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                Winter Park Community Center  Strategic Recreation Facilities Programming Plan  July 2011     


Acknowledgments   

City of Winter Park  K e n n e t h  W. B r ad l ey , M a y o r   

City Commission  Commissioner  Carolyn C o o p e r  Commissioner S te ven  L e a r y  Commissioner To m M cM a ck en  Commissioner S a r ah  Spri nkel 

  Park and Recreation Commission  B l ai r  Cu lp epp e r,   Ch ai r  M a rn i  Spenc e  J a n e t  At k ins  Wood y  Wood all  S a m S t a rk  Joel  Rob e rts  E d w a rd  En glander  M ich a e l P a lumb o,  A lt e rn at e   

Winter Park Health Foundation  Funding for this plan was made possible through a grant from the  Winter Park Health Foundation‐ Children, Youth & Older Adults work groups 

  Parks and Recreation Staff  John  H o l l an d ,  Di rec to r  B r end a M ood y,  Assistan t  Di rec to r  R o n ald  Mo ore,  Ass is t ant   Di rect o r  C h u c k  T ri ce,   Ass ist an t D i r ec t o r  L ei f Bou ffard , P r oje ct  M an a g er  Jason  S ee ley ,  R ec r ea ti o n  Ch i ef  N an cy  M cL ea n , S en io r  St aff  Ass is t an t  Kesha Patterson/ St a ff  Assistan t 

 

      Consultant 

 

    For more information about this document, contact GreenPlay, LLC  211 North Public Road, Suite 225, Lafayette, Colorado 80026, Telephone: 303‐439‐8369  Fax: 303‐664‐5313 Toll Free: 866‐849‐9959  Email: info@greenplayllc.com  www.greenplayllc.com        Strategic Recreation Facilities Plan

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A. Introduction and Process ................................................................................ 1  B. Demographics and Trend Analysis .................................................................. 3  1. Demographic Analysis ................................................................................................................... 3  2. Trends and Sustainability for Healthy Lifestyles .............................................................................. 7  C. Needs Assessment – Public Input ................................................................... 23  1. Focus Group Summary ................................................................................................................ 23  2. Statistically‐valid Community Survey Summary ............................................................................ 25  D. Program Validation and Space Utilization Analysis ....................................... 33  1. Seasonal Prime Time and Non‐Prime Time Programming Space Matrix ............................................ 33  2. Year Round Programming Capacity Summary .................................................................................... 34  3. Recreational Programming Recommendations .................................................................................. 37  4. Administrative Programmatic Recommendations .............................................................................. 39  5. Potential Programming Partnerships .................................................................................................. 40  E. Staffing Analysis ........................................................................................... 43  1. Benchmarking Analysis of Local Community Centers .................................................................... 43 

F. Winter Park Community Center Annual Operational and Maintenance Budget  Pro forma ......................................................................................................... 47  1. Budget Assumptions ........................................................................................................................... 47  2. Operational Budget Projections .......................................................................................................... 49  Appendix A – Statistically‐Valid, Community‐Wide Survey Results .................... 55 

Appendix B ‐ Seasonal Prime Time and Non‐Prime Time Programming Space  Matrix ............................................................................................................. 121  Appendix C ‐ Sample WORK‐REATION Guidelines ............................................ 131  Appendix D ‐ Sample Program Evaluation ....................................................... 135  Appendix E ‐ Sample Partnership Agreement Outline ...................................... 139  Appendix F ‐ Comparable Community Center Benchmarking Matrix ............... 143  Appendix G ‐ Comparable Community Center Benchmarking Survey Instrument  ....................................................................................................................... 147  Appendix H ‐ Benchmarked Facilities Organizational Charts ........................... 151  Appendix I ‐ Winter Park Community Center Organizational Chart ................. 159  Appendix J ‐ Winter Park Community Center New Position Job Descriptions ... 163                        iv  City of Winter Park, Florida 


Table of Figures  Figure 1: City of Winter Park Population ...................................................................................................... 3  Figure 2: 2010 Population Breakdown by Age ‐ Winter Park ....................................................................... 4  Figure 3: Households by Income – City of Winter Park ................................................................................ 6   

Table of Tables  Table 1: 2010 Race ........................................................................................................................................ 5  Table 2: 2010 Educational Attainment – 25 Years and Older ....................................................................... 5  Table 3: Housing Units (2010) ....................................................................................................................... 6  Table 4: Top Twenty Sports Ranked by Total Participation 2009 ................................................................. 9  Table 5: Ten‐Year History of Sports Participation (in millions) 1999‐2009 ................................................. 10  Table 6: Most Popular Extreme Sports in the USA (U.S. population; 6 years of age or older) ................... 12  Table 7: Worldwide Fitness Trends for 2008 and for 2009 ......................................................................... 13  Table 8: Programming Matrix ..................................................................................................................... 33  Table 9: Capacity Hours .............................................................................................................................. 34  Table 10: Program Plan Hours .................................................................................................................... 36  Table 11: Membership Rates ...................................................................................................................... 48  Table 12: Hourly Rental Rates ..................................................................................................................... 48                             

Strategic Recreation Facilities Plan

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A. Introduction and Process    The City of Winter Park is approaching the completion of constructing its first larger multi‐purpose  regional Community Center. This new center will replace the previous neighborhood focused center,  which was contracted for operations by the Boys and Girls Club. The total building square footage of  the new community center is approximately 39,000, and includes the parks and recreation  department offices, a youth room, a fitness center, a teen room, a gymnasium with one regulation  basketball court or two cross courts, a computer/media room, a seniors area, a kitchen, two large  multi‐purpose rooms that are dividable, and a small outdoor aquatic center. New staff is being hired  to complement and supplement the existing staff in the operation of the facility.    GreenPlay, LLC, was contracted to fully explore programming, core services, optimum cost recovery,  management, and operational aspects of the community center, and to compile a Programming Plan  to assist in the management and operation of the facility. This Programming Plan is intended to be a  comprehensive management tool to assist the City in continuously meeting the needs of the  neighborhood, community, and area residents. The Programming Plan healthy lifestyle includes  programming for all of the different backgrounds, demographics, age groups, and income levels.     The Programming Plan process includes:  • A Demographics and Trends Analysis including Sustainability for Healthy Lifestyles  • A Needs Assessment including a comprehensive Public Input Process with numerous  stakeholders participating in Focus Groups and a Statistically‐Valid Communitywide Survey  • Recommendations for complete facility programming  • A Space Utilization Analysis for all ages – older adults, adults, youth, teen, and families, with  an emphasis on long‐term sustainability including identification of Prime Time and Non‐Prime  Time Capacity of Programming Space for complete Facility Programming Recommendations  • Identification of Potential Programming Partnerships including Mather’s Café and Mather  Lifeway Community Initiatives  • A Staffing Analysis, including a Benchmarking Analysis of local community centers,  Organizational Chart, Compensation Model, and Job Descriptions  • An Operational Budget Projection and revenue analysis  • An Operational Five‐Year Pro Forma and revenue analysis      The City of Winter Park staff, Winter Park Health Foundation, key stakeholders, and decision makers  shared valuable information and previous planning efforts and were very involved at critical points in  the development of the Programming Plan. The details and results of the process are included in the  following sections of the Plan.                      Strategic Recreation Facilities Plan   

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B. Demographics and Trend Analysis    1. Demographic Analysis    City of Winter Park Population  Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc. (ESRI) was used for this study. ESRI uses data from the  US Census and multipliers to help with five year projections. The City of Winter Park’s population has  shown a slight but steady decline from 2000‐2015. As shown in Figure 1, the estimated 2010 population  for the City of Winter Park is 23,902 within the municipal boundary area. It is projected that the City will  experience a reduction of approximately 640 residents (.02%) from 2010 to 2015.    Figure 1: City of Winter Park Population  

City of Winter Park 24,200

24,090

24,000

23,902

23,800 23,600 23,400

23,253

23,200 23,000 22,800 2000

2010

2015

 

Source: ESRI 

  In addition to population, other demographic data was carefully considered and analyzed. The  community profile includes age, gender, race, education, household income, household size, and  employment. Implications of the demographic trends are broken down to help identify recreation and  leisure needs specific to the City of Winter Park.    Age Ranges and Family Information   It is important to understand the age distribution in Winter Park. According to ESRI’s demographic  profile, the median age in Winter Park is 43.9. The age distribution breakdown located in Figure 2 shows  that 60.9 percent of the population is age 35 or older. Moreover, residents already in their retirement  years represent 32.6 percent of the population. Planning for families, empty‐nesters, and active adults  will be important in the next five years.      Strategic Recreation Facilities Plan   

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Figure 2: 2010 Population Breakdown by Age‐ Winter Park 

City of Winter Park Age Distribution 16.0%

14.2%

14.1%

14.0% 10.8%

12.0%

9.7%

10.0% 8.0% 6.0%

4.9%

5.0%

5.4%

6.7%

9.0%

9.3%

6.2% 4.6%

4.0% 2.0% 0.0% Under 5

5 to 9

10 to 14 15 to 19 20 to 24 25 to 34 35 to 44 45 to 54 55 to 64 65 to 74 75 to 84 85 years  and over

Source: ESRI Business Information Solutions 

  The following age breakdown is used to separate the population into age sensitive user groups.     • Under 5 years: This group represents users of preschool programs and facilities. As trails and  open space users, this age group is often in strollers. These individuals are the future  participants in youth activities.   • 5 to 14 years: This group represents current youth program participants.   • 15 to 24 years: This group represents teen/young adult program participants moving out of the  youth programs and into adult programs. Members of this age group are often seasonal  employment seekers.   • 25 to 34 years: This group represents potential adult program participants. Many in this age  group are beginning long‐term relationships and establishing families.   • 35 to 54 years: This group represents users of a wide range of adult programming and park  facilities. Their characteristics extend from having children using preschool and youth programs  to becoming empty nesters.   • 55 to 64 years: This group represents users of older adult programming exhibiting the  characteristics of approaching retirement or already retired and typically enjoying  grandchildren.   • 65 years plus: Nationally, this group will be increasing dramatically. Pew Research reports that  by the time all Baby Boomers turn 65 in 2030, 15 percent of the nation’s population will be at  least that old. Recreation centers, senior centers, and senior programs can be a significant link in  the health care system. This group ranges from very healthy, active seniors to more physically  inactive seniors.               4 

City of Winter Park, Florida 

 


Race  According to ESRI the City of Winter Park shows little ethnic diversity. As shown in Table 1, the race with  the largest population is White Alone (82.3%) followed by African American Alone (12%). With the  exception of those two races, all other measured races in Winter Park demonstrate a very low percent  of residents in the remaining cohorts. It’s important to note that the trend in the City reflects a slight  diversification of races by the year 2015.     Table 1: 2010 Race   Race  White Alone  African American Alone  American Indian Alone  Asian Alone or Pacific Islander Alone  Some Other Race Alone�� Two or More Races 

City of Winter  Park  82.3%  12.0%  .3%  2.3%  1.4%  1.8% 

Source: ESRI Business Information Solutions  

  Education   According to ESRI Business Information Solutions, as shown in Table 2, the City of Winter Park shows a  high percentage of residents with a Bachelor’s or Master’s/Professional/Doctorate degree (52.8  percent). Only 5.8 percent of the population represents residents without a high school diploma.     National trends reported by the Federal Interagency Forum on Aging Related Statistics in March of 2008  suggest that older people enjoy higher levels of prosperity than any previous generation, with an  increase in higher incomes and a decrease in the proportion of older people with low incomes and in  poverty. Major inequalities continue to exist for people without high school diplomas who report  smaller economic gains and fewer financial resources.     Table 2: 2010 Educational Attainment – 25 Years and Older Level of Education Attained  City of Winter  Park  Less than 9th Grade  2.7%  9th‐12th Grade, No Diploma  3.1%  High School Graduate  17.0%  Some College, No Diploma  16.5%  Associate Degree  7.7%  Bachelor’s Degree  30.7%  Master’s/Prof/Doctorate  22.1%   Source: ESRI Business Information Solutions  

            Strategic Recreation Facilities Plan   

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Household Income  According to ESRI, the median Household Income is $59,813, and per capita income for residents in the  City of Winter Park is estimated at $40,298. The household income cohorts represent a close balance  from less than $15,000 to those earning over $200,000. Diversity in programs and services should reflect  a variety of residents and their ability to pay for recreational offerings. Figure 3 shows a comparison of  household income in the City.     Figure 3: Households by Income – City of Winter Park 

City of Winter Park 20.0% 18.0% 16.0% 14.0% 10.6% 12.0% 10.0% 8.0% 6.0% 4.0% 2.0% 0.0%

17.6% 13.0% 9.5%

13.0%

13.3%

9.5%

9.4% 4.1%

Less than  $14,999 to $25,000 to $35,000 to $50,000 to $75,000 to  $100,000  $150,000  $200,000  $15,000 $24,999 $34,999 $49,999 $74,999 $99,999 to  to  or more $149,999 $199,999

 Source: ESRI Business Information Solutions    According to ESRI Business Information Solutions, in 2010, the annual average amount spent on  entertainment and recreation by households in Winter Park was $4,224. This amount does not include  travel.     Household Size and Units  The 2010 average household size in Winter Park is 2.11 persons. Table 3 shows residents that own and  occupy their own home in Winter Park make up 54.1 percent of the population; just over half of  households.     Table 3: Housing Units (2010)  Housing Units  City of Winter  Park  Owner Occupied Housing Units  54.1%  Renter Occupied Housing Units  33.5%  Vacant Housing Units  12.4%  Source: ESRI Business Information Solutions 

          6 

City of Winter Park, Florida 

 


Employment   According to 2010 figures, 89.1 percent of the 16 and over population in Winter Park are in the civilian  labor force. Of the employed work force in Winter Park, approximately 80.8 percent are engaged in  White Collar professions such as management, business, financial, and sales. The balance of the work  force is engaged in service (10.7%) and blue collar (8.5%) professions.     Demographic Analysis Summary  In summary, key demographics to take into consideration for future planning efforts of the City of  Winter Park’s Parks and Recreation Department are the following:  • Median age for Winter Park residents is 43.9.  • Age distribution in Winter Park is balanced. The City is anticipated to show an age shift over the  next five years to represent a higher percentage of residents age 55+.  • Currently, the highest age cohorts are 35‐44 and 45‐54, translating into programming for a wide  variety of adults, including those that are about to become empty‐nesters.  • Median household income is $59,813.  • The annual average amount spent on entertainment and recreation by household in Winter Park  is $4,224.This amount does not include travel.   • Owner occupied housing units is just over half of the Winter Park households, 54.1 percent.  • Education attainment for Winter Park residents indicates more people 25 years and older with  Bachelor’s, Master’s/Professional/Doctorate degrees, 52.8 percent.  • Population in Winter Park is projected to slightly decrease at a slow and steady rate (‐.02%)  through 2015. 

2. Trends and Sustainability for Healthy Lifestyles    Influencing Trends  A challenge of parks and recreation departments is to continue to understand and respond to the  changing characteristics of those it serves. In this fast‐paced society, it is important to stay on top of  current trends impacting parks and recreation. The following information highlights relevant local,  regional, and national parks and recreational trends from various sources.     Facilities – National Trends   The current national trend is toward “one‐stop” indoor recreation facilities to serve all ages. Large,  multi‐purpose regional centers help increase cost recovery, promote retention, and encourage cross‐ use. Agencies across the U.S. are increasing revenue production and cost recovery. Another trend is  multi‐use facilities versus specialized space, offering programming opportunities as well as free‐play  opportunities. “One‐stop” facilities attract young families, teens, and adults of all ages.    According to Recreation Management Magazine’s, “2010 State of the Industry Report,” recent economic  conditions are leading many park and recreation agencies across the country to cut their budgets, while  at the same time, an increase in participation may be on the rise. Whether people are trading in pricier  health club memberships, they are taking advantage of public programs, or they are staying close to  home for vacation, many citizens are looking at their public recreation facilities to provide  entertainment and rejuvenation.      Strategic Recreation Facilities Plan   

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The report also summarized a survey that included public, private, and non‐profit agencies. The  following trends were highlighted specific to facilities:  • Despite crunching budgets, respondents were slightly more likely than average to be planning to  build new facilities, or make additions and renovations to their existing facilities. Although it is  noted that percentages are slightly lower than in previous years.   • The current top 10 amenities to be included in park facilities are:   o Playgrounds (included by 81.4% of park respondents)  o Park structures such as restroom buildings and picnic shelters (80.6%)  o Open spaces such as natural areas and gardens (71.6%)  o Outdoor sports courts for games such as basketball and tennis (70.6%)  o Natural turf sports fields for baseball and football (70.6%)  o Trails (68.4%)  o Bleachers and seating (68.3%)  o Concession areas (65.4%)  o Classrooms and meeting rooms (53.7%)  o Community or multipurpose centers (49.3%)    Amenities and specialty parks that are still considered “alternative” but increasing in popularity include  the following:  • Climbing walls.  • Cultural art facilities.  • Green design techniques and certifications such as Leadership in Energy and Environmental  Design (LEED®). A recent Building Commissioners Association (BCA) survey indicated that 52  percent of the recreation industry survey respondents stated that they were willing to pay more  for green design, knowing that it would significantly reduce or eliminate the negative impact of  buildings on the environment and occupants.   • Two of the emerging specialty parks include skate parks and adult fitness parks. The Sporting  Goods Manufacturers Association estimates that there are about 1,000 skateboard parks in the  United States.    Athletic Recreation ‐ National Trends     Sports Participation  The 2009 National Sporting Goods Association Survey on sports participation found some of the top ten  athletic activities ranked by total participation included: exercise walking, swimming, exercising with  equipment, bowling, camping, and bicycle riding. Additionally, the following active, organized, or skill  development activities remain popular: hiking, running/jogging, basketball, golf, and soccer. Table 4  further outlines the top twenty sports ranked by total participation in 2009 and the percent change from  2008.                  8 

City of Winter Park, Florida 


Table 4: Top Twenty Sports Ranked by Total Participation 2009  Sport    Exercise Walking    Exercising with Equipment    Camping (vacation/overnight)    Swimming    Bowling    Workout at Club    Bicycle Riding    Weight Lifting    Hiking    Aerobic Exercising    Fishing    Running/Jogging    Billiards/Pool    Basketball    Boating, Motor/Power    Golf    Target Shooting (net)    Hunting with Firearms    Yoga    Soccer   *Percent Change is from 2008 

 Total    93.4    57.2    50.9    50.2    45.0    38.3    38.1    34.5    34.0    33.1    32.9    32.2    28.2    24.4    24.0    22.3    19.8    18.8    15.7    13.6  

 % Change*   ‐3.4%    4.0%    3.0%    ‐6.1%    0.6%    ‐2.6%    ‐1.5%    1.8%    2.8%    3.0%    ‐22.0%    1.0%    ‐11.1%    ‐5.0%    ‐13.9%    ‐3.9%    ‐2.4%    0.3%    20.9%    0.6%  

Source: NSGA 2009 

  The Ten‐year History of Sports Participation Report published by NSGA shows national trends in team  sports and individual sports. Participation trends for team sports indicate that tackle football, hockey,  swimming, and soccer had an increase in participation between 1999 and 2009. Since the report,  lacrosse has also become one of the country’s fastest growing team sports. Participation in high school  lacrosse has almost doubled this decade. An estimated 1.2 million Americans over the age of seven have  played lacrosse within the previous year.     Individual sport trends which also include exercise activities show increases in: aerobic exercising,  bowling, camping, canoeing, exercising with equipment, hiking, running, and more. Table 5 illustrates a  ten year change in participation for selected activities including both team sports and individual sports.                       Strategic Recreation Facilities Plan   

