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In Salt Lake City's budget no-tell motels, hustling to survive is the name of the game. By Stephen Dark


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In Salt Lake City’s budget notell motels, hustling to survive is the name of the game. Cover photo illustration by Mason Rodrickc

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Cait’s her name and design is her game. This Salt Lake City-native is a board game buff, a rock climber and a lover of everything cats— especially “cat apps” (her most recent addiction is a game called Neko Atsumi). She’s been killing it at City Weekly for almost four years, and is now art director for our sister paper, Planet Jackson Hole.

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LETTERS A Rude Nude

Was it that necessary to post a picture of a nude drawing depicting two gay men having sex in the Feb. 4 issue of City Weekly [“He’s Got a Feeling”]? Your paper disgusts me.

JORDAN TAGGART Salt Lake City

Editor’s note: The image that Taggart refers to is a detail of “The Imprudent Boy,” a painting in the background of artist Andrew Moncrief’s photograph. The piece is part of the exhibit A Strange Feeling, on display at the Utah Museum of Contemporary Art. The exhibit actually depicts both the intimacy and aggression of wrestling.

Pass the Ban on Chambers

For the third time in three years, the Legislature is considering a bill to ban gas chambers to euthanize pets and wild animals. In previous years, Rep. Angela Romero, DSalt Lake City, and Sen. Todd Weiler, R-Woods Cross, both attempted to pass bills to ban carbon-monoxide chambers that a handful of cities in Utah use to kill animals. Although chambers are recognized as a method to euthanize animals, most animal-control services now use injections with sodium pentobarbital as the preferred and recommended method. The biggest problem with the gas chambers is that they

WRITE US: Salt Lake City Weekly, 248 S. Main, Salt Lake City, UT 84101. Email: comments@cityweekly.net. Fax: 801-575-6106. We reserve the right to edit for length and clarity. Preference will be given to letters that are 300 words or less and sent uniquely to City Weekly. Full name, address and phone number must be included, even on emailed submissions, for verification purposes. don’t always work. The standard operating method is to place the animal in the chamber, turn on the gas and usually in less than 30 seconds, the animal drops unconscious to the chamber floor. After about 30 minutes, the chamber is cleared of gas and the supposedly dead animal is removed. It is then placed in a freezer to kill it again. There have been cases where, after all that, the animal is still alive. Much of the concern about using gas chambers to kill animals is that for the final 30 seconds of their lives, animals could be panicking. In some cases, they howl, which is extremely disturbing to the staff operating the chamber. They shouldn’t have to die a cold and horrific death. Injection is the preferred method because they can be more comfortable going to sleep in the arms of someone comforting. The argument that gas chambers are needed for wild animals like raccoons is no longer valid. Former Salt Lake County Animal Services Director Mike Reberg created a program that solves the problem of wild raccoons in residential areas. For about $88,000 a year, Salt Lake County and any interested cities may use the services of federally managed raccoon and wild-animal specialists to catch and remove them from residential areas. Four cities including Salt Lake City have signed on to use this service. It is more cost effective than catching raccoons and maintaining/using a gas chamber. Salt Lake City is paying $35,000 a year and the more cities that sign on, the lower the individual cost. A reasonable compromise is found in this year’s House Bill 0187S01, sponsored by Rep. Johnny Anderson, R-Taylorsville.

Having recently passed a House committee and on its way to the House floor, this bill would ban the use of a gas chamber for wild animals after July 1, 2018, and bans the use of a chamber for domestic animals after July 1, 2017. In the best of all worlds, animal-control services wouldn’t have to kill animals. But in the real world, there are too many abandoned animals. Many organizations have worked hard to find adoptive families for cats and dogs. In Salt Lake County, the County Animal Services shelter has been able to maintain a no-kill status with the help of many volunteers and separate organizations like the Humane Society and Best Friends Animal Society. If you are able, please consider adopting a pet from your local animal services organization. They also need volunteers to help ensure that the animals are given love and attention while in the shelter. Kittens are especially prone to wasting away if they are not given attention.

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PRIVATE EY

Illegal Legal Ads

I recently gave testimony to a Utah House of Representatives committee hearing comments regarding changes to laws that include or exclude certain newspapers from the lucrative category of publishing legal notices. This newspaper is one of many in Utah—and among several that are members of the Utah Press Association—that has thus far been excluded from accepting legal notices. Salt Lake City alone spends at least $30,000 annually in legal notices. We don’t see a nickel of it. Multiply that by every municipality in the valley. Add in attorneys, contractors, trust and title agents and all the rest, and it makes for a tidy little monopoly for a select few recipients. But last week was different. For the first time in recent memory, a house committee was actually going to listen to various issues regarding legal notices. Rep. Kraig Powell, R-Heber City, chaired the hearing that began with 11 House members in attendance and at least one missing. Halfway through, one fellow left. I can’t say I blame him. The bill being examined is House Bill 178, sponsored by Rep. Scott Chew. A Uinta Basin Republican, Chew is carrying the banner for a local classified newspaper, The Basin Nickel, which is delivered to most of the homes in Vernal, Utah. Thus, it carries classified ads of every stripe—except legal notices, which—by very definition—are indeed classified ads, but which are reserved for Vernal’s generalinformation newspaper, The Vernal Express. Like us, The Basin Nickel does not qualify to accept legal ads, having been judged on some dubious merit as being unworthy. The owners of The Basin Nickel testified that their newspaper is larger than The Vernal Express, that it is part of the fabric of life in Vernal and that they just want to see people get information about legal matters. Representatives from The Vernal Express and the Utah Press Association both testified that such papers aren’t real newspapers, and

at least two “independent” persons told the committee that similar broadsides are either considered junk mail by the postal service or are quickly tossed in the trash heap by homeowners. Well, one man’s trash is another man’s treasure, and blood runs thicker than water, ever always for me. So, when The Basin Nickel owners gave their last name as Caldwell, I knew I was listening to testimony from a dear lost cousin, and sure enough, me and the Caldwells are descended from Utah pioneer, settler, Mormon Battalion member and polygamist Matthew Caldwell. I’m basically related to everyone from Roosevelt to the Colorado border. As it turns out, these Caldwells run through the matronage of Barzilla Caldwell, wife No. 1. I’m from No. 5, Nancy. No matter, that means I have to root for the Nickel. The only thing they don’t have, it seems to me, are two lobbyists named Doug Foxley and Frank Pignanelli. I began my own testimony by expressing thanks for being allowed to wear my Utah red colors. A few chuckles. I then apologized to anyone on the committee that City Weekly may have broadsided over time, to which Chairman Powell noted he had. (For the record, I would like to say to Mr. Powell that I agree that drones should not fly over forestfire zones and that even as a former smoker, I sympathize with him trying to make buying cigarette products illegal under the age of 21. I just don’t see it happening.) I also thanked anyone City Weekly had said good things about for their great wisdom. I then “droned” on until Powell cut me off at the 2-minute mark, but not before noting the unfairness of the present statute, that in this Internet age, the statute is an archaic interpretation of what a newspaper is, that no one could deny that City Weekly is a newspaper of general interest, that we are members of

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Readers can comment at cityweekly.net

@johnsaltas

the Utah Press Association, and that if the public interest and notifying them efficiently were really the issue, then the House and Senate would amend the wording to be more inclusive. I said it was odd that an institution that is broadly known to keep government out of the private business sector would actually condone and support a monopoly for a select business class. And finally, on that very day I testified, City Weekly had just printed more papers than the Deseret News did, so what gives? I guess nothing, because I was the only speaker of eight who was asked no questions. The committee voted to continue the bill and to clarify who can solicit legal notices. That seemed like a small victory so I walked outside into the hall and was soon met by one of the committee members, a very nice and smart man who identified himself as a reader and fan of City Weekly. I hesitate to identify him, as guiltby-association with me should not be his burden to bear—it’s already rough enough up there. I thanked him, then just threw up all over MediaOne, the company that operates The Salt Lake Tribune and the Deseret News and that has historically stymied legal-ad modifications. “Eff MediaOne and the tactics they used to keep their legal-notices monopoly secure! MediaOne sucks,” and so on. Feeling really good about myself, I asked a nicelooking man standing next to me—and who had heard my full-monty diatribe—which district he represented. He recognized me for the dummy I am, and said, “I don’t represent a district.” Ooops. Yep, foot firmly in mouth, it dawned on me who it was, my newest very bestest friend, Trent Eyre, vice presidente of advertising for MediaOne. I told him he could use my words against me anytime he pleased. He just smiled. Nice guy, that Trent. Too bad he works for Beelzebub. CW Send comments to john@cityweekly.net

WHAT GIVES? I GUESS NOTHING, BECAUSE I WAS THE ONLY SPEAKER OF EIGHT WHO WAS ASKED NO QUESTIONS.

If you were in business, and the government told you where you had to spend your advertising dollars, what country would you be living in? Scott Renshaw: Leaving aside the other stuff, if I were actually “in business,” I would be in a country where investors have no sense of who they should not be investing in as an entrepreneur, and therefore a country on the verge of economic collapse.

Randy Harward: That’s easy. The Isle of Man. No, wait, is it The People’s Republic of Funkytown?

Paula Saltas: Is this a trick question? Am I getting fired?

Pete Saltas: Germany, 1939. Jackie Briggs: What is North Korea? Jeremiah Smith: Well here in the USA, of course! There are all sorts of rules about that sort of thing. Mason Rodrickc: Narnia. Derek Carlisle: If you’re the Marlboro Man, it’s America. If you’re Victoria Secret, it’s good ol’ Saudi Arabia. So, if you’re the Marlboro Man, move to China; you’re very popular there. If you’re Victoria Secret, stay outta good ol’ Saudi Arabia.

Niccole Enright: Is this a trick question? Jerre Wroble: A country where government owns/profits from the media. Else why would they care?


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HITS&MISSES BY KATHARINE BIELE

FIVE SPOT

RANDOM QUESTIONS, SURPRISING ANSWERS

@kathybiele

Let’s talk about scapegoats. This week they would be Geri Miller-Fox and Wendy Horlacher, both of whom “resigned” from the division of Adult Probation and Parole. “Errors have occurred,” Gov. Gary Herbert says, referring to the shooting death of Unified Police Officer Doug Barney by parolee Cory Lee Henderson. This, of course, set off a chain reaction of blame, which probably should have ended up at the feet of the writers of the Utah Sentencing Guidelines—a 67-page document, effective Oct. 1, 2015, that includes colorful pyramid charts and mind-blowing matrixes. The guidelines state that Forms 1-5a are guidelines only, and “a distinction exists between the advisory nature of Forms 1-5a and the probation and parole violation/ revocation guidelines contained in Forms 6-10.” Good luck with that. A KSL Channel 5 report questioned whether the guidelines or the Justice Reinvestment Initiative were to blame. The problem may be simply that rehabilitation requires more than just releasing a prisoner.

Vaccinate, or Stay Home

Hats off to Rep. Carol Spackman Moss, D-Holladay, who’s trying to stem the tide of ignorance. A Deseret News report noted that Utah’s “on the brink of losing herd immunity” because of the growing number of parents choosing not to vaccinate their kids. Yes, there was a time when people worried that vaccinations caused autism, but science has since proved that wrong. Read Scientific American, for example. Moss thinks parents are relying on the Internet for information, or may just not want to jump through immunization hoops. She is sponsoring House Bill 221 to require those who opt out to watch an information video and have a plan to quarantine their sick child for up to six weeks if there’s an outbreak. In a crowded society, it’s not just about you.

Utah Tilts at Cybercrime

Whoopee! Utah is back in the national eye. The Volokh Conspiracy, a Washington Post blog written mostly by law professors, takes on Rep. David Lifferth, R-Eagle Mountain, who’s sponsoring House Bill 225, “Cybercrime Amendments.” Part of that bill takes the First Amendment and knocks it silly. The big deal is this provision “modifies the offense of electronic communication harassment to include distribution of personal identifying information.” The question is, what about identifying a legislator or even a real-estate agent, if you believe they are acting unethically? The blog suggests that limiting the law to Social Security numbers or a few other items might be constitutionally OK. But it’s way broader, like you wouldn’t want to intend to “annoy, offend or abuse” anyone.

COURTESY OF AUDIO INN RECORDING

‘Errors Have Occurred’

Here at City Weekly, we’re knee-deep in fine-tuning the details of our upcoming Best of Utah Music issue. It seems fitting then that we’d touch base with musician Eric Lo (pictured above, lowerright), co-founder of Audio Inn Recording (AudioInnRecording.com)—the latest studio to pop up in Salt Lake City’s ever-expanding musicscape. Lo describes the space as a “place where you instantly feel comfortable, whether you are a new musician or a seasoned vet.” [Editor’s note: This interview originally appeared Feb. 14 on Gavin’s Underground at CityWeekly.net]

What happened to South of Ramona? What other music have you been working on lately?

South of Ramona was one of my first projects. I was really driven to making it successful, but unfortunately, that drive drove it apart. Shortly after South of Ramona broke up, I joined The Red on Black. I played with those guys for a couple of years until ultimately deciding I no longer wanted to be in a band; I wanted to focus more on growing my businesses as well as entering into production work.

What got you interested in producing music?

Being in a band is equivalent to being in multiple relationships at the same time and, with an art form like music, it’s hard having so many people involved. I liked the idea of production because you are less focused on defining what the band’s sound is and more focused on creating music. Production has also forced me to learn how to write drum and bass parts, instead of only focusing on guitar and piano melodies. Additionally, the idea of touring all the time has become less appealing to me as I get older.

How did you learn to make an album?

I’m still learning. There’s a lot to learn in the world of music—from theory, to gear, to audio engineering. I like to constantly challenge myself to tackle things that I’m not familiar with. As time passes, I’m slowly becoming more confident in applying it.

Your recording studio is on Major Street, close to downtown. How did that come about?

It was a right time, right place kind of deal. Our space used to belong to Michael Sasich, owner of Man vs. Music. He finished building his new space, and then when our current space became available, we jumped at the opportunity immediately.

What was the reaction from fellow musicians when you opened up?

From the beginning, we’ve worked with phenomenal musicians who love and enjoy what we do every day at the Audio Inn. As we continue to spread our message and invite more musicians to create with us, I know it’s only a matter of time before we start making dramatic impacts on the music industry. We’ve only been open one year and have already established ourselves as one of the best studios in Salt Lake.

—GAVIN SHEEHAN comments@cityweekly.net


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BY CECIL ADAMS SLUG SIGNORINO

STRAIGHT DOPE Highway Robbery If plug-in cars become a reality, how will we pay for highways without a federal gas tax? —Steve Phelan

You’re right that relying on a federal gas tax to pay for highway upkeep is an unsustainable scenario, Steve, but you’re not exactly describing some distant carbon-free future. It ain’t working now, either. Consider: The nation’s roadways are supported by a tax on gas that goes into the Highway Trust Fund, established in 1956 to help build the Interstate system. This arrangement derives from the quaint notion that the feds should be responsible for a few basic infrastructure-related commitments—say, drivable roads. But that proposition’s been in question at least since 1993, which was the last time Congress could agree to raise the gas tax (currently 18.4 cents per gallon for regular, 24.4 cents for diesel). According to one estimate, adjusted for inflation, the value of the tax fell 28 percent from 1997 to 2011. To put it mildly, we’re not keeping pace. A recent study by the American Society of Civil Engineers found that the United States will need to invest $2.7 trillion by 2020 to maintain roads, bridges and transit systems. The federal levy (there are state and local taxes, too) currently pulls in about $30 billion a year, which, you’ll notice, isn’t quite going to make it. We can expect things to get worse. Not only has the tax not gone up; gas sales have been more or less stagnant since 2002. And the Department of Energy expects revenues to decline as much as 21 percent (from 2013 levels) by 2040. Most of that has to do with stricter fueleconomy standards, and not a whole lot with any widespread adoption of electric cars. Indeed, in 2014, Americans bought a mere 123,000 new electric vehicles, out of a total of 16.5 million new vehicles sold nationwide. According to government projections, just 7 percent of the cars on the road in 2040 will be hybrid or electric-powered. So, to sum up: 1. Some means are needed for dramatically increasing the revenue going to U.S. roads, bridges, etc. 2. Electric vehicles, while depriving the trust fund of a little bit of cash, won’t make the situation appreciably worse than it already is. Still, if we figure out a way to wean ourselves from the gas tax now, we’ll be better equipped for some eventual future that involves more widespread use of electric cars and other non-gas-burning vehicles. (High-speed long-distance rail? Hey, a guy can dream.) Ideas floated in this regard include a federal tax on the purchase of new vehicles, an annual tax on vehicle registrations and a mileage-based tax. Of these, the mileage-based user fee, or MBUF, seems to have the greatest traction.

California is currently looking for 5,000 volunteer drivers for a pilot program to determine the feasibility of such a regime; Oregon has signed up more than 1,000 since last July. It makes sense on its face, but some logistical issues present themselves: How, for instance, to track the mileage? One way would be an annual odometer inspection, but doing away with the relatively painless per-gallon tax add-on and replacing it with a yearly lump sum is going to be a tough sell for consumers. What about a device in the car that records mileage continuously— say, via GPS? This raises obvious and understandable concerns about privacy; it’s not like the government doesn’t have access to enough of your personal data already. A study undertaken by the Colorado Department of Transportation investigating the idea of an MBUF system neatly encapsulates the challenges to its implementation: The authors concluded that Colorado would be best off as a “near follower,” rather than a “national leader,” in adopting MBUF. In other words, let somebody else figure out the details, and then we’ll think about it. That’s at the state level, of course. Might such a system be adopted nationally, such as meets the funding needs of the country’s crumbling transportation infrastructure? Don’t be ridiculous. This time last year President Obama had just floated a plan to bolster the transportation fund with a 14 percent repatriation tax on offshore cash held by U.S. corporations—a perfectly fine proposal, and one with zero chance of becoming reality in the current political climate. It’s possible we’re not thinking nearly far enough outside the box here. A recent Wall Street Journal article suggested that, with the dual advent of self-driving cars and ridesharing concepts such as Uber, individual vehicle ownership might swiftly be on its way out—and good riddance: The piece noted that in the United States, the usage rate for cars is 5 percent, meaning that the other 95 percent of the time they just sit in the driveway. In the paradigm-shifting scenario envisioned, travelers wouldn’t own their driverless cars; they’d pay by the mile. This still doesn’t solve how to pay for roads, of course. Some things even Silicon Valley can’t fix. CW

Send questions to Cecil via straightdope. com or write him c/o Chicago Reader, 350 N. Orleans, Chicago 60654.


