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CWCONTENTS COVER STORY EATING WELL

Dining Guide 2016 Cover photo illustration by Mason Rodrickc

23

CONTRIBUTOR

4 LETTERS 6 OPINION 8 NEWS 16 A&E 22 DINE 76 CINEMA 79 TRUE TV 80 MUSIC 92 COMMUNITY

TED SCHEFFLER

Dining Guide, p. 23 Food, wine and travel writer Ted Scheffler is City Weekly’s dining critic, editor of Devour Utah and also rides herd over a growing guitar collection. Read about his ideal meal (p. 52) and his favorite restaurants across Utah (p. 32) in this week’s cover story.

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LETTERS Abortion Is Selfish

I read with great dismay your story “Voices of Choice” [March 24, City Weekly]. I am one of those pro-life people standing outside Planned Parenthood silently praying the rosary, smiling and holding my sign that says “Pray for the End of Abortion.” It is my choice to do that. Don’t judge me. We have been verbally attacked, abused, flipped off and laughed at. Fortunately, we have also been applauded and made friends with some and changed their minds. You judge us because you assume we are judging you— so far from the truth. We are praying for you and your baby that you felt compelled to kill. I don’t know why you felt you had to kill your child, but that is between you and your maker. I pray you aren’t haunted by the choice you have made. We can choose to be chaste, we can choose to use birth control, we can choose to give the child to someone like me who is infertile and desperate for a baby. It is not brave to have an abortion—it is selfish. My two children are adopted, and I thank God every day for their courageous birth mothers who carried them for nine months and then gave them a better life than they could provide at the time of their pregnancy . Now that’s courage. I don’t want even 10 cents of my tax dollars to go to Planned Parenthood. That is my choice. Yes, of course, some of these woman cry and yell “baby murderer” after the abortion. They cry because they have

WRITE US: Salt Lake City Weekly, 248 S. Main, Salt Lake City, UT 84101. Email: comments@cityweekly.net. Fax: 801-575-6106. We reserve the right to edit for length and clarity. Preference will be given to letters that are 300 words or less and sent uniquely to City Weekly. Full name, address and phone number must be included, even on emailed submissions, for verification purposes. killed their child. When society applauds killing its children, it is at the depth of depravity. How cavalier we have become about killing. The Ten Commandments have become a nice fairytale and religion is smirked at. We will continue to pray for those men and women who weren’t counseled at Planned Parenthood before they chose death for the child. We pray for the babies who could have been the next Steve Jobs (an adopted child), and we will continue to watch with great relief as PP clinics continue to close across the nation. We will continue to fight for life.

VICTORIA SHASHA LEFORESTIER Salt Lake City

Thirteen Years and Counting

As it is now the 13th year since of the beginning of the war on Iraq, I’d like to say that I’m proud to have been part of the massive resistance, online and on the ground, to the lead up. I and millions of people around the world saw through the lies that most Americans believed about this country that was no threat to us. Seventy-five percent of the American public believed that Iraq was responsible for 9/11! Thanks, corporate media—especially Fox So-Called News. You ought to be ashamed of yourselves, and I’m still waiting for apologies. MSNBC even fired Phil Donahue for airing antiwar voices. I’m grateful for all the activists I met protesting

downtown a dozen times at the federal building. I’m heartbroken that our massive movement around the world just wasn’t powerful enough to stop our government from murdering over 1 million Iraqis, sacrificing 4,000 U.S. troops in the process. People enlisting in the armed services now only allow these crooks to do the same damned thing in Iran. Will we let it happen again? When will we learn our lesson? Will the American people be duped by corporate media again in such a short time span by those who profit off of “Murder Writ Large”? It’s March 2016, the 13th anniversary of the U.S. War on Iraq, a conflict that has led to the destabilization of the region and the rise of ISIS. Where did your candidate stand? With the war criminals? Or the protesters?

DANIEL MCGUIRE Taylorsville

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It’s Déjà Vu

Sometimes, American voters have the attention spans of cocker spaniel puppies. When somebody says something like, “Let’s make America great again,” “Feel the Bern” or “We’ll build a wall. It’ll be sooo big,” our communal reaction is to say, “Ooh, look at the bouncy ball!” and then run after it. Political slogans energize easily distracted puppies. But, you know what happens to puppies after all-out running and jumping? They run out of gas and lie down for a nap. Which brings me to my time waiting in line for a record two-and-a-half hours to vote in this year’s political caucus. It was fun. Most of us joked about Bernie, Hillary, Ted and the Donald. But now, what will we do? Think this is a newly energized Utah? Naah. Look at local politics. Everybody whines about our state Legislature, but, come November, we’ll just be a litter of sleeping puppies. Sorry to say, little changes in politics. I’ve seen it all before. Back in 1968, I remember our national attention-deficit disorder being disrupted by then-Vice President Spiro T. Agnew, the Darth Vader political mentor of today’s Donald Trump. Way before Trump, Agnew attacked anyone who disagreed with him and didn’t care if you were a member of the GOP, or a Democrat. He labeled college students “an effete corps of impudent snobs,” creating today’s playbook on how candidates appeal to working voters. Since we didn’t have Facebook or Instagram in those days, activists at my school mocked Agnew wearing big buttons that read “A member of that effete corps of impudent snobs.” Wearing snarky political buttons was our social media. Agnew was a tough adversary. He had been successful in business, as governor of Maryland and as vice president. We feared that his General George Patton act would lead him right to the White House, just like we panic over today’s candidates. Fortu-

B Y S TA N R O S E N Z W E I G

nately, VP Agnew got himself convicted as a crook and was sent off to a different federally funded big house. Back then, we had angry neighborhoods. It got so tense, I was told not to study for final college exams because my National Guard unit was on standby after riots broke out across America. Los Angeles was under siege, yet most poor communities didn’t vote— just like Ferguson, Mo., where voter turnout in Michael Brown’s district was around 5 percent. Michigan’s governor may well end up in the slammer over bad water, but it is questionable whether Flint folks will vote beyond their usual 15 percent to 33 percent. Here in Utah, except when Romney runs, we have among the lowest presidential-voting record in the nation. Usually, three out of four who should be registered voters, don’t vote. Occasiona lly, some of us feel we can change things if we face our elected officials eyeball to eyeball. During the 2016 legislative session, I was invited to accompany the Coalition of Religious Communities, which is made up of 15 local faith groups working to alleviate poverty. The group’s plan was to spend a day lobbying on the Hill, advocating for fair housing, improved homeless services, and Medicaid expansion. I had never before lobbied nor had I even met a lobbyist; so I said, “Sure, why not?” These religious groups were very respectable—not effete, impudent, nor snobby—which was OK with me since I’d aged out of that stuff, any way. So, I put on a clean shirt and tie and went to the Capitol. After a one-hour crash course in lobbying, I was sent up the marble stairs to the House of Representatives, so I could send notes on little green sheets to various House members asking to inter-

6 | MARCH 31, 2016

rupt their debating and voting to come out and let me talk to them about two of more than 1,000 bills being debated and voted upon. It didn’t go all that well. Not one elected official honored my little green petition for attention. But I did get to chat with some really nice paid lobbyists, one of whom felt sorry for me and explained his “three truths” to me, hoping they would be useful if I decided to try this again next year. 1. Don’t bother to lobby in front of the Senate chambers. Those guys never, ever, come out to see you. 2. Don’t expect to accomplish much by lobbying at the House chamber door, either. If you haven’t already convinced them in committee, or in their offices, why would you think you’re going to do it here? 3. These 200 or so lobbyists are here crowding the House chamber door, not because this is the sure way to change the tide of a pending vote, but because they are paid lobbyists— and a paycheck is a paycheck. To be fair, Utah legislators worked really hard and passed 475 bills this year. They avoided a couple of big ones you may have been really keen on, such medical cannabis and Medicaid expansion. But I’m pretty sure lawmakers feel safe in keeping their jobs, unless you decide otherwise. So, congratulations to those of you who attended your Republican and Democratic caucuses. You made your feelings known as to whom you want for president. But, if Sanders or Cruz—the overwhelming Utah favorites—don’t make it on to the presidential ballot, will you come back in the fall to finish the job you started in March on the state level? Or will you be a cocker spaniel puppy, tired from chasing the bouncy ball, curled up in the corner napping? CW Send feedback to comments@cityweekly.net

HERE IN UTAH, EXCEPT WHEN ROMNEY RUNS, WE HAVE THE AMONG THE LOWEST, PRESIDENTIAL-VOTING RECORD IN THE NATION.

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Readers can comment at cityweekly.net

What food or drink items do you insist your visiting friends and family try out? Nicole Enright: Smothered burritos at La Frontera. Mmm.

Mikey Saltas: The fish tacos at Lone Star Taquería is evidence enough of a higher power watching over me.

Jeff Chipian:

Dolmathes, keftedes, pastitsio, souvlaki, stifado, spanakopita, calamari, pilafi, loukaniko, tyropita, baklava, melomakarona, koulourakia, loukoumades. And those are just the appetizers.​

Mason Rodrickc: Round 1: Hatch Family Chocolates for some hot chocolate. Round 2: Eva’s Bakery for some tasty pastries. Round 3: Gourmandise for some dessert. Round 4: Top it all off with some fry sauce shots at Crown Burger. Bonus Round: Indian Market has a good price on Pepto-Bismol. Paula Saltas: The Bianca or Bacca Pizza at Stoneground. Best pizzas you’ll ever taste. Try it. Steamed buns at Provisions or anything on their menu; it’s one of the best restaurants you’ll go to.

Jeremiah Smith: I take people to the Garage for funeral potatoes. They are delicious and uniquely Utahn. Then it’s off to Squatters for local beer. Josh Scheuerman: Southern Comfort, 7UP and ice. It pairs great with breakfast, lunch or dinner!

Jerre Wroble: I take my friends to Porcupine Pub & Grill for the chicken-noodle soup. With a buttered roll, it so hits the spot. For co-workers, it’s the Hot Pastrami & Swiss Sandwich at the Lift Cafe, downtown on 300 South. Finally, I hope to sip Porter’s Fire at the Tap Room (2021 S. Windsor in Sugar House) during the April 3 Cosplay Pub Crawl.


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Voting ‘Faithfully’

Maybe the amazing thing in this presidential election cycle is that Utah was just a sheep of a different color. Normally blindly following the nation’s Republicans, Utah this time let itself be led to the “Christian” waters of Ted Cruz. While the Deseret News played up the “role” Utah had in the so-called Stop Trump movement, The Salt Lake Tribune wondered what effect The Donald would have on Democrats here. But the real phenomenon is the religious muscle behind it all—you know, the Mormons. Glenn Beck, a self-professed “born again LDS Christian,” told the Hill that no real Christian would vote for Trump. So, that’s another discussion. NBC News’ Chuck Todd “wonders” if faith and morality didn’t play a role in Utah. Well, Mormon Moses Mitt Romney got spitting mad about Trump, after which the faithful fell in line.

STDs on the Rise

Let’s talk sex. The Deseret News did when it raised the alarm about a huge rise in STDs in Utah. And buried in the news story was a cry against abstinence-only education. “It kind of denies both the reality and it rejects kids that are sexually active,” a Salt Lake City School District official said. “Kind of”? An after-school program sponsored by Planned Parenthood of Utah is at risk with the governor’s decision to cut funding. And a bill from Rep. Brian King, D-Salt Lake City, to allow parents to opt-in to comprehensive sex education was defeated. All this while chlamydia, syphilis, HIV and gonorrhea have been rising precipitously over the past five years. So by all means, let Mom and Dad handle the problem. They’ve been doing a great job.

Not More Bureaucracy!

Nothing but the truth, the whole truth … that should be the mantra in the battle to wrest our public lands from the, ahem, public. The group Defending Utah brings up the real point in the management dilemma. If the state manages the lands, well then, some big government is still managing it. The group spoke out in a Salt Lake Tribune story noting that a public-lands bill would remove the local sheriffs from their role in protecting the people of a county. That miffed Rep. Mike Noel, R-Kanab, the sponsor of the bill that would create a new Division of Land Management. You know—bureaucracy. But while Defending Utah cares, the Utah Sheriffs’ Association doesn’t. They’re too shorthanded to do anything, anyway. The brouhaha just shows the folly in the effort to push out the feds.

Well-known Utah Avalanche Center (UtahAvalancheCenter.org) forecaster Craig Gordon is the face of backcountry accident prevention and safety. We see him on TV and teaching numerous classes and on-the-snow workshops. But when the snow has melted, fitness is his life.

Where do you come from and how did you get into avalanche forecasting?

When I was 14, I came to Utah from Long Beach Island, N.J., on a ski vacation. A few days into a storm cycle, the skies turned blue as I got off the top of the old Collins chairlift at Alta. It was magical as I watched two ski patrollers come across Mount Baldy throwing bombs, triggering small avalanches, but, better yet, skiing powder. I thought, “That looks like a pretty good gig to me, and this is what I am going to come back and do.” At age 22, I enrolled at the University of Utah. In 1986, I became a Brighton ski patroller and, two years later, returned to the U for an avalanche-forecasting and snow-dynamics class with Peter Lev, avalanche forecaster with the Utah Department of Transportation. That’s when the light bulb went on. I realized I can really make a living working with avalanches.

In spite of the Center’s great work, people still die in avalanches. Why?

I’ll tell you what’s interesting about snow. Ninety-nine times out of 100, nature allows you to get away with it. Then there is one time, maybe, that you don’t recognize something is slightly different. And I think that’s probably when most experienced people get tricked by a nuance in the snowpack.

Do you think those deaths are due to a lack of awareness?

There are those who have absolutely no awareness and those who do. I developed a successful awareness program called Know Before You Go, seen by nearly 300,000 middleschool, high-school and college-age kids here in Utah. That helps.

Is your whole life wrapped up in the backcountry, or is there more to Craig Gordon?

For many years, my life was 100 percent snow and avalanches. I spent 10 years working at Brighton. In the summer, I ran their trail crew, but in the last couple of years, I have come to embrace the off-season. I love the beach, the ocean, time in the gym and playing tennis. My wife and I are vegans and sustain a plant-based diet and clean lifestyle, close to the earth. You can be a really fit badass just eating plants. I dispel the myth that you have to eat meat to be strong. My core philosophy is to be peaceful, live in balance and harmony with other living things and, hopefully, not hurt anything along the way. We live with three parrots [one of which is pictured above] and connecting with them helps me understand myself and the impact we have on the earth and all living creatures.

Is that life philosophy why you do what you do?

I’m passionate with what we do at the avalanche center because we saves lives and give people a foundation to get out and enjoy the amazing backcountry without rolling the dice.

— STAN ROSENZWEIG comments@cityweekly.net


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After watching a few crime films, I’m wondering how many murders/rapes/kidnappings have been prevented or quickly resolved simply due to the widespread use of cell phones. I’m thinking of the first murder victims in the movie Zodiac, who weren’t able to alert anyone of their situation after spotting the suspicious-looking car whose occupant killed them. At the other end of the spectrum, the daughter kidnapped in Taken was found by her father in a fairly timely manner because she had a cell phone and was able to give him details of her kidnappers. So, how significant a role do cell phones play in crime prevention/solving in real life? —Carly, Chicago Remember 24, Carly? Highly motivated federal agent Jack Bauer scurries around Los Angeles sticking knives and screwdrivers into terrorists till they tell him where, exactly, they’ve planted their nuclear bombs, vials of deadly virus, etc.? At one point, the dean of West Point beseeched the show’s producers to ease off some on their constant suggestion that torture yields usable intelligence—it seems the troops were getting the wrong idea. All I’m saying: Maybe we shouldn’t take our cues on crime-fighting from Hollywood. Here in the real world, though, we see such cases as the Boston Marathon bombing, where abundant cell-phone documentation of the scene helped investigators quickly locate and release images of the suspects; later, when the soon-to-be infamous Tsarnaev brothers fled in a carjacked SUV, police tracked them via signal from the phone, still inside, belonging to the car’s owner. So there are obviously instances in which, yes, cell phones have helped solve crime, and it’s not hard to envision scenarios in which they might deter it. But can we go so far as to say that more phones in pockets actually means fewer victims? Violent crime in the United States has in fact been on a decided decline since the early 1990s—down 51 percent between 1991 and 2015, to the general befuddlement of social scientists, who’ve attempted to explain the trend with theories ranging from more incarceration to more abortions. Meanwhile, in 1996, people made 55,000 wireless calls to 911; in 2011 it was 396,000. When you see dots like that, it’s certainly tempting to connect them. Unfortunately, the research thus far is pretty thin and tends toward the speculative. The two main sources we’ve got are these: n A 2012 report out of the University of Pennsylvania’s Institute for Law and Economics notes that the beginning of the drop, in the ’90s, coincided with the ownership of mobile phones by “more than a trivial share of the U.S. population.” Spinning this observation into what they called an “intuition,” researchers looked at the relationship between phone ownership by state and reported instances of rape and aggravated sexual assault. These crimes, they reasoned, were—given FBI reporting and classification standards—“likely to occur among strangers and most plausibly

BY CECIL ADAMS SLUG SIGNORINO

STRAIGHT DOPE Dialing Crime

deterred by mobile phones.” Seeing or assuming that you’re carrying a phone, in other words, makes me less likely to assault you. Controlling for a few factors, like per capita spending on corrections and police, the authors found … well, they found results they called “interesting” and suggested that more work was needed. But they were very encouraging about it. n In 2015, a paper in the Journal of Crime and Justice described research building on those earlier results. The authors broadened the scope of the earlier report—using national-level data—as well as the timeline, looking at the numbers from 1984 through to 2009. And they took into account more categories of crime: seeing a significant negative relationship between cell-phone prevalence and rates of property crime, they noted that, combined with findings from the earlier paper, the data suggest “substantively similar deterrent effects of mobile-phone ownership rates on crime rates.” Again, though, identifying association ain’t the same as identifying causation, and these guys, too, concluded their paper with a call for further research, larger sample size, better information, etc. So basically criminologists have looked at your question, done a little research, and come up with: Maybe? It’s not hard to see why this is such a complicated case to make. As I mentioned above, theories about why crime is down are basically endless. Another, for instance—called the security hypothesis—suggests that not just cell phones but all manner of advanced tech (car and home alarms, better locks, etc) deserve some credit for falling crime rates. A bit farther out there, others have proposed the crime-substitution hypothesis: social media and gaming have become so popular among young folks that they’ve simply, um, forgotten to go out and rob people. What with the countless hours postmillennials spend on their devices, it’s not just crime they’re leaving behind, according to a recent article in the Canadian magazine MacLean’s, but all manner of misbehavior: the so-called Generation Z (born since 1995) is “smoking less, graduating more, having fewer pregnancies, and committing fewer robberies, car thefts and murders.” Phones do prevent crime, under this theory, but not because we’re all calling for help—it’s because we’re all posting photos of our lunch. n Send questions to Cecil via StraightDope. com or write him c/o Chicago Reader, 350 N. Orleans, Chicago 60654.


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MARCH 31, 2016 | 11


Promised Land

I M M I G R AT I O N

Amid anti-immigrant rhetoric, Utah continues welcoming immigrants to Zion. BY COLBY FRAZIER cfrazier@cityweekly.net @colbyfrazierlp

I

n this presidential election year, with pledges from Republican hopeful Donald Trump to deport 11 million undocumented immigrants and forbid members of an entire world religion from entering America, it would be natural to conclude that this nation of immigrants has forgotten where its people came from. One might also deduce that Trump’s platforms—and the way they are resounding with so many millions of Americans—could give rise to fears that the country is in decline and that America and its promises of equality, hope and freedom, aren’t as sparkling as they used to be, or at the very least, these principles just aren’t for everyone. But to the 150 people from 51 countries that took part in a naturalization ceremony at the State Capitol on Monday, March 28, America glistens with the same amount of promise as it has for generations. The immigrants, many dressed in their Sunday best, waived small American flags and cheered to speeches from civic leaders. And after pledging their oath of allegiance, vowing to defend the Constitution and to bear arms on behalf of the United States when required by law, the new Americans and their families posed with their crisp citizenship certificates in one hand, the stars and stripes in the other. “I came here to look for more opportunity and stay with my family,” said Claudia Amaya, who emigrated from Peru six years ago and is now in her final year of business school at Utah Valley University. “This is a dream for me, now.” For Yadu Khatiwada, the road to becoming a U.S. citizen stretched for decades and multiple countries. In the early 1990s, Khatiwada and his parents fled their home in Bhutan to seek refuge in Nepal, where they were refugees for 18 years. Seven years ago, with help from the International Organization for Migrants, Khatiwada, his parents and his wife and child, ended up in Utah. Far from feeling as though America is

COLBY FRAZIER

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NEWS

“Compared to India, this is a more rigorous democracy. People have a stronger voice in the election process, and they are very much proactive.” — Sachin Rajhans

Unphased by campaign rhetoric: 150 new citizens took the oath at the Capitol on March 28 to become naturalized Americans. in a rut when it comes to opportunity for immigrants, Khatiwada said he is excited to be able to participate in the democratic process. “I feel proud,” he said. The United States welcomed 729,995 new citizens in fiscal year 2015. Nearly 4,900 of those were living in Utah—a 12 percent increase over the prior fiscal year, when 4,372 immigrants living in Utah obtained their citizenship. During the first fiscal quarter of 2016, 858 citizenship applications were granted in the Beehive State. Leonor Perretta, a Salt Lake City immigration attorney, says this volume of new Americans doesn’t surprise her. “Our business has been on the increase since I started 20 years ago,” Perretta says. She says picking one specific occurrence and linking it to an increase or decrease in interest from those who might be seeking citizenship is difficult to do. But she says that whenever people are scared, she sees more foot traffic in her office. For instance, when politicians make anti-immigrant statements, or when officers from the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) department conduct raids, people ask Perretta to help them weigh their options. “People are afraid because of all the rhetoric and the bad publicity that Trump is giving them—the negativity and hostility,” Perretta says. “Whenever people are more afraid, they’re more likely to come in and ask questions.” She says that America’s anti-immi-

grant fervor has come in waves over the years. The worst bout, she says, came in the aftermath of the 9/11 terrorist attacks. Even when some Americans are vocal in their opposition to undocumented immigration, though, Perretta says the United States still holds more promise for most people than the alternatives. “It’s still a better option to come here than just about anywhere else,” she says. The young and old alike became citizens during Monday’s ceremony. Elvira Giles, 89, was helped from a wheelchair by her children and grandchildren for a post-oath photograph. And 19-year-old Guadalupe Bustos, who has lived in the United States for the past 10 years and in Utah for five, says she believes that having U.S. citizenship will help her get a foothold in applying to colleges. Bustos, who works in the milk department at Gossner Foods, in the Cache Valley, says that she decided to apply for U.S. citizenship when she realized her work visa would be expiring. “If you study real hard, then you will be able to pass,” Bustos says of the English and civics test. “So that’s what I did. I couldn’t believe it myself, but I did it.” Sachin Rajhans arrived in the United States as a 27-year-old student in 1997. He became a forensic psychiatrist, and in 2003, went to work for the Utah State Hospital. On Monday, Rajhans and his wife, Kirti, both became U.S. citizens. After living in the United States for 20 years, Rajhans says he’s looking forward to finally being able to add his

voice to the nation’s election system and vote for the first time. “Compared to India, this is a more rigorous democracy,” Rajhans says. “People have a stronger voice in the election process, and they are very much proactive. They are very strongly pro-democratic.” Rajhans says his first days and months in America were difficult. He was living in New York City, spoke with a thick Indian accent and struggled to understand the American accent. In order to better understand local language and culture, Rajhans says he bought a cable-television package and watched sitcoms like Friends. The decision to seek American citizenship, Rajhans says, has been gradual. His daughter’s birth contributed, but he struggles to pinpoint the moment when he decided he wanted to become an American. All Rajhans knows, he says, is that the outcome will be good. The topic of America, and whether it’s in decline or on the upswing, is one that Rajhans says he’s debated with friends. He argues the latter: That America has been great, is great and will continue to be a great place to live long into the future. “Overall, it’s just an instinct that’s pushing me toward becoming an American,” Rajhans says. “I think that it is a great thing. I think going forward that it will be great to be a citizen of America.” CW


