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CWCONTENTS COVER STORY MINING MEMORIES

The dwindling few who recall living in Bingham Canyon fight to keep alive memories of a community that was stolen from them. Cover photo Andreas Feininger, Library of Congress

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LETTERS Mormon power

In the just completed 2016 Utah legislative session: The frequent worst air in the nation was not even addressed. No teeth were added to the State’s weak hate-crime law Health care was denied to a hundred-thousand poor residents. Legalization of medical marijuana was voted down. Public school teachers are still prohibited from providing any real sex education. Even educating students about safe sex or birth control is still forbidden. However, the legislators did provide $53 million to build a deep-water port in Oakland, Calif. to store Utah coal, before its shipped to foreign countries so that these countries can further foster global warning. No funding was provided to increase alternate forms of energy or for re-training coal miners for new careers in the wind and solar industries. No efforts were made to properly fund public schools or to reduce class size. With 80 percent of Utah legislators being affiliated with the LDS Church along with the governor, lieutenant governor and the attorney general, I feel that it is reasonable to blame the Mormon Church for the mess Utah is in. As the late Apostle L. Tom Perry told me a few weeks before his death,” No one has the right to ever question the LDS leaders or any of the church’s writings.” I assume that the “no one” would extend to all the state’s legislators and all other elected and appointed officials. I’m not sure of the

WRITE US: Salt Lake City Weekly, 248 S. Main, Salt Lake City, UT 84101. Email: comments@cityweekly.net. Fax: 801-575-6106. We reserve the right to edit for length and clarity. Preference will be given to letters that are 300 words or less and sent uniquely to City Weekly. Full name, address and phone number must be included, even on emailed submissions, for verification purposes. consequences of going against the church would be for the state Mormon legislators and the other elected officials. Based, however on the church’s past treatments of any who would stand in opposition, I presume the punishment would run from a slap on the offending wrist up to being kicked out and thus being forbidden to ever get to go to the Celestial Kingdom to copulate with a plethora of young girls on one’s own planet. When a corporation is accused of not looking out for the best interest of the public, the CEO is usually held responsible. LDS President Tom Monson, does not have a CEO title. However, he does have the following titles, in addition to president: prophet, revelator, translator and seer. So just as President George Bush said to Michael Brown, director of the Federal Emergency Management Association, as New Orleans was drowning during Hurricane Katrina, “Brownie, you’re doing a heck of a job.” I’d like to paraphrase, You’re doing a heck of a job, Monson.

to have a vigil for the LGBTQA, shouldn’t we also commemorate the little kids in Pakistan-Yemen killed by the people you voted for and think are so great? Ted Cruz, John Kerry, Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton support the carnage in a multitude of ways. Hillary’s emails regarding the drones were just emerging as the main focus of that investigation. The shooting happened two days later and now nobody seems to care. Bernie says drone strikes have “done some good things” and he would not end them if president. How about if straights and gays alike apologize for not really caring about all the kids they financially helped blow up. It’s the equivalent of about 135 Sandy Hooks at this point. Then, after that, they can stand up for themselves with not as much guilt on their minds. Perhaps even join the Pink Pistols firearms self defense organization.

CRAIG MORGAN Ontario, Canada

TED OTTINGER

STAFF

Taylorsville

A message for everyone

Where are the vigils for the approximately 3,600 women and children killed by drones using your taxes? Whether Glynis is right about Orlando being partially staged [Letters, June 16, City Weekly] or not: If we are going

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OPINION

Topophilia

In 1975, my wife and I moved to Fitchburg, Mass., a decaying mill town arrayed along the banks of the Nashua River. Main Street was an unattractive stretch of neglected buildings and empty storefronts. Our house was on a hill. At the bottom of the hill was the river. Some days it ran red—others, blue—depending on the dye being used in the upstream paper mills that day. At the top of the hill was Rollstone Cemetery, a colorless collection of upright gravestones that one of our neighbors referred to as “the marble orchard.” One day, as we passed it, I told my wife facetiously that if she were to die unexpectedly, I would have her buried in Rollstone. She bristled. Not no but hell no would she be buried in Fitchburg! Her home was in Utah. I was surprised by her reaction, by the importance she gave to what I considered to be an inconsequential, post-mortem detail. I have since come to regard one’s choice of a burial site as the truest indication of one’s attachment to a particular place. “This is the place” is a pronouncement and a sentiment I no longer take for granted. For Brigham Young, the Great Salt Lake Valley was a place of sanctuary, a place no one else wanted. For me, it is the frame of my life, the place of beginning and ending. That there may be a visceral bond between person and place—a connection called topophilia—seems intuitive. I never felt grounded in Fitchburg, but there is much about New England that has resonance for me. I like the look of Vermont: It presents itself to passersby as a place where the lawns and hedges are trimmed every week. In Massachusetts, I like the politics of Cambridge, the walkable neighborhoods of Boston and the energy of Harvard Square on Friday night in late September. I particularly like the hardwood forests with mountain laurel in the understory. I am fond of the books of Concord’s three mostfamous residents—Hawthorne, Emerson and Thoreau. I favor stuff from L.L. Bean.

BY JOHN RASMUSON

We are kindred spirits, New England and I, but I don’t think of it as a final destination. Most of my life played out not far from “This is the Place” monument. Salt Lake City is a place of firsts for me: first trout caught, first paycheck earned, first golf ball hit, first beer drank, first marijuana smoked, first (and last) car crashed. I was married here. None of those firsts have any significance beyond that of being a first, but the city is the locus of memories. It is a place I know intimately. Returning to Utah after four years soldiering in East Africa, I noticed the sky was a different shade of blue. The Vietnam-era draft uprooted me. While I was not happy to be dragooned into the army, I was not unhappy to be leaving Utah. I was dismissive of the place I knew better than any other. I considered it benighted. Now, a lifetime wiser, I occasionally drive through my childhood neighborhood. In so doing, Pope Francis asserts, there is a chance to recover something of my “true self.” The streets are empty of kids on bicycles; no one is playing hopscotch on the sidewalk. What became of all those kids I grew up with? I realize that “nostalgic” describes my true self. I feel like the prodigal son who has been taken back by a place he once was eager to leave. Utah is not a perfect place, but “the ground is friendly” as Willa Cather put it. The friendliest ground is the mountains. I find myself imprinted on the Wasatch like a Lorenzian goose. My internal compass swivels on them. Without them as a reference point, I often lost my bearings in Fort Belvoir’s woods and found myself kneedeep in a swamp. It seems logical that the

character of friendly ground would find its way into the character of its residents as terroir informs the character of wine. However, I have never learned to see beauty in an arid expanse of sagebrush nor have I experienced the desert’s “pure, ascetic spirituality” one hears about from Ed Abbey and the like. Were I to map the contours of my “true self,” the detail would be trees and mountains, not sagebrush or seashore. I once speculated my true self might reflect Danish tribal values because all my forbears were Danes. But I have walked the streets in Copenhagen without feeling a magnetic sense of belonging. I have felt more at home in a stand of birches in Massachusetts or in a Utah trout stream. Frankly, I wish it were otherwise. I wish I could report a topophilia experience or a breath-taking encounter with a sacred space. Nostalgia may be as close as I ever get to topophilia. My wife has decided to donate her body to the University of Utah Medical School. She presses me for my final-disposition instructions. If I were rich, I would opt for what they did with Hunters Thompson’s ashes: Mix them into fireworks canisters and blast them into the night sky. What better finale than a starburst? On the other hand, Lee Hays, who sang with Pete Seeger in The Weavers in the 1950s, had his ashes mixed into a compost pile. That seems like the practical option. What is clear, as the days dwindle down, is that I am never going to say the words “this is the place” with conviction until I am being wheeled through the front door of an assisted-living facility. CW

THE FRIENDLIEST GROUND IS THE MOUNTAINS. I FIND MYSELF IMPRINTED ON THE WASATCH LIKE A LORENZIAN GOOSE. MY INTERNAL COMPASS SWIVELS ON THEM.

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STAFF BOX

Readers can comment at cityweekly.net

What constitutes the perfect Fourth of July for you? Scott Renshaw:

Family, food and unironically listening to patriotic music while watching fireworks.

Lindsay Larkin: Roger Federer playing at Wimbledon, obviously.

Mason Rodrickc:

The perfect Fourth consists of a handful of hamburgers, another handful of beer, 45 boxes of sparklers and friend that is willing to duct-tape them to a broom stick, light them all at once and swing it in big circles dangerously close to my handfuls of American vitamins.

Casey Koldewyn:

Floating down the so-cold-it-feels-blistering-hot river at my great-grandma’s cabin after a lunch of roasted hot dogs, followed by an afternoon of snacking. Who needs beaches, anyway?

Bryan Bale: A road trip on my motorcycle (but that’s not going to happen until I can afford to buy a motorcycle.)

Randy Harward: Burger in one hand, hot dog in the other, beer flowing from a garden hose. Plus explosives.

Tyeson Rogers: Great food, my wife in very little clothing and the sweet smell of black gunpowder.

Paula Saltas: In that order? Tyeson Rogers 2: No. My wife first, food second, fireworks third, ha ha.

Nicole Enright: It doesn’t matter what happens, as long as, at the end of the night, the entire crowd starts chanting USA, USA, USA!


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HITS&MISSES BY KATHARINE BIELE

FIVE SPOT

RANDOM QUESTIONS, SURPRISING ANSWERS

@kathybiele

Coal Priorities

STAN ROSENZWEIG

Let’s start with Utah’s highest priority: keeping the coal industry chugging along. This week, the Oakland City Council held a special hearing on an ordinance to block coal and petcoke exports through the city, according to an update from the Sierra Club. It all has to do with a quiet little deal between port developers and four Utah counties that want to send up to 10 million tons of coal through Oakland each year. Hey, that should help the industry—send it to a place where no one cares or can do much about clean air. Maybe China. The problem is that the port sits on city-owned land, and Oakland is none too happy about the plan. And a Bay Area poll showed that 76 percent of the city’s voters opposed the plan. Meanwhle, the federal coal-leasing program is under review, but The Hill reports that Republicans and coal interests oppose the review. No surprise there.

‘Political Spitefest’

And along the no-surprise line, health care—or the lack of it. The Salt Lake Tribune editorialized about the “political spitefest” that is hurting children not covered by the diminutive Medicaid un-expansion here. Utah’s rate of uninsured kids is 9.4 percent, while the nation—benefitting from the expansion—fell to 6 percent. The Deseret News ran a front-page story on the shutdown of Arches, the state’s only nonprofit insurance co-op. Critics, including Arches, say the state was too hasty in cutting off Arches, and in fact has spent $480,000 since December on a consulting firm to manage the liquidation. Some think the firm is dragging things out for personal profit, while providers have not yet been paid their due. And Arches was actually making headway, although two years was not enough time for them to build. Where ObamaCare is concerned, there will never be enough time for Utahns.

UTA Budget

Well, you have to read both the Deseret News and The Salt Lake Tribune to get the whole story about the Utah Transit Authority and its bouncing budget. The D-News touts approving a budget with “more service,” while the Trib notes that opponents worry extending the airport TRAX line will hurt bus service. The good news is that money approved in some counties will go to better bus service. But the question is now how to pay for the airport line. Supposedly everyone knew the present line was temporary, and an extension would be needed as the airport renovates. Too bad the plans weren’t coordinated. Now the UTA board has to approve $4.3 million in design work. Back to buses. There will be more, but Weber County is a bit perplexed about whether they’ll supersede other projects expected from the Proposition 1 money.

Valley Behavioral Health is a nonprofit network of clinics that last year served almost 18,000 clients with behavioral issues, addictions, psychiatric conditions and other chronic health issues. Among its 803 employees is new Case Manager Jessica Shade who came to this line of work via an unusual route.

Your education is not like anything we know of. Tell me about it.

As a United Methodist from the South, I got my Masters of Divinity from Emery University in Atlanta and studied Hebrew scripture. At Emery, I became interested in how new religions get started. I wrote my Master’s thesis on the Rastafari, an Abrahamic belief started in Jamaica in the 1930s. Rastafari is a relatively new religion that traces its lineage to King Solomon and the Queen of Sheba. It sees Ethiopia as the new Zion and reveres Ethiopian Emperor Haile Selassie I.

That’s different from your traditional Judeo Christian education. How did you even find it?

Here in the states, I met an elder called Queen Mother Moses in the 12 Tribe House of Rastafari. I met her through my Jamaican professor in grad school where he was teaching a world religions class on Rastas. Queen Mother Moses brought a small group of us from Emery to Jamaica and introduced us to the well-known Reggae recording artist Tony Rebel and the Bobo Shanti commune in Bull Bay. That field of study led me to spend time in Jamaica, which was fascinating.

How did you transition from academic divinity school to the rugged outdoors?

After graduating, I Google-searched for jobs I could do that would help people. I joined Aspiro Group in Sandy, Utah, which provides wilderness adventure therapy for young people between 13-30 suffering from everything from substance abuse to autism. Through wilderness settings and adventure, we increased self-efficacy by taking clients into the wilderness and help them function in all weather conditions, 365 day a year, in varied environments, all over the state. I was field operations manager when I left to become a client case manager at Valley Behavioral Health.

So you went from 24/7 outdoor work to 9-5 case management?

That wouldn’t be my characterization. Each program employs different methods to a common end. As a case worker, I now help people fill in the gaps between therapy and medications, addressing life’s many changes. We help people figure out how to run their day to day lives more smoothly. It is very rewarding to be able to work with people with needs and I enjoy helping them discover their strengths, build on them and have a better life.

Is there anything surprising about you?

In spite of the facts that I hike, bike, ski, climb and have a paragliding license, I am terribly afraid of heights. When I am paragliding, I tell myself that this is just a green screen.

— STAN ROSENZWEIG comments@cityweekly.net


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STRAIGHT DOPE Nuclear Cruise Ships

BY CECIL ADAMS SLUG SIGNORINO

The Science of Brewing...

Modern ships run on fuel—a lot of fuel. Why not make large ships, like cruise ships and cargo transports, nuclear-powered? —Xodiac

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Good news, Xodiac: the future is now. As soon as this weekend, you yourself can set sail on the Russian craft 50 Years of Victory, the largest nuclear-powered icebreaker in the world, which, as a side gig, takes passengers cruising over the sunny North Pole. A stateroom’s yours for a cool $26,995, and the two-week package includes an open bar, hot-air balloon rides, and the chance to see firsthand just how quickly climate change is rendering icebreakers obsolete. No wonder they’re turning to tourism. There is indeed something of a global existential need for technological advancement in this arena. And admittedly the non-Russian, non-icebreaking pickings are a little slim, as far as civilian nuclearpowered ships go, but there’s reason to think that’s about to change. Of course, there’s been reason to think it’s about to change since the 1950s, when the idea made its public debut, courtesy of President Dwight D. Eisenhower. World War II was over. Having let the nuclear horse out of the barn, the United States was now trying to keep the reins as tight as possible. To that end, Ike introduced his Atoms for Peace program, the aim of which was to spread globally the promise of a kinder, gentler split nucleus. We note here that Atoms for Peace has since been appropriated as the name of an alt-rock supergroup led by Radiohead’s Thom Yorke. Atoms for Peace was also propaganda— the Eisenhower initiative, that is, not the band. Ike hoped that by offering countries assistance in developing their nuclearenergy capabilities, the U.S. might keep their sympathies firmly on the side of the West. He made recipient countries pinky-swear they wouldn’t use the technology to develop a nuclear weapon, a geopolitical strategy that worked out about as well as you’d expect: The assistance set Iran down the weapons path, and also helped Israel, India and Pakistan cook up bombs of their own. But I digress. Ike was also keen to prove the myriad ways nuclear could benefit everyday Americans. Thus one stateside AFP project was the NS Savannah, a civilian nuclear ship launched in 1959 as a harbinger of America’s rosy atomic future. Well, sort of, but honestly more like a preview of how slow the whole nuclearmerchant-marine concept would be to gain any kind of traction. Currently the Savannah is gathering dust in Baltimore, having remained in useful service for only 10 years. The vessel did fine technologywise, but, configured as a hybrid of passenger ship and cargo ship, it fell short in both capacities—not really providing a model worth replicating. What’s been holding back nuclear merchant ships? There’s a matter of, for instance,

customer queasiness. Talking to the magazine Maritime Executive in 2015, one industry consultant said, “When you ask educated, professional groups whether they believe we should become more reliant on nuclear power, 30-40 percent are positive. When you ask the same group if they would be prepared to take their family on holiday on a nuclear-powered cruise ship, the number drops to below 10 percent.” Crew members on military nuclear ships, safe though they may be, wear dosimeters at all times, just in case—hardly a reassuring sight for your typical Caribbean vacationers, I’d imagine. Otherwise, the challenges look logistically complex but certainly not insurmountable: rejiggering regulatory regimes, retrofitting ships, trying to figure out what to do with the nuclear waste (a problem, of course, not specific to shipping). And the benefits are significant: n Ship owners nowadays have resisted switching to cleaner-burning natural gas because of a lack of in-port infrastructure for refueling, and so commercial craft continue to burn the dirtier fossil fuels. Nuclear avoids the issue altogether: not only zero emissions, but no refueling for 5-7 years at a time. n The startup costs of nuclear aren’t nothing—besides the reactor itself, there’s security, insurance, etc.—but Nuclear Engineering International estimates that, factoring in lower fuel costs, a given ship could break even within 10-20 years. The economics should continue to improve, too, as the world sees heavier regulation of fossil fuels. n Cheaper fuel means ships can travel faster—a boon in ways obvious (getting goods to market) and subtle. The technology is basically there, too. As I pointed out in a 2009 column, the bite-size nuclear reactors that might one day revolutionize power generation are still in early stages on land, but not at sea—the U.S. Navy’s been successfully powering submarines with small nukes for decades. And though there have been plenty of maritime accidents over those years, no leakage has ever resulted from a sunk nuclear reactor. We’ve seen increasing interest in the possibility of nuclear propulsion over the last several years, and one imagines companies will feel a further push from the Paris climate accord of 2015, which encouraged the development of nuclear technologies. So hold on to that 27 grand for now, Xodiac—I suspect you’ll see your options expand, and cheapen, soon enough. n Send questions to Cecil via StraightDope.com or write him c/o Chicago Reader, 350 N. Orleans, Chicago 60654


