Page 1

Carefree/Cave Creek

Community News Excellence Since 2002

news.CITYSunTimes.com

CAREFREE

CAVE CREEK

TAKE ONE COURTESY OF CITYSunTimes

SCOTTSDALE

Save the Date: Rodeo Days

28

Carefree Carefree Classic Classic Car Car Rally Rally

21

NORTHEAST PHOENIX

BLACK CANYON CITY

FOUNTAIN HILLS

ANTHEM

FEBRUARY 2019

Show Some Love for Your Library Matching grant gift to support youth and teen services

esert Foothills Library announced February as “I Love My Library Month.” The event was initiated in response to an anonymous matching grant gift to raise up to $15,000 to enhance youth and teen educational services and programs at the library. With just four weeks to raise these funds, the library is asking for donations from supporters and advocates to help rise to the challenge. Desert Foothills Library is a member-supported library that relies on the generosity of its members, community and local donors for funding. The library provides a variety of quality services and

programs to the community, making it a valued Cave Creek institution that serves the entire Desert Foothills area.

Soul Connection: Why Terry Volunteers

24

Cactus Shadows Boys Basketball Heads to State The Cactus Shadows High School Boys Varsity Basketball program is having a winning year and are now headed to the State playoffs. Read the story on page 35.

Everyone is welcomed to visit the Library during the month of February to discover the vast array of services, programs and resources offered to the community. Library staff invites residents to, “Come in, browse the shelves, check out a book or two, sit down and read or attend an event – fall in love all over again.” Beyond donating, library supporters can make a difference by sharing their enthusiasm about Desert Foothills Library through social media, on Facebook or Instagram (@dflalib). Everyone is invited to share why they love the library and encourage others to donate during “I Love My Library Month.” Desert Foothills Library is a 501(c) (3) nonprofit organization. All donations up to $15,000 will be matched dollar for dollar. Donations are tax deductible. The library is located at 38443 North Schoolhouse Road in Cave Creek. For additional information, call 480.488.2286 or visit www.desertfoothillslibrary.org. Looking for more ways to support Desert Foothills Library? See “Library to Host Tenth Annual Gala” on page 28.


2

2.19

Serving the Community Since 2002


Serving the Community Since 2002

3

2.19


EDITOR’S PICKS

INDEX

Be Fearless — P ractice Love “There are two basic motivating forces: fear and love. When we are afraid, we pull back from life. When we are in love, we open to all that life has to offer with passion, excitement and acceptance. We need to learn to love ourselves first, in all our glory and our imperfections. If we cannot love ourselves, we cannot fully open to our ability to love others or our potential to create. Evolution and all hopes for a better world rest in the fearlessness and open-hearted vision of people who embrace life.”

Around Town: Rosanne Cash

40

~ John Lennon In the United States and elsewhere, the month of February has become synonymous with “love” of the romantic variety. This month, however, I’d like to encourage you to look at love through a different lens. Picture a world…no, let’s start smaller. Picture a community where the needs of all are considered, where we truly do love our neighbor as ourselves. If you want to look at it on a microscale: before you “secure” your home by installing a patio floodlight that stays on all night, think about your neighbor behind you whose bedroom window is exposed to the light, and perhaps consider a motion-activated light instead. Your security is intact, and I *ahem* your neighbor can get a good night’s sleep without resorting to blackout curtains — neighborly love in action. On a grand scale, I agree with Jane Addams who said, “The good we secure for ourselves is precarious and uncertain until it is secured for all of us and incorporated into our common life.”

PHX Vegan Food Festival

Serving the Community Since 2002

45

4

Until next month, all my best.

Rockabilly Reunion

50

inside this issue

HEALTH & WELLNESS ... 38

Editor-in-Chief Kathryn M. Miller Creative Director Jenifer Lee Assistant to the Publisher Darlene Keberle Columnists Stephen Cohen, O.D. Cathy Droz Barbara Kaplan Rabbi Robert Kravitz Allen Nohre James Roberts Pastor Paul Witkop Contributors Cave Creek Mayor Ernie Bunch Dr. John A. Kriekard Scottsdale Mayor Jim Lane Carefree Mayor Les Peterson Account Representatives Bob Hesselgesser Susan Pine Bulk Distribution Mark Feinberg

10645 N. Tatum Blvd., Suite 200-413 Phoenix, AZ 85028 Phone: 480.922.8732 Fax: 480.922.8731 E-mail: info@CITYSunTimes.com news.CITYSunTimes.com CITYSunTimes is a locally owned community publication now in its 17th year, serving over 80,000 readers in the North Valley. CST offers personalized news each month to Scottsdale, Paradise Valley, North Phoenix, Carefree and Cave Creek. CST is mailed to area homes and businesses and is available for free pick up at locations in Paradise Valley, North Scottsdale, North Phoenix, Carefree, Cave Creek, Anthem, Black Canyon City, New River and Fountain Hills.

YOUR COMMUNITY NEWS Scottsdale ... 5

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT ... 40 Around Town

North Phoenix ... 13

FOOD & WINE ... 45

Fountain Hills ... 19

Anthem ... 20

Carefree ... 21

DESTINATIONS ... 47

Cave Creek ... 28

CITYSERVICES ... 52

Subscriptions by Mail: $50/year. Remit to “Subscriptions” at CITYSunTimes.

GET MORE ... 54

Visit us online at news.CITYSunTimes.com for editorial and advertising guidelines and standards.

COMMUNITY ... 37

2.19

Kathryn M. Miller, Editor-in-Chief kathryn@CITYSunTimes.com

Publisher Lorrie Pomeroy

CITYSunTimes is a proud member of:

YOUTH & EDUCATION ... 46

Editorial deadline: The first of the month preceding publication. Submit materials to news@CITYSunTimes.com. Advertising deadline: The 15th of the month preceding publication. Submit materials to advertise@CITYSunTimes.com. Corrections: Submit via e-mail corrections@CITYSunTimes.com.

to

Published by Indigo Publishing, Inc., monthly. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part is prohibited without the express written permission of the publisher.


MAYOR LANE WRITES... Events Season in Scottsdale By Mayor Jim Lane

With February upon us it is now time for another exciting events season! There are a variety of events happening all over the city and we invite you to enjoy the different experiences that are being offered. Scottsdale Western Week activities, Feb. 2–10 • Gold Palette ArtWalk — Thursday, Feb. 7, 6:30pm The Scottsdale Gallery Association’s popular ArtWalk with a western twist! Enjoy live mariachi performances, 480.312.3111 western art demonstrations and a rope trick artist! You www.scottsdaleaz.gov can watch Scottsdale’s Wild West roots come to life! Grab a friend and learn to line dance and enjoy a special performance from “The Singing Cowboy.” For more information, visit www.scottsdalegalleries.com. MAYOR City of Scottsdale

• Scottsdale Parada del Sol Parade and Trail’s End Festival — Feb. 9 Celebrate one of Scottsdale’s oldest traditions, the Parada del Sol Parade and Trail’s End Festival. The parade begins at 10am on Scottsdale Road south of Camelback. The party continues at noon with Old Town hosting live music, activity booths and other entertainment. Information: www.scottsdaleparade.com. • Arizona Indian Festival — Feb. 9–10 This free, two-day, family-friendly event begins at 10am both days on Scottsdale’s Civic Center Mall. Tribes from throughout Arizona will share cultural experiences, traditional dwellings, art demonstrations and more. Other highlights include Native American storytelling, performances, music, an artisan market, food trucks, fry bread stands and kids’ activities. For more details, visit www.arizonaindiantourism.org. Scottsdale Arabian Horse Show — Feb. 14–24 The annual Scottsdale Arabian Horse Show runs Feb. 14–24, at WestWorld, 16601 North Pima Road. Since 1955, the annual horse show has set the pace in the Arabian horse world, bringing top owners, trainers and breeders from around the globe. More information: www.scottsdaleshow.com. There are several ways residents and visitors can learn about activities and get traffic information: • The city of Scottsdale’s website at www.scottsdaleaz.gov features news and traffic information, plus a full calendar of activities under the “Things to Do” section. • You can subscribe to the city’s weekly Scottsdale Update newsletter at www.scottsdaleaz.gov, search “Scottsdale Update.” For more information about City events, visit www.scottsdaleaz.gov or call the city’s information line during business hours to get answers about events and activities: 480.312.3111.

Scene from A Bag of Marbles

The 23rd annual Greater Phoenix Jewish Film Festival, running Feb. 10–24 at three Harkins Theaters across the Valley, will showcase a slate of 20 independent films, including the Western United States’ premiere of a rare multi-camera shoot from the original Broadway run of the play about Golda Meir, Israel’s only female Prime Minister. Golda’s Balcony, The Film defies categorization — it’s a film of a play that plays like a film. The original Broadway performance was riveting and won every award in New York. The final masterpiece of author William Gibson (The Miracle Worker), the play follows the trajectory of the life of Golda Meir from Russian immigrant to American schoolteacher to a leader of international politics as the fourth Prime Minister of Israel. The film’s producer, David Fishelson, will appear Feb. 10 in Scottsdale and Feb. 11 in Tempe and conduct post-screening question-andanswer sessions with the audience. Other highlights of the festival are the fascinating documentary film subjects, including several Broadway stage stars (Broadway Musicals: A Jewish Legacy); Polish historian Emanuel Ringelblum who led a clandestine resistance group vowing to defeat Nazi lies and propaganda in the Warsaw Ghetto (Who Will Write Our History); and Rachel “Ruchie” Freier, a Hassidic woman who created the first all-female volunteer ambulance corps in New York City (93Queen). This year’s Classic Film selection is the 1996 film Shine, about Australian pianist David Helfgott (played by Geoffrey Rush who won an Academy Award for his role), an international prodigy who, after suffering a breakdown resulting in his institutionalization, gradually pieced himself back together. The film festival features a rich assortment of independent Jewish cinema that travels from a maternity ward in the South of France to the cramped living arrangements of the Warsaw Ghetto, from the back alleys of Budapest to the frozen Russian countryside; from the bright lights of Broadway to the harrowing ambulance runs in Brooklyn. Films screen Valley wide at three Harkins Theatres in Scottsdale, Tempe and Peoria. For more information on films or to purchase tickets, call 602.753.9366 or visit www.gpjff.org.

Serving the Community Since 2002

• Hashknife Pony Express gallops into Downtown Scottsdale — Feb. 8 Celebrate 61 years of the Hashknife Pony Express thundering into town at high noon Friday, Feb. 8. The fun begins at 11am with family-friendly activities, food trucks and live entertainment until 2pm at the Scottsdale Museum of the West. More information: www.scottsdalemuseumwest.org.

Tales of Broadway, Brothers, Budapest & More at Film Fest

5

2.19


Scottsdale

Experience Equestrian ‘Art in Motion’ at Waterfront Festival

ADVERTORIAL

What’s the Best Valentine’s Gift for Your Family?

Serving the Community Since 2002

By Libby Banks, The Law Office of Libby Banks

6

2.19

ith Valentine’s Day here, I’ve been wondering how to show my family I love them. And, of course, estate planning was one of my first thoughts! A proper estate plan makes it so much easier on those you love both if you become incapacitated and when you are no longer here. Without a cohesive, thoughtful estate plan, you may leave a gigantic mess. Your family may have to expend a large sum of money and lots of time and effort to clean it up. If you are incapacitated, they will have to petition the court to be appointed to care for you and take charge of your finances. That proceeding, called conservatorship, will involve at least two attorneys, even if the family all agrees on who is to serve and what is to happen. On your death, they will have to file a probate proceeding with the court, which will take more time and expense to wrap up than it takes to administer a proper plan. Even worse, your family may end up fighting over things. Time after time when I handled family estate fights, clients said they would never speak to their siblings or stepchildren or stepparent again, or lamented that the messy estate issues were breaking the family apart. I value family highly, and these cases broke my heart. I went into estate planning to help clients avoid these messy fights. A proper estate plan shows your love by easing the burden of administering your estate and by eliminating or minimizing potential fights. When there’s no fight, it’s much easier for your loved ones to think loving thoughts about you, and to love and support each other during the difficult time of your incapacity or death. Show your love by getting your estate plan in place. (And husbands, you may want to do something else nice for your wife for Valentine’s Day!) If you are ready to show your love with an estate plan, you can call my office for a complimentary initial consultation at 602-375-6752 or email me at libby@libbybanks.com. You may also want to attend my seminar at Gentech Support located at 402 E. Greenway Pkwy on February 12 at 6:00 p.m. Check my website for information and registration, http://libbybanks.com or email Andy@libbybanks.com.

Libby@LibbyBanks.com 602.375.6752 www.LibbyBanks.com

Thunderbird Artists presents its Eighth Annual Waterfront Fine Art & Wine Festival, February 8–10. Patrons will have the opportunity to stroll the beautiful banks of the Scottsdale Waterfront District and enjoy juried fine art, wine tasting, spirit sampling, live music, delectable edibles and sculptures by worldAl Glann renowned artist Al Glann. Glann’s passion for horses started at a young age. He grew up on a farm, but never owned horses, so he spent his time imagining what it would be like to have one. Now, he loves to create horses in action, a gestural threedimensional drawing with metal. His style has become his signature, exaggerating the form, giving it a sense of what he sees and feels it to be. “I love to work with the line, weight, movement, the essence of the form, the negative space in defining the form and character. I strive to capture the personality and spirit of horses, more than a specific realistic representation of one particular horse.” In addition to Glann, 125 juried fine artists from throughout the U.S. and abroad, will be on the Waterfront displaying original artwork in a variety of mediums. Paintings, sculptures, jewelry, photography, pottery, baskets, wood, glass, stone; these are just a few examples of some of the mediums that will be on exhibition throughout the three-day event. Patrons can leisurely stroll through fine art, while sipping on world-class wines and listening to live music. For $10, patrons will receive an engraved souvenir wine glass and six tasting tickets, providing a unique opportunity to sample an extensive collection of domestic and imported wines, as well as cocktails and icecold microbrews. The Ganga Jala Band will be the featured musician performing all three days in the amphitheater. The band encompasses vocals, guitar, “Blue Salutation” by Al Glann percussion and bass to create a unique sound all their own. Also performing at the festival will be guitarist Chuck Hall, pianist Jason Michael Tracy and Gina Machovina. The event is located just south of Nordstrom’s on the Southbridge pedestrian walkway and is handicap accessible with free parking. The hours are 10am–5pm daily. Admission is $3 for adults. For information, call 480.837.5637 or visit www. thunderbirdartists.com. “Horse” by Al Glann


Serving the Community Since 2002

The Exercise Coach will celebrate four years at its Hayden Road location with an open house event Saturday, Feb. 9, 11am–2pm. The public is invited to this milestone anniversary party where people can check out the facility, meet the coaches, including franchise owner Amanda Coe, and enjoy healthy snacks and beverages. “We’re like a family here,” says Coe. “Everyone feels welcome, whether you’re experienced or have never used exercise equipment.” Newbies to The Exercise Coach, which offers a “20 Minute Smart Workout,” can sign up for three free trial workout sessions. Visitors can also test-drive the studio’s exclusive high-tech, proprietary equipment that delivers workouts in 20 minutes. The event will offer a fun, relaxed atmosphere where everyone can experience the studio’s innovative approach to fitness. The Exercise Coach offers one-on-one training, training with a partner, small-group classes, and a family training program. Their latest development is personalized nutrition sessions with a certified holistic nutrition coach. “Clients achieve maximum results with just two 20-minute sessions per week, thanks to a uniquely effective combination of bio-adaptive exercise technology, a nutrition program, and the knowledge and encouragement of professional personal coaches.” The Exercise Coach uses a proprietary fitness system that is customized to be safe and time-efficient. “Our programs are private and customized to your fitness level,” says Coe, who also owns a second studio at 10101 East Bell Road in North Scottsdale. “Each person moves at their own pace.” The Scottsdale Exercise Coach won New Franchisee of the Year in 2013 and was recently awarded Franchisee of the Year for the second time and Top Performing Studio for the third time. Founded in 2000, The Exercise Coach currently has 45 studios throughout the US. They expect to have 300 locations by 2020. The Exercise Coach is located at 8300 North Hayden Road in Scottsdale. To learn more, visit http://scottsdale. exercisecoach.com.

Scottsdale

Scottsdale Exercise Coach Celebrates Four Years

7

2.19


Scottsdale Serving the Community Since 2002

8

2.19

Scottsdale Artists’ School Presents Palette Project Workshop Scottsdale Artists’ School is partnering with artist Daniel J. Keys to host Palette Project, a free two-day mentorship program taking place Friday, Feb. 1, through Sunday, Feb. 3. This unique weekend workshop is designed specifically for young adults, ages 17 to 22, who aspire to cultivate their talent and skills into a future art career. Students were hand-selected by Scottsdale Artists’ School and Keys based on their skills, passion and experience as reflected in an original one-page essay and one to two images of their work that were required for scholarship consideration. Twenty-one students were chosen overall. Five are local from Scottsdale, Tempe and Prescott and 16 from out-of-state. Those coming from out-of-state will travel to Scottsdale from California, Oregon, Colorado, Texas and as far as Indiana and Arkansas. “We take the responsibility of raising tomorrow’s artistic leaders seriously and doing our part to invest in their creative capacity. I am so excited this will be our seventh year mentoring this talented group of emerging artists,” says Keys. (www.danieljkeys.com) “The partnership we have with Daniel is very special,” says Trudy Hays, SAS executive director. “We are grateful to him for developing this mentorship program and for offering us the opportunity to host it. By giving these young artists the opportunity to get involved and learn from skilled professionals, we are making a way for the ‘torch’ of knowledge to be passed on to the next generation.” For more information on Scottsdale Artists’ School and Palette Project call 480.990.1422 or visit www.scottsdaleartschool.org.

