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TAKE ONE

COURTESY OF CITYSunTimes

JULY 2018

Route 66 Festival

Real Wild Wild & & Woody Woody Real

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Jenny and and the the Jenny Mexicats Mexicats

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Take An Art Walk This Summer! The Scottsdale Gallery Association (SGA) announced that the Summer Spectacular Art Walk, presented by Museum Square, will take place along Main Street from Scottsdale Road to Goldwater Boulevard and north of Indian School on Marshall Way to 5th Avenue. The event will be held Thursday, July 12, from 6:30–9pm, and art enthusiasts will be “transported to the tropics” of the Caribbean, while enjoying sidewalk misting (provided by Arizona Mist Systems), Hawaiian Shaved Ice with “adult” flavors, island music and balloon artist Joy Young who will be making inflatable art for the young and the young at heart. Participating galleries will feature exhibits by national and international artists and serve cold refreshments including fruit- and cucumber-infused ice water, flavored teas and wine. Holly Bohling, who serves on the board of the Scottsdale Gallery Association and as gallery manager and co-founder of one of the participating galleries, Amery Bohling Fine Art, says, “Our art walks have become world renowned as one of the few places where visitors can easily park, take a leisurely stroll and see a great variety of museum-caliber art from all genres.” “Galleries represent a wide array of art mediums including paintings from traditional landscape and portrait to contemporary works, sculptures, photography and one-of-a-kind jewelry. Visitors may even have an opportunity to meet a master artist and talk with them about their creative expressions. And when they are ready to stop for dinner or a drink, we have lovely places to dine in the midst of all the beautiful artistry.” More than 39 Downtown Scottsdale galleries are represented in the Scottsdale Gallery Association as members and participate in the SGA’s weekly art walks and special events. For more, visit www.scottsdalegalleries.com.

Photos: Clayton Karas Photography; Courtesy of Scottsdale Gallery Association

Those who find themselves in Downtown Phoenix on any given first and third Friday, can explore the culture and spirit of the area while mingling with other residents and visitors during the free Artlink First Fridays Art Walk from 6–10pm. And if you miss First Friday fun, catch up at the Third Friday event. Explore the gallery map and find transportation information at www.artlinkphx.org/ first-fridays.

Or, take a behind-the-scenes look at the artist’s creative process during the Artlink summer series: Artist Studio Tours. The July guided tour takes place Saturday, July 14, from 1–3pm, and begins at Grand Arthaus with artist Robert Gentile, and then takes participants to ABCreativeArt Studio, Amanda Adkins Studio and Fushicho Daiko Dojo/ Phoenix Taiko Drumming Studio. Register for the summer series, or find information about all Artlink events, online at www.artlinkphx.org.

POSTAL CUSTOMER

Photo courtesy of Visit Phoenix

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Serving the Community Since 2002


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Index

An Immigrant’s Story

EDITOR’S PICKS

“I wonder how the foreign policies of the United States would look if we wiped out the national boundaries of the world – at least in our minds – and thought of all children everywhere as our own.” ~Howard Zinn, A People’s History of the United States

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My great-grandfather, Carl Miller, was Danish/ Norwegian, born in 1887. He emigrated here from Denmark…as far as we can tell. An early census report shows him as having been born here — later documents show him as being born in Denmark. Assuming he emigrated, we still don’t know the year, but he was young — most likely a young teenager, and without his parents. That’s the way the family story is told, and probably how it happened…that’s the way a lot of immigrant stories go. It’s hard to imagine the life that he led as a teenager here. No family, a new country, foreign in so many ways, but apparently, he was quite adaptable. I’m told that by the time of his early demise, he spoke five languages. He was a fisherman by trade. He settled in Florida and raised a family there, marrying a North Carolina girl whose family had been here since the mid-1600s. He disappeared at sea around the age of 46. His oldest son, born in Florida in 1914, went on to marry into a family that had traceable roots here since Photo courtesy of the artist

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[This editorial originally ran in the August 2014 issue of CITYSunTimes. Four years of searching later, last month I finally found a family connection to our mysterious Carl. While the questions surrounding his emigration have not yet been answered, his story, and those of other young emigrants, deserve to be heard.]

Josiel Perez All-Stars @ The Nash

the early 1600s. Carl’s grandson, my dad, married a girl with American roots since right before the Revolutionary War on one side and, again, to the early 1600s on the other. A Miller family trait I guess — one that I have always found ironic, given the questions surrounding my great-grandfather’s provenance. We are and always have been a nation of immigrants. Some immigrants were welcomed with open arms. Others, not so much. But they all came for a better life. They came to escape intolerance, violence, poverty, war… or maybe just for the sheer adventure and opportunity of it all. These days, we hear a lot about those coming into our country illegally. Most recently, the news has been about the children who are coming here…these stories make me think about my great-grandfather. I don’t know how he came to be here, but I do know he worked hard. He learned the languages of his fellow immigrants and he embraced this country as his own. He came to America and made a life for himself, and I am grateful every day that he made the journey. Until next month, all my best,

Kathryn M. Miller, Editor-in-Chief kathryn@CITYSunTimes.com

Chula Seafood Seafood Chula at Uptown Uptown at

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Editor-in-Chief Kathryn M. Miller Creative Director Jenifer Lee Assistant to the Publisher Darlene Keberle Columnists Stephen Cohen, O.D. Cathy Droz Barbara Kaplan Rabbi Robert Kravitz Allen Nohre James Roberts Melanie Tighe Pastor Paul Witkop Contributors Cave Creek Mayor Ernie Bunch Scottsdale Mayor Jim Lane Dr. James P. Lee Carefree Mayor Les Peterson Account Representatives Bob Hesselgesser Susan Pine Bulk Distribution Mark Feinberg

Destination: San Diego

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CITYSunTimes is a locally owned community publication now in its 15th year, serving over 80,000 readers in the North Valley. CST offers personalized news each month to Scottsdale, Paradise Valley, North Phoenix, Carefree and Cave Creek. CST is mailed to area homes and businesses and is available for free pick up at locations in Paradise Valley, North Scottsdale, North Phoenix, Carefree, Cave Creek, Anthem, Black Canyon City, New River and Fountain Hills. Editorial deadline: The first of the month preceding publication. Submit materials to news@CITYSunTimes.com. Advertising deadline: The 15th of the month preceding publication. Submit materials to advertise@CITYSunTimes.com. Corrections: Submit via e-mail corrections@CITYSunTimes.com.

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Taliesin West Offers Summer Deals & Unique Experiences For Residents

MAYOR LANE WRITES...

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Scottsdale property owners started saving more on flood insurance May 1 thanks to flood hazard reduction efforts by the city. Scottsdale scored tops in the state among municipalities during a recent federal audit of floodplain management practices, ranking in the top 1 percent of all U.S. cities and counties. MAYOR There are 8,160 flood insurance policies in City of Scottsdale Scottsdale — more than any other Arizona community 480.312.3111 and more than one-fourth of the state’s total. www.scottsdaleaz.gov Scottsdale’s percentage is high because of the area’s topography. In heavy rains, floodwaters cascade down mountain terrain to place areas at risk. Portions of Scottsdale also experience urban flooding. Scottsdale’s rating for flood risk improved from Class 6 to Class 5 because of the audit — a move that will boost the premium discount in special flood hazard areas from 20 to 25 percent. Policy holders outside the special flood hazard areas will continue to see their premiums reduced by 10 percent. These adjustments will collectively save flood insurance policy holders an additional $200,000 a year and bring total annual premium savings to $1.1 million annually. That breaks down to an average overall savings of $137 per year per policy. Because severe weather and flooding can be unpredictable in the desert, Scottsdale urges all residents to consider carrying flood insurance. More information on the National Flood Insurance Program can be found at www.floodsmart.gov.

• E  nter the request or issue in the search bar, select a top request or browse by category.

Taliesin West, Frank Lloyd Wright’s desert laboratory and National Historic Landmark in Scottsdale, is offering summer specials for Arizona residents with discounts on the signature Insights Tour and a one-of-a-kind celebration for the famous architect’s 151st birthday. Nestled in the foothills of the McDowell Mountains, Taliesin West is a must-see in the Southwest and considered to be one of Wright’s most personal creations, with this year marking 80 years since the architect brought his famous design to life in the Sonoran Desert. Now, Arizona residents can visit the home of one of the most celebrated architects in America with discounted tour rates and specials for a limited time only. Guided tours at Taliesin West take guests behind-the-scenes into Wright’s winter camp providing an up close and personal look into some of the most iconic areas of the home. Visitors can learn the history and see the spaces firsthand, including Wright’s private living quarters where he hosted some of the biggest celebrity names of his time in the Garden Room; the Cabaret Theatre with nearperfect acoustics and Wright-designed furniture; the Music Pavilion with seats, curtains and carpet covered in red, Wright’s favorite color that he often referred to as the color of life, and more. As part of the summer specials at Taliesin West, guests with proof of proper identification will receive discounted rates on the 90-minute Insights Tour. Offered daily beginning at 8:45am with standard ticket prices starting at $35, this tour covers the main grounds of the property with an expert guide explaining what Wright was trying to achieve architecturally, as well as historical anecdotes. Through the end of August, Taliesin West is offering the following specials on Insights Tours: • Arizona residents will receive 50 percent off.

• C  hoose an address related to the request, or use a device’s GPS to pinpoint the location of the issue.

• S  tudents ages 13 through college-level will receive $10 off Monday through Thursday.

• Provide details and submit a photo, if applicable.

• “ Beat the Heat” special with tickets priced at $28 (or $14 with the Arizona resident discount) for the first tour of the day at 8:45am As an institution that values the importance of education, the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation would like to show its appreciation for teachers by offering free Insights Tours with proof of identification from July 16 through August 12. To guarantee a spot on an Insights Tour, reservations are strongly suggested and can be booked at www.franklloydwright.org.

Scottsdale EZ Now Available To Assist Residents Whether it’s a broken streetlight, a fresh pothole or a missing trash can, a new online service is making it easier for Scottsdale residents to report problems with city facilities or services. Scottsdale EZ is a single, mobile-optimized system that lets residents quickly report issues and provides the city with a consolidated tracking and reporting system. Using Scottsdale EZ is just that — easy: • Visit www.scottsdaleaz.gov/ez on a desktop or mobile device, or search online for “Scottsdale EZ” to find the application link.

• Review the information and submit it.

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Photo: Andrew Pielage

Serving the Community Since 2002

Flood Hazard Reduction Efforts Lower Insurance Costs For Property Owners

• C  ity staff will get back to the resident to confirm they’ve received the request. The more accurate information provided when submitting a request, the more quickly it can be assigned to staff and resolved. Visit www.scottsdaleaz.gov/ ez to learn more.


Photo by Diana Red

‘Dinner and a Movie’ At Valley Thai Chili 2 Go Now through August 31, Thai Chili 2 Go is offering residents the perfect way to beat the summer heat and have an entertaining night in. Purchase two entrees at any of the four Thai Chili 2 Go locations and receive a free Thai Dumpling appetizer and a code for a free Redbox movie rental. Upon pickup of order, guest must mention “Dinner and a Movie” to redeem free dumpling (cost will be waived at register) and receive Redbox code. This offer is available for dine in or to go only — it is not available using delivery services. Visit Thai Chile 2 Go in Scottsdale at 16203 North Scottsdale Road, Suite 105. For additional information, call 480.653.9158 or visit www.tc2go.com.

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The Scottsdale Area Chamber of Commerce will hold its next PM Connect event Thursday, July 12, 5–7pm, at Fred Astaire Dance Studio of Scottsdale, 10135 East Via Linda, Suite C116, in Scottsdale. The next AM Connect event will be held Thursday, July 19, 7–9am, at Jason’s Deli, 10605 North Scottsdale Road, Suite 101, Scottsdale. Both “Connect” events are free to members and $20 for guests. The Chamber will also host a Meet Your Neighbors for Lunch event Friday, July 27, 11:30am–1pm, at Pomo Cucina & Pizzeria, 8977 North Scottsdale Road in Scottsdale. Meet Your Neighbors is a monthly event designed for Chamber members and non-members to network over lunch. These monthly lunches are held throughout the Scottsdale area. Cost is $15 for members, $20 for guests if pre-registered. For a complete listing of upcoming events, or additional information about the Chamber, call 480.355.2700 or visit www.scottsdalechamber.com.

Scottsdale

Upcoming Scottsdale Chamber Events

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Scottsdale Serving the Community Since 2002

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Cold Beers & Cheeseburgers To Open Two New Locations

Photos: J. Martin Harris Photography

Square One Concepts, Inc. continues to expand the ‘Neighborhood Burger Joint’ Cold Beers & Cheeseburgers with two new locations opening in Metro Phoenix by first quarter 2019. Cold Beers & Cheeseburgers Park West is the first new location set to open Winter 2018. Housed in the Park West Shopping Center off the Loop 101 at Northern and minutes from Arizona Cardinals football stadium, 9828 West Northern Avenue, Suite 1700, the location boasts two outdoor patios and an indoor/outdoor bar seating up to 45 guests, plus comfortable leather booths, rustic wood tables, more than 50 HD flat screen TVs and a great sound system ideal for watching any and all sporting events. “This will be another special west side location for Cold Beers & Cheeseburger in Peoria,” said S. Barrett Rinzler, president, founder and CEO of Square One Concepts. “The Glendale location has been so popular we knew we needed to expand in the West Valley to reach more of our supporters.” Cold Beers & Cheeseburgers Pima Crossing, the fourth Scottsdale location, will open in first quarter 2019. Located in Pima Crossing Shopping Center, 8624 East Shea Boulevard, the restaurant is easily accessible off Loop 101 at Shea. The trademark of Cold Beers & Cheeseburgers is its award-winning handformed, half-pound burgers of never frozen ground chuck with a vast variety of versions (Juicy Lucy, Pittsburger, Steakhouse Truffle, among many others), and readily customizable burgers with toppings to suit a patron’s taste. The large collection of beers — the favorites to the obscure — keep the brew offerings an ongoing adventure. And, with five options for “MMMac & Cheese;” popular sides such as tater tots and sweet tots; four varieties of sliders; a salad selection, and more, it’s a menu that keeps on pleasing. Each Arizona location offers the fan favorite daily specials. For additional information, visit www.coldbeers.com.


Scottsdale

Bodega 13 Continues Summer Jazz Series

ADVERTORIAL

Your Vacation To Do List Should Include Estate Planning By Libby Banks

Most of us create a “to-do list” to get ready for our summer vacation. On the list should be creating or reviewing your estate plan. While international travel is still probably safer than driving in Phoenix, having this checked “Done!” before you leave will give you peace of mind. Here is a checklist of estate planning “to-do’s.” 1. Create an estate plan. If you’ve procrastinated about estate planning, a vacation can give you a deadline to move forward. Allow adequate time to complete your estate plan before your trip. If you don’t think you need an estate plan, come to one of my seminars to find out why you do! 2. Review and update your existing estate plan. A big mistake in estate planning is the “set it and forget it” syndrome. We need to review our estate plan from time to time. Families, situations and laws change. Your vacation can serve as the stimulus to update – and maybe upgrade – your plan.

Libby@LibbyBanks.com • 602.375.6752 www.LibbyBanks.com

3. Review your plan for minor children. Name a guardian for your minor children! If you haven’t, the court will decide who will raise your kids. If you

have named a guardian, consider whether they are still the best choice. The guardian you picked for your infant children may not be the right one for them now that they’re in middle school or high school. 4. Review beneficiary designations. Check beneficiary designations on your insurance and retirement plans. Be sure they are payable to the right people or to your trust as you intended. 5. Organize your accounts and documents. Once I could just point to my file cabinet and say everything was “in there.” But with online and cloud accounts, many of us leave no paper trail. Make sure the people who would take care of your estate know where to find what they will need. Include user names and passwords for online accounts, but keep them in a secure place! And I have to one last “to do”: Have a great time! You will likely come back safe and sound, but the peace of mind knowing that everything’s in place will let you truly relax and enjoy your vacation. Give me a call if I can assist you! I’m always happy to help clients put their estate plan in place before a trip.