NEWS Temple Visit

Temple Grandin on autism, animal rights and fancy shirts BY ENRIQUE LIMÓN elimon@cityweekly.net @EnriqueLimon

T

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©Rosalie Winard

the teasing. I can’t emphasize this enough: If you have kids in school that are having trouble with bullying, get them involved in shared-interest activities—band, literary art, it can be lots of different things—because those places are going to be refuges away from the bullying. Where did your interest for animal activism originate? Well, being an extreme visual thinker helped me in my work with animals; but the thing I’ve done the most work with is improving the slaughter plants. When I first started out, I designed a lot of the systems for slaughter plants, and one of my biggest frustrations was getting people to operate equipment properly. People always want “the thing” more than they want the management; they want the magical “thing.” Then in 1999, I worked on implementing the McDonald’s animal-welfare audits and the Wendy’s animalwelfare audits, and when I had the power of those big companies behind me, boy, did we make some changes take place. You talk about people being more interested in “the thing.” In this case, what is that? Slaughtering the animal? Well, the thing would be designing a really fancy cow-handling facility. It’s similar how in California they thought that if you put iPads in every school, it’s gonna make the schools wonderful. That did not make the schools wonderful. That does not replace good teaching. People always want the thing more than they want the management that needs to go with the thing. And I don’t care what field you’re in, that’s true for every field. Are you surprised by the attention autism has gotten in recent past years? Well, more and more kids are getting diagnosed with it. That’s one of the reasons why it’s getting all the attention. Autism ranges from half of the people that program computers in Silicon Valley, the famous scientists and musicians, to somebody that remains nonverbal with very severe handicaps. But when kids are little—like, I was very severe when I was a little kid—at 3-years-old, you can take two kids that look really, really severe, and one of them with very early therapy, you can pull ’em out of it—that’s me. And then you got another one that remains nonverbal, and some of those nonverbal kids have normal intelligence, but they have a very difficult time controlling their movements. It’s very, very variable. Another image that comes to mind is your fashion sense. How do you respond to being considered a fashion icon? Well, I make a point of getting lots of different kinds of shirts, a certain type of tie and fancy Western shirts, and sometimes people give them to me. I got a beautiful yellow Western shirt when I did a conference in Austin, but it was too small. I loved it! It was a beautiful shirt with the yellow roses of Texas. I would have just taken off the shirt I had on ... . I was gonna say to be careful and not give them a show. [Laughs] No, I wear a T-shirt under ’em. CW Read more of Grandin at CityWeekly.net

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emple Grandin wears several hats: autism educator, animal-rights advocate and accidental fashion icon. But prior to speaking engagements, earning a doctorate in animal sciences and having an HBO movie based on her life starring Claire Danes, she was an odd girl. One that was diagnosed with “brain damage” at age 2. Her mother, Anna, came upon the studies of Bernard Rimland with the Autism Research Institute early on did her best to tinge her daughter’s formative years with a sense of normalcy. Still, “normal” for Grandin meant being teased by her peers because of her unique speech pattern, but also being accepted and mentored by teachers who encouraged her to pursue her dream of becoming a scientist and livestock-equipment designer. Grandin has faced criticism within the autism community, with some calling her classist and ableist due to her distinctions between “high-functioning” and “lowfunctioning” autism. Still, as the “most accomplished and well-known adult with autism in the world,” according to her official bio, she stays the course and will be visiting Salt Lake City on Friday, April 1, to give a keynote address at The Bottom Line of Disabilities symposium at Columbus Community Center (3495 S. West Temple, ColumbusServes.org). EL: Tell me a little bit about your Utah experience; I know you’ve been here a few times. TG: I’ve been up to the university and talked to students about cattle handling, I’ve talked to them about autism and I’ve also talked to people about different kinds of minds, similar to my TED Talk. Some people are visual thinkers, some people are math thinkers, some people are word thinkers. [Also,] my good friend Rosalie Winard is in Utah. Growing up in a time when autism wasn’t a household term, what was your school experience like? Well, the thing that saved me in high school was the specialized interests. You know, the kids that were interested in horses or model rockets or elec t r on ics were not the kids that did

ADVOCACY


NUEVE

In a week, you can

CHANGE THE WORLD

THE LIST OF NINE

BY MASON RODRICKC & MICHELLE L ARSON

@MRodrickc

CANINE VACCINATION CLINIC

A series of classes to bring out the Queen in all of us! CLASS 1: MAKE-UP TUTORIAL Learn the tricks of the trade from our favorite Queens!

Saturday, April 9 | 6-9pm at

(751 N. 300 W.)

Get tickets at cityweeklystore.com All genders encouranged to participate!

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14 | MARCH 31, 2016

CITIZEN REVOLT

THE

Nine dishes we would like to see on Salt Lake City menus:

Brought to you by:

9.

Anesthetized Gary Herburgers or Organic Gary Herburgers endive?

Smoked Wheeze

3. Roasted Rod-Ham Clinton 2. Voter Fraudulini 1. Great Salt Steak

INEQUALITY EVENT

Yeah, yeah, it’s possible that the United States will have a woman president. Is that a big deal after 100 years of unprecedented growth in equality? Of course, it is. There are growing levels of economic inequality and persistent gender inequality in communities. “Inequality in our society affects our politics, our public health, our economy and more,” says Jim Curry, associate professor of political science at the University of Utah. Find out about the challenges and what you can do to help during this all-day event Unequal Voices: The Politics of Inequality. Morning panels: Hinckley Institute of Politics, Orson Spencer Hall, 260 Central Campus Drive, 801-581-8501, Thursday, March 31, 9:30-11:45 a.m., free, Hinckley. Utah.edu. Afternoon roundtable discussion with Jennifer Napier-Pearce: City Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, 2:30-4 p.m., free, SLCPL.org

DOWNTOWN GARDEN STROLL

8. When will this election 7. Sloppy Jo-bamas 6. Immigration Reformaroni 5. Lettuce Pray for Free Range 4. Macaroni & Inversion-

While humans are conflicted about vaccinations, the animal kingdom is good with it. Or at least the humans with animals. Nobody loves a rabid dog. To that end, Ogden Animal Services, along with the Humane Society of Utah, Doctor Jensen and Howard with Wasatch Hollow Animal Hospitals are offering a Canine Vaccination Clinic. Better yet, it’s a bilingual educational clinic, featuring free dog food, licensing, reduced-cost vaccines, hot dogs (not the real dogs) and vouchers. Marshall White Center, 222 28th St., Ogden, 801-628-8244, Saturday, April 2, 1-3 p.m., free, bit.ly/1Rpd6z8

&

Utahns either converge on or avoid downtown Salt Lake City during LDS Conference time. This year, there’s interest blooming on almost every street corner as eight artist-designed temporary public parks “pop-up” on Main Street. It’s time for the second annual Downtown Garden Stroll stretching from South Temple to 300 South. This ongoing event features diverse floral arrangements in a surprising and delightful array of creativity. The 8- by 20-foot parks are on sidewalks, launching during Conference. At the end of the event, elements of the pop-up parks will be awarded to the winner of a “selfie contest,” hosted on instagram. Various locations, April 1-May 8, free, open to public, DowntownSLC.org

—KATHARINE BIELE Send events to editor@cityweekly.net


S NEofW the

Hardly a “Do-Nothing” Congress In March, U.S. Rep. Pete Sessions of Texas, chairman of the House Rules Committee, introduced a resolution to recognize “magic” as one of America’s “national treasure(s),” backed by a 711-word paean urging all to “support and protect” the storied craft— which needs to be “understood and promulgated,” especially given that, according to Sessions, it “requires only the capacity to dream.” Sessions made no link of magic to resolving other congressional business (such as, for instance, ending the string of 64 consecutive failed votes to repeal the Affordable Care Act).

BY CHUCK SHEPHERD

n While America was outraged about the water in Flint, Michigan, the tap water in Crystal City, Texas (100 miles southwest of San Antonio) was suddenly as black and thick “as oil” and “stank,” according to a resident. The city’s water superintendent said the town had decided to clean residue from the system for the first time in “20 to 30 years.”

WEIRD

Leading Economic Indicators Residents on London’s swankiest street (Kensington Palace Gardens), stymied in efforts to build upward on their relatively small lots, instead plan elaborate “basements”—extending as far as five stories down, with elevators, swimming pools, gyms, climbing walls, and one even with a “Ferris wheel” for dialing up the resident’s daily choice among his several cars. However, embassies are located on the street and have challenged the construction chaos as offending their sovereignty under international law. Recent restrictions limit the basements to one story down, but billionaire entrepreneur Jon Hunt’s five stories are grandfathered in (though his “Ferris wheel” appears to have been shelved).

n Buddhist monk Julian Glew, 45, was arrested in September in Humberside, England, and later sentenced to 11 weeks in prison after he slashed (by his count) 162 tires in his neighborhood because, he said, he was angry that he had stepped on an insect and needed to be jailed. http://wtop.com/dc/2016/03/reaganairport-says-1-person-filed-6500-noise-complaints/

Least Competent Government Following a simplistic hack at the Internal Revenue Service that permitted several thousand tax returns to be illegally accessed and refunds commandeered, the agency created an equally porous “fix” merely copied from failed security elsewhere on the IRS website. According to a March Washington Post report, the fix admirably added one level of security (a personal PIN), but nonetheless allowed anyone to change another’s PIN using publicly available information. IRS Commissioner John Koskinen told the Post that “only a handful” of taxpayers were victimized by the faulty fix (but later defined “handful” as “fewer than 200”). Thanks This Week to the News of the Weird Board Editorial Advisors.

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Wait, What? A 5-year-old, slow-moving underground fire (beneath a Superfund cleanup site) is within 1,200 feet of a waste site for nuclear weapons near St. Louis, according to a December Associated Press report. The Environmental Protection Agency, of course, said not to worry, that the heat from the fire was not enough to ignite chemicals or trigger an explosion.

People With Issues Reagan National Airport in Washington, D.C., disclosed in March that in 2015 it received 8,670 noise complaints—but that 6,500 came from the same person (thus averaging 18 per day, every day).

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MARCH 31, 2016 | 15


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ESSENTIALS

the

ENTERTAINMENT PICKS MARCH 31-APRIL 6, 2016

Complete Listings Online @ CityWeekly.net

THURSDAY 3.31

THURSDAY 3.31

FRIDAY 4.1

Making its way around the world, Globalfest’s first tour, Creole Carnival, is performing at Kingsbury Hall this week. This international event highlights the roots of African music and combines it with American sounds—all thematically connected to the now widely celebrated party tradition of the pre-Lent Carnival, mixing faith, magic and festivity. Three performers will take the stage, all with their own unique musical style. From Brazil, Casuarina will get the crowd swaying to bossa nova, along with some original modern tunes and timeless classics. This five-member group creates a fusion of pop and urban sounds that has been hailed as part of a samba renaissance. From Haiti, Emeline Michel (pictured) will perform her inspiring lyrics and sultry sounds of Haitian rhythms and acoustic jazz. Brushy One String, from Jamaica, uses his acoustic guitar, with just one string, to woo the audience with his soul sounds and reggae-influenced tunes. Globalfest has created a musical platform in North America over the past decade to bring unity through cultural diversity. The nonprofit organization strives to build an audience for international music in the United States. Artists who perform at the festival are talented musicians given an opportunity to represent all corners of the world and help to bring awareness of the uniqueness embodied in those cultures. Each brings their heritage to life on stage through music, costumes and dance. (Aimee L. Cook) Globalfest Creole Carnival @ Kingsbury Hall, 1395 E. Presidents Circle, 801-581-7100, March 31, 7:30 p.m., $5-$20. UtahPresents.org

Classical country? No, not the Loretta Lynn/ Merle Haggard type of country. Pioneer Theatre Co.’s production of Cowgirls is a classical—the Chopin/Mozart kind—to country crossover, with strong female empowering tones and slapstick comedy. While it doesn’t seem like these two themes should mesh, neither should classical and country music. In Cowgirls, it works. It’s 1994 Kansas, and Jo Carlson (Leenya Rideout) is reopening her late father’s countrywestern bar, where women musicians haven’t played for 35 years. That’s about to change, as she hires musicians only to find out they’re not the Cowgirl Trio, but the classically training Coghill Trio: Rita (Lindsay Zaroogian), Lee (Jessica Bradish) and Mary Lou (Angela Chatelain Avila). They have to prove to Jo and her employees, Mickey (Karis Danish) and Mo (Ashlie Roberson), that they can pull off being country singers in time to save Hiram Hall from foreclosure. This all-female cast, along with director Karen Azenberg, amplifies Betsy Howie’s story and Mary Murfitt’s music and lyrics. While some classic country tunes are played from the juke box, the real joy comes from the original, toe-tapping songs. These women are talented, no matter what genre they’re singing or instruments they’re playing. But Danish steals the show, especially right before the opening of the show-within-the-show. The only problem is, there’s no firm resolution to saving Hiram Hall—although it’s implied. Fortunately, Cowgirls is so much fun, it doesn’t even matter. (Missy Bird) Pioneer Theatre Co.: Cowgirls @ Pioneer Memorial Theatre, 300 S. 1400 East, 801-581-6961, through April 9, MondayThursday, 7:30 p.m.; Friday, 8 p.m.; Saturday, 2 p.m. & 8 p.m., $40-62. PioneerTheatre.org

For younger fans, Paula Poundstone’s name might be synonymous with the NPR quiz show Wait Wait … Don’t Tell Me!, where nearly every week she quips with fellow panelists over the news. But Poundstone continues to tour the country frequently as a stand-up comedian, making her one of the busiest working today. With more than 30 years of performing under her belt, Poundstone has turned herself into a fixture in comedy circles. Whether it’s her correspondent pieces for various television shows, as a guest on game shows, her occasional standup specials for Bravo and HBO, her column for Mother Jones, providing commentary for CBS Sunday Morning, or even voicing the mom for a single season in the cult-cartoon show Home Movies, Poundstone works hard to stay funny and be in the public eye. Wearing her familiar single-colored suit and patterned tie, Poundstone performs live sets that are never the same from tour to tour, featuring a mix of new material and audience interaction. For this current tour, Poundstone tends to weave her interactions with people into personal stories of raising her kids and venting over the politics of the day. Continuing to grow and observe with modern culture, she tears apart how kids have become addicted to their screens, while in the same set, using her feet to re-enact a puppet show for the crowd. An evening with Poundstone is more than just kicking back with some personal jokes. It can become a personal, funny experience for those lucky enough to be in on the jokes. (Gavin Sheehan) Paula Poundstone @ Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801-355-2787, April 1, 7:30 p.m., $46. ArtSaltLake.org PaulaPoundstone.com

Globalfest Creole Carnival

Pioneer Theatre Co.: Cowgirls

Paula Poundstone

TUESDAY 4.5

Augusten Burroughs: Lust & Wonder In his best-selling 2002 memoir Running With Scissors—which was adapted into a feature film— Augusten Burroughs told the story of a singularly messed-up childhood. And while Burroughs may have survived an adolescence dealing with a psychotic mother, living with her bizarre psychiatrist, and being sexually involved as a teenager with the psychiatrist’s 33-year-old adopted son, that doesn’t mean he wasn’t going to spend his adulthood dealing with the fallout. Lust & Wonder picks up Burroughs’ own life story from the mid-1990s through the 2000s, as he struggles to find something resembling normalcy, whether in his career—transitioning from writing advertising copy to his success as a professional literary writer—or in his romantic relationships. That normalcy not particularly easy for him to find, however, as he wrestles with alcoholism, the psychic after-effects of living through 9/11 in New York City, and trying to understand what kind of happiness he can hope for from his lovers. Where the sheer improbability of the events captured in Running With Scissors made it pageturning reading, Lust & Wonder is in many ways a more conventional story about an urbanite’s oftenfrustrated quest for contentment. But that relative lack of craziness in the narrative itself might also allow for a purer showcase of Burroughs’ writing skills—sly and brutally funny enough to turn what could have been a self-pity party into a genuinely engaging search for self-understanding. It’s a satisfying journey with a survivor who’s trying to reach the point where he has a shot at a happilyever-after. (Scott Renshaw) Augusten Burroughs: Lust & Wonder @ The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, April 5, 7 p.m., free. KingsEnglish.com


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A&E

Fit to Be Tied

Ten local artists interpret their homeland in Utah Ties. BY BRIAN STAKER comments@cityweekly.net @stakerized

C

UAC—the art gallery that began life as the Central Utah Art Center in Ephraim, Utah, and from humble beginnings sprang to center stage in Salt Lake City’s 200 South art district—celebrates 10 years of the annual juried exhibition Utah Ties this month. Several developments distinguish this show from previous years’, not the least of which is CUAC’s director, Adam Bateman, selecting as its curator someone with a West Coast aesthetic and orientation. Curator Rob Greene, originally from rural West Virginia and Virginia, has his own “Utah ties,” having attended Brigham Young University for a degree in economics. Working in the finance departments of MGM Studios and 20th Century Fox until three years ago, he now owns Greene Exhibitions in Los Angeles, whose shows have received note in major art publications like Artforum, Flash Art and Contemporary Art Review Los Angeles. Selecting only 10 artists in an annual exhibit that usually features 20 or 30 might appear to exclude a wide swath of local artists, genres and styles. But this particular group allows artists’ methods to be viewed more in-depth, and for artists to engage in dialogue with one another. The exhibition consequently emphasizes the social nature of art and the strength of thematic and stylistic “ties” connecting this group of Utah artists. The variety of media included is far from comprehensive but still seems to represent a certain cross-section of work by local artists, providing a snapshot of the contemporary Utah arts environment. Digital art is present in the form of inkjet prints by Kendal Bryan, Daniel Everett, Noah Jackson and Jacob Haupt, and video works are pre-

sented from Rachel Barney and Daniele Vickers. Emily Ellis’ sculptural works are slightly architectural. Deaf until the age of 3, she says, “The early absence of this sense gave me a hyperawareness of the importance of tangible objects in enhancing one’s reality.” Painting is only represented by Roland Thompson, and his “Brake Light Sunset” (oil on aluminum)—with its geometric contours and vibrant colors—brilliantly references West Coast abstractionism. Kelly Brooks’ works in marker on cotton paper chart the patterns of everyday life in her household, transcribed from watching themselves on video, making a nod to the effects of surveillance in modern culture. Bateman notes that, true to the title, Utah Ties has often featured people from all around the country who “call themselves Utahn,” for various reasons—either because they are originally from here, or because they spent a significant period here that had a profound impact on them. This year, however, all of the selected artists currently reside in Utah. Bateman explains the exhibit’s mission: “By offering one exhibition that features Utah artists, no matter where they live, CUAC attempts to build a community around the broad cultural impact Utahns are having within Utah and nationwide.” This year’s artists were able to have that same impact while remaining here. Greene chose works that had a West Coast influence, which might be described, at the risk of overgeneralizing, as a feeling of being light and airy, while still sometimes taking on dark subject matter. He says, “I selected pieces that I felt would draw interest and acclaim in any setting in the world. … What ended up driving the selection were very obvious practices and pieces that seemed to be in close dialogue. As these pairings emerged, the rest of the conversation that needed to happen fell

COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

VISUAL ARTS

into place.” Among the most compelling of these artistic “conversations” are Etsuko Kato’s gelatin silver prints “Jean” and “Tom,” and Bryan’s “Untitled 2.” Kato’s prints—in the Japanese tradition of taking portraits of elders as a testament to their lives after they have passed—is an artistic examination of the presence of those past. Bryan’s image, meanwhile—of two people hiding behind screens—depicts existence as absense, hiddenness, a desire for anonymity, and it suggests a contemplation of what that implies about identity. The two video pieces in the show also create a dialogue about the nature of ritual. The subtext that really “ties” Utah art to the art of California is a sense of loneliness, even amid community, with a profoundly strong individuality. Haupt’s “Necromancer” and “Miniboss” look at loneliness through the context of video games, depicting outlandish characters. “I have experienced an intense loneliness after the ecstacy of gameplay wears off,” the artist says. “In this moment, the seams and artificiality in the imaginary world become

“Untitled 2,” by Kendal Bryan

more visible, even though they were there all along.” These artists use artifice to investigate loneliness, but also in a quest to ultimately transcend it. Greene has found, he says, that “the culture of Utah is based on a faith system that unabashedly mandates each person to seek out their destiny of transcendence. I think that is why you see so much work that is about the connection to ancestors, who are treated with greater reverence in Utah than many other places, or as the self here as a temporary, short-lived character on a much longer, eternal journey.” CW

UTAH TIES

CUAC 175 E. 200 South Salt Lake City 385-215-6768 Through April 8 CUArtCenter.org


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moreESSENTIALS

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE @ CITYWEEKLY.NET

FRIDAY 4.1

SALT Contemporary Dance SALT Contemporary Dance returns to the Rose Wagner after a previous successful run of sold-out performances a year ago with an entirely new show. The company itself is just under 3 years old, but their shows have received praise for the ensemble of talented dancers from various ballet and contemporary dance platforms, many of whom have studied at local universities. Simply titled SALT, this new 90-minute showcase is choreographed by some of Utah’s most prominent names in contemporary dance, including Garrett Smith, Brendan Duggan, Gabrielle Lamb, Courtney Mazeika and Jen Pendleton. While the subject matter of the dances is under wraps until the show, this particular grouping of choreographers has been hard at work pushing the boundaries of performing arts. Expect a presentation of modern dance in a forum where you might not expect to find it, that captures the audience’s attention with intense emotions. (Gavin Sheehan) SALT Contemporary Dance @ Rose Wagner Black Box, 138 W. 300 South, 801-3552787, April 1, 7:30 p.m.; April 2, 2 p.m., $20. ArtSaltLake.org

PERFORMANCE THEATER Cowgirls Pioneer Memorial Theatre, 300 S. 1400 East, 801-581-6961, through April 9, MondayThursday, 7:30 p.m.; Fridays & Saturdays, 8:00 p.m.; Saturday matinees, 2:00 p.m., PioneerTheatre.org (see p. 16) Disney’s The Little Mermaid The Ziegfeld Theater, 3934 S. Washington Blvd. Ogden, 855-944-2787, through April 23, 7:30 p.m, ZigArts.com Greece Is the Word The Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, 801-355-4628, through April 16, Monday, Friday & Saturday, 7:30 p.m., TheOBT.org Gypsy Westminster College Jewett Center for Performing Arts, 1700 S. 1300 East, March 31-April 2 & April 7-9, 7:30 p.m.; April 9, 2 p.m., WestminsterCollege.edu Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat Hale Center Theater Orem, 225 W. 400 North, Orem, 801-226-8600, through


