Page 1

Carefree/Cave Creek

TAKE ONE

Community News Excellence Since 2002

news.CITYSunTimes.com

NORTHEAST PHOENIX

CAVE CREEK

BLACK CANYON CITY

41

By Kathryn M. Miller

Arizona Restaurant Week

45

Family Campout Campout Family Weekends Weekends

FOUNTAIN HILLS

ANTHEM

MAY 2019

Keep Kids Safe Around Water

Around Town: Rent

50

CAREFREE

ummer is just around the corner and with it comes graduation parties, family get-togethers, holiday barbecues and, finally, back-to-school activities, and that means that distractions abound. When a swimming pool is added to the mix, summer fun can turn deadly — especially for young children. Drowning is the leading cause of unintentional death in Arizona for children age 4 and under, generally in pool-related incidents; it is the second leading cause of unintentional death for children under the age of 12; and nationally, three children die each day as a result of drowning. May is National Water Safety Month and with summer vacation on the horizon it the perfect time to raise awareness about how to be safe around water, and the Valley of the Sun YMCA (Y) is leading the way. “In Arizona, the Valley of the Sun YMCA is known as the most accessible community resource to prevent drowning,” said Jackie Gizzi, executive director of Leadership Development & Risk Management at the Y. “Our free swim lessons program and Water Watcher tags give us the ability to teach more children and adults in the Valley the importance of being safe around water.” The Y offers these top three water safety recommendations:

3 Summertime Tips

Swim lessons.

Children who have formal swim lessons are 88 percent less likely to have a drowning incident. The Y says that drowning can happen nearly anywhere with standing water but encourages parents and caregivers not to keep children sidelined. Rather, equip them with the tools they need to be confident in and around water. Summer water safety programs at the Y include swim lessons (6 months to adults) and swim team (5–18 years old). They also offer a year-round member benefit of free swim lessons for children 6 months to 36 months. In addition, as part of National Water Safety Month, the Y will offer two weeks of free swim lessons to the first 2,000 registrants at 13 Valley of the Sun YMCA branches the week of May 13–23. Visit www.valleyymca.org.

Parent supervision.

The importance of having an adult designated to keep a lookout when children are in and around water cannot be overstated. And while drowning can happen any time of the year, June through August is peak time for drowning in Arizona. One safety tool, especially for those summertime parties and outings, is a designated “water watcher” — the Y is distributing 13,000 Water Watcher tags to Valley residents.

Barriers.

Children are naturally curious, and a backyard swimming pool can be an attractive draw. A physical barrier to pool access is a first line of defense against drowning. In addition to a pool fence, a door alarm can add an extra layer of access prevention. Beyond swim lessons, supervision and barriers, parents can level-up their water safety game with CPR classes. The American Red Cross (www.redcross.org) offers CPR classes around the Valley. For additional tips and resources, visit www.ymca.net/watersafety, www.apsp.org/nwsm or www.childrensafetyzone.com. | CST

POSTAL CUSTOMER

SCOTTSDALE

COURTESY OF CITYSunTimes


2

5.19

Serving the Community Since 2002


Serving the Community Since 2002

3

5.19


4

5.19


Serving the Community Since 2002

5

5.19


INDEX

It’s Time We All Became Material Girls “…as long as the sun still shines and people still can plan and plant, think and do, we can, if we bother to try, find ways to provide for ourselves without diminishing the world.”

EDITOR’S PICKS Around Town: Keb’ Mo’

41

―Michael Pollan, The Omnivore’s Dilemma

Do you think money grows on trees? How many kids have heard this question from their parents? There is always the latest something-or-other to tempt us to spend our money. The “must have,” “must see,” “must do,” list that we are assured we need if we want to “keep up.” But fashion — whether in apparel, gadgets or entertainment — is a moving target and what is “in” today will be decidedly Carefree Public démodé tomorrow; definitely not a sustainable way to live. Gardens Day In the book Plentitude by Juliet B. Schor, the argument is made that true wealth is the ability to increase our personal time, “self-provision” by learning to make, grow or do things for oneself and be environmentally aware in our consumption. Schor quotes Raymond Williams: “Our problem isn’t that we are too materialistic; it’s that we’re not materialistic enough. We devalue the material world by excessive acquisition and discard of products.” This Mother’s Day has me thinking about my mom and those who came before her — a long line of women who grew, built, cooked and sewed — hard working women who knew what it was to do more with less. But they didn’t just grow food; they grew flowers too. They may have learned to sew for practical reasons (my grandmother had 12 children!) but they also made beautiful, heirloom crafts. They were artists and musicians and knew how to make the world more beautiful. They made time for family and valued knowledge — they lived very rich lives. I think that even if they had more monetary wealth, they would still self-provision — they lived close to the earth and knew the cost of what came out of it. There is a trend today in resale boutiques, reuse and repurposing — I think that it is a beautiful thing. We need to get out of the mindset of a disposable world and focus more on quality vs. quantity; style vs. fashion. It’s not about wearing homespun, but reconnecting with homespun values. Happy Mother’s Day, Mom, and thanks, to you and all of those generations past — there is still a lot we can learn from material girls like you. Celebrate Arizona Wines Until next month, all my best,

Serving the Community Since 2002

Photo: K. Miller

21

6

5.19

51

Sonoita Vineyards; Photo courtesy of Arizona Office of Tourism

Kathryn M. Miller, Editor-in-Chief kathryn@CITYSunTimes.com Editorial originally ran in the May 2011 issue of CITYSunTimes

inside this issue

Publisher Lorrie Pomeroy Editor-in-Chief Kathryn M. Miller Creative Director Jenifer Lee Assistant to the Publisher Darlene Keberle Columnists Stephen Cohen, O.D. Cathy Droz Barbara Kaplan Rabbi Robert Kravitz Allen Nohre James Roberts Pastor Paul Witkop Contributors Cave Creek Mayor Ernie Bunch Carefree Vice Mayor John Crane Dr. John Kriekard Nicole Nohre Julia Droz Serafine Account Representatives Bob Hesselgesser Susan Pine Bulk Distribution Mark Feinberg

10645 N. Tatum Blvd., Suite 200-413 Phoenix, AZ 85028 Phone: 480.922.8732 Fax: 480.922.8731 E-mail: info@CITYSunTimes.com news.CITYSunTimes.com

North Valley cover photo: Slide Rock State Park; Photo: Christopher Passero, courtesy of Arizona Office of Tourism

COMMUNITY ... 38

CITYSunTimes is a locally owned community publication now in its 17th year, serving over 80,000 readers in the North Valley. CST offers personalized news each month to Scottsdale, Paradise Valley, North Phoenix, Carefree and Cave Creek. CST is mailed to area homes and businesses and is available for free pick up at locations in Paradise Valley, North Scottsdale, North Phoenix, Carefree, Cave Creek, Anthem, Black Canyon City, New River and Fountain Hills.

YOUR COMMUNITY NEWS

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT ... 40 Around Town

Scottsdale ... 7

YOUTH & EDUCATION ... 44

North Phoenix ... 13

Fountain Hills ... 20

Carefree ... 21

Cave Creek ... 29

DESTINATIONS ... 48

Subscriptions by Mail: $50/year. Remit to “Subscriptions” at CITYSunTimes.

Anthem ... 37

CITYSERVICES ... 52

Visit us online at news.CITYSunTimes.com for editorial and advertising guidelines and standards.

CITYSunTimes is a proud member of:

FOOD & WINE ... 45 HEALTH & WELLNESS ... 46

Editorial deadline: The first of the month preceding publication. Submit materials to news@CITYSunTimes.com. Advertising deadline: The 15th of the month preceding publication. Submit materials to advertise@CITYSunTimes.com. Corrections: Submit via e-mail corrections@CITYSunTimes.com.

to

Published by Indigo Publishing, Inc., monthly. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part is prohibited without the express written permission of the publisher.


alley residents are invited to enjoy free concerts every Sunday evening, 7:30–9pm, through June 30 at McCormick-Stillman Railroad Park. With a variety of local bands, and recently recognized as one of the best live music venues in Arizona by Best of American Towns, Sunday’s at The Railroad Park are the place to be in Scottsdale this summer. With classic rock, retro 80s, country, rhythm and blues and retro 90s, there is a little something for everyone. Bring a blanket or chair and relax in the park.

Food is available for purchase. The park’s iconic steam engines pull the Paradise & Pacific Railroad. Train and carousel rides are $2. Children 2 and under ride free with a paying adult. May performers include Diamond in the Rough (May 5), Mogollon (May 12), Rock Lobster (May 19) and The Real Thing (May 26). McCormick-Stillman Railroad Park is located at 7301 East Indian Bend Road in Scottsdale. For additional information, call 480.312.2312 or visit www.therailroadpark.com.

Synchronized Swim Team to Hold Annual Water Show

Serving the Community Since 2002

Understanding the complicated cycle of domestic violence and the challenges facing victims trying to flee abusive relationships, the Scottsdale City Court and Chrysalis have teamed up to make getting an order of protection more accessible. The pilot program, which began April 15, will allow victims housed at Chrysalis’ emergency shelter to obtain protective orders using FaceTime from the safety of the shelter. “It’s a unique model provided within our four walls,” says Chrysalis president and CEO Patricia Klahr, who noted that safety concerns are common. “An advocate is right there. It gives an opportunity to go through the process without the additional trauma a court appearance sometimes brings,” she adds. “And more importantly, it gives choices to victims because they understand their situation better than anyone else.” It’s also fast. The ability to appear before a judge within hours, using FaceTime from the shelter, makes it possible to get an order of protection quickly. The City says that leaving an abuser can be the most dangerous time for a victim of domestic violence, and it’s common for an abuser to become even more angry, violent and hostile after they become aware that their victim has filed for legal protection. In addition to fear and other emotional trauma, sometimes a victim’s physical injuries or lack of transportation make it difficult to appear in court — all factors leading Scottsdale City Court staff to think outside the box and consider a new use of technology to assist this vulnerable population. The court currently averages approximately 900 protective order filings per year. “Our judges and court staff are committed to programs that provide better access to the court,” says Scottsdale Associate City Judge Statia Hendrix. “With the assistance of our community partner, this pilot creates a safe and supportive alternative for victims who petition the court for a protective order.” Klahr agrees, noting that when one in four women and one in seven men experience domestic violence in their lifetimes, “the stakes are high.” For more information, visit www.scottsdaleaz. gov/court or www.noabuse.org. Call Chrysalis at 602.944.4999.

Rock and Roll at the Railroad Park Photo courtesy of Experience Scottsdale

Court Pilot Program Offers Safety, Options to Domestic Violence Victims

7

Scottsdale Synchro Arizona (SAZ) will hold its annual water show at the McDowell Mountain Ranch Aquatic Center May 18 at 6pm. Doors open at 5:30pm, at which time a silent auction will be held. Scottsdale Synchro Arizona is a nonprofit synchronized swim team for youth ages 6–18 and is sponsored by the City of Scottsdale. SAZ is a competitive, nationally-ranked team. McDowell Mountain Ranch Aquatic Center is located at 15525 North Thompson Peak Parkway in Scottsdale. For information, visit www.scottsdalesynchro.org.

5.19


Scottsdale Serving the Community Since 2002

8

5.19

The Promenade Presents Date Night ‘Drive-In’ Movies

The Promenade, an open-air shopping center in North Scottsdale, will host a series of Date Night Drive-in movie nights and block parties every Friday night in May. Everyone is invited to join the Block Party with food tastings, raffles and music beginning at 7pm until the movie screening at 8pm. While the movies are free, a suggested donation of canned food items is requested to benefit the Harvest Compassion Center. “This year’s movie nights at The Promenade are curated for adults to enjoy a fabulous night out under the summer sky. Guests are invited to enjoy the Block Party or dine at one of the fine restaurants at the property prior to the screening of the movie. The curated movie set includes Oscar winning films like Bohemian

Rhapsody and A Star is Born along with classic favorites like Pretty Woman and Sleepless in Seattle,” said Rishika Mahtani, marketing manager, ShopCore Properties. The movies include Oscarwinning new releases and classic favorites, which are sure to incite romance as guests settle in on their cozy blankets and chairs to enjoy a romantic atmosphere and great company: May 3: Bohemian Rhapsody May 10: A Star is Born May 17: Pretty Woman May 24: Sleepless in Seattle May 31: When Harry Met Sally The movies will be shown near the Golden Spoon parking lot at The Promenade, 16243 North Scottsdale Road. For more information, visit  www.scottsdalepromenade.com.

Perk Up Mom this Mother’s Day Instead of having Mom make breakfast this Mother’s Day (or dirtying the kitchen making it for her), why not let Perk Eatery in Scottsdale do the cooking? Perk is spoiling moms Sunday, May 12, with $5 “MOMosas” and Chocolate Hazelnut French Toast topped with fresh berries for just $15 all day long. So, Mom can sleep in and still get a taste of this scrumptious special. Visit Perk Eatery Sunday, May 12, 6:30am–3pm, at 6501 East Greenway Parkway, Suite 159, in Scottsdale. For additional information, call 480.998.6026 or visit www.perkeatery.com. Photo: Pauline Martinez


Scottsdale

Discover Flavors of Summer at Arts Fundraiser Serving the Community Since 2002

The Art of Wine and Tastes of Summer, presented by AJ’s Fine Foods, offers an opportunity to discover new wines with friends in a fun, entertaining setting while supporting the arts. The event takes place Saturday, May 18, 2–4:30pm, at Scottsdale Center for the Performing Arts. Guests will taste 40 quality wines, all personally rated and selected by AJ’s cellar masters, who will be available to provide their expert recommendations for wine and food pairings. Tastings will be complemented with gourmet specialties from AJ’s, including artisan breads and cheeses, shrimp cocktail, sushi, delectable sweets and more. Guests will enjoy live music and a silent auction offering wines and other items from AJ’s and its partners. Event proceeds benefit the dynamic and diverse programs of Scottsdale Arts and its branches, Scottsdale Center for the Performing Arts, Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art (SMoCA), Scottsdale Public Art and Scottsdale Arts Education & Outreach. Ticket prices begin at $40. Scottsdale Arts members receive a discount on event tickets. VIP package is available. To learn more, visit www. scottsdalearts.org and click on the “Calendar” link or call 480.499.8587.

9

5.19


Scottsdale

ADVERTORIAL

FREE SEMINAR What should be on EVERY vacation checklist?

Serving the Community Since 2002

e t a t E s la n Pview Re

10

Thursday, May 23 • 6-7pm In less than an hour learn why: • Your family and you can be properly cared for in case of incapacity or death • Estate Planning is NOT just for the Rich or Old • The State has a plan if you die without a will, but it may not be what you want • There are EASY, AFFORDABLE solutions for your estate Let us know you will be there! Reserve your seat! www.libbybanks.com/events MESQUITE LIBRARY 4525 E. Paradise Village Parkway North Phoenix, AZ 85032

5.19

Libby@LibbyBanks.com 602.375.6752 www.LibbyBanks.com

Celebrate ‘Festa della Mamma’ at Marcellino Ristorante When Americans celebrate Mother’s Day Sunday, May 12, so too will Italians celebrate “Festa della Mamma.” For Chef Marcellino Verzino and his wife, Sima, owners of Marcellino Ristorante in Old Town Scottsdale, the day takes on a very special meaning since Chef Marcellino’s passion for cooking started with his mother and other maternal figures in his family. “Chef grew up on a farm in the Hand-crafted Porcini-infused fettuccine Campania region of Italy where his mother, grandmother and aunts taught him how to create delicious meals using fresh ingredients. He lived the farm to table life long before it became popular,” Sima Verzino said. “In Italy, our mothers are respected all year-long, but Festa della Mamma is quite a celebration, and authentic Italian cuisine is a big part of that!” Families celebrating Mother’s Day can expect a similar experience Tiramisu at Marcellino Ristorante May 12. The fine dining restaurant will serve lunch from noon to 3pm and dinner 4–9 pm. Reservations are requested since indoor and outside patio seating fills up quickly. Mother’s Day is the only day of the year that the restaurant provides a special children’s menu, and guests coming for dinner will be treated to a live musical performance by Monte Procopio starting at 5:30pm. Known as the “Velvet Voice,” Procopio performs regularly at the restaurant on Saturday nights. He will showcase classic songs of the old masters and smash hits from contemporary crooners. In addition to the normal menu, the restaurant will offer an “All Day Special for Mom” of hand-crafted Porcini-infused fettuccine with chunks of fresh lobster, shiitake mushrooms and drizzles of earthy white truffle oil for $40. Mom will also enjoy Chef Marcellino’s complimentary tiramisu. Marcellino Ristorante is located at 7114 East Stetson Drive in Scottsdale. The fine dining restaurant is open for lunch Tuesday through Sunday from noon to 3pm and for dinner nightly, Monday through Thursday, 4–10pm; Friday and Saturday 4–11pm; and Sunday 4–9pm. Reservations are suggested. For more information, call 480.990.9500 or visit www.marcellinoristorante.com.


Scottsdale

Cold Beers & Cheeseburgers at Pima Crossing to Open in September

Serving the Community Since 2002

Square One Concepts, Inc. continues to expand its “Neighborhood Burger Joint” as Cold Beers & Cheeseburgers readies three new locations by first quarter 2020, one of which is coming to Scottsdale. The Pima Crossing location is expected to open in September of this year at 8624 East Shea Boulevard. Highlights of the new location include a signature indoor/outdoor bar, leather booths, 55 HD flat The All American Burger screen TVs and state-of-the-art sounds system. In the meantime, Valley diners can visit multiple locations around town featuring happy hour 3–6pm, Monday–Friday, offering $3 domestics, $4 Four Peaks pints, $6.50 select appetizers and $8.50 All-American Burger accompanied with fries or chips. Cold Beers & Cheeseburgers also regularly features deals such as: • Monday — Mac Daddy Monday. All day, $13.50 unlimited toppings on MMMac & Cheese • T  uesday — Cantastic Tuesday. All day, $3 any canned beer and half-off bottles of wine • W  ednesday — Pimp Your Burger. All day, $13.50 with unlimited toppings • E  very Day — Ice Cold Beer Buckets. “Buy 6, Save $6;” “Buy 12, Save $12.” Fans can mix and match from a selection of 100 canned and bottled beers. For information, visit www.coldbeers.com. Photos: J. Martin Harris Photography

Vanilla & Chocolate Sundae – We want in on this! ~CST

Chamber to Hold History Hall of Fame Induction Area residents are invited to join the Scottsdale Area Chamber of Commerce and the Past Presidents Council in honoring the people and organizations who have contributed to the legacy of making the City of Scottsdale one of the “best cities to live” in the nation. Both Chamber members and guests are welcome to attend the 26th Annual History Hall of Fame, Thursday, May 9. A cocktail reception will be held 6–7pm, followed by the program, 7–9pm. The 2019 inductees include Ken Harder, Jeff Meyer, Bob and Renee Parsons, Jim Wellington, the Salt River Pima Maricopa Indian Community and Sugar Bowl restaurant/ice cream parlor. The event will take place at The Scottsdale Resort at McCormick Ranch, 7700 East McCormick Parkway in Scottsdale. Tickets cost $90 per person, or $900 for a table of 10. A portion of the proceeds benefit the Scottsdale Historical Society and its Little Red Schoolhouse. For information, call 480.355.2700 or visit www.scottsdalechamber.com.

