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CITY WEEKLY

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JUNE 1, 2017 | VOL. 34

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Drag superstar Alaksa Thunderf*ck on reading, patriarchy and confronting gender norms in Trump's America. By Enrique Limรณn


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CWCONTENTS COVER STORY

CLAWS OF ATTRACTION

Is the White House ready for a drag queen to take charge? RuPaul’s Drag Race breakout star Alaska Thunderfuck sure thinks so. Cover photo by Magnus Hastings magnushastings.com

19 CONTRIBUTOR

4 LETTERS 6 OPINION 8 NEWS 15 A&E 41 DINE 47 CINEMA 49 TRUE TV 50 MUSIC 61 COMMUNITY

CHASE WILSON

Cover package “Pride is a celebration of love, acceptance and community for anyone and everyone who has had to live in fear of being themselves in a world that is far too willing to maintain the status quo at the expense of queer lives,” the Ogdenite says. Read his bisexual manifesto on p. 28.

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SOAP BOX

COMMENTS@CITYWEEKLY.NET @SLCWEEKLY

@CITYWEEKLY

@SLCWEEKLY

Cover story, May 18, “Attack of the Killer Reboots!”

All movies I have no plan to support with my money—with maybe, just maybe, the exception of Spider-Man.

@ARTSETMETIERSUT Via Twitter

Speaking of killer reboots, we are recycling ignorance, too, and almost biblically. Stated in Isaiah-like terms, the unlearned man struts like a flower of the renaissance because he is an expert in his trade. Has no one told him he has a responsibility to go to college? He admires love, marriage and children, and promotes peace and country music, but he sits idly by while autocracy and violence swirl across the land. The learned man, on the other hand, sits astutely ensconced in his office chair and stands haughtily by his lectern. He knows things vertically. He reads deep in his field. But what does he know of the horizontal breadth of disciplines needed to secure the nation and fulfill its citizens’ needs? Does he remember the past, apprehend the present and know the future? He does not.

ROBERT KIMBALL SHINKOSKEY, Woods Cross

Can’t say that I agree completely with this … some potentially wonderful films under “WTF.”

@DAVEBASTIAN Via Twitter

Well, at least it is nice when film critics reveal that they have no idea what they are talking about early enough that you can stop reading. Specifically, in the preview to It, Mr. Riedel says, “and I’m still waiting for a Stephen King adaptation to be good.” As a film critic, I would have thought that you have actually watched a large number of movies so you would know

how wrong you are, or at least hope that you wouldn’t make such a ridiculous comment if you hadn’t watched many King adaptations. I could bring up a number of movies to prove the point, such as Misery, 1408, Stand By Me, The Dead Zone or The Green Mile. But, really, how wrong you are is pretty easily summed up in three words: The Shawshank Redemption.

CHRISTOPHER ROSE Via cityweekly.net

Author David Riedel responds: While I admit I forgot entirely about Misery (easy to do when so many King adaptations are so wretched), I contend The Shawshank Redemption is a God-awful POS.

News, May 18, “A cowboy bootwearing Rep. Stewart offers ‘nebulous’ answers during town hall.”

Boot-wearing? More like boot-licking Trump sycophant.

JOHN BARNHILL Via Facebook

New one same as the old one.

GERALD LARSEN Via Facebook

Representative Stewart, your comment that carving out a democratic congressional district would be gerrymandering is narcissistic and ignorant. You preside over a gerrymandered district—that is why it’s a full day’s drive from downtown SLC on one end to Richfield on the other. Please stop with the fool talk.

COURTNEY HENLEY Via cityweekly.net

This radical left progressive propaganda rag is the poster child of nebulism.

JAMES DUBIN JR. Via Facebook

Opinion, May 18, “Weiler’s Words”

Regarding Mr. Rosenzweig’s conversation with the good senator, two sayings came to mind from my Marine Corps days: The first one, my top (master sergeant, USMC) told me as a new, young corporal after I was arguing with a lance corporal to do some task. His paraphrased advice was, “Don’t argue with people not as smart as you.” I found out it probably came from Mark Twain’s saying, “Never argue with stupid people; they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience.” The other saying was given to me after I became an officer, which was, “Don’t argue with seniors or subordinates.” I believe both sayings apply to Mr. Rosenzweig’s attempts, even though he failed, but I sure give him credit for trying and hope he keeps up the good fight.

JH THOMPSON, Ogden

Hi, Stan. I read with interest your opinion exchange and questions about sex education in Utah Schools with U.S. Sen. Todd Weiler, R-Woods Cross. We pay taxes to the state, and they infamously claim that all tax dollars are used for education. That’s a big, non-distinct and vague way to justify discretionary spending in a state with the lowest, or near lowest, per-pupil spending in the nation at the elementary, middle and high school levels. Methinks they direct it to college and university levels with research grants, business development applications, etc. The feeling I get from Mr. Weiler’s stance is that many of the parents are majority Mormon. Sex education is a topic of continuous religious monitoring through the Bishopric with interviews about curious feelings youth have at 12 and 13 when [sexual] interest begins. They teach genderspecific norms and expectations ... Todd expressed worry of parents pulling kids out of the public school system because it’s a delicate balance—that sur-

prised me, considering that those parents can always send their children to a charter school that doesn’t require certified or licensed teachers. The corporate board can quash any talk of sex ed at the behest of a majority of parents. The idea of vouchers for charter schools is not dead. Accountability is not established. There are efforts to redirect federal education dollars to charter schools. Finally, using words like “some” or “many” speaks to the perception of majority, minority. Surely that affects racial considerations as well?

MIKE CUNNINGHAM, Bountiful

Film review, May 18, Alien: Covenant

The true monster was David, who played God, like throughout the xenomorphs were just byproducts of a synthetic Android’s spite of always being a creation. If a third entry were to come, it will be how David becomes the Yutani titan to Weyland company. That would be something to watch— like The Omen trilogy, only no religion involved. Just my two cents: Pretty much, the horror foreboding terror is David.

CHARLES LEWIS Via Facebook

STAFF Publisher JOHN SALTAS Editorial

Editor ENRIQUE LIMÓN Arts &Entertainment Editor SCOTT RENSHAW Music Editor RANDY HARWARD Senior Staff Writer STEPHEN DARK Staff Writer DYLAN WOOLF HARRIS Copy Editor ANDREA HARVEY Proofers SARAH ARNOFF, LANCE GUDMUNDSEN

Editorial Interns REX MAGANA, DAVID MILLER, JULIA VILLAR Contributors CECIL ADAMS, KIMBALL BENNION, KATHARINE BIELE, ROB BREZSNY, CAROLYN CAMPBELL, BABS DE LAY, BILL FROST, MARYANN JOHANSON, MIKE RIEDEL, TED SCHEFFLER, CHUCK SHEPHERD, ALEX SPRINGER, BRIAN STAKER, CHASE WILSON, LEE ZIMMERMAN

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PRIVATE EY Reflection Pool “Hello, it’s me. I’ve thought about us for a long, long time. Maybe I think too much, but something’s wrong. There’s something here that doesn’t last too long. Maybe I shouldn’t think of you as mine.” And so on. Except, I’m not Todd Rundgren (did he have any other songs?) and this isn’t exactly a forlorn note to a long-gone lover. Though, in a way, it is. I’ve always had a real affection for the people who read and support City Weekly. It’s all I’ve done since this paper began as a dinky private club newsletter (most of our readership today doesn’t know or care what a private club was, and that’s fine), and this week is the anniversary of our very first issue back in 1984. That was long ago, many friends ago, many clubs ago—a time of X-Acto knives, typewriters, Liquid Paper (thank you, mother of Monkee Michael Nesmith for inventing the stuff) and the smell of burning wax. It was a time when entering the newspaper business bordered on the cost prohibitive; you either had to have lots of money or lots of time. I had neither, but eventually, because I’m not trained to do anything besides tend bar and lay railroad track, time won out. Over the past 33 years, we have printed tens of thousands of pages—many in just black and white—and spent more money than we have made, made more friends than we deserved, comforted less of the afflicted than we wanted to and lost some memo-

rable close friends, associates and former co-workers. I miss them. But I don’t miss everyone. I’ve fallen for plenty of bad apples. If a con artist created the ideal victim, part of me would be included alongside widowed LDS grandmothers and blue-collar laborers who wear “Make America Great Again” hats. I’ve been a fool many times over, mostly due to just being a doofus who believes in leprechauns and unicorns. For someone accused of being a “people person” (aka pushover), I’m a horrid manager. My default setting, inherited from the mining culture I grew up in, is “Oh, yeah? Prove it!” All companies share woeful tales of wrong hires and wrong business decisions. But there was no one to fire me, who harkened the most of both. I reflect on that with weariness since the vast majority of folks who have done business with us or worked for us are of the highest character, but we could never put enough polish on them. Yet I love and respect them all, for their grit and commitment not just to City Weekly, but to you. It’s you they care about. It’s an open secret that the newspaper business is a shadow of its former self. It’s also likely an open secret that City Weekly suffers, too. Liberal bias is not hurting newspapers as the MAGA hat crowd claims. It’s a combination of many things—from classifieds moving online, to more competition of every stripe, to

B Y J O H N S A LTA S @johnsaltas

the mobile phone experience, to a belief that social media can actually replace advertising (it can’t; it’s a picture of an omelet, BFD). Along the way, business owners also settled into the notion that buying customers with digital tools and algorithms is smarter than spending dollars building brand and market share. Try telling that to the brick-and-mortar retailers that abandoned traditional advertising only to lose to bigger players and cheaper prices online. In the end, papers suffer most from another line from Rundgren’s song: “I take for granted that you’re always there.” Thing is, we might not always be there. We’ve been taken for granted, and we can’t continue to be there unless the math changes. In a full year, less 900 local business purchase ads in City Weekly. That represents our entire operating budget. Yet, we provide a free paper—over 2 million copies printed annually—for people who want and need an outlet like ours. Forget about online; that’s always been free. So, if a reader isn’t paying for us, and also doesn’t support the advertisers who support us, something has to give. Very soon, we’ll introduce a chance for you to help create a prosperous atmosphere in which City Weekly can more effectively write, print and thrive. We are calling our new initiative Press Backers. When you become a Press Backer, your

I’LL ALWAYS BE PROUD THAT THIS PUBLICATION STOOD UP FOR A COMMUNITY THAT DIDN’T HAVE A STRONG VOICE.

contribution and support dollars will not only help keep the free press alive, but you’ll also have a chance at winning lots of Skee-Ball-like prizes every time you contribute. It’s either that, or you concede more ground to the wasteland of Twitter and Trump. Your call. Do we matter? We think so. I distinctly remember 1984. Back then, there wasn’t a big Pride week in Utah. For more than a decade, Pride was gaining its footing. During that time, several publications reporting on issues in the LGBTQ community came and went. Pillar of Salt, if I remember correctly, was one of them. At some point, several prominent members of the local queer community approached us to produce an LGBTQthemed publication or to otherwise enlist our support of their causes. We didn’t have the resources for the first, but the second path was easy since we had always been in that corner. Among our first street-edition issues (with spot color, no less) were stories on two plagues: childhood AIDS and the sinister practice of gay bashing. I’ll always be proud that this publication stood up for a community that didn’t have a strong voice back then. We didn’t become their voice; they rightfully developed their own, but we’ve helped to nudge it along. That’s what we do. We’re not a battleship—we’re a spitball. We nudge and annoy, sure. But we also march. We march with many voices. So, if you see me or any of the City Weekly cohorts at Sunday’s parade, make sure to say hi. As Rundgren would say, “It’s important to me that you know you are free.” CW Send feedback to comments@cityweekly.net


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RANDOM QUESTIONS, SURPRISING ANSWERS

MICHAEL ADAM FERGUSON

FIVE SPOT

Three and a half years ago, historians J. Seth Anderson and Michael Adam Ferguson were the first same-sex couple to be legally married in Utah. So it seems natural that Anderson, 35, would pen a book about LGBT Salt Lake (also its title), published this month by Arcadia Press. While he doesn’t use the word “gay,” the Provo native with deep pioneer roots knew he was different from other boys at age 7. And at 11, “I knew the word was ‘gay’ and I knew that my church told me it was a very bad thing to be,” he says.

What’s ‘gay’ about Salt Lake City?

I actually prefer the term queer, meaning ‘peculiar, odd or unusual.’ Salt Lake is very queer in the way that it defies binaries. It’s both worldly and parochial, liberated and oppressive, and simultaneously a small town and a big city. It defies expectations, and those of us who are from there or live there know this is true. Outsiders oftentimes mistake it for a sleepy little place.

What was your most surprising finding?

I was pleasantly surprised to find a photo of the Crystal Lounge and a streetscape view of the Radio City Lounge dated from the late 1940s. Both of these places were frequented by the gay and lesbian community in the post-World War II era and are generally considered to be Utah’s first gay bars. I’ve read about these places for years, but had never seen a photo from the time period.

Any other unexpected revelations?

Through one of my contacts, I found a flier dated around 1965-66 promoting a drag show act billed as ‘The Missfits.’ There is [also] a photo of three men in drag who performed at the Tin Angel on State Street.

What prompted you to write about the subject?

I’m primarily a 20th-century American historian with an emphasis in the history of sexuality. As a grad student at the University of Utah, my research explored the history of HIV/ AIDS in the state. This required discovering the hidden history of what we would now call the LGBT community in Salt Lake. Most people don’t realize how far back that history goes, and I wanted to share that knowledge and those stories.

You’re also active in fighting so-called reparative therapy.

That’s correct. My husband and five other plaintiffs sued a conversion-therapy provider. They were represented by the Southern Poverty Law Center in a landmark case. After a three-week trial in 2015, the jury found the defendants liable for consumer fraud. We continue to speak and educate people about conversion therapy; we have testified before legislatures, and have even lobbied on Capitol Hill in D.C.

You have a home in Ithaca, N.Y. What’s the connection?

My husband and I are both academics and we moved to Ithaca for his post-doctoral fellowship at Cornell University. We are headed to Boston soon, where he will begin a second fellowship at Harvard, and I will begin my Ph.D. program at Boston University. We live a very queer life, though, and Utah will always be a home, no matter where we go.

—LANCE GUDMUNDSEN

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STRAIGHT DOPE

BY CECIL ADAMS

Please shed some light on presidential executive orders. It would seem that they can’t create laws, approve funding or interpret existing laws. So what can they do? And why, especially as used by the current president, are they so powerful? —Anthony Creech If you’re looking for a silver lining to this storm cloud of a presidency, well, at least we’re getting an intensive refresher course in civics. As scary as it might seem in the wrong hands, an executive order is nothing more than a U.S. president’s directive to the departments he oversees, instructing his subordinates in how to go about their business. Every president has issued at least one of them, except poor old William Henry Harrison, who never got a chance. Probably the most famous of them all came from the pen of Abe Lincoln: a little number called the Emancipation Proclamation. Lincoln, in fact, also issued executive order No. 1, though putting it that way is a bit misleading. The State Department didn’t start officially numbering the orders till 1907, beginning retroactively in 1862 with the oldest they then had on file, one granting parole to wartime political prisoners— some of whom had been taken into custody following the most controversial act of Lincoln’s presidency, the executive order suspending habeas corpus that allowed the military to imprison suspected traitors without review. An executive order is how Roosevelt ordered the internment of Japanese-Americans during W WII, how Truman integrated the armed forces afterward, and how Eisenhower sent troops to Little Rock to integrate the schools. As direct and functional as an executive order can be, its legal nature is surprisingly fuzzy. There’s no explicit constitutional authorization for an EO, though it’s hard to imagine presidents acting without something like it at their disposal. An EO isn’t a law, because only Congress can pass those, but it has the force of law—at least unless and until Congress decides to pass a law to counteract it, or the courts say it’s not kosher. After Harry Truman issued an order attempting to establish federal control of steel mills during the Korean War, the Supreme Court blocked his move, creating in the process a framework for evaluating when such orders were permissible. Effectively, the president’s executive power is reciprocal to congressional initiative: Where Congress has said nothing about an issue, executive power is at its height; where it’s given pretty clear instructions, a president’s hands are largely tied. Because presidential power is so poorly defined, it’s easy for opponents to paint the issuing of high-profile orders as undemocratic power grabs. And certain orders do seem to skirt the limits of presidential power, especially, these days, in the arena of immigration. Obama’s big immigration initiatives were instituted by executive order, but courts hobbled their implementation;

SLUG SIGNORINO

Laws & Orders

of course, Trump’s two attempts thus far at so-called “extreme vetting” measures have been even more severely curtailed. Here, at least, there seem to be effective judicial checks on any overreach. Sometimes critics will simply accuse a president of issuing too many executive orders—period. It’s hard, though, to imagine any president beating the record 3,522 orders signed by FDR, which haven’t seemed to mar his reputation too badly. More recently, the number of EOs has been roughly consistent from one administration to the next: of the 10 presidents before the current one, all averaged between 35 executive orders a year (Obama) and 80 (Carter). Reagan’s 381 overall were the most in this group, though Carter might have topped that tally with a second term. Trump, meanwhile, signed 33 in his first 100 days—more than anyone since Truman, who had a war to wrap up. You’d figure he can’t maintain a pace like that, though with this guy, who knows? Self-promotion being his bread and butter, Trump has naturally played up the theatricality of his executive-order signings, making them seem more momentous than they are. As you point out, the president can’t allocate the funds necessary for his initiatives on his own, though he can direct a federal agency to use its existing budget toward a certain end—a border wall, let’s say. Some of Trump’s executive orders might be intended to torpedo Obama-era policies, but there are bureaucratic procedures in place that slow down changes, of course. Once a federal agency has issued a rule, for instance, it can’t then just reverse itself without first undertaking a lengthy review process, no matter how ardently a new president might long to undo his predecessor’s work. Even so constrained, Trump’s flurry of EOs might well lead to real consequences, but, as was famously once said, elections do have those. Ultimately, the number of executive orders a president signs doesn’t really tell us a lot about what the president is getting done. Much of the power of the presidency has historically been exercised through less attention-getting means, in the everyday maintenance of the government: via the writing of memoranda, for instance, or by instructing department heads to issue administrative orders of their own. This is the sort of subtlety, one suspects, that President Donald J. Trump might not be destined to grasp. n

Send questions via straightdope.com or write c/o Chicago Reader, 350 N. Orleans, Chicago 60654.


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THE

OCHO

CITIZEN REVOLT In a week, you can CHANGE THE WORLD

THE LIST OF EIGHT

BY BILL FROST

@Bill _ Frost

SING IN SOLIDARITY

Has it been a little quiet lately? Not enough to protest? Well, you need to flex your vocal cords for a flash mob singing “I Can’t Keep Quiet” at the Pride Festival March and Rally. That’s the iconic song from the January Women’s March, and communities across the nation plan to sing it again, so start practicing now. It’s all happening at the 9th & 9th Pride Rally and Solidarity/Allies March, but that’s just the beginning, leading up to the national march in Washington, D.C., at 10 a.m. EDT (8 a.m. MDT) on Sunday, June 11. Start at 900 E. 900 South, end at 300 E. 500 South, 801997-9763, Friday, June 2, 5-8 p.m., free, bit.ly/2rGORtZ

MARCH FOR TRUTH

Eight new names for ‘fake’ global warming—even though summer 2017 temperatures are projected to be even hotter than last year—because science is a liberal conspiracy:

8. “Climate Ch-Ch-Change” (Dedicated to David Bowie)

7. “The Waterworld Inititive” 6. “Bikini Car Wash Wingding” 5. “Extinction Flambé” 4.

“F.A.T.A.L. (Fuck All Tangible Axioms—Lol)”

3. “Hellscape Deluxe” 2.

“FrankenWeather” (Dedicated to Brett Benson)

1. “Extra Crispy”

You know, that “truth” thing has been missing in political discourse. Sad. You can be alarmed about the role Russian state-led hacking and information warfare played in the 2016 election, but we need answers. What about the relationship between Russia and Donald Trump, or his associates and his campaign? The legitimacy of the U.S. government might hinge on the answers. But there’s a whole lot of #fakenews out there muddying the waters. Across the nation, the March for Truth is a peaceful way of asking Congress to conduct independent investigations and release the information to the public. Wallace Bennett Federal Building, 125 S. State, Saturday, June 3, 1-3 p.m., free, bit.ly/2qnqY6R

ELECTION IN A PLAY

Now here’s an idea: Listen to each other. A series of five-minute plays by Utah playwrights as part of Plan-B’s Scriptin-Hand Series, is an unique response to the 2016 election and the division and partisanship it has spawned. People increasingly feel their voices are being ignored. (in)divisible offers 24 fiveminute plays based around real-world experiences with equal parts liberal and conservative—all without mentioning, you know, politicians by name. If you’re sick of being sick, this is not to be missed. Studio Theatre at Rose Wagner, 138 W. 300 South, 801-297-4200, June 8-18 (Thursday-Friday, 8 p.m.; Saturday, 4 & 8 p.m.; Sunday, 2 p.m.), free, bit.ly/2r5PzAl

—KATHARINE BIELE Send tips to revolt@cityweekly.net


HITS&MISSES BY KATHARINE BIELE @kathybiele

Growth & Preservation

Maybe we’re too busy fighting to keep our national monuments to care. Or worrying about growth and where to put the throngs of people pouring into Utah. It’s just dizzying to think how Lehi is now the 11th fastest-growing large city in the U.S. Both daily newspapers pointed that out, with The Salt Lake Tribune running a front-page story and photo of carboncopy high-rise apartments. “One of the big issues of concern within the state is the shortage of housing that’s available right now. The residential builders are going fast and furious, and the multifamily market is booming,” Bryan Webb of Layton Construction told Construction Dive. Yes, we’ve talked about the lack of planning for air, water and human resources, but what about the state’s historic beauty? May was National Preservation Month. But while other states made proclamations and speeches about their efforts to preserve their historic past, neither our governor nor any mayor made a peep.