April 9, Monday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday matinee, 3 p.m., HaleTheater.org Kingdom of Heaven Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801-297-4200, March 31-April 10, Thursday & Friday, 8 p.m.; Saturday, 4 & 8 p.m.; Sunday, 2 p.m., PlanBTheatre.org Mother Courage and Her Children Harris Fine Arts Center, 1 University Hill, Provo, 801-4222981, through April 1, 7:30 p.m., Arts.BYU.edu Picnic The Grand Theatre, 1575 S. State, 801-9573322, March 31-April 2, 7 p.m., The-Grand.org The Pirate Queen Hale Centre Theatre, 3333 S. Decker Lake Drive, 801-984-9000, through April 2, weekdays, 7:30 p.m.; Saturdays at 12:30 p.m., 4 p.m., & 7:30 p.m., HCT.org Seussical the Musical Empress Theatre, 9104 W. 2700 South, Magna, 801-347-7373, April 1-23, Friday & Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; April 9 matinee, 2 p.m., EmpressTheatre.com Stupid F---ing Bird Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, 801-363-7522, April 6-May 1, Wednesday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Sundays, 1 & 6 p.m., SaltLakeActingCompany.org

DANCE

Beauty and the Beast Capitol Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, 801-869-6912, March 31-April 3, Thursday & Friday, 7 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m., 2 p.m. & 7 p.m.; Sunday, 12 & 5 p.m., BalletWest.org SALT Contemporary Dance Leona Wagner Black Box Theatre, 138 W. 300 South, 951-965-4805, April 1-2, 7:30 p.m.; April 2, 2 p.m., SaltDance.com (see p. 20)

CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

COMEDY & IMPROV

Andy Gold Wiseguys Salt Lake City, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, April 2, 7:30 p.m., WiseGuysComedy.com John Crist Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., Ogden, 801-622-5588, April 1-2, 8 p.m., WiseguysComedy.com Keith Barany Wiseguys Salt Lake City, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, April 1, 7:30 p.m. & 9:30 p.m., WiseguysComedy.com Paula Poundstone Rose Wagner Theatre, 138 W. 300 South, 385-468-1010, April 1, 7:30 p.m., ArtSaltLake.org (see p. 16) Rick D’Elia & Phil Perrier Egyptian Theatre, 328 Main, Park City, 435-649-9371, April 1-2, 8 p.m., EgyptianTheatreCompany.org Rob Schneider Wiseguys Salt Lake City, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, April 2, 7 & 9:30 p.m., WiseGuysComedy.com

LITERATURE AUTHOR APPEARANCES

Augusten Burroughs: Lust & Wonder The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, April 5, 7 p.m., KingsEnglish.com (see p. 16) Helen MacDonald: H is for Hawk The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-4849100, April 6, 7 p.m., KingsEnglish.com Janet Sumner Johnson: The Last Great Adventure of the PB & J Society The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-4849100, April 2, 4 p.m., KingsEnglish.com Jennifer Adams: A Midsummer’s Night Dream: A Babylit Fairies Primer The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-4849100, April 2, 12:30 p.m., KingsEnglish.com

Lisa Bickmore: Flicker The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, March 31, 7 p.m., KingsEnglish.com Wendy Newman: 121 First Dates The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-4849100, April 1, 7 p.m., KingsEnglish.com\

SPECIAL EVENTS FESTIVALS & FAIRS

2016 Wasatch Mountain Film Festival March 31-April 9, various times and venues, WasatchFilmFestival.org City Weekly and Porter’s Fire’s Cosplay Pub Crawl Various Sugar House bars, Sunday, April 3, noon-5:30 p.m., $10, CWStore.CityWeekly.net Globalfest Creole Carnival Kingsbury Hall, 1395 E. Presidents Circle, 801-581-7100, March 31, 7:30 p.m., $5-$20, UtahPresents.org (see p. 16) Provo Founders’ Day Provo Pioneer Village, 500 W. 600 North, 801-375-9299, April 1, 5 p.m.-8 p.m., ProvoPioneerVillage.org

VISUAL ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

Adriana Vawdrey: Please, You’re Welcome, I’m Sorry, Thank You Visual Art Institute, 2901 Highland Drive, 801-474-3796, through April 1, VisualArtInstitute.org A Call to Place: The First Five Years of the Frontier Fellowship Rio Gallery, 300 S. Rio Grande St., 801-245-7272, through May 30, VisualArts.Utah.gov Christopher McKellar: If the Rock is the Word, Color is the Music Anderson-Foothill Branch Library, 1135 S. 2100 East, 801-594-8611, through April 21, SLCPL.Lib.UT.us

Digital Photography by Martin Novak Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, 801-596-5000, through April 18, SaltLakeArts.org Hadley Rampton, Maung Maung Tinn, Nyan Soe: On the Border: Thailand and Myanmar Paintings Art Access Gallery, 230 S. 500 West, 801-328-0703, through April 8, Monday-Friday, AccessArt.org A Public Spectacle Essay: Letterpress works by Emily Dyer Barker Sweet Library, 455 F Street, 801-594-8951, through April 16, SLCPL.org History of Photography: Recent Work by Laurel Caryn Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, 801245-7272, through May 6, Heritage.Utah.gov Ian Booth: Kazakhstan: Tselina/Building the Virgin Lands Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through May 7, UtahMOCA.org Imaginal Love Urban Arts Gallery, 137 S. Rio Grande St., through April 3, Tuesday-Sunday, UtahArts.org Kevin Kehoe Modern West Fine Art, 177 W. 200 South, 801-355-3383, through April 9, ModernWestFineArt.com Laura Hope Mason: Extinct Art Access Gallery, 230 S. 500 West, 801-328-0703, through April 8, Monday-Friday, AccessArt.org Marci Erspamer: Tangled in Light “A” Gallery, 1321 S. 2100 East, 801-583-4800, March 18-April 16, AGalleryOnline.com Nina Tichava: It is All Just a Love Contest Gallery MAR, 436 Main, Park City, 435-6493001, through April 8, GalleryMAR.com Parlay: Paintings by Trent Call Marmalade Branch Library, 280 W. 500 North, 801-5948680, through April 22, SLCPL.org Utah Ties CUAC, 175 E. 200 South, Salt Lake City, 385-215-6768, through April 8, CUArtCenter.org (see p. 18)

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Chamber Music Series Kaysville Tabernacle, 198 W. Center St., Kaysville, 801-543-2814, Jan. 5, 7:30 p.m., DavisArts.com NOVA Chamber Music Series: L’Enfant Terrible Libby Gardner Hall, 1375 E. Presidents

Circle, 801-463-5223, April 3, 3 p.m., NovaSLC.org

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1/2 OFF SUSHI ALL DAY-EVERYDAY

GOODEATS Grove Market & Deli

3333 S. STATE ST, SLC 801-467-6697

SERVING AUTHENTIC CHINESE & JAPANESE CUSINE

BEER & WINE AVAILABLE

Originally opened by Greek immigrant Pete Savas in 1947, this Salt Lake City restaurant will undoubtedly be around in 2047 because of its fair and friendly service, and the incredible bang-for-the-buck sandwiches it’s famous for. Sandwiches are made to-order and come in full or half sizes. Don’t kid yourself: The “half size” sandwiches are about the size of a thigh. The Big John features seven deli meats—salami, ham, corned beef, pastrami, bologna, turkey and roast beef—piled 3 to 4 inches high, then topped with both Swiss and American cheeses, plus mayo, mustard, lettuce, tomato, pickle and pepperoncinis on a thick, airy ambassador roll, or on rye, French, sourdough or wheat. You don’t so much eat the Big John as you do battle with it … and lose. 1906 S. Main, Salt Lake City, 801-467-8860, GroveMarketDeli.com

Himalayan Kitchen

Found in downtown Salt Lake City, Himalayan Kitchen is a delicious Indian and Nepali restaurant known for its authentic lamb and chicken dishes. Don’t miss the momos—yummy Nepali dumplings—or the other Indian/Chinese/Nepali/Persian flavors that Himalayan Kitchen offers. Bhindi masala is a zippy okra dish that will appeal to vegetarians, while meat lovers will enjoy the tandoori lamb kababs. Indian food fans might opt for chicken korma or lamb vindaloo, and the housemade flatbreads are always a hit. Multiple Locations, HimalayanKitchen.com

Complete listings at CityWeekly.net

Hoppers Grill & Brewing Co.

It’s always great to discover a brewery that can make a great house Black and Tan. Hoppers has you covered with its Madame X Stout layered over the Pale Morning Ale. Or perhaps try one of the regular rotations of seasonal brews. You can also feel really good about Hoppers’ Orange Honey Wheat beer—it makes ordering a pitcher at brunch (served every Saturday and Sunday) seem classy. The other days of the week, check out Hoppers’ huge selection of burgers and sandwiches, including the garlic burger and steak wrap. 890 E. Fort Union Blvd., Midvale, 801-566-0424, HoppersBrewPub.com

The Huddle Sports Bar & Grill

Huddle is a large, fun and friendly sports bar in Cottonwood Heights. Chow down on the famous pulled pork sandwich or chile verde burrito as you watch some sports on TV. The Huddle stands out as one of Utah’s best sports bars, with unobstructed views of its 24 monitors equipped with “big ticket” games of the NBA, MLB, NASCAR, NFL and PGA. If that weren’t enough, friendly servers keep the food and drinks coming, which is much better than getting up and down to grab a cold one from your fridge. Be sure to stop by when they’re running a drink special, on Mug Monday, All’s Well Thursday or Saloon Saturday. 2400 E. Fort Union Blvd., Salt Lake City, 801-438-8300, TheHuddleSportsBar.com

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MARCH 31, 2016 | 23

—Enrique Limón elimon@cityweekly.net

Eating Well

E

ating well. Go ahead and think about the notion for a minute. “Well” can mean many things to different people: clean, sustainable or just down-home, grease-dripping-down-yourchin goodness. Thankfully, City Weekly has a stable of evercurious and always-hungry contributors who were up to the task of redefining the concept. Inside these appetite-inducing pages, you’ll find everything from a nod to altruistic eateries (p. 28) to a fantasy meal that takes bits and pieces from several eateries (p. 52) and vegetarian dishes that are—dare I say—as good (if not better) than their glutenous, meaty counterparts (p. 54). With the weather finally getting warmer, this might be a good time to hit the pavement and plan a foodie road trip; check out our road map on page 32. Ever wonder what tools are musts for your favorite chefs? We ask them on page 72. Additionally, we cull from the great minds who make our weekly issue happen and ask CW staffers where they go to satisfy their cravings on page 40. An omeletand-sausage-stuffed Belgian waffle sandwich? Yes, s’il vous plaît. Also included in this showcase of all things SLC nom is a nod to stellar hand-held foods (p. 38), a showcase of cocktails that’ll make you swear off your go-to rum and Coke (p. 64) and (gasp!) some love to not-so-bad-for-you drive-thru options. Room for dessert? Bow down to sticky bun and caramel chocolate pie goodness (p. 70). So join me in this culinary adventure, fellow elastic-waistbandwearing friends! Whether your idea of good grubbin’ consists of the herb-andgarlic-marinated flat-iron steak at Gracie’s or an order of ham fried rice at Little World, this faux nacho, fried chicken, absinthe-infused issue’s for you.

DINING GUIDE 2016

EATING WELL DINING GUIDE 2016


24 MARCH 31, 2016

| CITY WEEKLY |

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

DINING GUIDE 2016

Eating Well


BEST BAR IN UTAH BY BUSINESS INSIDER!

Eating Well

VOTED

DINING GUIDE 2016

WORLD BURGER CHAMPIONS

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

- 2013 & 2015 KSL A-LIST WINNER

BEST BURGER

- 2014 & 2015 Q MAGAZINE FABBY AWARD

MARCH 31, 2016 | 25

2014

| CITY WEEKLY |

BEST BURGER


Eating Well DINING GUIDE 2016

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26 MARCH 31, 2016

CONTENTS

28 32 Traveling Well I’m With the Hand 38 40 Well, Well, Well 52 My Ideal Meal 54 Almost Like the Real Thing Life in the Fast Lane 60 Sip Well 64 The Sweet Spot 70 72 Major Tools Meals With a Mission Fill your plates with a heaping side of good karma. By Amanda Rock

Utah meals worth a detour By Ted Scheffler

Ditch the plate and wrap your hands around these seven delicious treats. By Aimee L. Cook

Foodie picks from City Weekly’s hungry staff By City Weekly Staff

A restaurant critic’s fantasy dinner By Ted Scheffler

How to do junk food vegan-style By Amanda Rock

Five healthy-ish choices for those on the move By City Weekly Staff

Raise your glass to some of the best cocktails Salt Lake City has to offer. By Darby Doyle

Try these delicious desserts for the mind, body and soul. By Alex Springer

Talking trade and tools with some top local chefs By Heather L. King


DINING GUIDE 2016

DONE RIGHT! FRESH NOT FROZEN | VEGETARIAN & GLUTEN FREE OPTIONS PROUDLY SERVING LOCAL BEER & SPIRITS

Eating Well

PUB FARE FULL BAR- NO FOOD PURCHASE REQUIRED MINORS WELCOME WITH ADULT

ON

EVERYDAY

MARCH 31, 2016 | 27

677 SOUTH 200 WEST | 801.355.3598

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SPECIAL ALLDAY

RS E E 20 B TAP

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

$5 LUNCH


MISSION Fill your plates with a heaping side of good karma. By AMANDA ROCK comments@cityweekly.net

W

Spice Kitchen Incubator brings together refugees and other community members interested in starting a full or parttime food business.

COURTESY PHOTO

COURTESY PHOTO

hether you’re looking for a caterer for your next work meeting, in need of a new spot for lunch or just wanting to get your hands dirty by volunteering in a garden, supporting these local businesses and charities goes a long way for your taste buds, as well as our community.

Look for the Spice Kitchen food booths at World Refugee Day at Liberty Park on June 4

Spice Kitchen Incubator

Refugees interested in starting a food business are helped by Spice Kitchen Incubator (385-229-4484, SpiceKitchenIncubator.org), sponsored by the International Rescue Committee and Salt Lake County. Spice Kitchen Incubator provides technical assistance, training and an ample commercial kitchen. You can find menus from its burgeoning catering business on its website and learn how you can get involved. Be sure to keep your eyes peeled for their booths (such as Mother of All Sudanese cuisine, pictured) at area farmers markets and at World Refugee Day on June 4 at Liberty Park. Follow Spice Kitchen Incubator on Facebook and Instagram to keep up with its many entrepreneurs and to find out about opportunities to sample its delicious, authentic food.

COURTESY PHOTO

Sudanese falafel served at the Mother of All booth.

COURTESY PHOTO

Eating Well DINING GUIDE 2016

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28 MARCH 31, 2016

MEALS WITH A


COURTESY PHOTO

DINING GUIDE 2016

Yardbarkin Hot Sauces

COURTESY PHOTO

Eating Well

Deb Nahvi and Mindy Bridges are the enthusiastic couple behind Yardbarkin hot sauces. Turning their hobby into a business, they donate a portion of their earnings to animal organizations like Best Friends Animal Society and Ching Farm Rescue and Sanctuary. If you’ve been to the Wasatch Front Farmers Market at Wheeler’s Farm in Murray or Gardner Village in South Jordan, you’ve noticed them peddling their six flavorful hot sauces amid a crowd of customers and friendly dogs. You can also find their tasty hot sauces on Yardbarkin.com or at Urban Farm & Feed.

PARTIES & CORPORATE EVENTS

The Green Urban Lunch Box

CALL 385-424-2572 GRACIESSLC.COM

Donate your time, your fruit trees or even your backyard. The Green Urban Lunch Box (801-318-1745, TheGreenUrbanLunchBox.com) provides hands-on training for urban agriculture through creative programs. Kids are taught about growing food with the aid of an actual school bus turned into a mobile greenhouse. In the FruitShare Program, participants register their fruit trees for extra help with care and harvesting. What they don’t want will go to feed the hungry. Elderly community members turn their back yards into urban farms in the Back-Farm Program. The vegetables are divided between the homeowner, the volunteers and hunger-relief organizations.

2014

328 West Temple (In the heart of downtown)

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SWIM SUIT SEASON IS UPON US LOW CARB GREEK SALAD

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| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

DOWNTOWN

AIRPORT

404 E 300 S

Delta Terminal 2

MURRAY 5692 S 900 E 801-266-3336

801-322-2062

SO. JORDAN

1067 W. So. Jordan Pkwy 801-849-0653

WEST VALLEY

2192 W 3500 S 801-973-4976

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LEHI

*Now Open 2975 Clubhouse Drive 801-768-9090

MARCH 31, 2016 | 29

Food education for underserved children is the heart of 3 Squares (801-696-5044, 3SquaresInc.org). Through an after-school program, kids work with local chefs to learn about healthy food choices and making their own meals. Taste of the Wasatch (Sunday, Aug. 7) is the fundraiser behind this nonprofit. Each year, more than 50 chefs, restaurants and bakeries, boutique wineries and craft breweries (alongside hundreds of volunteers) come together to throw a party to raise funds to fight hunger. Guests can enjoy live music, a silent auction and the best food and drink in the state at Solitude Mountain Resort. Get your tickets at TasteOfTheWasatch.org.

| CITY WEEKLY |

3 Squares


Eating Well DINING GUIDE 2016

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30 MARCH 31, 2016

8 2 Y : MA

TE A D HE

T E V SA

y a D ger

r u B nal

o i t a N

CITY WEEKLY will be celebrating all week with

BURGER WEEK

stay tuned for details

If you’re proud of your burgers... contact Pete to participate 801.413.0936 | Pete@cityweekly.net

Even Stevens

Even Stevens (EvenStevens.com) has earned a reputation as the foremost philanthropic restaurant around by selling craveable sandwiches with the simple concept of donating a sandwich for each one sold. Partnering with local nonprofits, Even Stevens makes sure everybody gets fed. Between its four locations in Utah (downtown Salt Lake City, Sugar House, Draper and St. George), it donated 247,031 sandwiches in 2015 and shows no signs of slowing down. Look for other Even Stevens locations popping up in Intermountain cities like Ogden, Logan and Boise.


DINING GUIDE 2016

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WELL

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DINING GUIDE 2016

Eating Well

TRAVELING

Utah Meals Worth a Detour By TED SCHEFFLER comments@cityweekly.net

TY MANNION

F

rance’s sacred culinary bible—the Michelin Guide—has been directing discerning patrons to restaurants in France and beyond for more than a century. Created by the Michelin tire company, the guide was originally conceived to lend weary French travelers a helping hand in choosing where to eat and where to sleep. Today, the Michelin Guide—published annually—lists thousands of restaurants, with those in the top tiers earning one, two or the much-sought-after three stars. The two- and threestar ratings indicate that those restaurants are “worth a detour” and “worth a special journey,” respectively. Michelin Guide inspectors follow rigorous rules in rating establishments. As for me, well, I’m a bit more laissez-faire in my choices. After all, I’ll drive 100 miles out of my way for a first-rate hamburger or pizza. Here, then, are 10 offthe-beaten-path Utah eateries that I think are well worth at least a detour, and maybe even that special journey.

Who’d have imagined that you’d have to travel to Utah County to get your lips around the best Cajun-Creole cooking in in the state? At Boudreaux’s Bistro (78 E. State Road 198, Salem, 801-704-7209, GetYourCajunOn.com) the food is cooked from scratch and delivered to your table piping hot. There’s nothing fancy here: Styrofoam plates, plastic bowls and cutlery are the order of the day, and there’s no alcohol. But, who cares? Because Boudreaux’s serves up rich and hearty gumbo, etouffee, jambalaya, shrimp Creole, crawfish and po’ boys that any New Orleanian would covet. So, for an authentic taste of Louisiana, schedule a stop in Salem. Your taste buds will thank you—I gawr-on-tee.


JOSH SCHEUERMAN

DINING GUIDE 2016

Eating Well

The Cowboy Burger at Milt’s Stop n’ Eat

COURTESY PHOTO

Whenever I’m in Moab, near the top of my things-to-do checklist is to pay a visit to Milt’s Stop n’ Eat (356 Mill Creek Drive, Moab, 435-259-7424, MiltsStopAndEat.com). It’s not just one of my favorite Moab eateries, but one of my favorites on the planet. Moab’s oldest restaurant—opened in 1954 by Milt Galbraith—is today said to look pretty much as it did when it was built. The vinyl-topped stools and Formica counter are all original. The chili con carne is killer, and the milk shakes ... oh, those milkshakes! The shakes and malts are made with fresh cow’s milk from McClish Family Dairy in Moab’s Spanish Valley. They’re also made with fresh fruit, so expect chunks of real banana, strawberries and such to clog up your straw. These are old-fashioned shakes, meant to be eaten with a spoon.

| CITY WEEKLY |

Café Galleria’s Wood-fired Oven

All Whole Bean Coffee $7.95 lb. until April 30th 2795 South 2300 East I the-bluestar.com

MARCH 31, 2016 | 33

Café Galleria (101 W. Main, Midway, 435-657-2002, CafeGalleriaPizza.com) is situated in and around a 110-year-old house; there’s abundant seating indoors and lots more outside. Patio tables and furniture surround the house, and in warm weather, patrons can eat, literally, on the lawn. It feels like being in Boulder, Colo., or Portland, Ore. But enough about ambiance, because you’ll come to Midway for the pizza. These are traditional, thin-crust, Neapolitan-style pies, baked in a woodfired oven (they use cherry wood) at around 600 to 650 degrees Fahrenheit. The crust is terrific, but what really makes these pizzas stand out is the cheese, which is a secret house blend of homemade mozzarella and Parmesan. In the mornings, Café Galleria also serves excellent baked bagels.

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

W IN E F O O D R E E B E E F F J U IC E C O


DINING GUIDE 2016

WELL

Twin Rocks’ Cafe Navajo Pizza

There are many reasons to visit Twin Rocks Cafe (913 Navajo Twins Drive, Bluff, 435-6722341, TwinRocksCafe.com) when you’re in San Juan County, but none more compelling than its Navajo tacos. Twin Rocks makes its fry bread from scratch, and tops it with homemade chili, lettuce, tomato, onion, black olives and shredded cheddar, with sour cream and salsa alongside. This is also the home of the Navajo pizza, which uses that deliciously decadent fry bread as the crust. Work off some of the fry-bread calories while browsing the popular Twin Rocks gift shop.