It makes sense to get your company name, logo and service known in your community.

11

You see us. They will see you. 480.922.8732 | advertise@CITYSunTimes.com

5.19


Scottsdale

Cullum Introduces New Custom Golf Estates Newly awarded “National Custom Home Builder of Year,” Cullum Homes announced that construction has begun, and sales have started for The Village at Seven Desert Mountain. Built directly on two golf courses at the brand new Seven Desert Mountain community and named for the seventh private course in this exclusive community, Cullum is offering 33 top-tier custom golf estates. High-end amenities and options include guest casitas, Wolf Sub Zero appliance packages and oversized garages to accommodate up to seven cars. Cullum will also feature its signature one-of-a-kind Car Bar with a golf twist. An optional “19th Hole” basement entertainment zone, complete with indoor golf simulator, glass-enclosed collector car showroom, theater area and wet bar is available. Collaborating on the contemporary and modern design is architect Drewett Works. Cullum’s golf estates are available in

one- and two-story options. The homes will range in size from approximately 3,304–6,500 square feet with prices starting at $1,995,000. All but five of Cullum’s 33-custom golf estates in The Village at Seven Desert Mountain are located on the golf course. The homes are inside the 90-acre community, which is just to the west of the existing main gate on Cave Creek Road. The entire Seven Desert Mountain community will feature 190 homes designed around a par 54, 18-hole golf course and new clubhouse. The course, which opened April 23, is one of only two private par 54-rated courses in the United States and is expected to be a significant draw for Desert Mountain. “We are so thrilled to have finally broken ground on our first home in the Village at Seven Desert Mountain,” said Cullum Homes founder and president Rod Cullum. “We couldn’t have asked for a better

backdrop than to be right on this uniquely designed No. 7 golf course. Between the tremendous views of the nearby mountains and the course, it is just a perfect synergy to showcase our spectacularly modern and contemporary homes and it really embodies what Desert Mountain living is all about.” Homeowners at Seven Desert Mountain will become either a lifestyle or equity golf member at Desert Mountain, (subject to Desert Mountain membership approval) gaining access to its worldclass amenities including its newly renovated Sonoran Spa and Fitness Center, tennis complex, miles of private hiking and biking trails, six additional private championship golf courses, distinctive clubhouses and restaurants. For more information on The Village at Seven Desert Mountain visit www.cullumhomes.com and click on the “Homes” link.

Serving the Community Since 2002

DPC Opens Office at B7|BLOCK 7000

12

5.19

DPC Companies, a privately held real estate firm specializing in the acquisition and development of commercial property in Colorado, Arizona and the Rocky Mountain Region, announced the opening of a Phoenix office at 7000 East Shea Boulevard, the site of DPC’s redevelopment B7|BLOCK 7000. Jerry Noble, who was tapped to lead and manage the Phoenix office, joins DPC with 24 years of experience as a broker in the Arizona market. “DPC has developed, owned and managed properties in Arizona for the last 15 years, and our redevelopment at BLOCK 7000 presented the perfect opportunity to open a dedicated office here,” said Chris King CEO and president of DPC. “We are excited to have Jerry, a long-time veteran in the Phoenix market, join our team and continue to grow and diversify our portfolio of Jerry Noble commercial buildings in Phoenix and the Western U.S.” Noble joins DPC with more than two decades of experience as a former Phoenix city leader for Cushman and Wakefield and as an agency broker, helping manage a leasing portfolio of approximately six million square feet. During his brokerage career, he completed more than 1,600 lease and sales transactions totaling more than $1 billion in consideration. He also worked on several notable new developments, including Max at Kierland, The Scottsdale Quarter and Ascend at Chandler Airport. For more information about DPC’s holdings, visit www.dpccompanies.com.

news.CITYSunTimes.com


Wagyu Snake River Farms Striploin with Main Lobster Risotto

Phoenix Raises Minimum Pay for Employees to Provide Livable Wage New $15 minimum wage will take effect for full-time employees in May

New T. Cook’s Chef Brings California Sensibility, Fresh Approach to Mediterranean Fare Valley foodies have a whole new reason to visit the iconic T. Cook’s now that Chef Alex Robinson has taken over as executive chef, bringing with him an exciting take on Mediterranean cuisine that combines his California sensibility with French techniques. At 33, Robinson has worked in some of the country’s best five-star resort kitchens including The RitzCarlton Laguna Niguel, The Ritz-Carlton Chicago, Four Season Resort Jackson Hole, Four Seasons Chef Alex Robinson Hotel Denver, Four Seasons Hotel Boston and Four Seasons Resort Scottsdale at Troon North. “I want to push the boundaries at T. Cook’s and create inspired dishes where every element on the plate, even the garnish, is interesting, compelling and exceptional,” said Chef Alex. “T. Cook’s was always meant to be a neighborhood restaurant, not just for special occasions, and with every visit, I want to compel guests to come back and explore even Herbed Crusted more of the menu. For our new Sea Bass summer dishes, you’ll see more seafood options, local ingredients that support our Arizona farmers and nearly 80 percent of the menu is naturally gluten free. Expect See T. Cook’s Chef, page 15

Serving the Community Since 2002

To provide a livable wage to all the City’s full-time employees the Phoenix City Council, under the leadership of newly-elected Mayor Kate Gallego, raised employee minimum wage to $15 an hour at its April 3 formal meeting. “I am proud that in my first City Council meeting as mayor, my colleagues and I took concrete action to show our support for employees by providing them a true living wage that will make a real difference in their day-to-day lives,” said Mayor Kate Gallego. “The City of Phoenix is proud to have incredible employees who work hard to improve our community every day, and we must take the necessary steps to ensure that they are paid what they deserve. This will benefit our working families, young employees just beginning their careers who have dedicated themselves to public service, and for every employee who works hard and deserves a livable wage.” The recommendation, passed by a unanimous vote of the City Council, positions the city to better compete for talent in a competitive job market and ensures that people who provide frontline customer support in a variety of roles in the organization are compensated fairly. “Phoenix City Council’s unanimous action yesterday to guarantee a $15 minimum wage for our employees was a huge win for working families,” said District 5 Councilwoman Vania Guevara. “It’s exciting to see our city leading by example, making sure our employees are paid a wage that allows them to provide for their families, save for the future, and invest in themselves and their community.” The change in the minimum wage grew out of a collaborative discussion between city leadership and one of the City’s employee labor groups, LiUNA Local 777. LiUNA represents city employees in Unit 1, holding unskilled and semi-skilled positions. Applied to all employees, the increase would also affect positions represented by Unit 2 (trades workers) and Unit 3 (clerical workers) across the organization. “Raising the minimum wage to $15 an hour for the men and women who work at the City of Phoenix is life changing. These employees work tirelessly each day for the community and deserve to be paid a livable wage,” said Jennifer Grondahl, secretary, LiUNA Local 777 The state minimum wage in Arizona is currently set at $11 per hour and applied to Phoenix employees before the new Council action took effect. “Our vote to increase the minimum wage for our employees is more than just good business sense,” said District 8 Councilwoman Felicita Mendoza. “Each of the 150 employees who will immediately benefit from this change is going to be able to better support their families and take steps to improve their quality of life. Investing in our employees like this can truly transform our community by helping to ensure that the best candidates see Phoenix as an employer of choice.”

13

5.19


North Phoenix Serving the Community Since 2002

14

5.19

NVSO Honors Veterans & Others in Service at ‘Summer Salute’ North Valley Symphony Orchestra (NVSO) will close out its season and kick off the summer with a patriotic musical tribute to America. The “Summer Salute” concert will be held Saturday, May 11, at 7pm. The concert will be held at a new venue for NVSO: Shadow Mountain High School Performing Arts Auditorium, 2902 East Shea Boulevard in Phoenix. Get set for lively classics such as Sousa’s “Stars & Stripes Forever” and “Washington Post March,” Tchaikovsky’s “1812 Overture,” dance selections from the always popular “Rodeo” by Copland, and Gould’s “American Salute.” Veterans, active duty military personnel and first responders will be given free admission. To reserve a free ticket, enter the coupon code “HERO” on the payment screen at the ticketing website (www. Kevin Kozacek, NVSO music director, also served northvalleysymphony.org/ticket- as an Air Force F-16 pilot. sales). Wear your uniform, service participation to “sound the cannons” cap, or present other proof of service during the “1812 Overture.”  (e.g., military ID, badge, etc.) when “This will be a fantastic experience picking up tickets at will call. for our audience, not only helping The concert will open with a with cannon sounds, but also offering presentation of colors by the Luke recognition and thanks to the men Air Force Base Color Guard, and and women of the U.S. armed forces North Valley Youth Orchestra playing during the ‘Armed Forces Salute’,” the national anthem. Music director says Kozacek. “As each service Kevin Kozacek plans for audience hymn is played — Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines and Coast Guard — we will ask those in that service, veterans or active duty, to stand.” “We’re also honoring law enforcement and first responders with “Summon the Heroes,” a piece written by John Williams in 1996 for the 100th anniversary of the modern Olympic games,” says Kozacek. “I felt that piece was very appropriate to honor the heroic work performed by all of our nation’s first responders.” The “Summer Salute” concert is sponsored by the Phoenix Metro Chamber Foundation (PMCF). NVSO proudly provides affordable concert experiences to the Phoenix North Valley community. Tickets are only $5 and should be purchased online by early May — this concert is sure to sell-out. Visit www.northvalleysymphony.org for additional information.


Those who would like to learn how automation can free them from repetitive functions and increase productivity are invited to the May meeting of the Phoenix Chapter of the National Association of Women Business Owners (NAWBO). A representative from the software company Xeia will share these tips with attendees Wednesday, May 8, 11am–1pm “We invite business owners to join us on May 8 to learn more about this topic,” says Ronit Urman, 2018-19 NAWBO Phoenix president. “We strive to bring our members and guests the most up-to-date information and resources to help them better run their business.” NAWBO’s monthly business program includes the presentation, lunch, program discussion and time for networking. Meetings are held at the Gainey Ranch Golf Club (7600 East Gainey Club Drive) in Scottsdale. Tickets are $43 for members and $53 for guests. Reserve or get additional information online at www.nawbophx.org. Urman adds, “We invite business owners and community members to save the date for our annual Desert Diamonds Awards Gala on the evening of June 12 where we will honor outstanding NAWBO members and others in the community.” NAWBO is an organization that works to strengthen the wealth-creating capacity of its members and promote economic development; create innovative and effective changes in the business culture; build strategic alliances, coalitions, and affiliations; and transform public policy and influence opinion makers. For more information, visit www.nawbophx.org.

The Hot Stone

beautiful presentation, interesting flavor profiles and cuisine that are rooted in T. Cook’s Mediterranean values, but with a heightened approach.” Some T. Cook’s standout items on the new dinner menu include The Hot Stone ($23), American Wagyu Beef or Pacific Ahi Tuna, Yuzu Kosho Ponzu, Cilantro Scallion Crunchy Chili Garlic; Wagyu Snake River Farms Striploin with Main Lobster Risotto ($56), Grilled Asparagus, House-Made Steak Sauce; Achiote Marinated Salmon ($40), Cauliflower Puree, Chayote Slaw, Togarashi Orange Relish; Herbed Crusted Sea Bass ($44), Ancient Grain Risotto, Avocado Puree, Pickled Fresno Chili Citrus-Honey Reduction; Pan Roasted Branzino ($42), Coconut Pea Puree, English Peas, Blistered Cherry Tomato, Crispy Potato; and Colorado Rack of Lamb ($54), Boniato Sweet Potato Puree, Roasted Brussel Sprouts, Piquillo-Mint Jam. T. Cook’s menu focuses on simple preparations and uncomplicated dishes that honor the regions of Northern Italy, Greece, Spain and Provence. T. Cook’s culinary philosophy of magnifying the purity of fresh, seasonal ingredients is a celebration of its treasured legacy and offers a captivating environment in every sense with stone fireplaces, al fresco dining and unique design elements. Located at Royal Palms Resort and Spa, part of The Unbound Collection by Hyatt, T. Cook’s sits within the heart of the resort’s mature, lush nine-acre property at the base of the iconic Camelback Mountain. For more information on T. Cook’s or to book a reservation, call 602.808.0766 or visit www.tcooksphoenix.com.

Serving the Community Since 2002

T. Cook’s Chef, continued from page 13

North Phoenix

May NAWBO Presentation Explores Automation and Productivity

15

5.19


North Phoenix Serving the Community Since 2002

Golden Masquerade Event Celebrates 51 Years Benefiting Kids The Back to School Clothing Drive’s Golden Masquerade Gala 2019 begins at 6pm Saturday, May 18, at Phoenix Art Museum. Founded in 1967, the Back to School Clothing Drive is Arizona’s largest provider of uniforms, clothing, backpacks and school supplies to more than 25,000 Title I elementary school students at over 260 Maricopa County schools. This year’s New Clothes, New Beginnings clothing distribution is July 22–26 at Grand Canyon University Arena, 3300 West Camelback Road in Phoenix, with support from more than 2,500 volunteers. Masks and outfits are encouraged at the black-tie optional annual event that includes dinner, a live auction, fund-a-need and an awards ceremony. Champion for Children honorees are Corporate, Wells Fargo; Individual, board member Bonnie Smith of First

American Title; and Community, Fennemore Craig. Yetta Gibson and Ian Schwartz from CBS5 are masters of ceremonies. Local favorite Ear Candy Band will entertain. Live auction items include a private cooking class for six with chef Bob Anthony; a seven-night stay at Casa Piazza, a fully staffed beach house for 10-14 guests in Manzanillo, Mexico; private basketball lessons from Harlem Globetrotter great Slick Willy Shaw; Phoenix Firefighter and Phoenix Police Officer for a day experiences and more. Individual tickets are $175 with tables of 10 starting at $1,750. Sponsorships are available beginning at $3,000. To purchase tickets, reserve a table or for more information, visit www. btscd.com/gala. For more information about Back to School Clothing Drive, call 602.256.9408 or visit www. backtoschoolclothingdrive.com.

SPECIAL OFFER! Save Over 15%

Reg $47.95

NOW ONLY

$39.95

+ FREE SHIPPING!

16

Mother’s Day Brownie Bliss

16 Belgian Chocolate Brownies in 12 Mouthwatering Flavors

Visit brownies.com/m95126

or Call 866.230.7687 to order item SR216MD

5.19

Order by May 7th to ensure delivery by Mother’s Day. Cannot be combined with other offers. Free shipping to valid US addresses. Expires 5/31/19

O Sh rde ip r N La ow te , r!

Only $39.95 (reg. 47.95) + FREE SHIPPING!

Party to Benefit Two Pups Wellness Fund Pet lovers are invited to indulge in an evening of eating, drinking and dancing that promises to be a “howling” good time at the second annual Booze and a Band for the Bow Wow and Meows. Guests will enjoy live music with Status the Band hailing directly from Las Vegas for the cause. All proceeds support the Two Pups Wellness Fund, which provides financial assistance for dogs and cats who are critically ill, injured, neglected or abandoned. Two Pups’ mission is to provide financial aid from the heart for the care and health of four-footed friends who give people their hearts. Nancy Silver established the Two Pups Wellness Fund in 2017 through

the Arizona Community Foundation in honor of her own pups – Mr. P and Miss Lacie. The organization raises funds to help rescue and shelter dogs in need of vital medical treatment. Arizona Community Foundation provides expertise in the management and disbursement of Two Pups funds. The event will be held at Arizona Science Center, 600 East Washington Street in Phoenix, Saturday, May 18, 7–11pm. Tickets are $100. Sponsorship packages are also available beginning at $250 for two. Tickets and sponsorship packages can be purchased online at www.twopups. org. For additional information, call 480.490.7136 or send an email to thepack@twopups.org.

PVSchools Offers 74 Days of Summer Programs With only a few weeks left in the school year, many parents are finalizing plans for summer learning options. PVSchools will offer a variety of programs available for the 74 days of summer break. From Enrichment Classes to High School Summer School, PVSchools has many options to help ensure children have an amazing summer. Here are just a few of the programs that the Community Education Department will offer: • Camp Brown Bear: Mascot Summer Camp – A licensed childcare program that includes fun activities and field trips, the program is open Monday through Friday from 6:30am–6:30pm and is available to students in kindergarten (incoming) through sixth grade (exiting). Mascot Camp will be held at Aire Libre Elementary School. • Enrichment Summer School – The program offers kindergarten through sixth-grade students the opportunity to explore a wide variety of classes. Enrichment Summer School is available at six sites, including Boulder Creek Elementary School, Desert Cove Elementary School, Grayhawk Elementary School, North Ranch Elementary School, Pinnacle Peak Preparatory School and Wildfire Elementary School. The deadline to register is May 30 at 5pm. • Gifted Summer School – Planned and developed by certified Gifted instructors, participation in these classes is limited to students who have been designated by PVSchools as having Gifted qualifications. The summer program is offered June 3–27 at Fireside Elementary School. The deadline to register is May 30 at 5pm. • Sports Camps – Students will have the opportunity to participate in a variety of sports. The camps are available at Horizon High, Paradise Valley High and Pinnacle High. • STEM Academy – This program offers students the opportunity to participate in Science-Makers, STEM-Makers or Code-Makers and is available for students in fourth-ninth grades. The STEM Academy will be offered May 28–31 and June 3–6 at Paradise Valley High School. The deadline to register is May 23 at 5pm. PVSchools will also offer High School Summer School, Middle School Summer School and Kindergarten Readiness Camp. Registration for all programs is now open. To learn more, visit www.pvschools.net/domain/1928 and click on the “Summer 2019” link.


Mother’s Day Jewelry Personified

By Indra Jhaveri

An occasion to remember always. She is the one who has given selflessly, love, compassion, physical and emotional energies in upbringing the loved ones in the family. It is time to rejoice her. Jewelry is one of the gifts considered for such occasion. Mother’s ring or pendant with birthstones of her loved ones in the family, like children and spouse etc. The following are the highlights of birthstones for each month. Different gemstones have different metaphysical properties as accepted in ancient literature. (Ref. Google)  January: Garnet — A stone of commitment. Red garnet represents love.  February: Amethyst — A stone with healing powers to help with physical ailments, emotional issues and in energy healing.