Testing the Waters

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JUNE 1, 2017 | 13

Finally, someone’s thinking about water in a pretty dry state. That the Utah Division of Water Resources has been forced to respond to discrepancies in its reporting is water under the bridge. The Utah Rivers Council worried that the division was massaging data to make it look like water was running low and to justify major diversions, a KSL report said. A state audit was not kind, and the state Records Committee granted access to the faulty data. Now they just have to figure out what the state of conservation and water quality actually is. Meanwhile, Provo’s Daily Herald reported on the first Utah Lake summit, which addressed issues like 2016’s toxic algae bloom. If you can’t drink the water, you should be able to swim in it.

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Remember that First Amendment thing—the one that’s so troublesome for the new administration? There’s an interesting twist in Utah where a Republican lawmaker wants to “bolster” the rights of college students and faculty, according to The Salt Lake Tribune. In other words, stop trying to define what’s offensive. Of course, some Republicans think it’s all about civility, and Democrats seemed worried about bullying—although that’s mostly a gradeschool issue. And as with many rules and regulations, they might just overlap existing laws. Rep. Kim Coleman, R-West Jordan, is simply asking to form a working group. The Legislature already has made it a crime to harass someone online, but that, the Deseret News notes, has constitutional challenges, too. This is the year of the First Amendment, folks.

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Students’ Rights


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14 | JUNE 1, 2017

REWIND

1984

Oh, what a year! BY ENRIQUE LIMÓN elimon@cityweekly.net @enriquelimon

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t was a bright cold day in June, and Salt Lake City was aching for something different. By now you’ve heard our origin story, and if you haven’t, circle back in two years. (Seriously, who celebrates their 33rd?) It was the summer of love, 1984, and State Street was just starting to get dry while Layton City residents along Valley View Drive went through a calamitous mudslide causing $250,000 in damages. Emery County mourned the life of 27 of its own who perished in the Wilberg Mine fire, and Norman Bangerter became the state’s first-elected Republican governor since 1965. The Great Saltair was getting ready for yet another comeback, and the Salt Lake City Gulls were a thing, entertaining high-profile prospects like Harold Reynolds and Alvin Davis. Pound Puppies became the era’s fidget spinner, eventually generating sales of $300 million in 35 countries, while the Beehive got its own dose of puppy love with the newly formed Best Friends Animal Society.

Nationally, the Macintosh 128K was launched, along with an aptly dystopian ad campaign; newcomer Madonna writhed around the first VMA stage; and the art of white dudes holding their hands together to make a point was born thanks to TED talks. Shortly after City Weekly came to be, Places in the Heart hit theater screens, and would go on to win the Best Picture Academy Award. Much like its protagonist, 33 years into our run, it’s clear you like us, you really like us. The feeling is mutual. To celebrate, we highlighted some other events that made a splash that year. U of U grad Sonia Johnson, who garnered national attention thanks to her support of the Equal Rights Amendment and the excommunication from the LDS Church that followed, ran for president under the U.S. Citizen’s Party umbrella. The Logan native eventually moved to New Mexico to run a feminist resort. After serving as Bain & Company’s COO, Mitt Romney led and co-founded spinoff Bain Capital. According to a New York magazine profile titled “How Bad Is Bain Capital?” the private-equity firm workforce consisted of “Dockers-wearing numbercrunchers, geeks rather than Gekkos.” A world away from public office, Gary Richard Herbert was celebrating his 14th wedding anniversary to wife Jeanette, and the couple had already welcomed all of their children. Back then, he was then involved in the real estate business, but times were a-changing with

interest heading through the roof. “Times were really challenging,” the governor tells City Weekly, “and it was hard to feed a family with six kids, so in 1983—just the year before—we opened a family childcare and preschool business called Kid’s Connection.” The couple ran that business for 23 years. Another ’84 highlight, he recalls, was that the BYU Football program won the national championship. “That was a big deal,” Herbert recalls. As part of the Midwest Division, the Jazz, a team that began with nine straight losing seasons, wins their first playoff round against the Denver Nuggets. Coached by Frank Layden, the home team led the 3-2 scoreboard. A publication of a different sort, Playboy, releases its 30th anniversary with a special edition that includes Marilyn Monroe’s last nude photos. Hollywood producers were eagerly seeking the perfect location for a movie about kids that aren’t allowed to have fun, so Utah was a natural choice. Shot around Payson and American Fork, Footloose went on to gross $80 million in the domestic box office. The Chrysler Corporation came knockin’ with the first vehicles to be officially labeled “minivans.” They were branded as the Chrysler Town & Country, Dodge Caravan

and Plymouth Voyager. “Thriller,” the title track off Michael Jackson’s breakthrough album is released as a single on January 23. It would set the gold standard for music videos and inspire newfangled dances known as flash mobs in the future (insert Vincent Price’s maniacal cackle here). Prince’s “When Doves Cry” topped the Billboard yearly Hot 100 list, followed by Tina Turner’s “What’s Love Got to Do with It,” “Say, Say, Say” by Paul McCartney and Jackson, Kenny Loggins’ title track “Footloose” and Phil Collins’ “Against All Odds.” A pretty decent mix tape, if you ask us. Oh, also mixtapes. Jeopardy! begins its syndicated version on Sept. 10. I’ll take “Useless trivia” for $500, Alex. On October 31, Galileo is forgiven by the Vatican for his work on the Earth orbit, 368 years after being condemned. Schoolchildren around the world, however, are yet to forgive him for the torment otherwise known as solar system dioramas. Also born in ’84: Khloé Kardashian, LeBron James, Kate McKinnon, Mark Zuckerberg, Prince Harry, Avril Lavigne, Calvin Harris, Trevor Noah, Mandy Moore and Kim Jong-un. Yep, you’re old. And so are we. CW


Ogden Film Festival

MAILE MELOY

In her new novel Do Not Become Alarmed, Maile Meloy addresses one of the most terrifying experiences a parent can go through: having children go missing. Yet for her, the story actually began with a focus on the experience of those missing children. “I was reading the Richard Hughes novel A High Wind in Jamaica about kids who get accidentally taken by pirates,” Meloy tells City Weekly via email. “The pirates are horrified—they don’t want to get in trouble—and the kids mostly love the pirate ship. It made me want to write a novel about kids who don’t know how much danger they’re in because they’re kids.” The resulting story, however, is a fascinating suspense tale that shifts back-and-forth between the parents—two American couples who have taken their families on a cruise together—and their children, who become separated from them while they’re ashore in Central America. As the adults wind through reactions of fear, guilt and blame, the kids try to cope with their situation as the danger becomes more evident. Most compellingly, Do Not Become Alarmed evolves into an exploration of race, class and privilege, where the ultimate resolution of the families’ crisis yields even thornier questions. “I did begin with the epigraph from Teddy Roosevelt— ‘Americans learn only from catastrophe and not from experience,’” Meloy says. “It was only as I figured out what the story was, and tried to look at it from all angles, that I started thinking about it as a story about the United States in the world.” (Scott Renshaw) Maile Meloy: Do Not Become Alarmed @ The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, June 7, 7 p.m., free, kingsenglish.com

JUNE 1, 2017 | 15

When the brother-sister team of Derek and Julianne Hough say “move,” they mean it in the most literal way possible. Having made their mark on Dancing with the Stars, these worldrenowned, Utah dancers have joined the ranks of A-list celebrities, while garnering Emmys for two television specials (Grease: Live and Hairspray: Live)—both widely watched and critically acclaimed. Still, despite the fame in recent years, the siblings insist that it’s a fascination with the form that most motivates them. “What I absolutely love about dance is that it’s universal,” Derek told People magazine in September 2016. “It’s a language that everybody understands. You can be from any part of the world, but there’s something about dance that brings people together.” Indeed. Their 2014 and 2015 Move tours were so successful, they spawned another new show the pair insists is their most lavish production yet. Inspired by the elements of earth, wind, fire and water, it blends music, choreography and dance of every genre—from ballroom and salsa to hip-hop and tap—while incorporating several styles in between. Not surprisingly then, Move-Beyond offers audiences the ultimate example of the Houghs’ artistry. In that same People interview, Derek noted that the dance experience can be both compelling and contagious. “There’s something about moving, especially moving to music,” he said. “I can challenge anybody not to feel something.” No doubt that’s something this Move will prove. (Lee Zimmerman) Julianne & Derek Hough: Move-Beyond @ Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, June 7; 4 p.m. & 8 p.m., $36-$96, artsaltlake.org

Maile Meloy: Do Not Become Alarmed

| CITY WEEKLY |

WEDNESDAY 6/7

Julianne & Derek Hough: Move-Beyond

When Sundance Film Festival organizers decided not to return to Ogden this year, it left a disappointing void for the city’s film buffs—and left Peery’s Egyptian Theater without a regular showcase for filmmakers. That, in part, was the inspiration behind the inaugural Ogden Film Festival. “We think the Egyptian is just a gem in the community,” says Ben Taylor, communications manager for the newly formed festival. “There was an opportunity to hold a festival and bring some life to this old venue. We just kind of put our heads together, just in February, and thought, ‘Let’s give this a shot.’” That late start required some logistical jerryrigging, since the Egyptian Theater wasn’t available during the June 10-11 dates of the Ogden Arts Festival, with which the Film Festival is affiliated. “We felt that the theater was just a really important part of it—filmmakers getting a chance to premiere in this venue rather than just a hotel ballroom,” Taylor says. Those filmmakers include several Utah-native or Utah-based directors among the creators of the seven invited short films—like Tay Steele (Lumiére) Andrew Matthews (11:47) and Nick Garrett (Marcos El Muerto). The 40-minute documentary feature Under an Arctic Sky (pictured), about surfers attempting to find waves during the Icelandic winter, rounds out the program. This event might be during the height of spring rather than the winter chill of Sundance, but once again Ogdenites have a chance to get a first look at creative cinematic work. (Scott Renshaw) Ogden Film Festival @ Peery’s Egyptian Theater, 2415 Washington Blvd., Ogden, June 2, 6-10 p.m., $5 (includes admission to Ogden Arts Festival), ogdenfilmfestival.org

WEDNESDAY 6/7

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Masculinity has been a mythic subject in art going back to the time of cave-dwellers, and G.S. Larson explores new terrain regarding what it means to be male. His Aaronic Configuration series—photographs transferred onto paper backdrops, then painted with watercolors and acrylics—began as figure studies, but eventually developed into stories. The men Larson depicts are not ordinary artist’s models. He describes one subject who was having a difficult time replicating poses from art history books. The artist got him a beer, and photographed him in conversation. “He opened up, and told me about working security on a military base in Afghanistan,” he says. “He pointed out a scar on his body that he received when he fought a man who ran past a checkpoint to get onto the base.” Similarly, a man Larson met at a convenience store was obviously a heroin addict, but his physique and discussion revealed him to be a former high school athlete. Several pieces utilize bodybuilding-style poses to contemplate masculine clichés. Formerly LDS, Larson says he used the word “Aaronic” (as in Aaronic priesthood) in the title “because I like how it referenced the Mormon culture most of the models and myself grew up in.” It’s fitting because these works examine the ways in which masculinity is a product of culture. The intimate gallery space of God Hates Robots is ideal for viewing smaller-scale, personal works like these. (Brian Staker) G.S. Larson: Aaronic Configuration @ God Hates Robots, 314 W. 300 South, Ste. 250, through June 9, Monday-Friday, 11 a.m.-5 p.m., free, godhatesrobots.com

FRIDAY 6/2

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G.S. Larson: Aaronic Configuration

Complete listings online at cityweekly.net

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A&E

School’s Out

A high school student’s award-winning art represents a shift in the LGBTQ experience in Utah. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

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n 2017 Utah, a work by an openly gay high school student—including an artist’s statement addressing its LGBTQ themes—won a Juror’s Award at the Springville Museum of Art’s 45th annual All-State High School Art Show, where it became part of a touring exhibit that will make its way to state schools and libraries throughout the 2017-18 school year. Yet the most remarkable thing about Dylan Kime’s story, is that it doesn’t seem like a seismic shift, but rather part of a new normal. A graduating senior at Highland High School, Kime tells his story at a Salt Lake City coffee shop without angst, laughing often and seeming completely at ease. Though he was born into a Mormon household, his coming-out story seems far more amusing to him than traumatic. “I had been out at school since probably seventh grade, but my mom didn’t figure anything out until probably my freshman year of high school,” Kime says. “[She] decided to check her browser history, and it was a bunch of gay YouTube videos, and some … less appropriate stuff. She was, like, ‘What the hell is this?’ And I was, like, ‘Oh. Hi. I’m a homo.’” That matter-of-fact approach to his identity carries throughout the conversation, and his description of a high school experience he says has been amazing. When he mentions trying out for the ensemble of the school musical as a freshman, he describes it as “sort of your typical homo-in-highschool deal.” In fact, the most anxiety he describes involves the circumstances where he first got into photography, the art form that got him into the Springville exhibition. For his senior year, he signed up for a photography class, but was inadvertently placed in an advanced class, despite his lack of experience. “I went to the teacher and said, ‘I have no idea what I’m doing. I think I should drop this class,’” Kime recalls. “And she said, ‘No, no, don’t worry about it. I’ll help you through it, it’ll be great.’ And she worked with me a ton, and it turned into a huge deal. I feel like I started getting really good at it.” The piece that eventually wound up in the Springville show began as a class assignment. “I got super into it,” Kime says, “and wanted to make it something really meaningful. Like, personal. Like, gay.” The concept he developed involved

SCOTT RENSHAW

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FRANK CALIENDO CLEAN FAMILY FUN AND IMPRESSIONS JUNE 23, 8PM

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VISUAL ART

his ex-boyfriend, whom Kime called and invited over for a photoshoot. “I haven’t told him this,” Kime says, “but I kind of turned it into a tribute to lost love. I told him to make all these faces, look in different directions, all these emotions. I wanted that to be incorporated into my art.” While Kime’s teacher, Calleen Lester, believes that Kime’s photographic collage is the first queer-themed artwork accepted into the Springville show, the gallery itself was not able to confirm that milestone. According to Ali Royal Pack, of Springville Museum of Art’s School and Family Programs, “The work in the High School Show is often very personal and reflective of the students’ personal lives. We do ask for artist statements for the works in the show, but not all of the students include them, so there is no way for us to know if that was the first openly queer-themed work.” Kime himself says that he didn’t see anything else in this year’s show that suggested a similar subject matter, and speculates that his piece might have inspired some less-than-positive reaction. He recalls walking through the museum during the initial reception, and noticing some people looking at his work. “They were kind of giving it glares, whispering about it,” Kime

Student artist Dylan Kime

says. “I don’t know if it was bad or good, but it didn’t look good.” Like most artists, however, Kime is probably his own harshest critic, and it has nothing to do with the subject matter of his work. His own impostor syndrome popped up at the awards ceremony, where he first got a chance to see the other work accepted into the Springville exhibition, and says, “I honestly felt like I didn’t belong there.” His current plans do not include pursuing art as a career, as he attends Salt Lake Community College with a goal of getting an EMT certificate. Whatever his future plans, though, he begins them at a time when he appreciates the evolution in acceptance for a gay teenager in Utah, telling his story openly, whether through his art or simply through his life. “Just being a high school student, looking around, I have so many queer friends,” he says. “I don’t hear bashing as much. My friends feel safe. I feel safe. I have older friends in the queer community who have told me horror stories about living in Utah. But being in this generation is kind of great.” CW


moreESSENTIALS

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

New works by Art at the Main’s represented artists including Adrian Bangerter (pictured), Joy Nunn, Terrece Beesley and more are featured in a spring group show (210 E. 400 South, 801-363-4088, artatthemain.com) through June 9.

PERFORMANCE

Ruby Anniversary Kingsburry Hall, 1395 Presidents Circle, 801-581-7100, June 1, 7 p.m., tickets.utah.edu

THEATER

COMEDY & IMPROV

AUTHOR APPEARANCES

Dennis Lehane: Since We Fell The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, June 4, 3 p.m., kingsenglish.com Maile Meloy: Do Not Become Alarmed The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, June 7, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com (see p. 15) Miriam Klein Stahl: Rad Women Worldwide The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, June 6, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Patricia Koerner: Remember This Weller Book Works, 607 Trolley Square, 801-328-2586, June 6, 6:30 p.m., wellerbookworks.com

SPECIAL EVENTS FESTIVALS & FAIRS

JUNE 1, 2017 | 17

Ogden Film Festival Peery’s Egyptian Theatre, 2415 Washington Blvd., Ogden, June 2, 6 p.m., ogdenfilmfestival.org (see p. 15) Utah Lake Festival Utah Lake State Park, 4400 West Center St., Provo, 801-851-2900, June 3, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., utahlakecommission.org Utah Pride Festival City and County Building, 451 S. State, June 2-4, utahpridecenter.org (see p. 19) Zombie Family Bike Ride Cottonwood Heights City Hall, 2277 E. Bengal Blvd., Cottonwood Heights, 801-944-7067, June 5, 6 p.m., chbusiness.org

| CITY WEEKLY |

Bird and Water Dance Ensemble Murray High School Auditorium, June 3, 6 p.m., murrayhighinformation.webs.com Julianne & Derek Hough: Move-Beyond Eccles Theatre, 131 S. Main, 801-355-2787, June 7; 4 & 8 p.m., artsaltlake.org (see p. 15)

LITERATURE

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DANCE

Jon Rineman Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, June 1, 7:30 p.m.; Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., 801-622-5588, June 2-3, 8 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Open-Mic Night Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, Wednesdays, 7:30 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Tony Hinchecliffe Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, June 2-3; 7 & 9:30 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Beauty and the Beast Draper Amphitheater, 944 E. Vestry Road, Draper, June 2-12, FridaySaturday & Monday, 8 p.m., draperartscouncil.org Cabaret Ziegfeld Theater, 3934 Washington Blvd., Ogden, 855-944-2787, June 2-24, FridaySaturday, 7:30 p.m., theziegfeldtheater.com Captain AmericanFORK Desert Star Theatre, 4861 S. State, Murray, 801-266-2600, through June 3, times vary, desertstar.biz Disney’s Beauty and the Beast Egyptian Theatre Co., 328 Main, Park City, 435-649-9371, through June 4, Thursday-Saturday, 7 p.m.; Sunday, 6 p.m., egyptiantheatrecompany.org Hairspray The Grand Theatre, 1575 S. State, 801-957-3300, through June 3, ThursdaySaturday, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday matinee, 2 p.m., grandtheatrecompany.com Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat Hale Center Theatre, 3333 S. Decker Lake Drive, West Valley City, 801-984-9000, June 2-Aug. 12, Monday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m., Saturday matinees, 12:30 & 4 p.m., hct.org Newsies: The Broadway Musical Tuacahn Center for the Arts, 1100 Tuacahn Drive, Ivins, 435-652-3200, June 2-Oct. 18, tuacahn.org Pirates of the Carabeener Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, 801-355-4628, through June 10, 7:30 p.m., theobt.org Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Cinderella Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, 801-355-2787, through June 4, times vary, artsaltlake.org Shrek the Musical Tuacahn Amphitheatre, 1100 Tuacahn, Ivins, 435-652-3300, through Oct. 20, dates and times vary, tuacahn.org Disney’s Tarzan Hale Center Theater Orem, 225 W. 400 North, Orem, 801-226-8600, June 3-Aug. 5, Monday-Saturday, times vary, haletheater.org


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18 | JUNE 1, 2017

moreESSENTIALS TALKS & LECTURES

Ruby Chacรณn Park City Library, 1255 Park Ave., Park City, 435-615-5605, June 1, 7 p.m., parkcitylibrary.org