1147 EAST ASHTON AVE, SLC • 801.484.7996 MON- SAT 11-9PM • SUN 1-5PM

Hell’s Backbone Grill’s Patio

G E T C AS H F O R YO U R C LOTH E S

TY MANNION

FROM THE FAMILY THAT BROUGHT YOU GREEK SOUVLAKI

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TRAVELING

COURTESY PHOTO

Eating Well

Photo Credit: Nina Tekwani

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PADELISSTREETGREEK.COM | 30 EAST BROADWAY | (801) 322-1111

Located in Flaming Gorge National Recreation Area, Red Canyon Lodge (2450 W. Red Canyon Lodge, Dutch John, 435-889-3759, RedCanyonLodge.com) is truly one of Utah’s hidden treasures—a destination that is as appealing in winter as in summer. Red Canyon Lodge’s restaurant features mostly sandwiches and burgers for lunch, and it’s hard to top the Gorge Grilled Cheese. At dinner, the signature hand-cut elk sirloin with rosemary-garlicred wine demi-glaze is sensational, as is the simpler Rainbow trout fillet, lightly fried in herb-infused olive oil with fresh sage and rosemary. Kids and adults alike love Red Canyon’s fettuccine Alfredo and the chef’s gourmet mac ’n’ cheese with smoked Italian sausage, cheddar, Gruyere and Parmesan.

If I had to name a single Utah restaurant that was my favorite, it would have to be Hell’s Backbone Grill (20 N. Highway 12, Boulder, 435-335-7464, HellsBackboneGrill.com). It’s not the fanciest or edgiest. It’s neither hoity-toity nor precious. And that’s why I love it so. It is Utah’s answer to the beloved Chez Panisse: a restaurant where the food is truly local, mostly organic, sustainable and that which seems to envelop visitors in an aura of good karma. That’s thanks to the terrific team of co-owners—Jen Castle and Blake Spalding—and their exceptional Hell’s Backbone family. The food, from posole to “blue ribbon” buttermilk biscuits, is top-notch. The wine selection is terrific, and the magnetism of this culinary gem will bring you back, again and again.


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“In a perfect world, every town would have a diner just like Ruth’s”

-CREEKSIDE PATIO-86 YEARS AND GOING STRONG-BREAKFAST SERVED DAILY UNTIL 4PM-DELICIOUS MIMOSAS & BLOODY MARY’S-LIVE MUSIC SAT & SUN 11AM-2PM-

“Like having dinner at Mom’s in the mountains” -Cincinnati Enquirer

-CityWeekly

4160 EMIGRATION CANYON ROAD

801 582-5807 | WWW.RUTHSDINER.COM

VIETNAMESE • CHINESE • VEGETARIAN

TRAVELING

WELL

North Fork Table & Tavern’s Fiona Goode The menu at North Fork Table & Tavern (3900 N. Wolf Creek Drive, Eden, 801-6487173, NorthForkTableAndTavern.com) is nothing if not eclectic. Wood-fired oven pizzas share the menu with pan-seared Shetland salmon, wild-caught Pacific black cod, roasted organic chicken, Cobb salad, grilled New York strip steak and a vermicelli bowl with short rib, pickled daikon, cilantro, Marcona almonds and nuoc cham. I didn’t expect to find that in the tiny village of Eden. But Chef Jeff Sanich is secretly cooking up a storm here, adjacent to Powder Mountain, and he knocks it out of the park during breakfast, lunch, après ski and dinner. So, venture north, my friends.

The next time you’re heading to Bear Lake or find yourself in Logan, make time to enjoy a pizza at Jack’s Wood Fired Oven (265 N. Main, 435-7547523). The Margherita pizza at Jack’s is absolute perfection. But, there are other tremendous wood-fired pizzas that demand attention, too, like The Sunnyside, which is a breakfast lover’s pizza dream: potatoes, cream sauce, prosciutto, bacon, smoked cheddar and—the best part—two sunny-side-up eggs, finished with maple syrup. Or, try the Cozumel pizza with white sauce, shrimp, avocado, Peppadew peppers and Caribbean spices. Friendly service and cocktails, beer and wine all add to Jack’s appeal.

JOHN TAYLOR

LUNCH • DINNER • CATERING • TAKE OUT

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AS SEEN ON “ DINERS, DRIVE-INS AND DIVES”

POWDERMOUNTAIN.COM

Serving American Comfort Food Since 1930

Campfire Grill’s pan-seared Atlantic salmon

MON-THURS 11AM- 9PM FRI/SAT 11AM-9:30PM | SUN 11AM-8PM 7640 SOUTH STATE ST. MIDVALE, UT 801-889-4090 | PHO33UTAH.COM

Conestoga Ranch, located near Bear Lake, is seasonal; its unique Campfire Grill Restaurant (427 N. Paradise Parkway, Garden City, 844-464-5267, ConestogaRanch. com) is open from mid-May until early October. The Ranch is a “glamping” destination, where guests can bunk in luxurious cottages or covered wagons. Naturally, the food is pretty glam, too. Chef Gustavo Suclla Schiaffino’s menu includes a one-pound Angus rib-eye with béarnaise sauce and Parmesan-dusted frites; a wood-roasted half chicken with fingerling potatoes; pan-seared Atlantic salmon with charred asparagus and tomato beurre monte; heavenly mac ’n’ cheese with silky white cheddar, smoked gouda and provolone sauce, garnished with a crisp-fried slice of coppa; and much more. It’s the perfect place to enjoy al fresco dining while watching the spectacular sunsets.


TRAVELING

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Das Cafe’s Brats and Potatoes It’s far easier to find exotic foods such as Vietnamese pho, Indian curries, African wot, and Thai gai pad krapow in Utah than it is to find German cooking. That’s why whenever I’m in the vicinity of Spring City, Das Cafe (33 N. Main, Spring City, 435-4627484) calls out to me. Along with what might just be the best potato salad on the planet, Das Cafe serves up Reuben sandwiches and brats bursting with flavor, not to mention specials such as rolladen, goulash and wiener schnitzel. Fair warning: If you skip the bread pudding, you lose. Now, it’s time to fill ‘er up!

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HAND

com

Ditch the plate and wrap your hands around these seven delicious treats.

By A nt s I M E E @ ci t y w L . CO O eek K ly.n et

DEREK CARLISLE

AIMEE L. COOK

H

me

and-held foods are typically fast and convenient. That said, some could lack in taste and flavor—think drive-thru burgers or tacos. But, fear not; depending on what you are craving, there are many local options to satisfy that hankering, and you won’t have to sacrifice flavor for quick, cheap or filling. AIMEE L. COOK

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I’M WITH THE

Blue Poblano’s al pastor tacos

Yanni’s chicken souvlaki

The Pie Hole’s potato bacon pizza

The street-style tacos at the Blue Poblano Craft Taquería & Burger House (473 E. 300 South, Salt Lake City, 801883-9078) are made to order and with the freshest ingredients. All meats are flame-broiled and give each dish a smoky taste. Chef Mark Daniels cranks out some amazing food from the small cooking space in the eclectic restaurant that only seats 36. Try the al pastor tacos ($4 each) made with sweet, marinated pork, fresh pineapple, Monterey jack cheese, salsa roja, chipotle, fresh onion, cilantro, green onion and queso cotja served in a blue and white corn tortilla.

For a quick and delicious Greek meal, Yanni’s Greek Express (2761 S. Highland Drive, Salt Lake City, 801-466-6525) has stood the test of time. For more than 20 years, its quality and service have not wavered. The chicken souvlaki with rice ($5.45) is a local favorite and is served on a stick. Try the classic or chicken gyro ($5.45) on the menu. Topped with white sauce, tomato and onion and wrapped in a soft, warm pita, it’s a meal all on its own.

Pizza is one of the first foods that springs to mind when you think hand-held. The Pie Hole (344 S. State, Salt Lake City, 801-359-4653) has a few pies on the menu that are unique, (many have slices of potato and Alfredo sauce) and are downright good. Each day, the Pie Hole offers eight different varieties of pizza, including one vegan and four vegetarian. Grab a slice as you are walking by—it’s fast, cheap and easy, and even comes on a paper plate. Try the Ninja ($2.64, if it’s on the menu that day), a thin, extra large slice topped with pepperoni, jalapeño and pineapple. If not, you can’t go wrong with the classic pepperoni ($2.41).


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Since 1997

JOSH SCHEUERMAN

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Mexican Food & cantina

Eating Well

Chedda Burger’s “Kill Me Softly”

authentic

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Chedda Burger (26 E. 600 South, Salt Lake City, 801-448-6116) has taken its food-truck favorites and now offers them in a brick-and-mortar location. Chef Nick Watts has brought his love of gourmet burgers to the people of Salt Lake City, and the people are pleased. Priding itself on sourcing as many local ingredients as possible, Chedda Burger has taken the burger to new heights. From the Kill Me Softly burger ($8.99)—a beef patty, blue cheese, bacon, arugula and cranberry sauce all served on a Krispy Kreme doughnut—to the Old Faithful ($6.79), a beef patty, cheddar cheese, caramelized onions, tomatoes, leaf lettuce and fry sauce, there is a burger for every palate. Two hands are required for these burgers, even if you cut ’em in half.

Spitz’ street cart döner

Another obvious hand-held option is the burrito. Hector’s Mexican Food (2901 E. 3300 South, Salt Lake City, 801-487-3850) is food you crave. The drive-thru makes it a fairly quick option, yet one that doesn’t skimp on flavor. The breakfast burritos are hearty and the other burritos on the menu include classics like chicken and carnitas. Try the simple and delicious carne asada burrito ($5.20), a fresh tortilla stuffed with carna asada, guacamole and pico de gallo. Top each bite with red salsa, again a simple recipe, but a nice addition.

Speaking of burritos, they’ve taken on a new look, with new ingredients. Sushi Burrito (multiple locations, SushiBurritoUtah.com) has changed the way we eat sushi. Now you can get your favorite sushi rolls, like the Vegas, and have it morphed into a larger version, aka a burrito. The freshness of the burrito is similar to a traditional sushi roll, so you are not losing a thing. Try the California Sumo ($7.99), which comes with crab salad, avocado, cream cheese, cucumber and eel sauce in a deep-fried roll.

Spitz (multiple locations, SpitzSLC. com) brought the döner to the Beehive state. The Mediterranean street-food style wrap is filled with your choice of meat, lamb, beef, chicken, mixed meat or falafel and various other fillings, making it almost necessary to eat with two hands. The fresh and flavorful combination is a taste treat. Try the classic street-cart döner ($8.25)—a wrap filled with romaine, cabbage, tomato, onion, green pepper, cucumber, garlic aioli, fried lavash chips and tzatziki.

d w it h N o t v a li f fe r other o 0/16 2 / 4 Exp. 0

BlueIguanaRestaurant.net

165 S. West Temple • SLC

Below Benihana and across from the Salt Palace

801-533-8900

255 Main St • Park City Treasure Mountain Inn (Top of Main)

435-649-3097

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Sushi Burrito’s Utes burrito

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Hector’s carne asada burrito

e urchas W ith P trees o f 2 E n any

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EER E FAPR PETIZ


By CW STAFF comments@cityweekly.net

H

ere at City Weekly, we’re a hungry bunch. Long deadlines, longer work hours and consistently thwarted attempts to maneuver State Liquor Store hours keep us on our toes and fuel our undying appetites (you should see the stampede scene when someone brings in a box of cookies). So, for what it’s worth, we’re experts at eating good, fast and, if payday is days away, cheap. Want to know where we satisfy our voracious hunger? Read on.

ANDREA HARVEY, COPY EDITOR

Rainbow Trout @The Copper Onion (111 E. 300 South, Salt Lake City, 801-355-3282) My schedule and finances don’t generally allow me to be much of a restaurant diner, so when I do go to a higher-end spot, I hope to make it count. And I hit the jackpot during a visit to The Copper Onion, with the rainbow trout entrée. The trout itself was prepared with textbook finesse—crispy skin and succulent fish—but the entire plate came together brilliantly. A bed of French green lentils with morsels of caramelized speck was surrounded by a sauce of sofrito and Greek yogurt, creating an astonishing burst of textures and flavors that infused every bite—salty, chewy, tangy, silky, savory. Garnished with a slice of burned lemon for yet another unique component in its smoky acidity, it was simply one of the best meals I’ve ever had anywhere.

COURTESY PHOTO

SCOTT RENSHAW, A&E EDITOR

The Gouda Smoker @The Robin’s Nest (311 S. Main, Salt Lake City, 801-466-6378) I first went to The Robin’s Nest because a friend recommended it, and it’s close to the office. I go there at least twice per week now. Yes, it’s that good. The Gouda Smoker (below) is my favorite and one of the most popular at the restaurant. It features roasted turkey breast, bacon, tomato, lettuce, melted smoked Gouda cheese and garlic barbecue spread on toasted ciabatta bread. They’ll ask you if you want avocado—say yes. The lunch special includes a whole sandwich, orzo pasta or chips (get the orzo), a cookie or “dessert bite” and a drink for $9.99 (you can also do a half sandwich for $7.99). Gluten-free options are available. With seriously top-notch ingredients and a fast and friendly staff, it’s pretty clear why this sort of hole-in-the-wall type of sandwich shop is a Salt Lake City favorite.

JOHN TAYLOR

Eating Well

Foodie picks from City Weekly’s hungry staff

Chasing Tail Golden Ale @Squatters (147 W. 300 South, Salt Lake City, 801-363-2739) When I find something that works, I tend to stick with it. While there’s a downside to getting stuck in ruts of any kind, it’s also in keeping with my personality to appreciate food and drink that never lets me down, and return to it again and again. That’s been true over the years with Squatters Chasing Tail Golden Ale whenever I’m looking for a pairing. Squatters’ own restaurant menu is impressive about offering suggestions, but I love the versatility of Chasing Tail. It’s light and crisp enough for something as simple as a salad, but with enough bite that it can stand up to Squatters’ dishes like the Cajun-spiced Black & Bleu Burger. And sometimes, it’s just what I want all by itself, at the end of a long day.

Mountain West Ruby Hard Cider (425 N. 400 South, Salt Lake City, 801-935-4147) Utah has plenty of local breweries, but it isn’t exactly known for its hard cider. Salt Lake City’s first cidery, Mountain West Hard Cider, however, is turning the tables, thanks to its head cider maker, Joel Goodwillie, who came to Utah with more than 25 years of experience making award-winning wine and hard cider. With a tasting room and manufacturing facility located near downtown, and ingredients sourced only from the Mountain West region, it’s as local as you can get, and as tasty or moreso than the big names, like Angry Orchard or Woodchuck. Their flagship cider, Ruby, is an instant classic—with 6.8 percent alcohol by volume and a taste that isn’t too sweet or too dry. Cider lovers in Utah, you have to try this.

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DEREK CARLSLE

Top Sirloin @Braza Grill (5927 S. State, Murray, 801-506-7788) Come springtime, who doesn’t feel that yearning to start a fire? Cooking outdoors is one of the great pleasures that assails every sense, from the prickling of heat as you spread out the ash-coated coals under the grill, to the smell of fat and smoke mixing in the air above you. But at a time when the weather in Salt Lake City remains so unstable, I confess myself unwilling to risk costly chunks of meat when I can head over to the warm welcome of JR at his Braza Grill. The smell of coal fires greets you like a heady fragrance as you walk in, and by the time the waiter brings a sword threaded through a juicy, bloody chunk of top sirloin, I have some bread ready to lay the tender carving of sirloin upon that he or she slices off for my delectation. That smoky meat sandwich is one of the simplest yet most palategratifying experiences I can imagine. Fernet Branca and Coke @Bourbon House (19 E. 200 South, Salt Lake City, 801-746-1005) Wherever I roamed during the 10 years I lived in Argentina, the sight of someone nursing a glass of Fernet and Coke at a drearily lit downtown Buenos Aires bar or a countryside pulpería (think a rustic tavern with gauchos, Argentine cowboys) was one of the constants I always enjoyed. It was typically an older man, moodily hunched over a glass as the world passed by beyond the bar’s doors. A former manager at the Latino night club Karamba informed me that you could get Fernet at a state liquor store, but somehow drinking the vegetablesourced liquor mixed with Coke at home just isn’t the same. So when I get in a funk for la patria, I head down to Bourbon Street, sip on a Fernet and Coke, and dream of the cobblestoned streets of Buenos Aires and its mysterious, gothic spires. And, of course, I do my best to ignore how I’ve become one of those old men I once thought as charicatures.

AMEDA TARR, EDITORIAL INTERN

White Rum

Bottle Design

DISTILLERY 36 2374 S. Redwood Rd • 801-983-7303

Locally Hand-Crafted Spirits NOW AVAILABLE IN LIQUOR STORES

Chicken and Waffles @Pig & a Jelly Jar (401 E. 900 South, Salt Lake City, 385-202-7366) This is arguably the best meal in Salt Lake City. I’ve had chicken and waffles from many different places but Pig & a Jelly Jar’s recipe is quite remarkable. You can either add egg or bacon on the top (which I would highly recommend) or simply just the chicken and waffle. Either one is just as good on the eyes as the stomach. The chicken on top of the waffle isn’t like any you’ve ever had—I would put money on it. This chicken is extra crispy, warm throughout the meal, and seasoned with spices I’m sure only the chef knows of. The syrup served along with the dish gives the chicken a sweeter taste which complements the other seasonings. Usually, I throw some hot sauce on there, too, which is absolutely life-changing. Every time I walk into the restaurant, I can taste the food in my mouth, and get weirdly impatient, but the wait makes it that much more worth it. JOSH SCHEUERMAN

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STEPHEN DARK, SENIOR STAFF WRITER

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Rum THIS IS THE

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SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL NON-PROPHET


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Pabst Blue Ribbon with a water sidecar @any dive, anywhere As a baby drinker, I cut my teeth on candy drinks, like Copper Camels. Once upon a time, I liked to order super-steins of Long Island Iced Tea at The Holy Cow (now The Urban Lounge). These days, I might spike a giant styrofoam cup of Beto’s horchata with rum—but I tend to stick with shots and beer. Mostly the latter, and nothing too fancy. You see, I might order a Corona at the Red Iguana, but I don’t care how my brew matches my grub. I do enjoy a nice, cloudy hefeweizen, a toasty Fat Tire or sweet Newcastle Brown Ale, but when I’m out with friends, I am not a picky man. I’m just fine with a can of the good ol’ domestic pisswater known as Pabst Blue Ribbon, aka PBR. As long as it’s cold, the company is good, and I have plenty of water to ward off hangovers, I’m happy.

COLBY FRAZIER, STAFF WRITER

COLBY FRAZIER

Burrito @Real Taco (115 E. 200 South, Salt Lake City, 801-403-4771) As much as I can, and time permitting, I eat the same thing every single day for lunch: A bean, rice, cheese and fried onion burrito slathered with an unusual amount of pico de gallo and myriad other salsas. For five bucks, I find this consistent stream of nourishment on the northeast corner of State Street and 200 South, where the fine folks of Real Taco set up shop. I choose to forgo meat at lunchtime, but Real Taco offers the gamut of cooked animal that one would expect from a taco cart. City Weekly Senior Reporter Stephen Dark raves about their tortas. For me, though, I’m locked into the burrito. Even when I convince myself I’m going to order something new, the Real Taco crew overrides me. They throw a tortilla on the grill and start whipping up my burrito when they see my famished frame crossing State Street.

Brighton Revolver Session IPA @Molly Green’s (12610 E. Big Cottonwood Canyon Road, Brighton, 435-649-7908) Nothing stokes thirst like physical exhaustion. This is why ski resort bars exist, and it is also the reason why every ski-resort bar is packed all day, every day between Jan. 1 and tax day. When I hit the slopes, I usually go to Brighton—the no-frills resort that is much more about skiing and snowboarding than five-star amenities. At Brighton is Molly Green’s, an A-frame lumber bar that offers all of the poisons a famished skier or snowboarder could ask for. Grabbing a pitcher of the Brighton Revolver Session IPA, which rotates in style and is brewed by Uinta Brewing Co., is always tempting. But the happy meal is the ticket. For a mere $7, anyone can find themselves the proud owner of either a 16-ounce Rainier or 16-ounce Moab Red Rye IPA and a shot of whiskey. What you need to watch out for, dear reader, is overly enthusiastic drinking. A trip with pals to Molly Green’s too early in the day has been known to interfere with stellar performance on the slopes, so save the happy meal(s) for post-shredding hydration.

NATE MILLARD

Combination Platter @Red Iguana (736 W. North Temple, Salt Lake City, 801-3221489) My Red Iguana dining companions usually have to tell me—through their teeth—“Just pick something.” How can you choose from so much killer Mexican goodness? So, I have two fallback dishes. There’s the enchilada suizas, where shredded chicken, sour cream, avocado, corn tortillas and chocolaty mole poblano mesh together brilliantly. Or I get the tacos de carne asada, overflowing with seasoned sirloin nuggets. I also order a bowl of chile verde, extra tortillas, a bag of chips and a pint of salsa to go. The next morning, I use the thick chips and savory salsa for my bastardized version of migas, then have verde for lunch. Lately, though, I’ve discovered the massive Red Iguana combination plate, which is totally worth losing a day to self-loathing and naps. You get a chewy, gooey cheese enchilada, a juicy shredded-beef taco à la Iguana, a giant beef flauta with tons of guac, a chile relleno with tangy salsa Española, and a tostada. COURTESY PHOTO

Eating Well DINING GUIDE 2016

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RANDY HARWARD, MUSIC EDITOR


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FAN CY TAC OS FINE TEQ UILA S

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Lunch • Dinner • Weekend Brunch

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149 EAST 200 SOUTH 385-259-0940

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK | TAQUERIA27.COM

MARCH 31, 2016 | 45

4670 HOLLADAY VILLAGE PLAZA (2300 EAST) 801-676-9706

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1615 S. FOOTHILL DRIVE 385-259-0712


From the Creators of THAI GARDEN BISTRO

Salt Lake's Newest Thai Noodle House

11AM - 11PM 7 DAYS A WEEK! 385- 242-7605 168 East 3300 South, SLC

Lunch MON-FRI 11-3pm Dinner MON-THUR 5pm-9pm FRI 5pm-10pm Saturday 12pm-10pm Sunday 4pm-9pm

868 E. 900 S. SLC, UT 84105 801-355-8899 thaigardenutah.com

ENRIQUE LIMÓN, MANAGING EDITOR

Fried Chicken Plate @Curry Fried Chicken (660 State, 801-924-9188) So you love curry and you also love chicken...what to do? Luckily, the masterminds behind Curry Fried Chicken have come up with a winning formula not witnessed since those 1980’s “You got chocolate in my peanut butter” commercials. CFC beats its Kentucky counterpart not just in taste but in its attitude. Oh-so-loud Bollywood musicals play from a flat-screen, patrons can often be seen arguing with cooks over a mixed-up order, and a four-star Yelp review is proudly reproduced in the joint’s menu. As evidenced by a bright red sign, “Keep calm and curry on” is the mantra here, and you can’t go wrong with ordering anything featuring the spice mix—be it the hot fries ($1.99), rockin’ samosas (.99 apiece), or the daddy of them all, the Curry Fried Chicken plate ($9.99). My eyes turned like pinwheels upon arrival of the dish, overfilled with two pieces of crispy fried chicken, just-right basmati rice, a ladleful of sloppy and delectable vegetable curry and a warm pita to boot. CFC, you’ve earned your fifth star—not just in ratings, but in rank, too, as you have the Western tiewearing colonel beat. ENRIQUE LIMÓN

ZABB NOODLE

We’re Back!!!

Contemporary Japanese Dining L U N C H • D I N N E R • C O C K TA I L S

18 WEST MARKET STREET • 801.519.9595

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Introducing!