July: (1) Ruby — A stone to shield against negative energy, physical attack and energy vampirism especially of the heart energy. (2) Alexandrite — A stone to help balance one’s emotional state to provide confidence to increase self-esteem and to help bring about change. August: Peridot — A stone of compassion, believed to bring good health, restful sleep and peace to relationships by balancing emotions and mind.

(2) Yellow Topaz — It manifests your intentions to instill faith that you can bring all manner of good things into your life. December: (1) Turquoise — Healing powers of turquoise can improve the mental state overall by increasing all of the mental characteristics. (2) Blue Topaz — It is crystal of joy, generosity, abundance and good health and fortune. To contact Indra Jhaveri, send email to amidiamond@live.com or visit www.amidiamondsandsjewelry.com. One can also reach him at (602) 432-2920 or (602) 923-8200.

September: Sapphire — Blue sapphire increase/ enhances intuition, mental clarity and spiritual power.

April: Diamond — A stone to promote strength, invincibility, courage, creativity and imagination.

October: (1) Opal — It encourages freedom and independence. It stimulates originality and creativity. (2) Tourmaline — Tourmaline comes in different colors and is ideal for healing purposes as it can focus its healing energies and help remove blockages thus providing physical vitality.

May: Emerald — A stone of domestic bliss and loyalty. It enhances unconditional love, unity and promotes friendship.

November: (1) Citrine — It promotes motivation. Activates creativity and encourages self-expression.

Serving the Community Since 2002

March: Aquamarine — A stone of courage. Its calming energies reduce stress and quiet the mind. It has an affinity with sensitive people.

June: Pearl — Pearls especially enhance personal integrity. It gives wearer a sense of calmness. It promotes faith, loyalty, truth and purity.

North Phoenix

ADVERTORIAL

17

5.19


North Phoenix Serving the Community Since 2002

18

5.19

JFCS Creative Aging Class Showcases Its Stories On April 9, a number of the story tellers from JFCS Creative Aging class, presented a showcase of their stories, developed through an on-going weekly class offered by Jewish Family & Children’s Service (JFCS). The class is part of its Creative Aging program, which also boasts classes in Voice, Israeli Dance and Readers Theatre as well as a Senior Chorus. The Story Telling classes, offered in the Paradise Valley area, are taught by Kim Porter, an author, playwright, actor and master storyteller. Porter helps to develop and enhance the ideas brought in The CAST (Creative Aging Story Tellers), from left: Ken Love, Barbara Mark-Drefuss, Bonnie by the participants through Kabin, Beverly Rubenstein, Suzy Somers and Jeanine Korer. creative writing exercises and techniques coupled with feedback and tips for performance. Classes begin again in the fall. JFCS offers these classes to engage and enhance quality of life for older adults. To learn more about the classes, contact JFCS Creative Aging coordinator Janet Rees at 480.599.7198, or email seniorconciergeservices@ jfcsaz.org. For additional information, visit www.jfcsaz.org.

Wildflower Offers Free Loaf to Moms this Mother’s Day Wildflower (formerly known as Wildflower Bread Company) will be celebrating Valley moms Sunday, May 12, offering them a free loaf of bread on this day exclusively from open until close (while supplies last). Wildflower’s bread is prepared and baked fresh daily; the breads are all natural without any additives or preservation. The offer will be available at all of their locations (except for the airport) including Arcadia Commons, Arrowhead Gateway, Aspen Place at the Sawmill (Flagstaff), Chandler Fashion Center, Crown, Deer Valley Towne Center, Palm Valley Pavilions West (Goodyear), Prescott, Rivulon (Gilbert), Scottsdale Seville, Sonora Village North Scottsdale, Tempe Square, The SHOPS at Pinon Pointe (Sedona), Wildflower Village (Gilbert) and Crown on 7th (Central Phoenix/ Restaurant Row). Wildflower serves breakfast, lunch and dinner, and features handcrafted artisan breads and a specialty bakery. Wildflower is well known for its unique breakfast, sandwiches, salads, soups and pastas. Breakfast is served weekdays until 10:30am and weekends until 2pm. Pasta is served daily from 3pm to close. There are 16 locally-owned locations throughout the state of Arizona. For more information, visit www.wildflowerbread.com.


to process the materials on the city’s Resource Innovation Campus. Renew Phoenix was selected through a competitive Request for Proposal (RFP) process. Their plan is to use a proprietary chemical recycling process to reverse the plastic back into its basic molecular structure, which will allow them to convert the plastic waste into fuel. Renew Phoenix will also bring as many as 15 full-time jobs to the Valley, after investing more than five million dollars in capital to the project. “Renewlogy is excited about bringing our technology to Phoenix and creating a more circular economy around plastic waste locally,” said Priyanka Bakaya, founder and CEO of Renewlogy. “Phoenix will serve as a model for cities around the country looking for local solutions for plastic waste.” Once at full production, the project is expected to divert 10 tons per day of mixed plastic waste, which equates to 60 barrels of liquid fuel. This partnership will not only help Phoenix, but the Valley altogether. Renew Phoenix will be able to scale their production to allow regional remanufacturing of Plastics 3-7 to be processed as well. “We are proud to continue bucking the trend and pushing forward with innovation, economic development and repurposing our waste,” said Ginger Spencer, City of Phoenix Public Works director. “We are committed to building a circular economy and achieving our Reimagine Phoenix goals. This new venture to turn plastics into fuel is eye-opening and we hope it will serve as a model for other cities to reimagine their own recycling programs.” For additional information, visit www.phoenix.gov/publicworks/ reimagine, www.renewlogy.com or www.generated.com.

Serving the Community Since 2002

The City of Phoenix Public Works Department announced a new partnership with Renew Phoenix that aims to turn plastics destined for the landfill into fuel. This innovative repurposing of what’s known as “Plastics 3-7,” or low-value plastics, is the latest venture in the City’s “Reimagine Phoenix” initiative to increase its diversion rate to 40 percent by the end of 2020, and ultimately reach zero waste by 2050. “I believe in taking bold chances to make big change. The idea of making fuel with the plastics we are throwing away is certainly an ‘out of the box’ idea that I am thrilled to say will also bring jobs and revenue to our city,” said Phoenix Mayor Kate Gallego. “During a time when cities are giving up on recycling, Phoenix is again leading the way in setting the gold standard for innovation and creativity.” The need to find a way to re-use these materials comes on the heels of China no longer accepting certain recycled materials from the United States. This forced city leadership to think creatively to find new solutions for its recycled materials. Thanks to the foresight of the Phoenix City Council, this new project is now ready to take shape. “The future is all about recycling, sustainability and doing our part to ensure future generations have a healthy planet,” said Councilwoman Thelda Williams, who serves as the chair of the Water, Wastewater, Infrastructure and Sustainability (WWIS) Subcommittee. “I am certain that once others see what we are doing, they will want to be part of this movement to prevent more materials from being simply thrown away.” The plan is for Renew Phoenix, a joint venture between Generated Materials Recovery and Renewlogy, to work together to build a facility

North Phoenix

The City of Phoenix to Begin Turning Plastics into Fuel

19

5.19


Royal Renegades Hit the Stage at FHT

Serving the Community Since 2002

L to R: Cinderella, Erica Glenn; Snow White, Brandi Bigley; Sleeping Beauty, Elizabeth Bridgewater

20

5.19

Fountain Hills Theater (FHT) announced that the Arizona premier of the new musical Disenchanted! kicks off this month. Poisoned apples. Glass slippers. Who needs ’em?! Not Snow White and her posse of disenchanted princesses in the hilarious hit musical that is anything but Grimm. Forget the princesses you think you know. When these royal renegades toss off their tiaras, this hilariously subversive, not-for-thekiddies musical cleverly reveals what really happened “ever after.” Fountain Hills Theater presents three regularly scheduled seasons of productions in their two theaters. The theater’s year-round offering includes Mainstage, Mainstage Too!, and Youth

productions. Additionally, special events, community outreach, and educational arts programming for youth is also offered. The Mainstage (often called the “big” theater) seats 130 and is devoted to medium and large-scale popular musicals and plays including the best of Broadway and Off-Broadway. No seat is more than 35 feet from the stage. The Youth/Mainstage Too! (also called the “little” theater) is a smaller, more intimate 90-seat, thrust style auditorium that offers thought-provoking, inspiring and sometimes challenging productions including Broadway musicals, original plays, musicals and art works. Most of the youth productions are performed in the more intimate, smaller theater. Both stages often run productions concurrently. Special events are offered throughout the season on both stages as well as in community centers. The theater has been in operation as a professionally-directed community theater for over 30 years. Disenchanted! is produced by Leah Klein, directed by Peter J. Hill, musically directed by Robin Peterson and choreographed by Noel Irick. The production stars Brandi Bigley, Elizabeth Bridgewater, Breanna Ghostone, Erica Glenn, Juli Gore, Ariana Iniguez, Tina Khalil, Leah Klein, Anna Sell and Kori Stearns.

Disenchanted! will play May 10–26. Performances are Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays at 7:30pm and Sundays at 2pm. Individual tickets are $30 for adults and $12 for youth 17 and under. Seniors receive a $5 discount on all Thursday and Saturday performances. Group rates and student rush discounts are available.

Veteran and active duty discounts are also available.   All performances are at Fountain Hills Theater on its Mainstage Too at 11445 North Saguaro Boulevard (the corner of Saguaro and Rand). Tickets are available through the theater box office at 480.837.9661, Ext. 3, or by visiting www.fhtaz.org. 

Head to the Library for Cool, Fun, Learning in May As the Arizona temps climb, there is no better time to head to a local library. This month, the Fountain Hills Branch Maricopa County Library will offer a number of ways for residents to not only beat the heat but learn a few things and have some fun in the process. May 1–15: Meditation Station 5:30-6pm Escape a hectic day with a 30minute guided meditation while learning strategies for handling stress. Held Wednesdays through May 15 in the conference room. May 2–23: Time for Toddlers 10–11am Children 18–36 months old are invited to join staff on the first four Thursdays of each month for age appropriate stories, activities and crafts that focus on developing early literacy skills. This month’s theme is My Body. Held in the conference room May 2–30: ASL Practice Group 11:30am–1pm Join staff and others Thursdays in May to practice signing in American Sign Language (ASL). This class offers the opportunity to build skills and make new friends. Basic instruction is available through Rocket Languages at www.mcldaz.org under the “Learn” link. Held in the computer area. May 4: Paper Shredding 9am–noon Residents of Fountain Hills, Rio Verde, Tonto Verde and Fort McDowell

are invited to shred up to four file boxes of paper per person in this free paper shredding event funded by the Fountain Hills Friends of the Library. The shredding truck will be in the library’s parking lot at the corner of El Lago Boulevard and La Montana Drive from 9am until noon or until the truck is full. All participants must remain with their documents until they are placed in the shredding containers. No hardcover folders will be taken. Make sure large bundles of papers are loosened and remove clips, binding and other metal objects from all documents. May 17: Film Chat: “Robot & Frank” 9:30–11:30am Join others and gather to watch and discuss a film or documentary. This month, technology and humanity collide in “Robot & Frank.” Held in the conference room. The Fountain Hills Branch library, located at 12901 North La Montana Drive, opened in its 15,000-sq. ft. facility October 1, 2001. The Library is part of the Fountain Hills Community Center complex, which also includes a large activity building and The River of Time Museum. The Library is state-ofthe-art with over 40 public computers with flat screens, smart cards for printing and scheduling computer time and the latest in display shelving and marketing tools. The library is open Monday–Thursday, 9am–8pm, and Friday–Saturday, 9am–5pm. For information, call 602.652.3000 or visit www.mcldaz.org.


VICE MAYOR CRANE WRITES... May: A Time to Remember and A Time to Enjoy the Carefree Desert Gardens

Carefree Desert Gardens Celebrates National Public Gardens Day The crown jewel of Carefree and amazing oasis in the desert, Carefree Desert Gardens will join communities throughout the United States in a celebration of National Public Gardens Day Friday, May 10, 10am–3pm, in downtown Carefree. This day of public garden awareness traditionally occurs on the Friday preceding Mother’s Day weekend, inviting communities nationwide to explore the diverse beauty of their local green spaces and to take advantage of local conservation, education and environmental preservation resources. Among the activities planned for the day are a presentation of Desert Medicinal Plants by JoAnn Sanchez, creator and director the Western Herbalism program, Botanica, at the Southwest Institute of Healing Arts; an awards ceremony honoring the winning photos selected from those submitted in April during the annual Carefree Desert Gardens Photo Contest; and docent-led tours of the garden with Lee Brownson, former executive director of Wallace Desert Gardens. Plein air art creation by local artisans and live music will round out the celebrations. National Public Gardens Day was established in 2009 as a day to promote awareness about North America’s arboreta, zoos and historic, botanic and public gardens. Members of the American Public Gardens Association, a Pennsylvania nonprofit organization that supports, resources and promotes public gardens in North America, created the event as a way to increase knowledge about the educational resources public gardens provide within local communities. For more information and the complete schedule of events, contact the Town of Carefree at 480.488.3686, or visit www.carefree.org.

Serving the Community Since 2002

May is a month of remembrance, a time to memorialize those who have given their lives in service of our country. May is also the time when many desert plants are at their zenith of beauty, VICE MAYOR many adorned with desert flowers, as they are Town of Carefree awakened by the building heat of summer. 480.488.3686 On Memorial Day, our country remembers www.carefree.org those men and women who served and paid the ultimate sacrifice for the safety of our country, upholding the values we hold dear. In their honor, on Monday, May 27, at 8am, the Town of Carefree is proud to host a Memorial Day Tribute in an often-forgotten plot in the north-eastern corner of our Town, the Cave Creek Cemetery, located at 36400 North Pima Road in Carefree. There are 33 veterans interred within this pioneer cemetery. Joined by the Veterans Heritage Project (VHP) this year’s tribute will include a presentation and posting of colors by Boy Scout Troop 15 Cave Creek, an a cappella rendition of the national anthem, an invocation and a special rendition of “Taps” performed at the conclusion of the program. Guest speakers include Margo Angeli, whose brother Gus, a Navy veteran, is interred in the cemetery. West Point graduate, Vietnam veteran and two-time Purple Heart recipient Frank Lambert will be the keynote speaker. Tribute Riders RC will place flags upon the grave sites of the many veterans laid to rest there. Please join us as we pause to remember and honor those veterans who have preceded us in a setting that is most appropriate, solemn and fitting for those who have given so much. Earlier in May, Carefree will join communities throughout the United States in a celebration of National Public Gardens Day on Friday, May 10, from 10am–3pm in downtown Carefree. On this day of public garden awareness, you are invited to explore the desert vegetation beauty that abounds within the Carefree Desert Gardens and learn more about those plants and our desert environment. Among the activities planned for the day are a presentation of Desert Medicinal Plants by JoAnn Sanchez, creator and director the Western Herbalism program, Botanica, at the Southwest Institute of Healing Arts; an awards ceremony honoring the winning photos selected from those submitted in April during the annual Carefree Desert Gardens Photo Contest; and docent-led tours of the garden with Lee Brownson, executive director of the Wallace Desert Gardens Foundation. Plein air art creation by local artisans and live music will round out the celebrations. There is no better way to pass a Friday in May than to immerse yourself in the Carefree Desert Gardens — enjoy the beauty, take away a little knowledge and spend time with like-minded people who appreciate our beautiful surroundings. We hope to see you there.

Photo: K. Miller

By Vice Mayor John Crane

21

5.19


Carefree Serving the Community Since 2002

22

5.19

SOUL CONNECTION

Trusting God’s Guidance By Nicole Nohre

About one year ago, I had a really fun night sleeping over at my friend’s house. Early in the morning I got a text from my dad. He said he was coming to pick me up right away and it was urgent. Already nervous, when I got in the house, I saw my mom was upset. She told me they brought my dog, Allie, to the vet at two in the morning because she had blown out three vertebrae in her back and was now in emergency surgery. I was told she has a 50 percent chance of being paralyzed. She did end up being paralyzed and that was a new and unfamiliar thing for me and my family. We brought Allie home, our beautiful black lab, unable to walk. She recovered from surgery and she received therapy but was still unable to walk. We got her a wheelchair and we are now able to take her for walks using her front legs to pull herself. Despite her paralysis she is still the same lovable Allie. Many people told us we should just give up and put her down. Despite what people said, we pulled together as a family to do what we could for Allie. I think this was God’s way of guiding us through a hard time. I then began to find so much support from friends and family. One day my friend brought a basket filled with some of my favorite treats. She probably thought this was just a small gesture, but it really meant a lot. The whole experience showed me that by putting our trust in God to guide us, everything is going to be okay in the end. I am learning that whatever life throws at us, good or bad, God will be right next us all the way. Nicole Nohre is the guest writer of this month’s Soul Connection. She is the 13-year-old granddaughter of Carefree residents Allen and Kathie Nohre and lives with her parents, Karl and Debbie, in Minneapolis.

Celebrate the ‘Best Of’ Carefree & Cave Creek The Carefree Cave Creek Chamber of Commerce will hold its “Best Of” Celebration of Excellence awards presentation Wednesday, May 8, 5:30–8pm, at the Prickly Pear Inn. Attendees will find out who won the Chamber’s “Best Of” and who is Business of the Year. Food and drink will be provided by The Wandering Donkey Food Truck and The City Creamery and Grumpy Old Mule Mercantile. Event sponsors include APS (Stage sponsor), Desert Foothills Landscape (Beverage sponsor) and AZ Perfect Comfort (“Best Of” Trophy sponsor). Prickly Pear Inn is located at 6268 East Cave Creek Road in Cave Creek. The cost to attend is $30. For additional information, call 480.488.3381 or visit www.carefreecavecreek.org.


Carefree Restaurant Association (CRA) announced that its next Carefree Restaurant Week will be held May 5–11. Restaurant Week is an opportunity for participating area restaurants to showcase their menus to locals and visitors alike, at discounted prices. From Latin cuisine or family-style Italian, to modern American, soul food, high tea or simply a good old-fashioned burger, there is something to suit every palate. Some restaurants will offer a special lunch menu, others a three- or four-course dinner for dine-in customers. Prices (per person, excluding alcohol) are: • Lunch menu (two courses) — $18

Carefree

It’s Time to Dine Carefree

• Dinner menu (three courses) —$35; (four courses) $45 Unlike many other towns, Carefree’s restaurant base is made up of independent, family-owned businesses. Therefore, no large corporate chains dictate menu, pricing or marketing campaigns…rather, the individual business owner can determine the look, feel, style, concept and brand of their own restaurant based on their own individual culinary expertise. During Restaurant Week, customers will have an opportunity to sample new and exciting menu offerings and in doing so support their local restaurants. Participating restaurants include Alberto’s Ristorante, Black Mountain Café, Confluence, Corrado’s Cucina Italiana, English Rose Tea Room, Giordano’s Trattoria Romana, Keeler’s Neighborhood Steakhouse, Raven’s View Wine Bar, Sundial Garden Café and Venues Café. For a complete list of all Carefree restaurants and more details on Carefree Restaurant Week, including menus and other participating restaurants, visit www.carefreerestaurants.com.

