City & State Pennsylvania 062021

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E'S HE RA N

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Does it look like John Fetterman gives a damn? H

THE P E N N S Y LVA N I A POWER 100 Who are the political architects of the Keystone State?

Malcolm Kenyatta

Can he break barriers and pull off a U.S. Senate win?

SWPA HGTV

The Trump House

The neverending battle

Wawa vs. Sheetz

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JUNE 2021


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June 2021

Contents | JUNE 2021

City & State Pennsylvania

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D P i

A p L h i

A R

G

25

PA POWER 100 The most influential leaders in the Keystone State LETTERS … 4

NAGEL PHOTOGRAPHY

Publisher and editor describe a new vision for City & State PA

ADVISORY BOARD … 6 The group helping craft our Power Lists

TRUMP HOUSE … 8

The new state rep behind the iconic gathering point

EMERGENCY POWERS … 10

A timeline of COVID-19 restrictions and reopening

WAWA VS. SHEETZ … 12

Putting the two gas stations head to head

MALCOLM KENYATTA … 14

Can this young progressive from Philly make it to the U.S. Senate?

WINNERS & LOSERS … 70

Who was up and who was down last month

JOHN FETTERMAN … 18

He’s Wolf’s No. 2, and also trying to make it to Washington

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CityAndStatePA .com

June 2021

SUSAN PEIFFER Publisher

OVER THE PAST FEW MONTHS, City & State has made tremendous progress toward relaunching our Pennsylvania platform. We have a full team on board, our website has been relaunched, and our editors have been hard at work selecting and ranking the Pennsylvania Power 100 List. Fresh, original content is being posted several times each day, and our First Read subscriber base is growing quickly. Perhaps the most exciting development is the creation of our launch event, the PA Power 100, which debuts on June 17. In addition to opening remarks from Gov. Tom Wolf, former Gov. Ed Rendell and Mayor Jim Kenney, we will host a Sheetz vs. Wawa “debate” between Lt. Gov. John Fetterman and Congressman Brendan Boyle – something you won’t want to miss! City & State PA is a multimedia platform in the true sense, which includes a monthly magazine covering Pennsylvania politics, a robust website with in-depth reporting from Philly to Harrisburg, and a series of events and summits that attract a highly influential audience. As a result, an important new media channel has opened up for Pennsylvania advocacy organizations, labor unions, and lobbyists. Many Fortune 500 companies rely on City & State to get their message (or their services) in front of policymakers and influencers in Harrisburg and across the state, and we make this easy with event sponsorships, as well as digital, print, and First Read advertising. Following on the heels of the PA Power 100 is our PA Healthcare Power 100 list (July 19), which is a special issue recognizing top brass from government, health advocacy, hospitals, clinics, academia, media, business and beyond. Later in July is our Diversity Summit, followed by our tribute to Pennsylvania’s labor leaders in September’s Labor 50 edition. In October, it’s the 50 Over 50 event and magazine, and in November, we will do the Philly 100, followed by our Healthcare Summit in December. If this sounds like a lot, just wait until you see what is on the calendar for 2022! I look forward to working with many of you over the next several months as you take part in our events, develop messaging for First Read, and advertise in our monthly magazine and website. More newsletters will be launched in the coming months, including Harrisburg Agenda, for all the latest on policy and legislation. Based on the response we have received thus far, City & State is off to a fantastic start in Pennsylvania! City & State is committed to being Pennsylvania’s unrivaled source for political news, and we encourage readers to send feedback on our comprehensive coverage. Subscribe to our morning e-newsletter, First Read, and our monthly City & State magazine. Follow City and State on social media @CityAndStatePA and send us a shout out to help celebrate this exciting time. More newsletters will be launched in the coming months, including Harrisburg Agenda, for all the latest on policy and legislation.

RICHARD QUINDRY; JARED GRUENWALD

PUBLISHER’S NOTE


June 2021

City & State Pennsylvania

EDITOR’S NOTE

JENNY DEHUFF Editor-in-chief

WHOEVER SAID POLITICS is boring must not be paying very close attention. This person clearly missed the #gate scandal and never appreciated the humor in comically drawn legislative districts. Those might be superficial, but there are so many more reasons to care. That’s why City & State PA is back, rebranded, reinvigorated and ready to educate, inform and enlighten all of you who eat, sleep and breathe politics. Take a peek inside our inaugural issue to find in-depth profiles with prominent Pennsylvania politicians, thoughtful analysis on issues that impact the state and exclusive stories that don’t need to be oversold. We offer Pennsylvania political news in a fast, friendly fashion from local, trusted journalists. You can count on our talented team of top-notch reporters to deliver daily, on-demand stories from all across the Commonwealth. Only here can you find the kind of content that sparks provocative conversations among lawmakers, fuels the metabolism of public policymakers and keeps you in the politico know – from Erie to Philadelphia – every day. Another reason you should be excited about City & State PA’s relaunch is because our early morning First Read rundown offers a quick, digestible recap of the day’s top stories. The long-awaited 2021 Pennsylvania Power 100 recognizes this year’s most influential people in state politics, government, business, philanthropy, advocacy, labor, academia, media and more. Made up of individuals who have made an investment in the Keystone State, this list was carefully crafted by our award-winning reporters and editors at City & State. Our big relaunch event is just a few days away. On Thursday, June 17, we are thrilled to host a virtual celebration of our rebranding. It will feature keynote speakers Gov. Tom Wolf, former Gov. Ed Rendell, Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney, Lt. Gov. John Fetterman and Congressman Brendan Boyle. But perhaps the most talked about moment of the evening is when the baby-faced Boyle defends Wawa against the furrow-browed Fetterman, who’s backing Sheetz, for a highly anticipated, hotly contested debate over which establishment offers better coffee, slings better sandwiches, and is an overall better option for your next pit stop. You won’t want to miss it. So thank you for reading and please subscribe to our daily First Read e-newsletter, where you can sign up to get the City & State magazine mailed to you directly – and follow us on social media. Don’t forget to be on the lookout for five more City & State PA issues coming later this year. We’re thrilled to be back in action, and we can’t wait to talk politics with you.

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CityAndStatePA .com

June 2021

Introducing City & State Pennsylvania’s 2021 Advisory Board

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BOARD CHAIR FORMER GOV. EDWARD G. RENDELL Ed Rendell served as Philadelphia district attorney for two terms and went on to become mayor in 1991. As mayor, the city was was on the brink of bankruptcy, but Rendell turned that around in his first term. Rendell served as chair of the Democratic National Committee during the 2000 presidential election. In 2002, he was elected the 45th governor of Pennsylvania and served for two terms.

LESLIE GROMIS BAKER, BUCHANAN INGERSOLL & ROONEY Leslie Gromis Baker began working on the 1988 George Bush for President campaign, and then as a special assistant in the George H. W. Bush White House. She served on Gov. Tom Ridge’s senior staff, and ran his successful 1998 reelection campaign. In 1999, she started her own political and lobbying business – LG Strategies. In 2013, she left LG Strategies to serve as Gov. Tom Corbett’s chief of staff.

GENE BARR THE PENNSYLVANIA CHAMBER OF BUSINESS INDUSTRY As president and CEO of the Pennsylvania Chamber of Business Industry, Gene Barr has more than 40 years of experience in politics, government affairs and business operations, including work with BP America, Associated Petroleum Industries of PA and McNees Wallace & Nurick. He is a member of the board of the United Way of the Capital Region and others.

SAMUEL CHEN THE LIDDELL GROUP Samuel Chen is the founder and principal director of The Liddell Group, an award-winning political strategy firm. He hosts the television news journal, “Face the Issues” and is assistant professor of political science at Northampton Community College. He is also a member of the American Enterprise Institute’s Leadership Network, and author of two books. He completed his undergraduate and graduate studies at Baylor University.

JOSEPH HILL COZEN O’CONNOR PUBLIC STRATEGIES Joe Hill leads Cozen O’Connor Public Strategies’ government relations and public advocacy efforts in Philadelphia and southeastern Pennsylvania. He previously worked on Gov. Tom Wolf’s reelection effort, and served in several roles with Sen. Bob Casey Jr. and the Democratic National Convention Committee. He currently serves on the boards of Mural Arts Philadelphia, and the Kimmel Center.

TERESA M. LUNDY TML COMMUNICATIONS Teresa M. Lundy is the principal and founder of TML Communications, a strategic public relations, crisis communications and community engagement firm. TML Communications recently received the Inspiring Excellence Award from the Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce. Lundy served as campaign manager for Sheriff Rochelle Bilal’s election to become the first woman to head the Philadelphia Sheriff’s Office.

ANNE WAKABAYASHI THE WIN COMPANY Anne Wakabayashi is a media strategist. Before joining Win, Anne was national political director of Emerge Pennsylvania, an organization that trains women to run for office. She has managed campaigns from city council to state Supreme Court – all the way up to serving as Pennsylvania senior strategist for Elizabeth Warren’s presidential campaign. She was also appointed chair of the Pennsylvania Commission on LGBTQ Affairs.

RAY ZABORNEY RED MAVERICK MEDIA AND MAVERICK STRATEGIES Ray Zaborney has served as an adviser to Republican leaders across the Commonwealth. Zaborney has been named one of Harrisburg’s most powerful insiders as well as a statewide leader for his ability to help shape public policy. Zaborney represents some of America’s biggest companies, disrupters and industries. He lives in Harrisburg with his wife, Jen, and their kids, Grace and Emma.

STATE OF PENNSYLVANIA; JEN BARKER WORLEY PHOTOGRAPHY; STEPHEN MOYER PHOTOGRAPHY; CELESTE SLOMAN; COZEN O’CONNOR; MICHAEL GRAY/TML COMMUNICATIONS; CELESTE SLOMAN; SUBMITTED

HE GOAL OF THE ADVISORY BOARD is to help City & State represent a diversity of opinions about the relative influence of Pennsylvania’s elected officials, as well as its private sector and nonprofit leaders. These individuals have offered to share their insight as we prepare and vet our 2021-22 Power Lists, beginning with our inaugural Pennsylvania Power 100, featured in this magazine. We at City & State take great care crafting our lists, and with the help of these board members, we know we will continue to publish a premium product.


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June 2021

A Q&A with ‘Trump House’ creator and new state Rep. Leslie Rossi By Harrison Cann

H

ARRISBURG WELCOMED a new set of legislators to the Capitol following May’s special elections. One particular state representative caught the attention of the media: Leslie Rossi. Known for creating the “Trump House” in Unity, Rossi is the owner of Crystal Creek Management and a mother of eight. The “Trump House,” featuring American flag paint and a large Donald Trump cutout, gained notoriety around Westmoreland County

She’s a western Pennsylvania legislator with strong ties to former President Donald Trump and his ‘America First’ policies.

and helped spawn Rossi’s political activism. From promoting Trump’s reelection to starting her own campaign, Rossi is another legislator with strong ties to Trump’s agenda. She now holds the 59th District seat, vacated by Rep. Mike Reese, who died unexpectedly earlier this year. One of the newest faces in Harrisburg, she represents parts of both Westmoreland and Somerset counties. City & State PA reached out to Rossi to get to know her, learn her priorities, and understand her thoughts on the Republican Party.

LEE ANN ROADMAN

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June 2021

City & State Pennsylvania

Rossi declined to comment on the validity of the 2020 presidential election and the Jan. 6 insurrection in Washington, D.C. This interview has been edited for length and clarity. What was your inspiration for creating the “Trump House?” The reason I created the Trump House originally was to make sure voters were familiar and aware of what a delegate was and that they knew how it worked here in Pennsylvania, which is different from other states. In Pennsylvania, the candidate receives 17 delegate votes by winning the popular vote. But 54 of the delegate votes are unbound, so in 2016, it was really important that voters chose the correct delegates that were running that supported the primary candidate they wanted. I went to a town hall in Pittsburgh and watched delegates soliciting for votes, deceiving the voter as they did not disclose what candidate they supported. As I watched that, I couldn’t sit back and do nothing. I wanted the people in the area I live to know that their vote for delegates needed to reflect the candidate of their choice, and I did not want them going into the voter box blind. I wanted them to know and understand the process, so the Trump House was originally created for awareness of that. Then something magical happened and it turned into so much more: a grassroots movement that the people loved being a part of. What initial reactions did you receive? What messages did you hear from people visiting the house, and did that spark your interest in running for office? It was not all positive initially, but it did spark interest and curiosity, as people could not deny the amount of folks that were gathering there. Messages I heard from people back in 2016 were messages of desperation. I learned so much from just giving them my time and listening. They shared very deep personal stories with me and trusted me and we talked about things and ideas on how things could be better. Those

relationships, friendships and connections never went away and many of the people I met kept in touch with me telling me about things happening in their lives. In 2020, I was there again. Many people came back and many were new. Many wanted to change sides and were ready to do so officially. They came there to pick up a voter registration form. They could have done it anywhere, but wanted to do it at the Trump House. It was an easy decision to run for office. I was already there for the people and communicating with them, but running for office would allow me to represent them and be their voice. They were encouraging me and cheering me on, and it was a great feeling knowing I had such strong support.