VISUAL ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

Am I Mestizo Institute of Culture & Arts 631 W. North Temple, Ste. 700, through July 7, facebook.com/mestizoarts All of Us Beasts Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, through July 7, heritage.utah.gov Barbara Ellard Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, 801-596-5000, through June 9, saltlakearts.org Bill Lee Gallery at Library Square, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through June 9, slcpl.org Christopher Lynn: Misplaced Wall Salt Lake City Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-5248200, through July 19, slcpl.org G.S. Larson: Aaronic Configuration God Hates Robots, 314 W. 300 South, Ste. 250, through June 9, godhatesrobots.com (see p. 15) Jeff Juhlin: Shifting Ground A Gallery, 1321 S. 2100 East, 801-583-4800, through June 3, agallery.com Joseph Cipro: Cosmic Musings Gallery 814, 814 E. 100 South, 801-533-0204, through July 31 Laura Hope Mason: Abstract Landscapes Art Barn/Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, 801-596-5000, through June 9, saltlakearts.org

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

Mapping & Unpacking: Mixed Media and Sculpture by Bret Hanson Gallery at Library Square, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through June 9, slcpl.org Michael Ryan Handley: Sublimation UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through Sept. 9, utahmoca.org Petecia Le Fawnhawk: Desert Elements Modern West Fine Art, 177 E. 200 South, 801-355338, through June 10, modernwestfineart.com Rona Pondick & Robert Feintuch: Heads, Hands, Feet; Sleeping, Holding, Dreaming, Dying UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, 801-3284201, through July 15, utahmoca.org Rosalie Winard Art Barn/Finch Lane Galleries, 1340 E. 100 South, 801-596-5000, through June 9, saltlakearts.org Spring Group Show Art at the Main, 210 E. 400 South, 801-363-4088, through June 9, artatthemain.com (see p. 17) Tyler Bloomquist: Confusion FICE Gallery, 160 E. 200 South, 801-364-4722, through June 15, ficegallery.com Utah Watercolor Society Spring Exhibition Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W. 3100 South, West Valley City, 801-965-5100, through June 28, culturalcelebration.org Wild America: Process and Preservation Modern West Fine Art, 177 E 200 South, 801-3553383, through June 10, modernwestfineart.com Willow Skye-Biggs: Tastes Like Mandy Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through Aug. 12, utahmoca.org Woman/Women The Leonardo, 209 E. 500 South, 801-531-9800, through Aug. 31, theleonardo.org

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| PRIDE |

| CITY WEEKLY.NET |

JUNE 1, 2017 | 19

he quote “Be yourself; everyone else is already taken,” is often attributed to Oscar Wilde, though some could argue it was perhaps a marketing ploy by the brilliant minds at Hobby Lobby to sell more ready-made art. Still, the queer playwright and poet’s words carry with them a dose of self-acceptance heft. Despite many misconceptions, LGBTQ culture in Salt Lake City is thriving, and this week’s Pride festivities are a testament to that—from the 8th annual Miss City Weekly on Thursday, to Sunday’s march through downtown, to a series of splinter festivities across town—SLC’s rainbow colors run deep. This issue is licensed as a celebration, not a condemnation. To wit, subjects highlighted in this extra-special edition range from locals celebrating breakthrough milestones, to festival mainstage headliner Big Freedia, to a group of golden gays living life to the fullest, plus a revealing conversation with covergirl Alaska Thunderfuck. In these pages, you’ll also get chummy with some of the city’s top bartenders, learn to embrace often-misunderstood bisexuality and look back at some of the past 365 days’ landmark headlines. This is for you: the different, the outsiders, the weirdos. Go ahead and relish in the oddities that shape your individuality and remember to be bold. Be brave. Be proud. Be you.


20 | JUNE 1, 2017

| CITY WEEKLY.NET |

| PRIDE |


THE YEAR IN UEER, FROM A-Z By Enrique Limón

A

is for allies. Be them from inside the LGBTQ community (lesbians played a huge role helping out their gay brothers during the height of the AIDS crisis), or outside, the queer movement owes a lot to those who’ve lent their voice when they didn’t have to. Think the revolutionary flame has extinguished? Just last March, students at Mount Ogden Junior High School got approval from the Ogden Board of Education to start the district’s first gay-straight alliance club.

B

is for bathrooms. In February, the current administration rescinded former President Obama’s pledge that transgender students in public schools could use the bathroom that matched their gender. “This is a mean-spirited attack on hundreds of thousands of students who simply want to be their true selves and be treated with dignity while attending school,” Mara Keisling, executive director of the National Center for Transgender Equality, said at the time. As recently as last week, Texas Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick (R) once again implied that he’d press legislators to return for a special session on the matter.

C

is for Cox. Utah Lt. Gov. Spencer Cox. Though he shares a party affiliation with his Texas counterpart, their values could not be any more different. On June 15, in the wake of the savage Pulse shooting, Cox addressed a crowd of devastated locals outside the City and County Building, identifying himself as a straight, white, middle-aged, Republican “with all of the expectations and privileges that come with those labels.” Six months after the watershed, headline-making speech, Cox told City Weekly he thought it was sad that “a no-name, nobody lieutenant governor from a small state in the middle of nowhere” would get so much attention just by preaching kindness, adding, “I think that’s how far political discourse in our country has fallen, and people are just hungry for us to stop calling each other names, and to try to work together, and to be kind.”

D

is for dichotomy. Last October, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints launched Mormon and Gay. The move came almost a year to the day after the church declared that married same-sex couples should be considered apostates and that their children cannot be baptized until they turned 18 and were out of the household. Many, like Mormons Building Bridges’ Kendall Wilcox were quick to point out the message was far from timely, though he did note the website represents “a huge step forward.” is for Ellen DeGeneres. It’s hard to believe, but last April marked 20 years since the comedian came out publicly on the cover of TIME magazine. As witnessed by her perennially popular TV show and the $1.068 billion global box office Finding Dory garnered last year, the move clearly ruined her. is for film. A little more than a decade after Brokeback Mountain made a splash, Moonlight became the first LGBTQ movie to receive a Best Picture Oscar. Locally, the Damn These Heels festival, whose mission it is to provide a “safe, supportive environment that empowers historically marginalized LGBT voices and [to] facilitate discussions crucial to inspiring positive social change,” has educated and entertained audiences for 14 years. Watch out for their latest iteration July 14-16.

G

is for Interfaith service. Contrary to popular belief, we’re not all boozehound deviants (at least not since that damn .05 DUI bill passed). Designed to “celebrate the sacred in all of us,” this year’s Pride-sponsored worship service takes place Thursday evening at First United Methodist Church. So get off the apps and nurture your spiritual side before the party kicks into high gear. What’s that? Jesus is less than 25 feet away?

J

is for J. Stuart Adams. Call him a man of contrasts. Sure, the Layton Republican vocally opposed April’s decision by a federal judge in Chicago to expand the definition of workplace sex discrimination to include LGBTQ individuals. Yet, at the same time, he led a cross-country tour promoting a “Fairness for All” ideal. The concept, Adams says, is an extension of the basic “Love thy neighbor” principal. “Now I’m living my religion,” he told The Christian Science Monitor. “I’m being more compassionate and tolerant, and I’m getting respect back from the other side.”

K

is for Kids. The Bad ones. Founded in June 2012 as a response strict gender norms and even stricter nightlife regulations, the Bad Kids Collective continues to be a shining beacon for any and all that march to the beat of their own drum. Follow them on Facebook, and if you see they’re throwing a party, go. Your vision of SLC’s nightlife will never be the same.

L

is for Luxemburg. The small, landlocked European nation seldom makes headlines, so people paid attention when it started trending on social media last week. The reason? In a picture depicting NATO WAGS, the White House failed to acknowledge first husband Gauthier Destenay’s existence. “Is there a reason the @WhiteHouse didn’t include the First Gentleman of Luxembourg in this photo caption?” Weekend editor for The Daily Beast, Scott Bixby, tweeted. “Like, a non-homophobic one?” The gaffe was corrected 9 hours later.

M

is for Misty K. Snow, the self-defined “true Progressive” who last year became the first openly transgender candidate to win a major party’s U.S. Senate primary. Snow lost to Republican incumbent Mike Lee in November, but don’t count her out yet. On April 13, the Salt Lake City native announced she plans to run against incumbent Rep. Chris Stewart for Utah’s 2nd Congressional District seat in 2018.

N

is for “No promo homo.” While this year’s legislative session included few surprises, the Republican-controlled assembly approved Senate Bill 196, sponsored by Mr. J himself—Sen. J. Stuart Adams—with inordinate bipartisan support. Squashing the state’s dated “promotion of homosexuality” stature, the bill passed both houses and was signed into law by Gov. Gary Herbert. “Today is a historic day for Utah’s LGBTQ youth,” Troy Williams, Equality Utah’s executive director, said in a statement. The measure goes into effect July 1, 2017.

O

is for Orlando. Salt Lake City and the world shared the gutwrenching pain on June 12, 2016, when an armed gunman opened fire at Pulse nightclub leaving, 50 dead. We honor your legacy. We will forever remember your light.

P

is, for the second year in a row, for Pre-exposure prophylaxis. Taken once daily, PrEP has proven to be more than 90 perfect effective in preventing HIV exposure. Get the facts, and if it’s right for you, get on it.

is for Queer Prom. Being gay is hard enough, but being gay and young—and living in Utah for that matter—is quite the trifecta. Luckily, Pride’s Youth Activity Center circled the wagons and staged the 12th annual event last April. With a carnival-theme, Queer Prom represented a safe-space for youth ages 14-20 to experience the right of passage with their chosen attire and dates without fear of ridicule.

R

is for resistance. As a nation, we collectively saw the worst and the best of people in the aftermath of last year’s presidential election. One positive side effect was that a sleeping giant was awakened. A new slew of queer activists was born, lending their energy to a variety of topics, LGBTQ-related or not. In January, for example, Ella Mendoza passionately addressed to the crowd gathered at Salt Lake City International Airport protesting the current administration’s travel ban against visitors from seven Muslim-majority countries. “I want you to know that when they come for us, you need to be there,” Mendoza, a defender of gender-nonconforming, PoC and Latinx voices, said over a megaphone. “The time is now!”

S

is for sodomy. Fourteen states, including ours, still have obsolete anti-sodomy laws on their books despite a 2003 Supreme Court ruling nullifying them.

T

is for Trump. At a rally in Colorado last October, then-presidential candidate Donald Trump held up a rainbow flag emblazoned with “LGBT’s for Trump.” A spokesperson later said Trump was “proud to carry the ‘L.G.B.T. for Trump’ rainbow flag on stage,” being his aim was to be “president for all Americans.” Insert collective sigh here.

U

is for uterus. Aka a place where no crusty, white, male politician has a say. On the campaign trail, Trump said he intended to defund Planned Parenthood and overturn Roe v. Wade. Since then, people like Karrie Galloway, president/CEO of Planned Parenthood of Utah, have been working tirelessly to keep providing health services—including cancer screenings and birth control—for free or at a reduced cost. “Women need a safe and confidential place to get their reproductive health care,” Galloway told City Weekly in January. “We can’t let them down.”

V

is for visibility. On March 31, the Utah Pride Center joined others across the world to commemorate Transgender Day of Visibility. According to the Human Rights Campaign, 2016 was a record-breaking year for violence against transgender individuals in the U.S., registering 22 deaths. This year, violence has already claimed 11 trans* lives.

W

is for wedding registry. Utah’s ban on same-sex marriage was ruled unconstitutional by a federal court on Dec. 20, 2013. After a series of legal maneuvers, the U.S. Supreme Court refused to hear Utah’s appeal on Oct. 6, 2014. And guess what? The world hasn’t ended.

X

is for X Factor. Sophia Hawes-Tingley has it, and she’s hoping it’ll take her all the way to the Midvale Mayor’s office. If she wins, she’ll be the first transgender mayor of a Utah city. More on her on p. 24.

Y

is for youth suicide rates. They’re the principal cause of death for people under 24 in the state, and while no official statistic exists pairing them with conservatism and the mainstream religion, the dots aren’t hard to connect. “Please make a space for your gay members,” Neon Trees frontman Tyler Glenn said in an emotional Facebook Live video in July 2016. “Please tell them they are OK and they’re made in the image of God and they’re not flawed. Please stop telling them that they are abnormal. Please, please, please, how many more? How many more?”

Z

is for President Obama’s ZeroFucks-Given wrapup tour, which on June 24, 2016, included a National Monument designation for the Stonewall Inn. Learn your history, kids, and bow down to those who opened the watershed. Had it not been for those brave pioneers your school probably didn’t teach you about, there would be no Pride. CW

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is for Gilbert Baker, the man behind the rainbow pride flag. Prompted by Harvey Milk, Baker designed the iconic flag in 1978, with each colored stripe representing different qualities (red for life, orange for healing, yellow for sunlight, green for nature, turquoise for art and indigo for harmony). Before passing away on March 31, Baker saw his creation become an emblem of the gay liberation movement, a crosswalk adornment—in streets from the Castro to Saskatchewan—a Facebook filter and an emoji. Following his death, California State Sen. Scott Weiner said Baker’s work “helped define the modern LGBT movement.”

I

Q

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F

is for HIV. According to a City Weekly story published in February of this year, the Utah AIDS Foundation estimates that approximately 3,000 Utahns are living with HIV. Of those, between 200 and 400 could be carrying the virus and not know it. No longer synonymous with a death sentence, prevention, early detection and treatment continue to be paramount in preventing its spread. Unsure of your status? The foundation offers twice-weekly free STI screenings on a walk-in basis. Best part: It’s conducted in a completely welcoming, sex-positive and nonjudgmental environment.

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Big Freedia brings her Big Easy bounce to Utah Pride.

KOURY ANGELO

By Alex Springer

JUNE 1, 2017 | 23

World Record for assembling the largest movement of sustained twerking in world history. One thing that is inextricable from a Big Freedia show is her hometown roots. “New Orleans carried me for many years, and still does,” she says. “It’s helped me build my character, my personality and the music that I create.” One of the thousands displaced by Katrina, Freedia slept on an overpass, but rallied to help restore the community that raised her. “When I got back on my feet, I was one of the first people to come back and help rebuild New Orleans.” She recalls performing all over the world before those that lived in New Orleans to bring “a sense of home” to those impacted by the Katrina tragedy. As a headliner at the Utah Pride Festival, she’s bringing New Orleans— and a master class in her unique brand of ass-shaking bounce music— (that of the non-Yoncé persuasion) to the Beehive. Freedia’s headlining of the Pride main stage on Sunday not only solidifies the local festival’s standing as one of the West’s most prominent, but also shows our appreciation for expanding our musical horizons. It’s no stretch to imagine bounce music pumping from car windows of every downtown block party after Freedia performs. As our conversation winds down, I tell Freedia that our Pride festival is known for attracting the most party-hungry crowd around. “I’m super excited to get there and show my pride,” she says. “We’re going to make people come together. It’s gonna be a good time—don’t you worry.” CW

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call-and-response exchanges. “I grew up listening to it as a kid,” Freedia reminisces. “I can’t believe that I’m among all those great artists that came before me. It’s what we love and it brings people together.” Known among her contemporaries as the “Queen of Bounce,” Big Freedia’s origins as a performer began with an early interest. “I was into gospel music, and I was in community choir,” she says. In 1998, Freedia began performing with Katey Red, bounce’s first openly gay rapper. Red was known for performing in drag, and soon became one of the genre’s most influential members. Red’s notoriety paved the way for artists like Freedia to take the stage on their own terms. Hip-hop—bounce included—isn’t the most LGBTQfriendly genre, but the arrival and popularity of this socalled “sissy bounce” movement helped shape today’s more inclusive and diverse scene. “In the beginning, I had a little bit more trouble. Now I can say that I’ve earned my spot, and people respect me for my music, my craft and who I am,” she says. “I collaborate with a lot of different artists, and they don’t have any issues. I’m happy that I’m able to be myself without any questions.” In the time since Freedia launched her solo career back in 2000, she has since snagged her own reality TV show on Fuse: Big Freedia Bounces Back, which starts its seventh season this fall. “It’s going to be pretty juicy,” she says. Freedia also had the monumental opportunity to collaborate with Beyoncé on her anthemic single “Formation.” Oh, and she also happens to hold the Guinness

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he aftermath of Hurricane Katrina was one of the most gut-wrenching news cycles in recent memory. After the tragedy and horror passed, however, it became one of the most inspirational. Like many, as I followed the dire situation, I heard the humbling stories of musicians and artists who stuck around to help rebuild their city. As stories of ball-dropping politicians multiplied, so did accounts of impromptu dance parties and concerts. These, in their own way, fueled the reconstruction of New Orleans. Essential to this cultural convalescence was—and still is—a hip-hop subgenre known as bounce. It’s a rapid-fire, twerk-inducing music that ebbs and flows with the communal energy of all partygoers in attendance. NOLA native Big Freedia (born Freddie Ross, Jr.) reveres bounce as a cultural staple. “It’s been around in New Orleans for many decades now,” she says in a phone interview. “Everybody loves it—from kids to grandmothers. It’s a culture here.” While the best way to experience the nuances of bounce would be to catch Big Freedia’s performance at this year’s Utah Pride Festival, here’s a quick primer: It originated in New Orleans in the 1980s, and it’s known for whipping audiences into a frenzy with a feverish beat barrage, expertly constructed trash verse and bawdy

FREEDIA at Last!


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TODAY, I Celebrate

Local equal rights crusaders look back on significant milestones. By Carolyn Campbell ride has many facets. One of its biggest elements is celebration, says Liz Pitts, Utah Pride Center events director. “Pride is a time when LGBTQ people, and their friends, family and allies can come together and take time to enjoy the community we have built,” she says. “So much of what we do every day is activism and coming out. Pride is a time to relax and enjoy, to celebrate our sexuality, each other and the accomplishments of this diverse community.” The following profiles feature people from the LGBTQ community who are also enjoying other significant celebrations at this time of Pride.

P

Shane Frazier: celebrating acceptance

Frazier is celebrating acceptance. He plans on attending Utah Pride for the first time this year. Frazier is a 22-year-old political science major at Mormon-owned BYU. When his religious beliefs came at odds with his sexual orientation, he says he originally experienced depression, anxiety and suicidal thoughts. Within the last year—and in order to help prevent future suicides on the part of others—he spoke openly both about being gay and facing mental illness in a video interview with LDS Daily. “I was hopefully able to show people that there is nothing wrong with being gay or with having a mental illness,” he tells City Weekly. “You are not broken; there is nothing wrong with you and you are loved. As hard as these things have been for me and even though I struggled with my relationship with God, I feel that he gave me these opportunities to help other people.” Frazier is currently a member of BYU College Republicans and hopes to work toward positive reforms within the Republican Party and the LDS faith.

Sophia Hawes-Tingey: celebrating her mayoral candidacy

Hawes-Tingey is running for mayor of Midvale. If she wins, she’ll be the first transgender mayor of a Utah city, and the second time she’s made headlines. Back in October 2014, she and her partner Danilynn Tingey, became the first legally recognized trans-lesbian couple in the state. “The distinction will be that people will have the opportunity to know that a transgender person can serve and can serve well,” she says. “We’ve come a long way since the time when it was thought that if your internalized identity didn’t agree with your outward gender, that it was a disease that needed to be cured.” She clarifies that being transgender “isn’t why I run, but for a certain population, it’s why they want to support me.” She feels her political experience, her recent appearances in the Vagina Monologues at Westminster College and the University of Utah, and her approaching fourth wedding anniversary, all have contributed to this new chapter, and are worth celebrating. She concludes: “Pride is actually founded in the sense that we can—and should be able to—take personal pride and personal self-compassion in who we are and who we love. We have the right to take that pride.”

Joshua and Jason Tiedeman-Bell: celebrating their fourth anniversary and second baby adoption

Since he was a kid, Joshua Tiedeman-Bell always wanted a big family. “I was an only child. My dad was LDS and it seemed like everyone else had a bunch of siblings,” he says. As a gay man, he originally thought his dream would be just that. Then everything fell into place after he met Jason Tiedeman-Bell, through friends from Disney Cruise Line, where they both worked at different times. They quickly realized their family goals were in synchronicity. “One of the very first topics we ever discussed was ‘do you want kids?’ A family was something we both always wanted,” Jason says. They married in 2013 and pursued their dream of having a family through the California state foster-care system. They first adopted Landon, who will be 2 in June. The parental bug having kicked in, Aidan, now 10-months-old, followed. “As soon as I saw him, I fell in love,” Jason says. Joshua works from home for an Orem-based software company. A nanny holds down the fort during the day, but he’s able to bond with the kids during his lunch breaks. The challenge of caring for two kids in diapers who can’t quite communicate what they want yet, hasn’t dimmed the idea of continuing the pursuit of his Brady Bunchworthy family plans. “We have two boys now and hope to eventually adopt two girls,” he says. Last month, the couple hosted a soirée to commemorate their fourth anniversary and the finalization of Aidan’s adoption.