Celebrate Canines & Raise Funds for a Cause Gather friends, family and dogs and head to Scottsdale Civic Center Mall Feb. 23 for the fifth annual DogFest Phoenix. Everyone is invited to join in this day of fun, festivities, inspiring speakers, dog demonstrations, music, food and more. The community-based walk and festival brings dog lovers together for a cause. Whether one has a dog or simply loves them, spend the day at DogFest and celebrate canine friends and heroes that bring joy to the lives of their humans. All funds raised benefit Canine Companions for Independence and its mission of matching assistance dogs with children, adults and veterans with disabilities, free of charge. These expertly-trained assistance dogs make a profound impact through the jobs they do like opening doors, picking up dropped items, alerting to sounds and much more. DogFest Phoenix will take place 10am–2pm Saturday, Feb. 23. Scottsdale Civic Center Mall is located at 3939 North Drinkwater Boulevard in Scottsdale. Registration is free. For additional information, visit www.cci.org/dogfestphoenix.

news.CITYSunTimes.com


The monthly Gold Palette ArtWalk brings together the finest art in Scottsdale including 28 galleries and two museums — Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art and Western Spirit: Scottsdale’s Museum of the West. During the Scottsdale Gallery Association’s weekly Gold Palette ArtWalk, presented in partnership with the City of Scottsdale, the Scottsdale Arts District offers free trolley rides to various restaurants, museums, galleries and more throughout Old Town Scottsdale. Free parking areas are plentiful and valet service is offered. For more, visit www. scottsdalegalleries.com.

Scottsdale

Scottsdale Arts District to host Two February Gold Palette ArtWalks

“The Native American” by Karen Bezuidenhout, shown at Wilde Meyer Gallery

The Western Week ArtWalk  (Feb. 7, 6:30–9pm) serves as the official kickoff to the City of Scottsdale’s Western Week, including multiple events that recognize Scottsdale as “The West’s Most Western Town” such as the arrival of the Hashknife Pony Express, the Parada del Sol’s Trail’s End Festival and the two-day family-friendly American Indian Festival. The Western Week ArtWalk features live music from Desert Dixie band, line dancing instruction and demonstrations, and displays of traditional and modern Western artwork. Participating galleries include On the Edge Gallery, River Trading Post, Wilde Meyer Annex and Wilde Meyer Gallery. The Native Spirit ArtWalk  (Feb. 28, 6:30–9pm) celebrates the Native American spirit that is alive and well in the Southwest. Guests can enjoy native dancing and drumming while viewing works from tribal artists from around the state. This ArtWalk is a unique cultural experience that celebrates the traditional and modern Indian artwork available in the Scottsdale Arts District. Participating galleries include River Trading Post, Territorial Indian Arts Gallery, Wilde Meyer Annex and Wilde Meyer Gallery.

Serving the Community Since 2002

he Scottsdale Gallery Association announced two specially themed Gold Palette ArtWalks during the month of February. The two events —Western Week ArtWalk Thursday, Feb. 7, at 6:30pm, and Native Spirit ArtWalk Thursday, Feb. 28, at 6:30pm — pay homage to a distinct part of the City of Scottsdale’s history, its unique western roots and its strong Native American community. Taking place throughout Old Town Scottsdale’s Arts District between Main Street from Scottsdale Road to Goldwater Boulevard and north of Indian School on Marshall Way to 5th Avenue, the Scottsdale Gallery Association’s participating galleries host events such as sales, artist meetand-greets and demonstrations, entertainment and refreshments during the ArtWalks. “We are thrilled that our city’s artists community and group of art enthusiasts continue to grow and show interest in the multitude of art our Old Town District has to offer,” says Scottsdale Gallery Association president French Thompson. “With each Gold Palette ArtWalk we aim to highlight a different and unique type of art and culture that is represented right here in Scottsdale.”

9

2.19


Scottsdale Serving the Community Since 2002

10

2.19

Street Eats Food Truck Festival Returns to Scottsdale Over 60 of the Valley’s best food trucks will be on-site at the 2019 Street Eats Food Truck Festival this month. Spread across the grass lawns at Salt River Fields at Talking Stick Saturday, Feb. 16, and Sunday, Feb. 17, this family-friendly festival is open 11am–6pm daily, with all the food trucks offering $2 samples of their homemade treats. Plus, between bites attendees can enjoy live music, food eating contests and a massive kids’ zone for a fun weekend celebration. Tickets to the 2019 Street Eats Food Truck Festival are available online. VIP access is also available, and includes six beverages and four food tokens, private restrooms, plus access to VIP Lounge, and kids

under 12 (and parking) are always free. All food trucks accept cash (and most accept credit cards). For a list of participating food trucks and entertainment, or to purchase tickets, visit www. streeteatsaz.com. Salt River Fields at Talking Stick is located at 7555 North Pima Road in Scottsdale. For additional information, visit www.saltriverfields.com.

Photos: Yeung Photography


Scottsdale

Fari Designs is ‘One Stop Shop’ for Remodeling

Perk Serves Up Love on a Plate This Valentine’s Day Perk Eatery will offer a sweet treat for sweethearts this Valentine’s Day, Thursday, Feb. 14. The neighborhood restaurant is featuring strawberries and cream waffles for just $8.49 all day long — the restaurant is open 6:30am–3pm. Perk Eatery is located at 6501 East Greenway Parkway, Suite 159, in Scottsdale. For additional information, call 480.998.6026 or visit www.perkeatery.com.

Serving the Community Since 2002

There are few design/build contractors that can take an outdated, run-down house built in the mid-50s and within a short period of time create a home that feels and looks like it was built yesterday. But that is exactly what Fari Momeni, ASID, NKBA, the sole owner of Fari Designs, LLC, loves to do, and does well. Recently, Momeni designed, obtained building permits and constructed several ground-up restorations for a local developer who said, “Fari Momeni has the design talent and construction management know-how that is second to none. She has the ability to create something beautiful and then supervise the construction crew to build it according to her standards. In fact, one of those homes recently won the ‘Home of The Month Award’ in design and construction.” Momeni has a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Interior Design and a Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration along with her bonded and insured general contractor’s license (ROC #299160). Her trusting and professional personality, along with the confidence she brings to the table, puts her clients at ease, especially with her goal of “providing a high level of excellence in the quality of my work and in the final finished results of my team.” Fari Designs takes pride in eliminating middlemen — Momeni meets with all clients personally, one-on-one, and performs the work around the client’s schedule and availability. “I love what I do, and I think that shows in my final product,” says Momeni. “If you are serious about hiring a true professional who can turn your home into the next feature in House Beautiful magazine, call me.” To reach Fari Designs, LLC, call 480.522.8564 or visit www.faridesigns.com.

11

2.19


Scottsdale Serving the Community Since 2002

Italian Festival Brings Valley’s Best in Art, Culture & Food

12

2.19

The Italian Association of Arizona will hold its Sixth Annual Italian Festival, celebrating all things Italian, Feb. 23–24. This two-day event will entertain and delight guests with live music, delicious Italian food and wine, dance performances, authentic Italian crafts and more. The festival will take place at Old Town Scottsdale’s “Piazza del Southbridge,” south of Camelback Road and west of Scottsdale Road. This year’s event will feature live entertainment and some of the best Italian food the Valley has to offer, including gelato, pizza, hand-made meatballs, sausages, pasta, wine and other delicacies. Live performances will include Sbabieratori di Asta, A Ziarella (Italian Folk Group), Di Gala: Phoenician Tenors and Sima and her All-Star Trio. The event is sponsored by Talking Stick Resort Arena, Menabrea Italian Beer, Fiat & Alfa Romeo and Go AZ Motorcycles. Galbani Cheese will sponsor a stage and host celebrity chef Marco Sciortino. A portion of the proceeds from the event will go toward St. Vincent de Paul, an organization that helps feed, clothe, house and heal those in need in Arizona. Tickets to the event are $10 and children under 12 are free. Hours are 11am–9pm Saturday, and 11am–5pm Sunday. Old Town Scottsdale’s “Piazza del Southbridge” is located at 7114 East Stetson Drive. For additional information, visit www.italianfestivalaz.com.

Mix & Mingle with Scottsdale Chamber in February The Scottsdale Area Chamber of Commerce will hold its next PM Connect event Wednesday, Feb. 6, 5–7pm, at Fellow Osteria & Pizzeria, 1455 North Scottsdale Road, Suite 100, in Scottsdale. Its next AM Connect event is scheduled for Feb. 21, from 7:15–9am, at Desert Financial Credit Union Kierland, 15505 North Scottsdale Road, Suite 190, in Scottsdale. Both events are free to members and $30 for guests. In addition, the Chamber will host a Meet Your Neighbors for Lunch event at Lou Malnati’s, 17787 North Scottsdale Road in Scottsdale, Friday, Feb. 22, 11:30am–1pm. Meet Your Neighbors is a monthly networking event held the last Friday of each month at various locations throughout Scottsdale. For a complete listing of upcoming events, or additional information about the Chamber, call 480.355.2700 or visit www.scottsdalechamber.com.


Photos courtesy of Arizona Cocktail Weekend

Spirited Event Celebrates Valley Cocktail Scene one-of-a-kind cocktail experiences brought by the best talent and brands in the spirits industry — think ice-cold vodka paired with a kilo of caviar, or bourbon cocktails dispensed out of a custom-built, full-sized concrete mixer truck, just to name a few of the overthe-top cocktail creations featured at the 2018 AZCW. Tickets to the concert are available online at www.thevanburenphx.com.

Or skip the service fees and pick up your tickets in person at Stinkweeds (12 W. Camelback Rd. in Phoenix, 602.248.9461, www.stinkweeds.com). Weekend events continue Sunday, Feb. 17, with the return of Top Bars showcasing pop-up versions of renowned lounges from around the state, country and across the globe, all in one location. Hosted at historic warehouse turned hip event venue, The Croft, 2018 Top Bars participants included iconic imports from across the country, accompanied by Arizona favorites such as Bitter & Twisted, Blue Hound Kitchen & Bar, The Breadfruit & Rum Bar, The

Mora Celebrates Two Years with Festive Event Mora Italian will celebrate its two-year anniversary from 4–5:30pm Feb. 27 with free appetizers and a welcome cocktail. There will also be a wine tasting station, where guests can taste three Italian wines from Mora’s menu. Additional festivities will include a live DJ, photo booth, cake celebration and more. For guests who choose to dine-in, there will be an interactive discussion with celebrity chef, cookbook author and restauranteur, Scott Conant at 6:30pm and 8:30pm. Under the creative direction of Conant, Mora Italian delivers a modern osteria experience to the Valley. Conant’s cooking style, described as easy-tolove Italian fare with firepower, is evident throughout a menu that features blistered Neapolitan-style pizzas, pasta dishes, entrees and desserts. Thirsty diners can enjoy a sharp, progressive cocktail program and thorough wine list. Visit www.moraitalian.com for more details.

Brickyard, Clever Koi, The Gladly, Hotel Congress, Market Street Kitchen, OBON, Scott & Co., Tough Luck Club and UnderTow. Finally, on President’s Day (Monday, Feb. 18), the Last Slinger Standing bartending competition will host top mixologists from across the Southwest inside 7th & Union at Young’s Market Company. In addition, top lounges, bars and restaurants across Downtown Phoenix will be hosting AZCW events, dinners and exclusive cocktail tastings. For a complete rundown of Arizona Cocktail Weekend events, visit www.arizonacocktailweekend.com.

Annual Corks & Cactus Event to Benefit Botanical Garden Sample, sip and savor amidst the splendor of Desert Botanical Garden at Corks & Cactus, where boutique wines and desert beauty blend into a delightful event. To be held Feb. 9–10, guests can sample from 40 different wines each day, enjoy talented musical entertainment and purchase delicious fare from Fabulous Food Fine Catering and Events. Featured entertainment includes Lee Perreira (Feb. 9) and AJ Odneal (Feb. 10). During the event, visit with representatives from a variety of wineries and purchase by the bottle or case at the Garden’s Wine Retail Store. Most wines featured in the retail store are priced at $35 or less, with no sales tax on any wine purchased. Guests are able to mix and match 12 or more bottles and receive 10 percent off the total purchase price. All wine purchased benefits the Garden’s education, research, exhibition and conservation programs. Corks & Cactus is a 21-and-over event and runs 1–4:30pm daily. For tickets or additional information, call 480.941.1225 or visit www.dbg.org.

Serving the Community Since 2002

rizona’s annual salute to spirits and cocktail culture, the Arizona Cocktail Weekend (AZCW) runs Feb. 16–18, and kicks off the celebration with The Cocktail Jam. One of Phoenix’s own, national touring artist DJ Z-Trip, will headline the kickoff concert, hosted at The Van Buren Saturday, Feb. 16. The event combines an amazing evening of music with wildly-inventive,

Arizona Cocktail Weekend kicks off Feb. 16

13

2.19


North Phoenix Serving the Community Since 2002

14

2.19

NVSO to Host ‘Big Top’ Fundraising Gala North Valley Symphony Orchestra (NVSO) invites the public to attend its annual gala fundraising event, Saturday, Feb. 9. This “Big Top” event will be held at Arrowhead Country Club, 19888 North 73rd Avenue in Glendale. Join NVSO for “An Evening of Elegance Under the Big Top,” and witness fortunes told, feats of strength, and works of magic. The event will feature vignettes by the performance team of Vertical Fix Productions, a Valley cirque-style entertainment company. Also, sophisticated magical entertainment will be provided by special guest and magician Michael Paul. Attendees will have a variety of silent auction items to consider, including round-trip tickets on Southwest Airlines, a violin hand-made especially for the event by Jody Summerford, spa packages, original artwork and themed baskets. Guests can donate dollars to take photos with circus performers, challenge Yuri (the strongest man in the world), and experience real magic, all while jugglers, stilt walkers and contortionists roam the room. This circus-themed event begins with cocktails at 5:30pm, giving guests the opportunity to browse silent auction items and listen to NVSO musicians perform NVSO ring-master (board before dinner is served. Event tickets are $75 each member) Tammie Langdon, and include one cocktail, dinner and one raffle ticket. and stilt-walker Lindsay Seating is limited — make a reservation online at www. Maxfield, from Vertical Fix. northvalleysymphony.org/events-calendar. NVSO is a nonprofit community orchestra encompassing three youth ensembles and an adult orchestra. All NVSO musicians are volunteers who share a passion to rehearse and perform exceptional orchestral music for the North Valley community.

Washington Federal Reaches Nearly $70,000 in Local Donations Through its Washington Federal Foundation, the community grant program for Washington Federal, the bank’s 31 Arizona branches were able to donate $25,000 to UMOM New Day Centers (www.umom.org) and $15,000 to Care Fund (www.thecarefund.org), respectively, in recent weeks to cap off a year of successful local giving in the community in 2018. The Washington Federal Foundation’s purpose is to facilitate direct giving to community-based nonprofits serving low- and moderate-income individuals’ needs. Throughout 2018, the local branches donated nearly $70,000 to organizations in need and have already opened the grant submission window for 2019. The goal is to donate in excess of $70,000 by year’s end. Additional organizations benefiting from 2018 donations include Youth on their Own, Junior Achievement of Arizona, Habitat for Humanity, Pima Community Land Trust, Boys and Girls Clubs of Greater Scottsdale, Chicanos Por La Causa, Save the Family and more. “After the passage of the 2017 federal tax reform legislation, Washington Federal announced a five year, $5-million contribution to its foundation that supports nonprofits focused on housing, senior care and improving financial literacy. These enhanced donations are a direct reflection of that, and we intend to do the same this year,” says Mike Brown, Arizona regional president of Washington Federal. Brown says that, beyond financial contributions, they also have a volunteer program in-house called “Washington Federal Focus on Arizona.” “We empower our team members to work together on community volunteerism and fundraising efforts together in their own backyards,” says Brown. For more information, visit www.washingtonfederal.com.


A Brief Insight into Custom Designed Jewelry and Synthetic Diamonds By Indra Jhaveri, AMI Diamonds and Jewelry

Synthetic Diamonds Synthetic diamonds are now available on the open market. They possess the same physical and chemical properties as natural diamonds — a carbon chain formed under very high temperature and

pressure over thousands and millions of years. (Differences between the two are detectable, but with highly sophisticated equipment, which GIA [Gemological Institute of America] possesses now to differentiate properly. Some of the other labs also might possess some or all of the necessary equipment). Since the 1950s, General Electric and collaborators were working at creating this artificial High Pressure High Temperature technique (HPHT) to create man made or synthetic diamonds with very little success — very minute crystals and yellowish to brownish in color.

(1) In HPHT process, high pressure generated inside a machine causes powder made from real, natural diamonds to dissolve in molten metal and crystallize inside a capsule forming a synthetic diamond crystal. (2) There is another process, CVD or Chemical Vapor Deposition, in which manufacturers break down molecules of carbon containing gas with the resultant carbon atoms turning into crystals over several weeks. However, now with the HPHT and CVD process they are able to create bigger crystals with better colors and they are available on the open market with an average 30% to 40% less cost. Ethical manufacturers do sell them as synthetic diamonds. Larger size diamonds (e.g., ½ carat or larger) would have laser inscription on the girdle to identify them as synthetic from most of the synthetic diamond manufacturers. Jewelers who carry this synthetic diamond have ethical and legal responsibility to inform their customers and advise them on choices and customers can decide. Synthetic rubies, sapphires and emeralds have been on the market for over 100 years and customers have been making choices appropriately.  Also, equipment is available to jewelers to identify synthetic diamonds from natural diamonds most of the time. *1, *2 Courtesy of Rapaport 

Learn more at www.amidiamondsand jewelry.com; call 602-923-8200/602-4322920 or email amidiamond@live.com.