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City has 4.5 acres per 1,000 residents. The national average, the packet says, is 16.2 acres per 1,000 residents. But space is getting harder to come by. Mike Florence, the city’s director of Community Development, says that Granite High School is the largest unoccupied parcel in the city. “Everything we do here in South Salt Lake is redevelopment,” Florence says. “It’s buying property, having to relocate a business and tear down a building.” There remains a chance that the city council on Tuesday will refuse to grant the rezone, forcing the school district, developers and residents to take a long look at the property’s future. “They absolutely do have that power,” Wood says of the council’s latitude on refusing to green-light the rezone. “I feel that as a community, that we hold true to holding that public process and giving people an opportunity to come and be heard about the project.” The sliver of solace residents took in the decade since students stopped appearing at Granite High was the district’s willingness to leave the gates open to the track and the fields. But that stopped about year ago, Horsley says, when bicyclists and skateboarders were caught filming their high-flying exploits on school grounds. The district was also sued by a person whose child fell from the bleachers. Horsley says the suit was settled for tens of thousands of dollars. Inside the buildings, he says, water pipes have frozen and burst, causing flooding; asbestos has become exposed, creating a safety hazard, and some elaborate efforts have been undertaken to strip the walls of copper wiring. As the vacant school became a drain on policing resources, Horsley says efforts were made to block off the sports fields and any window that could be reached by a human was boarded up. “Unfortunately, the community’s not allowed to use it anymore,” Horsley says. A rare exception is the driver’s education course. On a frozen morning in February, as the track lay idle, the tennis courts drowning in water and the school looking like a bombed out relic of war, a smiling young girl steered a brand new Toyota Corolla around the course, a parent coaching from the passenger seat. CW

be understood that pretty much any developer is going to have, with respect to that property, some sort of commercial aspect,” Horsley says. “That is obviously outside the bounds of our control.” From a height of around 2,300 students enrolled in the late 1980s, Horsley says that by 2009, only 400 students attended Granite. He says the flight of students away from the school, which sits near 3300 South and 500 East, tracks closely with the school district’s rapid growth in the suburbs. “When you started to see significant growth in the overall school district is when you started to see Granite High start to decline,” Horsley says. While the school district, the developers and anyone keen on sales-tax revenues generated by a Wal-Mart’s brisk sales of everything from mayonnaise to Wrangler jeans are anxious to see the property developed, Mark Kindred, an at-large member of the city council, says the city can and should weigh heavily concerns from nearby residents about increased traffic and other woes that could accompany a mega-retailer. “The neighborhood has made it plainly clear that they don’t want a Wal-Mart, and I appreciate that; I understand that,” Kindred says. “I don’t think they want us, the council, to shove it through their throats.” At the same time, Kindred says residents had a chance to buy the property and didn’t. And he knows two things for sure: The property is not going to ever be a school again, nor is it going to be a 27acre park. These realities, he says, require that the city alter the way the property is zoned but retain tight control over how development unfolds there. By its own estimates, South Salt Lake City lags in its inventory of parks, open space, bike trails and recreation centers. According to a city study conducted through its master-plan process in 2015, as the city grows over the next decade, it will need 40.2 additional acres of parks space. An attempt in 2015 to secure a $13 million bond to acquire parks and open space, some of which might have been used to secure pieces of Granite High School, failed by 65 votes. A voter information packet pitching the bond to residents noted that South Salt Lake has 1.6 acres of parks and recreation facilities for every 1,000 residents, while neighboring Salt Lake

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by an effort to build more than 100 singlefamily homes, and was followed in short order by the current pitch for a Wal-Mart. Opposition to the plans, Wood says, has been stoked by the whisker-thin margin with which the bond failed. And, according to voter statistics, only about one-third of the city’s 6,680 registered voters in 2011 cast a ballot. “I think we didn’t see the disappointment that people felt until the first plan came to the city council about a year ago,” Wood says. “Many people stand up and say, ‘I didn’t vote. I wish I would have voted. If I would have known that this was going to be the development there, I would have voted.’” Had voters approved the $25 million bond in 2011, the site would have been transformed into a civic center, where offices for nonprofit organizations, afterschool programs and a preschool would have been housed. A recreation center would have emerged surrounding the pool and gymnasium facilities and the outdoor spaces would have been preserved. When the city couldn’t buy the property, Granite School District put it on the market. Now, the $10.6 million that Garbett and Wasatch have agreed to pay for it will be used to finance the district’s fleet of other schools that serve 68,000 students. But that $10.6 million, says Ben Horsley, communications director for Granite School District, will only flow into the district’s coffers if the South Salt Lake City Council approves the zoning change—the first hurdle in the project’s approval process. Horsley is well aware that residents have decried having a Wal-Mart plopped down in their backyards (the school grounds are surrounded on all four sides by apartments and single-family homes). But, he says that Garbett and Wasatch were one of many possible suitors for the property, and all options included a mix of commercial and residential. As a result, if the superstore plan isn’t approved, he doubts if many of the other projects could win approval, either—a possibility that would continue to put the brakes on the district’s desire to rid itself of the property. “With respect to what’s currently going on with the controversy, or concern with the Wal-Mart, I think it needs to

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flock of Canada geese occupy the south end zone, where a century of football teams sprinted for touchdowns. A half-dozen tennis courts are partially flooded, though the nets remain firm, ready to bat down aggressive serves. A dull patch of asphalt bears the fading blue, white and yellow lines that once guided 15-year-olds to coveted driver’s licenses. The buildings, some more than a century old, sit vacant, their windows and doors sealed shut with plywood. “No Trespassing” signs are plastered on the chained gates leading to the four-lane track and on the outskirts of the tennis courts. And at the entrances of Granite High School, home of the Farmers, are unsettling signs that read “Asbestos Hazard.” Closed in 2009 because of declining enrollment, the 27-acre patch of land— the biggest vacant parcel in the city of South Salt Lake—could soon be home to a mix of single family homes and a 50,000-square-foot Wal-Mart. Garbett Homes and Wasatch Commercial Management have petitioned the city to rezone the property from its historical designation to mixeduse and commercial. In spite of a wave of criticism from residents, the city’s planning commission approved the zoning switch in January—a decision that has set the stage for a battle at the Feb. 24 city council meeting. At stake, opponents of the development say, is valuable open space and recreational opportunities for the city of 23,000 people that, since Granite High School was constructed in 1907, has transformed from agriculture to residential uses and is now decidedly more commercial and industrial. Salt Lake City Mayor Cherie Wood says that when the Granite School District voted to shutter the school in 2009, the community mourned its loss. Realizing the school’s value as a community asset, the city in 2011 attempted to secure a bond to purchase the school. By a mere five votes, 1,006 to 1,001, the initiative failed, spurring the school district to begin courting developers. Wood, who played basketball at Granite High School, says that reality began to sink in when a developer emerged in early 2015 with a proposal to erect high-density housing on the lot. This plan was followed


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12 | FEBRUARY 18, 2016

THE

NUEVE

THE LIST OF NINE

BY MASON RODRICKC & MICHELLE L ARSON

@ 42bearcat

S NEofW the

Intelligent Design Wired.com’s most recent “Absurd Creature” feature shows a toad devouring a larva of a muchsmaller beetle, but the “absurdity” is that the larva is in charge and that the toad will soon be beetle food. The larva’s Darwinian advantage is that, inside the toad, it bites the hapless “predator” with its hooked jaws and then secretes enzymes to begin decomposing the toad’s tissue (making it edible)—and provoking it to vomit the still-alive larva.

WEIRD

Great Achievements in Laziness An 80-year-old man and a 37-year-old woman were ticketed in separate incidents in Canada the week of Jan. 18 when police spotted them driving cars completely caked in snow except for a small portion of the windshield. The man, from Brussels, Ontario, was driving a car resembling a “pile of snow on the road.” The Halifax, Nova Scotia, woman’s car was, a police statement said, “a snowbank with four wheels.”

Nine implications coming from the confirmation of general theory of relativity.

9. Trump’s presidency, also

once thought be an improbable theory, is confirmed as viable.

8. “I really did text you back,

it’s just all those black holes, man.”

7. All of the girls who friendzoned those physics majors will feel some serious regret.

6.

We might finally learn what the fox says.

5. With the new detection

abilities, Stephen Hawking will be revealed to have been an advanced drone for all these years.

4.

Guy Fieri’s theory of general edibility will be put to the limits as we are able to study those stars that he swears are made of string cheese with a more precise methodology.

3. The term “It’s all relative,”

will take on new meaning, but no one is completely sure what that meaning is.

2.

The writers from The Big Bang Theory will finally have new material.

1. #BlackHolesMatter will be-

come a trending topic on Twitter.

Great Art! Fed up with the “pretense” of the art world, performer (and radio personality) Lisa Levy of Brooklyn, N.Y., sat on a toilet, naked and motionless, at the Christopher Stout Gallery in January to protest artists’ “BS” by presenting herself in the “humblest” way she could imagine. Visitors were invited to sit on a facing toilet (clothed or not) and interact with her in any way except for touching. Levy told the Bushwick Daily website that too much ego “distorts your reality ... like a drug.” Wait, What? In January, the U.S. Department of Justice’s inspector general recommended closing down a program of the department’s Drug Enforcement Administration that paid employees of other federal agencies (Amtrak and the beloved Transportation Security Administration) for tips on suspicious passengers. (The program apparently ignored that federal employees have such a duty even without a bounty.) DEA was apparently interested in passengers traveling with large amounts of cash—which DEA could potentially seize if it suspected the money came from illegal activity (and also, of course, then keep the money under federal forfeiture law). According to the inspector general, the tipping TSA agent was to be rewarded with a cut of any forfeited money. n Chiropractor William DeAngelo of Stratford, Conn., was charged with assault in January after an employee complained that she was ordered to lie down on a table and let DeAngelo apply electrical shocks to her back—as punishment for being the office gossiper, spreading rumors about colleagues. DeAngelo said he was reacting to complaints from patients and staff, but seemed to suggest in a statement to police that he was only “re-educating” the woman on how to use the electrical stimulator in the office’s practice (though she felt the need to report to a hospital afterward).

The Continuing Crisis Britain’s North Yorkshire Police successfully applied to a judge in January for a “sexual risk order” against a man whose name was not disclosed publicly and whose alleged behavior was not revealed. Whoever he is and whatever he did, he is forbidden to enter into any sexual situation with anyone without providing at least 24 hours’ notice to the police—nor is he allowed to look at or possess any sexually oriented materials. According to the York Press, the order is temporary until May 19, at which time the magistrates may extend it. Bright Ideas Christopher Lemek Jr. was arrested in Palmer, Mass., in January and charged in a New Year’s Eve hit-and-run accident that took a pedestrian’s life. Lemek emerged as a suspect a few days after the collision when police, visiting his home, noticed freshly disturbed earth in his backyard. Eventually Lemek confessed to literally burying the evidence—using a construction vehicle to crush his truck and an excavator to dig up his backyard and drop the truck into it. n The 20-year New York marriage of Gabriel Villa, now 90, and Cristina Carta Villa, now 59, apparently had its happy moments, but as Cristina found out when things went bad recently, Gabriel had attempted to protect himself shortly after the wedding—by obtaining a Dominican Republic divorce and keeping it secret. Cristina found

BY CHUCK SHEPHERD out only when she realized in a property accounting that her name was not on the deed to their Manhattan apartment.

Suspicions Confirmed Several Connecticut state troopers involved in a DUI checkpoint in September were apparently caught on video deliberating whether to make up charges against a (perhaps obnoxious) checkpoint monitor. Veteran protester Michael Picard, 27, posted the videos on his YouTube page in January, showing troopers (illegally) confiscating Picard’s camera and suggesting among themselves various charges they could write up (at least some not warranted by evidence) to, as one trooper was heard imploring, “cover our asses.” (The troopers returned the camera after deliberating, but seemed unaware that it had been running during the entire incident.) State police internal affairs officers are investigating. Oops! A middle-aged woman reported to a firehouse in Padua, Italy, in January to ask for help opening a lock for which she had misplaced the key. It turned out that the lock was to the iron chastity belt she was wearing—of her own free will, she said (because she had recently begun a romantic relationship that she wanted not to become too quickly sexual). n Firefighers in Osnabruck, Germany, told Berlin’s The Local that in two separate incidents in December, men had come to their stations asking for help removing iron rings they had placed on their penises to help retain erections. (The Local, as a public service, quoted a prominent European sexual-aid manufacturer’s recommendation to instead use silicone rings, which usually do not require professional removal.)

Recurring Themes Few matters in life are weirder than the Scottish love of haggis (sheep’s liver, heart, tongue and fat, blended with oats and seasonings, boiled inside a sheep’s stomach to achieve its enticing gray color!), and in January, in honor of the Scottish poet-icon Robert Burns, prominent Peruvian chef Mitsuharu Tsumura joined Scotland’s Paul Wedgwood to create haggis from, instead of sheep, guinea pig. Wedgwood said he was “proud” to raise haggis “to new gastronomic levels.” Least Competent Criminals Briton Jacqueline Patrick, 55, was sentenced to 15 years in prison in December for the 2013 murder of her husband, accomplished by spiking his wine with anti-freeze. To cover her crime, she handed over a note the husband had supposedly written, requesting that if tragedy struck him, he wished not to be resuscitated, preferring to die with “dignerty” (sic). Suspicious, police asked Patrick to spell “dignity,” which, of course, came out “dignerty.” n Kristina Green, 19, and Gary Withers, 38, both already on probation, were arrested in Encinitas, Calif., in December after an Amazon.com driver reported them following his delivery truck and scooping up packages as soon as he dropped them off. Inside the pair’s car, officers found numerous parcels and mail addressed to others plus a “to-do” list that read, “steal mail and shoplift.”

A News of the Weird Classic (December 2011) In October 2011, the super-enthusiastic winners of a Kingston, Ontario, radio station contest claimed their prize: the chance to don gloves and dig for free Buffalo Bills’ football tickets (value $320), buried in buffalo manure in a wading pool. The show’s host, Sarah Crosbie, reported the digging live (but, overcome by the smell, vomited on the air). More curious was a runner-up contestant, who continued to muck around for the second prize even though it was only tickets to a local zoo. Thanks This Week to Patty Lively, Phyllis Sensenig, Ann Lloyd and Jeff Brown, and to the News of the Weird Board of Editorial Advisors.

CITIZEN REVOLT In a week, you can

CHANGE THE WORLD

SMALL-FARMS CONFERENCE

No, it’s not spring yet, but it’s coming soon to a garden near you. If you’re a beginner or just thinking about starting a little for-profit farm business, the fourth annual Urban and Small Farms Conference has a lot to offer you. Specialty crop producers engaged in direct marketing are especially invited to check out workshops, including the Good Agricultural Practices (GAP) workshop on Thursday. Irrigation, cover crops, USD programs, food hubs and more will be covered. A highlight will be meeting and hearing Dr. Kurt D. Nolte of the University of Arizona’s School of Plant Sciences and Stewart Jacobson of the Arizona Department of Agriculture, who both have experience working with farmers for GAP certification. Information and sample forms available. Viridian Center, 8030 S. 1825 West, West Jordan, 435-797-2323 , Feb. 17, 8 a.m.-5 p.m.; Feb. 18, 8 a.m.-4 p.m., $35 per day (includes lunch and breaks), DiverseAg.org

BLACK HISTORY CELEBRATION

As President Barack Obama wraps up his term of office, February is good time to recognize the achievements of African Americans. Black History Month (also called National African American History Month) began in 1915 after the 13th Amendment abolished slavery. Weber State University’s Black Scholars United Black History Month 2016 is honoring the “sites, souls and sounds of Utah’s black experience.” This series of events is wrapping up with jazz and the spoken word. You’ll be treated to live music and poetry from WSU students and community members. Weber State University, Shepherd Union Building, Ballroom A (313A), 3848 Harrison Blvd., Ogden, 801-626-6413, Feb. 24, 6 p.m., free and open to the public, Weber.edu

BALLOON FESTIVAL

Here’s a great excuse for a road trip— Kanab’s Balloons & Tunes Roundup. You can watch daily launches of colorful hot-air balloons in the red rock Vermilion Cliffs near the scenic Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument. Weather permitting, the balloons will launch each morning, and bands will compete in a Battle of the Bands on Friday and Saturday. The Street Fair is on Main Street, where you can buy food and one-of-a-kind crafts from area vendors. There will be a “S’mores School” by Chef Shon Foster, the “Balloon Glow” and a wishing lantern launch on Center Street in Kanab on Saturday at 7 p.m. Kanab Main Street, 76 N. Main, Kanab, 435-644-3696, Feb. 1921, 7 a.m. daily balloon launch, free, BalloonsAndTunesRoundup.com

—KATHARINE BIELE Send events to editor@cityweekly.net


NEWS POLITICS

Toying With Taxes

“We have the opportunity right now to be competitive.” —Rep. John Knotwell, R-Herriman

Lawmakers consider pulling $138 million out of education. BY ERIC ETHINGTON eethington@cityweekly.net @EricEthington

G

“There are many states doing incredibly well economically that don’t continually cut corporate taxes the way that we do.” —House Minority Leader Brian King in general the House Republicans are conscious of those concerns and have discussed them in their private caucus meetings. “We do things all the time to the income tax, which goes 100 percent into education, without really thinking of the impact on education,” Thurston says. “Right now there are 43 tax credits that people can get, and those tax credits reduce your income tax. All in all, it adds up to something like $600 million in taxes that could be going into education, but we choose not to because we want to do something else instead.” Thurston says that discussions around taxes and tax cuts are always difficult to balance, because “it pitches two sides of government against each other” as lawmakers try to weigh whether to try to provide incentives for business and the needs of schools to educate Utah’s future workers. “It’s the highest degree of difficulty in political decision-making,” Thurston says. “Often, we pass these incentives, but then we forget about them, so they stay on the books, pulling away from education even though they might not be working.”

Knotwell says he doesn’t expect his bill to actually pass but that he is trying to start a conversation. “We probably can’t afford to pull $138 million [out of education] this year,” Knotwell says, “but the legislative process is a long one. If I can move the needle, then maybe we could scale it back by having [the tax break] apply to fewer industries, or maybe implement it over time so the impact isn’t as great all at once.” “That’s a dangerous game to play with education,” King says. “What happens, if all of a sudden, the ideological hardliners decide that they’re all going to support the bill and it becomes law? We just have to hope that one of the committee chairs or leadership recognize how damaging a policy like this would be and hold the bill back from getting a final vote.” But Knotwell says “This is certainly where I think we need to end up, whether it’s this year, or in 10 or 20 years.” CW Editor’s Note: In addition to covering state politics for City Weekly, Eric Ethington is communications director for Political Research Associates.

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tendency to draw jobs [away from Utah]. We have the opportunity right now to be competitive,” Knotwell says. “We hear this idea a lot, that we have to match what any other state is offering or businesses won’t come here. But it’s dangerous to continue making tax policy based on speculation,” House Minority Leader Brian King, D-Salt Lake City, says. “There are many states doing incredibly well economically that don’t continually cut corporate taxes the way that we do. Just look at states like Washington and Oregon—that not only aren’t low-tax states, but could even be considered high-tax states. While we hear a lot of speculation that this could create new jobs, I have yet to hear anyone provide any evidence that the potential benefits will outweigh the cost of so drastically cutting money from our schools.” King calls it “Milton Friedman and Grover Norquist-style economics,” and says he agonizes over the fact that if proposals like Knotwell’s become law, it means lower teacher pay and higher numbers of students per classroom. Rep. Norm Thurston, R-Provo, says he has not seen Knotwell’s bill yet, but that

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ov. Gary Herbert, R-Utah, and House Speaker Greg Hughes, R-Draper, have touted the $75 million boost lawmakers gave to education in 2015. While it wasn’t enough to pull Utah out of its worst-in-the-nation ranking on per-pupil spending, it was the biggest bump Utah schools had seen in almost a decade. But now some legislators are considering a bill that would cut $138 million annually from the education fund. In an effort to attract more jobs in Utah, Rep. John Knotwell, R-Herriman, has proposed a bill that could cut the taxes of some of the largest corporations in Utah by more than 90 percent. House Bill 61 would allow companies to use a “single sales factor,” meaning instead of paying taxes on the formula from the current three factors—sales tax, income tax and property tax—they can pick just one to pay taxes on. So a corporation who primarily exports its products to other states (such as Kennecott, Adobe, or many manufacturers) could choose to only pay taxes on what it sells in-state, which could mean some of the largest companies might have a tax rate so low, they end up paying the same amount of money an individual does. “Our competitive states around us, like Nevada, South Dakota and Wyoming— which have no income tax at all—have a

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FEBRUARY 18, 2016 | 13


JOSH SCHEUERMAN

In Salt Lake City’s budget no-tell motels, hustling to survive is the name of the game.

