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Carefree/Cave Creek

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CAREFREE

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TAKE ONE COURTESY OF CITYSunTimes MARCH 2019

Mayors Proclaim March 2 ‘Dr. Seuss Day’ at the Library ‘Storytime’ events to be held throughout the month

Thunderbird Artists Fine Art & Wine

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City Creamery Celebrates Anniversary

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Karsten’s Team Recognized

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Carefree Mayor Les Peterson and Cave Creek Mayor Ernie Bunch signed a joint proclamation declaring Desert Foothills Library’s commitment to children’s literacy and promotion of reading in our community in honor of Dr. Seuss’ Birthday. March 2 is Dr. Seuss’ 115th birthday, and Desert Foothills Library will celebrate throughout March with a full month of Dr. Seuss themed programs. Programs will include the March 2 Birthday Party at 2pm and Saturday morning “storytime” each Saturday March 9–30 at 10:30am. These storytime events will each feature a special guest, such as the Phoenix Herpetological Society, Cave Creek Firefighters, green eggs and ham breakfast with Carefree Mayor Les Peterson, and Mother Goose Reads Dr. Seuss. All events are free and take place at Desert Foothills Library, 38443 North Schoolhouse Road, Cave Creek. In addition to the support of the Carefree and Cave Creek mayors, March’s programs are sponsored by Arizona nonprofit First Things First and local family Diana and Richard Deely. For additional information, call 480.488.2286 or visit www.dfla.org.

Cave Creek Mayor Ernie Bunch and Carefree Mayor Les Peterson at the Proclamation signing.

Enjoy Two Weekends of Fun During Cave Creek Rodeo Days With Sanderson Ford as the 2019 title sponsor, it’s time to celebrate the 42nd Cave Creek Rodeo Days. Enjoy a parade, mutton bustin’ and kick-off dance March 16, followed by three thrilling days of professional rodeo action, official Rodeo Days dance and more, March 22–24. Get all the details inside with our special 2019 Cave Creek Rodeo Days coverage beginning on page 21.


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Serving the Community Since 2002


Serving the Community Since 2002

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Let it Snow!

INDEX

EDITOR’S PICKS

Publisher Lorrie Pomeroy Editor-in-Chief Kathryn M. Miller Creative Director Jenifer Lee

“The sun did not shine. It was too wet to play. So, we sat in the house. All that cold, cold, wet day.”

Assistant to the Publisher Darlene Keberle

~ Dr. Seuss, The Cat in the Hat Ah, glorious rain, (and a little snow!) in the Valley, to round out the month of February and welcome March. As I write this, my laundry room is flooded, my internet is down, and I am behind schedule. But this cold, wet weather is lovely, even to a lifelong desert dweller like me. Weather aside, I hope you all have a beautiful March. Oh, and for those of you who live in Phoenix, don’t forget to vote for a new mayor March 12 (www.phoenix.gov/elections).

Around Town: Ryan Bingham

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Until next month, all my best,

Serving the Community Since 2002

Kathryn M. Miller, Editor-in-Chief kathryn@CITYSunTimes.com

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Contributors Cave Creek Mayor Ernie Bunch Dr. Debbi Burdick Melanie Droz Shawcroft Marcos Nájera Carefree Mayor Les Peterson Account Representatives Bob Hesselgesser Susan Pine Bulk Distribution Mark Feinberg

On the Northeast Valley cover: Stomp; Photo by Steve McNicholas On the Carefree Cave Creek Cover: Art by Sarah Goodnough, “A Cappella Sunrise”

Brunch at The Saguaro

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inside this issue

Heard Museum Indian Fair & Market

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FOOD & WINE ... 47

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Columnists Stephen Cohen, O.D. Cathy Droz Barbara Kaplan Rabbi Robert Kravitz Allen Nohre James Roberts Pastor Paul Witkop

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Explore the Visual, Culinary, Cultural & Performing Arts 2019 Scottsdale Arts Festival runs March 8–10

Artwork by 2019 featured artist, Michelle McDowell Smith

Festivalgoers will enjoy live music and entertainment as a central part of the Scottsdale Arts Festival, and this year’s lineup has tunes for everyone from indie to Cuban to alt-rock to jazz. It will kick off March 8 with national indie artist Cale Tyson 4:30– 6pm. Other headliners include Mexican-Canadian Latin singer-songwriter QuiQue Escamilla Saturday, March 9, 4:30–6pm. The Smokey Brights will make a stop to the Amphitheater stage Saturday, March 9, 2–3:30pm. Closing out the Festival is local folk artist Brian Chartrand Sunday, March 10, 3:30–5pm. Explore and cultivate creativity at the Scottsdale Arts Festival with hands-on activities, giant yard games (from Corn Hole to Jenga to Connect 4), museum visits and more. The popular Community Art Studio returns with fun for all ages, in addition to the Marble Mountain Installation with artist and Scottsdale Public Art’s Kayla Newnam, Cut + Paste Collaborative Collage, and a Positive Place designed in partnership with BGC and The Walter Hive. For the food lovers, the Festival brings a lineup of exceptional Valley gourmet food trucks and eateries, including Arcadia Farms, Barrie’s Original Kettle Korn, Be Crepeful, Eur Haus, Hibachibot, Local Lunchbox, Lu Lu’s Italian Ice, Mustache Pretzels, Paletas Betty, Que Sazon, Riley’s Spice of Life, Satay Hut, Short Leash Hot Dogs, The Maine Lobster Lady, Tom’s BBQ and Untamed Confections. A variety of fine wines, beers, cocktails and other beverages will be for sale, including The Deep Eddy Dive-In Bar at the Fountain Stage and the Milagro Tequila Pop-up Art Bar at the Amphitheater Stage with a live artist activation that will be donated to the Festival and included in the silent auction. Additionally, patrons can bring their reusable water bottles and use the City of Scottsdale’s water trailer for an easy refill to stay hydrated. During the Festival weekend, admission will be free to Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art (SMoCA), which will showcase the new spring exhibition “Now Playing: Video 1999–2019,” on view through April 28. On view at Young@Art Gallery inside Scottsdale Center for the Performing Arts is “Violins of Hope,” through March 24. The Festival is a major fundraiser for Scottsdale Arts and proceeds support the dynamic and diverse performances, exhibitions, installations and arts education and outreach programs presented by Scottsdale Arts. The Festival will run 10am–6pm March 8–9 and 10am–5pm March 10. Single-day tickets are $12; two-day pass is $20. Student tickets are available for $6, and children 12 and under get in for free. Parking and trolley service are free. Additional information is available at  www.scottsdaleartsfestival.org or by calling 480.499.8587.

Serving the Community Since 2002

For 49 years, the Scottsdale Arts Festival has brought world-class art, live music and tasty eats to the heart of Old Town Scottsdale and is recognized as one of the top art fairs in America. Attracting nearly 25,000 loyal visitors annually, guests will enjoy the best in visual, culinary, cultural and performing arts throughout the beautiful, 20-acre Scottsdale Civic Center Mall (Park). “The Festival has been a part of Scottsdale’s DNA for many years and is poised to remain a mainstay in the arts and culture calendar. Its long running history and reputation in the community is showcased with local, national and international awards and recognition,” said Jamie Prins, Scottsdale Arts Festival director. The festival showcases more than 170 jury-selected artists from the United States and Canada. This year’s featured artist, Michelle McDowell Smith, strives to create art that has a familiar narrative, yet is unique and true to herself. She works on canvas with several layers of acrylic paint and a plethora of mixed media materials (including handcrafted papers, sewing patterns, maps, old letters, pages from vintage books and other ephemera). Smith’s current body of work, titled “of land and sky, whimsical and free,” began in 2014 and focuses on storytelling, nostalgia and a hope for the future. In addition to Smith’s work, attendees can experience and purchase works ranging from painting, sculpture, glass, ceramics, jewelry, photography and other media.

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Scottsdale Serving the Community Since 2002

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Boat & RV Expo Comes to WestWorld International Sportsmen’s Expositions (ISE) and GS Media & Events (GS Events) are combining forces to expand the Arizona International Sportsmen’s Boat & RV Expo at WestWorld of Scottsdale, March 21–24. ISE will focus on the outdoor and boat exhibits and activities, while GS Events will manage the huge RV portion, which features a new 200,000-square-foot pavilion filled with the latest RV brands and models; on-site RV and camping packages for event patrons looking to stay on the WestWorld grounds; RV seminars and clinics to educate prospective and experienced RV owners; factory experts from RV manufacturers to explain new models and features; test-drive course allowing attendees to try out the latest RVs; special show pricing for Good Sam Club members. The 2019 expo will feature RV and marine dealers from Arizona and the Southwest, along with more than 200 companies occupying indoor and outdoor exhibits. Seminars and special show features will entertain and educate attendees who want to improve their outdoor skills and research and book an adventure in the United States and overseas. Testdrive courses will allow attendees to ride-and-drive the latest trucks and off-road vehicles, in addition to recreational vehicles. For information, visit www.sportsexpos.com or www.gsevents.com.

Head to the Farmers Market for ‘Original Arizona’ Educational food and chef series featured weekly Guests of the Old Town Farmers Market, located at the corner of Brown Avenue and 1st Street in Scottsdale, can enjoy a special presentation by Rebecca Seitz, co-owner of Sphinx Date Company, Saturday, March 9, from 9–10am. As part of the Old Town Farmers Market’s Original Arizona educational food and chef series that features a different native food speaker and topic each week, Seitz joins Mark Lewis of Chmachyakyakya Kurikuri in a demonstration on pairing Arizona-grown dates with other regional wild foods. The event is free, and the market runs from 8am–1pm. Old Town Farmers Market is located at 3806 North Brown Avenue in Scottsdale. Learn more at www.arizonafarmersmarkets.com. Learn about Sphinx Date Company Palm and Pantry by calling 480.941.2261 or visiting www.sphinxdateranch.com.

Terravita Smiles Offers Personalized Approach to Dental Care Dr. Goli Asadi has been practicing for 25 years, since earning her doctorate from The Ohio State University College of Dentistry. She and her team at Terravita Smiles are dedicated to providing patients with a dental experience that will surpass expectations. “Respect for your oral health, your comfort, safety and your individual smile goals are the foundations upon which the practice is built,” says Dr. Asadi. “It is a pleasure to provide exceptional family dental care in a warm and welcoming office. Our office has enjoyed wonderful relationships with our patients, and we would be honored to build one with you and your family too. We would love to become your trusted dental care team!” Terravita Smiles participates with all insurance plans and aims to make insurance easy for its patients. “We clarify your coverages, help you understand your plan and we submit all claims on your behalf,” says Dr. Asadi. “We provide an estimate in advance prior to treatment, with no hidden fees. By setting up long term dental objectives, we help you maximize your insurance benefits.” Dr. Asadi’s practice is located at 34522 North Scottsdale Road, Suite 140, in the Terravita Market Place (North Scottsdale Road and Carefree Highway). To make an appointment or for additional information, call 480.488.4444 or visit www.dentalcarescottsdale.com.


Scottsdale

Fundraiser to Support Families Facing Pediatric Cancer

Serving the Community Since 2002

The Rotary Club of Scottsdale North will host its fourth annual fundraising event Saturday, March 9, to benefit Arizona Cancer Foundation for Children, a Scottsdale-based charity that aids social, emotional and financial support directly to families going through the journey of caring for a child with cancer. The fundraising event will take place at Pinnacle Peak Village on the patio of the General Store, 8711 East Pinnacle Peak Road in Scottsdale, from 5:30– 8:30pm. The tickets cost $40 per person and include two glasses of wine or beer (additional drinks may be purchased), small plates/heavy appetizers, live music by the band Train Wreck and opportunities to bid on silent and live auction items. Arizona Cancer Foundation for Children was founded in 2013 after Chrisie Funari, founder and CEO, lost her daughter, Ava, to cancer at the age of 5. Funari knows the firsthand struggles of having a child diagnosed, needing to travel for treatment and experiencing a devastating loss. Arizona Cancer Foundation for Children has five programs, which benefit over two-thirds of children in Arizona diagnosed with cancer. The programs are focused to meet the needs of children and families battling pediatric cancer, such as financial assistance and physical support. Their newest program, Four Paws for Healing, a K9 companion program, provides medical and emotional support to the families through regular in-home visits and service dog placement. All proceeds from the event will support Arizona Cancer Foundation for Children through the Scottsdale North Rotary Foundation, a 501(c)(3) tax exempt organization. Purchase tickets online at www.rotaryscottsdalenorth. org/fundraiser.html. For questions, contact Ed Brachocki at 480.229.4258.

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Scottsdale

Storytellers Inspire the Audience to Find ‘Treasure in Life’s Wreckage’

ADVERTORIAL

Estate Planning – Back to Basics! Serving the Community Since 2002

By Libby Banks, The Law Office of Libby Banks

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Who Needs Estate Planning? Many people think estate planning does not apply to them because they “don’t have an estate to plan!” But the dictionary says your estate is “all of the things that a person owns.” We all have an estate! Estate Planning is More than Distributing What You Own at Your Death A good portion of estate planning is planning for the distribution of property at death. But you also need a plan in case you become incapacitated. Who will manage your assets and your financial affairs if you can’t? Who will make decisions about your healthcare? With proper planning, you decide that ahead of time, and assure that the right person can quickly take charge and see that you and your finances are taken care of while you are out of commission. Putting an Estate Plan in Place Means More than Writing a Will A Will alone isn’t enough. If you are alive but can’t take care of your financial matters, a Will doesn’t help you – it’s only effective upon your death. Instead, you need a Will along with a whole series of other documents to assure that you have a proper estate plan. For your financial affairs, you need a Durable Power of Attorney. You need a Healthcare Directives to appoint who can make health care decisions if you can’t, and to direct your agents in those decisions. Learn More About Estate Planning I offer a complimentary initial consultation to discuss your situation and what I recommend for you. You can request an appointment by emailing admin@libbybanks.com or by calling us at (602) 375-6752. You can also learn more about estate planning at my seminars. Check for them on my website at www.libbybanks.com/events.

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Libby@LibbyBanks.com 602.375.6752 www.LibbyBanks.com

A 2nd Act’s live, curated storytelling performance, S.T.A.R.S.: Survivors Tell A Real Story, finds treasures in the wreckage of life’s challenges, thereby giving them purpose. The show features eight Valley women who have faced a terrifying diagnosis and are using their gifts of life and experience to give back to the greater good in their 2nd Acts. The event will take place at 2pm Sunday, March 24, at Scottsdale Center for the Performing Arts (7380 East 2nd Street in Scottsdale). “Research supports the theory that there is great healing in helping, and these storytellers are doing wonderful things in the world,” said Judy Pearson, founder of A2ndAct. org. “And the value of a 2nd Act isn’t defined by size. Giving time one-on-one is just as valuable as creating foundations and building hospital wings.” The intriguing research Pearson is referring to involved cancer survivors. Nearly 90 percent acknowledged that volunteering (what the organization that bears its name calls a “2nd Act”) helped boost their well-being, while nearly three-quarters of those surveyed reported that doing so helped lower stress levels. Almost a third of those surveyed who had chronic medical conditions, meanwhile, reported that helping others helped them manage their illnesses. “Neither does a 2nd Act have to have a specific focus,” Pearson continued. “Animals, the environment, and education could all be fabulous 2nd Acts.”

Judy Pearson, founder of A2ndAct.org

Professionally coached and directed by a 30-year theatre veteran, each story of the eight-woman cast redefines courage and human potential and provides inspiration for the entire audience. The performance is underwritten by Scottsdale Medical Imaging, Ltd. Funds raised by the S.T.A.R.S. performance support the programs of A 2nd Act, including workshops and micro grants. The grants provide seed money for local women survivors ready to launch or grow their 2nd Acts, allowing them to follow their dreams, give back to the world and give purpose to their cancer journeys. All money raised stays in the Valley. Tickets are $22 (plus a $4.50 theatre surcharge) and available at the box office, 480.499.8587, or online at www.scottsdaleperformingarts.org.