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deal of time in both areas talking to people, but it’s fair to say the issues are the same. Election integrity was a hot topic. Education was also a much-discussed issue. The fact that people are making too much (money) on unemployment and refusing to go back to work or find jobs was another issue people had much to say about. They can’t get the things they need because many businesses are struggling due to staff shortages. Something people in my district care about is protecting their constitutional rights, and I plan to do that. What have you learned about the office since your election? I am learning every day and know that the constituents are our priority, so I am working on setting up the best team I can in my district to serve them.

What were your other motivations for running for office? The people are what motivate me. I have spent so much time hearing their real-life personal stories, views and opinions and have gotten What election reforms would you like to see how politics affect their daily lives, and to see implemented? And how can the legislature ensure that has changed me forever. election security while not I feel so in touch with them. limiting Pennsylvanians’ “People are I care about them and their constitutional right to vote? families. I feel I can be the looking voice of those very people (I’d like to see) commonsense for strong who live in the district we call reforms: Voter ID, signature home and love. match, deceased people removed leadership from voter rolls – along with to get our cleaning those up. Every polling How much of an influence state back on place needs to follow the same does former President election code. track to move Donald Trump have in forward.” the Republican Party, particularly in your Do you think both area of the state? parties will continue to split over internal I feel that President Trump’s politics, and how do you – state Rep. Leslie Rossi agenda worked well in our see the GOP handling state and that people were varying viewpoints better off after four years of his administration in office. That, in turn, within the party? has influenced conservatives to step up locally I think politics always has had different sides, and get involved, whether it be attending but the main focus has to be that we are discussion groups, running for office or working for our constituents we represent. encouraging others to run and offering up their support. People are aware, active and How do you see the Republican Party paying close attention. adjusting its message ahead of the 2022 elections, and will Trump’s ideas continue to be a focal point? What specific issues did you hear from Westmoreland residents that I think coming off of a lengthy shutdown that you would like to address? has crippled so many economically, people Westmoreland does not make up my entire are looking for strong leadership to get our district, so let’s keep that in mind. District 59 state back on track to move forward. Jobs, goes into Somerset, and the people there are energy, education and constitutional rights every bit as important to me. I spent a great should always be focal points.


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CityAndStatePA .com

June 2021

Emergency REINING IN

ENNSYLVANIA became the first state in the nation to constitution‑ ally cut back on its governor’s emergency powers after voters approved two constitutional amendments in May that limit the breadth of a governor’s ability to unilaterally respond to various emergencies. The constitutional amendments, which were approved by voters during the mu‑ nicipal primary, limit the length of a gu‑ bernatorial emergency declaration. These emergency declarations give governors

broad authority to issue executive orders with the force of law. Under the changes, such declarations are now limited to 21 days, unless extended by state lawmak‑ ers. Another change approved by voters gives the General Assembly the power to terminate an emergency declaration with‑ out needing the governor’s signature. The ballot questions were largely framed as a referendum on Gov. Tom Wolf’s COVID‑19 response, which relied heavily on executive orders, particularly in the early months of the pandemic when the Demo‑

TOM WOLF’S COVID-19 TIMELINE 2020

MAY 19 Wolf vetoes

three bills attempting to give counties and businesses the ability to develop their own mitigation and reopening plans.

MARCH 6 Gov. Tom Wolf signs an emergency declaration regarding the COVID-19 pandemic, giving him broad authority to issue executive orders with the force of law.

JUNE 3 Wolf renews the 90-day disaster declaration signed on March 6.

MARCH 19 Wolf

orders all non-life-sustaining businesses to close.

APRIL 1 Wolf

announces statewide stay-at-home order.

APRIL 3 House

Resolution 836, introduced by state Rep. Russ Diamond, is referred to the Veterans Affairs and Emergency Preparedness Committee. The concurrent resolution is Republicans’ first attempt to terminate the March 6, 2020 emergency declaration. Gov. Wolf recommends all

Pennsylvanians wear a mask anytime they leave their homes.

MAY 4 Wolf announces phased reopening and provides guidance to counties moving to “yellow phase” starting May 8.

JUNE 9 HR 836 is

passed through the Senate and concurred by the House.

JUNE 26 Wolf announces that the last Pennsylvania county will move into the green phase on July 3.

cratic governor issued sweeping executive orders to close businesses, restrict in‑per‑ son instruction at schools and require resi‑ dents to remain at home as part of an effort to limit the spread of the coronavirus. Now, Wolf will be forced to collaborate with law‑ makers on the state’s response to emer‑ gencies or risk the termination of various emergency declarations. In addition to the COVID‑19 declaration, Wolf has used them for other situations, including his response to the opioid epidemic and to civil unrest following the death of George Floyd.

OFFICE OF GOV. TOM WOLF

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POWER


June 2021

City & State Pennsylvania

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Voters curtailed the governor’s emergency authority, leaving the state’s COVID-19 response to lawmakers. By Justin Sweitzer & Harrison Cann

Gov. Tom Wolf and then-Secretary of Health Dr. Rachel Levine issued emergency orders during the pandemic.

JULY 1 Secretary

of Health Dr. Rachel Levine signs an order requiring masks to be worn outside the house. The Supreme Court of Pennsylvania rules that the legislature cannot force Wolf to end his disaster declaration.

JULY 8 HR 836 is

presented to Wolf’s desk.

JULY 14 HR 836 is vetoed by Wolf. SEPT. 1 Wolf signs second renewal of COVID-19 disaster declaration.

SEPT. 2 Motion to

override Wolf’s veto fails in the House.

SEPT. 21 U.S. District Judge William Stickman IV rules that key components of Wolf’s mitigation strategies are unconstitutional, including the decision to shut down businesses and limit gatherings. OCT. 16 Wolf vetoes

HB 2513, a bill that would allow restaurants to open up to full capacity regardless of state and federal mitigation guidelines.

NOV. 25 Wolf signs

third renewal of COVID-19 disaster declaration as the state surpasses 10,000 COVID-19 related deaths. He also vetoes two bills related to firearms regulations during a disaster declaration.

2021 FEB. 19 Wolf

signs fourth renewal of COVID-19 disaster declaration.

MAY 11 Wolf increases capacity limits to 50% effective May 17. MAY 18 Voters ap-

prove two constitutional amendments to limit the length of a gubernatorial

emergency declaration and to give the General Assembly the power to terminate an emergency declaration.

MAY 20 Wolf signs fifth renewal of COVID-19 disaster declaration. MAY 31 Wolf allows

all businesses and venues to return to 100% capacity.


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CityAndStatePA .com

June 2021

Wawa vs. Sheetz:

ultimately, reigns supreme in the world of Pennsylvania pit stops. It all began when two Pennsylvania farmers needed a place to sell their milk, and the Keystone State’s greatest gas station rivalry was born. Both Wawa and Sheetz share certain similarities: Each offers 24-hour service for low-price gas, coffee, snacks, pre-packaged food, as well as made-to-order hot or cold food options from a touch-screen kiosk, tobacco products and a seemingly endless array of cold beverages.

billion

billion

Their styles are different, though. Sheetz is typically louder and flashier, with a more intense vibe than Wawa’s unassuming, plain and simple appearance. Sheetz has a wide variety of exotic frozen drink options on their Slushie menu, ranging from peanut butter and jelly to horchata to orange creamsicle and more. But while Sheetz may seem like it has more options, Wawa reminds us that no matter how you are dressed, you are welcome there. Still wearing your pajamas and heading out for a snack? No one will judge you. Each store has several “signature” creations. Craving a Wawa Sizzli at 4 a.m.?

LTUMMY, R. ASHRAFOV/SHUTTERSTOCK

W

HETHER YOU CAN’T live without Sheetz or you gotta have a Wawa, this long-held Pennsylvania convenience store clash has been going on for far too long, and now it’s time to settle the score. We’re just a few days away from our big debate, when Congressman Brendan Boyle and Lt. Gov. John Fetterman go head-to-head to decide once and for all which chain really has better coffee, sandwiches, and


June 2021

City & State Pennsylvania

Let’s take a look at the stats on these two gas station chains and see what all the noise is about.

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Tale of the Tape

Go ahead and treat yourself. Hungry for Sheetz’s Mac ‘N Cheese bites with Boom Boom sauce? Sheetz has got you covered. That’s why, for most Pennsylvanians, your allegiance lies with one glorified gas station or the other. Even Johnny Knoxville got a Wawa logo tattooed on his shoulder. A 2017 survey conducted by the Bostonbased tech company GasBuddy revealed that the best overall convenience store experience went to Sheetz in Pennsylvania,

throughout six states and Washington, D.C

throughout six states.

while Wawa ranked supreme in New Jersey. Here’s where Sheetz may have had a leg up: Sheetz offers a full-service espresso and smoothie bar staffed by trained baristas. Some locations have a car wash, laundromat and showers for truckers on the go. They serve free coffee on Christmas and New Year’s Day. They even sell alcohol. Can Wawa compete with that? As our two politicos ready to square off for Thursday’s debate, we doubt either is a glutton for punishment or will be quick to throw in the towel. We’re willing to bet, though, that after this showdown, everyone will have an appetite.

Delaware County. Founded in 1803 as an iron foundry. A hundred years later, it opened as the Wawa milk processing plant.

Blair County. Founded in 1952 when Bob Sheetz bought one of his father’s dairy stores.


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CityAndStatePA .com

June 2021

By Harrison Cann

Malcolm Kenyatta working people’s candid OFFICE OF GOV. TOM WOLF

is ready to be the

The state rep running for U.S. Senate he has experienced


June 2021

City & State Pennsylvania

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Kenyatta hopes to replace Republican U.S. Sen. Pat Toomey.

ate wants voters to know struggle and is poised to fix a broken system.


CityAndStatePA .com

B

OUNCING AROUND North Philadelphia as a child, Malcolm Kenyatta quickly realized if he wanted to see change, he had to take action into his own hands. “Nobody is coming to save us,” Kenyatta told City & State. The state representative, elected as the first openly gay Black state legislator in 2018, wants to ensure people don’t face the same hardships he and his family did. As a young man living on Woodstock Street, he complained to his mother about their block and the trash in the neighborhood. Her response to him was: “Boy, if you care so much, why don’t you go do something about it?” And he did. Kenyatta went on to become a junior block captain at age 11 and didn’t stop there, going from community activist to state representative. Now, a 30-year-old candidate for the 2022 race for U.S. Senate, Kenyatta is bringing that same motivation to the campaign trail. The seat he’s going after, currently held by U.S. Sen. Pat Toomey, is going to be one of the most competitive races in the coming year. Kenyatta is already one of several Democrats who plan to run, including Lt. Gov. John Fetterman and Montgomery County Commissioner Val Arkoosh. The self-described “antithesis” to Toomey, Kenyatta is trying to bring real-world experience to the race that he says others have lacked. “I’m kind of sick of waiting around for career politicians – who will tell you how much experience they have, how great they are, and how much they care about the needs of working people – to actually do something,” Kenyatta said. “I watched my mom ration her insulin. I watched my dad do the same thing with his epilepsy medicine, and they both died way too young. I moved four or five different times as a kid, because we couldn’t make the bills. I know what it’s like to not have the gas or electricity on, and to have the tap water cut off. I know what those things mean.” Kenyatta says for the Democratic Party to be the working people’s party, it can’t “just have a list of talking points,” but must back up campaign promises with effective policy. And at a time when the country is very divided, he sees this as an inflection point for many reasons. Whether the focus is on climate change, criminal justice reform, income inequality, and even the democratic process itself, Kenyatta says now is the time to act. “I think this is one of those moments where

June 2021

either Pennsylvania is going to go in a new direction and have what I call a new day, or we’re going to be crushed under the weight of these compounding broken systems,” he said. The compounding issues he mentioned were at the center of his run for the state House in 2018, but after the COVID-19 pandemic, they’ve only been exacerbated. “You pick an issue, and COVID has exposed in it what was already broken,” he said, adding that the disparities exposed during the pandemic revealed how the color of your skin and where you live makes a big difference in your health and economic outcomes. Many people that were considered “essential workers,” he said, were the first to be let go or see a pay cut. He wants to be more than just the working people’s candidate, but the candidate that knows exactly what working people are going through. “Nobody else in this race was walking over broken pieces of our government’s failures,” Kenyatta said. “This is not about symbolism for symbolism’s sake. It’s about us having a party that holistically understands the concerns

“I’m kind of sick of waiting around for career politicians – who will tell you how much experience they have, how great they are – to actually do something.” – Malcolm Kenyatta

of Pennsylvania.” During his time in Harrisburg, Kenyatta has made a name for himself as someone who’s not afraid to speak his mind. He has been booed, and even received some national headlines for remarks he gave in opposition to legislation going through the Republican-led legislature. GOP attempts to cut cash assistance, reform

election laws and lift COVID-19 restrictions have been met with criticism across the aisle, and Kenyatta is often the loudest in the room. “I am somebody who will unequivocally … bite back at some of the worst things that the Republican majority is trying to do. That’s often the role that you play in the minority. You’re being a goalie,” he said.