BY STEPHEN DARK sdark@cityweekly.net @stephenpdark

W

hen the Colonial Village Motel at 1530 S. Main in Salt Lake City opened its doors in 1938, the chalets along its L-shaped tree-lined avenue led to a swimming pool shaped like a boat. Much as the days of motor vacations along America’s highways and back roads have been eclipsed by air travel and the Interstate highway system, the Colonial has succumbed to the brutal ravages of time. The pool was long-ago filled in, the trees in front of the chalets cut down, and while most of the buildings remain as they were when the Colonial opened, vacationing families have been replaced by people surviving on society’s margins. While many who stay there may have no criminal record, others pursue prostitution, drug dealing and other criminal activity, if only to keep a roof over their heads one night at a time. David Pope owns both the Colonial and the Alta Motel Lodge on State Street, next door to the Salt Lake County Complex. Every white front door of the Alta motel’s 31 rooms bears boot or shoe marks from being kicked in by guests or visitors in search of money, drugs or an individual. Cops rarely kick the doors in, Pope says. The Alta and the Colonial, the latter recently renamed Main Street Motel, are but two examples of 152 Salt Lake Countypermitted public lodgings. They are also part of a smaller group of budget motels and hotels on State Street, Main Street and North Temple in Salt Lake City, and to a lesser degree in other parts of the valley, that are used by homeless individuals and families seeking to avoid the Road Home shelter or living on the streets. Pope says that motels such as his, frequented not only by ordinary people but also by criminals and those forced into criminal activities to survive, need to be seen from two perspectives: their guests and those who own and manage the properties. “These people come in and bring all their problems through drug use, their prostitution, fighting, relationship problems—they’re bringing that whole bag to the one spot, and somehow, we have to kind of manage,” he says. “It’s tough.” Such motels provide shelter for people who, in many cases, are one-day’s payment away from homelessness. “We know that one of the things the motels do [is] make up for a lack of affordable housing,” says Rob Wesemann, Volunteer of America’s homeless services director. While it’s often easy to rent a room—you can pay in cash and in some cases, advocates say, you don’t need ID—that lack of barriers for homeless people who’ve lost or had their ID stolen is sometimes accompanied by “illegal drug trade, illegal sex work, so folks can make ends meet,” Wesemann says. “It keeps people isolated from service providers who can potentially offer assistance. We know the motels can be helpful on a temporary basis, but we also know some folks get stuck in that cycle.” A significant part of the motel clientele are chronically homeless women who rely on sex work and drug dealing to pay for the daily rate of

JOSH SCHEUERMAN

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NO VAGRANCY? approximately $55. City Weekly made a records request to the Salt Lake City Police and Fire departments regarding 11 motels that have been identified as homeless lodging by advocates, law enforcement, sex workers and veteran criminals. In total, those motels generated in just one year 1,782 calls to the police, 303 calls to the fire department, and 34 calls for help on overdoses, three of them fatal. The budget motels render invisible hundreds of the county’s homeless community, skewing to some degree the annual federal tally of the state’s homeless called the Point-in-Time C0unt. In May 2015, Utah’s then-head of housing, Gordon Walker, crowned his retirement by announcing that the state’s 10-year plan to end chronic homelessness had succeeded, with the number down 91 percent to 178 chronically homeless individuals. Other states and even Jon Stewart’s The Daily Show duly held up Utah as pursuing a highly successful progressive housing model with its muchlauded Housing First initiative. But Walker’s numbers relied on the Point-in-Time Count, an annual 4 a.m. head count over three nights in the depths of the January winter of people at the shelter or living on the street. That count does not include those who rely on motels to provide shelter if they can hustle up the night’s rent. “Someone staying in a motel temporarily is not considered homeless,” by the federal government, VOA’s Wesemann says. A joint commission by Salt Lake County and Salt Lake City is seeking $27 million in funding from the Utah Legislature this session to expand shelter and housing for the homeless. Yet the people who rely on Salt Lake City’s budget motels, particularly chronically homeless single women trapped in sex work, have not been included in that conversation. That’s something Salt Lake City Councilwoman Erin Mendenhall, whose District 5 includes motels on State Street, would like to see changed. She has

looked at both the motels and the plight of women ensnared in cycles of poverty, addiction and sex work who stay there. Civil enforcement and nuisance laws are both possible tools, she says, to bring to bear on motels that negatively impact the surrounding community and, to some degree, enable sex workers trapped in a vicious cycle. “The issues facing these women are tragic enough that we should be moved to act in the most significant ways we are able to as a society,” she says.

A Refuge But At What Price?

“I’ve lived in motels all my life,” says a 46-year-old veteran of street-sex work. “It’s all I’ve ever done.” Ask why and she replies, “I use; I’ve been in and out of prison.” Just several days prior to this recent conversation with a reporter, she had been locked out of her motel room by the owner at 11:30 p.m., she alleges, because she couldn’t come up with the $20 she’d promised to raise to cover the rest of that day’s charges. Her partner used his Social Security check to rent a U-Haul to sleep in, rather than staying in a motel. “Some people can’t help the situation they’re in,” he says about his girlfriend’s eviction. “You don’t have to kick them when they’re down. You really don’t.” Fourth Street Clinic’s medical outreach team, nurse practitioner Phil Taylor and medical assistant Leticia Vasquez, visit the motels on a regular basis to provide emergency care and follow-up for homeless clients and sex workers. Vasquez says she’s counted 250 women who do sex work in the valley since 2012, and only four have gotten out of prostitution and are substance free. Taylor says the sex workers are the most vulnerable population in the homeless spectrum. He becomes emotional as he


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FEBRUARY 18, 2016 | 15

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One veteran drug dealer, who spoke about his former criminal activities on condition of anonymity, claims that some of the sketchier motels in the area don’t require ID, a license plate, a deposit or a credit card and ignore the human traffic that accompanies the guests. They are “a city within a city,” he says. “Gang-bangers, hookers, dope dealers, check-fraud rings, parole violators,” he continues, then adds ID-forgers, muggers, burglars and murderers for good measure. If you are a fugitive on the run, or simply looking to deal drugs, unless you pull in with a “G-ride”—meaning a stolen car—or brandish a firearm then, chances are, you can lie low and not be bothered. Except, that is, by someone high on drugs or angry or desperate enough to kick down your door in search of someone else who’s long gone. The condition of some of the budget motels he patrolled on State and North Temple is “deplorable,” SLCPD’s Wilk-

ing says. “Really, when we go into these places,” he says, “we glove up, we don’t touch anything.” People who die in a room, he said, are taken away by the medical examiner; the room is straightened up and rented out again. “There is very little housekeeping and maintenance that is done in these places,” he says. “A long-term stay, the housekeeping is up to them, so it is maybe a little cleaner. There are cockroaches, mice, bedbug infestations, and it’s pretty unsavory.” A City Weekly records request to the Salt Lake County Health Department seeking two years of routine annual inspection reports and investigations of complaints of 10 public lodging motels on State, Main, and North Temple, revealed that the motels with the biggest problems from the Environmental Health Division’s perspective were two on North Temple, one of which currently has closed up to 10 rooms until the motel’s owner brings them up to code. “They were informed that if they did not correct the deficiencies within 90 days of that inspection, their permit may not be renewed,” according to an October 2015 Environmental Health Division report. The second motel in the division’s crosshairs had multiple rooms in August 2015 closed for several months until they were renovated. One room description in a report requiring corrective actions listed numerous areas of concern: “Room 8: exterior lights, air conditioner, lightwoods, holes in walls, heater, smoke detector, mold in fridge, mold in microwave, dead bugs, face cover for switches, toilet not seated, floor is damaged, sheer in closet, closed.” While inactive smoke detectors and bed bugs were common complaints, one motel came in for criticism because guests threw their trash onto the lot or the sidewalk. A Health Department investigator walked the lot with the manager and “confirmed, condoms, needles, debris, litter on the on the outskirts of the motel and also the motel property.” The manager committed to clean up within seven days. “The workload that these facilities [City Weekly has] looked at are considerably higher for the department than the more mainstream” hotels, says Environmental Health Division’s Dale Keller. The biggest problem the records request highlighted was bedbugs, something that in the past four to five years, Keller says, has become a problem nationwide. While complaints about motels are taken seriously, Keller points out that many are anonymous complaints with no working phone number belonging to the motel guest. Often, they appear to be linked to an eviction, an inability to pay room charges or similar issues.

JOSH SCHEUERMAN

Closed for Repairs

JOSH SCHEUERMAN

They’re places where the light doesn’t shine. Maybe they are harbors for troubled people, but they’re not safe harbors.” —Gregory Wilking, SLCPD

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Whatever the long-term implications for the child’s health, the initial health-care costs post-birth are “astronomical,” he says. He’s heard estimates that each child, born premature and addicted, can cost the state $250,000 in medical care. In many cases, the jail will not take a pregnant woman in her third trimester because they are considered too high risk, so instead, Snoddy says, they stay at a motel or on the street, where drugs are in ready supply. “It’s a huge gap in the system.” Salt Lake City Police Department public information officer Gregory Wilking spent seven years working what his department calls the “south and north tracks” (State Street and North Temple) and came to know the motels well. When asked if motel owners/managers are in any way responsible for illegal activities taking place on the premises, Wilking says it’s “tricky.” First, if the Health Department or the Police find drugs in a motel room, they can order the room shut down, forcing the owner to conduct costly decontamination. But there is still ambiguity—not only in expecting a manager or owner to know what is going on in guest rooms—but also in being able to prove in a court of law he or she knew criminal activity was taking place in a particular room. Wilking stresses that motels can’t be lumped together in one category of facilitating criminal activity. Each motel is unique, he says. Some actively work with law enforcement to inform them of problems, while others may turn a blind eye until it directly impacts them. Medical outreach agencies use a number of the North Temple motels for 3- to 7-day temporary respite care for some clients. Nevertheless, he sums up the motels where law enforcement is routinely called to for everything from trespass and fights to drugs and domestic violence, as “places of misery. They’re places where the light doesn’t shine. Maybe they are harbors for troubled people, but they’re not safe harbors. Troubled people find their way there and trouble follows them. Nothing really good comes from these places,” Wilking says.

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recounts how each time he hears “the most horrific story of physical and sexual abuse,” he’s ever encountered, only to hear worse the next day. “It’s so horribly wrong; it partially explains why substance abuse would be a tolerable option,” he says. Taylor says the motels are “definitely an integral part of housing—and yet the conditions are deplorable, and the circumstances are often shady and the rent is more than my mortgage.” Without the money for first- and last-month’s rent for an apartment, chronically homeless women can end up being forced on a daily basis to earn through traumatizing sex work or drug dealing between $1,400 to $2,000 a month, on top of which they have to earn money for drugs and food. Taylor has been part of conversations with many community partners where all agree that the sex-worker population has specialized challenges. But, he says, “It feels like [stakeholders] still don’t perceive it as a big-enough problem.” At times, he finds himself wondering if the cycle of tragedy he witnesses daily will ever end. For women who’ve lost children to the state because of their behavior, addiction issues, or their inability to care for them, “The guilt and shame only worsens,” he says. He recalls an elderly woman who still works on the streets. “I can see that she can’t let it go—the shame and the guilt drag her back in,” he says. But even such a discouraging reality should not stop advocates and state agencies, he says, from working to get these women out of the motels and into housing to improve their quality of life. “Who doesn’t deserve a place of safety where you can feel safe?” Taylor asks. Volunteer of America’s veteran-outreach specialist Ed Snoddy says women living in some of the motels struggle hour-to-hour to survive. “It takes a village to help this population,” he says. But in order to take somebody out of that situation, he says, they need access to safe housing, medical care, vocational and substance-abuse rehabilitation and traumaspecialized therapy, none of which is currently available in any kind of wrap-around services. It’s a population that in some cases can literally cost Utah millions. Several advocates express concern about a number of women who practice sex work without condoms, become pregnant and give birth to addicted babies. Snoddy mentions one woman in her early 30s who has had 11 children, all taken away by the state. Then he found out that she was pregnant again. An adoption program was housing her in a hotel room and would give her cash when the baby was born. “She’s kind of selling babies,” he says, that, because she uses through the pregnancy, the babies will be born with addiction issues. “How can you even think of doing this?”


“Welcome To Hell, Bitch”

Veteran street sex workers like Donna Steele and Melissa (last name withheld by request) have both spent extended periods of time at budget motels. While staying there, Steele says she was “constantly watching people going back and forth to buy drugs all day and all night long.” For women funding shelter and drug use through sex work, a number

Pulled Over

In the backroom of the main office of the Alta Motel Lodge on State Street, owner David Pope says he bought the Main Street Motel (formerly the Colonial Village Motel) almost 10 years ago after a career in computers and real estate, and subsequently purchased the Alta Motel Lodge three years ago. The Main Street Motel’s rooms “were horrible … really bad,” he says when he acquired the motel. “Basically nothing had really been done to them since 1938.” Pope started renovating the rooms two years ago. “It’s just a matter of money,” he says, as to why it took so long to renovate the rooms. He has four basic rules for the people who stay at his motels: “Don’t put a bunch of people in your room, don’t trash your room, do what you want but don’t bother anyone else doing it. But for some reason, a lot of the people have a hard time doing that,” he says. Two incidents, he believes, led to the police targeting his business in 2010. One was the arrest of a woman who had ingested drugs at his motel who later died in jail. The second was when a Mormon bishop visited a guest at the Main Street Motel for a scripture lesson, only to be offered sex by a woman. “He got pissed off and called the police,”

Niki Chan

Donna Steele: Budget motels were a way of life.

Niki Chan

Every night that she stayed at the motel, for a year and a half, Melissa said she “paid every night. It was either that or live on the street or go to the shelter.”

Josh Scheuerman

A City Weekly reporter visited 11 budget hotels and motels identified by law enforcement and advocates as places where homeless are known to stay. While a number of managers agreed to speak to the reporter, all requested their names be withheld. The managers advocated for either more shelters or increased low-income housing. “They’re trying to get on their feet, but they can’t find a place to rent,” said one motel staffer. One establishment charges Utah residents a $100 deposit on their rooms, but only charges the regular room rate for those from out of state. That becomes a challenge when a homeless person can’t afford the deposit and has to be escorted from the property, staff say. The homeless sleep in the laundry room, vending areas, on the stairway, and sometimes in guests’ cars to stay warm. “Unfortunately, we have to kick them out,” the woman says. Prostitution, she says, is evident, not so much in the rooms, but with pimps who stay at the motel and send women to work at other cheaper lodging. “Most of them don’t bring clients here,” she says. Because of concerns about violence, she doesn’t work graveyard shifts, and her husband won’t let her walk home after dark. “We just need this area [to be] safer,” she says. At a neighboring budget motel, the day-manager says, “We’ve done a lot of work to get rid of the harsher elements.” Drug paraphernalia is an automatic debarment from future lodging. “We don’t want to have a reputation for being a bad place to come; we want to make sure that the guests are safe,” she says. A man at the front desk of a 1930s-constructed State Street motel expresses concern about the foot traffic that comes from two nearby motels. He says the motel “has to be picky in terms of who we rent to. We try not to offend them, [so] we say we don’t have any rooms.” While they rent to a few homeless individuals, their strict adherence to “No ID, no room,” bars some from their property. “We try not to rent to prostitutes. It’s not legal for them to do it; it’s not illegal for me to rent to them.” Part of the reasoning is to “protect ourselves ... they bring a lot of narco people.” Mike Sayssan owns both the Wasatch Inn and Zions Motel on State Street. He expresses frustration that “walk-ins don’t respect people,” they cause trouble, his managers call the police, and the next day, the “troubled people” are released from jail and back looking for a room. His managers, he says, can’t ask their guests if they’re drug addicts or prostitutes any more than they can ask their race. He says he feels sorry for some of his guests. “They just need help. If there’s not a motel room, where do they go?”

Melissa (last name withheld): “It’s kind of like jail.” Josh Scheuerman

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16 | FEBRUARY 18, 2016

Not Always Welcome at the Inn

of budget motels along State, Main and North Temple “are close to the strip, it’s close to where they prostitute,” Steele says. “It’s easier just to walk out of the motel, catch a date, walk right back to the motel ... know what I mean?” VOA’s Wesemann says that because the women tend to be more functional and independent than other sub-populations in the homeless community, “they can stay off the radar longer.” At the motels, “there’s a huge social aspect to this, a camaraderie, a connection and familiarity; these people are peers; they are connected with one another and, as difficult as it is for us to see it or understand it, this is their social circle. This is really their way of life,” he says. While some advocates and sex workers argue that several motels are little more than brothels, Steele doesn’t agree. “They are a motel, not a brothel. The worst shape it’s in, it’s still a motel,” she says. But several motels, she adds, could not have stayed in business without sex workers willing to tolerate the conditions. For someone who is stuck living there, a life of sorts can be fashioned, says 46-year-old Melissa, even if at a high price. “I made a home out of [a motel] for 16 months,” she says. “It almost killed me, seriously. And, for sure, it took a piece of my spirit.” Claiming to have stayed in every motel in Salt Lake City, Melissa says, “It’s very, very sad, especially on Christmas or Thanksgiving.” She went away last Christmas to stay with friends, but when they dropped her off back at the motel, “it was heartbreaking,” she says. “It’s kind of like jail, it’s always the same, it doesn’t change.” Every night that she stayed at the motel, for a year and a half, Melissa said she “paid every night. It was either that or live on the street or go to the shelter.” Graffiti dominated the walls. In one room, she recalls, someone had scrawled: “Welcome to hell bitch, the devil has you,” over the bed where she slept at night.


Niki Chan

“A huge gap in the system.” —Ed Snoddy, Volunteers of America veteran-outreach specialist

Pope says. After a female officer pulled over Pope’s wife as she left the Main Street Motel—allegedly remarking that his wife seemed normal, given that the motel was full of “bad people” doing drugs—he went ballistic. He said he marched over to the officer’s car and said, “What the fuck are you doing?” vilifying the officer not only for pulling over his wife but also for lumping all his guests into one category. “Not everybody in there is bad, not everybody in there is a drug dealer,” he says he told her. Wilking with the SLCPD, takes a different view, claiming there was no investigation of Pope. Rather, in 2010, Salt Lake City Police Department came to regard Pope as “more of the problem,” he says, than the people living at his motel. So, for a few months, Wilking said, a group of officers in their spare time starting paying closer attention to the comings and goings at the Main Street Motel. “He was allowing this stuff to take place, [and the police were] viewing it not so much as he had a business to run, but he was profiting from others’ misery,” he said.