Scottsdale Serving the Community Since 2002

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Scottsdale

Sip & Sup Fireside or Bring on Brunch

Serving the Community Since 2002

Trout Bagel

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The Saguaro Scottsdale believes that desert winter nights call for three things: fireplaces, hot inventive cocktails and mouth-watering comfort food…all which can be enjoyed at Saguaro’s La Señora restaurant through March 31. The Desert Nights menu is offered on the vibrantly colored La Señora patio, 5–10pm nightly, and is an ideal way to begin or end a night in Old Town Scottsdale. Designed for sharing in front of the signature hot pink fireplace, the Desert Nights menu reflects La Señora’s colorful culinary approach to food and cocktails — traditional classics kicked up a notch:

Desert Dawn Mimosa Flight and Gluten-Free Churros

• M  exican Hot Chocolate (Cocoa Cafe Tequila, Abuelita Chocolate, Coconut Milk — dairy free) • Hot Spiked Cider (Whiskey, Apple Cider, Cinnamon, Spices) • Hibiscus Hot Toddy (Gold Rum, Orange Spiced Tea, Hibiscus Syrup) • Fondue Fries (House-Made Fries, Oaxacan Cheese) • Pulled Pork Sliders (Pulled Pork, House-Made Slaw) • Build your Own S’Mores (House-Made Marshmallows, Graham Crackers, Chocolate) If brunch is more your thing, La Señora is now offering weekend specials from 10am–2pm. The popular breakfast menu, featuring favorites such as Citrus

Cured Steelhead Trout Bagel; Chorizo Con Papas Burrito; Chilaquiles Verdes gf; Avocado Toast; Belgian Waffles and Banana Foster Buttermilk Pancakes, is now offered until 2pm. A variety of hand-crafted cocktails are available by the glass and the pitcher, such as the Saguaro Belle: a brilliantly balanced libation of pineapple vodka, sparkling wine, honey, jalapeño and lime; or dive into the Desert Dawn Mimosa Flight, served in stemless flutes, tucked into crushed ice and adorned with tiny artificial succulents. Saguaro Scottsdale is a 194-room hotel, located in Old Town Scottsdale at 4000 North Drinkwater Boulevard. For more information, visit www.thesaguaro. com/scottsdale or call 480.308.1100.


Scottsdale

Celebrate ‘Mardi Paws’ at BellyRubz

Network in March with the Scottsdale Chamber The Scottsdale Area Chamber of Commerce will hold its next PM Connect event Wednesday, March 6, 5–7pm, at Bubble Room, 7295 East Stetson Drive in Scottsdale. Its next AM Connect event is scheduled for March 21, from 7:15–9am, at Chick-fil-A, 14995 North 87th Street in Scottsdale. Both events are free to members and $30 for guests. In addition, the Chamber will host a Meet Your Neighbors for Lunch event at Old Town Gringos, 4209 North Craftsman CT in Scottsdale, Friday, March 29, 11:30am–1pm. Meet Your Neighbors is a monthly networking event held the last Friday of each month at various locations throughout Scottsdale. For a complete listing of upcoming events, or additional information about the Chamber, call 480.355.2700 or visit www.scottsdalechamber.com.

Serving the Community Since 2002

In honor of Mardi Gras, BellyRubz Doggy Playclub and Spa in Scottsdale will host a furry and fun-filled “Mardi Paws” client appreciation celebration for all dogs — big and small — and their dog-loving families. The celebration will be held March 5, 7–11am. Complimentary donuts, coffee and doggie treats will be served, and dog owners will get a chance to win a free day of doggie day care. Discounted daycare and boarding package pricing will be available during the special event. Dogs and their families will have a great time meeting and socializing with one another. In business since 2005, BellyRubz specializes in top-quality doggie day care, pet grooming with customized baths and haircuts and comfortable overnight boarding with just 16 spacious suites available for dogs. All grooming services include nail trimming, ear cleaning, expressing glands, shampoo and conditioners. The owners of BellyRubz, Sara and Bill Kelley, say they pride themselves on offering the “most personalized doggie day care and boarding facility in the Valley.” They also want the public to know that grooming is now available Saturdays and Sundays and they groom cats as well. Weekly business hours are Monday through Friday, 7am–6pm; Saturday, 8–3pm; and Sunday, 8–10am. BellyRubz is located at 8989 East Via Linda, Suite 104, Scottsdale. For information, call 480.657.2275 or visit www.bellyrubz.com.

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Scottsdale

Peter Max: The Retrospective 1960–2019

Serving the Community Since 2002

Peter Max in the gallery and “Better World”

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A newly-curated collection of artist Peter Max’s paintings will be on exhibition and available for acquisition in a limited engagement presentation at DeRubeis Fine Art of Metal in Scottsdale. The exhibition opens with previews Thursday, March 14, and runs through Saturday, March 16. Three gallery receptions for the public have been announced: Friday, March 15, from 6–8pm; and Saturday, March 16, from 1–3pm and 6–8pm. All events are complimentary and open to the public, however RSVP’s are required. Call 480.941.6033 or email phillip@fineartofmetal.com. DeRubeis Fine Art of Metal is located at 7171 East Main Street in Scottsdale. Visit www.derubeisfineartscottsdale.com for additional information.

Business Etiquette Workshop Offered Those looking to improve and polish their personal brand and feel more confident in social and professional situations are invited to a Business Etiquette Workshop March 9. Certified Etiquette Instructor SueAnn Brown will offer a helpful, one-day etiquette workshop designed for business professionals, small business owners, executives, soon-to-be college graduates, entrepreneurs and fundraisers. Topics covered will include why a professional image is crucial to success, dining etiquette and business meeting protocol, professional office etiquette, professional ways to dress, learning the art of small talk, the best ways to “work a room,” helpful ways to remember people’s names, positive and negative body language and more. The workshop will be held Saturday, March 9, from 10am to 3pm at The Orange Tree Golf Resort, 10601 North 56th Street, Scottsdale. Cost is $475 per person and includes an etiquette training manual, four-course lunch and a workshop training certificate. Advanced registration is required as space is limited. For more information and to register, call 480.510.6346 or visit www.itsallaboutetiquette.com.

SueAnn Brown


Scottsdale

Westin Kierland Presents Cocktail Culinary Series Nature’s Balance

A Tale of Five Isles food

Locals Only

w April 26: Nature’s Balance Spring cleaning with a twist, indulge in a holistic lineup of organic cocktail and culinary creations crafted with 100 percent certified organic ingredients, each hand-selected from organic farms, ranches, purveyors and distilleries across the Southwest. w May 17: Desert Delights Taste your way through the majestic Sonoran Desert’s more than 100,000 square miles with cactiinfused cocktails enriched with botanical liqueurs and paired with desert delicacies such as wild boar, rabbit, rattlesnake and more.

Serving the Community Since 2002

The Westin Kierland Resort & Spa is collaborating with Scottsdale League for the Arts to present “Mixed: A Cocktail Culinary Series” in which inventive cocktails are expertly paired with inspired culinary concepts in an imaginative series of five interactive tasting experiences with off-the-beaten-path themes. The inaugural dinner launched the series in February with “Birds & Bees,” honoring one of Mother Nature’s sweetest delights with honey-infused cocktails paired with savory poultry dishes. The series continues this month and runs through June: w March 15: Locals Only Designed in homage to the area’s finest flavors, a thoughtful collection of barrel-aged Arizona spirits, including Arizona Distilling Company and Hamilton Distillers, complements a menu of homegrown fare that features local ingredients cultivated and sourced from the Grand Canyon state.

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w June 14: A Tale of Five Isles In celebration of the contributions Scottish immigrants made to early Arizona, explore a variety of “Scotchtails” — Scotch whisky-based cocktails representing all five of Scotland’s iconic isles — joined by traditional Scottish fare rich with the likes of pecan- and barrel-smoked fish, game proteins and more. Each dinner is $100 per person and is hosted privately for 24 guests at The Westin Kierland Resort & Spa, 6902 East Greenway Parkway in Scottsdale. Tickets may be purchased at www.scottsdalefest.org/mixed. For additional information, call 480.624.1000 or visit www.kierlandresort.com.

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Serving the Community Since 2002

Phoenix Art Museum Presents Expansive Exhibition of Islamic Art

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Phoenix Art Museum’s Wondrous Worlds: Art & Islam Through Time & Place, the first Islamic art exhibition at the Museum in more than two decades, runs through May 26 in the Art of Asia galleries. The comprehensive exhibition, organized by the Newark Museum, will feature more than 100 artworks, including hand-written texts, ceramics, textiles, jewelry, photographs and paintings, from across centuries and from nearly every continent. Unlike previous national and international exhibitions on Islamic art, Wondrous Worlds is organized around the Five Pillars of Islam instead of geography, time period or material, offering a fresh perspective on a vast artistic genre. Curated by a team led by Katherine Anne Paul, PhD, curator of the arts of Asia at Newark Museum, the exhibition is structured around the Five Pillars of Islam, considered the core beliefs and practices of the world’s second largest religion. Each section of the exhibition showcases a range of objects from various countries and centuries, including works created in the service of Islam by Muslim artists for Muslim patrons, items created for purposes that are not explicitly religious and objects by non-Muslim artists created for both Muslim and non-Muslim patrons. Featured works include books of poetry, woven prayer rugs depicting paradise,

inscribed coffee pots, game boards and musical instruments. These traditional examples of Islamic art are displayed alongside contemporary works, such as calligraphic Sufi poems and sculpture, to demonstrate how artists today continue to explore Unknown, A Single Earring with Floral Motifs, Iran, Qajar Period the intersection between art and Islam. (1789–1925). Gold, enamel, pearls. “Islam connected cultures across the Middle Newark Museum Purchase East, the Mediterranean world and as far as China; through travel, trade and faith,” said Janet Baker, curator of Asian Art. “Its impact on the intellectual and scientific worlds was vast and long-lasting.” Over the course of the exhibition, the Museum will present various public programs inspired by the exhibition, such as public lectures featuring local Muslim leaders and familyfriendly activities in the galleries, to help build awareness and engage the community in conversation about Islam and Islamic art, now the world’s fastest growing religion. For details about the Museum or the exhibit, call 602.666.7104 or visit www.phxart.org.

Unknown, Inscribed Coffeepot and Cups, before 1928. Brass, copper, silver. Newark Museum Purchase

Pendak Skirt with Woman and Sheep and Floral Motifs, Java, Indonesia, before 1923, Netherlands East Indies Period (1800–1942). Cotton, resist-wax print (batik). Newark Museum Gift of Dr. H. H. Rusby, 1923

Make a Positive Impact on Local Nonprofits With recently enacted changes in tax laws that double the standard deduction, many people who would normally itemize their returns — and be able to deduct donations for charitable giving — may no longer make charitable contributions because there is no financial incentive to do so. In Arizona, that could mean a projected annual loss of $272 million in charitable contributions — and a loss of 10,000 jobs — to the state’s nonprofit sector. Arizona taxpayers can, however, take the deduction and make contributions by deciding to itemize, and the upcoming Arizona Gives Day may provide the means, motivation and widespread impact to make that happen. “With Arizona Gives Day approaching on April 2, as well as tax-filing season, we wanted to try to clear up some of the confusion surrounding the impact of

the new tax laws on donations to qualified, 501(c)(3) nonprofit organizations,” said Kristen Merrifield, chief executive officer, Alliance of Arizona Nonprofits (www. arizonanonprofits.org). “Unfortunately, given the changes and resulting confusion, we saw a downward trend in year-end donations to nonprofit organizations across the state. We hope that through Arizona Gives Day, nonprofit organizations doing great work in communities statewide may find new sources of funding and donors may find credible, important local nonprofits to invest in on AZGives.org.” A report by the Seidman Research Institute at the W.P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University estimates that charitable giving could be $272.7 million lower in 2018 following introduction of the Tax Cuts and Job Act (TCJA). Fewer Arizona taxpayers are expected to itemize deductions because

the TCJA nearly doubles the federal standard deduction offered to both single and married taxpayers. The Seidman report indicates the total economic impact will include a $775.4 million reduction in GDP by the state, 10,587 fewer jobs and $493.5 million less in labor income. Merrifield encourages donors considering contributions to nonprofits through Arizona Gives Day to “be sure to check with their tax consultants regarding the impact of tax-law changes on their personal tax situations.” Arizona Gives Day is a 24-hour online fund-raising event on April 2 that has raised more than $13.4 million since 2013. Arizona Gives Day, which raised $3.2 million in 2018, is hosted by the Alliance of Arizona Nonprofits and the Arizona Grantmakers Forum and presented by FirstBank. To learn more, visit www.azgives.org.


Ring Sizing — More Details By Indra Jhaveri, AMI Diamonds and Jewelry

Learn more: www.amidiamondsandjewelry.com; 602.923.8200, 602.432.2920; amidiamond@live.com. Read the January 2019 issue of CITYSunTimes online at http://news.CITYSunTimes.com/archives.

In April, The Phoenix Theatre Company will present a new world premiere play featuring the relationship between two U.S. Supreme Court justices who are polar opposites and also modern-day legends: feminist idol Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Arizona native Sandra Day O’Connor. Sisters in Law is based on the 2015 book of the same name written by Linda Hirshman. The adaptation for the stage was written by Jonthan Shapiro, ex-federal prosecutor and law professor turned author, award winning television writer and producer of shows like “The Black List” and “Boston Legal.” The Phoenix Theatre Company is the first theatre in the world to bring Sisters in Law to the stage. “Sisters in Law is an important piece of theatre and is especially relevant in these divisive times. It addresses vital national conversations on women’s rights, making lasting change in our society, and sharing viewpoints with those we disagree with,” said Michael Barnard, producing artistic director for The Phoenix Theatre Company. “Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Sandra Day O’Connor’s friendship is an inspiration and a reminder that our differences do not have to divide us.” Sisters in Law runs April 3–28. Tickets are on sale now and start at $29. To purchase by phone, call 602.254.2151 or visit www.phoenixtheatre.com.

Serving the Community Since 2002

Since the article on Diamond Jewelry Maintenance was published in CITYSunTimes around January 2019, there have been quite a few inquiries and incidences regarding ring sizing. So, this article is dedicated to more details. It is my estimate, based on customers we have served and other statistics, about 95 percent of the population would have some issue with knuckle vs. digit as shown in the diagram. Most of the time, the knuckle is little larger than the ‘digit’ behind it, so, the inner diameter of the ring has to clear the knuckle and could end up free floating on the digit causing discomfort, and in severe cases causing scraping, chaffing and cutting into adjacent fingers — especially top-heavy rings. In such cases ring guards and sizing dots, described in the January 2019 article, could be appropriate. Also, it has been observed that squarish bottom (sometimes referred to as European style shank) also can serve a similar purpose of not allowing the ring to float or roll over. In more severe cases, with arthritis causing a 2 or more size difference between the knuckle and digit behind it, an ‘adjustable shank’ may be used, as discussed in January 2019 article. In the most severe case, one manufacturer has devised a ring concept where it is opened up and placed directly over the digit bypassing the knuckle problem. This is the most expensive solution. 

