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Instapooch

How One woman is changing the lives

of shelter dogs a snap at a time By Dawn McBride


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CWCONTENTS COVER STORY INSTAPOOCH

Homeless pets are more popular on social media than you’ll ever be, so put that selfie stick down and return your lips to their upright position. Cover photo by Guinnevere Shuster; design by Mason Rodrickc

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With dreamy brown eyes and a personality to match, 2-year-old Storm is one of many pets that have gotten the red carpet treatment from the subject of this week’s cover story, Guinnevere Shuster. Check out more of Shuster’s work on the Humane Society of Utah’s social media channels and in the upcoming book, Shelter Dogs in a Photo Booth.

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LETTERS Only Socialism Can Save Us

In 2008, I supported Barack Obama. I still get goosebumps when I watch the famous speech where he exclaimed that there is no white America or black America, no Latino nor Asian America. There is only the United States of America. Eight years later, Obama has deported more immigrants than Bush. He didn’t close Guantanamo Bay. He spied on us. He dropped bombs via drones on countless fathers, mothers and children. His crown achievement, Obamacare, is filled with concessions to insurance companies. We are poorer and working harder than ever before. If you are a Millennial entering the job market or a senior getting ready for retirement, the future has never looked bleaker. Sure, we can’t lay all the blame on Obama; he did have to deal with an obstructionist Congress. Obama probably would have liked to leave a more progressive legacy. But that just underscores my point: We cannot rely on Obama or Clinton. We need to build a left political alternative to the corporate politics of the Democratic Party establishment. Socialism offers key insights about society that corporate politicians like Obama or Clinton don’t understand. Contrary to Obama’s analysis, we don’t all want the same America. There are people that profit from the system as is. A more fair and egalitarian world would see their privileges lost. There is a conflict between those who profit from this increasingly unequal society and those who want society to become fairer.

WRITE US: Salt Lake City Weekly, 248 S. Main, Salt Lake City, UT 84101. Email: comments@cityweekly.net. Fax: 801-575-6106. We reserve the right to edit for length and clarity. Preference will be given to letters that are 300 words or less and sent uniquely to City Weekly. Full name, address and phone number must be included, even on emailed submissions, for verification purposes. As socialists, we understand the need to expose that conflict. The Bernie Sanders campaign understands that the problem is money and the billionaire class that controls it. The problem is capitalism! Bernie isn’t afraid to say it—any politics that has any chance of cutting through the noise and confusion that the billion-dollar media machine creates needs to have that clear, socialist message. A political revolution is needed, but one politician isn’t a revolution. We need a broad socialist movement pushing a bold agenda and not afraid to say our current system is run by greed. It is run by capitalism—only socialism can save us. Socialist Alternative is the group that elected Kshama Sawant in Seattle. She is a socialist, and completely independent of the Democratic Party and all the corporate cash that goes along with that. Socialist Alternative has started a branch here in Utah. The massive Bernie vote during the caucus shows there is a huge hunger for a more progressive politics right here in Utah. Join Socialist Alternative and help build the movement to create a fair and equal world.

me want to throw up. Don’t get too upset—I’m not done yet. From the letter to the editor, “A Crime Against Humanity,” [March 17, City Weekly], Manuel Ybarra Jr. suggests we all dumb down and face the fact that we can’t think for ourselves, and let God take care of it. Remember the saying: “God helps those who help themselves”? In Ybarra’s doomsday world, we’ve all gone to hell. A person like Ybarra must have completely forgotten history where there have been plenty of atrocities committed in the name of God. It’s people like Ybarra who, without taking a long look on the other side, have shown throughout history the ignorance of humanity. When it comes to Roe v. Wade, they got it right the first time. And that means to me the very essence of the term: “The will of the people.” And they continue to still get it right, with their ruling on same-sex marriage. Somebody needs to wake up, Mr. Ybarra.

MARK HURST Murray

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A Gripe Against Stupidity

Many things are going wrong in America when a nation demands a man’s word, then follows God’s word only. It makes

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I Got “Berned”

Let me start off by saying that I am no political party loyalist. In the past few election cycles I have made financial donations and have volunteered hours to assist both Republicans and Democrats in Utah. My support is based entirely on my own intellectual analysis of a particular race, the results I believe a candidate is capable of, and how much sleep I’ve gotten the night before any of them have called me. I’ve never been to any national political convention, so when I saw the opening to become a delegate and attend the Democratic National Party Convention, I thought this could really be fun. So I signed up to be a delegate for Bernie Sanders. To win, one must campaign by sending emails to around 1,700 State delegates on a Democratic Party list. How hard could it be? This is a summary of my pitch: On Friday, April 22, you will vote to nominate the delegates in the same proportion as the primary vote results. Twenty-seven will go to Bernie Sanders and six will go to Hillary Clinton. I think Bernie will be extremely impressed if you choose me, because: n Bernie Sanders was born in Brooklyn 74 years ago. I was born in Brooklyn 74 years ago, too. n Bernie is Jewish, just like me, and he became Bar Mitzvah in 1954—just 3 months before me. n Bernie went to Brooklyn College from 1959 to 1960, same as me (but, in full disclosure, he left for University of Chicago after one year, while I finished up at Brooklyn). n Bernie has been a progressive most of his life, sometimes as a Democrat and sometimes as an independent. OMG, that’s exactly the same as me, too. n I relate to Bernie more than anyone else in Utah. In the early ’70s, while Bernie was just getting started in politics, one of our Democratic Party’s greatest heroes (also from Brooklyn and in Congress at the time) staged an unprecedented run for

B Y S TA N R O S E N Z W E I G

president as a women’s-rights and minority-rights candidate. That great Democratic hero was Rep. Shirley Chisolm. n So, here’s the bottom line. Several of us are offering to go to Philadelphia to cast symbolic votes that have already been locked in at our Utah primary. To make your choice more meaningful, elect the only delegate Bernie Sanders will get a big warm chuckle out of. It’s easy. You already voted for one semi-aged, Brooklyn-born, Jewish, independent-minded progressive when you voted for Bernie. How cool will it be when you do it again by voting for Stan? The response to my email pitch was, to paraphrase a candidate from another party, huge. One reply was, “As a very, very proud native New Yorker, son of a Brooklynite, and progressive, I’m happy to be able to give you my support.” There were more like that. Then things went sour. The next day, I had to send a more somber email and explain that the state Democratic Party advised me that campaigns are allowed to “not approve” any potential candidate for any reason and the Utah Sanders campaign did not want me to run. Why? I asked. Did the Utah Sanders campaign not like my email? The only things they know about me are that I am old, Jewish and come from Brooklyn, just like Bernie. In my second email, I continued, “I’m not into conspiracy theories, but what if they have a few campaign volunteers they would like to ensure get chosen to go to Philadelphia, without the nastiness of a democratic election? I suppose they might simply “not approve” anyone who is in the way. I can’t believe they would be so undemocratic. It sure would be nice to have a little transparency, though … I really do thank those of you who have shown support, so quickly, in your replies.” Now that I was an underdog, support was even more “huge.” An Eastern transplant

6 | APRIL 14, 2016

simply wrote, “WTF?” Other responses were “I never heard of anything like this,” “Wow, this all seems crazy,” “As a state delegate and somebody who is also running to become a national delegate for Bernie Sanders, I’m really concerned about the way you’ve been treated by the party” and “the whole situation reeks of insider politics—the very kind of thing that is corrupting our democracy and has led so many of us to be inspired by Bernie to become supporters of his ideas.” Many were surprised at this flagrant Utah Sanders campaign play to prohibit 1,700 voting delegates their choice to vote yea or nay. Utah members of the Sanders campaign seemed not to honor the democratic process they all fight for. Following a warm exchange between me and the 1,700, or so, state delegates, there were nice, respectful emails and phone calls from state party people. Chairman Peter Corroon phoned and gave me an appreciated virtual hug. Soon after, state party Executive Director Lauren Littlefield and I hugged in person, so we are all good. But, allowing unelected candidatecampaigner folks to strip lawful candidates from election ballots denies qualified voters their franchise, which fosters corruption. In Utah, some Berniacs have debased Bernie Sanders even more by throwing actual projectiles at State Rep. Patrice Arent for exercising her right to follow the rules and talk about it publicly. Then they use that same rule book they rail against to kick one of their own supporters in the butt. Are they misusing passion to destroy their own principles? Well, if it walks like a duck … CW

THE ONLY THINGS THEY KNOW ABOUT ME ARE THAT I AM OLD, JEWISH AND COME FROM BROOKLYN.

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OPINION

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STAFF BOX

Readers can comment at cityweekly.net

Do you see yourself being more involved in this presidential election versus previous ones? How so? Scott Renshaw: Absolutely more involved. I’m muting people in my Facebook and Twitter feeds at an unprecedented rate. Mason Rodrickc: I made a decision recently, to pursue writing an absurdist news column in an alt-weekly with my partner, I have never stayed up so late reading about politics in my life. This week we wrote about dogs (p. 14), such a sweet reprieve.

Jeremiah Smith: I have voted in every presidential race and primary since I was 18. I think I have been as involved in this one as all the previous elections. I expect more of this one than ones past.

Mikey Saltas: Yes. What absolutely baffles me is the HRC paying for attack ads against Drumpf. It isn’t even May yet. Respect your competition, the Dem. nomination isn’t a gimme.

Enrique Limón: I’ve participated in every election since I’ve been of age; though, I gotta say, I’ve never been this captivated by supporters’ fashions. Stephen Dark: As a legal alien—whatever that means—my impression of this election thus far has been akin to a sweat y-palmed voyeur watching with growing disbelief as the innate corruption in the political process finally gave way to the monsters we see before us. After 10 years of listening to candidates shout empty-headed platitudes at each other while taking mind-numbingly entrenched, partisan positions on every issue, there’s a tragic sense of logical evolution with the highstakes farce now playing out before us.


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Rape Culture?

How ironic is it that the professor who calls for exhaustive rape kit tests in Utah is from BYU—the very university whose honor code would appear to be encouraging rape culture? An article by Zachary Volkert in the Inquisitr questioned the wisdom behind a code that subjects the victim to a full investigation—just in case that person may have violated some other aspect of the code before the rape. A speech by Associate Dean Sarah Westerberg at a rape-awareness conference applauded the code, setting off negative reactions that concluded that BYU’s rape culture was “alive and well.” The story included a video of LDS authority Tad R. Callister saying “most women get the type of man they dress for” shot in 2013. Another video talked of a campus movement, “Free BYU,” to revise the honor code. Meanwhile, a study by BYU professor Julie Valentine showed that only 22 percent of rape kits had been tested, and a report in The Salt Lake Tribune says there are ample resources for that testing.

Nipping Nepotism

Utahns are familiar with the argument against ethics rules: the trust-us, you-can’tavoid-conflicts, we-know-best line of reasoning. In 2007, Draper City enacted an ethics ordinance that ostensibly took the state ethics rules a step further. “(The ordinance) will alleviate public perception that we as public officials would take advantage of our position,” the City Councilman Bill Colbert said in a Deseret News article. Then, this year, the council proposed easing the anti-nepotism law so that the city could hire family members of appointed and elected officials. A public uproar convinced the council to pull back. Three council members who wanted hiring restrictions lifted changed their minds, and the council was unanimous in supporting the anti-nepotism law, according to The Salt Lake Tribune. One resident said such a change would make the council look like “stereotypical corrupt politicians.”

City vs. State

Salt Lake City is positioning itself, once again, against things the state of Utah holds dear. Of course, that means money and business interests. In a press release from Mayor Jackie Biskupski, the city joined 53 others nationwide in supporting President Obama’s Clean Power Plan. The National League of Cities and the U.S. Conference of Mayors also signed the amicus brief. The state, however, joined a lawsuit to block the Environmental Protection Agency rules, according to a KUER Radio report. And, of course, the state’s congressional delegation is all about opposing the EPA. With state support for coal, this surprises no one. So, once again, thanks Obama.

Geoff Griffin—a regular City Weekly freelance contributor—has just published his first work of fiction, Brooklyn Bat Boy. It’s the story of Jackie Robinson’s 1947 rookie season with the Brooklyn Dodgers, through the eyes of Bobby Kelly, a 12-year-old fan observing the struggles of Major League Baseball’s first African-American player from up close. Griffin will read from and sign the book April 15 at The King’s English Bookshop (1511 S. 1500 East, Salt Lake City, 801-484-9100, KingsEnglish.com) at 7 p.m.

What was the inspiration for telling the Jackie Robinson story in a fictionalized form aimed at kids?

I have a background as a sportswriter, and I also teach elementary school. I thought it would be fun to write a sports book for kids, and … the most important figure in American sports history is Jackie Robinson. I felt there were so many great lessons kids could learn from Robinson’s story. It’s got good triumphing over evil, a hero and, best of all, baseball.

How is it to tell a period-piece story while still hoping to engage young readers?

I tried to make it fun by throwing in scenes where Bobby is playing stickball with his friends, sneaking into Ebbets Field in Brooklyn, N.Y., and getting into other mischief. I also used a lot of slang from 1940s New York. … We even put a glossary in the back. Hopefully, when kids are done with the book, they know the difference between a “knucklehead” and a “knuckle sandwich.”

Are incidents involving Robinson’s interactions with teammates and opposing players more historical than fictional?

A lot of that is very history-based. There were a couple of times where I did need to alter things a bit. There’s a famous [incident] where Robinson is getting heckled on the road, and Pee Wee Reese comes and puts his arm around him and everything goes quiet. I switched that to having it happen at Ebbets Field, so Bobby can see it.

What’s the most interesting thing you learned while researching that you hadn’t known before?

When we look back on the 1947 season, it seems obvious that things would work out the way they did: Baseball would become integrated, Robinson would become a Hall-ofFamer, etc. In researching how things actually unfolded that season, it’s amazing that it all worked out. There were so many times that things could have gone horribly off the rails. [Dodgers owner] Branch Rickey was a visionary, and Jackie Robinson was a genuine American hero for doing what he did.

—SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net


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STRAIGHT DOPE Jury Pay I was impaneled as a juror in a civil case. For this privilege, I got paid a whopping $5 per day—which, if that wasn’t insulting enough, is considered taxable income. OK, New Jersey is on the low end of juror pay. In Maryland, jurors get a whole $10.50 per day. Why is jury pay so low? —David Weintraub

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Heck, at least you showed up. One study found that 80 percent of prospective jurors in Dallas County, Texas, simply ignored their summons altogether. And who can blame them? I don’t know your specific economic situation, David, but I can think of a lot of people for whom jury duty’s not merely a petty hassle but an unaffordable luxury. I think there’s a clear case to be made that any jury system that requires folks to work for 5 bucks a day isn’t just annoying, it’s plainly undemocratic. But let’s back up. Just how bad is this problem? Well, take federal jurors. In 1968, they could expect to haul in $20 a day, or $136 in 2016 dollars. The actual dollars we pay federal jurors in 2016, however? Only $40 a day, $50 if their term of service stretches past 10 days—in other words, just short of the federal minimum wage for a day’s work. (Federal workers, we’ll note, have it good—they get paid their regular salary, in lieu of the usual compensation, to sit on a jury.) Outside the federal system, things are pretty patchwork—some states set the rate, and if they don’t, the counties do. Nationwide, pay generally doesn’t exceed $50 per day and, as your experience illustrates, is often much lower: as one observer crisply pointed out, “Some counties in South Carolina … pay jurors minimum wage for an eight-hour workday—as of 1938.” That amounts, by the by, to 2 bucks a day. In some states, rates improve the longer you sit on the jury: Pennsylvania, for instance, pays $9 for each of the first three days and $25 daily thereafter. You might get lucky and receive compensation for travel, but on the other hand, you might have to pay for parking: I give you Mobile, Ala., where jurors hearing cases at the county courthouse take home a whopping $10 per diem, plus five cents a mile driven there and back, less the $2 (the special jurors’ rate!) they’re pretty much forced to put down to leave their car in the parking lot. (OK, Alabama employers are required to pay full-time workers for the days they serve on juries, but that’s little help to those Alabamans who lack the security of a full-time job.) And of course there are more invisible costs too, like child care (Colorado and Minnesota do make some provisions for this), canceled vacation plans, etc. As I suggested up top, the implications of this pay regime are pretty brutal. Let’s say a person who makes minimum wage (in one of the 40 or so states without laws like Alabama’s) is forced to skip work at her full-time

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job to serve 10 days on a jury, for which she might take home, say, $100—we’re looking at a financial disaster. That’s why most states allow for hardship exceptions, if potential jurors can prove their service would be an undue burden. In one sense the exception seems merciful. Viewed another way, though, it’s downright unconstitutional: Someone’s getting excluded from meaningful participation in the American democratic system simply because she can’t afford it— which may well, according to a 2015 article in the Cornell Journal of Law and Public Policy, violate the equal protection clause of the 14th Amendment. Another paper, from the Columbia Journal of Law and Social Problems in 2012, argues that because most states link voter registration with jury service, jury duty basically constitutes a poll tax: it’s effectively a fee for casting a ballot. Citizens know they’ll be put on a jury list if they register to vote; some know they can’t afford to miss work to sit on a jury; therefore, they don’t register and subsequently can’t vote. The paper estimates that up to 7 percent of American citizens are thus disenfranchised and proposes official sources other than voter rolls—tax or DMV records, for instance—from which potential jurors’ names could be culled. Of course, that wouldn’t address the problem that juror pay is too low to begin with, or explain the root cause. I don’t think the reason for this execrable set of affairs is particularly mysterious. You might as well ask: Why are the country’s highways and bridges falling apart? What’s the reason for rising maternal mortality rates, or growing hunger and homelessness in major cities? What you’re seeing is the result of austerity and misplaced political priorities. In Minnesota, juror pay has actually been cut twice since 2003 due to tight state finances; last year, the governor proposed an increase, but his plan didn’t make it into the final budget approved by the Legislature. Thus, did the state’s pay rate for jurors remain at a paltry $10 a day. But hey, it’s a crumbling empire, man. What did you expect? n

Editor’s note: In Utah, the federal court rate is $40 per day; state district courts pay $18.50 for the first day and $49 per day thereafter, and the per diem pay for Salt Lake County Justice Court is $18.50. Send questions to Cecil via StraightDope. com or write him c/o Chicago Reader, 350 N. Orleans, Chicago 60654.