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Table 5: Ten‐Year History of Sports Participation (in millions) 1999‐2009    Aerobic Exercising   Backpack/Wilderness  Camp   Baseball   Basketball   Bicycle Riding   Boating, Motor/Power   Camping  (vacation/overnight)   Exercise Walking   Exercising with  Equipment   Fishing   Football (tackle)   Golf   Gymnastics   Hiking   Hockey (ice)   In‐Line Roller Skating   Kayaking   Mountain Biking (off  road)   Running/Jogging   Skateboarding   Skiing (cross country)   Soccer   Softball   Swimming   Table Tennis   Tennis   Volleyball   Weight Lifting   Workout at Club   Wrestling   Yoga  

2009   33.1   12.3  

2007   30.3   13.0  

2005   33.7   13.3  

2003   28.0   15.1  

2001   26.3   14.5  

1999  26.2  15.3 

11.5   24.4   38.1   24.0   50.9  

14.0   24.1   37.4   31.9   47.5  

14.6   28.9   41.1   27.5   46.0  

15.4   27.9   38.3   24.2   53.4  

14.9   28.1   39.0   23.9   48.7  

16.3  29.6  42.4  24.4  50.1 

93.4   57.2  

89.8   52.9  

86.0   54.2  

81.6   50.2  

78.3   43.9  

80.8  45.2 

32.9   8.9   22.3   3.9   34.0   3.1   7.9   4.9   8.4  

41.0   9.2   22.7   n/a   28.6   2.1   10.7   5.9   9.3  

41.6   9.9   24.7   n/a   29.8   2.4   13.1   n/a   9.2  

42.7   8.7   25.7   n/a   26.7   1.9   16.0   n/a   8.2  

44.4   8.2   26.6   n/a   26.1   2.2   19.2   n/a   6.9  

46.7  8.4  27.0  5.0  28.1  1.9  24.1  n/a  6.8 

32.2   8.4   1.7   13.6   11.8   50.2   13.3   10.8   10.7   34.5   38.3   3.0   15.7  

30.4   10.1   1.7   13.8   12.4   52.3   n/a   12.3   12.0   33.2   36.83   2.1   10.7  

29.2   12.0   1.9   14.1   13.1   58.0   n/a   11.1   12.2   33.5   34.7   n/a   n/a  

23.9   9.0   1.9   13.0   12.4   52.3   n/a   9.6   10.4   25.9   29.5   n/a   n/a  

24.5   9.6   2.3   13.9   13.2   54.8   8.4   10.9   12.0   23.9   26.5   3.5   n/a  

22.4  7.0  2.2  13.2  14.7  57.9  8.2  10.9  11.7  n/a  24.1  3.8  n/a 

Source: NSGA 2009 

   

 

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City of Winter Park, Florida 


Youth Sports  Specific offerings for kids’ fitness are slowly increasing in health and fitness facilities. Facilities are  offering more youth‐specific exercise equipment. Individualized youth sports training opportunities are  becoming more popular as well. For youth ages 7 to 11, bowling, bicycle riding, and fishing had the  highest number of participants in 2009; however, skateboarding, snowboarding, and tackle football saw  the highest percent of increase in 2009. It is important to note that of the six mentioned sports above,  football was the only team sport. In‐line skating experienced the largest decrease in participation  followed by softball and skiing.    Another noteworthy trend is the increase in ‘pick‐up’ play in team sports. In recent years, the Sporting  Goods Manufacturers Association (SGMA) noticed that participation in team sports has been driven by  organized/sanctioned play. However, in 2008, there were seven team sports where ‘casual/pick‐up’ play  exceeded organized/sanctioned play. Those sports were basketball, ice hockey, field hockey, touch  football, lacrosse, grass volleyball, and beach volleyball. It is believed that this is the result of athletes  and their families feeling the pinch of the economy. Many people are choosing the less expensive ways  to play sports and stay active.     Extreme Sports  Extreme sports are not just a fad. Regardless of the time of year, extreme sports are increasing in  participation. A 2008 SGMA report, as shown in Table 6, demonstrates this increase in participation.  Important to City of Winter Park are the following facts concerning extreme sports.  • Nearly 45% of all inline skaters participate 13 days or more��a year.  • More than 45% of all skateboarders participate 25 or more days a year.  • Trail running participation has been steady since 2000.  • Ultimate Frisbee is more popular than lacrosse, wrestling, beach volleyball, fast‐pitch softball,  rugby, field hockey, ice hockey, and roller hockey.  • Roller hockey’s biggest challenge is getting access to proper venues.  • Generation X and Millennials are most commonly drawn to extreme sports.                                        Strategic Recreation Facilities Plan   

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Table 6: Most Popular Extreme Sports in the USA (U.S. population; 6 years of age or older)  Extreme Sport  1. Inline Skating  2. Skateboarding  3. Mountain Biking  4. Snowboarding  5. Paintball  6. Cardio Kickboxing  7. Climbing (Indoor, Sport, Boulder)  8. Trail Running  9. Ultimate Frisbee  10. Wakeboarding  11. Mountain/ Rock Climbing  12. BMX Bicycling  13. Roller Hockey  14. Boardsailing/Windsurfing   

# of Participants (participated at least  once in 2007)  10,814,000  8,429,000  6,892,000  6,841,000  5,476,000  4,812,000  4,514,000  4,216,000  4,038,000  3,521,000  2,062,000  1,887,000  1,847,000  1,118,000 

Source: Sporting Goods Manufacturers Association, 2007 

  National Fitness and Health Trends  There have been many changes in fitness programs in the last ten years. What clients wanted in 2000 is  not necessarily what they want today. Fitness programs that have increased in popularity since 2000  include outdoor exercise, boot camp, personal training, post‐rehabilitation, kids‐specific fitness, and  sport‐specific training. Declining programs since 2000 include dance, health fairs, sports clinics, aerobics,  stress‐management classes, and weight‐management classes. (IDEA Health and Fitness Association)     The American College of Sports Medicine’s (ACSM’s) Health and Fitness Journal conducted a survey to  determine trends that would help create a standard for health and fitness programming. Table 7 shows  survey results that focus on trends in the commercial, corporate, clinical, and community health and  fitness industry. The Worldwide Survey indicates the following shift in fitness trends between 2008 and  2009.                                 12 

City of Winter Park, Florida 


Table 7: Worldwide Fitness Trends for 2008 and for 2009  2008  1. Educated and experienced      fitness professionals  2. Exercise programs for children to fight  childhood and adolescent obesity  3. Personal training  4. Strength training  5. Core training  6. Special fitness programs for older adults  7. Pilates  8. Functional fitness  9. Swiss ball  10. Yoga 

2009  1. Educated and experienced fitness  professionals  2. Children and obesity  3. Personal training  4. Strength training  5. Core training  6. Special fitness programs for older adults  7. Pilates  8. Stability ball  9. Sport‐specific training  10. Balance training 

Source: American College of Sport Medicine 

  Healthy Lifestyle and Trends  The United Health Foundation has ranked Florida 37th in its 2010 State Health Rankings, down two  rankings from 2009.    The State’s biggest strengths include:  • Low prevalence of binge drinking   • High immunization coverage  • Low rates of cancer deaths and cardiovascular deaths    Some of the challenges the State faces include:  • High incidence of infectious disease  • High rate of uninsured population  • High geographic disparity within the state    Economic Effects   Inactivity and obesity in the United States cost the country hundreds of billions of dollars annually. Some  local governments are now accepting the role of providing preventative health improvement through  park and recreation services. The following are facts from the International City/County Management  Association.   • 89% believe parks and recreation departments should take the lead in developing communities  conducive to active living.  • Nearly 84% supported recreation programs that encourage active living in their community.  • 45% believe the highest priority is a cohesive system of parks and trails and accessible  neighborhood parks.              Strategic Recreation Facilities Plan   

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As obesity in the United States continues to be a topic of interest for legislators and our government,  there continues to be research suggesting that activity levels are stagnant among all age groups. The  following are statistics that support this concern.   • Only 25% of adults and 27% of youth (grades 9‐12) engage in recommended levels of physical  activity.   • 59% of American adults are sedentary.   • Children born now have a lower life expectancy than their parents.   • Children engage in electronics such as video games, cell phones, mp3 players, computer games,  internet, etc. for 4.5 ‐ 8 hours daily (30‐56 hours per week).   • Prevalence of overweight children:  o ages 2 – 5 years (12.4%)  o ages 6 – 11 years (17%)  o aged 12 – 19 years (17.6%)    Healthy Lifestyle Trends  The health care issue is front and center. Park and recreation departments are finding that they are in a  position to be a catalyst in creating healthy lifestyles and communities. Steps such as assessments,  policy creation, financial analysis, and management process are occurring around the country to create  and validate a method for building healthy communities and gaining credibility as a public health  provider. Below is a look at both local trends occurring in Winter Park and the surrounding area, as well  as trends occurring on a national level.    Local Healthy Lifestyle Trends  The Winter Park Health Foundation and the Health Council of East Central Florida cited in the 2011  Boost Your Brain, Final Evaluation Report that increased physical activity and better nutrition in older  adults demonstrated gains in socialization, physical activity, mental stimulation, spirituality, and  nutrition. These trends were identified by Dr. Nussbaum, author of Your Brain Health Lifestyle, a  Proactive Program to Preserve Your Life Story.    Staff also reported the following successful programs as trends occurring locally:  • Intergenerational gardens  • Fit/Boot Camp  • Fitness Trails  • Workplace wellness campaigns    National Healthy Lifestyle Trends  In October, 2010 the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Vulnerable Populations Portfolio shared  thoughts on how health is impacted by where and how we live, learn, work, and play. Below  demonstrates the connection that nonmedical factors play in where health starts before illness sets in.                  14 

City of Winter Park, Florida 


Where We Live  Residential instability has adverse health impacts.    Example:  • Homeless children are more vulnerable to mental health problems, developmental delays, and  depression than children who are stably housed.   • Difficulty keeping up with mortgage payments may be linked to lower levels of psychological  well‐being and a greater likelihood of seeing a doctor.  • The connection between access to public transportation and health studies found that people  who live in counties with high “sprawl indexes” were likely to have a higher body mass index  than people living in more compact counties.   • Convenient, affordable, and available eating habits result from inability to move from place to  place within the community. PolicyLink and the Food Trust, two nonprofits focused on  expanding access to fresh foods where low‐income people live, have found that “decreased  access to healthy food means people in low‐income communities suffer more from diet‐related  diseases like obesity and diabetes than those in higher‐income neighborhoods with easy access  to healthy food, particularly fresh fruits and vegetables.”  • Communities without crime are healthier. Researchers from the Baltimore Memory Study found  that residents living in the most dangerous neighborhoods were nearly twice as likely to be  obese as those living in the least dangerous neighborhoods.    Where We Work   The relationship between work and health is critical to creating productive environments.   Investing in the right ways to support employees, businesses can help create a workforce that is less  stressed and more content. The net result: a happier, healthier workforce which is more productive and  yields better results.  • An approach such as “lifestyle leave” to take care of the inevitable personal and family needs  that arise is a valuable asset for many of the parents. Programs which help provide employees  with the peace of mind also help them to breathe and work easier.  • Business leaders and employees alike should view work as a place of opportunity — a source of  support, satisfaction, and motivation, which can offer mutual benefits when done correctly.    Where We Learn  Eight times more lives can be saved with education than with medical advances.  • Without graduating from high school, one is likely to earn less money and struggle to make ends  meet, work longer hours (and maybe even work two jobs) just to feed a family, and live in a  compromised neighborhood without access to healthy food.  • Better educated people have more opportunity to make healthier decisions. They have the  money and access necessary to buy and eat healthier foods.  • Data from the National Longitudinal Mortality Study indicates that people with higher education  live five to seven years longer than those who do not finish high school.  • In South Carolina, leaders improved the health of citizens by strengthening their education  system. A coalition of business and community leaders, politicians, educators, and parents came  together to support a one‐cent sales tax to fund education improvement.  • Schools are not just centers of teaching and learning, they are places that provide the  opportunity to improve the health of all Americans.    Strategic Recreation Facilities Plan   

15


Where We Play  Play is a profound biological process that shapes brain function.  • Play prompts us to be continually, joyously, physically active, combating obesity, and enhancing  overall health and well‐being.   • Play can interrupt the damage done by chronic stress, and even gives the immune system some  relief.  • Play is a basic need − a biological requirement for normal growth and development. Scientists  associated with the National Institute for Play are united in their concern about “play under‐ nutrition,” noting that the corrosive effects of this form of starvation gradually erode emotional,  cognitive, and physiological well‐being − a major aspect of sedentary, obesity, and poor stress  management can be readily linked to play starvation.  • Providing places to spend leisure time and recreate are critical to creating healthy communities.    Additional National Healthy Lifestyle Trends  The national population is becoming more diverse. As demographics are experiencing an age and ethnic  shift, so too are landscapes, daily lifestyles, and habits changing. The number of adults over the age of  65 has increased, and lifestyle changes have encouraged less physical activity; collectively, these trends  have created profound implications for the way local governments conduct business. Below are  examples of trends and government responses.  • According to the article “Outdoor Exercise ‘Healthier than Gym Workouts,’” published in March  2011, researchers have found that going for a run outdoors is better than exercising in the gym,  because it has a positive impact on mental, as well as physical health. Levels of tension,  confusion, anger, and depression were found to be lowered. This aligns with the trend of adult  fitness playgrounds that are popping up all over the world.  • Café Plus Concepts – Mather’s Cafes are opening around the country to attract Boomers and  seniors. The concept is more than a café. The “plus” offers leisure activities, trips/tours,  educational offerings, social opportunities, and fitness. These concepts can be integrated into  community centers or stand alone facilities.  • Essential services, healthy food options, workplaces, and other destinations are frequently not  located within easy walking or bicycling distance from where people live, learn, and play.  The link between health and the built environment continues to grow as a trend for local  governments. They are increasingly incorporating active living and physical activity into daily  routines.     Aquatics National Trends  According to the National Sporting Goods Association (NSGA), swimming ranked fourth in terms of  participation in 2009, down two rankings from 2008. Outdoor swimming pools are typically open three  months out of the year in most states. There is an increasing trend towards indoor leisure and  therapeutic pools.                   16 

City of Winter Park, Florida 


General Programming Trends – National Trends  One of the most common concerns in the recreation industry is creating innovative programming to  draw participants into facilities and services. Once in, participants recognize that the benefits are  endless. According to Recreation Management Magazine’s, June 2010 “State of the Industry Report,”  the most common programs offered included holiday and other special events, fitness programs, and  educational programs. Sports training was not in the top ten; however, golf instruction and tennis  lessons are a fast paced trend.    Recreation Management Magazine’s “2010 State of the Industry Report” highlighted the following top  10 programs Most Commonly Offered:  1. Holidays and special events   2. Fitness Programs  3. Educational Programs  4. Day Camps  5. Youth Sports Teams  6. Sports Tournaments or Races  7. Adult Sports Teams  8. Mind Body/Balance (e.g. yoga and tai chi)  9. Swimming Programming  10. Sport Training    Marketing  Niche marketing trends have experienced change more frequently than ever before as technology  affects the way the public receives information. Web 2.0 tools and now Web 3.0 tools are a trend for  agencies to use as a means of marketing programs and services. Popular social media electronic  marketing tools are constantly changing, but currently, primarily include:  • Facebook   • Whirl  • Twitter  • You Tube  • Flickr  • LinkedIn    Mobile marketing is a trend of the future. Young adults engage in mobile data applications at much  higher rates than adults in age brackets 30 and older. Usage rates of mobile applications demonstrate  chronologically across four major age cohorts, that millennials tend to get information more frequently  using mobile devices such as smart phones. For example, 95 percent of 18‐to‐29‐year‐old cell phone  owners send and receive text messages, compared to 82% of 30‐to‐49‐year‐olds, 57 percent of 50‐to‐64‐ year‐olds, and 19 percent of 65 and older. It is also a fact that minority Americans lead the way when it  comes to mobile access. Nearly two‐thirds of African‐Americans (64%) and Latinos (63%) are wireless  internet users, and minority Americans are significantly more likely to own a cell phone than are their  white counterparts (87 percent of blacks and Hispanics own a cell phone, compared with 80 percent of  whites).          Strategic Recreation Facilities Plan   

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3. Trends in Managing Natural Environments, Open Space, and Facilities    Economic & Health Benefits of Parks   There are numerous economic and health benefits of parks, including the following:  • Trails, parks, and playgrounds are among the five most important community amenities  considered when selecting a home.   • Research from the University of Illinois shows that trees, parks, and green spaces have a  profound impact on people’s health and mental outlook. US Forest Service research indicates  that when the economic benefits produced by trees are assessed, total value can be two to six  times the cost for tree planting and care.   • Fifty percent of Americans regard outdoor activities as their main source of exercise. “There’s a  direct link between a lack of exposure to nature and higher rates of attention‐deficit disorder,  obesity, and depression. In essence, parks and recreation agencies can and are becoming the  ‘preferred provider’ for offering this preventative healthcare.” – Fran P. Mainella, former  director of the National Park Service and Instructor at Clemson University.    The Trust for Public Land has published a report titled: The Benefits of Parks: Why America Needs More  City Parks and Open Space. The report makes the following observations about the health, economic,  environmental, and social benefits of parks and open space:  • Physical activity makes people healthier.  • Physical activity increases with access to parks.  • Contact with the natural world improves physical and physiological health.   • Residential and commercial property values increase.  • Value is added to community and economic development sustainability.  • Benefits of tourism are enhanced.  • Trees are effective in improving air quality and act as natural air conditioners.   • Trees assist with storm water control and erosion.   • Crime and juvenile delinquency are reduced.  • Recreational opportunities for all ages are provided.  • Stable neighborhoods and strong communities are created.    Nature Programming  In April 2007, the National Recreation and Park Association (NRPA) sent out a survey to member  agencies in order to learn more about the programs and facilities that public park and recreation  agencies provide to connect children and their families with nature. A summary of the results follow:  • 68% of public park and recreation agencies offer nature‐based programming, and 61% have  nature‐based facilities.   • The most common programs include nature hikes, nature‐oriented arts and crafts, fishing‐ related events, and nature‐based education in cooperation with local schools.   • When asked to describe the elements that directly contribute to their most successful programs,  agencies listed staff training as most important followed by program content and number of  staff/staff training.   • When asked what resources would be needed most to expand programming, additional staff  was most important followed by funding.   • Of the agencies that do not currently offer nature‐based programming, 90% indicated that they  want to in the future. Additional staff and funding were again the most important resources  these agencies would need going forward.   18 

City of Winter Park, Florida 


The most common facilities include nature parks/preserves, self‐guided nature trails, outdoor  classrooms, and nature centers.     When asked to describe the elements that directly contribute to their most successful facilities, agencies  listed funding as most important followed by presence of wildlife and community support.       Figures from the Association for Interpretative Naturalists, a national group of nature professionals,  demonstrate that nature‐based programs are on the rise. According to Tim Merriman, the association's  Executive Director, the group was founded in 1954 with 40 members. It now boasts 4,800 members,  with research indicating that about 20,000 paid interpreters are working nationally, along with an army  of more than 500,000 unpaid volunteers staffing nature programs at parks, zoos, and museums. The  growth of these programs is thought to come from replacing grandparents as the teacher to these  outdoor programs. It is also speculated that a return to natural roots and renewed interest in life’s basic  elements was spurred as a response to September 11, 2001.    Outdoor Recreation   Local parks and recreation departments are a common place for residents to look when getting outside  for leisure activities. It is often the mission of parks departments as well as private or non‐profits to get  more people outdoors.     The Outdoor Foundation released the 2010 Participation in Outdoor Recreation report. The report  highlights growth in nature based outdoor activities and continued decline in youth outdoor  participation. The Foundation states that the trends show the beginning of adjustments in American  lifestyles brought about by a challenging economy, shifting demographics, and changing times. Their  research brought the following key findings.    Participation in Outdoor Recreation  Return to Nature: Nearly 50 percent of Americans ages six and older participated in outdoor recreation  in 2009. That is a slight increase from 2008 and equates to a total of 137.8 million Americans.  Plans for the Future: While less than a quarter of all participants reported getting outside two times a  week or more in 2009, 82 percent said that they plan to spend more time participating in outdoor  activities in 2010.    The Economy: Forty‐two (42) percent of outdoor participants said the economy impacted how often  they participated in outdoor activities in 2009.   Fitness and Health Benefits: Outdoor participants rate their fitness level at 6.4 on a 10‐point scale  versus 4.9 for non‐participants. In terms of health, outdoor participants rate their health level at 7.5  versus 6.6 for non‐participants.  Preservation of Land: The majority of Americans agree that preserving undeveloped land for outdoor  recreation is important. A large percentage of outdoor participants also believe that developing local  parks and hiking and walking trails is important and that there should be more outdoor education and  activities during the school day.                Strategic Recreation Facilities Plan   

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Youth 

• • •

More Indoor Youth: An overall downward slide in outdoor recreation among 6 to 12 year olds  was realized.  The Influence of Family: Most youth are introduced to outdoor activities by parents, friends,  family, and relatives.  Physical education in schools: The importance cannot be understated. Among adults ages 18  and older who are current outdoor participants, 83 percent say they had PE in school between  the ages of 6 and 12. That compares with just 70 percent of non‐outdoor participants.  