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FEBRUARY 18, 2016 | 17

“Who doesn’t deserve a place of safety?” —Phil Taylor, Fourth Street Clinic nurse practitioner

Pope shows a reporter a room at the Alta motel. It’s musty, the closet has been removed—leaving nothing but stained carpet—and there’s some penned graffiti on the walls. The front door comes off its hinges as he enters. “This is one of the better rooms, to be honest,” he says, as he tries to get the door back up on its hinges. He then open up several rooms he’s personally renovated at the Main Street Motel. Eight rooms on one side of the chalet-L are being re-done. Because “drug people like to mess with stuff,” he keeps the design as simple as possible. A flat-screen TV graces the wall of one finished room, which boasts a sink with a marble counter top and a spacious shower with two heads. He says he’s had four TVs stolen already, so will probably revert to “the old tube TVs, so they don’t steal them.” The new rooms stand in stark contrast to a corner room Pope opens, its front door kicked in the night before. The carpet is dirty; there’s a large pile of bicycle

Councilwoman Mendenhall has been paying attention to the motels and to sex workers in recent months, consulting with law enforcement and others about what tools might be used to improve both the negative impact some motels have on their neighborhoods and the quality-of-life issues bedeviling the chronically homeless women. Crime statistics, Mendenhall says, “would support the claim that many motels on State Street are nuisances to the community and the city as a whole.” She hopes to see civil penalties being brought to bear on the worst offenders. “They would require whoever the owner is to come into compliance with health and safety standards and certainly not have criminal activities there,” she says. While Wilking acknowledges there are always guests not involved in criminal activity, “the majority are using [the rooms] for nefarious purposes,” he says. He is confident that the city and other community agencies are looking at ways to combat the negative impacts some motels have on their neighborhoods. “Having some level of compliance, oversight, perhaps through business licensing, even up to shutting them down completely and leveling them—all those options could be on the table.” Razing the most crime-ridden and poorly maintained motels, though, isn’t necessarily the answer, advocates say, even if it were feasible. Without the motels, “You’re in big trouble: You’ve got have a place for these girls to go,” says Fourth Street’s Taylor. Mendenhall says she has asked Salt Lake County Mayor Ben McAdams to add sex workers as a 10th sub-population to the groups the county and the city seek to address with their joint homeless initiative. McAdams’ response, she says, was that “nine is quite a list already.” When asked about it, McAdams’ communications director, Alyson Heyrend, says the commission’s report is “a consensus document,” and so the mayor is unable to alter the plan on his own. Meanwhile, Salt Lake City Mayor Jackie Biskupski’s spokesman Matthew Rojas says Mendenhall “raises a valid concern about the inclusion of additional sub-populations, such as sex workers,” in the joint-commission’s conversations. Mendenhall admits to frustration. “We are leaving out vulnerable populations whose lives are impacted every day on the streets of Salt Lake City by lack of services,” she says. Law enforcement and agencies agree that simply getting the women a room for the night was ineffective, but “we don’t have great tools yet to assist these women in leaving this lifestyle,” she says. Despite living in her own apartment thanks to the combined efforts of numerous advocates, Melissa remains grateful that the budget motel where she stayed is still a fallback option. “It’s a horrible, horrible place, but it is 100 times better than only having the option of the shelter,” she says. “I made that choice every single day. If you came and took my apartment from me, I promise you I’d spend my night [there] because I have no place to go.” CW

Not For Kids

Nowhere Safe To Go

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Pope is not shy about his use of harsh language to bring order to unruly clientele and former guests he has banned that may accompany them. But for some, his methods extend beyond profanity-laced commands. City Weekly interviewed eight members of the city street-sex worker community who claimed Pope was verbally abusive, disrespectful to women and, on occasion, physically abusive. Sex-worker Melissa thinks the behavior goes with the territory. Pope “needs to be tough to deal with the kind of people he gets there. If he was down there kissing ass, he’d get walked over. Drug dealers and prostitutes, they’re living the life of manipulation. If he was a pansy, he’d get picked,” she says. Police reports suggest that Pope gives as good at he gets in fights, even once chasing a male felon off his property. Pope acknowledges that he works in a dangerous environment. “If you don’t try to take a strong hand on this, you’ll be overwhelmed,” he says. He’s been beaten twice—once by two men, one of whom, a wellbuilt bouncer, was shot dead two days later at a University of Utah party; the second time, he was attacked at gunpoint by a man who was linked a couple of days later to a triple homicide in Midvale. Pope says he simply has to deal with issues that the police take too long to get to. “I want to resolve it quickly,” he says. While he denies manhandling guests or others on his property and also denies being disrespectful to women, he acknowledges being verbally abusive to both men and women. “I am. Let’s just be honest. I am,” he says. “But I’m never verbally abusive if they don’t pay. I’m only verbally abusive if, after I’ve given several warnings on something, let’s say having banned people in your room, then I say, ‘Get the fuck out of here.’”

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Niki Chan

Josh Scheuerman

Word Of Mouth

tires in the back room; and cigarette butts, popcorn, and other detritus litter the room. As Pope walks back to the main office, a middle-age woman he knows approaches him, asking for a room. “Have I ever called you a ‘bitch’?” he asks in reference to a reporter’s query that he was verbally abusive. She shakes her head. “No?” he says, seeming surprised. “I thought I did.” In the back room of the Main Street Motel office, a verdant swath of dog-eared bills of various denominations extend across the table, waiting to be deposited in a bank. “Most of these people, they can’t do credit cards,” he says. “All they have is cash.” He declines to say how much cash the motels generate each week. “They have to have an ID—it’s required by law. But if we know you by sight, we’ll check you in.” Pope says he makes sure potential guests are aware of the local drug-trade activity. A woman came with a small child recently, and he says he declined to rent her a room because people leave small pieces of drugs on the floor as well as uncapped needles. “We don’t recommend this place for kids,” he says. “Pay more money, and go to another place.”


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ESSENTIALS

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ENTERTAINMENT PICKS FEB. 18-24, 2016

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THURSDAY 2.18

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Musicals with major criminal elements— Chicago, Sweeney Todd or The Phantom of the Opera—are incredibly popular while featuring huge casts, large production numbers and catchy songs. Perhaps that’s why Good Company Theatre’s production of Thrill Me: The Leopold & Loeb Story is so unexpected. It relies on a two-person cast and small set to bring to the stage the true-life tale of wealthy lovers-turnedmurderers. If only Stephen Dolginoff—who wrote the book, music and lyrics—had managed to write at least one memorable song, this musical would be even more satisfying. Told through flashbacks from Nathan Leopold’s (Nick Morris) 1958 parole hearing, he reveals more about why he and Richard Loeb (Berlin Schlegel) committed a heinous murder in 1924. Richard, a Nietzsche-obsessed egomaniac, convinces Nathan to start committing petty crimes again. In return, Nathan wants Richard to fulfill his sexual desires. When their misdemeanors no longer thrill Richard, he wants to execute the “perfect crime”: killing a young boy. No one will ever suspect them—or so they believe. Under the musical direction of Nicholas Maughan, Morris and Schlegel take Dolginoff’s songs and perform them exceptionally. Director Derek Williamson uses every inch of Good Company Theatre’s limited stage space, though for those sitting farther back it’s difficult to see all the action. Since Thrill Me is performed in one act, the story feels abbreviated. With no song commanding the show, Morris and Schlegel provide the energy themselves. And that is certainly worth watching. (Missy Bird) Good Company Theatre: Thrill Me: The Leopold & Loeb Story @ 260 E. 25th St., second floor, Ogden, through Feb. 28, Thursday-Saturday, 8 p.m.; Sunday, 4 p.m.; $17. GoodCoTheatre.com

It’s not always easy for a theatrical production to evoke a sense of deep history, but the accumulation of years is part of Salt Lake Acting Co.’s production of Shawn Fisher’s Streetlight Woodpecker from the moment audience members step into the theater space. Dennis Hassan’s remarkable set—a rundown backyard in a Philadelphia neighborhood— bursts with the kind of details that make this a fully lived-in world: a tattered net hanging from a basketball hoop, a garage door stuck at an odd angle. That easy familiarity is crucial to this story of two childhood friends reunited under difficult circumstances. Benji (Stefan Espinosa, above right, with Matthew Sincell) is a wounded Marine veteran who had been staying with his father until his father’s recent death; Sam (Carleton Bluford) is that childhood friend, offering a temporary place in the home he inherited from his mother. Their relationship is complicated, however, not just by Benji’s disability but by his volatile emotions, which may be hiding more than the traumatic story behind his injuries. Fisher crafts dialogue and a story that pulses with its origins in a conservative working-class neighborhood, facilitating tremendous performances by the entire cast (Olivia Custodio is a knockout as Benji’s sister). The second act occasionally gets strident as it reaches for its big revelations, but those moments are rare in a text—efficiently directed by Richie Call—that favors the things that so often remain unspoken, even between people who care about one another. Streetlight Woodpecker lives in that space built on years of connection, with people as familiar as your own backyard. (Scott Renshaw) Streetlight Woodpecker @ Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, 801-363-7522, through March 6, TuesdaySaturday, 7:30 p.m.; Sunday, 1 p.m. & 6 p.m.; Saturday, Feb. 27 & March 5, 2 p.m.; $15-$42. SaltLakeActingCompany.org

Cramming for finals was known by a sweeter term back in 19th-century France. When teams of architecture students at Paris’ École des Beaux-Arts raced to meet term deadlines, they were working en charrette, making hurried final touches on their work before placing it on a cart (charrette) as it was wheeled through the studio. Since then, charrette has been used to describe any period of intense creative effort over a brief, fixed time—and, for 11 years, Repertory Dance Theatre’s annual Charette fundraiser has offered audience members an entertaining evening of intense dance creation. Regalia, the company’s 50th anniversary gala, will be a particularly special charette featuring four alumni choreographers tasked with creating a new and complete work in just four hours. This year’s lineup includes Francisco Gella, whose Shubert Impromptu had its world premiere with RDT in April 2015; David Marchant, a professor of dance at Washington University in St. Louis and co-artistic director of ZO Motion Arts; Marina Harris, co-director of Canada-based company X Puppets Theater, and who, in 2013, restaged her work Green Jello with RDT dancers; Andy Noble, co-artistic director of Houston-based NobleMotion Dance and assistant professor of dance at Sam Houston State University. Prior to the performance, patrons can wander the studios to watch the four choreographers as they put final touches on their work. Once on stage, it will be up to the audience to decide (with their money) who deserves “Best of Show” and a chance to choreograph for RDT’s 51st season. (Katherine Pioli) Repertory Dance Theatre: Regalia @ Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801-355-2787, Feb. 20, 5:30 p.m., cocktail party and dinner; 7:30 p.m. performance; $150 gala (includes dinner and cocktails), $50 performance. ArtTix.org

The title evokes Wallace Stevens’ 13 Ways of Looking at a Blackbird, and perhaps that’s fitting—because there’s a unique sort of poetry in Mona Awad’s sad, insightful, often darkly funny tale of one young woman struggling to be comfortable in her own skin. A book of fiction with the buzzy realism of a memoir, 13 Ways tells the story of Elizabeth across the span of 13 individual stories and approximately that many years. We meet her first as an overweight teenager, hanging out with her bad-girl best friend and trying to understand who might find her attractive. But over time, as she moves from men she just settles for to one who might actually love her, she also begins trying to lose weight. And the result changes more than the clothes she can fit into. Awad’s fascinating structural choices make for something that’s more complicated than a story of a “fat girl” who became thin. Folding in stories told from other points of view, including that of her husband, she uses the snapshots in time to dig into how body image frames Elizabeth’s interactions with friends, men, co-workers and her mother. It’s a story about someone who keeps trying on different identities, like different variations on her name from Lizzie to Liz to Beth. The result is a subtly heartbreaking story of how easy it is to become a slave to the person you think you’re supposed to be, and how after losing weight, in the words of Elizabeth’s friend, “maybe it’s all around us … our old fat.” (SR) Mona Awad: 13 Ways of Looking at a Fat Girl @ The King’s English, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, Feb. 24, 7 p.m. KingsEnglish.com

Good Company Theatre: Thrill Me

Salt Lake Acting Co.: Streetlight Woodpecker

Repertory Dance Theatre: Regalia

Mona Awad: 13 Ways of Looking at a Fat Girl


u n a n l A 28th Soup A rt &

Want to attend fun events while honing your video skills?

“Parasols” By Cristall Harper

March 2 & 3 at the Salt Palace Convention Center Grand Ballroom, South Entrance 100 South West Temple 11am - 2pm and 5pm - 9pm, both days

Tickets are $20.00 at the door or online at cns-cares.org 25 restaurants offering gourmet soup, bread and dessert samplings Featuring 44 local artists

EVENTS

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Art and Soup supports Community Nursing Services Charitable Care Program, donating health care to Utahns in need. CNS Cares.

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A&E

VISUAL ART CHECK US FIRST! LOW OR NO FEES! Thursday, February 18

Arms and Sleepers Kilby Court

The Budos Band The State Room

Saturday, February 20

Groove Garden Urban Lounge

Sunday, February 21

Streetlight Woodpecker Salt Lake Acting Company

Wednesday, February 24

Dirty Dishes Kilby Court

California Guitar Trio & Montreal Guitar Trio The State Room

Thursday, February 25

Gold Standard O.P. Rockwell

Friday, February 26

Hell’s Belles O.P. Rockwell

Poor Man’s Whiskey The State Room

monday, february 29

music for the masses Libby Gardner

wednesday, march 2

28th art & soup celebration salt palace

VISIT CITYWEEKLYTIX.COM FOR MORE SHOWS & DETAILS!

Off the Reservation

Kevin Red Star folds an era of artistic exploration into his works about American Indian culture. BY BRIAN STAKER comments@cityweekly.net @stakerized

A

merican Indians have been marginalized in American society almost from the beginning, by reservations and more direct forms of violence. So it’s no surprise that their art and culture have been marginalized, too. But Kevin Red Star was among a group of artists whose work broke into the modernart world during the revolutionary period of the 1960s, when stylistic experiments were shaking up everything. He used these artistic explorations to depict his culture and is known as one of the earliest artists to bring Native American art into the mainstream. Modern West Fine Art is featuring his work in a solo show, opening Feb. 19 for Gallery Stroll night. His journey started some 72 years ago on the Crow Indian Reservation in Lodge Grass, Mont. From an early age, the third of nine children had a love of art that was nurtured by his parents. His culture didn’t have the same sometimes self-focused concept of artistic expression that we have, but the arts were rather part of communal activities. “I always had an interest in art, but didn’t know that’s what it was called,” he says. “My mom and dad made traditional arts and crafts for ceremonial and social occasions.” His understanding of what it meant to grow up on the reservation also changed over time. “For the Crows, it was suitable because we were able to be in the land that we cherished; we weren’t moved to Arizona or back East. So it was good.” But he adds, “As a child, I didn’t realize until I got older that we were confined to those places.” Venturing into neighboring towns was still somewhat risky due to racism, so he mostly stayed on “the rez” where his family was forced to reside. His already-evident talent got him recruited into the newly founded Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe, N.M., a college preparatory school for Native Americans, in 1962. “It was a place where we were given the opportunity to study arts and music and culture from around the world, and I was influenced greatly by those things,” he says. “We came from very different tribal groups, from across the country.” It was there that he learned what it meant to be an “artist,” and he began studying his

Crow heritage in depth. “I went to their library and studied up on the Crow traditions, culture and designs,” he says, “how they were nomadic, horse people. We covered the Plains from Canada to Oklahoma. It was really quite fascinating.” He started to apply the techniques of modern art, including assemblage and expressionism, to depictions of his culture. The enrollment of only 150 students made for a tightknit group that still keeps in touch. He then won a scholarship to the San Francisco Art Institute, and with the explosion of styles in the art world at the time, found his eyes opened even further. He met a number of noteworthy artists and absorbed the influences that were dominant at the time. “I was really enjoying doing assemblages,” he says. “I used found objects to create things like a Crow Indian saddle or bag, or a buffalo robe, using collage and found objects, and it was exciting. We got to see the people who were doing that—Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg. They were having a grand time, so we took that, but we used our backgrounds for the imagery.” His own work isn’t dominated by any one influence but demonstrates a masterful, dramatic use of color, and a sense of cultural narrative that is profound. His website, KevinRedStar.com, quotes Rauschenberg: “There should be no barriers in art.” Red Star maintains that his American Indian cohorts were following that all along, crossing boundaries, using traditional artistic techniques in which they became fluent in order to express their own artistic

“Red Horn” by Kevin Red Star

sensibilities. These artworks, by helping foster an understanding of his culture, might help erase barriers in society. His two-dimensional works in acrylic, mixed media and oil balance dramatic colors with subtle textures and effective compositions, always tied very closely to nature. He’s considered a master, having mounted more than 100 exhibitions, collected in places like The Smithsonian Institution, but his description of his own work is self-effacing: “I wanted to just depict the lifestyle that we had here: the warrior figures, men on horseback or our lodges, stylistic teepees, representing the Crow Indian culture. I think it’s a friendly, fun group of works that I’m presenting here.” The nomadism and endless searching of the characters in his paintings could also be interpreted beyond a portrait of his people: as a metaphor for one sense of what it means to be an artist, constantly searching for a vision of something larger than yourself. What he has captured along the way is breathtaking. CW

KEVIN RED STAR

Modern West Fine Art 177 E. 200 South 801-355-3383 Feb. 19-March 12 ModernWestFineArt.com


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The Suzan-Lori Parks Show In 2002, Suzan-Lori Parks became the first African-American woman ever to win the Pulitzer Prize for drama for her play Topdog/Underdog. It’s the tale of two brothers—aspiring Three Card Monte hustler Booth, and his older brother Lincoln, who works at a carnival dressed as his presidential namesake, in whiteface, allowing customers to pretend to shoot him in the head. That fascinating setup is just the tip of the creative iceberg for an artist who has also been awarded a MacArthur Foundation “Genius Grant,” and was once again a Pulitzer (and Tony Award) nominee in 2015 for Father Comes Home From the Wars (Parts 1, 2 and 3). But this week’s Tanner Humanities Center lecture finds Parks showing off even more of her versatility. Her presentation The Suzan-Lori Parks Show includes music performance, reading of her work and—as she puts it—”consciousness raising of the collective unconscious.” Join the fun this week for an event that’s free to the public while tickets last. (Scott Renshaw) The Suzan-Lori Parks Show @ Kingsbury Hall, 1395 E. Presidents Circle, University of Utah, 801-581-7100, Feb. 24, 6 p.m., free, Tickets.Utah.edu

PERFORMANCE

THEATER

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EmpressTheatre.com An Inspector Calls Pioneer Theatre Co., 300 S. 1400 East, 801-581-6961, Feb. 19-March 5, FridaySaturday, 8 p.m.; Monday-Thursday, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday matinees, 2 p.m., PioneerTheatre.org Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat Hale Center Theater Orem, 225 W. 400 North, 801-226-8600, through April 9, Monday-Friday, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday, 3 p.m. & 7:30 p.m.; March 19-April 9, Saturday, 11 a.m., 3 p.m., 7:30 p.m.; HaleTheater.org The Last Five Years The Grand Theatre, 1575 S. State, 801-957-3322, through Feb. 26, MondayFriday, 7 p.m., The-Grand.org My Mormon Valentine: The Original Utah Version of Confessions of a Mormon Boy The Leonardo, 209 E. 500 South, through March 5, 7 p.m.; Saturday matinee, Feb. 27, 3 p.m., Facebook.com/MormonBoyLive My Valley Fair Lady Desert Star Theatre, 4861 S. State, Murray, 801-266-2600, through March 19, Monday & Wednesday-Saturday, multiple showtimes, DesertStar.biz The Pirate Queen Hale Centre Theatre, 3333 S. Decker Lake Drive, 801-984-9000, through April

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Based on a True Story Plan-B Theatre Co., Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801355-2787, Feb. 25-March 6, Thursday & Friday, 8 p.m.; Saturday, 4 p.m. & 8 p.m.; Sunday, 2 p.m., ArtSaltLake.org Broadway Revue BYU Harris Fine Arts Center, 1 University Hill, Provo, 801-422-2981, Feb. 18, 7:30 p.m.; Feb. 19, 7 p.m. & 9 p.m., Arts.BYU.edu Dirty Rotten Scoundrels The Ziegfeld Theater, 3934 S. Washington Blvd., Ogden, 855-944-2787, through March 5, 8 p.m., TheZiegfeldTheater.com First Date: The Musical Midvale Main Street Theatre, 7711 Main, 801-566-0596, Feb. 19 & 20, 7:30 p.m., MidvaleTheatre.com The Foreigner Midvale Performing Arts Center, 695 W. Center, Midvale, 801-819-9954, MondaySaturday, Feb. 19-27, 7:30 p.m., MidvaleArts.com A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum Empress Theatre, 9104 W. 2700 South, Magna, 801-347-7373, Feb. 19, 20, 26, 27, March 4, 5, 7, 11, 12, 7:30 p.m.; Feb. 27, 2 p.m.;

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moreESSENTIALS 2, weekdays, 7:30 p.m.; Saturdays, 12:30 p.m., 4 p.m., & 7:30 p.m., HCT.org Star Ward The Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, 801-355-4628, through Feb. 20, Monday, Friday & Saturday, 7:30 p.m., TheOBT.org Streetlight Woodpecker Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, 801-363-7522, through March 6, Wednesday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Sunday, 1 p.m. & 6 p.m.; Feb. 23 & March 1, 7:30 p.m.; Feb. 27 & March 5, 2 p.m., SaltLakeActingCompany.org (see p. 18) Suzan-Lori Parks Show Kingsbury Hall, 1395 Presidents Circle, 801-581-7100, Feb. 24, 6 p.m., THC.Utah.edu (see above) Thrill Me: The Leopold & Loeb Story Good Company Theatre, 260 25th St., Ogden, through Feb. 28, 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, 4 p.m. Sunday, GoodCoTheatre.com (see p. 18)