Death Star Margarita @El Chihuahua (3926 Highland Drive, Salt Lake City, 801-272-8091) A paradise awaits inside El Chihuahua’s strip mall storefront; one filled with the expected fare (enchiladas, tacos, quesadillas) and some of the most magical elixirs on this side of Tatooine: the rubber duckie-topped “Death Star” cocktails. Big enough to share between a colony of ewoks, these salt-rimmed bad boys are definitely sippers, not chuggers. Available in an array of flavors— and in every color of the rainbow—at 13 bucks a pop, the fruity libations are guaranteed to liven any mood. According to the establishment’s Twitter feed, the DayGlo drinks “rule the show,” and it ain’t hard to see why (imagine dumping four or so regular margaritas along with everything else that’s at hand into a fishbowl and going to town). Is your budget more Jakku than Cloud City? Chihuahua has you covered on Tuesdays and Thursdays with discounted ’Star rates; just make sure not to overdo it. It’s not uncommon to see holographic images the next day saying, “Help me, Tylenol Extra Strength; you’re my only hope.”


cold beer to go open 11am-11pm Monday-Saturday

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properbrewingco.com 857 S Main Street, Salt Lake City | (801) 953-1707 | @properbrewingco

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10am-2pm Sat & Sun

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avenuesproper.com I @avenues_proper Open late night 10pm-midnight 376 8th Ave, SLC UT 84103 I (385)227-8628


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CHARLES JAMES CAYIAS

INSURANCE

2150 South 1300 East #100 801-488-0085 charley@cayias.com

CAYIAS.COM

Anything @Takashi (18 W. Market St., Salt Lake City, 801-519-4595) Ask anyone in Salt Lake City where to get the best Japanese in town, more likely than not, you’ll be directed to Takashi. Don’t procrastinate, though: Dinner lines can be a couple hours long with people waiting to satisfy their sushi craving. What packs the house night in and night out? Takashi imports and serves only the freshest fish and inspects each shipment individually. Fresh fish—combined with an artisan flair—keep the restaurant atop of the so-called Utah dining food chain. Start off with the mussel shooters with quail egg, a delicacy with a kick of citrus soothed by the neutrality of the egg. Also try the fan-favorite Crunchy Ebi, served with shrimp tempura, avocado and tempura crumbs sprinkled on top. Another must-have is the Ramon’s Roll, dished up with tuna that melts like butter in your mouth. Not into raw sushi? Don’t worry, Takashi has a variety of hearty steaks and out-of-this-world soups. Really, there’s never a bad meal at Takashi.

NIKI CHAN

Let us provide your business with some cost saving options.

MIKEY SALTAS, DINING LISTINGS DUDE

MATTHEW KUNES, EDITORIAL INTERN

The Classic Burger @Wasatch Brew Pub (2110 S. Highland Drive, Salt Lake City, 801-783-1127; 250 Main, Park City, 435-649-0900) I’m a sucker for tradition, and in the field of food, it’s no different. I love a good old-fashioned burger as much as the next guy, and Wasatch Brew Pub has one of the best in town. Juicy meat, fresh pickles and tomatoes, cut onions and the usual Heinz 57 ketchup. You know the drill. Made to order, and with plenty of steak fries to wash it down with, the Brew Pub has you covered. If you’re feeling it, feel free to add sauteed mushrooms to the mix, or your choice of cheese and bacon. If you want to try something new, this burger is not for you. If instead, you want one of the finest specimens of American traditional cooking, head on over to the Wasatch Brew Pub for your burger-craving needs. COURTESY PHOTO

Eating Well DINING GUIDE 2016

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... and a Polygamy Porter Offering some of Utah’s favorite temptations, Wasatch Brewery also provides the most interesting beer brews in the state. My personal favorite, Polygamy Porter, is billed as a “chocolatey, easy-drinkin’ brown porter” rich in flavor. Giving a little comedic wink to one of the more interesting chapters in Utah history, the porter can be paired with any entrée, though I’ve found pairing it with their classic burger does the trick for me. Coming from a newbie to beer drinking, a quick browse through Wasatch Brewery’s selection could provide something for anyone’s palate, but I always come back to the Polygamy Porter as my first foray as a former Mormon boy into the world of drinking alcohol. I felt “more than a little naughty” washing that one down, and again and again, I’ve come back for more. Bottoms up!


Eating Well

TY MANNION

Bourbon No. 2 @The Rest (331 S. Main, Salt Lake City, 801-532-4042, Bodega331.com) Located down a flight of stairs from the Bodega bar on Main Street, entering The Rest requires advance reservations (or arriving at a time when seating is available). But once you’re allowed to enter, and you have occupied your coveted seat at a table or the bar, the speakeasy magic begins to happen. It’s hard to imagine that a windowless basement room with dimly lit chandeliers and flickering candles could warm your heart so, but it does, being perfectly appointed with random curios and figurines. From animal mounts and old-timey photos on dark wooden walls to bookcases filled with classic collections to a turntable spinning vinyl albums that music aficionados relish, the mood is utterly cool. And even as you’re drinking it all in, you then must decide what you literally want to drink. So consider this suggestion: Bourbon No. 2—a concoction of Caffe Lolita, Amaro Averna, orange and chocolate bitters, and, of course, lovely bourbon whiskey. Its slight chocolate notes will slide down your gullet with ease and its chemistry will lift your spirits and make you think anything is possible. Match it with the pork belly appetizer or the cheese plate, and the reason you live in Salt Lake City will be revealed to you.

DINING GUIDE 2016

Luke Breakfast Sandwich @Bruges Waffles & Frites (2314 S. Highland Drive, Salt Lake City, 801-486-9999, BrugesWaffles.com) There are almost too many reasons to visit Bruges Waffles & Frites, the “Machine Gun Sandwich” being one of the more famous. But for what is actually a hale and healthy breakfast, try putting your hands around “the Luke” waffle sandwich served at the Sugar House location. Its unique flavors are not something you’ll find at other breakfast joints. It all comes together between two savory waffles stuffed with egg, Provolone cheese, grilled peppers, caramelized onion and a choice of sausage (which really should be the lip-smacking freakandel). Add to that a side of Bruge’s famous frites and dipping sauce. Top your meal off with a creamy “Miraculous” coffee mocha, and you’re set to face the day. No need to go Dutch or get in Dutch for suggesting that you split the bill; this casual eatery is so easy on the wallet, you can spring for the bill.

JERRE WROBLE

JERRE WROBLE, EDITOR

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Eating Well

Restaurant MY IDEAL ACritic’s Fantasy Dinner

By TED SCHEFFLER comments@cityweekly.net

S

For my soup course, I would turn to the tomato soup at Oasis Café (151 S. 500 East, Salt Lake City, 801-322-0404, OasisCafeSLC.com). It’s a beautiful bowl of roasted tomato soup with hints of fennel—so simple, and yet so sensational—especially with a glass of wine from their list such as Cupcake Sauvignon Blanc from New Zealand.

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COURTESY PHOTO

First off, a couple of appetizer plates are in order: I’d slurp down a halfdozen fresh oysters on the half-shell from Kimi’s Chop & Oyster House (2155 S. Highland Drive, Salt Lake City, 801-946-2079, KimisHouse. com), served with mignonette du jour, housemade cocktail sauce and fresh lemon. Then I’d follow up those oysters with an order of The Copper Onion’s (111 E. 300 South, Salt Lake City, 801-355-3282, TheCopperOnion.com) Wagyu beef tartare dressed with minced red onion, capers, crispy garlic and salsa rosa.

COURTESY PHOTO

DEREK CARLISLE

ometimes I fantasize about food. But, not just any food. My food fantasy revolves around an impossible idea: the notion that I could enjoy my favorite dishes from local restaurants, all in a single meal. Sure, I suppose I could Uber from place to place during the course of an evening, but I like to imagine sitting down in one spot and digging into all of my faves. It would go something like this:

DEREK CARLISLE

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MEAL

I’d choose Log Haven (6451 Millcreek Canyon Road, Salt Lake City, 801-272-8255, Log-Haven.com) as the setting for my dinner, because of its warm, natural ambiance and surroundings—aso, my wife works there, and she’d demand it.


COURTESY PHOTO COURTESY PHOTO

COURTESY PHOTO DEREK CARLISLE

A salad course is called for to refresh the palate between fish, pasta and meat courses, and I’d opt here for The Paris’ (1500 S. 1500 East, Salt Lake City, 801-4865585, TheParis.net) salad Lyonnaise. It takes me back to the most memorable salad I ever ate, which was at a restaurant called Bistrot du Paradou, in Provence. The Lyonnaise salad at The Paris is heaven: a mix of radicchio, frisée, endive and mustard greens tossed with warm pancetta and a vinaigrette of sherry vinegar, mustard and black truffles. The finishing touch: Free-range, perfectly poached eggs. Chablis, please!

JOHN TAYLOR

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For my meat course, I’d be very happy with a sizzling steak from Ruth’s Chris Steak House (275 S. West Temple, Salt Lake City, 801-363-2000, RuthsChris.com). They are always perfectly cooked and superb. However, I’m going to opt this time for the “Three Little Pigs” entrée at Bambara (202 S. Main, 801-363-5454, Bambara-SLC.com). Chef Nathan Powers offers a tasty trio of pork: a grilled tenderloin, glazed ribs with bourbon BBQ sauce and braised cheek, all accompanied by white cheddar polenta cake, a cheddar tuile and apple-fennel slaw.

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TY MANNION

The super talented chef/owner of Del Mar al Lago Cebicheria Peruana (310 Bugatti Drive, Salt Lake City, 801-467-2890), Frederick Perez, is a master at creating memorable desserts. His torta derretida is gorgeous to behold and impossible to forget. Derretida means “melted” in English, and this is a decadent molten chocolate cake spiked with rocoto chili and cinnamon, sprinkled with dark chocolate crumbs and powdered sugar, garnished with fresh mint leaves. It’s spectacular.

Eating Well

Now, what dishes would you select for your ultimate meal?

I’m torn as to what to order for a pasta course; there are so many delicious options. But I’m going to have to pick two. First, I’d love a bite of the duck egg pierogi that the amazing Bowman Brown created for s o o n-to -b e - cl o s e d Forage (370 E. 900 South, 801-708-7834, ForageRestaurant. com). It’s one of the best things I’ve ever put in my mouth. I’d also like a portion of homemade gnocchi in mushroomcream sauce from Valter’s Osteria (173 W. 300 South, Salt Lake City, 801-521-4563, ValtersOsteria.com). And, yes, I would like fresh white truffles on top!

DINING GUIDE 2016

The fish course would consist of psari psito. That’s Manoli’s (402 E. 900 South, Salt Lake City, 801-532-3760, ManolisOn9th.com) amazing pan-seared branzino fillets with braised greens and lemon-roasted purple and yellow fingerling potatoes. And, yes, as a matter of fact, I would like a glass of Boutari Moschofilero with that.


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Granny V’s Sugar Cookies COURTESY PHOTO

How to do junk food, vegan-style

By AMANDA ROCK comments@cityweekly.net

hether you’re eating vegan for your health, the environment or for the animals, you’re going to crave junk food—you’re only human. If you’re looking to satiate your cravings without the meat, dairy and eggs, keep reading. Unbutton your pants, tuck a napkin into your shirt and get ready to chow down on these delectable vegan dishes.

Cakewalk Eclairs COURTESY PHOTO

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COURTESY PHOTO

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THE REAL THING

Cakewalk Bakery’s Kelly Colobella

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Frisch’s Full Whittaker nachos Full Whittaker Smothered Nachos, $9.50 If you’re craving something hearty, head straight for Frisch’s Full Whittaker Smothered Nachos. Organic corn chips are topped with a layer of housemade vegan cheese sauce and smoky red sauce, but it doesn’t stop there. A plethora of organic black beans, brown rice, tomatoes and meaty spicy soy “chicken” make these nachos meal-worthy. Served with a flavorful fresh salsa—they are messy and finger-licking delicious. Frisch Compassionate Eatery, 145 E. 1300 South, Ste. 201, Salt Lake City, 801-906-8277, FrischEats.com

Granny V’s Sugar Cookies, $27 for a dozen Salt Lake City’s most popular vegan baker, Kelly Colobella, first perfected the vegan Twinkie and then moved on to re-create another popular snack from our childhoods. Granny V’s Sugar Cookies are made without dairy, eggs and scary preservatives. They’re big, with pink frosting, and every bit as good as those other sugar cookies you buy at gas stations. Cakewalk is conveniently located inside Frisch for a wellrounded meal. Cakewalk Baking Co., 145 E. 1300 South, Ste. 201, Salt Lake City, CakewalkBakingCompany.com


FOR EMILY SENKOWSKY Costumes recommended for

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Corner Store at the base of PCMR 1325 Lowell Ave, Park City

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Halloween in the Spring

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Clown Day Fundraiser

www.gofundme.com/emilysenkowsky

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Tired of the same old Blues? Come hear a true power trio


Beer & Wine

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A L L DA

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Seaweed Rolls These palatable maki rolls will stick to your ribs. Opt for the Firecracker Roll ($8.99), a scrumptious and spicy combination of deep-fried soy meat, jalapeno and vegan cream cheese with a flaky soy topping, drizzled with savory brown sauce and a squiggle of peppery vegan aioli. The Double Jade roll ($7.99) is another winner. Stuffed with tofu, avocado and cucumber and topped with ultra crispy fried tofu. Ask for the Evergreen Menu to view the selection. Golden Phoenix, 1084 S. State, Salt Lake City, 801-539-1122 Zao Tacos, $7.25 For your next Taco Tuesday, try Zao’s Korean tacos. It’s “fast food” in that it’s prepared quickly, but the similarities end there. Three flour tortillas are filled with Thai-spiced organic tofu, romaine lettuce, dressed with a Korean red sauce and chili-lime aioli (optional) and topped with carrot daikon, crispy ginger scallions and cilantro. With locations throughout the valley, it’s easy to get a quick, flavorful healthy vegan option. Zao Asian Cafe, various Locations, ZaoAsianCafe.com

Ocean Love Noodles, $8.95 The moment you bite into the meaty, battered and fried vegan shrimp, you’ll fall in love just like the name suggests. This Vietnamese noodle salad is brimming with a tasty combination of fried “shrimp,” a sliced veggie egg roll (in an eggless wrapper, no less), shredded lettuce, cucumber and mint served over chilled vermicelli noodles with a sweet and sour sauce. A sprinkling of peanuts, scallions and housepickled carrot and daikon add color, flavor and crunch. Both filling and refreshing, this noodle salad is sure to please. All Chay, 1264 W. 500 North, Salt Lake City, 801-521-4789 The Avalanche, $9.50 Good luck escaping this avalanche of vegan breakfast food. It’s a lot of food: two fluffy pancakes with vegan butter and maple syrup, savory tofu scramble (taking the place of eggs), home-fried potatoes and housemade vegan sausage. Whether you’re in need of a hangover cure or just can’t decide between sweet and savory, The Avalanche will come to your rescue. It’s served all day. Vertical Diner, 2280 S. West Temple, Salt Lake City, 801-484-8378, VerticalDiner.com

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F F O % 50 I H S U S ALL LS Y ! L O R & Y E V E RY DA

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See Greece like a local..... September 26-October 5, 2016

Make your Greek Vacation one to Remember...

9 NIGHTS:

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DEREK CARLISLE

DAVID MORRIS

The Bagel Project’s Veg’d Out

City Cakes’ Vegan Mac & Cheese

DEREK CARLISLE

Buds’ Cheesesteak

Kein Fleisch Burger, $10 David Morris, the self-proclaimed “King of Vegan Junk Food” single-handedly created vegan bar food in Salt Lake. As co-owner of Ice Haüs, he’s made the bar into something special. The Kein Fleisch Burger is gloriously messy—loaded with sauerkraut, sautéed mushrooms and onions. A slice of vegan cheddar, lettuce, vegan mayo and mustard round out the burger made with quinoa and kale, peppered with crunchy almond bits. Choose from garlic, Cajun or regular fries as a side. Ice Haüs, 7 E. 4800 South, Murray, 801-266-2127, IceHausBar.com

Cheesesteak, $6.50 If “vegan cheesesteak” sounds like an oxymoron, you haven’t visited Buds Sandwich Co. This all-vegan sandwich shop has become popular for serving plantbased versions of traditional sandwiches. Its cheesesteak is as gut-busting and succulent as anything you’ll see Guy Fieri enjoying. A toasted sourdough hoagie is loaded with peppered soy steak, bell pepper, grilled onion and warm smoky cheese sauce. Take it up a notch and add housemade marinara and sliced olives to make it a pizzasteak. Buds, 509 E. 300 South, Salt Lake City, BudsSLC.com

Veg’d Out sandwich, $7 You don’t need fake meat or cheese to be satiated. Case in point: The Veg’d Out sandwich is bursting with fresh cucumber, tomato, kale, tart sundried tomato and a hearty slathering of Laziz hummus. Choose from any of the bagels (I suggest the everything) for your sandwich. A commitment to tradition means bagels are made without honey or eggs. You’ll be addicted, so be sure to grab a dozen (or two) to go. Pro tip: they freeze well. The Bagel Project, 779 S. 500 East, Salt Lake City, 801-906-0698, BagelProject.com

DEREK CARLISLE

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DINING GUIDE 2016

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Ice Haüs’ Kein Fleisch Burger

Vegan Mac & Cheese, $6.25 Macaroni and cheese is the ultimate comfort food, even if it’s vegan. City Cakes Vegan Mac & Cheese is luscious. Generous curly noodles are drenched in a distinctive bright orange cheese made from cashews and red peppers. Each forkful is gratifying and characteristically decadent—even better than the mac & cheese you might remember. Be sure to treat yourself to a chocolate-chip cookie for dessert; you’ve been good today. City Cakes, 1000 S. Main, Salt Lake City, 801-359-2239, CityCakesCafe.com


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DevourUtah.com

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Turn your passion for food into a career

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FAST LANE Five healthy-ish choices for those on the move

Glazed Chicken Chipotle Salad @Café Zupas (Multiple locations, CafeZupas.com) Super-fast, delicious and good for you? Can a patron expect all three from the same restaurant? If it’s Café Zupas, the answer is yes, which may be why the franchise—which started in Provo in 2004—now has 19 locations in Utah and more elsewhere: It’s catching on! Café Zupas makes its soups, salad dressings, sandwich spreads and salads from scratch daily and has them ready to assemble the moment you walk in the door. Right before your eyes, the friendly staff will prepare the Glazed Chicken Chipotle Salad, loading it up with all-natural grilled chicken, house-chopped mixed greens, red onions, grape tomatoes, corn, black beans, peppers, cheddar cheese, Hass avocado and tortilla strips. Your salad will then be nicely dressed with a lip-smacking chipotle ranch dressing and a honey-cilantro glaze. Your first crunchy bite is an OMG moment followed by the conviction that Café Zupas is your new go-to for fast food—never mind that it’s utterly good for you. (JW) “Build Your Own” Gyro @Padeli’s Street Greek, 30 E. Broadway, Salt Lake City, 801-322-1111, PadelisStreetGreek.com For years, Salt Lakers have flocked to the Greek Souvlaki to scarf up delectable Greek offerings ranging from souvlaki plates (grilled meat, rice and salad that’s hits the spot every time) to spanakopita (spinach-cheese pie) to avgolemono (chicken-lemon soup). For more than 40 years, the family-run chain has continued its proud tradition, cranking out souvlaki and gyros. But now, they’ve launched the “street Greek” concept and have opened a restaurant named after the patriarch of the family: Padeli’s. Here, you create your own gyro, bowl or wrap from scratch while you decide what goes it in. Choose from lamb, beef, chicken, pork and falafel and then add sauce and toppings to it. Based on the lunch-hour crowds alone (don’t worry, the line moves fast), Padeli’s is a winner. (JW)

Sconecutters’ Chicken Club Sandwich COURTESY PHOTO

Chicken Club Sandwich @The Sconecutter (2040 S. State, Salt Lake City, Sconecutter.com) Adhering to the motto “When in doubt, scone it out,” Sconecutter has been serving up the goods in Utah since 1977 when its first shop opened in 1977. Since then, the homegrown chain has spawned 11 locations. While the menu isn’t shy on indulgent delights (maple “sconuts,” for example), there’s a more mindful side to Sconecutter thanks to signature sandwiches like the chicken and bacon club ($8.18). This particular location thrives sandwiched between a Burger King and a Subway, and it isn’t hard to taste why—chunks of turkey meshed with bacon due to a sprinkling of cheese, fresh lettuce, tomato, pickles, red onions and sprouts, all snuggled in a housemade wheat roll. Leave your crumbly scone expectations at the door. Here they are light, fresh outta the oven and ever so fluffy. (EL)

ENRIQUE LIMÓN

By ENRIQUE LIMÓN, JERRE WROBLE & GAVIN SHEEHAN comments@cityweekly.net

I

n an ideal world, we’d all have the time to prepare a mindful feast and sit down to enjoy every meal of the day. That’s not the case, however, as the vast majority of us are eating on the go at fast-food joints and, oftentimes, don’t have the option to think twice about what we’re putting in our mouths. According to a popular article on Health.com, Utah is among the top 10 states most obsessed with fast food (we’ll drink our fry-sauce to that). Still, if you’re looking to mix up your happy meal and eat something “good-ish,” here are five selections that are far healthier than just asking for a super-sized No. 1.

Cafe Zupas’ Glazed Chicken Chipotle Salad

JOSH SCHEUERMAN

Eating Well DINING GUIDE 2016

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LIFE IN THE

Padeli’s ‘Build Your Own’ Gyro


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APOLLO

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13 NEIGHBORHOOD LOCATIONS FA C E B O O K . C O M / A P O L L O B U R G E R


DEREK CARLISLE

DEREK CARLISLE

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Mezquite Mexican Grill’s Carne Asada Fries

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Crown Burger’s Garden Burger

Garden Burger @Crown Burger (Multiple locations, Crown-Burgers.com) A staple of Salt Lake City fast food, Crown Burger is known for its gut-busting pastramitopped burgers and bodacious fries. But the chain also features a number of healthy offerings including the Garden Burger. It is a veggie patty (primarily tofu, mushrooms, nuts, grains and corn) served with tomato slices and lettuce. There is also a veggie burrito, which includes an extra helping of veggies. Some locations put on more beans and rice while others go heavy on the veggies, so you might end up having to play Goldilocks until you find the burrito you like the most. Completing the trifecta is the broiled chicken—a great substitute for the beef patties in any of the house-offered burgers. Crown Burger also offers a choice of six fantastic salads, including a Greek salad. I see you eyeing that Oreo sundae ($2.95 for a small). Go for it, you’ve earned it. (GS)

Zion~Since Curtain Free 2007~

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taco taco

Carne Asada Fries @Mezquite Mexican Grill (Multiple locations) OK, so we’ve given you a few healthy options, so why not live a little? Mezquite Mexican Grill locations are popping up like mushrooms lately, giving the Taco Bells and Del Tacos of the world a run for their money. The local Mexi-empire keeps things simple, and even then, offers a chockful menu. For a speedy breakfast, the baconand-egg burrito ($3.70) is a solid go-to. It’s bigger than a child’s arm, and takes care of both the most important meal of the day and partial lunch in one fell swoop. For something even heartier, head to the open-24-hours State Street location and order the carne asada fries ($8.21)—a heaping order of french fries, topped with carne asada, shredded cheese, salsa, sour cream and guac that’s guaranteed to make your tastebuds yelp ¡ajúa! (EL)

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Saturday, April 23

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Raise your glass to some of the best cocktails Salt Lake City has to offer. By DARBY DOYLE comments@cityweekly.net

S

tep behind the Zion curtain to explore Salt Lake City’s flourishing 21-plus bar options, and you’ll see there’s some advanced alcoholic alchemy going down. But more than just the quantity of recently available libation locations, it’s the increasingly top-notch quality of cocktails crafted by Utah’s cadre of talented and passionate boozeslingers that’s raising the beverage service bar across our fair city and beyond. The perennial question, “Where can a gal get a drink in this town?” is getting easier to answer all the time.

