUNGE Dueling Pianos (The Tavernacle) Jazz Jam Session (Sugar House Coffee)

LIVE MUSIC

Beach Slang + Potty Mouth + Dyke Drama + Eyesore (Kilby Court) DJ Courtney (Area 51) Holy Grail (Metro Bar) Hot Noise & Guest DJ (The Red Door) Jack Russell’s Great White Acoustic (Jack and Robby) (Liquid Joe’s) Jazz Joint Thursday w/ Mark Chaney and the Garage All Stars (Garage on Beck) Therapy Thursdays feat. Tritonal (SKY) The Widdler + Durandal + Strk 9 + Funkmod (The Urban Lounge)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge)

FRIDAY 4.29 Dueling Pianos (The Tavernacle) Retro Lounge Club Night (Maxwell’s)

LIVE MUSIC

FRI. MAY 13TH & SAT. MAY 14TH

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TUE – FRI 11AM TO 7PM • SAT 10AM TO 6PM • CLOSED SUN & MON LIKE US ON OR VISIT WWW.RANDYSRECORDS.COM • 801.532.4413

LIVE MUSIC

‘68 + Charlatan (The Loading Dock) Apocalyptica + 10 Years + Failure Anthem (In The Venue) A Broadway Convention (Masonic Temple) The Best Thang Smokin’ Tour feat. Berner + Kool John + Anonymous That Dude (The Complex) DJ Dolph (Downstairs) Don Benjamin (Club Elevate) Easy Star All-Stars (The State Room) Joy Spring Band (Sugar House Coffee) Mojave Nomads + Panthermilk + Rumble Gums + Westward (Kilby Court) see p. 40 Penrose + Scarlet Rain + Colonel Lingus + Zamtrip (The Royal) Pony Time + Secret Abilities + Muzzle Tung (Diabolical Records) see p. 42 RuPaul’s Drag Race: Battle of the Seasons (The Depot) see p. 44 Sky Saturdays feat. DJ Shift (SKY) The Spazmatics (Liquid Joe’s) The Summer Set (In the Venue) Tokimonsta + Flash & Flare + Devareaux (The Urban Lounge) Voz de Mando (Riverbend Sports Center)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge)

SUNDAY 5.1 LIVE MUSIC

Garage Artist Showcase (Garage on Beck) Laberinto y La Maquina Norteña (Deseret Peak Complex)

KARAOKE

Karaoke Bingo (The Tavernacle)

APRIL 28, 2016 | 45

Catch the Aces live May 6th at the rooftop concert series in Provo

| CITY WEEKLY |

available this Friday April 29th.

Stuck

Introducing The Aces with their new debut single

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

A Broadway Convention (Masonic Temple) The Doppelgangaz at The Hip-Hop House (Club Elevate) The Freeze (Club X) Friday Night Live feat. Funk & Gonzo (SKY) Jack Wilkinson + Vagablonde + Cold Year + Shasta and the Second Strings (The Royal) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Kvelertak + Torche + Wild Throne (In the Venue) Michelle Moonshine (The Cabin) Miss DJ Lux (Downstairs) Napalm Death + Melvins + Melt Banana (The Urban Lounge) see p. 40 The Night Spin Collective (Area 51) Retro Lounge Club Night (Maxwell’s) Rumba Libre (Peery’s Egyptian Theater) see p. 40 Sister Wives (Garage on Beck)

SATURDAY 4.30

SPRING $2 VINYL SALE,

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

OPEN MIC, SESSION & PIANO LOUNGE

Uvluv (Kilby Court) The Weekenders + Quiet Oaks (The State Room) see p. 38 Wild Nothing + Whitney (The Loading Dock)

RANDY'S RECORD SHOP


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

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| CITY WEEKLY |

46 | APRIL 28, 2016

TUESDAY 5.3

CONCERTS & CLUBS

JAMES MINCHIN

Marty Stuart’s The Fabulous Superlatives

Discovered in his early teens while photographing country music musicians, and subsequently deemed a country music prodigy by Americana legend Lester Flatt, Marty Stuart is now himself something of an icon. He’s released 17 albums since the 1970s, working in country, gospel and bluegrass, and continues to crank them out, including the most recent, 2014’s Saturday Night/Sunday Morning, came out on his own Superlatone label. In spite of his success, Stuart still maintains a fascination with chronicling country music in photos and even magazine articles and his own book, American Ballads. Expect to hear songs and stories from a man who knows country music inside and out. Our own local country luminaries, The Hollering Pines, open. (Randy Harward) The State Room, 638 S. State, 8 p.m., $48, TheStateRoomSLC.com