DANCE

Ballet West: Romeo & Juliet Capitol Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, 801-869-6920, Feb. 18-20, 7:30 p.m.; Feb. 20, 2 p.m., BalletWest.org Meet Myriad Dance Co. Fundraiser Millennium Dance Complex, 918 E. 900 South, Feb. 21, 7 p.m. Facebook.com/MyriadDanceCompany Repertory Dance Theatre: Regalia Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801-355-2787, Feb. 20, 5:30 p.m. cocktail party and dinner, 7:30 p.m. performance, ArtTix.org (see p. 18)

CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

Utah Valley Symphony: Mahler’s Resurrection Covey Center for the Arts, 425 West Center St., Provo, 801-852-7007, Feb. 24 & 25, 7:30 p.m., CoveyCenter.org O.C. Tanner Gift of Music 2016 Salt Lake Tabernacle, 50 N. Temple, Salt Lake

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City, 801-570-0080, Feb. 19-20, 7 p.m., MormonTabernacleChoir.org

SPECIAL EVENTS

VISUAL ART

COMEDY & IMPROV

FARMERS MARKETS

GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

Brad Bonar Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., Ogden, 801-622-5588, Feb. 19-20, 8 p.m., WiseguysComedy.com Greg Hahn Wiseguys Salt Lake City, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, Feb. 18, 7 p.m., WiseGuysComedy.com Laughing Stock Improv The Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, 801-355-4628, Fridays & Saturdays, 10 p.m., LaughingStock.us Mark Normand Wiseguys Salt Lake City, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, Feb. 19-20, 7:30 p.m. & 9:30 p.m., WiseGuysComedy.com Quickwits Midvale Performing Arts Center, 695 W. Center St., Midvale, 801-824-0523, Saturdays, 10 p.m., QWComedy.com

LITERATURE AUTHOR APPEARANCES

Debra Monroe: My Unsentimental Education Salt Lake City Public Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801359-9670, Feb. 24, 7 p.m., UtahHumanities.org Diane Les Becquets: Breaking Wild The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-4849100, Feb. 18, 7-9 p.m., KingsEnglish.com Mona Awad: 13 Ways of Looking at a Fat Girl The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, Feb. 24, 7 p.m., KingsEnglish.com (see p. 18) Patrick Tierney: Colorado’s Yampa River Ken Sanders Rare Books, 268 S. 200 East, 801-5213819, Feb. 19, 7 p.m., KenSandersBooks.com

Wasatch Front Farmers Market: Winter Market Wheeler Farm, 6351 S. 900 East, Salt Lake City, Feb. 21, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., WasatchFrontFarmersMarket.org Downtown Winter Market Rio Grande Depot, 300 S. Rio Grande Street, alternate Saturdays through April 23, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., SLCFarmersMarket.org

FESTIVALS, FAIRS & CELEBRATIONS

20th Annual Weber State University Story Telling Festival Weber State University Central Campus, 3848 Harrison Blvd., Ogden, Feb. 22, 10 a.m., Weber.edu Chinese New Year Celebration Master Lu’s Health Center, 3220 S. State, 801-463-1101, Salt Lake City, Feb. 20, 6 p.m., LuHealthCenter.com Banff Film Festival Kingsbury Hall, 1395 E. Presidents Circle, 801-518-7100, through Feb. 18, 7 p.m., Tickets.Utah.edu Family Mardi Gras Celebration Imagination Place, 1155 E. 3300 South, Salt Lake City, 801463-9067, Feb. 20, 3:30 p.m., ImaginationPlace. com Superhero Saturday Thanksgiving Point Show Barn, 3003 N. Thanksgiving Way, Lehi, 801-768-2300, Feb. 20, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., ThanksgivingPoint.org Utah Arts Festival Masquerade Party Trolley Square Falls Event Center, 505 E. 500 South, 801-322-2428, Feb. 20, 7-11 p.m., UAF.org

24 Hours in China: Photography from the China Overseas Exchange Association Part Two Salt Lake City Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through Feb. 21, SLCPL. org The Art of the Needle Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W. 3100 South, 801-965-5108, through March 2, CulturalCelebration.org Barbara Ellard: Organic Geometry Art Access Gallery, 230 S. 500 West Ste. 125, 801-3280703, Feb. 19-March 11, AccessArt.org Blackened White: Works by John Sproul Sweet Library, 455 F Street, 801-594-8951, through Feb. 20, SLCPL.org Carsten Meier: DAM Art Access Gallery, 230 S. 500 West Ste. 125, 801-328-0703, Feb. 19-March 11, AccessArt.org Chasing Light Utah Arts Festival Gallery 230 S. 500 West, Feb. 19-March 11, UAF.org Cultivate Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, through March 4, VisualArts.Utah.gov Curiouser and Curiouser Urban Arts Gallery, 137 S. Rio Grande St., 801-651-3937, through March 6, UtahArts.org David Brothers: Rolithica Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-3284201, through April 30, UtahMOCA.org Grant Fuhst: The Yearning Curve Art Barn/ Finch Lane Gallery, 54 Finch Lane, 801-5965000, through Feb. 26, SaltLakeArts.org Inception J GO Gallery, 408 Main, Park City, 435-649-1006, through March 11, JGOGallery.com


FIRESIDE DINING

Dinner by the Fire

DINE

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Alpine-style eats abound at Deer Valley’s Fireside Dining BY TED SCHEFFLER comments@cityweekly.net @critic1

COURTESY PHOTO

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Fireside Dining’s raclette station

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FEBRUARY 18, 2016 | 23

Empire Canyon Lodge 9200 Marsac Ave., Park City 435-645-6632 DeerValley.com/Dining

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DEER VALLEY FIRESIDE DINING

EER E FAPR PETIZ

woods, shiitake and oyster mushrooms. Other common dishes served at the Alpine station include luscious Millcreek Coffeerubbed elk short ribs with pearl onion, bacon and fresh thyme sauce; almond flourdusted Utah trout in lemon-shallot sauce; grilled quail with pickled purple cabbage, bacon and Cognac-black currant au jus; and Italian “Peasant” soup with baby lima beans, spinach, yellow tomatoes and Fontina cheese. At this point, I’m usually tempted to return for more raclette (it’s addictive). But, instead, in a rare exercise of willpower, I venture to the roasted leg of lamb fireplace, where whole legs are roasted directly over the fire and served with fresh thyme and rosemary lamb au jus, homemade applebasil jelly and aquavit salt. The perfect accompaniment to the roasted lamb is Fireside Dining’s “Mountain Macaroni,” a decadent take on mac and cheese with penne pasta in a rich cream, Gruyère and raclette sauce with diced slab bacon and sliced onions. But wait, there’s more! The fondue fireplace features warm, gooey, dark chocolate, caramel and white chocolate Grand Marnier fondues served with an array of fresh and dried fruits for dipping (I’ve determined that pineapple and dark chocolate is the heavenliest combination), along with cinnamon pound cake, cookie bites and almond biscotti. Other desserts include chocolate walnut pudding and appleberry kuchen. You know what to do next, right? Yes, start over. Back to the raclette. CW

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Guests are free to enjoy as much (or as little) from the huge selection of foods as they wish. Freedom is in force at Fireside, so if you’d prefer to kick off dinner with chocolate fondue-dipped fruit, so be it. My general recommendation, however, is simply to pace yourself. No one rushes you at Fireside Dining, and if you overindulge at the beginning of the evening, you’ll hate yourself for not having room for dessert later. So, I’ve devised a method that works for me. First, I hit the raclette fireplace. Raclette is a firm cow’s milk cheese popular with Swiss, French and German diners— one that melts very nicely. At Fireside Dining, one entire fireplace is devoted solely to raclette: Large half-wheels of it are loaded onto steel holders and the cheese is melted and scraped (raclette scraping is an art unto itself) onto hot plates, directly over the wood-stoked fire. I’m not above simply eating the cheese straight, right off the plate. But usually I enjoy raclette accompanied by Fireside’s steamed new potatoes; cured Italian meats such as prosciutto, capicola, bresaola and salami; fresh-baked baguette slices; and garnishes like marinated pearl onion, cornichons, housemade fig mustard and strawberry chutney. That’s just Step 1. While enjoying raclette, we peruse the wine list. It might surprise you, as it did me, but I’m always happy to see that mark-ups on wines are much fairer at Deer Valley Resort than at many Utah restaurants. There are cocktails, liqueurs and beer available as well, but the wine list is impressive— ranging from themed flights and wines by the glass—to bottles starting at $32. During our last visit, we chose an absolutely lovely Italian white wine from Italy’s Piedmont region, La Mesma Gavi ($45). My second Fireside Dining destination is the “Alpine Favorites” fireplace. Weekly specials vary, but since Day 1, Deer Valley has offered its outstanding veal and wild mushroom stew: large, tender chunks of veal bathed in a creamy sauce with wild mushrooms including chanterelle, hen of the

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t least once each ski season, my wife and I make sure to enjoy a meal at Deer Valley Resort. There are many terrific dining destinations there, ranging from the Seafood Buffet and Royal Street Café, to the fine dining at The Mariposa, not to mention leisurely meals at the Snow Park and Silver Lake Lodges, the Brass Tag, Deer Valley Grocery Café and more. I don’t think there’s a ski resort in the Americas that offers such stellar service and superb cuisine than Deer Valley restaurants do, as evidenced by the many national and international awards they’ve garnered for hospitality and overall quality. But, if I had to choose my single favorite Deer Valley dining location—and, thankfully, I don’t—I’d probably pick Fireside Dining. Maybe one factor making it special is that if you blink, you’ll miss it. Fireside Dining is a sort of seasonal “pop-up” restaurant located at Empire Canyon Lodge, only available at dinner time, Wednesday-Saturday during ski season. By mid-April, it will be a memory until the 2016-2017 winter season. By day, Deer Valley Resort’s Empire Canyon Lodge is a good spot to escape the lunchtime throngs that tend to gather at Silver Lake and Snow Park Lodge. The Empire Lodge features grilled items such as paninis, burgers, housemade bratwurst, fish tacos, Peruvian chicken, Korean BBQ steak wraps, soups, pastas, salads, baked goods, brews and more. But at night during ski season, Empire Canyon Lodge morphs into Fireside Dining, offering guests a European Alpsstyle eating experience, with foods cooked at the Lodge’s four large stone fireplaces. It’s an all-you-can-eat affair ($63/adults; $30/children 12 and younger), but it’s as far removed from Chuck-A-Rama or Golden Corral as you can get. You could eat lunch at Empire Canyon Lodge and return a few hours later to Fireside Dining and be hard-pressed to believe you’re in the same location. A cocktail bar appears, and tables are adorned with fine wine glasses and other accoutrements, like candles. Fireplaces are turned into serving stations while an army of top-notch servers, cooks, managers and others—sometimes seemingly outnumbering customers—keep glasses filled, used plates removed and the entire buffet-style dining process humming along smoothly, despite the fact that Fireside is packed most nights.


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Food You Will

FOOD MATTERS

LOVE

BY TED SCHEFFLER @critic1

Inversion Diversion

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Idaho Wines at Snowbird

D I N N E R

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I’m happy to report that wines from Idaho aren’t made from potatoes. In fact, the Snake River Valley of Idaho’s volcanic soils, cool desert climate and high elevation vineyards are especially well-suited for growing Viognier, Tempranillo and Syrah. You can sample Idaho wines for yourself on Saturday, Feb. 20, at Snowbird’s World Class Wines From Idaho dinner featuring Cinder Wines, which begins at 6:30 p.m. at the Lodge Bistro. The dinner will feature the husband and wife winemaker/owner team of Melanie Krause and Joe Schnerr, along with a special menu and wine pairings. It’s no wonder that Krause got into the fermented grape biz, as she grew up in Boise and worked a huge family garden that included “a collection of 40-plus varieties of grapes.” The evening kicks off with fresh Pacific oysters and Cinder Dry Viognier 2014, followed by a course of chicken confit and Cinder Chardonnay 2014. A serving of cioppino with Cinder Tempranillo 2013 will precede main course choices of sous vide bavette steak or mushroom ravioli, paired with Cinder Cabernet Sauvignon Blend 2013. The evening closes with dessert and local artisan cheeses served with Cinder Syrah 2013. Dinner with wine pairings is $99 per person or $69 for dinner only. Phone the Lodge Bistro at 801-933-2145 (ext. 3042) for reservations. For more information, visit Snowbird.com.

GenR Launch Party

GenR—short for Generation Rescue (Rescue.org/GenR)—is a group of “young and influential humanitarians between the ages of 25 and 40 who have joined forces with the International Rescue Committee (IRC) to help people survive and rebuild their lives.” The group is currently working to respond to the refugee crisis in Europe. On Tuesday, Feb. 23, GenR in Salt Lake City celebrates its official launch with a party at Publik Coffee Roasters (975 W. Temple, 801-355-3161, PublikCoffee. com) that will feature international cuisine catered by Spice Kitchen Incubator (SpiceKitchenIncubator.org), and prizes such as Utah Jazz tickets, a Moab Vacation package, a talk by celebrity chef Viet Pham and much more. To purchase tickets ($65-$75), visit EventBrite.com.

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Serious Sips of Sicily

Going mano a mano with Cusumano. BY TED SCHEFFLER comments@cityweekly.net @critic1

W

ine has been produced in Sicily for millennia. Legend has it that Dionysus (also known as Bacchus) brought pleasure to mankind, and wine to Sicily. Nonetheless, Sicilian wines have never been among Italy’s most sought-after or respected. For much of the past century, grapes grown in Sicily were exported and added to wines made in other parts of Italy. But, that is changing. In the past couple of decades, a new generation of winemakers has introduced changes in techniques and philosophies about how Sicilian wines should be made, and some of the Mediterranean country’s best wines are now coming from Sicily. One such producer is Cusumano. I recently had

the pleasure of sampling some Cusumano wines and was very impressed. The winery is owned and operated by the brothers Cusumano, Alberto and Diego, who work closely with expert winemaker Mario Ronco. All of the grapes for Cusumano wines are hand-harvested and estate-grown. They are artisanal wines that harken to the past in terms of vineyard techniques such as hand-harvesting, yet are modern and innovative on the palate. These wines of the “new” Sicily are adventurous and dynamic, meticulously made from vineyards spread across seven holdings throughout the region. Probably the best known of the Cusumano wines is the basic Nero d’Avola ($12), made with 100 percent Nero d’Avola grapes—the most common Sicilian varietal. Like many of Cusumano’s wines, the Nero d’Avola is bright, fruit-forward, with fresh red and black berry aromas, a good choice for a wide range of meat-based dishes. Also like many of Cusumano’s wines, this one features a glass top closure. My wife, who enjoys Italian wines more than most, really loves Cusumano Insolia 2012 ($12.99). And I’m glad, because it’s an absolute steal at the price. While many of Cusumano’s wines are prestigious and pricey, this has got to be one of the world’s best values in white wine. Native to Sicily, the Insolia grape was mostly used to make

26 | FEBRUARY 18, 2016

DRINK Marsala. It’s a somewhat odd white grape that doesn’t quite taste like any other to me. Its acidity and citrus qualities remind me of Sauvignon Blanc, but then tropical fruit and floral aromas make me think of Viognier. It’s softer than Chardonnay, yet quite rich. Try it with pork and fish dishes and pastas with creamy sauces. If you’ve had Nero d’Avola-based wines in the past, forget everything you know about them. Cusumano Tenuta San Giacomo Sàgana 2011 ($40.30) will forever change your thinking about what Nero d’Avola can be. For starters, in a return to Sicilian tradition, the wine spends one year in large casks to help smooth out the grape’s rough edges. It’s taken Cusumano years to find the right balance between wood and wine and their Sàgana is nothing if not well-balanced. That’s a good thing, because this

stuff is a fruit bomb. Almost black in color, it’s rich and bold, wellstructured with deep plum, cocoa, vanilla and black pepper flavors. It clocks in at 15 percent ABV, so go easy. I recently enjoyed Sàgana with homemade Margherita pizza, but it would also take well to meat dishes and red sauces. Based on the belief that Noah (of Bible fame) was the first person to create wine, Cusumano Noà 2011 ($50.32) is thusly named. The 15.5 percent ABV wine is a blend of 40 percent Nero D’Avola, 30 percent Merlot and 30 percent Cabernet Sauvignon. It’s a rich, full-bodied wine with sweet tannins—very jammy with hints of anise and cocoa—which would pair nicely with grilled red meats and roasts. CW

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It’s hard to find a more appropriately named restaurant, at least in the South Valley. Upon entering, the wafting aromas of coriander, cumin, mustard, cayenne pepper and turmeric from delectable curries might stop you in your tracks. Or, at least, the smells will prep your palate for dishes like lamb coconut korma, chicken vindaloo and chicken tikka masala. They also offer vegetarian options. And make sure to save room for a mango lassi (Indian milkshake). 715 E. 12300 South, Draper, 801-576-0707, AromaFineIndianCuisine.com

ssen e t a Delic ant n a r Germ Restau &

Sports junkies rejoice: ‘Bout Time Pub & Grub has the brews, the eats and the numerous flat-screen HDTVs to make game day truly memorable. The sports-centric atmosphere is even reflected in the friendly bartenders, who wear jerseys in support of their favorite teams. The extensive menu includes pub-fare favorites like Scotch eggs, wings and beer-battered onion rings. There are also gourmet burgers, flatbread pizza, fresh salads and more, which take the selection beyond typical bar food. Multiple Locations, BoutTimePub.com

Blue Lemon

Fresh cheese, tomato jam, spinich, corn & bacon chow chow, sourdough

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$125/Person, includes Small Plates & Gratuity Very Limited Seating RSVP to info@bourbonhouseslc.com

At Blue Lemon, you’ll discover a wide variety of healthy, wholesome fare in a vibrant, modern setting. That’s “pure, clean food with a twist.” Start out in this cafeteria-style eatery with a plate of hummus, sweetpotato fries or spinach and pear salad before moving on to something more substantial, like artisan sandwiches and gourmet entrées. The chipotle-pineapple barbecue brisket sandwich is tempting, and veggie lovers will enjoy the artichoke and tomato panini. Other dishes include lemon-chicken Alfredo, citrus-seared Atlantic salmon, black-bean ravioli and fiery fajita-style fish tacos. For a sweet addition to your meal, enjoy a fruit smoothie, such as the fuzzy navel or mango passion. Multiple Locations, BlueLemon.com

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Catering available Catering Available

“Private Whiskey Pairing Available Upon Request”

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Del Mar al Lago

If you love ceviche, you’ll love the Peruvian seafood restaurant Del Mar al Lago. Try the ceviche de mero, which is tender fish, mussels, octopus, calamari and more served with sweet corn and onions that complement the zesty spices. Portions are generous, and plates seem designed to be passed around, so don’t keep that lomo saltado (strips of beef marinated in soy sauce, vinegar and spices, stir-fried with onions and tomatoes, served with steamed rice and french fries) to yourself. The restaurant itself is clean and airy, with an open kitchen where you can see your meal being prepared. 310 W. Bugatti Drive, Salt Lake City, 801-467-2890

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Served 11-2pm Tue -Fri

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GOODEATS

WE CATER!