  Recreation and Park Administration National Trends  Municipal parks and recreation structures and delivery systems have changed, and more alternative  methods of delivering services are emerging. Certain services are being contracted out, and cooperative  agreements with non‐profit groups and other public institutions are being developed. Newer partners  include the health system, social services, justice system, education, the corporate sector, and  community service agencies. These partnerships reflect both a broader interpretation of the mandate of  parks and recreation agencies and the increased willingness of other sectors to work together to address  community issues. The relationship with health agencies is vital in promoting wellness. The traditional  relationship with education and the sharing of facilities through joint‐use agreements is evolving into  cooperative planning and programming aimed at addressing youth inactivity levels and community  needs.    Listed below are additional administrative national trends:  • Level of subsidy for programs is lessening and more “enterprise” activities are being developed,  thereby allowing subsidy to be used where deemed appropriate.   • Information technology allows for better tracking and reporting.   • Pricing is often determined by peak, off‐peak, and off‐season rates.   • More agencies are partnering with private, public, and non‐profit groups.     Trend Analysis Summary  The following are key recreation trends reflective of the City of Winter Park. These will be important to  evaluate for future planning efforts.  • Creating healthy lifestyles through where people live, work, learn, and play is a fast growing  trend for local governments.  • Local trends in Winter Park were demonstrated with increased physical activity and better  nutrition in older adults. Gains in socialization, physical activity, mental stimulation, spirituality,  and nutrition were realized.  • There is an increasing trend towards indoor leisure and therapeutic pools. Additional amenities  like “spray pads” are becoming increasingly popular as well.  • Some of the top ten athletic activities ranked by total participation included: exercise walking,  swimming, exercising with equipment, camping, and bicycle riding. Additionally, the following  active, organized, or skill development activities remain popular: hiking, running/jogging, soccer,  basketball, football, and skateboarding.  • The United Health Foundation has ranked Florida 37th in its 2010 State Health Rankings, down  two ranking from 2009.  • Special events, fitness programs, and environmental education programs were listed at the top  of the 10 programs parks and recreation departments are planning to add within the next three  years.   20 

City of Winter Park, Florida 


• • • • • •

Trails, parks, and playgrounds are among the five most important community amenities  considered when selecting a home. National trends in the delivery of parks and recreation systems reflect more partnerships and  contractual agreements reaching out to the edges of the community to support specialized  services.  Playgrounds, park structures such as restroom buildings and picnic shelters, and open spaces are  among the top three amenities currently included in park facilities.  For youth ages 7 to 11, bowling, bicycle riding, and fishing had the highest number of  participants in 2009; however, skateboarding, snowboarding, and tackle football saw the  highest percent of increase in 2009. Web‐based niche marketing tools are more popular for agencies to use as a means of marketing  programs and services.  Healthy vending and concession options are becoming more prevalent as an alternative to  traditional snacks. 

  Works Cited:  Ahrweiler, Margaret, ”Call of the Wild,” Recreation Management Magazine, June 2010Evans and Trachtenberg,  “Lacrosse Muscles It’s Way West,”  May, 2009, Wall Street Journal1  Gies, Erica, “The Health Benefits of Parks,” 2006, The Trust for Public Land  Mainella, Fran P., Honorary Doctorate, and Visiting Scholar at Clemson University and Former Director of the  National Park Service, highlights in the April 16, 2007 issue of Newsweek Magazine  Nussbaum, P. (2007). Your brain health lifestyle, a proactive program to preserve your life story. Tarentum, PA:  Word Association Publishers.   Pack and Schunel, Pack, A. & Schunel, “The Economics of Urban Park Planning,” Parks and Recreation, August 2005  Penbrooke, Teresa L, “Trends in Parks and Recreation”, Presentation for the National Recreation and Parks  Association  Ziegler, Jeffrey, "Recreating retirement: how will baby boomers reshape leisure in their 60s?". Parks & Recreation.  FindArticles.com. 29 Mar, 2011. http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1145/is_10_37/ai_93611647/   Boost Your Brain Final Evaluation 2011, Produced by: Winter Park Health Foundation and Health Council of East  Central Florida  “Outdoor Exercise ‘Healhtier than Gym Workouts’”  www.TheTelegraph.co.uk/earth/outdoors accessed, March 24, 2011  “Participation in Outdoor Recreation,” September 2009, Outdoor Foundation  “Participation In Team Sports,” National Sporting Goods Association, 2009  “U‐M study: Lifesylte Main Factor In Child Obesity,” The Detroit News –  <www.detnews.com/article/20110201/lifestyle03/102010359>   American College of Sport Medicine  CDC’s Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, http://www.cdc.gov/brfss/    <MarketingChart.com> accessed Jul 13, 10,  IDEA Health and Fitness Association  International City/County Management Association, 2004  P&R Magazine, May 2008  Outdoor Industry Foundation, <outdoorindustry.org/news.association>  Pew Internet and American Life Project, July 7, 2010  Sporting Goods Manufacturer’s Association, October 2009  United Health Foundation 

 

      Strategic Recreation Facilities Plan   

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C. Needs Assessment – Public Input    The creation of this plan included comprehensive information gathering and input from staff, key  stakeholders, and decision makers. The key partners and stakeholders that the focus groups listed to  collaborate on programs at the new community center included:  • Public (OCPS, Police, Fire, Library, etc.)  • Non‐Profit (YMCA, Boys & Girls Club, Scouts, etc.)  • Government Agencies (Orange County, Adjacent Cities, etc.)  • Private Businesses (Walmart, Target, Lowes, CVS, etc.)  • Educational Institutions (Rollins, UCF, Valencia, etc.)  • Health Providers (Hospital, Nursing, etc.)   • Specialties/Service Learning Agencies  • Foundations (WP Health Foundation, Dr. Phillips, Galloway, Edyth Bush etc.)  • Philanthropic  • Churches/Faith Based  • Associations   

1. Focus Group Summary    In February of 2011, over 80 stakeholders participated in eight focus groups to provide valuable  information on preferred programming issues for the new Winter Park Community Center. Their input is  summarized below.    The participants were asked to rank the quality of current programs the Parks and Recreation  Department offered on a scale of 1 to 5 with 1 being poor and 5 being excellent. The average rating was  2.9.    The participants were asked what current programs should be continued when programming the new  community center they listed (in alphabetical order):  • After School Programs  • Career & Academic Programs  • Computers  • Friday Night Dances  • Intergenerational Programs  • Local Meetings  • Meal Programs  • Midnight Basketball  • Senior Programs  • Summer Camps  • Summer Youth Employment  • Swimming  • Teen Ambassadors        Strategic Recreation Facilities Plan   

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The participants thought none of the current programs should be eliminated when programming the  new community center. There were no duplications or overlapping of programs with other service  providers. The focus group participants thought partnerships should be developed at the new  community center so no future overlaps would take place.  The participants were asked what additional programs they would like to see in the new community  center they listed (in no certain order):  • Health/Wellness  • Nature & Environmental  • Life Skills & Personal Development  • Sports/Fitness  • Special Needs  • Social Services/Resource Referrals  • Cultural & Performing Arts  • Special Events  • Historical/Cultural/Education/Preservation  • Aquatics  • Public Safety & Awareness  • Summer & Schools Out Programs  • Drop In     The key issues, values, concerns in programming the new community center the participants listed  include (in no certain order):  • Flexibility  • Innovative  • Consistency/Stable Schedule  • Affordability/Free  • Marketing/Communication/Open House/Tours  • Inclusion/Diversity  • High Quality  • Staff‐Qualified /Knowledgeable/Certified/Enthusiastic/etc.  • School’s Out Programming  • Ownership of Neighborhood/History/Traditional  • Caring/Welcoming/Customer Oriented/etc.    The participants were asked if they felt there were any underserved portions of the community that  needed to be included in programming the new community center they listed (in no certain order):  • Unemployed  • Those without transportation  • Seniors/Baby Boomers  • Birth to 3‐year‐olds  • 5‐year‐olds to Middle Schoolers   • Middle Schoolers   • West Winter Park  • African‐American population  • Those without access to computers/web  • School age when school is out  24 

City of Winter Park, Florida 


• • •

Special Needs  Unwed Mothers   South of Orange Ave/Fairbanks 

  The participants were asked how the programs should be financially supported and they listed their  answers as (in no certain order):  • Combination Fees/Taxes  • Drop In Use  • Fees for Scheduled Programs with Instructors  • Affordable Fees  • Scholarships Available  • Do not turn anyone away    The methods for community feedback the participant thought would be the best include (in no certain  order):  • Comment Cards/Simple 3‐5 Questions  • Surveys/Mailers  • Website  • Focus Groups/Quarterly Coffees  • Community Forum  • Social Media – Facebook/Twitter/Texting  • App Codes  • Program Advisory Boards – Youth/Senior/Community Center  • Program Evaluations  • Program Assessments  • Newsletter/Flyers  • Feedback Touch screen Computer    The feedback from the stakeholders in the focus groups and community forum were tested through the  community survey to provide statistically‐valid information on the programming information utilized to  assist in the programming plan for the Winter Park Community Center. 

  2. Statistically‐valid Community Survey Summary    The City of Winter Park Parks and Recreation Department hired Profile Marketing Research, a survey  consultant to conduct a statistically‐valid community survey to help understand residents’ needs, wants,  and preferences as they relate to its recreational program offerings at the Community Center.     On March 18th, 2011, 2,500 surveys were randomly mailed out (2,300 non‐CRA and 200 CRA). The total  number of completed surveys received was n=400 (382 non‐CRA, 18 CRA) yielding a response rate of  16% overall (17% non‐CRA and 9% CRA). Due to inequitable CRA response, responses received were  weighted in order to provide statistically‐valid results. With the sample size at 400, the sampling error is  no greater than +/‐ 4.9 percent at a 95 percent level of confidence.          Strategic Recreation Facilities Plan   

25


The survey was randomly mailed to residents to determine:  • Likelihood of participation in programs and activities  • Who would participate in programs and activities  • Time periods that programs and activities would be utilized  • Children’s programs preference, structured vs. unstructured  • Need for transportation  • Preferred methods of communication  Profile Marketing Research compiled the data from these surveys and the results from this research  study are provided in Appendix A.     The following is an overall summary of the key findings of the survey results.    Overall Likelihood of Participation  When asked in which programs or activities they would participate, respondents were most likely to  indicate that they would participate in Cultural and Performing Arts (57%), Health/Wellness (47%), and  Sports/Fitness (47%) programs or activities.     Among the programs/activities listed, there were three distinct tiers regarding the overall popularity of  programs that respondents ‘would’ or ‘may or may not’ participate in. They are as follows:  − High Interest:  o Cultural and Performing Arts (89%)  o Health/Wellness (85%)  o Nature and Environmental (82%)  o Historical/Cultural/Education/Preservation (81%)  o Sports/Fitness (78%)  − Moderate Interest  o Aquatics (56%)  o Public Safety and Awareness (55%)  o Lifeskills and Personal Development (53%)  − Less Interest  o Social Services/Resource Referrals (40%)  o Special Needs/Therapeutic Recreation (33%)  o Summer/School’s Out/After School Programs (23%)    Overall, only five percent of respondents stated that they would not participate in any City of Winter  Park Parks and Recreation programs or activities.    Top Program/Activity Choices  When asked to select four programs or activities they would be most likely to participate in, the most  popular first choice was Health/Wellness (23%), followed closely by Sports/Fitness (21%), and Cultural &  Performing Arts (18%).  • When including all choices, the most popular responses were Health/Wellness (61%) and  Cultural & Performing Arts (60%).   • Only five percent gave a reason as to why they would not participate in programs or  activities. Among those who gave a reason, nearly half (45%) gave a reason pertaining to  their current participation in similar programs and/or activities.    26 

City of Winter Park, Florida 


Cultural & Performing Arts  Cultural & Performing Arts programs are one of the most popular of those listed, with 57 percent of  respondents saying that they would participate, and another one‐third (32%) saying they may or may  not participate.     Cultural & Performing Arts programs are especially popular among households with children under five  years old, all of whom said they “would” or “may or may not” participate.   Among households with school‐age children, adults (52%) would be slightly more likely to attend  Cultural & Performing Arts programs than children (42%). Additionally, one‐third (33%) of respondents  said anyone would attend.  • Interestingly, among households with children under five, Cultural & Performing Arts programs  would be attended by children (48%) and adults (48%) evenly, with another one‐third (32%)  saying anyone would attend.    Health/Wellness  Health/Wellness programs are one of the most popular of those listed, with just under one‐half (47%)  saying they would participate and another 38 percent saying they may or may not participate.     As with Cultural & Performing Arts programs, Health/Wellness programs are especially popular among  households with children under five years old, 97 percent of whom said they “would” or “may or may  not” participate.     Health/Wellness programs are more popular among CRA residents (75 percent said they would  participate) than among non‐CRA residents (46 percent said they would participate).    Among households with school‐age children who “would” or “may or may not” participate,  Health/Wellness programs would more likely to be attended by adults (63%), although they would still  be popular among children (44%). Additionally, one‐quarter (25%) of respondents said anyone would  attend.    Nature & Environmental  Nature & Environmental programs are highly popular, with 43 percent stating that they would  participate and another 39 percent stating that they may or may not participate.     Nature and Environmental programs/activities resonate more with non‐CRA residents (12 percent first  choice, 50 percent all choices) than CRA residents (0 percent and 22 percent respectively).     Nature & Environmental programs are especially popular among households with children under five, 70  percent of whom state they would participate. Additionally among this group, 70 percent state that  children would attend (70%).     Among households with school‐age children, Nature & Environmental programs would be attended by  adults (57%) and children (51%) evenly. Additionally, nearly one‐third (31%) of respondents said anyone  would attend.          Strategic Recreation Facilities Plan   

27


Historical/Cultural/Education/Preservation  Historical/Cultural/Education/Preservation programs are highly popular, with 41 percent saying they  would participate and another 40 percent saying they may or may not participate.     Historical/Cultural/Education/Preservation programs are more popular among CRA residents (67  percent said they would participate) than among non‐CRA residents (40 percent said that they would  participate).    Sports/Fitness  Sports/Fitness programs are highly popular, with 47 percent saying they would participate and another  31 percent saying they may or may not participate.     Sports/Fitness programs are less popular among households with only seniors, of whom more than one‐ third (38%) stated they would not participate.    Aquatics  Aquatics programs are moderately popular, with 27 percent saying they would participate and another  29 percent saying they may or may not participate.    These programs are more popular among households with children under five (55 percent would  participate) and school‐age children (46 percent would participate) than among seniors only (17 percent  would participate) or households with no children or seniors (18 percent would participate).    Special Needs/Therapeutic Recreation  Special Needs/Therapeutic Recreation programs are less popular, with 10 percent saying that they  would participate and another 23 percent saying they may or may not participate.    These programs are most popular among households with seniors only (16 percent would participate,   and 27 percent may or may not participate).     Summer/School’s Out/After School Programs  Overall, Summer/School’s Out/After School Programs are some of the least popular, with three‐quarters  (77%) of those responding indicating they would not participate. However, only 23 percent of  respondents have school‐age children (age 5‐19) living in their household.  • Among those with school‐age children, nearly one‐third (31%) said they would participate and  another 26 percent said they may or may not participate.  • Of note, among those with children under five living in the household, over one‐half (55%) said  that they would participate in Summer/School’s Out/After School Programs, while another one‐ quarter (23%) said they may or may not participate.    Utilization of Time Periods  The most popular time periods in terms of utilization of the City’s Parks and Recreation programs and  activities are Saturday mornings (19 percent first choice and 48 percent all choices) and weekday  mornings (31 percent first choice and 38 percent all choices).        28 

City of Winter Park, Florida 


There are few significant differences in preferred time periods among those who would participate in  each specific activity of event. The exception is with Summer/School’s Out/After School programs in  which Saturdays (all day) and Sunday afternoons see a high preference rate.    There are some notable differences in preferred time periods between household composition groups.  In general:  • Households with children of any age prefer Saturday mornings, Saturday and Sunday  afternoons, and weekday afternoons after 3 pm.  • Very few households with children would participate in activities or programs on weekend  evenings or weekday afternoons before 3 pm.  • Households without children or seniors are the group most likely to prefer weekday evenings  after 6 pm (44%).   • Senior only households appear to prefer weekday mornings (67%) and weekday afternoons  before 3 pm (58%).     Communication Methods  Respondents’ preferred methods of communication are either through direct mail (45 percent, first  choice) or email (35 percent, first choice).     While not top choices, other methods of communication that may be effective include a neighborhood  newspaper (44 percent, all choices), the City of Winter Park website (32 percent, all choices), or a major  newspaper (30 percent, all choices).    Transportation Availability  The vast majority of respondents (94%) do not have a lack of transportation that would prevent them  from utilizing programs and activities.   • While only 6% of respondents overall said they have a lack of transportation, that percentage  increases to 13% among those who would potentially participate in Special Needs/Therapeutic  Recreation programs.    Children’s Programs – Structured vs. Unstructured  Overall, six‐of‐ten (61%) respondents with school‐age children living at home prefer structured  programs or activities for their children. Of note, among those who would potentially participate in  Summer/School’s Out/After School Programs and Lifeskills & Personal Development, the percentage of  those preferring structured programs increases to 76 percent for both.    Household Composition    Children Under Five Years Old Present in HH  Among those households with children under five years old, programs that may have a high level of  participation include:  • Cultural & Performing Arts (77% would participate)  • Sports/Fitness (75% would participate)  • Nature and Environmental (70% would participate)      

Strategic Recreation Facilities Plan   

29


When respondents living in these households were asked to pick their four favorite programs, the most  popular first choices were:  • Sports/Fitness (31%, first choice)  • Health/Wellness (19%, first choice)    When planning programs or activities for households with children under five, the time slots that should  be highly considered include:  • Saturday mornings (42%, first choice)  • Weekday afternoons after 3 pm (29%, first choice)    School‐Age Children Present in HH  Among those households with school‐age children, programs that may have a high level of participation  include:  • Sports/Fitness (68% would participate)  • Cultural and Performing Arts (60% would participate)     When respondents living in these households were asked to pick their four favorite programs, the most  popular first choice was:  • Sports/Fitness (39%, first choice)    When planning programs or activities for households with school‐age children, the time slots that  should be highly considered include:  • Saturday mornings (31%, first choice)  • Weekday afternoons after 3 pm (25%, first choice)    No Children, No Seniors Present in HH  Among those households with no children and no seniors, the programs that may have high levels of  participation include:  • Cultural and Performing Arts (53% would participate)     When respondents living in these households were asked to pick their four favorite programs, the most  popular first choices include:  • Health/Wellness (25%, first choice)  • Cultural and Performing Arts (23%, first choice)  • Sports/Fitness (18%, first choice)    When planning programs or activities for households without children or seniors, the time slots that  should be highly considered include:  • Weekday mornings (25%, first choice)  • Saturday mornings (20%, first choice)  • Weekday evenings after 6 pm (19%, first choice)              30 

City of Winter Park, Florida 


Seniors Only in HH  Among those households with no children or seniors, the program that could have the highest level of  participation is:  • Cultural and Performing Arts (55%  would participate)  • Health/Wellness (54% would participate)  • Historical/Cultural/Education/Preservation (49% would participate)     When respondents living in these households were asked to pick their four favorite programs, the most  popular first choices include:  • Health/Wellness (29%, first choice)  • Cultural and Performing Arts (20%, first choice)    When planning programs or activities for households without children or seniors, the time slots that  should be highly considered include:  • Weekday mornings (54%, first choice)  • Weekday afternoons before 3 pm (21%, first choice)    In summary, the key findings from the needs assessment prioritize the programming desires of the  community pointing out the primary areas of programming recommendations in the Programming Plan.  The Program Validation and Space Utilization Analysis utilizes the needs assessment information to  demonstrate the days, times, and program areas of the facility best utilized for what types of programs  and for what age brackets.               