Obsidian Healy: celebrating her 16th birthday at Queer Prom

Healy came out to her family when she was 12. She and her mom passed each other on the basement stairs as they rushed to get ready to go to a play at Hale Centre Theater. “I could tell she was visibly upset, her mom, Liz Healy, says. “We both sat down on the stairs and she said, ‘Mom, I need to tell you that I’m gay.’” Liz replied, “Get your shoes on. We’re going to be late.” Obsidian’s parents accepted her sexual identity in the same way they’d embraced her selfimposed name change from the original Megan. “We’re not LDS; maybe it was easier that she didn’t have the cultural stuff to deal with,” Liz Healy says. “And it’s not that I always thought she was gay, although she was tomboyish, and usually wore her hair short and dressed in basketball shorts and T-shirts. What I’m saying is, it didn’t surprise me.” Despite minimal fanfare and drama in her coming out, Obsidian suffered her share of adolescent struggles, including coping with anxiety. In response, she started the first gay-straight alliance club at her school. “She’s a force to be reckoned with,” her mom says. On April 22, Obsidian celebrated her 16th birthday—and the fourth anniversary of her coming out—at Queer Prom, sponsored by the Pride Center and held at the downtown Salt Lake City Library. With a palpable energy in the room, and surrounded by her peers, the milestone was one for the books. “The drag queens called her up onstage and sang to her. She had an amazing night,” her mom says.


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Jacob Dunford: celebrating togetherness

As a closeted gay student at BYU, Dunford spent many nights alone. On a particularly difficult night, he put on his running shoes, ran out of his dorm to a big grass field, sat in the middle of it and started to cry. “Back then, I didn’t even feel that I could cry in front of anyone. I thought they might guess my little secret,” he says. Dunford came out to his parents before leaving on his mission. “They said I could still go if I wanted,” he says. So he went. “It was when I got home that things got a little harder. But I always had my family’s support, even when I stopped going to church.” At that time, he decided he wanted persons like himself to be totally supported by their families the way he was. Today, he works for Encircle LGBTQ Family and Youth Resource Center, located in a renovated 1891 home in Provo. “Our slogan is ‘No Sides, Only Love,’” he says. “We choose to love everyone who walks in the door, no matter what they want or who they are. If you are a mom who is conservative LDS and your daughter came out as lesbian, this is one place that feels as comfortable as your own home. He describes Encircle as an initiative to keep families together through the tough threads that often are commonplace in the gay experience. “We see a lot of homelessness—physical homelessness, but more often emotional homelessness,” he says. “We see plenty of people who feel they aren’t welcome anywhere. We feel that is because of a misunderstanding. We can be a place that is a bridge toward understanding.” At a conference for LGBTQ Mormons, a woman approached Dunford with a defensive attitude, asking, “What does Encircle think I should do with my child?” Dunford grabbed a picture frame that showed the Only Love motto and the woman started to cry. “She came to Encircle and is now seeing a lot of progress with her daughter and her family.” Encircle offers support groups, counseling, referrals and fun stuff for youth. “It’s amazing what you can do when you have a place where you can talk about the gay thing and it’s not a big deal.” He adds, “What we really celebrate is families. We don’t pretend to understand what family is. There are a lot of LGBT kids whose families are struggling. As a gay guy, I understand how hard this is on the tender parts of your soul. But everyone deserves a group of people who cares about them. When you are at Encircle, you see all the other moms, dads and high school kids. We’re such a simple organization, but our impact has been huge.”

Ann Pack: celebrating her transgender journey

Pack felt that the scariest part of admitting she was transgender was that it seemed like nobody stayed married to their partners. “I felt that if I told, I would lose my family and friends and no one would want to be in a relationship with me.” So, prior to her transition, she did the her best to suppress the truth. She and her wife adopted a little girl who was the center of their world. “I felt that if I just acted manly enough, it meant I was a man.” Throughout their marriage, her wife would find stashes of her female clothing, “I could understand her view that if she married me and we were going to be an eternal family, I was now taking that family and destroying it. We knew this gender stuff was a problem we needed to face,” she says. For a while, they accepted the idea that it might just be a crossdressing phase. “For both of us, that felt a lot safer,” Pack says. Soon after, she came to terms with her reality. “I joined a support group for crossdressers in Salt Lake,” she recalls. “The other men would have their evening out as an alternate identity, then go back to being male. Whereas, after I got home and I’d have to go back to being a guy, I would cry.” Eventually, she told her wife that she was transgender. As a first call to action, they introduced their daughter to transgender friends of theirs. “She had a foundational knowledge when we told her,” Pack says. “She was scared that we were telling her we were getting divorced. I said, ‘We’re not. We’re trying to figure this out together.’” Today, the Packs have been married almost 18 years. Like many Utah couples, the balance between faith and self-acceptance has been a particularly tough one. “It is hard for both of us. We don’t necessarily get everything we want. There has been a lot of compromise and we are trying to meet each other in the middle somewhere. Right now, it is working well for us.” Last year, Pack was part of the Pride parade with her wife and daughter alongside the Mormons Building Bridges group. A good problem to have this time around, she says, is not knowing which group to march with. “There are so many groups, like Mormons Building Bridges, Affirmation and others,” she says. “I know I will march; I just haven’t quite decided who I will march with.”

Mike and Spencer Twede: celebrating being gay and Mormon

Dressed in white shirts—like they wore on their missions—and rainbow ties, Spencer and Michael Twede held the banner leading off the Mormons Building Bridges contingent in last year’s Pride parade. “For us, this is a different kind of mission, an opportunity to send a message to people in our lives that there is space to be both Mormon and gay,” Mike says. They are both important pieces of who we are and we shouldn’t have to hide one to have the other.” Both served Spanish-speaking missions in California. They met at USGA, (Understanding Same Gender Attraction), a support group that originally met in the BYU Law Library. “Both LGBT people and straight people attended and it was the right place for Spencer and me at that time,” Mike says. After one such meeting, a high school friend invited him to go to the library and hang out. “That is where I met Spencer. I stalked him like crazy on the internet, and found his number on Facebook,” he recalls. A text led to their first date the following week, and six months later they became engaged. Seven months after that, they married. “Our initial plan was to wait a year and go to California, where we were missionaries,” Spencer says. But when gay marriage first became legal in Utah in 2013, the men decided to seize the moment. Saying they fully embrace “everything we’ve learned, experienced and felt as Mormons,” the couple continues to attend church. “Our stake president has been warm and welcoming,” Mike points out. “We are able to participate in a lot of different ways and we like to be as involved as we can.” CW


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Let me eat

CAKE

By Chase Wilson o some, I’m gay. To others, I’m not gay enough. For a long time, I didn’t know what I was. I didn’t know where I was supposed to fit in. Could I fit in anywhere? Growing up in a forward-thinking household, my mom always told me to judge people according to their character. While a good rule of thumb, this is much easier said than done. We grow up in a world riddled with conscious and unconscious biases. Harmful micro-aggressions take seed in our brains early on and spread their roots deep. Through education, representation and honest communication, we remove these poisoned roots. We begin to discover who we are and where we belong. Often, the destination we arrive at is not where we expect to end up. As a child and through my adolescence, I never worried about my family judging me for how I presented myself, even though I found myself going through a new phase almost weekly. My family never judged me for who I chose to hang out with and I easily made friends throughout my school years despite social anxieties that resulted in overt shyness and introverted tendencies. I also enjoyed my fair share of “girlfriends” throughout elementary school. I use quotes here because I’m not sure these first interactions with the opposite sex as kids count as actual relationships, but they serve as a shallow foundation for relationship building as we grow older and begin to navigate the dating world. Cut to any family get-together during these years, where I was inevitably asked about school and, from there, if I liked any girls in my classes or if I had a girlfriend. It always felt innocent enough. A light joke to break the ice with a kid they rarely saw, but it never sat right in my head. Questions like these, asked of such young kids before they even possess an inkling of who or what they are, plant seeds of heteronormativity—the socially ingrained belief that men and women have distinct roles in life—and that heterosexuality is the natural form for relationships. My first real relationship began in middle school. I met a girl while working my first job in an amusement park. Things went well for nine months or so and then we went our separate ways. After this, I dated another girl, more serious than the last, which went on-and-off for around three years. Most of the details of these first relationships are irrelevant, other than they were born from the immense societal pressure that I felt (and I think most young people feel), compelled by everyone and everything around me to find a girlfriend, date her through high school, then get married and have kids. It’s what we’re supposed to do, right? As this rocky, on-again-off-again relationship began to fizzle out, I knew I possessed an attraction to members of the same sex. I never thought about it as being gay or bisexual, or anything other than straight; I always attributed it to feeling comfortable with my sexuality. More often than not, teenage boys at this time in their life are hypermasculine. Always flexing to prove who’s the tough guy; bragging about who gets the most girls; who could kick whose ass. Many of my close friends filled the stereotype with ease. Most guys this age meet any sign of femininity or gayness with immediate revulsion, mockery and disgust. This ultra-masculine atmosphere does more than just make boys puff their chests and act tough; it creates a false narrative about what makes a boy a man. Living in this atmosphere day after day—filled with constant displays of manliness and revulsion at the slightest hint of anything queer—helped me unconsciously repress any sort of thoughts or feelings that weren’t particularly straight. By the time I entered high school, I quit hiding from the truth. I did myself no favors by lying to myself. I knew that I didn’t fit into the straight narrative taught to me from a young age. I felt attracted to men. But I also knew that I didn’t fit into the gay narrative either. I absolutely felt attracted to women, too. As a result of some poking around the internet, I concluded that the term “bisexual” defined how I felt pretty accurately. Finally having some sense of identity empowered me. However, I could not find it in myself to come out immediately. I feared that coming out with my newfound sexuality might negatively impact—maybe even ruin—many of my friendships and possibly even

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THOMAS PEEK

A bisexual’s manifesto for living life somewhere in between.

sabotage my prospects for future relationships. I stayed quiet about it for a long while. Throughout the entirety of high school, I worked at Hot Topic at the local mall. I met Megan there and we began dating in my junior year. Early on, I could tell that this relationship felt different from any before it. She was, and remains, incredibly empathetic and genuine. I felt so strongly for her and trusted her so deeply that I made the decision to come out to her first. To say I felt nervous is an understatement. Up to that point, I don’t think I ever felt more anxious than I did in that moment. To my relief, I placed my trust in the right person. After telling Megan about my internal struggle, much to my shock, she actually reciprocated the action and came out as bi herself. It was truly a moment full of love and free from judgment. From there, it became easier and easier to come out to those around me. After I told Megan, I came out to my mom and sister. My sister couldn’t have cared less. Her reaction came off as the most “So what?” of so-what’s I’d ever heard. My mom came off a bit more cautious. She asked me a few questions: “What about Megan?” She knows, nothing has changed, I answered. “Does this mean you’re just confused?” No. “It’s not just a phase?” Nope. Then came a few semi-hurtful, “Are you sures?” as if I hadn’t thought about any of these questions over the years. After the interrogation, the conversation effectively ended. Since then, I’ve felt nothing but acceptance. Now came the part I dreaded most: coming out to my best friend. I thought a lot about this in the months and weeks leading up to finding the guts to pull the trigger. I recalled talking about LGBTQ issues with him in the past and it never went well. Repeated iterations of the same “it’s not natural, it’s a choice,” argument had stifled any sort of real conversation. Finally, the time came when I could no longer live vicariously through the scenarios I’d created in my head. I had to make this real and accept the outcome, whatever it might be. “I’m bisexual,” I managed to mumble over the phone from behind my jumbled nerves. “So tell me what that means,” I heard him say in a flat tone. That’s how it began. If I told you this conversation went how I planned, I’d be lying. I explained what identifying as bisexual meant to me, and how I’d come to that conclusion. He asked a few of the now-standard questions, and after saying all I had to say, he paused in a stone-cold silence for a few eternal minutes. I actually thought he’d hung up. “Hello?” I said. A sniffle. An apology. Without going into much of the sappy details, he apologized for all of the negative comments and arguments made over the years. He told me having someone close to him, someone that he calls a brother, come out as decidedly-not-straight opened a whole new world-view to him. He made a virtual 180-degree about-face. In fact, I can’t say that any of my close friends reacted in a way that negatively impacted our friendships in the years since coming out. That’s the important caveat though; these were people I’d known for years, but I still wondered how people who didn’t know me personally would react. Fast-forward to the present day. Megan and I are still together, going on two years of marriage. Newsflash: I’m still bisexual even after marrying a woman. Admittedly, we don’t have what is defined as a “traditional” marriage or relationship, whatever that is. We’re two bisexuals in a loving and committed non-monogamous marriage. In other words, we are emotionally exclusive while allowing one another to have separate sexual partners. I’m not here to tell you this lifestyle works for everyone, or that it’s an easy decision to make. It takes trust, love and most importantly open, honest communication. But in the end, this lifestyle works for us. Most interesting to me, it seems that people on both ends of the spectrum have considerable troubles comprehending this. Straight and gay folks alike wonder how, if I’m married to a woman, I could possibly still be bisexual—as if somehow my inherent sexuality switched off once I said “I do.” I’ve experienced some people at either end of the conversation who try and invalidate my marriage because they just know that I’m actually gay and don’t want to come out. They condescendingly tell me that I want to have my cake and eat it, too. I do. And I will. CW


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ANDREA HARVEY

SAGEAdvice

Group of elders aims to bridge the LGBTQ generational gap.

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remained unchanged. So for the queer community, step- and that can be detrimental.” Now an assistant professor at the University of Utah’s ping foot inside a senior center, nursing home or assisted College of Social Work and an investigator for Aging With living facility can feel like going back in time. “We’ve heard, nationally and locally, that [senior fa- Pride, Hoy-Ellis has researched and studied these issues cilities] are not very welcoming to gay seniors,” Richard for years, and says that LGBTQ elders are at a high risk of Starley, head of the SAGE Utah board, says. “They al- suicide, though the data are hard to collect. On a broader scale, SAGE collaborates with other loways say it’s the other residents who aren’t comfortable. You have to think in terms of generational issues here. cal organizations such as Salt Lake County Aging and The people around you grew up in a time when being gay Adult Services, and Utah Commission on Aging. But the latter, Starley says, didn’t welcome SAGE until recently— wasn’t acceptable.” The list of problems faced by the aging gay community an all-too-common roadblock in conservative Utah. Despite the challenges, SAGE Utah has thrived. Their is lengthy. But social isolation is at the top. LGBTQ persons in assisted-living facilities or nurs- budget is tighter than before, yet they’re more active than ing homes are particularly at-risk of social isolation and ever, thanks to the efforts of dedicated volunteers like its emotional repercussions, especially when lack of in- Starley. They’re now hosting an event every month—“a big step forward for this little group,” he says. dependence is factored in. Starley says SAGE makes From group dinners to classes featuring guest a point to visit these facilities regularly to provide speakers, events provide a supportive space for emotional support and caregiving when possible. local LGBTQ elders to broaden both their minds “It’s a difficult thing to do, but it’s an important and social circles. Their biannual potluck sees thing to do,” he says. “When you become ill or a turnout of around 300. vulnerable, you tend to go back in the closet a litMost recently, SAGE members traveled to tle bit. You don’t let everybody know you’re gay.” Provo for a gathering with the LGBTQ youth SAGE tackles the isolation through education, of Encircle. Over pizza and soda pop, people outreach and advocacy aiming to help facilities from all walks of life with one thing in better understand and serve their LGBTQ common swapped stories for three residents. That can start with something hours by. At some points, the as simple as including more represenroom was so full that it was hard tation of same-sex couples in their to move; at others, the laughpamphlets, to make them feel more “Socialization is really ing so loud that it was hard to welcome. important, because older hear. Despite differing experi“When you’re not seeing yourself people tend to get isolated— ences, opinions, religions and represented,” Hoy-Ellis says, “at especially if you’re gay.” ages, not a single voice went best, you’re invisible, which isn’t unheard. CW helpful. At worst, you don’t matter, –SAGE Utah's Richard Starley

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harles Hoy-Ellis was 15 years old in 1975 when he told his family and friends that he was gay. Rejected by his Southern Catholic parents and relentlessly bullied by his classmates, he eventually dropped out of school and moved to Seattle to start a better life. Among the many things he left behind was a secret: His brother was gay, too, but decided not to come out after seeing the way that Hoy-Ellis was treated. It wasn’t until 20 years later that the brother’s secret was finally shared—in a suicide note found by his parents. This was the turning point for Hoy-Ellis, who decided to pursue a career helping people like his brother. It was a different world back then. But although the nation has evolved in terms of LGBTQ rights, many of the people who grew up in that decade or earlier are still living in the past. The unique issues faced by aging queer adults have been historically overlooked—and that’s one of the many battles SAGE Utah has been fighting. Recognizing that the larger LGBTQ movement wasn’t paying much attention to the needs its elders, the national, New York-based organization SAGE (Services & Advocacy for GLBT Elders) was formed in 1978, and has since branched out to 20 states in the U.S. Utah was one of the first. Under the wing of the Utah Pride Center, SAGE Utah’s mission, in a nutshell, is to improve the quality of life for local LGBTQ adults over 50 by addressing five key needs: social, emotional, physical, mental and spiritual. They do this through outreach, education, advocacy and social events. While the LGBTQ rights movement has come a long way, the milestones are relatively recent. Among the elderly, many of the earlier conservative social values have

By Andrea Harvey


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SHEDDING Her Skin In a candid interview, Alaska Thunferfuck talks patriarchy, bullying and political ambition. Story & photos by Enrique Limón

reetings, Earthlings. Her name is Alaska Thunderfuck 5000 from the planet Glamtron, what’s yours? Phone interviews can be awkward, impersonal and even in the days of high-quality digital audio recording, hard to decipher. So, when it came to profiling the RuPaul’s Drag Race Season 5 breakout for our Pride/anniversary issue extravaganza, the answer was clear—it was time to take the show on the road. Specifically, Denver’s Oriental Theater. There, in a strip mall office adjacent to the venue, Thunderfuck (née Justin Andrew Honard) is in repose in front of a vanity, meticulously applying her makeup. Next to her, a towering suitcase holds heaps of hair (whatever you do, do mention the W word—wig) and a Pepto-pink plastic tablecloth, which will later double as a tear-away outfit. The All Stars Season 2 winner has been busy “spreading the gospel, the good word” of drag with her non-stop Poundcake Tour. The night’s 90-minute-long performance is noteworthy in that it’s the only one for which she’ll be accompanied by a live band. Upping the ante, Thunderfuck recruited legendary L.A. drag bushwacker Jackie Beat, an early influencer who she calls “a hero of mine for a long time.”

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Back in the early days, Thunderfuck cemented her rising-star status thanks to an unforgettable, Super-Soaker-inspired stunt to Whitney Houston’s version of “I Will Always Love You” at notorious club night Trannyshack. Today, the drag maven opts for her own material. Her first album, Anus peaked at No. 3 on Billboard’s dance chart. Videos for the first three singles of her latest, Poundcake, have collectively garnered close to 7 million views on YouTube. Alaska the persona also has three times the Facebook following that Alaska the state does. Thunderfuck’s burgeoning empire also includes a “sickening” adventure book (Alaska Thunderfun and the Inner Space Odyssey), a limited-edition watch and a newly launched doll. Still, as part of shtick, she projects an oblivious vibe. Asked if it the night’s show holds a special significance, the pride of Erie, Pa., answers: “Sure. I don’t know? Yeah?” in her trademark, drawn-out baritone. Before taking the stage and delivering a raw, passionate and unapologetic experience, the brains behind such anthems as “Your Makeup Is Terrible” and “Come to Brazil” talked pot—“Mmm, I smell a skunk,” she said while a bandmate partook in Colorado’s recreational activity du jour— expressed shock at that week’s episode of Drag Race (the one with the infamous Valentina mask incident), and gave a nod to homegrown talent Cartel Chameleon, calling her “insanely talented.” Along with Chameleon, Thunderfuck will be sharing the Metro Music Hall stage on Saturday with Eden Flesh, Chelsea Siren, Devon Dixx and Kenneth Leon.


On that topic, talk to me about “race-chasers.” A sub-culture that you immortalized in one of your songs. (laughs) Well, it was something that we were all talking about anyway. ’Cause it was, like, we would go to a city, and you know, we all sort of follow each other. Like, I’ll be there one week, and then, the next week, Detox or Jinkx will be there. And we’ve had stories where we’re flipping through photos and we’re, like, ‘Oh, you hung out with that guy, too? Oh, how clever!’ and literally, there are guys who I swear have punch cards and are trying to catch ’em all like Pokémon. What Pokémon would you be? Hmm, well I can’t be Jigglypuff, that’s taken. Is there a snake Pokémon? Ekans, I’m that one. You’re also very active on all forms of social media. At what point do you tune out the negative stuff? Well, I mean, some girls love the comments. Some girls love to talk about the comments, they love to talk about reddit and this and that. That’s not my business. I don’t go there, I don’t live there, I don’t visit there. So if you’re trying to reach me, the comments is not the place to get to me, because I’m not gonna see it.