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A Monkey Tale

News story highlighting animal testing mysteriously disappears BY COLBY FRAZIER cfrazier@cityweekly.net @ColbyFrazierLP

T

he story was made for television: A University of Utah research laboratory is performing tests on monkeys. A dose of anesthesia is given to a monkey so it can undergo a CT scan. The monkey’s body gets dangerously cold, and someone in the laboratory uses a special heater to warm the animal up. But instead, the animal is burned and, to halt its suffering, euthanized. These are the nuts and bolts of a news story that aired Wednesday, June 1 on Fox 13, but was later scrubbed from its website and social media pages. Animal rights activists began drawing attention to the monkey, which died in August 2015, after the U.S. Department of Agriculture issued a report in May 2016 that documented “failure of appropriate communication and oversight” by the university’s veterinary staff. The Salt Lake Tribune wrote a story, and Fox 13 reporter Kiersten Nuñez put her piece together. But university officials felt the television story contained inaccuracies and also failed to give them the chance to respond to animal rights activists, who characterized the incident as “extreme negligence.” With stories about the controversial practice of animal testing disappearing from the internet, Jeremy Beckham, the vivisection issues coordinator at the Utah Animal Rights Coalition, says the scenario strikes him as “borderline Orwellian.” “It’s like you want the public to forget it even happened,” Beckham says. “Just deleting the whole thing is wildly irresponsible.” Before the story could be removed, Beckham says it had been shared more than 1,000 times on Facebook and had garnered hundreds of comments. Kathy Wilets, the University of Utah’s director of media relations, says that while she asked Fox 13 news executives to meet with her to discuss the school’s concerns with the story, she never asked for it to be removed. “I’m not trying to block any sort of reporting,” Wilets says. “We’re a university and there are groups out there who are watching what we’re doing, as they should. I just want to make sure that if others speak out on it that we

M E D I A M AT T E R S

COURTESY PETA

NEWS

“It’s like you want the public to forget it even happened.” —Jeremy Beckham, Utah Animal Rights Coalition

at least have an opportunity to respond to what they’re saying.” Wilets says Fox reporter Nuñez reached out to her and asked for an on-camera interview. But Wilets couldn’t make the interview that day, and a written statement was given to the news station. Beckham, on the other hand, did make the interview, and the story, he says, understandably focused in on his points of view. “This reporter, from my understanding, gave the University of Utah ample opportunity to provide someone for comment,” Beckham says. “If they don’t do that, then I really don’t think they can complain that their viewpoint wasn’t in the story.” Fox 13 assistant news director Marc Sternfield directed City Weekly to the public relations wing of the station’s owner, Tribune Company. In an email, Tribune spokesperson Jessica Bellucci wrote: “The story didn’t meet the station’s journalistic standards (and didn’t present both sides of the story) thus it was decided the piece Frik, a monkey that underwent lab testing at U of U in 2009. This is not the monkey that was euthanized. would be pulled from the site.” Nuñez declined to comment, also referring any questions to ham says more than $5 million has that he, too, doesn’t know where the the Tribune Company. been spent on the study involving the photo was taken. If it was taken at the While the saga of the disappearing monkey. school, the veterinarian says that the story itself has intrigue, the University The National Science Foundation also type of headgear installed on the monof Utah’s long history with animal testcontributes large sums of money to the key is no longer used at the school. ing laboratories remains controversial, university for a wide range of studies, Beckham, though, says the picture, and, in the eyes of activists like Beckincluding some on animals. One study, of a monkey named Frik, provided by ham, is downright cruel. which commenced on Sept. 1, 2015, the group People for the Ethical TreatBut for scientists and doctors at the was for $925,000. By using something ment of Animals (PETA), was taken in school, animal testing, they say, has called computational cannula micros2009 at the University of Utah by a PETA provided a key bridge between a good copy, the study aims to take brain scans field observer. chunk of modern scientific and mediciof “awake, freely moving animals in unA PETA official in Washington D.C. nal breakthroughs. precedented spatial resolution.” confirmed that the photo was taken inThe university’s attending veteriWhile university officials say aniside a U of U laboratory. narian, who helps ensure that animals mal research is important, Beckham What Wilets and the veterinarian undergoing testing are being treated disagrees. And he says that, specifiwant the public to understand is that humanely, says that while all research cally with monkeys, there is no huthe school does what it can to ensure projects are not “Disneyesque,” they mane way to keep them stored away in the safety and welfare of the myriad are a far cry from torture. confinement. animals it uses for testing. “Many of the animals that are kept “What you see in laboratories all over “I think, obviously, animal research as pets have much tougher lives than the world when you put monkeys in this is a controversial subject, but the realthe animals we care for here,” says the type of environment, they start to exity is just about every medical advance veterinarian, who, citing security conhibit several signs of mental distress, we’ve enjoyed as a society and as vetericerns, asked that his name be withheld. mental illness,” Beckham says. narians to treat patients has come, one “The image of research animals that Monkeys, he says, have been known way or another, from animal research,” are undergoing significant torture and to bite themselves as they go “mad from the veterinarian says. distress is false and we make sure that this type of environment.” But on the other side of the testing that’s not the case.” “This is all, I think, hideously undebate, Beckham says he’d like Utahns The monkey was injured while unethical,” Beckham says. “I don’t think to know that a monkey was put to sleep, dergoing tests on a genetic disorder it’s giving us scientifically valuable its temperature wasn’t properly monipresent in some children that impacts information.” tored and then it was burned severely certain regions of the brain. One of Wilets’ problems with the Fox enough that university officials thought The University of Utah receives 13 story was the use of a picture that it best to kill the animal. millions of dollars each year for projshows a monkey in a cage with some And as for the Fox 13 news story, which ects that involve animal testing. This sort of device screwed onto its head. seems to have succeeded in evaporatparticular study, the school’s veteriWilets says she doesn’t know if the ing from the internet, Beckham says narian says, involved funding from the photograph was taken at the University that as he sees it, the story was “pretty National Institutes of Health. Beckof Utah. The school’s veterinarian says much entirely accurate.” CW


S NEofW the

Getting Fannies in the Seats The Bunyadi opened in London in June for a three-month run as the world’s newest nude-dining experience, and now has a reservation waiting list of 40,000 (since it only seats 42). Besides the nakedness, the Bunyadi creates “true liberation” (said its founder) by serving only food “from nature,” cooked over fire (no electricity). Waiters are nude, as well, except for minimal concessions to seated diners addressing standing servers. Tokyo’s Amrita nude eatery, opening in July, is a bit more playful, with best-body male waiters and an optional floor show—and no “overweight” patrons allowed. Both restaurants provide some sort of derriere-cover for sitting, and require diners to check their cellphones at the door.

WEIRD

Cultural Diversity Milwaukee’s WITI-TV, in an on-the-scene report from Loretta, Wis. (in the state’s northwest backwoods), in May, described the town’s baffling fascination with “Wood Tick Racing,” held annually, provided someone finds enough wood ticks to place in a circle so that townspeople can wager on which one hops out first. The “races” began 37 years ago, and this year “Howard” was declared the winner. (According to the organizers, at the end of the day, all contestants, except Howard, were to be smashed with a mallet.)

n Northern Ireland’s Belfast Telegraph reported in April that a man was hospitalized after throwing bricks at the front windows of a PIPS office (Public Initiative for Prevention of Suicide and Self Harm). As has happened to a few others in News of the Weird’s reporting, he was injured by brick-bounceback, off the shatterproof glass.

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No Longer Weird Once again, this time around midnight in Redford Township, Michigan, in June, police surrounded a suspect’s home and shut down the neighborhood for the next 11 hours, fired tear gas canisters through windows, and used a robot to scope out the inside—and ultimately found that the house had been empty the whole time. (The domestic violence suspect is still at large.) Armed and Clumsy (All-New!) More people (all are males, as usual) who accidentally shot themselves recently: Age 37, Augusta, Kan., while adjusting his “sock gun” at a high school graduation (May). Age 28, Panama City, Fla., a jail guard “preparing” for a job interview (May). An unidentified man in Union, S.C., who, emerging from a shower, sat on his gun (December). The sheriff of Des Moines County, Iowa, who shot his hand while cleaning his gun (Burlington, Iowa, December). A movie-goer adjusting in his seat in Salina, Kan., shot himself during the feature (October) (three months after acquiring a no-test-required concealed-carry permit). Age 43, Miami, demonstrating to a relative how to clean a gun (December). A teenager, Overland, Missouri, trying to take a selfie holding a gun (June). (The last two people are no longer with us.)

Thanks This Time to Stan Kaplan and Gerald Sacks, and to the News of the Weird Board of Editorial Advisors.

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n News You Can Use: When they were starting out, the band Guns N’ Roses practiced and “lived” in a storage unit in Los Angeles, according to a book-review essay in the May 2016 Harper’s magazine, and “became resourceful,” wrote the essayist. Wrote bass player Duff McKagan in one of the books reviewed: “You could get dirt-cheap antibiotics—intended for

Least Competent Criminals Damian Shaw, 43, was sentenced in England’s Chester Crown Court in June after an April raid revealed he had established a “sophisticated” cannabis-growing operation (160 plants) in a building about 50 yards from the front door of the Cheshire Police headquarters.

FIRST!

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n An ordinary green tree frog recently injured in a “lawnmowing accident” in Australia’s Outback was flown about 600 miles from Mount Isa to the Cairns Frog Hospital. CFH president Deborah Pergolotti spoke despairingly to Australian Broadcasting Corp. News in June about how society underregards the poor frogs when it comes to rescue and rehab—suggesting that “there’s almost a glass ceiling” between them and the cuter animals.

Recurring Themes The super-painful “Ilizarov procedure” enables petite women to make themselves taller. (A surgeon breaks bones in the shins or thighs, then adjusts special leg braces four times daily that pull the bones slightly apart, awaiting them to—slowly—grow back and fuse together, usually taking at least six months. As News of the Weird reported in 2002, a 5-foot-tall woman, aiming for 5-4, gushed about “a better job, a better boyfriend … a better husband. It’s a long-term investment.” Now, India’s “medical tourism” industry offers Ilizarovs cut-rate—but (according to a May dispatch in The Guardian) unregulated and, so far, not yet even taught in India’s medical schools. Leading practitioner Dr. Amar Sarin of Delhi (who claims “hundreds” of successes) admits there’s a “madness” to patients’ dissatisfactions with the way they look.

CHECK US

Awesome! For the last 17 months, Stan Larkin, of Ypsilanti, Mich., has gone about his business (even playing pickup basketball) without a functional heart in his body—carrying around in a backpack the “organ” that pumps his blood. Larkin, 25, was born with a dangerous heart arrhythmia, and was kept alive for a while with a defibrillator and then by hooking him up to a washing- machinesized heart pump, leaving him barely mobile—but then came the miraculous SynCardia Freedom Total Artificial Heart, weighing 13 pounds and improving Larkin’s quality of life as he endured the almost-interminable wait for a heart transplant (which he finally received in May). (An average of 22 people a day die awaiting organ transplants in the U.S.)

Perspective News updates from Kim Jong Un’s North Korea: In March, a South Korean ecology organization reported that the traditional winter migration of vultures from China was, unusually, skipping over North Korea, headed directly for the South—apparently because of the paucity of animal corpses (according to reports, a major food source for millions of North Koreans). And in June, the Global Nutrition Report (which criticized the U.S. and 13 other countries for alarming obesity rates) praised North Korea for its “progress” in having fewer adults with “body mass index” over 30).

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The Entrepreneurial Spirit! Basking in its “record high” in venture-capital funding, the Chinese Jiedaibao website put its business model into practice recently: facilitating offers of “jumbo” personal loans (two to five times the normal limit) to female students who submit nude photos. The student agrees that if the loan is not repaid on time (at exorbitant interest rates), the lender can release the photos online. (The business has been heavily criticized, but the company’s headquarters said the privately negotiated contracts are beyond its control.)

use in aquariums—at pet stores. Turned out tetracycline wasn’t just good for tail rot and gill disease. It also did great with syphilis.”

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Government in Action The Department of Veterans Affairs revealed in May that, between 2007 and last year, nearly 25,000 vets examined for traumatic brain injury at 40 VA facilities were not seen by medical personnel qualified to render the diagnosis—which may account for the result that, according to veterans’ activists, very few of them were ever referred for treatment. (TBI, of course, is the “signature wound” of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.)

BY CHUCK SHEPHERD


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CITIZEN REVOLT

THE

NUEVE

THE LIST OF NINE

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Nine unexpected Brexit consequences:

1. The U.K. to stop exporting

subtitles to the U.S. BBC affiliates.

2. Due to a loss in funding,

Sherlock will now be written by the team behind CSI: Miami.

3. The American people will suffer through the greatest crumpet famine in our history.

4. The great renaming of

English muffins to “Bloody hell, what have we done?” muffins.

5. Stock in fish and chips will dip into more than just tartar sauce.

6. Fox News will learn the difference between the U.N. and the E.U.

7. In order to raise campaign

funds and spirits, Boris Johnson and Donald Trump’s hair will hold a televised duel.

8. America is next in line to be the best at queuing.

9. Tea time will turn into regret time.

CHANGE THE WORLD

WAY TO MEET UP

Now here’s an idea to take you into a new realm of personal interaction. The fifth annual Awakward Celebration of Friends will take you out of the thankless bar-hopping regimen and into something new, if awkward. Tired of running into the same people over and over again? Tired of having to go to a bar or concert or some other miscellaneous outing that ends up being a disappointment/money sink? Plan to check out the park, see new faces and get out of your comfort zone. There could be a barbecue, but for sure there will be food, music and fun for all ages. Bring your mother, bring your brother, bring your frenemy. Liberty Park, 600 E. 900 South, Sunday, July 3, 8 p.m., free, bit.ly/28S7m6a

POLITICS IN UTAH DISCUSSION

The primary season in Utah is not only confusing, but well, it’s confusing! What happens in a political convention, and why even have one? This and other questions likely won’t be answered, but they will be discussed by political scientist Tim Chambless and journalist Paul Rolly in Is Our Politics Experiencing a Meltdown? And if you don’t want to reflect on the primary season, you may be interested in hearing Anthony Rampton of the Utah Attorney General’s Office talk about Inside the Armed Resistance to the Federal Government, a retrospective of his involvement in the April 2014 armed standoff in Nevada and the 41-day armed federal takeover in Oregon. First Unitarian Church of Salt Lake City, 569 S. 1300 East, 801582-8687, Sunday, July 31/primary discussion, Sunday August 7/federal standoffs, 10 a.m., free, open to public, SLCUU.org

FAIR PARK TOWN HALL

And you thought the Fair Park was a gonner! With a $3-million pledge from the LDS Church, supporters of the Utah State Fair Park managed to put together a proposal for a $17-million new stadium and a legislative committee recommends funding it. That means you, taxpayer. At least $10 million would come from public coffers. Now you can find out more about the plans at this community event, Fair Park Town Hall, hosted by Rep. Sandra Hollins, D-Salt Lake City. Fairpark Grand Building, 155 N. 1000 West, 385-232-1915, Thursday, June 30, 7-8:30 p.m., free and open to public, bit.ly/28S3Fxi

—KATHARINE BIELE

Send events to editor@cityweekly.net


mining memories The dwindling few who recall living in Bingham Canyon fight to keep alive memories of a community that was stolen from them. By Stephen Dark • sdark@cityweekly.net

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n the southwest corner of the Salt Lake Valley, the New Bingham Highway climbs into the mountains. It runs past the offices of Rio Tinto Kennecott, then through the leafy, quiet rural idyll of Copperton, past barren, overgrown land on the right, before cresting a hill—only to be closed off by several 2-foot-high concrete blocks. On foot, the hill drops down toward the former town of Lead Mine, telephone poles on the left, to reveal a far greater obstacle in the form of a manmade mountain. In the summer, the mountain is green with Kennecott-planted vegetation, but this early spring day it’s a dirty gray, reflecting its nature—namely millions of tons of waste rock ripped from the bowels of what Native Americans called the Oquirrhs, the shining mountains. This man-made mountain is far more than a dumping ground for the byproduct of a 113-year-old open pit mine that is one of the largest in the world. It’s an unmarked tombstone, a resting place for the hopes and dreams, the lives and loves of a community once known as Bingham Canyon. At its peak, Bingham Canyon was home to more than 15,000 miners and their families who had come from all over the world to work the mine. The community’s main artery was a 5-mile, 20-foot-wide Main Street that snaked up the canyon. At the Bingham Mercantile store at Carrfork, the street split. To the left was a one-way tunnel that led to the hamlets of Copperfield and Dinkeyville and to the right led to Highland Boy. “That canyon was so narrow, a dog had to wag its tail up and down,” old-timers quip. Throughout the canyon were small communities bearing such now-politically incorrect names as Frog Town, Jap Camp and Greek Camp, each reflecting, to some degree, its residents’ ethnic make-up. “Our confinement between these towering mountains seems to produce a closer bond of fellowship among the people,” wrote Mayor Ed W. Johnson in the 1939 souvenir program for Galena Days, the first of a series of frequently held celebrations of mining and canyon life that continued until 1957. With Salt Lake City 30 miles away, Bingham had every amenity you could want, be it neighborhood grocery stores, cafés and bars like Pasttime and Copper King, and even its own movie theater. Local, retired advertising executive Bill Nicholls lived in


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COURTESY UTAH HISTORICAL SOCIETY

COURTESY UTAH HISTORICAL SOCIETY

LOOKING TOWARD HIGHLAND BOY Frog Town as a child, and remembers paying 45 cents at the Princess Theater to watch Flash Gordon serials, eat popcorn and drink malted milk. Compared to the long-dominant Utah migration narrative of persecuted white Mormon pioneers pulling handcarts to what would become Salt Lake City, Bingham’s all-but-marginalized story was of a wealth of international migrants from the late 1800s onward, who ultimately would be driven out by the very mining companies that paid for them to come here. For all Bingham’s picturesque small-town pleasures, life was hard for both miners and their families. “Women who married three times, still outlived their husbands,” Kennecott retiree Eugene Halverson recalls. He estimates between 300 and 400 miners died each year from lung diseases related to inhaling mine dust. Dust wasn’t the only killer—accidents, cave-ins, along with avalanches and fires jumping shacks so close you could hear your neighbor snore—made life in Bingham hazardous. But the people who lived in the canyon, and in Lark, a smaller mining community directly to the east of the mine, loved their communities with a fierce pride. In the largest human displacement by a mining corporation in Utah history, former mine owner Kennecott Copper squeezed out the communities, buying up homes and businesses for cents on the dollar so the mine could expand. Since the late 1990s, the foundations of Bingham City have been buried beneath a mound of waste rock so high it all but eclipses the snow-capped mountains behind it. Lark, meanwhile, is a wasteland. Halverson has for years written about his memories of Bingham life on a blog called “Gene’s Family Tree.” In a post titled, “Bingham, a time to cry,” he quotes a deceased former mine worker. “Yes, I envy all of you that can go back to your home town and sharpen memories of day gone by, because I have only my memories to reflect on. The town I spent my youth in is gone. There is no remnant of the town to sharpen my mind—nothing to focus on and bring in to

DOWN CANYON FROM UPPER MAIN STREET sharper remembrance those long-gone days.” In the last few years, Bingham and Lark’s former residents have brought their long-buried yet still mourned homes back to life, freeze-framing and sharing their memories through virtual communities. Bingham native and now St George resident Eldon Bray administers a Facebook page called “Bingham Canyon History.” Some of its 1,946 members post photographs of Bingham, its streets, businesses, people and craggy landscape. A community that had vanished from Utah is viscerally evoked in black and white images asthose who lived in Bingham and their relatives post joyful comments, having identified faces and places in the pictures previously consigned only to fading memories. On a Facebook page entitled “Lark, Utah,” along with historical images of the town and its people, amateur historian and former Lark resident Steven Richardson has provided a wealth of documents, news clippings and reminiscences about the town’s history. As one woman writes on the Lark page, beneath a 1947 school class picture, “I love to see pictures like that. It makes my heart happy.”

