Discover Grove City September/October 2022

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GroveCity DISCOVER

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2022

The official magazine of Grove City, Ohio

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The

Making Space

INSIDE

School buildings change while community remains

SWCSD Principals

Celebration of 170 years Athletic HOF inductees BIA Parade of Homes


Ted’s

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1335 Dublin Rd., Ste. 101C Columbus, Ohio 43215 614-572-1240 • Fax 614-572-1241 www.cityscenecolumbus.com

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Gianna Barrett

Vice President Grove City Advertising Director

Jamie Armistead Gary Hoffman Cameron Carr Tyler Kirkendall Claire Miller Megan Roth Amanda DePerro Kate Anderson Lindsey Capritta

Vice President, Operations Creative Director Editors

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Brandon Klein

Digital Editor

Dan Nase Laura Pappas

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The Publisher welcomes contributions in the form of manuscripts, drawings, photographs or story ideas to consider for possible publication. Enclose a SASE with each submission or email editor@cityscenemediagroup. com. Publisher does not assume responsibility for loss or damage. The appearance of advertising in Discover Grove City does not constitute an endorsement of the advertiser’s product or service by the City of Grove City. Discover Grove City is published in January, March, May, July, September, November. Subscriptions are free for households within the city limits of Grove City and Jackson Township. For advertising information or bulk purchases, call Gianna Barrett at 614-572-1255. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written consent of the publishers. Discover Grove City is a registered trademark of CityScene Media Group. Printed in the U.S.A. © 2022.

www.DiscoverGroveCity.com


GroveCity DISCOVER

Volume 5, Number 2 September/October 2022

The official magazine of Grove City, Ohio

4 Calendar What’s Happening? 6 Message from Mayor Richard L. “Ike” Stage Arts in the Alley

8 Faces

New School, Same Principal

Principals look to maintain traditions and culture in new and updated middle schools

8

12

Get to Know Chief Fambro

13

Department Spotlight

14

In Focus

A Q&A with Grove City’s new Chief of Police

Grove City Development Department

A Bigger Boo Chamber of Commerce continues to expand Boo Off Broadway

14

18

Celebrating 170 Years

21

Student Spotlight

Host of commemorative events to be held throughout Grove City in September

Raisin’ the Hoof

GCHS student places fifth in national equestrian competition

23

Remember the Name

26

Living

Meet Grove City High School Athletic Hall of Fame’s newest members

Parade of Homes is Back in Grove City BIA Parade showcases new builds across central Ohio

29

Around Grove City Luxury Living

29

Real Estate Top Homes SOLD

30

Bookmarks The Source

28

21 @DiscoverGroveCity On the cover: Holly Henneman, Brett Harmon and Daniel Boland by Ray LaVoie

32

Parks and Recreation Offerings for October and November 2022

www.DiscoverGroveCity.com www.DiscoverGroveCity.com

September/October 2022 3


Calendar

For more events visit www.DiscoverGroveCity.com

What’s Happening? Events subject to change. Consult websites for details and updates.

Sept. 9-18

Grove City 170th Celebration | Ohio Open Doors Daily historical events at various locations throughout Grove City. Watch for event details. www.grovecityohio.gov Sept. 10 Heart of Grove City Car Show

Sept. 1-Oct. 31

Grove City Pumpkin Trek Visit Grove City 3995 Broadway www.visitgrovecityoh.com

Sept. 2, 16

American Red Cross Blood Drive Noon-6 p.m. Kingston Center 3226 Kingston Ave. www.redcrossblood.org

Sept. 2, 16, 30

Food Truck Festival and Shop Hop 4-9 p.m. Grove City Town Center Broadway and Park Street www.heartofgrovecity.org

Sept. 2

Summer Sizzle Concert Series – Lee Gantt Band 7-8:30 p.m. Town Center Park 3359 Park St. www.grovecityohio.gov

Sept. 3, 10

Grove City Area Chamber of Commerce Farmers’ Market 8 a.m.-noon Grove City Town Center 3444 Park St. www.gcchamber.org

4 September/October 2022

Sept. 10

Heart of Grove City Car Show 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Town Center Park 3359 Park St. www.heartofgrovecity.org

Sept. 10

Heart of Grove City Smoked Meats Festival 2-7 p.m. Town Center Park 3359 Park St. www.heartofgrovecity.org

Sept. 11

9/11 Memorial Service 8:30 a.m. Jackson Township Fire Station 204 4900 Buckeye Pkwy. centennial.legion.org/ohio/post164

Sept. 13

Grove City Community Club Meeting 7 p.m. 3397 Civic Pl. www.grovecitycommunityclub.org

Sept. 16-18

Arts in the Alley Friday, 5-9 p.m. Parade, Saturday, 9:30 a.m. Saturday, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Sunday, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Grove City Town Center gcchamber.org/arts

Sept. 17

Meet the Artists 10 a.m. Visit Grove City 3995 Broadway www.visitgrovecityoh.com www.DiscoverGroveCity.com


Sept. 23

Summer Sizzle Concert Series – Rezes-Hall Band 7-8:30 p.m. Town Center Park 3359 Park St. www.grovecityohio.gov

Do you have an event you would like to submit? Send details and photos to tkirkendall@cityscenemediagroup.com.

Oct. 14, 28

Food Truck Festival and Shop Hop 4-9 p.m. Grove City Town Center Broadway and Park Street www.grovecityohio.gov

Sept. 23-Oct. 9

Murder on the Orient Express Little Theatre Off Broadway 3981 Broadway www.ltob.org

Sept. 24

Community Shredding Day 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Park Street Intermediate School 3205 Park St. www.grovecityohio.gov

Sept. 24

SWACO Household Hazardous Waste Drop-off 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Kingston Center 4226 Kingston Ave. www.grovecityohio.gov

Sept. 24; Oct. 1, 8

Grove City Community Club Fall Harvest Market 8 a.m.-noon Grove City Town Center 3444 Park St. www.grovecitycommunityclub.org

Sept. 24

Southwest Franklin County Historical Society Open House 2-4 p.m. Century Village at Fryer Park 4185 Orders Rd. www.grovecityohio.gov

Sept. 30-Oct. 2

Autumn Adventures Various Grove City locations www.grovecityohio.gov

Sept. 30

Summer Sizzle Concert Series – Lords of Literature 7-8:30 p.m. Town Center Park 3359 Park St. www.grovecityohio.gov

www.DiscoverGroveCity.com

Oct. 15 Oct. 1-31

Minion Hunt Grove City Town Center www.grovecityohio.gov

Evans Center Craft Bazaar 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Evans Center 4330 Dudley Ave. www.grovecityohio.gov

Oct. 1, 8, 15, 23

Oct. 21

Author Spotlight 10 a.m.-noon Visit Grove City 3995 Broadway www.visitgrovecityoh.com

Oct. 2

K-9 Rescue Dog Walk/Run 10:30 a.m. Breck Community Park 3005 Demorest Rd. www.tedberryevents.com

Oct. 2

Old-Time Harvest Day Noon-4 p.m. Century Village at Fryer Park 4185 Orders Rd. www.grovecityohio.gov

Oct. 7, 21

American Red Cross Blood Drive Noon-6 p.m. Kingston Center 3226 Kingston Ave. www.redcrossblood.org

Oct. 11

Grove City Community Club Meeting 7 p.m. 3397 Civic Pl. www.grovecitycommunityclub.org

Chamber Foundation Fundraiser 6:30-10:30 p.m. Aladdin Shrine Center 1801 Gateway Cir. www.gcchamber.org

Oct. 22

Rotary Club of Grove City 4-6 p.m. Le Petit Chevalier Winery Creola, OH www.gcrotaryoh.com

Oct. 29

The Haunted History of Grove City Noon-4 p.m. Visit Grove City 3995 Broadway www.visitgrovecityoh.com

Oct. 29

Boo Off Broadway 1-4 p.m. Grove City Town Center Promenade Park Street at Broadway www.gcchamber.org

Oct. 31

Beggars’ Night 6-8 p.m. Throughout Grove City www.grovecityohio.gov

Calendar of Events Sponsored by Franklin County Banking Center. www.VCNBfamily.com September/October 2022 5


Arts in the Alley – A Fun-Filled Weekend

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ith the beginning of fall comes cooler temperatures, football and soccer, beautiful color-changing scenery, pumpkinspiced everything, and the Grove City Area Chamber of Commerce Arts in the Alley! The festival of music and art brings together artisans of every variety, including photographers, sculptors, crafters, quilters and more. Artists compete as their work is displayed throughout Town Center in six different juried show categories, vendors line the streets east of Broadway, selling their wares and Kids’ Fun Street invites budding artists to join in hands-on activities that nurture young, creative minds. Several delicious concessions are available from commercial vendors and charitable organizations taking advantage of the opportunity to raise funds for their causes. Again this year, the festival includes the Voice of Grove City vocal competition on the main stage where singers showcase their abilities while competing for the title. It’s nice to witness the crowd support the singers as they belt out their tunes. This all proves one thing for certain: Our hometown is teeming with talent, and we enjoy the annual opportunity to share it with all of central Ohio. In its 43rd year, Arts in the Alley continues to draw thousands of visitors to Grove City, but it’s more than simply a festival of artistic and musical talent. It’s a weekend filled with laughter, friendship and community, a time when we welcome visitors as our own neighbors and enjoy time with family. The Saturday morning parade down Broadway and onto Columbus Street is one of my favorite traditions. With more than 100 entries, I often have the flexibility to fit in with a participant at the start of the parade then swing back around and join another

6 September/October 2022

Mayor Stage waves to the crowd during the 2021 Arts in the Alley parade.

entry near the end of the parade. Seems silly maybe, but it gives me a chance to say hello to as many of the people watching the parade as I can. Just as many others do on that Saturday, I’ll stick around Town Center after the parade to watch the Grove City and Central Crossing high school marching bands and choirs perform and take in all the wonderful items vendors are selling. Many of the vendors have been part of Arts in the Alley for years, and I have come to know some on a personal level as a result. It’s like a reunion at times. I enjoy making my rounds to many of the shows – craft, fine arts, photography, quilt and youth art – to see the entries and cast my People’s Choice vote for each. It’s fun to see which flower-themed pieces of art in each category have been selected by the judges to contend for the Helena McComb Award, an award given by the McComb Family in memory of one of the festival co-founders. The Easel Award is another competitive show category of great interest

to me as the winning piece ultimately becomes part of the city’s collection and will hang in the hallway of City Hall. The independent, impartial judges sure have their work cut out for them in this category where the top prize is a $2,000 purchase award. The entry criteria for the Easel Award have changed this year, no longer limiting subject matter to a Grove City theme. This is likely to draw many more submissions, which this year must depict the artist’s vision of his or her own hometown. Arts in the Alley fills Grove City with vibrant art and musical talent, a wonderful reminder that the natural color and splendor of fall is just around the corner. To enter one of the show category competitions or for more information about Arts in the Alley, visit www.gcchamber.org/arts.

Mayor Richard L. “Ike” Stage

www.DiscoverGroveCity.com


Capital City Cakes The Garden Bar Grove City Nutrition Blu Willy’s Local Cantina Zamarelli’s Pizza Transcend Coffee & Roastery Grandstand Pizza Planks on Broadway Lilly’s Kitchen Tammy’s Pizza Plum Run Winery Grove City Brewing Co. Town Center Pub The Chandler

The Heart of Grove City We’re All In This Together! Support Local Businesses www.heartofgrovecity.org

Sommer House Gallery & Co Skylarks Toys & Comics Card Collector 2 Sports Cards Grace & 62 Grove Sheek Boutique

Upcoming Events Food Truck Festival & Shop Hop Sept. 2, 16, 30 | Oct. 14, 28

BOTOX| FILLER| KYBELLA| MICRONEEDLING

Heart of Grove City Car Show Sept. 10

Heart of Grove City Smoked Meats Festival Sept. 10

Boo Of f Broadway Oct. 29

3796 BROADWAY, GROVE CITY, OHIO 43123 Follow us: @fade_aesthetics

@FadeAestheticsGC


Faces

By Cameron Carr

New School, Same Principal

Principals look to maintain traditions and culture in new and updated middle schools

T

he first day of school is always a day of change and new beginnings. This rang especially true for many middle school students in the South-Western City School District as they began the 2022-23 school year at new or updated buildings. The district updated or moved five middle schools, including three that primarily serve the Grove City area. Brookpark Middle School moved a couple miles southwest into the new Beulah Park Middle School, Pleasant View Middle School relocated a few miles northwest and Jackson Middle School saw a number of additions to its existing building. “We’re really excited to be embarking on a year where we hope we can bring back some normalcy,” says Brett Harmon, principal at Pleasant View Middle School. “Most important is just to make sure that families and kids feel like we’re getting back to business.” The new and expanded buildings offer state-of-the-art technology and allow for a more balanced distribution of students across the middle schools. Students at all three schools will study in updated science labs, work in multiuse flex spaces and enjoy improved physical education facilities. Jackson Middle School saw the addition of five specificuse classrooms along with other flexible use spaces. The updates also include a new gym, leaving a second auxiliary gym space and an upgraded library media center.