Complete listings at cityweekly.net Cafe on Main

Cafe Rio

Ganesh Indian Cuisine

Curry Fried Chicken

At Cafe on Main, the emphasis is on Balkan cuisine such as ground-lamb sausages called cevapi. This small gem of a European-style cafe has Adriatic roots, so be sure to try the incredible chicken goulash when it’s on the menu. People also rave about the Caesar salad, the grilled kebabs, baklava, fresh espresso, tiramisu and more. You don’t want to pass by this great little family-owned eatery. 2701 S. Main, Salt Lake City, 801-487-9434 Order a tall Taj Mahal Indian beer and tuck into Ganesh’s yummy complimentary poppadom appetizer while you peruse the tantalizing menu. It’s filled with tempting dishes like “Chicken 85,” a fiery mélange of boneless chicken in a bright orange curry-yogurt sauce topped with zippy jalapeño slices. The Midvale restaurant serves garlic naan, freshly charred in the tandoor and sprinkled with sesame seeds and cilantro—the perfect tool for sponging up the creamy and rich masala curries. And don’t miss the fragrant Hyderabad special biryani, a uniquely delicious dish you don’t find in most Indian eateries. At lunchtime, pig out on all these great Indian dishes at the all-youcan-eat buffet. 777 E. Fort Union Blvd., Midvale, 801-569-3800, GaneshIndianCuisine.com

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Want to see your meal prepared before your eyes while the savory aroma of fresh-grilled steak and chicken fill the air? Look no further than Cafe Rio. Specialties include fire-grilled steak burritos, chile-roasted beef tacos, shredded chicken tostadas, cheese enchiladas and pork barbacoa quesadillas. For dessert, try the coconut caramel flan or the fresh lime pie. And stop in on Saturday when Cancún-style fried shrimp tacos are featured. Multiple Locations, CafeRio.com For fans of Curry in a Hurry, Curry Fried Chicken can get you similar curry-soaked Middle Eastern eats. Both restaurants are owned and operated by the same family, which has a talent for hummus and shawarma (tandoorimarinated chicken breast in a warm pita). Of course, the restaurant offers a curry-fried chicken plate (served with basmati rice, veggie curry, house salad and warm pita) and plenty of kebabs and wraps, along with traditional samosas. Get gutsy and try the Rooh Afza, a nonalcoholic, concentrated syrup drink made with fruit, herbs and vegetables. Don’t let the name fool you— there is more to this place than chicken. 660 S. State, Salt Lake City, 801-924-9188, Facebook.com/ CurryFriedChicken


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The New Yorker is the type of eatery to which the term “fine dining” still applies, a place where manners and service still matter. There is nothing cutting-edge about Chef Will Pliler’s menu, but I’ve never had a bad meal there. Consider starting with a terrine of housemade chicken liver paté accompanied by a generous helping of 10 grilled French bread slices—it’s enough to feed a crowd. The seafood chopped salad is my favorite of the salad offerings, and it also could easily serve as an entrée. The grilled Maine lobster fettuccine is my go-to New Yorker dish, but this time I couldn’t resist the divine Long Island duck confit, cooked slowly in duck fat, garlic, salt and thyme, rendering it crispy and rich, served with wild rice and huckleberry sauce. The ono entrée was even better. Ono is a firm-fleshed fish, and the large, thick filet was cooked to perfection—flaky and tender, served with minced tomato, fresh corn kernels, fava beans, zucchini, onion and micro greens. The New Yorker might not be the newest kid on the block anymore, but it is aging gracefully. Reviewed Feb. 11. 60 W. Market St., 801-363-0166, NewYorkerSLC.com


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30 | FEBRUARY 18, 2016

THE WITCH

The Wages of Sin

CINEMA

The Witch finds its terror in obsession with corruption. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

T

he witch in The Witch is real; of that, there can be no doubt. While writer/ director Robert Eggers easily could have created a version of this story in which the existence of his antagonist as a physical entity was a matter of interpretation, he provides clear evidence of a creature acting independent from the perception of his characters. It runs alone in the woods. It does … unspeakable things, with no one else watching. This is no mere delusion of its devout Christian characters in 17thcentury New England, not a creation of their collective paranoia. The witch exists. That internal reality of The Witch is crucial—and it also makes this subtly terrifying movie an incredibly difficult narrative to unpack. While it works simply as a horror yarn crafted to inspire bone-deep dread, it also seems like a story divided against itself. Is this a tale of religious fundamentalism transformed into mass psychosis? Or is it a recognition that such belief is a perfectly rational response to a world full of genuine, implacable evil? This is the world in which we find our central family, which has been banished from a New England settlement because of the refusal of patriarch William (Ralph Ineson) to back down from his insistence that the leadership is full of “false Christians.” Left to set up a farm alone on the edge of an ominous wood, William, his wife Katherine (Kate Dickie) and their five children try to scratch out subsistence. But then their infant son Samuel disappears while in the care of oldest daughter Thomasin (Anya Taylor-Joy), and the family gradually comes to suspect that some dark force is threatening both their lives and their souls. Eggers’ direction displays the kind of restraint that might be unfamiliar—and, frankly, even unwelcome—to genre fans who have grown accustomed to jump-scares and

overt booga-booga creepiness. While he does employ the unsettling sonic effect of dissonant strings and moaning choral voices, his individual scenes are almost clinical in their depiction of things like a possible demonic possession. Throw in the characters’ use of archaic English diction—a post-film title card notes that some dialogue was taken verbatim from period accounts of witchcraft—and The Witch becomes a challenging change-up from most contemporary supernatural horror films. It’s also considerably more unsettling, thanks to the way Eggers digs into the idea of people consumed with the doctrine of sinfulness. A key scene finds William and oldest son Caleb (Harvey Scrimshaw) hunting together in the woods, with Caleb responding, catechism style, to his father’s quizzing about the nature of human corruption and the need for grace. That’s quite a load to bear for the adolescent boy, who fears that his lost, unbaptized baby brother has been doomed to hell, and that his own growing lustful thoughts— we see him gazing curiously at Thomasin’s cleavage—mean that he is damned as well. Eggers ties that moment to the inherent fear of budding female sexuality, as Thomasin comes under suspicion for bringing tragedy to the family. Surely, she must be the witch. Except that she’s not; the witch is out there, and the witch is real. And that’s what makes untangling The Witch’s perspective on fire-and-brimstone faith such a messy business. But the answer, if there is an answer, might be there in the film’s sub-

Anya Taylor-Joy in The Witch

title: “A New-England Folktale.” Because in a folk tale, the monster may be real, but the monster isn’t just a monster; it’s a lesson, a piece of moral instruction to be conveyed from one generation to the next. There’s an element of hubris in William’s decision to accept banishment from the settlement; “We will conquer this wilderness; it will not consume us,” he tells Caleb, even though his crops and his attempts at hunting all fail. Eggers’ most daring conceit in The Witch may be suggesting that people obsessed with evil, and who throw themselves proudly into confronting it, may be even more vulnerable to it. Or, like some of the best genre tales—and most enduring folk tales—there may be other levels of meaning still to be unwrapped from The Witch. That may be part of what makes it so disturbing, even when Eggers doesn’t set out to shock you: He’s wrestling with something that we don’t fully understand, but that we know in our gut is real. CW

THE WITCH: A NEW-ENGLAND FOLKTALE

BBBB Anya Taylor-Joy Ralph Ineson Kate Dickie Rated R

TRY THESE The Exorcist (1974) Linda Blair Max von Sydow Rated R

The Crucible (1996) Daniel Day-Lewis Winona Ryder Rated PG-13

The Blair Witch Project (1999) Heather Donohue Michael Williams Rated R

The Babadook (2014) Essie Davis Noah Wiseman Not Rated


NEW THIS WEEK Information is correct at press time. Film release schedules are subject to change. IP MAN 3 BBB It’s kind of a shame that this series feels so determined to stick to the facts of real-life kung fu grandmaster Ip Man (Donnie Yen), because it’s a lot more fun when it’s a good old-fashioned martial arts free-for-all. Set in 1959 Hong Kong, it finds Master Ip helping protect his son’s school from a criminal gang who wants to take over its valuable real-estate, even as his wife (Lynn Hung) faces a medical crisis. Sammo Hung’s fight choreography is at its best when pitting Ip against bad guys in funky settings like the half-constructed hull of a ship and the confines of an elevator, or offering the opportunity to watch Yen go toe-to-toe with Mike Tyson—yes, Mike Tyson!—as the gang’s boss. Eventually, however, that subplot stops dead in its tracks, switching to domestic drama and the gauntlet thrown down by a newly arrived kung fu teacher (Jin Zhang). Yen’s continuation of his humble, almost saintly, performance as Ip may indicate the respect these movies want to show to this revered figure, but they’re much more satisfying when he’s just kicking ass. Opens Feb. 19 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)—Scott Renshaw

SPECIAL SCREENINGS JAFAR PANAHI’S TAXI At Park City Film Series, Feb. 19-20 @ 8 p.m., Feb. 21 @ 6 p.m. (NR) LUCKY STAR At Edison Street Events, Silent Films, Feb. 18-19, 7:30 p.m. (NR) ROBIN HOOD: PRINCE OF THIEVES At Brewvies, Feb. 22, 10 p.m. (PG-13) SONITA At Main Library, Feb. 23, 7 p.m. (NR)

CURRENT RELEASES DEADPOOL BB.5 From the opening credits, Deadpool announces its intentions to be a superhero movie with attitude; if only it weren’t quite so self-satisfied with that attitude. When this story of the Marvel Comics anti-hero—a wisecracking mercenary (Ryan Reynolds) who’s transformed into a nigh-immortal killing machine—aims for true weirdness in its gags, it feels like a breath of fresh air. But when we get two different jokes based on Green Lantern, it starts to feel less about skewering fan-service blockbusters than providing a slightly different kind of fan service. In fact, the irony is that it might be better at being a 21st century comic-book movie than it is at making fun of them. Deadpool isn’t half bad when it’s going balls-out for genre pleasures; it’s a bit more irritating when it gets cocky about its willingness to say “balls.” (R)—SR

HOW TO BE SINGLE BB Sex and the City gets a pre-emptive name-check in this very loose adaptation of former SatC story editor Liz Tuccillo’s novel, but the whiff of the overly familiar still permeates this New York City-set tale. Alice (Dakota Johnson) is our soul-searching Carrie; her sister Meg (Leslie Mann) is the flinty professional à la Miranda; Robin (Rebel Wilson) is the Samantha-esque promiscuous party girl; and Lucy (Alison Brie) is the Charlotte who only wants to get married. The leads are all appealing, and each one gets a couple of showcase funny scenes. But the structure makes it virtually impossible for the characters to become anything besides familiar archetypes. A few chuckles and new catch-phrases can’t erase the realization that the struggles of the urban singleton haven’t changed much in the 15 years since Carrie Bradshaw first got splashed by a bus. (R)—SR

CINEMA CLIPS

MOVIE TIMES AND LOCATIONS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

SON OF SAUL BBB.5 Lázsló Nemes finds a gripping new perspective on the Holocaust in his story of Saul Ausländer (Géza Röhrig), a Hungarian Jew working in Auschwitz when he becomes obsessed with securing a ritual Jewish burial for one dead boy he identifies as his son. Nemes’ prowling extended takes rarely feel like showy flourishes, instead creating a unique sense of the concentration camp as a physical space. And that physicality extends to the focus on the horrifying tasks given to the Sonderkommando that emphasize the place as an assembly line for destroying human lives. Röhrig’s haunted, dead-eyed performance adds intensity to his single-minded quest, one that even ends up costing others their lives, as one man who now exists only to facilitate destruction tries to find purpose in treating at least one of those lives as something that deserves respect. (R)—SR

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THE LADY IN THE VAN BB.5 Everyone has things that push their personal “problematic” buttons; for me, it’s the whimsical portrayal of someone who was likely mentally ill as a free spirit whose function was teaching an artist important life lessons. The artist in question is writer Alan Bennett (Alex Jennings), whose memoir is the source material for this story of his sort-of-friendship with Mary Shepherd (Maggie Smith), a homeless woman living out of a van that was parked in Bennett’s London driveway for 15 years. Smith is predictably entertaining as Miss Shepherd, and Bennett crafts a funny meta-script out of the division between the part of him that writes and the part of him that lives. But the part of him that writes did decide to turn this person into a character in his work, despite a backstory suggesting that a traumatic separation from not one but two callings deeply wounded her, along with a tragic event for which she feels unquenchable guilt. Turning that life into a brisk comedy—in which matters like how a homeless person deals with bodily functions are among the punch lines—feels rather hard to justify. Opens Feb. 19 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (PG-13)—SR

THE WITCH: A NEW-ENGLAND FOLKTALE BBBB See review on p. 30. Opens Feb. 19 at theaters valleywide. (R)

RACE [not yet reviewed] Dramatization of American track star Jesse Owens (Stephan James) at the 1936 Berlin Olympic Games. Opens Feb. 19 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13) RISEN [not yet reviewed] A Roman soldier (Joseph Fiennes) explores the disappearance of the body of the crucified Jewish teacher Jesus. Opens Feb. 19 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)

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2 | FEBRUARY 18, 2016

TRUE BY B I L L F RO S T @bill_frost

Bleat Emotion

TV

Heart Hug Hiss

Judd Apatow’s Love nails modern romance; Girls begins the countdown. Love Friday, Feb. 19 (Netflix)

Series Debut: Gillian Jacobs was always Community’s most underrated player, a reliable source of dark snark who functioned as a counterpoint to Joel McHale’s, well, darker snark, and was rarely forced to play the “pretty blonde” card. In her first real headlining gig in Judd Apatow’s Love, she plays a character even less motivated than Community’s Britta: Here, she’s aimless radio-station programmer Mickey, who spends most of her time stoned, partying or obliviously falling out of relationships. When she meets up with recently dumped Gus (Paul Rust), it’s … something at first sight. Apatow has been making films for so long, it’s easy to forget his early TV shows (Freaks and Geeks, Undeclared) where male and female teens and 20-somethings coexisted awkwardly while trying to figure out life. Love is an older, none-the-wiser closer of an unofficial Apatow trilogy, and the most brutally/hilariously accurate portrayal of modern dating since Aziz Ansari’s surprisingly fantastic Master of None. Bonus props to Netflix for not dropping Love’s 10 episodes on Valentine’s Day.

Pregnant at 17 Saturday, Feb. 20 (Lifetime)

Movie: Chelsea (Orphan Black’s Zoé De Grand Maison) is 17, pregnant and in love—too bad she’s a high-school dropout, and her 50-something(!) married(!!) boyfriend Jeff (Pretty Little Liars’ Roark Critchlow) now wants nothing to do with her because, you know, gross baby. Meanwhile, Jeff’s wife Sonia (Melrose Place’s Josie Bissett) finds out about all of this and, instead of plotting stone-cold revenge as you’d expect in a Lifetime movie, takes pity on the poor knocked-up teen and befriends her. But! No sooner than you can spell polyamory … go ahead, I’ll give you a minute … a dark, dangerous figure from Chelsea’s past turns up to endanger her effdup new “family”! Keep ’em coming, Lifetime.

Girls Sunday, Feb. 21 (HBO)

Season Premiere: Maybe you’re aware that Season 5 is the next-to-last for Girls; maybe you fell out of love with Hannah, Marnie, Jessa and Shoshanna a while ago and thought the series was already long-over; maybe you’ve only heard of the show in relation to that Kylo Ren guy from Star Wars: The Force Awakens; maybe your dad changed his HBO Go password—I don’t know your deal. Anyway: As long as creator/star Lena Dunham is smart enough to avoid Sex and the City’s legacy-destroying mistakes (making a terrible follow-up theatrical movie; making an incomprehensibly wretched follow-up to that followup that plays on 20 screens daily in hell; etc.), Girls’ place in TV history is guaranteed. Oh, and Marnie’s (Allison Williams) getting married, so that should be a trainwreck.

Superstore, Telenovela Monday, Feb. 22 (NBC)

Season Finales: When both of these new NBC comedies sneak-preview premiered in December 2015, Telenovela looked like the survivor, while Superstore appeared to be an ill-conceived waste of talent. Eleven episodes later, Eva Longoria’s Telenovela is working waaay too hard for too few laughs, while America Ferrera’s Superstore has become an effortless ensemble comedy that actually lives up to most of its surface comparisons to The Office. The ratings

Love (Netflix)

correspond, meaning there’s far more likely to be a second season of Superstore than another round of Telenovela— enjoy the big hair and boob tape while you can.

Nicole & Jionni’s Shore Flip Wednesday, Feb. 24 (FYI)

Series Debut: The list of tolerable ex-MTV personalities is a short one: There’s former Singled Out host Chris Hardwick, now of Comedy Central’s @midnight and every possible AMC post-show talker they can justify (Talking Saul? Really?), and a certain retired VJ who presides over Fox Business Network’s Kennedy (she’s the Caustic Queen of FBN—which is saying nothing, but she’s still as entertaining/annoying as she was in the ’90s). That’s it. There’s also not a more radioactively disdained past MTV property than Jersey Shore, so who greenlit a house-flipping series co-hosted by idiot oompa loompa Snooki—sorry, “Nicole”—and her equally witless husband, Jionni? The same network that brings you Kocktails With Khloé (Kardashian), of course. Maybe E! is no longer the epicenter of stoopid … my world is spinning.

Listen to Bill Mondays at 8 a.m. on X96 Radio From Hell, and on the TV Tan podcast via iTunes, Stitcher and BillFrost.tv.


Driving Force BY WESTIN PORTER comments@cityweekly.net @westinjay

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QUIET OAKS

SUNDAY & THURSDAY & SATURDAY

called them up, and they were all down,” Sayer says. The band that would follow was The North Valley, a five-piece with a sound too loud to be Americana. In just three years, The North Valley released an EP and a full-length album, and toured the West Coast. The band became known for its dual frontmen, shouting and harmonizing to raucous crowds. Just as they began planning their second album, internal disputes left the group without one of its front men, Relyea. Again, Sayer, Sandberg and the remaining members of the band were faced with the question of whether or not to continue. “That’s part of the reason we were able to do it: We all just sat down and decided we were going to make music together,” Sandberg says. “We just decided we’re not going to let this hiccup stop this; this is a driving force. I don’t give a shit what the band name is. I don’t give a shit what songs we play. This isn’t going to stop.” After The North Valley dissolved in December of 2014, the remaining members came together to form a new sound. Determined not to be just a “shittier version of The North Valley,” as Sayer puts it, yet understanding that the band could no longer exist as The North Valley without its co-frontman and songwriter Relyea (now of Rumble Gums), Sayer, Sandberg, Butler, Moon and McCausland began work on a new sound—something faster, heavier. “The driving force is the music and us playing the music together, and that’s what I wanted to keep going,” Sandberg says. “It wasn’t like, ‘[We] need to make something better than The North Valley or as good as The North Valley.’ It was more just, ‘We gotta keep doing this shit because, if we don’t, we’ll get stagnant and die.’” A few months into developing their new sound, Quiet Oaks was invited by Provo band Desert Noises to open for them during their residency in Nashville, Quiet Oaks accepted, making a Midwest tour out of the opportunity. With their road chops earned, and their sound honed, Quiet Oaks is now planning a summer tour to precede their album release in September. Until then, you can catch Quiet Oaks at ABG’s in Provo on Feb. 19, and at Kilby Court on Feb. 24 with New Yorkbased Dirty Dishes. CW

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I

t’s 7:30 on a weeknight at Kilby Court. The sun set hours ago, and winter darkness, threaded with inversion, looms over Salt Lake City like a thick blanket. Down the alley to the venue, crushed Pabst Blue Ribbon cans twinkle in headlights like early morning stars on a scarred asphalt sky. A group of teenagers huddles around a bottle and a cherry ember floats between them, glowing and fading in the dark. The courtyard to the venue is empty. Inside, the crowd buzzes, huddled together, elbow-to-elbow, chatting through the sound check. On stage, the five members of Quiet Oaks tune their instruments, point to the ceiling with one hand and to their monitors with the other. They’ve been here before. They’ve done this, all of this, before. The crowd packs tighter, inching toward the stage as frontman, Dane Sandberg addresses the fans: “How many of you remember a band called The Spins?” The young crowd is mostly silent. Some nine years ago, Sandberg and Quiet Oaks drummer Spencer Sayer played their first show at Kilby Court together as The Spins, a trio from suburban Bountiful that also included Sayer’s older brother. “I remember the first time I played there,” Sandberg says. “It felt like … I was in an actual band.” It isn’t usual for Quiet Oaks to play as the opening act at Kilby anymore. Made up of four of the five members of rock group, The North Valley, with Mike Moon, a transplant from Ghost Logic, Quiet Oaks has deep roots in the Salt Lake City music scene. “I think that we’re kind of a mainstay rock band right now,” Sandberg says. “I don’t feel like there are too many other just rock bands.” Sayer and Sandberg have been together since the beginning, those early days playing with borrowed equipment in front of sparse audiences. In 2012, The Spins released one self-titled EP, recorded in Sayer’s mother’s basement, and a few custom T-shirts. They played several venues throughout the valley to steadily growing crowds. But, as most high school rock bands do, The Spins dissolved after a few years, leaving Sayer and Sandberg with a taste for music neither could chase. “When The Spins broke up, me and Dane were trying to figure out what to do next, and it was like our first choice [for bandmates] was Jon [Butler], Spenny [Relyea] and Kramer [McCausland], so we

JOHNNYSONSECOND.com

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From The North Valley, Quiet Oaks emerge to just rock.