KEEPING STORIES ALIVE

Mining is a brutal industry that devastates landscapes. The obliterated Oquirrh Mountains speak to that. The company gets its ore, workers get their salaries and one day the community has to pick up the social and environmental pieces left behind. The corporate-driven demise of these two communities, protracted over years as far as Bingham Canyon was concerned, a few tension-filled months in Lark’s case, left only those who had lived there to mourn their passing. “They took my memories,” Halverson says. “They buried Bingham. I used to be able to go to the top of the mine and see where things were.” With no trespassing signs keeping people away, “Now, I can’t even go up there. Just seems like they took everything away from me.”

“You miss out on so much companionship and love and feelings,” says Stella Saltas, the 88-year-old mother of City Weekly publisher, John Saltas. She was born in Bingham and had to join the forced exodus from the canyon in the early 1990s. Since then, she has lived in a rambler in West Jordan. The long-gone city, she says, “will always be home. I live here, but it’s not home.” Many of Bingham’s displaced citizens say they left a part of themselves in the canyon that they never regained. Some, such as authors Eldon Bray and Scott Crump, have self-published books celebrating and preserving their memories of the canyons. Other former residents meet monthly at cafés and restaurants to share memories and keep alive old friendships forged in Bingham. Then there’s the Fourth of July chuckwagon breakfast at Copperton Park, a tradition started in Bingham Canyon and continued in Copperton by the local Lions Club chapter. These gatherings underscore the fragility of such communities; each year fewer Bingham Canyon survivors show up for the eggs and pancakes. London-based mining conglomerate Rio Tinto purchased the mine in 1989. On its website, it employs similar tools, but instead of an adhoc tour of personal histories and recollections, the corporation favors a 360-degree panoramic tour of the mine, which measures three-quarters of a mile deep by two-and-three-quarters miles across. “You can see it from the moon!” the tour guide in the video says. “Currently, we are planning on operating until at least 2029, and the long-term outlook for copper is strong,” spokesman Kyle Bennett writes in a response to emailed questions. Meanwhile, far from its shadows, in kitchens and basement studies, the children of Bingham Canyon build through photographs and words a virtual re-creation of a beloved world long since lost. Halverson says they have no choice. “If you don’t write these stories, and don’t pass them on, they will die.”


NIKI CHAN

ANDREA SFEININGER

COURTESY UTAH HISTORICAL SOCIETY

COURTESY UTAH HISTORICAL SOCIETY

MARKHAM BRIDGE

MAIN STREET, BINGHAM

MINER’S LUNG

FROM COMMUNITY TO GHOST TOWN

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JUNE 30, 2016 | 17

With the world’s insatiable appetite for copper ore, the various canyon communities the mining corporations had relied on for labor found themselves in the way of the mine’s expansion. The process of families being displaced that first began with open-pit mining operations, picked up pace in the 1950s. By 1959, Kennecott Copper began aggressively buying up canyon private properties and homes. At a meeting, Dunn quotes one resident saying, “Why should we sell our homes for a song, move to the valley and go into debt 20 years?” “It was all ending,” Nicholls says. “Almost all of them were gone, there were a few holdouts who didn’t want to take their pennies on the dollar offer.” Nicholls’ father sold his Coppergate bar in 1961. The work had taken its toll on him, his son says.”It just about destroyed him physically. He was an alcoholic, it was hard, hard work. He went through years of real struggle financially to keep things going.” Kennecott offered to pay the appraised property market value. Nicholls’ father paid $39,000 in 1945 when he bought the bar. Kennecott offered him the same amount to sell in 1961. While his father wasn’t pleased with the offer, “he was just happy to get out and get out with something,” Nicholls says. “They really had the city over a barrel.” In a blog post on Gene’s Family Tree, Halverson writes of playing as a child in the abandoned city. “The town’s water tank was now our swimming pool. Abandoned mines, buildings and equipment made a wonderful playground.”

Meanwhile, next to the mountains, Lark had a store, a gas station and a hotel, a bar and two churches—Catholic and Mormon. The land itself was owned by the U.S. Smelting, Refining & Mining Co.—some residents owned their homes, while many took advantage of cheap rents, the mining company-cum-landlord preferring to subsidize rents to have its employees close by. Lark sat on a hillside with spectacular views of Salt Lake Valley. “It was right on the corner of the valley,” says Lark historian and former Kennecott geologist Richardson. “You could look out and see the Wasatch Mountains.” He and his wife would go for walks after dinner on the sand dunes, the smells of the copper minerals in the tailings that formed the dunes rising up to greet them. What it shared with Bingham was the same miners’ work ethic, and for some the same net result, men dying young of silicosis and their widows struggling to support their children. Unless you owned your home, renting from the company made you vulnerable to eviction, if, as in the case of Crump’s grandfather, you fell sick with “miner’s lung.” He and his family were evicted because he couldn’t work anymore. A

friend found him rooms elsewhere in Lark, where his wife cared for him until he died. She raised her children on a tiny pension until she found work at the Lark Mercantile and as custodian of the local Mormon ward house.

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The canyon got its name, according to local historian Marion Dunn’s book Bingham Canyon, when Thomas and Sanford Bingham herded their cows there in August 1848. Back then, the canyon was covered with pine trees, many measuring 3-5 feet or more in diameter. Along with scrub oak and wildflowers, the Oquirrh Mountains were sources of timber to first build homes, the Mormon Tabernacle and to shore up the walls of underground mines. Individual mining claims gave way to acquisitive businesses. By the early 1950s, U.S. Smelting, Refining & Mining Co. owned the underground mines that let out near Lark, and Kennecott Copper owned the above-ground mine directly to the south of Bingham Canyon. Johnny Susaeta is a spry, twinkling-eyed 93-year-old who still displays the rugged good looks captured in photographs of the heroic local football star 70-plus years ago enshrined in a room dedicated to alumni at Bingham High in South Jordan. The World War II veteran and retired Kennecott worker’s parents were Basques who met in San Francisco after emmigrating from Spain. Susaeta grew up in Highland Boy, where he knew Slavs, Italians, Serbs and Croatians. “I spoke most of their languages when I was young,” he says. It was a tough town to grow up in, one where fighting was a way of life. “I got in a fair amount of fisticuffs,” Nicholls recalls. “Fighting was your way into making your mark and being accepted.” While Bingham taught its residents that diversity and acceptance went hand-in-hand, when they went to Salt Lake City, they’d often experience rejection. “When I went to the valley with my Mexican friends, they wouldn’t let us go dancing unless I ditched them,” Halverson says. “Well, hell, who would want to ditch their friends?” When hostilities broke out in Europe at the beginning of World War II, Bingham ethnicities of every stripe went to

war, leaving women to take over mining work. “Everybody in town was signing up,” Halverson recalls. Johnny Susaeta signed up with four friends. “We ran around together, so we decided we’d go win the war.” Three made it back uninjured. Nicholls’ father was a blacksmith. At war’s end, he bought the Coppergate bar in Bingham. Wide-eyed, 8-year-old Nicholls arrived in Bingham just days before the end of the conflict. Each night, he went to sleep to music from a jukebox in the bar below playing country music. The day the war ended, he marveled at the parties in the street, people hanging out windows banging pots and pans, firecrackers going off as residents sang and danced in the streets.

EUGENE HALVERSON

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MAKING YOUR MARK WITH YOUR FISTS

JOE BURGER’S ONE-SEAT RESTAURANT


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COURTESY UTAH HISTORICAL SOCIETY

COURTESY UTAH HISTORICAL SOCIETY COURTESY UTAH HISTORICAL SOCIETY

NIKI CHAN

STELLA SALTAS

CANYON RESIDENTS That included “a gun turret set on a narrow gauge circular track,” that decades prior allowed company strike breakers to “shoot strikers through one of several gun ports.” The city disincorporated in 1971 and the remaining holdouts left. When Crump returned from his LDS Church mission, “all the buildings were gone.” As he drove up the canyon, “I’d go by empty foundations. It was just a ghost town.”

THE BATTLE FOR LARK

Compared to the campaign of economic and social attrition Kennecott waged successfully against Bingham Canyon, the mine’s owners faced a public-relations nightmare when it sought to raze the much smaller town of Lark. On Dec. 14, 1977, a Kennecott official summoned Lark’s 591 residents to a meeting at the LDS ward house. It had just agreed with UV Industries, which had previously bought out the U.S. Smelting, Mining & Refinery Co., to pay $2 million for 640 acres, which included Lark. The people of Lark had to vacate their homes by Aug. 31, 1978. Those who owned homes had to move them; those that rented faced eviction. Kennecott would neither buy the homes nor pay moving expenses, the official said. The company, he added, “is not in the housing business.” The acquisition, Rio Tinto’s Bennett says, was for several reasons, including “owning buffer property adjacent to (the mine) and as a site for infrastructure that captures and moves storm water.” Hilda Grabner was a descendent of Cornish miners, who were among the first immigrants to start mining the canyon. The retired teacher had lived in Lark on her own since her husband died in 1939, cultivating an immaculate English garden. Then 81-year-old Grabner was one of six Lark residents who, strangers all to air travel, nevertheless flew to New York to attend a stockholders’ meeting of the financially struggling Kennecott. Grabner and another resident were given

UPPER BINGHAM BOARDING HOUSES five minutes. One irate shareholder shrilly interrupted them multiple times with the question, “Are they stockholders?” Grabner silenced her by replying, “We’re stockholders in human lives.” Faced by a swarm of reporters reveling in the David-andGoliath fight, Kennecott extended an olive branch. In early May 1978, it offered 120 percent of the appraised value of the homes, $1,000 toward the cost of relocating, and moving owned homes to Copperton free of charge. Most of Lark’s residents voted to take the deal. Perhaps the final insult to Lark’s memory was that the nine whiteboard houses that were moved free of charge by Kennecott to Copperton, were then clad in red brick as part of Copperton Circle. Richardson expresses frustration that he can no longer visit the land where his former home stood and where he and his wife raised four children. The last time they could walk there, they found pieces of a jigsaw puzzle his wife had made in the dirt. There was the tree where his kids had played on a swing. “You can’t leave the highway,” he says, as any straying on to where Lark stood is barred by no-trespassing signs. “There’s no sign there was ever a town there.”

FRIDAY NIGHT LIGHTS

Rio Tinto began dumping waste over the former city and Main Street in 1997. Retired Kennecott employee Gary Curtis recalls driving one of the first haul trucks to start the down-canyon dumping on his mother’s birthday. “I don’t know I really realized the ramifications of it,” he says now. “You can’t take away people’s memories, but you dump that rock in there, you’ve buried history, I guess.” By then, the last holdouts in Lead Mine, which stood at the bottom of the canyon, had gone. Stella Saltas lived there in her final Bingham years, the location of her home

THE TRAM and her father’s precious garden still partially visible from the road through a chain-link fence. “Little by little, they did it, till you’re about the only one left,” she recalls. “I wanted to stay there, that was home, I loved it,” she says. Her feelings for Bingham, wrapped up in memories of daily coffee with her own mother on the latter’s porch as hawks and eagles wheeled in the sky, are “something you can’t explain.” An important remnant of Bingham’s existence was Bingham High on the northern edge of Copperton. While the elegant, art-deco designed school, by then a junior high, had been closed in 1996 by Jordan School District, it remained an emotional touchstone for generations of Bingham and Lark graduates who saw it as all that was left to testify to their past. “Bingham people came from all over the world, really, to be miners,” Crump says. “They came from so many places speaking different languages and the school was the gathering place, where they would all come together, to first get ahead in America by getting an education. This was their gateway to a better life, to learn English.” Rio Tinto ordered it razed in 2002. Bennett says the building post-closure by the school district, “fell into disrepair due to vandalism and became a safety hazard,” so they had it torn down. Fourteen years on, feelings still run high. “It’s just a sin it was leveled,” says Nicholls. While other residents grabbed small mementos from the site, Johnny Susaeta and his three sons carried away a 2-by-4-foot, 200-pound capstone from one of the Art Deco school’s towers. “Everybody else took bricks,” Susaeta says, standing by the capstone, which they dug a hole for in his driveway. “We took that.” Now it’s simply a weed patch. The only sign there was ever a school there is some steps rising to where the ballpark once stood that rang to the cheers of Bingham fans.


NIKI CHAN

STEVE RICHARDSON POINTING TO WHERE LARK ONCE STOOD

“I LIVED IN LARK”

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The Bingham Canyon History Facebook page’s membership, Eldon Bray says, is largely made up of, “the children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren of people who grew up in Bingham or worked the mine. The town and the mine were all locked together in so many ways.” Sit with retired mine worker Gary Curtis as he reviews old mining photos online and the pleasure they provide are clear. He points to a picture of Marvin “Rosie” Ray, father of Russell Ray, Copperton’s former postmaster, and recalls the time Rosie “chewed my butt,” after he was caught up in a fight. “There’s Dr. Richards,” he says, pointing to a 1930s photo of a barbecue. “He birthed me.” Thanks to Lark historian Richardson’s diligent efforts, including interviewing former residents and posting their stories on Facebook, the Lark Facebook page paints a picture of both the community and its demise. While Richardson had long been interested in history, his passion to explore Lark’s past was fueled by Utah state archeologist Chris Merritt. In 2014, Merritt presented at a history conference a computer-software-generated 3-D flyover of Lark, circa 1978, using a town survey completed by Kennecott to calculate how much to pay residents for their homes, and black-and-white photographs of all the properties. The drone-like view begins from the Mascotte tunnel entrance, sweeping out over the streets and principal buildings that once made up the town. After the presentation, an emotional Richardson told Merritt, “I lived in Lark, I lived in that house,” Merritt recalls, Richardson having recognized his former home among the pictures Merritt had used to bring Lark back to life. Merritt coordinates the antiquities section for the Utah Division of State History and as a deputy state historical preservation officer, reviews “state and federal undertakings for their effects on archeological resources.” He first heard of Lark after a state agency sent him a water-mitigation project Rio Tinto Kennecott was proposing on the old Lark site. Merritt learned that while most of the buildings were long gone, “the street system was still intact”

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COURTESY UTAH HISTORICAL SOCIETY

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ANDREASFEININGER

COURTESY UTAH HISTORICAL SOCIETY

BALKAN BAR IN HIGHLAND BOY

DIMAS’ GROCERY

BINGHAM HIGH SCHOOL

IMMIGRANT MINERS

in the surface dirt, and there were several 1950s brick structures, along with the old water tower. Through a report on the site compiled by the state, Merritt learned that in contrast to the LDS ward house-centric neighboring city of West Jordan, Lark, with its majority Hispanic population, had a Catholic church at its center, with the union hall next door. The LDS ward house was “off on the bench land further away.” he says. “This is a classic mining town.” Since the site is not publicly accessible, working on documents he found in the state archives such as the town survey, “led us to a digital preservation of the community. That underscored you don’t need to have that physical place to retain a community. You can still have it through this digital expression.” Merritt plans to invite Lark old-timers to the Sept. 30 Utah State History Conference in West Valley to record their recollections of “what they remember about Lark, what sticks out about it.”

Walk with Patrick the block from his house to his father’s, and he talks about people he knows and the houses they live in. He doesn’t know the number of their house, just where it is. “People change,” Patrick says. “The town don’t.” While residents talk about the possibility of Rio Tinto one day buying out Copperton and leveling that, too, Bennett writes that, “The company has no plans to buy land within Copperton in the future, and it is unlikely that land in Copperton would be needed to accommodate growth.” That isn’t true for Lark, though. Tearing out the guts of a mountain, in order to process the less-than-1-percent of copper ore it contains, generates 50 million tons of waste rock every year. Rio Tinto is placing some of that waste rock close to where Lark stood, 40 years after it tore the town down. The only threat, resident and Copperton council member Kathleen Bailey sees, is encroachment from the valley itself. “Every year, they build further up Bingham Highway. I think one day they will be at our door.”