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What is a good place? Snail mail. Also, direct Twitter mentions. I’m very good at seeing those. So, if you have something really pressing to tell me—if you really hate something I’m doing—Twitter-mention me. You just mentioned reddit, which seem to be a hotbed for all things Drag Race. God bless them! I mean, if I was a fan … well, I am a fan of Drag Race—but if I wasn’t a RuGirl— I think I would love reddit. To me, it seems like it’s for die-hard fans who look at deep detail, and I love that. It’s cool, but they talk about me too much, so I don’t want to go there. You and Season 7’s Jasmine Masters are huge on reddit. Am I? Am I actually huge on reddit? See, I don’t want to know. Even while on the road, I’m assuming you’re following Season 9? I am, and I’m like a fuckin’ crackhead without a fuckin’ light bulb when I’m on the road, and I have a show on a Friday night and I can’t watch it. I can’t go on social media, because I’ll see a spoiler and I’ve gone this whole season without knowing what’s gonna happen. So I get so pissed, and I make everyone’s life a living hell until I get to watch the episode. Did you watch last night’s episode? I sure did. For you, what’s been the gag of Season 9? Last night (laughs). I was so upset! I’m still holding out hope. I think she’s gonna come back and she’s gonna win the whole show. I can’t say that, when is this coming out? June 1, Pride weekend. Whatever, put it in. I said it and I’ll say it again. How would you have reacted if you were in Valentina’s shoes at that moment? Well, I think it just one of those things that comes down to experience, and if she really has only been doing drag for 10 months, that’s not a long time. It takes years to get your legs as a performer; to figure out what you would do in a situation where you didn’t know the words. There are ways to get out of it, and to sell it, and to make it work to your advantage. It happens. Make a joke out of the fact that you don’t know the words, but legitimately trying to hide it? That’s not one of the ways that works. But, unfortunately, she was figuring out this lesson on TV, with eight cameras trained on her, and then broadcast across the world. That’s too bad, but she’s young. She’s gonna be fine. She’s lovely, I think she’s amazing. During another episode, one queen felt personally attacked when it came to ‘reading’—which is such a part of drag. Is there a limit when poking fun of someone when you’re in drag? Well, I mean, drag, inherently, is saying outrageous, mean, horrible

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Let’s start with pronouns. What do you prefer? AT: I’m going to give you the RuPaul answer: ‘Call me he, call me she, call me Regis & Kathie Lee’. It doesn’t matter. At what time of the transformation does Justin become Alaska? I actually think it’s the people—whether it’s the audience or whether it’s the meet-and-greet—the people bring her alive. Is it a good time to be a drag queen? Yeah, definitely. It’s insane. It seems everyone is eating it up now, and drag has crossed over to the mainstream. What’s your take on that? Well, I don’t know. Everyone keeps saying that, but it’s, like, drag used to steal from the mainstream and copy it, and now the mainstream is stealing and copying from drag. I guess it’s just, like, full circle. Many have speculated drag is inherently misogynistic. How do you respond? (laughs) Oh, it’s this kind of article … I promise we’ll have fun. I just want to touch on all the bases. Well, Jackie Beat’s answer to this query is, ‘Are women born with false eyelashes and hair stacked to Jesus? No.’ I mean, we’re making fun of not women; we’re sort of drawing attention to the artifice of beauty culture and how absurd it is. That’s what I’m doing—that’s the look of drag. The performance of drag, is celebrating femininity—that’s the ritualistic magical performance element of it. You’ve performed in Salt Lake City before. What are you bringing this time to the stage? I don’t know yet. Usually when I don’t know, I say it’s a surprise. So, let’s just say it’s a surprise. In preparing for this, I read a bunch of interviews with drag queens, and they all seem to lead with the same question … Why do you do drag? When did you start doing drag? Not even! It’s who would you kaikai with. It seems drag queens are the new sex symbol within the LGBTQ community. Oh, my! That’s wacky. Because, when I first started, I was seeing a guy who was, like, ‘Yeah, if you ever do drag, I’ll never sleep with you again. And that’ll be it.’ And I was still compelled and drawn to do it, and I’ve never looked back. So it’s crazy to think that drag queens are in some way a sex thing. So you don’t consider yourself a sex symbol? I don’t. I don’t really think of sex at all when I’m in drag. There’s too much going on—there’s pulling and prodding and taping and gluing— there’s more rigging going on than All Stars 2.


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things. That’s how we keep our scandal coming out where they’re claws sharp. It’s how we keep our doing anything weird—‘Oh no, I edge. I know I’m being compliment- smoked pot in college. Oh, my career ed if somebody I respect tells me is over’—if you put a drag queen in I’m the worst fucking drag queen political office, they’d be, like, ‘Yes, they’ve ever seen and that they hope I’ve done every drug. I’ve sucked I die. I mean, that’s amazing. That’s every dick. I ate every pussy, and honorable. … But, like, with Alexis now let’s fuckin’ govern.’ You know, Michelle, she felt really touchy about it gets all that shit outta the way. So people talking about her body or her yes, I will be running in 2020. No … weight. You have to pay attention to just kidding. Maybe later though. those things that make you feel selfSorry, what was the question? conscious or edgy, and you need to With everything happening right go forward at them 100-miles per now—RuPaul being named one hour. So she needs to say, ‘Yes, I’m a of TIME’s 100 most influential, fuckin’ fat bitch and I’ll fuckin’ sit on young kids in grade school doing your face and fuckin’ kill you.’ That’s makeup tutorials on YouTube—it’s what I would recommend as a way such a moment for queer culture. of dealing with it, ’cause you have to Yet, in a state like Utah, suicide is have thick skin. the No. 1 killer of LGBTQ youth. A recent piece on The Atlantic What would you say to those kids states drag is the ultimate retort to that are alone right now in a world Trump. What do you think of that? that hasn’t fully accepted them? Sure, I bet he hates Well, I’d say it. All the more rea“Drag, inherently, they’re not alone. son to do it. He sucks. As much as people is saying outraDo you consider feel alienated and geous, mean, horyourself to be poisolated, we also litical? rible things. That’s have a great many Yeah, totally. I tools and resourchow we keep our mean, drag is takes that we never ing popular culture had before. You claws sharp … I and identity and can go online, you know I’m being throwing it comcan find a commucomplimented if pletely into a fuckin’ nity that’s going wood-chipper and somebody I respect to accept you and coming out the support you, and tells me I’m the other side making find people who fun of it, and mak- worst fucking drag are like you. So, I ing fun of all these guess I would say queen they’ve ever things that society to them: You might takes so seriously— seen and that they feel alone, but taking the piss out you’re not. hope I die.” of patriarchy—and What was that I think that’s great. moment for you Like, look what men have done to when you were younger? the fuckin’ Earth so far—it’s not reWell, it was definitely the art ally working out that great, so I think nerds and the theater nerds. That we should give the women a chance was my tribe, and they made me feel to take over. accepted, and I Ioved them. On that note, what would be I want to make sure I don’t disTrump’s perfect drag name? appoint staunch RPDR fans. So She doesn’t get a drag name. what do you think I should ask John Oliver has jokingly suggested you as a final question? that perhaps it’s time for a drag Oh my God, I don’t know. I think queen to be in office. Would you you did a great job. ever be compelled to do that? Anything you want to put out I mean, yeah, we might as well. there. I promise it’ll make it in the I’m down, let’s do it. paper. I would say the Lil’ Poundcake With RuPaul being named one of TIME’s 100 most influential doll is now available on alaskathunderfuck.com (laughs) people … I wanna go back to the last one. And to vote for you in 2028. Yeah, exactly. CW Every politician is so scared of any


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Absolutely Fabulous. Now more than ever, local journalism matters. There’s no substitute for real, eyewitness reporting and editing. As we celebrate another anniversary, we say thanks to our readers and advertisers for supporting us and keeping us afloat during these first 33 years. The future won’t be easy, but if our community and dedicated staff’s fighting spirit is any indicator, it’ll be one teeming with vigorous energy.

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PRIDEof the Bar For a change of pace, we ask bartenders about themselves. By Randy Harward artenders might be therapists for the desolate, but have we ever asked them about their days? In advance of the weekend, when the city’s LGBTQ barkeeps are gonna be workin’ hard to make the celebration special for everyone, City Weekly thought it’d be a good move to listen to them, for a change. Work commutes that stretch state lines, sweet texts and soaked drag queens— these war-torn booze-slingers have experienced it all.

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Michael Elliott, Metro Music Hall

David Willeitner, Club Try-Angles

It’s approaching 8 p.m. at Try-Angles. The night is young, and 37-year-old David Willeitner— whom you might know by his drag name, Trynity Starr—is buzzing around the bar, laughing and teasing customers like they’re old friends. “I never applied to work here,” he says. One night, the joint was jumping and there wasn’t a barback on duty, so Willeitner, then a visual arts and media student, offered to help. Thirteen years later, “I don’t think they could get rid of me if they tried.” Like Elliott, Willeitner had restaurant experience but wasn’t a trained bartender, so he picked up mixology on the job. Now he can make almost anything and what he doesn’t know, he’ll learn quickly. He never fakes it because, as assistant manager, “It’s my job to be trusted when you come inside,” he says. “If there’s a problem, you need to talk to me.” Willeitner loves the social interaction that comes with the gig. “You have a lot of influence in people’s lives,” he says. A good day involves brightening someone else’s be it by lending an ear or steering a nervous newcomer toward a group where he’ll fit in. At the end of the night, if he’s made people feel safe and comfortable, he feels empowered. That extends beyond Try-Angles’ walls: Willeitner wants to follow owner Gene Gieber’s example and give back to the community. “My goal is to live as much in this atmosphere as I can,” he says. He doesn’t want to leave Try-Angles until, God forbid, something happens to it. If that happens? “I want to own a place that people feel safe and choose to help others. Most unforgettable night on the job: While hosting a fundraiser for the Salt Lake Men’s Choir as Trynity, Willeitner was bombarded with requests to enter the dunk tank in full makeup. The crowd egged him on with donations and raised more than $2,000. “So I got in there, hair and wig and everything. And there was a line of people on the patio waiting to throw balls at me.”

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At 6 feet 3 inches tall, with thick tattooed arms and heavy bronze rams dangling from his stretched earlobes, Michael Elliott, 32, looks more like a bouncer than a bartender. But he’s a gentle giant, soft spoken, mellow and considerate—even outdoors, at a picnic table on the Metro’s patio, he asks permission before smoking. Born and raised “pretty much all over” Utah but mainly in Ogden, he moved to Salt Lake City as a young adult. He’s worked in the customer-service industry, mainly restaurants, since he was 16. “I kinda just lucked out, getting into bartending,” he says. One night while at partying at the Metro’s old location on the corner of 200 South and 600 West, Elliott told the management, “Hey, I’ll sweep your floors, I’ll mop, I’ll do security, I’ll do whatever I can—I’m just lookin’ for a part-time job.” By the week’s end, he worked his first shift behind the VIP bar on a Saturday night. “They fed me to the fish,” he says, explaining he had only a basic knowledge of bartending from working in restaurants. Within the first year, he became manager. Seven memorable years later, under new ownership, he’s now the night manager—same job, he says, minus the 80-hour weeks. His teetotaler status notwithstanding, Elliott excels at his work. The Royal Court of the Golden Spike Empire has voted him favorite bartender several years in a row. He’s also enjoying a five-year run as favorite bartender in the Metro’s own “Dance Evolution Evolvees” awards. He’s known for his signature super-sweet drinks, like the Aphrodite, “a twist of sweet and tart with pomegranate Pama liqueur,” or “five pounds of sugar and some magic.” He attributes his success to his mother raising him to reject prejudice. “It’s ingrained in my psyche,” he says, so he treats everyone the same, whether they’re there for a drag show or a metal concert. And despite not being Metro’s muscle, Elliott says, “I definitely think I have a big presence. Especially among the gay, lesbian and queer community. It’s neat, how I kinda just landed into it, and it’s turned into the supermonster that it is.” Most memorable customer? “They’re all special in their own way,” Elliott says, adding there have been many throughout the years who’ve become ingrained in his life. But one does stand out. “It’s crazy how big of an impact a simple kind gesture or smile or hello can have on someone’s day,” he says. This particular customer recognized Elliott’s kindness in a text: “I had the worst week of my life this week and you made it a bit better tonight,” he wrote. “It’s this kind of stuff that makes it all worthwhile.”

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RANDY HARWARD

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Raised in a small, ultra-Mormon town, Kirsten “K.T.” Thomas’ backstory follows the usual arc, “especially after realizing I was gay and falling in love with a girl.” She came out at 25 and says her immediate family was super cool, some staunch Mormon cousins notwithstanding. Now 33, the former Weber State marketing student is quick to note that her hometown has “evolved a lot” since then. While there wasn’t much for a lesbian girl in Provo back in the day, now there are a couple of gay bars and even a Provo Pride festival. “It’s just a little Sunday festival,” she says. But it’s a start. Before landing at The Sun Trapp three years ago, K.T. worked at the Marriott for seven years and Hotel Monaco for two. “I love the sales-and-marketing side of things,” she says. She studied the field at Weber State and plans to earn a degree in hospitality. Being service-minded, K.T. looks at her native Provo with acceptance and perceives that she sees more of that back home. “I love and respect the religion; I am who I am because of how I was raised,” she says “There are people who can love their religion, and love me and love their community for what it is, and still live true to their values. It seems as though they’re finally realizing that gay people don’t really affect them: live and let live.” The tables have turned, in a way. It’s not hard to accept Provo coming out of its prejudicial funk—just hard to conceive. “In that bubble, you get that kinda heavy energy. It’s a different town, down there. But they’re comin’ around,” she says. In the meantime, Thomas gets what she needs in SLC at the Trapp. “I love workin’ here,” she says. “There are no boundaries. Everyone’s welcome.” Most memorable night on the job: One summer during Pride, someone let a Mylar balloon go—it got tangled in a transformer, causing a power outage in the bar. “Probably 100 people all just flipped their phones on, with their flashlights,” Thomas recalls. They also provided music so the party could continue. It lasted only 10 minutes, but it felt like an eternity. “The second the music popped back on, the energy popped back up and everyone was having a good time.”

Brian Olpin, Kween

Inside Bricks, bartender Brian Olpin leads us through a dark labyrinth until we enter a door too short for most people. It’s a dressing room/office, where drag performers and dancers prepare to take the stage during the venue’s Friday gay night, Kween. Raised in Heber City by adoptive Mormon parents, Olpin, 49, holds a degree in communication from the University of Utah and graduated first in his class in Salt Lake Community College’s construction-management program. His first job was with a local homebuilder. “But when they found out I was gay, they told me I would not be paid as a superintendent, that I would never, ever have a promotion, and that I wouldn’t be fired, but I’d be kept at a part-time level. And all other 28 employees got health insurance,” he says. So Olpin struck out on his own and started buying, renovating, flipping and renting properties. Today, he manages six rental properties. Bartending, which he’s done in New York’s SoHo neighborhood at a Chinese drag restaurant and at SLC’s now-defunct Club Blue—and almost every other local gay bar—is about fun. This is clear by how he dances and engages with customers down at the bar. “I work in solitude during the week,” he says. “This gets me out among people.” Given his previous work experiences, Pride is especially significant for Olpin. It was important to him back then, and it buoys him today. He gestures to the younger performers. “They don’t have the trauma that my generation had,” he says. “It’s great.” Best Pride? “In the early days, Pride was very small,” Olpin recalls. “People were scared to go. They were embarrassed to go. They had to have police protection.” Around 2000, Olpin found himself on Blue’s float in his “gay costume,” feeling apprehensive. But he noticed the crowds getting thicker and thicker—with people on his side. “It was overwhelming,” he says, tearing up. “Just a few years earlier, there wasn’t anyone there to applaud. And now it’s the second-biggest parade in Utah.”

RANDY HARWARD

BEN ALLEN @PARTY HARD

K.T. THOMAS

Kirsten “K.T.” Thomas, The Sun Trapp

Kyle Lake, Club JAM

Remember the T-shirts they used to sell at truck stops in neighboring states that said, “Eat, drink and be merry—tomorrow you may be in Utah?” Well, sometimes it’s better here. “I was raised gay in Wyoming,” says Kyle Lake, 25. “It was really isolating.” Without a community to foster him, he was forced to learn about queer culture from the internet and documentaries like Paris Is Burning. That wasn’t enough. Neither were the bars at home. “I didn’t like to go to any of those because it’s just always trouble,” he says. At 18, Lake began moving back-andforth between Salt Lake City and Rock Springs. At 21, he’d get off work at 9 p.m., then drive three hours just to hang out at Jam for an hour before closing. A year ago, the club gave him a job. His first night was Jam’s LDS Conference Weekend party. “I did two of those,” he says. “I’ve worked three Elevation Gay Ski Weeks, and this will be my third Pride.” As a reveller, however, this is his eighth Utah Pride. In spite of our thriving gay community, the irony of making his home in conservative SLC isn’t lost on Lake. “It’s been really hard, being the way that I am,” he says, gesturing to his tight, revealing clothing and saying it’s been a problem when the DABC pays a visit. Like many, he’s perplexed by the red tape involved with SLC bar ownership. “It almost feels like we’re being oppressed, in a way.” Then again, he could be in Rock Springs. “I’m here every weekend,” Lake says. “This is my place where I get to come and express myself. I’m really grateful for that.” Signature drink: Lake is the creator of Kay Byee’s Sourpuss. “That’s that drag queen, right over there,” he says, pointing over my shoulder. “It’s Absolut Citron, limoncello, sweet-and-sour and Sprite. It’s basically a big lemon drop.” CW


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RESTAURANT REVIEWS

Steeped in Tradition

DINE

This is

IT

ta as lt ie a n

Old-school ways are kept alive at Beltex Meats and Tradition. BY TED SCHEFFLER tscheffler@cityweekly.net @Critic1

T

STEVEN VARGO

Like your mama made it!

Beltex Meats’ display case

italianvillageslc.com A

U TA H

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JUNE 1, 2017 | 41

511 E. 900 South, SLC 801-532-2641 beltexmeats.com

H O U R S: MON-THU 11a-11p / FRI-SAT 11a-12a / SUN 3p-10p

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BELTEX MEATS

801.26 6.4182

Southern-style fried chicken ($20) is given a contemporary ass-kicking: crisp fried chicken confit with Thai basil slaw. Chicken and dumplings ($19), too, has an Asian tilt to it. I was surprised at the fiery broth seasoned with togarashi chili spices. The dish is delicious, but might more properly be called “dumplings and chicken”; while the chicken morsels were scarce, the biscuitstyle dumplings were plentiful. It’s a very satisfying dish that I’d happily order again. Chef Kendra Pugh prepared a wonderful customized version of their Arctic char fish and chips ($20) for my wife, who is trying to eat gluten-free and asked if it could be made sans the standard tempura coating. We were happily accommodated with a beautiful piece of seared char accompanied by lemon aioli and fantastic tallowcooked fries. Tradition was bustling on the night we visited, and the communal-style tables were mostly filled. So we grabbed a couple seats at the bar, where I was delighted to find one of my favorite restaurant people— Natalie Hamilton, formerly of Finca—working as bar manager. She’s as good as it gets. Beltex Meats and Tradition are both mixes of old and new, uniting modern techniques and flavors with old-school values and quality. Everything old is new again. CW

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sausages, hams, bacon, etc. You’d probably be surprised at how small the curing room is—no bigger than a walkin closet. But it’s there that Grubisa experiments with different yeast cultures, molds and fermentation techniques to create his world-class salami, chorizo, prosciutto, pastrami, ciccioli, hog’s headcheese, kielbasa, capicola and many more artisan charcuterie items. During a trip to Italy, Grubisa was pleased (and reassured) to find that generations-old, family-owned artisan butchers were using the same traditional methods that he was implementing in Utah. Unlike mass USDA meat producers, however, he doesn’t want every batch of salami, for example, to taste identical. Making charcuterie is as much a science project as it is an art, and he enjoys working with various mold and yeast strains to produce a unique “terroir.” However, as they age and evolve, one batch of salami might taste different from the next. That’s part of the excitement of small-scale, artisan butchery. In addition to its wide range of meat products, Beltex also sells excellent ramen and other types of broth, plus gourmet sandwiches on Saturdays. But don’t dillydally—they sell out quickly. Just a handful of steps from the butcher is its new neighbor, Tradition. Boasting “comfort food and cocktails,” it has strains of the South flowing through its veins, as you’ll quickly surmise by glancing at the appetizers. Included is a contemporary spin on classic fried green tomatoes ($10), which comes with chipotle aioli, cilantro pesto and chili jam. Other hearty starters include pan-fried funeral potatoes ($9), fried okra ($9), fried goat cheese with watercress ($13) and clams with fried fingerlings, peas, carrots, leeks, scallions and bacon with white wine-cream sauce ($16). Is everything fried at Tradition? No, but they do take frying seriously here. Classic

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he corner of 900 South and 500 East in Salt Lake City is quickly becoming very flavorful, steeped in tradition and the newish “roots” culinary movement. In that vicinity, Beltex Meats butcher shop and Tradition restaurant are nextdoor neighbors. Both are welcome additions to the thriving SLC food scene. Hailing originally from Miami, Philip Grubisa has worked as a chef—most recently at The Farm in Canyons Village—but he has butchery in his bones. Three years ago, he could be found at the Downtown Farmers Market selling brined pork chops and country pâté. That business was so successful that it led Grubisa to open his own artisan butcher shop, Beltex Meats, and to supply local chefs and retailers such as The Market in Park City with his high-quality meat products. Brent Whitford of Red Bicycle Breadworks uses Beltex sausage for some of his take-and-bake pizzas, and Chef Briar Handly puts Grubisa’s products to work at HSL, as does the newly opened Tradition for their “pigs in a blanket” dish. Many other Utah chefs turn here for their meat and pork products, especially charcuterie. Beltex is the only butcher shop I’ve ever encountered with a bookcase and sofa. In that regard, it’s quite nouveau, with more eye appeal than the typical meat market. But Grubisa believes in traditional ways of butchering and curing meats, beginning with utilizing the entire animal. “At the end of the day, our waste baskets are very light,” he says; virtually every part of the animal is used. Stuff that might not be quite fit for human consumption is turned into gourmet dog treats, or donated to Tracy Aviary to feed vultures and other animals. In addition to sought-after cuts such as center-cut pork chops and rib-eye steaks, Grubisa and his staff are educating consumers to appreciate lesser-known cuts like beef gooseneck (from the bottom round) and products such as pork butter. Beltex sources everything regionally, including animals from producers like Christiansen Farms and Pleasant Creek Ranch, for its whole-animal butchery. Not only is the quality of the locally raised animals of the highest order, but according to Grubisa, it’s also much more cost effective to buy and butcher an entire hog, for example, than to purchase boxes of chops,


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More than 30 local food trucks are scheduled to be on hand when Liberty Park hosts the 2017 Food Truck Face Off. On June 10, 3-9 p.m., visitors can buy tickets to purchase food items from vendors. Proceeds support five local nonprofits: Fourth Street Clinic, Habitat for Humanity, Utah Community Action, Volunteers of America Utah and Y WCA Utah. The nonprofit that sells the most advance tickets will receive an additional cash grand prize from sponsors. Visit foodtruckfaceoffslc.org to buy advance tickets and for more information.