MUSIC Eric J. Reed

QUIET OAKS


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MUSIC

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Ethereal Like A Fox

Logan-Provo indie pop band Kitfox serve “something special” with To Keep You Company. BY BRIAN STAKER comments@cityweekly.net @stakerized

T

he kit fox might sound like some kind of cute, endearing little animal, but it’s an endangered species of fox native to the Southwestern United States. The LoganProvo band Kitfox took its name after the creature, and it’s a symbol for them. Singer-guitarist Emilee Holgate, who grew up in Logan, explains that on warm summer nights, she and her cousins would go looking for kit foxes and “chase ’em around.” To her, the name of the band “is reminiscent of my childhood, and I think it’s fitting to our type of music because we strive to write very moody music, and nostalgia is one of my favorite emotions to try and capture.” The kind of melodic pop music indigenous to Los Angeles might sometimes appear endangered, but Kitfox has adapted it to a new habitat—Utah County. They are able to blend in with the indie folk scene that’s the big thing in Utah County and most elsewhere right now, but they also set themselves apart, by design. Holgate describes their sound as “ambient-folk-space-pop,” but you could perhaps just call it ethereal pop; centered around her winging, wafting voice, with underlying instrumental textures. “I always considered myself a folk artist,” Holgate confesses, “but had a weird realization while we were recording that our sound wasn’t really folk any more.” They recorded half of their debut fulllength album, To Keep You Company (selfreleased), in Nashville, and that’s another story of adapting to unlikely circumstances. Like most of us, they went through a run of embarrassing musical infatuations— influences like Dashboard Confessional, Jimmy Eat World and Death Cab for Cutie— whose emo excesses the band discarded, while keeping the intimacy of the confessional mode.

Kitfox

More recently, they turned to indie rock bands like Paper Kites and Kopecky, and the latter gave them the notion to head to Music City. In 2014, all the members of Kitfox were living on the East Coast, and they saw Kopecky perform live. Bassist-singer Conor Flynn recalls, “After that performance, I found out the lead singer, Gabe Simon, also did some producing, so I got this crazy idea that our band’s next album could be produced by him.” As poor college students, they figured they couldn’t come up with the $20,000 it would cost to record the album in Nashville, so they decided to try for half that on a Kickstarter campaign, and they reached their goal, recording half the album in Utah. Adapting to their dream studio setup wasn’t too difficult, Flynn notes. “The biggest difference was how fast the producer and sound engineer worked. Luckily, we really loved the vision that the producers had for our songs, so we only disagreed with where they wanted to take the songs a couple of times.” The results, in songs like “Nightfall” and “Ghost,” bridge the gap between the ethereal and a rock idiom, and add a greater depth to their sound. Holgate says that, as they wrote the album and prepared for the release shows, they considered what Kitfox wanted to say with To Keep You Company, and “what we want our contribution to the world to mean.” In doing so, they resolved their mission to “write and perform real, raw and emotional music. It’s not about creating a facade, or looking like a rock star, or writing a song that everyone wants to dance to.” Flynn says Kitfox has something special in store for those who attend the release show this Saturday at Kilby Court. The band plans to provide the audience with the lyrics to the songs “so they can really understand the vocals and sing along if they would like. We also want to make the experience interactive in other ways, so we have something special planned that is a secret until the night of the show.” Hmm … Could it be actual kit foxes? CW

KITFOX CD RELEASE SHOW

w/ Emily Brown, Brian Bingham Kilby Court 741 S. 330 West, Salt Lake City Saturday, Feb. 20, 7 p.m. $6 KilbyCourt.com


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THIS WEEK’S MUSIC PICKS

LIVE

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE CITYWEEKLY.NET BY DOUG BRIAN & RANDY HARWARD

THURSDAY 2.18 4760 S 900 E, SLC 801-590-9940 | facebook.com/theroyalslc

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❱ Bar | Nightclub | Music | Sports ❰

CHECK OUT OUR GREAT menu

wednesday 2/17

ultimate KARAOKE thousands of songs to choose from & bingo $ burger & Fries, amfs &

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Thursday 2/18

reggae at the royal every thursday

funk n gonzo herban empire 1/2 off nachos & Free pool

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5

liquid mary janes, amfs & long island iced teas

Friday 2/19

Live Music

Drowning pool with special guests

violent new breed | Audiotopsy hooga | late night savior saturday 2/20

Live Music

Jack wilkinson cd release party outside infinity | swinging lights Monday 2/22 hosted by robby reynolds & friends

Tuesday 2/23

the royal blues jam

open mic night

YOU Never KNow WHO WILL SHOW UP TO PERFORM

coming soon 2/26

big gay broadway sing-a-long 2/27

american hitmen

ALL SHOW TICKETS AVAILABLE AT SMITHSTIX OR AT THE ROYAL

The Budos Band

After three albums and an EP, each named eponymously and/or numerically, The Budos Band decided to “embark on a new sound” that’s “nothing like our first record” with Burnt Offering (Daptone). While it’s still rooted in Afrobeat, funk and blaxploitation-era soul, the band gets sonically and thematically darker, incorporating subtle psych- and stoner-rock influences (fuzzier guitar, and more of it). Given the band’s horror film fandom, the title might even be a reference to the 1976 Karen Black/Oliver Reed horror film Burnt Offerings. Since horror plus blaxploitation equals Blacula, this might seem an odd pairing. But Blacula is good for some genuine creeps, and there are moments on the album that deliver the same. Opening number “Into the Fog” sets an ominous tone with its introductory drone, and foreboding guitar-and-drum march. And the title track, with its wailing organ, keening (and slightly raspy) trumpet, fuzzy guitar, psychotic keys and pulsating effects creates a distinct “Coffin Joe Comes to Harlem” vibe. While not vastly divergent, it’s certainly different—and a natural evolution for the band. The Weekenders, nominated for Best Rock Artist in City Weekly’s Best of Utah Music 2016, kick things off. (RH) The State Room, 638 S. State, 8 p.m., $23, TheStateRoomSLC.com

FRIDAY, SATURDAY, SUNDAY 2.19, 20, 21 BeauSoleil Avec Michael Doucet

In the world of Cajun, Creole and zydeco music, Lafayette, La., group BeauSoleil is the gold standard—and they have been for more than 40 years. They have two Grammy Awards to prove it, but a

BeauSoleil

better testament to their majesty is the band’s 25-album discography. A virtual encyclopedia set of swampy American roots music, it even dips into rock, blues, calypso, Tex-Mex, bluegrass and jazz, showing the band not only being faithful to, but expanding on, the music they’ve championed since 1975. Their most recent release, From Bamako to Carencro (Compass) came out in 2013 and finds the band flavoring their Cajun/Creole base with jazz, blues and R&B. But isn’t that just zydeco? Eh, whatever. Laissez les bon temps rouler! (RH) The Egyptian Theatre, 328 Main, Park City, Friday and Saturday, 8 p.m.; Sunday, 6 p.m., $29-45 ($5 more if purchased within 30 minutes of start time), EgyptianTheatreCompany.org

FRIDAY 2.19 Reel Big Fish

When Reel Big Fish opened for Blondie in 1999, they granted a backstage interview to this cub reporter. They made the occasion special by cramming all seven members of the band into a single toilet

The Budos Band stall for a photo. And, in their dressing room (the Grizzlies locker room at the now-Maverik Center), they did magic tricks, like putting a banana through an apple and making cold cuts fly. That sort of buffoonery is part of what makes RBF shows a reliably good time—that, and their relentless musical merriment. Ska is just fun music, with all those happy horns, chick-chinking guitar chords and goofy, cynical and sardonic lyrics. In RBF’s case, the latter covers selling out, losing your girlfriend to another girl and how, if you run into an asshole in the morning, you met an asshole—and if you run into assholes all day, you’re the asshole. Throw in skanked-out hair metal and ‘80s covers from the likes of Poison, Europe, Lita Ford, Slade, Van Morrison, Nirvana, Tom Petty and A-ha, and you’ve got yourself a party. With Suburban Legends and The Maxies. (RH) In the Venue, 219 S. 600 West, 7 p.m., $19, IntheVenueSLC.com »

Reel Big Fish


Tuesdays at 9 - Karaoke that doesn’t suck! Quality drinks at an affordable price Saturday and Sunday Brunch til 3:00 Great food daily 11am - 12:15am Music Weds thru Saturday

MAIN

EXCHANGE PL.

400 S.

32 Exchange Place • 801-322-3200 www.twistslc.com • 11:00am - 1:00am

WHERE SOPHISTICATED MEETS CASUAL

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Holladay’s Premier Martini & Wine Bar

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STATE

300 S.

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DJ’s Friday & Saturday 9pm - Close

Full dining menu available from Cafe Trio

Reservations for special events / private parties

6405 S 3000 E | 801.943.1696 | ELIXIRUTAH.COM

FEBRUARY 18, 2016 | 37

Live Music Friday & Saturday 6pm - 9pm


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LIVE

BLACK Bar SHEEP & Grill West Jordan’s Newest Watering Hole JOHNSON VS. BADER Saturday, Jan. 30th

Taco & Tequila Tuesdays $1.50 TACOS & $3.00 CUERVO

16 BEERS ON TAP

Calabrese

Come in for a Beer Stay for our Food!

FULL LIQUOR MENU

1520 W. 9000 S. WEST JORDAN 801.566.2561 | THEBLACKSHEEPBARANDGRILL.COM

WEDNESDAY/SUNDAY

FRIDAY & SATURDAY February 19th &February 20th

Live band: channel z THURSDAY

all-you-can-eat Lunch buffet $8.95 12pm - 3pm Wednesdays 7pm-10pm $5 cover JAZZ AT THE 90

sundays 12pm-3pm no cover

LIVE JAZZ BRUNCH

Feb 11: kris johnson quartet feb 28: Chris Petty trio Feb 24: open jam nigh with Joe mCQueen

enjoy food & drinks

WED: TEXAS HOLD ‘EM - FREE 8PM

the crafty crew craft classes Wednesdays 7pm feb 17th: pot ‘o gold feb 24th: st. patty’s day wreath to register go to thecraftycrew.org COMING SOON

club 90’s st. patricks day party and lads and lasses fashion show! thrusday, march 17th 7pm

live band karaoke w/ this is your band - FREE! 9pm - 12pm SUNDAY

A horror-punk band of brothers from Phoenix, Ariz., Calabrese (the last name of Bobby, Jimmy and Davey) mines The Misfits and even, at times, cops the same 1950s vibe and Jim Morrison-esque vocal sound so adored by Glenn Danzig. Sometimes they even conjure the spirt of Joey Ramone. Their horror fandom isn’t limited to monster movies, however. The Traveling Vampire Show (2007) is named for late undergroundhorror author Richard Laymon’s Bram Stoker Award-winning book, and features two songs named for other Laymon books. What’s more, Calabrese III: They Call Us Death (2010) has a song named for Laymon’s most harrowing novel, Endless Night. That goes to show that Calabrese not only knows their punk rock, but also what is truly frightening— which greatly endears them to fans of horrorpunk. On Lust for Sacrilege (Spookshow, 2015), the band keeps one foot in the horrorpunk grave (one song tributizes Lucio Fulci’s giallo film, The New York Ripper), but shows they’re evolving in a more accessible direction, which sounds scary (like a sell-out), but it’s not. It’s just Calabrese, pulling in welcome rock and metal influences, while retaining their punk cred. Not an easy task. (RH) Club X, 445 S. 400 West, 8 p.m., $10 in advance, $15 day of show, ClubXSLC.com

3rd annual daytona party!

STRFKR, Com Truise

STRFKR grew out of frontman Joshua Hodges’ disdain for the bragging faux intellectuals of Portland, and the group’s blend of dance and pop is a lot like the theme to Portlandia. Coincidence? They’ve just released their first work since 2013, when they came out with Miracle Mile (Polyvinyl), a single called “Never Ever,” still ever faithful to their unique style. Meanwhile, Com Truise (a spoonerism of Tom Cruise) has the power of nostalgia behind him with Seth Haley’s stage name for producing techno music sounding like it belongs on the soundtrack to basically any ‘80s movie ever made. As synth-heavy as it gets, Com Truise’s music pays homage to Reagan-era technopop with almost cinematic scope. After two full-length releases, Galactic Melt and In Decay, four EPs, and more than 30 remixes (Neon Indian, El Ten Eleven, ZZ Ward), the Los Angeles-based producer will put out the Silicon Tare EP (Ghostly International) in April. Fake Drugs open. (DB) The Depot, 400 W. South Temple, 8 p.m., $21 ($2 surcharge if you’re under 21), DepotSLC.com

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 19TH

CRIMSON

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 20TH

TUESDAY

THE PEDS & MOOSEKNUCKLE

taco tuesday 2 for $2 (with beverage purchase)

free karaoke

qualify for the 2016 national talent quest every tuesday nightWe’re a regional venue!

150 W. 9065 S. • CLUB90SLC.COM • 801.566.3254 • OPEN EVERY DAY OF THE WEEK

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SHOTS IN THE DARK

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Monday @ 8pm

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breaking bingo

LIVE Music wednesdays @ 8pm

geeks who drink

live music sunday afternoons & evenings

thursday, february 18

TERENCE HANSEN ACOUSTIC SOLO friday, february 19

Johnathon Cooper, Joyce Hales, Renzo Vigo, Alyssa Woodliff, Ryan Mcfaddan

TBA

saturday, february 20

DJ LATU

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Weeknights

801.484.6692 I slctaproom.com

monday

• Kangertech • • Firefly • • Mention This • For Add

Andy Joy Chase, Evany Henningsen

tuesday

LOCAL NIGHTS OUT

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Anthony Padilla, Braden Ainsworth, Pete Bourdos

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Great food 5 lunch special

MONDAY - FRIDAY

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$

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10 brunch buffet

SATURDAYS FROM 11AM-2PM

12 sunday funday brunch $3 BLOODY MARYS & $3 MIMOSAS FROM 10AM-2PM

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Jamie Dickerson, Ashley Woodward, Zoey Zorka

31 east 400 SOuth • SLC

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THEGREENPIGPUB.COM

FEBRUARY 18, 2016 | 39

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854 South State Street 801-532-9002

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We carry e-cigarette supplies including juices, atomizers, and mods

OUR FAMOUS OPEN BLUES JAM WITH WEST TEMPLE TAILDRAGGERS

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PINKY’S

MONDAY 2.22

CONCERTS & CLUBS

Galactic

Initially formed as Galactic Prophylactic in the mid-’90s, this New Orleans, sextet dropped the condom reference before issuing their debut, Coolin’ Off (Fog City) in 1996. Since then, they’ve been on their own musical planet, working with a base of predominantly jazz, funk and soul. In recent years, they’ve increased their NOLA focus, and their musical gravity has pulled in a string of rappers (Lyrics Born, Chali 2na, Gift of Gab) and other collaborators, including J.J. Grey, Macy Gray and Mavis Staples on their latest, Into the Deep (Provogue). Expect the night to be an epic, intergalactic adventure. (Randy Harward) Park City Live, 427 Main, Park City, 9 p.m., $25-$45, ParkCityLive.net

CABARET This is NOT A Lounge Act! os Our Dueling Pian T O H g are Smokin

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IN THE STATE

Monday Nights Football Special

$6.50 steak w/ baked potato $3.50 draft beer 4141 So. State Street 801.261.3463

Join us at Rye Diner and Drinks for dinner and craft cocktails before, during and after the show. Late night bites 6pm-midnight Monday through Saturday and brunch everyday of the week. Rye is for early birds and late owls and caters to all ages www.ryeslc.com

FEB 17:

9PM DOORS FREE SHOW

CANDYS RIVER HOUSE JOSHUA STROUTHER TONY HOLIDAY PLEASE BE HUMAN

FEB 18: SLUG LOCALIZED: 8PM DOORS FREE SHOW

NEW SHACK ANGEL MAGIC RARE FACTURE

FEB 23: BITCHIN’ 8PM DOORS FREE SHOW RED BENNIES MORTIGI TEMPO SEASON OF THE WITCH FEB 24: CORNERED BY ZOMBIES 8PM DOORS FREE SHOW DEAD THINGS SUNCHASER FEB 25: UFO TV ALBUM RELEASE 8PM DOORS FREE SHOW

FEB 19: EAGLE TWIN 8PM DOORS OXCROSS $5 ACCIDENTE

HOT VODKA

RED DOG REVIVAL THE NODS FEB 26: SLMA CEREMONY

FEB 20: GROOVE GARDEN DEMARKUS LEWIS BOOGIE BASICS ANTHONY MOTTO HOT NOISE

8PM DOORS $5

MR. VANDAL ERASOLE JAMES DSZ KHENSU

9PM DOORS $10

FEB 27: 80’S 9PM DOORS FREE BEFORE 10PM $4 AFTER

DANCE PARTY!