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Bodega 13 kicked off its summer jazz concert series with a bang June 14, and now the restaurant has announced the July and August line-up starting off with a Fourth of July performance: “Red, White, and Blues” with Nicole Pesce and Renee Patrick July 5. Bodega 13 now features jazz concerts every Thursday night from 7pm to 10pm. The restaurant is transformed into a jazz club for dining and listening to top jazz artists from around the Southwest. Owner Emily Foppe notes, “There is such an amazing amount of talent here in the valley. My husband [Larry] and I really wanted to do something to showcase some of these amazing artists.” Reservations are required and are not accepted through Open Table. The restaurant anticipates sell-outs since they only have 100 seats available. So, call early to ensure a reservation. Full menu dinner options are available from 5pm until 8pm – with a special late-night menu available after 8pm. Table service runs until the concert ends. A $20 cover charge for the concert will be added to the bill. In addition to the July 5 show, upcoming shows include: • J uly 12: The Adam Roberts Quartet, featuring Adam Compeau, vocals • July 19: The Vicki McDermitt Quartet’s Billie Holiday Tribute • July 26: TBA • August 2: TBA • August 9: We3, A salute to the Doo-Wop Era • August 16: Beth Lederman, featuring Heather Jakeman, vocals • August 23: The Adam Roberts Quartet, featuring Holly Pyle, vocals • August 30: TBA Bodega 13 is located at the northeast corner of Pima and Pinnacle Peak Roads in the La Mirada Shopping Center, in front of Mastro’s Steak House. Call 480.284.7600 for reservations. For updates and details, visit www.bodega13.com.

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Scottsdale

Studio Movie Grill Unveils New Menu For Summer Season Studio Movie Grill (SMG), introduced a new menu in June with exciting culinary additions to traditional favorites for audiences to enjoy as the summer blockbuster season goes into full swing. SMG, which combines first-run movies with full-service, in-theater dining, state-ofthe-art sight and sound technologies and an ultra-comfortable viewing experience, has added new dishes to its popular menu: • Heirloom Tomato Avocado Toast — Grilled Onion Avocado Spread on Toasted Flatbread with Radishes, Tomatoes and Arugula • B  ento Boxes + Bowls — Asian Bento Box, Steak + Bleu Cheese Lunch Box, Sesame-Seared Ahi Tuna Bowl and Mediterranean Chicken Bowl • N  ot-So-Classic Chopped Wedge Salad — Chargrilled Fajita Chicken, Crispy Hickory-Smoked Bacon, Tomatoes, Scallions, Chopped Iceberg Lettuce, Creamy Danish Bleu Cheese Dressing

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• Pretzel-Wrapped Dog — Cheddar Hot Dog and Toasted Sesame Seed Pretzel Bun with Creole Mustard

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• Dill Spice Gourmet Popcorn Studio Movie Grill is also debuting a new 2 for $29 Sharing Menu combining new and perennial favorite menu items, in an easy one-time order. The 2 for $29 Sharing Menu both highlights and supports SMG’s legacy Chefs for Children program, a key part of the film exhibitor’s ongoing mission dedicated to opening hearts and minds, one story at a time, SMG will donate 5 percent of proceeds from each purchase to local nonprofits serving special needs children and families. This successful program has also enabled SMG to purchase adaptive bikes for local children. The Chefs for Children logo will be featured prominently to remind guests the tremendous good they are doing by ordering from that menu. For those with dietary concerns, SMG will continue to offer vegan, vegetarian and gluten-free options. The innovative additions offered to Studio Movie Grill’s audience members also include premium bar and cocktail additions to the ‘Ritas and premium cocktails that SMG is noted for. Daily specials can be found under the “Menu” link on the company website. In the Valley, Studio Movie Grill is located at 15515 North Hayden Road in Scottsdale. For information, call 480.991.3106 or visit www.studiomoviegrill.com.

SUSD Recommends Across-the-Board Pay Raises The Scottsdale Unified School District (SUSD) Governing Board voted in May to include salary increases for all district employees in the district’s 2018-19 Maintenance and Operations (M&O) budget. The salary increases would include: • 10 percent for teachers • $8/day increase for substitute teachers • 4  percent for hourly employees, including bus drivers, health assistants and other select, classified staff • 1 percent for administrators Other features of the proposed budget would: • Increase the annual pay of first-year teachers from $36,593 to $41,320 • Fund the hiring of four additional school security officers

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• Create longevity stipends for bus drivers “Our staff is at the heart of everything we do, and as our most important resource, we need to invest in them,” said Acting Superintendent Dr. John Kriekard. The Governing Board voted on the proposed budget June 26. Find more information about SUSD at www.susd.org.


Scottsdale Serving the Community Since 2002

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Scottsdale Serving the Community Since 2002

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Get Wild: Summer Full Moon Tours & More Join the Southwest Wildlife Conservation Center for summer full moon events and hear the wolves howl, mountain lion purr, jaguar rumble and bears huff. Who knows what else will be heard and certainly seen at the full moon tours. At 7pm on each full moon for of the summer, July 27 and August 25, guests can enjoy a wildlife experience as they walk through the sanctuary seeing and listening to the sounds of the not so wild. While the Center’s goal is to rescue, rehabilitate and release wildlife, the 30 percent that cannot be released have made Southwest Wildlife their home and residents can visit them by reserving a spot online. Southwest Wildlife will also offer Sunrise Tours Saturday mornings July 14, and August 18 at 7am. Beat the summer heat by waking up early for a sunrise tour. Guests will enjoy a guided walk through the wildlife sanctuary while experiencing the beauty of a desert morning. Hear the stories of the sanctuary residents and see how they also enjoy the cooler hours of the day. Enjoy a cup of coffee and a breakfast treat while touring the wildlife sanctuary. The cost is $30/ adult, $20/child (ages 3–12). Registration is required. In addition, join the Walk with Wildlife Tours at Southwest Wildlife, Tuesdays, Fridays and Saturdays at 9am. Whether an Arizona resident or visiting from out of town, the Walk with Wildlife tour of the nature center is a unique opportunity to learn about magnificent native wildlife. Guided tours allow guests to get an up-close view of some of the permanent sanctuary animals while hearing their compelling stories. The cost is $25/adult, $15/child (ages 3–12). Registration is required. Southwest Wildlife Conservation Center is located at 27026 North 156th Street in Scottsdale. To make a reservation or register for an event, or for additional information, call 480.471.3621 or visit www.southwestwildlife.org.


Beta Dance Festival Selects 2018 Choreographers

Williams To Serve As Phoenix’s Mayor Pro Tempore

Crudo will host a special pop-up event that’s temporarily transforming the adjacent Bar Crudo into “Barh Mi” and serving up a globe-spanning feast featuring Banh Mi sandwiches and more. Hosted for two weeks during its annual summer vacation and refresh, (July 11–14 and July 18–21), enjoy a full menu of these savory VietnameseFrench sandwiches served on fluffy baguettes, and other deliciously exotic eats. Hosted exclusively in the bar area, guests are invited to eat at the bar, or sit down in the cozy bar area seating for a full-service feast. In addition, Saturday, July 14, Crudo will host a Bastille Day celebration with French-inspired eats and drinks. Also, this summer Crudo’s chef/owner, Cullen Campbell, will be heading off on his annual summer respite, so Crudo’s sit-down dining room will be closed from July 1–23. During the break, Crudo will receive a summer refresh, including new flooring, chairs, paint, artwork, lighting and tabletops, before reopening for regular dinner service Tuesday, July 24. Crudo is located at 3603 East Indian School Road in Phoenix. For additional information, call 602.358.8666 or visit www.crudoaz.com.

Photo courtesy of Beta Dance Festival

Crudo To Host Pop-Up Feast Inside The Bar This Summer

Serving the Community Since 2002

In June, a bipartisan coalition of the Phoenix City Council unanimously selected District 1 Councilwoman Thelda Williams to serve as the City’s mayor pro tempore until voters choose a new mayor through the special election process. The election to choose a new mayor was required by the City Charter following the resignation of Mayor Greg Stanton last month. Williams will serve the dual-role as mayor and District 1 councilwoman. “It is a tremendous honor to earn the support of my colleagues to serve as mayor,” said Williams. “I look forward to working with the entire City Council in a cooperative way to meet the needs of the people we serve.” Williams said her highest priorities over the next few months will be public safety as well as streets and water infrastructure. This is Williams’ third time serving as Phoenix mayor. She was elected by her colleagues as interim mayor in 1994 following Paul Johnson’s resignation, and ascended from vice mayor to mayor for a brief period in 2012 following the resignation of Phil Gordon. The special election for voters to choose a new mayor will be held November 6. If there is a need for a run-off election, it will be held March 12, 2019, and Williams will remain in the role until a new mayor is sworn in. To learn more about the process, visit www.phoenix.gov/cityclerk/services/ election-information/november-2018-special-election.

The Phoenix Center for the Arts will present the fifth annual Beta Dance Festival, at its Third Street Theater, 1202 North 3rd Street in Phoenix, September 22–23. Beta Dance Festival celebrates and strengthens the diverse, multi-faceted Valley dance community through the showing and sharing of new works across a multiplicity of dance forms and genres, and it announced its 2018 choreographers in late June. “The diverse array of works in the 2018 festival speak to the current political moment, express and physicalize emotion, investigate the self, celebrate community and pass on cultural knowledge,” says festival coordinator, Allyson Yoder. “Audiences will experience a rich night of movement, music, and emotion as they bear witness to the many vital roles dance plays in our lives.” The 2018 festival lineup represents a mix of mature, established choreographers from the Valley and up-and-coming, younger artists, including students and recent graduates of university and community college dance programs: Bailey Moore, Ruby Morales and Michelle Marji; Balkanik DANCE; CaZo Dance Company; Chelsea Neiss; Dreams of Arabia Music & Dance Ensemble; Felix Cruz (Beta Residency Artist); Frankie Henderson; Grand Canyon University Dance Department; JAMovement; Jenny Gerena; Kevin Godfrey; Liliana Gomez; Michelle Marji; Nicole L Olson and Rembrandt Quiballo; OpendanceAZ; Rosenkrans Dance; The Rise Dance Company (RDC); Rylee Locker & Justin Villalobos; Samantha Lupascu (Beta Residency Artist); SM² Dance; and Tanya Stoyanova. The new Beta Residency Program will also allow two choreographers, Felix Cruz and Samantha Lupascu, the opportunity to workshop their pieces over several months leading up to the performance. The residency provides structural and artistic support in the form of free rehearsal space, professional marketing and documentation, a work-in-progress showing and feedback session, and a guaranteed performance opportunity at the Beta Dance Festival, creating a safe container for risk and experimentation as artists develop their craft. Tickets to Beta Dance Festival will be available for sale online August 1. For additional information, visit www.phoenixcenterforthearts.org/beta.

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Chula Seafood To Open New Location At Uptown Local fishmongers Jon Heflin and Hogan Jamison of Chula Seafood Fresh Fish Market + Restaurant announced an all-new storefront coming to Phoenix’s Uptown Plaza this fall. Founded in San Diego in 2009 to bring fresh-hooked, sustainably harvested seafood to the Valley, this proudly independent seafood company opened its first market and restaurant in Scottsdale in 2015. Now, in response to overwhelming demand, Chula’s owners (who are both Uptown Phoenix natives) are bringing the state’s freshest fish, shellfish and an expanded menu of deliciously prepared meals to this red-hot, revitalized mid-century modern shopping center at the northeast corner of Central Avenue and Camelback Road. Housed inside a sleek space with a 1950’s-era exposed brick demising wall and the exposed original wood deck and trusses and located in the same westfacing section of the center that also houses A.J.’s Fine Foods and Flower Child, Chula Seafood Market at Uptown Plaza will offer nearly double the selection of never frozen, sustainable fish by the pound, including additional shellfish options and an expanded menu of house-smoked seafood, compared to the Scottsdale location. Boasting 60 seats, this Phoenix location will also offer a larger kitchen, meaning Chula’s executive chef, Juan Zamora, and new Uptown chef, Kyle Kent (formerly of Artizen at The Camby), will be able to showcase an even larger menu of fresh, from-scratch California-style fare. Think grilled, sautéed, stir-fried and fried fish dishes, alongside Chula’s famed tuna melts, farmfresh salads and raw fish items such as poke, ceviche and sashimi. Plus, enjoy fresh-shucked oysters and other fruits de mer at the six-seat bar or take home exciting grab-and-go items including a selection of premium beer and wines (an exclusive for the Phoenix location). The secret to Chula’s success all starts out on the open ocean, where Chula Seafood founder Jim Heflin (Jon’s father) operates a custom 68-foot Hoquiam harpoon fishing boat, named F/V CHULA. Cruising the famously abundant waters off the Pacific Coast, Chula specializes in harpoon-caught swordfish and other high quality, fresh fish, which is much more sustainable and environmentally friendly than other forms of fishing such as scraping the ocean floor with massive nets that sweep up everything in its path. Today, Chula Seafood continues to drive fresh fish over multiple times a week inside its chilled commercial van, as well as fly in additional seafood from the best sustainable sources. Visit Chula Seafood Fresh Fish Market + Restaurant in Scottsdale at 8015 East Roosevelt Street. For additional information, call 480.621.5121 or visit www.chulaseafood.com.


Photos: Phoenician Bowl: Coconut infused Basmati rice, peanut sauce, garlic and herb infused lentils, mango salsa, fresh pineapple, avocado and toasted pumpkin seeds served on a bed of spinach Sonoran Bowl: Organic black beans, traditional guacamole, mango salsa, soyrizo, coconut rice, cashew cream and toasted pepitas served on a bed of julienned romaine

Serving the Community Since 2002

From hearty, house-smoked BBQ to an all new selection of delicious (and diet friendly) entrée bowls and salads, Bobby-Q Great Steaks & Real BBQ has something for everyone this summer at its Biltmore location. Named one of the nation’s 30 best BBQ restaurants by OpenTable.com, Bobby-Q is known for its rib-sticking menu of housesmoked and fork-tender meats. But there’s more to Bobby-Q, including an all new menu of farm-fresh, flavorful and doctor-approved Phoenician Bowl summer protein bowls and salads, which the restaurant began offering June 11. Handcrafted by Bobby-Q owner Bob Sikora and executive chef Mark Hittle, each item was also given the seal of approval from Dr. Art Mollen, a renowned Biltmore-area physician and fitness expert best known for creating the Art Mullen Fitness Trail on the nearby Arizona Canal. Sonoran Bowl “These bowls and salads are the perfect way to get ready for the summer,” said Dr. Mollen. “It’s important to always eat a well-balanced diet, and these bowls are a great healthy option at Bobby-Q.” Freshly prepared with premium ingredients, such as Purple Haze goat cheese, coconut infused basmati rice and wood-fired rotisserie chicken, the items tempt both vegetarians and BBQ fans alike. Offered daily exclusively at Bobby-Q’s Biltmore location, the summer protein bowls and salads will be available through fall. Proteins including n.a.e. rotisserie chicken, salmon, and shrimp are available for an additional charge.   Bobby-Q Great Steaks & Real BBQ Biltmore is located at 3154 East Camelback Road in Phoenix. For information, call 602.626.8856 or visit www.bobbyq.net.

North Phoenix

Savor Healthy Eats This Summer At Bobby-Q’s Biltmore

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Christine Regan Lake of Trauma Release Therapy says that parental alienation — a devastating experience that adversely affects both children and parents — typically occurs during a separation or divorce and is not well understood. Parental alienation is when a child or children become triangulated during a separation or divorce. In this scenario, the child(ren) are maneuvered by one parent to their side and the other parent, known as the targeted parent,

is alienated and essentially ‘ousted’ from the family system. The targeted parent’s status and role in the child’s life is diminished and ultimately the children step further and further away from this targeted parent. This is an incredibly destructive situation for the entire family unit and can have lasting emotional and psychological effects on the children for years to come.    Lake will host a healing event for victims of parental alienation July 29. This event

is suitable for all — whether the child of a parental alienation scenario or the targeted parent who has been cut off or alienated from a child. Through the use of EFT, emotional freedom technique, and sound healing, participants will have an opportunity to release and heal some of their wounds from this situation. Lake has been an EFT practitioner for

Photo courtesy of Angels Trumpet Arcadia

North Phoenix Serving the Community Since 2002

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Parental Alienation Support Circle To Be Held over 10 years and has helped countless clients to heal their emotional wounds. The event will be held at Center For Divine Awakening, 15801 North 40th Street in Phoenix, Sunday, July 29, 12–1:30pm. The cost is $20, and seating is limited. Call 480.676.1400 to secure your seat today. For more information, visit www.christinereganlake.com.