L Skincare is a one-stop shop with a wide variety of services that practice maintaining natural beauty as well as improving the overall appearance, radiance and health of each client’s skin. Services include facials, advanced facials, laser hair removal, cosmetic injectables, waxing, nails and lash extensions. “Here at L Skincare we specialize skincare treatments to your specific needs and personal goals,” says Lindsay Jackson Pennino, proud owner for four years. “Everyone deserves to feel beautiful inside and out, let L Skincare show you how to feel your absolute best every day!” Pennino, prides herself on hiring only the highest quality technicians for every service provided at the skincare boutique. “Our family of technicians are not only professionals, they are passionate, humorous and take immense pride in their clientele. Clients deserve to be pampered head to toe; therefore, we value the ambiance of our shop ensuring every minute spent with L Skincare makes you feel welcomed as well as valued.” She says that their mission is to provide comfort and relaxation to all. “We trust that you will find your experience beyond satisfying and we encourage you to explore the full range of services we offer. We thank all our clients for our growing memories, undeniable support and encouragement you embed in us to be the best we may be!” L Skincare is located at 7208 East Ho Road in Carefree. For additional information, call 480. 488.1441 or visit www.l-skincare.com.

Serving the Community Since 2002

L Skincare Offers Specialized Skincare Services

23

For the entire month of May, the L Skincare will honor mothers of Carefree with a Mother’s Day special: $20 off any service when presenting this article at checkout.

news.CITYSunTimes.com

5.19


Carefree L–R: Cynthia, winner of the Ruby award, and presenter, Elysa

2019 Young Women’s Service award winners

Melissa, winner of the Live Your Dream award

Serving the Community Since 2002

Soroptimist Members Recognize Area Women at Annual Awards

24

5.19

Soroptimist International of Saguaro Foothills held its annual award ceremony March 26 and presented its Live Your Dream, Young Women’s Service, and Ruby awards. The Live Your Dream (LYD) award was established in 1972 and is available to women who are head of household, demonstrate financial need and are motivated to achieve their education and career goals. Melissa, the LYD award winner from Tempe, was awarded $2,500. Melissa is a recent graduate of the dental hygiene program at Rio Salado College. She attended college full time and gained one year of clinical training in dental hygiene while caring for her two young children. Melissa has been selected as a finalist in the Golden West region of Soroptimist International and has the opportunity to win more awards at the regional level. This year, Saguaro Foothills Soroptimist had seven runners-up for its LYD award, each of whom received $1,000. They include Elizabeth, Nicole, Primrose, Tarra,

Katherine, Natalie and Marcella. The “Young Women’s Service” award recognizes young women who make their community and world a better place through their volunteer efforts. This program honors girls between the ages of 14 and 17 who contribute their time and energy to volunteer projects in their schools and community. Each girl was awarded $500 along with $100 to their charity. [Read more about these award recipients on page 30.] The Soroptimist “Ruby” award honors women who have worked to improve the lives of women and girls through their profession and/or volunteer work. This year’s Ruby award winner is Cynthia Driskell. She moved to Arizona in 1981 and started her own physical therapy practice in Carefree in 1987. Driskell has enriched many lives through her years of community participation and leadership. She was president of the state physical therapy association for three years and was also active at the national level,

serving on several committees and projects. She has served as a mentor to several students and young women in her profession. Driskell was the primary sponsor of the Foothills 10K for 10 years and ran the aid station for that event. She has coached basketball and soccer for girls and boys while raising a family of five children. Driskell was an active member of Soroptimist International of Saguaro Foothills for 30 years. During that time, she held several offices including the presidency and the chair of the Service committee. Soroptimist members thanked Driskell for her dedication and leadership in the community. Soroptimist International is a global women’s organization working together to transform the lives of women and girls. The organization works at the local, national and international levels to improve lives through education leading to social and economic empowerment. Learn about Soroptimist International of Saguaro Foothills at www.sisaguarofoothills.org.


Hampton Inn Project Receives Final Approval At its April 2 meeting, the Carefree Town Council approved the final two motions, the Site Plan and the Final Plat, required to enable the construction of a 97 room Hilton Hampton Inn within the Carefree Town Center. The hotel will be located on the vacant property just east of the building that houses the Carefree Post Office. The hotel will include traditional rooms and suites, a resort style pool, a fitness center and limited breakfast service and bar seating. This facility represents a major milestone in the Town Council’s efforts to both support local businesses and bring in new businesses to further reinvigorate the Town Center. It is anticipated by the development team that construction will begin this summer and the hotel will be operational by the Fall 2020.

Serving the Community Since 2002

Jennifer Rosvall joined the North Valley-based nonprofit Foothills Community Foundation (FCF) as executive director April 15. Rosvall most recently served as Wish Manager at Make-A-Wish Arizona. In commenting on her appointment, Jim Sherbert, FCF board chairman, said, “Jennifer’s extensive experience developing long-term community and corporate partnerships will be invaluable as we work to enhance our foundation’s effectiveness and sustainability. Her enthusiasm for building and maintaining relationships inside and outside the organization are a great match for us.” As Wish Manager with Make-A-Wish AZ, Rosvall was responsible for oversight and management of hundreds of wish experiences. Make-A-Wish Arizona is the founding chapter of the international wish granting organization. It seeks to grant the wishes of every child with life-threatening medical conditions and to enrich their and their families’ lives with hope at a very difficult time. Prior to joining Make-A-Wish, Rosvall was a long-term substitute teacher in Scottsdale Unified School District and, prior to that, a customer service agent for America West Airlines. She holds an BBA degree from University of San Diego. “This is a very exciting time to be joining FCF as it works to expand its impact in the North Valley,” said Rosvall. “Life-long learning, cultural enrichment and community service are essential to quality of life for people of all ages. I look forward to working with the FCF staff, volunteers and board as we strengthen the FCF’s work in these important areas.” Foothills Community Foundation develops and supports programs that seek to enhance the quality of life for residents of North Scottsdale and the Foothills region through life-long learning, community service and the arts. Current programs include Desert Awareness Committee, Desert Foothills Theater, Holland Community Center, Kachina’s Place, Partners in Education and Desert Foothills Leadership. FCF and the Holland Center are located on the Campus of Desert Foothills YMCA and Paradise Valley Community College at Black Mountain. For additional information, call 480.488.1090 or visit www.azfcf.org.

Carefree

FCF Welcomes New Executive Director

25

5.19


Carefree

ECS Offers Summer Programs for the Whole Family

Serving the Community Since 2002

The Thirty-Nine Steps production by the ECS High School Performing Arts Workshop; Photo: Alexa Dragone

26

5.19

This summer, Education & Community Services (ECS) Kid’s Club Summer Adventure Club will offer eight weeks of everything kids love — Pirate Adventures, Sherwood Forest, Mad Hatter’s Tea Party, Under the Sea Adventures, Alien Invasion, Jedi training, Animation Academy and Camp Mashup. The Adventure Camp takes place in June and July, and every week is packed with fun, new learning experiences in science, games and art, movies and field trips. Child’s Play Preschool kids explore makerspace, developing their engineering skills while learning to question, imagine and create. And everyone gets to shake out the wiggles with music and handson instruments. FocusedKidsTM Curriculum will also help children learn the three parts of their brain, the role each one plays and how to be in charge of them. There is also full-day Kinderprep available for students entering kindergarten in the fall. Elementary school students aren’t left out of the fun and learning. There’s no way to be bored with ECS programs such as Escape the Room — Math Skills Camp, Imagination Station, Military Style Cheer, Instruments and Dance with a Latin Rhythm, Mindful Artist, Recycle Art and Engineering, Spanish Kitchen, Sports Superstars, Warrior Yoga, 3D Art and Baseball Managers in Training.  Two unique programs for middle

schoolers are STEAMPlus Career Camp, which introduces a wide variety of interests and is facilitated by college professors and industry professionals, and a relationship program, #RESPECT4UANDME. These are exciting new additions to the ECS middle school and high school readiness offerings this summer. At Desert Foothills Theater Creative Kids Camp, young campers will create a script and set design from scratch. And DFT Musical Theater Camp’s  Rock Bottom production teaches preteens the basics of acting, singing, choreography, set building and painting, prop and costume design.  High school students interested in stretching their wings as an actor or dancer are encouraged to audition in May for the highly regarded ECS High School Performing Arts Workshop, July 8 – August 10.  ECS offers 103 courses and eight weeks of options to keep the whole family (adult courses are available, too) cool and happy all summer. ECS, a department of the Cave Creek Unified School District, provides quality, affordable courses, workshops and camps that meet student needs and interests. Classes are taught by CCUSD teachers, members of local nonprofit arts organizations and outside vendors selected for their rigorous and creative instruction. Visit www.ecsforall. org for the current ECS catalog.


Carefree

Desert Foothills Theater Announces May and June Events • J une 17–28: Act One Camp; 9am–4pm, ages 5–7. Kids write a play, rehearse, create the set, costumes and perform on the final day of camp. • June 17–28: Rock Bottom; 9am–4pm, ages 8–14. Full musical theater camp where kids learn all aspects of musical theater, participate in auditions, rehearsals, designing, creating and complete the week with a performance. The award-winning Desert Foothills Theater has been presenting live performances in the far North Valley since 1975. For tickets and more information about upcoming events, visit www.dftheater.org or call 480.488.1081.

Serving the Community Since 2002

The Desert Foothills Theater will present entertainment for the whole family in May and June. Seussical, Jr. opens Friday, May 10. Horton the Elephant, the Cat in the Hat, and everyone’s favorite Dr. Seuss characters spring to life onstage in Seussical, Jr., a fantastical musical extravaganza. Transporting audience from the Jungle of Nool to the Circus McGurkus, the Cat in the Hat narrates the story of Horton the Elephant, who discovers a speck of dust containing tiny people called the Whos. Horton must protect the Whos from a world of naysayers and dangers, all while protecting an abandoned egg. Although Horton faced ridicule, danger and a trial, ultimately the powers of friendship, loyalty, family and community emerge triumphant! Seussical performances are at 7pm Fridays and Saturdays, May 10, 11, 17 and 18, and at 2pm Sundays, May 12 and 19. Performances take place in the Cactus Shadows Theater, 33606 North 60th Street in Scottsdale. Tickets are $19 and may be purchased at www.dftheater.org. Jojo’s Jolly Tea Party will take place in the Cactus Shadows Theater on one day, Sunday, May 19, at 2pm. Tickets are $15, and may also be purchased online. Desert Foothills Theater Summer Camps start in June and offer creative classes for kids of all ages. “We teach teamwork,” explains Tia Wooley, managing director of the Desert Foothills Theater. “Learning to be a team player will build skills in collaboration, problem solving, focus, creativity, confidence, accountability, dedication, non-verbal communication, how to receive constructive feedback, perseverance and more. Bring your ‘shining star’ to Desert Foothills Theater to learn how process meets performance. Your child will learn the ins and outs of theater life, make new friends and build confidence to be in front of a crowd.” Dates and camps include: • June 3–14: Creative Kids Camp; 9am–noon, ages 5–7. Kids will take a book called “Bad Kitty does not like candy,” write a script and rehearse their play. They will also design and create masks for the characters. Final day of camp will include a performance of their play.

27

5.19


Carefree

Carefree Resident Honored for Work in the Humanities Long time Carefree resident and founding board member of Foothills Academy, Professor Joan McGregor received the Public Humanities Scholars — Dan Shilling Award from the Arizona Humanities Council April 14. The award “recognizes humanities scholars who have distinguished themselves by enhancing public understanding of the role the humanities play in transforming lives and strengthening communities and have been recognized leaders in promoting

Photo courtesy of Arizona Humanities Council

the humanities.” In recognizing McGregor, Arizona Humanities notes, “Professor McGregor has a sustained and significant record of ambassadorship and public engagement for the Humanities. Her ongoing project, ‘The Future of Food,’ has brought members of the community from diverse backgrounds together in various contexts. Her many projects and partnerships have demonstrated the value of Humanities research in addressing urgent problems of

our time and have engaged members of the public, academics across disciplines, and working professionals.” For more than 25 years, Arizona Humanities has honored and celebrated outstanding contributions to the humanities in the state by recognizing individuals and community organizations who have advanced the humanities in Arizona through their scholarship, leadership, support and advocacy. To learn more, visit www.azhumanities.org.

ave Creek

Carefree/C

TAKE ON E

Community

om YSunTimes.c

news.CIT

SCOTTSDAL

E

NORTHEAST

CAREFREE

PHOENIX

wn: Around To n Ma The Music

48

YON CITY BLACK CAN

FOUNTAIN

JANUARY

ANTHEM

LIFE IS FULL Take a Break and Stay Connected to

2019

, estic vehicles entic dom are and auth collectibles, automobilia the authentic rs, some of nd superca era one-of-a-ki ’60s to ’70s ted cove t usher world’s mos -Jackson will cles… Barrett action custom vehi ane auction of high-oct Auction, in a new year Scottsdale 48th Annual tsdale. As in during its Scot of rld ector at WestWo Jan. 12–20 Greatest Coll , The World’s Collector decades past epicenter of s will be the sands Car Auction entertain thou ive Week and Car Auction with interact sts usia ive enth of automot activities. a rtainment and has become exhibits, ente le Auction ctor “Our Scottsda in the colle r othe ke any rman tradition unli Jackson, chai ” said Craig ce the car industry, to experien e com le event, the world, who our Scottsda from around ertible heartbeat of Custom Conv e built enthusiasts ’54 Corvette ored to host auction is the pieces — we’v we are hon automobilia ms. While the on. “Every year of their drea s LFA or rare g Barrett-Jacks collector car enjoy.” exclusive Lexu ket includin and CEO of ing on the — like the le family will mar bidd who cars the the from on ctor cars colle dining comes ples: magic that ted collector s of enviable s, exhibits and A few exam . cove sand t vitie cles thou acti mos vehi to the of the custom t with fun e to some in addition to ‘70s era lifestyle even will be hom edible ‘60s automotive lable are incr tsdale Auction the ultimate avai Scot Also 2019 2). on’s (Lot #141 Barrett-Jacks 3) built by ring Edition pe (Lot #133 LFA Nürburg Custom Cou tang” a ‘12 Lexus Split Window “SN65 Mus et Corvette p; the ‘65 a ’63 Chevrol n Speed Sho ody cars and America es two unib lly integrat Jeff Hayes terfu mas ‘61 a which on; and (Lot #1325), s of producti by 40 year the separated 18.1) from Starfire (#10 Oldsmobile k Collection. Bryan Fran tion Auc ale ttsd The 2019 Sco e labl avai now ket is preview doc Looking ance online. Adv ary to view for more Janu k ticket nine-day action? Chec tickets, tion collector car Exceptional and informa Rare & the 10 or packages page out “Find the also on e are insid ages E. e Auction” on VIP Pack to GET MOR al at Worldwid s.com ition Time add YSun For visit news.CIT available. ettabout Barr Edition or information Nürburgring 480.421.6694 12 Lexus LFA Jackson, call .com. son jack rettvisit www.bar

14

oto Photo y Ph rary Librar Lib it hibit Exhib Ex

5

“CITYSunTimes is the Premier publication in the North Valley!”

ve Creek Carefree/Ca

~ CITYSunTimes Reader

STOMER POSTAL CU

Serving the Community Since 2002

2002

HILLS

HE P FOR T GEAR U HTH ANNUAL IG N FORTY-E DALE AUCTIO S T T O C S CAVE CREEK

Your Community and Local Happenings!

Q Opens Naked BB

28

llence Since

News Exce

TAK OF COURTESY s CITYSunTime

ws Excellence

Community Ne

s.com s.CITYSunTime

new

CAREFREE

CAVE CREEK

SCOTTSDALE

Fine Art & Wine Festival Returns

Since 2002

S FOUNTAIN HILL

ANTHEM

TAKE ONE COURTESY OF CITYSunTimes 9 JANUARY 201

CITYSunTimes covers the North Valley corridor from Scottsdale to Black Canyon City. 40,000 copies printed – delivered and available for free pick-up.

CATION UNIFIED EDU CAVE CREEK‘GRANTS THE DISTRICT’ FOUNDATION

NORTHEAST

CITY BLACK CANYON

PHOENIX

ation k Unified Educ he Cave Cree best (CCUEF) is Foundation g yearly showcasin known for its the talent, Rock of musical s, presents h not only grow whic rict, ical Dist mus students’ applauds and ed dollars s much need talents, but raise s. for classroom EF celebrated CCU , ester Last sem ol District k Unified Scho the Cave Cree grants whose teachers TAKE ONE (CCUSD) the District with Grant COURTESY OF were funded of the bers mem g CITYSunTimes alon and brought cation Edu h Yout e Creek CCYEF (Cav FEBRUARY 2019 rters from and two repo S ol’sANTHEM Foundation) Scho HILL High TAIN Shadows com YON (Cactus FOUN essCITY CAN er). CSPr news.CITYSunTimes. ENIX BLACK run newspap NORTHEAST PHO winner studentd sroom LE rict awar Dist TSDA t the pillars are: Clas CREEK SCOT annual Gran CCUEF’s four gy); Music During the CAREFREE CAVE travels to the w uding Technolo SD school bus (Desert Willo ; and Supplies (incl event, a CCU + Ms. Bayless and Wellness s for iving grants. e: Arts; Health teachers rece $2,268 for iPad Dat the the ry) of and the enta ols e ght Elem scho Sav are brou Learning. their classes said, International the art studio rised Teachers and Burdick Rodeo Days school and surp rintendent (Desert Sun the Supe um of t d, chba fron cate harde to the jump off + Ms. Kers Put group of dedi Carefre . Trustees who 00 for “Don’t “CCUEF is a only want the e 2019on ons illspage 25Library by the CCUEF Academy) $2,5 out th Footh le” t check, ballo esert volunteers who g k Pick gian ing a in a They in ec work th Love ols. nn with Ch scho p Your Heal the bus begi February as “I students and student grou ERE! Editionunced son best for our This year, a hers have po and Mr. Niel IT’S Hl Events anno — h.” The event was and flowers. year that teac + Ms. Stum ol) High School My Library Mont make sure each Specia s Middle Scho additional ymous from Cactus Shadows (Sonoran Trail g with a ity to access nse to an anon ry alon rtun respo libra in bus, 2 oppo & and ted 1 the s the ch initia $15,000 CCYEF, also rode $1,000 for Fren their classroom gift to raise up to ographer and resources for lucky to matching grant , Ms. Dahlke, tional CS Press reporter and phot grateful and and teen educa + Ms. Lindstrom CCUSD is so D’Ambrosi to enhance youth foundation es. Watts and Ms. ll but mighty local dignitari at the library. Ms. sma ams ers: this progr l Art and winn Inspire have services s Middle Visua mission, Here are the 2018 our s to raise these (Sonoran Trial supporting pillars.” for Special Ms. Taylor and @ just four week ugh their four SeriesWith for donations School) $1,844 + Ms. Cardin, library is asking Excellence, thro CCUEF, nology (Black Mountain funds mation on nd, the rters and advocates to help rise infor Ms. Steward Education Tech e mor Holla For g. s, Fausmed $2,302 for from suppo to visit the at www.ccuef.or klin,isMs. Library is welco Con Elementary) one r + Mr. their website Desert Foothills Every Cente Petrine, g it a Chromebooks Ms. mont to the challenge. h of February visit tesogn,the os of relies on kindergarten community, makin Ms.ryKnu durin rted library that e now to see phot Libra Spiess of services, programs to the (Lone Mountain Ms. array a member-suppo andvast that serves MORE: go onlin unity Skin Hendrie the ssic Creek institution verner ol) to the GET CCUSD students. + Ms. Classic its members, comm disco e Cla d Cave to Ms. dle Scho Car preschool value efree forarea. d s Midrces Carefre 50ills t awardees and the generosity of y Trail offere $2,2 gran librar ry) oran the The enta . resou (Son ng. Elem Desert Footh s.com gy to for fundi ly programs and Rally Car the entire technolo ng staff Car Ral residents Visit news.CITYSunTime s and local donors addi ert and invite for (Des es 00 a ry servic $2,5 Libra y of quality + Ms. Camaras community. check provides a variet ry) $2,500 for the Science lab. se the shelves, Willow Elementa to, “Come in, brow or sit down and read El periodico out a book or two, again.” fall in love all over attend an event – orters supp y librar Beyond donating, their ng ence by shari can make a differ Library t Desert Foothills enthusiasm abou ook or media, on Faceb through social is invited alib). Everyone Instagram (@dfl and love the library they why share to during s to donate encourage other ry Month.” “I Love My Libra ) Library is a 501(c ills Footh t Deser tions ization. All dona : (3) nonprofit organ r for be matched dolla Soul Connection eers up to $15,000 will ctible. unt dedu Vol tax ry are Ter Why dollar. Donations d at 38443 North The library is locate For in Cave Creek. Schoolhouse Road 88.2286 ation, call 480.4 additional inform rg. tfoothillslibrary.o or visit www.deser

26

Carefree/Cave

Community News

Creek

Excellence Since

Present and past issues are available online!