DEREK CARLISLE

DINING GUIDE 2016

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SIP WELL Bitter Thief @Bar X

(155 E. 200 South, Salt Lake City, 801-355-2287) No list of top spots for engaging in a little intemperance would be complete without Bar X, as, starting in 2010, it was arguably the first bar in town to elevate the craft cocktail scene to bi-coastal levels of hipness. Classics like Sazeracs and Manhattans are served up with equal parts skill and panache. But it’s the quality and attention to details on Bar X’s ever-changing original cocktail menu that keeps drinks aficionados coming back. Example? Check out barman Jacob Sloan Hall’s “Bitter Thief,” stirred up with internationally sourced abandon: rye whiskey, Smith & Cross Jamaican Navy-Strength rum, Cynar (an artichoke-based amaro), Génépy des Alpes, orange bitters, a hint of lemon and presumably the sparkly tears of baby unicorns.


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(270 S. 300 East, Salt Lake City, 801-574-2556, UnderCurrentClub.com) Called “the green fairy” by artists like Van Gogh, Degas, Picasso and others in late 19th-century Paris, absinthe is a chartreuse-colored booze famous back in the day for getting people both messed up and kinda crazy. In addition to one of the most dependably stellar cocktail programs in the city under the direction of Amy Eldredge, UCB brings back the romance of Parisian drinks service with two- and four-spout absinthe fountains, allowing guests to control drips of chilled water (usually over a sugar cube resting on a flat slotted spoon) into glasses of absinthe. This combo releases characteristic licorice and fennel flavors and creates a mesmerizing cloudy suspension called louche (“shady” in French). Oh-la-la!

Bloody Mary @Lucky 13

(135 E. 1300 South, Salt Lake City, 801-487-4418, Lucky13SLC.com) If your idea of “outdoorsy” means you like drinking on patios, the al fresco scene at Lucky 13 can’t be beat. The bountiful Bloodys ($4) here are all about spicy, boozy balance. No need for outrageous garnish gimmicks like a whole deep-fried chicken at Lucky 13, though we highly recommend getting the big ol’ house-smoked bacon slab upgrade for just a buck extra to snuggle up alongside that crunchy cornucopia of veg atop this sassy beverage. Think of it as a meal in a glass. Lucky 13 also sports an impressive (and inexpensive) selection of beer on tap, whiskey and phenomenal burgers.

DEREK CARLISLE

DEREK CARLISLE

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Absinthe Service @Under Current


reader’s choice

2015 best vegan dishes of Utah

100% gluten-free

275 S. 200 W. | (801) 433-0589 | zestslc.com

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kitchen & bar

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happy, healthy!

Best

SO GOOD it’s criminal

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552 West 8360 South, Midvale | 801.706.1428 outlawdistillery.com


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COURTESY PHOTO DEREK CARLISLE

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68 MARCH 31, 2016

Wine Flights BTG Wine Bar

(63 W. 100 South, Salt Lake City, 801-359-2814, BTGWineBar.com) Caffé Molise chef/owner Fred Moesinger and sommelier Louis Koppel have cranked Utah’s oenophilia excellence level to 11 at BTG. Offering pours from around 75 bottles total of reds, whites and fortified wines at any one time, BTG (By the Glass) excels at all levels of wine education, quality and service in an elegant and intimate space. Koppel also curates a changing menu of a dozen or so wine flights—usually three different wines offered as a trio of 2-ounce pours—comparatively highlighting wines by region, varietal or other notable characteristics. In addition to the superlative selection of vino, BTG offers clever cocktails, local beers and a selected Italian-forward menu from next-door sister spot Molise.

Classic Daiquiri O.P. Rockwell

(268 Main, downstairs, Park City 435-615-7000, OPRockwell. com) Named after one of Utah’s most famously hirsute guns-forhire, O.P. Rockwell corners the market on craft cocktails served with style. This Park City venue’s dark velvet speakeasy-like space hosts major musical talents like Poor Man’s Whiskey, Colin Hay and the Brothers Comatose. But even on nights without scheduled performances, locals in the know head to the upper-level bar to order truly exceptional cocktails crafted by drinks diviner and classic cocktail revivalist Christopher Panarelli and the talented slate of drinks slingers at O.P. In addition to a very nice selection of tequila, rum, whiskies and wine, the bar menu is filled with impeccably balanced standards like this delightful three-rum Daiquiri ($10) and other clever creations.

Green Juice Mimosa Zest Kitchen & Bar

(275 S. 200 West, Salt Lake City, 801-4330589, ZestSLC.com) For those of us who like to feel nominally healthy while getting our buzz on, Casey Staker, owner and bar guru at Zest’s vegan dining, dancing and drinking emporium has us covered. His solution? Super-fresh coldpressed fruit and veggie juices, Mamachari kombucha and top-shelf liquor brands featured in seasonally inspired cocktail options that are equal parts refreshing and delicious. Whether they’re fuel to keep us dancing well into the wee hours of the night or jump-starting recovery mode come 10 a.m. weekend brunch, Zest’s bright bevvies come in a rainbow of tasty options. Think berry-packed margaritas, High West whiskey sours and brunch Mimosas zapped with beet-apple-ginger, orange-basil or freshpressed green juice ($5).


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DEREK CARLISLE

Try these delicious desserts for the mind, body and soul. By ALEX SPRINGER comments@cityweekly.net

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Caramel Pecan Sticky Buns @Passion Flour Patisserie (165 E. 900 South, Salt Lake City, 385-242-7040, PassionFlourSLC.com) Nothing quite screams “breakfast of champions” like a warm spiral of dough dripping with thick caramel— it’s the type of food that provides a life-affirming comfort on those days when you just don’t want to get out of bed. The offerings at Salt Lake’s Passion Flour Patisserie achieve all of the gooey indulgence necessary to a sticky bun ($3.50)—it’s generously portioned, swimming in caramel and crowned with crushed pecans. Both the dough and the caramel taste rich and buttery, which might cause that pesky diet guilt to flare up a bit—until you remember that you’re in a 100-percent vegan-friendly patisserie. All of that sticky goodness comes thanks to Jessica Davies, a classically trained pastry chef with a miraculous ability to capture the flavor of butter, eggs and cream without actually using them.

Truffles @The Chocolate Conspiracy (774 S. 300 West, Salt Lake City, 385-212-4474, EatChocolateConspiracy.com) Truffles have often been touted as the most indulgent members of the chocolate community. As they’re not known for being easy on the waistline, it’s hard to justify their place in one’s diet. It’s something that the folks at The Chocolate Conspiracy have addressed head on, because chocolate doesn’t always have to be bad for you. The truffles at The Chocolate Conspiracy are made with raw cacao that is certified organic, fair trade and kosher. After getting hit with a little organic maple syrup for sweetness, they are dusted with raw cacao powder, cinnamon and coconut palm sugar or crushed pistachios. To call their cinnamon sugar truffle a piece of candy would be like calling Hamlet airplane reading. With one bite, this little morsel takes your mouth on a historical tour of the cacao bean that leaves you somewhere in the Aztec era.

Banana Split Sundae @Vertical Diner (2280 S. West Temple, Salt Lake City, 801-484-8378, Vertical Diner.com) VD is quickly becoming my go-to restaurant when I’m craving something that’s bad for me. Its vegan- and gluten-free take on classic diner food has yet to disappoint. Vertical Diner is not one to skimp on portion sizes, and its banana split ($7.50) is no exception. Big enough to share, its cruelty-free soy ice cream and housemade strawberry sauce provide more than enough of an excuse to keep it to yourself. I’ve tried a lot of dairy-alternative ice creams, and nearly all of them struggle texturally, landing somewhere on the spectrum between “frozen chalk powder” and “cold soup.” The ice cream at Vertical Diner is just right, melting into the chocolate and strawberry sauce only when you want it to.

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t this point in the year, most of us are licking the crumbs of our dietrelated resolutions off of our sugarglazed fingers. It’s always a challenge to keep on a diet’s good side—especially during tax season—but there are some local bakers, chocolatiers and pastry chefs who are whipping up some indulgent sweets that are surprisingly not bad for you. Even for a staunch nonvegan like myself, these desserts are everything you need to keep that sweet tooth satisfied.

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Caramel Chocolate Pie @Omar’s Rawtopia (2148 S. Highland Drive, Salt Lake City, 801-486-0332, OmarsRawtopia.com) No one does raw food quite like Omar. Boasting a huge menu of seriously satisfying raw food options is impressive enough—but how are the desserts? Omar’s Rawtopia is famous for its caramel chocolate pie ($8), a silky smooth slice of bliss on a crisp coconut-almond crust. It has all of the draw of a well-made chocolate cream pie, but the caramel swirled on top and the crust’s toasty coconut flavor add a bit of sophistication to this lavish dessert.

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72 MARCH 31, 2016

TOOLS MAJOR

Talking trade and tools with some top local chefs By Heather L. King comments@cityweekly.net

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1.

trike up a conversation with any home cook, and it eventually turns toward which kitchen tools have changed the way dinner gets done at their house. Whether the saving-grace gadget is a garlic press, sous vide machine or professional thermometer, each comes with a story about how it revolutionized the cooking process. Professional chefs are no different. In addition to the dedication, talent and fortitude it takes to be a great chef at a successful restaurant, having the right tools to produce tantalizingly tasty dishes for hungry Utahns each and every day is essential. So, we asked chefs from some of the most popular restaurants along the Wasatch Front (and Back) which kitchen gadgets they couldn’t live without. And while you might not be surprised to hear personal stories about necessary items like knives and pans, you might be delighted (and inspired) by some of the more unusual indispensible tools being put to use in some of your favorite restaurants.

1. Fred Moesinger, chef/owner Caffé Molise and BTG Wine Bar

“Which kitchen tool could I not work without? It’s probably my first chef’s knife from 20-plus years ago. It’s nicknamed ‘Precioso’ and it’s a 10-inch Wüsthof Classic chef’s knife. It makes my job easier because the blade stays sharp through many uses, the balance is just right for me, and there’s something about all that time we’ve spent together, too. The handle even has a thumb indentation that I’ve worn into it over the years. I bought it from Lorenz Cutlery back when they were on 400 South. A few years ago, Wüsthof came out with a double-serrated bread knife, and it is amazing. It works great on bread and delicate produce and is totally deserving of the hype and price.”

2.

3.

2. Jennifer Gilroy, chef/owner Porch and Meditrina

Lodge cast-iron skillets or any perfectly seasoned cast-iron pan are Gilroy’s go-to tool. “I use them while camping, at home and in the restaurants. There is no sear like a cast-iron sear. They’re great for searing ahi tuna, and we make the iron-skillet cornbread on the Porch menu in them.” In fact, Gilroy even has a castiron pan which was used in her great grandma’s bar and grill in Jensen, Utah, in the 1950s and which she still personally uses today along with her spatula.

3. Anny Sooksri, chef/owner Tea Rose Diner, Chabaar, Siam Noodle Bar

Sooksri can’t say enough good things about the Kiwi Pro Slice peeler made in Thailand. All three of Sooksri’s restaurants use the tool to shred and peel everything, from the shredded carrots in the pad Thai to the carrot art found atop rice bowls. Even though it’s inexpensive (around $6), there isn’t anything she’s found that will do the job better. “We just love it. It makes life easier,” she says. “At my cooking classes, we always let students use it to peel the carrots and everybody loves it and wants one.”


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“My knives would be my most critical tools,” Jones says. “Knives are very personal to most chefs.” He’s used many over the years but his favorites are from MAC, Miyabi, Misono, Wüsthof, Henckels, Shun and Global. “I would also say my cookbooks are extremely important to me on a daily basis,” he says. “Other critical tools that make life in the kitchen easier would be water stones, immersion blenders, mandolins, cast iron pans, Silpats, tongs, Vitamixers and Robot Coupes.”

6. Matt Harris, chef/owner Tupelo

The Gray Kunz spoon is Harris’ pick. “I use this for everything. It’s a spatula, unit of measure, ladle, sauce spoon, plating spoon—I have one in my hand about 90 percent of the time I’m in the kitchen. I write recipes using this spoon as measurement,” he says. “The spoon helps me train cooks, too, and keeps things looking neat.” His wife and restaurant co-owner, Maggie Alvarez, adds, “One of his chefs bought him the limited-edition gold-plated one. It lives in a special box at our house—where we also have a drawer full of more everyday Kunz spoons.”

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“My kitchen tool I could not live without, nor could Alamexo, is our comal plancha flattop range. We use this range for so many things—from roasting tomatoes and chiles for salsas and warming our tortillas to cooking almost all our proteins.”

5. Dave Jones, chef/co-owner Log Haven

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76 | MARCH 31, 2016

CITY OF GOLD

Citizenship Taste

CINEMA

City of Gold profiles a food writer as ambassador for the American Dream. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

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uring the opening credits sequence in Laura Gabbert’s documentary City of Gold, her subject, Jonathan Gold, drives through the streets of Los Angeles in his pickup truck. Scenes of bustling street life roll by, faces of every possible color, restaurant signs in a dozen different languages. The sax-infused music that plays over this sequence makes it feel like something out of a gritty 1970s detective drama, featuring the kind of jaded gumshoe who’d say things like, “These are my streets.” But Gold isn’t a detective. He’s a Pulitzer Prize-winning food writer for the Los Angeles Times, and one of the most highly respected critics of any kind in the country. It’s not hard, however, to imagine that he actually would say “these are my streets,” because City of Gold is, in part, a cinematic love story between Gold and his native city. And it’s a positively inspiring example of what it’s like to embrace a place because of its heterogenous complexity, not just in spite of it. There is some “origin story” sprinkled throughout City of Gold, and it’s not an insignificant element. Gabbert (No Impact Man) explores Gold’s childhood in a home filled with love of the arts, in a 1960s South Los Angeles neighborhood that represented a cultural melting pot his father saw as worth embracing. We learn about his background as a musician and a music writer, exploring tastes that ranged from opera to punk to the early stirrings of LA gangsta rap. The idea that this man would have not just an expansive critical sensibility, but an expansive appreciation for diverse cultural flavors, seems to have been destined from birth. The majority of the film, then, digs into how Gold’s particular history and personality manifests themselves in the kind of places he covers (literally any kind of place, but

with a special love for tiny ethnic eateries and food trucks of all kinds), and in the way he covers them. His writing isn’t merely a consumer guide for potential patrons, but a travelogue through his city as home to newcomers from all over the world, bringing their unique flavors with them. The chefs and restaurateurs interviewed here don’t talk about Gold as some Anton Ego-esque figure whose thumbs-up or thumbs-down is to be feared. They appreciate that he makes a genuine effort to engage with their cultures—and, in some cases, that he’s able to articulate what’s special about their food in a way they may not understand themselves until they read it in his words. Yet, there’s a more emotionally affecting subtext to City of Gold, one that resonates perhaps even more powerfully in an era when demagogues demonize “others.” On more than one occasion, Gabbert speaks to restaurant owners who are first-generation immigrants, proudly describing children who have graduated from college, fulfilling a parent’s dream for why they came to America. Gold understands how many of the places where he eats are part of American success stories, labors of love for people who make his city richer because of what they bring to it. When Gold talks about the gentrified changes that have come to a traditionally ethnic downtown Los Angeles market—one where new shops, in Gold’s words, offer up their “precious, artisanal” products—you can tell he understands what is lost.

Jonathan Gold in City of Gold

It’s fair to say that City of Gold is an extremely generous portrait of its subject. The worst that the movie seems to say about Gold is that he drives his editors crazy by being slow to turn in his copy, and he was even slower to embrace his environmentalist brother’s campaign against restaurants serving unsustainable seafood. While Gabbert does include excerpts from several pieces of Gold’s beautifully evocative reviews and essays, City of Gold is perhaps too little interested in the actual creative work of a man who is, after all, a Pulitzer Prize-winning writer. It is, however, tremendously interested in Gold as someone who shows why, in the age of Yelp, the voices of professional critics can still matter (self-serving though it may be for a different kind of critic to say so). City of Gold captures a passion for food as cultural art, and a love for the artists—the people—who create it. These are Jonathan Gold’s streets, and the stories he tells about them say something beautiful about what America can be. CW

CITY OF GOLD

BBB.5 Documentary Rated R

TRY THESE Ratatouille (2007) Patton Oswalt Peter O’Toole Rated PG

No Impact Man (2009) Documentary Not Rated

Jiro Dreams of Sushi (2011) Documentary Rated PG

Chef (2014) Jon Favreau Scarlett Johansson Rated R


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NEW THIS WEEK Information is correct at press time. Film release schedules are subject to change. CITY OF GOLD BBB.5 See review p. 76. Opens April 1 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (R) GOD’S NOT DEAD 2 [not yet reviewed] Sequel to the Christian agitprop hit, this time following a public school teacher (Melissa Joan Hart) facing legal action over talking about Jesus in her classroom. Opens April 1 at theaters valleywide. (PG)

RESCUE DOGS B I try; truly, I do. I try to convince myself that a micro-budget affair like this—built entirely around putting rescued animals on camera, and giving them goofy voices—is well-intentioned, intended to appeal almost exclusively to pre-schoolers, and maybe raise awareness for taking in rescued pets. That’s a nice notion. But the movie surrounding that notion is virtually unwatchable, a formulaic tale in which scruffily handsome Tracy (Paul Haapaniemi)

SPECIAL SCREENINGS HAPPY PEOPLE: A YEAR IN THE TAIGA At Main Library, April 5, 7 p.m. (NR) HOOT At Park City Library, April 2, 3 p.m. (PG) MICHAEL COLLINS At Weber County Library, March 31, 6 p.m. (R) SPOTLIGHT At Main Library, April 5, 7 p.m. (R) WHERE TO INVADE NEXT At Park City Film Series, April 1-2 @ 8 p.m., April 3 @ 6 p.m. (R)

CURRENT RELEASES BATMAN V. SUPERMAN: DAWN OF JUSTICE B.5 Did director Zack Snyder just tell his screenwriters, “Watch Iron Man 2; I want that, only more lugubrious”? There’s plentiful heavy-handed setup in this first screen meeting between Batman (Ben Affleck) and Superman (Henry Cavill), all swirling around the fallout from the cataclysmic battle at the end of Man of Steel. But whatever issues Snyder might have explored regarding the heavy burden of superhero-hood are buried in the sludge of the overstuffed narrative: good guys duking it out, introducing new characters for the upcoming hero-team, twitchy tech magnate

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KNIGHT OF CUPS BB.5 Terrence Malick continues his late-period style in this movie about a Hollywood insider named Rick (Christian Bale) trying to make sense of his life through his complicated relationships with his family and with women. It would be easy enough simply to shrug at the woe-is-me musings of a rich white guy who has everything but doesn’t feel fulfilled, man. Even that problem might have been solvable if Malick seemed to have any interest in making these characters flesh-and-blood people, rather than beings of pure voiced-over thought. Yet it’s hard not to get

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CREATIVE CONTROL BBB Maybe it’s easier to forgive a wildly uneven movie when the things that it nails, it nails so well. Writer/director Benjamin Dickinson also stars as David, a New York advertising exec whose latest client is advanced virtual reality technology in the form of glasses—the beta version of which starts to take over David’s reality. The story fumbles through familiar material about urban 20-somethings and their discontents, but Dickinson occasionally finds perfectly pitched scenes that capture a generation’s obsession with the life on their screens, including a priceless bit involving David multi-tasking his way through a video chat. The absurdist humor—like a commercial shoot for an anxiety medication in e-cigarette form—and Dickinson’s gift for striking imagery in the black-and-white cinematography carries the movie, even when it’s trying for too many millennial morality plays at the same time. (R)—SR

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MEET THE BLACKS [not yet reviewed] Satirical comedy about an African-American family that moves to an upscale neighborhood just in time for the annual 12-hour “purge night.” Opens April 1 at theaters valleywide. (R)

SATURDAY’S WARRIOR [not yet reviewed] Film adaptation of the much-loved Mormon musical about souls from the pre-existence learning their divine purpose. Opens April 1 at theaters valleywide. (PG)

as villain, etc. At least IM2 could fall back on Downey’s charm, where Cavill and Affleck both mostly seem constipated. Snyder crafts some evocative visual tableaux, but by the time we get to the obligatory everything-goes-kaboom finale, it’s just another cog in a franchise machine, and one that’s no damned fun, to boot. (PG-13)—SR

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I SAW THE LIGHT BB You’d think that Walk Hard might have driven a spike through the heart of “ponderous biopics about tortured musicians” as a subgenre, yet here we are. Writer/director Marc Abraham (Flash of Genius) bypasses a cradle-to-grave structure for the story of country music legend Hank Williams (Tom Hiddleston), opening in 1953 with his marriage at the age of 23 to first wife Audrey (Elizabeth Olsen), and following his brief career from honky-tonk bar gigs to Grand Ole Opry star. Predictable musicbio conflicts ensue (substance abuse, marital woes), sprinkled with performances of classic songs like “Move It on Over,” “Hey Good Lookin’” and “Your Cheatin’ Heart.” What’s missing is an actual point to any of it, beyond running through the bullet points of Williams’ professional and personal life, and allowing Hiddleston to show off a quite serviceable physical and vocal transformation. A late sequence, involving a journalist interviewing Williams, hints at some of the issues underlying his facility with heartbreaking lyrics, but a story about a great but doomed artist needs to have more to say than, “This artist was great; too bad that he was doomed.” Opens April 1 at theaters valleywide. (R)—Scott Renshaw

has to save his beachside breakfast restaurant from an evil developer who wants to bulldoze it for a golf course. There’s a misunderstandings-fueled romance, naturally, involving a sweet dancer (Courtney Daniels), and outsize performances of every other character (including screenwriter Jordan Rawlins as Tracy’s loopy brother). Mostly, though, there’s talking animal—well, at least thinking animal—nonsense that’s never funny, and seemingly edited almost at random, building to a conclusion in which dog farts literally save the day. Good intentions don’t change the fact that you still need to pay money for a ticket—and for that money, you should expect at least basic competence. Opens April 1 at Megaplex South Jordan. (PG)—SR


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occasionally swept away into a vision that’s more like symphony or poetry than conventional filmmaking. The challenge is making the ethereal experience connect to actual human experience. Whatever singular thing Malick has created, its appeal will be limited if it’s too easy to forget that it’s about people. (R)—SR

78 | MARCH 31, 2016

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MY BIG FAT GREEK WEDDING 2 BB.5 Your feelings about Nia Vardalos’ 2002 surprise-hit original should be considered a fairly safe barometer of your likely response to this follow-up, in which Toula (Vardalos) and Ian (John Corbett) face impending empty-nesthood, and Toula’s parents (Michael Constantine and Lainie Kazan) learn that their marriage in Greece was never official, necessitating a second big fat wedding. The jokes are again almost entirely at the expense of Toula’s oppressively close family; the structure matches a TV sitcom almost classically, including the stubbornly low stakes. It could easily be exasperating that every potential area of conflict simply becomes an opportunity to show how eccentrically supportive everyone is of everyone else, but Vardalos understands her audience. She wants to make the kind of movie that people walk out of saying, “That was so cute.” And it kind of is. (PG-13)—SR

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Hard Times

TV

Banshee returns for one last brutal run; good riddance, American Idol.