To see what Pleasant View Middle School was like circa 1987, Principal Harmon and Evan Debo, executive director of communications for the district, followed a treasure map that had been hidden behind a tile mosaic of the school’s Panther mascot. Harmon and Debo dug up the capsule themselves. The students who made the time capsule had all signed the box. Roots and dirt had largely corroded the contents, but a VHS tape and two cassette tapes were retrieved, though not in usable condition. “I’d like to hear,” Harmon says. “I graduated from high school in ’86. I bet there was some good stuff on that ’87 cassette.” 8 September/October 2022

Pleasant View Middle School Principal Brett Harmon

“It’s just gorgeous when you walk through it,” says Principal Daniel Boland. “We’re very excited about growing into that space.” A significant upgrade for Beulah Park and Pleasant View: air conditioning. “Parents and kids alike are going to relish walking into those schools,” Harmon says. Beulah Park will experience the biggest change as it moves its location and updates its branding. The middle school will www.DiscoverGroveCity.com

Photo by Ray LaVoie

Pleasant View Time Capsule


Photo by Ray LaVoie

Henneman. “It’s also an homage to Beulah Park, the old racing track that used to be there.” Reflecting the community involvement in the rebrand, the Beulah Park Broncos’ logo was designed by SouthWestern Career Academy interactive media design student Charlee Cahill, who graduated in spring 2022. While community members voted in favor of a rebrand from Brookpark to Beulah Park, they favored keeping Pleasant View the same. Harmon says that reflects the long ties that many have to the schools. During the final walk through of Pleasant View, Harmon says administrators saw a large turnout that included students in letterman sweaters from the ’60s. One former student worked with the district to dig up a time capsule buried at the school in 1987. “It’s amazing when you come here and you start to work in this community Jackson Middle School Principal Daniel Boland how deep the roots are,” Harmon says. “I pay tribute to the rapidly developing Beu“That was all set from community have teachers and other secretarial staff lah Park neighborhood it now calls home votes and involving staff in those deci- who went to Pleasant View or whose through its new mascot, the bronco. sions,” says Beulah Park Principal Holly kids went to Pleasant View. … There are

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September/October 2022 9


Sweet Schooling Principals have sweet teeth too! Here are their favorites. Holly Henneman: If you do two Milk Duds to one almond, that is the snack of champions. If you really want to work for it, you put them in the freezer. Brett Harmon: Reese’s. That’s a no brainer. Is there another favorite candy? Daniel Boland: I’m a Kit Kat fan. I can eat those all day long. lots of traditions and cool stories lingering, the ghosts of those folks in those hallways.” While the buildings may be changing, Boland, Harmon and Henneman emphasize their commitment to supporting community and culture in their schools, especially coming out of two school years impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Photo by Ray LaVoie

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Beulah Park Middle School Principal Holly Henneman

• The Official Magazine of Grove City • Mailed to more than 20,000 homes in Grove City and Jackson Township • Mailed to EVERY Grove City Business • Community Calendar • Award-winning design / editorial • The Source exclusively found LOOK FOR The in every issue INSIDE Contact Gianna Barrett at gbarrett@ cityscenemediagroup.com or 614-572-1255 10 September/October 2022

But, they assure the community, there’s little to be concerned about for students. None of the schools will see notable changes in day-to-day education and routines. “The instruction that happens in the classroom will still be the same,” Henneman says. “All of those things that set up that foundation, what happens in the rooms of the house is going to stay the same, the house is just a little different.” The multiuse spaces have the added benefit of easily adapting to the needs and interests of students. Possible uses include everything from staff meetings to student art galleries. The principals expect those uses to change over time. “Those are exciting problems to have,” Harmon says. “That’ll just evolve over time as we find out what works best.” For now, the principals are just happy to be getting settled in to their new buildings and see students making use of the space. “If you can’t adapt to change in education,” Henneman says, “then you’re probably not in the right profession.” Cameron Carr is an editor at CityScene Media Group. Feedback welcome at ccarr@cityscenemediagroup.com.

www.DiscoverGroveCity.com


www.DiscoverGroveCity.com

September/October 2022 11


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QA

Chief of Police

Get to Know Chief Richard S. Fambro

Interview of Richard S. Fambro, BSBA, MSM by Grove City Business amd Community Relations Officer Donald Walters

M

ayor Richard L. “Ike” Stage announced in July the appointment of Richard S. Fambro as Chief of the Grove City Division of Police, effective Sept. 12. Fambro brings significant experience to the Division, following 32 years of service with the Ohio State Highway Patrol. Chief Fambro recently took time to participate in a Q&A, giving Grove City residents an opportunity to know a bit more about the man behind the title. Throughout the Q&A, he shares his eagerness to engage with the community and integrate his experience with the women and men of the Division and community.

Don Walters: You began your career in law enforcement as a cadet dispatcher for the Ohio State Highway Patrol in 1989 and rose through the ranks, ultimately reaching the highest possible position as commander of Patrol in 2019. As colonel and superintendent, you led approximately 1,600 officers and 700 professional staff employees in nine districts throughout all of Ohio. Grove City’s Division of Police is considerably smaller, with just under 100 total employees. How will you adjust to the smaller size agency?

business in.” Additionally, at a time when law enforcement professionals are walking away from the profession I love, I want to walk toward leadership opportunities. I am appreciative Mayor Stage, City Administrator Boso, Deputy City Administrator Vedra and Safety Director Teaford have the confidence in me to lead our Division of Police. DW: The Grove City Division of Police enjoys a very supportive and transparent relationship with the community. How do you plan to build on that connection?

Chief Fambro: I am a people person, and as such, establishing and building meaningful relationships is important to me. The size of the Grove City Division of Police will allow me more opportunity to cultivate relationships with personnel. DW: Do you have any specific goals for the Division? CF: While it is early to state specific goals, I do think it’s critically important for me to interact with and get to know personnel, while watching and listening internally and externally. I am very curious to understand from personnel what specifically they would like to see the Division achieve as well as what is currently working and what isn’t meeting their and the community’s needs.

CF: I admire the growth of Grove City as a community and its Division of Police, which is intriguing to me. When people ask me that question, I respond with, “Why not Grove City? It’s a great place to live, work, and do 12 September/October 2022

Photos courtesy of City of Grove City

DW: Why did you decide to pursue the role of Grove City Police Chief?

Fambro during a December trip to New York. www.DiscoverGroveCity.com


CF: By being very transparent, authentically myself, engaged in the community, and willing to listen and learn. I want people to get to know me, which in turn will open doors to build on the connection that is currently enjoyed.

of whom I am very proud of. I am into German cars and am passionate about rescuing animals. I have a rescued cat, American bulldog, pitbull terrier, and boxer. I like to take care of myself by working out and running.

DW: What are you most looking forward to as Grove City DW: Share a fun fact: What is the most surprising or unique Chief of Police? thing people wouldn’t normally know about you? CF: Getting to know and understand the dedicated women CF: My Mom was surprised I chose a career in law enforceand men of the Division and engaging with the community. ment because I was afraid of police officers as a child. If I heard a siren, I would run home and dive through the DW: For people who don’t know you, as you are a new face screen door despite it being closed (Mom replaced lots of in Grove City, what do you want them to know about you? screens as I was growing up). She, for many reasons, is my guiding light. CF: I love people and embrace any opportunity to build meaningful relationships. l have two grown children, both

City Department Spotlight Development Department is Dedicated to Quality, Balanced Growth

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rove City’s diverse and inclusive development growth is planned, managed and nurtured by the City’s Development Department. The process involves working closely with developers, businesses, the community and with public officials as the team assists in bringing projects to a successful completion. Development Director Kyle Rauch leads the department of seven staff members whose combined experience with the City exceeds 55 years. “Each member of our team is truly dedicated to responsible growth for Grove City,” Rauch says. “Couple that with their talent and experience, and I am confident our community’s growth is in good hands.” The department earned recognition as one of the more forwardthinking jurisdictions in Ohio as the GroveCity2050 Community Plan received the Ohio Chapter of American Planning Association’s 2017 Award for Comprehensive Planning. GroveCity2050 was the first long-term, citywide plan in central Ohio to effectively leverage the Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission’s Insight2050 initiative to proactively plan for development and population increase through the year 2050. While ensuring quality and balanced development, one of the primary www.DiscoverGroveCity.com

Community Development Manager Kim Shields and Economic Development Manager Brittany Seebach facilitate Grove City’s long-term growth goals.

functions of the department is reviewing proposed new community development projects ranging from zoning and housing to medical facilities and innovative business ventures. The department strives to attract and retain jobs. Community Development Manager Kim Shields is often the first point of contact for new construction and development. As coordinator of current and long-range planning efforts for the city,

she helps guide others in their development to ensure the result is in line with the GroveCity2050 Community Plan. “I enjoy having the opportunity to look at projects from a variety of perspectives,” Shields says. “We get to balance technical code requirements and legal property rights with long-term community goals and aspirations to bring new growth and development to the community.” Economic Development Manager Brittany Seebach works to retain and expand Grove City businesses. Grove City’s more than 1,200 businesses can seek Seebach’s valuable input and assistance on all facets of business needs, including planning, financing, zoning, equipment, building permits and inspections, utility setups, and signage guidelines. She is the bridge between the City and its business community — a familiar connection for employers. “I enjoy interacting with people and offering help to our business community,” Seebach says. “Serving in this role allows me to do both on a daily basis.” It’s this personal touch that sets Grove City’s Development Department apart, overseeing the growth of a city whose primary goal is to preserve its small-town character while continuing to bring additional employment opportunities, residents and amenities to the community. September/October 2022 13


InFocus

By Anastasia Carter

A Bigger Boo

Grove City Chamber of Commerce continues to expand Boo Off Broadway

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14 September/October 2022

Photos courtesy of the Grove City Area Chamber of Commerce

n Halloween, the biggest fear for many is running out of candy to give to children going trick-or-treating. For the vendors and event planners of Boo Off Broadway, a candy shortage was a sign of success. Last year, the Grove City Area Chamber of Commerce took over planning Boo Off Broadway. The chamber’s revamp culminated in even more attendees than organizers imagined. The Grove City Division of Police estimates 5,000 people came to celebrate Halloween, but sheer numbers aren’t all that counts in success. “As far as growth goes, I don’t know how much room we have to grow,” says Shawn Conrad, executive director of the Grove City Area Chamber of Commerce. “Physical growth is not our en- Kids dress up for Boo Off Broadway tire goal. Our goal is to support a wonderful event for our community to make people aware of Grove City and some of its activities.” This year, Boo Off Broadway is set to take place 1-4 p.m., Oct. 29, on the Park Street Promenade, 3444 Park St. Boo Off Broadway offers a familyfriendly – and scare-free – event the weekend before Halloween. While vendors worked extra last year to ensure they were meeting visitor demand, all of the vendors this year are expected to have plenty of candy to give out treats and avoid any tricks. In 2021, Conrad says, many vendors sent out their team members to pick up more candy after they ran out. Vendors not only give out candy but info about their businesses, safety tips for Halloween and free swag as well. After reimagining events such as the Taste of Grove City to adhere to COVID-19 safety protocols, the chamber has angled Boo Off Broadway as an A Ghostbuster scans the area around trick-or-treaters for ghosts. www.DiscoverGroveCity.com


Spooktacular Schedule

www.DiscoverGroveCity.com

, e Let s B Tourists! A fun way to explore our city anew! Get your FREE booklet full of wonderful things to do in Columbus in September & October Visit 54 arts stops in September & October. Get stamped at each stop with one of 23 Columbus-artist-designed stickers. Redeem stamped passports online for fabulous prizes from signed artists’ prints to event tickets and gift certificates.

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additional fun way for businesses to interact with the public. “This event has stepped in and filled that need,” Conrad says. “(Businesses) have a much bigger audience in a much safer environment.” Not only did the event fill a need, it managed to become a favorite for chamber members and the community after just one year under chamber leadership. “I’m telling you, last year it just was a home run, hole in one, touchdown, whatever term you want to use,” Conrad says. To draw more people to the event, the chamber added vendors and other activities to the agenda that were absent in years past. Conrad says the chamber has seen high interest in the event following last year’s success. “Many of our business members were able to participate,” Conrad says. “We do so many events. This one is just flat out fun.” The parade, which takes place around the promenade, is a standout feature. Besides chamber members, expect a range of characters in attendance, including ghostbusters, princes and princesses. This year, the Chamber will also set up a photo booth for families to take pictures while dressed in their Halloween best.

Expect lots of characters to be out and about at Boo Off Broadway.

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There’s plenty to do in Grove City around Halloween! The Minion Hunt – Participants search around designated buildings in Grove City for hidden Minion characters and complete a Minion hunt worksheet for a prize. Window Decorating Contest – As part of Boo Off Broadway, local businesses decorate their windows for the season and judges select the best of the bunch. Fall Fun Days – Circle S Farms ramps up fall festivities with treats, a hayride, pumpkin picking and a corn maze.