Serving the Community Since 2002

1) Idea Strikes — Wanting something from your thought,heart and mind to be uniquely different than the cookie cutter or mass produced jewelry available on open market. 2) Brainstorming with a Professional — Someone with more information, knowledge and know-how to convert the idea into action. They have some samples, books and other material available to help with your vision. They can draw/sketch or on computer show you the potential outcome of your thoughts. Design to fruition step requires the knowledge of feasibility, imparting and properly communicating the design you have discussed is very important at this stage. 3) The Professional Jeweler — Meeting of the minds has been set and your design details have been confirmed; 10k, 14k, 18k, in yellow or white gold, silver, platinum etc. It is time to customize your jewelry. (a)  Making jewelry has been an  ART for hundreds of years wax was prepared by wax carver/ bench (master) jeweler to show the customer in rough format as to what the piece is going to look like. Customer can approve or ask for feasible changes to be made. Hopefully it is minor if the meeting of the minds was appropriate. For major changes, a new wax could be made for approval before the casting stage. 

(b) Today with technical advancement, Computer Assisted Design (CAD) are being made with more precision and shown to the customer for approval. A digital image even can be forwarded to the customer on a smartphone or email for approval. Some of the CAD professionals can have three-dimensional view and possibly 360-degree rotation also. As discussed in step (3)(a) above, after final approval from the customer, a CAM (Computer Assisted Manufactured) wax model is made to be sent to the casting facility. 4) Casting — Professionals who specialize in casting then casts the approved wax using lost wax casting method where molten metal at high temperature replaces the wax. Rough finished casting from the mold is then finished for setting the diamonds, gems, pearls, etc. per the design agreed upon. 5)Finishing Your Design — The jeweler, after setting the desired gems in the jewelry gives final finishes before presenting to the customer. Now the idea has become a reality you can wear and even pass down for generations to come. 

North Phoenix

ADVERTORIAL

15

2.19


North Phoenix Serving the Community Since 2002

Family H.E.R.D. Research Project Seeks Volunteers Horses Help is halfway through a research project that started in September. The purpose of the study is to determine whether or not an equine assisted activity program, such as the Family H.E.R.D., has a positive impact on family function. The organization is still recruiting families for this project. A total of 10 families have participated. There are currently six spots open that are needed for data collection. Participation is free to families who meet the criteria. Any family interested in participating in the research study will need to be able to commit to three consecutive weeks. The program is offered Monday evenings, Friday evenings, Saturday mornings or Saturday afternoons, and at least one child in the family must be age 10 or older. The research program is set up in three phases. Each week the family completes one of the phases that will incorporate something new and interactive about horses. All activities and challenges are centered on learning about horses as family members. Each participant will have multiple opportunities to work closely with the horses on the ground. Phase one focuses on three concepts: building rapport and caring for horses; seeing the world from a horse’s perspective; and learning about equine communication. Families are engaged in game-like activities and challenges in which they will experience the three concepts. Phase two focuses on understanding and accepting differences by learning about herd

PVSchools Governing Board Elects New President

Julie Bacon

16

2.19

dynamics. Families will learn the importance for animals of prey to work together, accept the differences in hierarchy and personality within the herd and how it relates to family dynamics. Finally, in phase three, families learn to establish and maintain boundaries while working with horses on and off lead. Concepts learned from phases one and two will also be revisited in phase three to help with the success of leading. Data collection includes filling out questionnaires prior to starting the program, after the completion of the three weeks and again after three months. All names and identities are withheld for confidentiality. The H.E.R.D. program is not a family therapy program, but an opportunity for families to enjoy being outdoors together while learning about horses and interactions. All families are welcome to participate as long as they meet the eligibility criteria, which can be found on the Horses Help website: www.horseshelp.org (click on the “Programs” link and “Equine Assisted Living” to find the “Family H.E.R.D.” link. Those who are interested in partaking in the Family H.E.R.D. research study, contact Kerri at kerri.s@horseshelp.org or call the office at 602.569.6056. There is no cost for participation. Participation in the project is voluntary.

The PVSchools Governing Board elected Julie Bacon as its new president at the Jan. 10 meeting. This is the second time Bacon will serve as president of the PVSchools Governing Board. She was first elected to the Governing Board in 2010 for the term beginning 2011 and is currently serving her third term. She previously served as Governing Board president in 2014. Reorganization of the Governing Board occurs once a year at the first meeting in January. Learn more about PVSchools at www.pvschools.net.


Chabad of Arizona will celebrate 42 Years of dedication and service in Arizona Feb. 24 with a gala fundraising event. Low income preschool scholarships, rural town Rabbinic visits, Shabbat dinner for seniors, special needs birthday celebrations, and a warm, non-judgmental, welcoming community — this is just a part of what Chabad does for the Greater Phoenix community.  In celebration of this great work, Chabad of Arizona will host a Gala fundraiser and auction celebrating its partners and supporters and raising funds as the organization focuses on a new year of growth. Auction prizes are the gifts of many wonderful business and stores that find meaning in Chabad’s mission and are also dedicated to strengthening communities they serve. The Gala Dinner & Auction will be held Sunday, Feb. 24. Chabad of Arizona is located at 2110 East Lincoln Drive in North Phoenix. To learn more, call 602.944.2753 or visit www.chabadaz.com.

North Phoenix

Chabad Celebrates Forty-Two Years of Service

Make a Splash with Indoor Swim Lessons at Hubbard

news.CITYSunTimes.com

Serving the Community Since 2002

The winter months are upon us and outdoor temperatures are not conducive to swimming. But inside at the Hubbard Family Swim School, the temperature of the heated, indoor swimming pools is 90 degrees all year long, making winter a perfect time for swim lessons. “Winter is a great time to enroll children in swim lessons because it gets them all prepared and ready for safe swimming this summer when they’ll want to spend a lot of time swimming outdoors with their family and friends,” says Bob Hubbard, co-owner of the Hubbard Family Swim Schools. “Swim lessons during the winter are not only terrific exercise and a lot of fun, but we also want to make sure that children learn how to swim and are always safe around water. Our basic philosophy is this: Children everywhere must learn how to swim. Learning to swim should not be a choice.” Hubbard Family Swim Schools offer lessons to children 8 weeks to 12 years of age. There are even free “baby splash” swim classes for babies 8 weeks to 5 months of age. Parent participation in the water is required. These fun-filled, 30-minute water acclimation classes give parents or caregivers a chance to learn excellent tips on how to enjoy tub time at home with baby and learn how to prepare baby for swim lessons. There are several different baby splash class times offered throughout the week. Advanced registration is required. “Our popular baby splash classes give parents an excellent way to spend quality time with their babies in the water,” adds Hubbard. “Their swim class together is wonderful ‘bonding time’ and then after the class, the babies always enjoy a nice, long nap.” Hubbard Family Swim School is located at 13832 North 32nd Street, Suite 100, Phoenix. For more information and to register for a class, call 602.971.4044 or visit www.hubbardswim.com.

17

2.19


North Phoenix

Female Entrepreneurs Invited to Free Diversity Workshop

Serving the Community Since 2002

The Phoenix Chapter of the National Association of Women Business Owners (NAWBO) invite female entrepreneurs to learn tips about leveraging diversity at its Feb. 7 Rise Up! Workshop. The workshop (9:30–11:30am) is part of NAWBO’s Rise Up! Quarterly program to promote diversity and inclusion. “Leveraging Diversity: Overcoming What Gets in the Way” will be presented by Stephanie Clergé, director of Training and Consulting at Kolbe Corp. “Attendees can learn how a perspective beyond typical aspects of diversity, coupled with practical tips for inclusion, can enhance your business results,” says Phaedra Earhart, NAWBO RiseUp! program director. “The business case Stephanie Clergé for diversity has never been clearer and thus leveraging diversity should be a part of every successful company’s talent decisions.” Clergé is responsible for the innovative, high-quality training programs that Kolbe Corp provides for leaders, their teams and individuals. She is an accomplished entrepreneur and manager, as well as a sought-after speaker in the field of talent development. Prior to joining Kolbe Corp, she had her own coaching and consulting practice and held a variety of operational leadership roles during a nearly 15-year career at Intel Corp. She holds a bachelor’s degree in industrial engineering and management science from Stanford University and an MBA focused on corporate entrepreneurship from Babson College. Additionally, Clergé holds a coaching certification from the Hudson Institute of Coaching and a credential from the International Coach Federation. “At NAWBO Phoenix, we recognize that there is a wealth of women business owners that are not represented in our chapter and we want to change that,” say Tish Times and Laurie Battaglia, Rise Up! facilitators. “One in three women business owners are women of color; 5 percent of millennials are business owners. Our goal is to have the members of our chapter represent the community at large. NAWBO Phoenix is focused on increasing diversity and fostering inclusion this year and we need your assistance to Rise Up!” Rise Up is a quarterly program targeted to attract a diverse group of women business owners who want to grow their businesses, while also having conversations about the benefits of inclusion and diversity. The free Feb. 7 NAWBO Rise Up! Workshop will be held at the Maricopa Small Business Development Center, 108 North 40th Street in Phoenix. Reserve by Feb. 6 or get additional information online at www.nawbo.org/phoenix; click on the “Events” link.

18 Kids Traffic

LIFE IS FULL Take a Coffee Break and Stay Connected to Your Community and Local Happenings!

2.19

To advertise:480.922.8732

| news.CIT YSunTimes.com


Save the Date: Tour d’ Artistes Studio Tour and Sale

Photo: Mirrored tin, silver mosaic by Sandra Herbst

The current benchmark for highperformance cars is to accelerate from zero to 60MPH in less than three seconds, but Concours in the Hills has gone from zero to 750 in just five — the first show was in 2014 but five short years later in 2018 there were 750 cars on display. In fact, the show has broken records in all four categories each successive year, growing to 750 cars, an estimated 20,000 spectators, 78 sponsors and over $117,000 raised for Phoenix Children’s Hospital. The show was created by Fountain Hills resident Peter Volny, a life-long car aficionado. Seeing the enormous number of suitable cars in the area, Volny felt that the time was right for a car show that would be on grass, where cars just look better, rather than in a parking lot, and where access would be only for suitable vehicles, plus where they could be spread out to look their best. He felt that the beautiful area around the lake and fountain would be the perfect backdrop. Volny approached then Mayor Linda Kavanagh and explained his concept, asking for approval to allow cars in the park, to which he says she enthusiastically agreed — there were 220 cars and a few thousand people at

the first event. As the show grew and needed more expertise, particularly in the area of organization and logistics, Volny transferred ownership of the show to Scuderia Southwest, a car club in Arizona with a following of over 2,000 (he is one of the five directors of the club). Concours in the Hills is not a formal “white gloves” event but rather a fun event designed to showcase a wide variety of domestic and imported vehicles and provide an opportunity for car lovers to meet new people and make new friends. The show is arranged by vehicle brand to encourage exhibitors to make those new acquaintances. Awards are given for Best Domestic, Best Import and Best of Show with a new award this year for Best Car Club Display. There are three new sections in 2019 — a large racing car display, a genuine Shelby section, and a dedicated Ford GT section. The 2019 show will be held Saturday, Feb. 9, and is free to spectators, as is spectator parking. Those wanting to display

a vehicle pay a fee of just $60 to Phoenix Children’s Hospital and can register on line at www.givetopchf. org/concoursinthehills. The show runs from 10am–3pm. There will be food and coffee trucks, plus many restaurants are within easy walking distance. The Riviera Broadcasting network will provide themed music and a radio DJ. About 80 sponsors have signed on to display the latest versions of most brands and many other automotive products and services, as well products from local Fountain Hills businesses. For more information, visit www.concoursinthehills.org.

Serving the Community Since 2002

The Eighth Annual Tour d’ Artistes Studio Tour and Sale will take place Friday, Saturday, Sunday, March 1–3, from 10am–4pm daily. A pre-Tour reception will be held Wednesday, Feb. 27, 5–7pm at the Fountain Hills Artists’ Gallery, 16858 East Avenue of the Fountains, Suite 103. Guests will have the opportunity to review the art and meet the Tour artists. What started with a small group of passionate artists has grown into an annual event, 15 studios and galleries with over 60 artists. During this free event, the public will have the opportunity to interact with local artists and observe them in the process of creating original artworks. There will be a wide variety of art media including painting, mixed media, glass, metal sculpture, digital photography, fiber art and jewelry available for purchase. Artist studios are located throughout the picturesque town of Fountain Hills. Visit all the studios and galleries and be eligible to win one of the three prizes, including a $150 gift certificate towards the purchase of art from one of the participating artists; $100 gift certificate toward a jewelry purchase from a local Fountain Hills Jeweler; and another $100 gift certificate from a local restaurant. For a list of participating artists and the Tour map, visit www. fountainhillsartleague.com. Tour maps may also be obtained from participating artists and galleries.

Concours in the Hills — Zero to 750 in Five

19

2.19


Serving the Community Since 2002

MTA Presents Daddy Long Legs in February

20

2.19

This month, Musical Theatre of Anthem (MTA) presents its production of Daddy Long Legs, a musical stage production based on the treasured novel that inspired the classic 1955 film about a witty and winsome young woman and her mysterious benefactor. Jerusha Abbott is the “Oldest Orphan in the John Grier Home” until a mysterious benefactor decides to send her to college to be educated as a writer. Required to write him a letter once a month, she is never to know the benefactor’s identity — so she invents one for him: Daddy Long Legs. Although she knows that he will never respond to her letters, she grows more and more fond of this elusive and kindly “old” gentleman. But another relationship soon begins to develop in Jerusha’s life introducing her to a world of literature, travel and adventure. Yet, there is one startling fact that Jerusha has yet to uncover — a fact that will change her life forever. The talented cast, comprised of award-winners and nominees ages 16– adult, presents the show Feb. 21–23 in Anthem. The award-winning production staff includes director Jackie Hammond and assistant director/stage manager Jessica Kishbaugh. Performances take place Thursday through Saturday at Musical Theatre of Anthem’s performance space, 42201 North 41st Drive, Suite B100. For tickets or additional information, visit www.musicaltheatreofanthem.org.

Celebrate Love & Music at Champagne Salon ProMusica Arizona will hold its Second Annual Musical Champagne Salon Feb. 9 at 7pm in a private home in the Anthem Country Club. Guests will be treated to an evening of musical performances by talented soloists and small ensembles throughout the evening. Heavy hors d’oeuvres, desserts, champagne, wine and other beverages will be served and can be enjoyed either indoors or outdoors. Event chairperson Connie Henry says, “The Musical Champagne Salon promises to be one of the most elegant events of the year. This evening, just a few days before Valentine’s Day, is an opportunity to dress up, socialize with other music lovers, enjoy a selection of scrumptious appetizers and Pictured: Jerry Gunderson and Ron Meekins desserts, and sip champagne and (foreground) wine all in a beautiful setting.” Last year’s Champagne Salon sold out, and tickets are limited for this year’s event as well. Tickets are $80 per person. For more information and to purchase tickets, go to www.pmaz.org and click on the “Tickets” tab or call 623.326.5172.


MAYOR PETERSON WRITES... Town Leadership Moves Closer to Unifying Carefree Under One Water Service Provider By Mayor Les Peterson

You mean there is more than one water provider in Carefree? Yes, there are two water providers operating within the Town of Carefree; the Carefree Water Company, which serves about 75 percent of residents, and the Town of Cave Creek, which serves the remaining 25 percent. The Cave Creek water service areas within Carefree are referred to as the “Carefree Service Area.”

What does this action mean? This action authorizes the mayor to initiate the formal process required to acquire the water system in the Carefree Service Area from Cave Creek and make it part of the Carefree Water Company. An agreement to acquire the Carefree Service Area was already memorialized in an IGA (intergovernmental agreement) approved by both towns in 2007.

Why this sudden action? This acquisition has been under review and discussion for over two years, but the Town leaders proceeded cautiously to make sure this is the right decision. About one year ago, a consulting team comprised of water system and financial experts was hired by the Town and the Carefree Water Company to study this issue to help determine how best to proceed.

Why is this action important? Unifying all of Carefree’s residents and businesses under one water system provides many benefits to both the existing Carefree Water Company users as well as residents and businesses within the Carefree Service Area.

What did the experts say? The complete summary of the findings of the team of experts has not been summarized in final written form at this time, but these outside experts and Carefree representatives have been involved in every step of the process. All of the findings of this collective team have been incorporated into the decision making and plan of action.

These benefits include: • G  reater water security to all of Carefree’s residents • S  tandardizes water maintenance practices for the Town • P  rovides all Carefree residents and businesses a voice in electing the officials that control the water system and establish water rates • Allows for greater operating efficiencies • S  trengthens the Carefree Water Company by adding over 500 new customers

Inaugural Classic Car Rally & Show Scheduled The Carefree Classic Car Rally board of directors announced that the inaugural Rally & Car Show will be held the last Sunday in February. The rally is an all-day event beginning with a two-hour car show from 8–10am, which is free to the public – who will vote for the “People’s Choice Award.” This will be followed by the rally send-off at 10am. The rally is limited to 40 vintage, classic, antique, and modified automobiles manufactured in 1985 and earlier. The event is a fundraiser with proceeds benefiting the ALS Association, Wounded Warrior Project, Desert Foothills Library and Literacy Program, and the Phoenix Children’s Hospital Foundation. For rally drivers and co-drivers, the day includes breakfast, a timed scavenger hunt, lunch, and an evening awards dinner at locations in and around Carefree’s Historic Spanish Village. “We are thrilled to be sponsoring the first vintage classic car rally to be held in Carefree,” said rally organizer Nanci Kelleher of Hermosa Designs. “We expect an enthusiastic turnout by the public and car owners alike.” The Carefree Classic Car Rally takes place Feb. 24 at Historic Spanish Village, located at 7212 East Ho Hum Road and Cave Creek Road in Carefree. For detailed information and an application, visit www.carefreeclassiccarrally.com.