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Party for the Birds

On June 2, beginning at 6:30 p.m., Tracy Aviary (589 E. 1300 South) hosts its ninth annual Ready to Hatch conservation gala. The fundraiser supports the aviary’s breeding programs and other conservation efforts, and features live music, a silent auction and close-up encounters with some of the birds. While you’re there, enjoy food provided by local restaurants including Laziz Kitchen, Meditrina, Pop Art Snacks and Pizza Nono, plus wine, spirits, beer and coffee from local purveyors. Adult tickets are $100 per person; visit tracyaviary.org for advance purchase.

Burger Week Bingo

If you’ve been snoozing, National Burger Day was May 28—but that doesn’t mean you can’t keep celebrating that delectable marriage of patty and bun. City Weekly Burger Week continues through June 4, with a chance to win prizes for visiting any of the more than 30 participating locations, including Gracie’s, Squatters and the newly opened Carnegie’s. Just print your official gameboard at cityweekly.net, take it to one of the locations and get a stamp every time you get the restaurant’s featured burger; the more stamps, the better your chances to win. That’s on top of the fact that once you’ve enjoyed these amazing treats, you’re already a winner. Quote of the Week: “I always say, ‘Eat clean to stay fit; have a burger to stay sane.’” —Gigi Hadid

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Pucker up Utah: Sour beers are creeping into the mainstream. BY MIKE RIEDEL comments@cityweekly.net @utahbeer

T

he first time I tried a sour beer, I wasn’t a big fan. This was in 2003 when India pale ales were just starting to make their hoppy splash. Back then, it was all about caramel malts and big bitterness. When a close friend urged me to try Belgian sours, they made me wince— they were dusty, dry and jaw-lockingly tart. As I experimented with sour beers more, I began to understand the wisdom behind them. I was still in an old-school frame of mind, and I needed to approach them more like sparkling wine and less like beer. Having gotten over the whole sour thing, my new problem was being unable to find these tasty brews. Living in Utah at the

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time was a bit of a challenge for a newly christened sour nerd. No local breweries were making them and few local bars had them on the menu. Fast forward 15 years, and not only have sour beers found an audience, but they’re finding their way into regular production schedules at many of the state’s top breweries. Right now, a half dozen or so local sours are available; here are four of my favorites.

Shades of Pale Bourbon Barrel Quad (13% ABV)

It pours a honey-brown color that’s somewhat murky with ruby highlights. The tan head is about one finger deep and fades to a thin cap. The nose has bourbon with liquor-soaked cherries, vinegar and marshmallow. The taste starts with tart cherry and balsamic vinegar. Hints of cocoa and brown sugar come next with thin bourbon notes rounding out the back end. It’s quite complex, has tons of flavor and is slightly slick in the mouth.

Uinta Cahoots Flanders Style Red (8% ABV)

Pours a clear ruby color with mahogany highlights. This beer has a two-fingertall dense, foamy, beige head that quickly reduces to a large patch of thin film. The nose is vinous with spicy red wine, vinegar and tart cherries. Tastewise, it starts with caramel malts but quickly transitions to

Chef-inspired, Locally Sourced

Gourmet

Burgers

sharp cherry and a big smack of lactobacillic sourness. There are light to moderate flavors of vinous/red wine and vinegar in the finish. There is a lingering aggressive sourness in this beer, which was conceived in collaboration with homebrewer Rob Rutledge.

Red Rock Paardebloem (9.2% ABV)

With a slightly hazy golden peach color, this pour has a single finger of foamy white head. The nose is peachy and lemony with some dusty/ sour notes. The taste starts with dry candy-peach-like sweetness that is followed by a vague floral bitterness. Next comes a touch of sourness along with some nice peppery notes; this provides a good balance for the big spicy/sweetness that the ale carries. As it warms, the toasted grains become more apparent and the sweetness becomes a little less pronounced. The sourness in this seasonal brew is more subtle than in previous years. Pro tip: Store it away for a year to bring out even more tart qualities.

Epic Oak and Orchard Syrah: Blueberry, Boysenberry and Black Currant (8.5% ABV)

This beer pours a nice ruby color with a minimal head that has light tinges of fuscia.

MIKE RIEDEL

SLC’s Sour Powers

BEER NERD

The nose is a bouquet of raspberries, cherry and a hint of melon sweetness that’s balanced out by a crisp, jaw-tingling sourness. The taste is excellent, as huge unripened berry and fruit flavors smack the tongue right off the bat. Nice puckering sourness comes next with a bit of balsamic sweetness rounding out the fruity tones. The end rewards the drinker with nice, dry-toasted oak flavors. It finishes slightly tannic and puckering, providing a great balance. If you’re feeling adventurous, you can buy any of these at their individual breweries. According to a trend forecasting piece by Bon Appétit, lactose-infused brews— along with sours and wine-barrel-aged beers—are set to make a big splash this year. Horchata stout, anyone? CW


TED SCHEFFLER

REVIEW BITES A sampler of Ted Scheffler’s reviews

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Derek Kitchen and Moudi Sbeity will forever be associated with the landmark Kitchen v. Herbert case, which successfully challenged Utah’s ban on same-sex marriage—but as important as the case was, my guess is that the unassuming pair would probably prefer to be known for their restaurant. The airy, inviting space is done in mostly white and cream, with splashes of green and copper/brown colored seating. Off to one side is a small market where guests can purchase items, including packaged spices, grains, and their signature “Hummusexual” T-shirts. On the menu, the muhammara—a Syrian spread/dip made from roasted Aleppo peppers, walnuts and pomegranate molasses, served with the best pita in town—is a must. For meat eaters, I highly recommend the kibbeh—fried balls made with ground beef, walnuts, Middle Eastern spices and cracked wheat served with pickles, tomatoes and tahini-based tarator sauce. Since Laziz Kitchen opens at 9 a.m., you might drop in for an omelet or shakshouka (scrambled eggs with green peppers, mint, garlic and onion). Recently, the restaurant launched dinner service on Fridays and Saturdays, and the plan is to expand to additional weeknights soon. Reviewed April 27. 912 S. Jefferson St., 801-441-1228, lazizkitchen.com

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GOODEATS Complete listings at cityweekly.net Featuring dining destinations from buffets and rooms with a view to mom-and-pop joints, chic cuisine and some of our dining critic’s faves. Stella Grill

Soups, salads and sandwiches here are reminiscent of the fare at Red Butte Café and Desert Edge Brewery, which are owned by the same restaurant group. The French onion soup—dripping with melted Gruyère cheese—is top-notch, and both the grilled Reuben and the Italian dip (a variation on the French dip sandwich but with grilled peppers and onion, mozzarella, spicy balsamic and roasted pepper au jus), are dependable choices for lunch or a light dinner. There’s a lot to love: friendly, efficient service, a pleasant atmosphere and excellent dishes at very fair prices. 4291 S. 900 East, Millcreek, 801-288-0051, stellagrill.com Taqueria 27 combines south-of-the-border grub with an American twist. Start with a heap of guacamole and any of the tequilas artistically displayed in chalk at each Salt Lake City location. Once downed, choose from the copious selection of tacos, such as the citrus pork carnitas, which include charred tomatillo salsa, pickled red onion, cilantro and napkins to sop up the mess you’re sure to make. Multiple locations, taqueria27.com

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Trolley Wing Co.’s foundation are its wings, which are served with your choice of 13 housemade sauces. These are not your typical wings: Thick and meaty with the just right dosage of sauce. If you have some sort of gripe with your tastebuds, try the Enema Challenge: 12 wings in the hotter-than-hell sauce. If you can finish them in 30 minutes, there’s no charge. 2148 S. 900 East, Salt Lake City, 801-5380745, trolleywingcompany.com

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FILM REVIEW

I Ham, I Said

CINEMA

Wakefield uses a big performance to find small truths. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

IFC FILMS

A

Bryan Cranston in Wakefield. After a few months, however, Howard essentially becomes feral, and here Cranston’s task gets even harder. Swicord makes some odd choices, including a chase sequence as he fights with Russian gleaners over items found in neighborhood garbage cans, and it would be easy for the bushybearded version of Howard to come off like a literary contrivance that just doesn’t translate to the screen. Yet there’s an element of Cranston’s performance that clings to Howard’s prior life; he’s not some homeless man in the same way others are homeless, because he still believes he can go back whenever he wants. It’s a role Howard can play for the purposes of an experiment—testing Diana, testing himself. Swicord builds to an appropriate enigmatic conclusion that’s less about how Howard will resolve his situation than about his winding journey as a tourist in off-the-grid existence. Wakefield’s effectiveness depends on an actor who can find a kind of arrogance in having next to nothing. I’ll take that with a side of ham. CW

WAKEFIELD

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BBB Bryan Cranston Jennifer Garner Jason O’Mara Rated R

TRY THESE Breaking Bad (2008-2013) Bryan Cranston Aaron Paul NR

The Curious Case of Benjamin Button (2008) Brad Pitt Cate Blanchett PG-13

Trumbo (2015) Bryan Cranston Diane Lane R

JUNE 1, 2017 | 47

Little Women (1994) Winona Ryder Susan Sarandon PG

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the windows as this family deals with his unexplained disappearance. Writer/director Robin Swicord—a veteran of literary cinematic adaptations like Little Women and The Curious Case of Benjamin Button—sets the tone with the jittery violins and tinkling piano of Aaron Zigman’s score suggesting an urbane mystery, and frames the story through Howard’s first-person narration. It’s an effective device for shifting our sympathies about him, first as he describes his strained relationship with Diana, and later as he reveals the circumstances though which he deceptively stole her away from his best friend (Jason O’Mara). Wakefield is less a story about a man who abandons his previous life than a story about a man who tries to comprehend a life from which he’s already become detached. What can you learn about your own existence when you get the chance to view it as a spectator? That narrative rests almost entirely on Cranston’s performance, and here is where his particular gifts as an actor make it all work. There’s a smug quality to the earliest scenes of Howard’s observations from the attic, as he provides mocking narration for the scenes he watches play out below—a gathering of sympathetic friends, or a visit by Diana’s mother (Beverly D’Angelo). His reaction involves a unique form of possessiveness—he doesn’t have to deal with Diana, but he can keep tabs on her behavior in his absence—and Cranston plays that alpha-maleness with just the right touch of acidity.

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s the 21st century marches toward being old enough to vote, and the novelty of Method acting recedes farther into our collective cultural rearview mirror, perhaps we should re-think our approach to “big” acting. It’s time for a ham-aissance. When it comes to out-sized cinematic thespians—as is true of all aesthetic matters, of course—ham is in the eye of the beholder. The scope of such a discussion could run from vintage Nicolas Cage to late-period Pacino, with any number of possible shades in between. But the important thing is that restraint isn’t always the best fit for a character. Sometimes, a performance is about a character’s own performance. Sometimes, bigger is better. Not everyone would characterize Bryan Cranston as hammy actor, however many hints of salty smokiness might be sprinkled throughout his résumé. But what he has done remarkably well in some of his most celebrated performances—as Walter White in Breaking Bad, or his Oscar-nominated title role in Trumbo—is play men whose defining quality is a kind of public role-playing. That’s why Wakefield might just be the perfect part for him. Based on a 2008 E. L. Doctorow short story, it casts Cranston as a New York attorney named Howard Wakefield who arrives home after work one day to find a raccoon scurrying into the attic above the detached garage. Once up there, Howard peers through the window at his wife, Diana (Jennifer Garner) and twin teenage daughters, and … he stays. He doesn’t answer his cell phone when Diana calls to find out why he’s late. He doesn’t emerge the next morning, either to reunite with his family or to go to work. “Who hasn’t had the impulse just to put their life on hold for a moment?” Howard ponders, and so he does—turning into a kind of raccoon himself, living unseen on his own property, scavenging for food and observing through


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CINEMA CLIPS MOVIE TIMES AND LOCATIONS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

NEW THIS WEEK

Information is correct at press time. Film release schedules are subject to change. CAPTAIN UNDERPANTS: THE FIRST EPIC MOVIE [not yet reviewed] Adaptation of Dav Pilkey’s stories about a pair of imaginative kids and their goofy superhero creation. Opens June 2 at theaters valleywide. (PG) CHASING TRANE BBB Documentaries about artistic geniuses are surprisingly hard; watching people sit around and try to tell you why their work is great too often overwhelms focus on the work itself. John Scheinfeld’s portrait of jazz saxophonist/composter/pioneer John Coltrane does indeed include plenty of talking heads— ranging from musicians who worked with Coltrane to scholars, biographers and fans (including Bill Clinton!)—while exploring his life from childhood in Jim Crow-era North Carolina through his career and tragic death from cancer when he was just 40. But the wisdom comes in Scheinfeld’s structure, which begins at a pivotal moment during Coltrane’s drug addiction, then circles back before revealing how his cold-turkey recovery marked the spiritual awakening that eventually gave rise to A Love Supreme. He’s also smart enough to include lots of uninterrupted music, offering just enough context for a particular piece’s thematic inspiration or revolutionary approach before shutting up and listening. Though a few interview subjects are indulged too much in their grand pronouncements—looking at you, Cornel West— Chasing Trane offers a worthy model for telling a story about the evolution of brilliance. Opens June 2 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (NR)—SR LOVE, KENNEDY BB Once again, folks: Religious certainty might make for comforting sermons, but it rarely makes for good drama. Writer/director T.C. Christensen, inspired by a Utah true story, follows the Hansen family—parents Jason (Jasen Wade) and Heather (Heather Beers)—as they cope with a diagnosis that their teenage daughter Kennedy (Tatum Chiniquy) has a rare, likely fatal degenerative

neurological disease. The focus is on Kennedy’s warm heart and inspiring spirit, with an anecdotal structure touching on episodes where others allowed her the chance to live out her dreams, or she touched others to be better people. But while Christensen manages to jerk more than a few tears successfully, there’s little conflict to drive the story when Kennedy is almost exclusively a stoic saint, and her parents do little wrestling with anger or questioning their faith. Like many of the LDS-themed dramas of the past 20 years, the goal of this one is comforting reassurance that the principles of the church are true. It’s sweet, well-intentioned, earnest and—if one is not already inclined to accept its theology—a one-note hymn. Opens June 2 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)—SR WAKEFIELD BBB See review on p. 49. Opens June 2 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (R) WONDER WOMAN [not yet reviewed] The Amazon warrior (Gal Gadot) enters the outside world to fight a world war. Opens June 2 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)

SPECIAL SCREENINGS HEDWIG AND THE ANGRY INCH At Tower Theatre, June 3, 11 p.m. (R) NORMAN: THE MODERATE RISE AND TRAGIC FALL OF A NEW YORK FIXER At Park City Film Series, June 2-3, 8 p.m. & June 4, 6 p.m. (PG-13) THE OUT LIST At Main Library, June 4, 2 p.m. (NR) THE SETTLERS At Main Library, June 6, 7 p.m. (NR) THE TRANS LIST At Main Library, June 3, 4 p.m. (NR)

CURRENT RELEASES BAYWATCH BB If you ever wondered what would happen if you combined the styles of writers whose credits include Reno 911!, The Smurfs and Freddy vs. Jason, it looks a lot like this. Dwayne Johnson, Zac Efron and Alexandra Daddario are among the aesthetically pleasing lifeguards at Emerald Bay, and the charm of the personalities involved goes a long way toward offering sporadic entertainment. But the 21 Jump Street-style self-parody that underlines the silliness of the source material also ventures into broad raunchy comedy that often comes off as desperate. Meanwhile, there’s an actual sort-of plot going on, involving a drug-smuggling real-estate magnate and a few rescues-at-sea, much of which is played surprisingly straight. There’s a place for goofy adaptations, for straightforward adaptations and for over-the-top adaptations. Ideally, those places should be in at least three different movies. (R)—SR

BUENA VISTA SOCIAL CLUB: ADIÓS BB The title suggests a valedictory follow-up to Wim Wenders’ 1999 documentary, and director Lucy Walker offers some of that, but it’s also a missed opportunity. She mostly offers context for the celebrated 1990s gathering of Cuban musicians, including details about the artists’ lives and behind-the-scenes footage in a way that’s more of an expansion of Buena Vista Social Club than a sequel, covering the same ground but in more detail. Eventually Walker focuses on vocalist Ibrahim Ferrer, and a fascinating subplot about him enjoying improbable post-Social Club fame after a lifetime as a backup singer. Then she shifts again, to look into other members who have passed on, as well as a 2015-16 tour of surviving members. Sometimes you need to know when to say adiós to your initial plan and let a great story take you where it will. (PG)—SR

PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: DEAD MEN TELL NO TALES B This ride has gone on long enough. This fifth installment is a cacophony of CGI spectacle, but forgets to give us a reason to care about the people caught in the middle of it. It’s full of the supernatural, but lacks magic. Abuse passes for wit, coincidence for fate. Jack Sparrow’s new Bones and Spock (Brenton Thwaites and Kaya Scodelario) share nothing but cringeworthy banter, a painful lack of chemistry and one of the least convincing onscreen romances ever. Johnny Depp’s Sparrow is now stupid rather than cunning, lacking in all the crafty charm he once had. The confusing, convoluted plot—involving a search for the mythic Trident of Poseidon, said to break all curses of the sea, and zombie-sailor Salazar (Javier Bardem) out for revenge—had me rooting for the bad guy all the way. (PG-13)—MaryAnn Johanson

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TV

Flaked and Fear the Walking Dead return; Jim Jeffries takes on late-night.

S

Flaked (Netflix) relief and dropping hints as to why the Stitcher program even exists (which will finally be revealed this season). If it all sounds similar to the methodology of iZombie, you’re overthinking it. No one at FX was overthinking the relocation of Jim Jefferies’ late, great Legit to then-baby network FXX a couple of years ago, which essentially killed a potential-laden comedy. Nevertheless, the Aussie comic persisted with a string of solid stand-up specials that have now led to The Jim Jefferies Show (series debut Tuesday, June 6, Comedy Central). His new not-quite-a-talk-show follows the format adopted by comedians like Chelsea Handler and Iliza Schlesinger, among others: Some monologuing, some desk work, some man-on-the-street chatter, some international flair, but broken up with the kind of biting, scorched-earth political and cultural commentary that only Jefferies can deliver. If you think the other late-night hosts have been hard on the Cheeto in Chief, you might want to brace for Hurricane Jim. CW Listen to Frost Mondays at 8 a.m. on X96 Radio From Hell, and on the TV Tan podcast via Stitcher, iTunes, Google Play and billfrost.tv.

