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2017 Annual Report


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4 Welcome from City Council 6 City Council Members 8 City of New Albany/New Albany School District Map 10 Village Center – Our Community Core 12 Rose Run – Our Planned Central Park 14 New Albany International Business Park 16 Innovate New Albany – Our Entrepreneurial Incubator 18 Web, Social & e-News Updates 20 The New Albany Classic – #1 in the Arena and in Our Hearts 21 Events 22 New Albany Government 101 24 Administrative Leadership 25 Community Development 26 Finances 28 Police 30 Public Service Cover photo courtesy of Ryan Hill Photos this page: top and bottom courtesy of Charlie Jones, middle courtesy of Ryan Hill

New Albany Contacts – Back Cover newalbanyohio.org | 2017 New Albany Annual Report

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Welcome MASTER-PLANNED. INNOVATIVE. INCLUSIVE. These are just a few descriptors we hear often about New Albany. There are many ways in which our community lives up to these attributes. Here are just a few examples from last year: A place that embraces education, culture, leisure and health. From our 200-acre school learning campus to the McCoy Center for the Arts and the Heit Center for Healthy New Albany, our community continues to build on the assets that enhance our quality of life. Last year, we launched plans to transform the Rose Run Creek and corridor, overgrown with brush and invasive species, into our Central Park, a civic asset to foster connections among people and with the environment. A place that constantly challenges itself to improve city operations. In 2017, our police department welcomed new officers; added a drug drop box to the police station lobby to collect unused medications; collaborated with area jurisdictions to implement the “Text to 911” service that will be operational in 2018; and saved another life thanks to a portable AED defibrillator that is now standard equipment in every police vehicle. Our public service department expanded its snow routes to better serve residents, began the process of changing all street lights to LED bulbs and hired a forester to conserve our natural assets. New Albany collaborated with Jersey Township and Johnstown to create the Western Licking County Accord, an agreement designed to protect our small town, rural character and promote desirable land uses as the area grows. A place that promotes smart growth and sustainable revenues. Last year was a banner one for the New Albany International Business Park. Nearly two million square feet of commercial space was under construction in 2017 and Facebook’s new $750,000,000 data center will add significantly to the park’s footprint. New commercial projects and the jobs that come with them generate tax revenues to support city services and reduce our residents’ tax burden. In fact, 84% of the city’s general fund revenues come from income taxes primarily attributed to the business park, which has also generated more than $68 million in total tax revenues for the New Albany Plain Local Schools since 1998.

City Council (from l. to r.): Chip Fellows, Colleen Briscoe, Mike Durik, Mayor Sloan Spalding, Dr. Glyde Marsh, Matt Shull, Marlene Brisk

A place where we continually invest in our quality of life. Many projects have demonstrated our ongoing commitment to community building and growth like the U.S. Route 62/Greensward roundabout; leisure trail expansions along Dublin-Granville funded primarily through a state grant; the expansion of Rocky Fork Metro Park; and new commercial development to add more restaurants, shops and services to the heart of town. A place where your opinion matters. In 2017, we launched a series of neighborhood conversations to create opportunities to engage with you and your neighbors about city projects and services. We plan to continue the dialogue in 2018. If you would like to host a conversation in your neighborhood or have an idea to share with us, please don’t hesitate to email us at council@ newalbanyohio.org or attend a City Council meeting.

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2017 New Albany Annual Report | newalbanyohio.org


newalbanyohio.org | 2017 New Albany Annual Report

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Photos: home courtesy of Peter Aaron; community garden courtesy of Rebecca Kopelman; bicyclists courtesy of Jeffrey Krugh; fence courtesy of Charlie Jones


City Council Sloan Spalding, Mayor

mayor@newalbanyohio.org voicemail: 614-939-4019 Term ends 12/31/19 Sloan and his wife Jennifer have been New Albany residents since 2002 and are the proud parents of three young boys. The Spalding family is very active in New Albany youth sporting leagues, charity walks and runs, community events, the New Albany Symphony and Pelotonia. He was first elected mayor in 2015 after having been elected twice to City Council. Prior to being elected to Council, Sloan served New Albany on the Personnel Appeals Board, Planning Committee, and was the Chair of the 2009 Charter Review Commission. Sloan received a degree in political science, with a minor in military science, from the University of Utah. During his college years, Sloan also served as a member of the Utah Army National Guard and upon graduation was commissioned as an Officer in the United States Army. Sloan moved back to Ohio in 1994 and earned a Juris Doctor degree from Capital University Law School. Sloan currently serves as Section Chief for Employment Law for Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine. Prior professional appointments have included General Counsel and Deputy Chancellor for the

Sloan Spalding, Mayor

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Ohio Board of Regents, Chief Legal Counsel to the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Labor Relations Director for The Ohio State University. Sloan is committed to maximizing New Albany’s economic development opportunities, maintaining our proud history of strong fiscal management, and providing our citizens with top-notch municipal services without having to increase income taxes.

cbriscoe@newalbanyohio.org voicemail: 614-939-4020 Term ends 12/31/21 Colleen and her husband Bob Berry moved into their New Albany home in 1992. They have two children, Connor and K.C., who graduated from New Albany High School. Colleen was raised in central Ohio and received her bachelor’s degree from Miami University and her J.D. from Capital University Law School. Following law school, she served as a prosecuting attorney and magistrate. She now practices law from an office in New Albany. She has been in private practice for over 30 years. Colleen served as Mayor of New Albany from 19962003. Since that time, she was appointed and then elected as a member of City Council.

While on City Council, she has been council’s representative to: Planning Commission, Economic Development Commission, and Community Improvement Corporation. In addition to volunteer work at various events in New Albany, Colleen has served on the Founders Day Committee and the Community Foundation Board. Colleen has been elected or appointed to numerous boards and committees of the Columbus Bar Association including the Board of Governors, the Judicial Screening Committee and the Committee on Racial Profiling. She currently serves on the Professional Ethics and Grievance Committee. In addition, Colleen has served as a board member of the Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission and Solid Waste Authority of Central Ohio. She has been recognized by Syntaxis Youth Homes for her pro bono work. Colleen is supportive of and extensively involved in economic development. Colleen has always been a proponent of leisure trails to connect the entire city and has worked to achieve this goal. She particularly appreciates the sense of spirit and cooperation alive in New Albany today, which results in residents, business leaders and government entities working

Colleen Briscoe, President Pro Tempore

Marlene Brisk

Colleen Briscoe, President Pro Tempore

2017 New Albany Annual Report | newalbanyohio.org

together with the common goal of improving the community.

