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2 | MARCH 3, 2016

CWCONTENTS COVER STORY BEST OF UTAH MUSIC

The votes are in: With 22 readers’ choice categories and 19 staff selections, here are Utah’s best musical acts and artists for 2016. Cover illustration by Travis Bone

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CONTRIBUTOR

4 LETTERS 6 OPINION 8 NEWS 25 A&E 29 DINE 35 CINEMA 37 TRUE TV 38 MUSIC 52 COMMUNITY

RANDY HARWARD Music Editor

Behold the brains behind this week’s hefty cover story. Since 1998, Randy’s published pieces in nearly two dozen magazines and newspapers, including Guitar World, CMJ, Request, Salt Lake Magazine and SLUG. He’s covered music for City Weekly since 2001, and is a “leapling” who celebrated his birthday Feb. 29.

Your online guide to more than 2,000 bars and restaurants • Up-to-the-minute articles and blogs at CityWeekly.net/Daily

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Monday’s anti-police brutality march drew droves. Facebook.com/SLCWeekly

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Graffiti duo Streetlight Art both says it and sprays it.

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SEE THE 2016 BEST OF UTAH MUSIC WINNERS PERFORM LIVE FRIDAY, MARCH 11 AT SKY. MORE INFORMATION & LINE UP ON PAGE 14


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4 | MARCH 3, 2016

LETTERS Land Grab Not About Education

My 1957 bride and I live in Sandpoint, Idaho, but we winter in Moab, Utah. The latter entitles us, we hope, to comment on a story we have been following for years, it seems, in City Weekly. The reason U.S. Reps. Rob Bishop, Jason Chaffetz and their cultist cronies are trying to steal public lands is not to upgrade Utah’s dismal public education. It is to feather the financial nests of fellow sect member entrepreneurs whose polluting dollars keep them in office. With straight faces, they insist they want to raise funds to improve Utah education. Baloney. During 10 years of Logan residency, we found precious little separation between church and state. From schools to judges to Boy Scouts to corporate chiefs, predatory cultists run the show. Forget the illegality of the Public Lands Initiative, a self-serving land grab effort by provincial elected officials. Officials who represent a state which, according to the U.S. Constitution, is itself illegal. So long as such devious and insular people as Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah; Reps. Rob Bishop and Jason Chaffetz, RUtah; Rep. Mike Noel, R-Kanab, and their ilk represent Utah in Washington, D.C., and Salt Lake City, the state will remain under the uneducated heal of zealous puppets of the One True Church. At the bottom of the heap in public education and in countless other telling categories as well.

TIM & JAQUELYNN HENNEY Sandpoint, Idaho

WRITE US: Salt Lake City Weekly, 248 S. Main, Salt Lake City, UT 84101. Email: comments@cityweekly.net. Fax: 801-575-6106. We reserve the right to edit for length and clarity. Preference will be given to letters that are 300 words or less and sent uniquely to City Weekly. Full name, address and phone number must be included, even on emailed submissions, for verification purposes.

Mind the Gap

The Affordable Care Act was signed into law six years ago this month. The uninsured rate is now 11.9 percent, the lowest ever recorded. Approximately 17 million more Americans have health insurance today than before the law was passed. Hospitals across the nation have saved untold amounts on uncompensated care. Despite this progress, more than 5 million Americans remain unable to access health insurance because they fall into the “coverage gap,” meaning they make too much income to qualify for Medicaid, but too little to be eligible for the tax credits that make private health insurance affordable. While 80 percent of this group live with incomes below the Federal Poverty Level, over 70 percent have at least one full-time worker in their family. Everyone stuck in the “coverage gap” lives in one of 18 states (Utah among them); the other 32 states have expanded Medicaid. While the Affordable Care Act has made a positive difference, a minority of states have stubbornly chosen to leave hard-working residents without access to health care. Those elected leaders have sacrificed the health of their constituents in pursuit of individual political goals. Now’s the time to tell your representative where you stand. Let’s work together to make the “coverage gap” a thing of the past.

JOHNATHAN HLADIK

Center for Rural Affairs Lyons, Neb.

It’s Easier to Build a Pipeline Than Conserve

The USGS says the average Utahn uses 248 gallons of water—the highest usage rate in the United States. Is this not just another form of gluttony? It seems logical that such wanton waste in the second-most arid state in the nation would be considered “sinful.” Senate Bill 80 proposed by the Legislature would take $36 million in sales taxes annually to fund the Lake Powell Pipeline and Bear River development. It doesn’t seek to solve a problem, but to normalize the behavior that causes it. It has already been pointed out that a miniscule 1 percent reduction in water use by the city of St. George would negate the need for the Lake Powell Pipeline. I’m sure a similarly manageable act of restraint by the Wasatch Front would save the Bear River from being overtapped even more. But, to paraphrase Aldo Leopold, it’s much easier to build a pipeline than to think of what the land and people really need.

JOSH BOLING Logan

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Salt Lake City Weekly is published every Thursday by Copperfield Publishing Inc. The Salt Lake City Weekly is an independent publication dedicated to alternative news and news sources, and serves as a comprehensive entertainment guide. 50,000 copies of the Salt Lake City Weekly are free of charge at more than 1,800 locations along the Wasatch Front, limit one copy per reader. Additional copies of the paper may be purchased for $1 (Best of Utah and other special issues, $5) payable to the Salt Lake City Weekly in advance. No person, without expressed permission of Copperfield Publishing Inc., may take more than one copy of any Salt Lake City Weekly issue. No portion of the Salt Lake City Weekly may be reproduced in whole or part by any means, including electronic retrieval systems, without the written permission of the Publisher. Third-Class postage paid at Midvale, UT. Delivery may take one week. All Rights Reserved. ®

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OPINION

Clogged Canyons

Something is happening to the ski resort canyons just east of Salt Lake City. For the first time, miles-long traffic pile-ups have become almost routine there, and not just on weekends. It can make for an hourlong crawl up the seven miles to Alta. Heavy traffic was always expected on holidays and prime weekends in both Cottonwood Canyons, but now gridlock appears practically any day the skiing’s good. On a recent Friday, officials invited TV cameras to witness a long, snaking line of cars backed up on access roads, inching toward Little Cottonwood Canyon. Resort officials say much of the congestion is from motorists driving alone, and there’s still plenty of capacity on the slopes. The traffic has gotten so bad that a popular weather blogger, Jim Steenburgh of WasatchWeatherWeenies.com, recently veered from forecasting to complain that Little and Big Cottonwood canyons “have always been popular, but this winter, things are completely out of control.” He added, “What is new is that this is happening every weekend.” Others are comparing it to Denver’s notoriously crowded ski traffic on Interstate 70. A “perfect storm” of events is crowding the Utah mountains this winter, says Mike Grass of Mountain Accord, a planning group of local mayors, government agencies, resorts and environmental watchdog groups. He cited bountiful snowfall after four anemic winters, a parched East Coast drawing more destination skiers to the West, and Salt Lake’s booming valley population, now over 1 million. That number is expected to grow to 1.5 million within 35 years, and many of the newcomers seem intent on skiing. Mountain Accord is calling for a host of transit improvements for canyon service, while the Utah Transit Authority says it’s committed to only deploying a few more buses next winter. Existing service is far from

B Y PA U L F O Y

ideal. Many skiers find it slow, crowded and, at $4.50, almost twice the regular fare. That may be why only 7 percent of skiers traveling to Salt Lake’s four premiere resorts take a public bus, a Ski Utah survey found in 2013. UTA says boardings have since gone up. To test the transit proposition fully, I lugged a pair of skis onto a train platform in the urban heart of the Salt Lake Valley on a snowy January morning. To other commuters, I was an odd sight. “Hey, where are you going?” asked one in a look of amazement. Only 1 percent of Wasatch skiers start their way to the mountain by light rail, Ski Utah found. I wanted to test a doorstep commute without any driving to determine if an urban skier could plausibly do it from almost any train station in the valley. Planning was necessary. I had to study a thicket of rail and ski bus schedules for connecting times. Choices were limiting. If I missed some bus connections, I wouldn’t be skiing, period. I did find that light-rail transfer credit reduces the premium bus fare, for a net cost of $9 round-trip. It seemed the right thing to do. Traffic monitors show as many as 1,300 vehicles an hour try to funnel into Little Cottonwood Canyon on busy mornings, with as many as 6,600 making the trip for the day. They not only clog access and canyon roads but add emissions in a valley notorious at times for toxic air. I wanted to avoid getting into my car to drive to a park-and-ride lot at the base of the canyons. That would defeat a pure transit experience. I took rail to Sandy Civic Center Station, where Bus 992 offered the most direct route with the fewest stops to Alta Ski Area. Other ski buses depart from Mid-Valley, downtown Salt Lake City and, on weekends, the University of Utah. I brought energy bars, an orange and a magazine and left the driving to someone else.

In all, my transit route took about 90 minutes. I can drive to Alta in 30 minutes on clear roads, but I was saving emissions and didn’t have to drive in heavy snow. The bus held traction without a slip. It was jam-packed on the way down. From Alta, the bus makes a tedious detour into congested Snowbird lots, to much complaint from those on board. An hour passed before the few remaining bus passengers arrived at the Sandy rail station, where the Blue Line provides efficient transportation to downtown Salt Lake City. Light-rail is comfortable, smooth and fast. If only tracks existed up the canyons— a dream of many skiers, but so impossibly expensive that regional planners have all but dismissed it out of hand. Mountain Accord says a tramway couldn’t haul enough skiers up the canyon fast enough to make that idea practical. For now, the group is calling for more shuttle buses, incentives for carpooling, and perhaps mandatory parking fees at resorts to discourage motorists. More buses can seem a half-measure— they can’t go faster than stuck traffic. Widening roads for dedicated bus lanes is another idea being tossed around. Mountain Accord says a larger bus fleet is worth deploying, along with more routes and departure lots from more areas of the valley. My transit experience showed it was possible to ski at Alta without stepping inside a vehicle in the valley, but it wasn’t easy. The day started early and ended late, and I had to schlep gear around. I’d do it again when setting off alone for a day of skiing but with little enthusiasm. I’d rather carpool with friends, and then I’d be like the 78 percent of Wasatch skiers who, according to a Ski Utah survey, take a car to the slopes. CW

ONLY 1 PERCENT OF WASATCH SKIERS START THEIR WAY TO THE MOUNTAIN BY LIGHT RAIL

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Readers can comment at cityweekly.net

Who is your personal pick for Best of Utah Music 2016? Pete Saltas: Ghostowne. That Steven Wells is a dreamboat!

Josh Scheuerman: Bonco! Can’t believe they pulled off another spectacular Best of Utah, ho-down zinger! I love me some indie-rock, alt-country, bluesinfluenced, local rock ’n’ roll! Mason Rodrickc: 16-year-old me chooses Kilby Court, because the fire pit masked my cigarette smell. 21-year-old me chooses Urban Lounge, because I could finally see the bands that wouldn’t play for 16 year olds. Current me chooses isolation, Reddit, my girlfriend and my cat. Oh, and Foster Body, they are cool.

Jeremiah Smith: Tony Holiday and the Velvetones. Tony and the gang have worked their asses off to get the blues back on people’s mind locally, and are working hard on delivering Utah blues to the the rest of the country. Plus, they kick ass.

Bryan Bale: Choosing Juana Ghani might be a conflict of interest since I’m in that band. Outside my own projects, I’d cast my vote for the young and talented prog-rock superstars known as Advent Horizon. Jerre Wroble: Utah-based EDM act Late Night Alumni, with Becky Jean Williams, John Hancock, Finn Bjarnson and Ryan Raddon (aka Kaskade) should make all Utahns beam with pride. And I gotta say your ears won’t complain if you should catch Ryan Miller’s acoustic guitar at Epic Casual Dining on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Randy Harward: Get Stakerized! Because, rock.


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HITS&MISSES BY KATHARINE BIELE

FIVE SPOT

RANDOM QUESTIONS, SURPRISING ANSWERS

@kathybiele

Holey Ground

ANDREA HARVEY

Amid all the growth in Salt Lake City is a vibrant debate between progress and preservation, and preservation is getting the short end of the stick. Sugar House is a case in point, and it’s not going down without a fight, albeit a quixotic one. Utah Stories recently posted an article on the infamous Sugar Hole, the property owned by Craig Mecham who obtained all kinds of perks from the city. After years lying fallow, some of the property now hosts high-rise apartments and chain restaurants. But next door, he has fenced off more property after evicting longtime tenants—except for one holdout. The Utah Stories article says he’ll rent to University Health Care, although he has yet to submit plans to the city. Much like the Gateway, Sugar House was supposed to feel like a little village. It makes you wonder what people think a village is.

Waiting for the Reveal

We know what sets off the Utah Legislature—sex. And of course, Planned Parenthood. But let’s start with sex. You know, the kind that Utah parents just don’t want to deal with. A bill from Rep. Brian King, D-Salt Lake City, to beef up sex ed was pretty much dead on arrival. Then we’ve got Rep. Curtis Oda, R-Clearfield, and his attempts to ban most abortions, even though it could be unconstitutional. And Sen. Curt Bramble, R-Provo, wants to make it mandatory to give anesthesia to a fetus undergoing abortion, even though there’s no scientific evidence of pain. But the sad fact is that Bramble just revealed his bill, which had been a “boxcar” with no text. Sen. Margaret Dayton, R-Orem, is trying the same strategy with an empty bill titled “Planned Parenthood Amendments.” Right. Don’t let the public know what you’re doing—until it’s too late.

BYO Shopping Bags

Well, if we can’t—or won’t— clean up the dirty air, maybe we can clean up the landfill. And save trees. A bill by Sen. Jani Iwamoto, D-Holladay, would require a 10-cent fee for single-use paper and plastic bags. This is hardly a new thing. Both the Deseret News and The Salt Lake Tribune have been writing about the perils of plastic for years, and communities in California were some of the first to ban the use of plastic bags. Maybe that’s enough to doom the bill in Utah, but we can hope for wisdom. In 2008, Whole Foods got rid of plastic bags. They probably should have eliminated paper, too, since, as Iwamoto points out, the manufacture process produces toxic gases. But not everyone thinks it’s a good idea. The D-News quoted former mayoral candidate George Chapman calling the plastic bag an “American success story.”

Lisa Boone, a Las Vegas native and Utahn for more than 10 years, has grand plans to open Salt Lake City’s first cat café in the downtown or Sugar House areas. You’re probably thinking, you’ve cat to be kitten me right meow—but hear me out for a mewment. (Sorry, had to.) Tinker’s Cat Café (TinkersCatCafe.com), in addition to selling local coffee and sweet treats (all with a cat-themed twist—think chamo-meow tea and cat-ppucinos), will also include a “cat lounge,” where a group of about 8 to 15 cats will be available to hang out with, play with and/or be adopted. Boone successfully raised $28,513 on Kickstarter and expects to open the café in late spring or early summer.

How did you come up with the idea of a cat café?

I was literally sitting on the couch, watching The Amazing Race, and I believe they were in Taiwan—the first cat café opened in Taiwan in 1998. Their obstacle was to go into the cat café and give them milk, and I’m like, “What? What is that?” I had no idea that it even existed. It just blew me away. I thought, I’m going to do that—I’m going to bring that to Salt Lake City. That was probably about a year and a half ago.

Where did the name Tinker’s come from?

When I was born, my mother had two Siamese cats, and one was named Tinker (above left). We grew up together—he was the first cat in my life, and he grew to be 22 years old. Many days were spent following him around, pretending I was a cat, too. He set the stage for my love and connection to cats, so the name is an ode to him.

So, would you consider yourself a cat person?

That’s really hard. Especially because I’m opening a cat café, you’d think that, for sure. But I love all animals. When I was little, we had a farm where we raised chickens and bunnies and cats and dogs. So, I love having dogs and cats at the same time; I couldn’t side. But you wouldn’t open a dog café. That would be difficult.

What kinds of reactions have you been getting? I’ve had people cry.

Wait, what?

[Laughs] I’ve had girls start crying instantly because they didn’t know it existed. They’re like, “Are you kidding me? This is real? Are you serious? I’m so happy right now.” It’s really cool because it’s a positive community/social thing for animal lovers, and the reaction has been really strong. People can’t wait to be a part of it—lots of people want to work there, and they’re trying to send me résumés already. And then there are some people who are confused, who don’t really know what it is. Some have even asked, like as a joke, if we’re serving cat meat.

—ANDREA HARVEY aharvey@cityweekly.net


THE

NUEVE

THE LIST OF NINE

BY MASON RODRICKC & MICHELLE L ARSON

@ 42bearcat

9. When am I going to get my

8. Just who gave my grandson a cell phone?

7. Did anyone ever find the beef? 6. I was told to get a podcast the other day. Will I need my doctor’s approval?

4. Where can I get some white Vans?

3. Did anyone else tear up

when Leo finally won an Oscar? Amanda Bynes?

1. Is my haircut on fleek?

Patriarchal societies like Utah often ignore the contributions of women. Now you’ll have a chance to hear about little-known stories of women’s history in Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Laurel Thatcher Ulrich’s lecture “Beyond Letters and Diaries: Unexpected Sources in Women’s History.” Ulrich is a professor of history at Harvard University, and earned a Pulitzer for A Midwife’s Tale, a book that became a landmark in women’s labor history. The talk is in honor of the Aileen H. Clyde 20th Century Women’s Legacy Archive. J. Willard Marriott Library, Gould Auditorium, University of Utah, 295 S. 1500 East, 801-581-3421, Thursday, March 10, 7 p.m., free and open to public, Lib.Utah.edu

1200 S State St.

n Nazanin Boniadi—actress, humanrights activist and Amnesty International spokesperson—will speak on “Breaking Barriers for Women and Girls” as part of the Tanner Center for Nonviolent Human Rights Advocacy’s “Artists as Advocates” series. University of Utah, Union Saltair Room, 200 S. Central Campus Drive, Monday, March 7, 4 p.m., free and open to the public, HumanRights.Utah.edu

GUN-CONTROL DEBATE

Don’t tell the Second Amendment freaks, but the Japanese are coming. In “Utah Debates Japan: A Public Event,” the University of Utah’s John R. Park Debate Society hosts a public debate featuring the Japanese National Debate Team taking on the resolution “Resolved: The United States of America should ban the private ownership of firearms.” Well, that’s not going to happen, but it’s worth a debate—peacefully. University of Utah, Languages & Communication Building, Room 1110, 255 S. Central Campus Drive, 801-581-6554, Thursday, March, 3, 7 p.m., free and open to the public, Debate.Utah.edu

THINK TANK

This takes speed-dating to a new, more cerebral level: The Jung Society is starting a Think Tank where members will meet monthly for three hours in a “forum for thoughtful individuals to collaborate on and enhance ideas.” No more than 12 members will meet for a 30- to 60-minute presentation (TED-style) by a team member, followed by a two-hour discussion on the topic raised. Visit the website for more details. 29 W. Layton Ave., 801-948-0920, Tuesday, March 8, $50/month (billed annually), JungUtah.com —KATHARINE BIELE Send events to editor@cityweekly.net

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The recent Ebola scare in the U.S. got me wondering: How is hospital wastewater handled? Does it just go straight into the regular sewer? It would seem like they must rinse some pretty nasty stuff down their drains. —Scott