Angels Trumpet Ale House To Open Second Location

Local restaurateurs Sharry and Mat Englehorn of Angels Trumpet Ale House in Downtown Phoenix announced an all-new location coming in early August to the heart of Arcadia. Named Angels Trumpet Arcadia, this stylish second location now under construction will share the same building with the couple’s newest passion project, a craft cocktail lounge named Tall Glass. Housed inside a stylishly restored, revitalized mid-century modern space that was formerly a Sears Auto Center, Angels Trumpet Arcadia/ Tall Glass is located at 2339 North 44th Street (inside the Arcadia Crossing shopping center on the southeast corner of 44th Street and Thomas Road in Phoenix). The couple also plans to eventually open a small microbrewery onsite, which Mat describes as, “an intimate brewer’s playground, where we’ll make the sort of beers that we like to drink.” “We live right around the corner, so we’ve had our eye on this building for years,” says Sharry. “We know from personal experience that this stretch of south Arcadia is missing a fun and welcoming all-day hangout, where you can pop in for a tasty lunch or sip drinks on the patio and watch the sun set on Camelback Mountain.” But first, the couple had to strip away decades of garage grime and patchwork redesigns to reveal the stylish mid-century foundations of this low-slung 10,000 squarefoot space. “Originally built as a Ward’s Auto Center in the late 1950s, this is the last remaining building of the

former Thomas Mall,” Mat says. “So, we wanted to honor that history and preserve the wonderful architectural bones, as well as preserve elements of the tire shop by keeping the industrial look, and the beat-up floor — just adding a lot of polish.” Scheduled to open in early August, Angels Trumpet Arcadia will feature the same irresistible food menu and casual indooroutdoor layout as the original. Not to mention Angels Trumpet’s signature (and ever-changing) selection of local and national craft beers available on tap, with the day’s offerings written on an oversized slate chalkboard. Carved into the west side of the building, Tall Glass will be a separate craft cocktail lounge with its own entrance and extensive menu of craft cocktails, including spirits from craft beer distilleries such as Rouge Spirits and Cutwater Spirits. Here, guests will be able to belly up to the 40-seat island-style bar, relax in a cozy booth, or unwind on an outdoor patio featuring a mature Palo Verde shade tree, all hidden behind a stylish, perforated steel fence. Serving a compact menu of gourmet bar bites, Tall Glass guests will also be able to order from the entire Angels Trumpet food menu. Angels Trumpet Arcadia will be open daily from 11am to midnight, while Tall Glass will be open daily from the late afternoon to midnight. For more information and exclusive construction updates, follow Angels Trumpet on Facebook and Instagram @angelstrumpetalehouse and Twitter @angeltrumpetale.


The Paradise Valley Unified School District will host a job fair to fill open Education Support Professional (ESP) positions Wednesday, July 11, from 8am– noon at the District Administrative Center, 15002 North 32nd Street in Phoenix. Prospective candidates should come dressed appropriately to interview the day of the Job Fair. PVSchools offers a competitive benefits package that includes: • Free employee-only medical benefits package (must work 30 hours a week to be eligible) • Dental and Vision Insurance • Arizona State Retirement System — employer matching pension • Paid holidays Open positions include After School Associates, Bus Aides, Bus Drivers, Childcare Associates, Clerks, Crossing Guards, Facilities & Construction Maintenance Technicians, Nutrition & Wellness Workers, Paraeducators: Special Education, Preschool Aides. Potential candidates can reach out with questions to Dr. Otstot by phone 602.449.2185 or by email at motstot@pvschools.net. To learn more about the Paradise Valley Unified School District, visit www.pvschools.net.

North Phoenix

PVSchools To Host Job Fair

Chamber To Host Foundation Fundraisers In July

Beat The Heat With Drive-Thru Pizza Pick-up Just in time to beat the summer heat, Luci’s at the Orchard is offering drivethru pickup of Pomelo at the Orchard pizza every day after 5pm. This way, guests don’t need to deal with finding shaded parking, or even stepping out of the car. Simply, call Luci’s at the Orchard to place an order: 602.633.2442. Guests can enjoy all of Pomelo’s wood-fired pizzas such as their Pesto Garden with mozzarella, pesto, zucchini, broccoli, garlic and ricotta cheese or their Carnivore pizza with tomato sauce, mozzarella, pepperoni, spicy Schreiner’s Tasso and Schreiner’s Sicilian sausage. Luci’s at the Orchard is located at 7100 North 12th Street. Enjoy tasty sandwiches, breakfast items, coffees, teas and smoothies with the family. The patio is the perfect place to enjoy a day and there’s even a splash pad for kiddos to play in. Surrounded by more than 80 citrus trees on a historic orchard property, the space is unique and beautiful set against the beautiful central Phoenix landscape. Visit www.lucisurbanconcepts.com or like them on Facebook for more information.

Serving the Community Since 2002

The Phoenix Metro Chamber of Commerce will hold two fundraising events in July. The first event is scheduled for Thursday, July 12, at the Desert Ridge Marketplace California Pizza Kitchen. The fundraiser will benefit the Phoenix Metro Chamber Foundation. Phoenix Metro Chamber Foundation works to aid charities who provide lifesustaining resources and support to disadvantaged children, veterans and their families, and at-risk animals in the community. The Foundation will receive 20 percent of the sales for those who bring in the flyers. The second fundraiser will be held Friday, July 20, as the Chamber partners with the Arizona Diamondbacks for an exciting night of networking and fun at Chase Field. Tickets can be purchased at http://groupmatics.events/ phoenixmetrochamber. A portion of the proceeds from ticket sales will be donated to the Phoenix Metro Chamber Foundation.  For additional information about the Chamber, or additional fundraiser information, visit www.phoenixmetrochamber.com.

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Get Into The Library For Summer Fun & More The Maricopa County Library District Fountain Hills Branch offers plenty of ways for children, teens and adults to escape the heat and summer boredom this month.

Serving the Community Since 2002

Time for Babies July 24; 9:30–10:15am Join the library in the Conference Room Tuesdays to share in stories, songs and movement that will help baby grow through brain-developing activities. This lap-sit program is limited to babies ages 0–24 months with a parent or caregiver.

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Time for Preschoolers – July 23; 10–11am Children 3–5 years old are invited on the first four Mondays of each month for age appropriate stories, activities and crafts that focus on developing early literacy skills. This month’s themed program, “Libraries Rock!” takes place in the Conference Room. Dungeons and Dragons – July 23; 3:30–4:30pm Enjoy an afternoon of action, danger and excitement. Those who have played Dungeons and Dragons before may come with their character’s back story. If not, one will be provided. Either way, break out the polyhedral dice and prepare to join the adventure.

Computer Coaching – July 07, 14, 21; 9–11am Have a computer question or need help with a personal device? Computer coach Alan Diaz will be available from 9–11am for oneon-one assistance in the Computer Area. The Fountain Hills Library is located at 12901 North La Montana Drive in Fountain Hills. For information, call 602.652.3000 or visit www.mcldaz.org.

Musical Comedy Brings Back Bygone Era of Radio Fountain Hills Theater presents The Big Radio Broadcast of 1941 by Peter J. Hill, with music and lyrics by Gus Schneider and Eddie Avril, on its Mainstage Too through July 29. A small, independent Midwest radio station is set to finally ‘go national.’ Everything, including their financial future, depends entirely on going live with the national radio programming. A sudden freak snowstorm knocks out any chance of receiving the national feed. But, the four employees realize that, while they can’t receive, they can still broadcast. Can just four dedicated employees recreate an entire evening’s national radio broadcast? Can they save the station? Can they do it without falling in love? Well, if not, it won’t be for lack of trying. The Big Radio Broadcast of 1941 charmingly recreates the old radio programs with their comedy, news and intrigue segments, set to some of the most Pictured L–R: Sarah Brisco, Thomas Niels Mangum, Peter J. Hill and wonderful, original music of the period. The Barbara McBain; Photo: Patty Torrilhon story of how this show came to be is nearly as touching and funny as the musical itself. While visiting his mother, author Peter J. Hill was surprised when she brought out a small box of sheet music composed by Hill’s grandfather. “Your Grandfather wrote all this music. The Andrew’s Sisters optioned some of these songs, but they never recorded them. Can you do anything with them?” Hill took the music, listened to what turned out to be delightful tunes, and created The Big Radio Broadcast of 1941 around these songs by composer Gus Schneider. Amazingly, Hill and Schneider, his maternal grandfather, never met. Schneider died the year that Hill was born and now he finds a deep and meaningful connection to his past through Schneider’s music. The Big Radio Broadcast of 1941 is directed by Hill, musically directed by and produced by Copperstate Productions. The show stars Sarah Brisco, Peter J. Hill, Thomas Niels Mangum and Barbara McBain, and plays Fridays and Saturdays at 7:30pm and Sundays at 2pm. Individual tickets are $30 for adults and $12 for children 17 and under and college students with ID. All performances are at Fountain Hills Theater at 11445 North Saguaro Boulevard. Tickets are available through the box office at 480.837.9661, Ext. 3, and on-line at www.fhtaz.org.


MAYOR PETERSON WRITES... The ‘Requirement’ Of A Full-Time Vs. Part-Time Mayor By Les Peterson

Mayor Peterson, the Carefree Water Committee and the Town of Carefree will host The Carefree Water Company and the Town of Carefree are shown another comprehensive discussion in the new at work developing the intensive engineering and financial study currently in development with outside engineering firm Coe and Van Carefree Town Council Chambers at 33 Easy Loo (CVL). The purpose of this study is to assist in determining the Street at 5pm Monday, July 9. engineering requirements, costs and advisability of incorporating the The Water Committee (Carefree Water areas of Carefree currently provided water service by the Cave Creek Water System into the Carefree Water System territory. Company GM, Greg Crossman; Carefree Mayor Les Peterson; Carefree Vice Mayor John Crane; Carefree Council Member Stephen Hatcher; and Carefree P & Z Vice Chairman Tom Cross) has been working and meeting regularly, analyzing data and meeting with the Central Arizona Project (the source of most Carefree water) to chart the path to the most appropriate water future for Carefree. Approximately 80 percent of Carefree homes and businesses today receive water and water service from the Carefree Water Company system. The remaining 20-plus percent, over 500 homes and the retailers, Lowe’s and CVS Pharmacy on the west side of Carefree, are serviced by the Cave Creek Water Company. These homes and businesses are referred to as being in the “Carefree Service Area” of the Cave Creek Water System. These homes and businesses in the Carefree Service Area have been identified by the Carefree Water Committee as an area not consistent with the Town’s long-term goals for its residents. These Carefree homes and businesses have questionable service today and uncertain water service and availability in the future. To RSVP for the discussion, send an email to events@carefree.org or call 480.488.3686. For information, visit www.visitcarefree.com.

Chamber Holds Ribbon Cutting At Eddie Merlot’s The Carefree Cave Creek Chamber of Commerce was present Tuesday, June 12, to conduct a ribbon cutting ceremony for Eddie Merlot’s Prime Aged Beef and Seafood. Quality, exceptional service, and an unparalleled atmosphere have made Eddie Merlot’s one of America’s great steak houses. Eddie Merlot’s serves U.S.D.A. Prime beef — only 2 percent of all U.S. beef is awarded this certification. Eddie Merlot’s ages it for a minimum of 21 days, to a supreme tenderness and flavor. The chef selects each piece for the optimum marbling and texture, before hand-cutting and seasoning the thick, tender steaks, to seal in flavor. It is then flash-seared on special high-heat grills. The from-scratch kitchen creates everything fresh from dressings and sauces to appetizers, sides and desserts. The restaurant offers private dining room to accommodate business meetings, wedding receptions, rehearsal dinners or holiday parties. Eddie Merlot’s is located at 23207 North Scottsdale Road in Scottsdale. For additional information, call 480.699.0480 or visit www.eddiemerlots.com.

Serving the Community Since 2002

With three years’ experience as Carefree Mayor, I am 100 percent convinced that being mayor of Carefree is a full-time position. First, Carefree Town Government was MAYOR established up by our founding fathers Town of Carefree under a Town Council/Town Administrator 480.488.3686 format. This approach yields a significantly www.carefree.org different set of tasks and responsibilities than are found under the Town Council/Town Manager approach that is seen in most Arizona communities. Under a Town Council/Town Manager approach, the Town Manager functions as the chief executive officer of the municipality, with the Town Council functioning as a board of directors to provide strategic guidance and to establish priorities for the town. Once the strategic direction and priorities are resolved, the Town Manager runs the municipality accordingly. In this management approach, the Mayor is freed up from day-to-day operating responsibilities, and can use their time basically as they see fit, including some who have outside fulltime jobs. In contrast, under the Town Council/Town Administrator approach as was established for Carefree, the Mayor is the chief executive officer of the municipality, with the Mayor receiving strategic guidance from the balance of the Town Council, and the Town Administrator working with the Mayor to implement projects to fulfill the strategic direction and priorities established. This approach puts a much greater burden on the Mayor to be present and involved in day-to-day activities because he or she is ultimately responsible for their successful completion.  Secondly, in Carefree, the responsibilities of the Mayor and the Town Council are even greater than all other similarly structured Arizona municipalities because approximately eight years ago, in response to the economic recession, Carefree reduced its Town staff to the absolute bare minimum. To compensate for this reduction in manpower, the Mayor and the balance of the Town Council then became a true working council, filling in on some tasks that had previously been handled by the Town staff. To make this approach continue to work, the Mayor needs to be present and involved in virtually all major tasks and to actively participate in projects all the way from investigation of alternatives and decision making through project implementation.  Given the above, a person can’t do everything required of the Mayor of Carefree on a part-time basis without some priorities being short-changed or not being properly addressed. It simply is a full-time job in Carefree. In closing, have a good summer and visit Carefree when we don’t have the seasonal crowds and see our beautiful Carefree Desert Gardens. Have lunch or dinner in one of our fine restaurants. I think you will find it to be a delightful and cool Carefree experience.

Mayor Schedules Water Meetings With Residents

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Carefree Serving the Community Since 2002

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Carefree Councilman Crane Seeks Re-election Within The Law In response to my challenge to Town of Carefree term limits, the Superior Court of Arizona determined the Town ordinance imposing term limits is in violation of the state constitution and state law. Please allow me to share background information and explain my thoughts. Judge Hegyi found that towns, such as Carefree, lack the ability to impose term limits on their elected officials absent express authority from the State Legislature.  The Judge wrote, “The legislature has, however, expressly authorized towns to determine the length of their officials’ terms of office, alternative processes for electing a mayor, and the ability to create council districts.”  He added, “The fact that the legislature did not expressly empower towns to impose term limits implies an intent not to confer that authority.”   Why challenge the term limit ordinance now?  Since the 2011 imposition of Carefree term limits by voter initiative, Town staff has been aware that the legality of our ordinance was questionable.  My informal discussions with notable municipal attorney Bill Sims and, then, a League of Cities and Towns attorney in the summer of 2017, reinforced my view that our ordinance was unenforceable.   As the first Town Councilmember to have served three terms and to have the desire to seek another term, despite the term limit ordinance, it was important that I had ‘standing,’ or had been harmed, by the ordinance when my challenge was filed or risk case dismissal.  In April 2018, I was collecting signatures and the Town intended to enforce the ordinance.  I was confident that I had standing to challenge the ordinance.  Those who signed my petitions were made aware of my intention and their support gave me additional confidence. The Rule of Law.  Local government is the only level of government that works.  It is closest to the people.  Citizens know us and visit with us.  Local government must not only be transparent and responsive, it must follow the Rule of Law.  The Rule of Law restricts the arbitrary exercise of power contrary to existing law.  Carefree term limits, as ruled by Judge Hegyi, violate state law. Oath of Office:  All Carefree Council members swear to support “the constitution and the laws of the state of Arizona.”  To knowingly continue to standby while the Town enforced an unlawful ordinance would be a violation of that oath. When Mayor Schwan stepped down, the Town found itself with a split Council and unable to appoint a successor.  I suggested turning to external legal counsel for guidance to understand our existing ordinances and precedence for moving forward.  This approach was not designed to pick favorite candidates, but to determine how to operate our government within the rules.  The term limit ordinance legal discussion is no different.  The issue is not term limits.  The issue is operating Carefree government within the rules.  My belief in the Rule of Law and the meaning of my oath of office prompted me to engage an attorney at my expense.    As the prevailing party, the judge may order the Town to pay my attorney costs.  Should that occur, I will use my political contributions to pay that cost to zero.  In this election cycle, I will have and will exercise my right to run to be your councilman and you will have the right to vote for me or not vote for me.  That’s the law. John Crane Carefree Councilman

Understanding Carefree Term Limits On May 24, 2018, the Maricopa County Superior Court ruled that a Carefree Town ordinance adopted in 2011 imposing term limits is in violation of the State Constitution and State law. The Court found that towns, such as Carefree, do not have the power to impose term limits. Furthermore, whether the imposition of the term limit is by an act of council or by voter approved initiative, it is in violation of state law. This is why no other town form of government within the state has a limitation on terms served by mayor or town council members and why term limits were never included in the original Town Code.