What if I want more information? This summary begins the communication process. We are happy to provide what additional information we can at this time, however, please understand that this project is entering a timeline that requires sensitive discussions and negotiations with the Town of Cave Creek. Information that could impact the discussions cannot be shared at this time. As the process progresses, continual information will be shared with Carefree’s residents and business customers.

Serving the Community Since 2002

On Jan. 15, the Carefree Town Council, the members of which also serve as the Board of Directors of the Carefree Water Company, unanimously approved a resolution authorizing the mayor to pursue the acquisition of the water system serving the far western parts of Carefree and integrating these areas into the MAYOR Carefree Water Company service Town of Carefree area. Included in this acquisition 480.488.3686 would be the water required to www.carefree.org service these accounts. This brief summary is intended to help you understand this action and why the Town Council/ Water Company Board of Directors believes that this task is critical to the future of Carefree.

21

2.19


Carefree Serving the Community Since 2002

22

2.19

Desert Gardens Presents February Seminar The Carefree Desert Gardens continues its 2019 seminar series Saturday, Feb. 9, with “Legumes: More Than Just Beans.� When most people think of legumes, they think of peas and beans. But legumes are so much more than that. With more than 19,500 species worldwide, legumes are more diverse by any measure than other flowering plant families and are second in economic/ agricultural importance only to the grass family, serving as a source of food, fodder, green manure, woods, oils and resins, dyes, medicines and horticultural varieties. Carefree Desert Gardens welcomes Dr. Marty Wojciechowski, associate professor at Arizona State University, where he specializes

in studies of legume evolution and geographic distribution. Dr. Wojciechowski will discuss some of the unique aspects of legume biology, their diversity in the Southwest, and importance in agriculture, horticulture and ecology. The program, which usually includes a plant raffle, will begin at 9:30am and run until approximately noon in the Town Council Chambers, 33 Easy Street in Carefree. A $5 (or more) donation is appreciated to support these programs. Seating is limited so it is recommended that guests arrive early. Additional seminar offerings will be held monthly through April on the second Saturday of the month. For information call 480.488.3686 or go to www. visitcarefree.com.


Keep the brain young, active and strong

• B  rian Browne, MS CSA: Latest research on achieving and maintaining brain health • J ohn Callahan, azWHOLEistic: Proven benefits of CBD and hemp extracts for brain health: how to reduce pain, inflammation and other health conditions • L  arry P. Canepa, Certified Culinary Educator: Ancient grains for the modern world • L  auren Hurst Daem, B.A., L.Ac, CCWFN: Where is your brain anyway? The role acupuncture and nutrition play in brain health and balance • L  ouise Gutowski, NMD: Healing your brain and body with homeopathy

Expo sponsors include HonorHealth; az WHOLEistic; Desert Foothills Family YMCA; Lone Mountain Memory Care; Paradise Valley Community College and CITYSunTimes. Advance registration recommended as the event has sold out the previous two years. The cost is $20 advance; $30 at door. Holland Community Center is located at 34250 North 60th Street, Scottsdale. For additional information and registration visit www.azfcf.org or 480.488.1090.

Serving the Community Since 2002

rain health study is a growing field and receiving a great deal of attention. A healthy active brain is as important as having a strong heart in overall good physical health. Contributors to a healthy brain are stimulating social activity, stretching intellectual curiosity, eating well, getting good sleep and reducing stress. Hosted by the Foothills Community Foundation’s MindQuest Committee, the Third Annual Healthy Brain Expo is scheduled for Feb. 23, 9am–2pm, at Holland Community Center. The expo will offer wide-ranging workshops — from current research in brain science, the study of biomechanics, and the benefits of hemp extracts and homeopathy, to understanding how nutrition and regular exercise improve brain health; learn about mind-body health through massage and chair yoga; integrate new strategies for brain health into life such as acupuncture. Attendees can enjoy nine diverse and stimulating workshops focused on brain health and wellness:

Carefree

Third Annual Healthy Brain Expo

23

• K  ari Johnson, PhD, RN, ACNS-BC: Science behind the brain — what are we learning? • C  huck Peck, Carefree Therapy Massage: Massage’s mind-body connection • M  ichael J. Robb, AAS, BA, DC: Brain strangulation — are you at risk? • L  aurie Satter, Desert Foothills Family YMCA: Chair yoga — pre-hab, re-hab or just plain feels good

2.19


Carefree Serving the Community Since 2002

SOUL CONNECTION This is Why Terry Volunteers at the Foothills Food Bank

24

Business owners, are you reading this? So it DOES work! Call Bob Hesselgesser today to reserve your space in our next issue!

2.19

602.214.7661

Some people in our community are hungry because they don’t have the money to buy food at Basha’s or Fry’s. Thankfully, also in our community are people — volunteers, donors and staff at the Foothills Food Bank — who make sure our neighbors don’t go hungry. Terry Dowd is one of more than 500 volunteers who made it possible last year for ALLEN NOHRE more than 15,000 people to get food and other Writer necessities for themselves and their families. Asked why she has volunteered four to six hours a week at the food bank since 2015, she said, “After I retired from my position as the manager of the radiology department in a hospital, I wanted to help people in a very direct way. The reward for my small contribution is seeing the happy relief on the face of a new client at the Foothills Food Bank getting help for their very human and basic need.” Terry, who helped develop an orientation and training program for volunteers, strongly endorses the organization’s non-judgmental philosophy of caring compassion for clients who are struggling due to circumstances beyond their control. Clients range from young families with children whose breadwinner has lost a job to senior citizens whose fixed income doesn’t cover expenses. In addition to the opportunity to directly help clients, Terry loves the interaction with other volunteers who come from many backgrounds and bring a variety of skills. She said, “My colleagues are awesome. This is a solid organization, very aware of the needs of the community, and it is a pleasant and fun place to work, especially because you know you are making a difference.” Donors are always needed, and additional volunteers will be needed as the summer months approach. If you want to be a donor or think you might enjoy being a volunteer, you can call the Foothills Food Bank: 480.488.1145 for the Cave Creek facility, or 623.374.9441 for the Black Canyon City facility. The next volunteer orientation is scheduled for March. “A Soul from Minnesota,” by Allen Nohre, a collection of CitySunTimes essays, is available on Amazon in paperback and Kindle. Allen can be reached at anohre@cox.net.


Taste of Foothills Fundraiser

DFWC to Hold 2019 Fundraising Event Desert Foothills Woman’s Club (DFWC) will hold its annual fundraiser Valentine’s Day, Thursday, Feb. 14, at Grayhawk Country Club. DFWC is a social and philanthropic organization comprised of over 100 women from the Foothills area. Its mission is to provide scholarship funds to graduating high school senior women and to fund local nonprofits. In 2018, the club raised approximately $20,000 and scholarships were awarded to four deserving young women and contributions were made to five local nonprofits. Tickets to the fundraiser are $75 per person. There will be a full dinner, dancing and both silent and live auctions. Those who would like to attend the event, contribute to the Club’s cause, or purchase an ad in the event program, should contact the club for detailed information via email: dfwc50@gmail.com.

Serving the Community Since 2002

Area residents are invited to save the date for the Foothills Caring Corps’ 15th Annual Taste of Foothills Fundraiser in Carefree, with gourmet food tastings, live auction and live music, all to benefit a good cause. The social event is a fundraiser to support independence for seniors, and will be held Wednesday, March 13, from 5–8:30pm, at CIVANA Carefree Resort, 37220 Mule Train Road. Special guest emcee Terri Ouellette, host of ABC15’s “Sonoran Living,” will inspire and guide attendees through the evening festivities. “Terri O” has entertained and educated viewers on the morning news, hosting several lifestyle shows and in her book, Easy Embellishing with Terri O. Popular auctioneer Jonathan Blair will lead the live auction. Attendees will enjoy a celebratory evening filled with sweet and savory Terri Ouellette will serve as emcee for the tastings from local restaurant favorites 15th Annual Taste of Foothills Fundraiser. and live music. General admission is $50 per person with VIP admission options available. All proceeds benefit the volunteer-based nonprofit Foothills Caring Corps. The Taste of Foothills Fundraiser provides key funding for the mobility and transportation services including the programs for mobile meals, medical transportation, shopping, medical equipment loan closet and van transportation. For tickets, to volunteer or for more information, call the Foothills Caring Corps at 480.488.1105 or visit www.foothillscaringcorps.com.

Carefree

Save the Date:

25

2.19


Carefree

Chamber Welcomes Premier Documents to Carefree The Carefree Cave Creek Chamber of Commerce held a ribbon cutting ceremony Tuesday, Jan. 15, at the Premier Documents Carefree location, 748 Easy Street, #11. Premier Documents is a family-owned business with several locations in the Valley. The founder, Michael Maloney Sr., created the company in Iowa in 1989. His son Michael Maloney Jr. joined him shortly thereafter. Premier Documents provides education on the subjects of estate planning, estate settlement and asset protection. Contact Stephanie and Mike Maloney at the Carefree location by calling 602.371.8898 or visit www.premieraz.net for more information.

Serving the Community Since 2002

‘Drive & Win’ Raffle to Support Local Nonprofits

26

2.19

Area residents are invited to help support two local nonprofits by participating in the “Drive & Win” raffle. Participants will not only be entered to win a two-year lease on a 2019 Porsche, but will be supporting Foothills Community Foundation’s community center, theater, education and equine assisted learning, as well as helping grant a wish for an Arizona child with a critical illness through Make-A-Wish Arizona. In addition to the raffle, supporters may bid on unique car, travel and golf items through an online auction. Find details (and restrictions) at www.azfcf.org/drive-and-win. Foothills Community Foundation (FCF) is a unique partnership that brings support, opportunity and community service to the Desert Foothills. FCF currently addresses community needs through community service projects, cultural programs and the support of education. These are provided by FCF’s programs including Desert Awareness Committee, Desert Foothills Theater, MindQuest Speaker Series, Visual Arts Lecture Series, Partners in Education and the Holiday Project. Learn more at www.azfcf.org or by calling 480.488.1090. As the founding chapter of the now international wish granting organization, Make-A-Wish Arizona continues to work toward its vision of granting the wish of every eligible child in Arizona. The organization is dedicated to its mission of granting the wishes of children with life-threatening medical conditions to enrich the human experience with hope, strength and joy. Learn more at www. arizona.wish.org or by calling 602.395.9474.

Mix & Mingle with the Chamber this February The Carefree Cave Creek Chamber of Commerce will hold its next mixer event Wednesday, Feb. 13, 5:30–7pm. This month’s host is Country Financial– The Bennett Agency, which is located at 7100 East Cave Creek Road, Suite 116, in Cave Creek. Always the second Wednesday of each month, the mixer event offers the opportunity to join Chamber members to network, socialize and win prizes. The cost to attend is $5 for members; $15 for non-members (non-members may attend twice before joining). To learn more about the Carefree Cave Creek Chamber of Commerce, call 480.488.3381 or visit www.carefreecavecreek.org.


The Foothills Food Bank & Resource Center is in need of non-perishable food donations. Pam DiPietro, executive director for Foothills Food Bank, says even more families and individuals are in need of food due to changing economic forces and work transitions. “Factors such as job change issues, the partial government shutdown and other life changes have resulted in an increase in the nutritional needs of many in our communities,” says DiPietro. “We ask the public to provide us with food donations to increase our food inventory through spring.” DiPietro adds, “The food bank also encourages area businesses, churches and individuals to host food drives — just like during the holidays — and ask food purveyors to help the food bank.” Foothills Food Bank and Resource Center provides emergency food, financial assistance and other life necessities and resources to individuals and families in the desert foothills, which encompasses a 180-square mile area that includes Anthem, Black Canyon City, Carefree, Cave Creek, Desert Hills, New River, North Phoenix and North Scottsdale. Foothills Food Bank & Resource Center is located at 6038 East Hidden Valley Drive in Cave Creek. For additional information, call 480.488.1145, email foothillsfoodbank@gmail.com or visit www. foothillsfoodbank.com.

Serving the Community Since 2002

Desert Awareness Committee (DAC) will host its next lecture, “Water, Use it Wisely… Aquifers & Our Spigots” at Holland Community Center Feb. 4. What is the state of water availability that supplies water in the Foothills area? Learn how Scottsdale manages and conserves its water resources at this lecture. Prior to the mid-1980s, Scottsdale relied almost entirely on groundwater for its water supply. Now, most of the supply is from renewable surface water sources. See what is being done to conserve water and what residents can do looking to the future. The presenter will be Elisa Klein, certified water efficiency professional, water conservation practitioner, desert landscaper, Smartscape, irrigation auditor. She is the water conservation coordinator from the Arizona Municipal Water Users Association. The Desert Awareness Committee of the Foothills Community Foundation hosts the lecture Feb. 4, 6:30–8pm, at the Holland Community Center, 34250 North 60th Street in Scottsdale. Reservations are not necessary; donations are appreciated. For information, visit www.azfcf.org/about-desert-awareness.

Food Bank in Need of Food Donations

Carefree

Learn About Water Use at DAC Lecture

27

2.19


MAYOR BUNCH WRITES… By Mayor Ernie Bunch

It’s February already and the weekend activity in town has certainly picked up! As usual, you’d be hard pressed to be bored in Cave Creek. There is live music, hiking, bike riding, horseback riding, arts and craft shows, great food and Rancho Mañana golf course is in great shape. The Museum is always good and if you didn’t know, new exhibits are put up each year. It’s worth the time to learn about our area’s history. MAYOR If you’re into gardening, it’s time right now to Town of Cave Creek take a look at the Maricopa County Planting Guide 480.488.1400 and get busy in the dirt! www.cavecreek.org So much to do in our great community. If you’re not aware, Infinite Finds (the old Wild West Pawn Store site) has classes and activities that are a real boon to Cave Creek in addition to their Thrift Store. On another note, your Town Council had a “retreat” Jan. 17 where councilmembers were able to discuss their goals and objectives for the future. Topics were wide ranging from lighting, noise, signs, water, sewer, traffic, law enforcement and parks. Of course, our staff isn’t the largest so priorities will have to be set with the hottest items getting attention first. As I write this on the evening of Jan. 20, I really can’t believe that as a nation we’re no closer to securing our border. There is a long and disappointing history on this issue. In 1987 Ronald Reagan agreed with Congress to allow 2.7 million illegal aliens stay in this country. What was supposed to follow was a barrier that would make infiltration more difficult. Didn’t happen. Since the reason for government is the health, safety and welfare of its citizens, it is shameful that we’re still not secure. The reasons for security are numerous and include illegal drugs, disease, economic issues and human traffickers. The societal costs are just too great to continue to ignore. The environmental degradation in Southern Arizona is appalling. I’ve seen it with my own eyes but will not see it again. It’s no longer safe to wander the hills near the border anymore.  Come on D’s and R’s! Get it together and do your jobs!

28

2.19

L–R: 2018 Cave Creek Rodeo Days Teen Queen Lilly Alsever, 2017 Cave Creek Rodeo Days Queen Samantha Erdmann, and 2018 Cave Creek Rodeo Days Queen Megan Alsever

Cave Creek Rodeo Days Returns March 22-24 ave the dates and get ready to attend one of the Valley’s biggest events — Cave Creek Rodeo Days is set for Friday, Saturday and Sunday, March 22, 23 and 24 in Cave Creek. Now in its 42nd year, with Sanderson Ford as the 2019 title sponsor, the event will take place at Cave Creek Memorial Arena with three thrilling PRCA rodeo performances featuring top-ranking Professional Rodeo Cowboy Association (PRCA) and Women’s Professional Rodeo Association contestants. This year’s event kicks off Saturday, March 16, starting at 9am with the festive Cave Creek Rodeo Days parade through town. Monday, March 18, the Cave Creek Rodeo Days Golf Tournament will take place at Tatum Ranch in Cave Creek. Photo courtesy of Cave Creek Rodeo Days

See Cave Creek Rodeo Days Returns, page 29

Library to Host Tenth Annual Gala Feb. 9 The Desert Foothills Library will host a “Red Carpet Evening” of glitz and glam at the 10th annual gala Saturday, Feb. 9, at 6pm. The Library, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, invites the Valley community to one of the organization’s largest fundraisers of the year. The gala will take place at the Library, 38443 North School House Road in Cave Creek. Gala attendees will enjoy hosted cocktails, a gourmet dinner and a live and silent auction, all within the beautiful, newly remodeled Desert Foothills Library facility. Entertainment includes performances by celebrated pianist Nicole Pesce and performers from the Phoenix Opera. “Our 10th annual gala is a special evening that provides ongoing financial support of the Library’s objective to enrich the community by promoting literacy and advancing knowledge through library resources and lifelong learning,” said David Court, Desert Foothills Library executive director. To purchase tickets, which are $200 per person, contact Court at 480.488.2286 or dcourt@ dfla.org. The library welcomes auction donations and sponsorship opportunities are available. All proceeds will benefit the Desert Foothills Library. For additional information, visit www.dfla.org or call 480.488.2286.