B

oy, do they ever. And is such sewage, like Chicago recycling, commingled? You bet it is. In developed countries that don’t regularly enjoy epidemics of intestinal diseases, the World Health Organization figures it’s generally OK for hospitals to dump their wastewater right into the municipal system with all the other crap. It’s worth spending some time on what it is we’re flushing, though. If you’re picturing hospital discharge brimming with Ebolaladen blood and other infectious effluvia, my friend, you’re not quite thinking big enough: There’s viruses and bacteria, of course, but the stuff we use to treat various maladies also has the potential to cause real headaches— despite significant concentrations of pain relievers in the mix. Here’s a grab bag: Chemicals: Estrogens, for instance, which can at certain concentrations lead to birth defects, reduced fertility and breast and testicular cancer in humans, and in male fish can essentially induce a sex change— an effect that’s been observed at the discharge sites of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs, in the lingo). Interacting with the chlorine used by WWTPs, estrogens can also form chlorinated byproducts whose effects are unclear. (In general, the fact that we don’t know how the various medical residues in the sewage system interact with one another is a matter of slight concern.) Painkillers like acetaminophen, meanwhile, are found in relatively high concentrations in hospital wastewater. And don’t forget about inorganic chemicals, such as those found in X-ray and MRI contrast media, and disinfectants. Radioactive waste: Hospitals aren’t dumping it directly down the drain—er, one hopes—but still, patients who ingest radioactive isotopes, say, as part of an imaging procedure, will pass some into the toilet. Studies have found radioactive medical residues in sewage, surface water and food chains, including high levels of technetium and radioactive iodine in algae, seaweed, fish and freshwater mussels that had the misfortune of living downstream from plants that treat hospital wastewater. (And that we might subsequently dine on.) The workers in such plants received measurable doses, too, but nothing sufficient to cause alarm. Antibiotics: If you’re concerned about picking up Ebola while splashing around in the municipal sewer, Scott, you’ll be heartened to learn that some studies have found that the concentration of bacteria and viruses can actually be lower in hospital wastewater than it is in your given municipal effluent, largely due to the antibiotics that are also in the system. Unsurprising, really: We use a lot of antibiotics overall (more than 50 million

BY CECIL ADAMS

SLUG SIGNORINO

STRAIGHT DOPE Toxic Flush

pounds are produced annually in the United States), and 25 to 75 percent of what’s administered passes through the recipients’ bodies unmetabolized. Antibiotics running wild in the water system encourage the development of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, such as the famously unpleasant methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA; hospital wastewater has been found to have antibioticresistant bacteria at two to 10 times the level of regular domestic wastewater. So we know hospital wastewater is questionable, though our understanding of what it’s doing to the environment (and, in turn, us), is limited and varies depending on the substance. Currently, as I mentioned, hospitals direct their effluent to the nearest municipal treatment plant by way of the sewer. OK, but are those plants actually equipped to filter all this stuff out? With what’s going on in Flint, Mich., I can’t say the American way of water filtration’s looking all that robust right now. And what happens when, for instance, heavy rains cause the system to overflow? Better to dump the affluent into the sewers, I say. Other options exist, but are rarer: Some hospitals treat their wastewater in situ and then release it into the nearest stream—which technique requires strict public oversight, for obvious reasons—and some use a combination of the foregoing, treating their output on-site and then pouring it into the municipal system for a second round of treatment. Where does that leave us? At the reality that, as a 2010 study in the Journal of Hydrology put it, there remains “no specific treatment to remove, at high percentage, all the kinds of micropollutants typically found” in hospital wastewater; another paper bemoaned the “remarkable paucity” of information regarding the downstream impacts of such untreated waste, and suggested that what’s needed are separate systems for treating hospital wastewater—a “matrix of treatment scenarios.” Reverse osmosis, for instance, could remove endocrine-disrupting compounds such as estrogen. Nanofiltration takes out certain pharmaceuticals. Patients whose treatment involves taking in radioactive materials could relieve themselves into a separate system, their waste set aside for special processing. Given the expense of such technologies, though—and an absence thus far of any clear medical-wastewater horror stories—you couldn’t call this a No. 1 priority. CW

Send questions to Cecil via StraightDope. com or write him c/o Chicago Reader, 350 N. Orleans, Chicago 60654.


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I N C A R C E R AT I O N

“We try to help folks be better when they come out,” —Lt. Rebecca Greene

Story Time

At the Salt Lake County lockup, books provide their own escape. BY STEPHEN DARK sdark@cityweekly.net @stephenpdark STEPHEN DARK

O

Salt Lake County Metro Jail library manager Vern Waters believes books can help inmates develop life skills.

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moody days, when I’m not prepared to deal with stupidity, I plunge into a book.” In an age where modern libraries are as much about information technology as access to culture, the jail library is decidedly old-fashioned in its sole focus on books. The jail brings a different dimension to being a librarian, Waters says. He gets “kites,” or letters, from prisoners that run the gamut from hilarious to heartbreaking, such as one from a 45-year-old man who wrote, Waters recalls, “he had never read a book from cover to cover before.” Sometimes, prisoner stories have a happy ending. Greene cites one woman who attended a jail tour who had a surprising knowledge of the lockup’s terminology. She later got an email from her saying that the woman had done time at the jail, but now worked as a library services supervisor. Those are the stories Greene loves to hear. Others, however, do not learn from their mistakes, much to the frustration of the librarians, who see shelvers they were sure would make it on the outside, return. “It’s kind of heartbreaking to talk to these prisoner workers,” Waters says. “It’s almost like [jail is] in their DNA. They always talk about their relatives, what different jails they’ve been in, what a stint in prison is like.” Waters feels the library services help improve the odds of prisoners not returning. “There’s such a focus in the jail at trying to help people develop some skills, help with their goals, or simply pass their time with reading,” he says. Waters gives a Life Skills class about using the Salt Lake County Library website. Prisoners fill out applications and get library cards when they’re released. That card can come in handy for those who believe the myth, “that if you don’t finish a book before you get released, then you’re destined to come back to finish it,” Waters says, shaking his head. “I tell them, ‘No.’ Just get it at a regular library.” CW

come out,” Lt. Rebecca Greene says. She says the library is invaluable, providing a “diversion for prisoners, tools for education used by program staff and a resource for custodial staff to use as a reward for good behavior.” The stacks are divided into fiction and nonfiction, the former’s bumpy spines amply testifying to repeated reading. “Men love George [R.R.] Martin, Stephen King,” Waters says, while women prisoners prefer true crime and nonfiction. The most popular magazine among men is Cosmopolitan. “For the slightly titillating stories,” one staff member says, referring to sex-themed pieces Cosmo is known for. Prisoners receive orange forms listing 36 categories they can tick, ranging from “street fiction,” “self esteem/ feel good” and “romance” to “business/ jobs,” “classics” and “graphic novels.” “Street fiction” dominates some of the library’s fiction shelves. Waters and Greene both note that street fiction, a recent publishing phenomenon featuring lurid titles and pulpy, street-smart narratives with cautionary, moral endings, often provides an entry point prisoners to take them in more literary directions. “They start reading urban fiction, then they want more substance,” Waters says. Darnell Cockle is at the jail on a possession charge. He started reading “street fiction”—stories that he could identify with, he says—but now favors true crime. Prisoners also can request specific titles, which, if not available, can be purchased through Waters’ $37,000-plus book budget. Some reading material is off-limits, including books about “Guns, bombs, martial arts, tattoos, illegal drugs, gambling, white supremacy, sex or explicit material,” according to a leaflet given to new prisoners. Only female prisoners can work at the library, for which they get “good time” reductions on their sentences. One of the women describes reading as “an escape, really. In housing, when I get emotional,

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juggle. Utah Library Association President Dustin Fife says, “When you have a little jail library with a few hundred books, there’s a good chance most of it is not something you care about, not stuff to help you grow, get to where you want to be in your life.” In June 2015, Fife, then working at the San Juan County Library, started visiting the 115-bed San Juan County Adult Detention Center once a week to help prisoners choose books and deliver their requests. Salt Lake County Metro Jail library manager Vernon Waters says he can’t imagine a more “underserved population than jails and prisons.” The average reading level at the jail, he says, is “about a fifth-grade level.” While some might express the view that jail is for punishment rather than rehabilitation, Waters tries to convey in a class to correction officers in training at the Utah Corrections Academy the importance of reading to prisoners. “I’d guess that some officers feel like my ex-wife feels that prisoners shouldn’t have books,” he says. The Salt Lake County Metro Jail houses approximately 1,900 prisoners. Its library occupies a small, windowless room with a collection that numbers between 20,000 and 30,000 titles, two-thirds of which at any given time are with prisoners. Trolleys crammed with paperbacks line the wall outside the library room, while 10 walls of shelves inside boast fiction and nonfiction. Waters supervises five county staff members who negotiate the small space with the three female prisoners tasked with “thumbing” the books for contraband, graffiti and wear and tear, before shelving them. The library is a key element in a series of programs including one called Life Skills, where prisoners learn about, among other things, checkbook management, parenting and first aid, computer skills and how to earn a GED. “We try to help folks be better when they

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ne recent winter’s afternoon, a librarian pushes a 200-pound, book-laden trolley along a windowless corridor toward a metal door. She waits a few seconds as the door slowly grinds to the left, then pushes the cart into Delta 1, the Salt Lake County jail unit that houses 80 male prisoners. There’s a palpable tension as men stand in cell doorways awaiting her arrival. Every few weeks, a staff member of the Salt Lake County Library Services based at the Metro Jail brings a trolley brimming with books and magazines to the kitchen-worker housing unit—one of 38 units the library delivers to at the Metro and Oxbow lockups. Each of the unit’s cells houses eight men. The first group of prisoners in green scrubs lines up to hand over books they have read and collect the up-to-six items they’ve ordered. Within 20 minutes, cells that were earlier full of morose, silent men have taken on a coffee-bar atmosphere as prisoners at metal tables or on metalframed bunk beds devour the first pages of their books, or excitedly compare what they requested. Jared Kendall, 45, says divorce “sent me off the wagon.” He is awaiting sentencing on a theft conviction and says that “if it wasn’t for those books, there’d be so much fighting going on.” The impact of an in-house library service goes far beyond providing an escape from tedium. Kendall describes his multiple stints of incarceration as “installments,” during which he has learned from books how to draw. He displays a number of highly detailed, professional-looking pencil illustrations he’s drawn. “Books help everybody go from a street thug,” he says, to, in his case, learning about “handto-eye coordination, how to draw.” He got an architecture degree on the outside and ran his own welding company before succumbing to old habits and incarceration in 2015. While the Utah State Prison has six walk-in libraries with 60,000 books and a total book budget of $37,500, the county lockup is one of few, if any, incarceration facilities in Utah housing a county-run branch. Most jails boast some form of library, but they tend to offer a much-worn collection of haphazard titles overseen either by a prisoner or a staff member with other assignments to


U TA H L E G I S L AT U R E

Sen. Al Jackson, R-Highland, sponsor of Senate Joint Resolution 2

Amend the Amendment The Utah Senate wants Congress to let state legislatures elect U.S. senators. BY ERIC ETHINGTON eethington@cityweekly.net @EricEthington

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hould U.S. senators represent the people, or should they represent state governments? That’s the question Utah lawmakers are asking as they consider a resolution asking Congress to repeal the 17th Amendment. Before 1913, U.S. senators were chosen by state legislatures, rather than by a popular vote. But Congress, as well as a majority of state legislatures, voted to change that original process, establishing the 17th Amendment, which turned over that power directly to the citizens. “When you’re subject to the popular vote,” Sen. Al Jackson, R-Highland, the author of Senate Joint Resolution 2, tells City Weekly, “and you have to answer to the people, you’ve got to raise money to run for office, and probably the majority of the money you raise comes from out of the state, where do you think your loyalties are going to lie? Your state basically becomes a constituent, instead of your primary responsibility.” Jackson says he believes that nine out of 10 Utah lawmakers feel that the U.S. Senate is not representing the will of state governments, because over the past century after the change went into effect, the U.S. Senate has either passed laws states don’t agree with—such as the Affordable Care Act—or has refused to pass laws giving state governments total control over their individual student curriculums. “The system is broken,” Jackson says, and U.S. senators are now beholden to special interests and lobbyists, rather than to state legislatures. While few people would disagree with Jackson’s assessment that special interests, lobbyists, and big money hold far too much sway with Congress, his proposal is certainly raising a few eyebrows as opponents point out what the U.S. Senate looked like before it became beholden to a vote by the people. The election of senators by state legislators became fraught with a number of problems.

First, because senators were elected by a small body of people (as opposed to the entire population of a state), corruption became a factor. Several elections of U.S. senators were actually voided due to allegations of senators bribing state legislators with money or promises, as was the case in Montana in 1900. In all, 10 different elections were called into question, leaving the Senate hampered by distrust of the people. Additionally, there were instances of partisan deadlock in state legislatures, leaving many states unrepresented for lengthy periods of time while lawmakers bickered over their selections. The most egregious example was Delaware, which had no representation in the Senate for four years from 1899 to 1903. Utah itself deadlocked twice shortly after being admitted as a state, in both 1897 and 1899. Jackson says he doesn’t believe those old issues would be a problem today. “It was only a few states,” he says. “But that doesn’t mean all of a sudden you get rid of something that works. You work within your state to fix it. People say I’m trying to take away their vote, but I’m not, because [the people] voted for their state legislators. And if they don’t appoint the right senator, then you get rid of them.” Jackson acknowledges that State legislators don’t always follow the will of the people. “But that’s where it becomes incumbent on the people to rise up and say ‘enough,’ and change enough of their state legislature to get those [who] will elect the senator the people want,” he says. Jackson says his bill isn’t aimed at any senator in particular. “They’re great; they’re all good and well-intentioned people. But they’re operating within a flawed system. When I worked in Washington, D.C., as a lobbyist, I had more access to the senators than you do because of the power of the purse and because we would write campaign checks.” When asked if it would be better to try to pass a bill banning all lobbyist contributions, Jackson says, “We could do that, but then how do you run an election? It costs money to pay for ads and things like that. But the bottom line is that senators were not intended to be involved in the popular issues of the day; they were meant to protect states’ rights. And it’s the House that is supposed to be the one closer to the people.” As of press time, Jackson’s bill passed the full Senate, and it’s being carried by Rep. Ken Ivory, R-West Jordan, in the House where it passed through committee on March 1. It now awaits a hearing by the full House. CW

Editor’s note: In addition to covering state politics for City Weekly, Eric Ethington is communications director for Political Research Associates.


S NEofW the

Cat Culture Longtime National Symphony cellist David Teie announced in November that his crowdfunding project was hugely successful, freeing him to produce an album of music meaningful to cats. (Cats, for example, relax in response to the earliest sound of their mother’s purring, which Teie clocked at 23 harp notes a second.) Teie’s work, according to an October Washington Post feature, includes examining waveforms of real-time purrs and creating an organ sound to mimic the opening and closing of a cat’s vocal chords. His Kickstarter pitch raised so much money that he might also try creating music for bored zoo elephants or stressed-out whales. In tests, cats responded well to Teie’s music, according to a 2015 journal article (but with less curiosity at the Washington cat café Crumbs & Whiskers).

WEIRD

Leading Economic Indicators Amazon.com has riled up Buddhist temples in Japan, according to a January Associated Press dispatch, by offering traveling monks rentable online to conduct funerals and other rituals. The monk would go to a home, grave or funeral home, at fees and upgrades ranging from the equivalent of $300 to about $8,500. (Many of Japan’s 75,000 Buddhist temples are struggling financially and destined to close. Complained a spokesman for the Japan Buddhist Association, what Amazon is facilitating “is allowed in no other country in the world.”)

n Ryan Dailey, 28, was arrested in Las Cruces, N.M., in February on several charges after, police said, he beat his mother by pounding her with a Bible. His explanation, police said, was that when he asked her who her soul belonged to, she repeatedly declined to answer.

Who Knew? The much-maligned pigeon was recently found by researchers to be as skilled as humans at distinguishing between slides of benign versus malignant human breast tissue. Writing in the journal PLOS ONE, specialists from the University of Iowa and University of California, Davis lauded the birds’ processing of

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Police Report A near-certain robbery of the PNC Bank in Zebulon, N.C., on Jan. 28 was prevented, with employees treated to an almostslapstick scene in which the bank manager kept the suspect outside by winning a tug-of-war for control of the front door. The manager had grabbed the door after noticing an armed, masked man approaching from the parking lot just after the bank opened. (The frustrated perp fled empty-handed, but was at large.) Awkward Moments Ahead in Lockup Joel Sloan, 51, was booked into jail for DUI by a sheriff’s deputy in Birmingham, Ala., in February. Sloan was dressed head-to-toe as a clown. (No explanation was offered.) n Vaughn Tucker, 23, was booked into jail in Tulsa, Okla., in February on drug charges. He was wearing a T-shirt with large lettering on the front: “I Would Cuddle You So Hard.”

Didn’t Think It Through The robbers of the electronics store Compucell in Springfield, Mass., in December came up empty, but are still at large. A man with a gun jumped the counter and demanded that the employee give him money from the locked cash register. The gunman moved to the back door to let in his accomplice, but that merely allowed the employee and two customers to run out the front door, and the accomplice fled, too, sensing that, with no one to unlock the register, the “robbery” was going nowhere. Perspective American hunters are so trophy-kill-obsessed that, in the decade lending to 2014 (according to Humane Society figures), they averaged nine imported carcasses a day among the “Big Five” African species (lions, elephants, leopards, rhinos and African buffalo)—most of which require special U.S. and foreign permits, with “conservation” conditions. Some countries endanger their own dwindling herds just to sell the lucrative permits, and South Africa even offers 150 captive lions a year to make trophy kills easier. (Total hunting imports of all animal trophies averaged 345 a day, mostly from Canada and Mexico.) The Litigious Society (Foreign) Chandan Kumar Singh told BBC News in February that his recent lawsuit against the Hindu god Ram was provoked by Ram’s mistreatment of his wife in spiritual lore. Said Singh, “(W)e cannot talk about respecting women in modern day India when we know that one of our most revered gods did not treat his own wife with respect.” Singh thus wants a court to tell the god to acknowledge he was wrong. Thanks This Week to Harry Thompson, Jim Colucci, Dirk Van Derwerker and the News of the Weird Board Editorial Advisors.

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Unclear on the Concept Angel Rivera, 49, was arrested in December in Orlando, Fla., on allegations that he punched a child in the face because the boy was not getting dressed for church fast enough. (The boy was wearing an ankle brace, which slowed him down.)

color, contrast, brightness and image compression, marveling that pigeons see more wavelengths of light than humans, even though their brains are one-thousandth the size. (Birds are already known to distinguish “hostile” humans in celebrated dive-pecking incidents.)

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n In February, Gawker.com introduced the semi-serious Lube Crude Index as a poignant indicator of how far the price of oil has fallen. Comparing the world price of a standard 42-gallon barrel of crude (about $31) with that of a 55-gallon barrel of Passion Natural Water-Based Lubricant (retailing as, when packaged in smaller quantities, a sexual aid) shows that “sex lube” is more valuable than crude oil by a factor of 28—a barrel’s worth of the lube recently priced at $1,175 versus crude’s barrel-adjusted $41. As recently as June 2014, the Lube Crude Index was near 1. (Gawker reported that only two actual barrels of Passion Natural could be found and that the price would likely rise further if one of them were sold.)