R ic h a rd D u a r

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PRIZES! Ja

ne tG Find passport stops and eorg e where to get your FREE booklet:

ColumbusMakesArt.com/ passport

The Greater Columbus Arts Council receives support from the city of Columbus, Franklin County Commissioners and Ohio Arts Council.

September/October 2022 15


Trick-or-Treat, also known as Beggars’ Night, is scheduled for 6-8 p.m., Monday, Oct. 31

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Boo Off Broadway brings together family fun, local businesses and Halloween festivities.

Businesses can have as much fun getting in the Halloween spirit as families. Last year as part of Boo Off Broadway, the chamber held a window decorating contest for businesses to show off their decorating chops and appeal to Grove City window shoppers. Boo Off Broadway serves as a complementary event to the traditional Beggars’ Night. There’s no registration required, and it’s free for all to attend. “It’s not a terribly difficult event to design and manage,” Conrad says. “It’s just fun.” For more information, visit www. gcchamber.org. Anastasia Carter is an editorial assistant at CityScene Media Group. Feedback welcome at feedback@ cityscenemediagroup.com. www.DiscoverGroveCity.com

Photos courtesy of the Grove City Area Chamber of Commerce

Disney princesses were among last year’s attendees.


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Celebrating 170 Years Host of commemorative events to be held throughout Grove City in September By Cameron Carr

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Photos by Cameron Carr

rove City is turning 170 years old, and there’s a lot of history to celebrate in those years. The city has retained its historic Town Center while connecting new and old developments. For many of the city’s residents, including Mayor Richard L. “Ike” Stage, the history is personal. “My family’s been a part of the history going back to the late 1800s when my great-grandfather was a town marshal,” Stage says. “So I am interested from a personal standpoint in figuring out again what were those things going on in the early life of this village.” Though the city has commemorated its anniversary throughout 2022, the celebration crescendos in September. A slew of events, ranging from educational lectures to character actors at historiMayor Stage looks through city council minutes that include his great-grandfather, John A. Stage, a cal sites, will take place Sept. 9-18. The town marshal.

18 September/October 2022

www.DiscoverGroveCity.com


dates align with Ohio Open Doors, a statewide initiative supporting events that connect to Ohio history. The Grove City events will highlight both the area’s past and ways to connect to it today. “The thing we’re trying to do is show (people) the history of our city,” says Parks and Recreation Superintendent Kelly Sutherland. “There’s so many activities you can do that are historically related that people don’t even know.” The September anniversary celebrations begin with a rededication of Sesquicentennial Park on Sept. 9. The Southwest Franklin County Historical Society will celebrate its 40th anniversary on Sept. 10, while the Gardens at Gantz, which includes one of the area’s oldest homes, will celebrate its 31st anniversary on Sept. 13. Century Village will host a Civil War encampment recreation on Sept. 11. Throughout the year, Century Village – which includes a blacksmith shop, a reconstructed barn original to the Bob Evans farm, the city’s 19th century train depot and other historic structures – hosts several historythemed events. Grove City’s oldest home, the Grant-Sawyer Home, will host a picnic on Sept. 17 with actors portraying members of the family from across time. The home was occupied by descendants of the same family from the 1840s until it opened to the public a half decade ago. But the anniversary events are about more than just celebrating those who have a long history in the city. “When you move to Grove City, you feel like you know everybody,” Sutherland says. “This history is an educational piece not only for the people who’ve been here for six generations but the people who’ve been here for six months.” But due to the massive growth in the city, many residents are new to laying their foundation here. In the mid-20th century, the population hovered around 6,000 people, Sutherland says. As of July 2021, the U.S. Census Bureau estimates the population to be 41,787. Stage points to a cyclical growth history that boomed in the latwww.DiscoverGroveCity.com

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ter half of the 19th century and again after each world war. As the population has developed, so has the city. Much of Grove City’s historic Town Center east of Broadway, comes from land purchased by Hugh Grant in the early 1800s. William F. Breck later bought a large portion of that land to plat and found Grove City in 1852. Adam Grant then made a significant westward expansion in 1889 with the development of Beulah Park west of Town Center. The Columbus and Harrisburg Turnpike, connecting Columbus and Harrisburg, helped attract Breck to the area. That road has since become Broadway, and a number of other key routes have developed. Railroads eventually gave way to highways that changed the layout and connections in Grove City. “I-71, when it came through, it created somewhat of a new barrier to the east,” Stage says. “Now, we’ve been able to join this with the west with the way we’ve upgraded White Road and Holton

Road and put in Buckeye Parkway and so forth.” That effort to maintain Grove City’s cohesion as time and development progress hasn’t ceased. Recent development at Beulah Park has intentionally honored the history of the Beulah Park racetrack, which opened in 1923 as Ohio’s first thoroughbred racetrack. Beulah Park Middle School took the bronco as its mascot, and local art and housing developments have paid tribute as well. The 170th anniversary commemoration began in May with the opening of a Park Street extension that connects Beulah Park to Grove City’s historic Town Center. That served as a literal and symbolic connection between the city’s old and new developments. “What we have not lost is the core city being our town center,” Stage says. “(It’s) like a living room in your house. It’s a place to gather.” Town Center remains a cornerstone of Grove City. Not only does it reflect the area’s history, but it also hosts many staple events including the Summer Siz-

Live in a neighborhood, belong to a community of active adults.

zle Concert Series and community festivals such as the Craft Distillers Festival, Wine and Arts Festival, Arts in the Alley and Mistletoe Market. The Grove City Welcome Center and Museum is also located in Town Center and will host extended hours on Sept. 16 for the Arts in the Alley Music and Arts Festival. Having that central connection, Stage says, helps unite Grove City. “It’s not like a lot of towns where you have different neighborhoods that form their own personalities,” he says. “We consider ourselves one big neighborhood.” Celebrating Grove City’s 170th anniversary serves as a way to bring the community together to honor both the city’s past and what residents are making from that history today. “It’s still influencing us,” Sutherland says. “Our past is helping us prepare for the future.” Cameron Carr is an editor at CityScene Media Group. Feedback welcome at ccarr@cityscenemediagroup.com.

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Student Spotlight

By Tyler Kirkendall

Raisin’ the Hoof

GCHS student places fifth in national equestrian competition

Photo courtesy of Trish Zelenak

I

n the span of just two minutes in late April, Peyton Zelenak proved her horseback riding mettle when she earned a top five finish at an international equestrian competition. That’s impressive for anyone, but especially for Zelenak, who is new to the sport. “I don’t know where it came from,” she says. “I never had any animals other than dogs. I just really like taking care of (animals).” Zelenak, a senior at Grove City High School, began competitive riding just this past year, which makes her fifth-place finish at the Interscholastic Equestrian Association (IEA) competition in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, all the more impressive. The competition has shown that she can meet with a new horse, connect with it and train it to execute a series of tasks – all within one day. In dressage, a rider carries out predetermined movements with their horse. For the IEA competition, riders are paired with horses they have never worked with before. The key, Zelenak says, is connecting with the animal. She says each horse has a different personality and a rider must quickly attune themself to the cues that their companion will respond to. For Zelenak, that analysis of a horse begins before the competition even starts. “The people that own the horse ride it around an arena with all the other horses and you can look out for mistakes,” Zelenak says. “Things like if the horse flinches or gets spooked, you’ll want to write that down.” She also takes note of the speed, weight and responsiveness of her horse as soon as she gets in the saddle. “It’s hard to describe,” she says. “It’s just a feeling.” While Zelenak is new to equine sports, she is no stranger to athletic competition. She’s been a cross counwww.DiscoverGroveCity.com

Peyton and her trainer, Arianna Mathias, at the national competition.

try runner at GCHS since her freshman year. Her family also instilled a value for fitness in her early on. Her mother, Trish Zelenak, helps local women create and maintain healthier lifestyles. Trish credits the community with helping lead her daughter to horseback riding. When a friend mentioned horseback riding, it seemed a perfect fit for

Peyton, who has a deep love for animals. She’s ridden at Cherokee Stables in Grove City and Hold Your Horses Stable in Ashville. Both have been influential in her development as a rider. Hold Your Horses is where she connected with her current coach, Arianna Mathias. Equine sports can seem cost prohibitive, but Trish emphasizes that it’s September/October 2022 21


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not necessary to own a horse or even have prior horseback riding experience to get started with the sport. The Zelenaks, for example, do not own a horse. Riding has taught Peyton valuable lessons as well. A favorite expression she’s learned from her coaches: “Heels down, head up.” It refers to technical riding posture but carries another meaning as well. “Heels down is in reference to being set on your goals and head up is keeping your eye on a goal and striving for it,” Peyton says. That mantra is always on Peyton’s mind as she looks toward continuing on to intercollegiate equestrian competitions and a future career. She’s an executive officer in the Navy Junior ROTC program at GCHS and hopes to someday connect that experience with her love for animals as a veterinarian for the U.S. Army. Tyler Kirkendall is an editor at CityScene Media Group. Feedback welcome at tkirkendall@cityscenemediagroup.com.

Grove City, Ohio

www.DiscoverGroveCity.com

Photos courtesy of Trish Zelenak

Peyton Zelenak riding at the IEA National Finals.


Remember the Name

Meet Grove City High School Athletic Hall of Fame’s newest members By Maisie Fitzmaurice

W

hile Grove City High School is fertile grounds for talented student athletes, coaches and athletic administrators, those who leave a lasting legacy on the school join an exclusive club when they’re inducted into the Grove City High School Athletic Hall of Fame. Only the most deserving of students, coaches and athletic directors are admitted. On July 29, three former GCHS athletes were inducted into the hall of fame during the Homecoming Celebration held in Grove City’s Town Center. The 2022 induction class includes the hall of fame’s oldest member, 91-year-old Carl Patzer, and its youngest member, 30-year-old Mike Mayers, to date. Lori (Thomas) Fullen rounds HOF inductees (from left) Carl Patzer and Lori (Thomas) Fullen, and Mark Mayers (father of inductee out the athletes. In addition to the in- Mike Mayers, who was unable to attend because he is in-season with the Los Angeles Angels). ductees, this year also honors former basketball coach, cross country coach and guidance counselor John Allen, who passed away at age 91 in February. The Hall of Fame’s committee recognizes individuals who have demonstrated excellence in their sport or made significant contributions to the athletic department at the high school, says chairman Steve Carr. Nominations for inductees come Pet Grooming from the panel’s 12 members but also from community input. Submissions often come from family members, class♥ Pampering mates or friends of former athletes, and individuals associated with the high Quality & Care school’s athletic department. The panel reviews each submission and the reasoning for their nomination Buck Pup before determining who they should ulit includes, scarlet & gray glitter nails, timately induct into the exclusive Hall & OSU bandana or bow and Ohio cookie of Fame. Three former administrators – for3899 Grove City Rd Grove City OH, 43123 mer coach and athletic supervisor Ron 614-991-0130 4pawsandatail.org Hutcheson, former principal Tom Rutan, and former coach and athletic director Jack Lehr – founded the Hall of Fame in 2015 with the goal of commemorating significant contributions

Photo by Susan Carr

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to the school’s athletic programs. Since then, the Hall of Fame has added to its ranks 43 former athletes, four former coaches, two former athletic directors, one former contributor and two former teams. The inductees are honored with permanent displays at GCHS. Carr hopes that seeing those accomplishments inspire current and future students to work hard to set and achieve their own athletic goals. “We’re hoping that present day students can look at the records of these athletes and former coaches and the kind of people they were and they can serve as role models,” he says. For many, Carr says, the Hall of Fame offers a nostalgic celebration of the school’s history.

Carl Patzer, class of 1948

Patzer played on the football, basketball and baseball teams. He was named first-team All-Franklin County League in football and basketball. As a senior he captained the basketball team to become Franklin County League cochampions. Patzer was a leading scorer on his high school basketball team averaging 16 points per game. His team won 60 games over three seasons. “It’s a great honor,” Patzer says. “I thought that they would forget us old timers that played sports back in the 1940s, so it’s a real honor to know that we’re still recognized.” Outside of athletics, Patzer was a member of the National Honor Society and served as a student government class officer all four years of his high school career. After high school, Patzer received his degree in Business Administration in 1952 and went on to serve as a navigational officer for the U.S. Air Force for four years. He has served as president for a number of community organizations including the Ohio Agri-Business Association, Grove City Kiwanis Club and St. John’s Lutheran Council. His father, Anton Patzer, served two terms as mayor of Grove City.

Lori (Thomas) Fullen, class of 1981

Fullen played on the varsity volleyball and softball teams all four years of 24 September/October 2022

www.DiscoverGroveCity.com


Know someone

worthy of the Hall of Fame? The nomination form and eligibility criteria can be found online at www. gchsgreyhounds.com. Submit nominations by Dec. 31. Mail completed forms to Grove City High School, Attn: Scott Todd, Athletic Director, 4665 Hoover Rd., Grove City, OH 43123. Please include your and your nominee’s contact information. high school and on the varsity basketball team for two years. She won a Kiwanis Scholar-Athlete Award and served as team captain and MVP for both volleyball and softball as a senior. In college, Fullen was a walk-on softball player at The Ohio State University and led the team in RBIs. She later received a Scholar-Athlete award from OSU. After college, Fullen returned to Grove City as an educator and coach. She was named Teacher of the Year twice at GCHS and once at Central Crossing High School. She was also named Coach of the Year at GCHS. “She was a terrific athlete at the high school and went on to become a great teacher and coach at the high school,” says Carr, who knows Fullen personally through her time as a teacher and coach. “Very deserving.”