FOR KENYATTA, or any Democrat for that matter, to stand out in this race, they’ll have to be more offensive than defensive. Toomey’s a two-term Republican representing a Pennsylvania that’s very different in the north and west than it is in the southeast. Kenyatta may be well known in his district and around the Philadelphia region, but he has work to do to build the “broad coalition” he’s striving for. “I reject this notion that because I’m young and I’m Black that I can’t be competitive in every single part of the state. And as I’ve gone around campaigning across the state, it’s been crystal clear to me that that is a trope that is not really grounded in any reality,” Kenyatta said. The reality in Pennsylvania is that a Black candidate has won a statewide election just once. Tim DeFoor, a Republican, became the first Black man to do so during the 2020 auditor general election. Kenyatta has picked up key endorsements from organizations including the Working Families Party and the American Federation of Teachers, as well as one of Fetterman’s predecessors, Braddock Mayor Chardaé Jones. In a crowded race that’s only going to get more congested, it’s going to be an uphill battle for every candidate. As he looks to become the first openly gay Black man in the U.S. Senate, Kenyatta doesn’t want his identity to be the focus of his campaign. “I don’t think people care that much what I look like or how I love. What they want to know is whether or not I’m going to fight for them,” he said. “Whether or not I’m going to fight to cancel student loan debt and make college more affordable; whether or not I’m going to fight to make sure every single person has health care; and whether or not we’re going to address the existential crisis of our time: the climate crisis.” With just over a year until the 2022 primary, there’s a lot of time left for more candidates to enter the race. As the race gets more crowded, control of the Senate could hinge on the results in Pennsylvania.

OFFICE OF GOV. TOM WOLF

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June 2021 Kenyatta

is sponsoring legislation to protect the rights of LGBTQ people.

City & State Pennsylvania

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“Nobody else in this race was walking over broken pieces of our government’s failures.” – Malcolm Kenyatta

5 measures LGBTQ advocates want to see advance in Pennsylvania

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BY JUSTIN SWEITZER

S PRIDE MONTH BEGINS, City & State PA is shining a spotlight on issues affecting LGBTQ people across Pennsylvania. For years, LGBTQ advocates and allies have been fighting for enhanced protections in state law in order to prevent discrimination and improve quality of life. Below, City & State PA looks at some of the major legislative changes being sought by members of the LGBTQ community and where they currently stand in the legislative process.

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THE PENNSYLVANIA FAIRNESS ACT For years, a bipartisan group of state lawmakers has been advocating for the proposed “Pennsylvania Fairness Act,” a proposal that would codify protections for LGBTQ individuals in the state’s Human Relations Act. The legislation would prevent people from being denied employment, housing and other accommodations based on a person’s sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or gender expression. The legislation has been sponsored by both Democrats and Republicans in the legislature, including Sen. Pat Browne and Reps. Dan Frankel, Malcolm Kenyatta, Brian Sims and Jessica Benham. The bill currently has yet to be introduced

a person’s sexual orientation, gender identity or gender expression. The proposal would also bar discrimination based on color, familial status, religious creed and national origin, among other changes. The legislation has yet to be introduced.

in the House and a companion Senate bill, SB 313, is currently awaiting a vote in the Senate Labor and Industry Committee.

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PROHIBITING DISCRIMINATION IN THE PENNSYLVANIA CONSTITUTION Pennsylvania lawmakers recently amended the state constitution to prohibit discrimination based on race or ethnicity, but the constitutional change did not establish protections for LGBTQ people. Kenyatta and Sims, who are both gay, are spearheading an effort to build upon the most recent constitutional amendment and prohibit the denial or abridgment of rights based on

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BANNING CONVERSION THERAPY FOR MINORS Also on the agenda for LGBTQ advocates is legislation to ban conversion therapy for minors. The legislation – sponsored by Sims and Benham – would specifically prevent mental health professionals from seeking to change a minor’s sexual orientation, gender identity or gender expression. The bill, HB 729, is sponsored by Sims and Benham and is currently awaiting a vote in the House Health Committee. EXPANDING HATE CRIME LAWS TO INCLUDE OFFENSES MADE TOWARD LGBTQ PEOPLE Another goal of LGBTQ advocates is

to expand the state’s hate crime laws to encompass offenses made toward LGBTQ individuals, as well as crimes related to a person’s ancestry or mental or physical disability. Frankel, Sens. Tim Kearney, Anthony H. Williams and Lindsey Williams are sponsoring the legislation. Frankel’s bill would also increase the fines for damages for those who commit hate crimes. The Senate legislation, SB 63, awaits a vote in the Senate Judiciary Committee, while the House package has yet to be introduced.

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COLLECTING DATA ON LGBTQ PEOPLE Kenyatta and Benham argue that to properly address issues faced by LGBTQ people, the state needs to collect more information on the experiences of its LGBTQ citizens. To do so, the lawmakers are proposing legislation that would require all state forms which ask for demographic information to include an optional question that allows respondents to indicate if they are LGBTQ. The bill’s two sponsors say it would help the state develop a more complete picture of its LGBTQ community, and in turn, allow lawmakers to craft more inclusive initiatives. The legislation, House Bill 1384, awaits a vote in the House State Government Committee.



June 2021

City & State Pennsylvania

Criminal justice reform By Justin Sweitzer

Pot legalization

Maybe some fracking?

The

Photography by Brad Trent

Gospel according to John Having redefined the lieutenant governor’s office, Fetterman hopes to build off his work and make it to the U.S. Senate.

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OHN FETTERMAN, Pennsylvania’s lieutenant governor, has once again set his eyes on incumbent U.S. Sen. Pat Toomey’s seat. What’s lesser known is that Fetterman – who also served four terms as mayor of Braddock in Allegheny County – before becoming lieutenant governor, didn’t originally plan on running for elected office. It was only after a series of tragic, life-altering events that Fetterman’s career trajectory changed. In 1993, as he was about to get his MBA from the University of Connecticut, Fetterman’s best friend died in a car accident while on his way to meet him. The traumatic moment forced Fetterman to reassess what he wanted his future to look like. “I had never experienced that kind of proximate tragedy, and I was really kind of fixated on this idea of waking up the next day and not knowing you have 15 minutes left. And I’m like, ‘Well what kind of legacy would I leave behind? What kind of impact have I made? Have I made any kind of difference?’ And at that point, I didn’t like the answer,” he told City & State. So Fetterman got involved with Big Brothers Big Sisters of America, where he was paired with a boy whose father had

June 2021

died of AIDS. Not long after his death, the boy’s mother also succumbed to the disease, but before she passed, Fetterman promised her he would make sure her son got a college education. And while Fetterman made good on his promise years later, the tragedy that befell the boy’s family stuck with him. “The combination of those two really pushed me to confront what I saw – this raging inequality and divergent outcomes,” he said. Fetterman went on to join AmeriCorps and was sent to Pittsburgh’s Hill District, where he set up computer labs and taught GED classes for young mothers and fathers. Two of his students were killed in shootings, which prompted Fetterman to run for mayor of Braddock. It was Fetterman’s first foray into public service, and it nearly didn’t happen. In 2005, Fetterman won the Democratic nomination for mayor by one vote, and then went on to win the race unopposed. Fetterman’s mayoral victory kick-started his career in politics. He went on to win three subsequent mayoral elections, including one that came after an unsuccessful run for the same Senate seat he’s currently seeking. But before Fetterman launched his second Senate campaign in February, he made what he hopes will turn out to be a pitstop between Braddock and Washington, D.C. In 2018, Fetterman announced that he was running to be Pennsylvania’s next lieutenant governor, an often-overlooked role that doesn’t hold a whole lot of power. Pennsylvania’s lieutenant governor is second in the gubernatorial line of succession, serves as president of the state Senate and chairs the Board of Pardons – a body tasked with reviewing and recommending pardons and commutations to the governor. Beyond those three key duties, the office doesn’t get a ton of attention. “Usually, we don’t think a lot about lieutenant governors,” said Chris Borick, director of the Muhlenberg College Institute of Public Opinion, noting that Fetterman occupies the office with a different presence than his predecessors. “We don’t give them lots of attention and the role is, like a lot of seconds, under the radar.” That hasn’t been the case with Fetterman, who has largely used the office as a bully pulpit to bring attention to various issues, including marijuana legalization, LGBTQ protections and criminal justice reform. At the beginning of his term in 2019, Fetterman embarked on a statewide, 67-county listening tour where he fielded comments, questions and concerns regarding the possibility of legalizing


June 2021

City & State Pennsylvania

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“When you understand how arbitrary and final many of these aspects of our criminal justice system are, particularly when you’re talking about the most serious penalty of dying in prison, it was horrifying to me.” – John Fetterman

Fetterman will be a formidable U.S. Senate candidate with his progressive bona fides and labor union ties.


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“You roll that all into one and that’s a compelling figure. There’s no doubt about that.” – Muhlenberg College professor Chris Borick, on Fetterman’s progressive appeal and links to organized labor

Robert Casey, after receiving a recommendation from the Board of Pardons. Fetterman, while acknowledging the “horror” of McFadden’s killing spree, characterized the decision to change the pardon threshold to a 5-0 vote as an “overreaction.” He said the legislature, and ultimately the voters, should amend the state constitution to return the vote threshold to a simple majority. “We can see now that that 5-0 vote has condemned a lot of otherwise deserving people to die in prison, and it also was a reminder that there could be political consequences to championing a second chance,” Fetterman said. “I’ve never let those considerations enter into my calculation, because these are lives, these are human beings and their freedom isn’t a political calculation. It’s a moral imperative, I believe. And if we were able to return that back to the simple majority, you would make that threshold significant, but not almost virtually impossible, given all the other challenges with this process.”

COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA; OFFICE OF GOV. TOM WOLF

marijuana for recreational use in Pennsylvania. At the conclusion of each stop, Fetterman would poll people on their thoughts on legalization, which would later be used to fashion a report on legalization in Pennsylvania. While the polling was not scientific in nature (it was conducted by a show of hands at each stop along the tour), Fetterman’s report concluded that nearly three-quarters of attendees favored legalizing cannabis for adult use, and that nearly all attendees supported expungement of nonviolent marijuana-related crimes. Fetterman’s own support of cannabis legalization prompted him to hang cannabis flags from his office’s balcony at the front of the state Capitol, along with LGBTQ pride flags – a practice that was later banned after state lawmakers amended a budget package to prohibit the flags. Throughout his tenure as lieutenant governor, Fetterman has also become a staunch ally of Gov. Tom Wolf, supporting the governor’s attempts to raise the minimum wage to $15, and enact a severance tax on natural gas extraction. His proudest accomplishments as lieutenant governor, though, he says, are in the criminal justice realm. As chair of the state Board of Pardons, Fetterman is one of five members who vote on whether or not to recommend a pardon or commutation to the governor. He said that recommending 32 individuals to Wolf over a three-year stretch is the highlight of his career in Harrisburg. “So far, 32 people and counting – whether they’re deserving or innocent – will not have to die in prison needlessly,” Fetterman said. “I’m so grateful that they don’t have to die in prison, and Pennsylvania doesn’t have to warehouse these people until their last breath.” “When you understand how arbitrary and final many of these aspects of our criminal justice system are, particularly when you’re talking about the most serious penalty of dying in prison, it was horrifying to me,” Fetterman added. “The fact that we’ve gotten more people out than every lieutenant governor combined since 1978 – we’re very proud of that fact.” Fetterman also led efforts to eliminate the $63 pardon application fee and, in conjunction with Wolf and Pardons Secretary Brandon Flood, expedited pardons for nonviolent marijuana-related offenses. Still, Fetterman sees more work to be done in this space. In the 1990s, state lawmakers changed the constitutional threshold to recommend a pardon or commutation from a 3-2 vote to a 5-0 vote. The change came after Reginald McFadden – a man who raped one woman and killed two others – had his sentence commuted by then-Gov.

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City & State Pennsylvania

Fetterman, a former mayor of Braddock in Allegheny County, almost never got into politics.