The Phoenix Theatre Company Presents World Premier Sisters in Law

North Phoenix

ADVERTORIAL

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North Phoenix Serving the Community Since 2002

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Celebrate History & Culture at Afro Caribbean Festival The Arizona Caribbean Cultural Association will present the 2019 Arizona Afro Caribbean Festival Saturday, March 30, at the Arizona Center. A parade will kick off the festivities at 10am, and folklore performers and dancers will take the stage beginning at 1pm. What is Arizona Caribbean Cultural Association? That’s a question that CEO Robert Cumberbatch fields frequently. “As an Afro Caribbean having European, East Indian genealogy, I migrated from Trinidad and Tobago to Arizona in 2010. I noticed during my travels within the state that there was a small footprint of Caribbean pioneers before my time who left a rich legacy, one that was not documented nor given a place in our state’s history.” Cumberbatch says that there are numerous instruments, cultural dishes and folklore dances that are played, cooked or demonstrated in schools, diversity fairs or corporate functions throughout Arizona, “Which has a very strong connection to who we are as a people, but the lack of recognition and proper representation of the value has not been forthcoming to say the least. We are an organization that is passionate in our cultural community outreach programs, humanitarian relief support efforts as well as our musical instruments.” As a result, the Afro Caribbean Festival was born to showcase historical and cultural passion in a family atmosphere while enjoying and celebrating diverse cuisine and cultural dances. Most Afro-Caribbeans are the descendants of captive Africans held in the Caribbean from 1502 to 1886 during the era of the Atlantic slave trade. Because of the complex history of these islands or nations they had at least British and French colonial influences in the region. Many people who identify as Afro-Caribbean also have African, European, East Indian, Chinese and South American genealogy, as well as in Spanish-speaking and Portuguese countries.  The Festival showcases the Caribbean Carnival Parade, arts and crafts, African Fashion Show, Caribbean African and Hispanic food, folklore dances, Caribbean paintings and sculptures and much more. Cumberbatch invites all to “Come on and play mas, jump and chip in Downtown Phoenix with your family and celebrate our culture – another culture that has been kept hidden away.” The Arizona Center is located at 455 North 3rd Street in Phoenix. For complete event details, visit www.azfrocarnival.com.


Interactive program for those with cognitive issues

Looking for a ‘Fur-Ever’ Home: Meet Luca Luca is a two-year-old long-coat Chihuahua mix weighing in at a chunkymonkey 24 pounds. He knows he is an irresistibly foxy boy, and his sweet puppy face will make you want to reward him with treats just for being so dang cute. Luca will use his looks and charms to get away with whatever he can, just like any typical teenager. He needs an experienced owner who will give him boundaries and structure. He will learn that he is not the one in authority and that by following consistent guidelines set by his owner he can reap the rewards of love and affection. Luca is a smart boy that does want to please. He knows the cue to sit, plays fetch and enjoys romping with his doggie friends. Luca loves being taken out on walks and he will strut about town. Meet Luca at Home Fur Good, Thursday, Friday or Saturday between 11am and 4pm. The shelter is located at 10220 North 32nd Street in Phoenix. His adoption fee is $225 and includes spaying/neutering, age-appropriate vaccinations and microchipping. To see all the pets available for adoption, visit www.homefurgood.org. For additional information, call 602.971.1334.

Serving the Community Since 2002

Jewish Family & Children’s Service (JFCS) presents its monthly Memory Café Thursday, March 7, at Beth El Congregation, 1118 West Glendale Avenue in Phoenix, from 10–11:30am. March’s guest teaching artist is Shari Keith, a visual artist who is also known as “The Junk Lady!” Area residents are invited to create a personal artifact from “junk.” Keith will provide a treasure trove of found objects for participants to use in creating a small work of art that can be worn as a pendant, hung as decor or used as a key fob. No background or artistic skills are needed. “This kind of activity allows a person to express one’s self with lots of creativity, and no ‘right or wrong,’” says Kathy Rood, JFCS Senior Services coordinator, who started the Café in the fall of 2017. “It’s a chance to play with color and texture and have fun socializing with others at the same time,” Rood continues “As a bonus, you have a unique personal item to take home!” The Café is a meeting place for those with changes in their thinking or memory, mild cognitive impairment or dementia due to Alzheimer’s disease or a related disorder, along with their care partners. Offered on the first Thursday of the month, each Café has a new theme and includes meaningful, fun activities to engage the participants and stimulate their minds and bodies. Socialization is a key component to the cafés, as they are meant to be a place to relax, meet others and have fun. Coffee and snacks are provided. There is no charge to attend, but registration is required. The Café is open to all backgrounds. To register or for further information, email kathy.rood@jfcsaz. org or call 602.452.4627. Partial funding for the Memory Café comes from the Jewish Community Foundation of Greater Phoenix and the Arizona Commission on the Arts, with space donated by Beth El Congregation. Jewish Family & Children’s Service is a not-for-profit, non-sectarian social service and behavioral health organization with over 80 years of service in the greater Phoenix area. Learn more at www.jfcsaz.org.

North Phoenix

JFCS Monthly Memory Café

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Join Beth Ami Temple for Speaker Series Sunday Hospice of the Valley executive and former longtime Channel 12 newscaster Lin Sue Cooney will speak about her transition from journalism to hospice care at the Beth Ami Temple Speakers Series Sunday, March 10, from 2–4pm at Beth Ami Temple in Paradise Valley. As Hospice of the Valley’s director of Community Engagement since 2015, Cooney oversees marketing, fund development, volunteers and creative services. Cooney Lin Sue Cooney will discuss how Hospice of the Valley provides much more than end-of-life care, touching upon its grief support and 11th hour programs and services, community talks and partnerships, and charity care. “Most people don’t know that Hospice of the Valley provides much more than end-of-life care, and that we offer many no-cost programs for everyone in our community,” says Cooney. “It’s my passion to share these resources so that families who need support know they can turn to us.” The transition from curative care to hospice care is an emotional time as a family faces the reality of a loved one’s condition, and Cooney is a trusted person when it comes to being the public face of the organization. Prior to joining Hospice of the Valley, the award-winning broadcaster spent 31 years as a newscaster for 12 News. Now, instead of delivering the latest headlines, she connects the community to the compassionate care provided by one of the country’s largest not-for-profit hospices. In fact, Cooney and her standard poodle Max are a pet therapy team at Hospice of the Valley. The public is invited to attend this informative and entertaining afternoon of discussion. A question-and-answer session will follow Cooney’s speech. Light refreshments will be served. Founded in 1978, Beth Ami Temple is a boutique Reform (URJ) temple for active adults seeking a spiritual connection with their Jewish roots and social involvement in a small friendly congregation. The Speaker Series brings to light important topics and interesting speakers that not only impact the city’s Jewish population, but the entire Valley community altogether. The event is free to attend; reservations are requested: 602.956.0805 or bethamitemple@hotmail.com. Beth Ami Temple is located inside Palo Cristi Church at 3535 East Lincoln Drive in Paradise Valley. For more information on Beth Ami Temple, visit www.bethamitemple.org.

Chamber Foundation Golf Tournament to Benefit Harvest Compassion Center A day playing golf will help a local food and clothing bank, thanks to the Phoenix Metro Chamber Foundation’s (PMCF) Third Annual Charity Golf Tournament, taking place Friday, April 26, at Stonecreek Golf Club. Proceeds from the event will benefit both the nonprofit Harvest Compassion Center (HCC) and the nonprofit Phoenix Metro Chamber Foundation. “Not only are we seeking single golfers and foursomes, there are plenty of sponsorship opportunities available. We’ll also be conducting a golf ball drop from a helicopter — you don’t have to play golf to participate in that, and you’ll have a chance to win 50 percent of the proceeds from the golf ball sales,” said Jason Bressler, executive director and charter member of the Phoenix Metro Chamber Foundation (PMCF). Bressler, who also serves as the founder and executive director of the Phoenix Metro Chamber of Commerce (PMCC), said the chamber foundation conducts fundraising efforts year-round for dozens of charities, but the golf tournament is their largest fundraiser of the year. “Our mission is to support children, families, veterans and pets,” he said. “We’ve seen firsthand how Harvest Compassion Center helps others. Not only do they provide care to anyone walking through their doors, they do so with dignity.” Nicolee Thompson, Harvest Compassion Center’s CEO and executive director, never thought she would be helping to feed and clothe people less fortunate than her. That was something her older brother, Mitchell Swaback, would do. When a drowning accident took Mitchell’s life suddenly in 2004,

Thompson and her family knew they had to do something that would honor his memory and legacy. At first, they focused on building shelters for women and children back in their hometown of Chicago, but when the recession hit, they saw the need was much greater. In 2012, Thompson co-founded Harvest Compassion Center in Phoenix with her parents, Bob and Gaye Swaback. Today, the faith-based nonprofit serves 750 families per month in both their Phoenix and Maryvale self-funded locations. “We provide a one-stop shop that is centered around love, respect, dignity and choice,” Thompson said. “Our guests receive a personal shopper to assist them as they shop for groceries and hygiene products. Then they shop on their own in our clothing boutique, which features both new and used apparel and shoes. Clothes that are donated to us are laundered and ironed on-site. Everything is free.” Guests do not need to prove their economic hardship, but shopping trips are limited to once a month. In addition, every guest is greeted with a bible and an offer to join in on prayer. “It’s our way of offering love and support, but it is not a requirement,” Thompson said. “We have guests of all religions and spiritual beliefs. Our goal is to help get people back on their feet.” Stonecreek Golf Club is located at 4435 East Paradise Village Parkway South in Phoenix. To register for the April 26 golf tournament or learn more, visit www.phxmcf.org or call 602.561.2348. To learn more about Harvest Compassion Center, call 602.788.2444 or visit www.harvestcompassioncenter.org.

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Nora Welsh playing piccolo in the NVSO woodwind section.

for NVSO youth members offers a prize of a violin hand-made by Jody Summerford, a local luthier living in Moon Valley. The “Spring is in the Air” concert is sponsored by CASCO Financial Group. NVSO is supported by the Arizona Commission on the Arts with funding from the State of Arizona and the National Endowment for the Arts, and also the Phoenix Office of Arts and Culture through appropriations from the Phoenix City Council. North Canyon High School Performing Arts Center is located at 1700 East Union Hills Drive. NVSO proudly provides affordable concert experiences to the Phoenix North Valley community. Tickets are only $5 and can be purchased online at www.northvalleysymphony.org.

NAWBO to Present Panel of Top Women Business Owners During Women’s History Month, the Phoenix Chapter of the National Association of Women Business Owners (NAWBO) will present a panel discussion with several of the Valley’s top women business owners. The monthly business program will be held Wednesday, March 13, 11am–1pm. Rosaria Cain of Knoodle advertising and Ginger Clayton of Elontec office furniture, who belong to NAWBO’s Circle, will participate on the panel. The Circle is a national program designed specifically for NAWBO Premier members who own businesses that exceed $1 million in annual revenue. The panel will be moderated by Becky Spohn, NAWBO program director and owner of Confidence Concepts, LLC. “We take great pride in informing and educating our business owners with top industry experts,” says Ronit Urman, 2018–19 NAWBO Phoenix president. “These business leaders were recognized by the Phoenix Business Journal for their accomplishments and they will share key information about how they have succeeded in their business.” NAWBO’s monthly business program includes the panel presentation, lunch, program discussion and time for networking. Meetings are held at the Gainey Ranch Golf Club (7600 East Gainey Club Drive) in Scottsdale. Tickets are $43 for members and $53 for guests. Reserve or get additional information online at www.nawbophx.org.

Serving the Community Since 2002

Enjoy light, breezy and delightful melodies as North Valley Symphony Orchestra (NVSO) welcomes springtime to the Valley with their “Spring is in the Air” concert, Saturday, March 9, 7pm, at North Canyon High School Performing Arts Center. This concert includes Mendelssohn’s popular “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” Overture, which introduces Shakespeare’s comedy about kings and queens, a forest filled with fairies, love potions, and magical moments in the woods outside Athens. NVSO patrons will also hear Beethoven’s Symphony No. 6 “Pastorale,” a piece inspired by his walks in rural Austria, depicting the loveliness of nature, including bubbling brooks, bird calls and a merry gathering of peasants. Delius’ “On Hearing the First Cuckoo In Spring” is also a perfect choice for this concert. Kevin Kozacek, NVSO’s music director, encourages the audience to, “…listen for the number of different instruments imitating the natural sounds of the cuckoo in this piece…the oboe, strings and clarinet.” This concert will also feature the winner of the 2019 Summerford Violin Concerto Competition, Haley McKeown, performing Vivaldi’s Violin Concerto in A minor. In addition to performing at an NVSO major concert, this annual competition

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‘Spring is in the Air’ at NVSO

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Serving the Community Since 2002

Kick Off Spring at Fountain O’Green Artisan Market

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Magic Bird Festivals welcomes the spring season with the Fountain O’Green Artisan Market. The annual event will take place March 15–17, in Fountain Hills, at 16872 East Avenue of the Fountains, adjacent to the landmark Fountain Hills fountain. The Fountain O’Green Artisan Market offers a wide selection of more than 100 exhibitors with fine arts and crafts, specialty gift items, boutique clothing, jewelry and home décor along with local food vendors. Attendees can browse handcrafted fine art and custom designs while celebrating the season when the Fountain Hills Fountain spouts the shamrock-colored hue Saturday, March 16, at noon, in honor of St. Patrick’s Day. Shop the stunning designs of this year’s featured artist, Maryann Hamel, Curliosity Metal Works, showcasing a wide variety of curled copper creations for the home and garden. This free, family-friendly community festival is open daily from 10am–5pm. For information, call  480.488.2014 or visit  www.magicbirdfestivals.com.

Explore the Night Sky at Second Annual Dark Sky Festival The Fountain Hills Dark Sky Association is dedicated to educating the community about the advantages of smart lighting and protecting the area’s unique dark sky. With the help of residents, light pollution and light trespass can be minimized so that current and future generations can enjoy the wonders of the nighttime sky. Fountain Hills stands apart from other communities for a number of reasons: its signature fountain, its geography and scenery, its smalltown feel in the corner of a major metropolitan area, its adjacency to parks, preserves and national forest, and now, its dark skies. Valley residents are invited to celebrate the dark skies at the second annual Dark Sky Festival, Saturday, March 30, from 4–9pm. This is a free community event for anyone. Activities for the whole family will range from astronomy-themed virtual reality, telescope viewing and a laser tour of the night sky, educational exhibits, food vendors, a beer garden and live entertainment, to name a few. An art and photo contest will also be part of the festivities. Visit the website for additional information. The festival will take place at the Fountain Hills Community Center, located at 13001 North La Montana Drive. Learn more about the Fountain Hills Dark Sky Association and find complete event details at www.fhdarksky.com. Photo courtesy of Fountain Hills Dark Sky Association

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602.214.7661

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n i o Jfun! the

Enjoy Two Weekends of Fun During Cave Creek Rodeo Days

Serving the Community Since 2002

hether you grew up on a ranch or moved here from a big city, you’ll love the excitement of Cave Creek Rodeo Days Now in its 42nd year, with Sanderson Ford as the 2019 title sponsor, the rodeo performances will take place at Cave Creek Memorial Arena March 22–24 with three thrilling PRCA rodeo performances featuring top-ranking Professional Rodeo Cowboy Association (PRCA) and Women’s Professional Rodeo Association (WPRA) contestants. This year’s event kicks off Saturday, March 16, starting at 9am with the festive Cave Creek Rodeo Days Parade through town. The fun continues that day at The Buffalo Chip Saloon with Mutton Bustin’ at 1pm (sign up is at noon). The Buffalo Chip Saloon is also sponsoring the Kick-Off Dance that night. On Monday, March 18, the Cave Creek Rodeo Days Golf Tournament will take place at Tatum Ranch in Cave Creek. Ride to and from town to participate in all the exciting events going on and be sure to take the bus Saturday if you are going back to Harold’s Corral for the Official Rodeo Dance March 23. Rodeo weekend, the town will be packed as locals and visitors take advantage of the free shuttle buses to the rodeo grounds. (Buses run Friday and Saturday only). Gates open at 5pm both Friday and Saturday, March 22 and March 23, with PRCA performances starting at 7:30pm. Gates open Sunday, March 24, at noon with the PRCA performance starting at 2pm.  Rodeo tickets purchased in advance cost $22; premium seating is also available in the Ranchero Club for $50 with a Yetti Cooler drawing (value of $400) for all who purchase seating in the new Club. Ranchero patrons will also have a finger food and two free drinks included in their ticket purchase. Finally, there is the ultimate experience enjoyed by event sponsors in the Stockman’s Club. Limited tickets are available for $150 per person, which includes a full dinner, drinks (hosted bar) and exclusive seating on the arena for an up-close rodeo experience. The Skybox is also available on Saturday and Sunday for $5,000 and includes private bar and food service in Stockman Club. All tickets at the gate will be $5 more per ticket. While parking at the rodeo arena is free, taking the free shuttle bus from town is easy, plus save $3 when purchasing tickets on the bus. Pick-up locations are in Downtown Cave Creek and also at the corner of Cave Creek Road and Carefree Highway. Check the website for specific locations and departure times. Ride free, with or without a ticket. To purchase rodeo performance tickets, go to www.cavecreekrodeo.com and click the ticket button. For up-to-date information, please visit www.cavecreekrodeo.com, call 480.304.5634 or email info@cavecreekrodeo.com.