BARBARIANS AT THE CANYON GATE

AN EMPTY GRAVE

opment—including so many deaths from miner’s lung—and Bennett responds by highlighting his company’s focus on achieving a “zero-harm workplace.” He writes, “We recognize the ultimate sacrifice many miners made before modern health and safety standards were in place.” Bill Nicholls and Maynard John Berg, both graduates of Bingham High, are the driving force behind a permanent memorial for the school, if not the city. They had searched fruitlessly for one of the capstones that crowned the school’s towers to use for the memorial. In mid May, having given up the hunt, a Copperton council member told them about Susaeta’s capstone in his driveway. In the late afternoon May sun, Nicholls and Berg, Susaeta, a volunteer and a City Weekly reporter gathered around the capstone. “This is the key to our monument,” Nicholls says. “We thought none of these existed. When I saw it, I just about fainted.” Berg squatted down by the capstone and dug a little of the dark, loamy soil that had been its home for so long. “I call it providence,” he says. The four men removed the capstone and took it to a shed at Copperton Park, to join several hundred bricks and smaller pieces of the old school’s masonry that had been rescued by onlookers. Shortly after the men drove away, one of Susaeta’s relatives realized that they had not filled in the hole that removing the stone had created. In the late afternoon sunlight, the black soil leant it the quality of a grave. The man picked up a shovel and dragged the edge of the blade over the surrounding concrete, filling in the sides of the hole with dirt, before finding some blocks to fill in the rest of the yawning space. The metal scraping against stone echoed around the silent neighborhood, providing a soundtrack of sorts to the dumper trucks lined up on the upper ridges of the wasterock mountain that looms above the town. CW

The sleepy town of Copperton all but stands guard on Bingham’s mountain-tombstone, dump trucks visible on the waste-rock pile’s upper echelons in the distance above houses on the west side of Copperton park. Once it had a café, a gas station, a grocery store, an elementary and a high school, but “that’s all gone now,” says Copperton resident Ron Patrick. “Basically it’s like we’ve moved away from some of the conveniences of the world.” Walk the quiet, drowsy streets and you encounter few cars or people. Copperton has three churches, a Mormon ward house, a Catholic and a Methodist church. Crump says being LDS and a Republican, “I’m in a minority. Republicans met in a telephone booth, while Democrats were a force to be reckoned with. They met in the Lions Club.”

Every Fourth of July morning, Copperton Park rings to the preparation of a chuck-wagon breakfast and the shouted encouragement of the young and the old as they take part in three-legged races and other short sprints. “A lot of people from Bingham come back for that day,” Patrick says. “They’ll sit here all day in the park and just visit.” Where once the breakfast used to be for 2,000 people, Patrick’s father Bud says, “now you do good if you have 500 or 600. You don’t get many people who lived in the canyon and remember it.” This year’s celebration will also see the unveiling of a memorial to the demolished Bingham High by Salt Lake County Mayor Ben McAdams. Ask Rio Tinto what should be done to memorialize Bingham Canyon, given the role it played in the mine’s devel-


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While some musicals are known for their dance numbers (West Side Story) and others for their comic appeal (The Book of Mormon), Motown: The Musical is all about the music. Based on the life of Berry Gordy and adapted from his 1994 autobiography To Be Loved: The Music, the Magic, the Memories of Motown, this “jukebox musical” makes up for what lacks in story with more than 50 classic Motown hits. Written as one long, nostalgic flashback, Motown begins in 1983, as Gordy is celebrating the 25th anniversary of Motown Records. It’s a moment when Gordy—who dabbled in boxing and worked at Detroit automobile factories before starting his career as a music producer—should be proud. After all, he’s founded the most successful black-owned music company in U.S. history. But the celebration is overshadowed by troubled affairs: The Motown label is in decline, its biggest stars are leaving for other deals and lawsuits threaten the company. The musical doesn’t dwell too much on these dour particulars and, almost before the audience is seated, the hits start rolling out, beginning with a sing-off between The Four Tops and The Temptations. And the hits keep coming: “My Girl,” “Dancing in the Streets,” “Ain’t No Mountain High Enough,” “Please Mr. Postman,” “Brick House” and more. Most characters (Diana Ross, Michael Jackson, Smokey Robinson, Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye) have only cameos, but what does that matter when the music is so good. (Katherine Pioli) Motown: The Musical @ Capitol Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, 801-355-2787, through July 3, $57-$200, see website for full schedule. ArtTix.ArtSaltLake.org

Donald Trump—err, Drumpf—two married gay men, two married lesbians and Joseph Smith walk into Kolob … This isn’t the beginning of a joke; it actually happens in Salt Lake Acting Co.’s annual production of Saturday’s Voyeur. In their annual satire of life in Utah, along with some presidential election-year commentary, creators Allen Nevins and Nancy Borgenicht know how to play to their liberal audience. Bordering on sacrilege, Saturday’s Voyeur jokes about current events, like education, fossil fuels, abstinence, the “dirty soda” war and BYU’s Honor Code. But the theme of this 37th edition is how children of gay parents can’t be baptized until they reach the age of 18 and denounce said parents. There’s also a subplot focusing a little too much Drumpf, despite being hilariously played by Justin Ivie. Ted (Devin Rey Barney) and Fred (Eric Lee Brotherson) co-parent their son Ned (Tito Livas) with Rose (Becky Cole) and Mary (Amanda Wright). In order to go on a mission, Ned has to distance himself from his loving moms and dads. It isn’t until he’s given a sip of dirty soda and has a dream about Kolob—with Heavenly Father (Ivie), Sister Lucie (Eb Madson), Heavenly Mother (Annette Wright) and Joseph Smith (Robert Scott Smith) in tow—that he begins to understand: Religion is confusing. Saturday’s Voyeur makes provocative and entertaining observations about Utah. Catering to a left-leaning crowd, this fantastic, preposterous parody would never work anywhere else. #blessed (Missy Bird) Saturday’s Voyeur 2016 @ Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, 801-363-7522, June 22-Aug. 28, Wednesday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Sunday, 1 p.m. & 6 p.m., $44-$55. SaltLakeActingCompany.org

Every summer, the Eccles Theater in Logan becomes a showcase for the wide variety of ways that theatrical performance and powerful music can combine to move an audience. Once again, the Utah Festival Opera & Musical Theatre offers a season of productions and events dedicated to works spanning decades, yet united by their ability to join song and story. The season opens on July 6 with Puccini’s celebrated 1918 trilogy of one-act operas: the Parisset Il Tabarro, the religious redemption tale Suor Angelica and the farcical Gianni Schicchi. Also part of the season is George and Ira Gershwin’s American opera Porgy and Bess, a love story set in a world of Southern African-Americans in the early part of the 20th century. Classic Broadway musicals fill out the schedule, including the Tony Award-winning Ragtime, the Kern/Hammerstein favorite Show Boat and the family-friendly adaptation of Peter Pan (above). And an impressive repertory company plays multiple roles to make all of these shows possible. But beyond these productions are dozens of fascinating opportunities to learn more about the creation and history behind the works, and the behind-the-scenes efforts to put a show together. Enjoy pre-show talkback sessions, Academy Classes and one-night-only concert events like a tribute to Cole Porter. Whether you want to dig into the Gershwin songbook, learn about theatrical costuming or explore the many incarnations of Peter Pan, UFOMT will have something to enhance a weekend—or a week—at the theater in northern Utah. (Scott Renshaw) Utah Festival Opera & Musical Theater @ Ellen Eccles Theater, 43 S. Main, Logan, 800262-0074, July 6-Aug. 6, $10-$77 individual tickets, season tickets available, see website for full schedule. UtahFestival.org

Utah Festival Opera & Musical Theatre

JUNE 30, 2016 | 21

A border is the mark of separateness, the dividing line of property or geography. Other cultures don’t always view borders in the same way. Local artisan William “Willy” Littig traveled to northern Spain several years ago to trace the Camino de Santiago de Compostela, a route of pilgrimage to the shrine of the early Christian apostle St. James the Greater in Galicia. He noticed subtle changes of material, color and texture where shared walls along the route met, and documented them with a series of photographs titled Vecinos—Spanish for “neighbors.” The poet Robert Frost once wrote that “good fences make good neighbors,” but that epigram doesn’t take into account the ways that a wall can sometimes say “welcome.” In his glasswork for local churches, including All Saints Episcopal and the Joseph Smith Memorial Building, Littig has shown that he has a deep understanding of the importance of symbolism in the decorative arts. In this photography collection, the purely utilitarian purpose of the wall is eclipsed by its social function. In addition to being the marks of those who have shared the walls as domiciles, these decorative impulses also have significance to those traveling along the routes, indicating that these artisans are fellow travelers, literally and figuratively. The chance meetings of sojourners, like the intersections of these designs, could lead to epiphanies, aesthetic as well as spiritual. These understated images, glimpsed plainly and unaltered by the camera lens, are a vibrant metaphor for how much more unites us than whatever walls divide us. (Brian Staker) William Littig: Vecinos @ Mestizo Gallery, 631 W North Temple, 801-361-5662, through July 8. MestizoCoffeeHouse.com

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he recently released Captain America-Steve Rogers #1 comic book brings the original “First Avenger” back into the fold of the Marvel universe. Written by Nick Spencer and drawn by Jesus Diaz, the book is action-packed, gorgeous to look at and easy to understand. In some ways, it’s the perfect jumping on point for a new reader. But the book might not be attracting a whole lot of new readers, which is a shame, because it’s a great read. The problem is probably that people were spoiled on the book by the press without any context. Hell, if you’re reading this, you’re probably one of the people who got spoiled. Everyone got spoiled. And if you hadn’t, here it is again. Spoiler alert: The last page of the comic book has Captain America proclaiming his allegiance to Hydra, the evil organization that was even too evil for the Nazis. Now, the book is much more than just that one page. I mean, how would you feel about watching The Empire Strikes Back if

the only thing you’d seen was Darth Vader’s proclamation that he was Luke’s father? Would Citizen Kane have the impact it did and make you want to watch it from the beginning if you had been inundated with images and memes with the sled being tossed in the incinerator? Of course not, because those moments are the result of build-up through the course of the story, and are virtually meaningless without all the context that brings you on the journey to that final place. It’s unfair to judge the destination of a serialized piece of art without also judging the journey. The journey for this comic book is a fascinating one, split between two timelines. In the present, we’re shown Steve Rogers saving the world against a new Hydra threat, led by the Red Skull. They’re wrapped in the symbology of Ayn Rand, and the things coming out of Red Skull’s mouth might very well be lifted directly from a Donald Trump speech. In the other timeline, we’re taken to 1926 to see a young Steve Rogers living with his mother. She’s a victim of spousal abuse, and the one organization that seems able and willing to help get her out of her plight is a community activist organization named—you guessed it—Hydra. Although it’s not stated specifically, there are hints that this is all a Hydra plot to undermine the world while Steve Rogers is at his most impressionable. JESUS SAIZ

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Captain America’s shocking line

In one issue, the book says so much about the bad ideas that can corrupt otherwise good-hearted people; it acts as a black mirror set against our current political situation. At their best, the comics starring Captain America have always offered a reflection of our political situation, whether it was his assassination during the Bush administration, or all the way back to punching Hitler on the cover of his very first issue. What’s it like to realize that your country has always been deeply racist and run by super-villains of an elite class? What’s it like to find that, through the same brain-washing tricks that allow children to believe in Santa Claus (or become Republicans), Captain America, at least in this timeline, might be the bad guy? It’s the reality check we need in such a desperate time. It’s fine to be upset by a comic book and the twist we see here, but I think the journey the book takes readers on is worth the shock of the ending. It’s not a publicity stunt meant to sell more comics as much as some great storytelling—which is also meant to sell more comics. Don’t be swayed by the online outrage you see over the book. Read it for yourself and see where that journey takes you. There’s more depth to it than the one page you’ve seen. In reading it, you might learn something about our America. CW

Though the first printing sold out, the book is being reprinted, and you will be able to find copies at your local comic-book stores. You can also snag it digitally at Marvel.com.


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1776 Murray Park Amphitheater, 495 E. 5300 South, 801-264-2614, through July 2, 8 p.m., NowPlayingUtah.com Arsenic and Old Lace Caine Lyric Theatre, 28 West Center St., Logan, 435-797-8022, through Aug. 5, varying days, 7:30 p.m., CCA.USU.edu Baskerville: A Sherlock Holmes Mystery Caine Lyric Theatre, 28 West Center St., Logan, 435797-8022, through Aug. 6, varying days and times, CCA.USU.edu The Cocoanuts Randall L. Jones Theatre, 351 W. Center St., Cedar City, 435-586-7878, July 1-Aug. 26, varying days and times, Bard.org The Curious Savage CenterPoint Legacy Theatre, 525 N. 400 West, Centerville, 801298-1302, through July 2, Monday & ThursdaySaturday, 7 p.m., CenterPointTheatre.org Footloose SCERA Outdoor Theater, 699 S. State, Orem, 801-225-2787, July 1-16, varying days, 8 p.m., SCERA.org Greenshow Greenshow Stage, 195 W. Center St., Cedar City, 435-586-7878, through Sept. 10, Monday-Saturday, 7:10 p.m., Bard.org Henry V Engelstad Shakespeare Theatre, 299 W. Center St., Cedar City, 435-586-7878, through Sept. 10, varying days, 8 p.m., Bard.org Jason Lyle Black: The Backwards Piano Man Sandy Amphitheater, 9400 S. 1300 East, Sandy, 801-568-2787, July 6, 8 p.m., SandyArts.com Mary Poppins Randall L. Jones Theatre, 351 Center St., Cedar City, 435-586-7878, July 2-Aug. 23, varying days and times, Bard.org Motown The Musical Capitol Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, 801-355-2787, through July 3,

Tuesday-Thursday, 7:30 p.m.; Friday, 8 p.m.; Saturday, 2 & 8 p.m.; Sunday, 1 & 6:30 p.m., Broadway-At-The-Eccles.com (see p. 21) Much Ado About Nothing Engelstad Shakespeare Theatre, 299 W. Center St., Cedar City, 435-5867878, through Sept. 8, Mondays & Thursdays, 8 p.m.; July 8, 8 p.m., Bard.org Neil Simon Festival Heritage Center Theatre, 105 N. 100 East, Cedar City, 435-267-0194, July 5-Aug. 8, various days and times, SimonFest.org Perfect Pitch Desert Star Theatre, 4861 S. State, Murray, 801-266-2600, through Aug. 20, varying days and times Monday-Friday, DesertStar.biz Peter Pan Hale Center Theatre Orem, 225 W. 400 North, 801-226-8600, through Aug. 6, Monday-Saturday 7:30 P.M., Saturday matinee 3 p.m., HaleTheatre.org Peter Pan Utah Theatre, 18 W. Center St., Logan, 801-355-2787, through Aug. 4, varying days and


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times, ArtSaltLake.org (see p. 21) Pirates of Penzance The Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, 801-355-4628, through July 23, Monday, Friday & Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday matinee, 2 p.m., TheOBT.org Puccini’s Trilogy Ellen Eccles Theatre, 43 S. Main, Logan, 801-355-2787, July 6-28, varying days, 7:30 p.m.; July 30 & Aug. 5, 1 p.m., ArtSaltLake.org (see p. 21) Saturday’s Voyeur Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, 801-363-7522, through Aug. 28, Wednesday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Sunday, 1 & 6 p.m., SaltLakeActingCompany.org (see p. 21) Shrek the Musical Beverly’s Terrace Plaza Playhouse, 99 E. 4700 South, Ogden, 801-3930070, through July 30, Mondays, Fridays & Saturdays, 7:30 p.m., TerracePlayhouse.com Singin’ in the Rain Caine Lyric Theatre, 28 W. Center St., Logan, through Aug. 6, varying days and times, CCA.USU.edu The Three Musketeers Engelsted Shakespeare Theatre, 195 W. Center St., Cedar City, 435-5867878, through Sept. 9, varying days, 8 p.m., Bard.org West Side Story CenterPoint Legacy Theatre, 525 N. 400 West, Centerville, 801-2981302, through July 18, various showtimes, CenterPointTheatre.org The Wizard of Oz High Valley Arts Outdoor Theater, 400 E. 250 South, Midway, July 1-16, varying days, 8:15 p.m., HighValleyArts.org Xanadu: A Benefit for Chris Clark Hale Center Theater Orem, 225 W. 400 North, Orem, through July 2, Thursday-Friday, 10:30 p.m., Saturday, 11 a.m. & 10:30 p.m., HaleTheater.org You Can’t Take It With You Caine Lyric Theatre, 28 West Center St., Logan, June 30-Aug. 5, varying days and times, CCA.USU.edu

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CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

FARMERS MARKETS

Michael Martin Murphey with the Utah Symphony Thanksgiving Point Waterfall Amphitheater, 3003 Thanksgiving Way, Lehi, 801-533-6683, June 30, 8:30 p.m., UtahSymphony.org Patriotic Celebration with Doug LaBrecque Snowbasin Resort, 3925 E. Snowbasin Road, Hunstville, 801-533-6683, July 1, 8 p.m., UtahSymphony.org Schubert’s Symphony No.5 St. Mary’s Church, 1505 White Pine Canyon Road, Park City, 801355-2787, July 6, 8 p.m., ArtSaltLake.org Utah Symphony Waterfall Amphitheater, 3003

COMEDY & IMPROV

Craig Bielik Wiseguys Ogden, 269 Historic 25th St., Ogden, 801-622-5588, July 1-2, 8 p.m., WiseguysComedy.com Improv Broadway Dress Rehearsals Brigham Larsons Pianos, 1497 S. State, Orem, 909-2602509, every Monday, 8 p.m., ImprovBroadway.com Improv Broadway Brigham Larson Pianos, 1497 S. State, Orem, 909-260-2509, every Friday, 8 p.m., ImprovBroadway.com Jacob Leigh Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, July 1-2, 8 p.m., WiseguysComedy.com Kristine Levine Sandy Station, 8925 S. Harrison St., Sandy, 801-255-2078, July 1, 8:30 p.m., SandyStation.com Laughing Stock Improv The Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, 801-355-4628, Fridays & Saturdays, 10 p.m., LaughingStock.us Off the Wall Comedy Improv Draper Historic Theatre, 12366 S. 900 East, Draper, 801-572-4144, every Saturday, 10:30 p.m., DraperTheatre.org Open Mic Night Wiseguys Salt Lake City, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, every Wednesday, 7:30 p.m., WiseguysComedy.com QW Improv Summer League Midvale Performing Arts Center, 695 W. Center St., Midvale, 801-824-0523, July 2-30, Saturdays, 10 p.m., QWComedy.com Travis Tate Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, June 30, 7:30 p.m., WiseguysComedy.com

SPECIAL EVENTS Park City Farmers Market The Canyons Resort, 1951 Canyons Resort Drive, Park City, Wednesdays, noon-6 p.m., through Oct. 26, ParkCityFarmersMarket.com Park Silly Sunday Market 600 Main Street, Park City, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., through Sept. 18, ParkSillySundayMarket.com Sugar House Farmers Market Fairmont Park, 1040 E. Sugarmont, Salt Lake City, through Oct. 26, Wednesdays, 5-8 p.m., SugarHouseFarmersMarket.org Downtown Farmers Market Pioneer Park, 300 S. 300 West, Salt Lake City, through Oct. 22, Saturdays, 8 a.m.-2 p.m., SLCFarmersMarket.org