2002

ur Libraesry ve for Yo d teen servic an Show SogramntegiftLo th to support you Matching

28

47

... committed to help drive customers to your business! news.CITYSunTimes.com

21

Carefree/Cave Cr

eek

24

Boys Basketball Cactus Shadows State Heads to

g year

5.19

NORTHEAST PHOE NIX

Arizona Renaissance Festival

Community News

CAVE CREEK

Excellence Since

BLACK CANYON CITY

or the sixth year in a row, chefs from some of the state’s most popul ar restaurants will use their culinary prowess to re-imagine one of the beloved flavors of Girl Scout Cookies — Do-Si-Dos, Savannah Smiles, Tagalo Samoas, ngs, Thin Mints and Trefoils — into a custom dessert menu item during the Girl Scout Cooki Dessert Challenge. e Each restaurant will feature its dessert on their menu Feb. 1–28, with a portio n of the proceeds from each dessert sold directly suppo rting Girl Scouting in Arizona. “Girl Scouts–Ariz ona Cactus-Pine Council (GSACPC) is thrilled that both Rusconi’s American Kitchen and The Thumb are taking part again. They’v e been with us for all six years and are major suppo rters as a result,” says Susan de Queljoe, senior associate of marketing and communications. “It’s also so inspiring to see Original

FOUNTAIN HILLS

2002 ANTHEM

TAKE ONE

COURTESY OF CITYSunTimes

FEBRUARY 2019

HELP WANTED ADS AND INSERTS ARE ALSO AVAILABLE!

Contact BOB HESSELGESSER 602.214.7661 Bob@CITYSunTimes.com 2002

47

CAREFREE

Desert ways to support Looking for more Host See “Library to Foothills Library? on page 28. Tenth Annual Gala”

Serving the Community Since

news.CITYSunTimes.com

SCOTTSDALE

having a winnin tball program is Boys Varsity Baske on page 35. ws High School fs. Read the story The Cactus Shado d to the State playof and are now heade


MAYOR BUNCH WRITES... By Mayor Ernie Bunch

Join the Chamber for Breakfast in May Join members of the Carefree Cave Creek Chamber of Commerce for an informational monthly business breakfast presentation and early morning networking. This month’s breakfast event will be held May 30, 7:30–9:30am, at Harold’s Cave Creek Corral, 6895 East Cave Creek Road. To contact Harold’s call 480.488.1906 or visit www.haroldscorral.com. The cost to attend is $8 for member and $15 for non-members. To learn more about the Chamber or find other events, call 480.488.3381 or visit www.carefreecavecreek.org.

The Foothills Food Bank & Resource Center announced the creation of Pantry Patrons, a new partnership program. According to Pam DiPietro, executive director of Foothills Food Bank, the new program will allow individuals and businesses to become monthly, quarterly or yearly contributors to the food bank. Contributors can call 480.488.1145 or visit www.foothillsfoodbank.com to find out more. In 2018, Foothills Food Bank and Resource Center provided more than 1,119,952 pounds of food to clients in the year, $97,672 in financial assistance and other life necessities to individuals and families in the desert foothills, which encompasses a 180-square mile area that includes Anthem, Black Canyon City, Carefree, Cave Creek, Desert Hills, New River, North Phoenix and North Scottsdale The Foothills Food Bank & Resource Center is located at 6038 East Hidden Valley Drive in Cave Creek. For additional information, call 480.488.1145 or visit www.foothillsfoodbank.com.

Harold’s Ball Wash Open Set for May 13

Participants and sponsors sought Harold’s Cave Creek Corral will hold its annual charity golf tournament Monday, May 13, at The Boulders Club. Harold’s  Ball Wash Open is a charity event hosted every year in support of the Camelot horse program and local charities such as Foothills Food Bank.  “We have made a significant difference in the lives of many children and families in our community,” says Daniel Piacquadio, Harold’s Corral owner and general manager. “It’s a great, fun event, which includes a prime rib dinner at Harold’s following the tournament.” Harold’s is seeking foursomes and sponsorships for this event. Businesses and individuals can also donate items for the raffle and silent auctions.  The Boulders Club is located at 34631 North Tom Darlington Drive in Carefree. For information, contact Harold’s at 480.488.1906.

Serving the Community Since 2002

May is upon us. The fall colors of out-of-state license plates have severely diminished. It’s hot and getting hotter as the month goes on. April and “Bike Week” is in the rearview mirror. Speaking of which, I am in receipt of correspondence complaining about the activities and congestion in Cave Creek during this event. Arizona Bike Week starts out as a proclamation by the governor. I don’t know which Arizona governor started it but MAYOR it is here to stay. Town of Cave Creek When the economy began to tank in 2007, and went 480.488.1400 really bad in 2008, I’m told that our former long-term Town www.cavecreek.org manager encouraged the owner of The Hideaway to make this an event in Cave Creek as well. This was to help replenish Town revenues that were going to be lost because of the economic downturn. Since that time “Bike Week” has continued to contribute to the Town’s revenues through sales tax. While individual sales tax numbers are protected from prying eyes by state law and I am not privy to actual individual businesses numbers, I am told that there is a bump in revenue to the Town of somewhere between $30K and $50K that had not been realized prior to the local businesses taking advantage of the event. I know it is an inconvenience to our residents and some of the behavior is not what we would wish for our town but, as long as nothing illegal is taking place the broadness of the First Amendment takes precedence. The deputies and traffic control costs are not borne by the Town but are covered by the businesses that benefit from the event. If you look closely at your property tax statement you will not find a line item that goes directly to your town. That is because there isn’t a property tax that supports Cave Creek. A huge amount of the Town’s revenue comes from sales tax, so the continued success of our town hinges on the success of the businesses.  This is simply one more example of Cave Creek becoming a victim of its own success. Imagine if you will just exactly what would happen if we did not allow the advance preparations of traffic control and security with this event. Conditions would be completely out of control and I believe some of the celebrants would show up with a chip on their shoulders.  As May comes upon us, those businesses that have behaved like the ant and not the grasshopper will still be here when the fall colors of license plates begin to once again change.

Food Bank Announces Pantry Patrons

29

5.19


Cave Creek Serving the Community Since 2002

30

CSHS Students Receive Young Women’s Service Awards Four Cactus Shadows High School (CSHS) students received Soroptimist International of Saguaro Foothills Young Women’s Service Awards in March. The awards ceremony was held at Foothills Community Foundation’s Holland Community Center Tuesday, March 26. Soroptimist is an international service organization of women who volunteer in their communities. Their mission is to improve the lives of women and girls through programs leading to social and economic empowerment. Soroptimist International is active at all the major United Nations centers around the world. They hold General Consultative Status with the UN’s Economic and Social Council and work to ensure that the voices of women and girls around the world are included in international decision making and policy setting. The 2019 Young Women’s Service Awards recipients are:

Emily Ahern — CSHS class of 2020: Emily received the award for her volunteerism at Wild at Heart.

Emma Torrey — CSHS class of 2019: Emma received the award for her participation in the Superintendent’s Student Cadre.

Lauren Anderson — CSHS class of 2021: Lauren received the award for her participation in the Veteran’s Heritage Project.

Jessica Brashear — CSHS class of 2021: Jessica received the award for her participation in the Cave Creek Youth Education Foundation.

Dr. Debbi Burdick said, “We are extremely proud of these accomplished young women and their commitment to their community and service. They are exemplars for other students in the spirit of community involvement.” For details, visit www.ccusd93.org or www.sisaguarofoothills.org.

5.19


Part of the Maricopa County’s Regional Parks System, Spur Cross Ranch Conservation Area encompasses 2,154 acres of diverse, rugged upper Sonoran Desert. The park offers ranger-led programs each month — here are a few of the programs coming up in May.

Cave Creek

Explore Spur Cross in Marvelous May!

May 5: Geology, Gold, and Streams Walk 8–10:30am Deer Vetch Learn about the geology and streams of the Spur Cross region on an easy two-mile walk with nationally known earth science author Thomas McGuire. Visit an abandoned gold mine, Nutcracker Rock and a Hohokam rock art site along Cottonwood Wash. Bring plenty of water and your natural curiosity. Meet at the main Spur Cross trailhead area. No reservations required.

Dragonfly Trail bridge placed in early March

May 18: Full Moon Hike 8–10pm The conservation area is a different experience when seen softly illuminated by the silver moon. While the group will attempt to minimize the use of flashlights, bring one in case it is needed. Moderate hike.

Serving the Community Since 2002

May 11: Life Along the Creek 8–10:30am Join rangers as they look at the plants and animals that live in the riparian area along a perennial stretch of Cave Creek. The hike will take the group through the Jewel of the Creek Preserve and along the lower Dragonfly Trail for a distance of approximately 1.5 miles. No reservations are required; meet at the main trailhead area where restrooms and picnic tables are located. Moderate hike.

31

A Desert Tortoise spotted along Spur Cross Trail in April.

May 25: Hohokam Houses-the Ruins of Spur Cross 8–11am Join staff for this 2.5-mile hike that will introduce visitors to the rich archaeological history of the area. See evidence of prehistoric Hohokam dwellings and learn about their culture while trekking up to one of their mesa-top compounds. Bring plenty of water. No dogs on this hike. No reservations are required; meet at the main trailhead area where restrooms and picnic tables are located. Moderate hike. Spur Cross Ranch is located at 44000 North Spur Cross Road in Cave Creek. For details, call 602.506.2930, Ext. 8, or visit www.maricopacountyparks.net. Photos courtesy of Spur Cross Ranch Conservation Area

5.19


Cave Creek

Check Out Your Local Library in May From photo contests and movie marathons to learning how to tell one’s own story and learning the true-life stories of others (and so much more), Desert Foothills Library has a lot to offer area residents this month. All programs are free, except where noted. DFL 2019 Photography Contest This competition is open to all, regardless of age. Awards are given to 1st, 2nd, and 3rd place with cash awards. Entries must be delivered in person. Drop-off times are Friday, May 10, 3–6pm and Saturday, May 11, noon–4pm. The entry fee is $5 per image. Payable by cash or check only. Free for youth age 17 and under. For more information, find the full application at www.dfla.org.

Serving the Community Since 2002

May 14: Guided Autobiography 2–3:30pm An introduction to Guided Autobiography, a method developed by Dr. James Birren, for helping people document their life stories. Guided by a

32

5.19

trained instructor, participants in this class will experience how easy, and fun, it is to write about their lives for their own enjoyment and/or as a way to leave a written legacy for their loved ones. Roselyn O’Connell began writing at a very young age. She has an MLS from Arizona State University and recently completed the instructor training course for Guide Autobiography from The Birren Center for Autobiographical Studies. She has led education and empowerment classes for women in Pakistan, Iraq, Jordan, the West Bank, Swaziland, Lesotho, Namibia, Ghana, Brazil and Trinidad-Tobago. RSVP for this free class online or by phone. May 18: The Stunning True Story told in the Book Red Notice by Bill Browder 10:30am–12:30pm A true account of high finance, and murder in Russia and one American’s fight for justice via the Magnitsky Act and what that Act does to V. Putin and Oligarchs who are looting Russia. Also, an update on the struggle of families of Holocaust victims as well as German Chancellor Markel to claim thousands of Nazi Stolen Paintings taken out of hiding in Russia in 1995 and held by Putin at the Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg. Mary F. Cook will tell these stories. She is a member of The International Foundation for Art Research. All proceeds benefit the Library. Tickets are $6 and may be purchased online or by phone. May 17: A Star is Born Movie Marathon All day event Join the library for a movie, or two, or three. The library will show three versions of the classic film throughout the day. Enjoy refreshments and three versions of A Star is Born. No registration is required 9:30am–noon: A Star is Born (1954) featuring Judy Garland and James Mason. Join for donuts, coffee and orange juice. 12:15-2:45pm: A Star is Born (1976) featuring Barbra Streisand and Kris Kristofferson. Pizza and refreshments will be offered. 3–5:15pm: A Star is Born (2018) featuring Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper. Enjoy popcorn and refreshments.  The library will be closed Monday, May 27, in honor of Memorial Day. Desert Foothills Library is located at 38443 North Schoolhouse Road in Cave Creek. For information on these or other programs offered at the library, or to register for events, call 480.488.2286 or visit www.desertfoothillslibrary.org.


Serving the Community Since 2002

At the March 11 Cave Creek Unified School District (CCUSD) Governing Board business meeting, the board approved the hiring of Jim Swetter for the principal position at Cactus Shadows High School (CSHS), Dr. Patty Jensen for principal at Lone Mountain Elementary School and Aaron Pettinato for principal at Horseshoe Trails Elementary School (HTES). Swetter is currently serving as the interim principal at Cactus Shadows High School for the 2018–19 school year. Previously, he was the assistant principal for Operations and Athletics at Cactus Shadows and prior to that, he was the Dean of Students.  He came to CSHS as a social studies teacher and served as the Varsity wrestling coach. In 2010, Swetter moved to the Valley from Ohio where he taught social studies in the Woodridge Local Schools and coached football, wrestling, and track and field. He earned his Bachelor of Science in Education from Kent State University, where he was a four-year letterman on the wrestling team. He has earned a Master of Arts in Education; Administration and Supervision and a Master of Arts in Education; Curriculum and Instruction (2008); both from the University of Phoenix.  Dr. Jensen is coming to CCUSD from Texas where she has served as an elementary school principal for the past seven years. She earned a Ph.D. in Educational Administration and Foundations in 2011 from Illinois State University. Her research focuses on how to implement successful two-way dual language programs at the elementary school level. She has received a number of awards throughout her career, including a six-star distinction for her school by the State of Texas in 2017–18. As flattering as these honors have been, Dr. Jensen believes that the purpose of elementary education is to ensure all students have access to an exceptional learning environment that recognizes their strengths, builds on them, and, thus, prepares them for the future. Pettinato is currently serving as the interim principal for Horseshoe Trails Elementary School for the remainder of the 2018–19 school year.  He has been a CCUSD employee since 2006, beginning his educator career as a student teacher in a fourth/fifth grade combination classroom at Horseshoe Trails Elementary School.  He was hired as a teacher at HTES that year and taught fifth and sixth grades at HTES for 10 years.  He was promoted to Dean of Students at Cactus Shadows High School in 2016.  Pettinato has two MA degrees from ASU, one in Elementary Education and a second in Educational Leadership.  He is a graduate of the 2014–15 CCUSD Aspiring Administrators Academy and has been a coach, trainer and valued member of many site and district committees.  He is among the first group of educators to travel to China to help launch the Chinese Immersion program at HTES.  He received the District’s highest recognition as a recipient of the Helping Us Grow Award (H.U.G.) in 2010.  CCUSD is the number one school district in Maricopa County for student achievement, and serves Carefree, Cave Creek, Phoenix and Scottsdale students.  For more information, visit www.ccusd93.org.

Cave Creek

CCUSD Announces Three New Principals for 2019–20 School Year

33

5.19


Cave Creek

Archaeology Society to Hold Final Event of the Season

Photo: Gordon P. Hanson

Serving the Community Since 2002

Photo: Bob Hernbrode

34

5.19

he Desert Foothills Chapter of the Arizona Archaeology Society will hold its final meeting of the season May 8. Guest speaker Janine Hernbrode will present “Patterns in Petroglyphs: Hints of the Hohokam Cosmology on the Landscape.” One is nice; two is interesting; three is a pattern. Fifteen years of rock art recording on four major petroglyph sites in Southern Arizona has enabled assembly of motif details, drawings and photographs of more than 16,000 glyphs located in landscapes with similar characteristics. This is a vast collection of data in searchable spreadsheets representing images known to anthropologists for some

time recording the belief systems of the inhabitants. The presentation will discuss a tiered universe, how and in what form people emerged from a lower world, flowers and their connections, bell rocks, and the importance of the boulder upon which the petroglyph was made. These basic understandings can enhance one’s own visits and enjoyment of petroglyph sites. Hernbrode is an independent rock art recorder and researcher based in and working near Tucson. Wary of becoming relentless quantifiers through rock art recording, she and her research partner, Dr. Peter Boyle, worked together to collect and analyze data obtained from their recordings

of Tumamoc Hill (a three-year project of the Archaeological and Historical Society and the University of Arizona), the Sutherland Wash Rock Art District (a six-year project for the Coronado National Forest), Cocoraque Butte and Cocoraque Ranch (a five-year project for the Bureau of Land Management, the Arizona Archaeological and Historical Society and the private owner of Cocoraque Ranch). The Desert Foothills Chapter meets September through May on the second Wednesday of each month in Cave Creek and features well-known guest lecturers during the meetings. The meetings are open to the general public at no cost with the exception of the December Christmas Party that is members only. Refreshments will be available at 7pm and the meeting begins at 7:30pm, usually ending prior to 9pm. Meetings are held in the Community Room (Maitland Hall) at The Good Shepard of the Hills Episcopal Church, 6502 East Cave Creek Road, Cave Creek. For information, visit www.azarchsoc. wildapricot.org/desertfoothills.