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Boat Rockers

POLITICS

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NEWS

”There’s never anything new or exciting about it that really reaches out and inspires more people to get involved.” -UPCU challenger Darin Mann

Democratic Party struggles to bridge gap between Sanders supporters and the establishment. BY ERIC ETHINGTON eethington@cityweekly.net @EricEthington

T

here’s a saying: “Be careful what you wish for, because it might come true.” Utah Democrats have been hoping for a massive voter turnout for decades, a key to turning the tide on their superminority status. That wish may have been granted with the recordhigh turnout at the March 22 presidential caucus. But with at least 25 percent of the vote coming from first-time caucusgoers—primarily younger voters inspired by the campaign of Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders—a rift is growing between the new voters the party desperately needs, and an establishment that may not want the changes these voters are seeking. “It’s been 40 years since Utah Democrats held a majority in either the Utah House of Representative or the Utah Senate. If that is ever to change,” says Jason Williams, a longtime Cache County-based political strategist. “It would take a substantial and consistent turnout of Democratic-leaning voters, particularly young and minority voters.” But in a state with one of the worst voter-participation rates in the country, that challenge has been difficult to mount—at least, until this year, when the draw came from an inspiring national candidate. According to Democratic Party political director T.J. Ellerbeck, more than 80,000 voters turned out to their neighborhood caucuses, often waiting in hourslong lines to cast their vote for either Hillary Clinton or Bernie Sanders. That number dwarfs the 10,000 to 15,000 in 2014, and the 15,000 to 20,000 who showed up in 2012 (during the last presidential election). When the dust settled, Sanders received more than 77 percent of the vote. That’s when the issues started. According to the party’s estimates, at least 20,000 of those voters were firsttime participants, and most were drawn in by Sanders’ unapologetic message of income equality, higher taxes on the wealthy, impacts of climate change, and strong social and welfare programs. Many voters were new to the process, and few understood the com-

Crowds gathered at This is the Place Heritage Park on March 18 to hear Bernie Sanders speak. plex politics behind the delegate-allotment process. That’s why many Democratic voters were appalled to find out that while the regular pledged delegates were divided among Sanders and Clinton proportional to the vote, the majority of Utah’s elected Democrats support Clinton, and half of the state’s four superdelegates would be supporting the former secretary of state as well. That feeling of exclusion has carried through to neighborhood community meetings and party gatherings, where new progressive voters say they feel like they’re being looked down upon by the more established party officials, candidates and supporters. Even on Facebook, it’s not uncommon to see established party figures, responding to the strong concerns of Bernie supporters, saying Sanders’ comments are “destructive,” “ignorant,” “poisonous,” and “they should just go start their own party.” Many Sanders supporters have responded in kind, and conversations, particularly those on social media, have quickly devolved into ugly name calling. But that still leaves the Democratic Party with a big question: How do they keep the tens of thousands of voters who showed up last month on caucus night activated, engaged and voting for Democrats? Out of the wave of support for a more progressive approach to politics in Utah has come the United Progressive Coalition of Utah, which put forward eight candidates seeking to carry Sanders’ progressive message in the Legislature. Three of those eight are challenging sitting Democratic House Reps. Rebecca Chavez-Houck, Carol Spackman Moss and Lynn Hemingway. City Weekly sat down with the respective UPCU challengers Darin Mann, Aubrey Lucas and Alexis Hall and the first

thing each said was they don’t see themselves as running against the incumbent Democrats. “I really don’t look at it like that,” Lucas says, noting that she and Spackman Moss agree on many things. “But in 16 years in office, [Spackman Moss] has never run a contested race, and I feel like now is the time for my generation to step up and have a voice,” she says. Mann agrees, saying those three incumbent Democrats “deserve all the credit in the world, because they’ve been fighting really hard as the minority. I don’t think inner-party challenges hurt the party, in fact they’re critical to keeping us moving forward.” Lauren Littlefield, executive director of the Utah Democratic Party, concurs. “We have no problem with [inner-party challenges,]” she says. “We want people to get involved in the process in whatever way they feel comfortable doing so.” But the challengers are worried—not that they would lose their races, which each subsequently did at the April 9 Salt Lake County Democratic Party Convention—but that the response to their candidacies and the wariness is flowing from party regulars is going to keep new voters home in November. “That’s what people who don’t live in the world of politics think of it,” Lucas says. “It just looks like ‘we’re the establishment and we’ve got it—so step aside.’” Alexis Hall adds, “People notice when, every time I go to a community event, someone introduces me as ‘the young girl who’s running against Lynn Hemingway.’” Many longtime Democrats have now begun encouraging a message of party-building, asking new voters to support the party no matter what and to just vote Democrat in November. That draws a sigh from Mann, who says, “There’s a reason there are so many thousands of people who haven’t shown

up for the party before. It’s not about loyalty to a party, and the party-building argument just isn’t effective. When you operate like that ... people get tired of the status quo, because it’s always the same. There’s never anything new or exciting about it that really reaches out and inspires more people to get involved.” That sentiment was reflected at the convention, as delegates overwhelmingly passed a nonbinding resolution encouraging all four of Utah’s superdelegates to support Sanders at the Democratic National Convention this July in Philadelphia. Littlefield says having these new voters stay home on Election Day because of dissatisfaction with party politics “is a real concern,” but she’s confident the party will find a way to bring them in and mobilize them. “We don’t know how we’re going to do it yet,” Littlefield says, “but we’ve got to show the thousands of new voters that it’s not just about the presidential race, but that we need them involved in the congressional races and in the state House and Senate races, too.” It’s been seven years since Utah Democrats have increased their numbers by even one seat in either the House or the Senate. “If that’s going to change this year,” Williams says, “the bridge between new voters looking for a wholesale rebranding of the Utah Democratic Party as an aggressively progressive voice, and the party establishment that isn’t necessarily looking to be that voice in deep-red Utah, is going to have to be bridged somehow—and sooner rather than later.” CW


T R A N SPA R E N C Y NEWS Let’s GRAMA Do It Mang The state’s record committee agenda swells with appeals for public documents. BY COLBY FRAZIER cfrazier@cityweekly.net @ColbyFrazierLP

I

proprietary. Woven into Frankel’s appeal is another possible reason why the records committee is seeing the number of appeals swell. A debt schedule detailing how public money is going to be paid back is a distant cry from a records request seeking a cache of emails from a governor. While Frankel says he doesn’t follow all of the ins and outs of GRAMA, he says that having to go to the appeals committee for basic public documents that detail how public money is to be spent is becoming more routine. “We’re having to go to the GRAMA appeals board for a debt schedule. That says it all,” Frankel says. “Can you imagine going into a bank and asking to see a copy of your mortgage payments and them saying to you: ‘Your mortgage payments that you’re going to have to make in the future are secret?’” While the number of appeals has risen steeply in recent years, it is unclear if it is due in part to an across-the-board rise in GRAMA requests. There is no statewide tabulation of the total number of GRAMA requests filed. Of the 108 notice of appeals filed in 2015 with the records committee, 19 cases were resolved through mediation, while the committee ruled favorably for another 11 appellants. Since the creation of the records ombudsman, appeals that make it before the records committee appear to have a slim chance of succeeding. Twenty appeals were denied in 2015, compared to 11 in 2011. The numbers also show that more of those who are denied at the records committee take it a step further to district court. In 2011, no appeals went to court, while in 2015, 11 cases found their way before a judge. CW

September 26-October 5, 2016

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Don’t waste time and money planning on your own. We know the language and know what to see and what to skip Email: JBriggs@cityweekly.net to reserve your spot!

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n this electronic era of human life, where vast amounts of information can be held in a pocket, one governmental agency tasked with weighing the desire for privacy against the necessity for transparency has been busy. Over the past five years, the Utah Public Records Committee has seen the number of appeals it handles increase by 42 percent. And in 2015, the committee saw the largest single-year spike in appeals since the Government Records Access and Management Act (GRAMA) was born in 1992, with 108 notices of appeal filed—a 33-percent jump from 2014. So far, in 2016, the committee, which is overseen by the Utah Division of Archives and Records Service, is on track for another

record-breaking year. “It’s going up,” says Patricia SmithMansfield, the state archivist and the chair of the records committee. “I also know that for this point in April, we’re higher than last year. We are increasing in the number of appeals and appeals requests as well.” Why the increase in appeals, Smith-Mansfield says, is difficult to say. But she suspects a number of factors are contributing. Appeals heard by the committee have climbed steadily since 2012, when Sen. Curtis Bramble, RProvo, made a couple of tweaks to GRAMA. Through Senate Bill 177, Bramble created the position of records ombudsman—a single person—Rosemary Cundiff, who organizes mediation sessions between various parties and also assists anyone with questions about the appeals process and GRAMA. Smith-Mansfield says Bramble’s bill also expanded the scope of appeals that can be heard by the records committee. Prior to 2012, Smith-Mansfield says municipalities and other nonstate agencies had the option of setting up their own appeals board. In places where this occurred, a person requesting public documents would first ask for records from the city, appeal a denial to the city’s chief administrative officer and then appeal that denial to the city’s records committee. If a municipality’s records committee also issued a denial, the next step in some cities was district court, not the state records committee. Now, all seekers of records can appeal to

the state records committee before going to court. Another important development, SmithMansfield says, is the widespread use of text messaging and email. Where public employees once had to pound out correspondence on a typewriter—a fairly deliberate process compared to sending a quick email—government workers are now texting and sending massive troves of electronic correspondence. When requests for emails and texts arrive on the desks of government officials, Smith-Mansfield says fulfilling the requests can get complicated because bits of emails might be private, or at least need to be reviewed to ensure they are not private. “While correspondence is generally public, it might have things that are protected or private,” Smith-Mansfield says. “So it’s not as straightforward. It’s much more complicated.” Regardless of whether there are multiple appeals being heard or just a couple, a date with the records committee is typically a fascinating way to spend an afternoon. Today’s meeting is no different, with eight appeals being heard. Among them is an appeal by the Utah Rivers Council, which sought and was denied a debt schedule for the billion-dollar Lake Powell Pipeline from the Washington County Water Conservancy District. Zach Frankel, executive director of the Rivers Council, says the water district has claimed in media reports that it is has a debt schedule to pay for the Lake Powell Pipeline. Frankel says his organization would like to see the debt schedule, but the water district has balked, saying the document is


CITIZEN REVOLT

THE

NUEVE

In a week, you can

CHANGE THE WORLD

THE LIST OF NINE

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@MRodrickc

CHECK OUT ALL OF OUR EVENT PHOTOS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET/PHOTOS

ADVENTURE + GEAR EXPO 4.8-4.9

Utah is Ted Cruz country, and in his world, Muslim Syrian refugees would be banned. Utahns, however, have a chance to learn the truth about the refugees Utah hosts now, and what others might offer. Are they a net drain or net benefit to the economy and life of the state? The Utah Fulbright Association presents Contributions of Utah’s Refugees, a panel discussion of refugee issues here. Representatives from four agencies will discuss the contributions that Utah’s refugees make to the life of the state and the challenges the agencies have in helping these new arrivals integrate into the life of the state. Westminster College, Malouf Hall, Room 201, 1840 S. 1300 East, Salt Lake City, 801-583-1227 (Robert Shaw), Wednesday, April 20, 7-8:30 p.m., free and open to the public

CREATIVE WORKSHOP

Having a child with Down Syndrome can be fulfilling and joyful. A creative community project called Jump Start focuses on individuals (ages 8 and older) with Down Syndrome and their families, exploring the joys of creative movement and word play. Families will write and move together, share discoveries and find new ways of playing. Participants will be guided by Pamela Geber Handman, associate professor in the University of Utah’s Department of Modern Dance, and author, poet and journalist Melissa Bond. Salt Lake City Arts Hub, 663 W. 100 South, Salt Lake City, 801-328-0703, Saturday, April 16, 9-11 a.m., $10 per participant, bit.ly/1VcGgY4

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14 | APRIL 14, 2016

PANEL ON REFUGEES

Nine Designer Dog Breeds You Probably Won’t Find at the Local Shelter:

9. Titanium Retriever 8. Air Jordan Terrier 7. Doberman Smoocher 6. iPug 5. South-of-the Border Collie 4. Old-foundland 3. Portuguese Water Boarding Dog

2. Not-so-great Dane 1. Bassinet Hound

UPCOMING EVENTS

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UTAH PIZZA PARTY!

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WASATCH HOLLOW TOUR

The city has been working on the Wasatch Hollow Open Space Project since 2011, and it’s almost there. Ten spectacular acres meandering along Emigration Creek will be previewed during a guided tour of this suburban gem. You’ll see the excavation of a historic spring and areas through new trails that will surround a newly created wetlands. Many invasive trees have already been removed as Wasatch Hollow takes shape to identify conservation values to be protected, including scenic, historic, ecological, wildlife and public education and use, while preventing commercial or residential development. Wasatch Hollow, 1650 E. 1700 South, 801-706-9413 (Michael Dodd), April 19, 4 p.m., free, open to public, WasatchHollowCC.org

—KATHARINE BIELE

AT THE HELLENIC CULTURAL CENTER (279 S. 300 W.)

PIZZA+BEER=PARTY

Send events to editor@cityweekly.net


S NEofW the

The Power of Precedent Department of Veterans Affairs employee Elizabeth Rivera Rivera, 39, was fired after her arrest (followed by a February guilty plea) for armed robbery, but when she was sentenced only to probation, an arbitrator ordered the VA to rehire her—and give her back pay she “earned” while sitting in jail awaiting trial. (She had been the driver for a man arrested for a street robbery in San Juan, Puerto Rico.) Rivera’s union had demanded the reinstatement without salary penalty—for “fairness”—because the same Puerto Rico VA office had earlier hired a convicted sex offender, and the office’s hospital director, recently charged with DUI and drug possession, avoided VA discipline because of technicalities about the traffic stop.

BY CHUCK SHEPHERD

but by 2014 Americans had resurrected it (677 reported cases), and researchers from Emory University and Johns Hopkins set out to learn how—and recently found the dominant reason to be the purposeful decision by some Americans to refuse or delay widely available vaccinations (especially for their children). (The researchers found similar, but less-strong conclusions about whooping cough.)

WEIRD

Evolution of the Civil Rights Struggle Turmoil in Selma, Ala., March 1965: The historic “Bloody Sunday” at the Edmund Pettus Bridge ultimately became a turning point in the battle for voting rights. Turmoil in Selma, Ala., March 2016: The town is riven by demands for stricter enforcement of the ordinance requiring horses on the street to be wearing diapers—a campaign led by Ward 8’s Councilman Michael Johnson (an African-American): “I’m tired of it because there’s other things I could be doing than dealing with horses.”

n Neighbors of a loudly frisky couple in a Stockholm, Sweden, apartment building were so frustrated by the noise that they reached out to the country’s health minister, Gabriel Wikstrom—who took the side of the randy couple (according to a translation by Stockholm’s The Local): “Sounds nice for them, I think. Good for their well-being and thus public health as well.”

n Valerie Godbout, 33, visiting Orlando from Montreal and charged with drug possession after alerting police with erratic driving, told the officer that she was on the wrong side of the road because that’s the way traffic works in Canada. (It’s not.) n Emily Davis, 21, caught by police displaying her recently deceased grandmother’s handicap-parking badge, explained that she was merely “using it in her honor.”

with their advertising.

Ironies Ervin Brinker, 68, pleaded guilty to Medicaid fraud as CEO of the Summit Pointe health care provider in Michigan and was sentenced in January to 32 months in prison. He had embezzled $510,000 in “mental health” payments and apparently spent it all on a Florida fortune teller. n Two of the three candidates for the Republican nomination for county property appraiser in Erwin, Tenn., in November died before the election, leaving Rocky McInturff the only survivor. However, he is ineligible for the nomination because he lost badly on Election Day by one of the two dead candidates.

Least Competent Criminals Albuquerque police encountered Leonard Lopez, 26, inside a Chevy Cobalt car (that was not his) just after midnight on March 30 after neighbors reported a man screaming inside, flashing the car’s headlights. A panicked Lopez was upside down, with his feet on the dashboard and his head and shoulders wedged under the steering wheel, hands and arms tucked inside his sweatshirt. He was charged with burglary, and police guessed he was probably going through opiate withdrawal. Recurring Themes Maryann Christy, 54, was arrested in Roselle, Ill., in January when police spotted her driving through town with a 15-foot-tall tree firmly lodged in the grille of her car, sticking straight up. She was apparently too intoxicated to recall where she “acquired” the tree or how many minutes earlier that was. n On March 23 on Interstate 95 near Melbourne, Fla., two tractor-trailers collided, spilling their contents on the road. One truck was carrying Busch beer and the other various Frito-Lay products.

Thanks This Time to John DePaoli, Gerald Thomason, Stan Kaplan, James Seabolt, Russell Bell, and Jan Wolitzky, and to the News of the Weird Senior Advisors (Jenny T. Beatty, Paul Di Filippo, Ginger Katz, Joe Littrell, Matt Mirapaul, Paul Music, Karl Olson, and Jim Sweeney) and Board of Editorial Advisors.

Call today to see how we can help you put your best foot forward! CONTACT PETE SALTAS 801-413-0936 or pete@cityweekly.net

APRIL 14, 2016 | 15

n In 2000, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention declared that measles had been eliminated in the United States,

CITY WEEKLY

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n Science magazine called the “butthole” “one of the finest innovations in the past 540 million years of animal evolution”—in that, until it developed, animals’ only channel of waste removal was through the same opening used for food intake. However, the recent discovery, announced at a March conference by a University of Miami biologist, that gelatinous sea creatures called comb jellies can excrete via other pores, was labeled by the magazine as “stunn(ing).”

In 2015 over 800 small businesses trusted

Breakthroughs in Science German researchers, publishing in March, revealed that female burying beetles uniquely discourage their mates from pestering them for sex after birth—thus explaining how the male of this species is observed actually helping with child care. The females apparently release a chemical “anti-aphrodisiac” to the father’s antennae. Said the lead researcher (a woman), “They are a very modern family.” Said another biology professor (also female), “Burying beetles are super cool.”

Fine Points of the Law Joe Vandusen said he has had no contact whatsoever with his estranged wife for “16 or 17 years” and that both moved long ago to other relationships (Joe currently living with a woman, raising both his two children and her two, as well). Nonetheless, Vandusen’s “real” wife recently gave birth, from another father, and, without claiming Vandusen as the father, filed in February for child support from him. In the Vandusens’ home state of Iowa (like the law in many states), he must pay, irrespective of any DNA test (unless he gets an expensive court order to “deestablish paternity.”

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n Benjamin Grafius, 39, charged with several instances of indecent exposure to Amish people near New Holland, Pa., told police that he targeted them because he knew they would not use phones to call police (March).

n A 25-year-old off-duty New York City police officer was killed on a highway near Elizabeth, N.J., in March. According to the police report, the officer had rear-ended another car and had gotten out to “discuss” the matter, then suddenly pulled his service revolver and threatened the driver using road rage-type language. As the officer backed up while pointing the gun, a passing driver accidentally, fatally struck him.

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Compelling Explanations Ms. Ashton Barton, 33, charged with shoplifting a vibrating sex toy from a CVS pharmacy in Largo, Fla., in February, tried for police sympathy by explaining that she was in a troubled marriage. “My husband doesn’t want to touch me anymore,” and “I would rather do this than be unfaithful.”

Undignified Deaths An 86-year-old woman died in February in New Cumberland, Pa., when she tripped and got her medical alert necklace caught on her walker, strangling herself.