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Turn the page for more coverage on the 2019 Cave Creek Rodeo Days and check out page 32 for a handy Calendar of Events.

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Cave Creek Rodeo Days Serving the Community Since 2002

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MAYOR BUNCH WRITES… By Mayor Ernie Bunch

Cave Creek Rodeo Days Parade is March 16 his year’s Cave Creek Rodeo Days parade is shaping up to be one of the largest yet. Gather family and friends and come early to get a good seat. Sponsored by Wells Fargo, the parade starts at 9am Saturday, March 16, on the west side of town by Cave Creek Town Hall and travels east to Harold’s Corral ending at approximately 11am. This year’s grand marshals for the parade are three PBR cowboys, who are sure to set the tone for an entertaining morning featuring horseback riders, draft hitches, floats, unique automobiles, rodeo royalty, clubs, organizations, bands, trick riders, clowns and other decorative and patriotic entries. “We’re very excited that The Shriners will be involved this year…their entry is like a parade within a parade,” said Kristin Lewis, parade coordinator and owner of Sage Medical Company. The parade will have seven announcing stations located at Local Johnny’s, Big Earl’s Greasy Eats, Frontier Town, the Kiwanis Marketplace, Outlaws, The Buffalo Chip and Harold’s Corral. Each entry will be announced as they pass by each station. For complete Rodeo Days information, visit www.cavecreekrodeo.com.

New Rodeo Queen and Teen Queen Crowned Cave Creek Rodeo Days royalty program organizers held its Queen Contest Feb. 16 at Venues Café where contestants were judged on their horsemanship, personality, appearance and understanding of the sport of rodeo. At the end of the evening, a new Rodeo Queen and Teen Queen were crowned: Brooke Taylor Smith, of Tempe, is the Cave Creek Rodeo Days Queen for the 2019–20 season. She started participating in rodeo in 2014 as a drill team member. She has held previous titles as the Copper Days Stampeded Sr. Teen Queen, the 2017 Lost Dutchman Days Sr. Teen Queen and the 2018 Sonoita Rodeo Queen. At age 18, she is looking toward her future while studying psychology at ASU. She hopes to finish her studies at NAU and become a physician’s assistant. Rylee Anforth, 14, is the new Cave Creek Rodeo Days Teen Queen. She currently attends Apache Junction High and is the 2019 student council freshman class president. She plans to pursue a career in psychology or equine chiropractic. Congratulations to Brooke and Rylee! Rylee Anforth

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March! Rodeo, craft shows, live music and the start of Bike Week. March is a busy month in Cave Creek! It’s a time when our businesses are doing their version of “The Ant and The Grasshopper” — trying to make enough money to get through the coming off season. Sure, it’s a bit inconvenient for those of us who live here year-round with the crowds and traffic but, MAYOR this too shall pass. If you’ve got visitors, Town of Cave Creek make sure they get to experience all that Cave Creek has to offer! 480.488.1400 www.cavecreek.org On to my soapbox now. I find it amazing that with the agreed upon new barriers on our southern border that an environmental group plans to file a lawsuit in opposition. They should go down to what were once beautiful “sky islands” and see the degradation for themselves. Many places look like an open landfill. What has been going on for years is nothing short of an attack on the natural beauty that once was there. One of the hot topics in our society today is minimum wage. One of the things you learn about in Economics 101 is the law of supply and demand. This applies to the workforce as well. Too many unskilled or entry level workers depress wages. Uncontrolled illegal immigration keeps the supply of unskilled labor high, thus depressing wages. On a scuba trip to Honduras years ago, one of the laments of the resort owner was that she couldn’t get help who could even learn to operate a washing machine.  Legal immigration is good, uncontrolled illegal immigration, not so much! So, March! Come on up to Cave Creek and join in the fun!

Brooke Taylor Smith

Publisher Lorrie Pomeroy Editor-in-Chief Kathryn M. Miller Creative Director Jenifer Lee Assistant to the Publisher Darlene Keberle Account Representatives Bob Hesselgesser \ Susan Pine

10645 N. Tatum Blvd., Suite 200-413 Phoenix, AZ 85028 Phone: 480.922.8732 • Fax: 480.922.8731 E-mail: info@CITYSunTimes.com news.CITYSunTimes.com CITYSunTimes is a locally owned community publication now in its 17th year, serving over 80,000 readers in the North Valley. CST offers personalized news each month to Scottsdale, Paradise Valley, North Phoenix, Carefree and Cave Creek. CST is mailed to area homes and businesses and is available for free pick up at locations in Paradise Valley, North Scottsdale, North Phoenix, Carefree, Cave Creek, Anthem, Black Canyon City, New River and Fountain Hills. Published by Indigo Publishing, Inc., monthly. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part is prohibited without the express written permission of the publisher.


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Family-Owned City Creamery Celebrates First Anniversary In 2012, Charlie Bolton visited The City Creamery in West Yellowstone, Montana. Intrigued by the concept and delicious ice cream, Bolton worked for the original owner of the two Montana ice cream shops. He managed The Virginia City Creamery shop and learned the process of the hand-crafted, small-batch, all-natural ice cream. Fast forward to February 2016, when Bolton purchased the Montana shops. To begin the family business, he partnered with his nephew and wife, Austin and Chelsea. In 2018, they opened The City Creamery in Cave Creek, where the original concept continues. This one-of-a-kind ice cream shop makes on-site, homemade ice cream, home-made waffle cones, home-made hot fudge and ice cream by the quart. “All this, providing top-notch service with a smile, you will leave feeling sweetly satisfied!” says Charlie. They serve traditional ice cream flavors, but continually strive to introduce new flavors. Try the huckleberry honey and lavender, wedded bliss, candied jalapeño, prickly pear, double chocolate orange and many others. The owners say that, “Sampling is encouraged!” Experience hands-on ice cream making for birthday parties and Girl Scout and Boy Scout events. And they bring the ice cream to the customer for wedding receptions, birthday parties, homecomings, etc. Stop by The City Creamery at Prickly Pear Plaza, 6268 East Cave Creek Road, Suite 8, Cave Creek. For additional information, call 480.397.1130 or visit www.citycreameryicecream.com.

XQUENDA Spa Introduces Membership Program “We knew change was inevitable, but what that change was, came directly from you, the residents and snowbirds of Cave Creek, Carefree, North Scottsdale and North Phoenix,” says Shandell Stanisic of XQUENDA Spa at Rancho Mañana. XQUENDA Spa at Rancho Mañana debuted Nov. 1, 2018, and the management asked its patrons, “What needs to change to attract more business and gain loyalty from our clients?” The answer, “Memberships!” Stanisic replied, “Done! XQUENDA Spa introduced its VIP Club XQUENDA Membership Program Feb. 9. For $79 per month, patrons will receive a 50-minute massage or facial each month for 12 months. “A smoking hot deal for anyone looking to improve and maintain their health,” says Stanisic. “You can even get a different service, just pay the difference over $100. Snowbird? No problem. With our freeze and roll option, your services will be rolled over to the next month until you return. Plus, you can share your rolled over services with friends or family too!” For more information, call 480.550.9521, visit www. xquenda-spa.com or stop by XQUENDA Spa at Rancho Mañana, located at 5720 East Rancho Mañana Boulevard in Cave Creek.


Read the rest of “The Sunshine Vitamin” online now and learn about foods high in vitamin D. Visit www.drgopines.com. DrGOpines.com is written and maintained by a retired local doctor. After practicing family medicine for 40 years in Indianapolis, Dr. William Gilkison, and his wife, Sandy, retired in Cave Creek. Visit www.drgopines.com to begin a twiceweekly learning experience.

Serving the Community Since 2002

About 10 years ago, there was major clamor about the importance of vitamin D. Many people were touting it as a preventive for several diseases and a cure for others. Teams of researchers were feverishly investigating whether vitamin D could really live up to the many claims being made about it. Some even said vitamin D was one of the more important medical subjects of the 21st century and get on board because it’s going to be the next big thing. Well, over the ensuing years, vitamin D has taken Dr. William Gilkison on new significance and importance, but it has not proven to be the cure-all for major diseases as was originally thought. Medicine and medical care have not been revolutionized by a deeper understanding of vitamin D nor has treatment and prevention of disease been greatly impacted by its use. Known colloquially as “the sunshine vitamin,” vitamin D is produced when your skin is exposed to ultraviolet light, i.e., sunlight. UV rays in sunlight cause your skin to make vitamin D. The amount produced is dependent on the season of the year, the time of day, the amount of cloud cover and air pollution, and your proximity to the equator. A direct correlation exists between vitamin D production and sunlight — more sun exposure for longer periods equals greater vitamin D amounts. Our diet is the best way to get enough vitamin D. A variety of healthy foods from all food groups supply us with vitamin D, but dietary intake alone is inadequate for our total need. The addition of UV light exposure complements dietary intake in most people, but some will still need supplementation.

Cave Creek

The Sunshine Vitamin: Vitamin D, Many People’s Cure-All

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Karsten’s Recognized as Top Performing Retail Location Ace Hardware Corporation announced that Karsten’s Ace Hardware of Cave Creek, on North Tatum Boulevard, achieved designation as a “Pinnacle Performance Retailing” store for its outstanding performance. Developed as part of Ace’s long-term retail growth strategy, 20/20 Vision, Pinnacle Performance Retailing is laser-focused on Ace’s customers, helping to ensure that Ace stores deliver on its brand promise day in and day out. For 95 years, Ace Hardware has been serving its neighbors with helpful service and quality products. With more than 5,200 stores in more than 65 countries, the team at Karsten’s is one of only a few hundred Ace retailers to achieve this prestigious Pinnacle status. To achieve Pinnacle Performance Retailing, the team at Karsten’s Ace successfully completed a number of key performance drivers that will help them provide a better overall shopping experience in their local community. One example of a proven performance driver is “Helpful Certification,” the foundational element of Ace’s “Certified Ace Helpful” retail training curriculum. To become certified, Ace Hardware associates complete courses such as Helpful 101 and 201 and the store conducts a week-long team-based certification event. “Achieving Pinnacle Performance Retailing is a tremendous accomplishment for an Ace store,” said John Tovar, vice president, Retail Operations and New Business, Ace Hardware Corporation. “We’re pleased to recognize Karsten’s Ace Hardware and its associates for their outstanding achievements, and proud to say they are a part of the Ace family.” “The team at Karsten’s is incredibly pleased to have earned the status as a Pinnacle Performance Retailing store,” said David Karsten, president at Karsten’s Ace Hardware. “What this means for our customers is that we are more committed than ever to providing our loyal shoppers with the best possible retail experience; from customer service to product offerings and more, we’re taking ‘Ace helpful’ to a new level.” Karsten’s Ace Hardware is located at 28220 North Tatum Boulevard in Cave Creek. For more information, call 480.513.7020 or visit www.karstensace.com.


Cave Creek

Charlie Connell describes the tram system; Photo: Stephanie Bradley

Support Your Community:

Volunteer at the Museum

Desert Awareness Committee Presents Two March Events The creature comforts residents enjoy at their homes are some of the same comforts creatures enjoy too: the pool, misters, flowers and edible plants, shade, and bushy trees and shrubs for privacy. These features also welcome pollinators, songbirds, small mammals and the animals that eat them such as bobcats and coyotes. Seeing wildlife up close can be exhilarating and scary. This presentation will help residents find a balance between welcoming wildlife and maintaining a safe environment for all. Nikki Julien, director of Education at Southwest Wildlife Conservation Center in North Scottsdale and has been inspiring connections to nature for all ages for over 20 years. She will share her love of wildlife Monday evening, March 4, at the Holland Community Center. The 6:30–8pm seminar is sponsored by the Desert Awareness Committee of the Foothills Community Foundation. Reservations are not necessary. Donations are appreciated. The Committee also invites residents to join them March 11 to learn how to make poultices, infusions, ointments and tinctures from the plants that grow in the desert. Attendees will actually make infusions to sip, poultices for wounds, ointments for skin conditions and tinctures as a way to preserve them. Everything is included and participants will have several to take home that evening. The Desert Awareness Committee has been offering classes about desert plants for 25 years. This hands-on workshop will also be held at the Holland Community Center, 34250 North 60th Street in Scottsdale, 6–8pm. The fee for the workshop is $35. Class size is limited, and reservations are necessary. Save a spot by calling the Foothills Community Foundation at 480.488.1090 or by visiting www.azfcf.org/about-desert-awareness.

Serving the Community Since 2002

Area residents who may be looking for a fulfilling way to spend their time are invited to join the Cave Creek Museum where all sorts of enjoyable volunteer opportunities can be found. There are fascinating local and national stories waiting to be discovered in the cultural exhibits and reference materials, and help is needed to keep this material available for everyone in the community. Volunteer positions are available in guest services and docent duties; assisting with newsletter assembly and bulk mailing; joining the Stamp Mill Dream Team; and providing hospitality. There are also new activities for middle and high school students in the Cave Creek Museum Junior Docent Program. For more information about volunteering, call the Cave Creek Museum at 480.488.2764 or visit www.cavecreekmuseum.org.

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Cave Creek Serving the Community Since 2002

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Soroptimist’s ‘Dream It, Be It’ Career Support Offered to Teens Soroptimist International of Saguaro Foothills Club (SISF) invite teenage girls, ages 13-18, and their parents or guardians to a 4-hour career counseling conference Saturday, March 2, 9am–1pm, at the Foothills Community Foundation-Holland Center in North Scottsdale. Registration is free for girls wishing to attend, and lunch and snacks will be provided to participants by the Club. The Soroptimist “Dream It, Be It” program targets girls in secondary school who face obstacles to future success. Soroptimists work in partnership with girls in a conference setting to provide them with the information and resources they want and need to be successful. Girls interested in attending can register online at www.sisaguarofoothills.org. The program will include a panel of women from the Club and surrounding area who will share their path to successful careers. In addition to learning important life skills, the girls will also leave with a variety of other resources and fun items, including a “Dream Journal” for keeping track of their goals and a certificate for participating at the end of the day. “Because we don’t expect that all girls will know what they want to do for the rest of their lives and we also know that plans change, the skills developed through the program can be applied to any goals the girls identify throughout their education and careers,” said Karen Tuffs, president of SISF. “The girls will also have the opportunity to speak with working women and explore careers that interest them and that fit with their values.” Dream It, Be It joins with the long-running Live Your Dream: Education and Training Awards for Women to create the Soroptimist Dream Programs, which provide sustainable, measurable change for women and girls, and ensure they have access to the education and training needed to reach their full potential and live their dreams. The Live Your Dream Awards assist women by giving them the resources they need to improve their education, skills and job prospects.

Join the Chamber at Monthly Business Breakfast Join members of the Carefree Cave Creek Chamber of Commerce for an informational monthly business breakfast presentation and early morning networking. This month’s breakfast event will be held March 28, 7:30–9:30am, at Harold’s Cave Creek Corral, 6895 East Cave Creek Road in Cave Creek. To contact Harold’s call 480.488.1906 or visit www.haroldscorral.com. The cost to attend is $8 for member and $15 for non-members. To learn more about the Chamber or find other events, call 480.488.3381 or visit www. carefreecavecreek.org.