BY CHUCK SHEPHERD

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ocal music fans, you set an all-time record for participation in City Weekly’s Best of Utah Music 2016. You cast more votes than in any previous year. Thank you for choosing the best acts and artists—among our ever-growing crop of excellent local musicians—that stand out as the Best of Utah. To further showcase Utah’s musical prowess, the staff writers got into the act and came up with their own picks. We’d also like to thank the BoUM 2016 nominating committee, which took the time to help us build and finalize the ballot: Adam Tye and Alana Boscan (Diabolical Records), Jeremy Cardenas (Thunderfist), Ransom Wydner (King Niko, Bass Mint Pros), Jarom Bischoff (Crucialfest, Exigent Records), Steve Williams (KCPW), Jeff Whiteley (Excellence in the Community), Corey Fox (Velour), producer and musician Mike Sasich, Court Mann (the Daily Herald), Bad Brad Wheeler (KRCL), Flash and Flare, Brian Kelm (Utah Blues Society), Al Cardenas (NightFreq), Taylor Richards (Royal Bliss, The Royal) and past BoUM winners Max Pain and the Groovies, DJ Matty Mo and Chaseone2. Your efforts and insights are greatly appreciated. The time to reveal the results is nigh. Cue lame, competitive-realityshow,forced-suspense music … scratched wax interjection— dramatic pause—and bass drop! Oops, it’s time for a commercial break. (Sorry, everybody. This is the world in which we live.) Aaaaand … we’re back! The results were printed on a small piece of paper in micro-point Comic Sans font, and kept in a hermetically sealed locket that was buried By among secrets, empty beer cans Kimball Bennion, and old bones in the backyard of Randy Harward, a City Weekly employee who will Westin Porter, remain nameless (Colby Frazier). Gavin Sheehan and And the winners are … Brian Staker —Randy Harward comments@cityweekly.net Music Editor


Band of the Year The National Parks

The National Parks

MIKEY BARATTA

Best Rock Artist Runner-up: The Weekenders, TheWeekendersMusic.com Album of the Year Runner-up: The Lovestrange, I Liked It, No I Didn’t TheLoveStrange.com

Music Week in Toronto. “Hopefully, we keep growing and reaching new fans,” Parks says. “We plan to hit just about every region of the U.S. at some point during 2016. We also have a new music video coming out. We can’t wait for people to see it.” (BS) Runner-up: Candy’s River House CandysRiverHouse.com

Best Live Act Thunderfist, Facebook.com/ThunderfistSLC

Early Thunderfist shows were crazy. Around the turn of the millennium, frontman/guitarist Jeremy Cardenas wore bunny ears onstage. I know, right? If that wasn’t crazy enough, when Cardenas got enough booze in him, he’d really bleed for his fans, cutting himself with, and rolling around in, broken glass. That’s punk rock and fucking roll, right there—but who can sustain such heroic drinking and buffoonery? Especially when the music becomes more important, and you’re evolving from a punk band of drunks into a rock & roll machine propelled by the influence of Motörhead, AC/ DC, Thin Lizzy and the Supersuckers (and possibly David Gray, if the framed poster in Cardenas’ living room means something). As the band matured over the years, they routed their raucousness through music, resulting in a show where the only casualty is the beer that spills when you raise your fist and yell for T-fist. Cardenas explains the band’s philosophy: “I want to deliver. I know the sacrifice people make to just go to a show. The babysitter and the time and spending of the money, and the drinks and dealing with the crowds and fuckin’ parking and everything else—to walk in and let you do your art. Whether it be ridiculous, Ted Nugent-inspired art with a liberal twist, or whatever else someone comes up with.” This ethos has led to Thunderfist being a consistently reliable source of rock & roll goodness going into their 19th year together. Here’s to many more. (RH)

Runner-up: Baby Gurl BabyGurl.Bandcamp.com

Thunderfist

JEANNINE ORR

After speaking with Jordan Young, singer-guitarist of popular Salt Lake City blues rock trio Candy’s River House, it’s apparent he doesn’t know how the band’s four Best of Utah Music nominations panned out. “There’s a lot of talk about [BoUM],” Young says. “It’s really opened up this year, with all the genres. People are excited.” Asked if he’s been notified by City Weekly, Young says, “All I know is I’m supposed to keep March 11 open.” Since we can’t really discuss how he feels about the award without telling him, the bomb is dropped. Young, looking every bit the rock star in his mirrored shades—pulled down to facilitate eye contact—covers his eyes with both hands when he hears that Candy’s River House won both Best Rock Artist and Album of the Year for their LP Another Night. It’s not what you think—he’s not crying. He’s stoked. To be nominated for four awards, including Best Blues Artist and Best Live Act, was an honor itself. “But to win two of them?” Young says, “that’s huge. This is gonna be a big deal for us … it’ll follow us wherever we go. Whenever we book a gig, we’ll be able to say we won these awards.” The back-to-basics blues rock sound of Candy’s River House started out as little more than an idea while Roosevelt-born Young spent his early 20s learning to play—and live—the blues in Tennessee. Candy’s River House became the band it is now when Young returned to Utah and enlisted drummer Joey Davis and bassist Nathan Simpson to round out a powerful trio. Another Night, produced by Terrance D.H., is a thrilling, soulful 10-track dose of bluesy moans, beefy riffs, tight, towering rhythms and Young’s masterful songwriting. It’s a loud, proud record that appeals to fans of blues-based classic rock like Free and early ZZ Top, and relatively newer bands like Gov’t Mule, The Black Crowes and The Black Keys. And, since it adheres to the old unspoken 10-tracks-per-platter rule, it’s easy to enjoy in one sitting, with headphones unplugged and the volume cranked. (RH, KB)

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and promoting it on and off the road. Touring, Parks knows, is key. “[We tried] to play in as many places as possible … we just really wanted 2015 to be a year that we went all-in.” The National Parks have ambitious plans for the future, including more touring and stops at Austin’s South by Southwest festival later this month as well as Canadian

Album of the Year Candy’s River House, Another Night Best Rock Artist Candy’s River House, CandysRiverHouse.com

Candy’s River House

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READERS CHOICE

of the

Provo-based band The National Parks didn’t even start making music under that name until 2013. The group, composed by BYU students John Hancock, Sydney Macfarlane, Brady Parks, Doug Patterson and Megan Taylor, found their brand of new folk music ear-catching in the Utah Valley music scene and beyond, as their initial LP, Young (self-released, 2013) ascended to No. 13 on iTunes’ singer-songwriter charts. For their second album, last year’s Until I Live, (Groundloop Records), they shifted gears, sliding into an indie-pop style that proved just as popular, as they moved up iTunes’ pop chart and Billboard’s Heatseekers. Winning Band of the Year evokes an avalanche of emotions for them, as they say they are “Honored, humbled, excited, all of it,” frontman Parks says. “There is so much musical talent in Utah that being named Band of the Year is really a big thing to us. We can’t stop smiling.” Touring is a large part of their success. Parks says the band feels like they worked really hard in 2015, recording Until I Live

Courtesy Photo

TheNationalParksMusic.com


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Belt grandstanding, crack open some Colt .46 and let them show you how fun it can be. (KB)

Afro Omega

Runner-up: Gina Jones ReverbNation.com/GinaJones8

Best Reggae Artist Afro Omega, Facebook.com/AfroOmega

Afro Omega ran away with the Best Reggae Artist category this year. Velvet bass lines, lofty vocals and a punchy rhythm characterize Afro Omega’s sound. For this reggae trio, music is simply a groovy vehicle by which to spread good vibes and fight racism, classism, poverty and depression. A fixture of Salt Lake City music for nearly 15 years, Afro Omega serves a rare flavor of reggae. Backed by the harmonies of Elisa Sofia, Bronte James delivers powerful vocal melodies with a captivating hook of provocative language and sing-song rhythms. (WP)

Runner-up: The Tribe of I ReverbNation.com/TheTribeOfI

Best Metal Artist Visigoth, Visigoth.Bandcamp.com

From a high mountaintop, armed with swords, armor and Magic: The Gathering trading cards, the five-piece metal godhead that is Visigoth had a badass year as one of Utah’s most dominant metal acts. At the end of 2014, they released their full-length opus, The Revenant King (Metal Blade), and spent 2015 playing several high-profile concerts around the state with a variety of touring acts. Also, it didn’t hurt getting a plug from comedian Brian Posehn’s Nerd Poker podcast back in July for their incredibly nerdy lyrics and heavy sounds that make playing Dungeons & Dragons extra awesome. Here’s another accolade for their pile of loot. (GS)

Runner-up: Baby Gurl BabyGurl.Bandcamp.com

Best Punk Artist Handicapitalist, Soundcloud.com/Handicapitalist

Lasting five years in the Salt Lake City punk rock scene is alone worthy of an award but hardcore trio Handicapitalist earned the respect and adoration of fans for their sheer punk attitude. Their 2011 full-length release, Our Only Debts Are Warrants, is as hard as the title implies. And with a band member also in Folk Hogan, to boot! The band looks at this award with a bit of a jaundiced eye … they say they voted for Discoid A. (BS)

Runner-up: Donner Partyhouse DonnerPartyhouse.Bandcamp.com

Best Blues Artist Tony Holiday & the Velvetones Facebook.com/TonyHolidayMusic

This one was a landslide: Tony Holiday and the Velvetones are a selfdescribed “dirtbag blues” band based on Holiday’s harmonica and a crowd-pleasing mixture of funk and soul added to the base. The band has gained a lot of fans the old-fashioned way—by touring incessantly, not just locally but nationwide. They make plenty of time to fit a lot of local shows into their itinerary and, as Holiday is co-founder of the Utah Blues Society, he does a lot to support the musical genre locally. Also, Holiday’s chops got props on Blues Harmonica Players, the biggest Facebook group for harp blowers, and he and the Velvetones are preparing a second album for 2016. (BS)

Runner-up: Candy’s River House CandysRiverHouse.com

Best Roots/Americana Artist Mad Max & the Wild Ones

ReverbNation.com/MadMaxAndTheWildOnes Next to the Osmonds, this rockabilly quartet is Utah’s most famous family band. Since 2006, when singer Duke Maxwell was only 5 years old, Mad Max & the Wild Ones have blown away crowds with their spot-on, spitfire ’billy sound. In the ensuing decade, they’ve played countless festivals, car shows and even late-night talk shows—David Letterman’s to be exact. Here at home, they’ve opened for the likes of Andre “Mr. Rhythm” Williams and Wayne “The Train” Hancock, while becoming one of Utah’s most exciting live bands. (RH)

Runner-up: Crook & the Bluff CrookAndTheBluff.com

Best Country Group Colt .46, Colt46.com

Colt .46 is here to remind you that there’s a great, big country outside of Nashville, and it’s worth listening to what it has to say. Formed by four guys who spent years in other bands before coming together in 2013, Colt .46 eschews the polish of the country radio machine in favor of a Western sound that doesn’t mind a little dirt, if that means having a good time. If you think all country has to offer is sentimental twang and Bible

Live-show virtuosos Folk Hogan, which also happen to have one of the top band names you wish you had thought of first, have a reputation of its own without making the top of this list, but it’s no less deserved after last year’s great circus-themed concept album, The Show. They may not fit into a traditional folk mold—or any mold, really—but if you’ve ever seen this Salt Lake City six-piece live, you’ve experienced the otherworldly energy these hairy troubadours can summon. The show mixes that energy with ambition and a manic work ethic that belies their goofy personas. (KB)

Runner-up: Canyons CanyonsMusic.com

Best Electronic Artist Muscle Hawk

Facebook.com/MuscleHawkOfficial

This electro-thrash SLC duo was blowing people’s minds and moving their feet throughout 2015 with their impressive performances. Greg Bower and Josh Holyoak killed it at the Utah Pride Festival this year with a mix of old and new tunes, combined with their light and high-energy stage show. Top that off with a Zodiac Empire remix over the summer, and it was a pretty cool year for them. Now, here’s hoping to a new release in 2016. (GS)

Runner-up: Nate Lowpass SoundCloud.com/Lowpass86

Best DJ-Open Format Sneeky Long

Soundcloud.com/SneekyLong

Sneeky Long holds this year’s mantle of Best DJ-Open Format, with his variant samples and genre breadth. Sneeky Long is known for his love of vinyl in an ever-evolving age of digital music, and treats audiences to all-vinyl sets as often as he can. Inclined to healthy doses of punk, reggae, funk and hip-hop, Sneeky Long has continuously honed his ear for mixes and his eye for audiences. Sneeky Long can be found in several Salt Lake City venues including Twist, Bar X and Tinwell. (WP)

Runner-up: Choice SoundCloud.com/EnjoyTheBasslines

Best Hip-Hop/Rap Artist Grits Green, ReverbNation.com/GritsGreen

This Ogden-based quintet plays a stripped down hip-hop sound laced with funk. The band evokes the reminiscent sound of the Beastie Boys while simultaneously refreshing audiences with a so-old-it’s-new hip-hop set performed on live instruments. Grits Green is composed of MC’s Rhagenetix and Porta D., Greggy Shaw, Bobby Gilgert and Jonny Knoder. Their sound is a simple guitar, bass and drum foundation and foregrounds each member’s conversational vocals. Notable tracks include “4 Chairs,” a hip-hop rendition of musical chairs, and “Give it Away,” Grits Green which features a horn section that would make George Clinton proud. (WP)

Runner-up: Scenic Byway Facebook.com/ ScenicBywayBand

PORTER DALTON

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READERS CHOICE

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Best Folk Artist Folk Hogan, FolkHogan.com


Photo Credit: Nina Tekwani

G E T C AS H F O R YO U R C LOTH E S

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The Aces

Best

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Runner-up: RKDN RKDNMusic.com

Best Jazz Artist Joe McQueen Quartet

Facebook.com/JoeMcQueenQuartet Joe McQueen has been one of the few of the authentic old-time jazzmen to make his home in the Beehive State, living in Ogden for over 70 years. As a part of Utah as well as jazz history, it’s no surprise that readers picked the jazz legend as Best Jazz Artist by a huge margin. The 96-year old has played with most of the greats—from Count Basie to Duke Ellington to Louis Armstrong and Charlie Parker—and April 18 is Joe McQueen Day in the state, established in 2002 by then-Gov. Mike Leavitt. If he wouldn’t know good jazz, who would? (BS)

Runner-up: Alan Michael Band

Best Venue The State Room, TheStateRoom.com

The State Room’s cozy atmosphere gives it a reputation among big and small names alike who see this unique space as Salt Lake’s perfect spot to perform intimate, unforgettable shows. The sound quality is superb, and the repurposed church pew seating hints that the 300-person venue is the perfect place for a discerning crowd who might as well consider good live music as their religion. (KB)

Runner-up:The Urban Lounge TheUrbanLoungeSLC.com

Which Local Band Should Get Back Together? Band of Annuals BandOfAnnuals.Bandcamp.com JayWilliamHenderson.com

Originally, this category included a great list of potential reunions: Vile Blue Shades, Form of Rocket, The New Transit Direction and Band of Annuals. Although things get stabby when Vile’s members get together, and Eli Morrison said a reunion is impossible/not gonna happen, we kept them on the ballot. ’Cause you never know, right? Well, the runaway winner here is Band of Annuals. It’s no wonder: BoA’s dusty, heartworn alt-country songs made them one of the most adored bands to ever grace SLC stages. When the band broke up, frontman/ songwriter Jay William Henderson turned to audio engineering—in Nashville. Lured back into music in 2013, Henderson put out two acclaimed solo albums, showing the magic still resides within. So we wonder if he might be keen to get the band back together, even for one night. What do you say, Jay? (RH)

Runner-up: Vile Blue Shades VileBlueShades666.Bandcamp.com

Best Album Cover/Poster Artist Chris Bodily, HatRobot.com

Chris Bodily first came on the scene as a designer and artist represented by Hive Gallery

in Layton, and got pegged to do murals for the Reddit HQ in Salt Lake City. His artwork is like a collision of the animals in the work of Leia Bell and the mad penstrokes of Ralph Steadman, but with more precision and control. He’s done a lot of work for local bands, but the poster that got him the nod from readers was for BassMint Pros hip-hop collective—a Halloween-ish image that also conveys their infectious beats. (BS)

ethics, buddy. Others among you voted for bands that appeared to be a legitimate exclusion, such as Cult Leader, The Moth & The Flame, and Eagle Twin. Well, the nominating committee felt certain bands—including SubRosa, had achieved a level of success (record deal, world tours) that elevated them above the readers’ poll. Yes, they’re local, but now they also belong to the world. That doesn’t mean we can’t include some them in our Staff Picks (as we have done with some of ’em), because their achievements do merit recognition. So which artist bubbled up to claim our Reader’s Choice Award? Well, several bands, individuals and venues had great representation—and the ultimate winner is someone we did inexplicably overlook. So thank you, readers, for ensuring that singer-songwriter-multi-instrumentalist Talia Keys got her well-deserved due. She works hard, books tons of gigs in and out of town, sings her ass off, plays most of the instruments on her album Fool’s Gold and puts on an incendiary live show. She’s also an avid human-rights activist, so bonus points for that. She’s on her way to being huge. Coming in a close second is Corey Fox and his Provo venue, Velour, finishing only nine votes behind Keys. Attribute this to Fox’s tireless efforts to book, promote and manage local acts, while providing them, and their fans, with one of the best all-ages stages in the state. (RH) CW

Runner-up: Sri Whipple Facebook.com/sri.whipple

Readers’ Choice: What Did We Forget? Talia Keys, TaliaKeys.com

Each year, City Weekly endeavors to recognize the pinnacle of musical achievement in the local scene. Try though we may, however, we’re gonna miss something. So we enlisted you, dear readers, to do what you were gonna do, anyway: Tell us where we effed it up. Some of you said we forgot nothing, or pointed out that we forgot our sainted mothers—you sweetie pies! A few of you made the perennial complaint that the whole shebang is a mockery, travesty, shame or total BS. See ya next year! A surprising number of you said we forgot bands that were already nominated, even in multiple categories. One guy voted for himself—daily, and from the same IP address. A for effort, F for

Best Friend of Local Music Circus Brown, KRCL 90.9 FM’s Not a Side Show

Circus Brown

BEST LOCAL PRODUCER Mike Sasich ManVsMusic.com

It’s been a minute since Circus Brown has been recognized in our awards (2008 to be exact), but that doesn’t mean he’s been slacking off. In fact, Not a Side Show is the state’s longest-running radio program to date that consistently highlights local music and features live performances from Utah-centric musicians. Chances are if you tune into his show at KRCL 90.9 FM every Friday from 8 to 10:30 p.m., you’ll hear new local music from bands you never knew existed, and they just might become your new favorite. Do yourself a favor. Before you go out to see local music on Friday nights, make Circus Brown’s Not a Side Show your opening act. (GS)

Runner-up: Corey O’Brien, X96’s Live & Local X96.com

Mike Sasich

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KRCL.org/Shows/Not-a-Side-Show

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Probably one of the youngest acts to ever make a mark on the Utah music scene, the all-women pop/rock foursome now known as The Aces (formerly The Blue Aces) dominated Provo in style before some of the members had even graduated high school. They remain a high-profile live act and closed out 2015 with a performance on the BYU program Audio-Files. We can only hope the group is working on new material to dazzle us with in the coming year and keep Utah County hopping. (GS)

Artis

READERS CHOICE

Best Pop Artist The Aces, @TheAcesOfficial

Mike Sasich not only twists the knobs on releases from local bands like Thunderfist, Night Sweats, The Weekenders, Joe McQueen, The Rubes, Starmy, SLAJO, Bronco, Laserfang, Folk Hogan, and last but not least, The Moths—but he also often lends a hand playing guitar on their recordings. He may not be the only musician in town who operates his own recording studio, but his joint is crammed with cool vintage gear, and Sasich arguably has the most discerning ear in town, for all genres of music. (BS)

Runner-up: Nate Pyfer SoundCloud.com/n8pyfer


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Now that the readers have spoken, the infallible tastemakers at City Weekly have their say with their own Best of Utah Music picks.