How One woman is changing the lives Lange of Lhasa apsos, if you will. Arriving at the Murray-based facility at 4 p.m., I’m surprised with how busy the shelter is on a weekday afternoon. Waiting by the front desk, I watch, through organized chaos, numerous people and pets are coming and going along with the expected cacophony. Potential adopters walk to and from the dog run with their chosen pooches on a leash to get a sense of whether or not they belong together. There’s a small pen set up directly behind the front desk housing three caramel-colored wiggly puppies with a sign next to them stating the importance of sanitizing your hands before touching. I find myself on tiptoes with my body bent in half at the waist in an attempt to lean closer over the

By Dawn McBride • Comments@cityweekly.net

“SAM”

ADOPTED APRIL 2016

GUINNEVERE SCHUSTER

NIKI CHAN

I

t’s Friday afternoon and, as part of an assignment for Salt Lake Community College, I’m en route to meet with Guinnevere Shuster, a professional photographer and social-media coordinator for the Humane Society of Utah. We were to interview Salt Lake City locals, and I couldn’t believe my good fortune at being able to meet with her. To call her just a photographer does not do her skill set justice. Her photo-boothstyle shots shared across the Humane Society of Utah’s social platforms are poignant, playful and the definition of sharable. I first came across her work on Facebook and quickly realized she is the David LaChapelle of labs; the Dorothea

of shelter dogs a snap at a time

NIKI CHAN

“PRESLEY”

ADOPTED APRIL 2016

GUINNEVERE SCHUSTER

16 | APRIL 14, 2016

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Instapooch

counter to get a better look. As a dog lover, I would gladly have bathed in a tub of sanitizer for a chance to climb into that puppy pen. Before I’m able to impose myself on the innocent furballs, Shuster shows up and introduces herself with a smile and a handshake and suggests we head to her office, where it’s quieter. Her workspace is a modest square cubicle with a desk, a window and a couple of small tables. Her photos are strung across her computer. Every surface is covered with papers, animal toys and paraphernalia. There is one spare chair that I pull close to her desk. As I’m about to sit down, I slip on a pink plastic stick with a string and feather attached to the end. It’s clear to me Shuster quite possibly has the best job on earth. I notice a plastic end table that pulls double duty as a hamster enclosure. In a weak attempt at small talk, I tell the story of my own childhood hamster, cleverly named Hammy the Hamster. Shuster doesn’t seem impressed. The 33-year-old is dressed comfortably in an oversize maroon T-shirt with a matching headband holding her long hair in place. She’s rocking an ever-so delicate nose piercing and patterned leggings, and tennis shoes complete the ensemble. I get the feeling it’s been a long day, but she is warm, friendly and willing to help despite the fact she has any number of better things to do at the moment, such as preparing for Love Utah Give Utah, an annual event designed to support Utah nonprofits. Shuster’s love affair with animals has been a lifelong one. Originally from upstate New York, she moved to Salt Lake City during high school and never left. “I grew up riding horses and was around farm animals. We always had dogs and cats, and I would bring home whatever I could find,” she reminisces. Wayward pets with varying lifespans found refuge with the young Shuster. One memorable creature was a baby rabbit “I think our dog had gotten it and I just didn’t know, and he was on his last leg,” she says.


SAD PUPPY MUGSHOTS

APRIL 14, 2016 | 17

In 2011, after receiving a bachelor’s degree from the U of U in photography and digital imaging, Shuster started volunteering at the Humane Society of Utah when a friend and fellow volunteer who had been taking pictures requested she take over. “So I started doing it and really enjoyed it and decided I would try to convince them to make it into a full-time job. And they eventually did,” she says. Now a staffer for two and a half years, Shuster has developed a style that is very clean and direct. She shoots a headshot of the pooches in front of a white backdrop while plying them with treats, peanut butter or bubbles. She then chooses the best four shots that showcase the personality and uses them to create her photo-booth strip. It’s a departure from what was once the norm. With a slight smile, Shuster describes what sounds like a tragically sad puppy mugshot—one consisting of a dull full body and side-view shots. Before her arrival, staffers would take the dogs out onto the grass while someone held the leash and a “here goes everything” shot would be snapped before returning the pup to its pen. While not as depressing as

| CITY WEEKLY |

GUINNEVERE SCHUSTER

I mean, you know, if there’s enough media around it, it may happen. But, otherwise …”

leader in many areas. [We’re] one of the largest cities in the country, for example, that has banned horse-drawn carriages; I’m almost surprised we beat New York City to that,” he says. “Also, Salt Lake City is remarkably veganfriendly for the size of our city, and I think one of the reasons that restaurants have so many vegan options, is because there is such a demand here … I think that the people of Salt Lake care a lot about animals, and that’s reflected in a number of ways.” Statewide, Beckham says, “the picture is not that good.” He cites that Utah is one of only six states in the country that have “ag-gag” laws—which forbid the use of recording and photography at factory farms and animal-processing plants without the express consent of their owners. Beckham breaks it down. “If you work, for example, at a daycare facility and you take pictures of child abuse and send those to the police, the police will rightly arrest the abuser in Utah. On the other hand, if you work at factory farm and take photographs of animal abuse and send those to the police, you’ll be the one who’s arrested.” Shuster thinks laws as they stand are nothing more than a slap on the wrist. “Unfortunately, I don’t think Utah does a lot for animals as far as laws and protection,” she says. “Very few people are actually convicted of animal abuse on a felony level.

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“LITTLE BEAR” ADOPTED FEBRUARY 2016

“ANNIE”

ADOPTED JANUARY 2016

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

GUINNEVERE SCHUSTER

I tell her about my college assignment which is to spotlight a local citizen directly involved in social justice work. I tell her how monumental I think her work has been in giving animals a second chance, especially those that have been abused, mistreated or are otherwise overlooked. This promptly leads to a discussion about current animal abuse laws in the state. Following a national trend, some

GUINNEVERE SCHUSTER

ENOUGH ABUSE

improvements have been made, but Utah still has a ways to go. Utah’s animal-cruelty laws are housed in Title 76 of the state’s Criminal Code. Injury, abandonment, malnourishment and fighting animals for “amusement or gain” are all considered misdemeanors. Under current law, only abuse to service animals could result in a felony. Still, activists like Jeremy Beckham, president of the Salt Lake City-based Utah Animal Rights Coalition, has seen progress. “In a general sense, I think Salt Lake City is a


“BUDDY”

ADOPTED FEBRUARY 2016 shelter, meaning all surrendered pets are welcomed. Shuster knew her images could up the ante. “In 2015, we placed 11,318 animals, which is even more than 2014, and we achieved what you call ‘no-kill’ status for both cats and dogs, which is a goal we had set for 2018,” she beams. Think of the designation, as the humane equivalent of being LEED-certified. “Nokill” means that a shelter does not kill healthy or treatable animals even when they are at capacity. While it sounds humane, not all are fans. An article on PETA’s website for example, calls the practice “rhetoric [that] lets the real culprits of the overpopulation crisis—greedy breeders and the ‘pet’ trade—off the hook and keeps them laughing all the way to the bank.”

| CITY WEEKLY |

GOING VIRAL GUINNEVERE SCHUSTER

18 | APRIL 14, 2016

GUINNEVERE SCHUSTER

pretty well-trained,” she says. In an effort to diversify, Shuster has tried to shoot other types of adoptable pets, with varying degrees of success. “I have tried cats, but they don’t tend to have as many expressions as dogs do, so it ends up looking like four shades of angry,” she says. How good is the end product? When asked if she’s ever been tempted to adopt her subjects, she smiles while looking slightly sheepish. “Ummm … yes.” “When I started working here, I had one dog that I’d had for eight years. Then, I adopted a dog that was here for about six weeks and had been in three homes previously.” She points to one of three photos she has strung across her desktop computer like a mini photo banner. “He’s a great, great dog. He’s kind of like one of my muses for pictures. His name is Tubs. He’s an oversize American Staffordshire terrier mix, and he loves to play dress up. And then, the other dog, the white one, I adopted about a year and a half after. Not necessarily from taking photos of him—he just was really scared and nervous and came from an unfortunate background. His name is Grant and he bonded really well with my other dogs,” she says. “So yeah, I’ve got three dogs.” With more than 10,000 placed animals, 2014 was a record-breaking for the Humane Society of Utah, which has the distinction of being an open-admissions

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a poor mutt cowering in the corner of a cell behind bars, it was a far cry from the “like”tempting shots of today. “Originally, we only used one photo for the website poster … and then when I would take the pictures, it was really hard to choose just one,” Shuster says. “So, then, I thought the photo-booth idea would show their personality a little bit better—especially when there would be a funny-looking picture where their eyes would be closed or something. That wouldn’t necessarily be the best if you were using a single image.” But because photos would be posted on Facebook, Instagram and other social media, she says, the square format with multiple shots worked best. Her dog whisperer-like ability to get animals to cooperate is evident. But as she recounts her experience with training dogs, horses and a stint at the Tracy Aviary working on the bird show, she plays with a set of keys she has in her hands, subtly shaking them up and down. I wonder if it’s because she’s nervous or because she’s pondering the myriad other tasks she could be working on at the moment. If the number of times her phone is beeping or dinging (which she resolutely ignored) is any indication, I’m going with the latter. “You know, a lot of the dogs that come in here are actually really great dogs. They already know how to sit and shake and do commands like that. I think people would be surprised at how many dogs that come into the shelter are

“RANGER”

ADOPTED FEBRUARY 2016

Shuster knew she was onto something early on. One of the first shots that blew up on social media was that of Charlie, a German shepherd/Belgian Malinois mix who had seen better days. “I grew up with German shepherds, so they’re near and dear to my heart,” Shuster says. “He had come in and they had transferred him from another shelter;

he was really emaciated, missing a leg and, you know, in pretty sad shape.” A couple of minutes in front of the camera later, the mutt got a second lease on life. “He had this amazing personality,” she recalls. “It didn’t matter what had happened to him or where he’d come from, he was this very sweet and loving dog.” She remembers posting the dogs snaps around 8 p.m. “The next morning, there were three families that had come in to meet him,” she says.

BOOTH BOOK

Another way the photographer is helping to find forever homes for animals is through Shelter Dogs in a Photo Booth, a soon-to-be released book half a year in the making that features 100 of her favorite shots. Each photo includes the story about that particular dog as well as some followup stories. Published by Kansas City-based Andrews McMeel Publishing, the book is currently on presale on websites like Amazon.com and IndieBound.org. As expected, part of the book’s $15 or so price tag will benefit the local Humane Society, as well as Best Friends of Utah, the nation’s largest no-kill sanctuary for companion animals.


GUINNEVERE SCHUSTER

“SHERLOCK” ADOPTED JULY 2015

APRIL 14, 2016 | 19

GUINNEVERE SCHUSTER

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“BIT O’ HONEY” ADOPTED NOVEMBER 2015

As I stand to leave and thank her for taking the time to meet, I can’t help but feel more than a little hero worship. The fact that Shuster is so humble about her work and the importance of what she is accomplishing in championing the plight of shelter animals restores my hope that there are still plenty of good people willing to work on behalf of those who can’t speak for themselves. Shuster’s talent and determination is as clear as her message: “There are a lot of really great animals in shelters. There pretty much isn’t anything you can’t find these days in a shelter, or rescue group, that you could get from a breeder.” She continues, “We’ve had everything from 8-week-old labradoodle puppies that you could buy from a breeder for $2,000. We just had a Corgi puppy a couple weeks ago. It might take a little time and a little extra effort in your search if there’s something you’re looking for specifically.” Her spotlight also shines for older dogs. “At certain points in people’s lives, maybe it’s better to get an adult animal,” she says, urging would-be adopters to be open minded. “A lot of people think shelter animals are damaged goods or there’s a problem with them and that’s the reason they’re in the shelter, when a lot of times people just run into problems.” She pauses. “These animals are getting their second chance. So that’s what I’m asking: just give them a chance.” CW

The physical space where the magic happens is a tight, square, windowless room with a filing cabinet, a rolling table and a large white backdrop duct-taped to a metal frame. On top of the filing cabinet is a bag of treats, which Shuster breaks into tiny puppy-size pieces. Below the table, a couple of boxes filled with props are stashed. Shuster quickly exits the room and returns holding one of the caramel-colored pups I had contemplated nabbing for myself.

GIVE THEM A CHANCE

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LICKS AND CLICKS

She believes he’s a Chihuahua mix but isn’t sure. She places him on top of the rolling table and proceeds to spoil him with treats. This is where the mastery starts to unfold. In order to get him to look at her, Shuster holds a teensy treat above her head and lets out a high-pitched, maniacal trill, one that would give Mariah Carey a run for her money. The pup is mesmerized and poses perfectly. Annie Leibovitz, eat your heart out. Next up is Charlie, a 9-year-old long-haired Chihuahua mix. His nonstop tail wagging creates the most adorable furry fan. The photog pulls out the big guns: a peanut butterdipped Beggin’ Strip. Charlie takes a tentative lick/nibble and, from the look on his little fuzzy face. I can almost hear him exclaim, “The hell woman? What is this rubbish you’re trying to pass off as a treat?” While he licks around the peanut butter, his face distorts into the most delightfully charming expressions that Shuster captures with her rapidlyfire camera. With only the peanut butter portion of the treat left, Charlie grudgingly finishes it off and gives the table a final lick for good measure, providing Shuster with a few more shots.

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“Hopefully it will do well, and it will show people the different types of dogs they can find in shelters,” Shuster says. “Different shapes, sizes, age, breeds—I tried to get ’em all in there.” Deann Shepherd, Humane Society of Utah’s director of marketing and communications, says she’s seen Shuster’s work “improve the adoption impact,” and says her style is now being emulated across other markets. Echoing the saying “Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery,” she notes, “Especially when it started to hit the Internet, and it started to go viral, we saw a lot of other shelters using the fun portrait style against the white background.” “However,” she continues, “[their use of Shuster’s style] is not a bad thing when the whole idea is to help animals everywhere. Guinnevere has actually consulted with other shelters and held workshops for those who have called us asking, ‘What have you done to promote your animals so well?’” Shepherd says that shelters using photos of animals where they look intimidated or scared isn’t doing them any favors. “A lot of the animals don’t come to us because they did anything wrong,” she says. “These are great family pets. The family may have moved to a location where they can no longer keep the pet, so they bring it to us— which is great because they’re thinking of the best interest of the animal.” Along with the jazzy pics, Shepherd credits other factors that have helped spike adoption. In 2012, HSU doubled the square footage of the facility and, two years later, it introduced “Dawgville” and “Tiny Town”—a couple of relaxed, size-specific kennel alternatives where adoptable pets can commingle with their would-be forever owners, though she quickly circles back to Shuster’s work. “It can be a great campaign, but if the images aren’t strong, they aren’t grabbing people’s attention,” she says. “A picture is worth a thousand words.” Those words also come in handy, Shepherd says, when lobbying for animal welfare during the legislative session. “If we put out a notice about something we’re working on,” she says, “it reaches more people because she’s maintained a high engagement on our social media.”


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20 | APRIL 14, 2016

ESSENTIALS

the

ENTERTAINMENT PICKS APRIL. 14-20, 2016

Complete Listings Online @ CityWeekly.net

THURSDAY 4.14

THURSDAY 4.14

FRIDAY 4.15

The culture of the visual image has undergone incredibly dramatic changes from the invention of photography through today. In a sense, our entire western culture is that of the image. Assistant professor and lecturer in the Department of Art & Art History at the University of Utah, Laurel Caryn specializes in historical and alternative photographic processes. In her new collection, History of Photography, Caryn uses technologies that have been lost—like 19th-century cyanotype—to contemplate transformations in the ways we receive and store visual information, and the trace left by the image in our memories. These works reference figures in art history and photography by the impressions of what are apparently slides of their works, in cyanotype (a photographic blueprint) and acrylic on paper, with silhouettes of an audience looking at them. Her juxtaposition of photographers like Man Ray and Chuck Close, and Robert Mapplethorpe and August Sanders, prompts us to ponder their relationships, the ways they restate and recapitulate artistic themes. The inclusion of viewers implicates those of us under whose gaze these pieces fall. It also reminds us of the voyeurism implicit in looking at works by someone like Mapplethorpe or Cindy Sherman. What is the role of the spectator: active, passive or somewhere in between? The history of photography, both in this collection and in general, is tied up with the history of looking. (Brian Staker) History of Photography: Recent Work by Laurel Caryn @ Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, 801-245-7272, through May 6, Monday-Friday, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Heritage.Utah.gov/Arts-And-Museums

Some plays break the “fourth wall.” And then there are plays like Aaron Posner’s Stupid F***ing Bird, which take a jackhammer to the fourth wall and hurl chunks of it into the audience. Most superficially, it’s a contemporary spin on Chekhov’s The Seagull, built around analogues of many of that play’s characters: a would-be playwright named Con (Alexis Baigue); his aspiring actress girlfriend, Nina (Anne Louise Brings); Con’s mother, veteran actress Emma (Nell Gwynn); Emma’s new lover, celebrated writer Trigorin (Terence Goodman); Emma’s brother, Sorn (Morgan Lund); Mash (Latoya Cameron), who loves Con unrequitedly; and Lev (Justin Ivie), who similarly longs for Mash. The play’s meta-textuality is clear almost before it begins, as the set piece of a stage on the Salt Lake Acting Co. stage hints at the art-within-the-art to come. But Posner goes even deeper, employing songs, dance numbers and experimental theater to explore how hard it is for art to really shake audiences into learning something about the human condition that will change anything. The production pulls viewers into the experience—almost literally, as audience members are invited at one point to shout out advice to the lovelorn Con. Yet this is also no academic slog through The Nature of Art. The magnificent cast, as directed by William Missouri Downs, somehow makes this thing—which they keep reminding us is fake—both hilarious and strangely heartbreaking. That’s the weird power of a work that’s sincere, cynical, charmingly phony and achingly realistic. (Scott Renshaw) Stupid F***ing Bird @ Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, 801-363-7522, April 6-May 1, Tuesday-Friday, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday, 2 p.m. & 7:30 p.m.; Sunday, 1 p.m. & 6 p.m., $29-$39. SaltLakeActingCompany.org

Ballet West rarely needs a content advisory for its audiences; Beauty and the Beast or Romeo and Juliet, two recent BW productions, are more in line with the company’s family-friendly style. So it was with keen interest that I read the “mature content warning” for The Nijinsky Revolution. The dancer-choreographer Vaslav Nijinsky, to whom the evening of ballets is dedicated, has been making audiences uncomfortable since 1913—the year that Parisians rioted upon seeing his unorthodox ballet The Rite of Spring. But what was shocking then isn’t exactly received with the same surprise by modern-day audiences. To remedy that, Ballet West has not just prepared an evening of Nijinsky’s works; they have prepared three updated versions, re-imaginings of Nijinsky ballets by contemporary choreographers. Helen Pickett’s Games, the piece that prompted the content warning, is based on Nijinsky’s Jeux (1913). Set to the exact same libretto and storyline, Games depicts two women and one man in an ever-changing love triangle. All three characters share intimate embraces, and the piece concludes with all three in a bedroom setting. Another updated version comes from Jerome Robbins, whose Afternoon of a Faun (1953) transforms Nijinsky’s mythical ballet into an earthly scene in which the two characters become ballet dancers enjoying a flirtatious moment in the dance studio. Finally, Nicolo Fonte’s Rite of Spring, which the company premiered in 2014, concludes the program. Fonte’s Rite centers his ballet with heightened intensity around the sinister theme of ritual sacrifice. (Katherine Pioli) Ballet West: The Nijinsky Revolution @ Capitol Theater, 50 W. 200 South, 801-3552787, April 15-23, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday matinees 2 p.m., $19-$87. ArtSaltLake.org