Cave Creek

Salon Provides ‘True Customer Service’ to Cave Creek Jagged Edge Salon just reached its one-year anniversary, with its expert hairstylist who feels it’s better to give the customer the style they want; unless, the customer prefers their expert advice. “That is called true customer service,” says stylist Deborah. “We offer our specialty haircuts to all our clients, male or female; Babe hair extensions, that can bedazzle you; Brazilian blowouts/keratin treatments; single, double process, toners, balayage, ombre, or corrective haircoloring, using OYA/ Goldwell products. Talk about hair body, we love body waves or perms designed to flow with the choice or style, using the proper tools and products in doing so; and, for those proms/weddings/evening updos or roller sets, we specialize in creating the most unique styles ever, even throw in a couple of braids, if needed; our eyebrow waxing designed so precise, that it fits just you, along with our gentle facial wax. Last but [not] least, we offer our facial makeup for anyone needed to go along with that special occasion or hairdo.” Jagged Edge Salon is snuggled in the Safeway Shopping Center, next to Subway in the Tatum Ranch area, 29834 North Cave Creek Road, Suite 106, in Cave Creek. Hairstylist and owner, George Tsigourakos, and stylist, Deborah, believe in giving the customer the style coiffure they want, rather than just “cookie cutting” each person’s hair the same way as the next. “Come in and check us out. I think you will love it too,” says Deborah. Call for an appointment and get a free consultation 480.563.3157. See Jagged Edge Salon’s May/June coupon on page 32, just in time for Mother’s Day.

Serving the Community Since 2002

35

Your Community News

All Month Long

Search CITY Sun Times

5.19


36

5.19

Serving the Community Since 2002

Cave Creek


Valley Bands Take the Stage at Music in May

ProMusica Names New Artistic Director, Principal Conductor

Five weeks of free concerts come to life at Community Park as Music in May returns for an 18th season. A different act takes the stage each Friday in May from 7pm to 9pm. Performers will bring a variety of classics and modern favorites to life at the Amphitheater, 41703 North Gavilan Peak Parkway. Attendees at the free, family-friendly event are encouraged to bring blankets, lawn chairs, picnics and flashlights. For the seventh year in a row, food trucks will be on site for the opening performance; an ice cream truck will be open for purchases the remaining weeks. This year’s lineup includes:

May 10: Neon Dedicated to delivering the best musical experience every time they take the stage, Neon has performed for the biggest names in the corporate world, countless weddings and every nightclub that seeks quality live entertainment. May 17: Radio London A high energy dance-pop band based in Phoenix, Radio London has decades of combined professional experience. Get ready to dance and have a good time; Radio London plays favorite songs from the 1960s to the present.

May 24: Rhythm Edition Rhythm edition is an all-variety party and show band with seven lead singers, each with their own style of vocals. May 31: City Nights Band This high-energy band plays greats from Bruno Mars to the Beatles, Michael Jackson to Journey, and Pink to the Band Perry.

Music in May attracts about 2,500 residents and guests each week. Anthem Community Council Special Events Director Michele DeMichele said, “This is one of Anthem’s most-loved community events. Residents pour into our beautiful Community Park to enjoy food, fun and fellowship with family and friends.” BrightView Landscapes, The Prickett Group and State Farm-Justin Simons Agency are this year’s Music in May event sponsors. To learn more about Music in May, visit www.onlineatanthem.com/music-in-may.

Patti Graetz, well known vocalist and conductor in the Valley and beyond, has been named artistic director/ principal conductor of ProMusica Arizona (PMAZ), according to Jan Sandoz, PMAZ Board president. “We are thrilled to have Patti move into the role of artistic director/ principal conductor of PMAZ,” says Sandoz. “She has served as interim conductor for the past season, and her expertise, energy and creativity, in addition to great conducting skills, are exceptional. Under her leadership this year, PMAZ concerts

It makes sense to get your company name, logo and service known in your community.

Serving the Community Since 2002

Patti Graetz; Photo courtesy of Azy Scotten Photography

May 3: Cold Shott and the Hurricane Horns (Food Truck Friday) This band got their start in Phoenix in 1990 as the three-piece Cold Shot Blues Band. Now, Cold Shott and the Hurricane Horns is one of Arizona’s longest-running, successful entertainment ensembles, having been wowing Arizona audiences for 29 years.

drew accolades from all audiences.” With a music career spanning more than 30 years, Graetz, has been with ProMusica Arizona since 2015, first as assistant conductor and conductor of the Women in Song vocal ensemble, and now in her new role. Not only is she a skilled conductor, but she is an awardwinning soprano, having sung leading roles with major opera companies including Houston Grand Opera and Arizona Opera. A Valley resident since 1989, Graetz was head of vocal departments at the Arizona Conservatory for Arts and Academics in 2003 and at the Arizona School for the Arts from 1998–2002. She was director of Music at Shepherd of the Valley Lutheran Church in Phoenix from 1995–2004. Before that, she was director of Music at Scottsdale Presbyterian Church. She attended Concordia College in Moorhead, Minnesota where she was a soloist in the world-renowned Concordia Choir under the direction of Paul J. Christiansen. Since its founding nearly 17 years ago, and with almost 100 multigenerational singers and instrumentalists, the group has performed more than 177 times for over 131,000 people. PMAZ is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization and is supported by the Arizona Commission on the Arts, which receives support from the State of Arizona and the National Endowment for the Arts.

37

You see us. They will see you.

602.214.7661

Bob@CITYSunTimes.com

5.19


COMMUNITY VOICES

Happiness… and Holocaust

Serving the Community Since 2002

Break Out the Flip-Flops & Walk for Those in Need

38

5.19

UMOM New Day Centers, a leader in shelter, services and housing for Arizona families, single women and youth experiencing homelessness, has officially made it into the Guinness Book of World Records for the Largest Thong Sandal 1k Race. Last September, UMOM celebrated its 10th Annual Walk the Walk to End Homelessness with a successful attempt to break the existing world record of 1,346 participants. The UMOM community rallied nearly 1,600 people from companies, churches, families and neighborhoods to put on flip-flops and support the effort to end homelessness in the community. Not only did UMOM make a new world record but the organization raised much-needed funds for its emergency shelters, comprehensive services and innovative housing solutions that are designed to meet the unique needs of each family and individual served. With a 12 percent increase in people experiencing homelessness from 2017 to 2018, the need is still great. Over 150 families are on a waitlist to escape the unsafe environment of living on the streets, sleeping in cars or residing in unstable living conditions. The next Walk the Walk to End Homelessness will be held September 21, 6–9am, at the Phoenix Zoo, and Valley residents are invited to help defend the world record, all while raising awareness about homelessness and raising funds for programs and services that help the most vulnerable. Visit www.umom.org/walk for more details and to sign up.

RABBI ROBERT L. KRAVITZ Northeast Valley

Joy-filled times of redemption and rebirth. Many of us just celebrated the holy days of Pesach (Passover) and Easter. Family time. Good food. Fancy new spring clothing. Travels to enjoy seeing relatives. Days of revelry and joy, happiness and fun. And now we are into the month of May where many eyes tear, families gather in sadness, and memories are all we have of our ancestors from the Holocaust. Yom ha-Shoah, Holocaust Remembrance Day is May 2, or the 27th day of Nisan, on the Hebrew calendar. Reflecting on the multiple generations lost to the Nazis, six million murdered, including a million and a half innocent children. We cry as we remember so many whose death was needless, without reason, absent of compassion. In everyone’s life there are times of happiness and times of sadness. But grief so deep that it carries through generations around the world is seldom noted. There will surely be commemorations; names of the murdered will be read publicly; solemn memorial services will be conducted. And still we ask… why? Why such hatred, prejudice, bigotry and horrific acts? As rabbis, we are taught that the most difficult answer is to the simple one-word question, “Why?” For some, there is no answer, never will there be an answer. How can we recall all the precious children whose lives could have brought us cures to disease, beautiful music and stunning inventions? How can we look back at the faces of family members eradicated from the planet, surviving only in smoke? Why do we still have to endure swastikas and anti-Semitism in

Arizona, the United States of America and globally? When will hatred, prejudice, bigotry and violent acts be squashed, and its vitriol washed away? Our world could be celebrating joyous times in harmony. We should be recognizing the faces of so many who do good and not evil, showing love for neighbors, lifting up the righteous. But day after day we see acts of hatred spilling into our homes and cities, and few stand against bigotry. Kudos to those who do. Yom ha-Shoah is just one day on the calendar. A day to remember the atrocities that occur even today because of hate. Yom ha-Shoah, a moment in our busy schedules to reflect on what happens when good people stay silent, when those who could make a difference slide under their covers and allow their neighbors to continue to suffer the pain and horror inflicted by demagogues and hate-mongers. Maybe this year, the world will finally begin to recognize that bigotry, prejudice and hatred — from the top of the mountain to the deepest valley — is wrong. Maybe this year we will be able to join hands in love and compassion; to challenge hatred and bigotry and anti-Semitism wherever it spews its odious and disgusting violence. Maybe this year, starting with this Yom ha-Shoah, we will retake our world; and by remembering those faces, begin to heal and then celebrate both rebirth and redemption. Rabbi Robert L. Kravitz, D.D., is known Valley-wide for his more than three decades of support for civil and human rights, and the positive efforts of law enforcement. A volunteer police chaplain, he regularly lectures on related subjects, while working part-time as Hospital Chaplaincy Coordinator for Jewish Family & Children’s Service. Contact him at rrlkdd@hotmail.com.

news.CITYSunTimes.com


No Confusion with a Fusion: 2019 Fusion Energi Titanium JULIA DROZ SERAFINE HER Certified

StoryFest and Author Showcase Coming in June Book lovers, aspiring writers and Valley families are invited to enjoy the KJZZ Arizona StoryFest & Authors Showcase at Mesa Convention Center June 1. Families can experience a creative Children’s Stage area, which includes interactive stories and crafts. Other free activities include the Authors Showcase  where visitors will  meet over 50 of Arizona’s talented writers and can purchase their books on the spot. The Authors Showcase and Workshop is in conjunction with Arizona State University’s Virginia G. Piper Center for Creative Writing. KJZZ is also partnering with Storytellers Project (www.storytellersproject. com) and South Mountain Community College Storytelling Institute (www. southmountaincc.edu/storytelling) to host talented storytellers sharing fascinating stories all day long. The outstanding storytelling lineup is the ultimate celebration of this classic art form.  The KJZZ Arizona Story Fest and Authors Showcase will be held Saturday, June 1, 10am–4pm, at Mesa Convention Center, Building C, 263 North Center Street in Mesa. There is no fee for entry to the event, however, tickets must be purchased for Main Storytellers Stage events. For complete event information, visit http://storyfest.kjzz.org.

getting on and off the freeway when the exit comes up quicker than anticipated. I also enjoyed the quietness of the car while driving on the highway...my kids must have been at home! The exterior of the car is “sleek and shimmering like a unicorn,” Gabby remarked. It has a nice look to it from past models and this midsize gas saver gave me a luxury feel even when the kids were kicking the back of my seat.

MSRP: $38,085 Price of Model Tested: $36,085.00 – Includes Fusion Energi Discount Note: This is a Plug-In Hybrid Vehicle Electricity-Gasoline

The 2019 Ford Fusion Energi Titanium is a no-nonsense vehicle. It’s straight to the point, an easy drive and leaves the driver super confident with their choice of car. Definitely, no confusion here! For more vehicle reviews, visit www. hercertified.com.

GUARANTEED. SAVE 77%

The Happy Family Feast 2 (5 oz.) Filet Mignons 2 (5 oz.) Top Sirloins 2 (4 oz.) Boneless Pork Chops 4 (3 oz.) Kielbasa Sausages 4 (4 oz.) Omaha Steaks Burgers 4 (3.5 oz.) Chicken Fried Steaks All-Beef Meatballs (12 oz. pkg.) 4 (2.8 oz.) Potatoes au Gratin 4 (4 oz.) Caramel Apple Tartlets Signature Seasoning Packet 48269FNX $ $213.91* separately COMBO PRICE

GET 28 ITEMS

+ 4 FREE BURGERS

Serving the Community Since 2002

The Serafine household is filled with confusion on a daily basis. It can range anywhere from homework assignments to who does what chores on what day of the week. Piano lessons, Girl Scouts, soccer, ballet and working at our coffee shop on Saturday mornings, even with a calendar on the wall, leads to “misunderstandings.” We’ve actually made confusion a lifestyle, sort of “the new normal.” So, if there is any way to simplify our life, well, mostly mine, sign me up! That’s exactly what the 2019 Ford Fusion Energi Titanium has accomplished! First of all, the Fusion only comes in one model trim level. I would like to thank Ford for not bombarding me with several different models and trim levels that would leave me in a further state of confusion. This happens to me all the time with the kids...they even get called the dog’s name! (What were we thinking naming the dog Holly?) Ford makes it easy and simple, just how life decisions should be (wink, wink). Even though the SE Luxury and Platinum trim levels have been dropped, the Fusion still has well equipped features. For me and my party of five, the most important feature is the cabin space. The Fusion definitely

is equipped with plenty of room for five adults or in my case, a nine year old with five different purses with her at all times, a seven year old who is attached to her unicorn pillow, a five year old who has to take everything PAW Patrol with her when we leave the house and a linebacker for a husband. Not only is the cabin roomy, but I found the placement of the interior instrument display very user friendly. The controls are clearly labeled, and everything is done pretty much at a glance or by voice, which thanks to today’s technology, my kids figured out how it worked before I did! The Fusion is also very functional with its lane-keeping system/alert, rear view camera, reverse sensing system and voice activated navigation. A lot of these features are only available on a higher trim model on other brands of vehicles, and at an increased price. This is the least confusing vehicle we’ve driven that comes with a reasonable price. Saving the best feature for last, the annual fuel cost. Anywhere I can save my family money is a bonus for me. Of course, actual results will vary, but based on 15,000 miles a year, combining electric and gasoline, you are looking at an annual fuel cost of only $750! The combo of electric and gasoline gets you 103 MPGe. That’s a lot of trips to ballet and back. The ride itself is very sturdy. The Fusion accelerates quickly, which I need

Communtiy

COMMUNITY VOICES

39

4999

ORDER NOW! 1.866.371.3611 ask for 48269FNX www.OmahaSteaks.com/dinner262 *Savings shown over aggregated single item base price. Limit 2 Happy Family Feast packages. Your 4 free burgers will be sent to each shipping address that includes (48269). Standard S&H will be added per address. Flat rate shipping and reward cards and codes cannot be used with this offer. Not valid with other offers. All product, prices and sales are subject to Omaha Steaks, Inc. Terms of Use and Pricing Policy. Visit omahasteaks.com/terms-of-useOSIExpires 5/31/19. ©2019 OCG | Omaha Steaks, Inc. 19I0114

5.19


AROUND TOWN

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT May 3–26

Thru May 19

Love and Money

Theatre Artists Studio www.thestudiophx.org; 602.765.0120

May 9–11

Guys and Dolls

Arizona Broadway Theatre www.azbroadway.org; 623.776.8400

May 4–5

May 9–12

Photo: Tim Trumble

Chase Field

May 10

Marcia Ball

Musical Instrument Museum

May 55 May

May 11

Arizona Musicfest Young Musicians Spring Concert Thru May 26

Joanne Shaw Taylor

Musical Instrument Museum

Musical Instrument Instrument Musical Museum Museum

11

May 1

Chase Field www.mlb.com/dbacks; 602.514.8400

May 66 May

Mindy Gledhills Gledhills Mindy

May 16 – June 2

Arizona Theatre Company at Herberger Theater Center www.arizonatheatre.org; 602.256.6995

6

May 16 – June 29

Mesa Arts Arts Center Center Mesa

Death Trap

May 11

May 2

Colbie Caillat feat. Gone West

Musical Instrument Museum www.mim.org; 480.478.6000

May 11–12

Crescent Ballroom

Run Boy Run

Musical Instrument Museum

Mesa Arts Center www.mesaartscenter.com; 480.644.6500

Arizona Diamondbacks vs. Pittsburgh Pirates

May 2–5 2–5 May

Ballet Arizona Arizona at at Symphony Symphony Hall Hall Ballet www.balletaz.org; 602.381.1096 602.381.1096 www.balletaz.org;

May 6

Chase Field

Crescent Ballroom www.crescentphx.com; 602.716.2222

May 14

Santigold

The Van Buren www.thevanburenphx.com

May 7

Liz Cooper & The Stampede The Rebel Lounge www.therebellounge.com; 602.296.7013

Russell Schmidt Trio and the East Valley Jazz Cooperative Musical Instrument Museum

May 8

Island Rhythms Mesa Arts Center

May 3

Mariachi Vargas de Tecalitlán Celebrity Theatre

May 3

Lee Ann Womack

5.19

May 14

Ariana Grande

Talking Stick Resort Arena www.livenation.com

May 7

40

Musical Instrument Museum

17

May 13–15

The Church

All Balanchine Balanchine All

Don Bluth Front Row Theatre www.donbluthfrontrowtheatre.com; 480.314.0841

Experience Polynesia

May 2

Jake Shimabukuro

2

16 Things I Know to be True

Childsplay at Herberger Theater Center www.childsplayaz.org; 602.258.9481

Arizona Diamondbacks vs. New York Yankees

Musical Instrument Museum

Arizona Diamondbacks vs. Atlanta Braves

Center Dance Ensemble at Scottsdale Center for the Performing Arts www.scottsdaleperformingarts.org; 480.499.8587

Schoolhouse Rock Live

Brett Dennen

Herberger Theater Center www.herbergertheater.org; 602.258.9481

Fantasies & Fairytales: Cinderella Rocks

5

May 16–17

The Screwtape Letters

May 8–26

The Three Billy Goats Gruff

Great Arizona Puppet Theater www.azpuppets.org; 602.262.2050

May 9

Rahim AlHaj and Sahba Motallebi Musical Instrument Museum

May 17

Lea Salonga

Scottsdale Center for the Performing Arts

May 17–19

Arizona Diamondbacks vs. San Francisco Giants Chase Field

May 18

15

Hot Dogs & Jazz for Families The Nash www.thenash.org; 602.795.0464

May 15

Patricia Barber

Musical Instrument Museum

May 18

Tedeschi Trucks Mesa Amphitheatre www.mesaamp.com  

May 19

Gershwin: Cuban Overture

Scottsdale Philharmonic at Scottsdale Bible Church www.scottsdalephilharmonic.com; 480.951.6077


Arts & Entertainment

20

May 25

Jenny and the Mexicats

May 20–21

Crescent Ballroom

Willie Nelson & Family Celebrity Theatre

25 May 26

Freddie McGregor

Musical Instrument Museum

28

22

Rent

ASU Gammage www.asugammage.com; 480.965.3434

May 29

Harpdog Brown

Scottsdale Center for the Performing Arts

May 22 – June 16

Once

The Phoenix Theatre Company www.phoenixtheatre.com; 602.254.2151

May 23–26

Phoenix Fan Fusion Phoenix Convention Center www.phoenixfanfusion.com

May 24 – June 19

Single Black Female

Black Theatre Troupe at Helen K. Kason Performing Arts Center www.blacktheatretroupe.org; 602.258.8129

May 25

Terry McBride

Musical Instrument Museum

MAY 16 – JUNE 2

LIMITED ENGAGEMENT!