Prep (“EP,” as it’s affectionately called) in a leased facility at the corner of Lone Mountain and Cave Creek Road. Sixth Grade moved from Ashler Hills to Lone Mountain, leaving 7–12 at Ashler Hills. In 2012, a kindergarten class was added at Lone Mountain. To see Foothills Academy kindergarteners in their uniforms proved to be an absolutely wonderful experience. In the 10 years following the opening of the Ashler Hills campus, Foothills Academy has developed an array of programs designed to produce well-rounded, independently thinking, college prepared graduates.  Foothills Academy Connected was created, approved under the Arizona Online Instruction designation (AOI), offering a full online curriculum with AP, Honors and credit recovery courses. The goal is online instruction with a high degree of personalized attention.  For dual and concurrent enrollment, the Academy partners with PVCC (at Black Mountain) to offer high school students the equivalent of two years of college credit. A number of juniors and seniors travel to PVCC in the afternoons to take college classes. Foothills Academy’s STEAM program, with generous support from Kiwanis of Carefree, was built from kindergarten up, reaching ninth grade last year.  The Kiwanis STEAM Lab was opened at Ashler Hills in 2016. Coding, robotics, organic gardening and on-site practical engineering foster an atmosphere of creativity. By spring 2019, Foothills Academy will have served the Cave Creek, Carefree, and North Scottsdale communities for a quarter century.  The journey was not without challenges, but this 25th anniversary finds Foothills Academy solidly strong, with an A rating from the Arizona Department of Education, regional accreditation through the AdvancED Accreditation Commission, and one of the nicest and most creative groups of students in Arizona. Learn about Foothills Academy at www.foothillsacademy.com.

Serving the Community Since 2002

Twenty-five years ago this year, Foothills Academy College Preparatory opened as a private school in Cave Creek with 30 students in grades 6 through 12. There was one senior in the senior class. In 1995, when charter legislation was passed, the school became one of the first charter schools in Arizona.  The school moved from its two-room schoolhouse on Basin Road to the old Cave Creek Elementary School in the center of Cave Creek with 65 students. For the next seven years in that facility, Foothills Academy honed its college preparatory offerings, combined with a kind of “Outdoor Action” mentality, that took middle and high school students into gifted-style learning modes and into wilderness areas including Cibecue Canyon and the Coconino National Forest. By the end of 2001, the school had begun to establish a record of students’ acceptances to colleges and universities across the country.  The list of colleges is impressive. On the list are Harvard, Brown, Cal Poly, University of Michigan…and here at home, the Honors program at U of A and ASU’s Barrett Honors College. As time went on, more students stayed in-state, attending ASU, U of A and NAU.  There was increased interest in attending Scottsdale and Paradise Valley Community College (PVCC) to meet general education requirements. In 2002, Foothills Academy moved into its new, environmentally friendly, straw-bale constructed, Crescordia Award-winning campus at the corner of Ashler Hills and Scottsdale Road.  By this time, there were 250 students, grades 6 through 12. The senior class was still small, by big school standards, with 32 students. The Outdoor Action days waned a bit in favor of the new sports program, increased focus on science, upper level math, music and creative writing. By 2009, it was clear that there was a need for a small, highly personalized elementary school, so the school opened Foothills Academy Elementary

Cave Creek

Foothills Academy Celebrates a Quarter Century

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28 Heritage at Carefree, The

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20 Carefree Floors, Inc.

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9 Bryan’s Black Mountain Barbecue Dairy Queen Brazier

29 Carefree Shell

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34 Harold’s Cave Creek Corral

24 Cave Creek Saddlery

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3 Heart & Soul Café

4 Cave Creek Welding, Inc.

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Cave Creek Rodeo Days Advertiser's Map

4See Retail/ Boutiques and Points of Interest on page 35

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2019 Cave Creek Rodeo Days

Schedule Of Events And Parade Route

Farrier • Blacksmith • Knifemaker Supplies

29834 N. Cave Creek Rd., Suite 134 Cave Creek, AZ 85331 (480) 626-0924

661 E. Howards Rd., Suite J Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 554-0700

Mon-Fri 8am-5pm; Sat 8am-2pm

Mon-Fri 8am-5pm

www.piehtoolco.com | 888.PIEHTOOL


Saturday, March 16

9am: Cave Creek Rodeo Days Parade —Historic Downtown Cave Creek 1pm: Mutton Bustin’ — Buffalo Chip Saloon & Steakhouse Sign-up begins at noon 8pm: Rodeo Days Kick-off Dance — Buffalo Chip Saloon & Steakhouse

Skyline Drive

Monday, March 18

Cave Creek Rodeo Days Golf Tournament Tatum Ranch Golf Course, 29888 North Tatum Ranch Drive in Cave Creek. Check in and refreshments at 10:30am; tee off at 12:30pm; banquet and awards dinner begin at 6pm.

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Schedule Of Events An

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Friday, March 22

7:30pm: PRCA Rodeo Performance Tough Enough to Wear Pink Night; gates open at 5pm Post-Rodeo: Dillon Carmichael Concert — Harold’s Corral Presented by Sanderson Ford and 102.5 KNIX

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nd Parade Route Parade Finish

Saturday, March 23

7:30pm: PRCA Rodeo Performance Man Up Crusade Purple Night; gates open at 5pm 9pm: Official Rodeo Days Dance — Harold’s Corral

Sunday, March 24

2pm: PRCA Rodeo Performance National Patriots Day — Red, White & Blue Day; gates open at noon All rodeo performances take place at the Cave Creek Memorial Arena, 37201 North 28th Street. All event information is current at time of publication. For up-to-date information, visit www.cavecreekrodeo.com.


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Serving the Community Since 2002

Cave Creek Rodeo Days


ontinued from Restaurants/Bars 4Cand Services on page 30

*Map is for informational purposes only and not to scale. umbers indicate approximate vacinity of business location.

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Cave Creek

Food Bank to Benefit from Arizona Gives Day

Chef Collaboration Dinner Series Continues at Cartwright’s Cartwright’s Modern Cuisine invites area diners to join them on the last Wednesday of every month for its Chef Collaboration Dinner Series, which runs through May 29. Each month, Cartwright’s will invite a new guest chef into its kitchen to create an unforgettable evening of food, wine and fun. Coming up this month, experience “A Taste of Wagyu” with chef David Duarte of The Social. The dining event will be held March 27, 6:30–9:30pm. Cartwright’s Modern Cuisine is located at 6710 East Cave Creek Road in Cave Creek. For additional information or to purchase tickets for the event, call 480.488.8031 or visit www.cartwrightsmoderncuisine.com.

The Foothills Food Bank & Resource Center will benefit from Arizona Gives Day, a powerful 24-hour online giving experience that unites Arizonans around causes they believe in. Arizona Gives Day is April 2. Hosted by the Alliance of Arizona Nonprofits, Arizona Gives Day raised $3.2 million in 2018 for Arizona nonprofits. According to Pam DiPietro, executive director of Foothills Food Bank, the 501(c)(3) organization will join Arizona Gives Day, along with hundreds of other nonprofits from all over the state, on Tuesday, April 2, to raise needed funds. Through www.azgives.org, Arizonans will be able to support their favorite nonprofit(s) for exactly 24 hours of virtual giving. Foothills Food Bank & Resource Center needs the community’s assistance. People can do their part by contributing to the food bank on the organization’s website. “Please consider a donation to Foothills Food Bank & Resource Center for Arizona Gives Day,” adds DiPietro. “We have many in the community in need and it is up to all of us to do our part to help.” Supporters of Foothills Food Bank can go to www.azgives.org and select Foothills Food Bank to make a direct contribution. These donations are crucial to helping fund local efforts throughout the year. In 2018: • 24,000 people gave donations

Serving the Community Since 2002

• 8  5 percent of nonprofits say Arizona Gives Day helps them raise additional money they would not have raised otherwise

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• 63 percent of donors say the day prompted them to give Arizona Gives Day, an annual giving movement, unites nonprofits, big and small, new and established, to celebrate and increase philanthropy through online giving. The Foothills Food Bank and Resource Center provides emergency food, financial assistance and other life necessities and resources to individuals and families in the desert foothills, which encompasses a 180-square mile area that includes Anthem, Black Canyon City, Carefree, Cave Creek, Desert Hills, New River, North Phoenix and North Scottsdale. Foothills Food Bank & Resource Center is located at 6038 East Hidden Valley Drive in Cave Creek. For additional information, call 480.488.1145 or visit www. foothillsfoodbank.com.

news.CITYSunTimes.com


MAYOR PETERSON WRITES... Exciting Upcoming Events and Activities in Carefree By Mayor Les Peterson Woodford

Carefree will be featuring a full schedule of special events and activities this Spring! Carefree Desert Gardens Seminar Series, “Preparing Trees for Summer” MAYOR Saturday, March 9, at 9am in the Town of Carefree Carefree Council Chambers, 33 Easy St. 480.488.3686 Featuring Sarah Maitland, this popular www.carefree.org gardening program will focus on learning how to prepare your landscape to withstand harsh weather conditions in the summer months, and how to prevent storm damage.

Sarah Goodnough, “A Cappella Sunrise”

The 2nd Annual Carefree Community Block Party Saturday, April 6, from 2–7pm in the Carefree Desert Gardens and Easy St. Residents and local businesses will be gathering together for a festive event celebrating the close of the season and marking the transition into the summer. Enjoy fun activities for all ages! Rock the District Friday and Saturday, April 12–13, times TBA. Rock the District’s annual fundraising concert event features musicians and singers from Cactus Shadows High School, as well as headline artists performing outdoors in Downtown Carefree. In addition, a number of regularly-scheduled activities will round out the calendar of events and activities, including: • The Carefree Farmer’s Market, every Friday from 9am–1pm at the Sundial • Free “Yoga in the Gardens” by the YMCA, every Monday at 11am at the Sundial • “First Friday Art Walks” occur the first Friday of every month at many of Carefree’s galleries, 4–7pm. • “Sights and Sounds in the Gardens” happens Saturday, March 30, and Friday, May 10. • The Kiwanis Splash Pad opens Monday, April 1. Hours of operations are 9am–7pm daily. Be sure to mark your calendars for: • Carefree Restaurant Week, May 5–11 • Second Annual Memorial Day Tribute, Monday, May 27 Additional information on all of these events and activities can be found at www.carefree.org. See you soon in Carefree!

Bracelet by featured artist Harold Lujan

Carefree Hosts Final Art & Wine Festival of the Season

Thunderbird Artists will once again partner with the Carefree Cave Creek Chamber of Commerce for the Town of Carefree’s final signature event of the season — the 24th Annual Carefree Fine Art & Wine Festival, March 1–3. The festival will feature jeweler, Harold Lujan. Lujan has spent the last 30 years developing his own unique style of jewelry that are one-of-a-kind sculptures in themselves. He utilizes semi-precious stones, which he Jerry Bergin, “Guts and Glory” cultivates himself from around the world, then cuts and shapes them all by hand. He is also an expert metalsmith and avid hunter, which are both reflected in his work. By combining his two passions, he has the opportunity to unite his love of working with his hands and love for the wild to create pieces that feature porcupine quills, fossilized mammoth tusk or elk and deer teeth. In addition to Lujan, this festival features 150 juried, world-class artists displaying over 5,000 original pieces of artwork in a variety of mediums. Wine tasting, ice cold microbrews and rum sampling is offered to patrons who choose to purchase a souvenir wine or beer glass, with six tasting tickets, for $10. The event will also host food trucks and sweet treats onsite. Carefree’s Sanderson Lincoln Pavilion will come alive with live performers and provide background music for attendees to enjoy while tasting fine wines and indulging in delicious sweets. This fine art event will take place in the heart of Downtown Carefree, surrounded by beautiful gardens emphasizing the plants and cacti indigenous to the Arizona desert. Hours are 10am to 5pm each day. Admission is $3 and parking is free all weekend. For additional information, call 480.837.5637 or visit www.thunderbirdartists.com.

Serving the Community Since 2002

The 24th Annual Thunderbird Artists Fine Art & Wine Festival March 1–3; 10am–5pm in Downtown Carefree. This last show of the season features juried, award-winning art from some of the most renowned artists in the Southwest.

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Carefree Serving the Community Since 2002

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Save the Date: Community Block Party The Town of Carefree will once again welcome local businesses and area residents for an afternoon of food, friendship, music and fun at the Second Annual Community Block Party Saturday, April 6, from 2–7pm in Downtown Carefree along Easy Street and in the Sanderson Lincoln Pavilion. “Everyone loved the Block Party last year and we have received many requests to make it an annual tradition” shared Mayor Les Peterson. “This event proved to be an excellent opportunity for Carefree residents to get together with friends, neighbors and area businesses before changing schedules for summer.” Local business owners are invited to showcase their goods and services to area residents in a casual, neighborhood party style atmosphere. Highlights of the event will include the return of the popular Carefree Water Company dunk tank, cornhole tossing, putt-putt golf and fun activities for kids of all ages. Grilled hamburgers and hot dogs will be available for purchase, as well as adult refreshments provided by Foothills Food Bank, and the always-popular Desert Foothills YMCA lemonade stand. The event rounds out with carnival-style treats, raffle prize giveaways from area businesses and much more. To sign up a business to participate, or to volunteer for the event, email vicki@ carefree.org or call 480.488.3686.

Mix & Mingle with the Chamber in March The Carefree Cave Creek Chamber of Commerce will hold its next mixer event Wednesday, March 13, 5:30–7pm. This month, Premier Documents presents the “Easy Street Showcase” with Carefree Cave Creek Chamber, Covenant Home Loans, Joi Prater, Premier Documents, Proven Media, State Farm – Steve Morse Agency, Tech 4 Life and Erika Wilson. The event will be held at the Chamber, 748 Easy Street. Always the second Wednesday of each month, the mixer event offers the opportunity to join Chamber members to network, socialize and win prizes. The cost to attend is $5 for members; $15 for non-members (non-members may attend twice before joining). To learn more about the Carefree Cave Creek Chamber of Commerce, call 480.488.3381 or visit www.carefreecavecreek.org.


Soul Connections Satisfy Time flies. During the past seven years, I have written more than 90 articles for the CITYSunTimes’ “Soul Connection” column. I have described soul connections to Kathie, our beautiful dog, Bailee, to Black Mountain, to the coyote howling in the wash behind our pool, my granddaughter Nicole and even my soul connection to the very old saguaro in our back yard who sadly crashed to the ground during a monsoon. These connections take me out of my ego-centric self and ALLEN NOHRE enrich my life. Soul connections range from exciting to profound. I am Writer even bold enough to call myself “A Soul from Minnesota.” That is the title of a book I have written, which contains short essays describing experiences that changed my life. The word soul has its difficulties. It is often used as a noun like “He’s an old soul,” or, refers to something that survives after we die. Soul is also used as an adjective to describe the special quality of something like “soul food” or “soul music.” You might have noticed I use soul as a verb to describe significant personal experiences. A soul experience is the experience of connection. It is like electricity that connects and lights up. You know it when it happens.

The question is: connections to what? Of course, soul connections are with people. They can also be with nature, nature’s non-human beings, a special place, music, art and the Divine. We are enriched by our personal links to all of the above. Without them, we are alone. Soul connections are the most important experiences in my life. That is why I write about them. Hafiz. “With That Moon Language.” The Gift: Poems by Hafiz, translation by Daniel Ladinsky, 1999

“A Soul from Minnesota,” by Allen Nohre, a collection of CITYSunTimes essays, is available on Amazon in paperback and Kindle. Allen can be reached at anohre@cox.net.