Strategic Recreation Facilities Plan   

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THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK 


D. Program Validation and Space Utilization Analysis    It is important to validate the programming priorities of the needs assessment by demonstrating which  program areas within the community center are best utilized for each age bracket at what days and  times. These days and times shift for many age brackets depending on the season. The obvious season  of change is summer when school age children are out of school. This affects the days and times these  age brackets are most available for the structured programming defined in the needs assessment.   

1. Seasonal Prime Time and Non‐Prime Time Programming Space Matrix    A programming space matrix has been developed for each season (Winter, Spring, Summer, and Fall) to  identify of prime times to provide recreational programming for each of the demographic age brackets  (Youth, Teen, Adult, Senior, Family) in each of the programming spaces in the facility. Below is a sample  of the Seasonal Prime Time and Non‐Prime Time Programming Space Matrix with the complete matrices  located in Appendix B. It is important to review all of the complete matrices as each open and available  programming hour of each of the programming spaces is identified as either a prime or non‐prime  programming time for certain demographic groups. These matrixes along with the focus group and  survey results should be of great assistance in what types of programs to offer at which times of day and  for which demographic groups.     Table 8: Programming Matrix  Programming Matrix 

  

  

Full Capacity    

  

  

   Program Areas 

Sept ‐ Nov 

12 weeks 

  

  

  

  

  

  

YP=Youth Programs 

FP=Family Programs 

TP=Teen Programs 

ODI=Open Drop In  R=Rentals 

  

Prime Time 

AP=Adult Programs 

  

Non‐Prime Time 

SP=Senior Programs 

  

  

Not Available 

Large Multi‐purpose A 

7‐8  am 

8‐9  am 

9‐10  am 

10‐11  am 

11‐12  pm 

12‐1  pm 

1‐2  pm 

2‐3  pm 

3‐4  pm 

4‐5  pm 

5‐6  pm 

6‐7  pm 

7‐8  pm 

8‐9  pm 

9‐10  pm 

Monday 

N/A 

SP 

AP 

SP 

SP 

SP 

YP 

TP 

FP 

AP 

YP 

AP 

Tuesday 

SP 

SP 

AP 

SP 

SP 

SP 

YP 

TP 

FP 

YP 

AP 

AP 

N/A 

SP 

AP 

SP 

SP 

SP 

YP 

TP 

FP 

AP 

YP 

AP 

SP 

SP 

AP 

SP 

SP 

SP 

YP 

TP 

FP 

YP 

AP 

AP 

Friday 

N/A 

SP 

AP 

SP 

SP 

SP 

YP 

TP 

FP 

FP 

FP 

FP 

FP 

Saturday 

N/A 

YP 

YP 

YP 

TP 

TP 

FP 

FP 

N/A 

N/A 

Sunday 

N/A 

N/A 

N/A 

N/A 

N/A 

N/A 

N/A 

Wednesday  Thursday 

  This portion of the sample of the Seasonal Prime Time and Non‐Prime Time Programming Space Matrix  lists the total Prime Time (PT) and Non‐Prime Time (NPT) Capacity hours available for each programming  space when the facility is open during that season. This programming plan utilizes 60 percent prime time  programming capacity and 20 percent non‐prime time programming capacity in each program space  within the facility as a very achievable and realistic total program capacity for the Winter Park  Community Center.       Strategic Recreation Facilities Plan   

33


Table 9: Capacity Hours    

PT Capacity  Hrs 

60% PT  Capacity Hrs 

NPT Capacity  Hrs 

20% NPT  Capacity Hrs 

Youth Programs 

144 

86 

Teen Programs 

84 

50 

Adult Programs 

96 

58 

60 

12 

Senior Programs 

180 

108 

84 

17 

Family Programs 

84 

50 

48 

10 

Open Drop In 

Rentals 

108 

65 

216 

43 

  Utilization of Time Periods  The most popular time periods in terms of utilization of the City’s Parks and Recreation programs and  activities according to the survey are Saturday mornings (19 percent first choice and 48 percent all  choices) and weekday mornings (31 percent first choice and 38 percent all choices).    There are few significant differences in preferred time periods among those who would participate in  each specific activity of event. The exception is with Summer/School’s Out/After School programs in  which Saturdays (all day) and Sunday afternoons see a high preference rate.    There are some notable differences in preferred time periods between household composition groups.  In general:  • Households with children of any age prefer Saturday mornings, Saturday and Sunday  afternoons, and weekday afternoons after 3 pm.  • Very few households with children would participate in activities or programs on weekend  evenings or weekday afternoons before 3 pm.  • Households without children or seniors are the group most likely to prefer weekday evenings  after 6 pm (44%).   • Senior only households appear to prefer weekday mornings (67%) and weekday afternoons  before 3 pm (58%).    

2. Year Round Programming Capacity Summary    A Year Round Programming Capacity Summary Matrix has been developed for the full year that adds up  all of the prime time and non‐prime time capacity hours from each season for each of the programming  spaces.     The following Year Round Programming Capacity Summary Matrix also lists the number of annual prime  time hours at 60 percent capacity and the number of annual non‐prime time hours at 20 percent  capacity for each of the demographic age brackets (Youth, Teen, Adult, Senior, Family) in each of the  programming spaces in the facility. The charts following the Year Round Programming Capacity  Summary Matrix list the annual number of hours utilized in this programming plan for structured  programs for each demographic age bracket and non‐structured programs. These matrices along with  the focus group and survey results should be of great assistance in what types of programs to offer at  which times of day and for which demographic groups.    34 

City of Winter Park, Florida 


Annual Programming Matrix Summary 

  

  

  

  

         YP=Youth Programs TP=TeenPrograms

            Programming Areas  Large Multipurpose Room (Dividable)  100% Annual Total Hours  Total Hours @ 60% PT & 20% NPT Capacity     Small Multipurpose Room (Dividable)  100% Annual Total Hours  Total Hours @ 60% PT & 20% NPT Capacity     Gym (2 Cross Courts / 1 Full Court)  100% Annual Total Hours  Total Hours @ 60% PT & 20% NPT Capacity     Senior Meeting Room  100% Annual Total Hours  Total Hours @ 60% PT & 20% NPT Capacity     Youth Meeting Room  100% Annual Total Hours  Total Hours @ 60% PT & 20% NPT Capacity     Teen Classroom  100% Annual Total Hours  Total Hours @ 60% PT & 20% NPT Capacity     Fitness Room  100% Annual Total Hours  Total Hours @ 60% PT & 20% NPT Capacity     Computer Classroom  100% Annual Total Hours  Total Hours @ 60% PT & 20% NPT Capacity     Kitchen  100% Annual Total Hours  Total Hours @ 60% PT & 20% NPT Capacity     Indoor & Outdoor Stage  100% Annual Total Hours  Total Hours @ 60% PT & 20% NPT Capacity     Outdoor Pool  100% Annual Total Hours  Total Hours @ 60% PT & 20% NPT Capacity     Total Programming Areas  100% Capacity Annual Total Hours     Total Hours @ 60% PT & 20% NPT Capacity 

PT= Prime Time NPT= Non Prime  Time 

YP  1176  706     YP  1080  648     YP  2454  1472     YP  0  0     YP  1512  907     YP  0  0     YP  0  0     YP  444  266     YP  0  0     YP  600  360     YP  144  86     YP  7410     4446 

YP  0  0     YP  120  24     YP  0  0     YP  0  0     YP  420  84     YP  0  0     YP  0  0     YP  0  0     YP  0  0     YP  0  0     YP  0  0     YP  540     108 

  

  

AP=Adult Programs  SP=Senior Programs

TP 804 482

TP 144 29

AP 768 461

AP 480 96

SP 1440 864

SP 672 134

FP 672 403

TP 672 403

TP 288 58

AP 1152 691

AP 420 84

SP 480 288

SP 672 134

FP 672 403

TP 216 130

TP 96 19

AP 336 202

AP 0 0

SP 480 288

SP 360 72

FP 0 0

TP 0 0

TP 0 0

AP 0 0

AP 0 0

SP 2304 1382

SP 576 115

FP 0 0

TP 0 0

TP 0 0

AP 0 0

AP 0 0

SP 0 0

SP 0 0

FP 0 0

TP 768 461

TP 0 0

AP 0 0

AP 0 0

SP 0 0

SP 0 0

FP 0 0

TP 192 115

TP 0 0

AP 240 144

AP 480 96

SP 240 144

SP 240 48

FP 0 0

TP 336 202

TP 0 0

AP 192 115

AP 480 96

SP 288 173

SP 288 58

FP 96 58

TP 192 115

TP 0 0

AP 192 115

AP 240 48

SP 240 144

SP 1056 211

FP 0 0

TP 384 230

TP 0 0

AP 336 202

AP 420 84

SP 240 144

SP 240 48

FP 240 144

TP 0 0

TP 12 2

AP 0 0

AP 48 10

SP 0 0

SP 108 22

FP 0 0

TP 3564

TP 540

AP 3216

AP 2568

SP 5712

SP 4212

FP 1680

2138

108

1930

514

3427

842

1008

FP  240  48     FP  96  19     FP  0  0     FP  0  0     FP  0  0     FP  0  0     FP  0  0     FP  0  0     FP  0  0     FP  192  38     FP  0  0     FP  528     106 

         FP=Family Programs ODI=Open Drop In

  

R=Rentals 

  

ODI  0  0     ODI  0  0     ODI  1368  821     ODI  0  0     ODI  240  144     ODI  960  576     ODI  2400  1440     ODI  720  432     ODI  0  0     ODI  288  173     ODI  564  338     ODI  6540     3924 

ODI 0 0

R 864 518

R 1608 322

ODI 0 0

R 1236 742

R 1608 322

ODI 2040 408    ODI 1152 230    ODI 1188 238

R 768 461

R 0 0

R 0 0

R 0 0

R 0 0

R 0 0

ODI 2688 538    ODI 624 125

R 0 0

R 0 0

R 0 0

R 0 0

ODI 1572 314    ODI 0 0    ODI 564 113    ODI 192 38    ODI 10020

R 0 0

R 0 0

R 1008 605

R 1200 240

R 480 288

R 336 67

R 0 0

R 0 0

R 4356

R 4752

2614

950

  

  

2004

    Strategic Recreation Facilities Plan   

35


Children’s Programs – Structured vs. Unstructured  Overall, six out of ten (61%) respondents with school‐age children living at home prefer structured  programs or activities for their children. Of note, among those who would potentially participate in  Summer/School’s Out/After School Programs and Lifeskills & Personal Development, the percentage of  those preferring structured programs increases to 76 percent for both. The chart below lists the annual  number of hours utilized in this programming plan for structured programs for each demographic age  bracket and non‐structured programs.    Table 10: Program Plan Hours  Structured Programming Hours  Budgeted 

Hrs/Yr 

YP 

TP 

AP 

SP 

FP 

Large Multipurpose Room (Dividable) 

3,223 

706 

511 

557 

998 

451 

Small Multipurpose Room (Dividable) 

2,753 

672 

461 

775 

422 

422 

Gymnasium (2 Cross Courts / 1 Full Court) 

2,183 

1,472 

149 

202 

360 

Gymnasium 

Senior Meeting Room 

1,498 

1,498 

Youth Meeting Room 

991 

991 

Teen Classroom 

461 

461 

Fitness Room 

547 

115 

Computer Classroom 

871 

266 

Kitchen 

634 

Indoor/Outdoor Stage  Outdoor Pool 

Hrs/Yr 

ODI 

840 

840 

1,063 

1,06 3 

1,690 

1,229 

461 

Senior Meeting Room 

230 

230 

Youth Meeting Room 

382 

382 

Teen Classroom 

1,114 

1,114 

240 

192 

Fitness Room 

1,565 

1,565 

202 

115 

230 

58 

Computer Classroom 

746 

746 

115 

163 

355 

Kitchen 

845 

845 

1,250 

360 

230 

286 

192 

182 

Indoor/Outdoor Stage 

641 

286 

355 

120 

86 

10 

22 

Outdoor Pool 

377 

377 

9,492 

5,928 

3,56 4 

TOTALS  14,531  4,554  2,246  2,347  4,270 

1,11 4 

     

 

Unstructured Hours  Large Multipurpose  Room  Small Multipurpose  Room 

TOTALS 

YP=Youth Programs / TP=Teen Programs / AP=Adult Programs / SP=Senior Programs / FP=Family Programs / ODI=Open Drop In / R=Rental 

   

 

36 

City of Winter Park, Florida 


3. Recreational Programming Recommendations    Based on the Needs Assessment, the following generalized program recommendations are intended to  give solid guidance and examples for program offerings at the Winter Park Community Center while  allowing flexibility for ongoing decision and to allow continuous evaluation of the programming success  and make improvements. The Seasonal Prime Time and Non‐Prime Time Programming Space Matrix  (Appendix B) and the Year Round Programming Capacity Summary Matrix (above) should be utilized  during the ongoing programming process and each annual budget cycle to determine which  demographic age bracket each program is created for in each programming area for each season.   All types of the programs listed below should be created for all ages including adults, youth, senior  adults, baby boomers, teens, toddlers, babies, family, and intergenerational in all program areas based  on prime times for each demographic for each program space within the building. The number of each  type of program should be kept within the perspective scale of the most popular, moderately popular,  and least popular for each of the age brackets as the survey results articulate.     The current special events and themed programming should continue including holiday programming,  senior trips, youth field trips, youth sports events, and holiday event programming.    Current successful programs that Winter Park Parks and Recreation Department is offering  themselves and with established programming partners should be implemented as a priority in the  new community center. Those groups with established relationships wanting to reserve meeting times  and/or rental spaces should also be given scheduling priority before opening rentals up to the public.    Programming priority should be given to continuing the programs through the positive relationship  with the Community Redevelopment Advisory Board as well as with the programmatic partners  assisting in providing these successful programs. The existing application process should be continued  and implemented in the new Winter Park Community Center as a priority.    Overall Likelihood of Participation  When asked in which programs or activities they would participate, respondents were most likely to  indicate that they would participate in Cultural and Performing Arts (57%), Health/Wellness (47%), and  Sports/Fitness (47%) programs or activities.     Among the programs/activities listed, there were three distinct tiers regarding the overall popularity of  programs that respondents ‘would’ or ‘may or may not’ participate in. They are as follows:    • High interest program areas:  − Cultural and Performing Arts (89%)  o Art Classes, Painting, Sculpture, Pottery, Drawing, Music Classes, Dance Classes,  Acting Classes, Plays/Productions, Classical Art, Crafts, etc.  − Health/Wellness (85%)  o Health Fairs, Culinary Classes, Nutrition Classes, Youth/Sr./Adult Cooking Classes,  Diabetic Classes, Stress Management Classes, Family Planning, Medication  Education, etc.    Strategic Recreation Facilities Plan   

37


Nature and Environmental (82%)  o Community Garden, Food Cooperative, Recycling Programs, Sustainability Programs,  Tree Programs, Bird Watching Classes, Camping Programs, Fishing Programs,  Farmer’s Market, etc.  Historical/Cultural/Education/Preservation (81%)  o Tutoring, Second Language Spanish (other foreign languages), Sign Language,  Reading Clubs, Academic /Motivational Guest Speakers, College Book Exchanges,  Drugs/Alcohol Prevention Programs, Mental Health Programs, CHILL, Personal Well  Being Programs, Job Fairs, Local History Programs, Underground Railroad, Anger  Management Classes, College Preparation Classes, Board Games, Current Events  Program, etc.  Sports/Fitness (78%)  o Aerobics Classes, Yoga, Fitness Instructional Classes, Weight Lifting, Exercise  Programs, Weight Control Fitness classes, Stroller Aerobics, Basketball, Volleyball,  Midnight Basketball, Cheerleading, Step Team, Double Dutch, Dance Classes, Tennis,  Tumbling, Ping Pong, Badminton, Soccer, Sportsmanship Programs, Sports Camps,  Wii Fitness Programs, Basketball Camps with Life Skills (OR&L), Winning Ways  Basketball Program, Running Clubs, Fitness Clubs, etc. 

  Moderate interest program areas:  − Aquatics (56%)  o Water Aerobics, Swim Lessons, Water Safety, etc.  − Public Safety and Awareness (55%)  o Community Safety, First Aid Classes, CPR Certification Classes, Self Defense, Fraud  Awareness, Gun Safety, Hunting Safety, etc.  − Lifeskills and Personal Development (53%)  o Computer Classes, Internet Safety, Legal Advice, Writing Wills, Estate Planning,  Financial Planning, Leadership Programs, Sewing, Quilting, Embroidering,  Babysitting Certification Classes, Character Building Activities, Mentoring, Job  Skills/Preparation Programs, Dance Classes, Parenting Classes, Sibling Classes,  Marriage Classes, Hobby Classes, “How To” Classes, Self Esteem Classes, Basketball  Camps with Life Skills (OR&L), Etiquette/Manners/Character/Ethics Classes, etc.    Less interest but still important program areas:  − Social Services/Resource Referrals (40%)  o Early Childhood Issues Programs, Faith Based Programming Initiatives, College  Preparation Resource Center, etc.  − Special Needs/Therapeutic Recreation (33%)  o Programs in all areas should be made available for those with special needs. Specific  therapeutic recreation programs can be include (but are not limited to) Special  Olympics, Camps, Sports, Fitness, Aquatics, Health, Wellness, Cultural Arts,  Performing Arts, Educational, Life Skills, Personal Development, etc.  − Summer/School’s Out/After School Programs (23%)  o Programs can include (but are not limited to) Summer Camps, Sports Camps, Sports,  Fitness, Aquatics, Health, Wellness, Cultural Arts, Performing Arts, Educational, Life  Skills, Personal Development, Video Games, Board Games, Before School Programs,  etc.    38 

City of Winter Park, Florida 


Rentals include (but are not limited to):  − Birthday Parties, Receptions, Meetings, Social Gatherings, Dinners, Team Practices, etc.    Note: For a complete summary of participation trends based on results of the statistically‐valid survey of  residents, please refer to Section C.    