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The shoot-first-don’t-bother-with-questions-later action hero ’Merica needs now more than ever returns in Decker: Unsealed (Season 2 premiere Sunday, June 4, Adult Swim), Tim Heidecker’s … tribute? … to Tom Clancy novels, Steven Segal movies and the comedic power of utterly incompetent production. How incompetent? In last year’s debut TV season, it was titled Decker: Unclassified; this time, it’s Decker: Unsealed—referring to secret government files, it means the same damned thing! Anyway: Superspy Jack Decker (Heidecker) and his codebreaker sidekick Jonathan Kington (Gregg Turkington) face new threats national and personal, if not at all logical, with guest appearances from powerhouse Hollywood A-listers like Joey Travolta, Jimmy McNichol and Steve Railsback. What, no Scott Baio? If you think that sounds stoopid, you’ve obviously never seen Stitchers (Season 3 premiere Monday, June 5, Freeform). Kirsten (Emma Ishta), a ridiculously good-looking 20-something with no discernable personality and “temporal dysplasia” (no sense of time—and no, this condition isn’t real), is recruited by a black-ops government outfit to have her consciousness “stitched” into the quickly slipping-away minds of the recently dead to help solve crimes because, science. After an initial season of misplaced grim seriousness, Stitchers lightened up and embraced the dumb, adding Allison Scagliotti (Warehouse 13) for comic

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omebody must have watched the first season of Will Arnett’s Flaked (Season 2 premiere Friday, June 2, Netflix), right? I mean, I did, but I get paid to watch shows … at least, I think I still do. Arnett’s recovering-butnot-really alcoholic Chip wasn’t exactly 2016’s most sympathetic character, a 40-something Venice Beach emotional leech who lied to his friends, sold out his community and routinely slept with women half his age. But! Late in Season 1, a satisfying-ish payoff finally arrived, which might explain why this season is six episodes instead of eight— Netflix’s way of saying, “Get to the damned point,” maybe. Flaked is about Chip’s redemption this time around, and the show is asking for a second chance, as well. Plus, it’s all just visually gorgeous; more TV series should be filmed through Instagram filters. Meanwhile, would you believe that it’s already time for Fear the Walking Dead (Season 3 premiere Sunday, June 4, AMC)? It seems like only yesterday that you were screaming, “I’m so done with The Walking Dead!” at your TV, and here’s another run of the AMC prequel that bears the impossible burden of not being Better Call Saul. Now that Madison, Travis and Alicia have been kicked out of the Hotel Zombiefornia, they’re trying to flee Mexico and cross back onto the U.S.—too bad a band of border patriots are there enforcing anti-immigration policy, as Ofelia has already learned the hard way. The most intriguing new development on FTWD is the addition of Buffy the Vampire Slayer wildcard Emma Caulfield to the cast in a still-mysterious role. As for Nick … yeah, no one cares about Nick. Speaking of fighting for your life against impossible odds and split ends: I’m Dying Up Here (series debut Sunday, June 4, Showtime), based on William Knoedelseder’s non-fiction book of the same name, dramatizes the struggles of Sunset Strip comedians in the ’70s, bad hair and all. Even though the “it’s a hard-knock life being a comic” trope is everywhere—most recently, and most gently, portrayed in Pete Holmes’ Crashing—the cast of I’m Dying Up Here is impressive: Melissa Leo, Ari Graynor, Michael Angarano, Clark Duke, Andrew Santino, Erik Griffin, RJ Cyler, Al Madrigal and Jake Lacy, with drop-ins from John Daly, Robert Forster, Alfred Molina, Sebastian Stan and more (but not exec producer Jim Carrey). It’s like Boogie Nights, but with dick jokes instead of actual dicks. Ba-dum-bump!

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It Was 50 Years Ago Today

MUSIC RANDY HARWARD

MILESTONE

One of the artists behind the Beatles’ Sgt. Pepper album cover prefers to look forward. BY KIMBALL BENNION comments@cityweekly.net

F

ifty years ago, Jann Haworth helped create what is likely the most famous album cover ever. By now, as anniversary after anniversary of the Beatles’ Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band—released in the U.S. on June 1, 1967—has passed, Haworth has absorbed as much of the praise, criticism, re-examinations and trivia about her cover art as she can. Enough has already been said about The Beatles’ groundbreaking concept album—an early prototype of the idea of the LP as art—that Haworth seems weary of the prospect of discussing it all over again. This time around, the album is celebrated with a deluxe 50th anniversary reissue, along with countless tributes and celebrations from music fans everywhere. And why not? Sgt. Pepper—from its cover to its tracks—is an undisputed and immovable icon. But Haworth has trouble with icons. As the daughter of Oscarwinning Hollywood art-director Ted Haworth (Sayonara) and artist Miriam Haworth, growing up around such houseguests as Marilyn Monroe and Alfred Hitchcock, she knows that legends only loom as large as we allow them to. “They’re just people,” Haworth says of the celebrities who criss-crossed through her formative years. “They’re nothing special. They’re nothing different.” So it’s no surprise that, even in the case of venerated work she helped to create, Haworth is all but tapped out of any reverence for Sgt. Pepper: “We need to grow up, culturally.” Idol worship, she says, “is kind of teenage, isn’t it?” Haworth was only in her mid-20s when she and her thenhusband, artist Peter Blake, came up with the idea for the cover art. It shows three rows of life-size photo cutouts surrounding the Beatles in a group portrait that straddles the line between Victorian propriety and Summer-of-Love surrealism. With some regret, Haworth points out that the majority of the figures are men, and that the women who do appear are mostly celebrities—including three versions of Shirley Temple. “Certainly, I should have been bright enough to say that, if we’re including women, we should do some research on women of stature,” Haworth says. “That’s so pathetic and ill-advised.” It would be difficult to find a tougher critic of her most famous work. But while she might tire of talking about it, she has often revisited it. Most notably, in 2004, she created the “SLC Pepper” mural, a simultaneous recreation and deconstruction of Sgt. Pepper that decorates the east wall of a parking structure at 250 S. 400 West. In this version, the Beatles are replaced by four faceless placeholders, and the figures surrounding them are a split 50/50 between men and women. Haworth says the do-over is an apology, “but also trying to set the record straight or improve on the original.” Perhaps some of Haworth’s frustration with the image is how anchored it is. She has moved on as an artist, while the art itself stays frozen in 1967. Each new plaudit heaped upon Sgt. Pepper

Jann Haworth with some of her works in progress. serves only to cement it even deeper to a fixed point in time that only recedes further into the past. Haworth is more excited about what she’s doing now—a project that will remain unfinished. “Work in Progress” is a 36-foot-wide stencil collage of historical women arranged in a group pose similar to the one on the Beatles’ magnum opus. The crucial difference, aside from gender, is that each woman is rendered by a diverse group of artists and non-artists alike. In all, 123 people slowly added to the roster of 150 figures as Haworth and her daughter, collage artist Liberty Blake, arranged them onto panels. As they take the project with them to different schools and exhibitions around the country, a new group contributes a batch of figures to another panel. As she looked it over before its opening exhibition at The Leonardo, Haworth happily pointed out the diversity of the group: Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg rubs convicted spy Margaretha Geertruida MacLeod (aka Mata Hari) and Princess Diana. Each was chosen by a different artist for a different reason. That way, “Work in Progress” isn’t irrevocably tied to any one person or entity. This work “doesn’t belong to anybody,” Haworth says. “You can’t own it.” The idea for the new mural began around 2008, but didn’t really gain traction until around 2015, a year that saw Hillary Clinton start down a path that Haworth and many others were sure ended at the White House. She says she began to see “Work in Progress” as something that could mark the historic moment when we finally elected a woman as the leader of the free world. It would stand as a symbol of all that had been achieved and the women who helped pave the way—until, suddenly, it wasn’t. Looking at the collage on election night she felt as if she had failed them. “It changed overnight,” she says. Pieces of “Work in Progress” have since been to the Women’s Marches, both in Washington, D.C., and in Salt Lake City. In light of Donald Trump’s electoral win last November, the mural’s message has morphed from one of celebration to one of urgency. It remains unfinished. Its future significance is anyone’s guess. But right now, it’s much better than being stuck in the past. CW


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WEDNESDAY 6/7 Dead & Company

Since Jerry Garcia died in 1995, the Grateful Dead’s music has survived in various configurations of original and new members: RatDog, The Dead, Furthur, Phil Lesh & Friends. Dead & Company consists of five founding members of The Dead: singerguitarist Bob Weir, drummers Mickey Hart and Bill Kreutzmann, bassist Oteil Burbidge (Allman Brothers Band, Tedeschi Trucks Band) and keyboardist Jeff Chimenti (numerous Grateful Dead spinoffs). “Company” refers to the only other official member: perpetually fresh-faced, prolific celebrity p-hound John Mayer. You gotta wonder how that happened. Although he cut the adult contemporary crap a decade ago and started playing to his very real guitar strengths, Mayer still hasn’t shaken his image. So, essentially dropping him into the Grateful Dead in place of iconic, fluffy-faced co-frontman, guitarist and songwriter Garcia? It’s odd, but it works. On YouTube clips, Mayer looks like a kid jamming with his uncles. That’s kinda perfect, since D&C happened because Mayer heard the band on Pandora one day, became obsessed, befriended the band, learned the songs and practically begged to join. A planned one-off show in 2015 became a tour, and Dead & Company is now a real band playing epic three-hour shows that have critics and fans agreeing that D&C is almost a resurrected Grateful Dead. Imagine that. (RH) Usana Amphitheatre, 5150 S. Upper Ridge Road (6055 West), 5:30 p.m., $40-$149.50, all ages, usana-amp.com

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Ogden Music Festival, feat. Hot Rize, Sarah Jarosz, Parker Millsap, Joshua James

SCOTT SIMONTACCHI

For four years, Ogden Friends of Acoustic Music (OFoAM) put on two of the most anticipated local music festivals—this one, and the Ogden Roots & Blues Festival. Don’t fret, fans of unplugged music: OFoAM’s OMF is OMG-good. Venerated bluegrass outfit Hot Rize, about to celebrate 40 years together, headlines along with singersongwriters Sarah Jarosz (pictured) and Parker Millsap, a solo set by Hot Rize main man Tim O’Brien and performances by nine other acts, including our own Joshua James and The Hollering Pines. As always, there are side attractions, including the Utah State Instrument Championships and workshops where you can learn about musical instruments, including how to play them and even build your own. Advance sales are closed, so you’ll have to pay at the gate. (RH) Fort Buenaventura Park, 2450 A Ave., see site for schedule, $10-$99, all ages, ofoam.org

SATURDAY 6/3

The Slow Poisoner, Believes in Ghosts, Mr. Hull

A year ago at the Boing! Anarchist Collective, three dozen people witnessed Andrew Goldfarb, aka The Slow Poisoner, put on a dark, spooky cross of Pee-Wee’s Playhouse and Sunday-school class. Armed with a tentacled, Lovecraft-meets-Purple Rain guitar, kick drum, minimal lights and maximum props, Goldfarb weaved tales of monsters, moons and mushrooms while scrolling through easel-mounted visual aids like our church teachers used in their own wacky tales. Like a splicing of hillbilly vampire troubadour Unknown Hinson and Pee-Wee Herman, Goldfarb held the crowd rapt with songs like the goofy “Hot Rod Worm,” creepy-cool “Knives” and interstitial stories. The most captivating moment, however, was during “In the Gloom” when Goldfarb wandered the room singing and banging on a rattling contraption. “On the recording, I use a chain,” Goldfarb says. “I switched to a donkey skull after I realized the chain was destroying stages.” That gem closes Goldfarb’s killer new album, Swamp Fist! (Rocktopus), produced by splatterpunk author, musician and filmmaker John Skipp. This is a donation show, but you’ll wanna bring extra money to buy Goldfarb’s books, comics, music and bitchin’ black-light paintings. (RH) Boing! Anarchist Collective, 608 S. 500 East, 7 p.m., $5 suggested donation, all ages, facebook.com/theslowpoisoner

The Slow Poisoner

Sarah Jarosz

SUNDAY 6/4

TajMo’: The Taj Mahal & Keb Mo’ Band, Black Pacific

Not long ago, master bluesman Taj Mahal performed at the Eccles Center in Park City. Now he returns with Keb Mo’, another noted blues musician, at his side. Their collaboration and debut LP are under a portmanteau of their names, which rolls off the tongue as freely as music flows from them. Taj’s gritty sound and Keb’s smooth adult-contemporary sensibilities mesh nicely on the album, which features plenty of name guests (Bonnie Raitt, Joe Walsh, Sheila E.). It’s also a diverse, entertaining listen, with an array of tones: smoldering late-night Chicago blues (“Don’t Leave Me Here”), happy front-porch numbers (“She Knows How to Rock Me”), pop (“All Around the World”), world-music influences (“Soul”) and rock (a cover of The Who’s “Squeeze Box”), among others. It’s a great primer for the Utah Blues Festival coming up on June 17. (RH) Red Butte Garden, 300 Wakara Way, 7 p.m., $38-$45, all ages, redbuttegarden.org

TUESDAY 6/6 Chuck Prophet

JOHNNY CRASH

54 | JUNE 1, 2017

BY RANDY HARWARD

FRIDAY-SUNDAY 6/2-4

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Although his time playing guitar with the much-loved Paisley Underground band Green on Red is a marquee résumé item, Chuck Prophet’s solo career as a singer-songwriter is illustrious. Each new album is a true all-killer, no-filler event—crammed with great songs that fit his jangle-pop background, but encompass so much more. His 14th album, Bobby Fuller Died for Your Sins (Yep Roc), is largely Petty-esque jangle-rock, but also spans folk, blues, gospel and fuzz-rock. As usual, Prophet’s wordsmith-ery makes his storysongs immensely satisfying, and your first spin of the record will earn an immediate reprise. Tuesday’s support act is still TBD, but even if one doesn’t materialize (and someone will), you won’t care. That said, if it’s still up in the air, and the State Room booker is listenin’, I nominate any of the following locals: Starmy, Pig Eon or 90s Television. With equally talented songwriters fronting each band, that’d make a helluva bill. (RH) The State Room, 638 S. State, 8 p.m., $20, 21+, thestateroomslc.com


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FRIDAY 6/2

CONCERTS & CLUBS

THURSDAY 6/01 LIVE MUSIC

FRIDAY 6/02 LIVE MUSIC

Après Ski (The Cabin)

HEATHER GROSS

All-Request Gothic + Industrial + EBM + and Dark Wave w/ DJ Vision (Area 51) Chaseone2 (Twist) DJ Jpan (Downstairs) Dueling Pianos feat. Troy & Drew (Tavernacle) Friday Night Fun (All-Request Dance) w/ DJ Twitch (Area 51) Funkin’ Friday w/ DJ Rude Boy & Bad Boy Brian (Johnny’s on Second) Hot Noise (The Red Door)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Cheers to You SLC) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge)

SATURDAY 6/03 LIVE MUSIC

Après Ski (The Cabin)

SPIRITS • FOOD • GOOD COMPANY 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.5 6.6

SIMPLY B WILL BAXTER BAND LAKE EFFECT OPEN BLUES JAM HOSTED BY ROBBY’S BLUES EXPLOSION PROFESSOR COLOMBO

6.7 6.8 6.9

DYLAN ROE PROPER WAY TONY HOLIDAY & THE VELVETONES 6.10 RAGE AGAINST THE SUPREMES

3200 E BIG COTTONWOOD RD. | 801.733.5567 THEHOGWALLOW.COM

JUNE 1, 2017 | 57

Cowboy Karaoke (The Cabin) Karaoke with DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Live Band Karaoke (Club 90)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

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KARAOKE

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DJ Logik (Crow and the Pitcher) Dueling Pianos (The Spur) Dueling Pianos feat. South & Drew (Tavernacle) Hot Noise + Guest DJ (The Red Door) Jazz Jam Session (Sugar House Coffee) The New Wave (‘80s Night) (Area 51)

Patio Time

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Bone (Barbary Coast Saloon) Chad Ellis Band (Outlaw Saloon) Colt.46 (Velour) Eighth Day (Club 90) The Girl Girl Party + Camila Grey (Urban Lounge) Hectic Hobo (The State Room) Joshua James (Provo Rooftop Concert Series) Kap Bros (Brewskis) Live Local Music (A Bar Named Sue) Live Music on the Plaza Deck (Snowbird) Off the Record (Club 90) Ogden Music Festival, feat. Sarah Jarosz + Parker Millsap (Fort Buenaventura) see p. 54 Regular Ass Dude + Benjamin Major + AZA + IVIE + Earthworm + Shanghaii + Lady Tony Holiday and the Velvetones (Funk ’n’ Dive Bar) Trey Anastasio Band (Red Butte Garden) TWRP + Conquer Monster (Kilby Court) Will Baxter Band (Hog Wallow Pub)

“This is what I’ve sunk to,” Michael Gross says in a self-deprecating text to City Weekly. He means that the release show for the debut EP of his new solo act, Whisperhawk, “will just be me, solo, in my basement—the same way I recorded the songs.” The move requires no apology, even a half-joking one, because it makes sense. Everybody knows artists have to get creative in order to get their music heard—and it’s all about social media, anyway. A one-man operation like Gross might as well fire up the webcam, ’cause it has to be easier than booking a gig and getting people to show up. This is convenient; nobody has to leave home or shower or even wear pants in order to see the show. And you really oughta check out what Gross—whose songs, voice and guitar you’ve heard with noted local indie-pop act The Brobecks, pop/rock band Michael Gross & the Statuettes and electro-pop trio The Lazy Waves—has been up to. Whisperhawk lands between The Brobecks and the Statuettes, with some of the latter’s early twang, and Gross’ songwriting continues to mature as he refines his craft. Watching him perform the tunes by himself, where they were born, should make up for any intimacy lost in the stream. But no matter how you hear it, Whisperhawk’s EP will reach out and hit you. (Randy Harward) Live stream, 9 p.m., free, all ages, facebook.com/whisperhawkmusic

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The Adarna + SeasOnSapphire + Westward + Slick Velveteens (The Loading Dock) Brandy Clark & Charlie Worsham (The Depot) The Causalities + Revolt + Drunk as Shit + The Ulteriors (In the Venue) Face to Face + Counterpunch (Urban Lounge) Jelly Bread (O.P. Rockwell) Joe McQueen Quartet (Garage on Beck) Lior Ben-Hur (Funk ‘n’ Dive Bar) Reggae Thursday feat. Gonzo + Aloha Radio + Dumbest (The Royal) Silver Tongued Devils (Hog Wallow Pub) Stereo RV (Coulter House) Twizted + G-Mo Skee + Young Wicked + Gorilla Voltage + Body Bag Syndikate + Andrew Boss + Shadow D + DJ Chunk (The Complex) Unwed Sailor + PINE + Silent Miles (Kilby Court)

Whisperhawk


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58 | JUNE 1, 2017

Indian Style Tapas

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Friday 6/3 - DJ Benetton Saturday 6/4 - DJ Curtis

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Steven May makes a move in Last Night.