Serving the Community Since 2002

Hafiz, the Muslim mystic writes: “Everyone you see, say to them, ‘Love me.’ Of course, you do not do this out loud; Otherwise, Someone would call the cops. Still, though, think about this, this great pull in us to connect.”

Carefree

SOUL CONNECTION

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Carefree

FCF Holland Center to Host ‘Brain Training’ Workshop There is a recently discovered part of the brain that is in charge of helping “you be you,” according to Phyllis T. Strupp, MBA. This special brain asset, the “default network,” holds one’s personal memories, and helps them get even better with age through wisdom. However, it is also the brain area where Alzheimer’s Disease strikes, so hands-on management is essential. The Foothills Community Foundation (FCF) Holland Community Center will host Strupp Saturday, March 9, 10am–noon, for “Brain Training to Build Your Story Workshop.” This session offers: • Overview of default network basics • Self-assessment exercise to identify default network blockages • Toolkit to take charge of meaning, memory, motivation

Serving the Community Since 2002

• P  ersonal Story Plan to help attendees’ life story and their default network get better with age Strupp is an award-winning author and brain training expert, speaking to audiences around the U.S. on how to make brains and lives get better with age (www.brainwealth.org). She has taught brain training programs at Vi at Grayhawk for 11 years. Her background includes a “Brain Research in Education” Certificate from the University of Washington in Seattle. Her book, Better with Age: The Ultimate Guide to Brain Training, offers a proven strategy for boosting brain performance at any age. The cost of the workshop is $55 and includes materials and book. FCF Holland Community Center is located at 34250 North 60th Street in North Scottsdale. For additional information, call 480.488.1090 or visit www.azfcf.org.

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Desert Gardens Seminar Series: ‘Preparing Your Trees for Summer’ Those who stay in the Valley over the summer are aware of what excessive heat and monsoon winds can do to Arizona desert trees. Trees can be prepared to withstand these conditions and help prevent significant storm damage from occurring. Carefree Desert Gardens welcomes Sarah Maitland, ISA Certified Arborist and an ISA Tree Risk Assessor, Saturday, March 9, to present: “Preparing Your Trees for Summer: What and When You Need to Know.” Maitland will discuss how to recognize and correct health issues in trees caused by insects and improper watering. She will talk about soil improvements and basic pruning concepts to prevent wind damage. The program, which usually includes a plant raffle, will begin at 9:30am and run approximately until noon at the Town Council Chambers at 33 Easy Street in Carefree. A $5 (or more) donation is appreciated to support these programs. It is recommended that guests arrive early as seating is limited. For additional information, call 480.488.3686.


A duo of Celtic harpists and multi-instrumentalists, Lisa Lynne and Aryeh Frankfurter, will be performing on rare instruments and presenting stories at the Spirit of the Desert Retreat Center in Carefree Friday, March 8, at 7:30pm. Lisa Lynne and Aryeh Frankfurter share a background as progressive rock musicians who later discovered a love for Celtic, Renaissance and Swedish music on unique acoustic instruments. They hail from Oregon and tour extensively playing fine performing arts centers, theaters and intimate venues around the U.S. and Europe. They perform as a duo, as a trio with legendary storyteller Patrick Ball, and with the Windham Hill Winter Solstice tours. Audiences are enchanted with their humorous and moving stories woven with breathtaking music both traditional and original, taking audiences on a unique journey they will not soon forget. Spirit of the Desert Retreat Center is located at 7415 East Elbow Bend in Carefree. Admission is $20, and advanced tickets are available at www. brownpapertickets.com/event/4070374. For more information, call Denise at 480.488.5218.

Carefree

Experience Celtic Harps, Rare Instruments & Wondrous Stories

Fun with Math and Science for Toddlers at Holland Serving the Community Since 2002

Area families are invited to join the Foothills Community Foundation at the Holland Community Center for a new class that is aimed at parents and their 2– 5-year-old children. “Fun with Math and Science” is a unique program aligned with Arizona’s Early Learning Standards for Math and Science and Arizona’s School Readiness Framework. Supporting a child’s math and science learning will help prepare them for kindergarten and future schooling. The program offers the opportunity for families to take an hour, put away the electronics and interact with their child during his or her most valuable learning years. The program kicks off March 14, 9:30–10:30am, and parents may choose to participate in one to six classes. Classes run weekly through April 18. The cost is $5 for each class or $25 for the six-week series. Register online at www.azfcf.org/hcc-class-list. Holland Community Center is located at 34250 North 60th Street in North Scottsdale. For additional information, call 480.488.1090.

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Hidden Treasure – Cimarron River Company Reopens

“People say that half the fun of shopping is the hunt! Well, you will have fun hunting for the new location of Cimarron River Company,” says owner Connie Miller. Visitors can explore the treasure trove of Native American Indian jewelry, pottery and Southwest home décor at Cimarron River Company’s new location. Miller says that when visitors open the door to this unique space, they are welcomed into an inviting and amazing selection of turquoise jewelry, hard to find pieces of home décor, leather handbags and Native Indian art. She and husband Jim decided to scale back with a smaller space and a larger web presence. Connie and Billie will be working in the store Mondays and Tuesdays from 10am until 4pm and private showings are available by appointments. Miller says, “We have made so many friends from Cave Creek, Carefree and around the World! It is hard to let that go!” The new location is in Mariachi Plaza at the corner of N. Tom Darlington Road and Cave Creek Road. They are in the lower level, under Brix Wine and The Meat Market. The hallway entrance is on the south side of the building and they are in Suite 7. For details, call or text 620.353.3331 or visit www.cimarronrivercompany.com.

DFT Presents Disaster! Desert Foothills Theater (DFT) will present Disaster! the Musical March 29 – April 14 at Cactus Shadows Fine Arts Center’s Black Box Theater. A side-splitting homage to classic disaster films by Seth Rudetsky and Jack Plotnick, Disaster! the Musical pays tribute to the era of bellbottoms, platform shoes and the hustle. With larger-than-life characters, snappy dialogue and some of the most recognizable songs of the ‘70s, Disaster! will have attendees “dancing in their seat and rolling in the aisle.” Cactus Shadows Fine Arts Center is located at 33606 North 60th Street in Scottsdale. For details, call 480.488.1981 or visit www.dftheater.org.


Fifteenth Annual Taste of Foothills The Foothills Caring Corps will hold its 15th annual Taste of Foothills Fundraiser in Carefree with gourmet food tastings, live auction and live music all to benefit a good cause — independence for seniors. Guests of the social event and fundraiser will savor award-winning cuisine from local restaurants Wednesday, March 13, from 5-8:30pm at CIVANA Carefree Resort. The Taste of Foothills Fundraiser provides key funding for the mobility and transportation services including the programs for mobile meals, medical transportation, shopping, medical Terri Ouellette equipment loan closet and van transportation. Special guest emcee Terri Ouellette, host of ABC15’s “Sonoran Living,” will inspire and guide attendees through the evening festivities. “Terri O” has entertained and educated viewers on the morning news, hosting several lifestyle shows and in her book, Easy Embellishing with Terri O. Popular auctioneer Jonathan Blair will lead the live auction. Attendees will enjoy a celebratory evening filled with sweet and savory tastings from local restaurant favorites and live music. General admission is $50 per person with VIP admission options available. All proceeds benefit the volunteer-based nonprofit.  CIVANA Carefree Resort is located at 37220 Mule Train Road. For tickets, to volunteer or for more information, call 480.488.1105 or visit www.foothillscaringcorps.com.

Carefree

Fundraiser to Support Elderly Independence

Serving the Community Since 2002

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Serving the Community Since 2002

Carefree


Community Kicks Off Twentieth Annual Anthem Days The celebration of the 20th annual Anthem Days, first billed as “Anthem Market Days” when the community opened in 1999, will be held in Community Park, March 23–24. Anthem residents and visitors from across the Valley are invited to this free, family-friendly event that runs 10am– 4pm each day. Admission and parking are free; activity and carnival fees apply. Highlights of the two-day event include live musical entertainment (Caution Party Band on Saturday; Zero

All-you-can-ride wristbands will be available for purchase at the carnival ticket booth only. All-you-can-ride discount coupons will be available ahead of the event at the Community Center and Civic Building, the Anthem Community Council and Frazier Shows Carnival Facebook pages, and at the Anthem Community Council booth at Anthem Days. The carnival schedule will be posted online. The Title Sponsor for this year’s Anthem Days event is ProSkill Services. For information or detailed event schedules, visit www.onlineatanthem. com/anthem-days.

Serving the Community Since 2002

Gravity Fighters on Sunday); food court and Rotary beer garden; kids’ zone with inflatables (fees apply); and a free egg hunt for kids (Sunday), featuring the Hippity Hop Band, Mother Nature and Peter Cottontail, hosted by Christ’s Church of the Valley. An egg hunt exclusively for special needs children will precede the public egg hunt, at 10:15am Sunday, on Softball Field #4. OSR Physical Therapy also returns with a baseball speed pitch challenge on the basketball courts (Saturday), featuring a meet-and-great with MLB Hall of Fame pitcher Ferguson “Fergie” Jenkins from 10am–noon. The Frazier Shows Carnival opens ahead of the event Thursday, March 21, at 5pm. The fun continues Friday evening, beginning at 5pm; and then Saturday and Sunday, beginning at 1pm (prices and times subject to change by carnival management).

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ProMusica Arizona Presents Mountain Days ProMusica Arizona will present the Arizona premiere of Mountain Days: The John Muir Musical in Concert, the story of naturalist John Muir, one of the early founders of the National Park System, March 23–24. A magnificent production through song and theater, Mountain Days depicts Muir’s passionate quest to explore and preserve the natural beauty of our great country. Music is by Phoenix composer Craig Bohmler of Riders of the Purple Sage opera fame, and script and lyrics are by Tony-nominated playwright Mary Bracken Phillips. Accompanying the grand musical performance of PMAZ Chorale and Orchestra, will be a heartwarming narrative performed by Arizona award-winning actors Rusty Ferracane, Trisha Ditsworth, Tommy Strawser and Matt Newhard. The performance will be enhanced by stunning multimedia visuals of our nation’s natural beauty.

Three performances of Mountain Days will be held: • M  arch 22, 7pm, — E. Lowell Rogers Amphitheatre, Murphy Park, Glendale (outdoor performance) • M  arch 23, 7:30pm, North Christian Academy, Phoenix • March 24, 3pm, American Lutheran Church, Sun City For tickets or additional information, call 623.326.5172 or visit www.pmaz.org.

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COMMUNITY VOICES

Living on the Edge: 2019 Ford Edge ST AWD MELANIE DROZ SHAWCROFT

Serving the Community Since 2002

HER Certified

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What do you do during all of these rainy days in the Valley? You take the 2019 Ford Edge ST AWD for a spin to the mall where you and your husband and two children can play for hours while staying dry — similar to the drive in the Edge. Of course, the Edge performed well in the rain. With its 2.7L V6 Ecoboost engine and 8-speed auto transmission, this Ford had some pickup. A little faster than the racing car the boys rode for 20 seconds that cost one dollar. The rain-sensing wipers kept us safe and the wiper activated headlamps kept the road clear. The LED fog lamps and ST performance brake package were also perfect for our adventure. I was itching to get back in the Edge after seeing the boys in the blue racecar at the mall. The pet store is always one of my favorite places to visit, and the Ford Edge provided plenty of space for us to bring home that Mastiff. With hands-free, foot activated liftgate, it would be easy to get our new friend in the Edge, and with leathertrimmed seats, dual zone automatic climate control and heated rear seats, this new puppy would definitely ride in style and comfort. It was important to get out of the pet store before the Mastiff became a reality, so we were off to the trampoline next.

The trampoline at the mall is Berrett’s favorite activity, and he was finally brave enough to do a back flip. With the 10 bungee cords and all the harnesses, it is hard to believe it took him so long. That contraption is nearly as safe as the 2019 Ford Edge. The trampoline, similar to the LATCH child safety system in the Edge, is missing the multiple airbags and SOS post-crash alert system. If the trampoline had the Edge safety features, we may have been able to keep our 2-year-old Spencer on for more than 12 seconds. Next on the agenda was the play area followed by the train ride around the mall. Although the children’s play area is entertaining, it is truthfully too many kids in a confined space going 90 miles per hour, which almost always leads to a crash. The 2019 Ford Edge could survive the chaos with its lane keeping system with alert, pre-collision assist with AEB, rearview camera and reverse sensing system. Without these crucial features, Spencer took a knee to the head and had to be carried crying to the train in order to cheer him up.

MSRP: $42,355 ST Package can go as high as $52,125 Day at the mall: $50 The train ride was a blast for the boys — all three of them. We ended our day with the carousel, which can almost always make me nauseous. Not nearly the smooth ride of the Edge. In that 3-minute carousel ride, I surely missed the 10-way heated driver and passenger seats, leather wrapped steering wheel with cruise and audio controls and the bucket seats with sueded cloth seat inserts. The ostrich moving up and down going in a circle was just not the same. Of course, we grabbed some ice cream on the way out to enjoy in the Edge on our way home after an exhausting day. We sure did enjoy looking out through the panoramic vista roof with ambient lighting and listening to the SIRIUS XM. It was a fabulous rainy day spent at the mall, but the relaxation, safety and convenience of the 2019 Ford Edge ST AWD made it the best ride of the day. For more vehicle reviews, visit www.hercertified.com.

Credit & Debt Management — What the Banks Don’t Want You To Know By Mark Field

There are mistakes or inaccurate information on most people’s credit reports. This should be addressed, especially if you are considering a refinance or other credit purchases. When I take on a new mortgage client, the first thing we do is listen to what the client’s goals are. Often, the goal is simply to stop spending so much money in credit card and car loan payments. There is almost no way for most people to afford having a 15-year mortgage, which would pay down the principal much quicker than the traditional 30-year mortgage. The banks make far more money with the homeowner being in a 30-year mortgage than they would in a 1- year mortgage. The banks prefer you to be in a 30-year mortgage.

Let’s see some actual numbers (based on a $300K loan amount and 4.5% interest rate with APR 4.875%): • A 30-year mortgage would be a monthly payment of $1,520 with $395 going to pay down principal. Only 25 percent going to principal. Total interest over the life of the loan is $247,218. • A  15-year mortgage would be a monthly payment of $2,294 with $1,170 going to pay down principal. Over 51 percent going to principal. Total interest over the life of the loan is $113,096. • A  10-year mortgage would be a monthly payment of $3,109 with $1,985 going to pay down principal. Over 63 percent going to principal. Total interest over the life of the loan is $73,098. There are additional strategies that can reduce your total cost of a mortgage including making payments on a bi-weekly basis and putting extra money towards

principal reduction with your payment. For example: with the 15-year option, if you also had the payments on a bi-weekly payment schedule, which would be 26 half payments a year plus an extra $500 on each bi-weekly payment, it would pay off the mortgage in 8.3 years instead of the 15-year term. These strategies require no credit card or car loan debt to allow the homeowner to focus on paying off the mortgage as quickly as possible. This is exactly what the banks do not want you to know. I would be happy to show you and your family what options are available to you. Mark Field is a 20-year mortgage professional (NMLS 965030) with Barrett Financial Group and was named the Mortgage Originator of the Year by the Arizona Journal of Real Estate. He can be reached at 602.241.2500.


New Executive Chef Dushyant Singh Enlivens Blue Hound

Tuna Crudo Braised Lamb Osso Bucco

practices, Chef Singh has tapped a variety of local and regional purveyors including Noble Bakery, Anson Mill, Niman Ranch and Frites Street. Most Certified Angus Beef on the menu is dry aged and butchered in Phoenix. A culinary veteran of more than 16 years, Chef Singh was born and raised in New Delhi, India and has garnered experience and recognition from a slew of notable establishments across the country. His talents brought him to Arizona where he enhanced his skills at some of the Valley’s most well-respected restaurants — most recently, at The Camby, Autograph Collection. It was here that Singh was nominated for “Best Upcoming Chef” by the Arizona Culinary Hall of Fame.