History of Photography: Recent Work by Laurel Caryn

Salt Lake Acting Co.: Stupid F***ing Bird

Ballet West: The Nijinsky Revolution

WEDNESDAY 4.20 Odysseo

A spectacle like no other, comprised of horse and man, is debuting in Sandy under the largest big-top tent currently traveling the world. Odysseo is the world’s largest touring production, and was created by Normand Latourelle, one of the co-founders of Cirque du Soleil. This magnificent show brings together 65 horses and 48 artists—riders, acrobats and aerialists—to amaze the crowd and bring a new dimension of entertainment to spectators. Hailed for its unique combination of circusstyle physical performance and impressive theatrical effects—plus live performances by both musicians and vocalists—Odysseo takes the mystical movements of horse and man and immerses audiences in a powerful sensory experience. The show takes the audience on a visual journey that begins in an enchanted forest, then moves to the Mongolian steppes and even to Utah’s own Monument Valley. It continues on to the African savannah to the Nordic glaciers, to the Sahara and Easter Island, culminating with a lunar landscape littered with stars and a real lake created from 40,000 gallons of recycled water that is sure to make the finale a memorable one. Odysseo made its world premiere in 2011 in Montreal and has since traveled throughout Canada, the United States and Mexico. Produced by Cavalia Inc., Odysseo has the largest stage and mind-blowing special effects. It’s a show that will leave you wanting more. (Aimee L. Cook) Odysseo @ South Towne Center, 10450 S. State, Sandy, 866-999-8111, April 20-May 1. $39.50-$259.50. Cavalia.net


A&E

THEATER

NATHAN SWEET

War Dance

RDT’s Revere celebrates José Limón’s exploration of post-war survival. BY KATHERINE PIOLI comments@cityweekly.net

I

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Repertory Dance Theater

REPERTORY DANCE THEATER: REVERE

APRIL 14, 2016 | 21

Rose Wagner Center 138 W. 300 South 801-355-2787 April 14-16 7:30 p.m. $30 RDUtah.org

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trusted with taking Limón’s work to dance companies around the world, setting the steps and fine tuning the quality of movement in the bodies of dancers. For three weeks in March, Watts worked intensively with RDT’s dancers to perfect their understanding and performance of Missa Brevis and Mazurka. Watts has trained RDT dancers numerous other times over the years in Limón technique and set other Limón works for the company. “I see [in our production of Limón’s work] this thread that’s continuing through the 50 years of our company,” Smith says. Through the decades, the company has changed, dancers have come and gone, but she continues to see the same level of commitment to excellence and devotion to the great works of modern dance. After all, Smith says, “José Limón’s works are deep and rich and still resonate with us today.” CW

Contrasted against each other, Mazurka is often considered the lighter, more uplifting of the two. It’s folkloric at times, and created as a series of smaller work—solos, duets, trios, quartets and ensemble pieces. Missa Brevis, unlike its sister piece, is a true Limón opus, a monumental work featuring 22 dancers; RDT’s eight company members will be augmented by dancers from the University of Utah. It is a piece that emphasizes the toll of war, an emotional and spiritual work made even more poignant by the musical score, the mass Missa Brevis in Tempore Belli, which will be performed live by organist Brian Mathias and the Salt Lake Vocal Artists under the direction of conductor Brady R. Allred. Written by Hungarian composer Zoltan Kodaly, the mass—translated to English as “a short mass in time of war”— was scored during the siege of Budapest, and serves as a memento to the cities lost, as well as a tribute to those who rose up after the destruction. “For many people who know Limón’s work, Missa Brevis and Mazurka stand out because they speak so strongly of human hope,” says former Limón Company dancer Nina Watts. “His ability to look at the same events and approach them from such different points of view shows the greatness of his talent.” Watts, who was once called “the perfect Limón dancer,” is now one of the company’s handful of “reconstructors” en-

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t would have been considered an extraordinary opportunity for a company so young, only in its first season, to perform works by the great dancer and choreographer José Limón. For that honor to be handed to some small burgeoning company in Utah was unimaginable—yet, in 1967, the unthinkable happened for Repertory Dance Theater (RDT). Those who were a part of it still remember. “The whole idea, that we were performing a piece by Limón, was amazing to the young dancers in the group,” says Linda Smith, artistic director of RDT and one of the company’s original dancers. “We felt humbled by the honor and knew that we had to achieve a high level of excellence to do his work justice.” Now, 50 years later, at the closing of the company’s anniversary season, RDT dancers will again perform Limón’s work, which is still considered pivotal in the history and canon of modern dance. For their spring concert, Revere, the company will devote the entire program to two of José Limón’s works: Missa Brevis and Mazurka. Born in Culiacán, Mexico, in 1908, Limón, while still very young, immigrated to Los Angeles with his family to escape the upheaval of the Mexican Revolution. Young Limón grew up surrounded by art (his father was a painter), and his initial forays into creative expression were through painting and drawing. While studying visual art in college, he moved to New York City, where he met modern dance pioneer Doris Humphrey. Soon after, he began performing in the Humphrey-Weidman Co. and choreographing works of his own. During World War II, Limón was drafted into the Special Services and served stateside entertaining the troops preparing to go overseas. It was only after the war—in the 1950s, when he served as a cultural ambassador for the United States—that Limón saw firsthand the devastation wrought by the war. Limón was particularly affected by a tour through Poland, an experience from which he drew inspiration for Missa Brevis and Mazurka, both choreographed in 1958. Limón’s particular movement style, with its use of theatrical gesture and its surrender to both gravity and breath, is particularly effective in conveying emotional themes like those of war and loss, but also hope and rebuilding. Missa Brevis and Mazurka reflect both the horror that Limón felt seeing the trauma of the war’s aftermath, and the strength he witnessed in the communities that were rebuilding.


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22 | APRIL 14, 2016

Inside Jokes

Any special tweaks for your show here?

BY ENRIQUE LIMÓN elimon@cityweekly.net @EnriqueLimon

That lack of sacred cows is definitely something that characterizes you. Do you ever fear that you’re getting too close to the edge?

Amy Schumer talks The Little Mermaid, locker room balls and fry sauce

A

my Schumer is a busy girl. She’s currently in the midst of a 19-city tour (the fourth stop of which is this Thursday at the Maverik Center); the fourth season of her Comedy Central show Inside Amy Schumer is set to debut April 21; her book The Girl With the Lower Back Tattoo—filled with tales that range “from the raunchy to the romantic, the heartfelt to the harrowing”— will be released by Simon & Schuster in mid-August; and if that wasn’t enough, she also just finished penning an as-yet-untitled script with pal Jennifer Lawrence. In typical self-deprecating fashion, a promo for the upcoming season of her TV show, features the New Yorkbred comedian being formally diagnosed with overexposure. A man portraying a doctor suggests that she fly under the radar for a while, to which Schumer, 34, responds, “No can do, Doc. Gotta follow my heart; keep exposing myself,” with a cat-that-ate-the-canary grin. Ever defiant, Schumer’s style is unapologetic and permeates to everything she does—be it gag-falling on a red carpet in front of Kim Kardashian and Kanye West—to bringing down the editors of Glamour magazine, who unbeknownst to the Trainwreck star, recently included her in their “Chic At Any Size!” issue. Schumer has the uncanny knack for weaving stories that draw audiences in, and just when they think they’ve figured the punchline out, she leads them on an unexpected soil-your-pants U-turn. On the phone with City Weekly from Penn State University, where she’s gearing up for a gig, the first thing I notice is that she pronounces my name to the hilt. After I compliment her on it, she lets me know it’s because she doesn’t identify as white. “Is it just, like, a sea of white people there?” she asks of Salt Lake City. The conversation quickly turns to pre-show rituals, political endorsements and Franken-burgers.

EL: Do you do anything to get into the zone?

AS: Yeah. I’m not religious, but we do a little group prayer before we go on. We all say that we wanna do the best show we’ve ever done; that we’re grateful people came out; and then my brother’s jazz trio goes up first, so I watch that and sip on a glass of white wine. It’s really not a ritual, as much as what I do.

So you’re plus-size now, huh?

Oh yeah, did you hear? I’m plus-size. Is that gonna go over well in Utah?

You’ll do great here. Utah is the home of fry sauce, after all—a half-ketchup, half-mayonnaise concoction.

Half-mayonnaise, half-ketchup? OK, I thought that was called Thousand Island, but what do I know? Don’t tell anyone there that that’s already a thing, and it’s called Thousand Island dressing. I’m really excited for the show there, because I think I haven’t performed anywhere near there since I was in Last Comic Standing, which was almost 10 years ago.

JUSTIN STEPHENS

A&E

STANDUP I plan on bringing it. I know the environment there, but I’m not gonna go any softer or change up my vibe at all.

You know, I’ve gotten death threats from my stand-up and, there are some things that make people upset, but what’s great about stand-up; that there are so many comedians, and you can go see who you want. I don’t think people are gonna pay money to come see me unless they know who they’re seeing, and are like-minded. That’s kind of the luxury of being better-known now than when I started out. Some things I talk about do scare me, but I do feel a responsibility— because I’m somebody with a voice right now—to talk about them, because they’re important to me.

You’ve crossed over from comedy clubs to large arenas … It’s crazy!

Do you ever come across paraphernalia from touring bands that might have performed in the same venue days before?

Unfortunately, they clean them out pretty well. That doesn’t mean that I don’t go hunting for it. But like last night, I performed at this place where people play hockey, so my luxurious dressing room was just a locker room that smelled like balls and beer.

Two of my favorite smells!

[Laughs] What could make a girl feel more at home?

What’s the plan of action now that you’ve been diagnosed as being overexposed?

To do what everybody does when they have a problem— be in denial and ignore it until it catches up with me.

That is also called the Mexican way, so you know. Thank you very much! I’m learning so much.

You recently endorsed Hillary Clinton for president, and while doing so, you quoted a line from Bambi. If we were in an alternate universe and you’d endorsed Trump, what Disney film would you reference?

Gosh … I think I’d be referencing The Little Mermaid’s Ursula—poor unfortunate souls—for all the souls I’d be trying to suck up, and stealing people with voices that matter. I’m really proud about that comparison [laughs].

You’re obviously doing the circuit, and these phone interviews can be a little bit awkward. What are some of the

AMY SCHUMER LIVE

Thursday, April 14 $39-$99 Maverik Center 3200 Decker Lake Drive, West Valley City 801-467-8499 AmySchumer.com

Schumer’s List: the comedian brings her no-holds-barred act to SLC on Thursday.

questions you’re over hearing? That way I’ll avoid them.

Well, first I want to say that this interview has been honestly a delight, but also that is not saying much, because they usually are really atrocious. Just yesterday on the phone, the guys was, like, ‘You wear a lot of short skirts. Do you ever get uncomfortable?’ And I was like, not until now. He obviously was really hung up on that. And just questions from people who are trying to work out how they feel about something, rather than use their time to talk about anything worthwhile. Like, ‘You say things that I’m uncomfortable with,’ and they wanna use the time for you to help them to digest you, and it’s like, you gotta work out your own shit on your own time.

Going back to Inside Amy Schumer, the fourth season hasn’t even aired yet, and I read it’s already been renewed for a seventh?

A seventh season? No, that rumor is not true, but that’s very funny. Yeah, we’re doing a fifth and then we’re not doing a sixth season, but we are doing a seventh season [laughs]. I’m really proud of this season, it’s the craziest one.

When you are on the road, do you give yourself time to explore the cities you’re in? Maybe hit up a local diner or donut shop?

Oh yeah. Every city I go to, I want to know what the thing is. You know, if I’m going to be a good plus-size model, I’ve gotta use these opportunities to plump up on the local fare. What would you say is the signature Salt Lake food?

Well, Salt Lake City is the home of the pastrami burger, which is a pastrami sandwich stacked inside an actual cheeseburger, so it’s like a double whammy.

Hmm … thank God they finally got the pastrami and the cheeseburger together. Well, I guess I know what I’m eating. CW


moreESSENTIALS WEDNESDAY 4.20

Alice Walker: Beauty in Truth Q&A The recent fire that ruined the offices of the Utah Film Center hasn’t stopped them from continuing the great programming that makes it so important to support them as they get back on their feet. This week, you can get a chance to see the documentary story of a Pulitzer Prize-winning author, and meet the subject at the same time—all for free. Director Pratibha Parmar’s Alice Walker: Beauty in Truth profiles the writer of The Color Purple, chronicling her life story from childhood in a family of Georgia sharecroppers through her eventual success as an artist, and how she has used her fame to support humanitarian efforts around the world. After the film, stick around for Q&A, which will feature both Parmar and Walker, moderated by Radio West’s Doug Fabrizio. Walker will also read from her new work of poetry at a Tanner Humanities Center event on April 21. (Scott Renshaw) Alice Walker: Beauty in Truth @ Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, April 20, 7 p.m., free, UtahFilmCenter.org; Alice Walker reading @ the Tower of Rice-Eccles Stadium, 451 S. 1400 East, April 21, 7 p.m. HumanRights.Utah.edu

PERFORMANCE

THEATER

Prokoviev’s Romeo & Juliet with Utah Shakespeare Festival Abravanel Hall, 123 W. South Temple, 801-355-2787, April 15-16, 7:30 p.m., UtahSymphony.org The Secret Garden Covey Center for the Arts, 425 West Center St., Provo, 801-853-7007, April 20-21, 7:30 p.m., UtahValleySymphony.org Cancionero: Music of Three Spains St. Mark’s Episcopal Cathedral, 231 E. 100 South, Salt Lake City, 801-649-8522, April 16, 8 p.m.; April 17, 5 p.m., UtopiaEarlyMusic.org

COMEDY & IMPROV

Amy Schumer Maverik Center, 3200 S. Decker Lake Drive, West Valley City, 801-988-8888, April 14, 8 p.m., $39-$99, AmySchumer.com (see p. 22) Laughing Stock Improv The Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, 801-355-4628, Fridays & Saturdays, 10 p.m., LaughingStock.us Ryan Hamilton Wiseguys Downtown, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, April 14-16, 7:30 p.m., April 15 & 16, 9:30 p.m., WiseGuysComedy.com Todd Johnson Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., Ogden, 801-622-5588, April 15-16, 8 p.m., WiseguysComedy.com Quick Wits Comedy 695 W. Center St., Midvale, 801-824-0523, Saturdays, 10 p.m., QWComedy.com

AUTHOR APPEARANCES

APRIL 14, 2016 | 23

Samuel M. Brown: Through the Valley of Shadows The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, April 14, 7 p.m., KingsEnglish.com Gail Chumbley: River of January Weller Bookworks, 607 Trolley Square, 801-328-2586, April 15, 7 p.m., WellerBookworks.com Geoff Griffin: Brooklyn Bat Boy The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-4849100, April 15, 7 p.m., KingsEnglish.com Erik Larson: Dead Wake Rowland Hall, 843 Lincoln Street, 801-484-9100, April 18, 7 p.m.,

| CITY WEEKLY |

LITERATURE

Beer & Ballet Ballet West, Capitol Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, 801-869-6938, April 14, 7-10 p.m., BalletWest.org The Nijinsky Revolution Ballet West, Capitol

CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

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DANCE

Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, 801-355-2787, April 15, 16, 21-23, 7:30 p.m.; April 20, 7 p.m.; April 23 matinee, 2 p.m., BalletWest.org (see p. 20) Revere Repertory Dance Theater, Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801-355-2787, April 14-16, 7:30 p.m., RDTUtah.org (see p 21)

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Chicago Midvale Main Street Theatre, 7711 Main, Midvale, 801-566-0595, through April 16, 7:30 p.m., MidvaleTheatre.com Curtains CenterPoint Legacy Theatre, 525 N. 400 West, Centerville, 801-298-1302, April 18-May 14, CenterPointTheatre.org Disney’s The Little Mermaid The Ziegfeld Theater, 3934 S. Washington Blvd., Ogden, 855944-2787, through April 23, 7:30 p.m, ZigArts.com Greece Is the Word The Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, 801-355-4628, through April 16, Monday, Friday & Saturday, 7:30 p.m., TheOBT.org Grounded People Productions, Sugar Space Arts Warehouse, 132 W. 800 South, 385-202-5504, April 14-24, PeopleProductions.org Murder on the Frontrunner Express Desert Star Theatre, 4861 S. State, Murray, 801-266-2600, through June 4, Monday, Wednesday, Thursday & Friday, 7:30 p.m.; Friday, 9:30 p.m.; Saturday, 11:30 a.m., 2:30 p.m., 6 p.m. & 8 p.m., DesertStar.biz Odysseo South Towne Center, 10450 S. State St., Sandy, 866-999-8111, April 20-May 8, Cavalia.net (see p. 20) Peter and the Starcatcher Hale Center Theatre, 3333 S. Decker Lake Drive, West Valley, 801-9849000, through May 18, Monday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday matinees, 12:30 p.m. & 4 p.m., HCT.org Rain: A Tribute To The Beatles Kingsbury Hall, 1395 Presidents Circle, 801-703-2060, April 16, 3 & 6 p.m., RainTribute.com Saturday’s Warrior SCERA, 745 S. State, Orem, 801-225-2787, April 15, 16 & 18, 7:30 p.m., SCERA.org Seussical The Musical Empress Theatre, 9104 W. 2700 South, Magna, 801-347-7373, through April 23, Friday & Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; 2 p.m., EmpressTheatre.com Stupid F---ing Bird Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, 801-363-7522, through May 1, Wednesdays-Saturdays, 7:30 p.m.; Sundays, 1 & 6 p.m., SaltLakeActingCompany.org (see p. 20)

KALI FILMS

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moreESSENTIALS KingsEnglish.com (see p. 8) Greg Zeigler: Some Say Fire The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, April 19, 7 p.m., KingsEnglish.com Douglas Brinkley: Rightful Heritage: Franklin D. Roosevelt and the Land of America The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801484-9100, April 20, 7 p.m., KingsEnglish.com

SPECIAL EVENTS FARMERS MARKETS

Wasatch Front Winter Farmers Market Wheeler Farm, 6351 S. 900 East, Murray, April 17, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., WasatchFrontFarmersMarket.org

FESTIVALS & FAIRS

Tulip Festival Ashton Gardens, 3900 N. Garden Drive, Lehi, April 15-May 7, 9 a.m.-8 p.m., ThanksgivingPoint.org Logan Library’s Community Fair Logan Library, 255 North Main, Logan, 435-716-9123, April 16, 11 a.m., Library.LoganUtah.org Spring Festival Rock Canyon Park, 2620 N. 1200 East, Provo, April 16, 4-8 p.m., Provo.org Centennial Carnival Logan Library, 255 North Main Street, Logan, 435-716-9123, April 18, 3 p.m., Library.LoganUtah.org