Cave Creek

Chamber Welcomes DunnEdwards to the Neighborhood The Carefree Cave Creek Chamber of Commerce held a ribbon cutting ceremony Tuesday, Jan. 15, at the newly opened Dunn-Edwards Paint. Dunn-Edwards has been a leading paint manufacturer in the Southwestern United States since 1925 and is “committed to providing the superior products and services that our customers have come to expect.” The Cave Creek location (#188) is open seven days a week; 6am–5pm Monday to Friday, 6am–6pm Saturday, and 10am–4pm Sunday. Dunn-Edwards Paint is located at 5350 East Carefree Highway, #101–104, Cave Creek. For additional information, call 623.428.2064 or visit www.dunnedwards.com and search for Cave Creek Store 188.

continued from page 28 Rodeo weekend, the town will be packed as locals and visitors take advantage of the free shuttle buses to the rodeo grounds. Gates open at 5pm both Friday and Saturday, March 22 and March 23, with PRCA performances starting at 7:30pm. Gates open Sunday, March 24, at noon with the PRCA performance starting at 2pm. Cave Creek Rodeo Days organizers are seeking contestants for its Feb. 16 Queen Contest, including Rodeo Queen and Teen Queen. The winners will travel the Turquoise Circuit representing Cave Creek Rodeo Days at events throughout the Southwest. Contestants will be judged on their horsemanship, personality and appearance. In addition, contestants must be able to communicate a strong understanding of the sport of rodeo. Young women ages 18–23 are invited to compete for Rodeo Queen, with teens ages 13–17 competing for the Teen Queen title. Girls ages 6–12 are encouraged to participate in the Princess Program. Princesses learn how to be good role models, spokeswomen and friends while promoting the sport of rodeo and the

western way of life. The next entry deadline is March 1, but princesses are accepted into the program year-round. Applications can be found at www.cavecreekrodeo.com/ royalty-information and they must be submitted to queens@ cavecreekrodeo.com no later than Friday, Feb. 8. Rodeo tickets purchased in advance cost $22; tickets at the gate are $25. Premium seating is also available in the Ranchero Club for $50 with a Yetti Cooler drawing (value of $400) for all that purchase seating in the new Club. Ranchero patrons will also have a finger food and two free drinks included in their ticket purchase. Finally, there is the ultimate experience enjoyed by event sponsors in the Stockman’s Club. Limited tickets are available for $150 per person, which includes a full dinner, drinks (hosted bar), and exclusive seating on the arena for an up-close rodeo experience. The Skybox is also available on Saturday and Sunday for $5,000. To purchase tickets, go to www. cavecreekrodeo.com and click the ticket link. For up-to-date information, visit the website, call 480.304.5634 or email info@cavecreekrodeo.com.

Serving the Community Since 2002

Cave Creek Rodeo Days Returns,

29

2.19


Cave Creek Serving the Community Since 2002

Make a Difference in the Lives of the Elderly Caring Corps seeking volunteers

Area residents who are looking to make a meaningful difference in their life, and in the lives of others in the community, are invited to team up with Foothills Caring Corps. The volunteer-based nonprofit serves the greater Northeast Valley, including Carefree and Cave Creek, and is seeking individuals to share their talent, skills and time with the organization whose primary mission is to support older adults to remain independent and living in their homes. Volunteers are needed for such programs as friendly visits and phone chats; mobile meals; shopping assistance; caregiver relief; business, computers and correspondence; health advocacy; van drivers; medical transportation; minor home repair; medical loan closet; and pet visits. Foothills Caring Corps provides a rewarding and gratifying experience for both the volunteer and the neighbor. Volunteers are given training, guidance and monitoring to ensure a quality experience. They are allowed to self-select areas in which they would like to be involved and are not required to contribute a minimum number of hours. “The Caring Corps opens their arms to people with a variety of skills levels, talent and interests. Everyone has something to contribute. Share your kindness and caring spirit with others,” said executive director, Debbra Determan.

The organization, which was established nearly 20 years ago, conducts Volunteer Orientation sessions at 9am on the second Thursday of each month. All are welcome. The Foothills Caring Corps offices are located at 7275 East Easy Street, Suite B103, in Carefree. For information or to RSVP, call the Foothills Caring Corps at 480.488.1105. To learn more, visit www.foothillscaringcorps.com.

30

Join the Chamber at Monthly Business Breakfast

2.19

Join members of the Carefree Cave Creek Chamber of Commerce for an informational monthly business breakfast presentation and early morning networking. This month’s breakfast event will be held Feb. 28, 7:30–9:30am, at Harold’s Cave Creek Corral, 6895 East Cave Creek Road in Cave Creek. To contact Harold’s call 480.488.1906 or visit www.haroldscorral.com. The cost to attend is $8 for member and $15 for non-members. To learn more about the Chamber or find other events, call 480.488.3381 or visit www.carefreecavecreek.org.


like,” said Jack. “We’ll have personal trainers available to help you learn how to use all of the equipment and to develop an individualized workout plan, if you like. We’ll also have a stateof-the-art video projection system that allows members to choose from dozens of video classes whenever it’s most convenient for them.” Membership at one Anytime Fitness club gives members access to nearly 4,000 clubs worldwide at no extra charge. The layout of every Anytime Fitness club is designed for quick and effective exercise. At the new club in Cave Creek, members will have full use of top-quality equipment and amenities, including inline body scan; circuit and resistance training machines; free weights; cardio equipment, including treadmills, elliptical machines and stationary bikes; small group fitness classes; and private bathrooms, changing rooms and showers. Prior to opening, Anytime Fitness is offering to reduce the $100 enrollment fee to $1. Membership information is available by calling 480.681.5200 or by emailing cavecreekaz@anytimefitness.com. For additional information, visit www. anytimefitness.com.

Join Post 34 Friday Nights for Fish Fry American Legion Post 34, an energetic post located in Cave Creek, now offers a Friday night fish fry with all the trimmings to the public at-large. According to Legion Post commander Ron Turrell, the post will offer the meals Friday nights from 4–7pm and feature two pieces of deep-fried cod with French fries and coleslaw for $10, six butterfly shrimp with sides for $12 and one piece of cod and four shrimp for $12. American Legion Post 34 is located at 6272 East Cave Creek Road. For additional information, call 480.488.2669.

Serving the Community Since 2002

Working out is about to get a lot easier for area residents — Anytime Fitness is coming to 29855 North Tatum Boulevard in Cave Creek. Anytime Fitness franchisees Casey and Kimberly Jack have signed a lease for a 5,569-square-foot space and plan to build a gym in Safeway Plaza on Tatum Ranch. Construction started Wednesday, Jan. 9, and is being performed by Bell Southwest. The target date for the club’s grand opening is end of February to early March. “What differentiates Anytime Fitness from other clubs is our focus on helping members get the results that they’re seeking,” said Jack. “Our gym will be small enough that we can provide personalized attention for all of our members. Whether weight-loss is your goal, or increased strength or improved balanced and flexibility — or a combination — we’re committed to helping you achieve those goals.” Nationwide, the average Anytime Fitness club has about 800 members. The gyms are staffed roughly 8 hours a day, but members can access the club whenever they like — even during unstaffed hours — using a computerized key-fob system. “We make it easy for our members to exercise whenever and however they

Cave Creek

Anytime Fitness to Open New Club in Cave Creek

31

2.19


Serving the Community Since 2002

Cave Creek

Realtor of the Year Named for Community Service

32

Special Issue!

Don’t Miss Out! 2019

MARCH 2019 ISSUE!

rch 22-24 March 16 & Ma

Complete Program Edition and Walking Map Reaching Out and Inviting CST’s 80,000+ Valley Readers! 40,000+ copies mailed and distributed throughout the Valley promoting your business and this exciting event. • Full Cave Creek Rodeo Days cover age – Event map will provide schedule for events! • Retail map with exclusive listings for advertisers will guide readers where to shop, dine and do business!

Serving the Since 2002

602.214.7661 or Bob@CITYSunTimes.com

Community

CONTACT BOB HESSELGESSER

Westfall

news.CITYSunTimes.com

t is one of the biggest events taki the Cave ng place in Creek Rod eo Days cele the Town This year, each year, bration ride Cave Creek and s into tow Rodeo Day western her The Cave n this mo s is celebra itage and Creek Rod nth. ting 41 yea promoting Produced eo Golf Tou at Tatum rs of preserv the sport by an allRanch Gol rnament take ing of profess volunteer Ford in Gle f Course, s place Mo March 23– ional rodeo. committee ndale, Cav and the live nday, March 25. and e Cre rodeo acti Kiwanis Mar sponsored ek Rodeo 19, on will thri Cervi Cha Days 2018 by Sander ketplace in mp ll spectators take son ionship Rod Cav s place Ma “We cherish e Creek is for the Cav eo is once rch 17–25. a Platinum our western e Creek Rod again sup The “Our entire Spo eo, with the lifestyle,” nsor this yea plying cha in every asp community says Cave mpionship Cervi fam r. ect of the Creek May This event ily is coming stock rodeo pro overseeing The three or Ernie Bun celebrates together duction. and particip per for eve ch. form ryth Cav atin Not only e Creek Rod ing we love ances of performanc g is the Cave about our eo Days. es) will take and was vote the Rodeo a commu Creek Rod town.” Arena, 372 place Ma eo (and nity-wide d first plac rch 23–25 01 North two Slack effort, it is e for the 201 Turquoise 28th Street at the Cav join the Kiw award-winn Circuit. The 7 Justin Boo e Creek Mem in Cave Cre anis Club ing, award is give t Best Foo consistent ek. In the orial of Carefre March 24, ting Award middle of ground con n to the rod e for a Rod 7–11am, in in the the action, ditions thro eo that had and level eo Car Pan efre cake Breakfa Those who playing field ughout the e’s Sander the safest, st Saturda son Lincoln most would like entire rod for the bar More tha y, style, nee eo, ensurin rel racing Pavilion. to enjoy n just a wee d to be in contestant the 41st Cav g a safe Queen and kend event, the Stockm s and their food, com e Creek Rod Teen on Ma an’s Club, after the horses. plimentary eo Days VIP a private naming of rch 10, Rod Saturday, beverages, seating for area that March 17, the 2018 preferred every PRC offers cate Rodeo with the Cav eo festivities official parking and Town of Cav A red per by ly form Pea e kick Creek Rod e Creek. Imm ks & Valley close-to-the ance. Frid off at 9am eo Days Par ay night’s Restauran -action & Steakho ediately afte by Q-to-U banquet will ade through t; Saturda use will hos r the parade -BBQ. Pur y night by t mutton bus be served the and the offi , the Buffalo chase tick Indigo Cro tin’ for the ets online cial kick-off Chip Salo w; and Sun children beg at www.cave dance beg day inning at 11:3 on inning at creekrodeo 8pm. .com. 0am,

Photo by Greg

RESERVE YOUR ADVERTISING SPACE TODAY! 2.19

David Crozier, an affiliate agent with the Scottsdale Carefree office of Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage, has been named the 2018 Realtor of the Year by the Scottsdale Association of Realtors. The “Realtor of the Year” recognizes an individual who has served not only the real estate profession but also their communities. Rebecca Grossman, CEO of the Scottsdale Association of Realtors, said, “Volunteers like David, help us be the best that we can be. His leadership has paved the way for others to continue the success he had during his years as chair and I am very proud that he was chosen as our Realtor of the Year.”  Crozier has served on the Association’s Realtors of Arizona Political Action (RAPAC) Committee for five years.  “As chair in the RAPAC Committee, we created an outstanding group of amazing volunteers, developed a solid plan and went out to change the culture of our membership organization,” said Crozier. “We introduced innovative techniques that have increased member participation from 8 percent to more than 31 percent and total monies raised have grown to more than $130,000 this year. As a result of our combined efforts, our association has become the most successful major association in the state in terms of participation and dollars raised.”

21


forth — and kept it congruent with (our notions of) Pueblo Style. That influence — or, more accurately, bias — from popular culture was reinforced by fundamental errors of American anthropology.  If we can get past those biases (our notions of Pueblo Style and anthropology’s errors), it is quite possible to understand Chaco on its own terms: a key episode in the history of the Pueblo peoples but a place that did not operate in Pueblo Style. AAS is a nonprofit celebrating over 50 years of existence in 2014 and the Desert Foothill Chapter is a youngster at 40 years old.  The chapter meets September through May on the second Wednesday of each month in Cave Creek and features well-known guest lecturers during these meetings.  The meetings are open to the general public at no cost with the exception of the December Christmas Party, which is members only.  Refreshments are available at 7pm and the meeting begins at 7:30pm, usually ending prior to 9pm. The meetings are held in the community room (Maitland Hall) at The Good Shepard of the Hills Episcopal Church, 6502 East Cave Creek Road, Cave Creek. For more information, visit www.azarchsoc. wildapricot.org/desertfoothills.

Serving the Community Since 2002

The Feb. 13 meeting of the Desert Foothills Chapter of the Arizona Archaeology Society (AAS) features Dr. Stephen Lekson, Curator of Archaeology and Professor of Anthropology at the Museum of Natural History, University of Colorado, Boulder. Dr. Lekson will present “Chaco and the Origins of ‘Pueblo Style’.” Archaeology (and Chaco) were present at the creation of the “Pueblo Style,” a distinctive contemporary architecture of the Southwest.  It all began in Santa Fe, New Mexico.  At the turn of the 19th century, Santa Fe was small, dusty and decrepit.  When citizens suggested moving the State Capital from old Santa Fe to modern, progressive Albuquerque, Santa Fe’s city fathers — archaeologists at the fore — fought back with culture:  ultimately, with Pueblo Style.  Old Spanish corner hearths became “kiva fireplaces” and faux vigas bristled from every roofline.  It worked: Santa Fe retained the capital and became a Pueblo theme park.  Pueblo Style, however, became more than an architectural veneer; indeed, it dominates narratives of regional prehistory, recursively influencing archaeology — once its major inspiration.  The February presentation tells the story of people, institutions and ideas that created Pueblo Style and how it now distorts our notions of the region’s ancient history.  For example: Chaco Canyon.  Chaco has always been the great anomaly of southwestern prehistory; it does not “fit” notions of how Pueblos work, of Pueblo Style.  So, archaeology invented odd notions that “normalized” Chaco — rituality, pilgrimage center, and so

Cave Creek

Archeology Society Presents February Lecture

33

2.19


Cave Creek Serving the Community Since 2002

34

2.19

Museum to Host Artist Lecture at Library Cave Creek Museum, in collaboration with Desert Foothills Library welcomes master sculptor and painter Oreland C. Joe as guest lecturer in “Native American Ledger Art with Oreland C. Joe,” Thursday, Feb. 28, 7–8:30pm, at the Library. “New Mexico artist Oreland C. Joe, renowned for his works in stone and bronze sculptures, offers a unique vision of Northern Plains Indians with his interpretations of ledger art in a contemporary, but also historic, context,” said Karrie Porter Brace, Cave Creek Museum executive director. “His artwork can be found in private, corporate, and museum collections throughout the United States and abroad.” “My goal is to decipher the importance of ledger art and also present it in a new way that hasn’t been seen before,” Joe explained. “Those images need to be preserved and their traditions need to continue. I want to use ledger as a way to frame these historic stories, but to do it in a new way and at the highest possible level of quality.” The Southern Ute and Navajo artist is the first Native American to become a member of the prestigious Cowboy Artists of America. While Joe’s artwork has a contemporary edge, it is, as he says, “filled with symbols and story,” all of which is heavily researched and catalogued. As a Southern Ute Tribal Historian, he takes great pride in bringing history to life. The origin and catalyst of Joe’s ledger work is rooted in the history of Cheyenne warrior Yellow Nose, whose late-1800 ledger book with his brother-in-law Spotted Wolf proved to be motivational. “Yellow Nose’s trajectory through the West inspired some of the most treasured ledger images ever created,” according to Joe, whose initial research into Yellow Nose’s life and works led to a lengthy and ongoing investigation into ledger art of the Northern Plains. His research covered the years from 1820 to 1895, regions in both the northern and southern plains, and tribes including Ute, Cheyenne, Arapaho and Sioux. This in-depth research directly inspired Joe’s new works. Admission to “Native American Ledger Art with Oreland C. Joe” is free. Desert Foothills Library is located at 38443 North Schoolhouse Road, Cave Creek. For directions or additional information call the Library at 480.488.2286 or the Museum at 480.488.2764 or visit www.cavecreekmuseum.org.


Cave Creek

Cactus Shadows Boys Basketball Heads to State

Serving the Community Since 2002

In mid-January, Cactus Shadows High School (CSHS) Basketball head coach Zach Washut, who is a Cave Creek resident, shared that CSHS Falcons Boys Basketball is having a great season. The team was tied for first in the Region, No. 6 overall in the State, and headed to the State tournament. “We are currently 15–2 and this is the best start in program history,” said Coach Washut. Last season we went 21–5 and reached the Elite 8 of the state tournament and have built off that momentum.” This is Coach Washut’s eighth year coaching high school basketball and his second as head coach at Cactus Shadows. Reaching the Elite 8 in the 2017–18 season marked the second time in school history the program has accomplished 20-plus wins and made an Elite 8 run. Of the players, Coach Washut says, “This team is senior heavy, with nine seniors. We have three guys that average 12 points or more and have a wellbalanced attacking team. We’re excited to finish the season strong and make some noise in the state tournament!” The State tournament playoff bracket will be available Feb. 6 for residents who would like to check out a game and cheer on the Falcons. Cactus Shadows High School is part of the Cave Creek Unified School District. Follow the District on Facebook @CaveCreekUSD. Learn more about CSHS at www.ccusd93.org/cshs or visit www.ccusd93.org/page/4535 to learn more about the Basketball program.

35

2.19


36

2.19

Serving the Community Since 2002

Cave Creek


Violins of Hope Brings Powerful Stories to Arizona

COMMUNITY VOICES JAMES ROBERTS Phoenix

Male Call: What Shivers Your Timbers?