By

RANDY HARWARD

comments@ cityweekly.net

Best Use of Flugelhorn Matt Starling, Dorian Reeds (for Brass) MattStarling.Bandcamp.com

Matt Starling founded the experimental group Salt Lake Electric Ensemble in 2009, and the unit had already tackled minimalist composer Terry Riley’s groundbreaking work, In C. In search of yet another challenge, Starling, a music teacher at East Hollywood High in West Valley City, took on Riley’s Dorian Reeds, a project for his master’s of music technology degree from online Indiana University-Purdue. Recording in Brazil and producing at home, Starling used flugelhorn and audio-editing software instead of the original saxophone and tape machines, and his loop-jazz interpretation is hypnotic, like teaching the horn a whole new language. (BS)

Best Music Ambassadors and Most Anticipated Album SubRosa, SubRosa.cc

With the likes of Eagle Twin, Cult Leader, Neon Trees and The Moth & The Flame making national and international waves, the Salt Lake City music scene has never been better represented. Then there’s SubRosa. Easily one of the most creative bands to come out of Salt Lake City, they’re touring the world, blowing minds along the way with their sludgy, violin-laced doom metal. It doesn’t hurt that Rebecca Vernon, who fronts the band (and even once worked as City Weekly’s copy editor), is one of the sweetest people ever. You can’t ask for a better ambassador. While we’re at it, let’s give them a nod for Most Anticipated Local Album of 2016. Local musicians and fans alike are already chattering about the currently untitled project, which the band is tracking at drummer/uberproducer Andy Patterson’s South Salt Lake studio. Vernon says SubRosa’s latest dose of hot shit is due this summer—July, to be more specific. (RH)

Best Not-So-New Band Cult Leader

CultLeaderMusic.Bandcamp.com Cult Leader is, without question, one of the biggest bands Salt Lake City has seen in a long time. The band can boast three releases on hardcore label Deathwish Inc. over the past two years, and they’ve taken a series of short tours halfway around the world. It’d be nice for us locals if they got more airplay—but it’s not like the band give a damn about what local radio thinks of them. Not when they can tour the globe serving their crusty punk metal to more and more new fans. (GS)

Best Dearly Missed Music Presence Bob Moss Facebook.com/ BobMossTribute

Last December marked four years since we lost folk musician and artist Bob Moss. There will always be a Bob-shaped void in the local music scene. A true one-of-a-kind, Moss was as bighearted as he was creative. He left behind a body of work that stands as some of the most original music and folk art in the world, and one wonders if Utah will ever see another artist like him. Later this year—perhaps by mid-spring—we’ll see the release of Bob Moss Tribute, Vol. I, featuring Moss covers performed by a group of local musicians that includes Mike Kirkland, Bad Brad Wheeler, Eli Morrison, Joe Judd, Josh Dickson, Greg Midgely, Dave Payne, Aldine Strychnine, Charles Schneider and more. (RH)

Best Effort to Keep Rock & Roll Evil The Moths TheMoths666.Bandcamp.com

As self-described “rock noir,” the latest project from Eli Morrison (The Wolfs, Pink Lightning, Red Bennies, Puri-Do, etc.) and company is nothing less than a five-song incantation, a veritable rock malediction, from the “I Put a Spell On You”—like opener, “I’m Catching Up on You” to the bluesy sexual apocalypse of closing track “Yours To Kill.” To ratchet up the wickedness, the CD release shows at Diabolical Records, Albatross Records and The Urban Lounge included a performance of the entire EP backward. Besides, what other local CD came with a special “yelling sack” to exorcise your personal demons at home? (BS)

Best Blend of Music and Winter Sports Joseph Ballent’s Ski-tars

Best Non-Miss of A Beat Quiet Oaks QuietOaks.Bandcamp.com

When The North Valley broke up at the end of 2014, Quiet Oaks sprouted quickly in their place. They’ve gigged prolifically ever since, adding to their already considerable fanbase. The hardhitting, whiskey spilling sound of Quiet Oaks is carried by frontman, Dane Sandberg, who fills the stage with his relentless energy and wide vocal range. The nascent musical stylings of the group continue to evolve, but are always rooted in “just rock,” as they put it. Quiet Oaks’ five-song EP, Put Your Dreams Where They Belong captures the group’s simple yet gripping songwriting and gives listeners just a taste of the band’s energetic live show. (WP)

Joseph Ballent

Facebook.com/BurnAtlas

Joseph Ballent of Burn Atlas and The Electric Sugar Bombs worships at the altar of ’90s alternative rock and grunge. He’s also an avid skier, which led him to combine his passions into two mighty axes he calls “ski-tars.” Starting with blocks of mahogany, Ballent cuts a truncated Flying V-style body and sets skis 1-1/2 to 2 inches into the back. He then bolts on Fender Stratocaster necks and installs a single P-90 pickup near the neck for a fat, crunchy tone. He doesn’t use the ski-tars in the studio, so you’ll have to catch one of the bands live to see and hear the instruments for yourself. But that’s kinda the point. (RH)

SHAUN ANDERS

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STAFF CHOICE

Matt Starling


Best Resident Adviser Mike Kirkland, Positively Fourth Street

Mike Kirkland

PracticeSpaceSLC.com

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After Russ Schmit retired as manager of Positively Fourth Street music rehearsal space after 25 years, it was unclear who would take it over. Well, who better to run a communal practice facility than a musician? Mike Kirkland, owner of Soundco Records, former CBGB doorman and bassist for major-label heavy metal band Prong, isn’t just any local musician—or manager. He immediately made changes, like paving the parking lot and adding a mural on the back of the building (painted by his brother James) reflecting the rich history of the building and local music. (BS)

Rest30Records.Bandcamp.com/Album/ Jazz-Jaguars-Twilite

Best Collision of Music & Visual Art Hip-Hop Roots BurnellWashburn.com

Each month at Metro Bar, rapper Burnell Washburn curates a mix of local hip-hop music and live art by graffiti muralist crew, NVS FAM.

Most Rewarding Lo-Fi Artist Comeback Kyrbir/Purr Bats, Red Velvet Devil Worship 8ctopusRecords.com

After an eight-year hiatus, the Salt Lake City singer/songwriter known as Kyrbir Is-p managed to deliver the most surprisingly engaging local lo-fi recording of the year. He didn’t even listen to music for several years, but when he was ready to return, he made an emphatic statement, creating—with collaborators Eli Morrison, David Payne and Leena-Maija Rinne—songs built out of cassette tape experiments. “The album revisits growing up gay and goth in Utah County in the 1980s,” he revealed, and its release on

801-363-0565 580 E 300 S SLC theartfloral.com

Halloween 2015, was a vehicle for confronting demons, yet conveying a quest for a kind of unquantifiable spirituality. (BS)

Best Punk Band Reuniting to Release a 7-Inch EP Dead Bod

If you only picked up one 7-inch EP by any local band last year, the one to get was Dead Bod’s eponymous EP. The old-school punk band,

composed of bassist Natasha Sebring, drummer Shaun Sparks, guitarist Terrence Warburton and singer Dustin Yearby, formed in 2011 and played a handful of riveting shows based around Yearby’s highly aggressive/sarcastic stage persona in the best punk-rock tradition, until their breakup in 2013. These four songs, recorded in 2012, are the entire recorded oeuvre of the band, and tracks like “Life’s Out” and “Like Wow” get their point across with sarcastic flair. (BS)

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Birthdays

Davin Abegg

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make someone ’ s day

Art Floral

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Inside on Metro’s ample stage, rappers like Erasole James and Washburn himself spit and flow, DJs drop beats, B-boys bust moves—and the blingy light fixtures quake from so much bass. Out on the club’s east patio, graffiti writers Sin, Just, Maso, Royce, Helm and Kaos add the hiss and rattle of their Montana II spray paint cans to the hip-hop thump, creating vivid visuals to complement the music. (RH)

Funerals weddings

The

Davin Abegg was already making oddball sounds with local awk-rock band Secret Abilities, but perhaps it wasn’t enough. In 2014, the Laytonite started Swoody Records, which through the magic of the Internet has put together several compilations of Homemade Holidays music, his own band’s Music To Break Up By (K Records), as well as the comp, Let’s Get Awkward: The Sounds of Off-Step Sincerity, and a number of other offerings. It’s a weirdo-rock wet dream, for those whose ears used to be glued to the radio for Dr. Demento as well as lovers of lo-fi comps like Nuggets. (BS)

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Sometimes local musicians have to get creative in order to find gigs. Usually, that means playing with other bands, or giving in to necessary evil and playing in cover bands. For just over a year at Twilite Lounge, Dave Payne and Jazz Jaguars (essentially current and former members of Red Bennies) have cranked down the amps and played lounged-up versions of songs by the Bennies and related projects (Coyote Hoods, Glinting Gems, Tolchock Trio, Lord British) as well as cool cover tunes. Covering yourself— what a concept! (RH)

Karl Jorgensen

Best Source of Cool and Strange Music Swoody Records, SwoodyRecords.Bandcamp.com

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Best Survival Tactic Jazz Jaguars’ Lounge Night at Twilite

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Since its founding more than five years ago, Karl Jørgensen has paved the way for electronic music to not just have a footing in the local musical spotlight but also a solid platform for it to reach the masses. With a combination of local and international talent, the label has given acts like Mooninite, Angel Magic, RS2090, OK Ikumi, Ben Best and more a place to shine with online releases and exclusive cassette copies for the true collector. The only things left for them to do is launch their own music festival and branch into the national eye. (GS)

STAFF CHOICE

Best Electronic Bastion Hel Audio, HelAudio.org


Cassette cover designed by Chase Estes

Best Packaging Fisch Loops and Applegreen, Jabuticaba

Fischloops.Bandcamp. com

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This split-release of fancy beats and noise that finds two electronic musicians’ styles dovetailing sublimely. On his side, Fisch Loops (Daniel Fischer) delved into world music and exotic rhythms, while Applegreen (Chase Estes) worked in mellower, ambient sounds. In addition to the pairing of Fischer and Estes, Jabuticaba’s actual packaging is rather neat. It’s a cassette, with a fantastic insert featuring an aqua/purple design pattern (created by Estes) that is actually pretty simplistic—but also hypnotic, if you stare at it too long. Which nicely fits the lucid dreamworld of Jabuticaba. (GS)

Most Overlooked Album Revolt of the Potatobug Into The Orchard ThePotatobug.com

It took more than two decades for Jason Bringard to record new material, but it was certainly worth the wait. Going under the moniker Revolt of the Potatobug, this 11-track album is a masterwork of instrumental rock, experimental indie and orchestral alternative, all wrapped up with one giant bow. These tracks are some of the most heart-warming, soothing, energy-mixing songs to be created in Utah during 2015. Give a listen to the title track, or “It Was Late in the Evening” in the car as you drive and allow yourself to become immersed in the experience. (GS)

Best Inspiration BayLee Parks and Jimmy Parks

In November, 17-year-old BayLee Parks, daughter of longtime local concert promoter, Jimmy Parks, decided to stop chemotherapy after a long battle with brain cancer. A gifted painter, BayLee spent her remaining days immersed in her art in the company of her loved ones. She passed away on Dec. 4, but her father, who kept a brave face throughout the seven-year ordeal, is already back booking gigs at Club X and Area 51. Both BayLee and Jimmy are a reminder of what matters in life, and why creatives do what they do—and continue to do it: because art and music have a way of pulling us up when we’ve been brought low. (RH)

Best Multitasker Andrew Goldring

SoundcaveStudio.com

There are those who create, those who influence and those who promote. Andrew Goldring is a trifecta of talent, an influential musician who has only blossomed since his days at Spy Hop, helping other bands take off while launching his own projects. Aside from his solo work, Goldring is the leading force behind the band Great Interstate, and a third of the conceptual alternative band Your Meteor. But his day job as the founding engineer and producer of Sound Cave Productions has him helping a new wave of talent to create and record music. (GS)

Best Comeback Granary Row

Facebook.com/GranaryRow

The past few years have seen a renaissance of various Salt Lake City neighborhoods, both as residential areas but also as places where people gather to shop, eat and enjoy special events. Due to its industrial background, Granary Row might seem the most unlikely of such places, yet it has become an arts district. In 2013, the Granary Row pop-up street festival was started by nonprofit urban-design group Kentlands Initiative. After a hiatus in 2014, the festival returned in 2015, and it’s on its way to becoming a local summer favorite. Honorable mention: Muse Music, for staging a memorable comeback in September 2015. (BS) CW


ESSENTIALS

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ENTERTAINMENT PICKS MARCH 3-9, 2016

Complete Listings Online @ CityWeekly.net

It’s early March, which means the annual SLC International Tattoo Convention is slated to take over the Salt Palace for a weekend of magnificent artistic achievements, expressed through displays and on actual skin. More than 200 professional tattoo artists will populate the convention floor, many visiting from across the country and around the globe. Visiting shops include Tattoo 08/15 from Germany, Polynesian Tattoo Factory of Hawaii, Everlasting Tattoo from San Francisco and Shin Kemumaki from Japan. Convention goers can peruse aisles of artwork and talk with the designers themselves about their style, technique, process and inks. You’ll see designs from the weird and freaky to the intricate and detailed, cartoonish to realism, popular to obscure, involving every kind of traditional and more modern application practiced by those who have spent their lives learning how to make awesome art pop on human skin. And if by chance you like something you see, you can hop in a chair and get some fresh ink from a professional you might never have known about otherwise. It wouldn’t be a Salt Lake City convention without local representation, and this year includes a lineup of who’s who of Utah-based shops, such as Lost Art, Loyalty, Anchor Ink, Ironclad, Big Deluxe, Painted Temple, Cathedral, Heart of Gold, Yellow Rose, King of Swords and more. And they’ll be ready to ink you up at a moment’s notice. (Gavin Sheehan) SLC International Tattoo Convention @ Salt Palace Convention Center, 100 W. South Temple, March 4-6, Friday, 3-11 p.m.; Saturday, noon-10 p.m.; Sunday, noon8 p.m., $5-$40. SLCTattoo.com

Particles drift and dart around the darkened set at the beginning of Plan-B Theatre Co.’s world premiere of Elaine Jarvik’s Based on a True Story. It’s a place of isolation, a limbo between past and future, yet as the play unfolds, it becomes a metaphor for how scary it can be to be in the present. Time travel is at the center of the story, which finds a woman named Megan (Nell Gwynn) inadvertently hurled 30 years into the future when her “time taxi” malfunctions. Unable to return to her own time—and the husband (Mark Fossen) she left behind—she becomes a kind of refugee, assisted in her transition by a pair of volunteers (Jason Bowcutt and Colleen Baum). Jarvik explores several variations on themes suggested by the title, including how comforting fictions become more valuable to us than the truth. The production provides plenty of entertainment—much of it coming from Colleen Baum’s versatility, as she plays eight different characters—as it digs into how hard it can be to avoid looking behind or forward as we try to cope with loss. While Jarvik unfortunately spells out her subtext a bit too literally near the end, and indulges in several Utah-specific nudging jokes, she finds a powerfully human story in how hard it can be to make peace with where we find ourselves right now. (Scott Renshaw) Plan-B Theatre Co.: Based on a True Story @ Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801-355-2787, through March 6, ThursdayFriday, 8 p.m.; Saturday, 4 p.m. & 8 p.m.; Sunday, 2 p.m. & 5:30 p.m., sold out at press time, pre-paid wait list available at box office. PlanBTheatre.org

The photo on the cover of young-adult fiction author Emily Wing Smith’s memoir All Better Now is instantly unsettling: the school picture of an elementary school girl in frilly dress and pigtails, yet wearing an expression of almost heartbreaking sadness. That same childhood sadness permeates a story that takes a uniquely powerful approach to a “survival” narrative. Because it does prove remarkable that Smith survived, on multiple levels. Beginning with a childhood defined by isolation, loneliness, aggression and physical difficulties that had her in therapy for years, she leads up to a nearfatal accident where she was hit by a car when she was 12 years old. It was only through the subsequent CAT scan that doctors discovered a brain tumor that likely would have killed her—but adolescence doesn’t become instantly easier for the one who becomes known as “Thank-God-She-Got-Hit-By-A-Car Girl.” Smith tells her story with a combination of almost clinical distance—including the text from actual medical assessments of her condition—and wistful reflection on her ever-present sense of being the “weird girl” with no friends. But it’s also the tale of a writer finding her voice, not only discovering the rare thing she believes she’s good at, but making her first real connections as a result. The combination makes for a story that finds the universal sense of disconnection and “differentness” in her very specific experiences, reminding readers of the time when they felt like that girl on the cover. (SR) Emily Wing Smith: All Better Now @ The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, March 8, 7 p.m. KingsEnglish.com

MARCH 3, 2016 | 25

The healing power of art is a truism that borders on cliché, and yet images still have an immediate power and intensity, even in the age of textuality. Bay Area-based artist Rachel Cardenas Stallings brought her mixed-media collection Laugh Attack to Mestizo Gallery for February Gallery Stroll. A Utah native and BYU graduate, the Colombian-American artist’s work is informed by the spiritual narrative of family members bearing witness to visitations from spirits, and shamanic personages prescribing medicinal substances. The subject matter of these visionary experiences is manifested in her artistic pieces, which are sometimes figurative, animalistic or human, or sometimes are abstract, almost in the form of pure energy. There is a sense of impulsiveness, that the paint isn’t just an artistic medium but is also a “medium” in the metaphysical sense, in the revelatory, discursive quality of these works. But the viewer doesn’t ever have a sense of voyeurism. Perhaps, it’s because there is a shared, communal feeling to the works or because of the sense of whimsy that the exhibit’s title implies. Yet, it’s also an “attack”—a bit convulsive, almost uncontrolled, as though the artist’s brush has been taken over, possessed. It’s not violent, but highly assertive in its presence. Stylistically, there are echoes of cubism, surrealism and Latin American folk art in her works, but there is also a dazzling sense of originality and daring. These shared visions are definitely eye-opening. (Brian Staker) Rachel Cardenas Stallings: Laugh Attack @ Mestizo Institute of Culture and Arts, 631 W. North Temple, Ste. 700., 801-596-5000, through March 11. MestizoArts.org

Emily Wing Smith: All Better Now

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TUESDAY 3.8

Plan-B Theatre Co.: Based on a True Story

FRIDAY 3.4

SLC International Tattoo Convention

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FRIDAY 3.4

Rachel Cardenas Stallings: Laugh Attack

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THURSDAY 3.3


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The Boys of Spring

Arizona’s Cactus League offers a getaway to enjoy pre-season baseball. BY KATHLEEN CURRY AND GEOFF GRIFFIN comments@cityweekly.net @TravelBrigade

P

re-season games in most sports are seen as a nuisance. Every August brings gripes about NFL fans having to shell out for meaningless exhibition games in order to get season tickets. October annually sees NBA teams traveling to towns that don’t have NBA teams in order to draw interest in games that don’t count. Not so with baseball. Every March, fans of Major League Baseball celebrate that winter might actually be coming to an end, and their favorite team is still officially undefeated. Seeing video clips of your club playing in a sunny place while you’re still thawing is a reason for hope on many levels. Fifteen teams currently call the greater Phoenix area of Arizona home for what’s known as the “Cactus League.” Salt Lake City-based fans of baseball and/or sunshine are just a two-hour flight or 11-hour drive from leaving Utah’s dicey early spring weather and emerging in a place where the average daily high temperatures for March hover in the high 70s. The teams that make up the Cactus League play in 10 different ballparks that are all within a 45-minute drive from downtown Phoenix. Salt Lakers will find that many of the parks are similar in size and amenities to Smith’s Ballpark. If you can make it to Arizona spring training, consider the following popular options.

Los Angeles Angels (Tempe Diablo Stadium): With Salt Lake being home to the Angels A A A team, the Bees, it’s only natural to want to see how players who spent time in Utah do in the big leagues. Every spring in Tempe sees several players on the fence between Salt Lake and Anaheim. Tempe Diablo Park also has the charm of being a bit smaller— capacity 9,315—and more intimate than many of the other spring training sites. The Angels also have the advantage of being in the same town with Arizona State University, and the Mill Avenue area of Tempe definitely has the feel of an upbeat, college town. Since parking is often the biggest challenge of attending a spring training game, take advantage of the free trolley that runs between Mill Avenue and the ballpark (info on TempeTourism.com). Also, if you can’t make it down south, your best chance to see early baseball is when the Angels come to Smith’s Ballpark to play the Bees on March 22 (SLBees.com). Colorado Rockies and Arizona Diamondbacks (Salt River Fields at Talking Stick, Scottsdale): Only two of the 30 MLB teams are in the Mountain time zone, and Utahns are supportive of both. The Rockies and D-Backs share a stadium with an outfield berm just like Smith’s Ballpark in Salt Lake. Forgot your sunscreen? They’ve even got dispensers in the outfield. Got any money left over after the game? Talking Stick Resort and Casino is just down the road and offers a free shuttle for guests to and from the park (TalkingStickResort.com). Chicago Cubs (Sloan Park, Mesa): Ask the locals and they’ll tell you the Cubbies are the biggest tourist draw in the Cactus League. Sloan Park is generally full of fans who get an experience with lots of tie-ins to the Windy City and its iconic Wrigley Field. The fact that Vegas oddsmakers have made Chicago’s North-siders the favorites to break a 108-year drought and win the World Series in 2016 means they will only be more popular this spring.