4. Administrative Programmatic Recommendations    Focus groups and a Teen Advisory Committee should be investigated to determine viability within the  first 12 months of operation of the Winter Park Community Center.    Training/Conferences  Ongoing staff training is a crucial to ensure the continuous success of the facility. With the wide  demographic of participants at the community center, some specific training and/or continuous  educational opportunities should always be included for the appropriate facility staff to be able to  implement ongoing industry standards and trends. Some example training topics that would assist in  ensuring quality service at the community center include (but are not limited to):  • Customer Service Training  • Athletic Business Conference  • First Aid  • FPRA Conference  • CPR  • NRPA Conference    WORK‐REATION  The City may want to consider implementing a WORK‐REATION program to help offset some of the  challenges of providing for lower income participation. “WORK‐REATION” is a sweat equity program  designed to allow youth to perform work tasks (no powered tools) assigned by the community center  staff to earn $5 per hour towards program/admission fees. These tasks will likely save the facility staff  from needing to complete them and probably save a few man hours, resulting in a win‐win situation for  both parties. Hours are tracked and can be used for anything offered at the community center except  for concession items. Many parents like this program as a method of youth earning the opportunity to  participate in programs that they may not ordinarily be able to participate in due to fee constraints.  Tasks typically include (but are not limited to) sweeping the gym floor, emptying trash, watering plants,  cleaning kitchen, washing dishes, pulling weeds, filling vending machines, etc. A sample WORK‐REATION  Guideline is located in Appendix C.    Scholarship Program  A scholarship fund would also provide an objective method for helping to solidify means for  participation of all levels of ability to pay, and should be considered for implementation. One can be  created and funded with donations from local businesses and corporations to provide services to those  unable to pay for services. Many communities also have fundraisers to enhance the scholarship fund  such as golf tournaments, auctions, etc.    Roll Out Process  New recreational and social programs should be implemented on a systematic roll out basis for quality  assurance as well as making sure each program “fits” into the community center’s vision and plan. There  is no need to try to fill the community center to capacity when it opens. Many successful facilities grow  into their programming and make sure they set up solid and long lasting programming partnerships  along the way.    Strategic Recreation Facilities Plan  39  


Customer Feedback  Continuous customer feedback opportunities need to be established to allow participants to give the  community center staff continuous feedback on all aspects of the community center such as program  and facility quality, instructors, content, levels, times, days, fees, hours, cleanliness, friendliness,  satisfaction, ideas, etc. Some ideas to gain participant feedback include (but are not limited to):  • Program Evaluation Process – program participants fill out program evaluations  • Customer Satisfaction – ongoing customer satisfaction surveys randomly filled out  • Staff Availability – center staff visible, available, and proactively asking for opinions  • Suggestion Box – centrally located and reviewed weekly noting responses on bulletin board  • Focus Groups    A sample Program Evaluation is located in Appendix D.    Structured Volunteer Program  As in all facility operation, volunteerism is a great method to stretch the center staff, supervisors, and  instructors to assist in the operation of the facility and programs on a daily basis. Implementing a  structured volunteer program that not only recruits volunteers but trains and rewards them will assist in  the success of the operation of the facility.   

5. Potential Programming Partnerships 

ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

  Current successful programs that Winter Park Parks and Recreation Department is offering with  established programming partners should be continued and implemented as a priority in the new  community center. Those groups with established relationships wanting to reserve meeting times  and/or rental spaces should also be given scheduling priority before opening rentals up to the public.  New partnerships should be established through an ongoing process of matching like interests with the  potential partners identified through this programming plan process and are listed below.    The key partners and stakeholders the focus groups listed to collaborate on programs at the new  community center included:  • Public   • Specialties/Service Learning  Agencies  • Non‐Profit   • Foundations   • Government Agencies   • Philanthropic  • Private Businesses   • Civic Groups  • Educational Institutions   • Churches/Faith Based  • Health Providers   • Association    Potential Programming Partners (in alphabetical order) mentioned in the public input process include:  ƒ Center for Independent  100 Black men  ƒ Banks/Financial  Living  Institutions  5th Quarter  ƒ Century Link  ƒ Black Men’s Health Group  8 Coed  ƒ Boy Scouts  ƒ Chamber of Commerce  A Gift For Swimming  ƒ Boys & Girls Club  ƒ Churches  AARP  ƒ Bright House  ƒ Circle Christian  Adjacent Cities  ƒ Center for Drug Free  ƒ Citizens Patrol  American Red Cross  Living  ƒ Community Nurse  40 

City of Winter Park, Florida 


ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

Community Service  Organizations  Councils  Crealde Heritage Center  CRV  CVS  Disney  Dr. Phillips Foundation  Easter Seals  Edyth Bush Foundation  Elizabeth Morse Genius  Foundation  Esteem  Farmer’s Market  Festivals  Fire Department  First Congressional Church  Fraternities/Sororities  Full Sail University  Galloway Foundation  Girl Scouts  Good Wills  Grass Root Organization  Hands On Orlando  Hannibal Square Land  Trust  Head Start  HEBNI Nutrition  Historical Association  HOAs  Home Depot  Home Schools  Hoop School  Hospital  HSCLT  INT Orland  Interfaith Council  Jeremiah Project   Junior Achievement  Kingdom Financial  KYDS   

ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

Lakeside  Lifelong Learning  Lisa Maile  Local Media  Local Urban Leagues  Lowes  LYNX  Medical School  Michele Puppets  Midnight Basketball  Morgan Ministries  Museums  National Movement  Nice Life Fitness  Nurseries  Nursing  OCPS  On Stage  OR&L  Orange County  Orange County  Community Affairs  Orange County Disaster  Relief Team  Orlando County Sports  Special Needs  Orlando Magic  Orlando Sports Social Club  Owens Realty  PAL Club  Paramore Kidz Zone  Parent Teacher  Associations  Philanthropic Center  Police Academy  Police Department  Pre‐schools  Private Schools  Publix  Restaurants  Rollins College 

ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

Salvation Army  Sarah’s Kitchen  Science Center  Second Harvest  Senior Resource Alliance  Seniors First  Sprint  St. Margaret Mary  Starbuck’s  State Farm Insurance  Target  Trio  UCF Nurses  United Way  Universal Studios  University of Central  Florida  UPS  Upward Bound  Valencia Community  College  Walgreen’s  Walmart  Warner Chapel Outreach  Whole Foods  Winning Ways Basketball  Winter Park Family  Emergency Services  Winter Park Health  Foundation  Winter Park High School  Winter Park Library  Winter Park Playhouse  Winter Park Sidewalk Art  Festival  Winter Park Tech  Workforce Central Florida  YMCA  Youth Can  Zoo

The potential partners list should be systematically and periodically reviewed to determine the best  programmatic fit for each potential partner then approached to determine interest in an ongoing  partnership. Partnership agreements need to be established for all existing and future partnerships and  reviewed on an annual basis. Any necessary adjustments can be negotiated each year and all parties  involved are familiar with the arrangements. All services including in‐kind should be recorded at market  rates to determine the equity of the partnership from each partner. A sample Partnership Agreement  Outline is located in Appendix E.    Strategic Recreation Facilities Plan   

41 


Mather’s Café / Mather Lifeway Community Initiatives  In reviewing the potential partnership with Mather Lifeways, the consultant made several observations  to believe it would be in the best interest of the City of Winter Park to operate the senior adult program  at the community center internally with local programming partners.     Mather Lifeways is a very solid non‐profit entity founded in 1941 by Alonzo Mather and is a growing  trend in certain areas of the country. Most of the facilities operate in the Chicago, IL area with one in  Tucson, AZ. There are several initiatives including Mather LifeWays Institute, Mather’s Café, Mather’s  Café Plus, Mather’s Edgewater, and Mather’s Community Initiatives that range from research, senior  residences, food service, and senior programming. More information is available online at  www.matherlifeways.com.     The Mather’s options for the Winter Park Community Center would be one of two initiatives. The  options are The Mather’s Café (food service) initiative which operates like a restaurant or The Mather’s  Café Plus initiative which is the food service plus senior programming typically in the same setting.     Both options require a long term lease or Mather’s ownership of the space, and Mather’s ideally wants  to be included in the design of the kitchen and eating space. The timing of the opening of the Winter  Park Community Center does not allow for the negotiations required for this to become a reality. In  addition, the designed caterer’s kitchen does not currently meet the requirements of a restaurant  kitchen, making a partnership for a Mather’s Cafe impossible without renovation.    Mather’s would require dedicated eating/programming space with sole internal access to all the leased  (or owned) space meaning no non‐Mather’s activities could take place. The city would not be able to  rent the kitchen or would need a separate caterer’s kitchen to be rented out with a multipurpose room.    Based on the Mather’s Cafe menus online, it is a fairly pricy option for senior meals are would require a  fairly high volume of daily “off street traffic” for retail restaurant style meals to be able to offer a meal  program several hours each day year round which is a goal of Mather’s Cafes. The Winter Park  Community Center is not located or sized for this type of senior adult market which is typically  surrounded by affluent senior housing and without competing senior adult services competing in the  same market area.    The City of Winter Park would not be able to offer senior adult programming in the facility as they would  not be allowed to compete with Mather’s Café Plus for senior programs. The facility would not receive  any revenue except the lease agreement and would give up the control of the portions of the facility  that were under the lease agreement. A better option at this point in time would be for the City of  Winter Park to partner with local senior adult agencies to provide the senior adult programming and  meals while retaining the ability to utilize the same spaces in the facility for programming and/or rentals  to additional age bracket demographic groups.     

42 

City of Winter Park, Florida 


E. Staffing Analysis    The Staffing Analysis utilizes a benchmark of several local community centers which were selected by  staff to seek some basic information about their center and facility staff. While no two centers, cities, or  situations are exactly the same, these comparisons are to be utilized only as one measurement to see if  the Winter Park Community Center is within a reasonable range of other centers in the area. As the  staffing analysis was developed, much of the information was gathered from the staff to adhere to the  City of Winter Park’s established human resources system.    

1. Benchmarking Analysis of Local Community Centers    Benchmarking is an important tool that compares a city’s management with similar communities. It is  very difficult to find exact comparable communities because each has its own unique identity, its own  way of conducting business, and differences in the populations they serve. For this project Winter Park  staff identified three areas of focus for a comparative data analysis:    • Staffing levels  • Organizational structures  • Facility amenities    Communities were chosen primarily with consideration of demographic make‐up and perceived  similarities to Winter Park. Staff selected eight agencies that were contacted. Some of those managed  multiple facilities while others managed just one. After reviewing all of the returned surveys, only one  was selected from those with multiple sites. All of the responses can be found in the Benchmarking  Matrix in Appendix F. The facilities represented in this comparison were chosen based upon the areas of  focus listed above. Of the eight that were contacted, six responded. Below are the agencies that were  contacted, and those in bold/underlined are the ones that responded.     • City of Altamonte Springs  • City of Kissimmee  • City of Dunedin  • Orange County  • City of Lakeland  • City of Oviedo  • City of Largo  • City of Orlando    It is important to keep in mind that each organization’s values, vision, and mission are very different  depending upon the demographic make‐up of the community (age distribution, household income,  race/ethnicity, education attainment, etc.). In turn, the community profile should reflect an agency’s  cost recovery goals (but may not always do so in each community). It is also important to acknowledge  that organizations do not typically break down direct and indirect expenditures in the same way, which  affects the bottom line reported. Therefore, the benchmarking information presented here should be  used as a catalyst for the City of Winter Park to continue researching best practices and to set internal  benchmarking against its own performance over time.                Strategic Recreation Facilities Plan   

43


Benchmarking Data Sought  A survey instrument was created for each of the focus areas and included some facility and amenities  information for comparison. The survey can be found in Appendix G. Each respondent identified the  area in which the facility serves. This is important to better understand community profiles and create  assumptions of values for each of those areas being served. A checklist of amenities was provided for  each facility. This helps to compare “apples‐to‐apples” when planning a new facility. Next, respondents  were asked to provide the square footage of their facilities to better understand staffing levels.  Organizational charts were requested; however, only three agencies had charts readily available. Finally,  the survey inquired about cost‐recovery levels. Cost recovery is determined by dividing the total annual  revenue by total annual expenses. With this information, staff can better identify best practices for  Winter Park.    Benchmarked Amenities Findings  • Across the board, all of the responding facilities have gymnasiums and drop‐in fitness areas.  • None of the facilities dedicate space for senior or teen programming.  • Comments were provided that organizations have stand alone senior centers but they are not  included as part of the multi‐use community or recreation center as a part of this benchmark  project.  • When asked about multi‐purpose rooms, all of the facilities responded that they have at least one.  • Some facilities have additional multi‐purpose rooms, those include:  − Goldenrod (2)T  − Largo (3)  − Orlando (4)  • Outdoor pools offered a variety of responses.  • Neither Dunedin or Goldenrod have outdoor pools.  • The City of Largo and the City of Oviedo both reported having two outdoor pools with a variety of  features.  • The remaining facilities reported that, “yes,” outdoor pools were a part of their facilities.  • None of the facilities reported having an indoor pool.  • Three facilities have game rooms, and four have dedicated arts and crafts rooms.  • Other spaces not listed on the survey, but written in by respondents include:  − Exercise and dance studios  − Martial arts rooms  − Preschool space  − Computer labs  • Square footage of these facilities ranged from 19,613 sq ft in Orlando to 42,624 sq ft in Dunedin.         

44 

City of Winter Park, Florida 


Benchmarked Organizational Charts  Three communities included organizational charts with the benchmarking results. Those were the City of  Dunedin, the City of Oviedo, and Orange County. Orange County staff submitted a chart on behalf of the  Meadow Woods Park facility. Winter Park staff specifically inquired about the Goldenrod facility for this  benchmark project; however, Orange County staff responded with surveys on behalf of eight of their  facilities of which we included the one that matched the Winter Park Community Center best. The  organizational charts submitted by the benchmark community centers for comparison are located in  Appendix H.    Benchmarked Staffing Levels  The number of full‐time staff ranged in the communities from five to at least seven, and possibly more  at the City of Oviedo’s Gym and Aquatics facility. The response from Oviedo was inclusive of the entire  department.    It is fair to say that across the board all facilities house programming staff as well as facility support staff.  The Benchmarking Matrix found in Appendix F also shows salary ranges.     Philosophies, pros, and cons using part‐time staff is also different from one facility to another. It is  evident by the responses that some facilities choose to invest in full‐time staff that might have a higher  retention levels, or on the other hand, facilities choose to utilize contractual instructors which at time  carry less over‐head. Again, the Benchmarking Matrix found in Appendix F further demonstrates  different approaches and philosophies utilizing part‐time staff.    Benchmarked Cost Recovery   There was a wide range of cost recovery reported by five of the six that responded to the survey. The  reported cost recovery range was from 10.7 percent to 70 percent for the benchmarked centers. Two of  the six facilities that reported back on cost‐recovery provided both total annual expense and revenue.  Those were the Dunedin Community Center and the Northwest Community Center and Pool in Orlando.  The Kelly Recreation Center in Lakeland did not report. As mentioned earlier, cost recovery targets are  often set as a result of the values, vision, and mission of a community which reflect the demographic  make‐up.    Benchmarking Highlights  The bottom line in this benchmarking process for the three focus areas, staffing, organization, and  facility amenities, is that the City of Winter Park is in a unique position to identify best practices from  around the area, and implement those based on the community’s values, vision, and mission. Following  is a summary of key findings identified in the comparative data analysis.  • Eight agencies were contacted. Of those six responded to the benchmark surveys.  • Some agencies have multiple facilities. Only the best comparable facility to the Winter Park  Community Center was selected from each agency for benchmarking purposes.  • In terms of aquatics, it is rare in these selected agencies to see multi‐use facilities include indoor  pools.  • All of the responding facilities included gymnasiums and drop‐in fitness areas.  • All respondents reported a comprehensive list and salaries of full‐time and part‐time staffing for  further comparison.  • The size of facilities ranged from 19,613 sq ft to 42,624 sq ft.   • The cost recovery of the benchmarked facilities ranged 10.7% to 70%.  Strategic Recreation Facilities Plan   

45


Winter Park Community Center Organizational Chart  An Organizational Chart for the Winter Park Community Center is located in Appendix I. The titles for  the recommended positions coincide with positions that already exist within the Human Resources  Department with comparable responsibilities and requirements in order to create consistency within the  City of Winter Park.     Winter Park Community Center Compensation Model  Pay Grades for Full Time positions:  • Recreation Chief (Exempt)      $42,607 to $66,245 per year  • Assistant Recreation Chief (Exempt)    $38,646 to $60,086 per year  • Program Support Coordinator (Exempt)    $33,383 to $51,904 per year           • Special Programs Coordinator (Exempt)    $30,279 to $47,079 per year  • Recreation Facilities Support Specialist    $11.40 to $17.73 per hour    Hourly Rates for Part Time and Seasonal positions:  • Recreational Leader         $10.86 per hour  • Summer Camp Counselor       $9.85 per hour  • Lead Lifeguard           $11.97 per hour  • Lifeguard           $9.85 per hour  • Maintenance Service Worker       $10.86 per hour  • Staff Assistant 1         $11.40 per hour    The salaries and hourly rates for the recommended positions coincide with pay grades that already exist  within the Human Resources Department with comparable responsibilities and requirements. The new  positions should start at lowest level of the salary or hourly rate range and no more than five percent  above the base pay in order to create consistency within the City of Winter Park.    Benefits currently add up to 45 percent of wages for full time employees and 10 percent of wages for  part time and seasonal employees.    Winter Park Community Center Job Descriptions  Job Descriptions for the staff being hired to operate Winter Park Community Center are located in  Appendix J.       

46 

City of Winter Park, Florida 


F. Winter Park Community Center Annual Operational and Maintenance  Budget Pro forma  The Operational and Maintenance Budget Pro forma is an annual line item budget projecting the annual  expenditures and revenues anticipated at the community center. Much of this information was gathered  from the staff and input into the budget. The budget matches the expenses and revenues submitted by  the staff detailing the anticipated participation, pricing, and programming levels.   