Mayers was a leading scorer, averaging 15.2 points per game, and named AllOCC. At the University of Mississippi, Mayers was named an All-SEC Academic Selection for three years. After three years, Mayers began his professional baseball career with the St. Louis Cardinals – he would continue online classes to earn a degree in 2020. He pitched for the Cardinals in 2016-2019 before being claimed by the Los Angeles Angels. He was named American League Reliever of the month in September 2020.

Remembering John Allen

John Allen passed away in February at age 91. He was heavily involved with GCHS, having worked as a school guidance counselor, head basketball coach and head cross country coach. He also served on the Hall of Fame committee since its beginnings in 2015. “Nobody cared about the Athletic Hall of Fame’s mission to honor Greyhound greats more than John,” Carr says. Maisie Fitzmaurice is an editorial assistant at CityScene Media Group. Feedback welcome at feedback@ cityscenemediagroup.com.

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Mayers played football, basketball and baseball. During his high school career, Mayers received seven varsity letters, one in football, three in basketball and three in baseball. As a junior quarterback for the football team, Mayers threw 1,336 yards. Unfortunately, his football career was cut short when a school levy failed and fall sports were canceled his senior year. In baseball, Mayers won All-Ohio honors as a junior pitcher with a 10-1 record and a 1.57 ERA. He was awarded All-Central district and All-OCC (Ohio Capital Conference) honors as a junior and senior. As a senior basketball player, www.DiscoverGroveCity.com

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Living

By Megan Roth

Parade of Homes is Back

Photo courtesy of D.H. Horton

BIA Parade showcases new builds across central Ohio

Since 1952, the Building Industry and builders together through its Parade homes in central Ohio, the Parade showAssociation has brought homebuyers of Homes. The largest showcase of new cases about 50 new builds each year. In previous years, the builds have been centered on one street in a single community. However, in 2021, the Parade underwent a vast expansion to showcase homes throughout the greater Columbus area. Now, each edition of the Parade includes homes in four quadrants of central Ohio: northwest, northeast, southwest and southeast. Within the quadrants, homes are spread across multiple communities as well. The Parade includes three categories highlighting different aspects of homebuilding: new builds, featured communities and dream homes. The feature deWe use fun learning activities to help your velopment this year is Beulah Park, just a child become school-ready, career-ready short walk from Grove City Town Center. and life-ready. Our wide range of programs This new community has something for promote a lifelong love of learning in literacy, everyone, and offers several different livscience, technology, engineering, arts and ing styles including a luxury condo from mathematics. Epcon Communities. Grove City also features builds by Fischer Homes and D.R. Horton. The Fischer Homes build – located off Jackson ENROLL TODAY! Pike – showcases five different customization options the company can accommoGROVE CITY • 614-801-2556 date for a custom build project, allowing 2585 London Groveport Road the homeowner to make the home their own. The D.R. Horton home is situated in GoddardSchool.com the new Trail View Run community, which

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offers walking trails, parks, bikes paths, picnic shelters and more. To get specifics on the homes in this year’s parade, visit www.biaparade.com. CityScene Media Group, publisher of Discover Grove City Magazine, partnered with the BIA to create the Official Event Guide for the 2022 Parade. Guides are distributed at Parade homes and a digital version with all tour home addresses can be accessed for free at www.cityscenecolumbus.com. The Parade begins Sept. 15 and runs Thursday to Sunday through Oct. 2. Map out your day, explore the area and build your dream home! Megan Roth is an editor at CityScene Media Group. Feedback welcome at mroth@cityscenemediagroup.com. www.DiscoverGroveCity.com

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Grove City Library | 3959 Broadway | Grove City, 43123 | 614-875-6716 Westland Area Library | 4740 W. Broad St. | Columbus, 43228 | 614-878-1301 September/October 2022 27


Photos by Alexander Rogers

Around Grove City

Congratulations to the Grove City High School Greyhounds Baseball team, the Ohio High School Athletic Association Division I runner-up! Thanks for a great year!

Summer in Grove City is enjoyed by friends and family at the many events and activities. Share photos on social media using hashtags #GroveCityOhio and #gc123.

Food Trucks and Shop Hops

Come out and enjoy the historic town center and all that it has to offer. Each night listed runs from 5 to 9pm. This is a DORA evening and you can grab your favorite adult beverage and enjoy yourself.

28 September/October 2022

Photos courtesy of City of Grove City

August 19 September 2, 16, 30 October 14, 28

www.DiscoverGroveCity.com


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Top homes sold in Grove City In June 2022, Grove City home prices were up 16.1% compared to last year, selling for a median price of $318K. On average, homes in Grove City sell after 35 days, equal to the market last year. There were 99 homes sold in June, down from 133 last year. (Data from Redfin) All information is collected from the Franklin County Auditor’s Office.

WHERE ARE YOU?

1850 Daylily Ct. 5 beds 3.5 baths $645,000 Sold on 6/10/22

1316 Ironwood Dr. 4 beds 3.5 baths $525,000 Sold on 6/2/22

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4379 Beechgrove Dr. 4 beds 2 baths $511,289 Sold on 7/5/22

1905 Southchase Ct. 4 beds 4 baths $569,000 Sold on 6/7/22

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1780 Tuscarora Dr. 3 beds 2 baths $560,000 Sold on 6/24/22

2619 Lori’s Way 4 beds 2.5 baths $488,200 Sold on 6/16/22

6099 Lavender Field 4 beds 2.5 baths $550,000 Sold on 7/7/22

4810 Tayport Ave. 4 beds 4.5 baths $475,000 Sold on 6/3/22

2437 Martha’s Wood 3 beds 2.5 baths $545,000 Sold on 6/15/22

4817 Saint Andrews Dr. 3 beds 2.5 baths $470,000 Sold on 6/28/22

Showcase your home listings to every homeowner in Grove City. Your listings will also appear in the digital edition of the magazine, hosted on the Discover Grove City home page: www.discovergrovecity.com Contact Gianna Barrett today for more information: gbarrett@cityscenemediagroup.com 614-572-1255 www.DiscoverGroveCity.com

September/October 2022 29


Bookmarks

Recommendations from Southwest Public Libraries — Grove City Library

We are almost fully operating normally as we did pre-pandemic (knock on wood!)

Whether they enlighten us about history, life or ourselves; transport us to a different time or place; or evoke our imagination and emotions, books are always teaching us something. Explore these recommendations from Grove City Library staff. Spirit Run: A 6,000-Mile Marathon Through North America’s Stolen Land (nonfiction) by Noé Álvarez Spirit Run mixes travel memoir with a coming-of-age story and lots of running. Noé Álvarez decides to participate in a Peace and Dignity Journey, which focuses on indigenous people and communities, in order to gain a deeper connection to the land. You’ll learn a lot reading this book and through Álvarez’s journey. Men to Avoid in Art and Life (nonfiction, humor) by Nicole Tersigni Has a man ever done something that just made you want to shake your head? This little volume captions classical works of art with uproarious commentary on men you have probably met and probably want to avoid. Violeta (fiction) by Isabel Allende Violeta del Valle was born during the Spanish flu, and a century later her life will end during another pandemic. The author tells the incredible story of the complicated life of Violeta through letters to a loved one. Violeta reflects on decisions she made in order to survive as the world around her changed.

Love & Saffron (fiction) by Kim Fay Set in the 1960s, a true friendship blossoms when a young newspaper writer sends a letter of appreciation to an experienced writer of a well-known newspaper column. This starts a deep and true friendship as they share their hopes and dreams, life experiences, heartaches and delish recipes. The author’s writing is so authentic and captivating that you won’t want the story to end.

Want more recommendations? Give us a call or visit www.swpl. org and explore NoveList Plus and NoveList K-8 Plus, online readers’ advisories featuring both fiction and nonfiction. Access via the ‘Resources’ tab, ‘Books & Literature’ section. 30 September/October 2022

Monstrous Affections: An Anthology of Beastly Tales (short stories) Edited by Kelly Link and Gavin J. Grant The stories in this collection are haunting and mesmerizing. Do you really want a vampire boyfriend? Is that spider-alien friend or foe when fighting space pirates? Well worth a look to find new authors, but be warned some stories may keep you up at night. Daisy Jones & The Six (fiction) by Taylor Jenkins Reid With the focus on Daisy Jones, this book tells her story of how she got placed into a band called The Six. Full of in-band drama and big personalities that love and hate each other, this book is a fast read. Fleetwood Mac heavily inspired Taylor Jenkins Reid, which adds a nostalgic flair that matches well with the late summer heat. In the audiobook, each character has their own narrator, which makes it feel like a true documentary of the otherwise fictional band. In My Dreams I Hold a Knife (fiction) by Ashley Winstead This thriller revolves around a college friend group that gets tangled in an unsolved murder. Told in dual timelines, this story is perfect for fans of character-driven and fast-paced suspense novels.

This Savage Song (young adult, dark fantasy) by Victoria Schwab In a city overrun with monsters, you always have to be on guard. The first book in a duology, This Savage Song follows Kate and August, two teens from different sides with different goals. As the pair fight monsters and each other, they learn they’ll have to work together to salvage their city. Grove City Library 3959 Broadway Hours: Mon-Thu: 9a-8p, Fri: 9a-6p, Sat: 9a-5p, Sun: 1p-5p Visit www.swpl.org or call 614-875-6716 for library services. Follow the library on social media www.DiscoverGroveCity.com


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www.GroveCityOhio.gov

The Source 1


The

P A R K S A N D R E C R E A T I O N O F F E R I N G S | O C TO B E R /N OV E M B E R 2 0 2 2

GUIDE

The Source is the activity

guide detailing Grove City Parks and Recreation Department offerings. You have the opportunity to see a fresh set of classes and activities six times per year to help you select what fits best in your family’s busy schedule. To register for a class or activity, call the Parks and Recreation office at 614-277-3050 or the Evans Center at 614-277-1060, use online registration, or stop in the Kingston Center, 3226 Kingston Ave.; or Evans Center, 4330 Dudley Ave. When registering for the first time, a staff member will assist you with establishing your household account in our system. To register online, customers must also have an online registration account. This simple process can be completed by phone or in person. Registration is required for all activities even if there is no fee, unless designated as a drop-in class. For more information on classes, activities and events in Grove City, visit GroveCityOhio.gov, sign up for our electronic newsletter and follow social media accounts on Facebook and Instagram @GroveCityOhio and @GroveCityParks and Twitter @GroveCityOhio.

Directory

Parks & Event Spaces

CITY OF GROVE CITY Building Division.....................614-277-3075 City Council............................614-277-3065 City Information......................614-277-3000 Community Relations..............614-277-3040 Development..........................614-277-3004 Division of Police....................614-277-1710 Evans Center..........................614-277-1060 Finance/Tax............................614-277-3025 Human Resources...................614-277-3013 Mayor’s Court.........................614-277-1715 Mayor’s Office.........................614-277-3006 Parks & Recreation.................614-277-3050 Parks Weather Hotline.............614-277-3060 Service Department................614-277-1100 Zoning....................................614-277-3086

Big Splash/Evans 2831 Southwest Blvd. Breck Community (Dog Park) 3005 Demorest Road Concord Lakes Off Lake Mead Drive Creekside Off Holton Road Fryer (Century Village, Splash Pad) 3899 Orders Road Gantz (Gantz Barn, Gantz Farmhouse) 2255 Home Road George Edge Music Park on Broadway Park St. at Broadway Grant-Sawyer Home 4126 Haughn Road Grove City Gold Star Families Memorial Columbus St. at Broadway Grove City Museum 3378 Park St. Henceroth (Purple Heart Memorial Walk) 2075 Mallow Lane

City Offices City Hall 4035 Broadway Evans Center 4330 Dudley Ave. Kingston Center 3226 Kingston Ave. Safety Complex (Police) 3360 Park St. Service Complex 3262 Ventura Blvd. 2 The Source

Hoover Off Haughn Road Indian Trails Off Buckeye Parkway Keller Farms Off White Road Meadowgrove Off Springhill Drive Pinnacle Area 2430 Holton Road Scioto Meadows Off Scioto Meadows Blvd. Skate Park 3728 Hoover Road Town Center Gazebo Grove City Road at Broadway Town Center Promenade Park St. to Grant Ave. (parking lot) Walden Bluff Walden Bluff Court Westgrove Park 3580 Magnolia St. Windsor (Evans Center) 4330 Dudley Ave. 4408 Broadway

Online GroveCityOhio.gov Connect with @GroveCityOhio and @GroveCityParks www.GroveCityOhio.gov