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FESTIVALS & FAIRS

Venezuelan Festival The Gateway, 90 S. 400 West, Salt Lake City, 801-824-5824, Saturday, July 2, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., free, LatinoArtsFoundation.org

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Absence, Presence CUAC, 175 E. 200 South, 385-215-6768, through July 8, CUArtCenter.org The Abstracts of Brad Lloyd Teare Marmalade Branch, 280 W. 500 North, 801-594-8680, through Aug. 3, SLCPL.org Colour Maisch and Gary Vlasic: Albedo Nigredo Art Barn/Finch Lane Gallery, 54 Finch Lane, 801596-5000, through Aug. 5, SaltLakeArts.org Dave Newman Modern West Fine Art Gallery, 177 E. 200 South, 801-355-3383, through July 9, ModernWestFineArt.com Denise Duong: New Work JGO Gallery, 408 Main Street, Park City, 435-649-1006, through July 22, JGOGallery.com Don Weller: Another Cowboy Kimball Art Center, 1401 Kearns Blvd., Park City, 435-6498882, through July 24, KimballArtCenter.org Eric Peterson: Wildlife Photography Red Butte Garden, 300 S. Wakara Way, 801-585-0556, through July 17, 9 a.m.-9 p.m., $7-$12, children under 3 free, RedButteGarden.org Ideologue Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through July 23, UtahMOCA.org Jennet Thomas: The Unspeakable Freedom Device Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through July 30, UtahMOCA.org Jennifer Seely: Supporting Elements Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through Sept. 24, UtahMOCA.org Megan Gibbons: Layers: New Figurative Work & Phoebe Berry: Out of Context: Found Object Assemblages Art Access Gallery, 230 S. 500 West, 801-328-0703, through July 8, AccessArt.org (see p. 24) William Littig: Vecinos Mestizo Institute of Culture & Arts, 631 W. North Temple, Ste. 700, 801-361-5662, through July 8, Facebook.com/MestizoArts (see p. 21) Nic Courdy: Metaphornography Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801328-4201, through July 23, UtahMOCA.org Nouveau Pastiche: Paintings by Wendy Van de Kamp Sprague Library, 2131 S. 1100 East, 801594-8640, through July 9, SLCPL.org The Painted Veil Rio Gallery, 300 S. Rio Grande, through July 8, 8 a.m.-5 p.m., VisualArts.Utah.gov Point.of.View Urban Arts Gallery, 137 S. Rio Grande St., through July 11, UtahArts.org Snapshots: Mixed Media Works by Larry Cohen Day-Riverside Library, 1575 W. 1000 North, 801-594-8632, through July 7, SLCPL.org Utah Arts Festival Exhibition: 40 of 117 Salt Lake City Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801524-8200, June 23-July29, SLCPL.Lib.UT.us The World Around Us Evolutionary Healthcare, 461 E. 200 South, through Aug. 7, EvolutionaryHealthcare.com Jim Williams: 265 I...Home As Self-Portrait Utah Musuem of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through Sept. 24, UtahMOCA.org


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28 | JUNE 30, 2016

This is

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he word paisano in Italian means fellow countryman, friend or pal— an informal term of affection that, in modern times, could be translated as “homie.” So, it is as a term of endearment that I refer to the homestyle Italian food at Sicilia Mia as paisano fare. The diminutive restaurant—a smaller sister spin-off to Sole Mio in Sandy—is a family affair. On any given afternoon or evening, you might encounter the patriarch Franco Mirenda in the kitchen, matriarch Margherita welcoming guests and helping to serve customers, Franco’s son Giuseppe managing Sicilia Mia and tending to diners’ every need, plus chefs Gaetano, Carmine, Angelo, Alessandro, Tony and others. You will hear Italian spoken here. Sicilia Mia (“My Sicily”) has only been open since late March, but it has already become one of the toughest tables to get in the Holladay/Millcreek area. It’s a fairly small space, but there’s talk of expanding into a neighboring location that previously housed a now-closed Quiznos. I’m guessing that folks quickly sussed out that Quiznos couldn’t in any way compete with the fresh, from-scratch flavors here. The restaurant might be small, but the menu is extensive. There are a dozen or so appetizers (antipasti) to choose from, plus soups, salads, pizzas, an array of pasta dishes, meat, seafood, fish and fowl entrées (secondi), and homemade desserts. Bring friends or family, come hungry and plan to share. Portion sizes are generous. I suggest ordering a glass of Italian wine, beer or soda from the beverage list and then settling in for a lengthy dinner. Carpaccio di carne ($12.95) is a large, made-to-share order of bright red, raw beef pounded paper thin and served with delicious simplicity, letting the natural flavors of the dish speak for themselves—nothing more than fresh arugula leaves, shaved Parmigiano Reggiano and a judicious drizzle of olive oil. Likewise, with calamari e gamberi ($9.95), less is more. Small shrimp and squid rings are coated in coarse bread crumbs (more like cracker crumbs, really) and flash-fried, served with marinara. The seafood is amazingly light and crunchy, needing nothing more than a smidgen of salt. Arancini are Italian rice balls that are so named because they sort of look like oranges, which in Italian are called arancia.

TED SCHEFFLER

BY TED SCHEFFLER comments@cityweekly.net @critic1

Here, they can be ordered à la carte or as part of the hot appetizer dish, misto caldo ($9.95). It’s a trio of arancini along with a pair of potato fritters, served on a marinara-coated plate and sprinkled with grated Parmesan. While I found the fritters to be a bit on the bland side, the arancini were anything but: beautiful orbs of cooked Arborio rice, mozzarella and ground beef, coated with breadcrumbs and deep-fried to a crisp, gorgeous golden color. It’s interesting that while many of the dishes here are served in a fairly straightforward manner, without much flash or artistic flair, others are edible works of art. Spinaci al burro ($8.95) is an example of the latter. Fresh spinach is quickly sautéed in butter and then formed into a timbale shape, served on a bed of shaved Parmigiano Reggiano, with more on top, and dressed in a crosshatch pattern of balsamic vinegar—a lovely presentation that tastes even better than it looks. Because my wife’s entrée didn’t arrive at our table at the same time as mine and our guests’, our server took it off of our bill—despite the fact that we weren’t in any hurry and hadn’t complained about the dish’s late arrival. It was well worth the wait. Tender, tasty codfish fillets came with a mountain of mushrooms and a veritable village of veggies—zucchini, tomato, eggplant and more—all bathed in a natural mushroom jus ($16.95). Just as enticing, albeit a little scary looking, was an all-black dish of squid ink pasta with shrimp and calamari ($15.95). It’s called Spaghetti al nero di seppia, and it’s brimming with briny flavors of the sea. For something a little more recognizable, try the spaghetti Bolognese ($9.95), which is a generous bowl of al dente spaghetti with a hearty and rich, rust-colored pork and beef (plus the holy trinity mirepoix) Bolognese sauce. But I haven’t even gotten to the

Sicilia Mia’s spinaci al burro showstopper yet. At Sicilia Mia, spaghetti alla carbonara ($19.95) is prepared tableside, usually by Commander Giuseppe. It’s quite the production. A large, car tire-size hollowed-out wheel of Parmigiano Reggiano is rolled to the guests’ table. A flammable liquid is drizzled into the wheel and set ablaze. Next, in rapid succession, precooked pasta and pancetta are thrown into the wheel, along with eggs. All is vigorously tossed while scraping the bowl to infuse cheese into the pasta. The carbonara is then transferred to a plate, garnished with Italian parsley and Giuseppe decorates the edge of the plate with artful balsamic slashes. The flavor is fantastic—although, to be honest, the eggs in the sauce tend to scramble a tad. It’s pretty hard to create a glistening, raw egg yolk coating for pasta in a restaurant setting. The lasagna here (grandma’s recipe) is, quite simply, the best I’ve ever tasted. Anywhere. Period. The pasta is perfectly cooked, al dente (not the usual mush I’m far too accustomed to), enveloped in a delicious béchamel-cheese mixture and served in a large, deep-sided plate with homemade marinara. Aside from the service, which couldn’t be friendlier or more accommodating, I have only one more thing to comment upon: Do yourself a favor and order one of the woodfired pizzas. They, like virtually everything else at Sicilia Mia, are a little piece of heaven. Oh, and the eggplant parmesan—get that, too. Hey, did I mention the tiramisu? CW

SICILIA MIA

4536 S. Highland Drive 801-274-0223 Facebook.com/Sicilia-Mia


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30 | JUNE 30, 2016

Contemporary Japanese Dining

FOOD MATTERS BY TED SCHEFFLER @critic1

B

P EER

IZZA & GOOD TIM ES!

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I’m always intrigued perusing the Lifelong Learning classes offered by the Continuing Education & Community Engagement department at the University of Utah. These are non-credit courses that (usually) require no advance expertise. For example, I learned to play a pretty decent ukulele there. For food and drink lovers, this summer offers some fun and tasty courses, including a class on making croissants, a hands-on course and field-trip for gathering wild mushrooms, a beer-brewing class, summer sangría class, a course titled “Italian White Wines from Top to Bottom of the Boot” and many other useful gardening and healthy living courses. To find out more, check out Continue.Utah.edu/ Lifelong.

Good Karma

For those of you who might be looking for an alternative to franchise fare for weekday lunches in Sandy, there is good news. I reviewed Karma Indian Cuisine (863 E. 9400 South, 801-566-1134, EatGoodKarma.com) a while back, and was generally very impressed by the food, ambiance and service there. Well, by popular demand, Karma is now serving a lunch buffet, Monday-Friday, from 11 a.m.-3 p.m., priced at $10.99 per person. Buffet items include curries, Indian breads, basmati rice, vegetable dishes, desserts and more.

Food Fest Vendors Wanted

The Wasatch International Food Festival was formed from a community initiative to hold a food-centric event that would showcase ethnic foods from across the Wasatch Front. This two-day festival will be held at the Utah Cultural Celebration Center Festival Grounds at 1355 W. 3100 South, in West Valley City, on Friday, Aug. 19, 5-10 p.m. and Saturday, Aug. 20, 12-10 p.m. The WIFF is currently accepting applications for food trucks, restaurants, artisan food and packaged food vendors—especially those with an international flair. For more information or to apply, contact Sarah Senft at 801-965-5110 or visit FoodFestUtah.org. Quote of the week: “An idealist is one who, on noticing that a rose smells better than a cabbage, concludes that it makes a better soup.” —H.L. Mencken

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For the Birds

Eat Drink SLC returns to Tracy Aviary to benefit nonprofits BY TED SCHEFFLER comments@cityweekly.net @critic1

F

or me, the single most enjoyable booze-and-food event in Salt Lake City last year was Eat Drink SLC, the inaugural libation and culinary fundraising event held at Tracy Aviary. This year’s edition promises to be even better, with an all-star lineup of wineries, distilleries and brewers in attendance, along with an equally impressive roster of restaurant partners. It works like this: Attendees stroll through the aviary on the evening of Thursday, July 7, noshing on small plates from around 25 different restaurants. Whiskey Street, Trestle Tavern, Stoneground Kitchen, HSL, Frida Bistro, Current, Copper Onion, Bambara, Avenues Proper and Amour Spreads among them. In addition, libations aplenty will be available at various stations throughout the venue, including more than 80 different wines to sample, plus craft cocktails featur-

ing small-batch local distilleries and local beers from award-winning Utah craft breweries. Presenting food sponsor Nicholas & Company will team up with drink curator Vine Lore Wine and Spirits to make sure everyone is well-fed, and whistles are wet. Live music will also be an important aspect of the summer evening. Proceeds from Eat Drink SLC benefit Tracy Aviary, SB Dance and Race Swami, the latter of which is an organization that empowers underserved youth from Salt Lake’s west side, many of whom are from families involved in the food and beverage industry. “The aviary is a wonderful setting for this urban culinary event,” Scott Lyttle, deputy director at Tracy Aviary, says via email. “And, we very much appreciate receiving a portion of the proceeds, which we will use to maintain our beautiful exhibits and support our many popular community programs such as Avian Adventure Summer Camps, Nature in the City and Little Chicks classes.” As mentioned earlier, local distilleries and restaurants will partner up during the event to create unique craft cocktails. Included in the pairings are SLC gin distillers Beehive Distilling, with drinks mixed by Takashi. Copper Common will handle the mixology duties for High West Distillery, while Rocky Mountain Distilling/Kid Curry Vodka will hook up for cocktails made by

Finca. Finally, the team of Craft + Estate and Whiskey Street have some tasty surprises up their sleeves. One the beer front, local brews will be provided by Red Rock Brewery, which was named Brew Pub of the Year by Brewpub Magazine and Large Brewpub of the Year by the Great American Beer Festival, along with more craft brews from Proper Brewery and Uinta Brewing Co. For wine lovers, Eat Drink SLC is an opportunity to sample from a bevy of wines poured by more than 20 wineries. Those participants range from home-grown Utah winemakers (such as Salt Lake City’s Ruth Lewandowski Wines and Park City’s Old Town Cellars) to the Mediterranean varietals of Uvaggio, and wines from the Northwest U.S. including Adelsheim, Canoe

LOGAN SORENSON

DRINK

Local wineries abound at Eat Drink SLC

Ridge, Elk Cove, Precept Wine Co. and Willamette Valley Vineyards. International sips will be provided by Premium Port Wines of Portugal, Italy’s Leonardo LoCasio Selections, both Old and New World wines from Mundo Vino and Communal Brands, plus wines from Napa, New Mexico and beyond. Tickets can be purchased online at EatDrinkSLC.com. Attendees must be 21 or older and ticket prices—which include food, drink and entertainment—are $85 per person in advance or $95 on the day of the event. However, I wouldn’t wait around to buy tickets. Last year’s Eat Drink SLC sold out two days prior to the event. CW

32 | JUNE 30, 2016

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BEER, WINE & SPIRITS

the ATHENIAN BURGER

• OPEN 365 DAYS A YEAR. • ENJOY DINNER & A SHOW NIGHTLY. • MONDAY NIGHT JAZZ SESSIONS. FIND OUR FULL LINE UP ON OUR FACEBOOK PAGE. • ENJOY OUR AWARD WINNING SHADED/ MISTED DECK & PATIO.

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Take A Bite

GOODEATS Complete listings at CityWeekly.net Featuring dining destinations from buffets and rooms with a view to mom-and-pop joints, chic cuisine and some of our dining critic’s faves.

Our Philosophy has always been to take the finest ingredients and do as little to them as possible. Classic Italian techniques used to make artisan pasta, homemade cheeses and hand tossed Pizza.

Moab Diner

out of your Dining Budget

Good through July 14th.

Mykonos

20

16 WINNER

249 East 400 South, SLC • (801) 364-1368 stonegroundslc.com

The shack is back!

While shopping the many downtown businesses, you can stop at Mykonos in the City Creek food court for fresh Greek favorites. Start off with hummus, fried zucchini and mushrooms or dolmades before digging into a shawarma wrap, gyro, falafel plate and more. For a healthy afternoon snack, try the pita with hummus. 28 S. State, Salt Lake City, 801-5324480, MykonosCityCreek.com

The People’s Coffee

6213 South Highland Drive | 801.635.8190

Delicious Food, Great Atmosphere!

Royal Eatery

A longtime staple for downtown Salt Lake dining, the casual Royal Eatery features an extensive American and Greek restaurant menu and a particularly popular breakfast. The terrifically thin and crispy fried potatoes are a breakfast crowd favorite, as are the madeto order omelets. For lunch, the delicious pastramitopped Royal Burger doesn’t disappoint. 379 S. Main, Salt Lake City, 801-532-4301

NOW OPEN for Lunch and Dinner I 110 W. Broadway, SLC, UT | 385-259-0574 715 East. 12300 South. Draper, UT I 801-996-8155

Apollo Burgers

cityweeklystore.com

Catering available 20 W. 200 S. • (801) 355-3891 Open Mon-Wed: 9am-6pm Thu-Sat: 9am-9pm

JUNE 30, 2016 | 33

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Apollo Burgers opened its first location on Salt Lake City’s North Temple back in 1984 and has grown since then to some dozen locations around the state. Of course, the classic Apollo burger is the main draw here. But there’s much more to the Apollo experience than just the burgers. For example, the Philly cheesesteak, BBQ beef, Reuben, Greek gyro, chicken souvlaki, corn dog, tuna melt and much, much more. For something really different, try to pastrami burrito. Of course, you’ll want an order of the baklava for dessert. Multiple Locations, ApolloBurgersOnline.com

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Caffeine junkies unite: You can get your daily fix of mochas, lattes and espressos at The People’s Coffee downtown. The walls are adorned with stimulating photographs of coffee foam and tables filled with interesting novels, yet it is the staff that’s most refreshing. Accompanying the personable crew, is engaging jazz music that fills the café on select nights. 221 E. 300 South, Salt Lake City, 801-9068761, Facebook.com/PeoplesCoffee

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Serving up classic ’50s diner fare for nearly classic ’50s diner prices, the Moab Diner offers ambiance, fast service and great food in a restaurant always packed to the brim. And then, if you’re not completely stuffed (or even if you are), try out the ice cream treats. Banana splits, sundaes or a kid’s cone larger than most of the higher-priced chains will be a perfect accompaniment to a hot Moab day. 189 S. Main, Moab, 435-259-4006, MoabDiner.com


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34 | JUNE 30, 2016

The BFG

Kid Stuff

CINEMA

Steven Spielberg’s gifts shouldn’t be taken for granted in The BFG. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