Marlene Brisk

mbrisk@newalbanyohio.org voicemail: 614-939-4021 Term ends 12/31/19 Marlene and her husband Jim have been New Albany residents since 2004. Their two oldest daughters, Rachel and Jessica, are graduates of New Albany High School and their youngest daughter, Julia, is currently a New Albany High School student. Marlene received a Bachelor of Science degree with a major in finance from The Ohio State University Fisher College of Business and earned a Juris Doctor degree from Emory University School of Law in Atlanta, Georgia. She began her career in private practice in Columbus and has been employed in the field of commercial real estate management since 2001. Prior to being appointed to City Council in 2016 and elected in November 2017, Marlene served on the Board of Zoning Appeals and subsequently on the Planning Commission. While on City Council, she was a steering committee member for the West Licking County Accord and she currently serves as Council Liaison to the Board of Zoning Appeals and to the New Albany Plain Local School District.

Mike Durik


Marlene believes that New Albany offers its residents a unique combination of the warmth and feel of a small town along with many amenities typically only available in a larger city. She is deeply committed to helping New Albany sustain that balance as the tax base, population and retail offerings continue to grow. Her goal is for New Albany to always be a place that future generations will be proud to call home.

Mike Durik

mdurik@newalbanyohio.org voicemail: 614-939-4022 Term ends 12/31/19 Mike and his wife Lorrie have enjoyed living in New Albany since 1993 and they are the parents of two adult children. A graduate of the University of Toledo, Mike received a Bachelor of Business Administration degree with a major in human resources and a Master of Business Administration in finance. Following a successful career as a corporate executive with a global organization, he is currently a senior director at The Ohio State University Fisher College of Business. Prior to being appointed to City Council in 2017 and elected by New Albany residents later that year, Mike served on several city boards and commissions, including the Economic Development

Chip Fellows

Commission, Zoning Appeals Board, Planning Commission, and the steering committee for the Western Licking County Accord. In addition, Mike has served on the boards of the New Albany Chamber of Commerce and Healthy New Albany. Mike believes it is important that we continue our commercial development in order to ease the economic burden on our residents and enable us to provide exceptional programs and services. His desire to serve on City Council stems from an appreciation of the community spirit of New Albany, where residents are actively involved in contributing thoughtful ideas and time to make this the best place to live.

in the New Albany International Business Park and work towards bringing new businesses and related amenities to the Village Center. Moreover, Chip is focused on maintaining fiscal responsibility, providing quality and responsive public service, maintaining safe neighborhoods with open green space and parks, and providing open and responsive communications with city residents.

Dr. Glyde Marsh

cfellows@newalbanyohio.org voicemail: 614-939-4023 Term ends 12/31/21 Chip has been a New Albany resident since 2001 and he has two children. He was appointed to City Council in 2006 and was first elected in 2007. Prior to his tenure on City Council, he also served on the New Albany Community Events Board and the Architectural Review Board. Chip grew up in Ohio and graduated from The Ohio State University. He is currently employed in the healthcare field. Chip’s primary focus for New Albany is to continue the robust economic development

council@newalbanyohio.org voicemail: 614-939-4025 Term ends 12/31/21 Dr. Marsh has been a New Albany resident since 1946 and has long been involved in giving back to the community in one way or another. Prior to serving on City Council, he also served on the New Albany Plain Local School Board. He is the oldest elected official in Ohio. Dr. Marsh is a retired Professor of Veterinary Science at The Ohio State University. He specialized in poultry medicine and continues to serve as a consultant to poultry producers throughout Ohio. Dr. Marsh was first elected to City Council in 1993, taking office in 1994. He remains active in financial matters for the city, serving as the Chair of the Finance Committee. He is also Council Liaison to the Board of Construction Appeals and is Council Representative to Plain Township.

Dr. Glyde Marsh

Matt Shull

Chip Fellows

Dr. Marsh views New Albany as the best place to live in central Ohio. The area is attractive with lots of amenities, and the city provides excellent police, maintenance and other services. New Albany has the qualities of a small town with friendly residents, and Dr. Marsh’s vision is to maintain this character.

Matt Shull

mshull@newalbanyohio.org voicemail: 614-939-4024 Term ends 12/31/21 Matt and his wife Vickey have been New Albany residents since 2000 and they have a son and two daughters who all graduated from New Albany High School. Matt received his bachelor’s degree in business administration from Bowling Green State University. He is currently employed in the healthcare field. Matt was appointed to City Council in 2016 and elected by its residents to a new four-year term in November 2017. He currently serves as Council Liaison to the Architectural Review Board, the Grants and Non-Profit Funding Committee, Service and Public Facilities Committee, and the New Albany-Plain Local Joint Parks District. Prior to his tenure on Council, he served on the Board of Zoning and Appeals for twelve years and as the chairman for two years. The City of New Albany has experienced tremendous growth and opportunity over the last couple of decades. Matt is committed to continuing that positive momentum by focusing on three key areas; economic development (growing our business campus), maintaining strong fiscal management, and providing top quality services to the community. Matt is a leader who looks forward to working for the citizens of New Albany, America’s best suburb.

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Community Village Center – Our Community Core NEW ALBANY’S VILLAGE Center has always been central to the city’s aspiration to create a place that embodies the heart and soul of the community and embraces the founding principles of education, culture, sustainability and health. Each thoughtfully conceived design feature reflects careful attention to the details that truly define quality of life and underscores the timeless traditions of small town America.

Achieving a Vibrant Core

As with all of the aspects of a nationally-renowned, masterplanned community, New Albany sought input from residents and the business community in developing the Village Center. Looking back at the Village Center Strategic Plan of 2010, many features exist today that the study notes “contribute to a vibrant, active and sustainable Village Center.” The library, one of the most quintessential elements of any community, is a key attraction for all ages, and the city’s 36+ miles of leisure trails connect Village Center restaurants, shops and office spaces to neighborhoods, business park, school learning campus and arts center.