Grammy-award winning violinist Gil Shaham will perform with the Arizona Musicfest Festival Orchestra, Feb. 23 at Scottsdale Center for the Performing Arts. (www.azmusicfest.org)

there is a Holocaust museum where people of all religions can go for education and knowledge,” said Julee Landau Shahon, co-chair of Violins of Hope. “In schools, the Holocaust is studied from a historical perspective but not in an in-depth, comprehensive way. Providing education on the Holocaust and relating lessons of the past to present day is key to creating a future where tolerance, hope and peace are valued.” According to Marty Haberer, CEO of the Jewish Federation of Greater Phoenix, presenter of the Violins of Hope, in every city where Violins of Hope programming has taken place, it has been a huge success — for the community as well as the participating organizations. “Given all that is happening in our world today, this program could not have come at a better time,” he says. “According to the AntiDefamation League, anti-Semitic incidents in the U.S. rose 57 percent compared to 2016. This is the largest single-year increase on record and the second highest number reported since the ADL started tracking such data in 1979.” Violins of Hope is a broad-reaching and collaborative effort with programs throughout the Phoenix Metropolitan area and Flagstaff, Tucson and Sedona. Many events are free or low-cost to encourage participation. For event information, visit www.violinsofhopephoenix.com.

GET MORE!: For a full rundown of Violins of Hope events, visit news.CITYSunTimes.com.

It doesn’t take a Robert Mueller to mull out what happened with your last relationship: All we need to do is look at what your dating profile says you don’t want. What the Male Call Advisory Board™ has discovered, ladies, through extensive, organic, non-GMO research consisting of about 30 minutes tracking you through Bumble and Tinder is that your dating profile often tells more about your last relationship than about what you really like to do (besides laughing, loving life, traveling and showing club selfies of you and your besties). Here are some real-life samples: “I want someone who is slow to anger” “I have my life in order and so should you” “No drama” “No games” “I want someone who will have my back” “Must love to laugh” “I’m financially stable…and you should be too” “No ex-girlfriends calling you” “Respect is a must” “No felons!” (this may have been a joke) “Please just be normal” See, all these phrases are red flags — and not the Valentine kind — announcing the things that went wrong last couple times. (Apparently you also get a lot of requests for hook-ups, but it doesn’t really help to call off the one-night hopefuls, much less the scammers, that’d be like posting a “no ants allowed” sign at your picnic.) So, fascinating as your prior relationships may have been, as Valentine’s Day approaches, how about proclaiming what makes your heart shiver with delight, not shrivel with distaste. A significantly over 40-something Phoenix-based writer, author of On Being Eight Again and The Tao of Coyote. Divorced with no children, he has been exploring the dating scene and collecting tales of woe for many years. Need a guy’s perspective? E-mail jrobertpenn@aol.com or visit jveeds.wordpress.com.

Serving the Community Since 2002

Violins of Hope tells the remarkable stories of violins played by Jewish musicians during the Holocaust. Today, these instruments serve not only as powerful reminders of an unimaginable experience but also reinforce key lessons of tolerance, inclusion and diversity that are pertinent now as well as for future generations. Violins of Hope will be in Arizona Feb. 3 – March 26. Israeli violinmaker Amnon Weinstein has devoted the last 20 years to locating and restoring the violins of the Holocaust as a tribute to those who were lost, including 400 of his own relatives. He calls these the Violins of Hope. Weinstein has restored more than 60 violins as a way to reclaim his lost heritage, give a voice to the victims, and reinforce positive messages of hope and harmony. The Violins of Hope have been played in concert halls and exhibited in museums throughout the world. They have been featured in books, print, film and television. They have been used in lectures and educational programs and their stories and messages have impacted hundreds of thousands of individuals. Violins of Hope will transcend religious and other barriers to facilitate a communitywide dialogue about music, art, social justice and free expression and the importance of cooperation and collaboration to achieve common goals. “In every major U.S. city, except Phoenix,

37

Children’s Museum to Hold Fundraiser The 2019 Children’s Museum Gala co-chairs, Cathy Brown and Rebecca Light, announced the details of its biggest Children’s Museum of Phoenix fundraiser of the year: And the Beat Goes On. Set for Saturday, March 9, this special event takes place at the Museum. The evening begins at 6pm with cocktails, hors

d’oeuvres and a silent auction inside the Museum. The event continues outside with a live auction, dinner under the stars and entertainment, followed by an after-party, featuring a dessert reception and music to dance the night away in the Museum’s trendy event space, The Monroe.

Proceeds from this event directly benefit the Museum’s Every Child Program, which provides free or reduced rate Museum access to families battling financial, emotional or circumstantial challenges. For more information visit www. childrensmuseumofphoenix.org.

GET MORE: Find complete Gala information online now. Visit news.CITYSunTimes.com.

2.19


Summit Healthcare Expansion Update

HEALTH & WELLNESS Over the last 50 years, Summit Healthcare has made significant advancements in technology, equipment and infrastructure to bring state-of-the-art healthcare to the communities it serves. In all, Summit Healthcare has invested $185 million on improvements; an impressive investment for a rural, not-for-profit facility. The largest investment completed to-date has been the addition of the five-story tower, housing private patient rooms, expanded services and administrative offices. When it comes to advanced diagnostic technology, $17 million has been invested on imaging equipment, as well as $12 million on a cardiac catheterization laboratory. These investments have been critical in providing healthcare services locally that historically required residents to travel out of the area. From the Cancer Center to the Level II Nursery to the

Wound Care Center, the advancements have continued steadily over the years, and Summit Healthcare has no plans for slowing down. In February, Summit Healthcare, NexCore, Haydon, Navapache Electric and other contractors broke ground on the $90 million expansion project. The new Outpatient Services Pavilion, Administrative Services Building and Ambulatory Surgery Center, are all located on the 19-acre plot of land adjacent to Summit Healthcare and are scheduled to be open mid-2019. Each building will house the following services with more healthcare services to be added: • A  dministrative Services building (scheduled to open in late February 2019), which will include Administration; Human Resources; Medical Records; Materials Management; Environmental Services; Business Office for Hospital and Physician Clinics; Quality and Professional Development;

Medical Staff Services; Accounting; some Information Technology • M  edical Office Building (scheduled to open in late June 2019) will include Primary Care Services (the Urgent Care Clinics in Show Low and Pinetop will remain open); Specialty Services to include Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery, Internal Medicine, Naturopathic Medicine, Pediatrics, Orthopedics, Pain Clinic, Heart, Lung and Vascular, OB/GYN, Urology, and General Surgery; Summit Healthcare Outpatient Diagnostic Imaging; Summit Healthcare Wound Care Center; Healthy Steps; and Summit Healthcare Pharmacy • A  mbulatory Surgery Center (scheduled to open late June 2019) Details for an open house in late Summer 2019 will be forthcoming. To learn more, visit www. summithealthcare.net.

Serving the Community Since 2002

Monthly Memory Café presented by JFCS

38

2.19

Jewish Family & Children’s Service (JFCS) presents its monthly Memory Café Thursday, Feb. 7, at Beth El Congregation, 1118 West Glendale Avenue in Phoenix, from 10am to 11:30am. February’s special guest artist is Michael Brace, who plays guitar and invites everyone to sing along with him. “It’s a treat to have Michael with us,” says Kathy Rood, JFCS Senior Services coordinator, who started the Café in the fall of 2017. “He is a great fit for our Café,” says Rood. “He has a terrific voice, knows the kind of music our participants like to hear, and even projects the words so all can easily sing-along.” The Café is a meeting place for those with changes in their thinking or memory, mild cognitive impairment or dementia due to Alzheimer’s disease or a related disorder, along with their care partners.  Offered on the first Thursday of the month, each Café has a new theme and includes meaningful, fun activities to engage the participants and stimulate their minds and bodies. Socialization is a key component to the cafés, as they are meant to be a place to relax, meet others and have fun.  Coffee and snacks are provided. There is no charge to attend, but registration is required. To register or for further information, send an email to kathy.rood@jfcsaz.org or call 602.452.4627. Jewish Family & Children’s Service is a nonprofit, nonsectarian social service and behavioral health organization with over 80 years of service in the greater Phoenix area. Learn more at www.jfcsaz.org.

Abrazo to Host Free Heart Health Event Abrazo Arizona Heart Hospital and Abrazo Community Health Network will host a free “Heart Health Public Forum” at 6pm Friday, Feb. 15, at JW Marriott at Desert Ridge Resort, 5350 East Marriott Drive in North Phoenix. The event is slated to feature a live broadcast of an advanced cardiac procedure, along with patient and physician storytelling, and a question-and-answer session with Abrazo’s top cardiovascular specialists. Free health screenings beginning at 4pm will also be provided to the first 50 people signing up on site. Heart disease is one of the top killers of both men and women in the United States, but new testing and treatments are offering patients more hope than ever before, according to Dr. Timothy Byrne, the event’s keynote speaker. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control reports that more than 600,000 Americans die of heart disease each year. It is the leading cause of death in both men and women, according to the CDC. Abrazo is committed to helping patients and their loved ones understand the risks associated with heart disease so they can seize control of their health. To register for the Feb. 15 Heart Health Public Forum, visit www.abrazohealth.com or call 877.934.9355.


Health & Wellness Serving the Community Since 2002

39

2.19


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

5

AROUND TOWN

Feb. 5

Joan Osborne Sings the Songs of Bob Dylan Mesa Arts Center www.mesaarts center.com; 480.644.6500

Thru Feb. 17

Aladdin

Feb. 9

Musical Instrument Museum

Thru March 1

An American in Paris Joan Osborne

The Sweet Remains Musical Instrument Museum

Feb. 6

Kalani Pe‘a

Thru March 3

Musical Instrument Museum

Childsplay & Black Theatre Troupe www.blacktheatretroupe.org; www.childsplayaz.org; 602.258.8129

Feb. 6

And in This Corner: Cassius Clay

Feb. 9

Jad Abumrad: The Miracle of Indoor Plumbing Mesa Arts Center

A Bowie Celebration The David Bowie Alumni Tour

Feb. 9–10

63rd Annual VNSA Used Book Sale

Mesa Arts Center

Thru March 10

Jersey Boys

9

Al Jardine: A Postcard from California

Michael James Scott (Genie); Photo: Deen van Meer

The Phoenix Theatre Company www.phoenixtheatre.com; 602.254.2151

Mesa Contemporary Arts Museum www.mesaartscenter.com; 480.644.6500

Feb. 5

ASU Gammage www.asugammage.com; Thru Feb. 17 480.965.3434

Arizona Broadway Theatre www.azbroadway.org; 623.776.8400

Feb. 8 – April 21

40th Annual Contemporary Crafts

www.vnsabooksale.org; 602.265.6805

7

Feb. 7

Feb. 9–10

Kodo

Experience Canada

Mesa Arts Center

Musical Instrument Museum

5

Feb. 9 – March 31

31st Arizona Renaissance Festival www.renfestinfo.com; 520.463.2700

Feb. 11

2cellos – Let There Be Cello Comerica Theatre www.livenation.com

Feb. 12

Feb. 2

Chicago

8

Celebrity Theatre www.celebritytheatre.com; 602.267.1600

The BoDeans Musical Instrument Museum www.mim.org; 480.478.6000

Feb. 12

The Bad Plus Musical Instrument Museum

Feb. 4

13

Villalobos Brothers and Flor de Toloache Musical Instrument Museum

40 Feb. 13

Feb. 8

Take 6

Bodytraffic Scottsdale Center for the Performing Arts www.scottsdalearts.org; 480.499.8587

Musical Instrument Museum

Feb. 14

Esteban: Valentine’s Day Love Scottsdale Center for the Performing Arts

Feb. 8

Albert Cummings Musical Instrument Museum

2.19

Feb. 14

Joshua Bell with Sam Haywood Mesa Arts Center


Feb. 22 – March 17

Ballet Arizona www.balletaz.org; 602.381.1096

Black Theatre Troupe at Tempe Center for the Arts http://tca.ticketforce.com; 480.350.2822

Detroit ‘67

Feb. 14 – March 3

Two Trains Running

Feb. 23–24

Arizona Theatre Company www.arizonatheatre.org; 602.256.6995

Celebrate Jazz Musical Instrument Museum

Feb. 15

Feb. 24

The Record Company

Susana Baca

Talking Stick Arena www.therecordcompany.net

Scottsdale Center for the Performing Arts

Feb. 16

Feb. 24

Richard Thompson Electric Trio

La Gran Fiesta

Musical Instrument Museum

Scottsdale Center for the Performing Arts

Feb. 17

Darrell Scott

Arts & Entertainment

Feb. 14–17

The Firebird & La Sylphide

Feb. 27

Sarah Brightman

Musical Instrument Museum

Comerica Theatre Feb. 17–24

10th Annual Devour Culinary Classic

Feb. 28

Brahms: Symphony No. 2 ASU Chamber Orchestra at Gammage

Desert Botanical Garden www.devourphoenix.com; 602.956.0909

Feb. 28 – March 3

19

Worlds of Wonder

March 1–3

Shen Yun

Mesa Arts Center

March 1–3

Feb. 19

Rosanne Cash Scottsdale Center for the Performing Arts

Silent Night Arizona Opera www.azopera.org; 602.266.7464

2

Feb. 20

National Geographic Live Cristina Mittermeier: Standing at The Water’s Edge

Serving the Community Since 2002

Canter Dance Ensemble www.centerdance.com; 602.252.8497

Mesa Arts Center

Feb. 21

41

Gregory Porter Scottsdale Center for the Performing Arts Feb. 22 – March 9

As You Like It

Southwest Shakespeare Company www.swshakespeare.org; 480.435.6868

Feb. 22 – March 9

The Taming of the Shrew Southwest Shakespeare Company www.swshakespeare.org; 480.435.6868

March 2

Aspen Santa Fe Ballet: An Evening with Pianist Joyce Yang Scottsdale Center for the Performing Arts

Thru May 26

Wondrous Worlds: Art & Islam Through Time & Place Phoenix Art Museum www.phxart.org, 602.257.1880

2.19


Arts & Entertainment

H H H JANUARY WINNERS! H H H • A  pair of tickets to the Arizona Theatre Company production of Two Trains Running at Herberger Theater Center: Melissa Grosso of Fountain Hills • A pair of tickets to see the Valley Youth Theatre production of The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane: Carlos Hernandez of Scottsdale • A Family 4-pack of tickets to the 31st Annual Arizona Renaissance Festival: Michele French of Phoenix

FEBRUARY CONTEST

Serving the Community Since 2002

Enter online at news.CITYSunTimes.com/contests or complete the short survey form, indicate which event you would like to attend and mail to CITYSunTimes, 10645 North Tatum Boulevard, Suite 200-413, Phoenix, AZ 85028. Deadline to receive submissions is February 15.

Enter To Win! [ ] A  Family 4-pack of tickets to the 31st Annual Arizona

Renaissance Festival, running Feb. 9 – March 31 [ ] A  pair of tickets to the Arizona Theatre Company production

of American Mariachi at Herberger Theater Center April 5 [ ] A  Family 2-pack of tickets to the Valley Youth Theatre

production of Tuck Everlasting, April 5–8 Name _________________________________________________________________ Address _______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________ Phone Number _________________________________________________________ E-Mail _________________________________________________________________

42

Do you receive CST at [

] your home or [

Do you have children? [

] Y or [

] N

] pick up on newsstand? Pets? [

] Y or [

]N

Who is the primary reader of CST in your home? __________________________ _______________________________________________________________________ What kind of advertising do you look for in newspapers? ___________________ _______________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________

2.19


Seventeenth Annual Melrose Street Fair

Serving the Community Since 2002

The Seventh Avenue Merchants Association (SAMA) presents its 17th Annual Melrose Street Fair Saturday, March 2, 11am–5pm. The event takes place throughout the entire Melrose District — which is located along 7th Avenue from Camelback to Indian School — and is expecting more than 25,000 guests. Open to the public and free to attend, the daylong event will feature more than 200 booths by local artisans and independent businesses; the “Melrose Patio” craft beer garden sponsored by Huss Brewing Company; a kid’s zone with face painting, video gaming truck, car show and live entertainment with local bands. Live entertainment for the event includes the Phoenix Metropolitan Men’s Chorus, Phoenix Women’s Chorus and Voices of the Desert (11–11:45am); Josh West Trio (noon–1:30pm); Haymarket Squares (1:45–3:15pm); and The Senators (3:30–5pm). The Melrose Street Fair will also boast a variety of popular food trucks, each selling their most sought-after items, including 2FG Grilled Cheese, Cactus Corn, Circle R Farm, Costantino’s Italian, Hummus Xpress, The Lemongrass Shack, Marcel Waffles Phoenix, Mustache Pretzels, The Panini People, Pizza Arno, Satay Hut and Yatai Ramen. Back as a partner this year is also Chester’s Classic Car Show, a massive car show that promises more than 200 vintage automobiles, each of which will be displayed at the event. At 3:15pm on the main stage, car show trophies will be presented as in year’s past. Thanks to a grant SAMA earned for the event this year from the Arizona Recycling Coalition, it will also be a zero-waste event, meaning all materials used at the event — even the marketing materials being used to promote it in advance — are made from recycled materials and/or or completely compostable post-event. Parking is free throughout the neighborhood and general vicinity, and there will be pedicabs available for guests who do not wish to hoof it all the way from their spots. The 17th Annual Melrose Street Fair is made possible by generous donors including Boxer Love Rescue, Clear Channel Outdoor, City of Phoenix Neighborhood Services, Echo Magazine, Girl Scouts–Arizona Cactus-Pine Council, Huss Brewing Company, Pioneer Title Agency, Sun Harvest Solar and Washington Federal. For details, to sign up as a vendor or sponsorship, visit www.m7streetfair.com.