While Fetterman’s work within the criminal justice sphere is the cornerstone of his work as lieutenant governor, an incident from 2013 has prompted questions about his judgment. At the time, Fetterman was outside with his son in his hometown of Braddock, when he heard what he believed to be gunshots. Fetterman, wielding a shotgun, proceeded to follow and confront a Black jogger named Christopher Miyares who he saw running away from the direction of the commotion. According to reports, Fetterman held Miyares, who was unarmed, at gunpoint, until first responders arrived. Fetterman said in a video addressing the incident that his actions were the result of a series of “split-second decisions” and that he was unaware of Miyares’ race. “At the time, it was never an issue. Never came up. I was elected overwhelmingly to two more terms after that and I’ve spoken extensively about it. It’s something that’s now almost eight and a half years ago,” Fetterman said. “I just continue to work and do what I believe in.” With Wolf – the other half of the 2018 Democratic gubernatorial ticket – term-limited after 2022, Fetterman has shifted his sights on the retiring Toomey’s

U.S. Senate seat, the same prize that eluded him in 2016, when he finished third in the Democratic primary. Five years later, however, things are different. Fetterman has national name recognition (he often appears on national cable news networks to offer a Pennsylvania perspective) and a statewide electoral victory under his belt. He’s also already raised a colossal amount of cash. According to data from the first quarter of his campaign finance report, Fetterman raised a total of $3.9 million – which his campaign touts as “the most a candidate for U.S. Senate in Pennsylvania has ever raised in their first quarter.” His campaign also released an internal poll showing Fetterman with wide leads against both potential and declared Democratic candidates. Fetterman leads Rep. Conor Lamb, who has been rumored to have an interest in the seat, by a 40%21% margin, and Philadelphia state Rep. Malcolm Kenyatta, who has already declared his candidacy, by a 40%-9% margin. The internal poll, conducted by Data For Progress, also shows Fetterman with single-digit leads over GOP candidates Jeff Bartos and Sean Parnell. Borick cautioned against putting too much stock in internal polls. “It’s an early poll. People aren’t thinking much about it. The race hasn’t formed very much. He’s got some statewide name recognition and it probably captures that as an advantage,” Borick said. “Any poll a year away should be taken with a big grain of salt – and most certainly with an internal poll.” Borick said regardless of what the Democratic field ends up looking like over the course of the next year, Fetterman’s ability to speak to both the progressive wing of the Democratic Party (think his stances

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on LGBTQ issues, marijuana legalization and criminal justice reform) – coupled with his affinity for unions and labor issues – makes him a formidable presence in the race. “You roll that all into one and that’s a compelling figure. There’s no doubt about that.” As far as his platform is concerned, Fetterman is focused on broad policy issues that he says are less about politics than they are about fairness. He wants to expand access to health care, regardless of the mechanism used to get there. “I would never sacrifice the good at the altar of the perfect,” he said of health care policy. He also wants to raise the minimum wage nationwide to at least $15 an hour and protect union jobs. Fetterman also wants to strike the right balance between transitioning to renewable energy sources, and being honest about the role that fossil fuels will play. “It needs to be fair, and it needs to honor those that are in the energy extraction and energy sectors, their way of life, their communities that they call home and make sure that they can participate and be involved in the conversation of what that transition needs to be,” he said. Fetterman stopped short of saying he was unequivocally the best candidate for Democrats in 2022, noting that voters will have the ultimate say over whether that turns out to be true. In the meantime, he will continue to focus on issues at the forefront of his entire political career, with hopes that they will resonate and propel him to Washington, D.C. “I just want to continue to push and champion for issues that I believe are core and central truths to what I think it means to be an American,” he said.



June 2021

City & State Pennsylvania

2021 THE

PENNSYLVANIA POWER

100 The key players in the Keystone State’s political arena

It’s safe to say it’s been an eventful year in Pennsylvania, particularly in politics. As Gov. Tom Wolf and the General Assembly grappled over COVID-19 restrictions and budget fixes, the state, counties, and cities all dealt with numerous other developments. Officials and organizations alike have looked to address issues in health care, policing, elections – you name it. Our staff at City & State has researched and reported on all the movers and shakers, and now, we’ve determined who truly holds the most power in the Commonwealth. For the first time since it’s relaunch, City & State Pennsylvania is releasing its Pennsylvania Power 100, which recognizes the most influential people in the public and private sectors statewide. This must-read list – co-written by reporters Justin Sweitzer and Harrison Cann – highlights a diverse array of leaders in the Commonwealth, including elected officials, lobbyists, media personalities, philanthropists, labor leaders, academics, business leaders, and more. All of these individuals have contributed to Pennsylvania policy in one way or another. Whether they’re shaping legislation, running programs, or representing workers, each of these people have influenced all corners of the state.

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1 Tom Wolf The trajectory of Gov. Tom Wolf’s second term changed dramatically with the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, causing him to shift his focus away from progressive policy priorities and to address the spread of the coronavirus. Wolf became the undisputed face of Pennsylvania, leading the state’s pandemic response alongside then-Health Secretary Dr. Rachel Levine. Over the course of the past year, Wolf has leaned heavily on his broad emergency powers to implement and rollback COVID-19 mitigation efforts, relax regulations and help refine vaccine distribution. He has signed legislation that would bolster the state’s vaccine deployment with the help of the National Guard and floated an ambitious budget proposal that would overhaul how education is funded in Pennsylvania. Wolf is also often the last line of defense against conservative bills that conflict with his party’s agenda. The Democratic governor has also moved Pennsylvania closer to entering a multi-state compact to cap carbon emissions and committed to finding alternative funding mechanisms to replace the state’s gas tax. Wolf’s tenure in Harrisburg has been fraught with battles between the Republican-led state legislature and his administration, which has only been exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic. Regardless of where you stand on Wolf’s policies and decisions, if the last year has made anything clear in Harrisburg, it’s that no statewide political figure has the power and influence to rival Tom Wolf.

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2 Bob Casey Jr. A veteran of the U.S. Senate, Bob Casey is a respected voice among Democrats and Republicans alike, particularly for his efforts to improve education and health outcomes for children. He’s been a strong supporter of the nation’s nutrition assistance programs and introduced legislation this session to expand eligibility for the Child and Adult Care Food Program. Casey is also reaching across the aisle to partner with U.S. Sen. Susan Collins to close a gap that allows children to be kicked out of the WIC nutrition assistance program before they start school. In addition to Casey’s investment in childrens’ issues, he has also molded himself into a leading advocate for elderly and disabled individuals. Casey is chair of the Senate Special Committee on Aging, and in 2018 succeeded in getting a law passed that improves access to information and bolsters resources for grandparents that raise their grandchildren. He has also sponsored a bipartisan, bicameral slate of police reforms this year designed to alter state and regional 211 and 988 call systems and divert some nonemergency calls to mental health and human services professionals. Casey has been elected to the Senate for three straight terms. Now, with a Scranton-born Democrat in the White House, Casey has a new ally to help him see his legislative goals to the finish line.

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3 Brian Roberts CHAIR AND CEO COMCAST CORP.

A billionaire businessman at the helm of one of the nation’s leading telecommunications companies, Brian Roberts’ influence can be felt across the Keystone State – not to mention the nation. There’s a pretty good chance that whenever you turn on the TV or connect to your Wi-Fi, that Comcast is behind it. Under Roberts’ watch, the Philadelphia-based telecommunications conglomerate increased its annual revenue from $657 million in 1990 to roughly $108 billion today, while transforming Comcast into a leading internet and cable TV provider. Comcast saw both its revenues and profits increase in its most recent fiscal year. Comcast also devotes a considerable amount of cash to influence policymakers each year, ranking among the top 20 companies in terms of lobbying expenditures since 1998. Under Roberts’ leadership, Comcast also made significant efforts to increase access to broadband throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. The company expanded its Internet Essentials program, to connect low-income students with broadband internet.

4 Pat Toomey U.S. Sen. Pat Toomey may be leaving office next year, but that doesn’t take away from the impact he has on Capitol Hill. He’s currently the ranking member on the Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs, and is one of the upper chamber’s most ardent fiscal watchdogs, routinely voicing concerns with spending proposals coming from President Joe Biden’s administration. Toomey has remained an advocate for strengthening background checks on gun purchases, despite both state and federal inaction on the issue. He has also introduced legislation this session to strengthen penalties against those who murder police officers, as well as legislation to that would prevent the release of COVID-19 vaccine intellectual property. He also is working with colleagues on a streamlined infrastructure package that serves as a Republican alternative to Biden’s American Jobs Plan, another initiative that only underscores Toomey’s legacy as a staunch fiscal conservative in the U.S. Senate. Toomey has indicated that he will not be running for elected office once his term expires and that he will instead transition to the private sector. His seat is already aggressively being sought by Democrats and Republicans alike. It’s likely that Toomey will still wield considerable influence wherever he goes.

THOMAS HAWK; U.S. SEN. PAT TOOMEY’S OFFICE

U.S. SENATOR


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June 2021

5 Jake Corman SENATE PRESIDENT PRO TEMPORE

As the top-ranking Republican in the state Senate, Jake Corman not only sets the tone for how his caucus – and the chamber – operates, but also has immense power over what bills do and don’t get passed in Harrisburg. He is also charged with the appointment of members to the chamber’s 22 committees. After being elected as president pro tempore in 2020, Corman took immediate steps to differentiate himself from his predecessor, Joe Scarnati, by coming out in support of a legislative proposal that would provide sexual assault survivors with a two-year look-back window to sue their abusers. Corman, along with state House Speaker Bryan Cutler, is also spearheading an overhaul of the state’s lobbying disclosure law that would require campaign consultants to register with the Department of State, while also banning campaign consultants from simultaneously being registered lobbyists. Corman, by nature of being one of the General Assembly’s highest-ranking Republican lawmakers, also serves as a foil to Gov. Tom Wolf and his agenda, as he stands in the way of many of Wolf’s budget and policy proposals. To Democrats, this is undoubtedly a negative, but when you look at Corman’s record of stifling Wolf’s agenda, as well as his own legislative achievements throughout his 20-plus year career in Harrisburg, it’s hard to argue any state legislator has more sway on what goes on in the state Capitol than Jake Corman.

6 Josh Shapiro Since first being elected in 2016, Josh Shapiro has steadily built up his resume as attorney general as he eyes the next step in his political career. From 2016 to 2020, Shapiro positioned himself as a leading opponent to former President Donald Trump’s administration, challenging his immigration policies, regulatory changes and his legal challenges to the 2020 election results. Shapiro has also joined multistate lawsuits against Facebook and Google, called for an overhaul to how the state regulates fracking and helped push through legislative changes to how police hire and screen prospective officers. Shapiro’s crowning achievement is his leadership of the 40th Statewide Investigating Grand Jury, which uncovered widespread child sex abuse within six Pennsylvania Catholic dioceses. The grand jury’s findings served as a catalyst for statute of limitations reforms signed into law by Gov. Tom Wolf in 2019. As a result of the investigation, Pennsylvania’s criminal statute of limitations for child sex abuse was abolished, and a number of other statute of limitations windows were extended. Widely viewed as a rising star within the Democratic Party, Shapiro handily won reelection in 2020 and has also been rumored to have an interest in running for governor in 2022.

SENATE REPUBLICAN COMMUNICATIONS OFFICE; SUBMITTED

ATTORNEY GENERAL


Independence Blue Cross is proud to celebrate our own Greg Deavens as one of City & State PA’s 100 most powerful people in Pennsylvania. We commend his leadership and commitment among the many outstanding honorees helping to transform our Commonwealth — and we applaud their support and dedication to improving the lives of the people of Pennsylvania and across the nation.


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7 Neal Bisno EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT SEIU

Neal Bisno is a labor heavyweight in the Keystone State, currently serving as the executive vice president of SEIU – a labor union comprised of more than 2 million workers in health care, property services and the public sector. As executive vice president, Bisno has championed COVID-19 protections for SEIU’s members, as well as President Joe Biden’s proposed “American Jobs Plan,” which Bisno has said will allocate $400 billion to improve access to home and community-based health care services if approved by both houses of Congress. Bisno has also been a part of the union’s nationwide campaigns to raise the minimum wage, combat racial inequality and pass the “PRO Act,” which would allow unions to override state “right-to-work” laws and prohibit employers from interfering in union elections. Prior to joining SEIU’s national arm, Bisno was the president of SEIU Healthcare Pennsylvania.

8 Jeffrey Romoff Not only is UPMC one of the largest health care networks in Pennsylvania, but it’s also Pennsylvania’s largest employer outside of government, with more than 92,000 employees across the Commonwealth. Under Romoff’s leadership, UPMC increased its operating revenue in 2020 by $3 billion, while also increasing its operating income by nearly $600 million. UPMC’s statewide footprint is continuously growing, with 40 hospitals, 8,700 licensed beds, 700 outpatient offices and approximately 6,300 physicians. The health network also fields an annual 5.5 million outpatient visits, 355,000 inpatient admissions and 900,000 emergency visits. Like many other health care providers across the nation, Romoff and his $23 billion health care nonprofit had to shift their efforts to battling the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020. In addition to caring for those who contracted the virus, UPMC has also been a key vaccine distributor, helping to disburse available doses to people across the state. Currently, Romoff has his team working to provide new monoclonal antibody treatment for COVID-19, which uses antibodies to block the virus’ ability to enter cells, thus slowing down the infection. UPMC’s administration of more than half a million COVID-19 vaccines is a testament to the impact Romoff and his team have had during the current health crisis.

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PRESIDENT AND CEO UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH MEDICAL CENTER


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June 2021

9 Amy Gutmann PRESIDENT UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

As University of Pennsylvania’s longesttenured president, Amy Gutmann is internationally renowned for her leadership at Penn. She was previously named one of Fortune magazine’s “World’s 50 Greatest Leaders” and has implemented a three-pronged approach to overseeing Pennsylvania’s only Ivy League university. Gutmann’s “Penn Compact” – first outlined in 2004 – centers around inclusion, innovation and impact. During her tenure, she has raised more than $9 billion for the university and spearheaded the largest fundraiser in university history – the $4.3 billion “Making History” campaign in 2012. The university also recently received an anonymous $5 million bitcoin donation that will be directed toward the school’s Stevens Center for Innovation in Finance, which focuses on finance and technology. The university has also made significant investments in the community, including giving a total of $25 million to the Penn Alexander School over the past 15 years.