PINKY’S In an effort to be the best in Salt Lake’s brunch game, RYE has decided to focus our aim on the a.m. hours. Effective February 29th, RYE will be open Monday-Friday from 9am-2pm Saturday and Sunday from 9am-3pm. What this means for you: even more house-made breakfast and brunch specials, snappier service-same fresh, locally-sourced fixins. Come on in. www.ryeslc.com

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COMING SOON 5.4 Blaack Heat 5.5 8th Annual Beat Society 5.6 DUBWISE w/ Thelem 5.7 The Beatles Tribute Night 5.8 The Thermals 5.9 Blondi’s Salvation 5.10 The Range

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CONCERTS & CLUBS

CITY WEEKLY’S HOT LIST FOR THE WEEK

Karaoke with DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue on State)

WEDNESDAY 5.4

MONDAY 5.2

OPEN MIC, SESSION & PIANO LOUNGE

LIVE MUSIC

Violent Femmes + Jake Prebes (The Depot) see p. 36

TUESDAY 5.3 LIVE MUSIC

Marty Stuart’s The Fabulous Superlatives + The Hollering Pines (The State Room) see p. 46 The Relapse Symphony (The Loading Dock)

KARAOKE

Karaoke with DJ Thom (A Bar Named Sue on State)

Dueling Pianos (The Tavernacle)

LIVE MUSIC

Behemoth + Myrkur (The Complex) Coasts + Knox Hamilton + Symmetry (In The Venue) Conn and Rob Live Jazz Music (Maxwell’s) Jazz at the 90 (Club 90) Social Repose + Whitney Peyton (The Loading Dock) ZHU (The Depot) see p. 42

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APRIL 28, 2016 | 47


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48 | APRIL 28, 2016

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Š 2016

OK OK

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ACROSS

1. "Walk ____" (1964 Warwick hit) 2. Send to the canvas 3. Waikiki's island 4. Nautical measure 5. Requests 6. GWB successor 7. Any one of five in the Big Apple 8. Drink named after a Scottish hero

57. Super-duper 58. Spa class 60. "Bye for now," in textspeak 62. Bereft 63. Squeezed (out) 64. Some reproaches 66. Vexation 67. When doubled, a giggle

Last week’s answers

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

DOWN

9. "Modern Family" network 10. Series of Nintendo games 11. "I Wanna Love You" singer, 2006 12. Gas in signs 13. Boats like the one Noah built 18. "Call on me! Call on me!" 19. Sounds from pounds 24. Some boxing results, for short 26. "____ you one!" 27. Recipe amt. 28. California's San ____ County 29. Model T feature 31. Prefix with musicology 32. Some world leaders 33. "My heavens!" 35. Crunchy snacks 38. Sushi bar quaff 40. Court star Nadal, informally 42. Sherpa's herd 45. 1950s coup victim 47. Obviously happy people 50. "Wicked Tuna" airer 51. Digital book file extension 55. Geometry calculation 56. Hurdle for a wouldbe doc

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

1. "Enough, I get it!" (or what to look for in 17-, 30-, 49- and 65-Across) 5. E.g., e.g. 9. Brand owned by Whirlpool 14. Tandoori flatbread 15. Chase off 16. "Sweet Love" singer Anita 17. In whatever way possible 20. Minors 21. Neighbor of Wash. 22. Restful places 23. Like a comfy pillow 25. This and that 27. Starz alternative 30. Song involving body parts 34. "Roseanne" star 36. Wood problem 37. Know-it-alls? 39. Step up 41. Like a wallflower 43. Eleniak of "Baywatch" 44. Thing removed before signing 46. Arrest 48. Long, arduous walk 49. Swamp on the Georgia/Florida border whose name means "trembling earth" in Seminole 52. GPS heading 53. Irene of "Fame" 54. Drains, as energy 56. Rudolph of "SNL" 59. N.L. home run king until Mays surpassed him in 1966 61. "Business in the front, party in the back" haircut 65. Falsifying accounting records 68. Hot state 69. Scrutinizer 70. Like school for toddlers, in brief 71. Bait 72. World Cup chorus 73. Make ____ meet