Arts & Entertainment

Melrose District is Throwing a Party — Everyone is Invited

43

2.19


Arts & Entertainment Serving the Community Since 2002

44

2.19

CRUSH Celebrates Anniversary with Expanded Two-Day Event CRUSH AZ is gearing up to celebrate a decade as Arizona’s longest standing EDM festival. Expanding to two days, the 10th anniversary of CRUSH AZ with return to the Rawhide Western Town & Event Center Friday, Feb. 15, and Saturday, Feb. 16, and will feature a lineup reflective of this milestone. Teasing a first round of artists that includes Alesso, Blossom, Kaivon, Spag Heddy and Wuki, and more. Created by Relentless Beats’ founder Thomas Turner, the event has grown to include cities across the country under the Insomniac brand but always returning each year to its original home — Arizona. “Relentless Beats has produced a myriad of events of all shapes and sizes, but there has always been CRUSH,” says Turner. “It’s exciting to see it enter its 10th year and still be so well received by our fans. I can’t wait to reveal everything we have in store for the RB faithful.” Rawhide Western Town & Event Center is situated on the Gila River Indian Community and is Arizona’s largest 1880s western-themed entertainment venue. Located just south of Phoenix, the venue is a mere 20 minutes from the Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport in Chandler. Crush Arizona is an 18 and over event. Purchase tickets online at www.relentlessbeats.com.

Celebrate Women in Film at Second Annual Festival In its second year celebrating women filmmakers, the Worldwide Women’s Film Festival kicks off Feb. 8 and runs through Feb. 10. Feature length and short films with a woman in at least one key creative role of writer, producer, director, cinematographer, editor and composer have been screened and judged for inclusion, with submissions from 21 countries, including South Africa, Croatia, Netherlands, Belgium and United States. Festival co-founders Kim Huenecke and Eva Louis held the first Worldwide Women’s Film Festival in 2018 to “educate, support and empower women in the collaborative endeavor of filmmaking while shining a light on women’s stories and diverse experiences.” The 2019 event, to be held again at the Harkins Shea 14 movie theatre, 7354 East Shea Boulevard in Scottsdale, will also include films with storylines focused on women and/or films with women lead roles.

“We’re really excited to team up this year with The Bridge Initiative, a nonprofit organization that celebrates professional female theatre artists and promotes gender parity across all theatrical disciplines,” says Huenecke. “They will give cash prizes for the top films passing the Bechdel Test, which must have two female characters speaking to one another about something other than a man.” Huenecke, a local actor and women’s organization volunteer, wanted to support and promote women in film, and helped create the festival in 2016. With Louis, a producer, writer and actor and president of Chronic Behavior LLC, a promotion and marketing company, the two Valley women have enlisted local and regional businesses and film community members to help with the festival. For information and updates, visit www.wwfilmfestival.com or follow the festival on Facebook.


Huss Goes Hyper-Local with CenPho Citrus IPA Brewed with homegrown citrus and honoring Phoenix’s first-ever (and oft-forgotten) Orangewood citrus grove, planted in Central Phoenix circa 1895, Huss Brewing Co. announced that its all-new CenPho Citrus IPA will make its debut Feb. 9 at the Arizona Strong Beer Festival. Handcrafted with community-grown citrus, this seasonal spring brew will also be offered at various events across Central Phoenix, at the Huss Uptown Taproom, and neighborhood bars, restaurants and convenience stores. Huss’ all-new CenPho Citrus IPA was created in partnership with Phoenix City Councilwoman Laura Pastor, who represents District 4, home to both Huss’ Uptown Taproom, and the state’s first-ever experimental citrus trees. Originally imported from California, the trees were planted on the verdant Orangewood estate of pioneering developer William J. Murphy (7514 Norrth Central Avenue), who built the Arizona Canal and later founded North Central Phoenix (not to mention Glendale, Peoria, Arcadia and more).

• Feb. 11: AZ Beer Week • F  eb. 16: Citrus Fest at Huss Brewing Co. Taproom at Uptown Plaza • F  eb. 24: Coronado Neighborhood Home Tour Beer Garden • M  arch 2: Melrose Neighborhood M7 Street Festival Beer Garden Plus, Huss’ CenPho Citrus IPA will also be served on tap at neighborhood bars such as Main Ingredient Ale House, Short Leash Hotdogs and The Causal Pint, as well as canned and sold at independent neighborhood craft beer convenience stores, such as King Beer & Wine and Virginia Market. “We love to incorporate as many local ingredients as possible, and citrus is such a great flavor for a fresh seasonal beer,” says Leah Huss, who owns Huss Brewing Co. with her husband Jeff. “So as soon as we met Councilwoman Pastor and heard about the deep citrus roots in the historic neighborhoods surrounding our Uptown Taproom, we knew this was the perfect way to, literally, share a beer with our neighbors.” For additional information, visit www.hussbrewing.com.

FOOD & WINE

Photo: Patrick Rapps Photography

he PHX Vegan Food Festival, presented by Davisson Entertainment, returns for its fourth consecutive year to Downtown Phoenix Feb. 23–24. Brand new for this year’s festival, the event has expanded to two days, with Sunday being a brunch theme. The PHX Vegan Food Festival will once again be held at Margaret T. Hance Park, and to accommodate the ever-growing event, the footprint of the festival will be expanded throughout the venue. The PHX Vegan Food Festival will be held Feb. 23 from 11am to 5pm and Feb. 24 from 11am to 3pm, with one-hour early entrance on both days for VIP ticket holders. The event will feature more than 100 vegan and veganfriendly vendors, including food trucks, restaurants and packaged food and non-food products. On Sunday, restaurants and food trucks are encouraged to serve brunch appropriate dishes. Several no-host bars will be located throughout the site, and on Sunday the offerings will be expanded to include brunch time beverages, such as mimosas, Bellinis and screwdrivers. Other highlights for the family-friendly festival include demonstrations and presentations by chefs and vegan experts, a kids’ area spearheaded by Scottsdale Center for the Arts, and live art demonstrations. There will also be a Zen Zone featuring yoga classes on the hour, and three stages

featuring a full day of live and local music, presented by The Listening Room Phoenix. The PHX Vegan Food Festival will showcase more than 100 of the state’s most beloved vegan and vegan-friendly restaurants, food trucks and vendors, as well as some out-of-town favorites. Restaurants, bakeries, food trucks and food and beverage artisans will be selling their delicious creations. In addition, product vendors will be showcasing and selling their vegan-friendly offerings, including household products, health and wellness items, and clothing and accessories. There will also be cooking demonstrations and presentations by chefs and industry experts. Advanced purchase general admission is $25 for one day or $40 for both days and includes access to the event vendors, entertainment, and demos,

Photo: Reg Madison Photography

as well as one alcoholic/ non-alcoholic beverage token. General admission ticket prices will increase by $5 at the door. Advance purchase VIP admission is $60 for one day or $90 for two days and includes all of the aforementioned, as well as one-hour early entry, an additional beverage token, a special VIP entrance, a Tito’s Vodka VIP tent, a swag bag and more. Additional food items, beverages and products are available for purchase. Admission for children 12 and under is free. Margaret T. Hance Park is located at 1202 North 3rd Street in Phoenix. For more information and to purchase tickets, visit www.phxveganfest.com.

Serving the Community Since 2002

So, to honor the area’s historic citrus roots, Huss invited the community to participate in crafting this truly homegrown IPA by inviting anyone with a backyard tree to donate citrus. Following its premier at the AZ Strong Beer Festival, Huss’ CenPho Citrus IPA will be poured at the Huss Uptown Taproom as well as these community events across Central Phoenix: • Feb. 10: Willo Neighborhood Home Tour Beer Garden

Annual PHX Vegan Food Festival Expands to Two Days

45

Photo: Reg Madison Photography

2.19


SUPERINTENDENT’S MESSAGE

YOUTH & EDUCATION

Serving the Community Since 2002

Five Ways Parents and Coaches Can Take Toxicity Out of Youth Sports

46

2.19

For many kids, organized sports aren’t much fun anymore. Overbearing parents, over-the-top coaches and overzealous competition are frequent images associated with youth-athletic leagues today. Though playing ball often used to embody the enjoyment of being a kid, the experience for many youngsters is too serious and stressful — and ultimately not worth it. One study revealed 70 percent of U.S. children drop out of organized sports by age 13, with pressure and burnout among the main reasons cited. “The politics, as well as the over-emphasis adults put on kids to see a college scholarship as the ultimate goal, is ruining a kid’s ability to get the most out of sports,” says Maya Castro, author of The Bubble: Everything I Learned as a Target of the Political, and Often Corrupt, World of Youth Sports (www.thebubbleweb.com). “This over-emphasis has created an environment amongst the parents and coaches that is similar to a mafia. We badly need changes in this toxic, political and corrupt environment. And it must start with the parents.” Castro, who says her own experience as a young soccer player was tainted by misguided and misbehaving adults, offers ideas on how adults can improve the youth-sports culture: • S  trive to be a mentor. Castro says parents and coaches have a great opportunity to use sports as a teaching tool for life. “The learning aspect of the game needs to be the focal point of youth sports. Sports should be an extension of family values and behaviors. Good parents and coaches tie in the ups and downs of competition with the challenges in navigating adult life.” • M  odel positive behaviors. Part of the negative image of youth sports is related to parents yelling at coaches, referees, opponents, or even their own kids. “Parents should set the right example for their kid — and for adults who obviously haven’t grown up.” • E  njoy the moment. Too many parents and their young athletes are fretting the future. “Too often it’s all about winning and getting the scholarship.” • B  e encouraging. “Celebrate the effort, not just the result. This goes for youth coaches as well as parents. Be honest in discussing room for improvement, but not at the expense of making them feel like they have to play perfect to get praise.” • M  ake education first. Castro and many observers of youth sports say parents have lost perspective by thinking their kid is on the fast track to a scholarship or a pro career. Statistics show few advance that far. “In the meantime, kids are exhausted from travel leagues and tournaments,” she says, “and the way their future through sports is emphasized, education becomes a distant second.” “Whether a kid decides to keep playing sports or to walk away,” Castro says, “he or she should be able to do so without deep regret in having wasted their time.”

Each new year ushers in a world of new possibilities, and in the Scottsdale Unified School District, we are excited about 2019. A new Governing Board was seated last month, with newcomer Patty Beckman elected to lead the Board as its president this year. Mrs. Beckman brings a background in finance with her to the panel, and she is an SUSD parent. We also welcomed Arcadia High School graduate JannMichael Greenburg to the Board. With the infusion of these new perspectives and the experience of our three returning Board members — vice president Allyson Beckham, Sandy Kravetz and DR. JOHN A. KRIEKARD Barbara Perleberg — I am confident that our Governing Board is up Acting Superintendent to the many challenges it will face this year, and that it will embrace Scottsdale Unified School District its responsibilities directly and diligently. In SUSD, we are fortunate, indeed, to have on staff many of Arizona’s finest and most respected teachers. In addition to our 86 National Board-Certified Teachers, SUSD educators have been recognized this school year as the state’s top art educator, best middle school art educator and most outstanding elementary physical education teacher. These talented educators and their colleagues share their best instructional practices with our students every day in their classrooms, mindful of the responsibility placed on them to prepare the next generation for an ever-changing and sometimes unpredictable world. They embrace the challenge every day. In return, it is the District’s charge to ensure that our teaching staff is well prepared and up to the task. We invest in our teachers through a variety of professional development opportunities throughout the year. It is imperative that our teachers remain students themselves to ensure their skill set continuously evolves. We recognize that investments in curriculum, technology and facilities are also essential components to creating a culture of teaching and learning. We continue to prioritize them with the leadership of our Governing Board. SUSD was in the fortunate position last spring to be able to provide our teachers with a pay increase for the current school year, in addition to the one granted by the state legislature and governor. We had committed to doing that well before any legislative action was taken. Our teachers deserve respectful and appropriate compensation for a job well done. SUSD continues to move forward. Follow us on social media to discover our unfolding story. We invite you to be a part of it. To contact Dr. Kriekard, call 480.484.6120. For more information on the Scottsdale Unified School District, visit www.susd.org.

Talent Sought for Annual Young Artists’ Competition Herberger Theater Center is accepting applicants for its 20th annual Arizona Young Artists’ Competition scheduled for March 9. Arizona Young Artists’ Competition is a collaboration between the Herberger Theater Center and Center Dance Ensemble to showcase the diverse and emerging talent of young Arizona artists, introduce them to the audition process, and provide them an opportunity to interact with highly-regarded arts professionals. This year’s event is sponsored by Billie Jo and Judd Herberger, Apatrou Photography, Jennings Strouss, Arizona Broadway Theatre (ABT), National Society of Arts & Letters and Articulate. Applicants may enter in one or more of the three areas of competition: Acting, Dance and Voice. With support from the National Society of Art & Letters, the winner in each discipline will receive a $1,500 scholarship to help further their education in the arts. An additional $1,500 scholarship will be awarded to one participant by ABT. That winner will be offered an opportunity to perform in a Main Stage production at ABT.

Applicants will register to perform for a panel of judges at preliminary auditions held Monday, March 4, (Acting – ages 15–19), Tuesday, March 5 (Classical Voice – ages 16–20), Wednesday, March 6 (Musical Theatre Voice – ages 15–19) and Thursday, March 7 (Dance – ages 15–19). The top four finalists in each category will be selected to participate in the finals competition Saturday, March 9, in front of a live audience at the Herberger Theater. The audience will play an important role in selecting the “People’s Choice” winners in each category. Tickets to attend the finals competition are $10 for adults and $5 for students. Parking passes for $6 at the Arizona Center are available. Contact the Box Office at 602.252.8497 for tickets and parking information or order online at www.herbergertheater.org. The non-refundable entry fee is $25 for each discipline. The registration form and audition information are available at http:// herbergertheater.org/ayac. Deadline to register is midnight Sunday, Feb. 24. For more information about the competition, contact Mary Robinson at 602.254.7399, Ext. 104.


Huzzah! Arizona Renaissance Festival Kicks Off This Month

e transported back to the 16th century as one of the largest and most picturesque Renaissance Festivals in the nation prepares for raucous revelry below the foothills of the Superstition Mountains. Celebrating its 31st season of pomp and pageantry the Arizona Renaissance Festival runs every Saturday and

Sunday, Feb. 9 through March 31, from 10am–6pm, including Presidents’ Day Monday, Feb. 19. Cheer for brave knights, then roam the 30-acre festival village filled with

whimsical castles, cottages, pubs and 14 stages of nonstop performances of music, mermaids, merriment, dance, acrobatics and comedy. Foolish pleasures mix with artisan treasures as

DESTINATIONS

visitors shop, eat and revel with a cast of nearly 2,000 colorfully costumed characters. This year offers new shows, new stage and don’t forget to reserve a seat at the Pleasure Feast — the most exclusive event within the Festival with a five-course dinner and variety show. Advance tickets are available for purchase online at www.renfestinfo.com or save with discount tickets purchased at Fry’s Food stores statewide. Discount ticket prices are adult $26, children 5–12 $16, when purchased at Fry’s Food stores; children under 5 are always free. Tickets purchased at the Festival are two dollars more. Senior discount tickets are $25 for those 60 and older, available only on Festival days at the front gate ticket booth. Parking is free, courtesy of Fry’s Food stores. The Renaissance Festival site is located east of Apache Junction on U.S. Highway 60, just past Gold Canyon Golf Resort. (12601 East U.S. Hwy 60). For information call 520.463.2700 or visit www.renfestinfo.com.

Serving the Community Since 2002

47

2.19


Destinations

Film Festival Celebrates Twenty-Five Years

Serving the Community Since 2002

Jane Alexander

Sedona International Film Festival marks its 25th anniversary Feb. 23 – March 3 with a full lineup of 160 films — selected from more than 1,400 entries — evening events and parties, workshops and very special guests from the film industry. “We’ve been planning for our Silver Anniversary Festival for more than a year, and the excitement is reaching a fever pitch already,” said executive director Pat Schweiss. “We’re screening more films than ever before to select the lineup for this year.  The tremendous quality of the films we’re seeing is reflective our growing reputation and we’re actively scouting for great films to bring in.  With everything we’ve got planned, it will be a week filled with great entertainment, great films and great memories.” In honor of the 25th anniversary, in the weeks leading up to opening weekend, the Festival will screen the

Django screened previously at Sedona International Film Festival.

top 25 Audience Choice Award winners. Schweiss said that Academy Awardwinner Jane Alexander, who received the 2017 Lifetime Achievement Award, will return to Sedona “and has helped us tremendously in our planning and our outreach.” A kick-off event is being planned “as a way of thanking our community for its deep and consistent support over the years,” Schweiss said.  Films will run all day beginning

Saturday, Feb. 23, at the Mary D. Fisher Theater, 2030 West Highway 89A, the Sedona Performing Arts Center at Sedona Red Rock High School, 995 Upper Red Rock Loop Road, and Sedona Harkins 6, 2081 West Highway 89A. Tickets may be purchased online or through the Festival Box office at 928.282.1177. For a complete lineup of films and events, or for additional information, visit www. sedonafilmfestival.org.

Still from 2018 Festival selection Poisoning Paradise

48

2.19

ROAD TRIP!

Arizona is a beautiful state.

Advertise today so 80,000+ readers in the valley know where to road trip it!


Everett Bowman Arena, located at 935 Constellation Road, just one mile east of the downtown area. Admission is $15 adults, $12 seniors, $5 students and children (6-17); children 5 and under are free. Gates open at noon. Saturday night, visitors can enjoy another old-fashioned melodrama performance from the Wickenburg Desert Stagers at 7pm.