Spring training at Arizona’s Salt River Fields at Talking Stick

Los Angeles Dodgers and Chicago White Sox (Camelback RanchGlendale): The Dodgers and Chi-Sox share a home located near University of Phoenix Stadium. A popular draw for Dodger games is the “All-You-Can-Eat Bullpen Patio,” where $32 on weekdays and $37 on weekends lets you be a true American who dines on unlimited hot dogs, nachos, peanuts and Cracker Jacks. However, be forewarned, beer costs extra. Kansas City Royals and Texas Rangers (Surprise Stadium): Even though Surprise is about a 45-minute drive from downtown Phoenix, the town will no doubt see increased traffic this spring due to having the defending World Series champions on hand. San Francisco Giants (Scottsdale Stadium): The Giants won it all in 2010, 2012 and 2014. It’s another year ending in an even number so you might want to check out this squad. Their stadium is located in the Old Town section of Scottsdale, an eclectic area full of fun shops, bars and restaurants with an Old West feel. Other teams in the Cactus League include the Oakland Athletics at Hohokam Stadium in Mesa, the Milwaukee Brewers at Maryville Park, the Cleveland Indians and Cincinnati Reds at Goodyear Ballpark and the Seattle Mariners and San Diego Padres at the Peoria Sports Complex. Cactus League games begin Friday, March 4, and some teams will continue to play in Arizona through Saturday, April 2. For more information, check out MLB.com/ springtraining/cactusleague. CW Kathleen Curry and Geoff Griffin host the Travel Brigade Radio Show and Podcast. You can find them at TravelBrigade.com


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SATURDAY 3.5

Bill T. Jones Dance/Arnie Zane Co.: Analogy/Dora: Tramontane Sometimes it’s not easy to distill the genre to which a piece of art belongs: Is it a dance performance? Is it a concert? Is it a theatrical play? These can be among the most fascinating works to experience, as artists interweave multiple disciplines to create something with a unique power that draws from each discipline’s strengths. The Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Co. creates such a work with Analogy/Dora: Tramontane, a mix of dance, music and spoken-word performance. Inspired by the life of Tony Award-winner Jones’ own mother-in-law, 95-year-old Holocaust survivor and French/Jewish nurse Dora Amelan, the company explores her story through choreography and excerpts from interviews; the dancers even sing as part of the performance. Memory, survival and perseverance become part of a narrative with the power to move an audience through all the tools at a performer’s disposal. (Scott Renshaw) Bill T. Jones Dance/Arnie Zane Co.: Analogy/Dora: Tramontane @ Eccles Center, 1750 Kearns Blvd., Park City, 435-655-3114, March 5, 7:30 p.m., $25-$75. EcclesCenter.org

PERFORMANCE

THEATER

MARCH 3, 2016 | 27

Evening of Concertos Harris Fine Arts Center,

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CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Co.: Analogy/ Dora: Tramontane Eccles Center, 1750 Kearns Blvd., Park City, 435-655-3114, March 5, 7:30 p.m., EcclesCenter.org (see above) Shut Up & Dance Series Kingsbury Hall, 1395 Presidents Circle, 801-495-3262, March 9-19, various shows, dates & times, OdysseyDance.com

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DANCE

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As You Like It Studio 115, 240 S. 1500 East, 801-581-6448, March 4-6 & 10-12, 7:30 p.m.; March 5 & 12, 2 p.m. matinees, Theatre.Utah.edu Based on a True Story Plan-B Theatre Co., Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801-3552787, Feb. 25-March 6, Thursday-Saturday, 8 p.m.; Saturday matinee, 4 p.m.; Sunday matinee, 2 p.m., PlanBTheatre.org (see p. 25) Climbing With Tigers Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, 801-363-7522, March 4-27; Fridays, 7 p.m.; Saturdays, 3 & 7 p.m.; Sundays, 1 & 6 p.m., SaltLakeActingCompany.org The Crucible CenterPoint Legacy Theatre, 525 N. 400 West, Centerville, 801-298-1302, through March 19, Monday & Thursday-Saturday, 7 p.m., CenterPointTheatre.org Dirty Rotten Scoundrels The Ziegfeld Theater, 3934 S. Washington Blvd., Ogden, 855-944-2787, through March 5, 8 p.m., TheZiegfeldTheater.com Disney on Ice: Frozen Vivint SmartHome Arena, 301 W. South Temple, 801-325-7328, through March 6, VivintArena.com Disney’s Beauty and the Beast CenterPoint Legacy Theatre, 525 N. 400 West, Centerville, 801-298-1302, through March 26, MondaySaturday, 7:30 p.m., CenterPointTheatre.org Disney’s Beauty and the Beast Draper Historic Theatre, 12366 S. 900 East, through March 19, Friday, Saturday and Monday, 7:30 p.m., DraperTheatre.org Doubt, A Parable Utah Repertory Theater Co., Sorensen Unity Center, 1383 S. 900 West, 435612-0037, March 4-20, UtahRep.org A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum Empress Theatre, 9104 W. 2700 South, Magna, 801-347-7373, March 4, 5, 7, 11, 12, 7:30 p.m., EmpressTheatre.com A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder Kingsbury Hall, 1395 Presidents Circle, 801-5817100, March 3, 7:30 p.m.; March 4, 8 p.m.; March 5, 2 p.m. & 8 p.m.; March 6, 1 p.m. & 6:30 p.m., Tickets.Utah.edu The Importance of Being Earnest Babcock Theatre, 300 S. 1400 East, 801-581-7100, March 3-6, 7:30 p.m.; March 5 & 6, 2 p.m. matinees,

Theatre.Utah.edu An Inspector Calls Pioneer Theatre Co., 300 S. 1400 East, 801-581-6961, through March 5, FridaySaturday, 8 p.m.; Monday-Thursday, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday, 2 p.m. matinees, PioneerTheatre.org Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat Hale Center Theater Orem, 225 W. 400 North, Orem, 801-226-8600, through April 9, Monday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday matinee, 3 p.m., HaleTheater.org My Mormon Valentine: The Original Utah Version of Confessions of a Mormon Boy The Leonardo, 209 E. 500 South, through March 5, 7 p.m., Facebook.com/MormonBoyLive My Valley Fair Lady Desert Star Theatre, 4861 S. State, Murray, 801-266-2600, through March 19, Monday & Wednesday-Saturday, multiple showtimes, DesertStar.biz The Pirate Queen Hale Centre Theatre, 3333 S. Decker Lake Drive, 801-984-9000, through April 2, Weekdays, 7:30 p.m.; Saturdays at 12:30 p.m., 4 p.m., & 7:30 p.m., HCT.org Selma ‘65 Pygmalion Theatre Co., Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801-355-2787, March 4-19, various showtimes, PygmalionProductions.org Soundsation Covey Center for the Arts, 425 West Center St., Provo, 801-852-7007, March 8, 7 p.m., CoveyCenter.org Streetlight Woodpecker Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, 801-363-7522, through March 6, Wednesday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m., Sunday, 1 p.m. & 6 p.m.; March 5, 2 p.m., SaltLakeActingCompany.org The Vagina Monologues Good Company Theatre, 260 25th St., Ogden, 801-3949456, March 4 & 5, 8 p.m.; March 6, 4 p.m., GoodCoTheatre.com


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1 University Hill, Provo, 801-422-2981, March 9, 7:30 p.m., Arts.BYU.edu Saint-Saëns “Egyptian” Piano Concerto Utah Symphony, Abravanel Hall, 123 W. South Temple, 801-355-2787, March 4-5, 7:30 p.m., UtahSymphony.org WCSO Pre-Spring Concert: Music of Foreign Lands All Saints Episcopal Church, 1710 S. Foothill Drive, March 6, 7 p.m., WasatchSymphony.com Winners of SummerArts with American West Symphony Libby Gardner Hall, 1375 E. Presidents Circle, 801-581-6762, March 9, 7:30 p.m., Music.Utah.edu

COMEDY & IMPROV

Comedy Sportz Comedy Sportz, 36 West Center St., Provo, 801-377-9700, Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m., ComedySportzUtah.com Dirtpod Live with Guy Seidel, Marcus and Allen Handy Wiseguys Salt Lake City, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, March 6, 7 p.m., WiseguysComedy.com Mike Toomey and Tim Walkoe Egyptian Theatre, 328 Main, Park City, 435-649-9371, March 4-5, 7:30 p.m., ParkCityShows.com Jamie Lissow Wiseguys Salt Lake City, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, March 4 & 5, 7:30 & 9:30 p.m., WiseguysComedy.com Jeff Dunham Vivint SmartHome Arena, 301 W. South Temple, 801-325-7328, March 9, 7 p.m., VivintArena.com Marcus Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., Ogden, 801-622-6688, March 4-5, 8 p.m., WiseguysComedy.com Laughing Stock Improv The Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, 801-355-4628, Fridays & Saturdays, 10 p.m., LaughingStock.us Quickwits Midvale Performing Arts Center, 695 W. Center St., Midvale, 801-824-0523, Saturdays, 10 p.m., QWComedy.com

LITERATURE AUTHOR APPEARANCES

Cassandra Clare: Lady Midnight Bennion Junior High, 6055 S. 2700 West, 801-484-9100, March 9, 7 p.m., KingsEnglish.com Emily Wing Smith: All Better Now The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, March 8, 7 p.m., KingsEnglish.com (see p. 25) Jeremy Pugh: 100 Things to do in Salt Lake City Before You Die The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, March 3, 7 p.m., KingsEnglish.com John Starley Allen: A Splash of Kindness The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801484-9100, March 5, 2 p.m., KingsEnglish.com Kevin Holdsworth: Good Water The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-4849100, March 4, 7 p.m., KingsEnglish.com Lindsay Eagar: Hour of the Bees The Gardens at Dry Creek, 877 N. 100 East, Lehi, 801-4849100, March 8, 6:30 p.m., KingsEnglish.com Marc Beaudin: Vagabond Song The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-4849100, March 7, 7 p.m., KingsEnglish.com

TALKS & LECTURES

An Ordinary Hero feat. Joan Mulholland Orem Library, 58 N. State St., Orem, 801-2297050, March 7, 7 p.m., OremLibrary.org Mark Stevenson: History of Irish Music Performance and Lecture Hibernian Society of Utah, Weber County Library, 2464 Jefferson Ave., Ogden, March 8, 7 p.m., IrishInUtah.org

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SPECIAL EVENTS FESTIVALS & FAIRS

2016 LDS Film Festival SCERA, 745 S. State, Orem, 801-225-2787, March 2-5, various shows & times, LDSFilmFestival.org Belly Dancing by Thia Spring Fest 2016 Utah State Fairpark, 155 N. 1000 West, 801-266-0473, March 5, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., BellyDancingByThia.com Half and Half Skate and Snow Grand Opening Half and Half, 60 East Exchange Place, 801-5324658, March 5, skate sesh demo, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; doors open for sale, 4 p.m.-8 p.m. Hostlers Model Railroad Festival Union Station, 2501 Wall Ave., Ogden, 801-393-9890, March 4-6, TheUnionStation.org SLC International Tattoo Convention Salt Palace Convention Center, 100 W. South Temple, March 4-6, Friday, 3-11 p.m.; Saturday, 12-10 p.m.; Sunday, 12-8 p.m., SLCTattoo.com (see p. 25)

VISUAL ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

Anna Prosvirova: Iris and Orchid Collection Day-Riverside Library, 1575 W. 1000 North, 801594-8632, March 1-27, SLCPL.org Barbara Ellard: Organic Geometry Art Access Gallery, 230 S. 500 West Ste. 125, 801-328-0703, through March 11, Monday-Friday, AccessArt.org Carsten Meier: DAM Art Access Gallery, 230 S. 500 West Ste. 125, 801-328-0703, through March 11, AccessArt.org Chasing Light Utah Arts Festival Gallery, 230 S. 500 West, through March 11, UAF.org Cultivate Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, through March 4, VisualArts.Utah.gov Curiouser and Curiouser Urban Arts Gallery, 137 S. Rio Grande St., 801-651-3937, through March 6, UtahArts.org Elaine Coombs and Heather Patterson: Second State J GO Gallery, 408 Main, Park City, 435-649-1006, through March 19, JGoGallery.com Four Sight Pioneer Memorial Theatre Loge Gallery, 300 S. 1400 East, 801-581-6961, through March 5, PioneerTheatre.org Ice: New paintings by Philip Buller Julie Nester Gallery, 1280 Iron Horse Drive, Park City, 435-649-7855, through March 29, JulieNesterGallery.com Inception J GO Gallery, 408 Main, Park City, 435649-1006, through March 11, JGOGallery.com Kevin Red Star Modern West Fine Art, 177 E. 200 South, 801-355-3383, through March 12, ModernWestFineArt.com Paul Crow: Here Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-3284201, through April 30, UtahMOCA.org A Public Spectacle Essay: Letterpress works by Emily Dyer Barker Sweet Library, 455 F Street, 801-594-8951, March 5-April 16, SLCPL.org Rachel Cardenas Stallings: Laugh Attack Mestizo Institute of Culture & Arts, 631 W. North Temple, Suite 700, through March 11, MestizoArts.org (see p. 25) Raw and Cooked Rio Gallery, 300 S. Rio Grande St., 801-245-7270, through March 11, Heritage.Utah.gov Sharon Alderman & John Erickson Phillips Gallery, 444 E. 200 South, 801-364-8293, through March 11, Phillips-Gallery.com Suzanne Kanatsiz: 10,000 Thoughts “A” Gallery, 1321 S. 2100 East, 801-583-4800, through March 5, AGalleryOnline.com


DINE

MEDITERRANEAN

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PADELI’S STREET GREEK

868 E. 900 S. SLC, UT 84105 801-355-8899 thaigardenutah.com

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The new Sugar House Spitz (“Home of the Döner Kebab”) is booming. And that’s not surprising given the warm, friendly atmosphere and funky vibe. I love that the restroom walls and the space behind the ordering counter are decorated with old vinyl covers. What’s not to love about the classic Herb Alpert & the Tijuana Brass’ Whipped Cream & Other Delights album cover? A döner is the Turkish name for rotisserie meat that is thinly sliced from a rotating spit and usually served on flatbread like lavash or pita. While I prefer pita, Spitz serves its döner meat—beef and lamb, chicken or mixed meats—on toasted lavash bread, although you can also get it in bowls, “döquitos” (Mediterranean-style taquitos), baskets or salads. The basic “Street Cart Döner” ($8.75) is pretty hard to improve upon: It’s a choice of lamb/beef, chicken, mixed meats or falafel served on lavash or as a wrap, with romaine lettuce, shredded cabbage, fried lavash chips, tomato, onion, green pepper, cucumber, tzatziki and garlic aioli. Yes, it’s as messy as it sounds. The falafel—which I raved about at the downtown Spitz location when I reviewed it in May 2014—was dry and lacked flavor at the Sugar House locale. It certainly didn’t taste like it was made in-house. But be sure to order the crunchy fried garbanzos with olives ($5.50) to nibble on while you’re tempted by Spitz’ craft cocktails, wine, homemade sangria and beer. CW

GR KITCHEN

Spitz’ Mediterranean Döner

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Padeli’s Street Greek is owned by brothers Leo, Frank and Chris Paulos, who named their newest venture after their father. The Paulos family founded Utah’s Greek Souvlaki restaurants, but Padeli’s is more upscale (although the space is small) and ingredients are of higher quality. As with GR Kitchen, options also abound at Padeli’s, where you can build your own meal or select from a number of featured menu items. To build your own, you first pick your “base”—a warm pita gyro ($6.50), “street” mini-gyros (3 for $7.50), a bowl ($8) or a wrap ($8). The bowl comes with lemon rice and garbanzo beans, and the wrap has romaine lettuce and garbanzo beans. Next, you’ll choose a filling from traditional lamb and beef gyro meat, chicken rotisserie, falafel or pork rotisserie. Then, a sauce from choices that include traditional tzatziki, spicy feta, creamy Sriracha, hummus, creamy mustard or roasted pepper tzatziki. Finally, top it all off by choosing three toppings from an array including romaine lettuce, spinach leaves, red onions, sport peppers, shredded cheddar cheese, sliced pepperoncini, roasted red peppers, feta cheese, banana peppers, chickpeas, Kalamata olives or diced tomatoes. That sure leaves a lot of room for customization. I’d happily eat everything I’ve tried at Padeli’s again. The classic gyro is a slamdunk with roasted pepper tzatziki, and the chicken is great with creamy mustard sauce. The falafel is especially memorable thanks to its moist interior and superb flavor (the secret is blending feta cheese in with the falafel mixture). While you’re there, be sure to treat yourself to one of the homemade brownies—they’re killer.

3300 S. SLC, 8 168 E. 4115

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here’s a trio of new-ish eateries in town that are quickly changing the way I think about fast food. With the recent opening of GR Kitchen, Padeli’s and a new Spitz location, I’m learning that convenient food can also be wholesome and delicious. The three business have much in common: They all specialize in handheld fare like gyros and wraps, and they all offer up Mediterranean flavors at budget-friendly prices. A sign I saw near Padeli’s, outside the Judge Café, read: “Friends don’t let friends eat in chain restaurants.” These three spots are a terrific alternative to chains and franchises, although I could easily see GR Kitchen, Padeli’s and Spitz taking the nation by storm. For now, though, they’re independent, and they’re ours. Chris Tsoutsounakis, owner of GR Kitchen, grew up working in his family’s Astro Burger restaurants, the first of which was opened by Greek immigrants John Lyhnakis and Angelo Tsoutsounakis. It’s a smart concept. Think Chipotle, but with Mediterranean flavors. GR Kitchen is spacious and filled with light. Easy, free off-street parking is a nice bonus. At this eatery, customers work their way down a food-filled assembly line, after deciding whether they want a traditional gyro ($6.95), a plate (protein, grains, two sides and pita for $9.95), salad ($9.95), wrap ($8.59) or tacos (three for $8.59). There’s also a kids’ plate for $4.75. Once a delivery system has been selected—gyro, wrap, plate, etc.—it’s time to pick a protein from a list that includes classic lamb/beef gyro meat, spit-fired pork, housemade falafel, spit-fired chicken, or chicken souvlaki. I’ve tried all but the chicken souvlaki—which is served kebab-style on skewers—and have loved all of it, but particularly the pork, which reminds me in flavor and texture of Mexican carnitas. After choosing a protein, the next step is to find a sauce. There’s yogurt and cucumber tzatziki, spicy red pepper and feta kafteri (my favorite) or hummus, made from chickpeas and tahini. The toppings and sides are where GR Kitchen really excels. Side dish options include delicious kale salad, quinoa, lemony rice, tomatoes with cucumber, roasted veggies, couscous and Greek salad. For toppings there are crumbled feta cheese, crunchy lettuce, jalapeños, olives and red onion. By the time you’ve piled on toppings and sides, you’ve got a lot of food for under $10. Oh, and GR Kitchen serves locally brewed craft beers, too. If there’s a reason to visit Midvale, this is it.

We’re Back!!!


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30 | MARCH 3, 2016

FOOD MATTERS BY TED SCHEFFLER

Inversion Diversion

L U N C H

&

BASHEER TOME

@critic1

D I N N E R

C O NTE M P O R A RY JA PA N E S E D I N I N G 1 8 W E S T M A R K E T S T R E E T, S L C • 8 0 1. 5 1 9 . 9 5 9 5 S U S H I • S A K E

Another Brick in the Wall

Provo’s Brick Oven (111 E. 800 North, 801-374-8800, BrickOvenRestaurants.com) is celebrating its 60th year of making brick-oven pizzas and homemade root beer this year, including a recent remodel of the dining and party rooms. In addition to their famous pizzas, Brick Oven offers much more—including calzones, appetizers, soups, salads, sandwiches and an all-you-can-eat buffet and pasta bar. I recommend trying the “Heaps Sampler”: rounds of Brick Oven pizzas, homemade garlic bread, cinnamon sticks and dessert pizzas all for $14.99 per person. Brick Oven also has locations in Layton, St. George and South Jordan.