Straightaway Any Day No Way

Banshee Friday, April 1 (Cinemax)

Dead 7 Friday, April 1 (Syfy)

Banshee (Cinemax)

Series Debut: It only sounds ridiculous because it is: Wynonna Earp (Melanie Scrofano) is a modern-day descendent of Old West gunslinger Wyatt Earp, who was also a supernatural demon hunter. Now it’s Wynonna’s turn, as she returns to her hometown of Purgatory to re-smite the evil souls (or Revenants) taken down once upon a time by Great Grandpappy—with an assist from the now-immortal Doc Holliday, of course. Wynonna Earp holds true enough to the ’90s IDW comic-book source material, and Scrofano easily brings her to life as a likeable combo of badass and goofball. Another winner from Syfy—hopefully, the Dead 7 lead-in will draw some eyeballs, because Wynonna has no established support series on Fridays after tonight.

The Powerpuff Girls Monday, April 4 (Cartoon Network)

Return: After a decade away, Blossom, Bubbles and Buttercup are back! (We’re going to pretend that illadvised 2014 Powerpuff Girls 3-D special, made with no input from series creator/writer/director Craig McCracken, never happened.) Likewise, The Powerpuff Girls 2016 won’t involve McCracken, but it does have his approval; aside from some new voice talent and a refreshed theme song from indie-rockers Tacocat, they’re still the same pintsized Townsville superheroines saving the world before bedtime. Is Cartoon Network taking reboot requests? My

comeback wish list: Sheep in the Big City, Grim & Evil and, most of all, Space Ghost Coast to Coast—SG is truly a hero for our modern times.

American Idol: American Dream Tuesday, April 5 (Fox)

Special: It’s been 14 years since American Idol was launched as a $inister initiative to destroy music, a productplacement garbage cannon inspiring millions of karaoke dropouts to eschew hard work and talent in favor of jumping a cattle-call train to Overnight Sensationville. Burn in hell, Simon Fuller, Simon Cowell and Ryan Seacrest. American Idol: American Dream (ha!) looks back on 15 seasons of pop failure dotted with the occasional bona-fide talents who likely would have become stars on their own (there’s a reason Carrie Underwood plays the EnormoDome while Taylor Hicks headlines boat shows). Again, burn in hell, Simon Fuller, Simon Cowell and Ryan Seacrest. The merciful end of American Idol is at hand, but the damage is done, and our tone-deaf Precious Snowflakes who’ve been conditioned to believe they crap rainbows still have an open mic on The Voice. One last time: Burn in hell, Simon Fuller, Simon Cowell and Ryan Seacrest. Listen to Bill Mondays at 8 a.m. on X96 Radio From Hell and on the TV Tan podcast via iTunes, Stitcher and BillFrost.tv.

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Movie: “From the makers of Sharknado … Say ‘Bye Bye Bye’ to zombies!” Yes, it’s for real: a zombie-apocalypse Western starring various members of ’90s boy bands *NSYNC, Backstreet Boys, O-Town and 98 Degrees (sorry, Color Me Badd do not represent). Aside from the admittedly slick gimmick, there’s little about Dead 7 that The Asylum’s Syfy zombie series Z Nation doesn’t do better/funnier, but rookie horror writer Nick Carter (of the Backstreet Boys, who also stars) at least deserves credit for keeping this slab of cheese somewhat coherent. Emphasis on “somewhat,” since none of the boy-banders can act, and there’s an incongruent Mad Max element thrown in because, well, why the hell not? Also: cameos by Jon Secada(!) and Everclear’s Art Alexakis(!!).

Wynonna Earp Friday, April 1 (Syfy)

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Season Premiere: Anyone flinching at the hand-to-handcombat brutality of Daredevil has never seen Banshee— which is probably most of you because, you know, Cinemax. Fortunately for those suffering from Too Much TV Syndrome, Season 4 will be the last for this overlooked, gritty slice of Amish-country crime noir (stay with me), so there’s hope for eventually catching up. The tale of an ex-con/thief (Antony Starr) who assumes the identity of Sheriff Lucas Hood en route to tracking down his former partner/girlfriend (Ivana Milicevic), who’s hiding out in the small town of Banshee, Pa., has taken many a bizarre turn, but the outcome is always the same (and bloody): The local Amish mafia, Native Americans, skinheads and even some of Hood’s own police force, would like him gone and/ or dead. Season 4 picks up two years after the events of Season 3’s shattering finale—Banshee isn’t a jump-in-anywhere story; do not attempt—with Eliza Dushku joining the fray as an FBI profiler who may be just as effed-up as Hood. Banshee is a wild ride; add it to your TV homework.


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Bohemian popsmiths The Dandy Warhols don’t feel grown up in Distortland. BY BRIAN STAKER comments@cityweekly.net @stakerized

T

he Dandy Warhols are in their 20s— as a band, I mean. If, like me, you recall their early releases, …The Dandy Warhols Come Down and Thirteen Tales from Urban Bohemia (both on Capitol Records) and they don’t seem like that long ago, welcome to feeling old. The Portland-based band’s most popular releases, hallmarks in a period that saw a revival in guitar-driven rock & roll with a strong sense of melody, came out in 1997 and 2000, respectively. Their debut LP, Dandys Rule OK (Tim/Kerr), came out in 1995. Yet, the band, influenced by British psych-pop, is still plugging away. “I’m surprised it’s lasted this long,” guitarist Peter Holmström tells City Weekly. “But I don’t know how to do anything else, and there’s something that happens with all four of us together that doesn’t happen with other groups. We know each other well enough that, when we’re on stage, there’s this trust that things are gonna happen in a certain way, and it’s gonna be good.” The Dandy Warhols’ live performances have evolved from their early days, when their shows included a lot of nudity. That was then, when the Dandies members themselves were in their 20s, and they’d scored major-label success. Consequently, Holmström says they made youthful mistakes. What would those be, exactly? “Not wanting to get up early in the morning to do interviews, or play on morning TV shows or radio shows, when it could have helped get our music out,” he says. For a time, the band traded on their fast-paced, non-conformist, style-conscious image, both reveling in and criticizing it. Holmström agrees that “Bohemian Like You,” the single from Thirteen Tales about stylishness and the hip crowd, and “Looking pretty cool,” which was used on TV ads and the TV show Buffy the Vampire Slayer, is likely the quintessential Dandy Warhols song. “That whole song is based on Courtney’s [Taylor-Taylor, the band’s singer, songwriter and guitarist] perception of where he lived and the people around him. It started with him looking out the window at a cute girl in a car at a stoplight, and he just wrote a story about that, if they’d ever met.” The song was nothing too deep, but—just like the band’s “We Used to Be Friends” (found on 2003’s Welcome to the Monkey House), which was also the theme to another hit TV show, Veronica Mars; it’s hummable and sticks in your head for weeks. That knack for pop hooks, and making the mundane seem deep, has been the Dandy Warhols’ greatest attribute. It’s difficult to write about the Dandy Warhols without mentioning the movie Dig! by filmmaker Ondi Timoner, which took the Documentary Grand Jury Prize at Sundance in 2004. The movie portrayed the rivalry between the Dandy Warhols and the Brian Jonestown Massacre, but members of both bands claim the story of competition between the two was created by taking various scenes filmed over a seven-year period out of context. If the band had it to do over again, Holmström says, “We would be more involved in the editing process.” The band was portrayed as more “poppy” and fame-hungry than they were, and the melodrama, Holmström says, was manufactured; the relationship between the

ERICH BOUCCAN

WEDNESDAY/SUNDAY

The Dandy Warhols two bands isn’t so sensational. “We’re all just making music; it’s not a competition. We liked [BJM’s] music and they liked ours.” The Dandies have nonetheless matured since then. They’re not as irresponsible or impetuous, but they haven’t lost their playful nature, which Holmström says is neither sarcastic nor snarky. They’re navigating the changing music industry, with perspective gained from their younger, un-wiser days. Another regret of the band’s, he adds, involves “certain choices that we made about interacting with record labels over the years.” He refers partly to the Dandy Warhols’ split with Capitol to start their own label, Beat the World Records, releasing their own music, as well as albums by Spindrift and 1776. The label saw only moderate success, and is currently inactive. The latest Dandy Warhols release, Distortland, comes out on April 8 via Toronto-based label Dine Alone Records. The album finds the band continuing their pattern of stripping down their psychedelic and garage-influenced guitar sound for a more streamlined pop vibe. But they throw some interesting wrinkles into the mix, like changing instrumentation. Synthesizers play a more prominent role, as they have been doing gradually since the band’s middle period. “I’m trying to come up with different sorts of textures, instead of just a wall of guitar fuzz,” Holmström says. Also, the Dandies’ music is increasingly focused on Taylor-Taylor’s lyrics. Holmström is pleased with the “guitar tricks” he uses on the song “Catcher In the Rye,” and he says the single “Killing Me” is a “different feel for us.” It starts with rhythmic synths, then the rhythms are accented by Holmström’s guitar with a little distortion as a contrast. As usual, a sugary melody conveys acid-tongued lyrics that aren’t necessarily profound or philosophical. Distortland also includes “The Grow Up Song.” Asked if he feels grown-up at all, Holmström responds, “We all have families and function in the world, but I still don’t feel grown up. I don’t picture myself any different from 20 years ago.” CW

DANDY WARHOLS

w/ Seratones The Complex 536 W. 100 South Friday, April 1, 7 p.m. 888-316-5387 $22 in advance (plus fees) TheComplexSLC.com


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JUAN CARLOS PEÑA

MUSIC

Hidden Legend

Lurking in the local rock en Español scene since 2003, Leyenda Oculta is coming out of hiding. BY RANDY HARWARD rharward@cityweekly.net

82 | MARCH 31, 2016

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he interview is over. The members of Leyenda Oculta trudge single-file down the stairs of Juan Rodriguez’ home, then crowd into the tiny 10-by-10foot room where they practice. Rodriguez’ huge drum kit takes up half the space. Singer-guitarist Gabino Ramirez and bass player Antonio Garcia set up their rigs on along the left wall. Lead guitarist Angel Martinez occupies the right-hand corner. I hope they play “El Rey.” It’s the first Leyenda Oculta song I ever heard. I’ve made no secret that it’s my favorite and, not even 10 minutes ago, sitting on the black leather couches in Rodriguez’ living room, the band said how they love when people shout requests at their shows. So, when Ramirez strikes the song’s opening E chord, I’m inwardly giddy. But I play it cool, resisting the urge to sing along. For all I know, the chugging, fist-pumping 12-bar blues tune, which sounds like it’s straight from a Robert Rodriguez movie, is simply the first song in their set. If not, it’d make one hell of an opening salvo. I choose to pretend that, right here and now, it’s a crowd-pleaser. It takes me back to the day in December when, while seeking content for our “Live” column, I noticed Liquid Joe’s had booked a rock en Español night. I hopped on YouTube and found a clip of Leyenda Oculta playing “El Rey” at a Halloween show at the Manhattan Club in 2008. The audio quality sucked, but YouTube recommended another clip—the studio version of the song. I played it repeatedly. When I found Leyenda Oculta on Facebook, and saw they’d been playing since 2003, I wondered how I’d missed them. Interestingly, Leyenda Oculta means “hidden legend.” That makes sense, especially after learning how the group is pretty big in Utah’s modest—but growing—Latin rock scene. From 2003 to 2007, they had a wellattended Saturday-night gig at the now-

Leyenda Oculta

defunct Manhattan. Whenever a big band like blues rockers El Tri—who, in Mexico, are like the Rolling Stones—comes to Utah, Leyenda Oculta opens for them. Same goes for shows by other big bands from Mexico, like rap-rock group Molotov and heavy metal outfit Rata Blanca. The local rock en Español microcosm encompasses nine bands: De Despedida, 4D, La Calavera, Cenizas Ajenas, Call Musor, DulceSky, Infusion Rock and Niebla. Much like the general Salt Lake City-area music scene, the Latin rock scene is incestuous; many of the musicians play in more than one band. Leyenda’s Martinez also plays in 4D, and Garcia is in La Calavera. And they’re all, with the exception of DulceSky, virtual unknowns. That should change soon, as the rock en Español night at Liquid Joe’s grows in popularity. It started in September 2015, and has continued each month since. Rodriguez says the night is getting so popular that “they might give us a Friday.” It’s already happened, actually: La Calavera held their CD release show at Liquid Joe’s last month, with Leyenda Oculta and DulceSky as their support acts. The next rock en Español night happens this Thursday, March 31 with Leyenda Oculta, 4D, La Calavera and Niebla. There’s a new Leyenda Oculta video on YouTube, taken from the La Calavera CD release show. It’s a performance of “Viva El Rock & Roll” (“Rock & Roll Lives”), another track from Leyenda’s self-titled CD. It’s similar to “El Rey” in that it’s a bluesbased rock number and has the same crowd-pumping energy. There’s a lyric in there that explains why Leyenda Oculta, and their peers in the local rock en Español scene, continue to play hard, even while existing—for now—below the radar. “Quiero que nos escuchen en toda la ciudad,” Ramirez sings. Translated, it says, “I want us to be heard throughout the city.” In the meantime, Leyenda Oculta plays for themselves, their friends in the other bands and the fans. “We love it when people shout out the names of our songs,” Ramirez says. “And when they sing along.” CW

LEYENDA OCULTA

w/ 4D, La Calavera, Niebla Liquid Joe’s 1249 E. 3300 South Thursday, March 31, 9 p.m. 801-467-5637 $7 LiquidJoes.net


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With spring in the air, it’s a good time to start getting out and enjoying the Excellence in the Community concerts again. Thursday’s free show features the Red Rock Hot Club, a quartet purveying acoustic “gypsy swing dance tunes.” The group, which has been kicking around the local music scene since 1999, is staffed by local virtuosos including guitarist Pat Terry of Salt Lake City ska stalwarts Insatiable, as well as John Flanders—typically known for blowing a mean sax—on woodwinds. The lineup is rounded out by guitarist James Martak (The Jukejoint 45’s, The Atomic Deathrays) and bassist David Bowen, who fronts his own trio and invented the “Bassboard,” a one-string bass he plays with his feet. Expect to see some flashy musicianship tonight. (Randy Harward) The Gallivan Center, 239 S. Main, 7:30 p.m., free, ExcellenceConcerts.org

SATURDAY 4.2 Joanna Newsom

A young harp prodigy, Joanna Newsom was in her early 20s when Will Oldham discovered her and took her on tour with him in the early 2000s. Later, she became Oldham’s labelmate, when her debut CD The Milk-Eyed Mender was released by Drag City in 2004. Since then, she’s released album after album to critical acclaim, and her associates form a list of usual suspects in the indie hipster music scene, including Bill Callahan and Devendra Banhart. She was twice selected to perform at the tastemaking UK festival All Tomorrow’s Parties (in the 2010 edition, curated by The Simpsons creator Matt Groening, and again in 2012, chosen by Neutral Milk Hotel’s Jeff Mangum). Newsom also started booking acting gigs, appearing on Portlandia, as well as

Red Rock Hot Club

ANNABEL MEHRAN

Red Rock Hot Club

LEX B ANDERSON

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acting in and narrating the film Inherent Vice, based on the Thomas Pynchon novel of the same name. One of Newsom’s most notable achievements, however, is making the harp cool to denizens of the indie music world, although her seductively pixie-ish voice is no small part of the appeal. Her newest release, Divers (Drag City, 2015), comes five years after Newsom’s epic three-disc set, Have One on Me. This is an artist for whom everything, from album covers to music videos to total presentation is a multi-faceted work of art. In a world where music is something you consume online, and as a result can often seem one- or two-dimensional, Newsom makes music feel expansive and all-inclusive again. Robin Pecknold of Fleet Foxes opens, playing an all-new solo set. (Brian Staker) The Depot, 400 W. South Temple, 8 p.m., $29 in advance, $35 day of show, DepotSLC.com

Sunflower Bean

Brooklyn scenesters Sunflower Bean marry dream pop and mild psychedelia in a lustrous, glossy mix that doesn’t always reveal all their various influences, which range from the Beach Boys to Black Sabbath to Bauhaus and beyond. But bits and pieces peek through at moments on their debut full-length, Human Ceremony (Fat Possum): “Wall Watcher” leads off with a fuzz riff that sounds like T. Rex by way of Death From Above 1979, while “Easier Said” is a jangly confection that makes it look easy. The band’s name suggests an organic-ism that makes the eclectic moments not feel momentary or fleeting—not like the band is trying on different stylistic garb, but that it’s part of who they are. After several EPs and singles, Human Ceremony is a confident, assertive collection. It’s all unified behind the airy, classically trained vocals of Julia Cumming. This stuff really put one in a mind of ‘80s psychedelic revival bands like Dream Syndicate, Rain Parade and the Bangles. In just a few short years, they’ve become one of the top bands in the Brooklyn music scene, and it’s a great chance to see a hot, happening band here. Weaves and New Shack open. (BS) Kilby Court, 741 S. 330 West, 7 p.m., $10, KilbyCourt.com »


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saturday 4/2

wednesday

THE TRIVIA FACTORY 7PM

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86 | MARCH 31, 2016

SCARLET O’NEILL

LIVE

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with special guests

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with special guests canyons & gorgeous gourds Monday 4/4 hosted by robby reynolds & friends

the royal blues jam

ALL SHOW TICKETS AVAILABLE AT SMITHSTIX OR AT THE ROYAL

Ruthie Foster

Calling Ruthie Foster a blues artist is accurate, but also incomplete. While the singersongwriter-guitarist can play the blues with aplomb, she brings enough folk, rock, soul and gospel into the mix to transcend the genre. Instead, she’s more like John Hiatt than John Lee Hooker—an artist whose palette includes more than just primary colors. That doesn’t stop her from earning accolades from the blues community, including the Koko Taylor Award (Traditional Blues Female) in 2013 and 2015, as well as a Grammy nomination for Best Blues Album (for 2013’s Let It Burn). Her eighth album, Promise of a Brand New Day, came out on Blue Corn Music in 2014. (RH) George S. & Dolores Dore Eccles Center Theater/ Eccles Center for the Performing Arts, 1750 Kearns Blvd. (Park City), 7:30 p.m., $25-$75, EcclesCenter.org

MONDAY 4.4 Arkells, Dreamers

In 2012 at South by Southwest, I was all about getting to one show: The Jesus and Mary Chain. Since the Scottish shoegazers had booked only one gig during the festival, everyone called me a fool for making the long walk across town and standing in a line that would surely only lead to me hearing Chains’ muted set from the street. Ha! Not only did I get in, but I got to see Titus Andronicus and Arkells. The latter, hailing from Canada, played an irresistible set of catchy, up-tempo, soul-infused rock & roll that took my mind off my aching feet—and stuck with me even after I’d seen The Jesus and Mary Chain for the first (and probably only) time in my life. That’s saying something. The band’s latest, High Noon (Universal Canada/Dine Alone, 2014) finds them refining their sound and their songwriting chops on hooky anthems like “Fake Money” and “Cynical Bastards.” It won’t be long before this thinking-man’s Walk the Moon is dominating the airwaves. Tonight, Arkells share the bill with Dreamers, a Brooklyn band that weaves the sweet sound of ‘70s punk into radio-ready dance rock, for a band hipsters and mainstream monkeys alike will enjoy. New Jersey’s Karma Killers open. (RH) Kilby Court, 741 S. 330 West, 7 p.m., $8 in advance, $10 day of show, KilbyCourt.com

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In an effort to be the best in Salt Lake’s brunch game, RYE has decided to focus our aim on the a.m. hours. Effective February 29th, RYE will be open Monday-Friday from 9am-2pm Saturday and Sunday from 9am-3pm. What this means for you: even more house-made breakfast and brunch specials, snappier service-same fresh, locally-sourced fixins. Come on in. www.ryeslc.com

MAR 30: SHANNON 8PM DOORS GAZEBOS BREAKERS

& THE CLAMS

MAR 31: GOLDEN PLATES 8PM DOORS JESUS CHRIST THE HIPS THE WATCHES THOMAS JACQUES APR 1:

APR 2:

9PM DOORS

DUBWISE W/ WE BANG

MISTER BLACK HEFF ILLOOM

DR. DERG

X&G MR. VANDAL HECKA GRAVY.TRON

APR 3: RA RA RIOT 8PM DOORS PWR BTTM AND THE KIDS APR 4:

8PM DOORS

LISSIE

SKRIZZLY ADAMS COMING SOON

Apr 5: Night Beats Apr 6: Talia Keys Apr 7: Dumb Luck Album Release Apr 8: Pete Yorn Apr 9: Peter Murphy SOLD OUT Apr 10: DMA’s

Apr 12: Mathew Logan Vasquez of Delta Spirit

Apr 13: Apr 14: Apr 15: Apr 16: Apr 17:

Autolux The Bee The Cave Singers Hardkiss Brothers Cloud Cult


THURSDAY 3.31

LIVE MUSIC

American Authors at The State Room (The State Room) DJ Courtney (Area 51) GlobalFEST on the Road (Kingsbury Hall) Hot Noise & Guest DJ (The Red Door) Jazz Joint Thursday (Garage on Beck) Jeremiah Maxey (Silver Star Cafe) Kemosabe and Friends (Downstairs) K-UTE Radio Presents: Milk & Bone (Kilby Court) Leyenda Oculta + 4D + La Calavera + Niebla (Liquid Joe’s) see p. 82 Michael Dallin (Hog Wallow Pub) Milk & Bone (Kilby Court) Red Rock Hot Club (The Gallivan Center) see p. 84 Therapy Thursdays: Christopher Lawrence (Sky)

JOSHUA WEAVER

CONCERTS & CLUBS OPEN MIC, SESSION & PIANO LOUNGE Dueling Pianos (The Tavernacle) Jazz Jam Session (Sugar House Coffee)

KARAOKE

Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue) Ogden Unplugged feat. Talia Keys (Lighthouse Lounge)

FRIDAY 4.1 LIVE MUSIC

ATB (Park City Live) Citizen + Turnover + Sorority Noise + Milk Teeth (Kilby Court) The Dandy Warhols + Seratones (The Complex) see p. 80 DComplexit + Bzenjil + glowcoil (Diabolical Records)

CONCERTS & CLUBS SATURDAY 4.2 Underoath, Caspian

When teasing their upcoming reunion tour, Underoath (above) dropped the cryptic message, “Rebirth is coming.” It’s kind of a cheeky tease for a Christian band, showing they’re perhaps not taking themselves and their reunion tour too seriously—while still giving the fans what they want. The post-hardcore (isn’t that just screamo?) band welcomes frontman and one-time Salt Laker Aaron Gillespie back into the band, and will play two fan favorite albums, They’re Only Chasing Safety (2004) and Define the Great Line (2006) in their entirety. Opening the show are Massachusetts outfit Caspian, touring behind last year’s serene masterpiece Dust and Disquiet (Triple Crown). (Randy Harward) The Complex, 536 W. 100 South, 6:30 p.m., $25 in advance, $30 day of show, TheComplexSLC.com