Background Carefree Vice Mayor John Crane has served three terms, one by appointment and two by election. Therefore, pursuant to the Carefree term limit ordinance, Councilman Crane did not have the right to run for another term. In April, after pulling nominating petitions, the Town advised Councilman Crane that should he submit nominating petitions to run for another term, his petitions would be rejected by the Town. As a result, Councilman Crane engaged an attorney, at his expense, and filed suit in the Superior Court claiming that the current Town ordinance was in violation of state law and violated his right to seek another term of office. Although the Town defended the ordinance, the judge found the ordinance was in violation of state law. The judge ordered that the Town must process John Crane’s petitions and that the County is required to print his name on the ballot. His nominating petitions were submitted on time and processed. The voters will now have the right in the upcoming election to vote for Councilman Crane if they wish to do so. If re-elected, John Crane cannot be barred from continuing to volunteer and serve an additional two-year term. Looking further ahead, the Town must rewrite the ordinance to comply with State law and the Superior Court decision and remove term limits from the Town Code. The Town of Carefree June 7, 2018

July Chamber Events Scheduled The Carefree Cave Creek Chamber of Commerce will hold a POWER Hour (Profitable Opportunities With Empowering Results) event Monday, July 9, at Liberty Station, 34522 North Scottsdale Road, Suite 180, in Scottsdale (www.libertystationtavern.com). The event will be held 5–6pm. This informal gathering was created for two reasons: to infuse cash into the host restaurant during the summer months when they need it the most and an additional opportunity to network with fellow Chamber members. Stay for a few minutes or the whole hour but come and show the host restaurant support. In addition, a Beach Party mixer is scheduled for Wednesday, July 25, at Good Shepherd of the Hills Episcopal Church (www.goodshepherdaz.org). The event will be held at 5:30pm. Good Shepherd of the Hills is located at 6502 East Cave Creek Road in Cave Creek. Find complete details on the Chamber website. To learn more about Chamber events, call 480.488.3381 or visit www.carefreecavecreek.org.

Holland Summer Art Show Scheduled This month, the Holland Gallery of Fine Art will offer a new show to celebrate area art league artists. The July Arizona Art Alliance show, “A League of Their Own,” runs through July 26 and will include the following leagues: Arizona Artists Guild, Arizona Designer Craftsmen, Desert Sage Artists, Laveen Art League, Mesa Art League, Northeast Valley Artists League, Scottsdale Artists League, Vanguard Artists and WHAM Art Association. The show will include an Art, Coffee and Conversation July 6, 10am–noon; and an Artists’ Reception July 14, 4:30–6:30pm. Both events are free and open to the public. The show will take place at the Holland Community Center, 34250 North 60th Street, Building B, Scottsdale. Online registration and details are available at www.azfcf.org. For additional information, call 480.488.1090.


Now I Lay Me Down To Sleep

“A Soul from Minnesota,” by Allen Nohre, a collection of CitySunTimes essays, is available on Amazon in paperback and Kindle. Allen can be reached at anohre@cox.net.

New Name & Location — Same Personalized Care Dr. Colleen Krahl moved her practice (Easy Street Clinic) at the end of June. The practice moved from Easy Street at 7202 East Carefree Drive in Carefree to 4532 East Lone Mountain Road (the northwest corner of Lone Mountain and Cave Creek Road in the same building as Cave Creek Fitness). Dr. Krahl has been a member of the Carefree Cave Creek Chamber of Commerce for many years and begins her three-year term on the Chamber board this month. She says that this is more than just a change of location for her and her team — they will operate under a new name, too: Champion Chiropractic. Keep an eye out for details on an open house and ribbon cutting event to be held at the new location soon. For more information, call 480.595.0001 or visit www.championcavecreek.com.

Serving the Community Since 2002

I wonder how many thousands of children have been tucked into bed with the prayer: “Now I lay me down to sleep, I pray thee Lord my soul to keep. If I should die before I wake, I pray thee Lord, my soul to take.” Today, the suggestion in the prayer of the possibility of a child dying and not waking up makes me uncomfortable. But, I don’t remember that bothered me as a child when ALLEN NOHRE that was my bedtime prayer. Our mother would come to Writer our bedrooms to “hear our prayers.” First, she would go to my two sister’s bedroom on the first floor of the house, hear their prayers, and then she would come upstairs to the bedroom where my brother and I slept. Marland and I were already under the covers. She would sit on the bed and together we would recite the “Now I lay me down” prayer followed by each of us saying the “God bless” prayer where we would name the members of our family and some relatives, especially Grandma and Grandpa. I don’t know how we decided who to name in our “God bless” prayer. We had too many aunts, uncles and cousins to name them all. Why wasn’t the reference to the possibility of dying upsetting to me? I believe it was because of Mom. Prayer connects us to God, yet I believe our strongest connection at bedtime was with Mom and that connection was security. She was there for us just before we went to sleep, and we knew she would be there in the morning making us breakfast. The reference to death didn’t seem to be a problem for me, but maybe this version is better theology: “Now I lay me down to sleep, I pray thee Lord my soul to keep. Your love guides me through the night, And wakes me in the morning light.”

Carefree

SOUL CONNECTION

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Carefree

ECS Summer Program: Popular Options In July

Serving the Community Since 2002

ECS Performing Arts Workshop; Photo: Alexa Dragone

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Cave Creek Unified School District has decades of experience (since 1974) in inspiring creative, engaging and educational workshops and classes in a wide variety of programs for all ages. The ECS Kid’s Club is in full swing all summer with the exciting theme, “A Trip Around the World” featuring hands-on learning segments reflective of other cultures. The month of July features United States, France, China and Russia. Activities each week include science, active games, art, clubhouse, music, cooking, special events, movies and field trips for K through sixth-grade students. (July 2–3 and 5–6 is United States; July 9–13 is France; July 16–20 is China; July 23–27 is Russia).  There are additional popular summer options for students K through sixth, like Cooking: Around the World in One Kitchen, Celebrando El Espanol, and Happy Feet Camp: Hip Hop. Also available are Sports Rock Camp, Karate, Robotics Camp, Bonanza Lego, Rosetta Stone, Stinger Success Program, Seventh Grade Jumpstart Transition Camp, and more. Visit www.ecsforall.org for locations, information and registration. The ECS Performing Arts Workshop (grades nine through 12), is July 9 through August 10 with performances at 7:30pm on August 10 and August 11, at Cactus Shadows Fine Arts Center. Instructors are Andrew Cupo and Haley Vago. Dance and theater students will collaborate to create an interpretive theatrical production. The dance students will develop choreography integrated with film to enhance the theatrical production. Theater students will develop their acting methods, physicality, vocality as well as a character’s inherent mentality, all of which will create authentic and believable characters. This partnership of talent will be showcased during the first weekend that school is in session (August 10 and 11). The annual production has become a ‘must-see’ event for performing arts enthusiasts in the community. The 24-page summer catalogue, and registration, is available online at  www.ecsforall.org.

Business owners, are you reading this? So it DOES work! Call Bob Hesselgesser today to reserve your space in our next issue!

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602.214.7661


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CAREFREE COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE

LOT 149, Deer Trail Rd. Fabulous, high, 1.81 acre view lot w/water, electric & phone. Striking homes on all sides, boulder strewn arroyo adds instant landscape character. MLS#5317571 $129,900

ANOTHER NEW Classic, Modern Landmark Office Building Now for Lease. Corner of Elbow Bend & Nonchalant. 7405 Nonchalant, 2,500 sq.ft. New building. 6 Luxury Office Suites now only available, 234-410 sq.ft. Can be combined. Turnkey ready. Tile and carpeting throughout. Private baths. Individual heating and cooling. A home office away from home. Modified gross leases now available. CAREFREE CORNERS Corner of Elbow Bend & Cave Creek Road. 1 suite now available, 3165 sq.ft. Multi-use building with roll up rear doors for assemblage, work area, 13 ft to graduating 18 ft ceiling. Front for showplace displays and office. Modified gross lease available. Excellent exposure. 37002 N SIDEWINDER Excellent office location, center of Town of Carefree. Approximately 990 sq.ft. 2 private offices plus meeting room. Ample parking. FOR SALE 22 EASY ST 2 story plus basement, 5,535 sq.ft. Excellent exposure on Easy Street. Ideal furniture, gallery, upscale retail, etc. Lease back available. Short Term. Offered for $839,000.

CAREFREE ROLLING HILLS PROPERTY 9214 E SUNRISE CIRCLE, LOT #29. A generous 1.27 acres of exquisite views to surrounding mountains. On a private cul-de-sac, easy to build property. All utilties available. An excellent investment in Carefree. MLS# 5667611 $168,500

CAREFREE COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE CAREFREE GALLERIA 3755 Hum Road. 3 upstairs office suites: 710, 722, and 1,749 sq.ft. Private baths. Individual heating and cooling. Modified gross leases available. Elevator access. Excellent views.

New modern upscale, landmark office building 7405 Nonchalant in Carefree is the address of the new modern upscale, landmark office building, seven suites ranging from 234 to 410 sq. ft. - individual heating and cooling - private baths - tile and carpeting throughout - A HOME OFFICE AWAY FROM HOME - modified gross leases. Call Harry S. Vardakis for appt. at Palm Desert Realty. Office: 480-4883099, cell: 602-399-0708, fax: 480-488-5483

Serving the Community Since 2002

Cave Creek Unified School District (CCUSD) announced that its preschool programs will be available at all five A+ elementary schools beginning with the 2018-19 school year. New for the 2018-19 school year, Desert Sun Academy will offer students the Global Beginnings Preschool. Global Beginnings Preschool will allow the students to experience their day learning three languages, Spanish/French/ English. Language immersion is an educational approach especially effective for young children, which results in second language acquisition. Lone Mountain Elementary School will offer students a STEM program and World Chinese Preschool. Black Mountain Elementary School will continue to offer students Child’s Play Preschool with Drama and Dance; Desert Willow Elementary will continue to offer students a Spanish Immersion Preschool and Horseshoe Trails will continue to offer their students a World Chinese Preschool. CCUSD is the only public school district in Arizona offering World Language programs to their students Pre-K through 12th grade. For more information on CCUSD’s Education and Community Services preschool choices, visit www.ecsforall.org or call 480.575.2440.

Beautiful, very well maintained classic Carefree residence on a large 1.6 acre lot. Location and neighborhood are the best Carefree has to offer. Quiet and private, yet close to the Carefree Resort, in the midst of a total makeover. Downtown Carefree just a mile away. Classic Black Mountain views from kitchen, living room and patio, 2 bedrooms, den, 3 baths in main house. Exceptional guest house (871 sq. ft.) with spacious living area bedroom, bath and kitchen. Two car garage is attached to main house. Guest house is an easy walk from main house yet the large lot insures privacy for both residences. Most furnishings are included with the sale. Not to be missed! MLS#5744236 $795,000

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The office is staffed with qualified professionals at all times. Associate Brokers Mike Ragains • Tara Laman Broker/Realtor Harry S. Vardakis (Cell 602-399-0708)

(480) 488-3099

30 Easy Street • PO Box 921, Carefree, AZ 85377 (480) 488-5483 fax

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Carefree Serving the Community Since 2002

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Community Partnership Supports Science For Bright Young Minds Kiwanis of Carefree participated in a Lowell Observatory science demonstration as part of the June 13 Education & Community Services (ECS) presentation on the Lowell Observatory Curriculum for Kids (LOCKs), an innovative hands-on science program offered by ECS Child’s Play Preschool at Horseshoe Trails Elementary School (Phoenix) in the Cave Creek Unified School District (CCUSD). ECS LOCKs will receive $4,000 from Kiwanis of Carefree for 2018–19. After explaining the concept behind LOCKs, ECS Child’s Play Preschool Teacher Kathy Grandprey handed out small batteries connected to intriguing wires and challenged Kiwanis members Gina Durbin at the LOCKs presentation to figure out a way to light up a tiny light bulb. Judging from the smiles and laughter, the experiment was successful in entertaining everyone while shining light on how preschool students learn from the types of experiments provided for the program by Lowell Observatory. “Kiwanis of Carefree have been so generous in supporting our preschool programs,” Gina Durbin, ECS Director said in thanking the organization. See Community Partnership, page 25


Serving the Community Since 2002

“Assisting with the supplies needed for the LOCKs program will ensure continuity of a valued program that brings STEM education and interests to our littlest students.” Preschool students in classes using the ECS LOCKs program perform scientific testing (investigating and modeling), conducting experiments and guided investigations in life, physical, Earth and space sciences with their teachers’ close guidance and supervision. Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff provides all the required material to perform the scientific investigations and experiments. “We’re very proud of the LOCKs program, beginning with Pre-K, growing into Kindergarten and onward,” said Bruce Kosaveach, Lowell Observatory philanthropy manager, sharing Lowell Observatory’s goal to expand LOCKs into all grade levels. LOCKs will soon be offered in Kindergarten at Annunciation Catholic School (Cave Creek). “The Carefree Kiwanis Club is pleased to announce that we will be funding the Lowell Observatory LOCKs program for younger children at both the Annunciation School and the CCUSD ECS program for the 2018–19 school year,” said John Skarda on behalf of the organization. This is the first time that Kiwanis of Carefree has awarded funds to LOCKs. The LOCKs classroom program was introduced at ECS during the 2015–16 school year.  For more information on ECS Child’s Play Preschool and ECS LOCKs, visit www.ecsforall.org. To learn more about Kiwanis of Carefree, visit www.kiwaniscarefree.org. Information on Lowell Observatory is available at www.lowell.edu. For information on both Lowell Observatory Camps for Kids and Lowell Observatory Curriculum for Kids (LOCKs), visit www.lowell.edu/visit/locks.