I

t is probably a cliché at this point to note that Steven Spielberg has become a victim of his own success, but … well, there it is. We know that he’s capable of masterpieces, whether he’s venturing into genre fare or exploring history’s Big Events. We’ve seen what it looks like when he’s applying his incomparable skills behind the camera to fascinating ideas, or profound emotion. And anything less is held against that standard. That’s particularly true when he’s taking on kid-oriented fare, which feels almost tragic in a world where The Angry Birds Movie is somehow given a pass as anything more than what a bird leaves on your windshield. His The Adventures of Tintin was brushed off as a busy diversion—and I raise my hand as guilty—even as it crafted breathtaking action set pieces filled with more pure cinema than you’ll find in 90 percent of family-friendly movies. The BFG may never be counted among Spielberg’s greatest triumphs, but it shouldn’t have to be, not when its own distinctive pleasures are just sitting there in front of you. Working from a script by the late Melissa Mathison (E.T.), Spielberg sticks close to Roald Dahl’s story of an orphaned British girl named Sophie (Ruby Barnhill) who, while up late one evening, spots from the orphanage window a huge figure prowling through the streets. He turns out to be a giant who calls himself the Big Friendly Giant (Mark Rylance)—or BFG, in Sophie’s shorthand—and he whisks her away to his home in Giant Country. But while the vegetarian BFG means her no harm—and indeed, does his best to protect her—the other, flesheating giants like Fleshlumpeater (Jemaine Clement) are another, more dangerous matter entirely. There’s something uniquely meanspirited about picking on a child performance, yet it’s hard to ignore that one of

the main problems with The BFG is Barnhill. While Spielberg has been phenomenal throughout his career at casting and directing young actors, Barnhill brings a kind of generic precocious pluckiness that may work better on the page than it does on a big screen, in a movie that seems to need a core of loneliness that sparks her friendship. Considering how much of the story she’s required to carry, her work feels like something the film has to overcome, rather than something that adds to its charms. Its charms, however, are ample. The BFG’s home is remarkable all on its own, glistening with the bottled dreams the BFG catches to distribute, and glowing with the cozy warmth of his fire. Spielberg builds wonderful visual jokes into the BFG’s attempts to remain hidden from human view, and lends a magical quality to the existence of Giant Country as a world upside-down from our own. And when it’s time for the story to sneak in its action bits—whether it’s Sophie attempting to avoid the mean giants seeking her out in the BFG’s home, or the climactic grand battle—there’s no one you’d rather have choreographing those near-misses than Spielberg. Mostly, however, The BFG has Mark Rylance, whose performance here may be just as impressive in a different way as his Oscar-winning work last year in Spielberg’s Bridge of Spies. The technical achievement of this motion-capture creation is certainly

Mark Rylance and Ruby Barnhill in The BFG

astonishing, and Mathison’s script gives him plenty of Dahl’s distinctive malapropisms to enliven his dialogue. But its Rylance who gives the BFG soul, and a gentle spirit that makes his connection with Sophie feel completely genuine. It seems inevitable that The BFG will get scolded for its inclusion of an elaborate lunch with the queen of England (Penelope Wilton) in which the BFG’s home-brewed beverage causes an outbreak of powerful flatulence. Leaving aside that the sequence is taken directly from the source material— Dahl’s wicked sense of humor could actually stand to be more present, to cut the fantastical sweetness—the entire bit is fairly irresistible. If you’re going to go for a fart joke to amuse the kiddies, then by heavens, you should go for a fart joke. That’s the kind of instinct you should expect from one of the greatest filmmakers in history. Even when he’s just telling a kid story, perhaps we should stop taking him for granted. CW

THE BFG

BBB Mark Rylance Ruby Barnhill Jemaine Clement Rated PG

TRY THESE E.T. The ExtraTerrestrial (1982) Henry Thomas Drew Barrymore Rated PG

James and the Giant Peach (1996) Paul Terry Joanna Lumley Rated PG

The Adventures of Tintin (2011) Jamie Bell Andy Serkis Rated PG

Bridge of Spies (2015) Tom Hanks Mark Rylance Rated PG-13


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NEW THIS WEEK Information is correct at press time. Film release schedules are subject to change. THE BFG BBB See review on p. 34. Opens July 1 at theaters valleywide. (PG)

SWISS ARMY MAN BBB.5 Plenty of Sundance Film Festival chatter surrounded walkouts at Daniel Scheinert and Daniel Kwan’s funky comedy-drama, theoretically connected to the role played by flatulence and erections. If that’s the case, it’s hard to imagine people proving a movie’s point quite so spectacularly. It takes some benefit-ofthe-doubt-granting to move beyond the basic premise: A man named Hank (Paul Dano), stranded after a boating accident on deserted island, finds potential salvation when a corpse he calls Manny (Daniel Radcliffe) washes ashore, and the body’s intestinal gas powers a journey that may take them to the mainland. Then the body starts talking, and … stop shaking your head now. Beyond simply being a hilariously bizarre journey, Swiss Army Man uses Manny’s complete naïveté about the human condition to dig into insecurities that keep relationships on a superficial level. “The Daniels” aren’t uniformly successful at keeping their philosophical musings from bumping up against the weirdness, but there’s tremendous imagination in their visual style. If you can reveal something profound about the way discomfort leads us to hide ourselves from others, and do so while parading fart and boner jokes, you’ve got something special going on. Opens July 1 at theaters valleywide. (R)—SR

SPECIAL SCREENINGS CAPTAIN FANTASTIC At Red Butte Gardens, July 6, dusk. (R) ELECTION At Tower Theater, July 1-2, 11 p.m. & July 3, noon (R) THE PRINCESS BRIDE At Brewvies, July 4, 10 p.m. (PG)

CURRENT RELEASES CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE BBB “Buddy action comedy” seems like such a simple formula, yet few examples manage to get it as right as this one does. Kevin Hart plays Calvin, an accountant whose bland middle-age life is

FINDING DORY BBB There’s nothing particularly wrong with Andrew Stanton’s sequel to Finding Nemo—in which memory-impaired blue tang Dory (Ellen DeGeneres) gets a flash of recollection about her childhood, and seeks out her parents at a California aquarium— except that once again it feels like Pixar is playing it safe. Stanton understands adventure, and orchestrates set pieces with great energy, yet the narrative misses a chance to deepen relationships between characters we already know, mostly ignoring Marlin (Albert Brooks) and focusing on new characters. It is perhaps enough that DeGeneres still inhabits Dory with soul and commitment, in a tale about characters with limitations who come to learn what they can accomplish. That story, however, ends up more or less where it begins. You could do a lot worse than another Dory story, but you could also do a lot better. (PG)—SR THE FREE STATE OF JONES BB Historical footnotes can make for fascinating movies, provided they’re not turned into footnotes of David Foster Wallace-esque proportions. Co-writer/director Gary Ross tells the Civil Warera true story of Newton Knight (Matthew McConaughey), a Mississippi farmer who leads a group of army deserters, irate fellow farmers and escaped slaves in a guerrilla battle against the Confederacy. Ross effectively sets up his conflict as an uprising against Southern 1-percenters, yet while the war ends in 1865, this story winds its way through another decade-plus of Knight’s activities against Reconstruction-era injustice. And McConaughey’s Knight remains a figure with little to define him besides his righteousness. The intent may be to show rightside-of-history consequences of fighting for seemingly lost causes, but this movie just rambles on, assuming that everything that happened to Knight was equally worth putting in a movie. (R)—SR

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OUR KIND OF TRAITOR BB.5 A holiday in Morocco doesn’t seem to be working to re-spark the romance between mild-mannered professor Perry (Ewan McGregor) and high-powered lawyer Gail (Naomie Harris)— but maybe a little international intrigue will do the trick? Perhaps it’s implausible that Russian mobster Dima (Stellan Skarsgård) would recruit Perry to act as go-between for him with MI6—Dima wants to defect with info about shady financial dealings—but it’s just plausible enough to carry off the ensuing trans-European spy shenanigans. The fantastic cast—also featuring Damian Lewis as a slippery MI6 agent—makes this worth your time, or at least almost. If you loved the recent, fabulous TV adaptation of John le Carré’s The Night Manager … well, you probably won’t love this one quite as much. Director Susanna White makes a valiant effort at imparting an air of the cinematic to a story (also based on a le Carré book) that feels as if it belongs on the small screen. But the inescapable comparison with Manager underscores how much better Traitor would be given more time to develop its characters across a

THE PURGE: ELECTION YEAR [not yet reviewed] No, it’s not a documentary, although it feels like it sometimes. Opens July 1 at theaters valleywide. (R)

shaken up by the appearance of former high-school classmate Bob (Dwayne Johnson), once a picked-on fat kid but now a super-spy. The McGuffin of a plot matters little; the A+ chemistry between Hart and Johnson is everything. Johnson does hilarious work as a badass killing machine with an eager-to-please nerd in his soul, and while Hart’s character feels a bit like a missed opportunity, he shows the comedic range to play straight man. Throw in action beats with a bit more creativity than you might expect, and the occasional dud joke seems rare indeed, especially when you’re watching the birth of a great comedy team. (PG-13)—SR

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THE LEGEND OF TARZAN BB.5 A promising concept lies at the heart of this latest version of Edgar Rice Burroughs’ lord of the jungle: It begins when Tarzan is already a legend. Eight years after returning to England, John Clayton, Earl of Greystoke (Alexander Skarsgård) is invited back to the Congo, part of a plot by the bankrupt king of Portugal and his henchman, Leon Rom (Christoph Waltz), to exploit the area’s diamond wealth; isolated flashbacks fill in the story of the shipwrecked, orphaned boy raised by gorillas. Director David Yates does a solid enough job with the obligatory action moments full of CGI animals, and pokes around at some interesting subtext about colonialism and conquest, partly through an American envoy (Samuel L. Jackson) who accompanies Clayton on his African journey. But nobody involved seems to know quite what to do with the idea of Clayton navigating the mythology surrounding him—and Skarsgård, chiseled of abdomen though he may be, doesn’t dig very deeply into the character. It’s left to Margot Robbie’s lively Jane and Waltz’s cultured villainy to give some personality to something that otherwise becomes just another summer franchise wannabe. Opens July 1 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)—Scott Renshaw

longer storytelling form. Opens July 1 at theaters valleywide. (R)—MaryAnn Johanson

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Arts and entertainment 1st place: Carolyn Campbell “Ripped and Ravaged”

Review/criticism 1st place: Scott Renshaw “Dream Into Action”

INDEPENDENCE DAY: RESURGENCE BB Twenty years after the Earth narrowly avoided being stomped by goopy Alien Overlords, a new wave arrives. And, boy, are they ever cheesed. The original Independence Day had its virtues—an ominous, slow-build first act and a charming dorky sincerity— but this sequel can’t spare time for either of these, being too busy cramming together even bigger space ships, a slew of new characters granted one personality facet each, and returning cast members (Bill Pullman, Judd Hirsch, Brent Spiner) displaying extremely variable levels of enthusiasm. Director Roland Emmerich has a tactile knack for large-scale carnage that eludes most of the Michael Bay generation, and Jeff Goldblum seems to be having fun, at least. That said, this is enough. The promise of another sequel delivered in the final frames feels an awful lot like a threat. (PG-13)—Andrew Wright THE NEON DEMON BB.5 Nicolas Winding Refn flirts with notions of female beauty that may be entirely superficial—and maybe that’s okay. Jesse (Elle Fanning), a 16-year-old would-be model in Los Angeles, immediately becomes a can’t-miss prospect, and therefore a threat to other models’ careers. There’s an inherent challenge built into a story about someone who’s supposed to have an instantly recognizable “it-factor,” so it’s fortunate that Refn has Fanning, who’s had “it” as an actor since grade school. She provides a

MOVIE TIMES AND LOCATIONS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

solid anchor point for a milieu that’s right in Refn’s wheelhouse: Fascinating surfaces that may have nothing going on beneath them. It comes down to whether the gleeful garishness accompanying his often-striking compositions proves engrossing or off-putting. We shouldn’t under-value a commitment to unforgettable images, but when those images are an excuse for selfindulgence, perhaps we shouldn’t over-value it, either. (R)—SR

THE SHALLOWS BBB.5 Director Jaume Collet-Serra serves up the stripped-down survival story Nancy (Blake Lively), an American medical student whose encounter with a shark at a secluded Mexican beach leaves her injured and stranded on a rock 200 seemingly infinite yards from shore. Lively has to carry nearly the entire 85 minutes, and Collet-Serra trusts her performance enough to stage one brutal attack on another person almost entirely through her terrified reaction. But while the script offers just enough back-story to frame Nancy’s quest, it works mostly as a supremely efficient example of building suspense through limited options in a fixed space: a broken surfboard; a nearby buoy; a piece of jewelryturned-impromptu suture. Relying on its toothy CGI antagonist only to a limited degree, The Shallows reminds us that a skilled craftsman’s use of tension and release may be the essence of movie-making. (PG-13)—SR

ALL THE NEWS THAT WON’T FIT IN PRINT

Best overall blog 1st place: Gavin Sheehan “Gavin’s Underground”

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Best news-oriented website 3rd place: CityWeekly.net

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Medical/science reporting Honorable mention: Colby Frazier “Killing Fields”

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TV

Sex&Drugs&Rock&Roll is still dumb fun; Killjoys and Dark Matter return. Sex&Drugs&Rock&Roll Thursday, June 30 (FX)

Greatest Hits Thursday, June 30 (ABC)

Killjoys Friday, July 1 (Syfy)

Season Premiere: Neither Killjoys, nor its Friday-night companion, Dark Matter, were ratings blowouts in their

Ground Spinner Snake debut seasons last summer, both hovering at around 1 million viewers a week—but at least they got Syfy back into space (and, as observed in publications geek-thinkier than this one, projected a more realistically race- and genderdiverse future than most sci-fi series). Killjoys, about a trio of interplanetary bounty hunters (Hannah John-Kamen, Aaron Ashmore and Luke Macfarlane) working a quadrant seething with societal-class tensions (before Syfy’s pricier The Expanse did it), is the more fun series, balancing action, humor and clear stakes, and letting John-Kamen’s Dutch just be a badass heroine with none of the genre’s usual Strong Female Lead hype. A Season 1 Hulu binge here is a must, more so than with …

Dark Matter Friday, July 1 (Syfy)

Season Premiere: Syfy seemingly thought Dark Matter would be last year’s insta-hit, promoting it heavily and leaving Killjoys to bat cleanup. But a really, really, really ridiculously good-looking cast didn’t make up for a muddled storyline (six people wake up on an adrift spaceship with no memories, but specific mercenary skills and bad attitudes) and a dreary, claustrophobic setting (their ship made the Battlestar Galactica look like a Carnival Cruise). Even though Season 2 opens with the gang entering an intergalactic prison in their undies—well-played, Syfy— the Sexy Six will see more of the outside world this time around before unleashing some vengeful ass-kickery onto the Corporate Warlords (which I’m trademarking as a

Sex&Drugs&Rock&Roll (FX) band name as you read). In addition to more focused plotting, Dark Matter has scored a major get in casting Franka Potente as a galactic authority determined to bring the group down. Season 1 is on Netflix, but you might as well just jump in now.

Lady Dynamite Streaming (Netflix)

New Series: Yeah, I missed this when it debuted—have I mentioned that There Are Too Many Shows? But, there’s no better way to spend the Fourth of July weekend than watching all 12 episodes of Maria Bamford’s Lady Dynamite, a meta-comedy that does for bipolar disorder what Bojack Horseman did for depression and Jessica Jones did for PTSD: make entertaining, thoughtful art out of the usually “too heavy” to even talk about. Lady Dynamite’s timejumping storytelling and fourth-wall-breaking asides would be overkill even in a less-surreal setting, but the long-underrated Bamford, and a boatload of guest stars, make the weirdness of this semi-autobiographical story work seamlessly—and kudos to Sugar Ray’s Mark McGrath for one of the most self-deprecating rock-star cameos of all time. Sounds good, feels right. Listen to Frost Mondays at 8 a.m. on X96 Radio From Hell, and on the TV Tan podcast via Stitcher, iTunes, Google Play and BillFrost.tv.

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Series Debut: In 2015, a study stated that the average person stops seeking out and listening to new music at the age of 33, settling into a one-ear-in-the-grave groove of just sticking with the tunes of their formative years. This is why all “classic rock” radio stations play the same 20 songs every day, as opposed to the same 10 songs spun into the ground hour after hour on younger-skewing “pop hits!” stations, broken up by regular 12-minute ad breaks on both. So, if you’re dead inside enough for commercial radio, Greatest Hits is probably for you: O.G.s (Original Geezers) and newer artists come together to perform the chart-toppers of yesteryear. Sound harmless? Tonight’s premiere episode features the union of REO Speedwagon and Pitbull. Think about what you’ve let happen, ’Merica.

M-80

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Season Premiere: The debut of Denis Leary’s Sex&Drugs&Rock&Roll last summer presaged two rockcentric dramas: HBO’s just-canceled Vinyl and Showtime’s currently meh Roadies—and his occasionally haphazard, always swaggering comedy still nails inter-band relationships better than either. As Season 2 opens, Johnny Rock (Leary) and his Assassins bandmates react to the death of a fellow musician—2016 is the year for it—as only rock narcissists would: We each gotta establish solo-career immortality! (Wiki “Kiss,” “1978” and “mountains of record-company cocaine,” kids.) As terrible/hilarious as that idea sounds, SDRR doubles-down with actor Campbell Scott (as himself) buying bassist Rehab’s (John Ales) Irish Potato Famine rock opera from Season 1 and remaking it as a Hamilton-esque Broadway musical. Sex&Drugs&Rock&Roll is still gloriously ridiculous—rip off the knob and turn it up.