For additional information or to book a reservation, call 602.258.0231 or visit www.bluehoundkitchen.com.

Local Taco Joints Get Ready to Rumble Arizona’s second annual Rockin’ Taco Rumble brings together some of the Valley’s tastiest tacos at Unexpected Art Gallery in Downtown Phoenix Friday, March 1. Doors open at 6pm, then it’s time to let the taco rumble begin. Attendees can sample every delicious taco from local taco teams/restaurants and then vote for a favorite in the “People’s Choice” competition. Guests can also enjoy local craft beer and spirits, live music and delicious desserts and sides. General admission is $45 online ($55 day of event) and includes unlimited taco sampling and six beers or cocktails; water and soda are free. This is a 21-and-over event In addition to the People’s Choice, there will also be a panel of local foodies, media and chefs casting a vote for their favorite tacos in the Judges Choice category. One winner in each category will take home a $500 cash prize, a trophy, a Golden Ticket to participate in the World Food Championships and bragging rights. The Rockin’ Taco Rumble takes place at Unexpected Art Gallery, 734 West Polk Street in Phoenix. For additional information, visit www.rockintacorumble.com.

Serving the Community Since 2002

Blue Hound Kitchen & Cocktails is getting an infusion of sophistication and a touch of finesse as new executive chef Dushyant Singh releases his first dinner menu since joining the Downtown Phoenix restaurant. With this new American-focused menu, Chef Singh is creating an “elevated, yet approachable dining experience.” Utilizing undiscovered flavors, seasonal ingredients and contemporary techniques, the menu offers familiar yet refined favorites that share the spotlight with sophisticated sharable plates and an expanded curated-beef program featuring high-quality butcher’s cuts like ribeye, pork chop and steak. “For this menu, I wanted to take guests on a culinary journey with more refined dishes, while still offering familiar favorites. By using seasonal and unique ingredients with modern techniques, we’re able to deliver simple and straightforward dishes with complex flavor profiles,” said Chef Singh. “This is also just the beginning of the curated beef program at Blue Hound and eventually, I’d like to expand further to incorporate more high-quality beef and game options.” The new dinner menu includes dishes such as the Chicken Liver Plate with red wine, pickled blackberries, onion marmalade, honey and Noble Bread; Tuna Crudo with sushi grade tuna, blood orange compressed watermelon, tajin and red onion; Ricotta Gundi with brown butter emulsion, crispy sage, Parmesan and pickled beech mushrooms; Caesar For Two with baby gem, brioche croutons, heirloom tomatoes and Parmesan; Braised Lamb Osso Bucco with porcini cherry demi, roasted root vegetables, gremolata and Anson Mill grits; 22oz Bone-in Ribeye; 16oz Kansas City Strip; and 16oz Niman Ranch Pork Chop. For those who have enjoyed the Blue Hound dining experience since the beginning, Chef Singh is also carrying over a few favorites like the Shrimp and Grits with andouille sausage, baby tomatoes, chorizo cream and Anson Mill grits. With a significant focus on sourcing quality ingredients by partners who only use the best farming

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT 1

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March 3–31

Sunday A’Fair

Scottsdale Civic Center Park www.scottsdaleperformingarts.org; 480.499.8587

March 4

March 1–3

Silent Night

Tinsley Ellis and Coco Montoya

Arizona Opera at Symphony Hall www.azopera.org; 602.266.7464

March 2

Aspen Santa Fe Ballet: An Evening with Pianist Joyce Yang

March 5

March 14

Wiesenthal

Scottsdale Center for the Performing Arts

March 5–10

Stomp

March 15

Alfredo Rodriguez and Pedrito Martinez

Mesa Arts Center www.mesaartscenter.com; 480.644.6500

March 2

Scottsdale Center for the Performing Arts

March 6

Novo Amor

The Rhythm Room www.rhythmroom.com; 602.265.4842

March 15

Discovery Series Cuba: Late Nite Cigar Rolling & Storytelling

Musical Instrument Museum

March 6–31

Airness

March 3

The Phoenix Theatre Company www.phoenixtheatre.com; 602.254.2151

Arizona Musicfest Young Musicians Winter Concert

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March 8

Scottsdale Center for the Performing Arts

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March 15

JigJam

Alpin Hong

Musical Instrument Museum

March 9

Cirque du Soleil: Amaluna

Musical Instrument Museum

Joe Jackson

Orpheum Theatre Phoenix www.phoenixconventioncenter.com

March 10

Chris Potter

Musical Instrument Museum

March 10

Amor al Baile 5

Tempe Center for the Arts

March 13

Jacob Collier

Crescent Ballroom www.crescentphx.com; 602.716.2222

March 13

Steep Canyon Rangers 3.19

Mesa Arts Center

Phoenix Chamber Music Society at Musical Instrument Museum

Sugaray Rayford

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Break of Reality

Passion for Bach and Coltrane

Scottsdale Center for the Performing Arts www.scottsdaleperformingarts.org; 480.499.8587

Musical Instrument Museum www.mim.org; 480.478.6000

March 14

Musical Instrument Museum

Mesa Arts Center

March 15 – April 14

www.cirquedusoleil.com/amaluna

March 17

River Whyless and Darlingside Musical Instrument Museum

March 17

No Festival Required: Selected Shorts Scottsdale Center for the Performing Arts

March 17

Gordon Lightfoot

Celebrity Theatre www.celebritytheatre.com; 602.267.1600

March 19

Mandolin Orange Crescent Ballroom


Violins of Hope Tribute Concert Scottsdale Center for the Performing Arts

March 24

Omar Sosa & Seckou Keita: Transparent Water

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Musical Instrument Museum

March 26

Morgan James

Musical Instrument Museum

March 29

Complexions Contemporary Ballet: Star Dust Scottsdale Center for the Performing Arts

March 29

Canned Heat

L–R: Harrison Unger, Jonathan Fielding, Clifton Duncan, Amelia McClain and Alex Mandell; Lyceum Theatre. Photo: Jeremy Daniel

The Rhythm Room

March 29

March 19–24

Bill Charlap Trio

The Play That Goes Wrong

ASU Gammage www.asugammage.com; 480.965.3434

March 19–20

Ladysmith Black Mambazo

Arts & Entertainment

AROUND TOWN

March 19

Musical Instrument Museum

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Musical Instrument Museum

March 20

Mesa Arts Center

March 21

March 29–30

Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater Mesa Arts Center

Ryan Bingham

Crescent Ballroom

March 22

Discovery Series Cuba: Coco Fusco Scottsdale Center for the Performing Arts

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March 30

Pink

Gila River Arena www.gilariverarena.com; 623.772.3800

March 30

Gina Chavez

Mesa Arts Center

March 30

Mozart and Schubert Chamber Music Festival 2 Phoenix Symphony at Musical Instrument Museum

April 5

Buddy Guy & Jimmie Vaughan March 23

Celebrity Theatre

Musical Instrument Museum

The Dip

Sofía Rei and JC Maillard with Tupac Mantilla

Serving the Community Since 2002

National Geographic Live: Wild Seas, Secret Shores

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April 6

Crescent Ballroom

CITYSUNTIMES SUPPORTS THE VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS COMMUNITY

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Arts & Entertainment Serving the Community Since 2002

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Cirque du Soleil Returns with New Big Top Show Cirque du Soleil will bring its new critically acclaimed production, Amaluna, to Phoenix. The show will be open in Phoenix March 15 for an engagement of 38 performances under the iconic Yellow-andBlue Grand Chapiteau at State Farm Stadium. Written and directed by Tony Award-winning director, Diane Paulus, Cirque du Soleil  ’s 33rd production,  Amaluna is a celebration of love and a tribute to the work and voice of women.  Amaluna is a fusion of the words ama, which refers to “mother” in many languages, and luna, which means “moon”; a symbol of femininity that evokes both the mother-daughter relationship and the idea of goddess and protector of the planet. Amaluna is also the name of the mysterious island where this magical story unfolds. For the first time in Cirque du Soleil’s history, the production features a cast that comprises mostly women, with a 100 percent female band. “Amaluna is a tribute to the work and voice of women,” explains Director of Creation Fernand Rainville. “The show is a reflection on balance from a women’s perspective.” Paulus, winner of a 2013 Tony Award (Pippin) and named as one of Time Magazine’s 100 Most Influential People of 2014, says, “I didn’t want to build a ‘women’s agenda’ show. I wanted to create a show with women at the center of it, something that had a hidden story that featured women as the heroines.” Paulus drew from a series of classical influences when creating the concept of the show; including tales from Greek and Norse mythology, Mozart’s The Magic Flute and Shakespeare’s The Tempest. For ticket information, visit www.cirquedusoleil.com/amaluna.


Arts & Entertainment Serving the Community Since 2002

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Arts & Entertainment Serving the Community Since 2002

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American Mariachi – Soundtrack of Life, Love & Remembrance By Marcos Nájera

There are many wild and colorful stories chronicling the true origins of mariachi music. Some stories credit the Spanish explorer Hernan Cortés with bringing theatre orchestra musicians with him from overseas when he landed in what is now modern-day Mexico. Meanwhile, others speculate that the word ‘mariachi’ comes from a now-extinct indigenous Mexican language. In written form, the word reportedly started to appear around the year 1852 — specifically in a letter written by a priest named Cosme Santa Anna.

Fast forward over a century later to Northern California. That’s where you’d find a young José Cruz González who’d fallen in love with mariachi music. He even remembers the first album that touched his heart as a boy back in the 1960s. “It was a record that my mother played by Javier Solis,” recalls González. “She had to clean the house — we all had to clean the house. One of our first homes was an abandoned bracero barracks. And she always had her records playing.” González grew up in the farming

village of Watsonville with his mom, Maria Jesus González, and an extended family who made their living by picking crops in the countryside. All the while, mariachi music would play in the background. “I didn’t stop doing fieldwork until I left for college. But as time went on, I even started to learn to play mariachi music as an adult,” laughs González. “I audited a class. I started on guitar and then moved on to other instruments. But I didn’t even know what the terminology was. When they’d say they were ‘starting on the downbeat,’ I had no clue what they meant. And so, it was like learning the most difficult language on earth. That’s how unprepared I was!” Gonzales would listen Artwork by Esser Design to his music teachers tell her mom’s memory starts fading and him about their memories of mariachi. even the simplest of subjects become The stories reminded him of home tough to talk about, a bold idea strikes and the people confronting life’s Lucha. She decides the best way to everyday challenges underscored by communicate with a hurting parent is these beloved Mexican folk songs. to turn to music’s healing power. It all inspired González, who is now So, she forms an all-girl mariachi an accomplished playwright, to pen band. After all, mariachi had always American Mariachi. been her mom’s favorite music. Here’s the catch. González set the play in the 1970s during a time when macho attitudes towards women in music reigned supreme, the mariachi community notwithstanding. “It’s a tradition that’s passed on from father to son,” explains González. “So, these women take on that challenge The theatrical comedy tells the story and all heck breaks loose for them! of a Latina named Lucha. Her mom But in the end, these ladies do it all battles dementia while Lucha tries to wonderfully and really put it together, figure out how to help. because music is memory.” For González, it’s a storyline he American Mariachi was originally knows all too well. His own mom was commissioned by and developed at the diagnosed with early dementia last year. Denver Center for the Performing Arts “My brothers and I wonder what Theatre Company in cooperation with are the next stages,” says González. San Diego’s Old Globe in 2015. Before its “As she forgets more and more.” upcoming Arizona Theatre Company But that’s exactly where music and premier, the show was previously theater can play important roles says workshopped at Cal State Los Angeles, González. He is quick to point out that where González currently teaches. these art forms can help people, himself American Mariachi opens this included, reimagine tough times in life. April at the Herberger Theatre Center Lucha, the play’s protagonist, does (www.arizonatheatre.org). |CST exactly that. When she notices that


A pair of tickets to the Arizona Theatre Company production of American Mariachi at Herberger Theater Center: Kelly Flint of Scottsdale A Family 4-pack of tickets to the 31st Annual Arizona Renaissance Festival: Sandra Schultz of Sun City

MARCH CONTEST

Arts & Entertainment

H H H FEBRUARY WINNERS! H H H

Enter online at news.CITYSunTimes.com/contests or complete the short survey form, indicate which event you would like to attend and mail to CITYSunTimes, 10645 North Tatum Boulevard, Suite 200-413, Phoenix, AZ 85028. Deadline to receive submissions is March 15.

[ ] A  pair of tickets to the Arizona Theatre Company production

of American Mariachi at Herberger Theater Center April 5 [ ] A  Family 2-pack of tickets to the Valley Youth Theatre

production of Tuck Everlasting, April 5–8

Name _________________________________________________________________ Address _______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________ Phone Number _________________________________________________________

Serving the Community Since 2002

Enter To Win!

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] your home or [

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] pick up on newsstand? Pets? [

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Who is the primary reader of CST in your home? __________________________ _______________________________________________________________________ What kind of advertising do you look for in newspapers? ___________________ _______________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________

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YOUTH & EDUCATION

Serving the Community Since 2002

Valley of the Sun JCC Hosts Community Purim Carnival

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The Valley of the Sun JCC is hosting its annual community-wide Purim carnival Sunday, March 24, 11am–3pm on the soccer fields. In addition to the traditional carnival rides and activities, there will be special attraction areas for tots and for teens, superhero-themed costume parade, live DJ and Jewish community organizations tent. “We are thrilled to once again host the community-wide Purim Carnival. Creating an opportunity for all of our Jewish organizations to come together and welcoming the entire Greater Phoenix community is thrilling,” said Kim Subrin, COO. “There will be plenty of fun with inflatables, rides, face painting, costumes, music, food and more!” The J’s 2019 Community-wide Purim Carnival is presented by Flader Wealth Consulting Group – RBC Wealth Management. Admission is free and everyone is welcome. The J is located at 12701 North Scottsdale Road in Scottsdale. More information, and special savings on tickets for rides and attractions, is available at www.vosjcc.org/purim2019.

SUPERINTENDENT’S MESSAGE As spring approaches, schools begin to plan for the upcoming school year, as do parents! Some parents may be looking for a change for their students and “shopping” schools to find the right fit. I always encourage parents to take their student and visit the schools they are considering, meet with the principal and ask for a tour during school hours if possible. This allows a parent and student(s) to get a “feel” for the school climate. At every school, parents should see happy kids engaged in DR. DEBBI BURDICK learning and camaraderie between staff and students and Superintendent staff and other staff members. In addition, parents should Cave Creek Unified School District pay attention to how they are greeted upon entering a school, if they feel welcomed and if the office area, as well as the school grounds, hallways and classrooms are organized, attractive for the students’ age levels and conducive to learning. Spring is also when parents of four- and five-year-olds are considering where to send their child(ren) for kindergarten. Kindergarten has evolved over the years and has expectations and supports for academic learning in many areas but most importantly, English Language Arts (ELA) along with STEM (science-technology-engineering-math), social studies, the arts and collaboration skills. In the Pre-K through 12th grades, the Cave Creek Unified School District also teaches world languages at every elementary school, including language immersion programs in Spanish, Chinese and French, and uses personalized learning structures through the use of technology. Here is a snapshot of our effective elementary schools: • B  lack Mountain Elementary emphasizes the performing arts (music, dance and drama), teaches Spanish Pre-K to 6th grade and uses an individualized learning model. • Desert Sun Academy offers French Immersion, Spanish Pre-K to 6th grade and a focus on STEAM (science-tech-engineering-arts-math). • Desert Willow Elementary offers Spanish Immersion as well as Spanish Pre-K to 6th grade and is an International School. • Horseshoe Trails Elementary offers Chinese Immersion, Chinese Pre-K to 6th grade and an on-site horsemanship and equestrian program. • Lone Mountain Elementary is a STEM school, teaches Chinese Pre-K to 6th grade and uses personalized learning. We look forward to sharing our A+ schools with you. To set up a tour, please call 480.575.2000 for more information. I hope to see you in our schools! Learn more at www. ccusd93.org. To contact Dr. Burdick, call 480.575.2000. For more information on the Cave Creek Unified School District, visit www.ccusd93.org.