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Community Partnership, continued from page 24

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MAYOR BUNCH WRITES…

Serving the Community Since 2002

By Mayor Ernie Bunch

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The July 3 Fireworks at Harold’s were NOT cancelled. The permit was never issued! Mike Baxley left Danny a message on May 21 because he wanted to have a discussion about the possible problems with the event. For whatever reason that call was not MAYOR returned. Plans were then Town of Cave Creek made, and advertising was 480.488.1400 purchased, and reservations www.cavecreek.org taken all before the Fireworks Permit was even applied for. When May 25 rolled around the state issued a Level II fire danger notice for Maricopa County parks and state lands following the Tonto National Forest elevations of danger in April. The state notice was not caught in time for staff to react and the Balloon Festival event went off the next day. In my opinion it should not have occurred and had the Level II notice been seen, I’m fairly certain it would have been cancelled. My first term on the Town Council began in June of 2005. For those who have been here that long, that was the same month the Cave Creek Complex Fire began. The entire community was on pins and needles and praying that the firefighters and winds would keep the flames away from our slice of heaven. At one point, then Mayor Francia was briefed about the possibility of signing off on a huge bulldozed firebreak that the land wouldn’t have healed from in a thousand years. In discussions during and after the event, the mayor asked me to look into ways to make our town safer from wildfire in the future. I dutifully went

off and amassed all of the material I could find on the program called Firewise. Community Firewise Certification requires wide swaths of vegetation be removed to make sure that buildings are safe during an event. These requirements are everything Cave Creek is not! Cave Creek is Upper Sonoran Desert beauty at its best. It is why so many of us live here. I shared some of these facts with the mayor and elected to not pursue Firewise. The required Native Habitat Corridor is nothing more a “fuse” through our town but adds to the beauty! I tend to try and avoid mobs with torches and pitchforks as they are a detriment to my health. So, when faced with the fireworks show that occurred last year up Spur Cross Road and Honda Bow, I saw the benefit of an ordinance that would preclude that ever happening again. I supported Councilwoman Wright, Mike Baxley and our attorney in the crafting of this ordinance and Council passed it with a 7–0 vote. It is very simply about the health, safety and welfare of our town. The following are the rules for a Stage II declaration. • No fires, campfires, charcoal, coal, and wood stoves. (Except using a device that is solely fueled by liquid petroleum or LPG fuels that can be turned on and off in areas that are barren or cleared of all overhead and surrounding flammable materials within three feet of the device.) Propane fire pits and fire bowls are allowed. •  No smoking (except within an enclosed vehicle or building). • No using an explosive. • No possessing, discharging or using any type of firework by pyrotechnic device. Fireworks are always prohibited. • No operating a chainsaw or any other equipment powered by an internal combustion engine from the hours of 9am to 8pm (except generators with an approved spark arresting device within an enclosed

vehicle or building or in an area that is barren or cleared of all overhead and surrounding flammable materials within three feet of the generator). • No welding or operating an acetylene or other torch with open flame. •  No operating or using any internal or external combustion engine without a spark arresting device properly installed, maintained and in effective working order. (This does not include motor vehicles. This is aimed at things such as landscaping tools.) •  No discharging firearms, air rifles or gas guns (except while engaged in a lawful hunt pursuant to state, federal or tribal laws and regulations). • No possessing or using a motor vehicle off state lands or roads. Vehicles must stay on roads and cannot drive/park over any vegetation at any time. We’ve all seen how fast a Christmas tree goes up in flames and the ground cover is just as dry or drier now. The small amount of rain in the center of town was not enough to diminish the danger. I love a good event just as much as the next person and am saddened that we will not be celebrating Independence Day eve. I’m especially saddened by the negative financial impacts on the employees who will be missing out on all the tips they receive on this particular day. None of that changes the facts as they are. Our businesses are already acting like the U.S. Marine Corps whose unofficial motto is “Improvise, Adapt and Overcome.” On another note, scarcely five weeks into my term as mayor, when I found out about the plans for Fiesta Days Rodeo moving to Buckeye, Danny was the first person I called and together on that very day, we put together a group that saved that historic event, emerging from the rubble as Cave Creek Rodeo Days. I am eternally grateful for his friendship and support in keeping Cave Creek great!

Big Earl’s Holds Annual ‘Trash Bash’ For more than six years, Big Earl’s Greasy Eats has held its annual summer Trash Bash event smack in the middle of summer. The madness continues with Trash Bash 7, Saturday, July 21, 8pm–2am. According to owner Brooke Dallas, Big Earl’s Greasy Eats, a burger and adult milkshake joint, will take the event to new levels. “It’s hot, sticky, sweaty and dubbed the best party in Cave Creek in the summertime,” says Dallas. “It’s inappropriate, hilarious and fun. As always, we will have a trailer in the front accompanied by a clothespin line, flamingos, beer and Jell-O shots, but that’s just for starters.”

The event will feature insanely named costume contests, exciting games, an inflatable waterslide and a disc jockey and music to keep the event going trailer park style. “We will collect canned goods beforehand and donate a percentage of sales to local Foothills Food Bank & Resource Center,” adds Dallas. “Having fun and giving back to the community is what it’s all about. Last year, we raised more than $2,000 for the Garcia family, who passed away during last summer’s flash floods. Giving back is now a tradition I want to keep.”  See Trash Bash, page 27


Cave Creek

Frontier Town Brings New Entertainment To Unique Western Venue Six Gun Entertainment to entertain crowds beginning fall 2018

Trash Bash, continued from page 26 Participants for the adults-only party are encouraged to dress and be adorned by their best overalls, mullets, beer bellies, curlers, slippers, spam, Slim Jim’s and Pringles cans. Dallas explains the history of the event: in 2012, a community newspaper wrote an article about the former owner calling her “white trash.” She saw the opportunity to turn the comment into an event. The whole town supported her summer concept. Dallas says she is “proud to carry on a tradition that has become an event that local Arizonans look forward to every year.” Big Earls Greasy Eats is located at 6135 East Cave Creek Road in Cave Creek. For details, call 480.575.7889 or www.bigearlsgreasyeats.com.

Serving the Community Since 2002

Frontier Town, one of Arizona’s only remaining western town locales, is expanding its operations and entertainment plans with the creation of a one-ofa-kind western town and the scheduling of action-packed western shootouts and other western entertainment. According to Marc Peagler, general manager of Frontier Town, the Wild West will come alive with a vengeance beginning in October 2018 as award-winning Six Gun Entertainment performs stunt and acting shows that will thrill western aficionados, residents, tourists and film industry representatives. “Frontier Town will become a major entertainment core for people seeking Wild West entertainment,” says Peagler. “Beginning this fall, people will see some of the most thrilling Wild West action this side of the Rio Grande.” The entertainment begins at noon, and dates, which may be added to, are: 2018 — October 13; November 10 & 24; December 8 2019 — January 5; February 2 & 16; March 2 & 16 “The industry is abuzz with excitement about this highly anticipated entertainment concept,” says Chaz Lee, director of affairs and stunt coordinator for Six Gun Entertainment. “And best of all, it is coming to one of Arizona’s most western towns in the heart of Cave Creek.” Peagler says that in addition to the planned western entertainment, more exciting changes and enhancements are planned for the upcoming season. Frontier Town (www.frontiertownaz.com), which is located at 6245 East Cave Creek Road in Cave Creek, is one of the oldest, most established western towns and shopping retail locations in Arizona. Six Gun Entertainment, LLC offers headlining, authentic Wild West theatrical stunt and acting performances for special events, stage, film and television and high-quality production services.

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Third of July Update – Harold’s Cave Creek Corral To all the Cave Creek and Carefree residents, businesses owners, and to all our visitors from around Arizona and the United States who were truly looking forward to seeing Cave Creek’s 3rd of July Fireworks this year: Harold’s and the other sponsoring local businesses are announcing the Town of Cave Creek’s cancelation of our annual 3rd of July Fireworks show, a 25-year, Cave Creek, fun family tradition. Please check out all our websites and Facebook pages to see what we will be doing instead — we are grateful for your business and support through these slow summer months. In the 25 years of hosting this spectacular show, we have entertained over 150,000 spectators and we have raised more than $100,000 in donations for many local charities, including the 100 Club of Arizona and the Foothills Food Bank. For those planning to bring canned goods and donations this year, we encourage you to donate directly: www.foothillsfoodbank.com. Since last week, we’ve heard from many patrons who shared their stories of how the 3rd of July Fireworks event helps bring people together. We were overwhelmed with support from people who took the time to call and email us or post messages of support on social media channels. We’re also proud of how our local businesses have worked together over the years to produce a fun, safe event that draws traffic from all parts of the state.  We estimate that in the past 25 years, this tradition has generated more than $2 million of additional revenue to local businesses during our slow summer months.  We were very sensitive to the safety concerns that the Town presented to us, and we addressed those concerns above and beyond any of our shows in the past 25 years and the safe fireworks show the Town allowed to happen on May 26.  We are disappointed that Cave Creek’s leaders allowed selective enforcement and passed a new code that was ambiguous at best and allowed one individual to have the power to cancel our great tradition. We will be asking these same leaders to change the code in weeks to come, so we have a more definitive code and have the true fire safety experts make that decision, not a town employee lacking knowledge. We will be asking for your support in the upcoming elections.  It’s important to recognize our council members and the mayor, who all took the time to listen to our concerns and have acknowledged that we should have a discussion on the Town’s fireworks code. The following Town officials went above and beyond the call of duty to listen to our concerns, offer informative feedback and acknowledge our disappointment: Fire Chief John Kratz; Town Manager Carrie Dyrek. The following council members: Ron Souva, Susan Clancy, David Smith and Thomas McGuire. We are looking forward to working with all of them after this year’s election. Finally, we realize this has been a controversial topic and we want to thank those of you who shared your opposing views with us. There have been a lot of debates about this topic, and thankfully, most of the discourse has been civilized. Please have a safe, fun 4th of July holiday celebrating our great nation’s Independence Day in the best small town I know in America, Cave Creek, Arizona. Danny Piacquadio, Harold’s Cave Creek Corral June 21, 2018

Kristin Lewis Announces Candidacy for Cave Creek Town Council My family and I have been in the Cave Creek for over 17 years. I am proud to have founded a woman owned medical company that started in Cave Creek. I have chosen to raise my three children in the warmth and western heritage of this community. I have had a great opportunity to have been a part of some wonderful events in our town. I have been a committee member of Cave Creek Rodeo Days along with a board member of Cave Creek Merchants and Events along with co-chairman of Wild West Days. I have also brought that experience and volunteerism to my children and my community. I am very proud to be a part of such a unique community. I love this town, the people, the unique character and the Cave Creek brand. I believe it is important to have a unified council that represents all of that and more. It is time to unite and fight for our beloved town. I have a strong understanding of what we need to do and great feedback on the priorities. It is up to our citizens to inform the town’s leadership of what is most important. I want to fix the broken communication between our citizens and the town. As taxpaying citizens, the town should work for you.  I’m open to your suggestions and promise to be fair to everyone. I have no slate, no personal agenda, no preconceived notions and no special interests. My only interest is to make the Town of Cave Creek what it once was — a place we were all proud to say we are from! Proud, unified citizens. It must happen. I truly believe I can make a difference. Please feel free to contact me at  lewisforcavecreek@gmail.com.

Sanderson Ford and Sanderson Lincoln Support Mayor Ernie Bunch and the Town of Cave Creek Over the years, Sanderson Ford and Sanderson Lincoln, have proudly built a strong relationship with the Town of Cave Creek. We have been involved in Wild West Days, are presenting sponsors of Taste of Cave Creek, entertainment sponsors of the annual Cave Creek Balloon Festival and supporters of Octoberfest. And not to be left out, one of our most favorite community events, to partner with the Town of Cave Creek, is the Cave Creek Rodeo Days. From the parade to the actual rodeo itself, the entire Sanderson family comes out to be a part of this 40-year tradition. After several years, of being the presenting sponsor and helping it grow year after year, the producers of the then, Fiesta Days Rodeo, wanted to move this great event out of the Town of Cave Creek to try and make it much bigger. With only a few months left before the event, they pulled out, leaving the Town of Cave Creek high and dry. The producers thought we, Sanderson, would follow with their new rodeo. They were wrong. When I got the news, I was furious. How could we do that to the town we have partnered with for years. We have a lot of loyal customers in Cave Creek and I was going to do everything I could to help put it back together. That’s how I first got to know Mayor Ernie Bunch. When I got the word about the rodeo, I called the Mayor and asked him if we could get together to discuss it and try to save the event. He too, was very upset with the situation and to my surprise, agreed to meet with me the very next day. I promised Sanderson Ford, would help any way we could, and we very quickly met with former and new members of the rodeo to form a new committee. Because of the Mayor’s quick actions, we pulled it off and the 40th annual Cave Creek Rodeo Days went on. Last year, we elevated the event even more by adding a David Lee Murphy concert. It was one of the most successful years. With the proceeds we were able to support the following local charities — Cave Creek Food Bank, Cave Creek Boy Scout Troop 124, Triple R Horse Rescue, Arizona Rangers Phoenix, Cave Creek Museum, Black Mountain Elementary School Arts Program, American Legion Post 34, Desert Cancer Foundation of Arizona, The 100 Club (on behalf of the Rural Metro Cave Creek location) and first responders. None of this would be possible if it was not for the passion Mayor Ernie Bunch has for his town. I found him to be straightforward, honest and trustworthy. He is good for the Town of Cave Creek and that is why Sanderson Ford, Sanderson Lincoln and myself support Mayor Ernie Bunch. We look forward to working with the Mayor and the Town of Cave Creek on not only, the upcoming 42nd Annual Cave Creek Rodeo Days, but much, much more. David Kimmerle, Sanderson Ford and Sanderson Lincoln


Cave Creek residents are invited to a Mayoral and Council Candidates Forum scheduled for Tuesday, July 10, 6–9pm. The forum will be held in the new Desert Foothills Library Lecture Hall located at 38443 North Schoolhouse Road in Cave Creek (www.desertfoothillslibrary.org). The moderator for the forum is Ken Strobeck, executive director of the League of AZ Cities and Towns (www.azleague.org). Town of Cave Creek candidates on the August 28 primary ballot include: Mayor — Ernie Bunch; Eileen Wright Council Member (6 Seats) — Tom Augherton; Susan Clancy; Paul Diefenderfer; Thomas McGuire; Reg Monachino; Bob Morris; Kathryn Royer; David Smith; Ronald Sova The polls will be open from 6am until 7pm on Election Day, Tuesday, August 28. For additional information on upcoming elections, visit the Town of Cave Creek website: www.cavecreek.org/index.aspx?nid=228.

Cave Creek

Cave Creek Candidates Forum Scheduled For July 10

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Serving the Community Since 2002

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Art Festivals • Wild West Days Hidden In The Hills & Community Events 11.17

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Oak’s Gives Back To Community Seniors Cave Creek’s Oak’s Diner & Flapjacks will give back to one of the communities it serves by cooking and delivering homemade pies, every Tuesday, to Infinite Finds, a 501(c)(3) that operates a Cave Creek community/activity center where seniors find unique resources and can learn about important senior-related topics, take exercise classes, enjoy crafts, games, music and now, fresh diner-crafted pies. Infinite Finds is located at 6528 East Cave Creek Road in Cave Creek. For more information, call 480.221.3464. According to Oak’s owner Sherry Vogler, the popular diner will provide homemade pies to Infinite Finds every Tuesday. The homemade pies will give seniors a little extra something special to look forward to each week. Oak’s Diner and Flapjacks is located at 6219 East Cave Creek Road in historic Cave Creek. For additional information, call 480.488.5704.


all had to wait until the pick of the summer crop of tomatoes was in, I feel like ringing the restaurant triangle to call in the cowhands — it’s here and come and get it.” Dooley continues, “We also will have our watermelon wedges, drizzled in the best honey and mixed with some cardamom to bring a whole new flavor aspect to this mouth-watering refresher. Plus, I created the Salted Caramel Corn on the Cob, which is a winner as well.” Along with the Tomato Sandwich, vegetarians can enjoy a Pulled Squash sandwich, topped with Bryan’s BBQ sauce and placed on a pillow-like bun to cradle the divine taste. Now vegans and meat eaters can share the table and find satisfaction on the open range. Dooley remembers, “We wanted

Serving the Community Since 2002

Chef Bryan Dooley of Bryan’s Black Mountain Barbecue in Cave Creek knows that Arizona winters are long, and the spring is short, and that, now that summer is here, his hungry fans will be clamoring for a longawaited summer special: his famous Tomato Sandwich. The sandwich is dripping with his house-made Dijon mayonnaise, layered with succulent summer tomatoes that have been topped with his house-smoked salt, then layered with red onion and topped with watercress. The bread itself is a whole other story, grilled to buttery perfection. Once diners take a bite of this sandwich, Dooley says guests beg for more. “People have been begging me to put this sandwich back on the menu year after year, now it’s in its eighth year,” says Dooley. “They

Cave Creek

Summer Means Means Summer Tomato Sandwiches Sandwiches Tomato And More More –– At At Bryan’s Bryan’s –– And

to fit the cowboy west into the feel of Cave Creek but with a clean modern look — we like to call it ‘clean cowboy.’” Much if the atmosphere and style inside is the work of Bryan and Donna, from the more modern feel of the seating to the acid washed metal walls and huge round wood center table. With the growth of the restaurant came the newest addition of a round bar outdoor seating around a huge Saguaro. The patio welcomes guest who want to sit back, kick up their boots and greet old and new friends. Step back inside and on any night and watch old black and white cowboy movies on a big screen or pull the guitar off the wall and play a few tunes. Dooley has been known to play a few for the crowds himself. Bryan’s Barbecue is located at 6130 East Cave Creek Road in Cave Creek. For information, call 480.575.7155 or visit www.bryansbbq.com.