1. Budget Assumptions    In order to project the operating and maintenance pro forma, a list of base level assumptions must be  made. For this project, the Operational and Maintenance Budget Pro forma is built around these  assumptions:  • Facility will be owned and operated by the City of Winter Park.  • Budget is calculated in 2011 figures.  • Facility is approximately 39,000 square feet including programming space square footage:  ƒ Kitchen – 394 sf  ƒ Youth Room – 522 sf  ƒ Fitness Center – 2,095 sf  ƒ Small Multi‐Purpose A – 1,011 sf  ƒ Teen Room – 875 sf  ƒ Small Multi‐Purpose B – 1,090 sf  ƒ Gymnasium – 11,725 sf  ƒ Large Multi‐Purpose C – 1,436 sf  ƒ Computer/Media – 1008 sf  ƒ Large Multi‐Purpose D – 1,506 sf  ƒ Seniors Area – 875 sf  • Hours of Operation  Monday, Wednesday, Friday      8:00am ‐ 10:00pm  Tuesday, Thursday          7:00am ‐ 10:00pm  Saturday          8:00am ‐ 8:00pm  Sunday          10:00am ‐ 6:00pm  • Budget is based on: 92 hours/week x 51 weeks – 2 Holidays = 4,668 hours per year  • Facility will be closed for one week for maintenance and on Thanksgiving and Christmas.  • Fitness Pass holders can participate in fitness room and must pay additionally for all classes with  user fees.  • There will be no contracts, initiation fees, or registration fees associated with the passes.  • Automatic debits from checking accounts, savings accounts, or credit cards will be an option and  not mandatory for passes.  • A programming and rental matrix of each prime time and non‐prime time program space in the  building which defines the programming and rental capacity. Sixty (60) percent of prime time  program space and 20 percent of non‐prime program space was utilized in calculating the level of  programming and rentals in the budget.  • Concessions and vending resale items revenue is calculated at 200 percent of direct costs.                  Strategic Recreation Facilities Plan  47  


Table 11: Membership Rates  Membership Rates ‐ CRA/Resident/Non‐Resident                                     Includes Admission to Fitness Room(program fees not included)                      Pool Admission NOT included in Annual or Monthly Fitness Passes    

Adult (18+) 

Youth (<17) 

Annual Fitness Passes 

$55/$80/$150 

NA/$30/$55 

Monthly Fitness Passes 

$7/$12/$24 

$7/$12/$24 

10‐Punch Pool Pass 

NA/$15/$30 

NA/$15/$30 

Daily Admission (Fitness & Pool)  NA/$2/$4  NA/$2/$4    All recreational program revenues are calculated at 110% recovery of direct costs. The direct costs  include all the specific, identifiable expenses (fixed and variable) associated with providing a service or  program. These expenses would not exist without the program or service. Direct costs include the  following:  o Hourly contractual rates for instructors, leaders, officials, teachers, camp counselors, etc.  o Consumable equipment and supplies provided by instructor or agency, etc.  o Uniforms, tee shirts, for participants.  o Non‐consumable equipment purchased only for the program that require periodic, continual  replacement, or are necessary for the start of the program.  o Promotions associated with specific programs (5%).  o Printing associated with specific programs (5%).  o Office supplies associated with specific programs (5%).  o Any other costs associated or attributed specifically with the program or service.  A $ 40,000 grant from CRA is included to fund programming that is not revenue generating and is based  toward community enrichment as well as to fund scholarships for all programs    Table 12: Hourly Rental Rates  One‐Time Rental  Continuous Rental  Hourly Rental Rates 

Large Multi‐Purpose Rooms 

$80 

$60  

Small Multi‐Purpose Rooms 

$55  

$40 

$220 + $20 w/Kitchen 

$150 + $20 w/Kitchen 

Kitchen 

$50  

$30  

Amphitheater 

$30  

$50 

Both Large Multi‐Purpose Rooms w/Kitchen 

$190 

$140  

$50/$125  

$40/$100 

$75 +$15 over 30 guests 

N/A  

Ballroom 

Gymnasium (Per Court/Full Gym)  Pool After Hours    •      Rental Discounts  o Winter Park Resident       o CRA District Resident        o Non‐Profit Organizations      48 

20% off regular fee  25% off regular fee  30% off regular fee 

City of Winter Park, Florida 


2. Operational Budget Projections     6205 Community Center Operational Budget   6205 

STAFFING PROJECTIONS 

  

  

  

  

$502,569 

69.52% 

   12‐10 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

Number 

Unit Cost 

  

$221,450 

  

  

  

Recreation Chief 

 $48,450  

$48,450 

  

  

  

  

Assistant Recreation Chief 

 $40,000  

$40,000 

  

  

  

  

Program Support Coordinator 

 $35,000  

$35,000 

  

  

  

  

Administration Coordinator 

 $35,000  

$35,000 

  

  

  

  

Transportation I 

 $32,000  

$32,000 

  

  

  

  

Special Programs Coordinator 

 $31,000  

$31,000 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

Full Time Staff 

13‐10 

Part Time Staff 

Hours 

Unit Cost 

  

$173,416 

  

  

  

Recreation Facilities Support Specialist 

2000 

$11.40 

$22,800 

  

  

  

  

Recreation Leader (5) 

4500 

$10.86 

$48,870 

  

  

  

  

Maintenance Service Worker (2) 

2500 

$10.86 

$27,150 

  

  

  

  

Staff Assistant I 

2000 

$11.40 

$22,800 

  

  

  

  

Summer Camp Counselor (8) 

3200 

$9.85 

$31,520 

  

  

  

  

Head Lifeguard 

648 

$11.97 

$7,757 

  

  

  

  

Lifeguards (3) 

1271 

$9.85 

  

  

  

   14‐10 

  

  

  

$12,519    

  

  

  

   $502 

  

Overtime Wages 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

   21‐10 

Benefits 

  

  

  

$107,201 

  

  

FICA Taxes 

  

  

  

  

  

22‐10  22‐20  23‐10 

Pension  ICMA City Contrib.  Group Health Ins. 

        

  

$28,818    

$15,502 

  

  

  

  

$1,893 

  

  

  

  

$51,140 

  

  

  

23‐11 

Life Ins. 

  

  

$485 

  

  

  

23‐12 

AD&D Ins. 

  

  

$54 

  

  

  

23‐13 

Disability Ins. 

  

  

$539 

  

  

  

24‐10 

Worker's Comp. 

  

  

$8,486 

  

  

  

25‐10 

Unemployment Comp. 

  

  

$284 

  

  

  

                Strategic Recreation Facilities Plan   

49


Operational Budget Projections (continued)   6205  6205  41‐15  43‐20  43‐40 

EXPENSES  Given Expenses  Telephone Equipment Charges 

        

        

Water  Gas 

     

     

43‐70  44‐60  44‐62  45‐10  45‐11  45‐30  45‐40  46‐50  46‐60  52‐20     6205 

Electricity  Vehicle Rental 

     

     

Excess Vehicle Rent Credit  General Liability  Risk Management Operation  Vehicle Insurance  Other Insurance 

        

        

     

     

Vehicle Maintenance  Fleet Maintenance Overhead  Fuel    

           

           

Operating Expenses  34‐40  Contractual Services  34‐45  Credit Card Fees  34‐50  Medical Testing  40‐10  Travel & Training  40‐20  Car Allowance  41‐20  Cell Phones/Beepers  42‐10  Postage & Freight  43‐80  Waste Collection  46‐10  Maintenance Contracts  46‐20  Building Maintenance  46‐40  Equipment Maintenance  47‐10  Printing & Binding  48‐10  Promotional Activities  51‐20  Office Equip Under $1000  52‐14  Recreation Supplies  52‐15  Inventory ‐ Food & Beverages  52‐10  General Operating Supplies  52‐50  Chemicals  52‐60  Janitorial Supplies  52‐70  Clothing  52‐90  Equipment Under $1000  54‐20  Memberships 

  

  

  

6205 

TOTAL EXPENSES 

        

   $122,101    

   16.89%    

     

     

     

$65,000  $2,671  ‐$1,168 

     

     

     

        

        

        

$8,135  $1,035  $712  $6,700  $1,413  $249  $3,540    

                                                           

                                                           

   $15,000  $2,500  $500  $1,050  $2,407  $3,630  $2,250  $300  $9,400  $2,500  $400  $2,000  $750  $1,250  $3,100  $3,000  $2,250  $2,000  $9,000  $2,120  $2,300  $775 

  

  

$29,750 

     

55‐60  Other Recreation Events 

      $3,814  $25,000  $5,000 

        

  

     

     

     

     

     

           

           

           

        

                                                                 

                                                                 

     

  

13.59% 

                                                           

     

  

$98,232 

     

  

$722,902 

          50 

City of Winter Park, Florida 


Operational Budget Projections (continued)  6202

  

REVENUE  Passes (calculated at average of CRA Rates and Resident Rates)

$32,050

  

Annual  FitnessPasses 

Number

Price

$13,000 

  

  

  Adult 

175

$70

$12,250

  

  

  

  Youth 

25

$30

$750

  

  

Number

Price

  

  

  

Monthly Fitness Passes  (Average 3 months out of year)

  

  Resident/CRA 

175

$10

  

  Non‐Resident 

25

$24

  

  

  

10 Punch Passes 

Number

  

  

$7,050 

  

$5,250

  

  

$1,800

  

  

Price

  

  

$12,000 

  

  

Resident 

600

$15

$9,000

  

  

Non‐Resident 

100

$30

$3,000

  

  

  

  

  

Number

Price

4000

$2

Resident 

  

  

  

Pool Group Rate (calculated at Resident Rates to be conservative)

  

  

  

Resident 

  

  

   $8,000

Daily Admissions (calculated at Resident Rates to be conservative)   

14.31%

$8,000

  

  

  

  

  

  

3.57%

$825

Number

Price

550

$1.50

$825

  

  

  

  

  

  

0.37%

                                            Strategic Recreation Facilities Plan   

51


Operational Budget Projections (continued)     Rentals (calculated at average of 1‐time & continuous CRA Rates)   

  

  

  Large Multipurpose Rooms (2) 

  

     (Avg. $52/hr x 4 hrs/wk avg x 50 wks x 2 rooms)

  

#/Year

Cost

Multiplier 

  

200

$52

2

$20,800 

  Small Multipurpose Rooms (2) 

  

     (Avg. $35/hr x 4 hrs/wk avg x 50 wks x 2 rooms)

200

$35

2

  

  Ballroom 

  

     (Avg. $140/hr x 2 hr/wk avg x 50 wks) 

  

  

  

  

  

  Kitchen 

  

    (Avg. $30/hr x 8 hrs/wk avg x 50 wks,) 

50

400

$140

$30

2

1

$14,000 

$12,000    

  

  

  Amphitheater 

  

     (Avg.$30/hr x 2 hrs/wk avg x 50 wks) 

  

  

  

  

  

  Gymnasium 

  

     (Avg. $35/hr x 4 hrs/wk avg x 50 wks x 2 cts)

  

  

  

  

  

  Pool After Hours Rentals 

  

   100

200

$30

$35

1

2

$3,000 

$14,000 

12

$75

2

$1,800 

1

$800

1

$800 

  

  

Recreational Programs (100% Direct Cost)    

2.68%

  

  

  

$6,000

  

  

  

43.17%

$14,000 

  

  Full Facility After Hours 

 $96,701 

  

  

  

35.90%

  

  

  

$80,400

     Recreational Program User Fees 

Direct Cost

Multiplier

  

$87,910

110%

$96,701 

Direct Cost

Multiplier

  

$3,000

200%

$6,000 

  

   Customer Services 

  

Concessions/Vending 

  

 

 

6202

TOTAL REVENUE

  

$223,976

6205

TOTAL EXPENSES

  

$722,902

TOTAL NET

  

‐$498,926

COST RECOVERY 

  

31%

        Five‐Year Pro forma     52 

City of Winter Park, Florida 


Winter Park Community Center Five‐Year Proforma

  

Year 1 

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

  Year 5 

% Increase

EXPENSES 

  

  

  

  

  

Staffing 

 $   502,569 

$   517,646 

$    533,175 

$   549,171 

 $   565,646  

3%

Given Expenses 

 $   122,101 

$   125,764 

$    129,537 

$   133,423 

 $   137,426  

3%

Operating Expenses 

 $      98,232 

$   100,197 

$    102,201 

$   104,245 

 $   106,329  

  

  

2%

  

  

 $   809,401  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

REVENUES 

  

  

  

  

  

TOTAL EXPENSES 

 $   722,902 

  

  

$   743,607 

$    764,913 

$   786,838 

  

Passes 

 $      32,050 

$      33,653 

$       35,335 

$      37,102 

$      38,957  

5%

Daily Admissions 

 $         8,825 

$         9,090 

$          9,453 

$         9,831 

$      10,225  

4%

Rentals 

 $      80,400 

$      84,420 

$       88,641 

$      93,073 

$      97,727  

5%

Recreation Programs 

 $      96,701 

$   104,437 

$    112,792 

$   121,815 

$   131,561  

8%

Customer Services 

 $         6,000 

$         6,240 

$          6,490 

$         6,749 

$         7,019  

4%

$   237,839 

$    252,711 

$   268,571 

$   285,488  

  

  

TOTAL REVENUE 

 $   223,976 

     

  

  

  

  

  

  

NET 

 $ (498,926)

COST RECOVERY 

31%

$ (505,767) 32%

$  (512,202) 33%

$ (518,267) 34%

$ (523,913)  35% 

     

  

 

 

Based on 2011Figures 

  

 

   

 

Strategic Recreation Facilities Plan   

53


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Appendix A – Statistically‐Valid, Community‐Wide Survey Results     

Strategic Recreation Facilities Plan   

55


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2011 PARKS AND RECREATION STUDY APPENDIX - A Prepared by: Profile Marketing Research 4020 South 57th Avenue Lake Worth, Florida 33463 561- 965- 8300 www.profile-mktg-res.com April 2011


Table of Contents

Background and Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3

Methodology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4

Key Findings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5

Detailed Findings Overall Likelihood of Participation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Top 5 Programs/Activities - Detail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Other Programs/Activities – Detail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Time Periods of Utilization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Communication Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

Transportation Availability. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

38

Children’s Programs – Structured vs.Unstructured . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Household Composition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

42

Demographics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

62

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park – Parks and Recreation Survey

2


Background and Objectives

The City of Winter Park Parks and Recreation Department seeks to understand residents needs/wants/preferences as relates to its offerings . As such, a survey was mailed to residents to determine: •

Likelihood of participation in programs/activities

Who would participate in programs/activities

Time periods that programs/activities would be utilized

Children’s programs preference, structured vs. unstructured

Need for transportation

Preferred methods of communication

Profile Marketing Research compiled the data from these surveys and results from this research study are provided herein.

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park – Parks and Recreation Survey

3


Methodology

Mail Survey Among City of Winter Park Residents • 2,500 surveys were mailed out (2,300 non-CRA and 200 CRA). • The total number of completed surveys received was n=400 (382 nonCRA, 18 CRA) yielding a response rate of 16% overall (17% non-CRA and 9% CRA). • With the sample size at 400 the sampling error is no greater than +/- 4.9% at a 95% level of confidence. • Mailings were distributed on March 18, 2011 and were received between March 21 and April 18, 2011. •

Given the small number of CRA residents responding (n=18), caution should be used when referencing.

In the Household Composition section of this report, the ‘Seniors Only’ subgroup represents households whose only residents are age 65 or above.

Throughout this report tests of significance between subgroups was conducted. Where applicable, significant differences are indicated with CAPITAL letters (letters represent the column or subgroup where the significant difference resides).

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park – Parks and Recreation Survey

4


Key Findings

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Parks and Recreation Survey

5


Key Findings Overall Likelihood of Participation When asked in which programs or activities they would participate, respondents were most likely to indicate they would participate in Cultural and Performing Arts (57%), Health/Wellness (47%), and Sports/Fitness (47%) programs or activities. Among the programs/activities listed, there were three distinct tiers regarding the overall popularity of programs that respondents ‘would’ or ‘may or may not’ participate in. They are as follows:

• Highly popular: • • • • •

Cultural and Performing Arts (89%) Health/Wellness (85%) Nature and Environmental (82%) Historical/Cultural/Education/Preservation (81%) Sports/Fitness (78%)

• Moderately popular: • • •

Aquatics (56%) Public Safety and Awareness (55%) Lifeskills and Personal Development (53%)

• Less popular: • • •

Social Services/Resource Referrals (40%) Special Needs/Therapeutic Recreation (33%) Summer/School’s Out/After School Programs (23%)

Overall only 5% of respondents stated that they would not participate in any City of Winter Park Parks and Recreation programs or activities.

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park – Parks and Recreation Survey

6


Key Findings Top Program/Activity Choices When asked to select four programs or activities they would be most likely to participate in, the most popular first choice was Health/Wellness (23%), followed closely by Sports/Fitness (21%) and Cultural & Performing Arts (18%). •

When including all choices, the most popular responses were Health/Wellness (61%) and Cultural & Performing Arts (60%).

Only 5% gave a reason as to why they would not participate in programs or activities. Among those who gave a reason, nearly half (45%) gave a reason pertaining to them already participating in similar programs and/or activities.

Top 5 Programs/Activities - Detail Cultural & Performing Arts Cultural & Performing Arts programs are one of the most popular of those listed, with 57% of respondents saying they would participate, and another one-third (32%) saying they may or may not participate. Cultural & Performing Arts programs are especially popular among households with children under 5 years old, all of whom said they ‘would’ or ‘may or may not’ participate. Among households with school-age children, adults (52%) would be slightly more likely to attend Cultural & Performing Arts programs than children (42%). Additionally, one-third (33%) of respondents said anyone would attend. •

Interestingly, among households with children under 5, Cultural & Performing Arts programs would be attended by children (48%) and adults (48%) evenly, with another one-third (32%) saying anyone would attend.

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park – Parks and Recreation Survey

7


Key Findings Health/Wellness

Health/Wellness programs are one of the most popular of those listed, with just under one-half (47%) saying they would participate and another 38% saying they may or may not participate. As with Cultural & Performing Arts programs, Health/Wellness programs are especially popular among households with children under 5 years old, 97% of whom said they ‘would’ or ‘may or may not’ participate. Health/Wellness programs are more popular among CRA residents (75% said they would participate) than among non-CRA residents (46% said they would participate). Among households with school-age children who ‘would’ or ‘may or may not’ participate, Health/Wellness programs would more likely to be attended by adults (63%), although they would still be popular among children (44%). Additionally, one-quarter (25%) of respondents said anyone would attend. Nature & Environmental Nature & Environmental programs are highly popular, with 43% stating they would participate and another 39% stating they may or may not participate. Nature and Environmental programs/activities resonate more with non-CRA residents (12% first choice, 50% all choices) than CRA residents (0% and 22% respectively). Nature & Environmental programs are especially popular among households with children under 5, 70% of whom state they would participate. Additionally among this group, 70% state that children would attend (70%). Among households with school-age children, Nature & Environmental programs would be attended by adults (57%) and children (51%) evenly. Additionally, nearly one-third (31%) of respondents said anyone would attend. Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park – Parks and Recreation Survey

8


Key Findings Historical/Cultural/Education/Preservation

Historical/Cultural/Education/Preservation programs are highly popular, with 41% saying they would participate and another 40% saying they may or may not participate. Historical/Cultural/Education/Preservation programs are more popular among CRA residents (67% said they would participate) than among non-CRA residents (40% said they would participate). Sports/Fitness

Sports/Fitness programs are highly popular, with 47% saying they would participate and another 31% saying they may or may not participate. Sports/Fitness programs are less popular among households with only seniors, of whom more than onethird (38%) stated they would not participate.

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Parks and Recreation Survey

9


Key Findings Other Programs/Activities - Detail Aquatics Aquatics programs are moderately popular, with 27% saying they would participate and another 29% saying they may or may not participate. These programs are more popular among households with children under 5 (55% would participate) and school-age children (46% would participate) than among seniors only (17% would participate) or households with no children or seniors (18% would participate). Special Needs/Therapeutic Recreation Special Needs/Therapeutic Recreation programs are less popular, with 10% saying they would participate and another 23% saying they may or may not participate. These programs are most popular among households with seniors only (16% would participate and 27% may or may not participate). Summer/School’s Out/After School Programs Overall, Summer/School’s Out/After School Programs are some of the least popular, with three-quarters (77%) of those responding indicating they would not participate. However, only 23% of respondents have school-age children (age 5-19) living in their household. •

Among those with school-age children, nearly one-third (31%) said they would participate and another 26% said they may or may not participate.