EARTH DAY EVENTS

Alta Earth Day Alta Resort Peruvian Lodge, 10000 E. Little Cottonwood Canyon Rd., 801359-1078, April 16, 9 a.m., Alta.com Earth Day Fair Ogden Nature Center, 966 W. 12th St., Ogden, April 16, 11:30 a.m.-4 p.m., OgdenNatureCenter.org TreeUtah Project Oxygen Rose Park Regional Athletic Complex, 2150 Rose Park Lane, 801-3642122, April 16, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., TreeUtah.org

VISUAL ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

A Call to Place: The First Five Years of the Frontier Fellowship Rio Gallery, 300 S. Rio Grande St., 801-245-7272, through May 30, VisualArts.Utah.gov A Public Spectacle Essay: Letterpress Works

by Emily Dyer Barker Sweet Library, 455 F Street, 801-594-8951, through April 16, SLCPL.org A Real Rockwell?: Cover Art from the Saturday Evening Post Main Library Special Collections, Level 4, 210 E. 400 South, 801-5248200, through May 31, SLCPL.org Abstract Expressions Evolutionary Healthcare, 461 E. 200 South, 801-519-2461, through June 11, EvolutionaryHealthcare.com Aeron Roemer: A Place Far Away from Here Mestizo Institute of Culture and Arts, 631 W. North Temple, Ste. 700, through May 13, Facebook.com/MestizoArts Christopher McKellar: If the Rock Is the Word, Color Is the Music Anderson-Foothill Branch Library, 1135 S. 2100 East, 801-594-8611, through April 21, SLCPL.Lib.UT.us Connie Borup/Don Athay Phillips Gallery, 444 E. 200 South, 801-364-8284, April 15-May 13, Phillips-Gallery.com David Maestas: Peaceful Chaos Utah Artist Hands Gallery, 163 E. 300 South, 801-355-0206, through May 18, UtaHands.com Digital Photography by Martin Novak Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, 801-596-5000, through April 18, SaltLakeArts.org Ian Booth: Kazakhstan: Tselina/Building the Virgin Lands Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through May 7, UtahMOCA.org History of Photography: Recent Work by Laurel Caryn Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, 801-245-7272, through May 6, Heritage.Utah.gov


PIES WORTH THE JOURNEY

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crew turn out handstretched pizza crusts that Napolitanos would kill for. There is no shortage of pizza styles in America and elsewhere. Most of us are familiar with the basics, like deep-dish Chicago pizza, New York City by-the-slice pizza, Neapolitan, etc. But there’s an East Coast-style of pizza that can be found from New Haven to the Jersey Shore, that’s hard to put a finger on. You just know it when you eat it. Maxwell’s Fat Kid Pizza (1456 Newpark Blvd., Park City, 435-647-0304; 357 S. Main, Salt Lake City, 801-328-0304, MaxwellsECE.com) is that kind of pizza. You can get Maxwell’s pizza by the slice, or as a whopping 20-inch pie. My favorite is the one topped with perfectly seasoned homemade meatball slices. These pizzas are hearty (but with relatively thin crust) pies made with high-quality cheeses and a light touch of perfect tomato sauce— not too acidic and not too sweet. Steven Maxwell, owner of Maxwell’s East Coast Eatery, is of Italian descent and hails originally from New Jersey. “Somewhere between Penns Grove, N.J., and South Philly,” he says, he learned how to make a truly bodacious pizza pie. Thank goodness he decided to move West. I’ve saved my newest pizza find for last. If shopping mall pizza has you thinking Sbarro, think again. For I have found New Yorkstyle pizza perfection at the Layton Hills Mall. Located in the mall’s food court—right next to an exit to the parking lot, which makes it convenient for takeout—is Tossed Pizzeria (1201 N. Hill Field Road, Layton Hills Mall, 801-546-3558, TossedPizzeria. com). This is a family-run pizzeria, owned by affable pizza maker Charlie Wallwork. He says he’s hoping to open up a location in Salt Lake City, but until then, you’ll have to find an excuse to visit Layton to enjoy his remarkable pizzas. The “New York-style” is exactly that: hand-tossed dough topped with homemade tomato sauce, Grande mozzarella (the best shredding cheese) and whatever additional toppings you’d like. It’s divine, but so are the excellent handmade salads at Tossed Pizzeria. Every topping and items such as the buffalo chicken and addictive spicy ranch salad dressing is made from scratch. I am happy to report that there is now no longer a need to fear mall pizza. What’s you favorite off-the-beaten-path pie? CW

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epperoni is in the air. To wit, City Weekly will be unveiling our first-ever Pizza Issue next week. If that weren’t enough, we’ll be hosting our second annual Pizza Party on Saturday, April 23 at the Hellenic Cultural Center (279 S. 300 West). BY TED SCHEFFLER It goes without saying that if you love pizza, you don’t comments@cityweekly.net want to miss this bodacious bash. Unfortunately, there @critic1 are some excellent pizza places around our state—ones very worthy of your petro-dollar—that might not be able to represent. But take it from a guy who is nothing if not passionate about pizza: These far-flung pizza emporiums are bucket-list items for serious pizza lovers and well worthy of a detour. With new, interesting, independent restaurants popping up now with frequency, Provo/Orem isn’t the culinary desert it once was. One of the pioneers of the burgeoning dining scene there was Pizzeria 712 (320 S. State St., Orem, 801-623-6712, Pizzeria712.com), which coowners Colton Soelberg and Joseph McRae opened in 2009. Their Heirloom Restaurant Group also operates Heirloom Catering, Communal, Mountain West Burrito and Heirloom Cafeteria Co. Way before it was de rigueur, Pizzeria 712 was putting toppings like speck, Yukon gold potatoes, white anchovies and Clifford Farm eggs on their wood-fired pizzas, not to mention accoutrements such as poblano crème fraîche, arugula, housemade chorizo and heavenly Gran Biscotto ham. They were one of the first “artisanal” pizza joints in the state and are still among of the best. If the name Tony’s Pizza makes you shudder and think of frozen supermarket pizza pies, it shouldn’t. For over 50 years, Tony’s Pizza (403 39th St., Ogden, 801393-1985) has been delivering Ogdenites pizza perfection that has outlasted all the others. The term “hole in the wall” might have been coined to describe Tony’s, which doesn’t look like it’s been updated since it opened in the 1960s. But that’s OK because once the pizza arrives, any décor foibles are forgiven. The founder, Tony, is still around, and his grandkids mostly run the restaurant, providing the kind of family-style friendly service that is all too rare nowadays. Like the décor, the menu is sparse: There are a few pasta dishes, garlic bread, sandwiches, salads and pizza. Pizza toppings are traditional; don’t come looking for artichoke hearts, shiitakes or truffles. But a classic ground beef or pepperoni pizza at Tony’s is a blast from the past—the honest, delicious pizza I remember from childhood. I’ve always found it difficult to find places to eat in Cedar City, but now I just set my GPS to Centro Woodfired Pizzeria (50 W. Center St., Cedar City, 435867-8123). Centro features 12-inch Neapolitan-style pizzas such as the Margherita, with hand-crushed tomatoes, fresh basil and fior di latte mozzarella, and more elaborate ones like the pollo rustico: wood-roasted chicken, crème fraîche, roasted garlic, Parmigiano-Reggiano and oregano. Centro also offers terrific salads, rustic breads, bruschetta and a charcuterie board. The beer and wine selection makes this the must-visit Cedar City eatery. It was fairly recently that I discovered the sublime pizzas at Eden’s North Fork Table & Tavern (3900 N. Wolf Creek Drive, Eden, 801648-7173, NorthForkTableAndTavern.com). The vision for NFT&T revolves around a custom-made, 2,000-pound, Valoriani wood-fired oven from Italy. Chef Jeff Sanich says that “we played with dough and technique for literally months before finding the process that was satisfactory to us.” He says he now has a “love/hate” relationship (although mostly love) with “her”—the Valoriani oven, which is named Donna. Using nothing more than Lehi Roller Mills’ all-purpose flour, kosher salt, yeast, water and extra-virgin olive oil, Sanich and his

Take A Bite


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FOOD MATTERS BY TED SCHEFFLER @critic1

Trio Cottonwood Beer Dinner

Spring is in the air at Café Trio in Cottonwood (6405 S. 3000 East) and on Tuesday, April 19, the restaurant and beverage director Jimmy Santangelo will host a multi-course dinner featuring five different spring-friendly wheat beer styles, from traditional Hefeweizen and Kristallweizen to infused ales, brewed by Squatters and Wasatch breweries. Each beer will be paired with a special menu of contemporary Italian fare created by executive chef Tara Juhl. The cost per person (21 and over) is $35 for food and $20 for the optional beer pairings. Reservations are strongly suggested and can be made by calling 801944-8746 or at TrioDining.com.

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Forage Closes

It was with a tinge of nostalgia and sadness that I reported last week’s closing of Fresco Italian Cafe. I had enjoyed many wonderful evenings there over the years. And, although I’ve dined much less frequently at Forage restaurant, it’s with sadness that I must report its closing as well. I think in the two-plus decades that I’ve been writing about food and restaurants in Utah, the two eateries that made the biggest impact and were the most important in terms of elevating the culinary scene in this state, were Metropolitan and Forage, both now shuttered. What chefs Viet Pham and Bowman Brown created at Forage was a menu and dining experience that could pass the muster anywhere: Paris, San Francisco, New York City—you name it. The lease ran out on current owner Brown’s cramped space at Forage, and he’s hopeful to be working again soon in a larger space and kitchen. I’m hopeful, too.

Ballet & Beer

The Ballet West premiere of The Nijinsky Revolution (see p. 20) on the evening of Thursday, April 14, will be a bit different than the standard opening night. Prior to the performance at the Janet Quinney Lawson Capitol Theatre, from 7-8 p.m., light appetizers from Le Croissant and craft beer from Epic Brewing will be served, in addition to non-alcoholic beverages. The ballet begins at 8 p.m.; food and drink service will continue in the lobby. To purchase tickets, visit BalletWest.org or call 801-869-6938.

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UTAH PIZZA PARTY

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BEER, WINE & SPIRITS

Con Game

Discovering the decadent delights of Condrieu BY TED SCHEFFLER comments@cityweekly.net @critic1

W

henever I’m feeling a little flush or have managed to balance my checkbook and find that I am actually in the black, I like to treat myself to a bottle of wine that wouldn’t normally fit into my drinking budget. And, upon those rare occasions, I often put my dough into a bottle of Condrieu. Are you familiar with it? Condrieu is one of two tiny appellations of France’s Northern Rhône—so small as to be nearly unviewable by satellite—the other being the 8.6-acre Château-Grillet, which is France’s smallest wine appellation. I’ll save the discussion of ChâteauGrillet, which holds the distinction of being both its own appellation within Condrieu and a single producer, for another time. For now the focus is on Condrieu, the bigger brother of the two. So, Condrieu is a French wine appellation

made up of about 250 acres, and it’s also the name of a French white wine. The grape varietal planted on those 250 acres, and from which Condrieu is made, is Viognier (pronounced VEE-ohn-yay). Karen MacNeil, author of The Wine Bible, calls Viognier “possibly the most drippingly sensual white grape in the world.” I agree wholeheartedly, which is why I raid the piggy bank and spring for a bottle on special occasions. Now, you can find types of Viognier that aren’t expensive (there’s actually about four times the amount of Viognier grown in California than in France), but Condrieu isn’t one of them. Expect to shell out over $60 for a bottle of the most basic Condrieu. It’ll be worth it. Someone should capture and bottle the floral and tropical aromas that explode upon opening a bottle of Condrieu—or any good Viognier, for that matter—and sell it at a parfumerie. Lush, ripe notes of white peaches and melons, lychee, honeysuckle, tangerine, pineapple, apricot and orange blossom tell you that there is some seriously sexy sipping in store. One of the reasons that Condrieu is so pricey is that Viognier is notoriously difficult to grow. It’s a temperamental grape that is fussy about humidity and dampness, prone to disease and produces low yields. The naturally low-acid grapes can

DRINK end up tasting bitter and/or bland if the producer isn’t on top of his or her game. And Viognier’s subtle, elegant flavors can be all too easily masked and overwhelmed by anything but the most restrained and judicious use of wood-aging. All of this makes for a wine that, yes, is expensive, but at its best is also one of the most enjoyable wines you’ll ever taste. In Utah, Condrieu is a rarity. While its most prestigious producer is Georges Verney—and others like Dumazet, Yves Cuilleron, Robert Niero, René Rostaing and the like make great Condrieu—our state wine stores here only list three available versions. E. Guigal Condrieu 2013 ($68.75) undergoes malolactic fermentation with one-third of the vintage going into new wood barrels and the rest into steel tanks. The wine is then aged in 100

percent new oak. The wine, while rich and full-bodied, is still a tad tight, and I think would benefit from a year or two of continued aging in the bottle. Saint Cosme Condrieu 2013 ($78.20) is wellbalanced with great finesse, offering elderflower, peach and jasmine notes. It’s very round and aromatic, and I think it would be sensational with lobster dishes. One of the “tresors” (treasures) in Guigal’s collection of fine wines is E. Guigal Condrieu “La Doriane” 2014 ($129), which is culled from vines averaging 35 years in age. Its light acidity is balanced by sensational, full-bodied fruitiness. This is a richly perfumed, very sexy, spectacular wine that will get even better over the next few years. CW


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Ichiban Sushi has been one of Salt Lake City’s favorite local restaurants for sushi and Japanese cuisine for more than 20 years. Ichiban is housed in a 19thcentury historic church, complete with original brick and mortar, and choir loft converted tatami rooms. Start out with a mussel shooter or Kobe beef tataki before diving into nigiri, sashimi and sushi. The restaurant offers varieties of sushi rolls that are extensive, but popular favorites include the Surf-and-Turf roll, Pink Power, X96 roll, Rainbow and the incendiary Death roll. Happy hour is 5 to 10 p.m. on Mondays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays. 336 S. 400 East, Salt Lake City, 801-532-7522, WatkinsRG.com/ Ichiban_Sushi_Utah

India Palace

1 3 N E I G H B O R H O O D L O C AT I O N S FAC E B O O K . C O M / A P O L L O B U RG E R

India Palace restaurant is truly a palace of vibrant dining, and owner Amrik Singh makes every customer feel like royalty. The restaurant’s menu is a whopping three pages, filled with fresh baked breads, tandoori dishes, curries and, of course, lots of spice. To conquer the heat, India Palace restaurant serves refreshing lassi drinks, as well as imported beers from India and Germany. The diverse food options include lamb, chicken, seafood and vegetarian dishes, and will satisfy even the most inexperienced diners. Monday through Friday, you can take part in the three-hour lunch buffet. Finish your meal off with some smooth mango ice cream for dessert, because when you’re at India Palace restaurant, your taste buds are king. 1086 W. South Jordan Parkway, South Jordan, 801302-0777, IndiaPalaceUT.com

Jasmine China Bistro & Sushi Bar

Serving both Japanese and Chinese cuisine, Jasmine China Bistro & Sushi Bar offers entrées as well as a good selection of sushi rolls. Noodle dishes are popular, or you can enjoy curry chicken or vegetable lo mein. If you have an appetite for sushi, focus on the Japanese menu and its wide selection of decent-size (8-12 pieces) rolls, which includes classics like The Vegas Roll or The Caterpillar Roll, as well as many vegetarian options. 4810 S. Highland Circle, Holladay, 801-2786688, JasmineChinaBistroSushi.com

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Joni’s Deli & Grill is the type of place one wishes were a chain/franchise, since it would be nice to have easier access to its brand of food and service on every corner. But Joni’s is a definite one-off, if only because there’s just one Joni Sorenson, the deli’s namesake. This 20-year-old, unpretentious little sandwich shop is a great find. If you don’t find it, the packed house at lunchtime will never miss you. While Joni’s traditional Philly cheesesteak is the stuff of legend, the chicken Philly is its modest, blushing cousin. Order it and be ready for a veritable bomb: a fresh-baked roll encasing grilled chicken and veggies topped off with melted cheese, all designed to explode in your mouth (and your hands if you’re not careful). 52 E. 1700 South, Salt Lake City, 801-466-6662, Facebook.com/JonisDeli

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The new Sugar House location of the “Home of the Döner Kebab” is booming. And that’s not surprising given the warm, friendly atmosphere and funky vibe. A döner is the Turkish name for rotisserie meat that is thinly sliced from a rotating spit, usually served on flatbread like lavash or pita. While I prefer pita, Spitz serves its döner meat—beef and lamb, chicken or mixed meats—on toasted lavash bread, although you can also get it in bowls, “doquitos” (Mediterranean-style taquitos), baskets or salads. The basic “Street Cart Döner” is pretty hard to improve upon: a choice of lamb/beef, chicken, mixed meats or falafel served on lavash or as a wrap, with romaine lettuce, shredded cabbage, fried lavash chips, tomato, onion, green pepper, cucumber, tzatziki and garlic aioli. Yes, it’s as messy as it sounds. The falafel—which I loved at the downtown Spitz location—was dry and lacked flavor at the Sugar House locale. It certainly didn’t taste like it was made in-house. But be sure to order the crunchy fried garbanzos with olives to nibble on while you’re tempted by Spitz’ craft cocktails, wine, homemade sangria and beer. Reviewed March 3. 1201 E. Wilmington Ave., 385-322-1140, SpitzSLC.com

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Oasis Cafe

Drop in for lunch—even on a Monday or Tuesday—and chances are that most tables will be filled; I can’t think of another restaurant in town that caters to such a loyal crowd of repeat customers. The food is excellent, and the prices almost seem like those of yesteryear. A grilled-cheese sandwich and soup will set you back $9, but you really get four crustless half-sandwiches, alongside a heavenly, fresh-tasting roasted tomato and fennel soup. Another excellent option—either for lunch or dinner—is the tender, flaky grilled salmon filet ($13 for lunch, $20 for dinner), which comes with a luscious honey-lavender polenta cake,

fresh arugula and grilled tomato, drizzled with saba, extra virgin olive oil and merlot vinegar. Unlike at many other restaurants, vegans and vegetarians are well-tended to here, with dishes like wild mushroom strozzapreti, udon peanut stir-fry or eggplant Parmesan risotto with roasted vegetable pomodoro. Keep in mind also that Oasis Cafe serves breakfast/brunch until 2:30 p.m., so if you’ve a craving for the bodacious breakfast burrito, a German buttermilk pancake, or an “Oasis Scramble” for lunch, that’s a doable option. Reviewed April 7. 151 S. 500 East, 801322-0404, OasisCafeSLC.com

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REVIEW BITES

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THE JUNGLE BOOK

The Brand Necessities

CINEMA

The Jungle Book can’t resist making an action-adventure tale kid-friendly. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

T

Iron Man (2008) Robert Downey Jr. Gwyneth Paltrow Rated PG-13

Cinderella (2015) Lily James Cate Blanchett Rated PG

APRIL 14, 2016 | 37

101 Dalmatians (1996) Glenn Close Jeff Daniels Rated G

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The Jungle Book (1967) Phil Harris Sebastian Cabot Rated G