Got Pulp?

In case you missed it, the owners of Pulp juice bar at The Gym in City Creek Center opened the much larger Pulp Lifestyle Kitchen (49 Gallivan Ave., 801-456-2513, PulpLifestyleKitchen.com) adjacent to the Gallivan Center in downtown Salt Lake City. The inviting eatery specializes in a wide range of vegetarian fare, cold-pressed juices, smoothies, pressed paninis, wraps, salads, soups and açaí bowls. The Moroccan coconut-lentil soup is especially tasty, and the “Man Crush” makes for a delicious, filling breakfast: choice of brown rice, quinoa or homemade hash, cage-free eggs, zucchini, spinach, mushrooms, scallions, broccoli and kale. Or, try the sweet and tangy sano bowl, featuring honey-jalapeño glazed chicken or tofu, brown rice or quinoa, roasted sweet potato, corn, black beans, scallions, cotija cheese, avocado, cilantro, fresh lime and housemade salsa.

RIP Mr. Mondavi

Peter Mondavi Sr. passed away on Feb. 20, 2016, at his Napa home in St. Helena at the age of 101. Along with his brother Robert, the Mondavis changed the way we eat and drink, eventually guiding the California-based American wine industry from jug and fortified wines to ones that would garner international fame and respectability. Among his many accomplishments, Peter Mondavi revolutionized winemaking with his research on cold fermentation, and he was also the first winemaker in Napa to age wine in French oak barrels, purchasing 450 of them in 1963. The Charles Krug Winery he founded is still a familyrun business, with sons Peter Jr. and Marc Mondavi now at the helm. Quote of the week: Olives are Italian passion fruit.

—Cathy Cardner

Food Matters 411: tscheffler@cityweekly.net

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Sipping South Africa, Part 2 A tantalizing taste-tour of South African wines BY TED SCHEFFLER comments@cityweekly.net @critic1

A

s I wrote in my Feb. 25 column—which was an introduction to South African winemaking and history—I’ve been tasting my way through a wide selection of wines from that country. Believe me, it was my pleasure, especially given that many South African wines are so budget-friendly. A lot has changed since Dutch colonists began making South African wine in the 1650s. Chenin Blanc, which is the most widely planted grape varietal in South Africa, was originally grown from vine cuttings via France. Wonderfully fresh and tasting of herbs, Mulderbosch Chenin Blanc Steen op Hout ($15)—“Steen” being the South African term for Chenin Blanc— has white peach flavors with oh-so-subtle

hints of oak. With its good minerality, this well-balanced wine pairs beautifully with grilled chicken. Indaba Chenin Blanc ($11) would make for a fantastic porch sipper in the spring and summer. It’s an easy-drinking wine bursting with tropical citrus flavors and a slightly sweet, honeyed finish: a fun, nottoo-serious interpretation of Chenin Blanc. MAN Family Wines Chenin Blanc ($8.99) is a steal, and made solely with freerun juice (no pressing of the grapes) which is left on its lees for three to four months to give the wine body. MAN calls this their “sweet and sour” wine for its good balance of acidity and sweetness. That off-dry quality makes this Chenin Blanc a good partner for spicy curries. Located on the slopes of the Helderberg Mountain in South Africa’s most wellknown wine region of Stellenbosch, Ken Forrester Vineyards wines are renowned for their exceptional quality and value. Ken Forrester Old Vine Reserve Chenin Blanc ($14.99) has garnered boatloads of awards and accolades for its complexity and tricky balance of oaky vanilla and delicate fruit flavors. This Chenin Blanc would rock a crawfish/crab/lobster boil. One of the best bottles of bubbly I’ve tasted in many moons is DeMorgenzon DMZ Cabernet Rosé ($12). Made from 100 percent Cabernet Sauvignon, this is pink

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DRINK bubbly with a lot of backbone, hailing from DeMorgenzon’s biodiverse and ecologically sensitive vineyards. It’s a remarkably elegant sparkling wine for the price, brimming with strawberry, pomegranate and watermelon notes, accompanied by splashes of spice. Pinotage is South Africa’s only native wine varietal, a cross between Pinot Noir and Cinsault. Don’t confuse Pinotage with Pinot Noir; they’re not at all alike. A young Pinotage can be bright and easy on the palate, and that’s the case with Ken Forrester Petit Pinotage ($12). This is a well-restrained wine with smoky notes and concentrated cherry flavors—light enough to sip with barbecued meats. Further proof that apartheid in South Africa is fading into the past, Seven Sisters winery is owned and operated by seven black sisters. They produce Seven Sisters Dawn Pinotage/Shiraz ($12), a soft, rich red wine with spicy pepper flavors and smokiness that would be a

slam-dunk with steak au poivre. Founded by Lithuanian immigrants in the early 20th century, Backsberg is a Jewish-owned winery and one of only two South African wine producers making kosher wine. If you’re thinking Manischewitz, don’t. Backsberg Klein Babylons Toren ($25) is an intense, tannic blend of Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and other Bordeaux varietals with dense black fruit flavors. The vintage I tasted was 2007, and it still seemed a tad young, indicating that this is a very age-worthy wine. I wish I had the space to write in detail about the other quality South African wines I had the privilege of tasting, but I’ll just have to list them here: The Wolftrap ($10), Graham Beck Brut Rosé ($17), Grand Plaisir ($28), The Curator ($8), Limestone Hill Chardonnay ($20), MAN Shiraz ($9) and Chardonnay ($9) and Bellingham Bernard Series Chenin Blanc ($22). Try them all! CW

AUTHENTIC JAPANESE CUISINE

32 | MARCH 3, 2016

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Thanks to its location near the airport, Basilico is a place where you won’t feel like an oddity dining solo. The restaurant is equipped with a wood-fired pizza oven in which calzones and pizzas are cooked. The Italiano pizza in particular is terrific; there’s a lot to love about this pizza, but the housemade sausage really sets it apart. The “tempura shrimp fritti” appetizer apparently refers to the style of butterflying the shrimp, not the coating in which they’re cooked. I love fried shrimp, but couldn’t detect enough shrimp flavor, which got lost in the breading. I did like the perfectly cooked pasta and flavor of Basilico’s spaghetti carbonara, except that it wasn’t traditional carbonara—no egg in the pasta (which traditionally is tossed with raw yolk), nor hardly any cheese. The dominant flavors were olive oil, garlic and chili flakes; in essence this was aio e oio with bacon and peas. No doubt, I will stop in and try more items when I’m in the vicinity of the airport again. For sure, I’ll be picking up more pizzas from Basilico to help me recover from long days of air travel. Reviewed Feb. 25. 2110 W. North Temple, 801-890-0071, BasilicoSLC.com

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Atlantic Cafe & Market

Downtown’s Atlantic Cafe & Market has so much to offer, it’s hard to know where to begin. For breakfast, omelets are always a great choice, and at lunch, the sandwiches and pizzas are the way to go. Especially tasty is the Mediterranean pizza and the vegetarian lasagna. There are also luscious chicken kebabs, Balkan sausages called cevapi and more, including wine, beer and sidewalk seating in warm weather. 325 S. Main, Salt Lake City, 801524-9900, AtlanticCafeMarketSLC.com

Boulevard Bistro

A blend of upscale and casual dining, Boulevard Bistro is a great place to take a date or enjoy a meal with friends. You’ll find a blend of American, Italian and French cuisine for breakfast, lunch and dinner at this hip, modern restaurant. During the summer, enjoy your meal on the patio and start off with an appetizer such as the trio of Mediterranean dips served with rye toast. The panseared red trout and the clam linguine are excellent entrée options, but make sure to save room for some gelato. 1414 S. Foothill Drive, Salt Lake City, 801953-1270, BoulevardBistroFoothill.com

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The newest venture from Ryan Lowder (owner-chef of downtown’s Copper Onion and Copper Common) is located in the shiny new Holladay Village Plaza alongside new iterations of other locally owned restaurants and retail shops. Copper Kitchen in Salt Lake City has a boisterous brasserie feel to it—a big, bustling eatery featuring the type of food that has made so many so fond of Lowder’s other restaurants: steak frites, braised lamb shank, duck confit croquettes, beef bourguignon and noodles and lots more. 4640 S. 2300 East, Holladay, 385-2373159, CopperKitchenSLC.com

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ZOOTOPIA

Beasts of One Notion

CINEMA

Zootopia depends entirely on its well-intentioned allegory about prejudice. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

S

Judy, Nick and Flash in Zootopia takes advantage of the fact that all wolves start howling when they hear one howl. For a movie built entirely around “don’t judge an animal by its species,” there’s also plenty of “a leopard can’t change its spots.” That’s not to say that there isn’t also a welcome complexity to the way Zootopia approaches prejudice: as fuel for demagoguery; as something that’s not easy to avoid even if you’ve been a target of it yourself; as a cycle that encourages despair in those who get tired of fighting against assumptions. It’s a great starting point for introducing kids to the idea. But its ideas also never sneak up on you emotionally the way, for example, Inside Out managed with its exploration of childhood’s end; it’s more like that vintage Star Trek episode about the aliens with halfwhite/half-black faces, allegory writ large and highlighted so there’s no confusion. The result is sporadically fun but clunky, wellintentioned but rarely powerful. Prejudice is bad. It’s an important idea to convey, with plenty of better ways to convey it. CW

ZOOTOPIA

BB.5 Ginnifer Goodwin Jason Bateman Idris Elba Rated PG

| CITY WEEKLY |

TRY THESE Madagascar (2005) Ben Stiller Chris Rock Rated PG

Wreck-It Ralph (2012) John C. Reilly Sarah Silverman Rated PG

Inside Out (2015) Amy Poehler Phyllis Smith Rated PG

MARCH 3, 2016 | 35

Robin Hood (1973) Brian Bedford Phil Harris Rated G

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reluctant partner, allowing Zootopia to ride on the familiar rhythms of a “mismatched buddy cop” movie. To Zootopia’s credit, those are much more welcome rhythms than those of the “our world, but with different kinds of characters” set-up that characterizes so much feature animation. The film mostly bypasses cheap, obvious animal-pun gags based on familiar product names—although you do get the occasional Lemming Brothers bank, or Targoat—and builds the relationship between Judy and Nick with enough depth that their conflicts feel genuine, and earned. What’s missing, however, is depth to its world-building. The concept establishes a central, integrated melting-pot “hub” of the animal-occupied city, surrounded by individual, artificially maintained habitatbased regions like tundra, savanna, rain forest and the like. Yet beyond that idea providing multiple visual environments for the filmmakers to create—and a couple of high-energy chase sequences—there’s no real sense for why those habitat “ghettos” are at all relevant to the story, as though that were a concept that felt too risky to explore in mass-market animation. It’s even more confusing when it starts to feel that Zootopia is working against its own message to get easy laughs. One extended sequence is set at the animal equivalent of the DMV, which is staffed entirely by slowmoving sloths. It’s a decent-enough idea, until you realize that it’s based on a stereotype: This kind of animal has one particular kind of character trait, and every one of them is the same. The same notion pops up when Judy

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poiler alert: Zootopia is about prejudice, and how prejudice is bad. And I suppose there’s more than a touch of sarcasm in the inclusion of that spoiler alert, because that is always, even from the first few minutes, what Zootopia is about. Not that there’s anything inherently wrong with that. Plenty of contemporary animated features have lacked thematic ambition, offering up some variation on the “Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer Rule” which essentially assures kids that “different-ness” is OK, and you need to be true to yourself, and so on and so forth. Zootopia digs deeper. That’s worth something. It is, unfortunately, also the majority of what Zootopia has going for it. The premise sets up a world of talking mammals who have civilized themselves and formed a society where they all interact in a relatively human way. Among them is Judy Hopps (Ginnifer Goodwin), a young rabbit who dreams of becoming a police officer, despite there never having been a rabbit police officer in Zootopia’s history. Yet she works hard enough to make it onto the force—only to find that she isn’t taken seriously by the water buffalo police chief (Idris Elba), and is immediately assigned meter-maid duty. Goodwin’s voice performance does a lovely job of establishing the mix of determination and self-doubt that follows Judy into her work, while the screenplay by Jared Bush (Big Hero 6) and Phil Johnston (Wreck-It Ralph) effectively introduces background elements that impact her personality, like the anxiety of her own parents and a traumatic childhood encounter. As Judy gets her big break working on a missing persons—um, missing otter—case, she brings along street hustler fox Nick Wilde (Jason Bateman) as a


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THE BOY AND THE BEAST BBB You could look at Momoru Hododa’s animated fantasy from the glass-half-full perspective (genuinely engaging visual filmmaking) or glass-half-empty (subtext that is never once, even for a moment, allowed to remain as subtext). It opens as 9-year-old Ren runs away after the death of his divorced mother and slips through a doorway to a city populated by beasts. There he becomes an apprentice to bold, self-absorbed Kumatetsu, who can only be considered as a candidate to succeed the city’s ruler if he takes such an apprentice. The story dynamic is familiar, as the angry Ren finds a surrogate father and Kumatetsu learns patience from being a mentor. Such stuff is also spelled out quite explicitly; one character helpfully notes, “Kumatetsu has grown more than the boy.” But even when it highlights every metaphor like a dog-eared Cliffs Notes, there are still memorable directing choices, from Ren’s off-screen dispatch of a group of bullies to the psychic whale form taken on by one villain. We’re all quite clear that it’s about letting go of anger before it consumes you—and it manages to be about that idea with some style. Opens March 4 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (NR)—Scott Renshaw

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LONDON HAS FALLEN .5B If only all those other stupid countries could be as awesome as America. After the British prime minister dies suddenly and mysteriously, world leaders summoned to London for the funeral—allegedly “the most protected event on Earth”—come under terrorist attack. The only survivor among them is U.S. president Benjamin Asher (Aaron Eckhart), thanks to absolutely badass Secret Service agent Mike Banning (Gerard Butler), even though Banning concedes that he is made of nothing more than “bourbon and poor choices.” (One wonders what all those failed non-American security people could possibly be made of? Cotton candy?) It is laughably beyond preposterous, all the security lapses in every single British service, from the NHS ambulance corps right up to MI6, that is required for the army of swarthy brown men to pull off stupendously coordinated multiple attacks across a geographically sprawling world city—though the astonishing aptitude of the attackers is meant to leave a fear-mongered audience pissing its pants. Even more vile than its outrageously propagandistic progenitor, Olympus Has Fallen, this is pure terror porn: racist, jingoistic and thoroughly obnoxious. Opens March 4 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)—MaryAnn Johanson

ZOOTOPIA BB.5 See review p. 35. Opens March 4 at theaters valleywide. (PG)

SPECIAL SCREENINGS BARBARA FREITCHIE At Edison Street Events Silent Films, March 3-4, 7:30 p.m. (NR) BEAVER TRILOGY PART IV At Rose Wagner Center, March 9, 7 p.m. (NR) CAROL At Park City Film Series, March 4-5 @ 8 p.m., March 6 @ 6 p.m. (R) THE CHOCOLATE FARMER At Main Library, March 8, 7 p.m. (NR) ODDBALL At Main Library, March 5, 11 a.m. (NR)

CURRENT RELEASES EDDIE THE EAGLE BB Why are movies about inspirational stories so uninspired? This factbased story—about the British ski-jumper Eddie Edwards (Taron Egerton) who became a folk hero at the 1988 Calgary Winter Olympics—does little more than hit every feel-good underdog sports movie bullet point. There’s the backstory that makes the protagonist likeable, showing his working-class roots and childhood medical struggles. There are the obstacles both benign and malignant, including the snooty British sports federation officials and Eddie’s own unsupportive dad. And there’s the down-on-his-luck coach with something to prove. (Hugh Jackman, playing more or less the same character as he did in Real Steel). Throw in the training montage ahead of the rousing finish, and all that matters is he’s an underdog, and we get a chance to root for him. Beyond that, everyone’s work is done here. (PG-13)—SR

THE MERMAID [not yet reviewed] A mermaid tried to stop a real estate development that threatens her people. Opens March 4 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (R) WHISKEY TANGO FOXTROT [not yet reviewed] A journalist (Tina Fey) finds a unique challenge in covering war in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Opens March 4 at theaters valleywide. (R)

| CITY WEEKLY |

36 | MARCH 3, 2016

Information is correct at press time. Film release schedules are subject to change.

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Politics as Usual

TV

See It Save It Suck It

Stump with The Family and House of Cards; dump Damien. The Family Thursday, March 3 (ABC)

House of Cards Friday, March 4 (Netflix)

The Family (ABC)

Season Premiere: After a couple of years hinting at it, Norman Bates (Freddie Highmore) finally started becoming Psycho Norman Bates last season—and occasionally Norma, even though Bates Motel already has a perfectly fantastic Norma (Vera Farmiga—why has she not won all of the awards for this role?!). As Season 4 opens, Norman’s still on the run to avoid being checked into a pricey loony bin ($20,000 a month? Might as well just send him to rehab in Malibu with Andy Dick), Emma (Olivia Cooke) is closer than ever to no longer being “Oxygen Tank Girl” (though I will still insist on referring to her as such) and Norma’s closer-er than ever to finally just going to Bone Town with Sheriff Romero (Nestor Carbonell). If you haven’t yet—hacky TV critic joke alert— checked into Bates Motel, do it now: There’s only one more season to come after this one.

Damien Monday, March 7 (A&E)

Series Debut: Are they sure it wasn’t a “999” on the back of the baby’s head? Easy mistake—just sayin’. The latest take on Keeping Up With the Antichrist was created and produced by Glen Mazzara (The Shield, The Walking Dead), and features some veteran on-screen talent (Barbara Hershey and Walking Dead alum Scott Wilson), but do we really

need a grown-up Damien? Star Bradley James (Merlin) has none of the devilish charisma of Fox’s Lucifer, or even a houseplant on the set of Lucifer, so all of the impressively creepy cinematography and whispery foreboding Mazzara can conjure isn’t going to make Damien the viable Bates Motel companion piece that A&E still needs (Remember The Returned? Yeah, neither does anyone else). Maybe try a Phantasm remake series next year.

Of Kings and Prophets Tuesday, March 8 (ABC)

Series Debut: Between The Family, The Real O’Neals and Of Kings and Prophets, this is shaping up to be the worst ABC midseason in years—and they haven’t even dropped Uncle Buck yet. Of Kings and Prophets was originally pitched by the showrunners as a “sexy biblical epic,” which, naturally, means, “We set out to make a cable-caliber drama loaded with steamy sex and bloody violence … but then the network stepped in and watered it down while we updated our résumés in the break room.” Listen to Bill Mondays at 8 a.m. on X96 Radio From Hell, and on the TV Tan podcast via iTunes, Stitcher and BillFrost.tv.

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Season Premiere: Speaking of political thrillers, TV’s second-most-realistic Beltway series (the first being HBO’s Veep, of course), House of Cards, is back for Season 4, and facing steep challenges: bouncing back after a relatively weak third season, the departure of its showrunner and competing with the ongoing tragi-comedy that is our current presidential election cycle. President Frank (Kevin Spacey) and First Lady Claire (Robin Wright) are still at odds, and Frank’s Democratic-nomination win against Heather Dunbar (Elizabeth Marvel) is looking far less assured than Hillary Clinton’s is in real life (sorry, Bernieacs). That’s not the end of his female problems—Ellen Burstyn and Neve Campbell are also on board for S4—and they, thankfully, bring out the darker and dirtier sides of Fightin’ Frank that made House of Cards’ first two seasons click. And no, the news media still doesn’t come off well … at all.