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lightly Stoopid is one of those rare bands who have chosen hard work over cheaply won fame, persistence over instant gratification and a more natural sort of green over the other. And now, at around 20 years strong, they show no signs of slowing down, giving in or selling out. The band was founded in 1994 by childhood friends Miles Doughty and Kyle McDonald, a pair of surfer-skater dudes who got distracted by music, learning guitar and bass. With original drummer Adam Bausch, the trio began playing punk and ska in small venues around Long Beach, Calif. In 1995, they crossed paths with Miguel Happoldt, co-founder/producer for Skunk Records, and his partner Bradley Nowell, lead singer of Sublime. Doughty and McDonald struck up a friendship with Happoldt and Nowell, who signed the band—whose members were still in high school—to their label. This recording session yielded Slightly Stoopid’s debut album, Slightly $toopid (Skunk Records). Released in ’96, it’s a punk-rock meditation on what it means to be young and have a penchant for speedy, aggressive expression. They spent the next several years on the road, living—in a style befitting their Long Beach lifestyle— out of their van. “That’s how things started early on,” says drummer Ryan “RyMo” Moran, who joined Slightly Stoopid in 2003, prior to recording the band’s fourth album, Closer to the Sun (Reincarnate/Imusic). RyMo first saw his future bandmates play in 1996, and got to know them from the local club circuit. In 2002, SS took RyMo’s old band the B-Side Players on tour, and a year later, Doughty and McDonald offered RyMo the drum stool. With RyMo’s multi-instrumental background—variously playing piano, violin, trumpet and drums while growing up—and musical education from San Diego State University, he was Slightly Stoopid’s missing puzzle piece. Now, with eight studio albums, four live albums and an EP under their belt, Slightly Stoopid is an octet. The base trio of Doughty and McDonald (sharing bass, guitar and vocals) with RyMo on drums is buttressed by percussionist Oguer “OG” Ocon, keyboardist Paul Wolstencroft, trombonist Andy Geib and Daniel “DeLa” Delacruz, plus unofficial eighth member Karl Denson (Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe, The Rolling Stones, Greyboy Allstars) on saxophone. The expanded band enabled Slightly Stoopid to more easily diversify their sound. “The musicianship is really good, and all the guys really practice and study music,” RyMo says. “We went from being a punk and ska trio to now being able to play reggae, funk, rock and world [music].” It is little wonder that Slightly Stoopid’s list of influences has grown to encompass greater diversity. “Fishbone is a huge influence, Operation Ivy, Rancid, NOFX, Bad Religion, Pennywise, Bad Brains, Led Zeppelin, Radiohead and Rush,” says RyMo. “As far as reggae stuff: Daniel Reed, Bob Marley—of course—and Toots and the Maytals.” Listening to Slightly Stoopid, the aforementioned greats’ impact on their sound is clear—but they’re not simple copycats.

Slightly Stoopid “As a musician, you learn how to emulate what someone is playing, then you forget all that and play it your way; that’s really the best way to learn things. You find your own musical voice; you put your own personal stamp on it.” The band isn’t shy about another well-known, not-exactly musical, influence: weed, which, in many ways, contributed to Slightly Stoopid’s development. “For us, smoking has always been a lifestyle thing, and it’s natural that we sing about it,” RyMo says. “It does take you to a different place, mentally, where you can channel different avenues in your brain and open new doors to your creative side.” Ganja’s skunky stank is all over the band’s latest album, Meanwhile…Back at the Lab (Stoopid Records, 2015). It’s the band’s most sonically diverse and technically mature release to date, an effortless concoction of punk, folk and reggae. And for those “Stoopidheads” out there, there’s more in store. “About a month ago, we went up to [Grateful Dead guitarist/ vocalist] Bob Weir’s studio, and we did a live webcast for a DVD,” says RyMo. “We played with Bob, Angelo Moore from Fishbone, Chali 2na from Jurassic 5 and Don Carlos, the great reggae singer. We also have an upcoming collaboration with professional skateboarder Danny Way … a punk-rock album to be released with a skateboard, and all the proceeds will go to charity.” Both projects are looking at late-2016/early-2017 release dates. In the meantime, Slightly Stoopid will continue doing what they’ve been doing for the last two decades: touring and keeping people dancing. RyMo finds satisfaction in that, and the overwhelming support of their fans. “The fact that we are still doing it—that’s success for us. I’m glad we didn’t take the one-hit wonder route.” CW

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here’s a point for every band where you have to make a decision about the future of the group: Stay the same and become stagnant, or adapt and survive. For Salt Lake City trio JAW WZZ!!, that moment happened last spring, when they became Sculpture Club, releasing a new album to mark the occasion. The band originally formed in 2011, when singer/guitarist Chaz Costello and drummer Madison Donnelly wanted to make more music and tour more frequently than they were doing in their other band, Broken Spells. The two took influences from acts like The Chameleons, The Smiths, Nü Sensae, The Raincoats and Xiu Xiu to create the new-wave post-punk sound they have today. They launched JAWWZZ!! as a duo, put together a list of 10 songs (most of which were released on their debut album, CHUMMZZ) and hit the road during 2012. The group got a lot of early buzz and became an intricate part of SLC’s indie punk scene, capitalizing on it by releasing the Party Problems EP in July 2013. Their live sets became the talk of the city—particularly the ones at record stores and private homes, where the band implemented visual effects like CO2-propelled confetti cannons, laser lights, fog machines, piñatas, streamers and glitter. Shortly after their EP dropped, the band brought in Chris Copelin on bass in order to push both their songwriting and sound in new directions. “I was a pretty big Broken Spells fan, and had actually seen that band play a lot more than I had seen JAWWZZ!!,” Copelin says in an email interview. “But I was really impressed with both Madison and Chaz’s musical inclinations and stage presence, and was truly flattered when they asked me to potentially join their band.” The band continued to play as JAWWZZ!! until shortly after the 2016 Treefort Festival, when Donnelly brought up the idea of changing names. It turned out that Costello and Copelin had also been mulling it over,

Sculpture Club

stemming from a point in 2014 when their newer music didn’t feel like it fit the old name. In May, they decided to release their newly recorded album A Place to Stand as Sculpture Club—and retire the band name with a festive JAWWZZ!! funeral at Diabolical Records. The album itself demonstrates amazing growth, in both sound and lyrics. When sequencing the album, the band discovered a loose, accidental concept that “kinda tell a story of my mental state over the last five years,” Costello says. His vocals are haunting, almost Robert Smith-like in their delivery, pouring into the microphone like a fountain of verbal riches. Songs like “Blooming” and “It Doesn’t Get Better” show off his emotional range, shifting demands to pleas in a heartbeat. Copelin and Donnelly interact well, standing out when needed but always in tandem, shining on songs like “Lovely Lashes” and “My Favorite.” A Place to Stand proves a punk band can be much more than loud, and new wave can be powerful instead of quirky or mopey. While the band prepares for a short statewide tour, many of their other projects (Big Baby, Choir Boy, Human Leather and Fossil Arms) are finishing albums— all due for release this year. And although Donnelly will take a six-month break for school this fall (with Jacob Hall filling in for her during that time), she says the band is ready to “commit super-hard” when she returns in February. “We are talking about touring again in the spring, and releasing a seven-inch … Also, this is the funnest band I’ll ever be in, with the best band dynamic, so I have to bask in it while it lasts.” Does that mean they’ll be keeping the cannons and papier-maché candy delivery vessels? So far, they haven’t discussed it but, “I think we probably will [keep them],” Donnelly says. “I think the ‘dance party to keep from crying’ concept is very close to our band, and the piñatas and confetti add to that.” CW

SCULPTURE CLUB (TOUR KICKOFF)

w/ Chalk, Primitive Programme Diabolical Records 238 Edison St. Friday, July 8, 8 p.m. $5 suggested donation All ages Facebook.com/DiabolicalRecords


Tuesdays at 9 - Karaoke that doesn’t suck! Quality drinks at an affordable price Saturday and Sunday Brunch til 3:00 Great food daily 11am - 12:15am Music Wednesday thru Saturday

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In an effort to be the best for brunch in SLC, Rye has decided to focus on the AM hours. Going forward Rye will be open: Monday-Friday from 9am-2pm Saturday and Sunday from 9am-3pm. What this means for you: even more house-made breakfast and brunch specials, snappier service-same fresh, locally-sourced fixins. Come on in. www.ryeslc.com

JUNE 29:

ANDREW GOLDRING ALBUM RELEASE

8PM DOORS FREE SHOW

L’ANARCHISTE LITTLE BAREFOOT

JUNE 30:

MORTIGI TEMPO ALBUM RELEASE

8PM DOORS FREE SHOW

JULY 1:

9PM DOORS

JULY 2: 8PM DOORS

TEMPLES THE HOUND MYSTIC DAISY & THE MOONSHINES

DUBWISE

MUSIC PICKS

THURSDAY 6.30

Peter, Bjorn and John, Jim Adkins, The National Parks

Do you remember the first time you heard Peter, Bjorn and John’s breakout single, “Young Folks” (Writer’s Block, Wichita/ Startime, 2006)? It’s the one with that unmistakable whistling intro. I was driving down the Pacific Coast Highway, headed to San Diego. That breezy, sunny melody— combined with the soft pump of the bass, the cheeky whisper-scratch of the shakers, the unobtrusive but effective drums and the wistful, longing lyrics—instantly captivated me. Paired with the unburdened feeling of driving on a beautiful stretch of road I’d never before traversed, with the ocean on one side and rolling mini-mountains on the other, and my family sleeping peacefully as I drove us on this rare vacation … It was one of the happiest moments of my life. I knew, instinctively, that I’d have to avoid the song, to never play it intentionally and always let it be an incidental joy. So, while the publicist sent me the CD, and the radio beat the song to death, and the band licensed the tune for a commercial, and the whistle came to be vilified, I still love it, along with every other song I’ve heard by the Swedish trio, who have since released four more albums (totaling seven), including

Vixen

MACHINEDRUM ILLOOM ARCONE DRINK

MARCUS PALMQVIST

CABARET

LIVE

BY RANDY HARWARD

the newest one, Breakin’ Point (INGRID/ Warner/Kobalt). Not that I play them on purpose. For me, they’re always an incidental joy. So maybe I’ll see this show, and maybe I won’t. I’m good either way. Jim Adkins of Jimmy Eat World, and our own The National Parks, open the show. (RH) Ogden Twilight Concert Series, Ogden Amphitheater, 343 E. 25th St., 5 p.m., $5 in advance, $6.50 day of show (plus $1.50 fee), OgdenTwilight.com

THE ROLLING STONES TRIBUTE NIGHT:

THE RUBES QUIET OAKS RUMBLE GUMS 90S TELEVISION

JULY 3:

VNDMG

9PM DOORS

BOGL CRISIS WRIGHT DECAY

JULY 5:

FEMI KUTI & THE POSITIVE FORCE

7PM DOORS

DJ SNEEKY LONG DJ FERAL CAT

JULY 6: 8PM DOORS FREE SHOW

JULY 7: 8PM DOORS

BRAIN BAGZ

THE MOTHS MOONS OF DELIRIUM CVPITVLS

X&G

AZTEK KHENSU SWELL MERCHANTS SHORYUKEN B2B SHAMBLES THOROUGHBRED

COMING SOON July 8:Quiet Oaks Tour Send Off July 9: Wye Oak July 13: Corb Lund July 15: Max Pain & The Groovies July 16: Iceburn

July 18: July 21: July 22: July 23: July 25:

Deerhoof Protoje Zeke Beats The Hound Mystic EP Release Strong Words MARK WEISS

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PINKY’S THIS WEEK’S

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Peter, Bjorn and John

FRIDAY 7.1 Vixen

Isn’t it strange that in the midst of the ‘80s hair metal craze, when all the bands looked like women, female bands in the genre— who often rocked just as hard, and never resulted in guilty turgidity—got so little love? What a shitty deal. Out of all of them, only one did very well (unless you count Lita Ford, but she fronted a band of dudes). What’s that? The suspense is killing you? Even with the photo staring you in the face? Vixen. Although their biggest hits were written by someone else (“Edge of a Broken Heart” was penned by schmaltz-meister Richard Marx and, weirdly, Fee Waybill of legendary art-rockers The Tubes), they still played their asses off, earning the respect of their peers. They also sold 1 million records, a feat that no other all-female band from the era matched. Plus, not to diminish them as musicians, they were so much better looking than Bret Michaels. Like many of the era’s hair farmers, they’ve continued in various incarnations, through lawsuits and even the death of founding guitarist Jan Kuehnemund—just months before reuniting their original lineup. Anyway, they’re back—and, in more than one way, hotter than ever. (RH) Liquid Joe’s, 1249 E. 3300 South, 7 p.m., $25 in advance, $30 day of show, LiquidJoes.net

»


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W W W. S O U N DWA R E H O U S E .C O M HOURS

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SATURDAY 7.2

Stadium of Fire, featuring Tim McGraw

Tim McGraw may as well be an “Indian Outlaw.” After all, he’s one of a rare species of Nashville lefties who doesn’t pander to the Red-State Mouthbreather Society of ‘Murrica (est. 9-11-2001) and he still has a career. In fact, he can play über-patriotic mass gatherings like this and most of the fans will just look the other way, forgetting—amid the colorful explosives and redwhite-and-blue butt floss—that this “Obama Worshiper” is aiding and abetting them durn latte-chugging liberal infidels. You know, while they swill domestic light beer from apple juice bottles in the parking lot with their bishops, arguing over who’s the biggest patriot, before singing along with McGraw. Then again, maybe they’re just happy it’s not Miley Cyrus headlining the shindig again this year. Note to the butt-hurt: Hyperbole is fun. Especially when you’re talkin’ about them who ain’t like you. But you already knew that. (RH) LaVell Edwards Stadium (BYU), 1700 N. Canyon Road (Provo), 8 p.m., $29-$175 ($29 tickets have sold out), BYUTickets.com/Stadium-Fire

kinds of flack over their name last year. There was even a petition to force them to change their name, which they refused to do in a lengthy press release. Good on ‘em, because there are a zillion other bands out there with names more awful than that. And these guys are just a harmless gaggle of stoners with a fetish for big riffs, big buds and ‘60s/’70s pop culture—and who make one bitchin’ racket. San Jose powerviolence-grind merchants DeathgraVe and, from parts unknown, the mighty muthafuckin’ Eagle Twin (little known not-fact: formerly known as Eagle Conjoined Twin) open the show. (RH) Metro Bar, 615 W. 100 South, 8 p.m., $7 in advance, $10 day of show, JRCSLC.com

Tim McGraw

Black Pussy, DeathgraVe, Eagle Twin

Speakin’ of butt-hurt: Black feminists had a strong allergic reaction to the name of our Portland-hailing headliners. Taken at face value, you can see how it might trigger objectification and racism sensors. Well, Black Pussy takes their name from the original title of The Rolling Stones’ “Brown Sugar,” which has been condemned as racist and defended as the opposite—but more the former, lately, as our society walks on eggshells scattered over hair-triggers. Anyway, although Mick Jagger’s lyrics were inspired by the mother of one of his children—and, in spite of his puzzling use of slavery-era imagery, could be a simple expression of lust—Black Pussy got all

BUDD BUTCHER

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WEDNESDAY/SUNDAY

LIVE

NO R VE CO ER! EV


SHOTS OF SUMMER

BY JOSH SCHEUERMAN @scheuerman7

Utah Arts Festival . 200 E. 400 S / facebook.com al iv UtahArtsFest

LIVE Music thursday, june 30

JOHN UNDERWOOD friday, july 1

2016 Utah Arts Festival - Casey Kawaguchi

Megan Hales, Medusa

FUN IN THE SUN AT THE PIG! saturday, july 2

DJ LATU

monday ENJOY 4TH OF JULY ON OUR PATIO!

Leah Cadavona, Sin Saber

wednesday

THE TRIVIA FACTORY 7PM

Every sunday ADULT TRIVIA 7PM

Stacey & Dustin Deittman, Shanna Marchant

Isaac, Macae Hansen & Family

Jet Black Pearl

Great food

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tuesday

LOCAL NIGHTS OUT

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Brooklyn Morgan, Dobby, Michelle & Rowan Griffin

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THEGREENPIGPUB.COM

JUNE 30, 2016 | 45

City Weekly ‘Out of the Box’


CONCERTS & CLUBS

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE @ CITYWEEKLY.NET

THURSDAY 6.30 CHECK OUT ALL OF OUR EVENT PHOTOS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET/PHOTOS

UTAH ARTS FESTIVAL 6.23-6.26

LIVE MUSIC

311 (The Depot) Bubba Sparxxx (Liquid Joe’s) Coco Montoya + Western Centuries (The State Room) Cinders + Bruneel + Rob the Queen + Michael Barrow (Muse Music Cafe) Emanon + Hallovved + Equinox + Inside Job (Kilby Court) Jazz Joint Thursday with Mark Chaney and the Garage All Stars (The Garage) Major Tom & The Moonboys + Funky Violet (Velour Live Music Gallery) Peter Bjorn & John + Jim Adkins + The National Parks (Ogden Amphitheater) see p. 42 Rick Gerber (The Hog Wallow) Slightly Stoopid +SOJA + The Grouch + Eligh + Zion I (The Complex) see p. 38 Stitched Up Heart + ImAlive + The Rock Princess (Metro Bar)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

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CITY WEEKLY’S HOT LIST FOR THE WEEK

10AM- 6PM AT SUGARHOUSE PARK

JOIN THE STREET TEAM! GET PAID TO ATTEND FUN EVENTS

EMAIL RESUME TO NENRIGHT@CITYWEEKLY.NET

Backwash (The Hog Wallow) Bandemonium 4 (Diabolical Records) Black Pussy + Eagle Twin (Metro Bar) see p. 44 Doug LaBrecque (Deer Valley) Radius + Ivie + AZA + Brayzee (Kilby Court) The Sextones + Kris Lager Band (O.P. Rockwell) She Loves Meechie (Castle Manor) The Spazmatics (Liquid Joe’s) Telluride Meltdown + The B and B + My New Mistress (The Royal)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE DJ Sneeky Long (Twist) Miss DJ LUX (Sky Lounge)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge)

KARAOKE

The Animal in Me + Set to Stun + Allies Always Lie + Away At Lakeside + Elysium (The Loading Dock) Squirrel Nut Zippers (Deer Valley)

LIVE MUSIC

MONDAY, JULY 4

LIVE MUSIC

SUNDAY 7.3

FRIDAY 7.1

SUGARHOUSE ARTS FESTIVAL & FIREWORKS

SATURDAY 7.2

Therapy Thursdays feat. Dzeko + Torres (Sky Lounge) Reggae Thursday (The Royal) Cowboy Karaoke (The Cabin) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge)

UPCOMING EVENTS

Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge)

Arrival: The Music of ABBA (Sandy Amphitheater) Atomic Amy + The Spent Rods (The Royal) Bad Feather (The Hog Wallow) Castle + The Wake Of An Arsonist + Barlow (Metro Bar) Creature Double Feature + Gloe + Forest Feathers (Kilby Court) The Heretix + Maikon + Phaya (The Madison) Joe Russo’s Almost Dead (The Depot) see p. 48 Kingdom of Giants + Storm Tide Horizon + Hylian + The Conscience (The Loading Dock) Vixen (Liquid Joe’s) see p. 42 Xavier Rudd + Dustin Thomas (The Complex) see p. 47

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE DJ Chase One2 (Twist) DJ Jesse Walker + Damian Ardenne (O.P. Rockwell) DJ Luian (Mi Casa Night Club)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Cheers to You SLC)

LIVE MUSIC

KARAOKE

Karaoke with DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue on State) Karaoke (The Tavernacle)

MONDAY 7.4 DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Monday Night Blues Jam (The Royal)

KARAOKE

Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue) Bingo Karaoke (The Tavernacle) A RELAXED GENTLEMAN’S CLUB DA I LY L U N C H S P E C I A L S POOL, FOOSBALL & GAMES

NO

COVER E VER!