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who considers any human a Mowgli (Neel Sethi) and Baloo in The Jungle Book threat. Yet that opening sequence suggests a tone that’s much more about adventure than about a kid-friendly “Where the hell is the kid stuff?” romp. Favreau builds big set pieces around The shame of it is that there’s a lot to like Mowgli’s attempt to escape Shere Khan in a about individual pieces of The Jungle Book, stampeding herd of wildebeest, and Mow- even beyond its visual impact. Young Neel gli’s kidnapping by the apes who bring him Sethi gives an endearingly charismatic to the orangutan King Louie (Christopher performance, which is particularly imWalken). The photorealism of the sets is pressive considering he isn’t working with immersive, and the animals are dynamic a single other human actor. There’s even creations; when Shere Khan launches an an intriguing contemporary political alattack here, it’s physical and—considering it could look like he’s leaping out of the legory built into the tale of Mowgli as an screen if you’re watching in 3-D—fairly immigrant in this world—especially given terrifying for young children. Imagine a that the main villain is an orange-haired movie under the Disney banner, based on a bully who threatens everyone, and thinks Disney animated property, that’s not at all the immigrant is a danger that needs to be eliminated. meant for kids. Well, you can kill that imagination, beBut The Jungle Book isn’t simply a movie. cause that’s too much to ask. Since the It’s a Disney brand, and there’s too much at songs from the 1967 movie are among the stake to build a movie on scary thrills withmost recognizable things about it, you can out also including comfortably nostalgic be sure that we’ll get snippets of “The Bear callbacks and cuddly talking animals. ParNecessities” and “I Wanna Be Like You,” ents bringing their youngsters will find a even though they feel completely out of movie that’s really not for them—and would place in this interpretation of the source have been even better if Disney hadn’t tried material. The action stops more or less to convince them otherwise. CW dead in its tracks so a few additional cute critters can emerge while Mowgli tries to procure honeycomb for Baloo, as almost all THE JUNGLE BOOK the comic relief—including Murray’s vocal BB.5 performance—falls flat. There’s a “studio Neel Sethi notes” vibe radiating from large chunks Bill Murray of this thing, as though some executive looked at a draft of the script built on the Ben Kingsley pure excitement of the story, and fumed, Rated PG

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he opening moments of The Jungle Book promise something … well, “different” might be too hopeful a choice of words. It’s a high-energy sequence, involving the “man-cub” Mowgli (Neel Sethi) darting through the jungle with his wolf siblings, scampering up trees and across branches in a pursuit game that’s also a form of survival training. As the frame bursts with energetically-staged 3-D imagery, there’s a glimmer of optimism: What if Disney has taken the radical step of turning one of its animated classics into a flat-out action movie? These are the things one must hope for, since it’s a long-ago-surrendered reality that Disney will keep making live-action versions of its animated catalog until money stops pouring into their pockets for doing so. From Alice in Wonderland and Cinderella to currently-in-development retellings of Beauty and the Beast and Dumbo, the release schedule will be full of recognizable titles stripped of their original cartoon context. But maybe, occasionally, the new version could have a reason to exist that’s not exclusively fiscal. Maybe, instead of using a name-brand as a crutch, Disney can use it as a launching point for a fresh point of view. And that’s what, at least initially, seems to be going on in director Jon Favreau’s (Iron Man) The Jungle Book. All the familiar characters from the Rudyard Kipling stories—at least as they are known by way of the 1967 Disney incarnation—are in place as the story unfolds of the orphaned boy raised by a pack of wolves. Bagheera the panther (Ben Kingsley) is here as Mowgli’s main guardian, as is the genial Baloo the bear (Bill Murray); the principal antagonist remains the tiger Shere Khan (Idris Elba),


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MOVIE TIMES AND LOCATIONS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

NEW THIS WEEK Information is correct at press time. Film release schedules are subject to change.

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BARBERSHOP: THE NEXT CUT BB.5 Spike Lee’s 2015 feature Chi-Raq was a satirical comedy about efforts to curb gang violence in Chicago’s black neighborhoods. Not many people saw it (though it’s great); like a lot of Spike Lee films, its anger makes it a tough sell. But by sheer coincidence, here comes a mildly funny but wholly sincere comedy from Lee’s cousin, Malcolm D. Lee. A sequel to the Barbershop films from 2002 and 2004, The Next Cut covers much of the same ground as Spike’s movie—Calvin (Ice Cube) makes his Chicago barbershop neutral ground for a gang ceasefire, while he and his employees and customers discuss the problems of black America—but in a congenial, non-confrontational way. Written by Kenya Barris (creator of TV’s Black-ish) and Tracy Oliver, the film raises tough questions honestly but only addresses them as deeply as its formula (Inoffensive Mainstream African-American Comedy) allows, yielding little insight. As well-meaning but insubstantial “issues” movies go, though, it’s a pleasant one, with a large, likable cast (including Cedric the Entertainer, Regina Hall, J.B. Smoove, Common, Nicki Minaj and New Girl’s Lamorne Morris) and a palpable respect for the community it represents. Opens April 15 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)—Eric D. Snider

38 | APRIL 14, 2016

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BORN TO BE BLUE BB.5 In an attempt to avoid the pitfalls of trite cradle-to-grave “troubled artist” biopics, writer/director Robert Budreau throws a little bit of everything at the wall in his profile of jazz trumpeter Chet Baker (Ethan Hawke)—and some of it even sticks. Set primarily circa 1966, it follows Baker’s efforts to re-start his career while recovering both from heroin addiction and from a brutal beating that forced him to re-learn how to play his instrument. The gamble is risky, since it allows for little time showing why Baker was actually considered great, and requires clunky expository dialogue. It’s also puzzling watching Budreau wrap his entire narrative around a fictionalized relationship between Baker and a struggling actress (Carmen Ejogo) who tries to help him stay clean. But after the shaky opening half-hour, including blackand-white scenes from a never-made biography of Baker’s life in the 1950s, it eventually settles into a solid story of a man trying to find a way back to his art. Hawke ultimate uncovers the soul of someone who viewed his addiction as necessary for his gift; it’s too bad the movie takes so many odd detours before it gets there. Opens April 15 at Tower Theatre. (R)—Scott Renshaw

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CRIMINAL BB.5 There’s no shortage of ludicrous action movies for teenagers, but let us sing the praises, however mildly and briefly, of far-fetched thrillers meant for adults—like this sober-minded (but nonsensical) piece of espionage fluff from the writers of Double Jeopardy and The Rock. When CIA spy Bill Pope (Ryan Reynolds) is killed before he can relay crucial information, his bosses use science to transfer the electrical impulses that constitute his “memories” to the brain of Jericho Stewart (Kevin Costner), a murderous sociopath whose frontal lobe is sufficiently underdeveloped to allow for such interpolation. Giving a CIA spook’s training and knowhow to a psycho goes wrong, of course, if not as outrageously wrong as one might hope. The entertainment value is in Costner’s loose performance, especially when Jericho starts Jekyll-andHyding between his own impulses and the influence of the good guy whose memories he inherited. Everything with Bill’s widow (Gal Gadot) and young daughter is perhaps too ridiculous, even for a ridiculous movie, and director Ariel Vromen lets the pace drag. But some day you’ll catch this on cable and think, “Hey, this isn’t bad!” Opens April 15 at theaters valleywide. (R)—EDS THE JUNGLE BOOK BB.5 See review p. 37. Opens April 15 at theaters valleywide. (PG) MY GOLDEN DAYS BBB Nostalgic, aching reminiscence gets the Arnaud Desplechin treatment—meaning that it’s a narrative full to nearly bursting

with tone shifts, emotional swings and cinematic flourishes. Beginning in the present with the story of an academic named Paul Dedalus (Mathieu Amalric) as he prepares to return to Paris from Tajikistan, it’s spent mostly in flashback to key events from Paul’s 1980s youth (Quentin Dolmaire), particularly his mercurial relationship with his first love, Esther (Lou Roy-Lecollinet). Once Desplechin settles into that story, it’s an affecting story of young romance, complicated by their long-distance relationship, the challenges of volatile family and friendship connections, and their respective insecurities. You just need to wade through Desplechin’s penchant for diversion—like an odd subplot involving young Paul’s involvement in smuggling documents to Soviet Jews—and find it endearing rather than distracting that he’s so fond of stuff like split-screens, iris shots, direct address to the camera and ghostly apparitions. This is a filmmaker who’s always been committed to conveying turbulent feelings in an unapologetically big way—which means he’s found an ideal kind of story to tell. Opens April 15 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (R)—SR

SPECIAL SCREENINGS ALICE WALKER: TRUTH IN BEAUTY See p. 23. At Rose Wagner Center, April 20, 7 p.m. (NR) HALF BAKED At Brewvies, April 18, 10 p.m. (R)

HITCHCOCK/TRUFFAUT At Park City Film Series, April 15-16 @ 8 p.m., April 17 @ 6 p.m. (NR) HOW TO CHANGE THE WORLD At Main Library, April 19, 7 p.m. (NR)

CURRENT RELEASES

THE BOSS BB.5 Melissa McCarthy stars as Michelle Darnell, a corporate dragon lady/self-help guru trying to come back from an insider-trading conviction with the help of her former assistant (Kristen Bell). McCarthy can be wonderfully vulnerable as an actor, and can also play her physicality for broad laughs completely ungrounded in reality. But the screenplay—credited to McCarthy and her husband/ director Ben Falcone—tries to have it both ways, giving Michelle a tough childhood that shaped her cutthroat personality while also involving her in a massive street brawl between competing bands of baked-goods-selling girls. You’re always going to get at least a few brilliant moments from McCarthy, and Bell makes for an appealing

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THE CLAN BB It’s perversely fascinating to watch a filmmaker take a real-life story and focus on everything that is least interesting about it. Set in 1980s Argentina, Pablo Trapero’s drama follows the activities of Arquímedes Puccio (Guillermo Francella), a merchant and government official who ran a profitable side business leading a criminal enterprise kidnapping people and murdering them once the ransom was paid. The central conflict theoretically involves the moral qualms of Arquímedes’ son Alex (Peter Lanzani), a rugby star who helped with the crimes, especially as he considers a normal life with his girlfriend Mónica (Stefanía Koessl). But Trapero spends too little time on either Arquímedes’ rationalizations for his actions or on Alex’s growing anxieties, instead focusing long stretches on the kidnapping operations themselves, and a back-and-forth chronology that serves little narrative purpose. And considering the significance of the time frame—Argentina’s shift from military dictatorship to democracy—you could get lost in the story’s political dynamics without a working knowledge of Argentine history. A few solid performance moments can’t overcome a sense that we’ve left a story about an actual crime family without knowing much about who they are. Opens April 15 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (R)—SR

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foil. There’s just too much awkward collision between the attempt at a redemptive character arc and the part where she’s katana-fighting with Peter Dinklage on a heli-pad. (R)—SR DEMOLITION B.5 Occasionally in a movie, you’ll arrive at The Moment of Nope: when a story loses you, irretrievably. Here, it occurs when Davis Mitchell (Jake Gyllenhaal)—an investment banker whose wife has died in a car accident—begins processing his unexpressed emotions in letters to a vending-machine company’s customer service representative (Naomi Watts). It’s just one of many writerly contrivances in Bryan Sipe’s script, which also finds Watts’ character stalking Davis because she’s so touched by his plight, and Davis playing with guns with her troubled teenage son. Pretty much nothing represents actual human behavior; Gyllenhaal’s performance feels lost in all the increasingly ridiculous things Davis does as he wanders through his not-exactly-grieving toward a climax that feels exploitative and unearned. Nearly two hours is a long time to wait for some hope, especially after a narrative so full of nope. (R)—SR

MOVIE TIMES AND LOCATIONS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET KRISHA BBBB Writer/director Trey Edward Shults’ simple but magnificently crafted story observes a Thanksgiving family gathering, where black-sheep Krisha (Krisha Fairchild)—a 60-something recovering alcoholic—is trying to prove that she’s gotten her act together, including to her estranged son (played by Shults). It could have felt gimmicky that Shults uses his own family— including Fairchild, his real-life aunt—but Krisha never plays like some surrogate airing of dirty laundry. From the extended opening tracking shot through the subsequent freewheeling chronology, and especially through stunning sound design, Shults puts us inside the head of a woman who can’t completely cope with her environment, and for whom self-medicating simply allows the world finally to slow down. Fairchild’s wrenching performance anchors one of the great film portraits of an addict, and of a wellintentioned family with no clue how to help her. (R)—SR

PARK CITY Cinemark Holiday Village 1776 Park Ave. 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

Broadway Centre Cinemas 111 E. 300 South 801-321-0310 SaltLakeFilmSociety.org

Redstone 8 Cinemas 6030 N. Market 435-575-0220 Redstone8Cinemas.com

Century 16 South Salt Lake 125 E. 3300 South 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

DAVIS COUNTY AMC Loews Layton Hills 9 728 W. 1425 North, Layton 801-774-8222 AMCTheatres.com

Cinemark Sugar House 2227 S. Highland Drive 801-466-3699 Cinemark.com Water Gardens Cinema 6 1945 E. Murray-Holladay Road 801-273-0199 WaterGardensTheatres.com Megaplex 12 Gateway 165 S. Rio Grande St. 801-304-4636 MegaplexTheatres.com Redwood Drive-In 3688 S. Redwood Road 801-973-7088 Tower Theatre 836 E. 900 South 801-321-0310 SaltLakeFilmSociety.org WEST VALLEY 5 Star Cinemas 8325 W. 3500 South, Magna 801-250-5551 RedCarpetCinemas.com Carmike 12 1600 W. Fox Park Drive, West Jordan 801-562-5760 Carmike.com Cinemark 24 Jordan Landing 7301 S. Bangerter Highway 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Cinemark Valley Fair Mall 3601 S. 2700 West, West Valley City 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Showcase Cinemas 6 5400 S. Redwood Road, Taylorsville 801-957-9032 RedCarpetCinemas.com

Cinemark Sandy 9 9539 S. 700 East, Sandy 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

Megaplex 20 at The District 11400 S. Bangerter Highway 801-304-INFO MegaplexTheatres.com

Megaplex Legacy Crossing 1075 W. Legacy Crossing Blvd., Centerville 801-397-5100 MegaplexTheatres.com WEBER COUNTY Cinemark Tinseltown 14 3651 Wall Ave., Ogden 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Megaplex 13 at The Junction 2351 Kiesel Ave., Ogden 801-304-INFO MegaplexTheatres.com UTAH COUNTY Carmike Wynnsong 4925 N. Edgewood Drive, Provo 801-764-0009 Carmike.com Cinemark American Fork 715 W. 180 North, American Fork 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Cinemark Movies 8 2230 N. University Parkway, Orem 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Cinemark Provo Town Center 1200 Town Center Blvd., Provo 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Cinemark University Mall 1010 S. 800 East, Provo 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com Megaplex Thanksgiving Point 2935 N. Thanksgiving Way 801-304-INFO MegaplexTheatres.com Water Gardens Cinema 8 790 E. Expressway Ave. Spanish Fork 801-798-9777 WaterGardensTheatres.com Water Gardens Cinema 6 912 W. Garden Drive Pleasant Grove 801-785-3700 WaterGardensTheatres.com

APRIL 14, 2016 | 39

Megaplex Jordan Commons 9400 S. State, Sandy 801-304-INFO MegaplexTheatres.com

Gateway 8 206 S. 625 West, Bountiful 801-292-7979 RedCarpetCinemas.com

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Cinemark Draper 12129 S. State, Draper 801-619-6494 Cinemark.com

Cinemark Tinseltown USA 720 W. 1500 North, Layton 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

SOUTH VALLEY Century 16 Union Heights 7800 S. 1300 East, Sandy 800-326-3264 Cinemark.com

Cinemark Station Park 900 W. Clark Lane, Farmington 801-447-8561 Cinemark.com

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MIDNIGHT SPECIAL BBB Writer-director Jeff Nichols branches out into science-fiction in this story about Roy Tomlin (Michael Shannon), a Texan fundamentalist cult member whose 8-year-old son, Alton (Jaeden Lieberher), has certain awe- and reverence-inspiring powers. The sect treats Alton spouts of gibberish as scripture, and the NSA wants to know how this gibberish contains government secrets. Roy, his faithful friend Lucas (Joel Edgerton), and the boy’s mother (Kirsten Dunst) want nothing but Alton’s safety as the date of a foretold spiritual event approaches. Once it’s all laid out, the story is simple, almost to a fault; don’t expect to be surprised by much. But Nichols reveals details skillfully, weaving an intriguing narrative out of an ordinary one. This deft storytelling and sincere, plainspoken performances let Nichols harvest much wonderment from his ordinary, extraordinary tale. (PG-13)—EDS

SALT LAKE CITY Brewvies Cinema Pub 677 S. 200 West 801-355-5500 Brewvies.com

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HARDCORE HENRY B It’s a “first-person movie,” as in, “Let me be the first person to tell you how bad this movie is.” Writer/director Ilya Naishuller’s barelycoherent fantasy shoot-’em-up is seen entirely through the eyes of its title character: a voiceless, bionic amnesiac who must stop a villain from creating an army of super-soldiers. The ever-hammy Sharlto Copley pops up in different disguises as Henry’s guide, but neither he nor the movie ever explains what, exactly, the hell is going on. As a gimmick, the first-person POV doesn’t get in the way (much), but it doesn’t make us feel like we’re part of the action, either. The scant humor is sophomoric; the violence, predictably, is graphic and plentiful. It’s not even like watching someone play a video game. It’s like watching a video of someone watching someone play a video game. (R)—EDS

THEATER DIRECTORY


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0 | APRIL 14, 2016

TRUE BY B I L L F RO S T @bill_frost

Flesh & Clone

TV

Orphan Black returns with multiplied tension; The Night Manager bests Bond. Orphan Black Thursday, April 14 (BBC America)

Season Premiere: Tense sci-fi soap Orphan Black has so much going within its clone-crowded narrative that the news of out-there musician Peaches appearing in Season 4, playing herself, barely even registers (in fact, it almost makes too much sense). In this chapter, Sarah (Tatiana Maslany) sets out to investigate Beth, the deceased sister-clone whose identity she stole at the beginning of the series, and the origins of the clone conspiracy—which of course leads to trouble, as does trying learn anything in this universe. Unrelated … maybe … yet another clone, a mysterious outsider who’s been aware of her multi-sister status all along, enters the picture, upping Maslany’s character load for the season to eight (and still no Emmy, huh?). One again, There’s Too Many Shows, but definitely move Orphan Black to the top of your TV homework pile.

Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt Friday, April 15 (Netflix)

Season Premiere: Last year, Netflix snapped up Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt after NBC decided to get out of the “thinky” comedy business and canceled it before ever going to air; if you can name a single now-dead sitcom the network ran with instead, you probably work at NBC Universal (for now). Kimmy (Ellie Kemper) won hearts as a bubbly, wideeyed rescued ex-doomsday cult member discovering the modern world for the first time, but where to take her in Season 2? Don’t worry, she’s still plenty naïve—and, after 15 years in an underground bunker (possible spoiler alert), still a virgin. Also brace for waaay more of UKS breakout star Tituss Burgess (“Peeno! Noir!”), if not a return appearance by Kimmy’s bunker mates (including, if there’s any justice, Jon Hamm’s hilarious cult leader, Rev. Richard Wayne Gary Wayne).