Bates Motel Monday, March 7 (A&E)

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Series Debut: ABC has only launched a single winner in the 2015-16 TV season: Quantico (aka Federal Beautiful Investigators, aka How to Get Away With Homeland, which returns March 6, if you were wondering). Everything else has been DOA, and The Family will likely be no different. The dully named “political thriller” stars Joan Allen as Maine politician Claire Warren, an aspiring candidate for governor whose campaign is rocked by the sudden return of her son Adam (Liam James), who was presumed murdered a decade ago. Is Claire’s politically prudent persona as a “survivor” in jeopardy? Will the wrongly jailed “killer” (Andrew McCarthy) seek revenge? Where the hell’s Adam been—if it’s really even him? Is the Warren family harboring even more secrets and lies than ABC’s other lamely titled drama, Secrets and Lies? Couldn’t this have all been wrapped up in a Lifetime movie? So many questions, so few mehs to give.

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FOSTER BODY

ID, Please

MUSIC

Body find a little more of 4760 S 900 E, SLC Foster themselves on Moving Display. 801-590-9940 | facebook.com/theroyalslc

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3/12

3/17

St. patrick's day party open at 3:00 Green beer & food specials live reggae with iya terra

ALL SHOW TICKETS AVAILABLE AT SMITHSTIX OR AT THE ROYAL

BY RANDY HARWARD rharward@cityweekly.net

S

everal weeks ago, Diabolical Records’ Adam Tye gave City Weekly a preview of Foster Body’s second LP, Moving Display. When Tye dropped the needle on his new test pressing, the first strains of content ticking from the speakers made an instantly indelible impression. The low rumble of bass guitar joined the drums, followed by guitar chords so clean they squeaked—then, a voice that’s at once manic, frustrated and robotic, like an automaton warning that its self-destruct sequence has been activated. They—maybe the whole damn ship—are on a countdown to blow. The song’s final 20 seconds indeed headed that way, as all the instruments combined to reach a ticking-pumping-squeaking crescendo before dissipating in a cymbal’s sweet, fading hiss. Then, on the tense but fun “You Were Not You,” the robot popped up to dance to more squeaky guitar, pumping bass lines and driving drums. In those six minutes and 21 seconds, a vortex of references swirled: Devo, Television, Dead Kennedys, The Fall, Talking Heads, the B-52s—none more dominant than another. The urge to dance collided with a sense of being scolded and/or schooled. It was a sublime musical cognitive dissonance. I begged for an early advance copy. It would be three weeks before the Bandcamp key arrived, unlocking Moving Display for on-demand consumption. In that time, I listened to Foster Body’s debut, Landscapes. Raw and angry, with the vocals hidden behind effects and volume, it was the sound of a slightly insecure band not quite settled on an identity. Weeks later, in an interview, bassist/vocalist Dyana Durfee says Landscapes was Foster Body saying, “I’m gonna yell! Listen to me! But don’t look directly at me. There’s some fog, and maybe let’s distort everything so you can’t tell exactly what I’m saying—but here we are.” On Moving Display, the songs breathe easier, even if they aren’t relaxed. The funnel cloud mixes in more musical debris: the bass parts conjure Les Claypool and Mike Watt, and the lyrics are sarcastically erudite like Jello Biafra’s, and vitriolic like those of The Fall’s Mark E. Smith. The conflict remains: The album is equally fun and furious. Seated on a row of barstools among screenprinting supplies and workspaces at Copper Palate Press, Foster Body looks less posed and composed than they do in their promotional photos—but still like a young version of a someday-substantial band. You know the type: four distinct creative entities, comprising a greater whole. Durfee, looking like a cross between Molly Ringwald in Pretty in Pink and Ally Sheedy in The Breakfast Club—vulnerable, but feisty. Korey Daniel Martin, the unassuming, crafty guitar player. Robin Banks, the singer, who seems odd onstage, but is quiet and gentle off it. And the drummer, Jeremy Devine, resembling a shy/bored Thomas Dolby. Someday their muses may push them to form side projects, leading to a breakup, a clamor to reunite and ultimately, fruition and renewed creative alchemy. For now, they’re in the throes of finding themselves as a band. Foster Body say they formed, initially as a one-off, to fill a void, to be what they found lacking in the Salt Lake City music scene. “It was definitely reactionary,” Banks says. What, exactly, was lacking is harder to identify. Actually, it probably boils down to identity—figuring it out, and fitting in. So it starts there, at least, the part of the scene that Foster Body inhabits, a lack of representation of their ideas and their identities. Which, in a band of four, will

Foster Body vary with their individual experiences. Martin says it starts with one of them, and evolves. A lot of songs begin with Banks, but don’t necessarily end there. “We really don’t see how a song came together to fit the theme, conceptually, until after [it’s done].” Durfee completes the thought, “And we’re all on the same emotional page.” Picking it back up, Martin says there will be “contrast” and “contradiction,” that they’re “talking over one another, yet still in sync, somehow.” “Because it is a universally understood sentiment, to be misrepresented or misunderstood,” Devine says, “there are times when we’ve misunderstood each other’s parts, too, but have been able to communicate effectively to understand each other. And it will come around in a more interesting way than if we tried to fit one view.” In “Content,” Banks writes, “Sum it up/ sum it up with a word/ One word/ A single syllable/ You’ve got it figured out/ What I’m after/ What I want/ Predispositioned/ In one quick glance/ Content determined/ Container defines.” It’s not that easy to pin down Foster Body, or any one of its parts. So it’s not so much that Moving Display shows Foster Body with a greater sense of self. It’s more like they’re comfortable in the ongoing search for it. It’s “much more vulnerable,” Durfee says. But it’s also more empowering, according to Banks. On Landscapes, they didn’t know who they were. “This album, I realized, I don’t have to fucking know … it is a process.” CW

FOSTER BODY W/ TRACE POP, FULL TRASH, BRAIN BAGZ

Diabolical Records 238 S. Edison Street Saturday, March 5, 8 p.m. 801-792-9204 Free Facebook.com/DiabolicalRecords


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D’yer Mak’er

The abrasive, atheistic ethos of Making Fuck gets deeper on A Harrowing End. BY BRIAN STAKER comments@cityweekly.net @stakerized

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he band Making Fuck began, as you might imagine, as a joke. It was prompted by a line from the movie Clerks, in which Silent Bob’s Russian cousin, Olaf, bellows the misbegotten pickup lines/song lyrics, “My love for you is like a truck/ Berserker!/ Would you like some making fuck?/ Berserker!” Singer/guitarist Kory Quist recalls, “The bad grammar seemed comparable to the way we played—not sticking to normal time signatures or keys or scales. And as abrasive as it is, I thought that described our music as well; we were trying to be abrasive, in your face.” People said it was a bad move, because the band wouldn’t be able to get any press. Quist had an interest in music since growing up on his parents’ favorites, but in his early teens discovered hardcore/posthardcore metal bands like Refused. “I’d never heard anything like that, never heard anybody scream like that,” he marvels. The genre made him want to be a musician, and shaped the style of music he would play. At the same time, his background, growing up in Utah County, had an influence as well. “I’ve seen what religion does to people,” he says. Finding that “what religion does” was not for the better, he soon adopted an atheism that encompasses a social critique of what he calls “the 9-to-5,” expressed on “A Slave to the Lazy Boy,” a song on the band’s 2013 self-released, self-titled EP. Starting in 2006, Making Fuck was just a side project for Quist’s band Nine Worlds until 2012, when cellist Jessica Bundy joined. After several personnel changes, the band is now made up of Quist, Bundy, bassist Levi Hanna, cellist Scott Wasilewski and drummer Jamison Garrido. Kim Pack, violinist for SubRosa, guests on the title track of their new album, A Harrowing End. Released by local Exigent Records and Gypsy Blood Records, it’s a double-album of eight songs that expands on the ideas of

Making Fuck

the EP. “The title track talks about working that bitter 9-to-5 and coming out with nothing,” Quist explains. “Jesus Christ Incorporated” is an indictment of corporate religion. Other songs include “Mormon Guilt,” “Rats Get Fat,” and “Rich Man’s Son,” so you get the point. Andy Patterson’s engineering has something to do with the sheer density of the onslaught of sound, and he offered to drum on an interim basis, but his schedule wouldn’t permit it. The band uses some of the “heavy” sonic techniques of doom metal, slight rhythmic variations and sludgy guitars, to different ends. Quist says the band endeavors to avoid the usual cartoonish tropes of the doom/sludge/stoner genres. “My issue with doom metal,” Quist says, “is you can only follow the smoky cloud to the purple mountain to seek the wizard so many times before the voyage doesn’t mean anything anymore. I’m trying to touch on real issues.” For him, all the social criticism isn’t just an intellectual exercise; it’s personal. “I found out I can be hopeful and happy without God, or the idea of God,” he says. And perhaps that’s the paradox of dark metal, in its multiple guises: producing angry music—the aural equivalent of “making” a sonic expletive—produces pleasure, and makes these musicians happy. With cello and occasional violin, there’s also a classical beauty balancing out the sludge. Making Fuck’s album release show at Diabolical Records on March 11 launches a regional tour, They hope to write more songs later in the year. With the recording of the new album came another controversy about the band’s name, this time from an unlikely source: the album artwork includes exquisitely executed lettering by professional calligrapher Skyler Chubak. “Some of the old guys in the calligraphy community who saw it online said you shouldn’t use it to write profanity,” Quist chuckles. “But then the calligrapher from the White House also saw it online and approved. He said it was beautiful work.” CW

Friday, March 11, 8 p.m. 801-792-9204 w/ Worst Friends, Die Off Free Diabolical Records Facebook.com/ 238 S. Edison St. DiabolicalRecords MAKING FUCK CD RELEASE


WEDNESDAY/SUNDAY

MONDAY

LADIES BUNCO 7PM FREE TO PLAY COME LEARN HOW TO PLAY AT 6:30 BEST ST. PATTY’S COSTUME WINS A PRIZE!

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MARCH 3, 2016 | 41

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THIS WEEK’S MUSIC PICKS

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THURSDAY 3.3

Johnny Love, The Hemptations

Hailing from Santa Ana, Calif., Johnny Love was born into a family of musicians, and first picked up a guitar at age 13. Since his family played a variety of music—including jazz, funk and Tejano—Love developed an appreciation for multiple styles. Ultimately, he settled on a blend of reggae, rocksteady, ska and cumbia. Opening for Love is Salt Lake City’s own Latino-reggae group, The Hemptations, who are fronted by singer-guitarist Omar Gerardo—the former guitar wizard in 2016 Best of Utah Music’s Best Reggae Artist, Afro Omega. Singing in English and Spanish, Hemptations blend traditional roots reggae with Latin flavor and Gerardo’s ripping solos, which led to their own Best of Utah Music nomination. The band is preparing to enter the studio to record an as-yet untitled EP, but you can hear four songs at ReverbNation.com/TheHemptations and an older demo, “Jah Words,” at ReverbNation.com/HemptationsBand. (RH) The Royal, 4760 S. 900 East, 10 p.m., $5, TheRoyalSLC.com

Tad Calcara Swing Sextet

Since his main gig is as the principal clarinetist for the Utah Symphony, you might think Tad Calcara has all the work he needs. That doesn’t stop him from exploring his muse with the 17-piece New Deal Swing big band, or this smaller iteration. Chalk it up to the passion that fans of big band music, who aren’t just oldsters; video

Vince Staples

game series like BioShock and Fallout breed a new fandom for those swingin’ standards of yesteryear. Perhaps we’ll see another swing revival soon. If we don’t, we’ll always have torchbearers like Calcara to do that voodoo so well, bringing, as the Excellence in the Community press release says, “the tunes and stories from the golden era of swing” while you can “bring your dancing shoes.” (RH) The Gallivan Center, 239 S. Main, 7:30 p.m., free, ExcellenceConcerts.org

FRIDAY 3.4 Vince Staples

On his own, as one-third of the hip-hop group Cutthroat Boyz, and a close associate of Odd Future’s Earl Sweatshirt and Mike G, Long Beach, Calif., rapper Vince Staples raps about the struggle in black neighborhoods but attacks the issues from a conscious perspective. After selfreleasing four mixtapes—including Stolen Youth, a collaboration with Larry Fisherman (aka Mac Miller)—and appearing on albums by Odd Future members, Staples released the Hell Can Wait EP in 2014. Last summer, he dropped his debut double-album, Summertime ‘06 (Def Jam/ARTium/ Blacksmith), to universal acclaim. (AT) The Complex, 536 W. 100 South, 7 p.m., $18 in advance, $22 day of show, TheComplexSLC.com

The Hemptations’ Omar Gerardo

SATURDAY 3.5

The Rev. Horton Heat, Unknown Hinson, Th’ Legendary Shack Shakers, Lincoln Durham

By now, you should know The Reverend Horton Heat’s deal: He’s a psychobilly legend, a larger-than-life guitar-slinger with Billy the Kid gravitas. By now, you should know the Legendary Shack Shakers, who, under the leadership of J.D. Wilkes, are roots rock icons themselves. But do you know Unknown Hinson? Adult Swim fans might know recognize his voice as that of the cantankerous ink-oozer Early Cuyler on Squidbillies, although he was credited for the first few seasons under his real name, Stuart Daniel Baker. Hinson is Baker’s musical alter ego, a hillbilly-vampire/country-western troubadour/bona

»

Unknown Hinson


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MARCH 3, 2016 | 43


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fide guitar hero with bleeding gums, a penchant for “party liquor,” and a yearning for “womerns.” Baker’s goofy-sincere-ornerymenacing character transcends gimmickry, especially when you hear his deep drawl on sweet ’n’ silly songs like “I Ain’t Afraid of Your Husband,” and see him play guitar like a redneck Jimi Hendrix. With Hinson, two roots-rock icons and Southern gothic punk-blues-gospel artist Lincoln Durham, a fiddle-banjo-guitar wielding one-man band with a literary bent, this bill is crammed with quality—a real must-see. (RH) The Depot, 400 W. South Temple, 7:30 p.m., $21 in advance, $25 day of show, DepotSLC.com

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John Németh got his start playing with different groups in his hometown of Boise and, by his mid-20s, he was backing up Junior Watson. A few years later, he was picked up by Blind Pig Records and, after two self-released albums, released his third studio album, Magic Touch. Seven years, four more records and another label later, he signed with Blue Corn Music for Memphis Grease. Németh is going the whole nine yards in bringing back the sound and feel of blues with his incredibly soulful voice and dedication to the traditional themes and playing styles of blues gods. Now, with the 2015 Blues Music Award for Best Soul Blues Album on his shelf—and a 2016 nomination for the BMA’s highest honor, B.B. King Entertainer of the Year, Németh is getting the respect he deserves. (DB) The State Room, 638 S. State, 8 p.m., $15, TheStateRoomSLC.com

The Invisible Czars

TUESDAY 3.8

The Invincible Czars perform Nosferatu

In 2012, I got to see virtuoso guitarist Gary Lucas (Jeff Buckley, Gods and Monsters) perform a new, original score to Coffin Joe’s 1967 psychedelic horror film This Night I’ll Possess Your Corpse. It’s easily one of my all-time favorite music (and film) experiences, watching Lucas, silhouetted— except for a bit of flickering light on his face, against the lower left-hand corner of the screen, performing alongside the film. Musicians have done this for decades, usually with public domain movies like F.W. Murnau’s 1922 German expressionist vampire flick Nosferatu (re-scored by several musicians, including a 2001 goth-industrial treatment featuring Christian Death’s Rozz Williams) and Fritz Lang’s 1927 sci-fi film Metropolis (famously tackled by Giorgio Moroder in 1984). Austin, Texas, quartet Invincible Czars, whose Josh Robins is a Salt Lake City native, started creating new soundtracks for silent films in the oughts, at the original Alamo Drafthouse Cinema. Their seventh project, Nosferatu, incorporates Romanian classical and folk music, and takes cues from Danny Elfman, Ween and Ennio Morricone. They’ll perform beneath the Tower screen in specially made wardrobe, putting Murnau’s sublimely creepy film in a new and fitting light. (RH) Tower Theatre, 876 E. 900 South, 7 p.m., $15 ($10 student tickets and $25 21+ VIP tickets available), SaltLakeFilmSociety.org


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MARCH 3, 2016 | 45

Live Music Friday & Saturday 6pm - 9pm


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46 | MARCH 3, 2016

MONDAY 3.7 Bronze Radio Return

Roots rock sextet Bronze Radio Return is a mostly independent group, but since their formation in 2007, the Hartford, Conn., band has landed songs in commercials for nearly a dozen major brand products, as well as in multiple national TV shows and the trailer for the Bill Murray film St. Vincent. At a time when America is ravenous for the exact blend of roots and indie rock that BRR purveys, the exposure translated to a monumental 25 million streams on Spotify. Their Light Me Up EP came out last year via the subscriptionbased record label DigSin. (Doug Brian) The State Room, 638 S. State, 8 p.m., $13, TheStateRoomSLC.com

CONCERTS & CLUBS In an effort to be the best in Salt Lake’s brunch game, RYE has decided to focus our aim on the a.m. hours. Effective February 29th, RYE will be open Monday-Friday from 9am-2pm Saturday and Sunday from 9am-3pm. What this means for you: even more house-made breakfast and brunch specials, snappier service--same fresh, locally-sourced fixins. Come on in. www.ryeslc.com

MAR 2: THIRD MAN RECORDS TOUR

MAR 8:

TIMMYS ORGANISM VIDEO THE NODS

MAR 9:

8PM DOORS

MAR 3: 8PM DOORS FREE SHOW

MAR 4: 9PM DOORS

WOLF EYES

8PM DOORS FREE SHOW

ALEXANDER ORTEGA IT FOOT IT EARS ALBINO FATHER

DJUNA WOLFBITCH ADRACK ILLOOM

8PM DOORS

Mar 15: Dance Off Mar 16: FREE SHOW Charles Ellsworth Mar 17: FREE SHOW Slug Localized Mar 18: Thriftworks Mar 19: Rob Crow’s Gloomy Place Mar 21: Murder By Death Mar 22: Young Fathers Mar 23: Geographer & Crookes Mar 24: La Luz Mar 25: San Fermin Mar 28: Chairlift Mar 29: Cullen Omori Mar 30: Shannon And The Clams Mar 31: FREE SHOW Golden Plates Apr 1: Dubwise Apr 2: DIRT FIRST Apr 3: Ra Ra Riot Apr 4: Lissie Apr 5: Night Beats Apr 7: Dumb Luck Album Release Apr 8: Pete Yorn Apr 9: Peter Murphy (Seated Event)

SPIRIT CITY OSKAR AND JULIA

STWO

DJ JUGGY CONCISE KILGORE DJ SET

MAR 11: EL TEN ELEVEN 8PM DOORS CONQUER MONSTER MAR 12: TY

8PM DOORS

PRINCE FOX STELOUSE TYPEFUNK

BERNIE SANDERS FUNDRAISER WESTWARD

MAR 10: SKULLCANDY PRESENTS

DUBWISE

MAR 5: LNE PRESENTS 8PM DOORS

8PM DOORS

SEGALL & THE MUGGERS

MAX PAIN & THE GROOVIES ZHOD JAWWZZ

COMING SOON Apr 10: DMA’s Apr 12: Matthew Logan Vasquez of Delta Spirit Apr 13: Autolux Apr 15: The Cave Singers Apr 16: Delusions Of Grandeur Apr 17: Cloud Cult Apr 18: The Movement Apr 19: Zion I Apr 22: Hook N Sling Apr 23: PaceWon Apr 28: The Widdler Apr 29: Napalm Death & Melvins May 3: The Slackers May 5: 8th Annual Beat Society

May 7: The Beatles Tribute Night May 8: The Thermals May 12: Big Wild May 13: Tortoise May 15: Sensamotion May 19: Sticky Fingers May 26: Chelsea Wolfe May 27: Machinedrum May 29: Subhumans June 4: The Velvet Underground Tribute Night June 8: Local H June 12: Ill Nino July 2: The Rolling Stones Tribute Night Aug 6: Queen Tribute Night Nov 7: Peter Hook & The Light

Enjoy Live Music &

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03.09 SCOTT ROGERS

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MONDAY 3.7 Firekid

Firekid (Dillon Hodges), out of Muscle Shoals, Ala., is hitting his stride, recently signing to Atlantic Records and releasing his eponymous debut. In the vein of indie folk, Hodges takes things a step further, bringing soulfulness, depth and poppy little extras into his sound. The result is catchy, peppy folk-pop that leaves listeners tapping their feet and humming. Firekid is working his way up, well on the route to success with heart and optimism that is so well reflected in his music. (DB) Kilby Court, 741 S. 330 West, 7 p.m., $10, KilbyCourt.com

CONCERTS & CLUBS

THURSDAY 3.3

SATURDAY 3.5

LIVE MUSIC

LIVE MUSIC

LIVE MUSIC

News from the geeks. what’s new in comics, games, movies and beyond.