Sunday’s activities include an arts/crafts area, gold panning, family carnival, rodeo performance, melodrama, and special day events such as the Arizona Gold Panning Championship, where contestants compete for money and prizes while panning for gold, which starts at 1pm. The second performance of the Senior Pro Rodeo at the Wickenburg Rodeo

Grounds is at 2pm and at 7pm is the final performance of the Wickenburg Desert Stagers melodrama. The Wickenburg Chamber of Commerce is the proud producer of the celebration each year, along with the Town of Wickenburg, partners and sponsors. For more information and tickets call 928.684.5479 or visit www. visitwickenburg.com.

Serving the Community Since 2002

Wickenburg’s Gold Rush Days celebrates the town’s origins as a ranching and gold mining center in the days before there was a Phoenix. The heritage event was founded 70 years ago, and today Gold Rush Days draws tens of thousands of visitors, during the three-and-a-half days of activities. Festivities begin Thursday, Feb. 7, with the Brown’s Amusements Family Fun Carnival opening at 4pm in the downtown district. Heading to Wickenburg for special concert performances is the multi-talented Nashville artist Tracey Byrd, Thursday, Feb. 7, and Friday, Feb. 8; the show starts at 7:30pm, and is sponsored by the Del E. Webb Center for the Performing Arts. To purchase tickets only for the Webb Center concert call 928.684.6624. The official opening gets underway Friday, Feb. 8, during the opening ceremonies on Frontier Street at 10am with western act by actor stuntman Will Roberts, and gold rush officials kicking off the event. Friday is the only day guests will be able to see beautiful classic cars on Frontier Street from 9am–2pm. The main festival area on Valentine Street in the historic district will see exhibitors at the Wickenburg Art Club artisans’ fair, and juried fine art show at Stone Park and in the public library. At the community center, attendees will find daily activities such as gold panning and arts/crafts, as well as a food court from 10am–5pm. The carnival will run throughout the evening. Nearby is the free stage entertainment area set-up for live music each day starting at noon. One of the highlights on Friday is the first show of the Desert Stagers old-fashioned melodrama, held in the historic Saguaro Theatre at 7pm ($10) nightly throughout the celebration. The second concert performance at The Webb Center is again at 7:30pm. A parade will be held Saturday at 10am. It is one of the largest in Arizona with 75 entries including horses, historic wagons, classic auto’s, floats, marching bands, and youth groups. Spectators line the street as one of the largest parades in Arizona passes by. The parade theme is “Rides for the Brand.” Saturday the main event activities are the same but include the additions of a Western Barbeque sponsored by the Wickenburg Saddle Club at 11am, and the first performance of the National Senior Professional Rodeo & Open Rough Stock, held at 2pm at the

Destinations

Celebrate Wickenburg Heritage at Gold Rush Days

49

2.19


Destinations Serving the Community Since 2002

50

2.19

Rockabilly Reunion Heats Up Lake Havasu

Head to Lake Havasu City this month to take a nostalgic three-day stroll with the cool cats and chicks — check out retro-fashion and rat-rods, bop to rock-nroll oldies music and much more. The 11th Annual Lake Havasu Rockabilly Reunion will host 150 vendors of all types, food, beer garden and the ever-popular Pin-Up Girl contest. New this year: a second stage has been added and 30 bands will be rockin’. Over 800 cars and motorcycles will also be on display. Other events include giveaways, a swap meet, a 1950’s hair salon and barber, celebrity appearances, after-parties and more. The 11th Annual Lake Havasu Rockabilly Reunion takes place Feb. 15–17 at Lake Havasu State Park, and runs noon–10pm, Friday; 10am–10pm, Saturday; and 10am–8pm, Sunday. Pre-sale tickets are $45 (plus service fee) for a three-day pass; children 10 and under get in for free. To enter the Pin-Up Girl Contest, send an email to pinups@lakehavasurockabillyreunion.com. For a registration form to enter a car, email carshow@lakehavasurockabillyreunion.com. For complete Reunion details, visit www.lakehavasurockabillyreunion.com or click on the “Calendar” link at www.golakehavasu.com.

Eat, Drink & Create at Hermosa’s Palette to Palate Events Built originally as Lon Megargee’s home and art studio, The Hermosa Inn continues its artistic legacy with its winter Palette to Palate, a three-day art retreat designed to awaken the senses, soothe the spirit and create picture perfect memories to last a lifetime. Guests can craft their own palette by choosing from a diverse array of unique events, including workshops led by nationally acclaimed artists and a culinary celebration, #UnmistakablyArizona Winter Harvest Dinner, highlighting a collaboration of Arizona’s premier culinary talent, produce and wine. Romance will be in the air for Valentine’s weekend, beginning with the Friday, Feb. 15, Corks & Concert event (5:30–7:30pm; $125 per person) with Esteban and winemaker Eric Glomski. Saturday, Feb. 16, experience the #UnmistakablyArizona Winter Harvest Dinner (6–9pm; $149 per person). Executive chef Jeremy Pacheco welcomes acclaimed Arizona vintner Eric Glomski for a celebration of Arizona farming that serves as the inspiration for this fivecourse dinner, which will be paired with Page Springs Cellars. Two events take place earlier in the day Saturday. The Mimosas & Monet painting class (9:30-11:30am; $85 per person, includes instruction, all supplies, mimosa, coffee and pastries) with Hermosa Inn’s artist-in-residence Carrie Curran who will teach, inspire and guide guests on an artistic journey while using acrylic on canvas to create their very own masterpiece. The Journaling — Art and Observation series “Feathered Friends” (1:30–4:30pm; $85 per person includes instruction, all supplies, wine and appetizers) is presented in partnership with Scottsdale Artists’ School (www.scottsdaleartschool.org) and instructed by local artist and illustrator Devon Meyer who will focus on how to capture posture, proportion, angles, traits and color while sketching and painting birds of the Southwest. Wrapping up the weekend is Sunday’s “Focus on Food” with Christina Barrueta, award-winning food, beverage and travel writer (9:30am–noon; $85 per person includes brunch, mimosa, dessert, instruction, gratuity and taxes). She will share tips and tricks for photographing food with either an Apple or Android phone. Learn to prop, prep and play with plates of food created by Pacheco to create drool-worthy images as seen in her social media and website, Write on Rubee (www.writeonrubee.com). Participants do not need to be registered hotel guests, but should they choose to make a weekend out of it, rates begin at $430 per night, with a prepaid-advance purchase reservation for overnight accommodations in one of 43 luxury casitas. For more information and reservations, call 602.955.8614 or register online at www.hermosainn.com — click on the “Things to Do” and “Calendar of Events” links.


beer, wine and spirits – visit the Donuts and Drafts zone or Lovers Lounge. And multiple kids’ zones, a sweet treat scavenger hunt, a s’more making station and crafts for the little ones add icing on the cake. The Family Rocks entertainment zone will be rocking with performances by teenage bands from across the state. School of Rock will be putting together a variety of local bands to entertain crowds with “sweet” tunes as they taste their way through the festival. A portion of the event proceeds benefit Foster Arizona. A local charity helping the Valley youth year-round. Learn more about the organization at www.fosterarizona.org. Civic Center Park is located at 50 East Civic Center Drive in Gilbert. For tickets or additional information, visit www.sweetsfest.com.

Serving the Community Since 2002

It’s time to celebrate the East Valley’s ode to all things ooey, gooey, syrupy and sweet. The Sweets Festival is set for 1–6pm Saturday, Feb. 16, at Gilbert’s Civic Center Park, giving sweets fans of all ages a five-hour window in which to consume massive amounts of cookies, cakes, candies, donuts and other sweet treats. Revelers can swing by the Cookie Castle, the Cupcake Commons or the Gummy Gulch for a taste of what lies inside or work their way up the Chocolate Mountain or through the Lollipop Woods on the hunt for even more candy-coated surprises. Or take in a pie eating contest, cookie decorating and cupcake decorating areas. Over-21 attendees can sip on a variety of fun cocktails and traditional

Destinations

Sweets Festival Returns to Gilbert This Month

51

2.19


citySERVICES Serving the Community Since 2002

52

JOIN OUR TEAM. Sell advertising in the Scottsdale/ North Phoenix area for one of the best family publications with a unique distribution of over 80,000 readers monthly!

WHY? • • • •

Distributed in the Northeast Valley since 2002. CST is powered by people in YOUR community. Work with a committed and supportive team. Work from home. Make your own hours.

Send resumé or get more details: Publisher@CITYSunTimes.com 2.19


citySERVICES

RESIDENTIAL

We Cover It All!

COMMERCIAL

ARIZONA’S PREMIER ROOFING CONTRACTOR

Covering your community since 2004

Tile • Shingle • Foam • Re-Roof • Repairs & Maintenance FREE CONSULTATIONS

ROC 195475

602-296-5944 • rencoroofing.com

ROC 196424

Serving the Community Since 2002

RENCORoofing

53

2.19


PASTOR PAUL WITKOP Light of the Desert Lutheran Church

God is Greater Than Any Challenge I Have What is your challenge today? We all have them. The older we grow, the wiser we become if we realize that despite all our education, expertise and experience, we don’t have the answers to every problem we encounter. Sooner or later, there comes a challenge that will bring us to the humbling conclusion that we are not invincible. One of my favorite accounts from the Bible is David and Goliath in I Samuel 17. All the odds were against David. He was young and inexperienced. Goliath was gigantic, bigger than anyone had ever seen before. I have been to the place where the battle took place. Even the geography was against David. Goliath seemed invincible.

Serving the Community Since 2002

GET MORE: Read the rest of “God is Greater…” online now.

54

nce for Over

ws Excelle Community Ne

mes.com news.CITYSunTi

CAREFREE

CAVE CREEK

ion! Special Sect

2018–19 Cave Creek Special Events

21

SCOTTSDALE

NORTHEAST

T

FOUNTAIN HILLS

a Decade

ANTHEM

Sought Student Artisintsthe Hills n e Hidd For orm begin Sept. 15 ation sessions

PHOENIX

CITY BLACK CANYON

news.CITYSunT imes.com

Inf

SCOTTSDALE

52

works Labor Day Fire Spectacular

41

2018

Carefree/Cav

e Creek

Community

g NORTHEAST PHOENIX League is issuin Sonoran Arts CAREFREE he nonprofit CAVE CREEK TAKE ONE s” for the 22nd Student Artist BLACK CAN COURTESY OF a “Call for Studio Tour YON CITY CITYSunTim FOUNTAIN HILL in the Hills Artist es ends Annual Hidden S ANTHEM last two week g place the 12 gh (HITH) takin throu SEPTEMBER 6 s in grades 2018 Student artist raged encou are of November. n area nix metropolita al youth art alley speci from the Phoe a at resid ents are invite sell their work d to learn more to showcase and about the the event. legendary League, HITH studio during Frank of Sonoran Arts o Lloyd Wright’s impa A signature event ning artist studi ct on Arizo t and longest-run architecture na al artists through Footp is Arizona’s larges res 174 profession rints featu t on Deser event the t: Frank Lloyd c Deser 2018–1 201 tour. This year’s 8–19 Wright in Arizo ghout the sceni 9 Per Perfor formin from Sept. 15 and locations throu na ming g – Dec. 31 at the at 44 studio Artss Pre ree, Cave Creek Art Previe Gallery @ view the Library, unities of Caref w Scottsdale Civic Foothills comm Center, 3839 North Drin . art tour offers North Scottsdale kwater Boulevard uided studio . “Frank Lloyd s at work The free, self-g artist ve Wrig obser ht believed United State the rare chance to public s needed an enthusiasts a are open to the architecture of its own, but studios, which 16–18 also believed in their private Sunday, Nov. that the dramatically y, Saturday and guest Arizona different geog 10am–5pm Frida has one or more raphic areas of the art . Each studio also Restaurant coun and Nov. 23–25 they create their try called how work We te her ek nstra selling desig for demo nsand that were appr ence exhibiting artists who will work. opriate to their Demers valuable experi Patty chara and selling their Photo: has cter,” said Marg Olivia Bartz gained Art Studio One. while displaying prestigious tour Emerging artist oron Stipe, director the Hills Youth and curat a decade, the o One, at last year’s Hidden in or s,” of Came For more than ective client collection prosp at Youth Art Studi Frank Lloyd to engage with student artists like to find s for the expanding tors oftenWrig ht Fount,datio included local their art to how collec the League is n. “He was enchanted talen that savvy art first year that of the Valley. their op the know parts is devel “We this other by they but said. Arizo as s from na and said 2017 Taliesin o One de young artist important s and follow them it ‘seem West, s to Art cry Studi out for a space Youth always been an front evening; the studio to inclu emerging artist to visit -loving architecture mentorship have rage collectors Sonoran Arts Photo: Andre of its own.’” “Education and w Pielage and we encou Bell-Demers, tour.” The ation on,” said Pat en in the Hills not only gives al inform rican speci threeAme Institute part of our missi during the Hidd h Art Studio One “greatest Ame League will host of paintings, tive director. “Yout from 1–2pm;of Architects has called The Sonoran Arts League execu case a variety day, Sept. 15,rican archi Wright the tect show Satur s: to e e of with from artist all receiv nt this exhib , Nov. 14, time.” Celeb nts s a chanc rate his work student artist sessions for stude pieces, the stude h featu ; and Wednesdayition, whic mixed media 25, from 6–7pm to notab le Wrig at the Sonoran res images and artifacts al support.” sculptures and Thursday, Oct. connected will take place ht-designe and profession d build , ings in the Road ation sessionsincluding Talie ipated as a ess experience Grand Canyon sin Creek West in Scott practical busin 6–7pm. The inform a artist who partic 7100 East Cave State, sdale, the Davi Hous is a multimedi r for the Arts, by HITH. e ron in red Cente Phoe e’s Came featu . ‘Sp nix d & Gladys Wrig and the Haro Sarah Creek a for in Cave Art Studio One ht nt a Arts DreLeagu “Footprints 24, orld Price Sr. House in coach Village am very first Youth League’s stude on75.66 Paradise Valle call 480.5 the Desert student in the Suite 144, at’ Stage at Sanctuary to serve as the y. Wrig,ht’s ideas offers a brief information come full circle about how to introduction For additional Now she has Studio One. build in the .org.“Centered to them tour’s Youth Art Southwest,” around Talie hiddeninthehills s by helping www. artist mentor for the nt Stipe visit sin said. West, the archi home here, the empower stude to price tect’s iconic exhibit featu “Our goal is to thing from how every winte res learn designs, built r both public ic skills and and private space and unbuilt, hone their artist of what © 2018 Frank Lloyd Wrigh s could be when appreciation t Foundation The Frank Lloyd for the bruta designed with , Scottdale, Wright Found l power and an Avery Archit AZ. Courtesy desert. The takea ation Archives incredible beau of ectura (The Museum way, we hope ty of the All rights reserv l & Fine Arts Library, Colum of , will be inspi possible than ed. bia University, Modern Art | ration and the most of what New York). understanding is being built An opening today.” that our living reception will spaces matter be held Frida Swaback, a Wrig — and that so y, Sept. 21, from ht apprentic much more is e and former 6:30–8pm. The four free work director of plann keynote spea shops will be ker will be Scott ing for the Fran offered at the This project was library throu k Lloyd Wrig sdale architect made possible, ghout the exhib ht Foundatio Vernon the City of Scott in part, by the n. In addition itions run, the sdale, the Arizo Institute of Muse to the reception first of which na Heritage is scheduled um and Libra For informati Center and the for October 8. ry Services in on about the Frank Lloyd Wrig cooperation exhibition, visit call 480.874.46 with Scottsdale ht Foundatio 45. www.scottsdal Public Art, n. epublicart.org and click on the “Tempora ry Art/Exhibi tions” link or

Opening recept slated for Sep ion t. 21

56

Carefree Week Restaurant

TAKE ONE COURTESY OF CITYSunTimes

SEPTEMBER

News Excelle

nce for Over

a Decade

Scottsdale Lib Launches W rary ght Design Exhri ibit

19

62

Community, Arts, Local Topics, POSTAL CUS TOMER

GET MORE! news.CITYSunTimes.com

e Creek

Carefree/Cav

BARBARA KAPLAN Scottsdale Interior Designer

Trends For 2019 Interior design trends for 2019 are all over the map. It’s no surprise when you look around the world at what is going on politically, economically and socially. Design is always a reflection of people’s attitudes. It has become a global experience. After 2008, when our economy was suffering, colors were muted, dull and somber. Many manufacturers went out of business and new designs were not created. The DIY craze grew, and people started decorating for themselves. Due to the internet and the abundance of information and resources available, people can make purchases with confidence. Today we have done a 180. Colors are alive and vibrant. Several colors and patterns are combined for interest and dramatic effects. Pantone just named the color of the year as ultra violet, which is a bright purple. People have become less fearful to add color to express their personal taste and style both at home and in their lives.             Here are a few of the trends I see reflecting in the new year…

Mailed extensively to homes, plus free pick-up at over 300 businesses, restaurants, retail stores and libraries. CST reaches 80,000 affluent readers in North Phoenix, Scottsdale, Fountain Hills, Cave Creek, Carefree, New River, Black Canyon City and Anthem. Serving the community for over a decade. CST is welcomed into more North Valley homes than any other paper. Period.

GET MORE: Read “Trends For 2019” online now!

Your Community News @CITY Sun Times

2.19

All Month Long

For advertising, please call Bob Hesselgesser today! 602.214.7661 We are committed to help drive customers to your business! news.CITYSunTimes.com


Serving the Community Since 2002

55

2.19


Profile for Jenifer Lee

Carefree Cave Creek CITYSunTimes February 2019 Issue  

CITYSunTimes is a locally owned community publication now in its 17th year, serving over 80,000 readers in the North Valley. CST offers pers...

Carefree Cave Creek CITYSunTimes February 2019 Issue  

CITYSunTimes is a locally owned community publication now in its 17th year, serving over 80,000 readers in the North Valley. CST offers pers...

Advertisement