10 Gene Barr PRESIDENT AND CEO PENNSYLVANIA CHAMBER OF BUSINESS AND INDUSTRY

There may be no greater ally to the business community in Harrisburg than Gene Barr, the current president and CEO of the Pennsylvania Chamber of Business and Industry. The PA Chamber represents nearly 10,000 members and wields a massive amount of influence within the state Capitol – so much that Gov. Tom Wolf tapped Barr to offer reassuring remarks and strategies to the business community as Wolf rolled out his first COVID-19 restrictions on businesses. As the head of the chamber, Barr has established himself as a vocal advocate for business-friendly policies, including corporate tax reforms, workforce development initiatives and other proposals that provide flexibility to businesses across the state. Later in the COVID-19 pandemic, Barr emerged as a vocal critic of the governor’s restrictions on businesses and fought for the relaxation of Wolf’s mitigation orders. Barr and the PA Chamber are also active on the political side of things, offering endorsements and contributions to a slate of candidates each election cycle. (The ChamberPAC spent more than $137,000 on campaign-related expenses in 2020.) The opinion – and the endorsement – of the PA Chamber goes a long way, warranting Barr’s placement in the top 10 of our Pennsylvania Power 100 list.


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City & State Pennsylvania

11 Jim Kenney MAYOR OF PHILADELPHIA

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA; STEPHEN MOYER PHOTOGRAPHY; SUBMITTED; ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE OF PENNSYLVANIA COURTS

Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney is known for his controversial beverage tax, sometimes called the “soda tax,” which opened the door for his PHLpreK program that provides pre-K education at no cost to Philadelphia families. In his second term, Kenney has had to grapple with the coronavirus pandemic and calls for policing reforms, while finding time to challenge the state over its preemptions on city gun restrictions and plastic bag bans.

12 Thomas Saylor JUSTICE PENNSYLVANIA SUPREME COURT

Thomas Saylor and the state Supreme Court have played an outsized role in Pennsylvania government over the last decade, which has held true throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. The Court instituted an eviction moratorium at the onset of COVID-19, ruled in favor of Gov. Tom Wolf in an effort to terminate his COVID emergency declaration and recently tapped former University of Pittsburgh Chancellor Mark Nordenberg to head redistricting efforts in the state, which could reshape legislative maps for years to come.

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13 Larry Krasner PHILADELPHIA DISTRICT ATTORNEY

One of the most-watched prosecutors in the country, Larry Krasner’s decisive victory in the Democratic district attorney primary race all but guarantees a clear mandate for the reformist prosecutor – assuming the electorate doesn’t throw any curveballs in November. Krasner, who has made limiting the use of cash bail and expanding diversion programs for some gun offenses key priorities of his first term, is on track to get another four years to continue his work.

14 Bryan Cutler SPEAKER PENNSYLVANIA HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Bryan Cutler’s quick ascent to the top leadership position in the state House came after one term as majority leader, and after a series of legislative victories in his 13-year career. Cutler was an architect behind the creation of a state insurance exchange and reinsurance program, as well as a lobbying reform law passed in 2018 – an effort that Cutler is looking to build upon this session alongside Senate President Pro Tempore Jake Corman.


June 2021

City & State Pennsylvania

15 Kim Ward MAJORITY LEADER PENNSYLVANIA SENATE

The first woman ever elected Senate majority leader in the Pennsylvania General Assembly, Kim Ward has already made an impact during her first few months on the job. Ward is now in charge of the Senate calendar and was the chief architect of new constitutional amendments that overhauled the governor’s use of emergency powers. As floor leader, she will now have a hand in drawing Pennsylvania’s state legislative maps.

16 Kerry Benninghoff

NINA SUBIN; SUBMITTED; PENNSYLVANIA HOUSE REPUBLICAN CAUCUS

MAJORITY LEADER PENNSYLVANIA HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Since being elected as the new House Majority Leader last year, Kerry Benninghoff has emerged as the face of House Republicans, as he sets much of the legislative agenda for the caucus. This year alone, Benninghoff has helped shepherd legislation that creates a statutory legal remedy for sex abuse survivors through the House and push changes to the governor’s emergency powers onto the ballot – where they ultimately got approved by voters.

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17 John Fetterman LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR

Lt. Gov. John Fetterman has taken a role with little dayto-day power and used it to overhaul the state’s pardon process by advocating for legal recreational marijuana, all while building a statewide – and national – profile for himself as a major figure in progressive politics in Pennsylvania. Fetterman is now eyeing a seat in the U.S. Senate, looking to finish what he started in 2016 and win the Democratic nomination – and ultimately one of Pennsylvania’s two Senate seats.

18 Bill Peduto MAYOR OF PITTSBURGH

While Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto was not reelected to a third term, the outgoing mayor still has a range of achievements to hang his hat on and still holds considerable power in the Steel City until his term ends. Peduto’s tenure will be marked by investments in affordable housing, switching city facilities to renewable energy sources, divesting the city’s pension funds from fossil fuels and championing a paid-leave policy for city workers.


June 2021

City & State Pennsylvania

19 Madeleine Dean MEMBER OF CONGRESS

Rep. Madeleine Dean has seen her profile rise since first elected to the U.S House of Representatives in 2018. She is currently vice chair of the powerful House Judiciary Committee and was named an impeachment manager for former President Donald Trump’s second impeachment trial. Dean has repeatedly backed legislation that addresses the need to reduce PFAS contamination in local water sources. She also supports stronger background checks for gun buyers and legislative language aimed at closing gun sales loopholes in an effort to curb gun violence.

20 Richard Bloomingdale PRESIDENT PENNSYLVANIA AFL-CIO

SUBMITTED

Richard Bloomingdale has been a labor leader in the Commonwealth for decades. He began his career with AFSCME in 1977, before serving a short stint as deputy political director for Bill Clinton in 1992. As AFL-CIO president, he represents about 900,000 members and continues to fight for workers’ rights. His political power is also seen in his membership on the Unemployment Compensation Board of Review and the Democratic National Convention.

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22 Brendan Boyle

Rich Askey

MEMBER OF CONGRESS

PRESIDENT PENNSYLVANIA STATE EDUCATION ASSOCIATION

Working his way up the government ladder, Rep. Brendan Boyle has gone from Harrisburg to Washington in just a few years. He won the race for the 13th Congressional District in 2014 to represent Montgomery County and northeast Philadelphia in the U.S. House of Representatives. As a member of the Committee on Ways and Means and Committee on the Budget, Boyle has prioritized addressing income inequality and expanding access to education and health care.

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Rich Askey’s leadership experience at both local and state levels led to his rise as PSEA president in 2018, and more recently, his membership on Gov. Tom Wolf’s Commission on LGBTQ Affairs. A music teacher for 32 years, Askey has spent most of his career in Harrisburg School District and continues to advise government and agency officials on policies affecting education and LGBTQ communities.

24 Mike Doyle

Mike Brunelle

MEMBER OF CONGRESS

CHIEF OF STAFF OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR

In his 14th term in Congress, Rep. Mike Doyle has solidified himself as a top Democratic leader in the Commonwealth. He represents the 18th Congressional District in the U.S House of Representatives, encompassing parts of Pittsburgh and Allegheny counties. He’s consistently pushed to address climate change and create green jobs while on the Committee on Energy and Commerce, and has been an advocate for net neutrality and broadband expansion.

Mike Brunelle is considered Gov. Tom Wolf’s righthand man. As chief of staff, his political experience comes from his time as a state legislator in New Hampshire, director of the New Hampshire Democratic Party, and campaign director for SEIU. He left SEIU in 2015 to join Gov. Wolf’s staff as a special assistant to work on the state budget. Fast forward to today, and he is a leader in the administration and the go-to guy if you want to reach the governor.


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City & State Pennsylvania

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26 Rich Fitzgerald

Timothy DeFoor

ALLEGHENY COUNTY EXECUTIVE

AUDITOR GENERAL

U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES; SUBMITTED; MARA RAGO PHOTOGRAPHY; SUBMITTED; ALLEGHENY COUNTY EXECUTIVE’S OFFICE; DEPARTMENT OF THE AUDITOR GENERAL; SUBMITTED

The two-term county executive is in search of a third term in November. Rich Fitzgerald, a Pittsburgh native, championed investments in transportation and infrastructure, including the port authority, early in his tenure. While he continues to lead the county through the COVID-19 pandemic as vaccines roll out and restrictions are lifted, he has also maintained a focus on supporting clean energy, sustainability and affordable housing for the future.

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Timothy DeFoor made history last year when he became the first Black candidate to ever win election for statewide office in Pennsylvania. The first Republican to hold the office since 1997, DeFoor has already taken steps to fight waste and fraud in the Commonwealth. He’s announced audits of several school districts, as well as worked with legislative leaders in an attempt to put guardrails around how federal relief dollars are spent.

28 J. David Henderson

Darrell Clarke

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR AFSCME DISTRICT COUNCIL 13

PRESIDENT PHILADELPHIA CITY COUNCIL

J. David Henderson is known to have union support in his blood. Taking over as executive director of AFSCME D.C. 13 this year, Henderson is a third-generation member of the union. As an international vice president and executive director in Pennsylvania, he represents more than 65,000 Pennsylvania employees. His advocacy has continued to support workers in the state, including recent efforts to oppose the state system of higher education’s plans to integrate six colleges and universities into two.

Darrell Clarke has been at the center of Philadelphia politics for more than two decades, representing the 5th councilmanic district in North Central Philadelphia. Clarke has flexed his political muscles both in Philadelphia and around the state in advocating for progresssive, affordable housing and police reforms, and in endorsing Democratic candidates. Much of what Democrats plan to do in the southeast part of the state will likely have to go through him.

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30 Michele Buck

Madeline Bell

PRESIDENT AND CEO THE HERSHEY COMPANY

PRESIDENT AND CEO CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL OF PENNSYLVANIA

Michele Buck began working at Hershey in 2005, before becoming the company’s first female chair, president, and CEO 12 years later. With more than 15,000 full-time employees, Hershey is not only one of Pennsylvania’s most recognizable names, but also one of its largest employers. Buck’s been named to Fortune’s “Most Powerful Women” list multiple times and continues to thrive in Pennsylvania business.

Madeline Bell has worked her way up one of the top-ranked children’s hospitals in the country. She began as a pediatric nurse in 1983 before going into hospital administration, later becoming president and CEO in 2015. Bell now oversees a hospital system with more than 15,000 employees and more than $3 billion in annual revenue, and serves on the boards of the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, Comcast-NBCUniversal and more.

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John Dougherty

Ray Zaborney

BUSINESS MANAGER IBEW 98

FOUNDER RED MAVERICK MEDIA

Chief of Philadelphia’s electricians union, John Dougherty’s political influence remains despite ongoing federal investigations. Known as “Johnny Doc,” he has played a critical role in the election of Democrats, including Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney and Pennsylvania Attorney General Josh Shapiro. Amid federal indictments for allegedly misusing union funds and extortion, among other things, Dougherty and the union’s future may be up in the air.

Ray Zaborney’s impact in Pennsylvania politics can be seen in the Republican-majority General Assembly. Prior to founding Red Maverick Media, he became known as a top political operative for Republicans in the state. He helps run Maverick Strategies, a lobbying firm, as well as Red Maverick Media, a company that runs Republican campaigns. His family-owned firms help Republicans run for office, and also lobby them once they’re in office.


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34 David L. Cohen

Stan Saylor

CHAIR UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA BOARD OF TRUSTEES

STATE REPRESENTATIVE

THE HERSHEY COMPANY; CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL OF PHILADELPHIA; SUBMITTED; PA HOUSE REPUBLICAN CAUCUS; COZEN O’CONNOR; JEN BARKER WORLEY PHOTOGRAPHY

In business, politics, and education, David L. Cohen’s influence in Pennsylvania goes beyond one title. He went from being thenPhiladelphia Mayor Ed Rendell’s chief of staff to executive vice president of Comcast in 2002. Now a senior adviser to the CEO at Comcast, Cohen is still dealing with government affairs and corporate communications. He’s also maintained his massive influence in Democratic politics, being rumored to be President Joe Biden’s choice for ambassador to Canada.

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One of the longest tenured legislators in the General Assembly, Stan Saylor has been representing the 94th District in York County since 1993. He has been in Republican leadership for years, taking over as chair of the House Appropriations Committee following his reelection in 2016. Now a leader in fiscal policy, Saylor is continuing to guide how federal and state relief funds are allocated and to push for charter school and unemployment compensation reforms.