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MARCH 31, 2016 | 87


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| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

88 | MARCH 31, 2016

CONCERTS & CLUBS DUBWISE w/ We Bang + Mister Black + Heff + illoom (The Urban Lounge) Foxtails Brigade (The Underground) Friday Night Live: VINYL TAP (Sky) Monuments (The Loading Dock) Sammy J (The Complex) Spiritual Rez (The Cabin) Tony Holiday & the Velvetones (Hog Wallow Pub) Yuck (Metro Bar)

OPEN MIC, SESSION & PIANO LOUNGE Dueling Pianos (The Tavernacle) Retro Lounge Club Night (Maxwell’s)

SATURDAY 4.2

A RELAXED GENTLEMAN’S CLUB DA I LY L U N C H S P E C I A L S POOL, FOOSBALL & GAMES

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LIVE MUSIC

Badfeather & Stonefed (O.P. Rockwell) Bane & Twitching Tongues (The Loading Dock) Bane Final SLC Show (The Loading Dock) Chris Orrock & Pals (Feldman’s Deli) DIRT FIRST w/ Dr. Dreg, X&G, Gravy.Tron, and more! (The Urban Lounge) Dr. Derg (The Urban Lounge) Joanna Newsom + Robin Pecknold (The Depot) see p. 84 Justin Beiber: Purpose World Tour (Vivint Smart Home Arena) Leæther Strip (Metro Bar) Ruthie Foster (Eccles Center Theater) see p. 86 Sky Saturdays: Anthony Pisano (Sky) The Steel Belts (Hog Wallow Pub) Sunflower Bean + Weaves + New Shack (Kilby Court) see p. 84 Underoath + Caspian (The Complex) see p. 87

OPEN MIC, SESSION & PIANO LOUNGE Dueling Pianos (The Tavernacle) Retro Lounge Club Night (Maxwell’s)

KARAOKE

Cafe Karaoke (Guru’s Cafe)

SUNDAY 4.3 LIVE MUSIC

Garage Artist Showcase (Garage on Beck) The Last Honkytonk Music Series (Garage on Beck) Mike Rogers (Deer Valley) Ra Ra Riot (The Urban Lounge)

LIVE MUSIC FRI APRIL 1 ◆ 8 PM $5 Fam Jams Reunion SAT April 2 ◆ 8 PM $5 Red Dog Revival with Simply B

Join us for Ogden Restaurant Week April 7-17 For a delicious 2-course lunch for $10 or 3-course dinner for $17 Bloody Mary Bar, Brunch & Brooke Macintosh every Sunday 10am-3pm Open Everyday 11am till 1am Great Eats, Great Drinks, Great Music. 130 25th Street Ogden lighthouseogden.com

RANDY'S RECORD SHOP VINYL RECORDS NEW & USED CD’s, 45’s, Cassettes, Turntables & Speakers

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TUE – FRI 11AM TO 7PM • SAT 10AM TO 6PM • CLOSED SUN & MON LIKE US ON OR VISIT WWW.RANDYSRECORDS.COM • 801.532.4413


OPEN MIC, SESSION & PIANO LOUNGE

Mike Rogers (Deer Valley)

KARAOKE

Karaoke Bingo (The Tavernacle) Karaoke Church (Club JAM) Karaoke with DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue on State)

MONDAY 4.4

LIVE MUSIC

Arkells + Dreamers + Karma Killers (Kilby Court) see p. 86

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Poplar Street Pub)

TUESDAY 4.5

DWIGHT MARSHALL

WEDNESDAY 4.6

CONCERTS & CLUBS

Anders Osborne, Sister Sparrow OPEN MIC, SESSION & PIANO LOUNGE Open Mic Night (The Royal) Open Mic Night (Velour)

KARAOKE

Karaoke with DJ Thom (A Bar Named Sue on State)

WEDNESDAY 4.6 LIVE MUSIC

Anders Osborne + Sister Sparrow + The Dirty Birds (The State Room) see right Conn and Rob Live Jazz Music (Maxwell’s) Jazz at the 90 (Club 90)

OPEN MIC, SESSION & PIANO LOUNGE Dueling Pianos (The Tavernacle)

With his freshly released eleventh album, Spacedust & Ocean Views (Back on Dumaine Records), Swedish singer-songwriter and guitarist Anders Osborne (right) focuses on the songs. That might disappoint some fans, who came aboard because of Osborne’s six-string heroics. The thing is, Osborne has earned a reputation as an ace songwriter over the past 27 years and, for his last few albums, the narrative has been all about his guitar chops. You can’t blame the guy for wanting to remind people he’s no one-trick pony. Besides, there’ll be plenty of room for his sinewy slide licks in his live set. Openers Sister Sparrow & the Dirty Birds, led by powerhouse vocalist Arleigh Kinchloe are promoting their new double-live album, Fowl Play. (Randy Harward) The State Room, 638 S. State, 8 p.m., $27, TheStateRoomSLC.com

CONCERTS & CLUBS

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CROSSWORD PUZZLE

Š 2016

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ACROSS

45. Beirut's land: Abbr. 47. 6'4" late-night host 50. "Peace out!" 51. "Presumed Innocent" author 52. Knight's ride 53. Prefix with phobia 55. Suffix with fashion 58. Jane or John in court 59. Old jazz great Kid ____ 60. Sport-____ 61. Cameron or Mitchell on "Modern Family," e.g. 62. Ambulance destinations, for short

MARCH 31, 2016 | 91

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

| CITY WEEKLY |

SUDOKU

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

Last week’s answers

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7. Columnist Maureen 8. 1920s White House monogram 9. "Woo-____!" 10. Kitchen pest 11. Someone with a bone to pick? 12. The White House getting blown to smithereens by a UFO in "Independence Day," to its filmmakers 13. French wave 19. ____ Black (Gary Oldman's character in the "Harry Potter" films) 21. Naturalist who took Teddy Roosevelt on a tour of Yosemite in 1903 25. "Yabba dabba ____!" 26. Follower of directions? 28. Cousin on "The Addams Family" 29. 2000 CBS premiere 30. Family with at least one member serving in the U.S. Congress every year from 1947 to 2011 33. Longings 34. Miss DOWN 35. One of two Best Director winners 1. State Farm rival of 2007 2. Iraq's second-largest city 36. You alone 3. Golden, in Guanajuato 37. Sculler's need 4. Experiment site 39. Remove from the stock exchange 5. Labor union that merged with the CIO in 1955 42. Wall St. deal 6. "These aren't the ____ you're looking for" 43. Joe Biden's state: Abbr. (Obi-Wan Kenobi line in "Star Wars") 44. Letters before an alias

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

1. Mil. authority 4. Cheryl of "Charlie's Angels" 8. [Kapow!] 14. Do a preplanting chore 15. Big top? 16. Continued ahead 17. Troop-entertaining grp. 18. Is indecisive 20. ____ Khalifa (world's tallest building) 22. Tyrannical Amin 23. Kickoff aid 24. Like reptiles 27. Henderson who is the all-time Major League leader in stolen bases (1,406) 31. ____ d'oeuvres 32. "Piece of cake!" 34. His song "(Just Like) Starting Over" became a #1 hit three weeks after his death 37. Neglected 38. Little matter 39. Marx's "____ Kapital" 40. Like some Crayola crayons 41. Snubber's offering 44. "Someone may have accessed your account" and others 46. Florida island resort 47. Let pass 48. Oil used in perfumery 49. With 57-Across, classic holiday song (or a hint to solving 18-, 24-, 37- and 41-Across) 53. Hotshot 54. What Marcie calls Peppermint Patty in "Peanuts" 56. James Joyce's "Ulysses," per a 1921 court decision 57. See 49-Across 63. Buried treasure? 64. Stoop (to) 65. Zoom 66. Adversary 67. Feature of Mike Wazowski in "Monsters, Inc." 68. No ifs, ____ or buts 69. Email directive: Abbr.


send leads to

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iquor connoisseurs and novices alike should check out Beehive Distilling, a local gin company that has been in operation since August 2013. Chris Barlow, the lead distiller and co-founder, has been involved with Beehive Distilling since it was just a dream. “Three longtime friends spun the idea out one afternoon around beers,” he says. “The next thing we knew, we were open and had products on our shelves. It was a wild year.” Even though Beehive Distilling is relatively new, it has already made a huge impact on the Salt Lake City bar and restaurant scene. Beehive Distilling’s Jack Rabbit gin is carried in nearly every Utah liquor and wine store, as well as in dozens of restaurants, like Avenues Proper, The Tin Angel, Takashi and more. Barlow loves his job. “After years of a dead-end job in corporate America, the best part of this job is just working for myself,” he says. “It’s great to be part of something that you can actually contribute to and make a meaningful impact on.” Barlow has good cause to be proud of what the folks at Beehive Distilling have created. Unlike at a lot of other distilleries, the people at Beehive Distilling actually distill their own products in their own distillery, using high-quality ingredients and traditional methods to produce a true, London dry-style gin. “People would be surprised to learn how many distilleries don’t even have a still,” he says. Barlow believes that his company’s dedication to craft and passion for local products results in a particularly good gin. “Our gin isn’t like any other we have tasted,” he says. That commitment to quality doesn’t go unnoticed by customers. Christina DeVore raves about Beehive Distilling.

Chris Barlow, hand-charring a French oak barrel for Beehive’s Barrel Reserve gin.

COURTESY OF BEEHIVE DISTILLING

INSIDE /

community@cityweekly.net

Beehive Distilling co-founders (L-R) Erik Ostling, Chris Barlow and Matt Aller

But she wasn’t always a gin fan. “The founders of Beehive have heard all the stories of someone’s first bad experience with gin,” she says. “I have mine. It was over 15 years ago in England, trying it for the first time.” Needless to say, she wasn’t a fan at the time—then she tried Beehive’s Jack Rabbit Gin. “It is carefully crafted to highlight the smooth texture,” she says. Finding Beehive has allowed her to expand her choice of cocktails to include gin-based drinks. DeVore found out about Beehive Distiller y on a tour of the facility with Heartbeat Nosh’s Cocktail Club. DeVore learned about Beehive’s process, the f lavors and aromatics of juniper berries that make their gin so vibrant. “Beehive made me a believer in gin,” DeVore says. “That’s why I pick their brand over others—they are my top shelf.” Not sure where to start your gin-based adventures? Never fear. The distillery has recipes on its website for cocktails like the Ginger Kick, Bee’s Knees, the Old Fashioned and, of course, the classic gin martini. n

Beehive Distilling BeehiveDistilling.com

Check out Beehive’s website for cocktail recipes.

COURTESY PHOTO

@clayton_quarles

COURTESY PHOTO

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92 | MARCH 31, 2016

T BEA

PHOTO OF THE WEEK BY


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY B Y R O B

B R E Z S N Y

Go to RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Your advice for the near future comes from poet Stephen Dunn. “If the Devil sits down,” he says, “offer companionship, tell her you’ve always admired her magnificent, false moves.” I think that’s an excellent plan, Libra! Maybe you’ll even be lucky enough to make the acquaintance of many different devils with a wide variety of magnificent, false moves. April fool! I lied. In fact, I think you should avoid contact with all devils, no matter how enticing they might be. Now is a key time to surround yourself with positive influences.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20) “People only get really interesting when they start to rattle the bars of their cages,” says philosopher Alain de Botton. If that’s true, Taurus, you must be on the verge of becoming very interesting. Metaphorically speaking, you’re not just rattling the bars of your cage. You’re also smacking your tin cup against the bars and trying to saw through them with your plastic knife. April fool! I lied. You’re not literally in a prison cell. And I got a bit carried away with the metaphor. But there is a grain of truth to what I said. You are getting close to breaking free of at least some of your mind-forged manacles. And it’s making you more attractive and intriguing.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) In 1841, a British medical journal prescribed the following remedy for the common cold: “Nail a hat on the wall near the foot of your bed, then retire to that bed, and drink spirits until you see two hats.” My expert astrological analysis reveals that this treatment is likely to cure not just the sniffles, but also any other discomforts you’re suffering from, whether physical or emotional or spiritual. So I hope you own a hat, hammer and nails. April fool! I lied. The method I suggested probably won’t help alleviate what ails you. But here’s a strategy that might: Get rid of anything that’s superfluous, rotten, outdated or burdensome.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20) If I had to decide what natural phenomenon you most closely resemble right now, I’d consider comparing you to a warm, restless breeze or a busily playful dolphin. But my first choice would be the mushrooms known as Schizophyllum commune. They’re highly adaptable: able to go dormant when the weather’s dry and spring to life when rain comes. They really get around, too, making their homes on every continent except Antarctica. But the main reason I’d link you with them is that they come in over 28,000 different sexes. Their versatility is unprecedented. April fool! I exaggerated a bit. It’s true that these days you’re polymorphous and multifaceted and well-rounded. But you’re probably not capable of expressing 28,000 varieties of anything.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) To begin your oracle, I’ll borrow the words of author Ray Bradbury: “May you be in love every day for the next 20,000 days, and out of that love, remake a world.” I have reason to believe that this optimistic projection has a good chance of coming true for you. Imagine it, Sagittarius: daily swoons of delight and rapture from now until the year 2071. April fool! I lied, sort of. It would be foolish to predict that you’ll be giddy with amorous feelings nonstop for the next 54 years and 10 months. On the other hand, I don’t think it’s unrealistic for you to expect a lot of that sweet stuff over the course of the next three weeks.

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When the heartless world has unexpected windstorms, economic fluctuation, and pregnant teens, the Lord will authorize state sponsored soldiers of our great nation to blow up foreigners who terrorize. We both hold to fetishes, thou sayeth, but I have no care for how you judge it. You’re a cultist, and I’m a man of faith based upon my omnipotent budget. When scales are burned from your eyes you will see only the foolish reject prophecy. Clay Marks (pseudonymous) Send your poem (max 15 lines), to: Poet’s Corner, City Weekly, 248 South Main Street, SLC, UT 84101 or e-mail to poetscorner@cityweekly.net.

Published entrants receive a $15 value gift from CW. Each entry must include name and mailing address.

#cwpoetscorner

MARCH 31, 2016 | 93

CANCER (June 21-July 22) “Whatever it is you’re seeking won’t come in the form you’re expecting,” warns Japanese novelist Haruki Murakami. If that’s true, why bother? Why expend all your precious yearning if the net result won’t even satisfy your yearning?! That’s why I advise you to abandon your beloved plans! Save your energy for trivial wishes. That way you won’t be disappointed when they are fulfilled in unanticipated ways. April fool! I was messing with you. It’s true that what you want won’t arrive in the form you’re expecting. But I bet the result will be even better than what you AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) In 1991, hikers in the Italian Alps discovered the well-preserved expected. corpse of a Bronze Age hunter. Buried in the frigid terrain, the man who came to be known as Ötzi the Iceman had been there for 5,000 LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) You’re due to make a pilgrimage, aren’t you? It might be time years. Soon the museum that claimed his body began receiving to shave your head, sell your possessions and head out on a inquiries from women who wanted to be impregnated with Ötzi’s long trek to a holy place where you can get back in touch with sperm. I think this is an apt metaphor for you, Aquarius. Consider what the hell you’re doing here on this planet. April fool! I was the possibility that you might benefit from being fertilized by an kidding about the head-shaving and possessions-dumping. On influence from long ago. April fool! I was just messing with you. It’s the other hand, there might be value in embarking on a less true you can generate good mojo by engaging with inspirational melodramatic pilgrimage. I think you’re ready to seek radical influences from the past. But I’d never urge you to be guided by a bliss of a higher order—and get back in touch with what the hell vulgar metaphor related to Ötzi’s sperm. you’re doing here on this planet. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Caligula was an eccentric Roman emperor who had a physical VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Are you ready to fight the monster? Do you have the courage resemblance to a goat. He was sensitive about it. That’s why and strength and stamina and guile to overcome the ugly beast he made it illegal for anyone to refer to goats in his company. I that’s blocking the path to the treasure? If not, turn around and mention this, Pisces, because I’d like to propose a list of words head back to your comfort zone until you’re better prepared. you should forbid to be used in your presence during the comApril fool! I lied. There is a monster, but it’s not the literal ing weeks: “money,” “cash,” “finances,” “loot,” “savings” or embodiment of a beastly adversary. Rather, it’s inside you. It’s “investments.” Why? Because I’m afraid it would be distracting, an unripe part of yourself that needs to be taught and tamed and even confusing or embarrassing, for you to think about these sore cared for. Until you develop a better relationship with it, it will subjects right now. April fool! I lied. The truth is, now is a perfect just keep testing you. (P.S. Now would be a good time to develop time for you to be focused on getting richer quicker. a better relationship with it.)

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CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) “I am tired of being brave,” groaned Anne Sexton in one of her poems. “I’m sick of following my dreams,” moaned comedian Mitch Hedberg, adding, “I’m just going to ask my dreams where they’re going and hook up with them later.” In my opinion, Capricorn, you have every right to unleash grumbles similar to Hedberg’s and Sexton’s. April fool! The advice I just gave you is only half-correct. It’s true that you need and deserve a respite from your earnest struggles. Now is indeed a good time to take a break so you can recharge your spiritual batteries. But don’t you dare feel sorry for yourself.

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ARIES (March 21-April 19) According to my astrological analysis, you would benefit profoundly from taking a ride in a jet fighter plane 70,000 feet above the earth. In fact, I think you really need to experience weightlessness as you soar faster than the speed of sound. Luckily, there’s an organization, MiGFlug (MiGFlug.com), that can provide you with this healing thrill. (I just hope you can afford the $5,000 price tag.) April fool! I do in fact think you should treat yourself to unprecedented thrills and transcendent adventures. But I bet you can accomplish that without being quite so extravagant.

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CITY WEEKLY NOW Offering PTO! Paid Time OFF for ALL Drivers after 90 DAYS!

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CONVERGYS Customer Service and Sales Reps careers.convergys.com IRONWOOD FINANCIAL Appointment Setters jobs@iwpmts.com ALPENGLOW SOLAR Journeyman Electrician utahjobcenter.com AMERICAN MANPOWER SERVICES Electrician utahjobcenter.com

LINE COOK Legends Sports Bar & Grill utahjobcenter.com LOCAL CARPENTERS Home Advisor utahjobcenter.com LINE COOK Legends Sports Bar & Grill utahjobcenter.com SALES EXECUTIVE Franklin Covey utahjobcenter.com

94 | MARCH 31, 2016

| COMMUNITY | | CITYWEEKLY.NET |

CONTACT US NOW TO PLACE YOUR RECRUITMENT ADS 801-413-0947 or JSMITH@CITYWEEKLY.NET For more Employment Opportunities, go online to www.utahjobcenter.com

Apply online

www.guitarcenterinc.com/pages/careers in person at 180 West Election Rd, Draper UT 84020 or email resume to rbrown@musiciansfriend.com


REAL ESTATE

URBAN L I V I N

WE SELL HOMES & LOANS TO ALL SAINTS, SINNERS, SISTERWIVES

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S ON U W FOLLO GRAM A T S IN

EEKLY

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MIDVALE Massive 2 bdrm fourplex! Hook-ups, swamp cooler, tile, dishwasher, private patio! $795

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SUGARHOUSE

Deluxe 2+bdrm. 2 bath condo w/ city views! Gorgeous hardwood floors and granite counters! Rooftop hot tub, pool, concierge, billiards room, gym! $2100

Splendid 1+bdrm. 1 bath duplex! Private yard area, washer dryer hookups, 14’ ceilings, pets ok! $845

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Lovely 3 bdrm 1.5 bath townhome condo w/ luxury details! Stainless steel appliances, dishwasher, swamp cooler, private plant patio, two tone paint! $1295

Deluxe 1+bdrm w/ gas included! Hardwood floors, covered parking, on-site laundry, cat or small dog OK! $845

FOR A FREE LISTING OF ALL OF OUR RENTALS, PLEASE DROP BY OUR NEW OFFICE LOCATED AT 440 S. 700 E. STE #203

PARTLOW RENTS 801-484-4446

Content is prepared expressly for Community and is not by City Weekly staff

Loan Officer 801-747-1206 julie@brizzee.net www.brizzee.net

Granting loans for 29 years in Happy Valley- NMLS#243253

Broker/Owner 801-201-8824 babs@urbanutah.com www.urbanutah.com

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Your home could be sold here. Call me for a free market analysis today.

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MARCH 31, 2016 | 95

WEST SALT LAKE

Babs De Lay

Julie A. Brizzée

| COMMUNITY |

SUGARHOUSE Stunning 2 bdrm. 2 bath condo 2/ vaulted ceilings and attached garage! Private balcony, central A/C, fireplace! $1395

f you know me well, you’d have learned years ago that I hate Peeps marshmallow candy, and I really am not a fan of bagpipes. My bio-mom loved Peeps. When they began making more than just yellow-colored chickens, she wrote the company to complain, that “colored peeps were a sacrilege!” Peeps I can avoid, bagpipes I cannot. If death had a sound, surely it would be the screech of bagpipes. Folks who play those bags of misery are sometimes known as “buskers,” which are musicians who play for money on the street. And guess what? Salt Lake City is looking for more bagpipers, singers, hoopers, fire eaters and the like to amuse downtown patron this spring and summer. Kim Angeli, formerly the queen of the Downtown Farmers Market (now retired) is helping our fair city to liven up our streets. “With the ever-evolving downtown Salt Lake City and the opening of Eccles Theater later this year, I am researching how sidewalk artists and performers fit into the mix,” she says. “Gathering feedback and knowledge from downtown businesses, employees, residents and both practicing and potential performers, I will make recommendations to support a vibrant busking community.” She adds, “Cities like Boston, Boulder, Ashville and New Orleans are known for street performances and sidewalk artists in pedestrian-dense areas. Could Salt Lake City, its artists and citizens benefit from similar programs? That’s what I’m here to find out.” You can help her by filling out this survey at bit.ly/1Rr8MiJ. If buskers step forward, we’ll get more than the lone, squealing bagpiper performing on Regent Street this fall when the Eccles Center opens. The Downtown Garden Stroll begins April 1 and will run through May 8. No, I’m not talking the annual pilgrimage to Temple Square to see the phenomenal posies planted there. I’m talking about the temporary “parklets” set up on Main Street between South Temple and 300 South. Artists just competed to decorate these platforms. The pop-up parks will have art and f lowers at each platform through Mother’s Day. You can grab a nosh and cuppa and sit out in the sun on one of the entries like a f lower yourself, ready to bloom and soak up the vitamin D. And if you have to, you can eat Peeps, but I won’t be joining you. n

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

If rentals were FLOWERS ...which would you PICK?

Busk or Bust I


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| CITY WEEKLY • BACKSTOP |

96 | MARCH 31, 2016

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Profile for Copperfield Publishing

City Weekly March 31, 2016  

Eating Well- Dining Guide 2016

City Weekly March 31, 2016  

Eating Well- Dining Guide 2016