Spring Break Basketball Camp Available DreamTeam Academy — a new, state-of-the-art, youth basketball training facility — will host a Spring Break Basketball Camp for ages 7 to 13 March 11–15 and March 18–22. All members of the coaching staff include current and former college basketball players. Camp days include three hours of basketball training in the morning with two hours of open court time. In the afternoon, kids have a great time relaxing in the social lounge where they can watch parent-approved movies, play video games, board games, chess, read books on comfy bean bag chairs, and just hang out. There are even gentle massage chairs and special video game playing chairs for children to enjoy. A half-day camp option is available from 8:30am–1pm. The cost is $50. The full-day option is from 8:30am–6pm. Pick-up is between 4–6pm, and the cost is $75. A catered lunch is also available for an additional $10 per day. Advanced registration is required. Space is limited to 20 children per day. DreamTeam Academy is located at 15955 North Dial Boulevard, Suite 3, Scottsdale. For details, call 480.800.8326 or visit www.dreamteamacademy.com.


Alzheimer’s & Caregiver Educational Conference Comes to the Valley The Alzheimer’s Foundation of America’s (AFA) 2019 national Educating America Tour will visit Tempe Tuesday, March 12, with a free Alzheimer’s and caregiver educational conference at the Marriott Tempe at the Buttes (2000 West Westcourt Way, Tempe) from 9am to 1:30pm.

Help Understanding Medicare Advantage Enrollment Available Individuals who enrolled in a Medicare Advantage Plan for 2019 can change plans during Medicare Advantage Open Enrollment through March 31, 2019. Medicare Advantage enrollees can: • Switch from a Medicare Advantage Plan, with or without drug coverage, to a different Medicare Advantage Plan • D  rop Medicare Advantage and return to original Medicare and also be able to join a Medicare Prescription Drug Plan “Understanding any changes that may apply to Medicare health insurance is vitally important in the decision-making process, as is knowing about options that may assist with paying for Medicare monthly premiums and Medicare prescription drug costs,” said Area Agency on Aging CEO Mary Lynn Kasunic. “Area Agency Benefits Assistance Counselors can provide that insight.” For information or to speak with a Benefits Assistance Counselor, certified through the State Health Insurance Assistance Program, call 602.280.1059. For more information about the Area Agency on Aging, call the 24-Hour Senior Help Line at 602.264.4357 or visit www.aaaphx.org.

Spring Candlelight Yoga Series Kicks Off in March The Spa at Four Seasons Resort Scottsdale at Troon North invites residents to savor yoga in the warmth of a spring evening under a glowing sunset followed by wine with friends under a starry night sky as it presents its popular Candlelight Yoga Series. Participants will be treated to an hour-long yoga flow practice and incredible sunset views of the Valley on the resort’s outdoor lawns. After the yoga session, mingle with friends al fresco in candlelight over a glass of red or white wine, provided complimentarily to all attendees age 21 or older. Open to both resort and local guests, the yoga classes begin at 6:30pm and are priced at $25 per person. Local guests are encouraged to bring their own yoga mats. All guests should check in at The Spa upon arrival. The Spring Candlelight Yoga Series will be held every other Thursday in March and April. The dates are March 14 and 28, and April 11 and 25. To reserve a spot or for more information about spring programming, call The Spa at 480.513.5145 Designed to blend flawlessly with the surrounding environment, Four Seasons Resort Scottsdale at Troon North’s 12,000-square-foot, full-service Spa features 14 treatment rooms, including two private spa suites. The Spa offers an extensive array of seasonal, indigenous and innovative skin and body treatments, scrubs, clay wraps, facials and massages. For information, visit www.fourseasons.com/scottsdale/spa.

Serving the Community Since 2002

The conference, which is free and open to everyone, is designed to connect people with information about Alzheimer’s disease, brain health and dementia caregiving. Participants have the opportunity to interact with Alzheimer’s experts, ask questions, network and obtain a free memory screening. “More than 140,000 Arizonans are living with Alzheimer’s disease; many others are caring for a family member with Alzheimer’s. As those numbers grow, it’s critically important to connect people with information that can help them if Alzheimer’s enters their lives,” said Charles J. Fuschillo, Jr., AFA’s president and chief executive officer. “This conference will help individuals learn about Alzheimer’s disease, caring for someone who has Alzheimer’s and support resources

that are available to help. We invite everyone to attend.” There will be several informative sessions led by dementia and caregiving experts: •  Unraveling Alzheimer’s Disease — John DenBoer, Ph.D., will provide an overview of Alzheimer’s disease, an update on Alzheimer’s research and clinical trials, and what is expected on the horizon. • Caregiver Story: Juggling Life, Work and Caregiving — Amy Goyer, author of Juggling Life, Work, and Caregiving and a family and caregiving expert for AARP, will share her journey as a caregiver for her father, Robert, who has advanced Alzheimer’s disease. •  Innovative Activities: Preserving Functional Ability — Learn how thinking outside the box when programming activities allows for greater success and helps maintain high level of functioning. Free, confidential memory screenings will be conducted throughout the day. Registration is free and open to all. For more information or to register, visit www.alzfdn.org and click on “events calendar” at the top of the page. Those who can’t attend the conference or have immediate questions about Alzheimer’s disease can contact AFA’s national toll-free helpline at 866.232.8484.

HEALTH & WELLNESS

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DESTINATIONS

Antlers Inn Provides ‘Local Experience’ to Travelers

Serving the Community Since 2002

What’s the difference between a chain hotel and a mom and pop motel? There are many lodging variations and what suits each traveler best is dependent upon their needs, whether on business or pleasure, and what makes them most comfortable. Is price important? Staff friendliness? Room size and amenities? A hot breakfast? Reviews and ratings? “Sometimes you just need a room while you travel and don’t want to be bothered,” say Stephan and Jeanne Begovac, innkeepers at Antlers Inn. “It doesn’t matter to you if you can tell where you are by the motels decor or are greeted by a smiling face eager to tell you

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about the local sights. If you are traveling for pleasure, however, sometimes the best experience will come from the mom and pop motels.” The couple says that, “Antlers Inn provides that local experience, plus we love our guests! We know what places to send you that will treat you well and make you want to come back again; from the best places to eat, where to shop to find hidden treasures, beautiful trails to hike or bike and where the fish are biting. We want you to enjoy your stay so much that you can’t wait to come back and recommend Antlers Inn to your family and friends!”

Antlers Inn is located at 1023 East White Mountain Boulevard in Pinetop. The motel sits back off the main road offering a quiet rest to travelers, and yet is centrally located and just minutes away from popular year-round outdoor activities. “You can’t say that one type of lodging is better than the other,” the Begovacs say. “It depends on why you are travelling. But if you do want the local experience, Antlers Inn, Pinetop is your place. We want to help you make memories that you can take home with you!” For additional information or to book a reservation, call 928.367.4146 or visit www.antlersinnaz.com.


61st Annual Heard Museum Indian Fair & Market

The Heard Museum Guild Indian Fair and Market runs Saturday March 2, 9:30am–5pm, and Sunday, March 3, 9:30am–4pm. For more information and to purchase event tickets, visit www.heard.org/fair or call 602.252.8840.

Serving the Community Since 2002

The Heard Museum Guild will welcome more than 600 Native artists chosen through a juried selection process for the 61st Annual Indian Fair & Market, March 2–3. A nationally recognized event, and the largest art market in Arizona, the fair is a gathering place for art lovers and the community to celebrate and learn about Native art and culture, enjoy food, performances, activities for the kids and more. “Since 1959, this family-friendly event has provided opportunities for American Indian artists to showcase their work to visitors who come from all over the country,” said fair chair Anna Flynn. “It is a unique chance for guests to buy one-of-a-kind art pieces, meet the artists, and support American Indian art and artists. Artists keep 100 percent of the proceeds from the sale of their items.” The artists, both emerging and critically acclaimed, represent over 100 American Indian and Alaska Native Tribes and Canadian First Nations. They will show and sell pieces including baskets, beadwork, quillwork, jewelry, lapidary, paintings, drawings, photography, graphics, personal attire, pottery, pueblo carvings, sculpture, weaving and textiles as well as other artistic media. Festivities begin each morning with an opening ceremony that includes the Presentation of Colors by First Nations Warrior Society Color Guard led by Michael Smith (Diné), the Native American Flag Song performed by Thunder Springs Drum Group (Hopi/Pima) and a Native blessing. Live performances throughout the weekend will include the Cha’Bii’Tu Apache Crown Dance Group, Native flutist and world-champion hoop dancer, Tony Duncan (Apache/ Arikara and Hidatsa); the Thunder Boy Dance Troop (Hopi Butterfly Dancers) and The Women Dance Beautifully featuring Doreen Duncan and granddaughter Summer Lopez leading an ensemble of women dancers demonstrating the fancy shawl, jingle dress, northern traditional and southern traditional. Grammy-winning Canyon Records is sponsoring the Courtyard Stage featuring a renowned list of

Destinations

Experience Native Artists, Performances, Activities, Food and More

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performers. The Fair will end Sunday afternoon with a rousing closing ceremony on the Heard Museum’s grassy amphitheater. Families will enjoy Young Warriors Storytelling and crafts with Violet Duncan (Plains Cree/Taíno), a children’s book author, illustrator and former Miss Indian World who combines traditional dance styles and storytelling.

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Destinations Serving the Community Since 2002

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Annual Ostrich Festival Returns to Chandler March 8–10 Organized by the Chandler Chamber of Commerce and Steve LeVine Entertainment & Public Relations, the 31st annual Ostrich Festival announced that chart-topping singer and rapper, Flo Rida, will headline the festival Friday, March 8. Grammy Award-winning Motown and R&B/Funk band, The Commodores, will headline Saturday, March 9, and Pop singer, Andy Grammer will join the lineup Sunday, March 10. “We are very excited about the headliner band lineup for the 31st annual Ostrich Festival. Flo Rida, The Commodores and Andy Grammer — there’s something for everyone throughout the weekend. You can’t beat the fact that a reasonably priced general admission ticket gets you access to a day filled with over 100 hours of amazing, family-friendly performances and musical acts,” said president and CEO of the Chandler Chamber of Commerce, Terri Kimble. The Ostrich Festival is a community and family event featuring three stages of interactive shows and attractions, meet and greets with favorite mascots, ostrich-themed activities, national and regional entertainment, carnival midway, spectacular food, upscale arts and crafts and much more. In addition, there are performances by several local community groups throughout the weekend. The festival is introducing a new educational component surrounding its namesake mascot. Attendees will get an up-close look at live ostriches with an exhibit highlighting facts about the birds, their history in Chandler and fun photo opportunities. The Ostrich Festival will also feature new attractions like Big Bee the Transforming

Robot Car, Big Bounce America, BMX Pro Tricks Show and Victoria Circus. These attractions join returning festival mainstays Mango and Dango, Pangaea Land of the Dinosaurs Adventure Land with free fossil digs and Dinosaur meet and greets, the Imaginology STEM Tent featuring interactive STEM-based activities for kids ages 3-12, Pig Races, Professor Smart’s Science Show and Bear Hollow. Fan favorite amusement ride the “Turbo,” will return to the festival’s ride lineup. On Turbo, riders are taken for a 70-mph spin at the end of a whirling arm that swings them 120 feet in the air and sends them hurtling toward the earth in an arc generating forces three times the pull of gravity. The ride also features upside down and free flipping action. Other rides include festival favorites like the Giant Ferris Wheel, the Century Wheel, Vertigo, Inversion, 1001 Nachts, Quazar, Pole Position Coaster, Wave Swinger, Giant Scooter and Scrambler, among many others. The festival will also feature kiddie and family rides, including the Frog Hopper, Tom Kangaroo, Chopper Hopper, Lolli Swing, Wacky Worm Coaster, Looney Tooter Train and many more.

Tickets for the 31st annual Chandler Chamber Ostrich Festival are available online at www. ostrichfestival.com. Adult tickets are $15, tickets for seniors 55 and older and children 12 and under are $8, and children 3 and under will be admitted to the festival free of charge. Limited VIP tickets will be available for purchase.


Destinations

Current Colleen and Rose, Kelsey Kelleher with the 2019 contestants

Annual St. Patrick’s Day Parade and Irish Faire to be Held

Serving the Community Since 2002

The St. Patrick’s Day Parade and Irish Faire committee is gearing up for its annual event, to be held Saturday, March 16. The event has become a staple in the Phoenix community, and committee members say this year’s festivities are a can’t miss. “This is the 36th year of the event and we feel like it just gets better every year,” said Jeff Aspland, president, St. Patrick’s Day Parade and Irish Faire Committee. “Parade and Faire goers have come to expect a top-notch event, and this year should prove to be no exception.” The Parade includes marching bands, Irish step dancers, bagpipers, police and fire vehicles, government dignitaries, floats and of course the 2019 Arizona Irish Colleen/Arizona Rose with her court. The Arizona Colleen and Rose programs encourage young women to take pride in their Irish heritage and become involved in the Irish community. Cory McCloskey, of FOX 10 Phoenix, has been named grand marshal and the Irish Persons of the year are Joan Hassett and Eileen Lynch (Lavin). The Parade will take place in Downtown Phoenix on Third Street from Sheridan south to McDowell. The Irish Faire will be held at Hance Park, which is on the west side of Central at the Irish Cultural Center. Admission to the Faire is $12 for adults 13 and older; children 12 and under are free. Admission for seniors (55 and over) and military is $10. Free parking is available at the garage at 1850 North Central Avenue. For more information or to get tickets, call 602.280.9221 or visit http://stpatricksdayphoenix.org.

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GET MORE! news.CITYSunTimes.com RABBI ROBERT L. KRAVITZ Northeast Valley

Once Upon a Time There was a Bunny… A fluffy little bunny was scampering across a green field. Alone. With nothing special in mind to do this day. Enjoying the green of the field and the comfort of the quietude. Suddenly he was struck by the appearance of another bunny on the other side of the field. She was going her own way and didn’t even notice him. Bounding across the field he smiled at her; she at him. Soon they were ambling about enjoying the countryside and each other’s company. It was a special time and each bunny felt comfortable with the other. He went back to his place and she to hers. But he could not forget the incredible joy and comfort he felt being with her. They shared so much in common; even having lived in the same cities at the same time, but not knowing the other was there. Read the rest of “Once Upon a Time There was a Bunny” online now!

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It’s All Greek to Me Myopia. Hyperopia. Astigmatism. Presbyopia. “I have no idea what you’re talking about-opia.” If you are like millions of other Americans, one of these terms describes you. Presbyopia alone affects over 100 million people, but don’t worry, it’s not contagious. These are the terms that describe how your eyes work, or, in some cases, do not work. They are terms that are often thrown around, but at the same time, are often not really understood. The first two terms, myopia and hyperopia, are more commonly known as “nearsightedness” and “farsightedness,” respectively. However, even these more common terms are often misunderstood. When you are nearsighted, you are “sighted for near,” and may have difficulty seeing far away. When you are farsighted, you are “sighted for far.” In this case, you may have difficulty seeing things up close, or your eyes may have to work harder to see things up close. Read the rest of “It’s All Greek to Me” online now!

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Profile for Jenifer Lee

Carefree Cave Creek March 2019 CITYSunTimes  

CITYSunTimes is a locally owned community publication now in its 17th year, serving over 80,000 readers in the North Valley. CST offers pers...

Carefree Cave Creek March 2019 CITYSunTimes  

CITYSunTimes is a locally owned community publication now in its 17th year, serving over 80,000 readers in the North Valley. CST offers pers...

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