The

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Preschool Gymnastics (Ages: 3-4) Boys and girls learn foundation gymnastics skills for vault, bars, beam and floor to use and build upon for future gymnastics and other athletic pursuits, while developing basic skills to practice balance, coordination, flexibility and strength. Gymnastics (Ages: 3) Wks: 6 • Classes: 6 • Day: Tue. Kingston Center Gym $48 (NR: $53) Begins: Oct. 4 • 5-5:30 p.m. Act. #: 1012210_01 Wks: 6 • Classes: 6 • Day: Tue. Kingston Center Gym $48 (NR: $53) Begins: Oct. 4 • 6-6:30 p.m. Act. #: 1012210_03 Wks: 6 • Classes: 6 • Day: Thu. Kingston Center Gym $48 (NR: $53) Begins: Oct. 6 • 5-5:30 p.m. Act. #: 1012210_04 Gymnastics (Ages: 4) Wks: 6 • Classes: 6 • Day: Tue. Kingston Center Gym $48 (NR: $53) Begins: Oct. 4 • 5:30-6 p.m. Act. #: 1012210_02 Wks: 6 • Classes: 6 • Day: Thu. Kingston Center Gym $48 (NR: $53) Begins: Oct. 6 • 5:30-6 p.m. Act. #: 1012210_05 Modern Dance (Ages: 3-4) Participants learn jazz dance style, adapting bold, dynamic movements and techniques to later apply to a variety of modern dances, developing skills to grow and enhance their journey of dance. Wks: 6 • Classes: 6 • Day: Thu. Kingston Center Room 4 $48 (NR: $54) Begins: Oct. 6 • 6-6:30 p.m. Act. #: 1022210_01 www.GroveCityOhio.gov

JumpBunch (Ages: 18-36 months) Toddlers build coordination, balance, teamwork and motor skills during coach-led activities. Through encouragement and success, children gain confidence, sports-readiness skills, and the foundations of fitness. JumpBunch (Ages: 18-24 months)

via teaching styles that build an understanding of basic skills in an encouraging atmosphere. Each week, players participate in developmentally appropriate instruction and modified, recreational game play. Wks: 6 • Classes: 6 • Day: Tue. Highland Park Elementary School $80 (NR: $80) Begins: Nov. 1 • 6:15-7:15 p.m. Register at bit.ly/BallyBktballGC

Wks: 6 • Classes: 6 • Day: Wed. Kingston Center Gym $60 (NR: $68)

Wks: 6 • Classes: 6 • Day: Tue. Highland Park Elementary School $80 (NR: $80)

Begins: Oct. 5 • 6-6:30 p.m. Act. #: 1032210_01

Begins: Nov. 1 • 7:15-8:15 p.m. Register at bit.ly/BallyBktballGC

JumpBunch (Ages: 24-36 months) Wks: 6 • Classes: 6 • Day: Wed. Kingston Center Gym $60 (NR: $68) Begins: Oct. 5 • 6:30-7 p.m. Act. #: 1032210_02 Sporties for Shorties (Ages: 3-5) Young children develop kicking, running, throwing and team skills through exciting lead-up sports activities and group games. Focus sports may include baseball, soccer, football and others. Powered by JumpBunch. Wks: 6 • Classes: 6 • Day: Wed. Kingston Center Gym $60 (NR: $68) Begins: Oct. 5 • 7-7:45 p.m. Act. #: 1032210_03 Little Ballers Basketball (Ages: 4-5) Bally Sports Group provides a fun, educational first basketball experience using fun terminology and engaging activities. Players learn proper sportsmanship and the fundamentals of dribbling, shooting, passing, rebounding, defense and game play

Registration

Online, phone and office registration begins Mon., Sept. 12

KinderMusik (Ages: 1-4) Music supports cognitive, social, physical and musical whole-child development. Children (each with one caring adult) join Stephanie Dille of Groove City Kids Music, for interactive musical experiences. Play instruments, sing and dance for learning, for health and for joy! Wks: 3 • Classes: 3 • Day: Thu. Kingston Center Room 3 $50 (NR: $55) Begins: Oct. 6 • 9:30-10 a.m. Act. #: 1082210_02 KinderMusik (Ages: 1-2) Wks: 3 • Classes: 3 • Day: Thu. Kingston Center Room 3 $50 (NR: $55) Begins: Nov. 3 • 9:30-10 a.m. Act. #: 1082211_02 KinderMusik (Ages: 3-4) Wks: 3 • Classes: 3 • Day: Thu. Kingston Center Room 3 $50 (NR: $55) Begins: Oct. 6 • 10:15-11 a.m. Act. #: 1082210_03 Wks: 3 • Classes: 3 • Day: Thu. Kingston Center Room 3 $50 (NR: $55) Begins: Nov. 3 • 10:15-11 a.m. Act. #: 1082211_03

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Youth P.A.R.K. (Grades K-4) Programmed After-school Recreation for Kids is committed to providing a safe, secure, enriching and affordable place to be after school. This schoolage childcare program offers daily after-school activities for children in kindergarten through grade four staffed by qualified childcare providers at each site. P.A.R.K. operates in the school gymnasiums every day the South-Western City School District (SWCSD) is in session. The program is designed for, but not limited to, children of working parents. P.A.R.K. provides planned cooperative games, outrageous play, fitness, indoor and outdoor activities, free art, specialinterest and free-choice activities and much more. Please pack a nutritious snack daily. School Days • Days: Mon.-Fri. SWCSD Sites 2:30-6 p.m. Act. #: 2982212_02 P.A.R.K. Before-school Elementary (Grades K-4) Before-school P.A.R.K. creates a safe, fun environment in the morning hours before school starts for students of Buckeye Woods, Highland Park, J.C. Sommer, Monterey and Richard Avenue elementaries. The monthly tuition fee includes breakfast and supervised recreational activities. This program meets every day the SWCSD is in session. Transportation to the child’s home school is provided by the SWCSD Transportation Department; J.C. Sommer elementary students walk to school with P.A.R.K. staff. School Days • Days: Mon.-Fri. Kingston Center Room 2 6-8 a.m. Act. #: 2982212_06

Options for 4 year olds: peewee karate is open to ages 4-7. Check the Youth Sections for details! 4 The Source

P.A.R.K. Before-school Intermediate (Grades 5-6) Before-school P.A.R.K. creates a safe, fun environment in the morning hours before school starts for students of Hayes, Holt Crossing and Park Street intermediate schools. The monthly tuition fee includes breakfast and supervised recreational activities. This program meets every day the SWCSD is in session. Transportation to the child’s home school is provided by the SWCSD Transportation Department; Park Street Intermediate students walk to school with P.A.R.K. staff. School Days • Days: Mon.-Fri. Kingston Center Room 4 6-9 a.m. Act. #: 2982212_07 Basketball Registration (Grades K-12) GCPR’s recreational basketball leagues focus on fun and fundamentals with boys and girls competing in separate leagues. Register by individual online, by phone or in person at the Kingston Center. Teams are determined via blind draft conducted by GCPR staff. Volunteer coaches are needed. Includes reversible mesh jersey. $20 fee for late registration. Games: 8 • Days: Weekday Practice, Saturday Games SWCSD Sites $83 (NR: $88) Practices Begin: Dec. 5; Games Begin: Jan. 7 Register Throughout October Gymnastics Parkour (Ages: 4-10) Learn the basics of jumping, climbing and rolling and using obstacles, mats and blocks. Gain strength, coordination and stamina while learning to safely perform skills with parkour form. Gymnastics Parkour (Ages: 4-5) Wks: 6 • Classes: 6 • Day: Mon. Kingston Center Gym $65 (NR: $70) Begins: Oct. 3 • 4:30-5:15 p.m. No class: Oct. 31 Act. #: 2012210_01

Gymnastics Parkour (Ages: 5-6) Wks: 6 • Classes: 6 • Day: Mon. Kingston Center Gym $65 (NR: $70) Begins: Oct. 3 • 5:15-6 p.m. No class: Oct. 31 Act. #: 2012210_02 Gymnastics Parkour (Ages: 7-8) Wks: 6 • Classes: 6 • Day: Mon. Kingston Center Gym $65 (NR: $70) Begins: Oct. 3 • 6-6:45 p.m. No class: Oct. 31 Act. #: 2012210_03 Gymnastics Parkour (Ages: 9-10) Wks: 6 • Classes: 6 • Day: Mon. Kingston Center Gym $65 (NR: $70) Begins: Oct. 3 • 6:45-7:30 p.m. No class: Oct. 31 Act. #: 2012210_04

P.A.R.K. programs are popular! Call 614-277-3050 to ensure availability before attempting to register. www.GroveCityOhio.gov


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Gymnastics (Ages: 5-9) Practice foundational gymnastics to build upon and increase skill levels through use of vault, bars, beam and floor. Develop balance, coordination, flexibility and strength to use for future gymnastics and most other athletic pursuits. Gymnastics (Ages: 5-6) Wks: 6 • Classes: 6 • Day: Tue. Kingston Center Gym $48 (NR: $53) Begins: Oct. 4 • 6:30-7 p.m. Act. #: 2012210_05 Wks: 6 • Classes: 6 • Day: Thu. Kingston Center Gym $48 (NR: $53) Begins: Oct. 6 • 6-6:30 p.m. Act. #: 2012210_06 Gymnastics (Ages: 7-9) Wks: 6 • Classes: 6 • Day: Thu. Kingston Center Gym $48 (NR: $53) Begins: Oct. 6 • 6:30-7 p.m. Act. #: 2012210_07 Modern Dance (Ages: 5-10) Learn jazz dance style, adapting bold, dynamic movements and techniques to later apply to a variety of modern dances. Develop skills to grow and enhance your journey for future dance. Modern Dance (Ages: 5-6) Wks: 6 • Classes: 6 • Day: Thu. Kingston Center Room 4 $48 (NR: $53) Begins: Oct. 6 • 6:30-7 p.m. Act. #: 2022210_01 Modern Dance (Ages: 7-10) Wks: 6 • Classes: 6 • Day: Thu. Kingston Center Room 4 $53 (NR: $58) Begins: Oct. 6 • 7-7:45 p.m. Act. #: 2022210_02

www.GroveCityOhio.gov

Scarecrows (Ages: 5-10) Fall is here! Use your brain and provided materials to make life-size scarecrows, mason jars scarecrows and a yummy scarecrow snack. Wks: 1 • Class: 1 • Day: Tue. Kingston Center Room 2 $12 (NR: $14) Oct. 4 • 4:15-5:15 p.m. Act. #: 2042210_01 Jack-o’-lanterns (Ages: 5-10) Get your pumpkins ready for Halloween. Paint pumpkins and make jack-o’-lantern mason jars and more. Wks: 1 • Class: 1 • Day: Thu. Kingston Center Room 2 $12 (NR: $14) Oct. 6 • 5:30-6:30 p.m. Act. #: 2042210_02 Kids in the Kitchen: Fall (Ages: 6-7) Children learn to read recipes, practice basic kitchen safety and use proper cooking techniques to create delicious chocolate treats. Wks: 3 • Classes: 3 • Day: Thu. Gantz Farmhouse Classroom $45 (NR: $50) Begins: Oct. 6 • 6-7:30 p.m. Act. #: 2072210_02 BOO! (Ages: 5-10) Conjure up some scary ghost crafts to decorate your home for Halloween. Wks: 1 • Class: 1 • Day: Tue. Kingston Center Room 2 $12 (NR: $14) Oct. 11 • 4:15-5:15 p.m. Act. #: 2042210_03

Caramel Apples (Ages: 5-10) Enjoy caramel apples? Explore various ways to make the original treat on a stick in food and craft form. Wks: 1 • Class: 1 • Day: Tue. Kingston Center Room 2 $12 (NR: $14) Oct. 18 • 4:15-5:15 p.m. Act. #: 2042210_04 Falling Leaves (Ages: 5-10) Leave your cares behind and enjoy making leaf gnomes, falling leaf jars and more fun things with leaves. Wks: 1 • Class: 1 • Day: Thu. Kingston Center Room 2 $12 (NR: $14) Oct. 20 • 5:30-6:30 p.m. Act. #: 2042210_05 Trick or Treat (Ages: 5-10) Get ready for Halloween! Design your own treat bag, create a mask and make more fun Halloween-themed crafts. Wks: 1 • Class: 1 • Day: Tue. Kingston Center Room 2 $12 (NR: $14) Oct. 25 • 4:15-5:15 p.m. Act. #: 2042210_06 Cookie Graveyard (Ages: 6-9) Plot and execute your own completely edible, scary graveyard scene using cookies planted in a brownie base. Wks: 1 • Class: 1 • Day: Wed. Gantz Farmhouse Classroom $20 (NR: $23) Oct. 26 • 6:30-7:30 p.m. Act. #: 2072210_01

Registration

Online, phone and office registration begins Mon., Sept. 12

Program details subject to change to reduce community health risks from COVID-19.