“ONE OF THE BEST NEW PLAYS OF THE YEAR!” – CHICAGO TRIBUNE

May 30

Davina and the Vagabonds Musical Instrument Museum

May 31

Esme Martin The Spectrum Jazz Ensemble The Nash

May 31

by andrew

bovell

directed by

mark clements

41

Phoenix Mercury — Opening Night

Talking Stick Resort Arena www.phoenixmercury.com; 602.252.WNBA

May 31 – June 2

Arizona Diamondbacks vs. New York Mets Chase Field

June 1–2

The Fairest of Them All

Phoenix Dance Academy at Herberger Theater Center

american premiere produced by

ARIZONA THEATRE COMPANY and MILWAUKEE REPERTORY THEATER HERBERGER THEATRE CENTER

HURRY! GREAT SEAT S GOING FAST!

Photos: Michael Brosilow

May 22

Keb’ Mo’

The Rhythm Room www.rhythmroom.com; 602.265.4842

LIMITED ENGAGEMENT!

Serving the Community Since 2002

May 28 – June 2

222 E. MONROE ST. PHOENIX

ARIZONATHEATRE.ORG / 602-256-6995 SEASON AND BETH KASSER SE ASON SPONSOR: SPONSOR: I. MICHAEL MICHAEL AND BETH K ASSER

5.19


Arts & Entertainment Serving the Community Since 2002

42

5.19

H H H APRIL WINNERS! H H H A pair of tickets to see Run Boy Run at Musical Instrument Museum: Cory Shapiro of Phoenix A pair of tickets to the Arizona Theatre Company production of Things I Know To Be True at Herberger Theater Center: Kathleen Garast of Scottsdale A pair of tickets to see the Arizona Diamondbacks take on the San Diego Padres at Chase Field: Zach Moller of Cave Creek A family 2-pack of tickets to the Valley Youth Theatre production of Disney’s Freaky Friday: Nancy Tarvin of Mesa

The Cheer team from the BGCS Scottsdale Charros Branch performed at the Second Annual Innovative Dreammakers EXPO.

Youth Display Art & Talent at ‘Dreammakers Expo’ Youth and teen members from Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Scottsdale (BGCS) displayed their visual, digital and performing art at the Second Annual Innovative Dreammakers Expo as part of National Fine Arts Exhibit programming Wednesday, April 3, at the Scottsdale Center for the Performing Arts. Fine art and photography pieces were showcased at the event that placed during organizational competitions held throughout the year along with live vocal, dance, drama, hoop dance and cheer performances. “I like art because I get to use my imagination and go free. Someday I’m going to be a famous artist,” said Geo, age 8 from the BGCS Hartley & Ruth Barker Branch. He proudly displayed his second-place winning mixed media art at the expo. Over the past year, Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Scottsdale has committed to growing its arts programming with daily fine arts activities, specialized art classes, environmental art programming, and one-of-a-kind experiences and career development with Valley artists. As part of the Innovative Dreammaker initiative, youth also are exposed to performance opportunities with dance classes, cheer teams, music and voice. “I like cheer and dance because it is fun and when I’m bored, I can just do it,” said Beyonce, age 10 from the BGCS Scottsdale Charros Branch. Beyonce and her cheer team performed at the expo. “It makes me happy to dance with my friends. The most exciting thing that happened was when we won the Spirit Stick at the Chant Off at the end of summer camp last year.” “At a time when schools continue

to cut back on arts education, we are making sure all of our after-school program members have access to fine arts programming every week,” said Robyn Julien, BGCS president and CEO. “We are forming new partnerships with respected Valley arts organizations so that we can bring the best into our Clubs.” A Thunderbirds Charities award of $50,000 to Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Scottsdale spearheaded the growth of the initiative which has already shown results in helping youth to develop specialized skills, find their passions and use their voice. “We’re thrilled to help Boys & Girls Club of Greater Scottsdale and their mission to foster innovation in our communities,” said Thunderbirds Charities president Carlos Sugich. “BGCS has a tremendous positive impact on our young people and we’re very proud to help any way we can.” The winning pieces from competitions held throughout the year will be sent to the regional competition, which will be hosted by BGCS May 14 at the BIG YAM offices on Northsight in Scottsdale. BGCS offers of variety of arts and innovation programming at their nine clubs located within the communities of Scottsdale, North Phoenix, Fountain Hills, Mesa, the Salt River PimaMaricopa Indian Community and the Hualapai Nation. Find out more about programming at Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Scottsdale by visiting www.bgcs.org. GET MORE: Learn more about the winning Dreammakers pieces online now. Visit news.CITYSunTimes.com.

H SHOW US YOUR WINNING SMILE! H Ken and Janice Speaks, who won tickets to the Arizona Theatre Company production of American Mariachi sent us this photo saying, “We are just returning home from a fabulous evening at the Herberger Theater. The play was heartwarming and funny along with some awesome mariachi music! Had us standing up and clapping loudly during the last scene! We really enjoyed ourselves and thank you and the CITYSunTimes.”

Pictured L–R: Erika Lorti and daughter Veronica Lorti; Toni Hernandez, who won tickets to see the Valley Youth Theatre production of The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane wrote us saying, “Thank you for the tickets. I take my granddaughter, Veronica, several times a year. This play was extraordinarily well done!!! We loved it.”

Enter online at news.CITYSunTimes.com/contests or complete the short survey form, indicate which event you would like to attend and mail to CITYSunTimes, 10645 North Tatum Boulevard, Suite 200-413, Phoenix, AZ 85028. Deadline to receive submissions is May 15.

Enter To Win! [ ] A  pair of tickets to see Sona Jobarteh at Musical Instrument Museum June 11 [ ] A  Family 2-pack of tickets to the Valley Youth Theatre production of Disney’s Freaky Friday, opening weekend, June 14–16 Name _________________________________________________________________ Address _______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________ Phone Number _________________________________________________________ E-Mail _________________________________________________________________ Do you receive CST at [

] your home or [

Do you have children? [

] Y or [

] N

] pick up on newsstand? Pets? [

] Y or [

]N

Who is the primary reader of CST in your home? __________________________ _______________________________________________________________________ What kind of advertising do you look for in newspapers? ___________________ ______________________________________________________________________


Arts & Entertainment Serving the Community Since 2002

43

5.19


Serving the Community Since 2002

YOUTH & EDUCATION

44

SUPERINTENDENT’S MESSAGE

daily work to supporting the s we finish the academic year on a strong note, I would classroom and solidifying our like to congratulate the District’s 123-year legacy of Class of 2019 and wish which we are so proud. our graduates great success as We are fortunate to have they embark on their next educated multiple generations endeavor. We are confident of local families, and we will that the educational continue this tradition opportunities the DR. JOHN A. KRIEKARD in the next school year Scottsdale Unified School as we welcome the Superintendent District (SUSD) has Class of 2032! As we Scottsdale Unified School District provided these students evolve and modernize during their years with us will serve them SUSD to make sure we remain the top well in the future. This class of graduates public education choice for community is prepared, accomplished and ready to families, we are enhancing our culture move on. Now it’s up to them! of learning in these and many other Each day across our 29 campuses, ways: truly amazing achievements take place in our classrooms, in our performance • Deploying technology and structural spaces and on our athletic fields. This upgrades to make all of our schools is not possible without our teachers, safer whom we recognize during this first • Strengthening recruitment processes week of May each year for Teacher and expanding to LinkedIn and Appreciation Week. All of us in SUSD, out-of-state hiring events to reach a regardless of our role or title, are united new pool of talented applicants behind a single, core purpose: ensuring • Implementing changes through a that all of our individual learners reach Wellness Committee, inspired by their full potential. We each tie our

If you know a child who is ... ... connect with us today! 4-Week Summer Theatre Camps: Ages 7-15 Session 1: June 3 – 28 Session 2: July 8 – August 2

The magic of musical theatre comes to life at VYT’s summer camps! Campers will experience what it takes to create a full production, from auditions to performance. No theatre experience necessary, just come and have fun!

Monday – Friday | 9am – 3pm Location: Valley Youth Theatre 525 N 1st St, Phoenix, AZ 85004 Cost: $750* Before and After Care is available at an additional cost for our Musical Theatre Summer Workshops Before Care $100 for 4 weeks After Care $300 for 4 weeks Both $340 for 4 weeks

1-Week Summer Theatre Camps: Ages 5 & 6 Each week will have a special theme, so you can enroll for one, two, three or all four weeks of camp!

Session 1: Session 2: Session 3: Session 4:

June 10 – 14 June 17 – 21 July 15 – 19 July 22 – 26

Monday – Friday | 9am – 3pm Location: TBA | Cost: $225* *There is an additional $10 administrative fee and a $5 internet service fee for online registration. Please note there are NO REFUNDS OR PRORATED PRICING.

5.19

(602) 253-8188 x302 www.vyt.com/education

feedback from parents, students, staff and community members who took part in a District climate study • F  ortifying procurement processes to ensure fiscal responsibility with our public funding • C  ollaborating with classified and certified staff to develop new handbooks that reiterate our total commitment to professionalism and respect in the workplace In my many years in this community, I know how supportive you are of this

school district and to the success of every student. The Governing Board and I are committed to delivering exceptional academic instruction to every student at every grade level. It is what has distinguished SUSD for more than a century and is no less relevant today as we work together to inspire students to learn and achieve. I am convinced we are on the right path. To reach Dr. Kriekard, call 480.484.6120. For more information about the Scottsdale Unified School District, visit www.susd.org.

‘Shark Frenzy’ Summer Program Coming to Hubbard When the school year ends in May, the summer swim season at the Hubbard Family Swim School (HFSS) kicks into high-gear. This year, from May 28 through July 29, HFSS will offer a summer program called “Shark Frenzy” that will be exclusively available for current and past “Hammerhead” swimmers. The purpose of this new Shark Frenzy program will be to give children the opportunity to expand their swimming skills with intensive sessions, swim meets and clinics all summer long. Shark Frenzy practices allow parents to pick multiple, one-week sessions throughout the summer months with the flexibility to schedule around vacations. Pick a practice time for every week that a participant can commit to four practices per week. Parents can build a schedule for the summer with as many practice weeks as they can in order for their children to make maximum progress. The practices at Hubbard’s Phoenix location will be offered Monday through Thursday from 8–9am and 2–3pm. The Hubbard swim coaches will coach from the inside of the pools and also from the pool deck. Swimmers will be swimming the length of the pool and will get the opportunity to experience competitive meets where everyone’s a winner and gets to be part of a team. Children will also get swimming experience outside of their usual shallow water pools to practice dives, starts and turns.  Shark Frenzy meets are held at the Moon Valley Country Club in Phoenix and give children a chance to swim in competitive races against one another and against kids outside of HFSS. This is an excellent introduction to competitive racing. The HFSS swimmers compete in three different strokes including freestyle, backstroke and either butterfly or breaststroke. Ribbons are awarded for each race. Times are tracked and shared with competitors. The cost is $50 per child for a four-day week session ($37.50 when closed for a holiday) Hubbard Family Swim School is located at 13832 North 32nd Street, Phoenix. For more information and to register, call 602.971.4044 or visit www.hubbardswim.com.


Ten Days of Creative

FOOD & WINE

CulinaryAdventures Await

Serving the Community Since 2002

Roaring Fork offerings

It’s May and that means that it is time to savor the best that the state’s restaurants have to offer during Spring Arizona Restaurant Week (ARW). Arizona Restaurant Association, which celebrates its 80th anniversary this year, is bringing the tasting tour back Friday, Hearth 61, Niman Ranch Prime Tenderloin of Beef May 17, through Sunday, May 26. During this time, participating restaurants around the Valley offer culinary adventurers dedicated dining specials and menus that showcase local chefs’ culinary abilities. Each participating restaurant offers a unique tasting opportunity apart from their regular menu, featuring three-course, prix-fixe menus for just $33 or $44 per person. “Arizona Restaurant Week has become one of the most popular dining events in the state,” says Arizona Restaurant Association president and CEO, Steve Chucri. “We are proud to have a hand in sharing our state’s culinary chops with residents and visitors alike and give our local restaurants a platform to showcase their amazing talents through a fun and creative outlet.” One of Arizona Restaurant Week’s goals is to position Arizona as one of the top culinary destinations in the nation by increasing awareness of the more than 9,000 dining opportunities available as well as stimulate business and revenue for restaurants throughout the state. Restaurants currently set to participate in Spring ARW include Barrio Queen, Buck & Rider, Dorian, Elements, Four Peaks Breaking Company, Hearth 61, Ladera Taverna Y Cocina Kitchen & Bar, Mother Bunch Brewing Co., Prado, Roaring Fork, The Canal Club, The Gladly, The Keg Steakhouse + Bar, The Melting Pot and Thirsty Lion Gastropub, among many others. Diners can view a complete list of participating restaurants for Restaurant Week online at www.arizonarestaurantweek.com; Hearth 61, Beet Salad menus are added as they are received and will be updated frequently.

45

Café ZuZu, Braised Beef Short Rib

Buck & Rider, Voodoo Fried Rice

The Arizona Restaurant Association announced that its 2019 Fall Restaurant Week is set to take place Friday, September 20, through Sunday, September 29.

5.19


HEALTH & WELLNESS

Serving the Community Since 2002

Monday Morning ‘Rise & Shine’ Yoga at JoJo Coffeehouse

46

5.19

Yoga instructor Jenni Pirmann; Photo courtesy of Nicole Anne Yoga

Join yoga instructor Jenni Pirmann, from Nicole Anne Yoga, every Monday morning 6–7am at JoJo Coffee House in Scottsdale for a relaxing but challenging, hour-long Vinyasa Flow yoga class. Vinyasa Flow synchronizes movement with breath and offers both physical and mental benefits. Physically, it helps build strength, stretches muscles and re-energizes the body. Mentally, the synchronized breathing relaxes the chatter of the mind and helps to release any blockage of energy flow throughout one’s body. All fitness levels and levels of yoga experience are welcome. This class is great for beginners. The cost is $10 per person. A complimentary drip coffee is also included. Attendees are asked to bring their own yoga

mat, blanket, boosters if needed and a water bottle. JoJo Coffeehouse is located at 3712 North Scottsdale Road, Suite 110, Scottsdale. Advanced registration is suggested as space is limited. Nicole Anne Yoga is a new, mobile yoga company offering different types of yoga classes all around the Valley. For more information and to register, visit www.nicoleanneyoga.com.

Valley Hope Launches Alcohol Awareness Campaign Valley Hope, a nonprofit addiction treatment center, highlighted issues surrounding women and alcohol during National Alcohol Awareness Month in April. But the need for information and help is ongoing. The residential and outpatient addiction treatment association continues to provide expertise on topics including women and moderate versus heavy drinking, personal recovery stories, rising alcoholism rates among women and alcoholism year-round. “With alcohol misuse rates rising, women face particular challenges and health risks related to excessive drinking,” said Dr. Patrick Hall, executive vice president, Valley Hope. “We aim to help inform the public on this issue with a deep dive into topics that provide extended education and resources concerning women and alcohol.” Visit www.gethelpfindhope.org to access information and resources related to women and alcohol. Explore Valley Hope’s Beyond the Valley blog for extensive resources and information for loved ones, families and the recovery community. Valley Hope provides residential and outpatient addiction treatment services at 16 centers in Arizona, Colorado, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, Oklahoma and Texas. Since its founding in 1967, Valley Hope has helped more than 310,000 individuals overcome addiction to lead successful and productive lives in recovery. For more information on addiction, treatment and recovery, visit www.valleyhope. org or for help 24/7 call 800.544.5101.

Local Relationship Experts Publish Book ‘The Surprise Date Challenge’ helps couples rediscover love

Fun Fantasy Ritual (FFR) is sharing its formula for couples who want to sustain a fulfilling long-term relationship in its new book “The Surprise Date Challenge: Be the Happiest Couple You Know.” Rooted in mystery and adventure, the book is a guide to planning surprise dates over the course of three months. Written by FFR owners and real-life couple Dana Lam and Martin Kupper, the 82-page publication is filled with challenge steps to help the planner move from intention to action. The 12 months of surprise date ideas includes a proclamation at the end of the book to commit to the challenge. “I started planning surprise dates to spend time with Dana in unconventional ways,” said Kupper, co-owner of FFR. “We realized that challenging each other to come up with these creative dates is the secret elixir in our relationship. While the challenge is for three months, it is a practice that can be repeated, turning it into a ritual that nourishes the relationship.” In the book, Lam and Kupper detail why date activities are essential for relationships through discussing their unique path to discovering and cultivating the concept. Couples who have accomplished the challenge themselves also disclose how it has influenced their relationship. The book is intended to inspire couples at all stages to put love at the forefront. “Couples tend to give each other only the scraps of what’s left after a busy day,” said Lam, co-owner of FFR. “Between work and life demands, let alone adding kids into the mix, spending quality time with your significant other can be difficult. The book gives couples the tools to make date night fun again.” Mark Victor Hansen, co-creator of the “Chicken Soup for the Soul” series, which has sold more than 500 million copies worldwide, is a big supporter of the book. “Almost everyone wants an exalted and cherished relationship,” said Hansen. “Here is a book that gives you the clues, tips and techniques to help make that relationship a reality.” Based in Phoenix, FFR helps couples enhance romance and connection through date concierge services, coaching, events and courses such as the Couples Connection Playshop. Local date activities and a free FFR Inspiration Kit can be found on its website. “The idea impacts how couples connect on a deeper level, leads people to be intentional about their romance and most importantly, rediscover why they fell in love,” said Lam. The book is available in paperback and hardcover at Barnes & Noble, Amazon and www.funfantasyritual.com.