Spurring Private Investment

Creating an economically sustainable Village Center also required a commitment to incorporate a variety of housing. This action provided the critical mass of residents necessary to spur private investment and support local merchants. New Albany recently broadened the residential mix, beyond owner-occupied developments like Keswick, to include luxury apartment-style living at Market & Main to attract young professionals and empty nesters. While these two sectors will add few (if any) new students, the luxury apartments are expected to produce $600,000 annually in new revenues for our schools. Perhaps no other institution exemplifies New Albany’s unique ability to bring ideas to life as the Philip Heit Center for Healthy New Albany. At a time when other communities were potentially burdened by costly community recreation centers, New Albany leaders spearheaded partnerships to provide medical, fitness, social and educational programs and services in the heart of our community. These partners—The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Nationwide Children’s Hospital and Healthy New Albany—not only offset the cost of the building, they also share a vision to create “the healthiest community in America.”

Fostering Connections

For nearly twenty years, New Albany leaders have considered the Rose Run corridor a critical Village Center component. Soon this corridor will be utilized to create a “Central Park” for New Albany, fostering connections among people as well as the environment. When completed, Rose Run Park will provide a large plaza for events, safe crossing between the park and school, a protected bike lane, a bridge across the stream bed, library garden for outdoor activities, and a wooded glen and trail with kid-friendly recreational elements.

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2017 New Albany Annual Report | newalbanyohio.org


Opposite top photo courtesy of Jeffrey Horvath

New Albany’s 36+ miles of leisure trails connect Village Center and its restaurants and shops to neighborhoods, the library, school campus, business park and arts center. newalbanyohio.org | 2017 New Albany Annual Report

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Environment Rose Run – Our Planned Central Park NEW ALBANY PRIDES itself on the many natural and planned amenities designed to connect people to activities and each other. With the completion of Rose Run Park, a creek with overgrown brush and invasive species will be transformed into a key civic asset that will foster connections among people and with the environment.

Heart of the Community

For years, the city has aspired to create a “Central Park” that would link Market Square to the New Albany Plain Local Schools’ learning campus and the McCoy Center for the Arts and become “the physical, visual and emotional heart of the community.” Rose Run Park is the answer. It will preserve green space in the heart of New Albany, create a civic green for events, attract more residents, employees and visitors to the city’s parks, trails and businesses, improve safety for school children crossing Dublin-Granville Road and spur moe private development in the area.

Exercise, Exploration & Relaxation

The future Rose Run Park commands a central location bordered by Dublin-Granville Road to the north, Main Street to the east and Market Street to the west. North of Dublin-Granville Road, a terraced limestone and grass wall will provide seating. Traffic lanes will be narrowed to reduce speeds and feature crosswalks, a protected bike lane, and sidewalk. South of Dublin-Granville Road, generous plaza space will lead to a pedestrian bridge that will offer an attractive pathway across the stream bed. A walk lined with birch trees will connect the creek area to the Columbus Metropolitan Library’s New Albany branch where a garden will be created with a seating area and lawn for reading and library activities. Along the creek, a natural play area with kid-friendly elements will inspire exercise and exploration. The park also will feature a leisure trail and a bike hub for cyclists to inflate tires and fill water bottles.

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For years, New Albany has aspired to create a “Central Park” that would link Market Square to the school learning campus and McCoy Center; and become “the physical, visual and emotional heart of the community.”

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Business QUICK FACTS • 2017 jobs created in New Albany International Business Park: 2,089 • Total business park jobs: 15,000 • Total business park square footage: 11,500,000 • Total business park private investment: $3,400,000,000 • New Albany Plain Local Schools property/income tax revenues from business park since 1998: >$68 million • Completed Innovation Campus Way extension, piggybacking ODOT’s Mink Road Interchange investment • Innovate New Albany, the city’s business incubator, hosted 60 community events

New Albany International Business Park AS THE NEW ALBANY International Business Park enters its 20th year, the ambitious vision to transform cornfields into a master-planned business park that delivers the assets businesses need to succeed is now a reality. Two decades ago, few people could have anticipated the extent to which the park would successfully compete, not only regionally, but nationally and internationally, to attract businesses that are proud to call New Albany home.

Achieving Unprecedented Growth

To date, companies have invested $3.4 billion and have built more than 11.5 million square feet of commercial space in the park. The park’s workforce has grown to 15,000. In 2017 alone, New Albany announced 1.9 million square feet of commercial construction that will result in a total investment of $830 million and the addition of 2,089 employees to the local workforce. Among last year’s accomplishments was the announcement that technology behemoth Facebook would build one of the most advanced, energy efficient data centers in the world at the park. The company is investing $750 million to build a 970,000 square-foot facility. The company also committed to provide $700,000 in annual revenue to New Albany by 2021 and $1.4 million annually by 2023. The business park’s specialized business clusters – Information Technology, Personal Care and Beauty, Corporate Office and R&D, High-Tech Manufacturing & Logistics and Health Care – continue to attract industry leaders seeking an environment that keeps pace with their energy, technology, logistics and workforce needs while promoting collaboration. Investment in the Personal Care and Beauty Campus grew by 72% since 2011 while the Information and Technology cluster grew by 840% since 2008.

Leveraging Our Advantages

A comprehensive strategic plan executed by a team that embraces community building from a collaborative standpoint has become a distinct advantage for the city in competing for business. Technology-and-shovel-ready sites, robust fiber optics and triple-feed electric capabilities combined with the city’s commitment to transparency, communications and expedited planning all earn the praise of site selectors, developers and contractors. The result is that New Albany is able to attract and retain a remarkable range and caliber of companies that generate sustainable tax revenues that are invested in everything from safety services and infrastructure to parks and leisure trails.

Delivering a Strong Return on Investment

In 2017, 84% of New Albany’s general fund revenue came from income taxes primarily derived from the business park. Additionally, $68 million in property and income tax revenue generated by the park has gone to support New Albany Plain Local Schools since 1998. With a carefully crafted planning process New Albany can continue to promote smart growth and commerce while improving quality of life and reducing the service tax burden for residents.

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Facebook announcement photo courtesy of James DeCamp

In 2017, 84% of the city’s general fund revenues came from income taxes primarily derived from the business park. The park has also produced more than $68 million in revenues for New Albany Plain Local Schools.