Some adult classes are open to teens. Check the Adult section or call 614-277-3050 for options. The Source 5


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Harvest Party (Ages: 5-10)

Pumpkin Everything (Ages: 5-10)

Gather together for autumn-themed activities sure to yield fun for all! Play bingo, complete a scavenger hunt and do so much more!

Orange you glad autumn is here? Celebrate the most popular gourd by painting artificial pumpkins and making pumpkin clay and pie.

Wks: 1 • Class: 1 • Day: Thu. Kingston Center Room 2 $12 (NR: $14)

Wks: 1 • Class: 1 • Day: Thu. Kingston Center Room 2 $12 (NR: $14)

Oct. 27 • 5:30-6:30 p.m. Act. #: 2042210_07

Nov. 10 • 5:30-6:30 p.m. Act. #: 2042211_03

Sunflowers (Ages: 5-10)

Thanksgiving Turkey Treats (Ages: 6-9)

No plant inspires quite like the cheerful sunflower. Celebrate this beautiful, useful plant by making a variety of themed crafts.

Make Thanksgiving turkey-shaped treats on a stick using cookies, Indian corn and candy that you will love to gobble up.

Wks: 1 • Class: 1 • Day: Thu. Kingston Center Room 2 $12 (NR: $14)

Wks: 1 • Class: 1 • Day: Mon. Gantz Farmhouse Classroom $12 (NR: $15)

Nov. 3 • 5:30-6:30 p.m. Act. #: 2042211_01

Nov. 14 • 6:30-7:30 p.m. Act. #: 2072211_01

Baking Buddies (Ages: 5-6 with Adult)

Apple Pie Anyone? (Ages: 5-10)

In this parent-child cooking class, mix up a different variety of quick bread each week to enjoy at home.

One of the best parts of fall is apples! Enjoy apple pie in a cup while making apple pie crafts.

Wks: 3 • Classes: 3 • Day: Thu. Gantz Farmhouse Classroom $45 (NR: $50)

Wks: 1 • Class: 1 • Day: Tue. Kingston Center Room 2 $12 (NR: $14)

Begins: Nov. 3 • 6-7:30 p.m. Act. #: 2072211_03

Nov. 15 • 4:15-5:15 p.m. Act. #: 2042211_04

Gobble, Gobble (Ages: 5-10)

Happy Thanksgiving (Ages: 5-10)

It is almost turkey time! Make some Thanksgiving keepsakes to adorn your home.

Celebrate Thanksgiving by fashioning tepees, thankful trees and more fun crafts and treats.

Wks: 1 • Class: 1 • Day: Tue. Kingston Center Room 2 $12 (NR: $14)

Wks: 1 • Class: 1 • Day: Thu. Kingston Center Room 2 $12 (NR: $14)

Nov. 8 • 4:15-5:15 p.m. Act. #: 2042211_02

Nov. 17 • 5:30-6:30 p.m. Act. #: 2042211_05

Registration

Online, phone and office registration begins Mon., Sept. 12 6 The Source

Countdown to Christmas (Ages: 5-10) It is almost time for Christmas! Measure the days left until the holiday with a variety of countdown crafts. Wks: 1 • Class: 1 • Day: Tue. Kingston Center Room 2 $12 (NR: $14) Nov. 29 • 4:15-5:15 p.m. Act. #: 2042211_06 Modeling: The Catwalk (Ages: 7-16) Experience fashion on a make-believe catwalk stage. Learn to walk with grace and style as well as basic etiquette to help with good behavior and manners. Invite a guest to see you work the stage and model your favorite outfits on the last day. Students are encouraged to model their favorite Disney character costumes/outfits. Take home photos from the in-class session with a professional photographer (included). Wks: 6 • Classes: 6 • Day: Tue. Kingston Center Room 3 $150 (NR: $165) Begins: Oct. 11 • 5-6 p.m. Act. #: 2052210_01 Acting Games (Ages: 7-16) Build confidence and creativity while having fun: learn to act through games and improvisational situations to help you think on your feet and explore the possibilities of your imagination. Acting games build skills in collaboration, expose participant to new experiences and foster self-reliance. Wks: 6 • Classes: 6 • Day: Thu. Kingston Center Room 3 $75 (NR: $83) Begins: Oct. 13 • 5-5:50 p.m. Act. #: 2052210_02

Program details subject to change to reduce community health risks from COVID-19. www.GroveCityOhio.gov


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Karate Peewee Advanced (Ages: 4-7) Build on the basics of karate with movement drills, kata (form) and noncontact sparring with added emphasis on concentration, confidence and the martial arts philosophy. Wks: 6 • Classes: 6 • Day: Wed. Kingston Center Room 3 $45 (NR: $50) Begins: Oct. 5 • 5-5:30 p.m. Act. #: 2062210_02 Wks: 6 • Classes: 6 • Day: Wed. Kingston Center Room 3 $45 (NR: $50) Begins: Oct. 5 • 5:30-6 p.m. Act. #: 2062210_04 Karate Beginners (Ages: 8+) Deepen levels of concentration and confidence while emphasizing martial arts philosophy and learning more advanced movements, drills, kata (form) and non-contact sparring. Wks: 6 • Classes: 6 • Day: Mon. Kingston Center Room 3 $60 (NR: $65) Begins: Oct. 3 • 6-7 p.m. No class: Oct. 31 Act. #: 3062210_01

Acting Class with Showcase (Ages: 7-16)

Karate Peewee Beginners (Ages: 4-7)

Work in groups to act out various, age-appropriate acting scenes, including some from TV, movies and plays. Improve your memory, learn to develop a character and increase self-confidence and stage presence. Great for anyone interested in working in the entertainment industry. The instructor can provide guidance to parents of children interested pursuing professional acting. Last day is a showcase for guests to see the participants in action.

Learn basic movements, the martial arts philosophy and the importance of concentration and confidence.

Wks: 6 • Classes: 6 • Day: Thu. Kingston Center Room 3 $113 (NR: $128)

Begins: Oct. 3 • 5:30-6 p.m. No class: Oct. 31 Act. #: 2062210_03

Begins: Oct. 13 • 6-6:50 p.m. Act. #: 2052210_03

Wks: 6 • Classes: 6 • Day: Mon. Kingston Center Room 3 $45 (NR: $50) Begins: Oct. 3 • 5-5:30 p.m. No class: Oct. 31 Act. #: 2062210_01 Wks: 6 • Classes: 6 • Day: Mon. Kingston Center Room 3 $45 (NR: $50)

Wks: 6 • Classes: 6 • Day: Wed. Kingston Center Room 3 $60 (NR: $65) Begins: Oct. 5 • 6-7 p.m. Act. #: 3062210_02 Karate Advanced (Ages: 8+) Build concentration and confidence with an emphasis on martial arts philosophy while learning karate basics, movement, drills, kata (form) and non-contact sparring. Wks: 6 • Classes: 6 • Day: Mon. Kingston Center Room 3 $60 (NR: $65) Begins: Oct. 3 • 7-8 p.m. No class: Oct. 31 Act. #: 3062210_03 Wks: 6 • Classes: 6 • Day: Wed. Kingston Center Room 3 $60 (NR: $65) Begins: Oct. 5 • 7-8 p.m. Act. #: 3062210_04

www.GroveCityOhio.gov

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Adult Yoga (Ages: 18+) Learn to relax the body and calm the mind. Melt away tension and stress by combining Hatha yoga posture with breathing techniques and deep relaxation. Wear loose, comfortable clothing, bring a towel or mat and come with an empty stomach. Wks: 4 • Classes: 4 • Day: Tue. Evans Center Auditorium $22 (NR: $24)

Wks: 6 • Classes: 6 • Day: Wed. Kingston Center Room 3 $60 (NR: $65) Begins: Oct. 5 • 6-7 p.m. Act. #: 3062210_02 Karate Advanced (Ages: 8+) Build concentration and confidence with an emphasis on martial arts philosophy while learning karate basics, movement, drills, kata (form) and non-contact sparring.

Begins: Oct. 4 • 6-7 p.m. Act. #: 3032210_01

Wks: 6 • Classes: 6 • Day: Mon. Kingston Center Room 3 $60 (NR: $65)

Wks: 4 • Classes: 4 • Day: Tue. Evans Center Auditorium $22 (NR: $24)

Begins: Oct. 3 • 7-8 p.m. No class: Oct. 31 Act. #: 3062210_03

Begins: Nov. 1 • 6-7 p.m. Act. #: 3032211_01

Wks: 6 • Classes: 6 • Day: Wed. Kingston Center Room 3 $60 (NR: $65)

Workout With Weights (Ages: 18+) Complete a different series of simple, effective exercises for most activity levels each session! Learn a new 45-minute strength workout from a certified trainer each week that you can also do at home. Bring a yoga mat and five-pound or heavier weights. Wks: 4 • Classes: 4 • Day: Wed. Evans Center Auditorium $23 (NR: $25) Begins: Oct. 5 • 6-7 p.m. Act. #: 3032210_02 Wks: 4 • Classes: 4 • Day: Wed. Evans Center Auditorium $23 (NR: $25) Begins: Nov. 2 • 6-7 p.m. Act. #: 3032211_02 Karate Beginners (Ages: 8+) Deepen levels of concentration and confidence while emphasizing martial arts philosophy and learning more advanced movements, drills, kata (form) and non-contact sparring. Wks: 6 • Classes: 6 • Day: Mon. Kingston Center Room 3 $60 (NR: $65) Begins: Oct. 3 • 6-7 p.m. No class: Oct. 31 Act. #: 3062210_01 8 The Source

Begins: Oct. 5 • 7-8 p.m. Act. #: 3062210_04 Self Defense Holiday Safety (Ages: 15+) Designed to give the average person the ability to recognize, avoid and deal with threats, this class includes a lecture, PowerPoint presentation and other visual aids, and hands-on applications to introduce protective techniques including use of pepper spray and other less lethal and improvised weapons. Wks: 1 • Class: 1 • Day: Sat. Evans Center Auditorium $22 (NR: $24) Nov. 5 • 9 a.m.-Noon Act. #: 3112211_01 Aromatherapy Soap Dough (Ages: 18+) New! Make bath time more fun and relaxing by fashioning great smelling, handmade soap from a special recipe you roll out and cut into shapes. Wks: 1 • Class: 1 • Day: Tue. Gantz Farmhouse Classroom $12 (NR: $16) Oct. 4 • 6:30-7:30 p.m. Act. #: 3042210_01

Concrete Pumpkins (Ages: 18+) Concrete is not just functional, it is also great for making durable outdoor decorations. Make cute little pumpkin shapes for fall using nylon pantyhose and heavy string. Wks: 1 • Class: 1 • Day: Wed. Gantz Farmhouse Classroom $20 (NR: $25) Oct. 5 • 6:30-7:30 p.m. Act. #: 3042210_02 Fairy Houses on Slate (Ages: 18+) Use all-natural materials to create a charming fairy house on a slate base. Placed indoors or out, this whimsical structure will be a stellar home for visiting fairies. Wks: 1 • Class: 1 • Day: Wed. Gantz Farmhouse Classroom $38 (NR: $42) Oct. 19 • 6:30-7:30 p.m. Act. #: 3042210_03 An Apple a Day (Ages: 18+) The markets are full of many varieties of fresh, locally grown apples. Learn about the varieties including the best ones to bake in pie, cook for tasty apple sauce, or slice and snack on. Samples for tasting and recipes are shared. Wks: 1 • Class: 1 • Day: Tue. Gantz Farmhouse Classroom $20 (NR: $25) Oct. 18 • 6:30-8 p.m. Act. #: 3072210_01 Make Ahead Christmas Gifts (Ages: 18+) Using the bounty of the herb garden, make an herbal syrup for beverages, a dry herb blend for dips or soups, and an herb and spice stove-top simmering potpourri. Wks: 1 • Class: 1 • Day: Wed. Gantz Farmhouse Classroom $25 (NR: $30) Nov. 2 • 6:30-7:30 p.m. Act. #: 3042211_01

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Orange Pomanders (Ages: 18+) Make pomanders from fresh oranges and whole cloves that dry naturally and give off a pleasant scent for years. Wks: 1 • Class: 1 • Day: Tue. Gantz Farmhouse Classroom $12 (NR: $16) Nov. 8 • 6:30-7:30 p.m. Act. #: 3042211_02 Herbal Cookies (Ages: 18+) Looking to spice up your traditional holiday baking plans? Explore cookies flavored with different herbs and spices with samples and recipes provided. Wks: 1 • Class: 1 • Day: Tue. Gantz Farmhouse Classroom $25 (NR: $29) Nov. 15 • 6:30-8 p.m. Act. #: 3072211_01 Winter Squash Recipes (Ages: 18+) A fall staple, pumpkins and butternut and acorn squashes are tasty additions to fall menus. Make a great roasted squash side dish using sage and take home many more recipes. Wks: 1 • Class: 1 • Day: Wed. Gantz Farmhouse Classroom $20 (NR: $25) Nov. 16 • 6:30-7:30 p.m. Act. #: 3072211_02 Herb Butter Mix (Ages: 18+) The famed Jai Lai Restaurant, a Columbus mainstay for six decades, offered a much-loved herb butter. Prepare a batch using the restaurant’s recipe including garlic and lemon juice. The butter freezes well and is a great addition to any Thanksgiving spread. Wks: 1 • Class: 1 • Day: Tue. Gantz Farmhouse Classroom $12 (NR: $16)

Project Heart Strings - Gift Drive (Ages: All) Celebrate the true meaning of the holiday season with the Evans Angels! Purchase gifts or donate funds for seniors who may be forgotten or alone. Lists of suggested items are available at the Evans Center starting Nov. 1. The suggested contribution is $20. Drop off unwrapped gifts to the Evans Center by Dec. 2.