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Flag Corps Club Promotes Civic Duty

Horseshoe Trails Elementary School (HTES), located in the Cave Creek Unified School District, has a Flag Corps club led by Deb Feibus, fourthgrade teacher. Feibus said, “The purpose of the Flag Corps at Horseshoe Trails Elementary School is to raise and lower the American flag and the State of Arizona flag when school is in session, weather permitting.” Members of the club, fourth-, fifth- and sixth-graders, offer flag facts and education about flags to all students and staff. The club also receives all halfstaff notifications from the governor’s office and posts that information for all HTES staff. The club has parent volunteers who wear “Proud to be a Flag Corps Parent” lanyards whenever they assist and attend Flag Corps events. The students hope to model proper flag raising and lowering etiquette while observers can learn and honor the flag. The students wrote a guide that is posted on the HTES website. The club was initiated by interested fourth-grade students in January 2017. The Flag Corps club has a set of parade flags and harnesses. They are eager to share their expertise and knowledge with the community. Superintendent Debbi Burdick said, “These students are learning a valuable, hands-on experience on basic patriotism as it relates to our country and state flags and translates to civic duty and strong citizenship. To see their pride in our flag and what it stands for is inspiring. Thank you to Ms. Feibus for overseeing this club with the strong values it teaches our students.” Horseshoe Trails Elementary School is an “A+ School of Excellence” offering its students Chinese Immersion and on-site Horsemanship and Equestrian programs. For more information, contact the principal, Dr. Matt Schenk, at 480.272.8505 or by emailing mschenk@ccusd93.org.


“We have had a very busy season at the Buffalo Chip,” says owner Larry Wendt, “but it has not kept us from adding attractions and making changes for our wonderful friends and customers.” Some of the changes are: • Improved seating and aluminum bleachers for bull riding fans every Wednesday and Friday night all year long • Kids intermission, games and activities during bull riding • N  ew and improved misting systems in all V.I.P. area

Cave Creek

Enjoy Summer At The Chip

• N  ew menus and executive chef for V.I.P. areas and menu changes for main areas • N  ew mechanical bull and punching bag matches for customers entertainment • A  ntique rodeo poster wrap of semitrailer for catering and smokehouse “We have more and more tour groups from all over the world and these slow down in summer, so it is a great time to come out and enjoy our free activities and 10-degree cooler weather,” says Wendt. “We pride ourselves on having the most attentive and capable staff and live entertainment seven nights a week.” The Buffalo Chip Saloon & Steakhouse is located at 6823 East Cave Creek Road in Cave Creek. For additional information, call 480.488.9118 or visit www.buffalochipsaloon.com.

Reliance Heating & Air Conditioning was founded in 1984 by Dalen Blumentritt’s dad, Dave. Dave’s mission was to always stay on the cutting-edge of technology with high-quality, personal service. In 1999, Dalen and his wife, Michele, took over the business. Today, they carry on the same mission as his father. For more than 30 years, they have proudly served thousands of customers throughout the Metro Phoenix area. The Reliance staff is well-informed on the latest developments in climate control technology, and they offer their customers state-of-the-art efficiency and energy-saving solutions to fit their heating and air conditioning needs. The entire staff takes great pride in their work and cares deeply about their customers. Reliance Heating and Air Conditioning is committed to helping their customers find the best solutions for all of their heating and air conditioning needs, and they look forward to sharing their expertise and experience with customers. For additional information, call 602.944.9585 or visit www.relianceac.com.

Serving the Community Since 2002

Setting The Temperature On Comfortable

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Serving the Community Since 2002

Cave Creek


Volunteers Needed For Hospice of the Valley Not-for-profit Hospice of the Valley is blessed with compassionate volunteers who provide companionship to patients who may be lonely and support family members who are often emotionally overwhelmed and physically exhausted. Their presence is a gift — whether they’re visiting, reading, running errands or taking time to really listen and comfort. “The joy people get from a simple visit touches your heart and makes you feel good,” says volunteer John Hickey. Right now, the agency has a special need for volunteers in Black Canyon City, Anthem and New River. Those who may feel a stirring are invited to give it a try. It may be one of the most fulfilling things you ever do. Call 602.636.6336 or email volunteeropportunities@hov.org. For more information, visit www.hov.org.

Volunteer Susan Rose

Serving the Community Since 2002

Forty-one years ago, Susan Rose became a volunteer — and it changed her life. “When my father-in-law was dying of cancer, he was put in the back of a care facility, drugs were rationed, and he would have been alone if our family had not taken turns sitting with him. I vowed to do something to help. At just that moment, three wonderful angels founded Hospice of the Valley and I found my calling.” Ironically, every time Susan s howed people love and kindness, it came back tenfold. It’s also a lot of fun. “I had one patient who taught me how to make cowboy beans. I made them for him every Wednesday,” recalls volunteer Rena Muise. “Another patient taught me to brew English tea. A 95-year-old is sharing the autobiography he is writing. It’s fascinating!”

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Local Animal Rescue Offers Summer Safety Reminders Home Fur Good Animal Rescue and Placement, a no-kill animal shelter located in North Phoenix, would like to remind the community of the dangers faced by pets during the summer months.

FOREVER FAMILIES / BY CLINT WILLIAMS Aid to Adoption of Special Kids

Meet Nina

Serving the Community Since 2002

Teen loves sports and scholastics

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Thirteen-year-old Nina has big plans. “I really like to tell people that I want to be president,” the rising high school freshman says, “but I know I have to be mayor or senator first. “I just want to make a change in the world,” she says, adding that change includes making things better for children in foster care. “I want to know that kids out there are going to have homes out there to sleep in, they have families to be there for them,” Nina says. Meanwhile, until that first campaign, Nina stays busy with sports and school – and doing well in both. “She is such a smart girl,” says Rene Durfee, Nina’s mentor for four years. Nina is an honor roll regular, voracious reader and pretty good baker. “She is great at making pies,” Durfee says. Nina has played soccer since age 8, but recently took a dive into a new sport – flag football. Classmates were surprised when she tried out for the middleschool team “I ended up making the team, but it was hard being a girl,” she says. But, she worked extra hard in practice. “I ended up being the best nose tackle and I got a lot of flags,” Nina says, adding that she earned the respect of the boys on the team. Durfee says Nina would thrive in a two-parent household and would be a great sister. Nina is confident she could contribute to a forever family. “I’m goofy, I’m smart, I’ll make you laugh on your bad days,” she says. For more information on children in foster care eligible for adoption, call Aid to Adoption of Special Kids (AASK) at 602.930.4900, or visit www.aask-az.org.

Heat Safety: • The normal body temperature for a dog is 101 to 102 degrees. • A  three-degree rise can put a dog into a dangerous situation and increase its need for oxygen. • A  t 108 degrees the heart, brain, liver, kidneys and intestinal tracts begin to break down. • Don’t leave your dog or cat in a car. • M  ake sure that your pets have plenty water and shade. • I f you believe your pet is overheating, bring it into air conditioning. You can immerse it in cool (not cold) water and give it “sips” of water. If necessary, apply ice packs and immediately take your dog to a veterinarian. • If the pavement or sidewalk is too hot for your feet, it’s too hot for your dog’s paws. The pads can be easily burned on hot days. General Summer Safety • Keeps pets away from hot barbeque grills or coals. • Store pesticides and fertilizers out of reach of pets. • Make sure that pets are not sniffing grass seed into their noses. • Dogs that watch you plant bulbs may dig them up. The bulbs can be poisonous. • D  ogs or cats with white noses or ear tips can sunburn. If your pet will wear sunscreen, that’s great. But most of them will lick it off. It’s best just to keep them inside when the sun is bright. Fourth of July Safety • More family pets will run away from home this weekend than during any other time of the year because of fireworks. • Do not bring your pets along to the fireworks displays. • Bring your pets indoors before fireworks displays begin. • M  ake sure that your pets have access to their favorite “safe place” or find a quiet, comfortable, enclosed room where your pets can “hide” if they need to. • I f you are going to a firework display and leave your pets at home alone, leave the radio or television set on so there is “normal” background noise. • M  ake sure your pets are micro-chipped. Many of the pets that run away during the fireworks will escape by slipping out of their collars. Micro-chip will ensure that your pet is returned if it ends up at the shelter. Micro-chips can be received by any veterinarian, or at Home Fur Good’s low-cost vaccine clinic on Sundays from 11am to 2:30pm on a walk-in basis. Cost is $30 with no office visit cost. Home Fur Good Animal Rescue and Placement will be open July 4 from 11am to 2pm for a special Independence Adoption Day. All veterans and first-responders will receive a $50 discount off of any adoption fee. (I.D. required). Micro-chips, normally priced at $30, will be given on the spot for $20. This will be ahead of the fireworks, the time many scared animals run away from home. Home Fur Good is located at 10220 North 32nd Street in North Phoenix. For additional information, call 602.971.1334 or visit www.homefurgood.org.


The Saguaro

Camp-Themed Restaurant Offers Hot Summer Deals

Just in time for summer, Ocean Prime announces a “spicy” new cocktail guaranteed to bring the heat. The Picante Tequila Cocktail, featuring pineapple-infused Maestro Dobel Diamante Tequila, picante syrup, fresh squeezed lemon juice and a few dashes of Regan’s Orange Bitters, is just $14. The combination of flavors offers a balanced and smooth result, finishing with a refreshing burst of acidity from the fresh lemon, with a gentle lingering spice that entices guests to have another sip. Ocean Prime is open Monday–Thursday, 5–10pm; Friday and Saturday, 5–11pm; and Sunday 5–9pm. The restaurant is located at 5455 East High Street in North Phoenix. For information, call 480.347.1313 or visit www.ocean-prime.com.

Explore Local Craft Brewers At Annual Festival

Yogi Bear’s Picnic

Reserve happy hour food specials are available until midnight on Thursdays and until 1am Fridays and Saturdays. In addition to nibbles to nosh well into the night, Camp Social is heating things up with beverages specials on their reverse happy hour menu including $2 Hamm’s beer on draft; $3 local draft beers and house wine; $4 Three Olives vodka (including flavored varieties); and $5 Jameson shots. “Camp Social is the perfect place to get away, without having to go too far from home,” says Anthony Georgoulis, Camp Social’s director of operations. “With our fully misted patio, two bars, game room and open dining room, and now our new reverse happy hour specials, we hope guests will consider Camp their home away from home this summer.” Camp Social is located at 6107 North 7th Street in Phoenix. For additional information, call 480.750.0506 or visit www.campsocial.com.

The Real, Wild & Woody Festival will take place Saturday, July 28, from 2-6pm. The Phoenix Convention Center will once again welcome a variety of fresh flavors and seasonal specialties poured by more than 65 of the Southwest’s best craft brewers. With over 350 craft beers, there is something for everyone. Join the Arizona Craft Brewers Guild as they celebrate 30 years of craft beer in Arizona with a festival that includes, brews, bites, a silent disco, live music, rock wall and a gamers paradise. The indoor summer festival will again prove a great spot for sampling specialty casks, rich and unique flavor combinations and other never-before-sipped brews from some of the industry’s best. Real, Wild & Woody will also again partner with some of the region’s top restaurants to provide complementary small bites for festival-goers. To learn more and purchase tickets, visit www.realwildandwoody.com.

Serving the Community Since 2002

Camp Social, Central Phoenix’s camp-themed restaurant and bar, introduces new specials and an all new Reverse Happy Hour menu with prices designed to help guests beat the heat. The summer menu is offered nightly Thursday through Saturday from 9pm to close. Specials start with $9 pizzas until 1am, including Camp Social’s most popular varieties such as the Saguaro with ricotta choose, house cheese blend, butternut squash, Fresno honey, pepitas and herbs; the Haleakala with house made tomato sauce, grilled pineapple, bacon, pepperoni, candied Fresno chili, smoked mozzarella and basil; and the Mount Rainier featuring truffle cream, wild mushroom mix, house cheese blend, arugula, parmesan and truffle oil. Other specials include half price on The Twist, a salted soft pretzel served with creamy beer cheese for $4.25 (normally $8.50); and the Yogi Bear’s Picnic, a charcuterie board featuring artisanal meats and cheese, duck fat nuts and “Yogi’s” selection of goodies for just $11.50 (regularly priced at $23).

New Summer Cocktail At Ocean Prime

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Summers Are Deadliest For Teen Drivers

Serving the Community Since 2002

AAA offers safety tips for teens and parents alike

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Scottsdale Optometry Practice Named Among ‘Best’ For its leadership in optometry and delivery of exceptional care to its patients, Stephen Cohen, O.D. (“Doctor My Eyes”) in Scottsdale has been named a 2018 Best Practice by CooperVision, Inc. — one of the world’s leading manufacturers of soft contact lenses (www.coopervision.com). Now in its third year, the Best Practices initiative seeks to discover and recognize U.S. eye care practices that have found unique ways to drive growth in their businesses and celebrate the visionary and innovative things they do every day for their patients and communities. Dr. Cohen is included among the 10 honorees chosen as this year’s class of Best Practices after a nationwide search that began in Fall 2017. Honorees were first announced last month and are profiled on the program’s web site at www. eyecarebestpractices.com. Founded in 1985, Dr. Cohen’s practice is built on relationships. The practice motto is “where modern technology meets old-fashioned care,” and for 32 years, Stephen Cohen, OD, has cared for patients who have become like extended members of his family. Dr. Cohen has long been an early adopter of new technology, but there is one area in which he plans to be the last person standing: he refuses to “upgrade” to an automated phone system. Dr. Cohen views optometry as a service field and believes that patients should always reach a person when they call. Dr. Cohen encourages his staff to “strive for perfection and pray we never get there,” knowing that once a practice has “arrived,” it settles into complacency, while he would rather continue to improve. Dr. Cohen has been actively involved in the profession of optometry, welcoming students into his practice, lecturing and holding various board positions over the years. In 2011, he became the first optometrist to serve on the national board of the Sjogren’s Syndrome Foundation and is currently serving as the first OD Chairman of the National Board. “It is a tremendous honor to be acknowledged for the way we serve our patients, and to know that our work stands out,” said Dr. Cohen on being named a Best Practice. “When you receive an industry-wide honor, it carries a certain distinction, because we have been recognized by our peers and among our peers.” Dr. Cohen’s practice is located at 10900 North Scottsdale Road, Suite 301, in Scottsdale. For information, call 480.513.3937 or visit www.doctormyeyes.net.

More than 1,050 people were killed in crashes involving a teen driver in 2016 during the 100 Deadliest Days, the period between Memorial Day and Labor Day. That is an average of 10 people per day — a 14 percent increase compared to the rest of the year, according to data analyzed by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety. “The number of fatal crashes involving teen drivers during the summer underscores the importance of preparing inexperienced teens for some of the most dangerous driving days of the year,” said Michelle Donati, spokesperson for AAA Arizona. “Through education, proper training, and involvement of parents, we can help our young drivers to become better and safer drivers, which in turn keeps the roads safer for everyone.” Speed and nighttime driving are significant factors contributing towards the number of crashes, and subsequently fatalities, involving teen drivers during the 100 Deadliest Days. “This is a timely reminder for parents to be actively involved in their teen’s learningto-drive process and to be educated on their state’s teen driving law,” Donati said. Effective July 1, 2018, Arizona teen drivers will be prohibited from using wireless communication devices, such as a cell phone, while operating a vehicle during the permit and first six months of the GDL phases, except for in emergency situations. “Although our enhanced GDL law doesn’t go into effect until later this summer, AAA encourages parents to establish this as a family rule for their teen drivers as the 100 Deadliest Days begins,” Donati said. In preparation for the dangerous summer driving period, AAA encourages parents to educate their teens and themselves about risky driving behavior. Parents should: • Discuss with teens early and often the dangers of risky driving situations, such as speeding and nighttime driving. • Teach by example and minimize your own risky behavior when behind the wheel. • M  ake a parent-teen driving agreement that sets family rules for teen drivers. Consider setting driving limits that are stronger than a state’s law and enforce those limits. A variety of tools can be found at www.teendriving.aaa.com, including licensing and state law information, to help prepare parents and teens for not only the dangerous summer driving season, but also all year long. The site also features new interactive widgets highlighting teen driving risks, as well as a social host quiz. The online AAA StartSmart program also offers great resources for parents on how to become effective in-car coaches as well as advice on how to manage their teen’s overall driving privileges.