SUDOKU

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50 | APRIL 28, 2016

CROSSWORD PUZZLE


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Sound and Vision

INSIDE /

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

usic lovers in Salt Lake City Michael Maccarrone and Pam Lancaster pride have a new record shop to themselves on owning a store with a laid-back vibe obsess over—Sound and and offering items at affordable prices. Vision Vinyl, opened by Michael Maccarrone and Pam Lancaster in of classic pieces [and pieces] all the way up 2015. Maccarrone describes the founding of to today.” Sound and Vision Vinyl as a love story spread Like Maccarrone, Lancaster is no stranger over decades. In 1980, he and Lancaster met to the music industry. From 1985 to 1991, she and fell in love in a punk-rock club in Long was the director of fashion and makeup for Island, N.Y. Over time, they drifted apart, MTV, where she did makeup for the likes of but reconnected on Facebook. Maccarrone David Bowie, Guns N’ Roses and The Cure. moved to Salt Lake City to be with Lancaster “We’ve spent our careers with rock stars,” in 2012. Maccarrone’s old boss in New York Lancaster says. “We want to pass those stowas eventually begging him to return to ries on to the next generation.” manage his previous record store. That’s Sound and Vision is a record collector’s when the couple began thinking of opening paradise—the perfect place for a novice their own shop in Salt Lake City. to learn about vinyl but also a comfortable Maccarrone is responsible for all the daily place for the seasoned, veteran collector. store operations. “Music and records have Maccarronne and Lancaster are both diebeen a major passion of mine since I was 3 hard David Bowie fans and named their or 4 years old,” Maccarrone says. Maccarstore after one of his songs. In addition to rone has managed 10 different record stores owners with impressive backgrounds in over the course of 30 years and is proud to music, the store boasts a vast collection of have created an “old school” record store in Beatles records and collectables for sale. Sound and Vision Vinyl. The store stocks new and used records, CDs, “When you walk in, you feel like you have music DVDs and various memorabilia. “If walked into your own home,” Maccarrone I don’t have something you are seeking in says. The store has a wide range of music stock, I can special-order it in stock typicalplaying from classics to obscure gems, and ly in seven to 10 days,” Maccarrone says. “If televisions showing video of rare footage you are a serious collector of specific bands, from concerts. I can assist you in the discovery of rarities “I love seeing fans find items they have for your collection.” n searched for, and also introducing a new artist to someone for the first time,” Maccarrone says. “Sound and Vision Vinyl allows me the chance to share what I have 3444 S. Main, Salt Lake City absorbed from my lifetime working in re385-229-4165 cord stores.” Monday-Saturday Co-owner Lancaster is just as excited 10 a.m.-7 p.m. about the record store. “I love turning SoundAndVisionVinyl.com young kids on to the beauty of vinyl,” she says. “We’re different because we have a lot

@CITYWEEKLY

The shop displays unique memorabilia, such as autographed album covers.

APRIL 28, 2016 | 51

Sound and Vision offers special collector’s items for sale.


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52 | APRIL 28, 2016

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Poets Corner

A GREAT HORNED OWL It’s marble eyes Fixed But surveying The small and frightened Tracking the lift of grass Bent in frenzy Of panic in motion Silent swooping Until his prey Reads his future In his captor’s eyes. Kathryn Deckert

Send your poem (max 15 lines), to: Poet’s Corner, City Weekly, 248 South Main Street, SLC, UT 84101 or e-mail to poetscorner@cityweekly.net.