275 0 SOU T H 3 0 0 W ES T · (8 01) 4 67- 4 6 0 0 11: 3 0 -1A M M O N - S AT · 11: 3 0 A M -10 P M S U N


Xavier Rudd

They call Xavier Rudd a singer-songwriter—but that hardly does him justice. In his songs—which merge folk with reggae, soul, blues and rock— the Australian musician plays a pile of instruments, including the yidaki (a local term for digeridoo), banjo, harmonica and Weissenborn lap slide guitars (yup, just like Ben Harper plays). A virtuoso on most of them, Rudd demonstrates his social and political consciousness chops in his lyrics, which champion the cause of Aboriginal people of his—their—homeland, as well as environmental concerns. He’s touring behind his ninth album, Nanna (Nettwerk), which is attributed to Rudd along with his band, The United Nations. (RH) The Complex, 536 W. 100 South, 7 p.m., $23 in advance, $25 day of show, TheComplexSLC.com

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AT THE HOG WALLOW

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CONCERTS & CLUBS

ARTERIUM

FRIDAY 7.1

7.07 RICK GERBER

7.01 BAD FEATHER

7.08 THE SCANDRALS

7.02 BACKWASH

7.09 RED DOG REVIVAL

7.06 MICHELLE MOONSHINE

7.11 OPEN BLUES JAM HOSTED BY ROBBY’S BLUES EXPLOSION

3200 E BIG COTTONWOOD RD. | 801.733.5567 THEHOGWALLOW.COM

JUNE 30, 2016 | 47

6.30 RICK GERBER

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SPIRITS • FOOD • GOOD COMPANY


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48 | JUNE 30, 2016

CONCERTS & CLUBS e1

n friday, Ju

d xavier rudex

SCOTT HARRIS

the compl

oe’s

uid j iv xen - liq

drum e n i h c a m : dubwise ge n

urban lou

july 2 , y a d r u t a s urt o c y b l i k radius ly 3 sunday, ju

FRIDAY 7.1

Joe Russo’s Almost Dead

Journeyman drummer Joe Russo has played with many acts, in a variety of genres, including indie singer-songwriter Cass McCombs, the Gene Ween Band (an offshoot of—wait for it—Ween) and Furthur, with Bob Weir and Phil Lesh of the Grateful Dead. With Almost Dead, which also features keyboardist Marco Benevento

(himself no stranger to genre-jumping, as he moonlights in ambient doom-metal bands), Ween bassist Dave Dreiwitz (who may be busy with Ween when this show happens), and singer-guitarists Scott Metzger (Anders Osborne) and singer-guitarist Tom Hamilton (American Babies), Russo plays mainly Grateful Dead tunes. There’s not much else to say, except that these classic tunes are in pretty good hands, no? (RH) The Depot, 400 W. South Temple, 9 p.m., $36, DepotSLC.com

TUESDAY 7.5 LIVE MUSIC

The Receiver + Angel Magic + IVOURIES (Kilby Court) Total Chaos + Version Two + Hi-Fi Murder + LSDO (Kamikazes)

Monday @ 8pm

breaking bingo

KARAOKE

Karaoke with DJ Thom (A Bar Named Sue on State) Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck (Twist) Karaoke with Spotlight Entertainment (Keys on Main) Karaoke (The Tavernacle)

WEDNESDAY 7.6 LIVE MUSIC

Austin Wolfe (Deer Valley) Michelle Moonshine (The Hog Wallow) Midnight North + Liver Down The River (O.P. Rockwell) Pity Sex PWR BTTM + Petal (Kilby Court) The Queers + HiFi Murder + I’m A Monster + Dirtbomb Devils (The Metro Bar) Vesuvius + Curses + Change Is + No Company + Oak & Elm (The Loading Dock)

ounge

an l b r u g m vnd

ly 7

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wednesdays @ 8pm

geeks who drink

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y8 l u j , y a d i fr oyal r e h t n hitme american VISIT CITYWEEKLYTIX.COM FOR MORE SHOWS & DETAILS!

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© 2016

TWO-PARTY

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ACROSS

53. Thrilla in Manila participant 54. Wine list heading 55. Pirouette points 56. "The boy you trained, gone he is" speaker 59. Mediterranean ____

Last week’s answers

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

21. "Your" of yesteryear 25. Not just overweight 26. ____ Miss 27. Chaney who starred in "The Phantom of the Opera" 28. Part of DJIA 29. Busy IRS mo. 33. Cousin of Inc. 34. Actress Lucy 35. Cockney abode 36. Pan in Chinese cookery DOWN 37. Accepted, as terms 1. Opposite NNE 38. Willy-nilly 2. Summer itch cause 41. NBA official 3. Caribbean island that got its name, Latin for 42. Worrisome engine "eel," due to its shape noise 4. Eurasian plain 43. One of the Blues 5. Lethargy Brothers 6. Photographer Adams 44. Seagoing vessels 7. "____ Mommy kissing ..." 45. Some sports cars 8. ____ Bing! (go-go bar on "The Sopranos") 46. Bother persis9. Actor Jay of "Jerry Maguire" tently 10. "Veronica ____" (2003 Cate Blanchett 47. Quick on the film) uptake 11. Language family including Mongolian 50. "Laughing" 12. Knitted item for a baby animal 15. Third of September? 52. They have pre16. Terrier's bark cincts: Abbr. 20. ____ Van Winkle

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

1. Second-highest peak in the Cascades 7. Watson's creator 10. Yak 13. Relayed 14. South America's most populous city 17. Track transactions 18. Follow 19. Campus house that's all about food storage? 21. Capital of Libya 22. Three on a grandfather clock 23. In better health 24. Synchronized swimming? 30. Handbag monogram 31. It barely gets beyond the infield 32. Bedsheet for a trick-or-treater's ghost costume? 39. Stars travel in them 40. Neighbor of Switz. 42. Save a beer container from danger? 46. "Je ____ français" 48. "____ My Children" 49. "There is only one great adventure and that is inward toward ____": Henry Miller 51. It consists of Democrats and Republicans (or something seen in 19-, 24-, 32- or 42-Across) 57. "Ciao!" 58. Technique-building pieces 60. Not straight 61. Irk 62. Both Begleys 63. Org. that tracks baby name popularity 64. Part of the iris

SUDOKU

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50 | JUNE 30, 2016

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Orchid Dynasty offers all sorts of live plants, from exotic flowers to succulents. Lewis says that one thing that makes working at the shop so fun is that the diversity in flowers and plants is endless. “We get new things in every week, and the plants are seasonal, so [our inventory] is constantly changing,” he says. In addition to having the finest flowers and plants, they also offer unique containers—from copper planters to blown glass vases and more. “We put a lot of effort into sourcing containers,” Clinton says. Lewis’ favorite part of running the business is the interaction with customers. “I love showing people what can be grown and how to grow it,” he says. He has a deep passion for what he does, as well as the exotic plants he is able to grow and share with others. Orchid cultivators are the largest hobbyist group in America, with tens of thousands of enthusiasts trying their hands at making the beautiful bloom grow. If you’re looking to try your hand at keeping orchids, check out Orchid Dynasty’s beautiful greenhouse, with flowers blooming from all over the world. n

Orchid Dynasty 959 East 900 South 801-583-4754 Monday-Friday: 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturdays: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. OrchidDynasty.com

JUNE 30, 2016 | 51

Visit the shop to find the perfect summer gift.

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Co-owner and floral designer Shelly Huynh crafts custom floral arrangements for events like weddings or funerals.

INSIDE /

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Whether you’re looking for a gift for someone else, or a new plant to brighten up your living space, check out Orchid Dynasty in the 9th and 9th shopping district. In business for 15 years, the shop offers floral arrangements for events from weddings to funerals to graduation ceremonies, as well as live plants you can nurture yourself in your home or office. Co-owned by couple Clinton Lewis and Shelly Huynh, the shop is the perfect place to find the perfect plant. Lewis focuses on plants while Huynh is an expert on floral design. Lewis believes the combination of skills is perfect for the business and its customers. “Typical florists don’t know about plants,” he says. “We know everything about what we grow and offer, inside and out.” The couple is committed to quality and a good price point, as well as a unique eye for design and a thorough knowledge of their plant products. The American Institute of Floral Designers (AIFD), an internationally recognized organization, offers certifications that are the equivalent of a master’s degree for florists. Most floral shops don’t even have one AIFD on staff, but Orchid Dynasty has two. “I love the variety of flowers that we carry,” employee Tracy Barlow says. She is a designer and one of the store’s certificate holders. “The products are very untraditional, very unconventional.” Huynh is also AIFD certified and she loves the experience of working at and coowning the shop. “We do everything, from wedding to sympathy,” she says. And because the shop has a floral design studio on-site, as well as a showroom for customers, you can rest assured that your flowers will be fresh when you buy them.

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY B Y R O B

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B R E Z S N Y

Go to RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

ARIES (March 21-April 19) During winter, some bears spend months hibernating. Their body temperatures and heart rates drop. They breathe drowsily. Their movements are minimal. Many hummingbirds engage in a similar slow-down—but they do it every single night. By day they are among the most manic creatures on earth, flapping their wings and gathering sustenance with heroic zeal. When the sun slips below the horizon, they rest with equal intensity. In my estimation, Aries, you don’t need a full-on immersion in idleness like the bears. But you’d benefit from a shorter stint, akin to the hummingbird’s period of dormancy.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) “In life, as in bicycling, pedal when you have to, coast when you can.” So says author James Lough, and now I’m passing on his advice to you—just in time for your transition from the heavypedaling season to the coasting-is-fun phase. I suspect that at this juncture in your life story you may be a bit addicted to the heavy pedaling. You could be so accustomed to the intensity that you’re inclined to be suspicious of an opportunity to enjoy ease and grace. Don’t be like that. Accept the gift with innocent gratitude.

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JUNE 30, 2016 | 53

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) “When a jet flies low overhead, every glass in the cupboard sings,” writes aphorist James Richardson. “Feelings are like that: choral, not single; mixed, never pure.” That’s always true, but it will be intensely true for you in the coming weeks. I hope you can find a way to tolerate, even thrive on, the flood of GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Of all the concert pianos in the world, 80 percent of them are made ambiguous complexity. I hope you won’t chicken out and try by Steinway. A former president of the company once remarked that to pretend that your feelings are one-dimensional and easily in each piano, “243 taut strings exert a pull of 40,000 pounds on an understandable. In my opinion, you are ripe to receive rich lesiron frame.” He said it was “proof that out of great tension may come sons in the beauty and power of mysterious emotions. great harmony.” That will be a potential talent of yours in the coming weeks, Gemini. Like a Steinway piano, you will have the power to CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) turn tension into beauty. But will you actually accomplish this noble Pop artist Andy Warhol said that in the future, everyone would goal, or will your efforts be less melodious? It all depends on how be famous for 15 minutes. His idea had a resonance with the phrase “nine days’ wonder,” which as far back as Elizabethan much poised self-discipline you summon. times referred to a person or event that captured the public’s fascination for a while. You Capricorns are entering a phase CANCER (June 21-July 22) Once upon a time, weren’t you the master builder who never finished when you’re far more likely than usual to bask in the spotlight. building your castle? Weren’t you the exile who wandered aimlessly Between now and September 2017, I bet you’ll garner at least a while fantasizing about the perfect sanctuary of the past or the sweet short burst of glory, acclaim, or stardom—perhaps much more. safety zone of the future? Didn’t you perversely nurture the ache that Are you ready for your close-up? Have you prepped for the influx arose from your sense of not feeling at home in the world? I hope of attention that may be coming your way? that by now you have renounced all of those kinky inclinations. If you haven’t, now would be an excellent time to do so. How might you rein- AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) vest the mojo that will be liberated by the demise of those bad habits? One of my readers, Jay O’Dell, told me this story: “After my cancer surgery, a nurse said to me, ‘You may as well try magical thinking. Regular thinking hasn’t helped.’ I said to the nurse, LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) In accordance with the astrological omens, I have selected three ‘Well, why the hell not?’ That was seven years ago.” In bringing aphorisms by poet James Richardson to guide you. Aphorism O’Dell’s testimony to your attention, I don’t mean to suggest No. 1: “The worst helplessness is forgetting there is help.” you will have any health problems that warrant a strong dose My commentary: You have the power to avoid that fate. Start of magical thinking. Not at all. But you may get wrapped up in a by identifying the sources of healing and assistance that are psychological twist or a spiritual riddle that would benefit from available to you. Aphorism No. 2: “You do not have to be a magical thinking. And what exactly is magical thinking? Here’s fire to keep one burning.” My commentary: Generate all the one definition: The stories that unfold in your imagination have heat and light you can, yes, but don’t torch yourself. Aphorism important effects on what actually happens to you. #3: “Patience is not very different from courage. It just takes longer.” My commentary: But it may not take a whole lot longer. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Let’s talk about X-factors and wild cards and strange attractors. By their very nature, they are unpredictable and ephemeral, VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) You may not know this, but I am the founder and CEO of Proud even when they offer benevolent breakthroughs. So you may To Be Humble, an acclaimed organization devoted to minimiz- not even notice their arrival if you’re entranced by your expecing vanity. It is my sworn duty to protest any ego that exceeds tations and stuck in your habitual ways. But here’s the good the acceptable limits as defined by the Geneva Convention on news, Pisces: Right now you are not unduly entranced by your Narcissism. However, I now find myself conflicted. Because of expectations or stuck in your habits. Odds are high that you will the lyrical beauty and bighearted charisma that are currently spy the sweet twists of fate—the X-factors and wild cards and emanating from your ego, I am unable, in good conscience, strange attractors—as they float into view. You will pounce on to ask you to tone yourself down. In fact, I hereby grant you a them and put them to work while they’re still fresh. And then license to expand your self-love to unprecedented proportions. they will help you hike your ratings or get the funding you need or animate the kind of love that heals. You may also feel free to unleash a series of lovely brags.

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TAURUS (April 20-May 20) “Dear Dr. Brezsny: A psychic predicted that sometime this year I will fall in love with a convenience store clerk who’s secretly a down-on-his-luck prince of a small African country. She said that he and I have a unique destiny. Together we will break the world’s record for dancing without getting bitten in a pit of cobras while drunk on absinthe on our honeymoon. But there’s a problem. I didn’t have time to ask the psychic how I’ll meet my soulmate, and I can’t afford to pay $250 for another reading. Can you help?-Mopey Taurus.” Dear Mopey: The psychic lied. Neither she nor anyone else can see what the future will bring you. Why? Because what happens will be largely determined by your own actions. I suggest you celebrate this fact. It’s the perfect time to do so: July is Feed Your Willpower Month.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) The next 28 days will not be a favorable period to sit around passively wishing to be noticed. Nor will it be a good time to wait to be rescued or to trust in others to instigate desirable actions. On the other hand, it will be an excellent phase to be an initiator: to decide what needs to be done, to state your intentions concisely, and to carry out your master plan with alacrity and efficiency. To help ensure your success during the next 28 days, make this declaration each morning before breakfast: “I don’t want to OBSERVE the show. I want to BE the show.”

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Poets Corner

The soft song of snow is the whispering rain. Are her tears of joy or sorrow? Each tiny star floats gently, resting atop Eyelashes that fall and rise for thoughts of tomorrow. Crystalline breath dances on silent wing that flutters the frozen chime-song.

It beckons the crispness that lingers and comforts The gems that shine all winter long.

Samantha Peters Send your poem (max 15 lines), to: Poet’s Corner, City Weekly, 248 South Main Street, SLC, UT 84101 or e-mail to poetscorner@cityweekly.net.

Published entrants receive a $15 value gift from CW. Each entry must include name and mailing address.

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Geneaology

I heard on the TV the other day that the No. 1 hobby for Americans is gardening and that the No. 2 hobby is now genealogy. My wife just signed up to Ancestry.com two weeks ago to hunt down family history and hasn’t come up for air except to yell, “Wow” and “OMG!” She didn’t have much family chatter in her past about relatives past her grandparents on one side of her tree, and now she’s finding out about Russians and possible spellings of her maiden name that might connect her to more history. You get a free month of tempting data and then you pay to play. But, hey, they have over a billion records to look over—from death certificates, newspaper archives, marriage records and, of course, birth records. If you find that your Great Uncle Shishkebob came over on the Good Ship Lollypop they will most likely have a photo of that boat, too. For $100, Ancestry.com will send you a swab kit, which you return to Sandy, Utah, and you’ll shortly find out some secrets to your ethnic DNA makeup. Their sales pitch is “more people tested means more ways to connect,” but a spokesperson shared with TV viewers that people search because they want to know what famous person they are related to, past or present. Who knows who they sell this and other data to, but it’s possibly more lucrative than the data mined on Facebook every second. Most people believe that the company is owned by the LDS Church. Facts: 1. started by Paul Allen (a Mormon) in Provo back in the 1980s when they began offering info on floppy discs to clients interested in genealogy; 2. the company is not a subsidiary of the LDS Church but has partnered with them in buying some of its libraries. And, wow, does it make money for its investors under the public NASDAQ: ACOM. Their mobile app reached 1 million downloads in 2011, they sponsor TLC’s Who Do You Think You Are? and purchased Find a Grave, Inc. in 2013. They also own MyFamily.com, LongLostPeople. com, Genealogy.com, Fold3, Ancestry24, Ancestry Academy, RoosWeb and ProGenealogists. To bring this all back home, the largest cemetery in the state is in the Avenues of Salt Lake City. There are only 800 plots left in this 120-acre green space and people are now putting their heads together as to what to do with it when it’s full. There are birds to watch, 9.5 miles of roads to jog and 124,000 or so headstones to read. The sextant is running out of ways to make money (plot sales) and a gift shop has been tossed around as a money maker in the future. Public hearings are being held and the next one is sometime this fall. n Content is prepared expressly for Community and is not endorsed by City Weekly staff.

VOTE 2016

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City Weekly June 30, 2016  

Mining Memories

City Weekly June 30, 2016  

Mining Memories