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MARCH 3, 2016 | 47

TUESDAY 3.8

| CITY WEEKLY |

SATURDAY, MARCH 5TH

MONDAY 3.7

Amarfis (Club Karamba) Berlin Breaks + On 3 + Out of Anger (Club X) Canyons (Union Station) Carly Rae Jepsen + Cardiknox (The Depot) Cure For The Common (O.P. Rockwell) DJ Reverend 23 + Stryker (Area 51) Djunya + Wolf Bitch + Adrack + Illoom (The Urban Lounge) Folk Hogan (Muse Music Cafe) see p. 18 Hippie Sabotage (Kilby Court) Johnny Love (Lighthouse Lounge) John Moreland + Lilly Hiatt (The State Room) Live Music at Wildflower (Iron Blosam Lodge) Local Music Set (A Bar Named Sue on State) Mad Max & the Wild Ones (Garage on Beck) see p. 18 Michelle Moonshine (Lighthouse Lounge) Night Spin Collective (Area 51) Penrose (The Royal) Red Yeti + Mojave Nomads + The Clay Temples (Velour) Ripchain + A Balance of Power (The Loading Dock) Scooter and Lavelle (Downstairs) Vince Staples (The Complex) see p. 42

BIG SHINY ROBOT!

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

FRIDAY 3.4

Alicia Stockman (Deer Valley) The Anchorage, Pop Warner, Uncle Dirt (Kilby Court) Claude VonStroke (SKY SLC) Brothers Brimm (Lighthouse Lounge) DiseNgaged CD Release (The Loading Dock) DJ Scooter (Downstairs) Joy Spring Band (Sugar House Coffee) Local Music Set (A Bar Named Sue on State) Madchild (Club X) Otter Creek (The Acoustic Space Event Venue) Pepper (Poplar Street Pub) Prince Fox & SteLouse + Typefunk (The Urban Lounge) The Rev. Horton Heat + Legendary Shack Shakers + Unknown Hinson + Lincoln Durham (The Depot) see p. 42 Sander Van Doorm (Park City Live) Scenic Byway + Max Pain and the Groovies (O.P. Rockwell) Spencer Nielsen Band (The Royal) Winter Rock Reggae feat. Iration + Pepper + Passafire + more (The Complex)

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Alexander Ortega + it foot, it ears + Albino Father (The Urban Lounge) DJ Courtney (Area 51) DJ Kemosabe (Downstairs) Hot Noise (The Red Door) Joe McQueen Quartet (Garage on Beck) see p. 20 Johnny Love + Hemptations (The Royal) see p. 42 The Loners CD Release Show feat. Psychosis + Isaac Farr Trio (Kilby Court) Recess Club feat. Jeremy Olander (Elevate) Tad Calcara Swing Sextet (The Gallivan Center) see p. 42 Therapy Thursdays: Stanton Warriors (SKY SLC) Yellow Claw (Park City Live)


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48 | MARCH 3, 2016

LIVE MUSIC

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CROSSWORD PUZZLE

© 2016

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ACROSS

| CITY WEEKLY |

MARCH 3, 2016 | 51

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

Last week’s answers

SUDOKU

1. Big lipstick seller 2. Film villain played eight times on screen by Robert Englund 3. 2008 campaign slogan 4. "Nothing beats ____" (beer slogan)

42. U.S. swimmer Dara who competed in her fifth Olympic Games at the age of 41 43. Like Jimmy Kimmel and Jimmy Fallon 47. Fast 48. Sonia of "Moon Over Parador" 49. Provide a new soundtrack for 50. Mac 53. 6/6/1944 56. Veep before Al 57. Opposite of WSW

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

DOWN

5. Embarrassing sound when one bends over 6. Classic British sports car 7. Brazil's ____ Alegre 8. Where to see "bombs bursting" 9. Lead on 10. Improvise, in a way 11. ____ 8 12. Book publishing's ____, Straus and Giroux 13. Blue eyes and blond hair, e.g. 18. Giggle syllable 24. Tortilla chip dip 25. ____ sci 26. Israeli natives 28. Black Eyed Peas singer who released the 2006 solo album "The Dutchess" 31. Character in the #1 bestselling children's book "Goodnight, Goodnight, Construction Site" 32. Newswoman Curry 33. "Battling Bella" of '70s politics 35. Bananas 36. Professes 39. Natural disaster also known as a seismic seawave 40. Employs 41. Like the Everglades

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

1. What's up? 4. Where to place a thermometer when using the axillary method of taking a child's temperature 10. How a dud goes 14. Prior to, poetically 15. Much-feared earthquake 16. Fabulist 17. Give "Dracula" author Stoker a boost? 19. Site of the Taj Mahal 20. Cut down 21. It may be left on a table 22. Space race hero Gagarin 23. Arch in some Gothic architecture 24. Athlete who's a handful? 27. Word before room or center 28. ____.com (website of a toy store established in 1862) 29. '60s activist Bill who was in the news during the 2008 U.S. presidential election 30. Title heroine of a Strauss opera 33. Face on a fiver 34. What actor Pitt's mom was doing when her son was just an infant? 37. NYC luggage tag letters 38. Where Jesus grew up 41. Absolut rival, briefly 44. Director Van Sant 45. Show featuring the LVPD 46. "The red, yellow and blue balloons on our packages of white bread is an iconic look!"? 50. You can hardly see it 51. The good dinosaur in Pixar's "The Good Dinosaur" 52. "What ____ the odds?!" 53. "Dog the Bounty Hunter" star Chapman 54. Singer Jason who won a 2009 Grammy for "Make It Mine" 55. Drag queen's fashion items ... or a description of 17-, 24-, 34- and 46-Across 58. Officemate of Don and Peggy on "Mad Men" 59. Galápagos creature 60. Jimmy Eat World genre 61. WWI's Battle of the ____ 62. "WarGames" actor Coleman 63. Sloth, e.g.


| COMMUNITY | | CITYWEEKLY.NET |

52 | MARCH 3, 2016

Poets Corner

PHOTO OF THE WEEK BY

@ashton.w.photography #CWCOMMUNITY

T BEA

MY ANGEL

send leads to

She’s the angel on my sholder, I see her for who she is. She is with me in my travels, I feel her presence in this abyss. I know her spirit is with, I see her in my dreams. This angel on my shoulder, Carries me with her wings. QUINTON CASE Send your poem (max 15 lines), to: Poet’s Corner, City Weekly, 248 South Main Street, SLC, UT 84101 or e-mail to poetscorner@cityweekly.net.

Published entrants receive a $15 value gift from CW. Each entry must include name and mailing address.

#cwpoetscorner

INSIDE /

COMMUNITY BEAT PG. 52 POETS CORNER PG. 52 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY PG. 53 UTAH JOB CENTER PG.54 URBAN LIVING PG. 55

Hello, Gorgeous W

hether you’re looking for a fresh cut and color, a shiny manicure, new makeup or the coolest hot tool, check out Got Beauty. It’s more than a traditional beauty-supply shop—it’s a full-service salon and spa and carries over 15,000 beauty products, gifts and accessories, making it one of the most fun, unique shopping experiences in Salt Lake City. Jennifer Holmstead, director of operations at Got Beauty, has been working there for 11 years. “I loved shopping at the little store on 700 East and 2100 South,” she says. “One day the owner said, ‘Cute earrings. Do you want a job?’” Holmstead is amazed by how much the company has grown since then. She considers Got Beauty to be a fantastic place to work, and she loves the company culture her boss, Tammy Taylor, has created. Taylor founded the company after a lifetime of working in the beauty business. Taylor’s grandmother helped develop Max Factor and Redken, her father opened Utah’s first retail beauty supply chain in the 1970s and her uncle and several cousins are makeup artists for movie studios. Taylor spent her summers working at her father’s business when she was growing up, and then eventually began her own company as an adult. She opened a virtual beauty store called GotBeauty.com. As the website took off and customers began clamoring for the chance to shop at the warehouse, Taylor decided to open her brick-andmortar location in the heart of Sugar House’s commercial district. “Tammy has a passion for making women feel beautiful and genuinely helping every client who steps through our door,”

community@cityweekly.net

Check out GotBeauty.com and sign up for its newsletter to get updates on new products and sales.

Holmstead says. “I can honestly say that each and every Got Beauty employee feels the same way about our customers. When you combine our customer service with the amazing mix of products and gifts we carry, you get an out-of-this-world experience.” Other employees agree: “I love working with inspiring women and being in such an uplifting environment,” Clare Emery says. Co-worker Alisia Delaney echoes that sentiment. “The culture of Got Beauty is my favorite part [of the job],” she says. “Each and every employee makes it feel good to come to work every day.” Those good vibes among Got Beauty’s staff positively affect the customers who walk through the doors. Hailey Archer, a Salt Lake City resident, brought her entire bridal party there for manicures the morning of her wedding. “The staff was great—they were so friendly and able to accommodate everyone’s different styles,” Archer says. Even when one of the bridesmaids was involved in a fender bender and showed up late, Got Beauty’s nail technicians made sure everyone left the store ready to shine. n

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY B Y R O B

B R E Z S N Y

Go to RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

ARIES (March 21-April 19) Actress Blythe Baird writes about the problem that arises when her dog sees her eating a peanut butter and chocolate chip bagel. Her beloved pet begs for a piece and becomes miserable when it’s not forthcoming. Baird is merely demonstrating her love, of course, because she knows that eating chocolate can make canines ill. I suspect that life is bestowing a comparable blessing on you. You may feel mad and sad about being deprived of something you want. But the likely truth is that you will be lucky not to get it.

glorious task. Although the work might be hard, it won’t be anywhere near as hard as it usually is. And you are likely to make more progress than you would be able to at other times.

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| COMMUNITY |

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Unless you work at night and sleep by day, you experience the morning on a regular basis. You may have a love-hate relationship with it, because on the one hand you don’t like to leave your comfortable bed so early, and on the other hand you enjoy anticipating the interesting events ahead of you. But aside from your personal associations with the morning, this time of day has always been a potent symbol of awakenings and beginnings. Throughout history, poets have invoked it to signify purity and promise. In myth and legend, it often represents the LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) “For a wound to heal, you have to clean it out,” says author Yasmin chance to see things afresh, to be free of the past’s burdens, Mogahed. “Again, and again, and again. And this cleaning process to love life unconditionally. Dream interpreters might suggest stings. The cleaning of a wound hurts, yes. Healing takes so much that a dream of morning indicates a renewed capacity to trust work. So much persistence. And so much patience.” According oneself. All of these meanings are especially apropos for you to my analysis, Libra, you should be attending to this tough but right now, Pisces.

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| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) “The other day, lying in bed,” writes poet Rodger Kamenetz, “I felt my heart beating for the first time in a long while. I realized how little I live in my body, how much in my mind.” He speaks for the majority of us. We spend much of our lives entranced by the relentless jabber that unfolds between our ears. But I want to let you know, Scorpio, that the moment is ripe to rebel against this TAURUS (April 20-May 20) “I do not literally paint that table, but rather the emotion tendency in yourself. In the coming weeks, you will have a natural it produces upon me,” French artist Henri Matisse told an talent for celebrating your body. You’ll be able to commune interviewer. “But what if you don’t always have emotion?” she deeply with its sensations, to learn more about how it works, and asked him. This is how Matisse replied: “Then I do not paint. to exult in the pleasure it gives you and the wisdom it provides. This morning, when I came to work, I had no emotion. So I took a horseback ride. When I returned, I felt like painting, and had all SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) the emotion I wanted.” This is excellent advice for you to keep in In his “Dream Songs No. 67,” poet John Berryman confesses, mind, Taurus. Even more than usual, it’s crucial that you imbue “I am obliged to perform in complete darkness operations of every important thing you do with pure, strong emotions. If great delicacy on myself.” I hope you will consider embarking on similar heroics, Sagittarius. It’s not an especially favorable time they’re not immediately available, go in quest of them. to overhaul your environment or try to get people to change in accordance with your wishes. But it’s a perfect moment to spruce GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Some night soon, I predict you’ll dream of being an enlightened up your inner world—to tinker with and refine it so that everysovereign who presides over an ecologically sustainable paradise. thing in there works with more grace. And unlike Berryman, you You’re a visionary leader who is committed to peace and high won’t have to proceed in darkness. The light might not be bright, culture, so you’ve never gone to war. You share your wealth with but there’ll be enough of a glow to see what you’re doing. the people in your kingdom. You revere scientists and shamans alike, providing them with what they need to do their good work CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) for the enhancement of the realm. Have fun imagining further Here’s the dictionary’s definition of the word “indelible”: details of this dream, Gemini, or else make up your own. Now is “having the quality of being difficult to remove, wash away, blot an excellent time to visualize a fairy tale version of yourself at the out or efface; incapable of being canceled, lost or forgotten.” height of your powers, living your dreams and sharing your gifts. The word is often used in reference to unpleasant matters: stains on clothes, biases that distort the truth, superstitions held with unshakable conviction or painful memories of romanCANCER (June 21-July 22) It’s not always necessary to have an expansive view of where you tic break-ups. I am happy to let you know that you now have have been and where you are going, but it’s crucial right now. So I more power than usual to dissolve seemingly indelible stuff like suggest that you take an inventory of the big picture. For guidance, that. Here’s a trick that might help you: Find a new teacher or study this advice from philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche: “What teaching that uplifts you with indelible epiphanies. have you truly loved? What has uplifted your soul; what has dominated and delighted it at the same time? Assemble these revered AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) objects in a row before you and they may reveal a law by their According to poet Tony Hoagland, most of us rarely “manage to finish a thought or a feeling; we usually get lazy or distracted nature and their order: the fundamental law of your very self.” and quit halfway through.” Why? Hoagland theorizes that we “don’t have the time to complete the process, and we dislike LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Sportswear manufacturer Adidas is looking for ways to repurpose the difficulty and discomfort of the task.” There’s a cost for this trash that humans dump in the oceans. One of its creations is negligence: “We walk around full of half-finished experiences.” a type of shoe made from illegal deep-sea nets that have been That’s why Hoagland became a poet. He says that “poems confiscated from poachers. I invite you to get inspired by model the possibility of feeling all the way through an emotional Adidas’ work. From an astrological perspective, now is a good process” and “thinking all the way through a thought.” The time to expand and refine your personal approach to recycling. coming weeks will be a favorable time to get more in the habit Brainstorm about how you could convert waste and refuse into of finishing your own feelings and thoughts, Aquarius. It will useful, beautiful resources—not just literally, but also metaphori- also be more important than usual that you do so! (Hoagland’s cally. For example, is there a ruined or used-up dream that could be comments appeared in Gulf Coast: A Journal of Literature and Fine Arts.) transformed into raw material for a shiny new dream?

FANTASTIC MASSAGE

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) “There isn’t enough of anything as long as we live,” wrote Raymond Carver. “But at intervals a sweetness appears and, given a chance, prevails.” According to my analysis of the astrological omens, Virgo, you’ll soon be gliding through one of these intervals. Now and then you may even experience the strange sensation of being completely satisfied with the quality and amount of sweetness that arrives. To ensure optimal results, be as free from greed as you can possibly be.

MARCH 3, 2016 | 53


| COMMUNITY | | CITYWEEKLY.NET |

54 | MARCH 3, 2016

CONTACT US NOW TO PLACE YOUR RECRUITMENT ADS 801-413-0947 or JSMITH@CITYWEEKLY.NET For more Employment Opportunities, go online to www.utahjobcenter.com CACTUS & TROPICALS

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REAL ESTATE

URBAN L I V I N

WE SELL HOMES & LOANS TO ALL SAINTS, SINNERS, SISTERWIVES

G

WITH BABS DELAY Broker, Urban Utah Homes & Estates, urbanutah.com Chair, Downtown Merchants Association

S ON U W FOLLO GRAM A T S IN

KLY

WEE C L S @

Living In A House Of Cards? Try Something with a Better Foundation!

LAYTON Lovely 3 bdrm 1.5 bath townhome! Hook-ups, swamp cooler, dishwasher, exterior storage closet, covered parking, large pet ok! $895

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Massive 2 bdrm four-plex! Tiled kitchen, dishwasher, hook-ups, swamp cooler, off street parking! $795

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FOR A FREE LISTING OF ALL OF OUR RENTALS, PLEASE DROP BY OUR NEW OFFICE LOCATED AT 440 S. 700 E. STE #203

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Content is prepared expressly for Community and is not by City Weekly staff

Julie “Bella” Hall

Realtor 801-784-8618 bella@urbanutah.com Selling homes for 3 years

Babs De Lay

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MARCH 3, 2016 | 55

SUGARHOUSE Sweet 2 bdrm four-plex! Wall mounted A/C, pet friendly, on-site laundry, Close to all Sugarhouse shopping! $725

t Burning Man, we call them Blue Rooms, but they are known in different regions as Drop Zones, Tee Pees, Thunder Boxes, Donation Huts and the now-famous Portland Loos. If you read this column regularly, you know I’ve been dancing in my pants to get better public restroom facilities downtown for street folk and homeless people for years. The Pioneer Park permanent bathrooms were closed for safety reasons (drugs, sex, sleeping, camping) and portable units were installed closer to the street where cops could keep an eye on things. As merchants and residents of downtown, we know that allowing strangers into our restrooms can be risky. Portland, Ore., had similar problems. Several years ago, the city installed stainless steel toilets in its decrepit downtown areas to be used free as public facilities. The doors are open at the bottom and top so passersby can see your feet and maybe your head if you’re tall enough when you are not actually sitting down. At night, they have an eerie blue light—a beacon for those in need. The Portland Loos have been so successful that cities all over the country have installed similar public toilets. Salt Lake City, after years of planning, fundraising, fund-losing, wrong installations and delays, opened two Salt Lake City Loos on 500 West and 200 South this past fall to rave reviews. There’s always a line of people wanting to get in to do their business. Sadly, though, the see-through drop zones have not stopped people from going in, shooting up and passing out. On Feb. 13, police reported a 45-year-old male as overdosed and sitting/passed out in one of the units. Security at the nearby shelter didn’t have a key, nor did the Salt Lake City Fire Department, so of course the new loo had to be forced open. The paramedics slammed him with two doses of Narcan (an opiate antidote) and when he came to, he refused any further treatment and walked away. Heroin use is up all over the city, state and country. The mayor of Ithaca, N.Y., wants his city to host the nation’s first supervised heroin-injection facility. Basically, you’d go in, shoot up your drugs and a nurse would stand by in case of a medical emergency. Despite the efforts of many, Salt Lake City still doesn’t have a needle-exchange program. That could change if the Legislature passes House Bill 308 this session. The bill would authorize a needle-exchange program for Utah. If it doesn’t pass, maybe I’ll get my friends in the ’hood to sponsor our own exchange and attach needle dispensers and disposal containers to our “loos” as an upgrade for the Salt Lake City. n

| COMMUNITY |

SALT LAKE CITY Charming 1 bdrm. Hook-ups, semi formal dining, off street parking, cat friendly, water/sewer/garbage included! $685

Drop Zones A

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

SUGARHOUSE Stunning 2 bdrm 2 bath condo! New luxury flooring, chef’s kitchen, gas fireplace, private balcony, attached garage and more! $1395

AND B -BALL FAN S


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| CITY WEEKLY • BACKSTOP |

56 | MARCH 3, 2016

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City Weekly March 3, 2016  

Best of Utah Music 2016

City Weekly March 3, 2016  

Best of Utah Music 2016