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY B Y R O B

B R E Z S N Y

Go to RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

ARIES (March 21-April 19) The oracle I’m about to present may be controversial. It contains advice that most astrologers would never dare to offer an Aries. But I believe you are more receptive than usual to this challenge, and I am also convinced that you especially need it right now. Are you ready to be pushed further than I have ever pushed you? Study this quote from novelist Mark Z. Danielewski: “Passion has little to do with euphoria and everything to do with patience. It is not about feeling good. It is about endurance. Like patience, passion comes from the same Latin root: pati.” TAURUS (April 20-May 20) You’re in a phase of your cycle when you’ll be rewarded for your freshness and originality. The more you cultivate a “beginner’s mind,” the smarter you will be. What you want will become more possible to the degree that you shed everything you think you know about what you want. As the artist Henri Matisse said, if a truly creative painter hopes to paint a rose, he or she “first has to forget all the roses that were ever painted.” What would be the equivalent type of forgetting in your own life? GEMINI (May 21-June 20) “Am I still a hero if the only person I save is myself?” asks poet B. Damani. If you posed that question to me right now, I would reply, “Yes, Gemini. You are still a hero if the only person you save is yourself.” If you asked me to elaborate, I’d say, “In fact, saving yourself is the only way you can be a hero right now. You can’t rescue or fix or rehabilitate anyone else unless and until you can rescue and fix and rehabilitate yourself.” If you pushed me to provide you with a hint about how you should approach this challenge, I’d be bold and finish with a flourish: “Now I dare you to be the kind of hero you have always feared was beyond your capacity.”

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SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) “We have to learn how to live with our frailties,” poet Stanley Kunitz told The Paris Review. “The best people I know are inadequate and unashamed.” That’s the keynote I hope you will adopt in the coming weeks. No matter how strong and capable you are, no matter how hard you try to be your best, there are ways you fall short of perfection. And now is a special phase of your astrological cycle when you can learn a lot about how to feel at peace with that fact. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) How do plants reproduce? They generate seeds that are designed to travel. Dandelion and orchid seeds are so light they can drift long distances through the air. Milkweed seeds are a bit heavier, but are easily carried by the wind. Foxglove and sycamore seeds are so buoyant they can float on flowing water. Birds and other animals serve as transportation for burdock seeds, which hook onto feather and fur. Fruit seeds may be eaten by animals and later excreted, fully intact, far from their original homes. I hope this meditation stimulates you to think creatively about dispersing your own metaphorical seeds, Capricorn. It’s time for you to vividly express your essence, make your mark, spread your influence. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) “It is a fault to wish to be understood before we have made ourselves clear to ourselves,” said philosopher Simone Weil. I hope that prod makes you feel a bit uncomfortable, Aquarius. I hope it motivates you to get busy investigating some of your vague ideas and fuzzy self-images and confused intentions. It will soon be high time for you to ask for more empathy and acknowledgment from those whose opinions matter to you. You’re overdue to be more appreciated, to be seen for who you really are. But before any of that good stuff can happen, you will have to engage in a flurry of introspection. You’ve got to clarify and deepen your relationship with yourself. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) “I have never let my schooling interfere with my education,” said writer Mark Twain. That’s excellent advice for you to apply and explore in the coming weeks. Much of the time, the knowledge you have accumulated and the skills you have developed are supreme assets. But for the immediate future, they could obstruct you from learning the lessons you need most. For instance, they might trick you into thinking you are smarter than you really are. Or they could cause you to miss simple and seemingly obvious truths that your sophisticated perspective is too proud to notice. Be a humble student, my dear.

APRIL 28, 2016 | 53

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) “Show me a man who isn’t a slave,” wrote the Roman philosopher Seneca. “One is a slave to sex, another to money, another to ambition; all are slaves to hope or fear.” Commenting on Seneca’s thought, blogger Ryan Holiday says, “I’m disappointed in my enslavement to self-doubt, to my resentment toward those whom I dislike, to the power that the favor and approval of certain people hold over me.” What about you, Virgo? Are there any emotional states or bedeviling thoughts or addictive desires that you’re a slave to? The coming weeks will be a favorable time to emancipate yourself. As you do, remember this: There’s a difference between being compulsively driven by a delusion and lovingly devoted to a worthy goal.