36 Stephen Cozen FOUNDER AND CHAIR COZEN O’CONNOR

You can’t mention Pennsylvania law without using his name. Stephen Cozen is the founder and chair of the powerhouse law firm Cozen O’Connor, and an accomplished litigator and counselor. Cozen’s Public Strategies set a new record in income in 2020 and continues to be an influencer in Pennsylvania politics. As part owner of SugarHouse Casino, Cozen maintains his status as one of the top gaming lobbyists.

Leslie Gromis Baker

CO-CHAIR AND MANAGING DIRECTOR OF STATE AND FEDERAL GOVERNMENT RELATIONS BUCHANAN INGERSOLL & ROONEY

A top fundraising consultant, Leslie Gromis Baker has a history with the Republican Party in Pennsylvania. She was the midAtlantic chair for President George W. Bush’s presidential runs in 2000 and 2004, and worked under former Govs. Tom Ridge and Tom Corbett. Now, Baker oversees state and federal government relations at Buchanan Ingersoll & Rooney and remains one of the most influential Republicans in the Commonwealth.

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38 Steven Crawford

Patricia Mackavage

PRESIDENT AND PARTNER WOJDAK GOVERNMENT RELATIONS

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR DUANE MORRIS GOVERNMENT STRATEGIES

Former secretary for legislative affairs and chief of staff to Gov. Ed Rendell, Steven Crawford’s experience in Harrisburg goes back more than two decades. He is president and partner of Wojdak Government Relations, one of the largest lobbying firms in the state. Working on both sides of the aisle, the firm has clients in education, transportation and gaming, and has helped push for the expansion of mini-casinos and video gaming terminals in the state.

Before becoming executive director in Duane Morris’ Harrisburg office, Patricia Mackavage was a legislative aide for the last three administrations. She has extensive experience in public finance and economic development, and continues to represent clients before state and local governments. Notably, she lobbied to allow Wegmans to sell craft beer and worked on behalf of the Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority.

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40 Daniel Greenstein

Eric Barron

PASSHE CHANCELLOR

PRESIDENT PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY

As the chief executive of the state’s system of higher education, Dr. Daniel Greenstein oversees 14 colleges and universities serving more than 100,000 students. Since taking office in 2018, he has taken bold steps to make the education system more sustainable and accountable. Most recently, he’s led an integration plan that looks to consolidate six universities into two to maintain the system’s affordability.

As president of the state’s largest university, Dr. Eric Barron brings 35 years of education and administrative experience. He serves about 100,000 students in State College alone, in addition to the students at Penn State’s 19 Commonwealth campuses. The university receives more than $250 million in funding from the state. Barron’s tenure at the university has been headlined by efforts to crack down on Greek organizations, increase inclusion and diversity and freeze tuition rates.


June 2021

City & State Pennsylvania

SUBMITTED; PENN MEDICINE; IBX; SUBMITTED

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Thomas Hagen

Regina Cunningham

CHAIR ERIE INSURANCE

CEO HOSPITAL OF THE UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

Thomas Hagen’s experience in the Commonwealth spans more than 50 years. As chair and former CEO of Erie Insurance, he’s led one of the largest property, auto, and business insurers in the nation. He served as Secretary of Commerce and Secretary of Community and Economic Development under thenGovernor Tom Ridge. With a net worth estimated to be $3.6 billion, Hagen’s wealth and influence in Pennsylvania is rarely overstated.

Regina Cunningham is a top health care executive, serving as CEO at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, as well as assistant dean for clinical practice at the School of Nursing. Her tenure at Penn has been headlined by initiatives to improve efficiency, including decreasing emergency room overcrowding. She also made the news recently in announcing all hospital employees and clinical staff at Penn will be required to be vaccinated for COVID-19.

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44 Gregory Deavens

John Zillmer

PRESIDENT AND CEO INDEPENDENCE BLUE CROSS

CEO ARAMARK

Last year, Gregory Deavens became the first AfricanAmerican president and CEO of the region’s largest health insurer. He joined Independence Blue Cross in 2017 and has led all financial components of the company to date. Since taking over in 2020, Deavens has been laser focused on addressing racial disparities in health care and mental health access. More recently, Independence Blue Cross was assisting Rite Aid in providing one-on-one support for people seeking vaccine appointments.

John Zillmer has overseen the global foodservice giant since 2019. Headquartered in Philadelphia, Aramark employs more than 280,000 people nationally and provides food service and uniform services to hundreds of colleges and universities, correctional facilities, and other large venues. Its lobbying efforts have also increased over the years, with nearly $700,000 in expenditures in 2020 – pushing for, among other things, the Relief for Workers Affected by Coronavirus Act.

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46 Conor Lamb

Matthew Cartwright

MEMBER OF CONGRESS

MEMBER OF CONGRESS

Rep. Conor Lamb came into the national spotlight in 2018 when he won a special election in then18th Congressional District in the greater Pittsburgh area. Now elected in the realigned 17th Congressional District, Lamb serves on the Committees on Science, Space, and Technology; Veterans’ Affairs; and Transportation and Infrastructure. He also serves as chair of the Congressional Steel Caucus and continues to be a strong advocate for the industry in Western Pennsylvania.

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Representing the 9th Congressional District in Northeast Pennsylvania, Rep. Matthew Cartwright has been in Congress since 2013. With a Democratic majority in the U.S. House, Cartwright plays a pivotal role as member of the Appropriations Committee and chair of the Subcommittee for Commerce, Justice, and Science. A strong advocate for working families, seniors and veterans, Cartwright continues to be one of the most influential and bipartisan members of the Pennsylvania delegation.

48 Leslie Richards

Christine Toretti

GENERAL MANAGER SOUTHEASTERN PENNSYLVANIA TRANSPORTATION AUTHORITY

NATIONAL COMMITTEEWOMAN REPUBLICAN PARTY OF PENNSYLVANIA

Leslie Richards is widely considered the transit expert in the Commonwealth. Prior to becoming the general manager of SEPTA, she served as secretary of transportation under Gov. Tom Wolf from 2015 to 2019, and was the first female chair of the Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission. Richards now oversees more than 9,500 employees and the sixth largest public transportation agency in the nation.

A leader in business and politics, Christine Toretti is the national committeewoman for the Pennsylvania GOP. She is the former chair and CEO of S.W. Jack Drilling Co., and held prominent positions in the administrations of former governors Tom Ridge and Mark Schweiker. Her company was a big donor for Republicans, including former Gov. Tom Corbett, and her work with the Republican National Committee continues. As national committeewoman, she has been recognized as a top fundraiser in local, state, and federal elections.


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50 Lawrence Tabas CHAIR REPUBLICAN PARTY OF PENNSYLVANIA

U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES; MATTHEW COURCHAIN/SEPTA; KRIS MELLINGER; SUBMITTED; U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES; STATE OF PENNSYLVANIA

Chair and longtime general counsel for the Republican Party of Pennsylvania, Lawrence Tabas has ample experience representing candidates at all levels of government. Recognized as an election law expert, Tabas is a partner at the Obermayer Rebmann Maxwell & Hippel law firm and chair of Obermayer’s Election Law Practice Group and Health Care Law Department. He has also represented cases involving campaign finance, ballot referendums, recounts and more.

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Glenn Thompson MEMBER OF CONGRESS

Rep. Glenn Thompson’s experience prior to taking office includes years as a volunteer firefighter, school board member, therapist and nursing home administrator. He was first elected to the House in 2008, representing the 5th Congressional District before being redistricted to the 15th district. During his time in Washington, he has served on the House committees on agriculture, education and labor, championing a bill to bolster career and technical education.

52 Mike Kelly

Ed Rendell

MEMBER OF CONGRESS

SPECIAL COUNSEL BALLARD SPAHR

Rep. Mike Kelly is known around western Pennsylvania for more than just his family’s car dealerships. Currently representing the 16th Congressional District, he has focused on improving education and is wellrespected among his consevative colleagues. Kelly also serves on the influential House Ways and Means Committee, and serves on the ranking member of the Subcommittee on Oversight.

A former governor, former mayor of Philadelphia and former chair of the Democratic National Committee, Ed Rendell’s presence – and his influence – are still felt across the Keystone State. Rendell’s work as governor is still being felt across Pennsylvania and he is a go-to voice for analysis on the Pennsylvania political landscape. He also is special counsel at Ballard Spahr, where his work focuses on infrastructure and housing.

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Peter Gleason

Mary Isenhour

PARTNER K&L GATES

PARTNER ROONEY NOVAK ISENHOUR GROUP, LLC

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Charlie Gerow CEO QUANTUM COMMUNICATIONS

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John Saler CHAIR, GOVERNMENT & PUBLIC AFFAIRS STRADLEY RONON

William Sasso CHAIR EMERITUS STRADLEY RONON

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June 2021

City & State Pennsylvania

K & L GATES; HARTMAN BENZON MEDIA; QUANTUM COMMUNICATIONS; STRADLEY RONON; JEFFERSON HEALTH; SUBMITTED

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58 Stephen Klasko

Richard Englert

CEO JEFFERSON HEALTH

PRESIDENT TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

Dr. Stephen Klasko is both the president of Thomas Jefferson University and CEO of Jefferson Health in Philadelphia. Since taking the reins in 2013, the Jefferson health system has grown from three hospitals to 14, with annual revenues above $5 billion. It also has more than 30,000 employees, and nearly 10,000 students. In the Philadelphia region, Klasko is a mainstay when it comes to health care and higher education policy.

Richard Englert’s time at Temple may be coming to an end soon, but his work at the school spans more than four decades. He has navigated Philadelphia’s public university through expansion and growth, and has served as a professor in the College of Education since 1985. Englert will be succeeded by Jason Wingard, former dean at Columbia University, who will be Temple’s first Black president.

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Dennis Glass CEO LINCOLN FINANCIAL GROUP

The company may be recognized for its stadium name, but Lincoln Financial Group’s influence goes well beyond football. Dennis Glass is the president and CEO of Lincoln National Corporation and has become one of the highest paid executives in the insurance industry. Lincoln Financial has more than 9,000 employees, more than $1 billion in assets, and is still among the top 10 largest insurance companies in the nation.

Joanna McClinton MINORITY LEADER PENNSYLVANIA HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Rep. Joanna McClinton has been a trailblazer since coming to Harrisburg in 2015. Just three years after she arrived, she became the first woman and first Black official to be elected as the House Democratic Caucus chair, and the first woman elected House Democratic leader. Born and raised in Philadelphia, she represents the 191st district in Delaware and Philadelphia counties. Her time as House minority leader has been highlighted by Democrats’ recent push to use federal relief funding for a Pennsylvania Rescue Plan.

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Lauren Hobart PRESIDENT AND CEO DICK’S SPORTING GOODS

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June 2021

City & State Pennsylvania

Gerard Sweeney

DJ Paoni

PRESIDENT AND CEO BRANDYWINE REALTY TRUST

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PRESIDENT SAP NORTH AMERICA

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EAS Carpenters

DICK’S SPORTING GOODS; GREENBERG TRAURIG

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Eastern Atlantic States

REGIONAL COUNCIL OF CARPENTERS William C. Sproule, Executive Secretary- Treasurer

The Eastern Atlantic States Regional Council of Carpenters is part of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America and is made up of over 41,000 highly skilled men and women living and working in Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Washington DC, Virginia, West Virginia, and Puerto Rico. Learn more at EASCarpenters.org @EASCarpenters


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66 Stacy Garrity PENNSYLVANIA STATE TREASURER

Stacy Garrity, a retired Army Reserve colonel who served during Operation Desert Storm, defeated the incumbent Pennsylvania treasurer in 2020 despite being outraised financially. She now oversees nearly 350 employees and $110 billion in state assets. Most recently, Garrity joined 14 other state treasurers in threatening to pull funds out of banks that cut off lending to fossil fuel companies.

Pennsylvania Democratic Congressional Delegation See sidebar on page 56.

PENNSYLVANIA TREASURY; SUBMITTED

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68 Jeffrey Lurie CHAIRMAN AND CEO PHILADELPHIA EAGLES

Jeffrey Lurie is most notable for being the owner of the Philadelphia Eagles, but his influence in Pennsylvania goes beyond football. He gained his wealth in cinema as a movie producer and then purchased the Eagles for $195 million in 1994. As a former professor of social policy, he has become outspoken on a variety of political issues. He also established the Eagles Autism Challenge, which has generated more than $6 million for autism awareness and research programs.

Art Rooney II OWNER AND PRESIDENT PITTSBURGH STEELERS

Art Rooney is a household name in Pittsburgh, largely due to his involvement with the Pittsburgh Steelers, which, along with being a cultural pillar in the state, are also a major economic driver for the region. Rooney also practices law at Buchanan Ingersoll & Rooney PC and donates to various political causes, including to President Joe Biden’s presidential campaign, Rep. Conor Lamb’s congressional campaign and other political action committees.