Of note, among those with children under 5 living in the household, over one-half (55%) said they would participate in Summer/School’s Out/After School Programs, while another one-quarter (23%) said they may or may not participate.

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park – Parks and Recreation Survey

10


Key Findings Utilization of Time Periods The most popular time periods in terms of utilization of the City’s Parks and Recreation programs and activities are Saturday mornings (19% first choice and 48% all choices) and weekday mornings (31% first choice and 38% all choices). There are few significant differences in preferred time periods among those who would participate in each specific activity of event. The exception is with Summer/School’s Out/After School programs in which Saturdays (all day) and Sunday afternoons see a high preference rate. There are some notable differences in preferred time periods between household composition groups. In general: •

Households with children of any age prefer Saturday mornings, Saturday and Sunday afternoons, and weekday afternoons after 3pm.

Very few households with children would participate in activities or programs on weekend evenings or weekday afternoons before 3pm.

Households without children or seniors are the group most likely to prefer weekday evenings after 6pm (44%).

Senior only households appear to prefer weekday mornings (67%) and weekday afternoons before 3pm (58%).

Communication Methods Respondents’ preferred methods of communication are either through direct mail (45%, first choice) or email (35%, first choice). While not top choices, other methods of communication that may be effective include a neighborhood newspaper (44%, all choices), City of Winter Park website (32%, all choices), or a major newspaper (30%, all choices). Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park – Parks and Recreation Survey

11


Key Findings Transportation Availability The vast majority of respondents (94%) do not have a lack of transportation that would prevent them from utilizing programs and activities. •

While only 6% of respondents overall said they have a lack of transportation, that percentage increases to 13% among those who would potentially participate in Special Needs/Therapeutic Recreation programs.

Children’s Programs – Structured vs. Unstructured Overall, six-of-ten (61%) respondents with school-age children living at home prefer structured programs or activities for their children. Of note, among those who would potentially participate in Summer/School’s Out/After School Programs and Lifeskills & Personal Development, the percentage of those preferring structured programs increases to 76% for both.

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park – Parks and Recreation Survey

12


Key Findings Household Composition – Children Under 5 Years Old Present in HH Among those households with children under 5 years old, programs that may have a high level of participation include: •

Cultural & Performing Arts (77% would participate)

Sports/Fitness (75% would participate)

Nature and Environmental (70% would participate)

When respondents living in these households were asked to pick their four favorite programs, the most popular first choices were: •

Sports/Fitness (31%, first choice)

Health/Wellness (19%, first choice)

When planning programs or activities for households with children under 5, the time slots that should be highly considered include: •

Saturday mornings (42%, first choice)

Weekday afternoons after 3pm (29%, first choice)

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park – Parks and Recreation Survey

13


Key Findings Household Composition – School-Age Children Present in HH Among those households with school-age children, programs that may have a high level of participation include: •

Sports/Fitness (68% would participate)

Cultural and Performing Arts (60% would participate)

When respondents living in these households were asked to pick their four favorite programs, the most popular first choice was: •

Sports/Fitness (39%, first choice)

When planning programs or activities for households with school-age children, the time slots that should be highly considered include: •

Saturday mornings (31%, first choice)

Weekday afternoons after 3pm (25%, first choice)

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park – Parks and Recreation Survey

14


Key Findings Household Composition – No Children, No Seniors Present in HH Among those households with no children and no seniors, the programs that may have high levels of participation include: •

Cultural and Performing Arts (53% would participate)

When respondents living in these households were asked to pick their four favorite programs, the most popular first choices include: •

Health/Wellness (25%, first choice)

Cultural and Performing Arts (23%, first choice)

Sports/Fitness (18%, first choice)

When planning programs or activities for households without children or seniors, the time slots that should be highly considered include: •

Weekday mornings (25%, first choice)

Saturday mornings (20%, first choice)

Weekday evenings after 6pm (19%, first choice)

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park – Parks and Recreation Survey

15


Key Findings Household Composition –Seniors Only in HH Among those households with no children or seniors, the program that could have the highest level of participation is: •

Cultural and Performing Arts (55% would participate)

Health/Wellness (54% would participate)

Historical/Cultural/Education/Preservation (49% would participate)

When respondents living in these households were asked to pick their four favorite programs, the most popular first choices include: •

Health/Wellness (29%, first choice)

Cultural and Performing Arts (20%, first choice)

When planning programs or activities for households without children or seniors, the time slots that should be highly considered include: •

Weekday mornings (54%, first choice)

Weekday afternoons before 3pm (21%, first choice)

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park – Parks and Recreation Survey

16


Overall Likelihood of Participation

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Parks and Recreation Survey

17


Likelihood of Participation Likelihood of Participation in Specific Programs/Activities

Would Participate

Would Not Participate

May or May Not Participate

77% 68% 60%

57% 47%

47%

43%

38% 32%

39%

31%

27% 29%

22%

18%

14%

11%

47%

43%

41% 40%

45% 40%

32%

28%

23%

21%

18%

15%

12%

11% 12%

10% # 0% 0%

Cultural and Performing Arts

Health/ Wellness

Sports/ Fitness

(n=370)

(n=345)

Nature and Environmental (n=346)

(n=359)

Historical/ Cultural/ Education/ Preservation

Aquatics (n=325)

Lifeskills and Personal Development

Public Safety and Awareness

(n=327)

(n=314)

(n=350)

Social Services/ Resource Referrals

Summer/ Schools Out/ After School Programs

Special Needs/ Therapeutic Recreation

(n=309)

(n=306)

(n=316)

Other (n=1) Includes ‘A dog park with lower fees’

Percentage selecting ‘Would’ or ‘May or May Not’ participate for each activity 89%

85%

78%

82%

81%

56%

53%

55%

40%

23%

33%

#

Q2. Would you or any other members of your household consider participating in the following programs or activities if offered by the City of Winter Park? Additionally, please indicate who in your household would be most likely to participate in the given program/activity.

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park – Parks and Recreation Survey

18


Top Program/Activity Choices First Choice

Total

All Choices

Base

391

(Multiple responses accepted)

Health/Wellness

23%

Base

391

Sports/Fitness

21%

Health/Wellness

61%

Cultural & Performing Arts

18%

Cultural & Performing Arts

60%

Nature & Environmental

12%

Sports/Fitness

51%

Historical/Cultural/Education/Preservation

10%

Nature & Environmental

49%

Aquatics

4%

Historical/Cultural/Education/Preservation

45%

Summer/Schools Out/After School Programs

3%

Aquatics

23%

Lifeskills & Personal Development

2%

Lifeskills & Personal Development

19%

2%

Summer/Schools Out/After School Programs

11%

Public Safety & Awareness

9%

Special Needs/Therapeutic Recreation

9%

Social Services/Resource Referrals

8%

Special Needs/Therapeutic Recreation Public Safety & Awareness

#

Social Services/Resource Referrals

0%

Other

#

None

5%

Total

Other

#

Reasons for Not Participating

Total

(Among those giving a reason for not participating)

Base

20

Already Participating (Net)

45%

We belong to Winter Park Towers/YMCA/tennis club and have access to facilities/activities there.

20%

I am happy with my current programs/activities.

20%

There are plenty of available places already to do these kinds of things.

5%

It is not the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s responsibility to educate/entertain use/City should only provide essential services.

25%

Age/Health (Net)

25%

Too old.

15%

Health concerns.

10%

These are not the kind of activities we would participate in.

5%

I like to participate in activities closer to where I live.

5% Multiple responses accepted

Q3. In which FOUR of the programs or activities from the list above would your household be most likely to participate?

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Parks and Recreation Survey

# = Less than 0.5%

19


Top Program/Activity Choices Residency Type

First Choice

Home Ownership

Non-CRA (A) 373

CRA (B) 18

Own (A) 327

Health/Wellness

23%

28%

21%

Sports/Fitness

21%

17%

Cultural & Performing Arts

17%

28%

Base

Nature & Environmental

Rent (B)

Household Income

Transportation No Transportation (A)

Has Transportation (B)

61

<$100K (A) 175

$100K+ (B) 174

20

368

36%A

31%B

16%

35%

23%

22%

13%

12%

29%A

0%

22%A

19%

13%

13%

22%A

5%

19%A

12%B

0%

13%B

3%

12%

12%

10%

12%

Historical/Cultural/Education/Preservation

10%

11%

10%

8%

11%

9%

20%

9%

Aquatics

4%

6%

4%

3%

6%

3%

0%

4%A

Summer/Schools Out/After School Programs

3%

6%

2%

8%

4%

3%

0%

3%A

Lifeskills & Personal Development

2%

6%

2%

5%

2%

2%

10%

2%

2%B

0%

2%

3%

4%

1%

15%

1%

Public Safety & Awareness

#

0%

#

0%

1%

0%

0%

#

Other

#

0%

#

0%

1%

0%

0%

#

None

5%B

0%

5%

7%

4%

4%

5%

5%

Special Needs/Therapeutic Recreation

Residency Type

Home Ownership

Household Income

All Choices (Multiple responses accepted)

Non-CRA (A) 373

CRA (B) 18

Own (A)

Rent (B)

327

61

<$100K (A) 175

Health/Wellness

60%

72%

60%

62%

61%

Cultural & Performing Arts

59%

72%

61%

51%

51%

Base

Sports/Fitness

Transportation No Transportation (A)

Has Transportation (B)

20

368

61%

55%

61%

67%A

50%

61%

$100K+ (B) 174

51%

56%

49%

59%

45%

62%A

10%

53%A

50%B

22%

50%

43%

47%

53%

55%

49%

Historical/Cultural/Education/Preservation

45%

39%

48%B

31%

43%

48%

40%

46%

Aquatics

22%

28%

21%

33%

27%

21%

30%

22%

Lifeskills & Personal Development

19%

22%

18%

23%

24%B

16%

35%

19%

Summer/Schools Out/After School Programs

11%

6%

11%

13%

9%

13%

5%

11%

Public Safety & Awareness

9%

17%

10%

7%

12%B

5%

5%

10%

Special Needs/Therapeutic Recreation

9%

6%

9%

12%

14%B

3%

35%B

7%

Social Services/Resource Referrals

7%

Nature & Environmental

7%

33%A

7%

13%

13%B

3%

20%

Other

#

0%

#

0%

1%

0%

0%

#

None

5%B

0%

5%

7%

4%

4%

5%

5%

Q3. In which FOUR of the programs or activities from the list above would your household be most likely to participate?

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Parks and Recreation Survey

# = Less than 0.5%

20


Top 5 Programs/Activities Detail

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Parks and Recreation Survey

21


Top 5 Programs/Activities – Cultural & Performing Arts Among those who ‘Would’ or ‘May or May Not’ participate

Likelihood of Participation (Among those responding) n=359

Preferred Communication Method (Top Choices)

Direct mail

44%

Email

37%

Lack of Transportation

Would 57% Would Not 11%

89%

n=286

n=318

Yes

6%

No

94%

Refused/No Answer

1%

Program Preference (Among those with school-age children)

May or May Not 32%

n=75

Structured

59%

Unstructured

27%

Refused/No Answer

15%

Who Would Participate (Multiple responses accepted)

n=318

Adults

48%

Seniors

32%

Children

14%

Anyone

13%

Refused/No Answer

11%

Household Composition

Likelihood of Participation Would

Children under 5 (A) n=31

School-age No children, children no seniors (B) (C) n=83 n=134

Seniors only (D) n=86

77%CD

60%

53%

55%

May or May Not

23%

30%

34%

31%

Would Not

0%

10%A

13%A

14%A

Q2. Would you or any other members of your household consider participating in the following programs or activities if offered by the City of Winter Park? Additionally, please indicate who in your household would be most likely to participate in the given program/activity.

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park – Parks and Recreation Survey

22


Top 5 Programs/Activities – Health/Wellness Among those who ‘Would’ or ‘May or May Not’ participate

Likelihood of Participation (Among those responding) n=370

Preferred Communication Method (Top Choices)

Would 47%

Direct mail

47%

Email

35%

Lack of Transportation

85%

Would Not 14%

n=290

n=317

Yes

5%

No

94%

Refused/No Answer

1%

Program Preference (Among those with school-age children)

May or May Not 38%

n=75

Structured

61%

Unstructured

24%

Refused/No Answer

15%

Who Would Participate (Multiple responses accepted)

n=317

Adults

54%

Seniors

37%

Children

14%

Anyone

8%

Refused/No Answer

7%

Household Composition

Likelihood of Participation

No Children School-age children, under 5 children no seniors (A) (B) (C) n=32 n=87 n=139

Would

Seniors only (D) n=87

59%C

51%

40%

54%C

May or May Not

38%

36%

42%

35%

Would Not

3%

14%A

17%A

12%

Q2. Would you or any other members of your household consider participating in the following programs or activities if offered by the City of Winter Park? Additionally, please indicate who in your household would be most likely to participate in the given program/activity.

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park – Parks and Recreation Survey

23


Top 5 Programs/Activities – Nature & Environmental Among those who ‘Would’ or ‘May or May Not’ participate

Likelihood of Participation (Among those responding) n=346

Preferred Communication Method (Top Choices)

Would 43%

Direct mail

46%

Email

35%

Lack of Transportation

Would Not 18%

82%

n=263

n=284

Yes

6%

No

93%

Refused/No Answer

1%

Program Preference (Among those with school-age children)

May or May Not 39%

n=70

Structured

64%

Unstructured

21%

Refused/No Answer

14%

Who Would Participate (Multiple responses accepted)

n=284

Adults

53%

Seniors

32%

Children

18%

Anyone

11%

Refused/No Answer

7%

Household Composition

Likelihood of Participation Would

Children under 5 (A) n=30

School-age No children, children no seniors Seniors only (B) (C) (D) n=33 n=135 n=78

70%BCD

49%

40%

35%

May or May Not

20%

35%

44%A

44%A

Would Not

10%

16%

16%

22%

Q2. Would you or any other members of your household consider participating in the following programs or activities if offered by the City of Winter Park? Additionally, please indicate who in your household would be most likely to participate in the given program/activity.

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park – Parks and Recreation Survey

24


Top 5 Programs/Activities – Historical/Cultural/Education/Preservation Among those who ‘Would’ or ‘May or May Not’ participate

Likelihood of Participation (Among those responding) n=350

Preferred Communication Method (Top Choices)

Would 41%

Direct mail

48%

Email

36%

Lack of Transportation

Would Not 18%

81%

n=260

n=286

Yes

5%

No

94%

Refused/No Answer

1%

Program Preference (Among those with school-age children)

May or May Not 40%

n=64

Structured

59%

Unstructured

25%

Refused/No Answer

16%

Who Would Participate (Multiple responses accepted)

n=286

Adults

49%

Seniors

35%

Anyone

11%

Children

9%

Refused/No Answer

9%

Household Composition

Likelihood of Participation

Children under 5 (A) n=31

School-age No children, children no seniors Seniors only (B) (C) (D) n=83 n=131 n=84

Would

39%

39%

37%

49%

May or May Not

45%

39%

41%

39%

Would Not

16%

23%

22%D

12%

Q2. Would you or any other members of your household consider participating in the following programs or activities if offered by the City of Winter Park? Additionally, please indicate who in your household would be most likely to participate in the given program/activity.

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park – Parks and Recreation Survey

25


Top 5 Programs/Activities – Sports/Fitness Among those who ‘Would’ or ‘May or May Not’ participate

Likelihood of Participation (Among those responding) n=345

Preferred Communication Method (Top Choices)

Would 47%

Direct mail

46%

Email

37%

Lack of Transportation

Would Not 22%

78%

n=246

n=268

Yes

5%

No

94%

Refused/No Answer

1%

Program Preference (Among those with school-age children)

May or May Not 31%

n=80

Structured

61%

Unstructured

25%

Refused/No Answer

14%

Who Would Participate (Multiple responses accepted)

n=268

Adults

50%

Seniors

30%

Children

20%

Anyone

14%

Refused/No Answer

6%

Household Composition

Likelihood of Participation Would

Children under 5 (A) n=32

School-age No children, children no seniors Seniors only (B) (C) (D) n=80 n=104 n=47

75%CD

68%CD

40%

34%

May or May Not

25%

24%

39%B

28%

Would Not

0%

8%A

21%AB

38%ABC

Q2. Would you or any other members of your household consider participating in the following programs or activities if offered by the City of Winter Park? Additionally, please indicate who in your household would be most likely to participate in the given program/activity.

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park – Parks and Recreation Survey

26


Other Programs/Activities Detail

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Parks and Recreation Survey

27


Other Programs/Activities – Aquatics

Likelihood of Participation (Among those responding) n=325

Who Would Participate (Among those who ‘Would’ or ‘May or May Not’ participate)

Would 27% Would Not 43%

56% May or May Not 29%

n=184

Adults

47%

Seniors

23%

Children

22%

Anyone

16%

Refused/No Answer

9% Multiple responses accepted

Q2. Would you or any other members of your household consider participating in the following programs or activities if offered by the City of Winter Park? Additionally, please indicate who in your household would be most likely to participate in the given program/activity.

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park – Parks and Recreation Survey

28


Other Programs/Activities – Public Safety & Awareness

Likelihood of Participation (Among those responding) n=314

Who Would Participate (Among those who ‘Would’ or ‘May or May Not’ participate)

Would 15%

Would Not 45%

55% May or May Not 40%

n=172

Adults

45%

Seniors

31%

Children

13%

Anyone

11%

Refused/No Answer

13% Multiple responses accepted

Q2. Would you or any other members of your household consider participating in the following programs or activities if offered by the City of Winter Park? Additionally, please indicate who in your household would be most likely to participate in the given program/activity.

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park – Parks and Recreation Survey

29


Other Programs/Activities – Lifeskills & Personal Development

Likelihood of Participation (Among those responding) n=327

Who Would Participate (Among those who ‘Would’ or ‘May or May Not’ participate)

Would 21%

Adults Would Not 47%

53% May or May Not 32%

Would 47%

n=172

50%

Seniors

33%

Anyone

11%

Children

10%

Refused/No Answer

8% Multiple responses accepted

Q2. Would you or any other members of your household consider participating in the following programs or activities if offered by the City of Winter Park? Additionally, please indicate who in your household would be most likely to participate in the given program/activity.

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park – Parks and Recreation Survey

30


Other Programs/Activities – Social Services/Resource Referrals

Likelihood of Participation (Among those responding) n=309

Who Would Participate (Among those who ‘Would’ or ‘May or May Not’ participate)

Would 12% Would Not 60%

May or May Not 28%

40%

n=125

Adults

38%

Seniors

36%

Anyone

10%

Children

7%

Refused/No Answer

14% Multiple responses accepted

Q2. Would you or any other members of your household consider participating in the following programs or activities if offered by the City of Winter Park? Additionally, please indicate who in your household would be most likely to participate in the given program/activity.

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park – Parks and Recreation Survey

31


Other Programs/Activities – Special Needs/Therapeutic Recreation

Likelihood of Participation (Among those responding) n=316

Who Would Participate (Among those who ‘Would’ or ‘May or May Not’ participate)

Would 10% Would Not 68%

May or May Not 23%

33%

n=102

Seniors

39%

Adults

36%

Anyone

10%

Children

6%

Refused/No Answer

14% Multiple responses accepted

Q2. Would you or any other members of your household consider participating in the following programs or activities if offered by the City of Winter Park? Additionally, please indicate who in your household would be most likely to participate in the given program/activity.