COMING SOON Feb 28: That 1 Guy Feb 29: Ringo Deathstarr Mar 2: Wolf Eyes Mar 3: FREE SHOW Alexander Ortega Mar 4: Dubwise featuring Djuna Mar 5: LNE Presents Prince Fox & Stelouse Mar 9: FREE SHOW Westward Mar 10: STWO Mar 11: El Ten Eleven Mar 12: Ty Segall & The Muggers Mar 15: Dance Off Mar 16: FREE SHOW Charles Ellsworth Mar 17: FREE SHOW Slug Localized Mar 18: Thriftworks Mar 19: Rob Crow’s Gloomy Place Mar 21: Murder By Death Mar 22: Young Fathers Mar 23: Geographer & Crookes Mar 24: La Luz Mar 25: San Fermin

Mar 28: Chairlift Mar 29: Cullen Omori Mar 30: Shannon And The Clams Mar 31: FREE SHOW Golden Plates Apr 1: Dubwise Apr 2: DIRT FIRST Apr 3: Ra Ra Riot Apr 4: Lissie Apr 5: Night Beats Apr 7: Dumb Luck Album Release Apr 8: Pete Yorn Apr 9: Peter Murphy (Seated Event) Apr 10: DMA’s Apr 12: Matthew Logan Vasquez

of Delta Spirit Apr 13: Autolux Apr 15: The Cave Singers Apr 16: Hardkiss Brothers Apr 17: Cloud Cult Apr 18: The Movement Apr 22: Hook N Sling Apr 23: PaceWon Apr 28: The Widdler Apr 29: Napalm Death & Melvins May 8: The Thermals May 13: Tortoise May 19: Sticky Fingers Nov 7: Peter Hook & The Light

Enjoy Live Music &

BEER AT THE BEST

bar in town SPIRITS • FOOD • GOOD COMPANY 2.18 LORIN COOK BAND

2.23 JOSH HOYER & SOUL COLOSSAL

2.19 YOU TOPPLE OVER

2.24 MICHAEL DALLIN

2.20 PIXIE & THE PARTY

2.25 JOHN DAVIS

GRASS BOYS

2.26 JEREMIAH & THE RED EYES

3200 E BIG COTTONWOOD RD. | 801.733.5567 THEHOGWALLOW.COM


WEDNESDAY 2.24

A RELAXED GENTLEMAN’S CLUB

Megadeth, Children of Bodom, Havok

After 15 albums and 33 years, singer-guitarist Dave Mustaine and bassist David Ellefson are the group’s only remaining original members, but they keep asserting their place in heavy metal’s Big Four, along with Metallica, Slayer and Anthrax. Their most recent release, Dystopia (Universal), features the expected technical riffs, virtuosic solos and themes of death, destruction and chaos. Longtime Lamb of God drummer Chris Adler will accompany them on tour. Supporting act Children of Bodom exists somewhere between melodic death metal and thrash, with elements of power metal popping up on I Worship Chaos (Nuclear Blast). American thrashers Havok open. (Doug Brian) The Complex, 536 W. 100 South, 6 p.m., $40 in advance, $45 day of show, TheComplexSLC.com

CONCERTS & CLUBS

THURSDAY 2.18 LIVE MUSIC

The Budos Band (The State Room) see p. 36 Dirt Cheap (Liquid Joe’s) A Film in the Ballroom + Broke + Abby Normal + Al Deans (Velour) The Hollow + Ellipsis + Innocence Lost (The Loading Dock) Funk & Gonzo + Herban Empire (The Royal) Kris Lager Band (O.P. Rockwell) New Shack + Angel Magic + Rare Facture (Urban Lounge)

LIVE MUSIC

SATURDAY 2.20 LIVE MUSIC

11: 3 0 -1A M M O N - S AT · 11: 3 0 A M -10 P M S U N

RANDY'S RECORD SHOP VINYL RECORDS NEW & USED CD’s, 45’s, Cassettes, Turntables & Speakers

RETURN OF THE $2 LP SALE | Feb. 26th- 27th Most LP's Valued at $2- $7 Some $8-$10 Over 2000 LP's put out both Fri & Sat

LIVE MUSIC

“UTAH’S LONGEST RUNNING INDIE RECORD STORE” SINCE 1978

BeauSoleil Avec Michael Doucet (The Egyptian Theatre) see p. 36 Garage Artist Showcase (Garage on Beck) Mike Rogers (Deer Valley) DJ Juggy (Downstairs)

MONDAY 2.22

TUE – FRI 11AM TO 7PM • SAT 10AM TO 6PM • CLOSED SUN & MON LIKE US ON OR VISIT WWW.RANDYSRECORDS.COM • 801.532.4413

LIVE MUSIC

Galactic (Park City Live) see p. 40 The Royal Blues Jam (The Royal)

TUESDAY 2.23 LIVE MUSIC

Bitchin’ + Red Bennies + Mortigi Tempo + Season of the Witch (Urban Lounge) Emo Night SLC (The Fallout) Hawthorne Heights + Mest + The Ataris (The Complex) Of Ruins + Fortunes (The Loading Dock) Open Mic Night (The Royal) STRFKR + Com Truise (The Depot) see p. 38

WEDNESDAY 2.24

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MOD HAVE 1 TOELS 2 WARRANTI YEAR W/ DEALE ES INSTALLAT R ION

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Art Alexakis (Metro Bar) California Guitar Trio + Montreal Guitar Trio (The State Room) Conn and Rob Live Jazz Music (Maxwell’s) Cornered by Zombies + Dead Things + Sunchaser (Urban Lounge) DJ Matty Mo (Willie’s Lounge) Dustin Christensen + Paul Jacobsen + Mark H. Smith + Dominic Moore (Velour) Hell Jam (Devil’s Daughter) Jazz at the 90 (Club 90) Megadeth + Children of Bodom + Havok (The Complex) see above Men of Obsession (Liquid Joe’s) Dirty Dishes + Quiet Oaks + Panthermilk (Kilby court) see p. 33 Seabound + Nite + Vain Machine (Club X)

UP TO

Afton Shows (The Complex) BeauSoleil Avec Michael Doucet (The Egyptian Theatre) see p. 36 Calabrese (Club X) see p. 38 Come Away to the Skies: Bluegrass Music (St. Ambrose Catholic Church) The Crossing + The Wednesday People + Miniature Planets (The Loading Dock) Dusty Boxcars (Deer Valley) Groove Garden + Demarkus Lewis + Boogie Basics + Anthony Motto + Hot Nois (The Urban Lounge) Hive Riot + Coral Bones (Velour) Jack Wilkinson Band + Outside Infinity + Swinging Lights (The Royal) Jelly Bread (Snowbasin Ski Resort) Kitfox + Emily Brown + Brian Bingham (Kilby Court) see p. 34 The Led Zeppelin Experience feat. No Quarter (The Depot)

275 0 SOU T H 3 0 0 W ES T · (8 01) 4 67- 4 6 0 0

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

BeauSoleil Avec Michael Doucet (The Egyptian Theatre) see p. 36 Come Away to the Skies: Bluegrass Music (St. Ambrose Catholic Church) Drowning Pool + Violent New Breed + Hooga + Late Night Savior (The Royal) DJ Brisk (Downstairs) DJ Reverend 23 + Stryker (Area 51) Eagle Twin + Oxcross + Accidente (The Urban Lounge) Joshua James + RuRu + Colby Stead (Velour) Logic (The Complex) My New Mistress (Kamikazes) Reel Big Fish (In the Venue) see p. 36 Rick Gerber & The Nightcaps (Garage on Beck)

SUNDAY 2.21

NO

COVER E VER!

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

FRIDAY 2.19

Michelle Moonshine (Garage on Beck) Miss DJ Lux (Downstairs) DJ Karma (SKY) The Spazmatics (Liquid Joe’s) Vance Joy + Elle King + Jamie Lawson (Saltair)

DA I LY L U N C H S P E C I A L S POOL, FOOSBALL & GAMES


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42 | FEBRUARY 18, 2016

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CROSSWORD PUZZLE

Š 2016

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ACROSS

Last week’s answers

| CITY WEEKLY |

FEBRUARY 18, 2016 | 43

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

UDOKU

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

1. Three, it's said 2. Art shop offering 3. "What ____!" ("Bummer!") 4. Mossy wetland 5. Willa Cather title heroine 6. Talking Heads singer David 7. Some online reading 8. Center of Florida? 9. Stand-up routine in a stadium? 10. Spreader of holiday cheer 11. Pizzeria fixture

country 52. Miss by ____ 53. Enterprise rival 54. Pitcher Jim who was a 16-time Gold Glove winner 55. Four-time Best New Age Album Grammy winner 56. ____ occasion (never) 57. Maritime letters

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

DOWN

12. Perform on "The Voice," say 13. Pic on a pec, perhaps 21. "____ or charge?" 22. Bath residue 27. ____ beans (chickpeas) 28. Madeline of "Blazing Saddles" 29. Kind of party 30. "____ It" (2006 Young Jeezy single) 31. Buster Brown's dog 32. Thin strip 33. Catch, as a criminal 34. Suffix with orange or lemon 35. ____ choy 40. 2001 National Book Award winner "The ____ Demon" 41. Keep from 42. It's not wall-to-wall 43. Mental pictures 44. He called some of his pieces "hand-painted dream photographs" 45. Not get out of the car, say 49. 1964 Beatles tune "If ____" 50. Toward the back 51. Arabian Peninsula

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1. Show support 5. Red as ____ 10. Budgetary concern 14. Car, slangily 15. Mythological maiden 16. Nike competitor 17. ____ vez (again, in Spanish) 18. Slightest amount 19. Flat fee? 20. "A puzzle that uses the names of African countries in punny ways ... ____?" 23. Plant with a bitter root 24. It's the end of the lion 25. Two-time All-Pro linebacker Umenyiora 26. Some sweaters 30. "Puns! And world geography! Why, this puzzle ... ____!" 36. Adjective in many rap star names 37. Scene 38. "____-ching!" 39. "Wait, what? You don't like puns OR world geography ... ____!" 46. President, at times 47. Deface 48. "That's ____ haven't heard" 50. One-named singer who is alphabetically first in "The Billboard Book of Top 40 Hits" 54. "Well, I happen to have a soft spot for both geography and puns ... ____?" 57. It's out on a limb 58. Zellweger of "Chicago" 59. Gulf State leader 60. Poet Angelou 61. Forearm bone-related 62. Word that follows asteroid, black or conveyor 63. Spend the night 64. Word sung twice before "hallelujah" 65. Santa ____ Valley (winegrowing valley)


| COMMUNITY | | CITYWEEKLY.NET |

44 | FEBRUARY 18, 2016

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ith the sunny days of summer still months away, those looking for a little heat should check out Boneyard’s Bloody Blend, a Bloody Mary mix made right here in Utah. Company president Brian Kellen created the concentrate so that you simply mix with tomato juice, add vodka and have a killer cocktail. “For the last decade, I have been using my secret recipe to create the freshest, best-tasting Bloody Marys around,” Kellen says. After much encouragement from family and friends, Kellen decided take his mix on the market and founded Boneyard’s Bloody Blend in 2013. “The industry is chock full of literally thousands of pre-mix products, but to my surprise, there are only a couple companies that offer a concentrated Bloody Mary that you simply mix with tomato juice.” So far, Boneyard’s Bloody Blend has received rave reviews from the bars that carry it. “Since we switched to Boneyard’s as our only Bloody Mary mix, our sales have more than doubled,” says Tony Crowson, owner of Cooper’s Bar and Restaurant in Fish Haven, Idaho. “Everyone seems to love it.” Local bar owner Neal Middleton agrees: “Boneyard’s is what we use in our Premium Bloody Mary at The Royal” (4760 S. 900 East, Salt Lake City, 801590-9940, TheRoyalSLC.com). And Boneyard’s isn’t just for those

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who like a little vodka with their breakfast. What makes Boneyard’s special is that it also makes an awesome marinade for all cuts of meat and adds zest to virtually any side dish. From eggs to salad dressing to soup, the possibilities are endless. Now in their third year of business, Kellen and his Boneyard Bloody team are planning to publish a recipe book. Boneyard’s comes in two flavors—Original, for those who like flavor but a mild spice level, and Spicy Blend. “Our Spicy Blend is just that—spicy, but not so hot that you can only drink one,” Kellen says. Boneyard’s plans to introduce a “Blazin’ Hot” flavor in the coming months to satisfy the most extreme spicy food addicts. Boneyard’s has a variety of sizes, including a 2-ounce travel-size bottle perfect for taking on a plane, a 16-ounce retail size and a 64-ounce jug for restaurants and bars, which makes approximately 150 individual Bloody Marys. “Please stay tuned if you are a Red Beer drinker,” Kellen says. “We are in the testing stages and hope to launch Boneyard’s Bloody Brew in mid-to-late spring of this year.” Boneyard’s Bloody Brew will be a smooth lager infused with Boneyard’s Bloody Blend, creating an enjoyable beer for all times of the day. n

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fo LY.N al ceKp rieEnE looking @s-CeIT pYeW igit We are RGA on x et or d eRrsD rk p a E m T l S a c plus. lo CWE a f s o dge unitie : Knowle opport m su e to Email re .NET

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EEKLY

The blend features three mascots—Boneyard Jenkinz representing Brian Kellen, Boneyard Betty representing his girlfriend and business partner, and Boneyard Pug, the couple’s pug—all in skeletal form.


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY B Y R O B

B R E Z S N Y

Go to RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

ARIES (March 21-April 19) “Old paint on a canvas, as it ages, sometimes becomes transparent,” said playwright Lillian Hellman. “When that happens, it is possible to see the original lines: a tree will show through a woman’s dress, a child makes way for a dog, a large boat is no longer on an open sea.” Why does this happen? Because the painter changed his or her mind. Early images were replaced, painted over. I suspect that a metaphorical version of this is underway in your life. Certain choices you made in the past got supplanted by choices you made later. They disappeared from view. But now those older possibilities are re-emerging for your consideration. I’m not saying what you should do about them. I simply want to alert you to their ghostly presence so they don’t cause confusion. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Let’s talk about your mouth. Since your words flow from it, you use it to create and shape a lot of your experiences. Your mouth is also the place where food and drink enter your body, as well as some of the air you breathe. So it’s crucial to fueling every move you make. You experience the beloved sense of taste in your mouth. You use your mouth for kissing and other amorous activities. With its help, you sing, moan, shout and laugh. It’s quite expressive, too. As you move its many muscles, you send out an array of emotional signals. I’ve provided this summary in the hope of inspiring you to celebrate your mouth, Taurus. It’s prime time to enhance your appreciation of its blessings!

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) “I would not talk so much about myself if there were anybody else whom I knew as well,” said the philosopher and naturalist Henry David Thoreau. In accordance with your astrological constitution, Leo, I authorize you to use this declaration as your own almost any time you feel like it. But I do suggest that you make an exception to the rule during the next four weeks. In my opinion, it will be time to focus on increasing your understanding of the people you care about—even if that effort takes time and energy away from your quest for ultimate self-knowledge. Don’t worry: You can return to emphasizing Thoreau’s perspective by the equinox.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) “If you ask for help, it comes, but not in any way you’d ever know.” Poet Gary Snyder said that, and now I’m passing it on to you, Capricorn. The coming weeks will be an excellent time for you to think deeply about the precise kinds of help you would most benefit from—even as you loosen up your expectations about how your requests for aid might be fulfilled. Be aggressive in seeking assistance, but ready and willing to be surprised as it arrives. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) For a limited time only, 153 is your lucky number. Mauve and olive are your colors of destiny, the platypus is your power animal and torn burlap mended with silk thread is your magic textile. I realize that all of this may sound odd, but it’s the straight-up truth. The nature of the cosmic rhythms are rather erratic right now. To be in maximum alignment with the irregular opportunities that are headed your way, you should probably make yourself magnificently mysterious, even to yourself. To quote an old teacher, this might be a good time to be “so unpredictable that not even you yourself knows what’s going to happen.” PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) In the long-running TV show M*A*S*H, the character known as Sidney Freedman was a psychiatrist who did his best to nurture the mental health of the soldiers in his care. He sometimes departed from conventional therapeutic approaches. In the series finale, he delivered the following speech, which I believe is highly pertinent to your current quest for good mental hygiene: “I told you people something a long time ago, and it’s just as pertinent today as it was then. Ladies and gentlemen, take my advice: Pull down your pants and slide on the ice.”

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bur your soul reaches out like branches of a tree it is the soul and spirit that sets one free for without them both there is no I in me.

John Weighall Send your poem (max 15 lines), to: Poet’s Corner, City Weekly, 248 South Main Street, SLC, UT 84101 or e-mail to poetscorner@cityweekly.net.

Published entrants receive a $15 value gift from CW. Each entry must include name and mailing address.

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FEBRUARY 18, 2016 | 45

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) You are entering the inquisitive phase of your astrological cycle. One of the best ways to thrive during the coming weeks will be to ask more questions than you have asked since you were 5 years old. Curiosity and good listening skills will be superpowers that you should you strive to activate. For now, what matters most is not what you already know but rather what you need to find out. It’s a favorable time to gather information about riddles and mysteries that have perplexed you for a long time. Be super-receptive and extra wide-eyed!

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Asking you Sagittarians to be patient may be akin to ordering a bonfire to burn more politely. But it’s my duty to inform you of the cosmic tendencies, so I will request your forbearance for now. How about some nuances to make it more palatable? Here’s a quote from author David G. Allen: “Patience is the calm acceptance that things can happen in a different order than the one you have in mind.” Novelist Gustave Flaubert: “Talent is a long patience.” French playwright Molière: “Trees that are slow to grow bear the best fruit.” Writer Anne Lamott: “Hope is a revolutionary patience.” I’ve saved the best for last, from Russian novelist Irène Némirovsky: “Waiting is erotic.”

So much of life slips away wasted

| COMMUNITY |

CANCER (June 21-July 22) The Old Testament book of Leviticus presents a long list of forbidden activities, and declares that anyone who commits them should be punished. You’re not supposed to get tattoos, have messy hair, consult oracles, work on Sunday, wear clothes that blend wool and linen, plant different seeds in the same field or eat snails, prawns, pigs and crabs. (It’s OK to buy slaves, though.) We laugh at how absurd it would be for us to obey these outdated rules and prohibitions, and yet many of us retain a superstitious loyalty toward guidelines and beliefs that are almost equally obsolete. Here’s the good news, Cancerian: Now is an excellent time to dismantle or purge your own fossilized formulas.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Russian writer Ivan Turgenev was a Scorpio. Midway through his first novel Rudin, his main character Dmitrii Nikolaevich Rudin alludes to a problem that affects many Scorpios. “Do you see that apple tree?” Rudin asks a female companion. “It is broken by the weight and abundance of its own fruit.” Ouch! I want very much for you Scorpios to be spared a fate like that in the coming weeks. That’s why I propose that you scheme about how you will express the immense creativity that will be welling up in you. Don’t let your lush and succulent output go to waste.

Poets Corner

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Coloring books for adults are best-sellers. Tightly wound folks relieve their stress by using crayons and markers to brighten up black-and-white drawings of butterflies, flowers, mandalas and pretty fishes. I highly recommend that you avoid this type of recreation in the next three weeks, as it would send the wrong message to your subconscious mind. You should expend as little energy as possible working within frameworks that others have made. You need to focus on designing and constructing your own frameworks.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Poet Barbara Hamby says the Russian word ostyt can be used to describe “a cup of tea that is too hot, but after you walk to the next room, and return, it is too cool.” A little birdie told me that this may be an apt metaphor for a current situation in your life. I completely understand if you wish the tea had lost less of its original warmth, and was exactly the temperature you like, neither burning nor tepid. But that won’t happen unless you try to reheat it, which would change the taste. So what should you do? One way or the other, a compromise will be necessary. Do you want the lukewarm tea or the hot tea with a different flavor?

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y wife and I are huge fans of the summer farmers markets and the Winter Market at the Rio Grande. She is the one who seeks out the fresh-squeezed juices and the stinky local cheeses, and I look for tasty fried dough bits stuffed with something yummy cooked by a chef with ethnic roots. My Argentinian friend, Analia Valdemoros (or “Ana Empanada,” as I call her), has been selling some damned fine empanadas at the summer market on Saturdays so, of course, I can always be found standing in line at her booth buying her spinach or beef and lemon pockets of crispy love. I met her when I was serving as a Planning & Zoning Commissioner, and she was on the P&Z staff for Salt Lake City. Although she was a planner by day, she worked the market each week, hoping to take her small food business and turn it into a fulltime restaurant. The problem? Affordable restaurant space is pricey and hard to come by. Buzzwords like “small batch” brews, “locally made baked, canned or grown”— have been a trend for foodies and creative chefs in cities and towns around the United States for at least a decade. Sure, you can brew beer in your basement for your July 24th party or put up your killer curried pickle for friend and family gifts. But if you want to take that killer recipe and produce supplies of it to sell, you must create it in a Health Departmentapproved kitchen. No one has that facility in their home, and yet many folks want to test the commercial waters with their great creations. Valdemoros and fellow foodie friend/former planner Tham Soekotjo have just been awarded grants and loans from Salt Lake City to develop a culinary incubator kitchen, called Square Kitchen, in Poplar Grove, at 751 W. 800 South that will break ground next month and open in the summer (if they get past the city’s rules). This will be a gathering place to increase food diversity in our city with workshops, cooking classes and tastings. It’s is a boon for potential entrepreneurs and the plans are amazing: 10,000 square feet of a Health Department-approved commissary kitchen that can be rented out by chefs by the hour, week or month. There will also be chefs to consult with prospective creators and business people/volunteers/contacts to help with marketing and packaging ideas. This new incubator kitchen will help folks with food-prep guidelines, safe food handling, business plans, branding, local sourcing of products, partnering with existing programs, as well as the un-fun stuff like insurance, liability and legal issues. Frankly, my stomach can’t wait! n

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No Vagrancy?

City Weekly Feb 18, 2016  

No Vagrancy?