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PENNSYLVANIA DEMOCRATIC CONGRESSIONAL DELEGATION

June 2021

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Dwight Evans Chrissy Houlahan Mary Gay Scanlon Susan Wild

U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES; MICHAEL RAY PHOTOGRAPHY

R

EP. DWIGHT EVANS, top, has been in office since 1980 and spent 36 years in Harrisburg before making the move to Washington. As a state representative, he became the first Black chair of the House Appropriations Committee, and fought to provide better access to economic and educational opportunities for underrepresented communities. Evans is now a member of the House Ways and Means Committee and House Small Business Committee, and has been an active member of the Progressive and Black caucuses. Rep. Chrissy Houlahan, center, became the first woman to represent the 6th Congressional District when she won the seat in 2018. An Air Force veteran with a background in both business and education, she has brought a variety of experience to the U.S. House of Representatives. As a member of the House Armed Forces, Foreign Affairs, and Small Business committees, she has remained committed to fighting for equality and government accountability. Beginning her time in the U.S. House representing the 7th Congressional District, Rep. Mary Gay Scanlon, bottom left, has been representing the 5th Congressional District after state redistricting. She began in public service as pro bono counsel at a Ballard Spahr, working on issues such as voting rights, immigration, housing and criminal justice reform. Those priorities have endured during her time in Congress, as she continues to fight for victims while on the House Judiciary and House Rules committees. Representing the 7th Congressional District, Rep. Susan Wild, bottom right, is the first woman to represent the Lehigh Valley since 1999. Succeeding seven-term Republican Rep. Charlie Dent, she is one of several women who broke into the Pennsylvania delegation in 2018. A member of the House Education and House Foreign Affairs committees, she is focused on equitably funding public education and giving veterans opportunities to transition to civilian life.


June 2021

City & State Pennsylvania

Joseph Coradino

Patrick Gallagher

CEO PENNSYLVANIA REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT TRUST

CHANCELLOR UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH

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Pennsylvania Republican Congressional Delegation

congratulates our very own

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and all of City and State PA’s 2021

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TUESDAY, JUNE 1, 2021 WEATHER: Philadelphia: partly sunny, high of 79; Harrisburg: mostly cloudy, high of 78; Pittsburgh: mostly cloudy, high of 76. FROM CITY & STATE * Republican state Rep. Jim Cox has introduced legislation that would end the unemployment programs provided by the CARES Act while aiming to motivate unemployment claimants to find jobs by offering them a c cash bonus for finding work. NEW THIS MORNING: * Republican leaders of the state House of Representatives threatened last Friday to impeach Philadelphia elections officials if they count undated mail ballots from the May 18 primary, The Philadelphia Inquirer reports reports. * With the state’s wide-open races for governor and U.S. Senate taking shape, Republican candidates with strong ties to Donald Trump are running and considered strong contenders for the party’s nominations, The Associated Press reports. reports * Democratic state Rep. Amen Brown is crafting legislation to permanently get rid of a $5 copay state prison inmates are required to pay for medical care after prison officials said inmates had avoided COVID-19 tests because of the fee, NBC Philadelphia reports. reports * People receiving unemployment are concerned about the state’s planned weeklong shutdown of the online unemployment claims system for a full overhaul, Spotlight PA reports. reports * U.S. Sen. Bob Casey called GOP senators who haven’t supported a January 6 commission, voting rights protections or gun control measures “impediments to change” in an interview with MSNBC MSNBC. * Philadelphia Magazine profiled state Lt. Gov John Fetterman’s “meteoric rise” from mayor to Senate candidate and writes about whether issues from his past could potentially sink his candidacy. EDITORIAL PAGES

* The USA Today Pennsylvania Bureau writes via GoErie


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Chris Gheysens

William Demchak

PRESIDENT AND CEO WAWA

CHAIR, PRESIDENT AND CEO

Joseph Sheetz CEO SHEETZ

RICHARD MILLS

Chris Gheysens has helped WAWA expand its reach and update its branding. Most recently, he oversaw the company’s store remodeling projects and the establishment of the mobile app. The company has expanded into northern New Jersey and Florida, with more than 35,000 employees overall. It also has nearly 250 locations in the Commonwealth. Sheetz began as a family business and is still recognized as one today. Joe Sheetz is one of several family members serving in executive leadership roles within the company. He oversees the Altoona-based convenience retailer that has more than 600 stores in six states. The company played a major role in the expansion of liquor licenses in Pennsylvania. Its efforts to change alcohol sales in convenience and grocery stores is loved by many across the state.

PNC Financial Services Group William Demchak oversees one of the largest financial services companies in the country. He joined PNC as chief financial officer in 2002, before being elected president in 2012. A western Pennsylvania native, he serves on the board of the Allegheny Conference on Community Development and chairs the Pittsburgh Regional Alliance. As a company, PNC is the fifth largest commercial bank in the U.S., with nearly 53,000 employees and more than $16 billion in annual revenues.

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Clockwise from top left: John Joyce, Fred Keller, Guy Reschenthaler, Lloyd Smucker, Scott Perry and Dan Meuser

Brian Fitzpatrick John Joyce Fred Keller Dan Meuser Scott Perry Guy Reschenthaler Lloyd Smucker

prioritizing workforce development and national security. Representing the suburbs of Harrisburg and the surrounding area, Rep. Scott Perry has been serving his home region since 2007. Following three terms as a state representative, Perry made the move to Congress in 2013. The military veteran is a vocal member of the Freedom Caucus and Second Amendment Caucus. Now serving on the House Foreign Affairs and Transportation and Infrastructure committees, he’s an ardent supporter of strong national security and government oversight. Rep. Guy Reschenthaler’s legal background includes time in the U.S. Navy’s Judge Advocate General’s Corps and as a magisterial judge in Pittsburgh. He left the courtroom for the debate floor, serving in the Pennsylvania State Senate for four years before running for the U.S. House in 2018.

U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES; KORY ADDIS

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RIOR TO representing Bucks County in the U.S. House of Representatives, Rep. Brian Fitzpatrick served the nation as a special assistant to the U.S. Attorney and Federal Bureau of Investigation supervisory special agent. He was ranked as one of the most bipartisan members of Congress during the beginning of his tenure. Now, he uses his intelligence experience on the House Foreign Affairs and Transportation and Infrastructure committees and remains an advocate for addiction and mental health treatment. Rep. John Joyce and his wife, Alice, served residents of his district through their practice, Altoona Dermatology Associates, before he was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 2018. He succeeded Bill Shuster in the 13th Congressional District, one of the state’s most conservative. Today, he serves on the House Energy and Commerce Committee and was one of few House Republicans to endorse the safety of the COVID-19 vaccines, despite opposing vaccine passports or mandates. From Harrisburg to Washington, D.C., Rep. Fred Keller has been serving residents of central Pennsylvania for more than a decade. He began his political career as a state representative in 2011, before succeeding Rep. Tom Marino in the 12th Congressional District in 2019. He currently sits on the House Education and Labor, and Oversight and Reform committees, and has taken his focus on promoting job creation, agriculture and small businesses to the U.S. Capitol. Rep. Dan Meuser served as the secretary of revenue under Gov. Tom Corbett before running for the U.S. House in 2018. He began his career in his family business as an executive at Pride Mobility Products, a motorized wheelchair manufacturer in the Scranton area. He previously testified before Congress in support of the rights for the disabled, and continues that advocacy today. Meuser also serves on the House Small Business and Foreign Affairs Committees,


June 2021

City & State Pennsylvania

David Burritt

Bruce Van Saun

PRESIDENT AND CEO U.S. STEEL

CHAIRMAN AND CEO CITIZENS BANK

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CONGRATULATIONS TO THE POWER 100

Leslie Gromis Baker

Arthur J. Rooney II

Co-Chair and Managing Director State and Federal Government Relations Buchanan Ingersoll & Rooney

President, Pittsburgh Steelers Of Counsel Buchanan Ingersoll & Rooney

Harrisburg

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Pittsburgh

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15 Offices Nationwide

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BIPC.com

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Les Neri

Jaewon Ryu

NATIONAL 2ND VICE PRESIDENT FRATERNAL ORDER OF POLICE

It’s hard to find someone that looks out for law enforcement more than Les Neri. In addition to his duties as a leader of the Fraternal Order of Police, headquartered in Downingtown, Neri also serves as president of the Pennsylvania State Lodge. He has assisted local lodges in collective bargaining, pension, and grievance issues, and now works to achieve more victories at the legislative level. Previous achievements include 100% college tuition assistance for children of fallen officers, and he continues his efforts to uphold police bargaining rights.

PRESIDENT AND CEO GEISINGER HEALTH

Dr. Jaewon Ryu started at Geisinger in 2016 as executive vice president and chief medical officer, before taking over as president and CEO in 2018. With more than 550,000 members and nine hospital campuses, he oversees one of the largest health systems in the state. He has focused on using innovation to address complex problems, including affordability and quality of care. His leadership has also helped Geisinger promote initiatives that meet the needs of patients with mail-order pharmacies and at-home care programs.

Trusted Advisors. Bipartisan Connections. Delivered Results

www.rnigrp.com

GEISINGER

On behalf of our entire team at Rooney Novak Isenhour, congratulations to our own Mary Isenhour for making City & State’s Pennsylvania Power 100 2021 list.


June 2021

City & State Pennsylvania

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Heyward Donigan

Mack Stulb

PRESIDENT AND CEO RITE AID

Under the leadership of Heyward Donigan, Rite Aid saw a 3.3% increase in sales, a 2% increase in same store prescription sales and 3% growth in retail pharmacy revenues in the fourth quarter of 2020. The Camp Hillheadquartered pharmacy chain has also been on the front lines of testing and vaccinating Pennsylvanians for COVID-19, and helped administer vaccines as part of the Federal Retail Pharmacy Program, which allowed Rite Aid to supplement state and local vaccination efforts.

PRESIDENT L.F. DRISCOLL CO.

Frank “Mack” Stulb became the president of L.F. Driscoll in 2005 after spending more than 20 years at the company. He oversees the company’s finance, construction and project management, and led it through a merger with Structure Tone. L.F. Driscoll, which specializes in construction management at-risk services, has nearly $140 million in annual revenue and is one of the largest construction management firms in the region.

Congratulations

Gene Barr

on being named to the Pennsylvania Power 100 List Additionally we celebrate our PA Chamber Board Chair and President/CEO of The GIANT Company Nick Bertram and congratulate the following PA Chamber members as inaugural City & State Power 100 honorees: Leslie Gromis Baker, Buchanan, Ingersoll & Rooney Ed Rendell, Ballard Spahr Gerard Sweeney, Brandywine Realty Trust Madeline Bell, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Brian Roberts, Comcast Corp Stephen Cozen, Cozen O’Connor Lauren Hobart, Dick’s Sporting Goods Patricia Mackavage, Duane Morris Government Strategies Jaewon Ryu, Geisinger Health System Gregory Deavens, Independence Blue Cross Pete Gleason, K&L Gates

Maggie Hardy Knox, 84 Lumber Laura Jan Kuller, Ridge Policy Group Eric Barron, Penn State University Jeffrey Lurie, Philadelphia Eagles Art Rooney II, Pittsburgh Steelers Bill Demchak, PNC Financial Services Group Bruce Van Saun, Citizens Bank of Pennsylvania David Buritt, U.S. Steel John Walsh, UGI Corporation Jeffrey Romoff, UPMC

417 Walnut Street I Harrisburg, PA 17101 I 800.225.7224 I pachamber.org

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Ed Gainey

Miguel Patricio Jeff Brown

Tom Reilly

STATE REPRESENTATIVE

CEO KRAFT HEINZ

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT TURNER CONSTRUCTION

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PRESIDENT AND CEO BROWN’S SUPER STORES

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C O N G R AT U L AT E S

RAY ZABORNEY O N B E I N G N A M E D T O C I T Y & S TAT E P A’ S

POWER 100 LIST


June 2021

City & State Pennsylvania

Scott Mirkin

Richard Hayne

John Walsh

PRESIDENT AND EXECUTIVE PRODUCER ESM PRODUCTIONS

PRESIDENT AND CEO URBAN OUTFITTERS

PRESIDENT AND CEO UGI CORPORATION

Maggie Hardy Knox

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OWNER AND PRESIDENT 84 LUMBER

2021 SPONSORED BY

Connecting Government and Pennsylvania’s MWBEs July 27, 2021, 1:00-3:30 PM

City & State PA’s Virtual Diversity Summit will offer industry executives, public sector leaders and academics a half day virtual conference dedicated to fostering business partnerships between the state and local government, prime contractors and MWBEs. Find out what it takes to thrive in Pennsylvania’s competitive procurement arena by connecting with key government agencies, prime contractors, and state & local representatives at the City & State Virtual Diversity Summit.

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Register Here by scanning the above QR code.


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Richard Yuengling Jr.

Jeff Guaracino

OWNER AND PRESIDENT YUENGLING BREWERY

PRESIDENT AND CEO VISIT PHILADELPHIA

Since buying the family brewery from his father in 1985, Dick Yuengling Jr. has turned his family’s namesake company into one of the nation’s most well-known brewers. This year, Yuengling announced a partnership with Molson Coors Beverage Company to expand its distribution into Texas, building on its existing 22-state reach. A billionaire, Yuengling Jr. has also made his voice known in political circles, donating to an array of Republican candidates over the last two decades.