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Innovation Innovate New Albany – Our Entrepreneurial Incubator SINCE 2010, INNOVATE New Albany, our technology incubator for startups, has lived up to its name by continuously evolving the services and resources it provides to entrepreneurial enterprises while maintaining an environment that promotes collaboration and commerce. By all measures, Innovate New Albany is a success. From the beginning, its 8,000 square feet of space that provides 16 offices, eight cubicles and ten “virtual” offices achieved 100 percent occupancy and it has stayed that way. Neil Collins Onsite Leader, Innovate New Albany

Shared Services & Ambitions

Tenants share a high-speed fiber optic network, conference rooms, presentation facilities, office equipment and kitchen. Rev1 Ventures, central Ohio’s venture development organization, provides fundraising support, seed capital and access to corporate partners. The Small Business Development Center, supported by the U.S. Small Business Administration, Ohio Department of Development and Columbus State Community College, provides business consulting services.

Insights that Power Growth

Its busy lineup of talks, workshops and networking events attracts more than 1,500 visitors annually. Among the most popular are the TIGER Talks and Workshops that feature accomplished professionals in a variety of fields sharing their expertise on everything from trademark protection and patents to doing business in China. TIGER stands for Technology, Innovation, Growth, Entrepreneurship and Responsibility – five values which match Innovate New Albany’s mission and brand. “People walk out of a TIGER Workshop with a new skill or new tool that can benefit their business immediately and new connections with individuals who have complementary skill sets,” notes Collins. “It has become so popular that people throughout the community are volunteering to speak.” Last year, Innovate New Albany started a new program called Expert Office Hours where entrepreneurs can go for a free, 30-minute consulting session with experts ranging from digital marketers to attorneys, and public relations teams to bankers. Innovate New Albany’s Business Networking Group has grown so popular that it has moved out of the incubator’s conference room to a larger area to accommodate the growing group of 20 plus participants. The incubator’s role as a hub that inspires entrepreneurship continues to grow as well. In fact, Innovate New Albany is the site of one of 14 sessions of Otterbein University’s Entrepreneurship Class, giving students a chance to meet with real entrepreneurs. Otterbein’s Young Alumni Club and the New Albany Women’s Network have hosted events at the incubator; and the Columbus Executive Forum, a group of senior executives in job transition, holds monthly meetings there.

Closer to home, Collins sees opportunities to increase and expand upon the nature of engagements between Innovate New Albany and residents. “It’s really become a hub or crossroads where people from all walks of life and stages of their career can come to explore an idea for a new start up, get support to create a scalable enterprise or find the opportunity to apply their skills for one of our startups in a new and emerging industry,” Collins notes. “The opportunities are limitless.”

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2017 New Albany Annual Report | newalbanyohio.org

Photos courtesy of Malik Media

Connectivity & Community


“ Collaboration is essential to everything we do. The magic happens when people come together. We see it between the entrepreneurs housed within Innovate New Albany and among the individuals who participate in our programs.� Neil Collins, Onsite Leader, Innovate New Albany

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Connect QUICK FACTS • Resident website: www. newalbanyohio.org

Web, Social & e-News Updates

• Economic development website: www.newalbanybusiness.org • Innovate New Albany website: www.innovatenewalbany.org • New Albany households (3,500) and population (10,360) • Facebook posts displayed 1.6 million times to 826,000 unique users (50% increase from 2016) • 260,000 Twitter impressions (19% increase from 2016)

@cindyrun87 @saltybones

• 1,900 Instagram followers (72% increase from 2016) • All pics seen in this section were from Instagram users who tagged #NewAlbanyOhio • 2,058 of New Albany households now utilize Nextdoor • Use the hashtags #NewAlbanyOhio and #MyNewAlbany on your social media posts • Want to receive New Albany’s “the LIST” weekly e-newsletter? Register for it at www. newalbanyohio.org/subscribe

#NewAlbanyOhio

www.newalbanyohio.org

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www.newalbanybusiness.org

www.innovatenewalbany.org


@maggiekarunakarar

@caitlin.cippolo

@alexandra477

@jkaniaris

@marta.szajek

@ashleykohlerhill

@whattheark

@buckeyeweimaraners

@davideckl

@katie_rausch

@tink186

@jkaniaris

@jkaniaris

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The Classic The New Albany Classic – #1 in the Arena and in Our Hearts AFTER 20 YEARS of extraordinary success in raising more than $32 million for the fight against family violence through The Center for Family Safety and Healing, The Classic hung up its helmet. The Classic was recognized as the #1 specialty equestrian event in North America four straight years, helped establish show jumping in the central Ohio market, and contributed to significant local growth in the sport. In fact, Brave Horse, a new 75-acre show grounds just north of New Albany, will host a World Cup qualifier in 2018. Ultimately, this growth made scheduling increasingly difficult for future Classics, further exacerbated by the World Equestrian Games which will occur this September. When it became apparent that it would be impossible to select a date that would work well for the world-class and Olympic riders, The Classic organizers made the decision to retire the event. “The Classic has been a labor of love for all of us involved, and we simply could not be more proud of the impact of its success,” said Abigail Wexner, The Classic’s Founder and Host. “Thousands of families have been helped as a result of the support of so many loyal sponsors, volunteers and guests. We are grateful for the participation of the equestrian community as well, who came to New Albany from across the country to compete. Retiring this event after a successful twenty year run represents an opportunity to develop something new and I’m looking forward to exploring what’s next.” In all, more than 200,000 residents and visitors attended The Classic over its two decade span. The event will remain etched in the memories of many parents and children who shared special moments there during its run. “The New Albany Classic was a marquee event for our community and raised significant resources for The Center for Family Safety and Healing,” said New Albany Mayor Sloan Spalding. “I want to express my deep appreciation for the sponsors and patrons who supported this meaningful event and of course the cadre of volunteers that truly made it all so special. We look forward as a community to doing our part to support The Center for Family Safety and Healing’s mission and the critical services the Center provides to central Ohio families.”

The Classic became recognized as the #1 specialty equestrian event in North America and helped establish show jumping in the central Ohio market. 20

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Events NEW ALBANY PLAYS host to some of central Ohio’s most popular events, bringing the community together and providing opportunities for thousands of visitors to observe firsthand the beauty, serenity and friendliness of our community.