FIRST & THIRD FRIDAYS Game Night at Kafeneio

In case you missed it, there’s been a board game renaissance. You don’t have to play Monopoly (read: Monotony) for the umpteenth time, or humiliate yourself by revealing your artistic incompetence in Pictionary. There’s a board game for everybody nowadays, and on the first and third Friday of every month, dozens of players—carrying towering stacks of boxed board games—congregate at the South Salt Lake coffee shop Kafeneio to get their geek on. On the night I showed up, almost every table was full. People played games like the social deduction game Secret Hitler, the crazy card game Food Fight and Last Night, a game that simulates a slasher film—pretty much exactly Friday the 13th. That’s the game I chose and, frankly, expected to win. I mean, you get to choose from three characters depending on the color of your meeple (pawn). Knowing horror tropes, you know not to choose the black dude, the sexually free-spirited blonde or the fat stoner guy ‘cause they all die early. No. You go with the brainy, sexy girl (even if you’re not one). In horror flicks, she’s whatcha call the final girl, the one that survives. Except one player at the table is the killer, with his own shielded game board, so you can’t always see where he’s moving. A fast-paced, but deep game, Last Night does a great job creating suspense. You know, provided you survive long enough to participate. So my final girl? She didn’t make it. First one down, in fact. Oh, well. At least she still had half a latte left while playing the totally made-up one-player side game, Slurp ‘N‘ Watch. (RH) Kafeneio, 258 W. 3300 South, free, 801-485-1282, kafeneiocoffee.com Blackbear (The Complex) Chad Ellis Band (The Outlaw Saloon) Colt.46 (Velour) Free Throw + Homesafe + Heart Attack Man + Sunsleeper (Kilby Court) Joy Spring Band (Sugar House Coffee) Live Local Music (A Bar Named Sue) Live Music on the Plaza Deck (Snowbird) Live Trio (The Red Door) Monophonics (O.P. Rockwell) Off the Record (Club 90) Ogden Music Festival, feat. Hot Rize + Amy LaVere + Bryan Sutton Band + The Hollering Pines (Fort Buenaventura) see p. 54 Ryan Shupe & the Rubberband (Sandy Amphitheater) Salt Lake Metal Fest (The Royal) Samothrace + He Whose Ox Is Gored + Conflagration (The Loading Dock) Spazmatics (Liquid Joe’s) Strange Familia + Panthermilk + Sarah Anne DeGraw (Urban Lounge) Sugarbone + Truce + Dissension (Liquid Joe’s)

The Slow Poisoner + Believes in Ghost + Mr. Hull (Boing! Anarchist Collective) see p. 54

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Dueling Pianos feat. Troy, South & Drews (Tavernacle) DJ Latu (The Green Pig) DJ Sneeky Long (Twist)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Karaoke w/ B-RAD (Club 90)

SUNDAY 6/04 LIVE MUSIC

Après Ski (The Cabin) Live Bluegrass (Club 90) Live Music on the Plaza Deck (Snowbird) Ogden Music Festival feat. Joshua James + Sammy Brue + Tim O’Brien & Jan Fabricus (Fort Buenaventura) see p. 54 R.A. the Ruggedman + AFRO + Dumb Luck + The Outsiders + Dead Walkers (Urban Lounge)


Simply B (Hog Wallow Pub) TajMo’ + Black Pacific (Red Butte Garden) see p. 54

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

HOME OF THE

4

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Silver Tongued

Devils 9PM NO COVER

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MONDAY 6/05 LIVE MUSIC

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& BRINGING YOU SLC’S LONGEST RUNNING EDM NIGHT WEDNESDAYS

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Cabin Fever & Miss DJ Lux (The Cabin) Open Jazz Jam (Bourbon House) Open Mic (The Wall at BYU)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Tavernacle) Karaoke w/ DJ Thom (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck (Twist) Karaoke w/ Zim Zam Ent. (Club 90)

JUNE 1, 2017 | 59

DAYS REASONS

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The Anchor + Scarlet Canary + Elysium + Colonel Lingus (The Loading Dock) Chuck Prophet + special guest TBD (The State Room) see p. 54 Cryptopsy + Rivers of Nihil + Visceral Disgorge + Seeker + Gloom (Metro Music Hall) Hellyeah! + Sons Of Texas + Righteous Vendetta (The Complex) Kitfox + Tarot Death Card + Stephanie Mabey + Mary Lion Proudfit (Urban Lounge) Notion + Binson + HalfBad + Solid A (Kilby Court)

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Monday Night Open Jazz Session w/ David Halliday & the JVQ (Gracie’s) Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig) Open Blues Jam hosted by Robby’s Blues Explosion (Hog Wallow Pub) Open Mic (The Cabin)

M O N DAYS

KARAOKE

Dueling Pianos (The Spur Bar and Grill) DJ Curtis Strange (Willie’s Lounge) Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig Pub) Red Cup Event w/ DJ Juggy (Downstairs)


© 2017

PRE-K

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ACROSS

45. Start to remove a baby’s onesie, say 46. Reason for hanging a “Cerrado” sign in one’s shop window 49. The Hatfields and the McCoys, e.g. 50. ____ facto 51. It’s often called pickled cheese because it’s cured and stored in brine 52. Bygone Japanese audio brand 53. “I was reading the dictionary. I thought it was a ____ about everything”: Steven Wright 54. Designer Gucci 55. Indigent 56. Pac-12 school that’s the answer to the joke “What happens when the smog rises in California?” 58. Recipe amt. 59. Yang’s counterpart

Last week’s answers

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

6. Capital city whose highest point is the 358-feet-tall Jose Marti Memorial 7. Kind of fee 8. In great supply 9. Letters in some church names 10. Collection of signs 11. “Mamma Mia!” group 12. Aim 13. Cabinet position: Abbr. 18. Mark in Spanish class 19. First person to win a Pulitzer Prize for film criticism, 1975 23. ____ papers (answer to the joke that asks “What do animals read in zoos?”) 24. Seeger who won a Grammy in 2009 for his album “At 89” 25. Get 26. Copy, for short 27. Washington, for one 28. “____ understand ...” 29. Minute Maid brand 30. Bare minimum 31. Think out loud 32. Magna ____ DOWN 37. Capital of Switzerland 1. Francis, for one 38. “Go team!” 2. Pussy ____ (Russian girl group) 39. Zap 3. Character who sings “Let It Go” in “Frozen” 41. 2003 hit song Rolling Stone magazine 4. 1991 Nobel Peace Prize winner Aung San called “a genre-humping blur of acoustic guiSuu ____ tars ... and Andre 3000’s funktastic charm” 5. Agency originally formed to provide sup42. Like Dylan Thomas, by birth plies for child victims in World War II 44. Feature of some high heels

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

1. Nursery school, informally (and an apt description of the answers to 17-, 25-, 43and 57-Across) 5. Zoe Saldana’s role in 2009’s “Star Trek” 10. Turns abruptly 14. Like unwashed hair 15. “Saturday Night Live” alum ____ Pedrad 16. “’Well, Someone’s Gotta Play ____,’ Screams Frustrated Band Teacher” (Onion headline) 17. Desired response from a focus group 20. LAX posting 21. Words of compassion 22. Roll named after a Polish city 23. “Rhinestone Cowboy” singer Campbell 24. Vegetable soup vegetable 25. Timepiece popularized by a 19th-century song with the lyrics “But it stopped short -never to go again / When the old man died” 33. Prompt again 34. “Hud” director Martin 35. energystar.gov org. 36. Bldg. units 37. National League’s 2012 Rookie of the Year ____ Harper 39. Den 40. B’way sellout sign 41. What mobsters pack 42. “Rome ____ built in a day” 43. Outback order 47. Thesaurus entry: Abbr. 48. River featuring steamship service from Cairo to Aswan 49. “Looking ____ is great -- if you’re sixty”: Joan Rivers 52. Cathedral recesses 54. Seller of Squishees on “The Simpsons” 57. Philip Roth novel whose title features the name of a Shakespeare character 60. Spanish 101 verb 61. Worry about, in slang 62. Object of adoration 63. Dove, e.g. 64. Argentine grassland 65. “I Feel Bad About My Neck” author Ephron

SUDOKU

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CROSSWORD PUZZLE


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Go to realastrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20) “The most intense moments the universe has ever known are the next 15 seconds,” philosopher Terence McKenna said. He was naming a central principle of reality: that every new now is a harvest of everything that has ever happened; every fresh moment is a blast of novelty that arises in response to the sum total of all history’s adventures. This is always true, of course. But I suspect the phenomenon will be especially pronounced for you in the near future. More than usual, you might find that every day is packed with interesting feelings and poignant fun and epic realizations. This could be pleasurable, but also overwhelming. Luckily, you have the personal power necessary to make good use of the intensity.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) You’re in a phase when you have the power to find answers to questions that have stumped you for a while. Why? Because you’re more open-minded and curious than usual. You’re also ready to be brazenly honest with yourself. Congrats! In light of the fact that you’ll be lucky at solving riddles, I’ve got three good ones for you to wrestle with. 1. Which of your anxieties might actually be cover-ups for a lazy refusal to change a bad habit? 2. What resource will you use more efficiently when you stop trying to make it do things it’s not designed to do? 3. What blessing will you receive as soon as you give a clear signal that you are ready for it? CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) A typical Capricorn cultivates fervent passions, even to the point of obsession. Almost no one knows their magnitude, though, because the members of your tribe often pursue their fulfillment with methodical, business-like focus. But I wonder if maybe it’s a good time to reveal more of the raw force of this driving energy than you usually do. It might humanize you in the eyes of potential helpers who see you as too strong to need help. And it could motivate your allies to provide the extra support and understanding you’ll need in the coming weeks.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) “On some hill of despair,” poet Galway Kinnell wrote, “the bonfire you kindle can light the great sky—though it’s true, of course, to make it burn you have to throw yourself in.” You might not exactly feel despair, Scorpio. But I suspect you are in the throes of an acute questioning that makes you feel close to the edge of forever. Please consider the possibility that it’s a favorable time to find out just how much light and heat are hidden inside you. Your ache for primal fun and your longing to accelerate your soul’s education are converging with your quest to summon a deeper, wilder brilliance.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Your body is holy and magic and precious. I advise you not to sell it or rent it or compromise it in any way—especially now, when you have an opening to upgrade your relationship with it. Yes, Taurus, it’s time to attend to your sweet flesh and blood with consummate care. Find out exactly what your amazing organism needs to feel its best. Lavish it with pleasure and healing. Treat it as you would a beloved child or animal. I also hope you will have intimate conversations with the cells that compose your body. Let them know you love and appreciate them. Tell them you’re ready to collaborate on a higher level.

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JUNE 1, 2017 | 61

ARIES (March 21-April 19) Life is in the mood to communicate with you rather lyrically. Here are just a few of the signs and portents you might encounter, along with theories about their meaning. If you overhear a lullaby, it’s time to seek the influence of a tender, nurturing source. If you see a type of fruit or flower you don’t recognize, it means you have a buried potential you don’t know much about, and you’re ready to explore it further. If you spy a playing card in an unexpected place, trust serendipity to bring you what you need. If a loud noise arrives near a moment of decision: Traditionally, it signifies caution, but these days it suggests you should be bold.

INDIVIDUALIZED CARE

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LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) From my study of the lost prophecies of Nostradamus, the hidden chambers beneath the Great Pyramid of Cheops and the current astrological omens, I have determined that now is a favorable time for you to sing liberation songs with cheeky authority … to kiss the sky and dance with the wind on a beach or hilltop … to gather your most imaginative allies and brainstorm about what you really want to do in the next five years. Do you dare to slip away from businessas-usual so you can play in the enchanted land of what-if? If you’re smart, you will escape the grind and grime of the daily rhythm so you can expand your mind to the next largest size.

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CANCER (June 21-July 22) Nobody likes to be scrutinized or critiqued or judged. But we Crabs (yes, I’m one of you) are probably touchier about that treatment than any other sign of the zodiac. (Hypersensitivity is a trait that many astrologers ascribe to Cancerians.) However, many of us do allow one particular faultfinder to deride us: the nagging voice in the back of our heads. Sometimes we even give free rein to its barbs. But I would like to propose a transformation of this situation. Maybe we could scold ourselves less, and be a bit more open to constructive feedback coming from other AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) In accordance with the astrological omens, I invite you to carry people. Starting now. out a flashy flirtation with the color red. I dare you to wear red clothes and red jewelry. Buy yourself red roses. Sip red wine LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) The lion’s potency, boldness and majesty are qualities you have and savor strawberries under red lights. Sing Elvis Costello’s a mandate to cultivate in the next three weeks. To get in the “The Angels Want to Wear My Red Shoes” and Prince’s “Little righteous mood, I suggest you gaze upon images and videos of Red Corvette.” Tell everyone why 2017 is a red-letter year for lions. Come up with your own version of a lion’s roar—I mean you. For extra credit, murmur the following motto whenever a actually make that sound—and unleash it regularly. You might splash of red teases and pleases your imagination: “My red-hot also want to try the yoga posture known as the lion pose. If passion is my version of high fashion.” you’re unfamiliar with it, go here for tips: tinyurl.com/lionpose. What else might help you invoke and express the unfettered PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) “If you want a puppy, start by asking for a pony,” read the leonine spirit? bumper sticker on the Lexus SUV I saw. That confused me. Would the owner of a Lexus SUV be the type of person who VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) “What does it matter how many lovers you have if none of them didn’t expect to get what she really wanted? In any case, Pisces, gives you the universe?” French psychoanalyst Jacques Lacan I’m conveying a version of this bumper-sticker wisdom to you. If posed that question. I invite you to put it at the top of your list of you want your domestic scene to thrive even more than it already hot topics to meditate on. In doing so, I trust you won’t use it as does, ask for a feng shui master to redesign your environment an excuse to disparage your companions for their inadequacies. so it has a perfect flow of energy. If you want a community Rather, I hope it will mobilize you to supercharge your intimate that activates the best in you, ask for a utopian village full of alliances; to deepen your awareness of the synergistic beauty emotionally intelligent activists. If you want to be animated by a you could create together; to heighten your ability to be given focused goal that motivates you to wake up excited each morning, ask for a glorious assignment that will help save the world. the universe by those whose fates are interwoven with yours.

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I’ve been diagnosed with both obsessivecompulsive disorder and attention-deficit/ hyperactivity disorder. I don’t medicate, but I get a lot done. I feel very comfortable when I recount and recount things. I was a math major for a time, but usually worked myself into a mental cul-de-sac when I’d rework problems over and over. Thus, I envy and can relate to people who count stuff for a living, like bean counters (CPAs) and census takers. A new U.S. Census for 2016 was recently released, with population figures for the nation’s cities and towns. Our government doesn’t have the technology to count all of us in real time, or technology to get exact numbers, but it is what it is. We now know what the fastest growing cities are, and Utah County’s Vineyard ranks No. 1. in the state, according to a report in The Salt Lake Tribune. Where is it? On the shores of Utah Lake in the Provo/Orem vicinity. It’s only been around since 1989 after a massive cleanup of the old Geneva Steel mill. According to census workers, the town has grown from 611 people to 3,953 in just two years. Vineyard is a planned community on 1,700 acres built by Anderson Development. It forsees an eventual 26,000 residents, an intermodal hub, 2 million square-feet of retail, 3.5 million square feet of offices and choice lakefront properties. You’re likely thinking, “Ew! Lakefront at Utah Lake? It’s so gray and polluted!” At one time, Provo piped its poop into the lake but that practice was stopped long ago. The color is a symptom of the gray clay that sits on the bottom of the lake. The other fastest-growing cities in Utah are: Herriman (14.8 percent), Bluffdale (8.3 percent), Elk Ridge (7.9 percent), followed by Mantua and Monticello (tied at 7.5 percent), Eagle Mountain (7 percent), Blanding (6.9 percent), Francis (6.8 percent) and Saratoga Springs (6 percent). Growth is good, as it brings more people and more businesses, like restaurants and retail. It’s bad because it brings traffic and increases crime. Last week, I visited the Adobe headquarters and got a real-time look at the horrible traffic mess surrounding Lehi, where so many commuters and newer residents try to navigate daily. Oy vey! On the downside, Vernal’s shrunk by 3.9 percent and was followed by Naples, Altamont, Tabiona, Duschene, Myton and Roosevelt. The losses are attributed to coal mine shutdowns. n Content is prepared expressly for Community and is not endorsed by City Weekly staff.

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Breaking News (Rare Fetish!) Jordan Haskins, 26, was sentenced to probation and sex counseling in May after pleading guilty to eight charges arising from two auto accidents in Saginaw, Mich. Prosecutors said Haskins described “cranking,” in which he would remove a vehicle’s spark-plug wires to make it “run rough,” which supposedly improves his chances for a self-service happy ending. Haskins’ lawyer added that it’s not “something I don’t think we understand as attorneys.”

BY CHUCK SHEPHERD

improvement”—alas, perhaps merely helping already successful people to even greater heights. Some sports teams are experimenting with “transcranial direct current stimulation” as a way to put athletes’ brains into constant alert, and KQED pulic radio reported in May that about a third of the San Francisco Giants players have donned weak-current headsets that cover the motor cortex at the top of the head. The team’s sports scientist (bonus name: Geoff Head!) said players performed slightly better on some drills after the stimulation.

WEIRD

The Entrepreneurial Spirit! Le Plat Sal (The Dirty Plate) restaurant in the Marais district of Paris features specialties actually containing dirt—or as Chef Solange Gregoire calls it, “the mud of the earth that caresses our toes, the sand kissed by the sun and rocks.” A Food Network host in April mused, “What’s left? People are already eating snout-to-tail, leaves-toroots ...” Gregoire extolled her four-star dishes, including pastry crust a la Mont Lachat rock and a Boue Ragout stew simmered with silt from the River Seine. (NPR also noted that the founder of The Shake Shack was quietly planning a new American chain, Rock in Roll.) n Goldman Sachs analyst Noah Poponak’s 98-page paper (leaked to Business Insider in April) touted the wealth obtainable by capturing the platinum reputed to be in asteroids. The costs to mine the stone (rockets, launch expenses, etc.) might have dropped recently to about $3 billion—a trifle next to the $50 billion worth of platinum Poponak said a single asteroid might contain. (On the other hand, experts point out, such abundance of platinum might crash the worldwide price.) n The Twisted Ranch restaurant in the Soulard neighborhood of St. Louis, saw crowds swell in March after it revamped its menu with more than two-dozen items made with ranch dressing (including ranch-infused bloody marys). As one satisfied visitor put it, “Ranch is everyone’s guilty pleasure.”

n Barbara Lowery, 24, was arrested for disorderly conduct in Cullman, Alabama, in May after police spotted her standing on a car, stomping out the windshield and smashing the sun roof. She said it was a boyfriend’s car, that she thought he was cheating on her, and that she had spent the previous night thinking about what to do, “pray[ing] about it and stuff.” However, she said, “I did it anyway.”

The Drone Economy A Netherlands startup company announced in March its readiness to release drones capable of tracking freshly deposited dog poop (via an infrared glow from the pile) and, eventually, be guided (perhaps via GPS and artificial intelligence) to scoop up the deposits and carry them away.

n Social critics and futurists suggest that the next great market for computerization (already underway) will be selling “human

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Clearing the Conscience In February, a 52-year-old man who, arrested for DUI and taken to a police station in Germany’s Lower Saxony state, wound up spontaneously confessing to a 1991 cold-case murder in Bonn. Police confirmed that, after reopening the files, they found details matching the man’s account, though the man himself was “not quite clear” why he had confessed. n A game warden in Titus County, Texas, reported in December arresting a man for possessing a shotgun—the man’s third arrest as a convicted felon with a firearm. The warden had spotted the weapon only because the man “out of the blue” approached him and asked if he wanted to inspect his hunting license—which, it turns out, was in order.

Amazing Transformation A 22-year-old Los Angeles makeup artist who calls himself Vinny Ohh has, according to his several TV and YouTube appearances and much social media presence, transformed himself into a “genderless,” extraterrestrial-looking person via around 110 bodily procedures (so far), costing him at least $50,000. He says his appearance is merely an “all-in” representation of how he feels inside. Ohh has yet to specify a pronoun preference. Update The impending retirement from public life of Britain’s Prince Philip, announced in May, has likely quashed any slight chance he will visit the Imanourane people on Tanna in the South Pacific island nation of Vanuatu—tragic, of course, because Tanna’s Chief Jack and his followers continue to believe Philip descended from their own spiritual ancestors and has thus dominated their thoughts for the past seven decades. In fact, when Tanna was in the path of Cyclone Donna in May 2017, the Imanourane were quickly reminded of Philip’s continuing “powers.” Philip has never visited, but Tannans have long prayed over an autographed photograph he sent years ago. A News of the Weird Classic (October 2013) The story of Kopi Luwak coffee has long been a News of the Weird staple, begun in 1993 with the first reports that a super-premium market existed for coffee beans digested (and excreted) by certain Asian civet cats, collected, washed and brewed. In June 2013, as news broke that civets were being mistreated—captured and caged solely for their bean-adulterating utility—the American Chemical Society was called on for ideas how to assure that the $227-per-pound coffee beans had, indeed, been expelled from genuine Asian civets. Hence, “gas chromatography and mass spectrometry” tests were finally developed to assure drinkers, at $80 a cup in California, that they were sipping the real thing. Thanks this week to Jon Maxwell and the News of the Weird Board of Editorial Advisors.

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Potentially Unemployed Bees In March, researcher-inventor Eijiro Miyako announced in Chem journal that he’d created a drone that pollinates flowers (though requiring human guidance until GPS and AI can be enabled). Miyako’s adhesive gel lightly brushes pollen grains, collecting just enough to touch down successfully onto another flower to pollinate it.

Babs De Lay

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Smooth Reactions Police in Cleveland are searching for the woman whose patience ran out on April 14 awaiting her young son’s slow haircut at Allstate Barber College. She pulled out a pistol, took aim at the barber and warned: “I got two clips! I’ll pop you.” She allowed him to finish up— more purposefully, obviously—and left without further incident.

DRAG KINGS!

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Unclear on the Concept Yale graduate students (at least eight of them), claiming “union” status, demonstrated in front of the Yale president’s home in April demanding better benefits beyond the annual free tuition, $30,000 stipends and free health care. Some characterized their action as an “indefinite fast” while others called it a “hunger strike.” However, a pamphlet associated with the unionizing made it clear that strikers could go eat any time they got hungry.

Recent Alarming Headlines “U.K. woman who urinated on Trump golf course loses case” (London). “Fish thief on unicycle busted by DNR [Department of Natural Resources]” (Battle Creek, Mich.). And, from the Northwest Florida Daily News (Fort Walton Beach), all on the same day (May 16, 2017): 1. “Man throws fork at woman in fight over dog poop.” 2. “Senior citizen punches husband for taking Lord’s name in vain.” 3. “Two people busted for creating fake football league, lawmen say.” 4. “Man denies defecating in parking lot despite officer witnessing deed.”

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