So Good So-So So What? Containment Tuesday, April 19 (The CW)

Series Debut: Under the Dome, Colony, any dystopian-future YA book/movie you care to name—should it be disturbing that ’Merica seems to love stories about communities held captive? Go write a thesis or call Alex Jones; I have TV to review here. Oddly paired with the superhero fun of The Flash, the dark Containment follows the panic, societal breakdown and, of course, conspiratorial whisperings behind the outbreak of a deadly virus in Atlanta (first The Walking Dead, now this—Georgia can’t catch a break). Between the pretty citizens freaking out and dying inside the quarantined area, and the pretty scientists on the outside racing to find a cure, there’s mucho Big Drama to go around. But enough to carry 13 episodes? Here it comes: Containment isn’t all that infectious.

The Night Manager Tuesday, April 19 (AMC)

Miniseries Debut: Tom Hiddleston is, of course, best-known for the films Midnight in Paris and Muppets Most Wanted, or a handful of Marvel movies as Thor’s uptight brother with the mullet (aka the Asgard Natural, or “Party in the back, extermination of the human race up front”). In The Night Manager, he plays a British ex-soldier charged with infiltrating the inner circle of an international businessman/criminal (Hugh Laurie) and taking down his armsdealing trade. The undercover-spy-in-too-deep trope isn’t

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Orphan Black (BBC America)

anything new, but Hiddleston and Laurie ¡Acting! off each other is expectedly fantastic, and The Night Manager is every bit the Bond adventure that Spectre should have been— and, from the look of it, probably almost as expensive. At least AMC is spending some of that Walking Dead money wisely.

Time Traveling Bong Wednesday, April 20 (Comedy Central)

Miniseries Debut: Ilana Glazer, the bigger-haired half of Broad City’s comic duo, is one of the funniest women on the planet—within the context of Broad City as “Ilana.” Outside of it, we don’t yet know. Time Traveling Bong, premiering after the Season 3 finale of Broad City on 4/20 (dude …), pairs her with a new partner, Paul W. Downs (also of Broad City), in a three-episode miniseries that’s summed up entirely by its title: Glazer and Downs play cousins who discover a bong that enables time travel, and they subsequently “blaze through time.” Until the bong breaks, that is, and the two become lost in the space-time continuum. TTB is even more stoopid than you’re already imagining it to be, but, hell, it’s only three half-hour episodes over three nights—you know the proper states in which to enjoy this; one is Colorado.

Listen to Bill Mondays at 8 a.m. on X96 Radio From Hell, and on the TV Tan podcast via iTunes, Stitcher and BillFrost.tv.


Best Fests

Earthy octet Cloud Cult watches its carbon footprint while gazing skyward.

Two eagerly anticipated summer concert series announce their 2016 lineups.

BY BRIAN STAKER comments@cityweekly.net @stakerized

BY RANDY HARWARD rharward@cityweekly.net

C

W Graham Tolbert

hen spring rolls around, teasing summer, local music fans pant in anticipation of two particularly well-curated concert series: the Salt Lake City Arts Council’s Twilight Concert Series and the Red Butte Garden Outdoor Concert Series. Both announced their lineups this week. The 2016 Twilight Concert Series, held in downtown’s Pioneer Park, is a favorite for its sheer bangfor-the-buck value. Individual shows cost $5 in advance, $10 day of show, and a series pass is $30—a steal, since any one Twilight bill would command more at another venue. Factor in the food trucks, the craft fair partnership with Craft Lake City, and the fact that it’s an all-ages experience where you can still get a cold beer, and it’s even better. “Attending a Twilight concert is definitely more than just seeing a killer live show,” says Jesse Schaefer, performing arts program manager with the Arts Council. The experience, he says, is similar to that of festivals like Coachella and Bumbershoot, “albeit on a slightly smaller scale. And you’re in the core downtown area of a metropolitan city, which makes it even more special.” The Twilight series begins July 21 with Chet Faker and runs weekly with Big Grams with Anderson Paak & The Free Nationals (July 28), Diplo, Jenny Lewis with Shannon and the Clams (Aug. 11), Pusha T. and Digable Planets (Aug. 18), Grimes with Jagwar Ma (Aug. 25) and Fitz and the Tantrums with Trombone Short & Orleans (Sep. 1). City Weekly Best of Utah Music winners Sneeky Long (Best DJ—Open Format) opens for Diplo, and The National Parks (Band of the Year) support Fitz and the Tantrums. The Aces (Best Pop Artist) and Grits Green (Best Hip-Hop/Rap Artist) will open other dates TBA. Directly east of Pioneer Park, in SLC’s breathtaking eastern foothills, the 2016 Red Butte Garden series, kicks off with The Lumineers on May 25. Another 29 shows follow, including The Monkees (June 16), Tears for Fears (July 6), Neko Case, k.d. lang and Laura Veirs (July 8), Willie Nelson and Family (July 28), the Tedeschi Trucks Band, Los Lobos and North Mississippi Allstars (Aug. 7), Ryan Adams (Aug. 15), Wilco (Aug. 30) and Jason Isbell (Sep. 15). Promoter Chris Mautz says the series continues to thrive thanks to the “tremendous support” of the fans, which allows the series to attract “a wide spectrum of artists and achieve our goal of keeping awareness of the Garden high, while being part of something pretty unique.” Tickets for the Red Butte Garden shows go on sale to members on Apr. 25 at 7 p.m., and to the public on May 2 at 9 a.m. Tickets for the Twilight Concert Series are available now at Graywhale locations and 24tix.com. See TwilightConcerts.com and RedButteGarden.org for more information. CW

Cloud Cult

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w/ Paul Fonfara The Urban Lounge 241 S. 500 East Sunday, April 17, 7 p.m. 801-746-0557 $16 in advance, $18 day of show TheUrbanLoungeSLC.com

CLOUD CULT

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in a song like “There’s So Much Energy In Us,” from the album Light Chasers (2010), the band’s genius is in being able to synthesize all the energies swirling around this cloud chamber of an ensemble. Another reason Cloud Cult avoids being a gimmicky miasma, staying grounded while its songs often gaze skyward, is its multimedia approach. In addition to its multi-dimensional sound, blending genres from classical to rock to folk, Minowa’s wife Connie and artist Scott West—in addition to providing backing vocals—each create a painting to be auctioned off at the end of the night. And, with their newly released 10th album, The Seeker, the band moves into narrative feature films. Once again defying stereotypes and sidestepping genre boundaries, The Seeker also provides the plotline for a movie of the same name, starring Josh Radnor of the TV show How I Met Your Mother. “We started working on the album about two and a half years ago,” Minowa says, “and I didn’t realize that it was a storyline until early 2015.” He wrote a treatment for the film, which follows a woman who experienced hard losses at a young age and became “a little cynical,” but is led on a new path by “something from the past.” Slated for release later this year, The Seeker symbolizes Minowa and his Cult’s musical journey as it has expanded and evolved—and is still not without its difficulties. Now that Minowa has two young kids (ages 4 and 6), it’s getting harder to go on the road, so he is considering switching to fly-out tours. It’s hard to say how that will impact the band’s carbon footprint, but it will change one thing, primarily for Utah fans who seek to see Cloud Cult live. “Unfortunately, it ends up altering the kinds of cities we can visit,” Minowa notes. “This might be the last [time] we’re in Salt Lake for the foreseeable future.” CW

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loud Cult is an ethereal-sounding name, and the band can be by turns dreamy, lush and even philosophical. But they are also, in their own way, down-toearth and direct. Perhaps that is a result of their concern for the planet, which extends to ecological practices in their recording and touring. The Duluth, Minn.-based experimental indie band was founded by singer-songwriter Craig Minowa more than 20 years ago, as a solo studio project after the sudden death of his 2-year-old son. By the time of Cloud Cult’s third album, They Live On the Sun (2003)—released on Minowa’s Earthology label, which reached No. 1 on college radio charts—the 40-year old with a B.A. in environmental science “was getting pressure to create an actual band.” Cloud Cult became a trio, later expanding to a sextet and, now, an octet. Earthology—the studio and the band’s philosophy—is the heart of Cloud Cult. They take it extremely seriously. The studio, built on Minowa’s organic farm in Wisconsin, has solar panels. All of their products are manufactured with 100 percent organic, recycled or post-consumer recycled materials. The large band also tracks its carbon footprint in all aspects of their work—and takes steps to erase it. “We figure out how much CO2 we put out, for everything from the energy we’re using on stage to traveling in airplanes, and we figure out how many trees we would need to plant to absorb all of that,” Minowa says “So, we plant a few hundred trees every year.” And, although Minowa is proud to say the band is “completely off the grid,” Cloud Cult isn’t above helping sustain it: They buy sustainable energy, created mostly via wind turbines on Native American reservations, to put back into the grid. Minowa notes that, early on, it seemed “cultish” to be environmentalists, and it caused prospective listeners to make judgments about the band, especially in their early days. “Back in the early 2000s,” he explains, “it wasn’t very trendy, and when people heard that, they assumed we were some kind of hippie jam band, or a really preachy folk band, or something like that. There were a lot of stereotypes [formed] about what it meant to be an environmentalist and a musician. But over the years, the green trend has really taken off, and those stereotypes don’t seem to be applied anymore.” Cloud Cult busted through the haze of labels with their music, racking up an impressive list of critical plaudits. Aurora Borealis (2004) was nominated for Album of the Year in the Minnesota Music Awards, alongside Prince and Paul Westerberg. The notoriously stingy Pitchfork rated Advice from the Happy Hippopotamus (2006) highly, and The Denver Post included The Meaning of 8 (2007) in its top 10 albums of the decade. Their next one, 2008’s Feel Good Ghosts (Tea Partying Through Tornadoes) led MTV to make a short feature about the band. The following year saw the band release a full-length documentary film, No One Said It Would Be Easy: A Film About Cloud Cult. Demonstrated

PHOTO COLLECTIVE STUDIOS

Living in the Cloud

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GRAHAM TOLBERT

CLOUD CULT


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SLC underground rapper Concise Kilgore has only his words, and the images they conjure. BY RANDY HARWARD rharward@cityweekly.net

L

ocal underground rapper Concise Kilgore once told City Weekly that he “spits random cool shit that rhymes.” Asked to explain, Concise says, “I like to use colorful, descriptive words that you may not have heard.” Words you may not have heard. The rhyme is unintentional. The words just came out. The track list for his third album, Kil Joy Division (Pink Cookies), gets your imagination working, evoking indiscriminate imagery like a Mexican Viking afterlife, defunct English post-punk bands, Mayan ruins, the Easter Bunny, snakes, pills and compensatory wheels. A list of corresponding song titles is not forthcoming. For now, Concise Kilgore is saying how his lyrics float toward him on the stream of consciousness. And, for that reason, he likes listeners to draw their own conclusions about the meaning of his words. You know, like they’re standing on the bank of the same stream on a different plane, incidentally encountering them. That free-floating feeling permeates Kil Joy Division. It’s as loose as it is tight. It can be atmospheric background music or a fullimmersion experience. Tones change within tunes. They might come on strong, like the dark, distorted pulse of the title track, a sonic allusion to the titular reference, then dissipate into sublime trance sounds and, finally, only the sound of a random candid moment from Concise’s life. Or, like on “Easter Pink”—which is actually about sex—it starts slow, builds to a certain rhythmic intensity, then pumps hard to the finish line. Floating between randomness and precision might seem contradictory. Opposites, however, go together. So when, in “Ochoa Valhalla,” Concise raps, “I don’t write/ it’s more like archery/ my arrows pierce your chest plate/ and slump you at high velocity,” then claims to have freestyled lines like, “piff fuchsia/ fluorescent fill-ins futura/ Fab Five formaldehyde/ freakin’ Kama Sutra,” it’s just two sides of one guy. The constant, according to Concise, is “imagery. I like to create imagery.” So you might play Kil Joy Division while doing odd jobs around the house. During its relatively lean 30-minute run time, you lose the thread as you ebb away from your speakers, but pick up snapshots as you flow back. Later, you might be at work, captive at your desk and tethered by earbuds to the music. That’s when you get the full picture. “It’s like jigsaw puzzles to me,” Concise says. “That’s basically how I write. If I’m tellin’ a general story, I get direct and straight to the point.” At the same time, he likes pulling things out of the air and piecing them together. “If it’s one of these songs where I can play with these crazy words, I’d rather play with these crazy words, and make you form an image for yourself. ’Cause it’s all different. It’s all subjective. I see it as [me meaning one thing] and a listener

THATGUYGIL

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CONCISE KILGORE

Concise Kilgore might see it as something totally different.” So on “Chichen Itza,” guest emcee Tristate—sounding like Doug E. Fresh tripping balls in limbo—repeatedly laments preadolescent smoking (or something). Then comes Concise, painting pictures with his crazy words. Those pictures aren’t of the mysterious ruins, beaches and turquoise water he saw when he visited Chichen Itza, but rather random images of Carhartt, ammunition, animals, weather, breakbeats and death adders. That’s Concise’s process. During the day, working at a 9-to-5 job that keeps him moving all day, he plucks words or phrases out of the air, puts them to scraps of paper, then “I’ll empty my pockets when I get home.” With the scraps in front of him, he assembles the words in a way that pleases him—and, hopefully, satisfies his listeners. “If somebody else is listenin’ to this, like another emcee or somethin’, [I want them to say], ‘Damn. He took his time to write this.’” Kil Joy Division finds Concise achieving that aim. Open to interpretation, it’s immensely enjoyable, with infinite replay value, as each new listen holds a new image for the listener. An image formed from words. Concise is all about his. “Yeah, that’s all [a rapper] has.” CW

CONCISE KILGORE

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Live Music Friday & Saturday 6pm - 9pm


Ever since the Aston twins each decided the other was a jerk, there have been two versions of Gene Loves Jezebel, the beloved British band that gave us glammy goth-rock songs like “Gorgeous,” “Motion of Love,” “Heartache” and “Desire” in the late ’80s. When they settled their legal dispute in 2009, Michael claimed the United States for himself, and Jay took the U.K. If either of them decide to tour in the other’s domain, they must call themselves Michael (or Jay) Aston’s Gene Loves Jezebel. So, on this show, don’t expect any of the Jayonly GLJ tunes, like “Jealous,” from 1990’s Kiss of Life (Geffen). That’s too bad, because the sassy rocker got so much airplay here in Salt Lake City. But a lot of people think the band’s best albums are its two predecessors: 1986’s Discover and 1987’s The House of Dolls. Since the four aforementioned fan favorites came from those two albums, most fans oughta be happy tonight. (Randy Harward) Liquid Joe’s, 1249 E. 3300 South, 8 p.m., $12 in advance, $15 day of show, LiquidJoes.net

FRIDAY, SATURDAY, SUNDAY 4.15, 16, 17 Booker T. Jones

Soul innovator Booker T. Jones has had—and continues to have—an awe-inspiring career. Born in Memphis, Tenn., Jones was something of a musical prodigy, learning to play the oboe, sax, trombone and piano at an exceptionally young age. He went on to play the key-

Booker T. Jones

BOSSAGENCY.COM

Gene Loves Jezebel

board, bass, guitar and, most notably, the Hammond B-3 organ. In his teens and 20s, Jones went to work for Stax Records as a studio musician and writer, variously crafting hits for Eddie Floyd, Otis Redding and Albert King. His first major success came with the instrumental “Green Onions” by Booker T. and the M.G.s, released in 1962. Since then, Jones has received three Grammy Awards, released more than 20 albums, and collaborated with Neil Young, Elton John, Lou Reed and even Rancid—playing organ on “Up to No Good,” from 2013’s Let the Dominos Fall (Hellcat Records), along with countless others. Sound the Alarm, released in 2013, heralded Jones’ return to Stax, with favorable reviews. Jones’ signature soul, R&B and rock sound is as versatile as it is ageless. (Zac Smith) The Egyptian Theatre, 328 Main, Park City, Friday & Saturday, 8 p.m.; Sunday, 6 p.m., $35-$55 ($5 more day of show), EgyptianTheatreCompany.org

Gene Loves Jezebel song. So, when he juxtaposes one “me” with the other, comparing his serious stuff to his, sigh, “hit,” he’s simply asking us to check out what else he has to offer. “Nobody,” and the other songs on Spose’s fifth album Why Am I So Happy? (on his own P. Dank label), are hilarious and incisive, a much-needed rap reality check. Universal’s loss is our gain, as Spose capitalized on the experience, using social media to ensure he didn’t fade away— his newer YouTube tracks still clock in the six- and seven-figure range. With Tommy B, The Underclassmen and Young Yankee. (RH) In the Venue, 219 S. 600 West, 7 p.m., $14, IntheVenueSLC.com

Spose

SATURDAY 4.16 Spose

CONCORD MUSIC GROUP

“This is me,” wrote Spose in an email to City Weekly. “This” was a link to the video for his song “(Nobody).” He probably sent it to every other media outlet on his tour schedule, too. I mean, it’s not like we’re special. Or awesome. “But, whether I like it or not,” Spose followed up, “I’m most known for this.” That link pointed to “I’m Awesome,” a track from his self-released 2007 album, Preposterously Dank. The track went viral and, as of this writing, has 12.7 million views on YouTube. It also netted Spose a deal with Universal Republic Records, which lasted all of one album—because Spose, who champions the working class and lives to skewer the egomania and hypocrisy of rap music—wouldn’t sell out and write a pop

ANDREW FOSTER

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44 | APRIL 14, 2016

BY RANDY HARWARD, BRIAN STAKER & ZAC SMITH

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Salt Lake City band The Nods play a style of garage punk (for lack of a better term) that harks back to classic ’60s garage-rock bands like The Seeds or The Sonics: tambourines and treble knobs aflutter, reverb pedals pushed to the floor like the accelerator pedal of your dad’s GTO. Their sound also connects with ’80s revivalists like Echo & the Bunnymen and The Jesus and Mary Chain. Their 2015 album Ariadne’s Thread (available on their Bandcamp page) stitches a seven-segmented web that ensnares you with its infectious snarl. True to the punk part of their label, “Brittle System,” “Ignore the Scene” and others engage in a little of the protestation that punk rock can’t seem to do without. But there’s fun, too, with the tongue-in-cheek “Pretty Song,” and introspection with “Chromatic Recollection.” Josh & Ian, Soft Limbs and Chalk open. These local acts, together on the same bill, bridge the gap between the sounds emanating out of garages in the ’60s, the ’80s, into the present and beyond. (Brian Staker) The Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 8 p.m., free, TheUrbanLoungeSLC.com.