Beginner-level dancers learn country and ballroom routines with instructor-led tutoring set to fun and beautiful music. Wear comfortable clothes and shoes that slide easily across the floor. Learn exciting dances and meet new friends!

Evans Center $20 (suggested donation)

Begins: Oct. 6 • 6-7:30 p.m. Activity #: 3022210_01

Nov. 1-Dec. 2

Wks: 4 • Classes: 4 • Day: Thu. Evans Center Auditorium $22 (NR: $24)

Wks: 3 • Classes: 3 • Day: Thu. Evans Center Auditorium $16 (NR: $18) Begins: Nov. 3 • 6-7:30 p.m. Activity #: 3022211_01

Program details subject to change to reduce community health risks from COVID-19.

Nov. 22 • 6:30-7:30 p.m. Act. #: 3072211_03

Registration

Online, phone and office registration begins Mon., Sept. 12 www.GroveCityOhio.gov

Line Dance (Ages: 18+)

Project Heart Strings - Wrapping Party (Ages: All) Do you enjoy wrapping presents or just want to contribute to a great cause? Volunteer to wrap donated gifts for seniors at local care facilities. Day: Fri. Evans Center Free Dec. 9 • 9 a.m.-Noon

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55+ Fall Festival (Ages: 55+) Celebrate the beautiful changing colors of this season together with music, dancing, food and fun. Wks: 1 • Class: 1 • Day: Fri. Evans Center Multipurpose $10 (NR: $10) Oct. 21 • 1-3 p.m. Act. #: 4082210_01 Health Fair (Ages: 55+) Speak with representatives from various health care fields, mental health, COAAA, OSHIIP, Medicare insurance providers and more. Live life with the vibrancy that peace of mind can bring by learning ways to boost your quality of life. Lunch provided for registered participants. Wks: 1 • Class: 1 • Day: Fri. Evans Center Multipurpose Free Oct. 7 • 9 a.m.-Noon Act. #: 4112210_04 Chair Exercise (Ages: 55+) Autumn Craft Bazaar (Ages: All) Be ready to decorate for the holidays or pick up unique presents for friends and family. Vendors offer a variety of fun, festive items to keep or share. Day: Sat. Evans Center Free Oct. 15 • 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Drop in

Autumn Craft Bazaar - Rent a Table (Ages: All) Reserve an eight-foot table and two chairs to sell or promote your products for our event. Space is limited and all reservation are first come, first served. Contact the Evans Center for information. Limit of two tables per reservation.

This video-based program provides a group exercise experience for social interaction and motivation to get you moving! Seated fitness routines offer people with mobility, endurance and balance issues a way to lower blood pressure and to increase stamina, muscle tone, flexibility, coordination and a sense of well-being through lowimpact workouts.

Evans Center $25 per table

Wks: 4 • Classes: 4 • Day: Thu. Evans Center Auditorium Free

Registration opens Sep. 1 Call 614-277-3050 to register.

Begins: Oct. 6 • 10-11 a.m. Act. #: 4032210_03 Wks: 3 • Classes: 3 • Day: Thu. Evans Center Auditorium Free

Registration

Begins: Nov. 3 • 10-11 a.m. Act. #: 4032211_03

Online, phone and office registration begins Mon., Sept. 12 10 The Source

www.GroveCityOhio.gov


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Senior Exercise (Ages: 55+) Are you a more physically active senior looking to increase strength, gain flexibility and range of motion, achieve better mobility and gait, and improve balance? This group class offers low-impact aerobics with a warm-up session, aerobic exercise, progressive resistance strength training (weightlifting), and a cool down and stretching session. Stay active and moving in a fun, motivating, camaraderie-based atmosphere. Bring an exercise mat and hand weights. Wks: 4 • Classes: 8 • Days: Mon., Wed. Evans Center Auditorium $15 (NR: $15) Begins: Oct. 3 • 9-10 a.m. No class: Oct. 10 Act. #: 4032210_04 Wks: 4 • Classes: 8 • Days: Mon., Wed. Evans Center Auditorium $15 (NR: $15) Begins: Nov. 2 • 9-10 a.m. No class: Nov. 30 Act. #: 4032211_04 Chair Volleyball (Ages: 55+) Indoor chair volleyball promotes physical wellness, social interaction, competition and, most of all, lots of laughs. Reduce stress while boosting self-esteem and confidence as you meet new people, strengthen upperbody mobility and have fun while staying seated. Game is played with a light-weight beach ball and net. Registration required. Wks: 4 • Classes: 8 • Days: Mon., Wed. Evans Center Auditorium Free Begins: Oct. 3 • 1-2 p.m. No class: Oct. 10 Act. #: 4032210_02 Wks: 4 • Classes: 8 • Days: Mon., Wed. Evans Center Auditorium Free Begins: Nov. 2 • 1-2 p.m. No class: Nov. 28 Act. #: 4032211_02

www.GroveCityOhio.gov

Senior Yoga (Ages: 55+) Move through yoga poses designed to increase flexibility, balance and range of movement while enjoying restorative breathing exercises that promote stress reduction and mental clarity. Wks: 4 • Classes: 4 • Day: Thu. Evans Center Auditorium $15 (NR: $15) Begins: Oct. 6 • 11 a.m.-Noon Act. #: 4032210_05 Wks: 3 • Classes: 3 • Day: Thu. Evans Center Auditorium $12 (NR: $12) Begins: Nov. 3 • 11 a.m.-Noon No class: Nov. 24 Act. #: 4032211_05 Tai Chi (Ages: 55+) Yang-style tai chi creates a peaceful mental space and builds a calm balancing energy that fosters positivity and confidence. The slow, mindful movements leave you feeling energized and more physically and mentally flexible. Wks: 4 • Classes: 4 • Day: Tue. Evans Center Auditorium $18 (NR: $18) Begins: Oct. 4 • 10-11 a.m. Act. #: 4032210_06 Wks: 4 • Classes: 4 • Day: Tue. Evans Center Auditorium $18 (NR: $18) Begins: Nov. 1 • 10-11 a.m. Act. #: 4032211_06 Fitness Room (Ages: 55+) Do not let life events and setbacks keep you from being active! Use the Evans Center fitness room to make physical activity a regular part of your life. Exercise at your own pace using elliptical machines, treadmills, NuSteps, recumbent and upright bikes, hydraulic weight machines and free weights. Registration is required; participants are assigned a time slot. Contact the Evans Center for available times. Days: Mon.-Fri. Evans Center Fitness $15 per month Call 614-277-3050 to reserve a time.

Bead Artwork (Ages: 55+) Beads are versatile and make the perfect material for crafting projects. Join us as we use beads to create a variety of handcrafted items perfect for sharing. Come prepared for crafting on another level by adding loads of fun and personality. Purchase kits separately. Wks: 5 • Classes: 5 • Day: Mon. Evans Center Classroom Free Begins: Oct. 3 • 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Act. #: 4042210_01 Wks: 4 • Classes: 4 • Day: Mon. Evans Center Classroom Free Begins: Nov. 7 • 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Act. #: 4042211_01 Open Art Studio (Ages: 55+) You provide the artistry, we provide the space for all kinds of creations. Create your own artwork using pastel, paint, watercolor, pencil, charcoal, colored pencil or other medium. Bring your own supplies. All skill levels welcome! This is self-guided. Wks: 4 • Classes: 4 • Day: Fri. Evans Center Classroom Free Begins: Oct. 7 • 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Act. #: 4042210_02 Wks: 3 • Classes: 3 • Day: Fri. Evans Center Classroom Free Begins: Nov. 4 • 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Act. #: 4042211_02

Program details subject to change to reduce community health risks from COVID-19. The Source 11


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Showstoppers Present: For Goodness Sake The Showstoppers, the Evans Center in-house acting group, is preparing for an original production, “For Goodness Sake,” a seasonal comedy for all ages. During a last-minute check, Santa’s chief elf sees Billy’s name on the naughty list. Billy has a lot to learn about Christmas, but the elf sets things in motion to remedy the situation and teach him the true meaning of the holiday before Santa’s big ride. Day: Tue., Wed. or Thu. Evans Center Auditorium Free Movie Fun (Ages: 55+) Immerse yourself in the scent of fresh popcorn, the darkness illuminated by the flicker of a film, and the emotion of the surrounding crowd reacting to the on-screen events. The shared experience changes the way you see the movie, and spurs conversation and analysis. Join us for movie days in our own “theater.” Registration required. Movie Fun: Sweet November (Ages: 55+) (2001; PG-13) Eccentric Sara and workaholic Nelson fatefully cross paths at the DMV. Sara asks Nelson to spend November with her, promising to change his life for the better. During their month together, Nelson learns there is much more to her story. Wks: 1 • Class: 1 • Day: Fri. Evans Center Auditorium Free Nov. 4 • 1-3 p.m. Act. #: 4082211_01 The Wilds (Ages: 55+) Discover the Wilds from an open-air vehicle led by a knowledgeable guide. Encounter amazing animals, many rare and endangered, as they roam in large natural, open-range areas. Includes deli lunch at Wilds Overlook Café. Wks: 1 • Class: 1 • Day: Thu. Departs the Evans Center $54 (NR: $54) Oct. 6 • 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Act. #: 4122210_05 12 The Source

Adena Mansion and Gardens (Ages: 55+) Visit the 2,000-acre estate of Thomas Worthington, sixth governor of Ohio. The mansion house, completed in1807, is restored to look as it did when the Worthingtons lived there, including many original furnishings. Stroll through three terraces of fall flowers, and look east from the north lawn to see the view that inspired the Great Seal of the State of Ohio. Stop for lunch (on your own). Wks: 1 • Class: 1 • Day: Wed. Departs the Evans Center $19 (NR: $19) Oct. 19 • 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Act. #: 4122210_06 LaComedia: White Christmas (Ages: 55+) This heartwarming musical comedy perfect for the whole family is inspired by the classic film of the same name. The performance features classic songs including Blue Skies, Sisters, and the most famous holiday song, White Christmas. Wks: 1 • Class: 1 • Day: Wed. Departs the Evans Center $57 (NR: $57)

Nov. 29, Nov. 30 or Dec.1 • 1 p.m. Drop-in; Large groups encouraged to call ahead Showstoppers Present: For Goodness Sake Day: Wed. Evans Center Auditorium Free; Donations accepted for Food Pantry and Showstoppers Nov. 30 • 7 p.m. Drop-in; Large groups encouraged to call ahead Eldorado Casino (Ages: 55+) Try your luck at the slots and enjoy lunch at the café or Brew Brothers (on your own). Wks: 1 • Class: 1 • Day: Thu. Departs the Evans Center $5 (NR: $5) Oct. 20 • 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Act. #: 4122210_01 Wks: 1 • Class: 1 • Day: Thu. Departs the Evans Center $5 (NR: $5) Nov. 17 • 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Act. #: 4122211_01

Nov. 30 • 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Act. #: 4122211_06

Registration

Online, phone and office registration begins Mon., Sept. 12

Program details subject to change to reduce community health risks from COVID-19. www.GroveCityOhio.gov