2018 Schedule of Major Events

May 19

Founders Day Festival & Community Parade

May 26

Project Hero Honor Ride

July 4

New Albany Symphony Independence Day 5K

July 4

New Albany Community Events Independence Day Parade

July 29

New Albany Chamber Taste of New Albany Pelotonia

August 11

Canine Companions Dog Fest

August 18

Touch-a-Truck @ New Albany Public Service Department

September 7

A&F Challenge

September 9

New Albany Walking Classic

November 22

Thanks For Giving Thanksgiving Day Run/Walk

Photos: bungee jumper, volunteers and American flag courtesy of Meg_At; top right courtesy of Kate Morrison; Michael Fenster courtesy of Eagle Backers

August 4-5

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Government 101 QUICK FACTS • Population estimate 10,360

• Square miles 14.37 (9,197 acres) • Number of homes 3,500 • Median home value $492,400

• Median household income $191,375

• High school grad 99%

• College grad 77%

NEW ALBANY, OHIO, is a master planned community of 10,360 residents located fifteen miles northeast of Columbus, Ohio’s capital city, and ten miles from the John Glenn Columbus International Airport. New Albany’s pastoral setting, timeless architecture, worldclass amenities and attention to detail offer an exceptional quality of life for its residents. New Albany is home to one of the largest master planned international business parks in the Midwest, featuring dual feed electric power and fiber optic capabilities for companies of all sizes.

Home Rule Charter

New Albany residents approved the community’s first charter in 1992, giving the city greater local control and flexibility in the governance of local affairs. Ohio statutes govern only on matters that the New Albany Charter does not address. The charter is reviewed every ten years and any proposed revisions must be approved by the New Albany electorate before they can be enacted.

Style of Government

New Albany utilizes the Council-Manager form of government, which combines political leadership of elected officials with the managerial experience of an appointed, professional city manager who serves as the city’s CEO.

Mayor & City Council

City Council has been granted certain powers by the Ohio Constitution, the laws of the State of Ohio and the New Albany Charter. These powers are exercised through the adoption of ordinances and resolutions. Among other things, the charter gives City Council (from l. to r.): Chip Fellows, City Council the authority to create and abolish departments, Colleen Briscoe, Mike Durik, commissions, boards and committees, audit accounts and Mayor Sloan Spalding, Dr. Glyde Marsh, records, conduct inquiries and investigations, levy taxes, enforce Matt Shull, Marlene Brisk laws and regulations, adopt a budget and appropriate funds, adopt building and zoning regulations and hire a city manager.

City Administration and Department Directors

The city manager serves as the community’s CEO and is appointed by City Council to: • Provide organizational leadership • Manage municipal operations • Coordinate and direct the budget process • Oversee implementation of City Council enacted policies and adopted budgets • Ensure effective delivery of services to New Albany residents and businesses • Advise City Council on policy matters and keep them apprised of municipal operations • Direct department heads and consultants • Implement all fiscal, planning and infrastructure programs

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Photos: Peletonia barn courtesy of Rebecca Kopelman; Market Square courtesy of Peter Aaron; fall trees courtesy of Charlie Jones

City Council is the legislative branch of government consisting of seven members, one of whom is the mayor. City Council and mayoral elections are held in November of odd-numbered years and are non-partisan. City Council members are elected by residents to four-year terms. The mayor, in addition to the powers, rights and duties of a City Council member, presides over meetings and often acts as a spokesperson to other governments. The mayor has no veto powers.


New Albany Boards & Commissions

City boards and commissions play an important role in our local government by evaluating matters of interest and making recommendations to City Council. All board and commission meetings are open to the public. Architectural Review Board Meets the second Monday of each month at 7:00 p.m. Duties: Review plans, drawings, and signage applications. Issue Certificates of Appropriateness for any major or minor environmental or zoning changes. (See NA Code 1157.07.) Hear appeals of staff decisions or interpretations made under New Albany Code section 1157. Qualifications: Candidate preferably has background in architecture, landscape architecture, city planning, interior design, industrial design, engineering, or other allied design professions. Board of Construction Appeals Meets the third Monday of each month at 7:00 p.m. Duties: Hear all appeals related to one-, two-, and three- family dwellings but not commercial buildings or Property Maintenance Code. Also has jurisdiction over licensing procedures when determination is needed as to the issuing, detaining, or revoking of a license.

Qualifications: Candidates must have qualifying experience and/ or training pertaining to residential construction such as persons trained in mechanical/structural engineering, building, architecture or other applicable field. Board of Zoning Appeals Meets the fourth Monday of each month at 7:00 p.m. Duties: Hear and decide appeals regarding legislation and administrative determinations related to zoning and land use. Also shall hear variances from zoning area regulations and general development standards. Subpoena witnesses, administer oaths, compel discovery as needed. Qualifications: Preferred background in design, architecture, landscaping, construction, engineering, city planning or other applicable field. Cemetery Restoration Advisory Board Meets as necessary Duties: Advise City Council and staff on issues related to the restoration of the Old Burial Grounds. Qualifications: No specific qualifications necessary. Community Improvement Corporation Meets as necessary Duties: Trustees adopt by-laws and govern the CIC, handle CIC employee matters, handle CIC

financial matters, act as agent of New Albany in certain matters. Qualifications: Prefer experienced business background. Economic Development Commission Meets as necessary Duties: Study, analyze, and make recommendations regarding economic development in New Albany Qualifications: Background in business and/or economic development preferred. Income Tax Board of Review Meets as necessary Duties: Hear tax appeals, issue resolutions/declarations. Qualifications: Background in tax law and finance preferred. Jeanne B. McCoy Community Center for the Arts (Appointed by City of New Albany, Plain Township, McCoy Center, New Albany Community Foundation, New Albany Plain Local Schools) Meets the second Thursday of each odd month at 8:00 a.m. Duties: Foster an appreciation of the arts and culture by providing life-long learning opportunities through education, exposure and participation. Qualifications: No specific qualifications necessary. New Albany Parks & Recreation (Appointed by City of New Albany, New Albany Plain Local Schools, and Plain Township) Meets the first Monday of each month at 5:30 p.m. Duties: Oversee fiscal operations of JPD, approve budgets. Qualifications: No specific qualifications necessary. Preferred background in finance, business, law, or active user of the parks. Parks & Trails Advisory Board Meets the first Monday of each month at 6:00 p.m. Duties: Advisory capacity only, make recommendations regarding

parks and trails to council and administration. Qualifications: Preferred background in natural resources, parks, city planning, or an active user of parks and trails. Personnel Appeals Board Meets as necessary Duties: Shall hear appeals from administrative determinations made pursuant to Administrative Code. Qualifications: HR, business, or law background preferred. Planning Commission Meets the third Monday of each month at 7:00 p.m. Duties: Hear applications for land use, zoning classifications, recommend legislative actions, review legislation, rules, and regulations re: city planning, land use, and zoning. Qualifications: Preferred background in design, architecture, landscaping, city planning, etc.