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Back in the aughts, the Mothership landed at Kingsbury Hall. Rarely do you see people get out of their seats in that venue, but we all rushed the stage like UFO nuts eager for abduction. When the band came on, it seemed like they played for half an hour or more before George Clinton showed up. When he finally appeared, Clinton looked majestic in his robes, like space royalty—nay, a god! The great architect behind Parliament Funkadelic’s intergalactic sound, a rocket fuel composed of whomping bass, big horns and Minimoog (also credit original keyboard player Bernie Worrell for that, especially on “Flash Light”), then proceeded to, as the song says, “tear the roof off the sucker.” There are gonna be a lot of happy funk fans in the roofless house tonight. (RH) The Depot, 400 W. South Temple, 8:30 p.m., $30 in advance, $33 day of show, DepotSLC.com

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THURSDAY 4.14

Utah Opera Resident Artists

This week’s installment in the nonprofit Excellence in the Community concert series takes you to the opera. Utah Opera’s Resident Artists program has been established for singers and pianists as a stepping-stone between graduate school and a career in operatic performance. The current season’s resident artists include soprano Jessica Jones, mezzo-soprano Sarah Coit, tenor Christian Sanders, baritone Markel Reed and pianist Timothy Accurso. These artists are already well-traveled in their studies, with residencies and guest performances at some of the major opera houses around the world. The evening gives a local audience an opportunity to preview some of the upand-coming faces in the opera world. (Brian Staker) Gallivan Center, 239 S. Main, 7:30 p.m., free, ExcellenceConcerts.org

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48 | APRIL 14, 2016

CONCERTS & CLUBS

LEX B. ANDERSON

PINKY’S

In an effort to be the best in Salt Lake’s brunch game, RYE has decided to focus our aim on the a.m. hours. Effective February 29th, RYE will be open Monday-Friday from 9am-2pm Saturday and Sunday from 9am-3pm. What this means for you: even more house-made breakfast and brunch specials, snappier service-same fresh, locally-sourced fixins. Come on in. www.ryeslc.com

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Apr 26: Big Black Delta Apr 27: Dressy Bessy Apr 28: The Widdler Apr 29: Napalm Death / Melvins Apr 30: Tokimonsta May 3: The Slackers

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THURSDAY 4.14 LIVE MUSIC

LIVE MUSIC

Basement (Kilby Court) Berlin Breaks + T-Rex’s Birthday Bash (The State Room) Booker T. Jones (Egyptian Theatre) see p. 44 The Cave Singers (The Urban Lounge) Dueling Pianos (The Tavernacle) Gene Loves Jezebel (Liquid Joe’s) see p. 44 Larusso + Fists of Funk + Signal Sound + All Hope Contained (Billboard-Live!) MISS DJ LUX (Downstairs) Nathaniel Rateliff & The Night Sweats (The Depot) see above The Night Spin Collective (Area 51) Retro Lounge Club Night (Maxwell’s) Wolf Alice (The Complex)

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Bombino + Last Good Tooth (The State Room) Booker T. Jones (Egyptian Theatre) see p. 44 Cloud Cult + Paul Fonfara (The Urban Lounge) see p. 41 Crossroads Urban Center Beer, Blues & Brats Benefit Party (Wasatch Presbyterian Church) Judah & The Lion (The Complex) L.A. Guns’ Tracii Guns (In The Venue)

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APRIL 14, 2016 | 49

The Bastard Suns (Metro Bar) Bent Self (The Dawg Pound) Blameshift + New Years Day + Sylar + My Enemies & I (Billboard-Live!) Booker T. Jones (Egyptian Theatre) see p. 44 Darkness Divided (The Loading Dock) Delusions of Grandeur (The Urban Lounge) DJ Juggy (Downstairs) Ferry Corsten (Park City Live) Joy Spring Band (Jazz) (Sugar House Coffee) Lukas Graham (The State Room) Problem Daughter (Kilby Court) Retro Lounge Club Night (Maxwell’s) Select Sound 4/20 Fest feat. Concise

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Absu (Metro Bar) DJ Courtney (Area 51) Hot Noise & Guest DJ (The Red Door) Jack Parker (Hog Wallow) Michael Dean Damron (Hog Wallow Pub) Mystic Circus (Kilby Court) So This Is Suffering + Lord Of War (The Loading Dock) Utah Opera Resident Artists (Gallivan Center) see p. 48

Kilgore, Flatbush Zombies, Dom Kennedy, Dizzy Wright, The Underachievers, Hieroglyphics, Devin the Dude, Burnell Washburn, Cig Burna, House of Lewis, DJ Juggy, SEM (The Complex) see p. 42 Smoke Siignals presents: (RIITU∆L) with Woolymammoth (Club X) Spose, Tommy B, The Und3rclassmen & more (In the Venue) see p. 44

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CROSSWORD PUZZLE

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BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ACROSS

45. Subject of Spike Lee's "When the Levees Broke" 46. Unlikely to cheat 47. Part of a pool for diving 49. Kenan's old partner on Nickelodeon 52. Rug rats 53. To date 56. Mogadishu-born supermodel 57. Lab fluids 58. End-of-week cry 60. Digs 63. Subj. of Snowden leaks

APRIL 14, 2016 | 51

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

| CITY WEEKLY |

SUDOKU

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

Last week’s answers

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

4. Architect Mies van der ____ 5. "____ Pinafore" 6. 1959 hit song "La ____" 7. Top draft status 8. In the 70s, say 9. Financial shellacking 10. Boot camp reply 11. "Star Wars" queen and senator 12. Sound of a woodpecker pecking 13. First sold in 1903, brand that promoted itself as being "for educational color work" 21. Signs, in Sorrento 23. Two-time loser to DDE 26. Dangerfield of "Caddyshack" 29. It might be late-breaking 30. Charlie ____ (French weekly in 2015 news) 31. Odd ending? 32. Pal of Scooby-Doo 36. Bryn ____ College 38. Subj. of the book "Live From New York" 39. Chris of MSNBC 40. Fey's costar in 2015's DOWN "Sisters" 1. Historic figure whose gravestone features the 41. Veteran sailor emblem of the Society of American Magicians 42. Source of an essential oil 2. Love, to hate? with medicinal properties 3. How GIFs play

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

1. What this puzzle starts with that, by 70-Across, it's lost 5. Test ban subject, briefly 10. Dealer's enemy 14. ____ occasion (never) 15. Craze 16. Obama's favorite character on "The Wire" 17. Locale of 1869's Golden Spike 18. Process, as ore 19. ____ spell (rest) 20. Hands (out) 22. 24-hour period in which no one understands you when you say "Yes" to them in Japanese? 24. Italian diminutive suffix 25. Long time 27. Muse for Lord Byron 28. Lupita who won an Oscar for her role in "12 Years a Slave" 30. Radiator sound 33. Kobe Bryant's team, on scoreboards 34. Loom 35. Biblical verb ending 36. Spydom's ____ Hari 37. Ekes out a victory in a stand-up competition? 40. They may be cast-iron 43. Cut short 44. Got an eyeful 48. "Bravo!" to a torero 49. ____ Ren ("Star Wars: The Force Awakens" character) 50. Do the watusi, e.g. 51. Computer hookup? 53. Vote in favor 54. Part of "btw" 55. Ones who make the symbol for the first element on the Periodic Table look really, really good? 59. Rx order 61. Meadow bird 62. "The Kelly File" anchor Kelly 64. It might be wild or dirty 65. Gen. Robt. ____ 66. Spring zodiac sign 67. ____ instant 68. UPS driver assignments: Abbr. 69. Three-country agreement of '94 70. Lacking 1-Across


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For the first year of the business, she sewed every order, but soon demand increased beyond what she and Cole could produce. So, they started a Kickstarter to fund the initial costs of finding a manufacturer, and raised $42,000 in just 15 days. The local support of Fawn has overwhelmed the Weckers. Now the couple rarely goes any where without seeing someone with one of their bags. “That never gets old,” Jenny says. She is so happy they took that leap two years ago and credits Cole for encouraging her to do something she loved. “You really can do whatever you really want to in life,” she says. “You just have to do it. We never thought our business would turn into what it is today, but we know that a lot of hard work has taken us to that place. We can’t wait to see where we are in another two years.” n

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52 | APRIL 14, 2016

| COMMUNITY | | CITYWEEKLY.NET |

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ARIES (March 21-April 19) “When I discover who I am, I’ll be free,” said novelist Ralph Ellison. Would you consider making that a paramount theme in the coming weeks? Will you keep it in the forefront of your mind, and be vigilant for juicy clues that might show up in the experiences headed your way? In suggesting that you do, I’m not guaranteeing that you will gather numerous extravagant insights about your true identity and thereby achieve a blissful eruption of total liberation. But I suspect that, at the very least, you will understand previously hidden mysteries about your primal nature. And as they come into focus, you will indeed be led in the direction of cathartic emancipation. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) “We never know the wine we are becoming while we are being crushed like grapes,” author Henri Nouwen said. I don’t think that’s true in your case, Taurus. Any minute now, you could get a clear intuition about what wine you will ultimately turn into once the grape-crushing stage ends. So my advice is to expect that clear intuition. Once you’re in possession of it, I bet the crushing will begin to feel more like a massage—maybe even a series of strong but tender caresses. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Your sustaining mantra for the coming weeks comes from Swedish poet Tomas Tranströmer: “I am not empty; I am open.” Say that aloud whenever you’re inclined to feel lonely or lost. “I am not empty; I am open.” Whisper it to yourself as you wonder about the things that used to be important but no longer are. “I am not empty; I am open.” Allow it to loop through your imagination like a catchy song lyric whenever you’re tempted to feel melancholy about vanished certainties or unavailable stabilizers or missing fillers. “I am not empty; I am open.”

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Adyashanti is my favorite mind-scrambling philosopher. One of his doses of crazy wisdom is just what you need to hear right now. “Whatever you resist you become,” he says. “If you resist anger, you are always angry. If you resist sadness, you are always sad. If you resist suffering, you are always suffering. If you resist confusion, you are always confused. We think that we resist certain states because they are there, but actually they are there because we resist them.” Can you wrap your imagination around Adyashanti’s counsel, Libra? I hope so, because the key to dissipating at least some of the dicey stuff that has been tweaking you lately is to stop resisting it. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) During every election season, media pundits exult in criticizing candidates who have altered their opinions about important issues. This puzzles me. In my understanding, an intelligent human is always learning new information about how the world works, and is therefore constantly evolving his or her beliefs and ideas. I don’t trust people who stubbornly cling to all of their musty dogmas. I bring this to your attention, Scorpio, because the coming weeks will be an especially ripe time for you to change your mind about a few things, some of them rather important. Be alert for the cues and clues that will activate dormant aspects of your wisdom. Be eager to see further and deeper.

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| COMMUNITY |

APRIL 14, 2016 | 53

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Friedrich Nietzsche published his first book, The Birth of Tragedy in 1872, when he was 28 years old. In 1886, he put out a revised edition that included a preface entitled “An Attempt at Self-Criticism.” In this unprecedented essay, he said that he now found his text “clumsy and embarrassing, its images frenzied and confused, sentimental, uneven in pace, so sure of its convictions that it is above any need for proof.” And yet he also glorified The Birth of Tragedy, praising it for its powerful impact on the world, for its “strange knack of seeking out its CANCER (June 21-July 22) According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you are close fellow-revelers and enticing them on to new secret paths and to tapping into hidden powers, dormant talents, and future dancing-places.” In accordance with the astrological omens, knowledge. Truths that have been off-limits are on the verge of Sagittarius, I invite you to engage in an equally brave and celcatching your attention and revealing themselves. Secrets you ebratory re-evaluation of some of your earlier life and work. have been concealing from yourself are ready to be plucked and transformed. And now I will tell you a trick you can use that will CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) enable you to fully cash in on these pregnant possibilities: Don’t “Go back to where you started and learn to love it more.” So adopt a passive wait-and-see attitude. Don’t expect everything advised Thaddeus Golas in his book The Lazy Man’s Guide to to happen on its own. Instead, be a willful magician who aggres- Enlightenment. I think that’s exactly what you should do right now, Capricorn. To undertake such a quest would reap longsively collects and activates the potential gifts. lasting benefits. Here’s what I propose: First, identify three dreams that are important for your future. Next, brainstorm LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) This would be a perfect moment to give yourself a new nickname about how you could return to the roots of your relationships like “Sugar Pepper” or “Honey Chile” or “Itchy Sweet.” It’s also with them. Finally, reinvigorate your love for those dreams. a favorable time to explore the joys of running in slow motion or Supercharge your excitement about them. getting a tattoo of a fierce howling bunny or having gentle sex standing up. This phase of your cycle is most likely to unfold with AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) maximum effectiveness if you play along with its complicated, “What am I doing here in mid-air?” Ted Hughes asks in his sometimes paradoxical twists and turns. The more willing you poem “Wodwo.” Right about now you might have an urge to are to celebrate life’s riddles as blessings in disguise, the more wonder that yourself. The challenging part of your situation is that you’re unanchored, unable to find a firm footing. The fun likely you’ll be to use the riddles to your advantage. part is that you have an unusual amount of leeway to improvise and experiment. Here’s a suggestion: Why not focus on the fun VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Right about now you might be feeling a bit extreme, maybe even part for now? You just may find that doing so will minimize the zealous or melodramatic. I wouldn’t be surprised if you were unsettled feelings. I suspect that as a result you will also be able tempted to make outlandish expostulations similar to those to accomplish some interesting and unexpected work. that the poet Arthur Rimbaud articulated in one of his histrionic poems: “What beast must I worship? What sacred images PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) should I destroy? What hearts shall I break? What lies am I How many fireflies would you have to gather together in order supposed to believe?” I encourage you to articulate salty senti- to create a light as bright as the sun? Entomologist Cole Gilbert ments like these in the coming days—with the understanding estimates the number to be 14,286,000,000. That’s probably that by venting your intensity you won’t need to actually act beyond your ability to accomplish, Pisces, so I don’t recommend it all out in real life. In other words, allow your fantasy life and you attempt it. But I bet you could pull off a more modest feat creative artistry to be boisterous outlets for emotions that with a similar theme: accumulating a lot of small influences that add up to a big effect. Now is an excellent time to capitalize on shouldn’t necessarily get translated into literal behavior. the power of gradual, incremental progress.

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54 | APRIL 14, 2016

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hings that begin with F: Forage and Fresco Italian Cafe. Both Salt Lake City restaurants recently announced they are closing—not because their food was bad, but because the owners are moving on to bigger and better things. The restaurant biz is by far one of the hardest and most stressful paths to choose in life. I know because I’ve owned a bakery/catering business and a bar, and worked for years as a chef and a waitron in a variety of businesses around town. Fresco is located in the back of the King’s English Bookstore in the lovely 15th and 15th neighborhood just south of the Harvard/Yale avenues. I always tell buyers looking in that area that 9th and 9th is for folks who’ve just graduated, and 15th and 15th is for the folks who teach the graduates. Both the bookstore and restaurant space started in a Tudor-style stucco house on a rare, neighborhood commercially zoned street. The eatery came after Betsy Burton opened the bookstore, and it was first called Afterwards. Brother and sister Rick and Pam Davis put together a menu based on a book and author theme. For example, the tongue sandwich was named “The Virginia Woolfe,” and the food was yummy. That place was sold and Pam and Rick bought an old ice cream shop on 700 South and 900 East and opened The Dodo restaurant. Deni Christiansen painted the huge bird in a tux on the wall. That restaurant was sold to David Harries and the location is now Trio restaurant. My wife and I went to Forage once. We had to take out a second mortgage for the two of us to dine on a prix fixe menu of countless bitesize courses. Nothing on our plates during the evening was ever bigger than a 50-cent piece. We were told the chef would go out during the mornings and forage in the hills for things to cook with, like fresh mushrooms or cedar berries on trees. He would bring back his finds and create little bits and pillows of noms for patrons to try. Not many in Utah places do that. And Forage got so much attention and the chefs so many awards during its run that it seems odd it is closing. But new adventures are always exciting. You would have never guessed that the most expensive restaurant in town during its heyday was located below 500 East on 900 South, on a street of run-down bungalows and boarded-up foreclosures. Now the area boasts a brand new high-end hipster Greek restaurant, the Pig & A Jelly Jar, a tea shop, a Thai restaurant and more cafés to come. Way to gentrify, Forage. We’ll miss your haughty but earnest influences. n

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| CITY WEEKLY • BACKSTOP |

56 | APRIL 14, 2016

FIXER UPPER Bargains, lowest prices. These homes need work. Call for a free list w/pics go to www.nathanolpin.com/fixeruppers

Free list call

801-792-2337 USA Real Estate

NEW WINDSHIELDS

FREE Home Buying Secrets Text BUYUTAH to 44222 to get your free report

www.utahhomebuyermistakes.com

Installed starting at $107.77 in shop.

They say it, we do it: No Bait n' Switch

WE WAIVE

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INSURANCE DEDUCTIBLE.

801-414-4103

WORDS GET YOUR REAL ESTATE LICENSE for only $399.99 Plumsy Learning www.plumsy.com 801-448-7305 CREDIT TROUBLE? NEED A CAR? Mark Miller Loan Center will get you in a car you deserve today. 801-506-1215 mmsloancenter.com

AWI N D SH I ELD R EPLAC EME NT.CO M

Certificates available in

WELLSPRING MASSAGE SWEDISH • DEEP TISSUE

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BUYING OR SELLING A HOME? Call Sylvia 801-631-6250 Berkshire Hathaway Home Svcs

REFLEXOLOGY

HANDEE SERVICE

385-222-3799

Home repair and more 100% guaranteed since 1987 Call Frank 801-854-3900

OPEN: MON-SAT • SUN BY APPT. 4449 SO. COMMERCE DR, MURRAY (DIRECTLY EAST OF MC D ONALD’S) www .

WELLSPRINGMASSAGEUT . com

CITYX CUSTOM COUNTERTOPS Granite, Marble, Quartz Vanities Starting $190 Mike 801-473-0883

CASH FOR JUNK CARS! • NO TITLE NEEDED!

DIVORCE ONLY $297 SLC 652 S. REdwood 801-886-2345

WE PAY CASH

WE’LL EVEN PICK IT UP TEARAPART.COM

OGDEN

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763 W. 12th St 801-564-6960

DEWEYSBAILBONDS.COM

801-364-0572

WE SUE DUI LAWYERS

If it were me, I'd Call me

Barker Law Office, LLC 2870 South State, SLC 801-486-9636

Defending DUI’s for over 25 years

(801) 627-1110

Top Dollar paiD

For your car, truck or van. running or not, lost title

i Can help!

801-895-3947

CarSoldForCash.com

Easy and Fast (48 hrs) www.callthedivorcefirm.com Free Consult 801-491-4478

MATRIX MASSAGE

Couples Massage, spa packages 7 days a week. 533 S 700 E. 801-799-4999 matrixmassagespa.com DRUG PROBLEM? - WE CAN HELP.

Narcotics Anonymous 801- 252-5326 English 801-332-9832 Spanish WWW.UWANA.ORG

GOT WORDS?

sales@cityweekly.net or call 801-413-0947

City Weekly April 14, 2016  

Instapooch

City Weekly April 14, 2016  

Instapooch