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LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) I watched a video of a helicopter pilot as he descended from the sky and tried to land his vehicle on the small deck of a Danish ship patrolling the North Sea. The weather was blustery and the seas were choppy. The task looked at best strenuous, at worst impossible. The pilot hovered patiently as the ship pitched wildly. Finally, there was a brief calm, and he seized on that moment to settle down safely. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you may have a metaphorically similar challenge in the coming days. To be successful, all you have to do is be alert for the brief calm, and then act with swift, relaxed decisiveness.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) “Zugzwang” is a German-derived word used in chess and other games. It refers to a predicament in which a player cannot possibly make a good move. Every available option will weaken his or her position. I propose that we coin a new word that means the opposite of zugzwang: “zugfrei,” which shall hereafter signify a situation in which every choice you have in front of you is a positive or constructive one; you cannot make a wrong move. I think this captures the essence of the coming days for you, Scorpio.

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CANCER (June 21-July 22) “We need people in our lives with whom we can be as open as possible,” declares psychotherapist Thomas Moore. I agree. Our mental health thrives when we can have candid conversations with free spirits who don’t censor themselves and don’t expect us to water down what we say. This is always true, of course, but it will be an absolute necessity for you in the coming weeks. So I suggest that you do everything you can to put yourself in the company of curious minds that love to hear and tell the truth. Look for opportunities to express yourself with extra clarity and depth. “To have real conversations with people may seem like such a simple, obvious suggestion,” says Moore, “but it involves courage and risk.”

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) “Everyone who has ever built a new heaven first found the power to do so in his own hell.” That noble truth was uttered by Libran philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche, and I bet it will be especially meaningful for most of you during the rest of 2016. The bad news is that, in the past few months, you’ve had to reconnoiter your own hell a little more than you would have liked, even if it has been pretty damn interesting. The good news is that these explorations will soon be winding down. The fantastic news is that you are already getting glimpses of how to use what you’ve been learning. You’ll be well-prepared when the time comes to start constructing a new heaven.

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54 | APRIL 28, 2016

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e went to the season-opening game of the Salt Lake Bees a few weeks ago. I so love our city’s baseball stadium. The views of the Wasatch Range from the seats are enhanced by the red dirt of the mound and the perfectly groomed grass on the field. It’s about the best damned fun anyone can have for a really great price. Best of all, if you get your tickets from Smith’s Tix for Monday night games, you only pay $5 for great seats and a darned good hot dog, too. I was thinking to myself, “What else will $5 buy you around this town?” Megaplex Theaters have $5 Tuesdays at any of their theaters. Actually, many movie chains offer weekday specials, so just Google “movie deals” and I’m sure you’ll find some near you. If you get 15 of your friends together, you can jump to your heart’s delight at the Wairhouse Trampoline Park (3653 S. 500 West, Salt Lake City, 801-266-5867, TheWairhouse.com). Kids at the AIRena there (1-6 years old) can jump for $5 per hour on weekdays. They have several other good deals, too. What you really might want to take advantage of is getting advance tickets to the Twilight Concert Series this summer (TwilightConcerts.com). Folks often don’t remember that they can purchase tickets ahead of time, especially when there are bands in the lineup that they don’t want to see. It looks like there could be some sellouts this summer, so plan accordingly. Need a staycation? Travel outside of the capital city and pay $25 per vehicle for a seven-day pass to Arches National Park just outside of Moab; Zion National Park or Bryce Canyon is $30 per vehicle. Or, for a closer adventure, plan a trip to Lagoon for $53.95 for adults or $38.50 for kids. Staycations are so much more affordable than out-of-state adventures. A one-day adult ticket to Disneyland or California Adventure in Anaheim starts at $95. Tickets for the Magic Kingdom park in Florida start at $105, and Epcot, Disney’s Hollywood Studios or Disney’s Animal Kingdom Park (also in Florida) start at $97. If you’re a roller-coaster freak, Cedar Point in Sandusky, Ohio, has 18 coasters and is a deal at $65 per person (or $45 online). If you’re headed to the Big Apple, know that a visit to the Empire State Building starts at $32 for adults, and the Statue of Liberty starts at $18. Legoland California starts at $111, while the one in Florida starts at $69. We do live in one of the most beautiful states in the country. The splendor of our mountains, deserts and waterways is always free. Get out and enjoy! n

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Profile for Copperfield Publishing

City Weekly April 28, 2016  

Billionaire Saves Paper!

City Weekly April 28, 2016  

Billionaire Saves Paper!