Rocky Fork Blacklick Accord (Appointed by City of Columbus, City of New Albany, Plain Township) Meets the third Thursday of each month at 7:00 p.m. Duties: Evaluation applications for rezoning and make recommendations to the planning body of the impacted jurisdiction (Columbus, New Albany, Plain Township) in the RFBA area. Qualifications: No specific qualifications necessary. Preferred background in design, architecture, landscaping, city planning, etc.

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Leadership LIKE MANY PRIVATE sector CEO/Board relationships, the city manager serves as CEO, advises City Council on policy matters, implements City Council enacted policies, works with City Council to develop and execute a community vision and provides organizational leadership. Organizational priorities include the continued pursuit of improvements and efficiencies to city operations; growing our local economy through programs and projects that encourage private development and maximize New Albany’s return on capital investment; and enhancing our community through development that supports lifelong learning, health and wellness, the arts and sustainability.

Joseph Stefanov City Manager

Administration functions include human resources, public records management, legal services, information technology, risk management, buildings and grounds, community relations, special event coordination, Mayor’s Court, and special projects. Most of these administrative functions are overseen by the Director of Administrative Services.

QUICK FACTS • 2017 full-time city staff positions: 86 • 2017 Mayor’s Court cases processed: 1,308 • Coordinated logistical support for 14 community events • Established McCoy Center longterm capital funding source with partners • Rose Run Park planning nearly complete (see page 12 for more information) • Spearheaded creation and implementation of the Western Licking County Accord in conjunction with Jersey Township and the Village of Johnstown. This accord will guide development in the Licking County corridor for decades to come.

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Photos: Ealy House courtesy of Ryan Hill; Village Hall and home courtesy of Peter Aaron; Market Square courtesy of Jeffrey Horvath; leisure trail courtesy of Ken Tilley; Highgrove bridge courtesy of Charlie Jones

Adrienne Joly Director of Administrative Services


Development THE COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT team manages the built environment through comprehensive planning, zoning, building, economic development and engineering services. Beauty abounds here, from our Georgian architecture and wooded vistas to our vast array of parks and green space. Counting the Rocky Fork Metro Park, nearly one in five acres is devoted to parkland or open space; and our 36 miles of leisure trails connect our neighborhoods to the business park and the Village Center, our core and gathering place for dining and community celebrations.

Jennifer Chrysler Director of Community Development

QUICK FACTS • Total residential units: 3,500 • Average days for building permit review in 2017: residential – 4.8; commercial – 18.5 • Total Permits Issued: 721 • Total Inspections: 4,701 • 2017 jobs created in the New Albany International Business Park: 2,089 • Commercial development under construction: 1.9 million square feet • Acres zoned in 2017: 478.97 • SmartRide New Albany riders: 19,546

Our 4,000-acre New Albany International Business Park is the largest master planned commercial office park in Ohio with 15,000 jobs, more than eleven million square feet of commercial development and five specialized industry clusters. In 2017, the community development department managed more than 1.9 million square feet of commercial construction in various stages of development throughout New Albany and announced the creation of 2,089 jobs. Major 2017 company recruitment or expansions included Facebook, AEP, Aetna, Aerotek, Aromair, Bocchi, PharmaForce, Onyx and Wallick Communities. These company partners are crucial to our community success because local income taxes are the life blood of city services (property taxes mainly support our schools, township fire, parks and county-wide services).

New Albany Land Use at a Glance Commercial • 39.9% commercial • While best known for its iconic white horse fence and Georgian architecture, New Albany is home to the largest master planned business park in Ohio. • The New Albany International Business Park, located within 500 miles of half the U.S. and Canadian population, has four interchanges along SR 161. Residential • 35.9% residential • 3,500 total households • 0.38 units per acre, the lowest residential density (by far) of all comparable central Ohio cities Right-of-Way • 13.0% Right-of-Way/Civic, Institutional, Governmental Open Space • 11.2% Open Space • Counting Rocky Fork Metro Park, which abuts New Albany, >18% • 36+ miles of leisure trails connecting all facets of New Albany • Park or open space within ¼ mile of most neighborhoods

New Albany’s Planning Framework • • • • • • • • • •

Compelling environment Exciting destination People take precedence Connected community Carefully considered design Commitment to quality Recognizable community Comprehensive sustainability Collaborative growth Accessible participation

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Finances NEW ALBANY FINANCE functions include overseeing fiscal operations, debt issuance, providing an accurate accounting of receipts and disbursements, and coordinating the annual audit. New Albany’s general obligation rating from Moody’s Investors Service is Aaa and New Albany’s rating from Standard & Poor’s is AAA, the highest ratings possible by those agencies. New Albany was recognized by the Government Finance Officers Association of the United States and Canada, as well as the Ohio House of Representatives, for its Comprehensive Annual Financial Report.

Your Taxes Bethany Staats, Certified Public Accountant Finance Director

QUICK FACTS • New Albany participates in Ohio’s Checkbook Program, where residents can review every check written by the city.

Property Taxes

Property taxes, which are based on the local tax rate (in mills) and the taxable value of the property, are critical to schools, townships and county-wide services agencies. In 2017, the Franklin County Auditor determined annual property taxes for City of New Albany households to be $2,729.60 per $100,000 fair market value based upon the mills for Tax District 222 – City of New Albany, Franklin County, New Albany Plain Local Schools, Plain Township Fire. (This millage rate does not include the 3.75 mills paid by most New Albany residents to the New Albany Community Authority for debt on the New Albany High School building, Fodor Road improvements and fire station improvements and equipment.)