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Dining Trips (Ages: 55+) Enjoy time away with others for conversation over a good meal at popular regional dining destinations traveling on the Evans Center bus for door-to-door drop-off and pickup service. Lunch Bunch: Hofbrauhaus (Ages: 55+) Wks: 1 • Class: 1 • Day: Mon. Departs the Evans Center $5 (NR: $5) Oct. 3 • 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Act. #: 4122210_03 Lunch Bunch: Liberty Tavern (Ages: 55+) Wks: 1 • Class: 1 • Day: Tue. Departs the Evans Center $5 (NR: $5) Nov. 8 • 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Act. #: 4122211_03 Supper Club: Carrabba’s Italian Restaurant (Ages: 55+) Wks: 1 • Class: 1 • Day: Tue. Departs the Evans Center $5 (NR: $5) Oct. 18 • 4-8 p.m. Act. #: 4122210_04 Supper Club: The Rusty Keg Tavern (Ages: 55+) Wks: 1 • Class: 1 • Day: Tue. Departs the Evans Center $5 (NR: $5) Nov. 15 • 4-8 p.m. Act. #: 4122211_04 Shopping & Lunch: Der Dutchman (Ages: 55+) Enjoy an Amish-style meal and browse the delightful gift shop featuring timeless treasures, homemade treats and handcrafted heirlooms. Wks: 1 • Class: 1 • Day: Tue. Departs the Evans Center $5 (NR: $5) Nov. 22 • 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Act. #: 4122211_02

www.GroveCityOhio.gov

Shopping & Lunch: Morgan House (Ages: 55+) Experience fine cuisine in a converted antebellum log home and browse for collectables and home accents, clothing, jewelry, furniture and packaged gourmet food. Wks: 1 • Class: 1 • Day: Thu. Departs the Evans Center $5 (NR: $5) Oct. 13 • 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Act. #: 4122210_02 Loss Support (Ages: 55+) There is no normal way to experience grief. While you may be tempted to isolate yourself, it can be healthy to lean on others for support. Interacting with friends, family and support groups can be helpful when you feel low or overwhelmed. Meet with others with similar experiences and join in discussions or just listen. Wks: 1 • Class: 1 • Day: Wed. Evans Center Multipurpose Free Oct. 12 • 10-11 a.m. Act. #: 4112210_05 Wks: 1 • Class: 1 • Day: Wed. Evans Center Multipurpose Free Nov. 9 • 10-11 a.m. Act. #: 4112211_05 Diabetes Education Introduction (Ages: 55+) Are you or a loved one newly diagnosed as diabetic? Discover how the disease affects your body, gain understanding on the impact of food on blood sugar and learn the optimal diet to manage diabetes in an intro class presented by Shelley Turski with Shelley’s Simple Sweets. Sample delicious, diabetes-friendly food. Bring $5 to class. Wks: 4 • Classes: 4 • Day: Wed. Evans Center Multipurpose Bring $5 to class Begins: Oct. 5 • 11 a.m.-Noon Act. #: 4112210_01

Lunch & Learn: Arthritis Prevention & Care Tips (Ages: 55+) Arthritis symptoms can come and go or be steadily persistent with varying degrees of pain severity that impact quality of life and independence. Review the different types of arthritis, prevention tips and care tips to minimize or slow the disease process. Presented by Holly Holton with Right At Home. Wks: 1 • Class: 1 • Day: Wed. Evans Center Multipurpose Free Oct. 26 • 11 a.m.-Noon Act. #: 4112211_02 Lunch & Learn: Beating the Holiday Blues (Ages: 55+) The holidays can be a wonderful, joyous time for many surrounded by friends, family and loved ones. However, less day light and holiday pressures can create stress and trigger anxiety or depression. Discover strategies and coping mechanisms to battle the holiday blues during an interactive presentation by Josh Rusdinski with Enliven Home Health. Wks: 1 • Class: 1 • Day: Thu. Evans Center Multipurpose Free Nov. 17 • 11 a.m.-Noon Act. #: 4112211_03 Lunch & Learn: Memory Loss: Normal vs. Abnormal (Ages: 55+) Are you or a loved one experiencing memory loss, difficulty concentrating, or problems managing finances or medications? Engage in an open, engaging conversation about normal versus abnormal memory loss, other cognitive changes, and strategies for dealing with them. Presented by Josh Rusdinski with Enliven Home Health. Wks: 1 • Class: 1 • Day: Wed. Evans Center Multipurpose Free Oct. 12 • 11 a.m.-Noon Act. #: 4112210_02

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Lunch & Learn: Residential Right-sizing (Ages: 55+) Discover how right-sizing might be the answer to unlocking your financial dreams! Leveraging the equity in your house can create a living benefit that allows you to enjoy life now by providing the financial freedom to do the things you really want to do. Presented by Nora Vancleave with Coldwell Banker Realty. Wks: 1 • Class: 1 • Day: Wed. Evans Center Multipurpose Free Oct. 19 • 11 a.m.-Noon Act. #: 4112210_03 Lunch & Learn: Stretch Your Grocery Dollars (Ages: 55+) Eating healthy doesn’t have to be expensive. Learn easy ways to get the biggest bang for your buck on healthy foods at the grocery store from Cindy Grotsky with Humana Marketpoint. Wks: 1 • Class: 1 • Day: Wed. Evans Center Multipurpose Free Nov. 9 • 11 a.m.-Noon Act. #: 4112211_01 Veterans’ Display The November display case in the Evans Center will feature and honor veterans for their contributions to our freedom. The Center would like to borrow your photos or other materials to place in the case. Drop off items at the front desk by Oct. 25 with key info such as dates, war and service era. Please label items clearly to help return to owners by Nov. 28. Oct. 25 LifeCare Alliance Lunch Program (Ages: 60+)

Computer Lab (Ages: 55+) Stop by the Evans Center to use one of the available desktop computers. Day: Mon.-Fri. Evans Center Multipurpose Free Evans Center hours S.A.L.T. (Seniors and Law Enforcement Together) (Ages: 55+) The Grove City Division of Police wants to be a resource and advocate for older citizens. Seniors are often targeted for crimes due to high levels of trust and other vulnerabilities. S.A.L.T. raises awareness and shares prevention tips to lessen the risks. Elder Services Coordinator Teri Ruslander also discusses neighborhood concerns and answer questions.

Meet with the Evans Center director to ask questions about Center-related activities and share suggestions. Wks: 1 • Class: 1 • Day: Wed. Evans Center Multipurpose Free Oct. 5 • Noon-12:30 p.m. Drop in Wks: 1 • Class: 1 • Day: Wed. Evans Center Multipurpose Free Nov. 2 • Noon-12:30 p.m. Drop in Senior Club Meetings (Ages: 55+) Join other members of the Grove City Senior Citizens’ Club to hear club updates.

Wks: 1 • Class: 1 • Day: Tue. Evans Center Multipurpose Free

Class: 1 • Day: Wed. Evans Center Multipurpose Free

Oct. 11 Drop in

Oct. 5 • 12:30-1:30 p.m. Drop in

Wks: 1 • Class: 1 • Day: Tue. Evans Center Multipurpose Free Nov. 8 Drop in Alzheimer’s Support Group (Ages: 55+)

Senior Club Board Nominations (Ages: 55+) Interested in serving on the executive board of the Grove City Senior Club or know someone who is? The committee is accepting nominations for election or re-election of president, vice president, secretary and treasurer. A nominee must be a current member in good standing with the club. Officers are expected to serve a two-year term and attend scheduled club and board meetings. Voting is during the Dec.7 club meeting.

The everyday challenges faced by those dealing with Alzheimer’s and related diseases can be overwhelming. If someone you care about suffers from Alzheimer’s or a related dementia disease, do something to help them and yourself. Caregivers meet monthly Evans Center to share experiences and receive Deadline: Oct. 31 support, acquiring a sense of belonging by interacting with others facing similar challenges.

Enjoy a nutritious lunch twice weekly at Wks: 1 • Class: 1 • Day: Tue. the Evans Center. There are no financial Evans Center Multipurpose restrictions, but please call in advance Free to make a reservation. Oct. 18 • 7 p.m. Days: Twice Weekly Drop in Evans Center Lunchroom Wks: 1 • Class: 1 • Day: Tue. $2 (suggested donation) Evans Center Multipurpose 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Free Call 614-277-1067 to make a Nov. 15 • 7 p.m. reservation. Drop in 14 The Source

Talks with Tammy (Ages: 55+)

Registration

Online, phone and office registration begins Mon., Sept. 12 www.GroveCityOhio.gov


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Registration

Grove City Parks and Recreation offers five easy methods to register for classes. Registration forms are available for download online at GroveCityOhio.gov or pick up at the Kingston Center or the Evans Center. ONLINE registration is available at GroveCityOhio.gov for most Parks and Recreation offerings, providing 24-hour access to our exciting array of options for all ages.

1 2

WALK-IN registration is available Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., in the Kingston Center, 3226 Kingston Ave., for preschool, youth and adult classes, and at the Evans Center, 4330 Dudley Ave., for 55+ offerings.

3

Registration by PHONE is accepted via Visa, Discover or MasterCard only, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Call the Evans Center, 614-277-1060, for 55+ classes, and the Kingston Center, 614-277-3050, for all others.

4

Use the silver DROP BOX located on the parking lot side of the Kingston Center for afterhours registration. The box is opened at 8 a.m. each business day; registrations placed in the box after 8 a.m. are processed the next business day.

5

MAIL your payment and completed registration form to: Grove City Parks and Recreation Department, Kingston Center, 3226 Kingston Ave., Grove City, OH 43123

Payment Methods • Cash or Money Order • Checks made payable to: City of Grove City. A customer with a returned check is assessed a $25 fee. Any customer with two returned checks within 12 months must pay all subsequent fees by cash or money order. • Credit Card: MasterCard, Discover or Visa only Confirmation Once you have registered for a class, no other confirmations are made unless a change is made in the program details. It is the responsibility of the participant to be present on the date and time listed. Cancellations/Credit Registered participants may cancel from a program, but it is that participant’s responsibility to contact the Parks and Recreation Department. A credit is made to the participant’s account if a request is made in writing prior to the start of the program. To receive a full refund for sports, the request must be made before uniforms are ordered. Class/Event Cancellation All classes and events are subject to change or cancellation based on participation and instructor availability. A staff member will notify all registered class participants as changes occur. Photos and Videos The City of Grove City reserves the right to photograph or record event and program participants for publicity purposes. Images may be used in catalogs, brochures, magazines, ads or other print or electronic public relations efforts (i.e., website, social media). Residency Rates & Fair Share Policy The lower “resident rate” provides credit to those paying municipal taxes that help support the programs www.GroveCityOhio.gov

and events offered by the City of Grove City. To qualify as a resident, a person must live or work in Grove City or Jackson Township. This does not include all of ZIP code 43123; ZIP codes are used by the U.S. Postal Service to designate the office that delivers mail to an address. Visit FranklinCountyAuditor.com to check your address. Grove City parcel IDs start with 040; unincorporated Jackson Township with 160. Through the City of Grove City Fair Share Policy, non-residents who pay income tax to the City of Grove City are eligible to participate at resident rates. To be eligible, non-residents must annually provide proof of employment on company letterhead with the signature of the personnel director or a current pay stub showing the employer’s address. Equal Opportunities and Special Populations The Grove City Parks and Recreation Department is committed to serving the whole community. All persons regardless of age, sex, race, color, national origin or religion are encouraged to participate. Our goal is also to include individuals with special needs in our existing programs based on their need and ability. Groups or individuals serving special populations are welcome to contact the department to make program arrangements. The City of Grove City does not discriminate on the basis of disability in the admission or access to its programs or activities. An ADA Coordinator has been designated to coordinate compliance with the nondiscrimination requirements contained in the Department of Justice regulations implementing Subtitle A of Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act (42 U.S.C. §12101 et seq.), which prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability by public agencies. The ADA Coordinator can be contacted at 614-277-3050. The Source 15


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We Are Getting a New Look in 2023! BE READY FOR OUR NEW SYSTEM! Starting January 2023, registering with Grove City Parks and Recreation will be easier than ever! The change to a new system requires all users to set up a new household account starting Tuesday, Jan. 3. The new account can be set up online without contacting the office. It can also be done in person and by phone. Watch for updates at GroveCityOhio.gov, and on social media at E Q @GroveCityParks. 16 The Source

Easier activity searches, registration and payment. Online shelter and field rental registration and 24-7 availability checks. Downloadable calendars to track your family's activities. Streamlined communications capabilities. Simple document management for submitting paperwork. Ability to manage a child's registrations and payments in multiple households. www.GroveCityOhio.gov


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LEAF COLLECTION MAP & SCHEDULE

GUIDE

2022

Area 1

Area 2

Area 3

Area 4

First Collection

Oct. 17-21

Oct. 24-28

Oct. 31-Nov. 4

Nov. 7-10

Second Collection

Nov. 14-18

Nov. 28-Dec. 2

Dec. 5-9

Dec. 12-16

Collection for each area begins on Monday and may take the entire week to complete. Please review the map and schedule to determine the designated location and assigned week(s) for your area.

The City of Grove City residential leaf collection begins Monday, Oct. 18. The city is divided into four areas, each assigned two collection weeks through Friday, Dec. 16. Crews travel each street a minimum of one trip during the designated week. Rake leaves to the curb by 7 a.m., Monday of the assigned collection week. Leaves should only be placed in the grassy area between the street and sidewalk or to the edge of the lawn for areas without a sidewalk. Leaves placed in the street can block storm sewers and create hazards for parking. Do not park vehicles in front or on top of leaves 7 a.m.-4 p.m. during collection weeks so workers can maneuver leaf collection machinery. Collection is for leaves only as equipment is damaged by branches, twigs, rocks and other debris. Leaf piles do not kill grass, but may lead to temporary discoloration. To prevent grass discoloration and raked leaf piles from blowing, rake leaves a day or two prior to your collection week. Leaves are accepted year round as part of regular trash pickup by Local Waste Services. Place leaves in yard waste bags/containers and place on the curb on your normal pickup day. A greener alternative is to mulch with your mower, which acts as a natural fertilizer. For more information, please view a list of FAQs on the City website or contact the Grove City Service Department at 614-277-1100.

@GroveCityOhio www.GroveCityOhio.gov

GroveCityOhio.gov The Source 17



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