Health & Wellness Serving the Community Since 2002

47

5.19


DESTINATIONS

Exhibit to Showcase Rich Artistic Traditions of Native Cultures

Serving the Community Since 2002

From May 16 through June 25, the ’Tis Art Center and Gallery, in partnership with the Smoki Museum, will present Journeys in Spirit 2019: Traditional and Contemporary Native Art Exhibition. Entering its ninth year, the exhibit centers on showcasing the visual arts, music, dance and storytelling of and by Native people. This cultural celebration will be held at ‘Tis Art Center and Gallery, conveniently located across from Prescott’s Courthouse Plaza at 105 South Cortez Street. To celebrate the launch of Journeys in Spirit 2019,

48

5.19

there will be an opening reception for the artists May 24, 5–8pm. Presented as part of Prescott’s popular 4th Friday Art Walk, the reception will feature Mike Goodluck performing on a Native flute. The weekend fun will continue at noon Saturday, May 25, and Sunday, May 26, with flute music, storytelling and dazzling hoop dance, performed by World Champion hoop dancer Tony Duncan, his wife Violet and their young family. Journeys in Spirit will spotlight emerging and

established artists from various Native cultures, including the Acoma, Apache, Choctaw, Diné, Hopi, Yaqui, Yavapai and Zuni. The arts play an integral role in Native society. Beginning at a young age, Native children are introduced to artistic mediums, including bead working, basketry, woodcarving, weaving and metalworking, as well as the crafting of musical instruments and ceremonial attire. Color and See Native Cultures, page 49


imagery carry symbolic meaning in Native cultures, and music and dance are considered an essential aspect of social and ceremonial gatherings. Storytelling, the oldest of all the art forms, is used to keep alive cultural history and sacred beliefs. For many Native artists, inspiration is found in the stories, ceremonies and rituals that have been passed on to them across several generations, while others are influenced by their personal experiences in the modern world, both within and outside of their tribal communities. Journeys in Spirit attendees will have the opportunity to view a wide variety of artistic mediums, ranging from basketry and bead working to sculpture and photography. Some works will reflect the traditional styles of Native cultures, while others will incorporate a contemporary aesthetic or a combination of old and new. Examples of works that will be on display include sculpture and paintings by the exhibit’s curator, Hopi artist Filmer Kewanyama, and paintings by acclaimed Choctaw artist Karen Clarkson. Regardless of the unique style or medium, all works showcased at Journeys in Spirit will reflect the artist’s personal stories and ongoing quest for discovery and knowledge. For more information, visit www.tisartgallery.com and click on the “Journeys in Spirit” link.

Destinations

Native Cultures, continued from page 48

Serving the Community Since 2002

Prescott Valley’s Bronzesmith to Host Open House

49

Join Bronzesmith Fine Art Foundry and Gallery for its annual open house Friday, May 24, 9am–4pm. The Bronzesmith team will be on hand to share their knowledge of the fascinating bronze casting process with special bronze pours scheduled at 10am and noon. Bronzesmith promotes both established masters and emerging talent in the sculpture medium. The featured artist is wildlife and Western sculptor and patina artist Carl Wolf. Wolf will be introducing some of his newest limitededition bronze sculptures along with one-of-a-kind patina paintings. Guests will also get a “sneak preview” of Bill Nebeker’s 14-foot enlargement of “If Horses Could Talk.” Meet the artisans, tour the foundry and enjoy the gallery and sculpture garden — and don’t forget to visit the bronze sale room. Bronzesmith Fine Art Foundry and Gallery is located at 7331 East Second Street in Prescott Valley. For additional information, call 928.772.2378 or visit www.bronzesmith.com.

5.19


Destinations

Explore Arizona at Family Campout Events

No experience… no problem

Serving the Community Since 2002

View of Cathedral Rock from Red Rock State Park; Photo: Kelli Klymenko

50

5.19

The Arizona Family Campout Program weekends are designed for families that have little or no experience camping. Arizona State Parks staff will introduce guests to the great experiences they can share with family and inspire them to continue to explore the great outdoors. Learn how to set up a tent and get an introduction to cooking outside, plus guests get to try some fun activities that can be done while camping.

36 Cabins on 14 Acres of Land, Backing National Forest Service Land. Located in Pinetop, Arizona

Fireplace • Kitchen • Cable TV Private Spa Cabins Call for

CURRENT SPECIALS and DISCOUNTS!

MILITARY DISCOUNTS AVAILABLE (Not redeemable with any other offer.)

(928) 367-4386 • 1-800-840-3867 www.whisperingpinesaz.com

Camp dates so far this year have taken families to Lost Dutchman State Park, Catalina State Park, Patagonia Lake State Park, Fool Hollow Lake Recreation Area and Red Rock State Park. In May, visit River Island State Park (May 11–12) and Dead Horse Ranch State Park (May 18–19). Fall camping dates begin in September at Tonto Natural Bridge State Park (Sept. 14–15) and will continue monthly through Dec. 1. Families should bring food, sleeping bags or any bedding, pillows, camping chairs, clothing, sturdy shoes and personal items including toothpaste, towels, soap, etc. The program will provide tents, sleeping mats, flashlights, chairs and all activity equipment. Beverages provided include water, coffee, tea and sports drinks. Provided snacks include seasonal fruit, granola bars and more. Families are responsible

Wildlife at Lost Dutchman State Park; Photo: Valerie Lindsay

for bringing two lunches, dinner and breakfast Activities vary depending on the park, participant ages and weather conditions, and may include guided hikes, mountain bike clinics, archery, geocaching, fishing clinic, live animal demonstrations, campfire stories, presentations on geography, birding, geology and astronomy, and service projects. Registration is $90 for a family of up to four. Additional family members $5 each. One family per registration. For families greater than four, special arrangements are needed — send an email to ljuers@azstateparks.gov. Children 5 years and younger and pets cannot attend this program. Since this event focuses on learning to tent camp, RVs are not allowed. If a session is listed as full, guests may be added to the waitlist by sending an email to ljuers@ azstateparks.gov. To learn more about camping and recreation opportunities in Arizona State Parks, visit www.azstateparks. com/camping-in-arizona.


Destinations

Celebrate Arizona Wines in May Arizona Stronghold Vineyards; Photo: Holly House; courtesy of the Arizona Office of Tourism

food samplings and all of the art and entertainment at the event. Visit www.verdevalleywinefestival.com for additional information. The Willcox Wine Country Spring Festival will be held May 18–19 at the Willcox Historic Railroad Park. The Willcox American Viticulture Area produces 74 percent of the state’s grapes. Join Arizona winemakers to celebrate the harvest and the Arizona wines from the Willcox region. Festivities will include music, art and vendors. Entrance is free; cost for tastings is $25. The event will run 11am–5pm, daily. For additional information, call 520.384.2272 or visit www.willcoxwinecountry.org.

Poncho Vega’s – A Lot to Offer in Tombstone Located on the corner of 3rd and Fremont Street in Tombstone, Arizona, is Poncho Vega’s Gun & Cowboy Leather — a little store that has a lot to offer. Mike and Linda Vega came to Tombstone in 2018 and decided to do what they love. Mike’s passion is making custom leather products. He can make most anything he puts his mind to including but not limited to holsters, scabbards, chaps, belts, canteens, rifle slings, wallets, cell phone cases and so much more. Mike also has a Federal Firearms License and a wide variety of original and reproduction Western guns for sale. Linda makes her own natural products using Doterra Essential Oils, and is a notary public and bookkeeper. She also keeps the store running. Visitors can find jewelry, silk scarfs and knives as well as an assortment of other things inside the store. There are also consignment items available: • Out of the Bead Tray by Mama Hawk featuring hand beaded hat bands, chokers and bracelets

Serving the Community Since 2002

Whether heading north or south of the Valley this month, May is the perfect time to celebrate Arizona’s regional wines. Clarkdale’s Town Park, 1001 Main Street, will host the Fourth Annual Verde Valley Wine Festival Saturday, May 11. Northern Arizona’s premier wine festival is presented by Four Eight Wineworks and Made in Clarkdale arts organization. The event, which runs from noon to 5pm, will feature wine produced solely from Arizona wine grapes and scrumptious food from around Arizona plus art in a cool, historic environment. General admission of $35 includes a wine glass, eight tastes of wine or libation of choice,

51

• Grammy’s Cast Iron with a wide variety of refurbished cast iron items • P  oncho’s Closet with an assortment of lightly used clothing, boots, hats and 1880s period clothing Visit Poncho Vega’s at 302 East Fremont Street in historic Tombstone. The store is open Wednesday through Monday, 9am–5pm, and closed on Tuesday. Find more information on Facebook: @ponchovegasgunsandcowboyleather.

5.19


Carefree/Cave

Carefree/Ca ve Creek

Creek news.CITYSunTim

SCOTTSDALE

es.com

NORTHEAST

2002 ePHOE NIX

s Excellence Sinc

Community New

m

news.CITYSunTimes.co

CAREFREE

CAVE CREEK

SCOTTSDALE

: Save the Date Rodeo Days

28

sic Classic free Clas Care Carefree Rally Car Car Rally

21

24

ANTHEM

CAREFREE

News Excelle

2019 CAVE ARY CREE FEBRU K BLACK CANYON CITY

Carefree/Cave Cre

ek

nce Since 200

2

news.CI TAKE TYSunTimes.com ONE

Gry EAR UP ra for Your Lib Oices RTY-EIG FOR THE Show Some Loveport youth and teenFserv

IX NORTHEAST PHOEN

CITY BLACK CANYON

Matching grant

gift to sup

Library Foothills esert y as “I Love announced Februar ” The event was My Library Month. ous e to an anonym initiated in respons $15,000 to up raise to gift matching grant onal and teen educati to enhance youth s at the library. services and program these raise weeks to With just four ns is asking for donatio funds, the library help rise and advocates to from supporters Library is Desert Foothills to the challenge. relies on rted library that a member-suppo nity members, commu its of ity the generos library for funding. The and local donors and of quality services provides a variety

Around Aro und Tow Town: n: The Mus The Music ic Man Man

FOUNTAIN HILLS

ANTHEM

COURTESY OF

CITYSunTim SCOTTS DALEes NORTHEAST PHOENIX

JANUARY 2019

HTH A DALE AUNNUAL CTION

SCOTTS

are and authe ntic domestic vehicles, authentic automobilia Arizo na collec one-of-a-kin tibles, d supercars, some of the Rena world’s most ce coveted ’60s issan custom vehicl to ’70s era es… Barrett-Jac Festi val kson will in a new year usher of high-octane auction action during its 48th Annual Scotts dale Auction, Jan. 12–20 at the WestW visit to orld of Scotts ed decades past, dale. As in Everyone is welcom The World’s it a February Greatest Collec the month of community, making Car Auctions Library during tor , programs to the will be the epicen serves vast array of services institution that ter of Collector Car Auction to discover the valued Cave Creek Week and entert to the resources offered ain thousands Foothills area. of automotive programs and ts the entire Desert enthusiasts ’54 Corvet te Custom Conver staff invites residen with interactive exhibits, entert tible community. Library ainment and the shelves, check activit browse in, ies. “Our Scotts to,of“Come and CEO or dale Auction Barrett-Jackson. sit down and read has become tradition unlike “Every year out a book or two, magic that a again.” any other in comesevent fall in love all overwe are honored to host car industry,” the collector an from– biddin Naked g on the Nak in additiattend enthusiasts from ed BBQ said Craig Jackso support BBQ Ope collecers on to the thous tor car of their Opens around the world n, chairman ns andsg, oflibrary dreams. While the ultimate Beyond donatin enviab their , who come le collec by sharing automotive the auction tor cars — like to experience lifestyce is the heartb make a differen le event with the the exclusive Barretcan eat of our Scotts t-Jackson’s about Desert Foothills Library fun Lexus LFA or ies, exhibits dale event, Scottsdale Auctio k activit rare enthusiasm2019 a ‘12 Lexus autom or and dining the whole obilia pieces n will be home LFA Nürbu media, on Faceboo — we’ve built rgring social family will enjoy. to some of the Edition (Lot a ’63 Chevrthrough invited ” olet Corvette most covete Everyone is#1412 ). Also availa Split b). m (@dflali d collector cars Windo Custo ble are incred Jeff Hayes Instagra and AZt Cock on the marke Library the library m Coupe Libr and Americanthey love w ible ‘60s to ‘70s ary Pho tail Week end (Lot #1333) built Photo including Speed Shop; era custom to (Lot #1325),to share why by vehicles. A few the during donate which maste ‘65 “SN65 Musta others examples: rfully to Exhibit encourage Exh ng” separated by integr ibit 40 years of Month.” ates two unibody cars production; is a 501(c) Oldsmobile “I Love My Library and a ‘61 Starfire (#101 Library s 8.1) from Desert Foothill Bryan Frank All donations Collection. fit organization.the nonpro (3) The 2019 Scotts dollar for willnbe matched dale Auctio Concours in the preview dockeup to $15,000 Hills t is now availa ns are tax deductible. ble dollar. Donatio to view North online. Advan is located at 38443 The libraryce tickets, Creek. For nine-day Road in Cave ticket packages andSchoolhouse .2286 inform information, call 480.488 on VIP Packa additionalation ary.org. ges are also sertfoothillslibr available. For or visit www.de additional information support Desert about fortt-more ways to Barre Looking to Host Jackson, call ? See “Library 480.421.6694 year s Library a winning or visit www.barre Foothill Looking all program is having Gala” on page 28. tt-jack for more Januar Annual Boys Varsity Basketb page 35. Tenthson.c om. 12 Lexus y collect Read the story on Shadows High School

14

n: Soul Connectio nteers Why Terry Volu

FOUNTAIN HILLS

TAKE ONE COURTESY OF Com nTimesity CITYSumun

48

47

CAREFREE

Community News

CAVE CREEK

Excellence Since

BLACK CANYON CITY

FOUNTAIN HILLS

13

5

“CITYSunTimes is the Premier publication in the North Valley!” 19

The Cactus to the State playoffs. and are now headed

LFA Nürburgring

Edition

or car action? out “Find the Check Rare & the at Worldwide Exceptional Auction” inside visit news.C on page 10 ITYSunTimes. or com to GET MORE.

POSTAL CUS TOMER

~ CITYSunTimes Reader

Serving the Community Since 2002

COURTESY OF CITYSunTimes

ANTHEM

Serving 80,000+ Readers!

Boys Basketball Cactus Shadows State Heads to

Mailed extensively to homes, plus free pick-up at over 300 businesses, restaurants, retail stores and libraries.

52 Contact Bob Hesselgesser Account Representative

602.214.7661 • Bob@CITYSunTimes.com Help Wanted Ads and Inserts also available!

5.19

TAKE ONE

2002

FEBRUARY 2019 or the sixth year in a row, chefs from some of the state’s most popular restaurants will use their culinary prowess to re-imagine one of the beloved flavors of Girl Scout Cookies — Do-Si-D os, Samoas, Savannah Smiles, Tagalon gs, Thin Mints and Trefoils — into a custom dessert menu item during the Girl Scout Cookie Dessert Challenge. Each restaurant will feature its dessert on their menu Feb. 1–28, with a portion of the proceeds from each dessert sold directly support ing Girl Scouting in Arizona. “Girl Scouts–Arizona Cactus-Pine Council is thrilled that both (GSACPC) Rusconi’s America n Kitchen and The Thumb are taking part again. They’ve been with us for all six years and are major support ers as a result,” says Susan de Queljoe , senior associate of marketi ng and communication s. “It’s also so inspirin g to see Original Gravity, PNPK, ZuZu at Hotel Valley Ho, The Herb Box and Lovecraft taking part since they are all either proud womanowned businesses have female chefs or in the kitchen.” First-time challeng ers this year include Babbo Italian Eatery, Jake’s Unlimit ed and The Phoenix Ale Brewery Central Kitchen. In year’s past, the Dessert Challenge Champion was decided by dessert sales. This year, the Council is hosting a poll at www.girlscoutsa z.org/dessertchallenge. But beyond concept ualizing, creating and offering the desserts on their menus, this year the chefs are also partnering with the Girl Scouts on several enhanced element s of the challenge. “Last year, we got the idea to have a few girls join us in the kitchen to see all the moving parts that goes into both running a restaurant and delivering food to the table,” says chef Lance Whipple of Proof is the largest girl-led at the Four Seasons entrepreneurial program Scottsdale Resort in the world: Girl Scout Cookie Troon North. “It was such Season. a hit that we are All the chefs hope hosting ‘Girl Scout Trips’ with some local not only to raise funds Field local Girl Scouting troops this year to to support , but also to inspire really get them excited about the art, math home cooks across and science behind Arizona to buy an extra what box or two this season we do. Maybe there are even a few future to create their own desserts. Girl Scout chefs in our mix!” Cookie season runs Similarly, Aioli Gourme through March 3 year. Locations of t Burgers, ZuZu, this cookie booths can PNPK and others will bring girls behind be found online at girlscoutsaz.org/cookiefi the scenes this cookie www. season. And several nder. partners are helping troops to set up formal boothing stations outside their venues, allowing our girls GET MORE: Find the to sell cookies in delectable details what of each venue’s creation online now. Visit news.CITYSunT imes.com.

POSTAL CUSTOMER

citySERVICES

Your Community News – Focused on Local Topics, the Arts and Our Youth Since 2002

news.CITYSunTimes.com


We Cover It All!

COMMERCIAL

RENCORoofing ARIZONA’S PREMIER ROOFING CONTRACTOR

Covering your community since 2004

Tile • Shingle • Foam • Re-Roof • Repairs & Maintenance FREE CONSULTATIONS

ROC 195475

602-296-5944 • rencoroofing.com

ROC 196424

citySERVICES

RESIDENTIAL

HELP WANTED

Serving the Community Since 2002

Seeking an Advertising Sales Representative Join a Great Team!

Self Starter Previous Sales Experience

Good Communication/ Negotiation Skills 20-hour a Week Minimum Commitment

Basic Computer Skills Home-based Office Please send resume to publisher@CITYSunTimes.com.

53 It makes sense to get your company name, logo and service known in your community.

This ad Is looking at you just like your ad will look at them. That’s right... CST Designer can put eyes in your ad too.

480.922.8732

advertise@CITYSunTimes.com

You see us. They will see you. Contact Bob Hesselgesser:

602.214.7661

Bob@CITYSunTimes.com

5.19


54

5.19

Serving the Community Since 2002


Serving the Community Since 2002

55

5.19


Profile for Jenifer Lee

North Valley CITYSunTimes May 2019 Issue  

CITYSunTimes is a locally owned community publication now in its 17th year, serving over 80,000 readers in the North Valley. CST offers pers...

North Valley CITYSunTimes May 2019 Issue  

CITYSunTimes is a locally owned community publication now in its 17th year, serving over 80,000 readers in the North Valley. CST offers pers...

Advertisement