2017 Property Taxes

• 84% of all general fund revenues in 2017 were from income taxes paid primarily by businesses and their employees who work in New Albany, no matter where they live.

$2,729.60 per $100,000 of Value Source: Franklin County Auditor’s Office

Itemized Breakdown of Resident Property Taxes

• Property taxes constituted less than 6% of revenues for city services. • Local income tax rate: 2% • New Albany’s Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (CAFR) received Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting – the highest form of governmental accounting recognition • New Albany’s bond rating: Moody’s – Aaa; Standard & Poor’s - AAA (the highest ratings possible)

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62% New Albany Plain Local School District . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,679.00 19% Franklin County . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 519.19 Board of Developmental Disabilities; Children’s Services; Alcohol, Drug and Mental Health Board; General Fund; Aging; Metro Parks; Zoo 10% Plain Township Fire. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 285.24 3% Columbus Metropolitan Library. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 77.29 2% Eastland Joint Vocational School. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 61.74 2% City of New Albany. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 59.89 2% New Albany Joint Parks District. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 47.25

Income Taxes

In 2017, local income taxes accounted for 84% of all city general fund revenues. In Ohio, income taxes are typically paid to the community where people work, not where they live. Most New Albany residents pay no income taxes to New Albany because the city provides them a 100% credit for income taxes they pay to other communities. This is why creating jobs inside New Albany borders is so critical. New Albany levies a two percent local income tax on gross wages, salaries and other personal services compensation. This tax is also levied on net profits of corporate headquarters and small businesses based here.

2017 New Albany Annual Report | newalbanyohio.org


2017 Revenue and Expenses 2017 City of New Albany General Fund Revenue

2017 City of New Albany General Fund Expenses

Source: City of New Albany

Source: City of New Albany

24% Police 12% Community Development 21% Public Service/Engineering 9% Administration 3% IT 5% Finance 2% Legal 1% Mayor’s Court 3% Facilities Maintenance 3% Other Charges 11% Transfers/Advances 6% Debt Service

$20,415,125

5.5% Property Taxes 84% Income Taxes 1.5% Hotel Taxes .5% Inter-governmental 2% Charges for Services 4% Fines, Licenses, Permits 2.5% Other

Cash Balance at Beginning of Year

$15,657,464

2017 2016 2015 2014 2013 $13,299,809 $12,087,415 $10,541,880 $10,615,669 $ 8,407,623

Revenue Property Taxes $ 1,141,832 $ 981,941 $ 1,243,861 $ 1,043,756 $ 1,001,933 Income Taxes $17,179,909 $15,747,212 $14,238,998 $11,663,496 $11,710,706 Hotel Taxes $ 328,232 $ 258,630 $ 184,065 $ 183,225 $ 48,447 Inter-governmental $ 118,021 $ 126,734 $ 119,284 $ 896,990 $ 282,295 Charges for Services $ 392,819 $ 313,551 $ 428,929 $ 470,435 $ 429,900 Fines, Licenses, Permits $ 733,040 $ 548,812 $ 656,890 $ 665,082 $ 578,997 Other $ 521,272 $ 430,428 $ 485,052 $ 512,165 $ 484,245 Transfers $ 0 $ 85,000 $ 48,059 $ 9,685 $ 884,533 Total Revenue

$20,415,125 $18,492,308 $17,405,138 $15,444,834 $15,421,056

Expenses Police $ 3,808,707 $ 3,536,323 $ 3,399,609 $ 3,114,690 $ 2,861,532 Community Development $ 1,914,616 $ 1,980,815 $ 1,914,034 $ 1,827,821 $ 1,579,895 Public Service/Engineering $ 3,219,995 $ 3,134,180 $ 3,063,379 $ 2,818,412 $ 2,493,588 Administration $ 1,460,852 $ 1,353,446 $ 1,878,377 $ 1,507,701 $ 1,151,343 IT $ 409,478 $ 382,013 $ 375,278 $ 402,343 $ 115,610 Finance $ 845,848 $ 874,357 $ 781,110 $ 684,326 $ 741,016 Legal $ 268,436 $ 207,075 $ 371,340 $ 293,092 $ 338,581 Mayor’s Court $ 237,463 $ 240,670 $ 222,145 $ 223,630 $ 225,259 Facilities Maintenance $ 480,962 $ 532,626 $ 365,772 $ 360,813 $ 325,846 Other Charges $ 486,982 $ 495,103 $ 351,319 $ 366,645 $ 425,550 Transfers & Advances $ 1,655,000 $ 3,556,822 $ 2,105,000 $ 3,919,150 $ 2,954,789 Debt Service $ 869,125 $ 986,484 $ 1,032,241 $ 0 $ 0 Total Expenses

$15,657,464 $17,279,914 $15,859,604 $15,518,623 $13,213,010

Cash Balance at End of Year

$18,057,470 $13,299,809 $12,087,414 $10,541,880 $10,615,669 newalbanyohio.org | 2017 New Albany Annual Report

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Police NEW ALBANY IS one of Ohio’s safest communities and a key reason is our police force’s strong interaction with residents and businesses to protect life and property. Whether performing vacation house checks, offering women’s self-defense classes, working with businesses, patrolling neighborhoods, conducting bicycle safety programs for children or maintaining a presence on the school learning campus throughout the academic year, our officers understand that strong relationships set the foundation for a safer community.

Greg Jones Police Chief

QUICK FACTS

The New Albany Police Department consists of 22 uniformed officers and nine civilian staff, including seven full-time dispatch staff. More than 70% of our uniformed officers have obtained undergraduate degrees and four are military veterans. The department holds itself to the highest standards of excellence and professionalism. To that end, it is in the second year of a three year process to become nationally accredited. Our school district partners promote the idea that if you see something, say something and report it. We couldn’t agree more. Please report suspicious activity to the police at 614-855-1234. Those who believe an activity could be a life threatening emergency should call 9-1-1 immediately.