CDC Releases Results Of At-Risk Youth Survey The Jason Foundation, Inc., a nationally recognized leader in youth suicide awareness and prevention, shared the announcement in June that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has released the results of the 2017 Youth Risk Behavioral Surveillance System (YRBSS). The YRBSS is a survey, conducted by the CDC, that includes national, state and local school-based representative samples of 9th- through 12th-grade students. The purpose is to monitor priority health risk behaviors that contribute to the leading causes of death, disability and social problems among youth in the United States. The surveys are conducted every two years to determine the prevalence of these health risk behaviors. Behaviors that contribute to unhealthy lifestyles and those that indicate possible depression and/or suicidal ideation are included. Currently, suicide is the second leading cause of death for high school aged youth, as well as for youth ages 10–24. The four questions here are included in the YRBSS and relate to suicidal thinking. The national statistics are provided. See Youth Survey, page 39


SUPERINTENDENT’S MESSAGE As educators, we are in the business of teaching lessons to our students. This spring, I learned some extremely valuable lessons from our students, teachers, support staff and parents. Lesson one: The power of student voice. Insightful students across the nation and in PVSchools rallied in support for increased student safety on school campuses. I am so DR. JAMES P. LEE proud that our students displayed civility Paradise Valley Unified School District while exercising their constitutional rights. Student leaders reached out to principals to seek meaningful, respectful and safe ways to stand united in an effort to have their voices heard. The lesson I learned is that our students want to be heard, and they understand their role and their rights in a democratic society. Lesson two: Educators have the ability to change history. Out of frustration, from years of low wages and inadequate school funding, teachers finally received attention from the media and our state policymakers. Not only did teachers and support staff across the state march on the state capitol, parents, children and community members joined in to show support and solidarity. I have witnessed time and time again, over the years, how students benefit when educators and parents partner to help students achieve success in the classroom. The lesson that I learned from this grassroots movement is that educators and parents, working together, have the ability to change the future for public education in a way that will benefit students across the state for years to come.

I am proud to be a public educator, and I am proud of the work we are doing on behalf of our students in PVSchools! To learn more about PVSchools, visit www.pvschools.net/enroll or call 602.449.2000. To reach Dr. Lee or for more information about the Paradise Valley Unified School District, call 602.449.2000 or visit www.pvschools.net.

Youth Survey, continued from page 38 • H  ave you experienced the feeling of hopelessness and sadness for a constant period of two weeks or greater during the past twelve months (possible beginning of clinical depression)? 31.5% answered YES or almost 1 out of every 3 young people • Have you seriously considered suicide in the past twelve months? 17.2% answered YES or over 1 out of every 6 young people • Have you made a plan to commit suicide in the past twelve months? 13.6% answered YES or almost 1 out of every 7 young people • Have you attempted suicide in the past twelve months? 7.4% answered YES or over 1 out of every 14 young people Visit www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/data/yrbs/results.htm to see the full report that includes a state by state breakdown. The Jason Foundation provides programs for youth, parents, educators and the community to help recognize when a young person may be struggling with thoughts of suicide and how to assist them. All programs and materials are available at no cost to the public. The Jason Foundation has 117 Affiliate Offices across the country, which services all 50 states. For more information or to find your local Jason Foundation Affiliate Office, visit www.jasonfoundation.com.

Program expanded to include foster and homeless children The Back to School Clothing Drive, Arizona’s largest provider of uniforms, clothing, backpacks and school supplies to more than 25,000 Title I elementary-school students at over 260 Maricopa County schools, is gearing up for the 2018 event, July 23–27 at Grand Canyon University Arena, 3300 West Camelback Road in Phoenix. Among sponsors already committed to the event are BHHS Legacy Foundation, Bank of America, Arizona’s Family 3TV and CBS5, Discover, Grand Canyon University, and Fiesta Bowl Charities. Additional sponsorship opportunities are available by calling 602.256.9408 or visiting www. backtoschoolclothingdrive.com. Sponsorship packages range from $1,000 to $25,000 and include benefits based on sponsorship level. More than 5,000 K-6 pre-registered students attend the annual week-long New Clothes, New Beginnings event. Back to School Clothing Drive has expanded its outreach and impact this year through collaborations with organizations serving children in foster care and homeless children including Arizona Helping Hands, Arizona Friends of Foster Families and Children First Academy. All students are pre-selected, pre-registered by their schools and bussed to Grand Canyon University Arena, which is transformed into a large “department store.” Each student is assigned a personal shopper to help select a new wardrobe including two pairs of shorts, two polo shirts, a sweatshirt, one belt, three pairs of socks and underwear, one pair of sneakers, a backpack filled with school supplies, hand-made items sewn by a Stitches-of-Love volunteer, dozens of school supplies and personal hygiene items. Each child takes home approximately $350 worth of merchandise, at no cost to them, totaling $1.8 million by the end of the week. “We believe the impact we make is just the beginning,” said executive director Karl Gentles. “Our ambition is to move beyond just school uniforms and supplies to help break down those systemic barriers students face in their pathway to early school and childhood success.” Founded in 1967, Back to School Clothing Drive distributes items through its signature programs, the “New Clothes, New Beginnings” clothing distribution and Student Attire for Education (SAFE), with support from more than 2,500 volunteers to children whose families are at or below the federal poverty level, approximately $30,000 annual income for a family of four. “For five decades, Back to School Clothing Drive has helped break down barriers to early childhood success for students from kindergarten through sixth grade who desperately need new school uniforms and outfits, backpacks and school supplies,” Gentles said. “Our products may be school uniforms and supplies, but we deliver selfesteem, self-confidence and a successful start to school for thousands of students.” For information about Back to School Clothing Drive, email Gentles at karl@ btscd.comor, call 602.256.9408 or visit www.backtoschoolclothingdrive.com.

Serving the Community Since 2002

Lesson three: Why I’m committed to public education. This spring, I have seen a renewed resurgence in the spirits of our students, teachers, support staff, leadership, parents and community members. The public education community has raised the bar through a collective voice to speak out on causes that matter the most to them. This voice has only strengthened, and will continue to strengthen, the cornerstone of our democracy — public education. The lesson that I have learned is that there is certainly a renewed passion for public education, which is directly attributed to dedicated teachers, support staff, parents and community members across Arizona.

Back to School Clothing Drive Seeks Additional Sponsors

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July 14

Christopher Lloyd Goes Back to the Future Orpheum Theatre www.luckymanonline.com; 480.829.1300

15 July 7

Phoenix Mercury vs. Connecticut Sun Talking Stick Resort Arena www.phoenixmercury.com; 602.252.WNBA

Photo: Alexei May

Diplo

July 5

The Pool at Talking Stick Resort www.livenation.com

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July 5–8

Arizona Diamondbacks vs. San Diego Padres

July 15

Chase Field www.mlb.com/dbacks; 602.462.6500

Arizona Broadway Theatre at Herberger Theater Center www.azbroadway.org; 623.776.8400

Musical Instrument Museum www.mim.org; 480.478.6000

Jazz Meets Poetry

July 7

Pro Jam Session w/ Lewis Nash

Brelby Theatre Company www.brelby.com; 623.282.2781

Thru July 21

Serving the Community Since 2002

Musical Instrument Museum

Disney’s Mary Poppins

The Star Spangled Girl

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July 10

July 6–22

Thru July 21

Spy Love You

Don Bluth Front Row Theatre www.donbluthfrontrowtheatre.com; 480.314.0841

Davell Crawford: Tribute to Fats Domino

Primus/Mastodon Comerica Theatre www.livenation.com

The Fixx

July 15

The Nash

July 11

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The Nash www.thenash.org; 602.795.0464

12 July 16

Foster the People Marquee Theatre www.luckymanonline.com; 480.829.1300

July 12

The Smashing Pumpkins

July 18

Gila River Arena www.ticketmaster.com; 800.745.3000

The Rocket 88s The Rhythm Room

July 12

July 18–29

Curley Taylor & Zydeco Trouble

Jack Rabbit and the Desert Tortoise

The Rhythm Room www.rhythmroom.com; 602.265.4842

The Great Arizona Puppet Theater www.azpuppets.org; 602.262.2050

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July 19

Jenny and the Mexicats Musical Instrument Museum

July 13

Rita Coolidge Musical Instrument Museum

July 13 – Aug. 12

Catch Me If You Can Arizona Broadway Theatre

July 14

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Spanish Harlem Orchestra Musical Instrument Museum

Photo: Marisa Gesualdi

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July 19

The Breeders Marquee Theatre www.luckymanonline.com


Talking Stick Resort Arena

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24 July 24–25

Django Festival Allstars

July 20

Chris Isaak

Musical Instrument Museum

Celebrity Theatre www.celebritytheatre.com; 602.267.1600, Ext. 1

Phoenix Mercury vs. Chicago Sky

July 25

Talking Stick Resort Arena

July 20

Emerging Artist Series: Jude Poorten The Nash

July 25

Belinda Carlisle, Modern English & Tony Lewis The Van Buren www.thevanburenphx.com; 480.659.1641

July 20

Maria Muldaur Musical Instrument Museum

July 20–22

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Chase Field

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July 26

Marc Cohn with The Blind Boys of Alabama Musical Instrument Museum

July 27

July 21

Pentatonix Ak-Chin Pavilion www.livenation.com

July 21

Phoenix Mercury vs. Minnesota Lynx Talking Stick Resort Arena

July 21

Jeff Beck Celebrity Theatre www.celebritytheatre.com; 602.267.1600

July 23

Dave Alvin and Jimmie Dale Gilmore with the Guilty Ones Musical Instrument Museum

A Night in Havana: Josiel Perez All-Stars The Nash

July 28

Billy Cobham and The Crosswinds Project

Serving the Community Since 2002

Arizona Diamondbacks vs. Colorado Rockies

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Arts & Entertainment

AROUND TOWN

July 19

Phoenix Mercury vs. Las Vegas Aces

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Mesa Arts Center www.mesaartscenter.com; 480.644.6500

July 30–31

Arizona Diamondbacks vs. Texas Rangers Chase Field

July 31

Phoenix Mercury vs. Seattle Storm Talking Stick Resort Arena

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Arts & Entertainment

Museum Explores Gender Inequality Through Art On the heels of the #MeToo movement and considering growing awareness of gender inequality in many contexts including art museums, Phoenix Art Museum presents In the Company of Women featuring approximately 50 works created by women from the Museum’s collection. Showcasing an array of styles and media, with works on view by Frida Kahlo, Georgia O’Keeffe, Faith Ringgold, Erica Deeman, Daniela Rossell, Cindy Sherman, Marguerite Zorach, and many others, this exhibition invites visitors to see these objects in a new light. In the Company of Women creates a new context for some of the Museum’s most iconic pieces, prompting conversations about gender inequality, the systematic exclusion of women from mainstream art circles, and the idea that artistic production must be understood in the context of society at large. The exhibition runs July 7 – August 12 in the Steele Gallery. A free preview night event will be held July 6 from 6–10pm. Phoenix Art Museum is located at 1625 North Central Avenue in Phoenix. For additional information, call 602.666.7104 or visit www.phxart.org.

WE LOVE OUR READERS JUNE WINNERS • A  pair of tickets to see the Arizona Diamondbacks take on the San Diego Padres in July at Chase Field: Pat Hill of New River • A  pair of tickets to see the Phoenix Mercury take on the Minnesota Lynx in July at Talking Stick Resort Arena: Pamela Siegel of Paradise Valley

Serving the Community Since 2002

TICKET GIVEAWAY – JULY CONTEST Enter online at news.CITYSunTimes.com/contests or complete the short survey form, indicate which event you would like to attend and mail to CITYSunTimes, 10645 North Tatum Boulevard, Suite 200-413, Phoenix, AZ 85028. Deadline to receive submissions is July 15.

Enter To Win! [ ] A  pair of tickets to see the Arizona Diamondbacks take on the Philadelphia Phillies, August 6 at Chase Field [ ] A  pair of tickets to see the Phoenix Mercury take on the Los Angeles Sparks August 12 at Talking Stick Resort Arena

Name ____________________________________________________________________________ Address __________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________

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Phone Number ____________________________________________________________________ E-Mail ____________________________________________________________________________ Do you receive CST at [

] your home or [

] pick up on newsstand?

Do you have children? [ ] Y or [ ] N Pets? [ ] Y or [

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Who is the primary reader of CST in your home? ______________________________________ What kind of advertising do you look for in newspapers? _______________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________

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SHOW US YOUR WINNING SMILE! Our April winner of two tickets to the Valley Youth Theatre production of Annie, Kim Howard (pictured here with daughter Carly), sent us this photo saying, “We scored fabulous tickets for the opening night of Annie! Thank you very much! Girlies night out!” | CST

Herberger Accepting Artist Applications For New Exhibit Arizona artists are invited to submit up to six pieces of art for consideration in Artist Inspirations, an exhibit to be held at the Herberger Theater Center (HTC) in March and April 2019. Celebrating what gives an artist inspiration, this exhibit will be held in conjunction with Center Dance Ensemble’s performance of Worlds of Wonder featuring: Creation, Light, Water, Earth, Flight and Man. Consider these elements when submitting images. Inspiration = to do or feel something, motivation, encouragement, imagination, originality, vision, muse, influence, lift, boost. Artists are selected to display and sell their work at the HTC through a blind jurying process, based on relevancy to the noted theme, originality and quality of execution. Original artwork through a variety of mediums and processes, including photography, two- and three-dimensional, monoprints, lithographs and giclée prints in limited edition, is accepted. A portion of art sales benefit the Herberger Theater’s Arts Education and Youth Outreach initiatives. Applications are open to artists residing in Arizona, who must be 18 years or older. To download the prospectus with detailed instructions and application fee, visit www.herbergertheater.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/ArtistInpirations-Call.pdf. Completed prospectus, application fee and required CD of art images must be postmarked or hand-delivered by September 21, 2018. For more information, contact Laurene Austin at laustin@herbergertheater.org or 602.254.7399, Ext. 105. The HTC Art Gallery is a self-funded exhibition program that promotes contemporary art by artists throughout Arizona. The Gallery, sponsored by Billie Jo and Judd Herberger, is open weekdays, 10am–5pm, during performances and by appointment. For additional information, visit www.herbergertheater. org/art_gallery. The Herberger Theater Center is a 501(c)(3) Arizona nonprofit organization that supports and fosters growth of the arts in Phoenix as the premier performance venue, arts incubator and advocate. Opened in 1989 and fully renovated in 2010, the Herberger Theater offers three theater venues, art gallery, plaza and rentable event space for a variety of community uses.


Annual Gathering of Cowboy Poets Set For August

poster by artist Steve Atkinson. Organizers of the Gathering believe in educating more about the authentic way of the cowboy how their poetry and music is developed. They feature free day sessions where attendees can meet cowboy poets and singers to enjoy stories about the colorful culture and history that celebrate the true American cowboy. “We really couldn’t do this large event without our hard-working

Serving the Community Since 2002

One of Prescott’s most popular events will take the stage at Yavapai College Performing Arts Center August 9–11. More than 40 authentic cowboy poets and singers will perform for two days and three nights to share their heritage and the culture of the American cowboy. Featured performers include Kevin Davis, Doris Daley, and Jean and Gary Prescott. The theme for this year’s gathering is “Nightcap” and features a

volunteers that have dedicated their time to bring this to Prescott for the past 31 years,” said the Arizona Cowboy Poets Gathering’s board president Joe Konkel. “The culture of the real American cowboy lives on stage here every year and it’s been an honor to bring this form of entertainment to locals and tourists alike.” The Arizona Cowboy Poets Gathering has maintained a standard that has been abandoned by most other gatherings: that of inviting men and women who are now or have been in the past a part of the working cowboy’s environment and workplace. It is respected by the cowboy poets as one of the best gatherings in the country because it helps maintain the true “working cowboy” culture and heritage. For complete event details, visit www.azcowboypoets.org.