As the head of Visit Philadelphia, Jeff Guaracino is charged with bringing people to the City of Brotherly Love through the organization’s branding and marketing efforts. After a successful 2019, Guaracino has had to shift his efforts to leading the region’s economy out of the COVID-19 pandemic by partnering with local businesses to encourage commerce. The organization also committed $2 million to summer marketing efforts to revitalize the city’s tourism and hospitality sectors.

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92 Michael Long

Matt Brouillette

PARTNER LONG, NYQUIST & ASSOCIATES

PRESIDENT AND CEO COMMONWEALTH PARTNERS CHAMBER OF ENTREPRENEURS

A co-founder of Long Nyquist & Associates, Mike Long is a wellknown name among Harrisburg lobbyists due to the power and influence his firm has had in the state capital. A former staffer in the state Senate, Long, along with the firm’s other partner, Todd Nyquist, has had a key hand in shaping policy in Harrisburg thanks to the close relationship Long Nyquist has enjoyed with the Senate Republican Caucus.

Matt Brouillette is a heavyweight in conservative circles in Harrisburg thanks to his work at Commonwealth Partners, as well as his 14-year stint at the Commonwealth Foundation, an active conservative think tank. Brouillette also serves as treasurer for both the Commonwealth Leaders Fund and the Commonwealth Children’s Choice Fund – two political action committees that had a combined $11.2 million in cash on hand as of early May.


June 2021

City & State Pennsylvania

J. FUSCO FOR VISIT PHILADELPHIA; BARRY KIDD; JEREMY BAKER/COMMONWEALTH PARTNERS; FRANCES CIVELLO PHOTOGRAPHY; THE GIANT COMPANY

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94 Laura Jan Kuller

Nicholas Bertram

GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS COUNSEL RIDGE POLICY GROUP

PRESIDENT AND CEO THE GIANT COMPANY

A former chief of staff to Pennsylvania’s House Majority Leader, Laura Jan Kuller now puts her legal and political chops to work as government affairs counsel for Ridge Policy Group, where she helps develop client strategies for legislative and administrative issues. Kuller has been named one of the “Top Lawyers in Central PA” by Harrisburg Magazine, and received her J.D. from American University’s Washington College of Law.

Nicholas Bertram‘s stores faced an immense challenge over the past year, having to reconfigure operations due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Through it all, The GIANT Company continues to open new grocery stores and still found ways to provide financial aid to child care centers, farms and other businesses hit hard by the pandemic. Bertram is also chair of the PA Chamber Board of Directors, where he’s helping to launch the Chamber’s “Bringing PA Back” initiative.

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Mona Ghude PARTNER FAEGRE DRINKER BIDDLE & REATH LLP

As a partner at Faegre Drinker Biddle & Reath, LLP, Mona Ghude’s work focuses heavily on helping employers navigate the complex world of employee benefits. As part of her practice, Ghude develops defined contribution plans, defined benefit nonqualified plans and equitybased plans. Ghude was also named an “Influencer of Law” by The Philadelphia Inquirer in 2019 for her expertise in tax law and the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974.

William Sproule EXECUTIVE SECRETARYTREASURER EAS REGIONAL COUNCIL OF CARPENTERS

As the top-ranking member of the Eastern Atlantic States Regional Council of Carpenters, William Sproule oversees more than 40,000 members across seven states and Washington, D.C. Sproule is key in the council’s development of its policies and procedures, and also plays a hand in the development of collective bargaining agreements for the council’s unions. Sproule was formerly the president and regional manager of the Northeast Regional Council of Carpenters, before it was dissolved and merged with another council.

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98 Arielle FrankstonMorris

Gabriel Escobar

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR TEACH PA

An experienced journalist and newsroom leader, Gabriel Escobar has guided The Philadelphia Inquirer through its transformation toward a digitalfirst platform. One of the highestranking Latinos at a U.S. news organization, Escobar has also led the Inquirer through coverage of the 2016 Democratic National Convention, the COVID-19 pandemic and more. The Inquirer continues to be a significant news source in the nation, with more than 10 million unique users per month and more than 45,000 subscribers.

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Alan B. Miller

Keith Leaphart

CEO UNIVERSAL HEALTH SERVICES

CHAIR THE LENFEST FOUNDATION

The founder and owner of Universal Health Services, Alan Miller has watched his health care company in King of Prussia become one of the largest providers in the nation. Prior to stepping down as CEO this year, Miller was listed among the top executives in the country for UHS’ consistent growth and returns to shareholders. The company now owns more than 400 hospitals and health care facilities, has more than 90,000 employees and generates more than $11 billion in annual revenue.

As chair of the Lenfest Foundation’s board, Leaphart oversees all of the foundation’s efforts to improve educational opportunities for Philadelphia youth. The foundation’s work includes programming for middle school students, as well as career assistance for children and young adults. Leaphart is also the president and CEO of Replica Creative, a print and design firm that has been recognized by the Philadelphia mayor’s office as one of the city’s “best small businesses.” ORTHODOX UNION; SUBMITTED

As the executive director of Teach PA, Arielle FrankstonMorris represents Jewish Day Schools across Pennsylvania and has advocated for bolstering state tax credit programs that fund scholarships for students to attend nonpublic schools. In addition to organizing lobbying efforts to sell lawmakers on the need for educational tax credit programs, Frankston-Morris has also been an avid supporter of efforts to improve schools security, as well as increased funding for school health services.

EDITOR THE PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER


2021

Celebrating Pennsylvania’s Most Influential People in Politics and Government July 27, 2021, 5:30-7:00 PM Join us as we celebrate Pennsylvania’s Power 100 with our Virtual Event on June 17th, 2021. Don’t miss our Keynote Speakers Governor Tom Wolf, Governor Ed Rendell, and Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney, a LIVE “Wawa vs. Sheetz” debate with Congressman Brendan F. Boyle and Lieutenant Governor John Fetterman, and stay tuned for a rundown of all 100 on our list! For more information about City & State PA Events, please contact events@cityandstatepa.com For more information about sponsorship opportunities, please contact advertising@cityandstatepa.com

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SPEAKERS GOVERNOR TOM WOLF State of Pennsylvania GOVERNOR ED RENDELL State of Pennsylvania MAYOR JIM KENNEY City of Philadelphia LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR JOHN FETTERMAN State of Pennsylvania CONGRESSMAN BRENDAN F. BOYLE U.S. House Representative PA-02 District


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CITY & STATE PENNSYLVANIA MANAGEMENT & PUBLISHING Publisher Susan Peiffer speiffer@cityandstatepa.com Group Publisher Tom Allon Event & Sales Director Lissa Blake Vice President of Operations Jasmin Freeman Comptroller David Pirozzi

Who was up and who was down last month

CREATIVE Creative Director Andrew Horton Art Director Joseph Caserto Photo Researcher Michelle Steinhauser

LOSERS

ADVISORY BOARD Chair Governor Ed Rendell Board members Leslie Gromis-Baker, Gene Barr, Samuel Chen, Joseph Hill, Teresa Lundy, Anne Wakabayashi, Ray Zaborney

THE REST OF THE WORST

GLEN GRELL PSERS Executive Director Glen Grell has been under fire in recent months after he revealed a calculation error inflated the fund’s investment numbers. In March, the FBI announced a probe into the pension fund, and just this month, state Senator Katie Muth tapped a national transparency law expert to investigate the lack of, well, transparency. STEPHEN ZAPPALA Allegheny County District Attorney Stephen Zappala reportedly said that clients of Black attorney Milton Raiford – who called his office “systemically racist” – should not receive plea deals. The comments have led to calls for his resignation from state lawmakers, while others have raised ethical concerns.

Vol. 1 Issue 1 June 2021

ER

E'S HE RA

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H Does it look like John Fetterman K

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MARK NORDENBERG All eyes were on former University of Pittsburgh Chancellor Mark Nordenberg this month after he was tapped him to lead the Legislative Reapportionment Commission – the body tasked with drawing state legislative maps. Nordenberg’s appointment received praise from lawmakers and advocates who admired his academic pedigree and his apparent independence.

RICK SANTORUM Pennsylvania’s former senatorturned-CNN pundit sent the internet into a frenzy last month when he nearly forgot that Native Americans were “here” before the pilgrims. After some public outcry, Santorum surfaced on CNN and attempted to clarify his remarks, saying he “misspoke.” Santorum was later fired and blamed “cancel culture.”

DIGITAL Digital Director Michael Filippi Digital Marketing Manager Caitlin Dorman

a damn? T H E gives P E N N S Y LVA N I A POWER 100 Who are the political architects of the Keystone State?

Malcolm Kenyatta

Can he break barriers and pull off a U.S. Senate win?

SWPA HGTV

The Trump House

The neverending battle

Wawa vs. Sheetz

CIT YANDSTATEPA .COM

@CIT YANDSTATEPA

JUNE 2021

Cover photograph: Brad Trent

CITY & STATE PENNSYLVANIA is published monthly, 12 times a year by City & State NY, LLC, 61 Broadway, Suite 1315, New York, NY 10006-2763. Subscriptions: 202.964.1782 or subscribe@cityandstatepa.com Copyright ©2021, City & State NY, LLC.

TYLER TITUS FOR ERIE COUNTY EXECUTIVE; GAGE SKIDMORE

THE BEST OF THE REST

ED GAINEY Ed Gainey unseated Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto during May’s Democratic primary election. With no Republican running against him in the general election, Gainey is now poised to become Pittsburgh’s first ever Black mayor.

ADVERTISING advertising@cityandstatepa.com Senior Sales Executive Michael Fleck mfleck@cityandstatepa.com Sales and Events Coordinator Laura Hurliman events@cityandstatepa.com

W

TYLER TITUS After winning the Democratic primary for Erie County Executive, Tyler Titus is a win in the general election away from becoming the first openly transgender county executive in the nation. He has worked in the Erie County Office of Children and Youth and served on the Erie City School Board. And he could make history in November.

OUR PICK

OUR PICK

WINNERS

From some cringeworthy TV appearances to historic elections, Pennsylvania produced an array of winners and losers over the course of the past month. There’s never a dull day in the Commonwealth, so many of these individuals did the work for us. Below, City & State takes a look at those who had a good month in the Keystone State, as well as those who struggled.

EDITORIAL editorial@cityandstatepa.com Editor-in-Chief Jenny DeHuff jdehuff@cityandstatepa.com Senior Reporter Justin Sweitzer jsweitzer@cityandstatepa.com Staff Reporter Harrison Cann hcann@cityandstatepa.com NY Editor-in-Chief Ralph Ortega NY Managing Editor Eric Holmberg NY Deputy Managing Editor Holly Pretsky NY Associate Editor Patricia Battle


Compiled by CITY & STATE

An advocacy campaign including City & State First Read provides a targeted way to reach decision makers in Pennsylvania government and politics.

TUESDAY, JUNE 1, 2021

WEATHER: Philadelphia: partly sunny, high of 79; Ha cloudy, high of 78; Pittsburgh: mostly cloudy, high of FROM CITY & STATE

* Republican state Rep. Jim Cox has introduced legis the unemployment programs provided by the CARES motivate unemployment claimants to find jobs by offe bonus for finding work. NEW THIS MORNING:

Campaigns Include:

ADVOCACY MESSAGING OPEN-HOUSE PROMOTIONS NEW HIRE ANNOUNCEMENTS Contact us at advertising@cityandstatepa.com for advertising and sponsorship opportunities.

* Republican leaders of the state House of Represent Friday to impeach Philadelphia elections officials if th ballots from the May 18 primary, The Philadelphia Inq

* With the state’s wide-open races for governor and U shape, Republican candidates with strong ties to Don and considered strong contenders for the party’s nom ated Press reports.

* Democratic state Rep. Amen Brown is crafting legis get rid of a $5 copay state prison inmates are required care after prison officials said inmates had avoided C cause of the fee, NBC Philadelphia reports.

* People receiving unemployment are concerned abo weeklong shutdown of the online unemployment claim overhaul, Spotlight PA reports.

* U.S. Sen. Bob Casey called GOP senators who have January 6 commission, voting rights protections or gu “impediments to change” in an interview with MSNBC

* Philadelphia Magazine profiled state Lt. Gov John F rise” from mayor to Senate candidate and writes abou from his past could potentially sink his candidacy. EDITORIAL PAGES

* The USA Today Pennsylvania Bureau writes via GoE Wolf’s frequent use of veto power to block GOP-led le defining attribute of his administration.

* The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review writes that a compre is needed of the state agencies and procedures that f proposed constitutional amendment that would have


New Airbnb Hosts in PA with only one listing have earned over $22 million between March 2020 and March 2021 sharing their homes on Airbnb, but that’s not all... Airbnb has also: • Collected and remitted approx. $13M in Hotel Occupancy taxes to the State of Pennsylvania from January 1, 2019 through December 31, 2019. • Collected and remitted approx. $5.9M in Hotel Room Rental taxes to the City of Philadelphia, PA from January 1, 2019 through December 31, 2019. • Put public health first and promoted responsible travel through: • Global ban on parties • Removal of party houses • Neighborhood Support Line • One-night stay limitations for the Fourth of July


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