• Officers dedicated to the school learning campus throughout the school year: 2 • Times distracted driving simulator used at high school: 11 • Number of ALICE (Alert, Lockdown, Inform, Counter, Evacuate) active shooter response trainings conducted: 4 in each building • Unwanted medications collected through Drug Drop Box: 75 pounds • Citizen Police Academy graduates: 30 (the largest class ever, in conjunction with the Gahanna PD) • RAD (Rape Aggression Defense) classes for females aged 18 and older: 3 • 2017 Safety Town registrants: 316 children • 2017 service training hours: 2,983 • 2017 vacation house checks performed: 2,510 (to sign up for a house check, go to https:// newalbanyohio.org/answers/ vacation-checks/).

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Police Station Drug Drop Box Proving Very Popular By Greg Jones, Police Chief

I am guessing that everyone reading this is aware of the opioid epidemic in our country. Every community has been impacted in some way by opioids, including New Albany, and it has become increasingly important for communities find ways to keep prescription drugs out of the hands of those who aren’t prescribed them. For years, police and fire agencies in central Ohio have worked with the Drug Enforcement Agency, area hospitals and pharmacies to coordinate drug takeback days. In late 2016, Dr. Phil Heit from Healthy New Albany came to me with an alternative solution – a permanent community drug drop-off box that would help keep prescription drugs off our streets and possibly out of the hands of teens and loved ones. Later in 2017, after we completed research about drug drop boxes, the New Albany Police Department installed a permanent drug drop box in the police station lobby (50 Village Hall Road). Since then residents have dropped off more than 75 pounds of unwanted

prescriptions and over the counter drugs into the drug drop box…no questions asked. I highlight this fact because anonymity may be important to some who would think about using the box. Staff is always available to assist you if you want or need it, but you can remain as anonymous as you want to be. Drugs placed in the box stay out of the hands of those who may abuse them because everything placed in the box is incinerated. Plus, the box is available for use 24/7/365. It is important to note that the drug drop box isn’t for illegal drugs – although if there is a parent who wants to work with the police in dropping off illegal drugs they may have found, I encourage them to call 614-855-1234 to coordinate a drop-off with police staff. The contract with the drug drop box company does not cover illegal drugs, only prescription and over the counter drugs.

litter and thrown away with trash), nor are syringes or illegal drugs. Many pill containers will not fit in the drug drop box receptacle. The NAPD suggests recycling the actual pill containers at home and destroying any personal information from those pill containers for your own protection before you bring your medications to the police station. The box is not for use by local doctor’s offices.

Accepted drop box drugs include prescription pills, over the counter pills and FDA pills for animals. Liquid drugs are not accepted (these can be disposed of in cat

The drop box allows for 24/7/365 service, and residents disposed of more than 75 pounds of unwanted prescription and over the counter drugs since Autumn 2017.

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Public Service NO DEPARTMENT BETTER depicts traditional city services than public service, whose crews work around the clock when necessary to perform such services as snow removal, leaf collection, mosquito management, road maintenance, fire hydrant maintenance, water and sewer line maintenance, traffic signal maintenance, trimming of right-of-way trees and even maintaining the streetlight flower pots along Market Street. Their efforts enhance the quality of life of residents, visitors and employees throughout our community and they are essential to other city departments by performing maintenance on all city-owned properties, vehicles and equipment. Trash, recycling and yard waste collection are also managed by this department.

Mark Nemec Director of Public Service

Accomplishments during 2017 included implementing a program that will eventually lead to the changing of all street lights to LED bulbs; hiring a city forester; and gaining “City Arboretum” status through ArbNet, an international community of arboreta and tree-focused professionals. This status is above and beyond our efforts of being recognized as a Tree City USA community since 2010.

QUICK FACTS Basic infrastructure to maintain: • 3,214 catch basins • 2,336 sanitary sewer manholes • 1,311 streetlights • 1,153 fire hydrants • 278 miles of roadway • 232 miles of water and sewer lines • 36.6 miles of leisure trail • 22 bridges • Multiple city buildings, structures and parking lots • Collected more than 568,000 pounds of leaves • Managed the collection of 10.2 million pounds of trash, recycling and yard waste • The annual Touch-a-Truck event, which will be held this August 18, is a big hit for the entire family.

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2017 New Albany Annual Report | newalbanyohio.org

Photos: Touch-a-Truck courtesy of Sandy Martin; Rose Run Bridge courtesy of Alonna Skinner

• 18 signalized intersections


A HUB OF ENTREPRENEURIAL INITIATIVES • Created in a community built by visionary entrepreneurs, now inspiring the next generation of entrepreneurs. • Featuring an active business incubator with the space and resources needed for start-ups to scale rapidly. • Leveraging partnerships that improve entrepreneurs’ access to customers, capital, expertise and skilled talent.


City Contacts

Other New Albany Area Municipal Services

City Service Contacts Administration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 614.855.3913 admin@newalbanyohio.org Community Development. . . . . . . . . . . 614.939.2254 development@newalbanyohio.org Community Development Inspection Scheduling. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 614.939.2222 City Council. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 614.939.2244 council@newalbanyohio.org Finance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 614.939.2245 finance@newalbanyohio.org Mayor’s Court. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 614.855.8577 court@newalbanyohio.org Police. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 614.855.1234 info@newalbanypolice.org Public Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 614.855.0076 publicservice@newalbanyohio.org

Local Income Tax Questions Regional Income Tax Agency. . . . . . . 1.866.721.7482

New Albany Plain Local Schools. . . . . . 614.855.2040 New Albany Parks & Recreation. . . . . . 614.939.7275 New Albany Library. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 614.645.2275 Plain Township. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 614.855.7770 Plain Township Fire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 614.855.7370 Plain Township Aquatic Center. . . . . . . 614.775.9430

New Albany Chamber of Commerce and Franklin County Contacts New Albany Chamber of Commerce. . . 614.855.4400 Franklin County Board of Elections. . . . 614.525.3100 Franklin County Auditor. . . . . . . . . . . . 614.525.4663

Utilities Cable (Spectrum). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.800.892.4357 Electric (AEP). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.800.672.2231 Electric, Gas & Propane (The Energy Cooperative). . . . . . . . 1.800.255.6815 Gas (Columbia Gas). . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.800.344.4077 OUPS (Call Before You Dig). . . . . . . . 1.800.362.2764 Sewer (City of Columbus). . . . . . . . . . . 614.645.8164 Trash (Rumpke). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.800.828.8171 Water (City of Columbus). . . . . . . . . . . 614.645.8270

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New Albany Annual Report - 2017  
New Albany Annual Report - 2017