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Destinations

Texas Welcomes Visitors To 2018 Route 66 Festival

Serving the Community Since 2002

It’s just 178 miles across but there is a lot to see on Historic Route 66 in the Texas Panhandle. Thousands are expected to do just that July 12–15, for the annual Route 66 Festival, this year hosted by the town of Shamrock with support from all the Texas towns up and down Historic Route 66. This festival has been held in cities up and down the “Mother Road.” It was held in Amarillo in 2011. Roadies will come from across the U.S. and around the world to bask in the marvels of Shamrock and the other Texas cities.

district on Sixth between Georgia and Western Streets with lots of original architecture, new clubs and restaurants and great antique and gallery shopping. The Big Texan Steak Ranch on the east side of town and Cadillac Ranch just west of town. • V ega is home to the Milburn-Price Culture Museum while Adrian is the midpoint of Route 66. The Midpoint Café (open April-October) is a great stopping point for roadies.

• S  hamrock is home to the U-Drop Inn, a beautiful classic gas station that was an inspiration for Ramone’s in the Disney movie CARS. The U-Drop is also home to Shamrock’s Visitor Center and Historic Route 66 Museum. • M  cLean is home to the Devil’s Rope and Route 66 Museum as well as the first Phillips 66 station in Texas. • Alanreed is home to an unrestored, but iconic, Phillips 66 Super Station. • Groom is home to the leaning water tower as well as the Cross at Groom. • Amarillo is the largest Texas city on Historic Route 66 and features a mile-long

• G  len Rio is a real ghost town on the TX/NM border. It is exit 0 off Interstate 40 and features the remnant of a First Motel/Last Motel in Texas sign. The festival is focused on Shamrock July 12–15, but all the towns expect lots of explorers along Route 66 before and after the festival. Admission may be charged at some festival events. Shamrock has over 600 hotel rooms, but they will be reserved quickly. Nineteen Amarillo hotels are offering special festival rates from July 10–17, giving visitors to Shamrock a few extra days to explore Amarillo’s Route 66. Rates cover all price points, from budget properties to full-service hotels. For a complete list of special rates, go to www.visitamarillo.com. Just mention the “Texas Welcomes The World Route 66 Festival” when making a reservation. All offers are subject to availability. For additional festival information, visit www.texaswelcomestheworld.com.

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ROAD TRIP!

Arizona is a beautiful state.

Advertise today so 80,000+ readers in the valley know where to road trip it!


Elegant Trogon by Dominic Sherony, CC BY-SA 2.0

“I started managing the park and when I learned the area and what folks are interested in, I did things to accommodate them,” she says. She has ponds, including a koi pond, and gardens on the property to encourage birdwatchers and birds to have a place of peace and respite. The area has historical significance that draws guests, also. Geronimo, of the Apache, is from the area and created his legend in and around the Chiricahua Mountains. Whether it is birding, astronomy, history, hiking or any of the other outdoor experiences one can have in the desert, Rusty’s accommodates them all. Add in a weekly potluck, friendly staff and spotless grounds and it is easy to feel at home. Rusty’s RV Ranch is located at 854 State Highway 80, Rodeo, New Mexico. For information, call 575.557.2526, send an email to info@rustysrvranch. com or visit www.rustysrvranch.com.

Serving the Community Since 2002

“Sometimes when people take pictures of our place, it looks empty because the lots are so big,” says Rusty Ahles, “and we have big lots, so people feel like they are at home.” Ahles, and husband Tim, own Rusty’s RV Ranch in Rodeo, New Mexico, which is about as ‘middle of nowhere’ as one can get. The unincorporated town has a population of 101 and it is in Hidalgo County, the boot-heel of New Mexico. This extremely rural place is exactly why the Ahles sell out in peak seasons and is quite popular with select groups of RVers. “We fly the Canadian flag also because we get a lot of snowbirds from up there,” Rusty says. Beyond snowbirds, Rusty’s is a famous spot for birdwatchers, hunters, as well as amateur astronomers. “This is a dark sky location,” Rusty says. Astronomers who attend the park are not taking pictures of Orion’s Belt or things like that. “They are taking pictures of other galaxies.” Rodeo is 50 miles away from any significant population, resulting in a prime spot to view the stars. Bird watching is another draw to Rusty’s RV Ranch. “We have over 400 species of birds that can be seen near the ranch,” Rusty says. That is one-third of the bird species found in the United States. The Chiricahua Mountains, which surround the ranch, are ranked on every top 10 list for birding destinations in the United States. Of the many birds known to frequent the area, one of the most unique is the Elegant Trogon. It is a pretty bird, with a beautiful red breast, that is said to be a bit easy to watch in the environment, as it will stay perched in one spot for a few minutes. Other birds such as orioles, owls, tanagers, hummingbirds and many more come through Rusty’s.

Destinations

Rusty’s RV Ranch – A Wide-Open Desert Home

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Destinations

Courtesy San Diego County Fair

Cook Up A Summer Escape To San Diego

Serving the Community Since 2002

Tiki Oasis attendees; Photo: Mitch Tobias

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As Arizona cranks the heat up to full broil, and summer vacation cabin fever begins to simmer, Valley families may be looking for some quick relief. With a drive time of just over five hours, or less than an hour by air, San Diego has the perfect recipe for a quick, summertime family escape. From parks and gardens to festivals and performing arts; delicious new dining to tiki-tastic gatherings (and, oh yeah, the beach!), San Diego has a flavor to satisfy most appetites. Annual Festivals July 19-22, San Diego becomes the center of the pop culture universe during Comic-Con International (www.comic-con.org), America’s longest continuously-run comics and popular arts convention. August 8-12, the largest and longest-running tiki gathering in the world, Tiki Oasis (www.tikioasis. com), returns to Mission Valley. Enjoy a tiki-tastic art and fashion marketplace, live tropical-jazz music, go-go dancers, a classic car show, pool parties and more.

Perennial Favorites Walkabout Australia at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park (www. sdzsafaripark.org) will transport visitors to a land featuring a walkthrough exhibit teeming with kangaroos, grasslands where wombats frolic, and forests filled with kookaburras and cassowaries. Experience wildlife from the Land Down Under and come face-to-face with some of the most mysterious animals on Earth. Something New In March, Little Italy’s (www. littleitalysd.com) Piazza della Famiglia opened as a central public gathering place to host farmers’ markets, concerts, cultural events and more in the heart of this San Diego neighborhood. Within the plaza space, the Little Italy Food Hall will open in summer 2018. Arriving with it will be six locallydriven food stations, a mobile outdoor chefs’ area featuring pop-up cooking demonstrations See Summer Escape, page 47


Photo Courtesy San Diego Urban Adventure Tours

Summer Escape, continued from page 46 and a full bar program complete with local beers and craft cocktails. Opened in June, TownePlace Suites San Diego Downtown (www. marriott.com) is a new, pet-friendly hotel with 98 suites featuring king or two queen beds, full kitchens and separate living/working and sleeping areas. The hotel is also the first hotel in downtown San Diego to offer the Guest Service Robot Butler, which can deliver guest items to rooms 24 hours a day. In summer 2018, chef Claudette Zepeda-Wilkins will open  El Jardin restaurant at San Diego’s Liberty Station (www. eljardinrestaurantbar.com; www. libertystation.com), a dining and arts district in the Point Loma neighborhood. El Jardín features Zepeda’s contemporary approach to regional Mexican cuisine alongside an extensive selection of tequila and mezcal.

Scenic Tours In March, Out of the Ordinary Group and Team Adventures  (www. groupadventures.com) unveiled a “5 Bridges Walking Tour,” a guided walk through the neighborhoods of Balboa Park that includes viewing historic homes, footbridges over canyons filled with wildflowers, cacti, palm trees and bamboo forests. The company offers public and private options for booking this and other tours.  For additional information on things to do and places to stay, visit www.sandiego.org.

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Serving the Community Since 2002

Old Town Urban Adventure San Diego tours; Courtesy R Jordan Photography

Arts Scene The Old Globe (www.theoldglobe. org) theater in Balboa Park opened its 2018 summer season with Shakespearean classic The Tempest (through July 22) and will end the season with Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing (Aug. 12–Sept. 16). From July 2–Aug. 12, The Old Globe will show the U.S. premiere of Dr. Seuss’s The Lorax. The criticallyacclaimed and Olivier Awardnominated production is a musical event the entire family can enjoy.

Destinations

Something Brew San Diego’s first waterfront tasting room, Eppig Brewery’s Waterfront Biergarten (www.eppigbrewing. com), opened April 21, bringing the views and brews of the craft beer scene to Shelter Island. Perfectly situated with an expansive 2,000-square-foot outdoor patio to take in scenic views of the marina and downtown skyline, the site features 20 taps serving Eppig Brewing beers and a variety of beerfriendly snacks.

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Two Dogs Surfing; Courtesy Dale Porter, Surf Dog Competition

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A Major Health Problem In The United States

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Most people have an awareness that glaucoma can lead to loss of vision, and that diabetes can damage the back of our eyes. However, there is a disease that is more prevalent than glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy combined. It is estimated that this disease will affect about 7 percent of the population above the age of 40, more than 10 percent aged 60 or more, and about 1 in 3 people aged 75 or older! This disease? Macular Degeneration (ARMD). Deposits in the sensitive part of our retina responsible for our sharp, central vision, will gradually damage the macular area. This could lead to significant or total loss of our central vision, leaving the patient with only blurry peripheral vision to function. Tasks like reading, driving and watching TV can be severely impaired. Read the rest of “A Major Health Problem In The United States” online now.

MELANIE DROZ SHAWCROFT HER Certified

Watch Out: I’m On Weight Watchers 2018 Mitsubishi Outlander 2.4 Sel S-AWC Well, I am officially a member of Weight Watchers. After years of looking for the right program, I think I have finally found it. I have kicked off my journey in an eight-way power adjustable leather, heated driver’s seat behind the convenient steering wheel with controls of the 2018 Mitsubishi Outlander, which has encouraged me to get active and enjoy the ride — the car and my life. I am hoping once I am successful on Weight Watchers, I won’t need the extra room; however, with the third-row seating and an easy fold-down second and third row, the Outlander offers a ton of space for family and friends or healthy groceries, gym equipment, workout gear… The power remote liftgate and cargo light make it easy to throw my stuff in the back after a late-night workout.

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ON CITY BLACK CANY

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OCTOBER

2017

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More Grilled fall festival ober 20-29, than 650 Steward t’s Modern ral, ind Garden will Oct igh a-k Cor n ’s twr -ofope old Car is volunteers prov d, Har ission, one ages, and w, talents to help ide their time the many new Mexican Foo This free adm season for all , Indigo Cro residents and visito and experience El Encanto ing Donkey magical the Halloween garden and , der rs ir of expe the ny’s the nt learn Wan rienc Jon in ugh & tme from e, enjoy and ng the Sonoran Dese Local enchan Addiction to stroll thro Sans Souci, ed and frolicki rt on the 30,580-ac m will carve s are invited one of the largest Bakery, Le ully imagin re Preserve — , The Horny 9pm. Visitor ne and his tea urban preserves racters, artf It’s a Divine ain View Pub o cacti, in the nation. pkins, Villafa pumpkin cha Conservancy volu mble Saguar Café, Mount , the Village playful pum rese ion tto mischievous t the Fus Gro to tha n ntee n ks t. rs serve as trailh tan e. In additio trails, perform trail Cakes, Z’s Asia lit by LED ligh ead hosts, patro displayed in , The City garden hom Toad, Small l served and maintenance proje servation and ales, Venues tion for pre pkin, carved cts, lead guided pkin faces pre Tukees Tam conduct education rket, The hikes, 10 3-D pum -pound pum a pickling solu Coffee Shop, al programs Arizon the 400o The Meat Ma to take immersed in Edible to U BBQ, and other activ ortunities isa Tacdisp Fes lay for t visitorscar sculpted and ities in the cago Dogs, Creamer, Q r photo opp on Chi , gs ula e’s vin een pop Mik low st Hal mo Preserve. The Patio Grill, Burritoholics, ek will create new One of the kend before y, s Cre McD wee ver ater e owel car Tre the r l up-clos The himself m of fou Sonoran Conserva with them research angements, by Villafane Villafane’s tea Arructs ncy Field g cond n to carve re. carvinarm, and madina ny mo family photos. 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There tume contest competition, feathered or cudd nsored by e The Cro interact with crawling, slith ds that spea are recomme oktacular cos lud n pie eating tastings spo ly frien kers ering, som19) 5–9pm, inc ch, pumpki an adult spo etim local craft shaded amp , h pat and a es ; ent wit bring n” hithe ng and inm pki t alon er aters alo rke g. The talks take tob with benc kids of enterta opt a Pum onh(Oc seati nal the Brow harvest ma place in ng at the Gateway lude the “Ad n’s Ranc er 18); Fosters ks and autum crafts, a new Trailhead Amphithe activities inc Amp ). Kings (Octobh Trailhead g, arts and ry food truc e ater and (both nightshitheater. They with culina visitr at 3pm on face paintin na and CanSundays durin g the Distric coolt er the .6636 or occu mon e Bella Don k mos corn maze, Peaks along .488 r ths, t Roc tiqu of 480 the and Fou bou g fi l last rst take a leisurely walkrmation, call and third for 45 minutes to featurin k with loca 5pm. one hour. If time For info along the near.by acce beer garden Town will wor Easy street at permits, guests can ssible, interpreti loween, the ecreek.com .488.3686. ng Carefree’s Hal 480 alo fcav Upco ve On nt trails call steo ts. ming eve or befo trea events include re or after the talk. www.ta Treat” rden.com os “Southwest Wild a “Trunk or pumpkinga of Villafane Studi life Mammals,” Native and Urba to coordinate Photo courtesy t www.carefree Octo n visi Wild , ber life ails 22; “Center for Rept det iles,” November For event 19; and “Geology, 5; “Wild at Hear ” December 3. Chec t Birds,” Novembe Artoberfest in k the Family Sono r the Conservancy ran Sundays sche Williams website at www dule on .mcdowellsonoran infor mati 29. on, call 480.998.79 .org for updates. tober 20 71. For more Garden, Oc

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STEPHEN COHEN, O.D.

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Flavor Savor Local

The Beauty In A Smile She sat there. He was sitting across, mindlessly watching the world go by. He glanced at her, a twinkle in her eye caught his. She smiled. He smiled…and a new relationship blossomed. Sounds like the beginning of a romance novel. Right? Maybe it’s the way human interactions begin. Does everyone have to be “top of the hill?” Does every person have to be superior to every other one? Does equality only count versus others? Maybe, we are all human, all created in the image of the same Creator, all defined by HOW we act, not what we look like, or how we speak, or not.

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Community, Arts, Local Topics, mpkin

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Taste All That Ar izona Has To Offer Save the

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date for Arizona

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y Russell; Courtesy

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Fall Fest

The Arizona Fall Fest, a free and family-friendly celeb things uniquely ration of all Arizona, will be hosted at Margaret Phoenix, Saturday T. Hance Park in , November 4, from 10am–4pm. Form the Certified Loca erly known as l Fall Festival, this will be the 13th hosted by Local annual festival First Arizona. Read the full story on page 13.

ted Pumpkin Gard

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North Valley July 2018 Issue of CITYSunTimes  

CITYSunTimes is a locally owned community publication now in its 16th year, serving over 80,000 readers in the North Valley. CST offers pers...

North Valley July 2018 Issue of CITYSunTimes  

CITYSunTimes is a locally owned community publication now in its 16th year, serving over 80,000 readers in the North Valley. CST offers pers...

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