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park – Parks and Recreation Survey

32


Other Programs/Activities – Summer, School’s Out & After School Programs

Likelihood of Participation (Among those responding) n=306

Who Would Participate (Among those who ‘Would’ or ‘May or May Not’ participate)

Would Not 77%

Would 11% May or May Not 12%

23%

n=70

Children

64%

Anyone

11%

Adults

11%

Seniors

6%

Refused/No Answer

16% Multiple responses accepted

Q2. Would you or any other members of your household consider participating in the following programs or activities if offered by the City of Winter Park? Additionally, please indicate who in your household would be most likely to participate in the given program/activity.

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park – Parks and Recreation Survey

33


Utilization of Time Periods

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Parks and Recreation Survey

34


Time Periods Time Period Most Likely to be Utilized (Among those responding) (n=372)

First Choice

All Choices (Multiple responses accepted)

48% 38%

36%

31%

36%

31%

28% 24% 19% 8%

11%

19% 11%

11%

3% Weekday morning

Weekday afternoons before 3 p.m.

Weekday afternoons after 3 p.m.

Weekday evenings before 6 p.m.

11% 3%

Weekday evenings after 6 p.m.

Saturday mornings

Saturday afternoons

Saturday evenings

10% 4% Sunday afternoons

1% Sunday evenings

Q7. What would be the THREE time periods that persons in your household would most likely utilize the City of Winter Parkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s recreational programs or activities?

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Parks and Recreation Survey

35


Communication Methods

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Parks and Recreation Survey

36


Communication Methods Communication Methods (Among those responding) (n=390)

First Choice

All Choices (Multiple responses accepted)

76% 63%

45%

44% 35%

32%

30%

25% 15% 6% Direct mail to your home

Email

Neighborhood newspaper

5% Major newspaper

4% City of Winter Park website

2% Social networking sites (Twitter, Facebook, etc.)

14% 2% Text message

14% 1% Television

1% Radio

Q8. Please indicate below the methods that the City of Winter Park can use to successfully communicate its recreational program and activity offerings to you and your household.

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Parks and Recreation Survey

37


Transportation Availability

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Parks and Recreation Survey

38


Transportation Availability Transportation Availability (Among all)

Lack of Transportation

Household Composition SchoolNo age children, children no seniors (B) (C)

Total

Children under 5 (A)

Seniors only (D)

Base=

400

32

92

149

101

Yes

6%

0%

1%

7%AB

7%AB

No

94%

100%CD

97%

93%

92%

Refused/No answer

1%

0%

2%

0%

1%

Among those who ‘Would’ or ‘May or May Not’ participate in each program/activity

Lack of Transportation Health/ Wellness (A)

Nature & Environmental (B)

Lifeskills & Personal Development (C)

317

284

172

Base=

Special Needs/ Therapeutic Recreation (E)

Historical/ Cultural/ Education/ Preservation (F)

Social Services/ Resource Referrals (G)

Cultural & Performing Arts (H)

268

102

286

125

5%K

Sports/ Fitness (D)

Aquatics (I)

Public Safety & Awareness (J)

Summer/ School’s Out/After School Programs (K)

318

184

172

70

9%K

6%K

6%K

5%K

1%

Yes

5%

6%K

7%K

5%

13% ABDFHJK

No

94%E

93%E

92%

94%E

85%

94%E

90%

94%E

94%E

94%E

96%E

1%

1%

1%

1%

2%

1%

1%

1%

1%

1%

3%

Refused/No answer

Q8. Please indicate below the methods that the City of Winter Park can use to successfully communicate its recreational program and activity offerings to you and your household.

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park – Parks and Recreation Survey

39


Children’s Programs Structured vs. Unstructured

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park – Parks and Recreation Survey

40


Children’s Programs – Structured vs. Unstructured Structured vs. Unstructured Preference (Among those with school-age children living at home) n=92

Structured 61% Refused/No answer 15%

Unstructured 24%

Among those with school-age children who ‘Would’ or ‘May or May Not’ participate in each program/activity

Structured vs. Unstructured

Sports/ Fitness (D)

Special Needs/ Therapeutic Recreation (E)

Historical/ Cultural/ Education/ Preservation (F)

Social Services/ Resource Referrals (G)

Aquatics (I)

Public Safety & Awareness (J)

Summer/ School’s Out/After School Programs (K)

Cultural & Performing Arts (H)

75

59

42

46

73%

59%

70%

69%

76%H

25%

15%

27%

19%

19%

20%

16%K

12%

15%D

12%

12%

4%

Health/ Wellness (A)

Nature & Environmental (B)

Lifeskills & Personal Development (C)

75

70

37

80

21

64

26

Structured

61%

64%

76%

61%

71%

59%

Unstructured

24%

21%

19%

25%

24%

15%K

14%

5%

14%

5%

Base=

Refused/No answer

Q6. For your school-age children living in your household, would structured (pre-registration with planned curriculum) or unstructured (free play with no registration and no curriculum) programs or activities be your preference?

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park – Parks and Recreation Survey

41


Household Composition Children Under 5 Present in Household

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Parks and Recreation Survey

42


Household Composition – Children Under 5 Years Old Present in HH Likelihood of Participation in Specific Programs/Activities (Among households with children under 5 years old)

Would Participate 77%

75%

55%

55%

38% 25%

55%

36%

Cultural and Performing Arts

20%

(n=32)

39% 32% 29%

28% 21%

17%

16% 10%

7%

3%

0% Sports/ Fitness

45% 39%

23%23%

10% 0%

77%

72%

70% 59%

23%

Would Not Participate

May or May Not Participate

Nature and Environmental

Health/ Wellness (n=32)

(n=30)

(n=31)

Summer/ Schools Out/ After School Programs

Aquatics (n=31)

(n=31)

Historical/ Cultural/ Education/ Preservation

Public Safety and Awareness

Lifeskills and Personal Development

(n=31)

(n=29)

(n=31)

17% 7%

Social Services/ Resource Referrals

Special Needs/ Therapeutic Recreation

(n=29)

(n=30)

Who Would Participate (Among households with children under 5 years old who ‘Would’ or ‘May or May Not’ participate in each activity Base

31

32

27

31

24

28

26

19

13

8

7

Children

48%

59%

70%

61%

83%

61%

31%

58%

39%

25%

29%

Adults

48%

59%

67%

68%

17%

39%

50%

53%

69%

50%

57%

Seniors

7%

6%

0%

7%

0%

0%

8%

0%

0%

13%

0%

Anyone

32%

28%

26%

16%

8%

32%

31%

16%

31%

13%

29%

Refused

13%

3%

4%

10%

8%

7%

12%

16%

0%

25%

14%

Q2. Would you or any other members of your household consider participating in the following programs or activities if offered by the City of Winter Park? Additionally, please indicate who in your household would be most likely to participate in the given program/activity.

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park – Parks and Recreation Survey

43


Household Composition â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Children Under 5 Years Old Present in HH Specific Programs/Activities Most Likely to Participate In (Among those responding in households with children under 5 years old)

First Choice Base

Total 32

All Choices

Total

(Multiple responses accepted)

Sports/Fitness

31%

Base

32

Health/Wellness

19%

Sports/Fitness

88%

Nature & Environmental

13%

Health/Wellness

56%

Aquatics

13%

Nature & Environmental

53%

Summer/Schools Out/After School Programs

13%

Cultural & Performing Arts

50%

Cultural & Performing Arts

9%

Aquatics

47%

Historical/Cultural/Education/Preservation

3%

Summer/Schools Out/After School Programs

47%

Lifeskills & Personal Development

0%

Historical/Cultural/Education/Preservation

28%

Special Needs/Therapeutic Recreation

0%

Lifeskills & Personal Development

6%

Social Services/Resource Referrals

0%

Public Safety & Awareness

6%

Public Safety & Awareness

0%

Social Services/Resource Referrals

3%

Other

0%

Special Needs/Therapeutic Recreation

0%

None

0%

Other

0%

None

0%

Q3. In which FOUR of the programs or activities from the list above would your household be most likely to participate?

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Parks and Recreation Survey

44


Household Composition – Children Under 5 Years Old Present in HH Time Period Most Likely to be Utilized (Among those responding in households with children under 5 years old) (n=31)

First Choice

All Choices (Multiple responses accepted)

71% 55%

52%

45%

42% 29% 13%

16%

13% 7%

19%

16% 7%

7% 0%

Saturday mornings

Weekday afternoons after 3 p.m.

Saturday afternoons

Sunday afternoons

Weekday evenings after 6 p.m.

Weekday morning

Weekday evenings before 6 p.m.

0% Saturday evenings

7% 0% Sunday evenings

0%

3%

Weekday afternoons before 3 p.m.

Q7. What would be the THREE time periods that persons in your household would most likely utilize the City of Winter Park’s recreational programs or activities?

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park – Parks and Recreation Survey

45


Household Composition â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Children Under 5 Years Old Present in HH Communication Methods (Among those responding in households with children under 5)

First Choice Base

Total 27

All Choices

Total

(Multiple responses accepted)

Direct mail to your home

44%

Base

32

Email

41%

Email

81%

Neighborhood newspaper

4%

Direct mail to your home

78%

Social networking sites (Twitter, Facebook, etc.)

4%

City of Winter Park website

50%

Text message

4%

Neighborhood newspaper

41%

Major newspaper

4%

Social networking sites (Twitter, Facebook, etc.)

25%

City of Winter Park website

0%

Text message

25%

Radio

0%

Major newspaper

25%

Television

0%

Television

25%

Radio

9%

Q8. Please indicate below the methods that the City of Winter Park can use to successfully communicate its recreational program and activity offerings to you and your household.

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Parks and Recreation Survey

46


Household Composition School Age Children (Ages 5-19) Present in Household

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Parks and Recreation Survey

47


Household Composition – School-Age Children (Age 5-19) Present in HH Likelihood of Participation in Specific Programs/Activities (Among households with school-age children)

Would Participate

Would Not Participate

May or May Not Participate

73%

68%

66% 60% 51%

53%

49% 36%

46%

30%

Sports/ Fitness (n=87)

Cultural and Performing Arts

16%

14%

10%

38%

31% 26% 23%

29% 25%

24% 8%

39% 39%

35%

46%

43% 28% 19%

21%

17%

21%

13% 6%

Health/ Wellness (n=87)

Nature and Environmental

Aquatics (n=79)

(n=83)

(n=83)

Historical/ Cultural/ Education/ Preservation

Summer/ Schools Out/ After School Programs

(n=83)

(n=80)

Lifeskills and Personal Development

Public Safety and Awareness

(n=79)

(n=77)

Social Services/ Resource Referrals

Special Needs/ Therapeutic Recreation

(n=77)

(n=78)

Who Would Participate (Among households with children under 5 years old who ‘Would’ or ‘May or May Not’ participate in each activity Base

80

75

75

70

59

64

46

37

42

26

21

Children

55%

41%

44%

51%

53%

33%

74%

43%

43%

27%

29%

Adults

50%

52%

63%

57%

46%

53%

11%

57%

45%

42%

33%

Seniors

1%

1%

4%

1%

0%

3%

0%

3%

0%

0%

10%

Anyone

34%

33%

25%

31%

29%

33%

15%

27%

31%

31%

24%

Refused

6%

13%

7%

4%

10%

11%

11%

5%

10%

19%

24%

Q2. Would you or any other members of your household consider participating in the following programs or activities if offered by the City of Winter Park? Additionally, please indicate who in your household would be most likely to participate in the given program/activity.

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park – Parks and Recreation Survey

48


Household Composition â&#x20AC;&#x201C; School-Age Children (Age 5-19) Present in HH Specific Programs/Activities Most Likely to Participate In (Among those responding in households with school-age children)

First Choice Base

Total 90

All Choices

Total

(Multiple responses accepted)

Sports/Fitness

39%

Base

90

Health/Wellness

12%

Sports/Fitness

79%

Summer/Schools Out/After School Programs

12%

Cultural & Performing Arts

52%

Nature & Environmental

11%

Nature & Environmental

51%

Historical/Cultural/Education/Preservation

9%

Health/Wellness

49%

Cultural & Performing Arts

8%

Historical/Cultural/Education/Preservation

38%

Aquatics

4%

Summer/Schools Out/After School Programs

37%

Special Needs/Therapeutic Recreation

2%

Aquatics

28%

Lifeskills & Personal Development

1%

Lifeskills & Personal Development

14%

Social Services/Resource Referrals

0%

Public Safety & Awareness

6%

Public Safety & Awareness

0%

Special Needs/Therapeutic Recreation

4%

Other

0%

Social Services/Resource Referrals

4%

None

1%

Other

0%

None

1%

Q3. In which FOUR of the programs or activities from the list above would your household be most likely to participate?

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Parks and Recreation Survey

49


Household Composition – School-Age Children (Age 5-19) Present in HH Time Period Most Likely to be Utilized (Among those responding in households with school-age children) (n=88)

First Choice

All Choices (Multiple responses accepted)

57% 51%

49%

41% 31% 27%

25% 17%

16% 9%

15% 3%

Saturday mornings

Weekday afternoons after 3 p.m.

Saturday afternoons

Weekday evenings after 6 p.m.

13%

13%

8%

Weekday morning

Sunday afternoons

3% Weekday evenings before 6 p.m.

5% 1% Sunday evenings

1% Saturday evenings

1% Weekday afternoons before 3 p.m.

Q7. What would be the THREE time periods that persons in your household would most likely utilize the City of Winter Park’s recreational programs or activities?

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park – Parks and Recreation Survey

50


Household Composition â&#x20AC;&#x201C; School-Age Children (Age 5-19) Present in HH Communication Methods (Among those responding in households with school-age children)

First Choice Base

Total 80

All Choices

Total

(Multiple responses accepted)

Direct mail to your home

43%

Base

92

Email

41%

Email

78%

Neighborhood newspaper

6%

Direct mail to your home

70%

Social networking sites (Twitter, Facebook, etc.)

4%

Neighborhood newspaper

39%

City of Winter Park website

3%

City of Winter Park website

35%

Text message

3%

Social networking sites (Twitter, Facebook, etc.)

21%

Radio

1%

Text message

21%

Major newspaper

0%

Major newspaper

17%

Television

0%

Television

15%

Radio

8%

Q8. Please indicate below the methods that the City of Winter Park can use to successfully communicate its recreational program and activity offerings to you and your household.

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Parks and Recreation Survey

51


Household Composition No Children and No Seniors Present in Household

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Parks and Recreation Survey

52


Household Composition – No Children, No Seniors Present in HH Likelihood of Participation in Specific Programs/Activities (Among households with no children, no seniors)

Would Participate

Would Not Participate

May or May Not Participate

95%

66%

61% 53% 40%

44%

34%

40% 39%

21%

16%

13%

40% 42%

37%

34%

45% 41%

35% 25%

22%22%

17%

47%

45%

41%

18%

15%

14%

25% 9% 1%

Cultural and Performing Arts

Nature and Environmental

Sports/ Fitness

Health/ Wellness

(n=132)

(n=139)

(n=135)

(n=134)

Historical/ Cultural/ Education/ Preservation

Lifeskills and Personal Development

Aquatics (n=123)

(n=128)

Public Safety and Awareness (n=121)

(n=131)

4%

Social Services/ Resource Referrals

Special Needs/ Therapeutic Recreation

Summer/ Schools Out/ After School Programs

(n=122)

(n=122)

(n=115)

Who Would Participate (Among households with children under 5 years old who ‘Would’ or ‘May or May Not’ participate in each activity Base

116

113

104

115

102

71

65

67

48

41

6

Children

2%

2%

1%

3%

2%

0%

3%

0%

4%

0%

17%

Adults

71%

72%

72%

77%

74%

72%

69%

67%

65%

63%

33%

Seniors

18%

16%

17%

19%

20%

18%

15%

19%

19%

15%

0%

Anyone

6%

4%

6%

3%

4%

6%

8%

6%

6%

5%

0%

Refused

9%

12%

8%

6%

7%

9%

8%

10%

10%

17%

50%

Q2. Would you or any other members of your household consider participating in the following programs or activities if offered by the City of Winter Park? Additionally, please indicate who in your household would be most likely to participate in the given program/activity.

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park – Parks and Recreation Survey

53


Household Composition â&#x20AC;&#x201C; No Children, No Seniors Present in HH Specific Programs/Activities Most Likely to Participate In (Among those responding in households with no children, no seniors)

First Choice

Total

All Choices

Base

147

(Multiple responses accepted)

Health/Wellness

25%

Base

147

Cultural & Performing Arts

23%

Cultural & Performing Arts

64%

Sports/Fitness

18%

Health/Wellness

64%

Nature & Environmental

12%

Nature & Environmental

55%

Historical/Cultural/Education/Preservation

10%

Historical/Cultural/Education/Preservation

44%

Aquatics

2%

Sports/Fitness

48%

Special Needs/Therapeutic Recreation

1%

Lifeskills & Personal Development

24%

Lifeskills & Personal Development

1%

Aquatics

20%

Summer/Schools Out/After School Programs

1%

Public Safety & Awareness

12%

Public Safety & Awareness

1%

Social Services/Resource Referrals

8%

Social Services/Resource Referrals

0%

Special Needs/Therapeutic Recreation

5%

Other

1%

Summer/Schools Out/After School Programs

1%

None

5%

Other

1%

None

5%

Total

Q3. In which FOUR of the programs or activities from the list above would your household be most likely to participate?

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Parks and Recreation Survey

54


Household Composition – No Children, No Seniors Present in HH Time Period Most Likely to be Utilized (Among those responding in households with no children, no seniors) (n=138)

First Choice

All Choices (Multiple responses accepted)

51% 44%

25%

44%

41%

28% 20%

23% 19%

17%

17%

14%

12% 6%

Weekday morning

Saturday mornings

Weekday evenings after 6 p.m.

Saturday afternoons

Sunday afternoons

6%

Weekday afternoons after 3 p.m.

4% Weekday evenings before 6 p.m.

4% Saturday evenings

4% Weekday afternoons before 3 p.m.

12% 1% Sunday evenings

Q7. What would be the THREE time periods that persons in your household would most likely utilize the City of Winter Park’s recreational programs or activities?

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park – Parks and Recreation Survey

55


Household Composition â&#x20AC;&#x201C; No Children, No Seniors Present in HH Communication Methods (Among those responding in households with no children, no seniors)

First Choice

Total

All Choices

Base

131

(Multiple responses accepted)

Direct mail to your home

44%

Base

144

Email

38%

Direct mail to your home

77%

City of Winter Park website

8%

Email

65%

Social networking sites (Twitter, Facebook, etc.)

4%

Neighborhood newspaper

49%

Major newspaper

3%

City of Winter Park website

38%

Neighborhood newspaper

2%

Major newspaper

26%

Text message

2%

Social networking sites (Twitter, Facebook, etc.)

22%

Television

1%

Television

22%

Radio

0%

Radio

16%

Text message

13%

Total

Q8. Please indicate below the methods that the City of Winter Park can use to successfully communicate its recreational program and activity offerings to you and your household.

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Parks and Recreation Survey

56


Household Composition Seniors Only Present in Household

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Parks and Recreation Survey

57


Household Composition – Seniors Only Likelihood of Participation in Specific Programs/Activities (Among households with seniors only)

Would Participate

Would Not Participate

May or May Not Participate

91%

55%

60%

54%

31%

49% 35%

39%

47%

44% 35%

32%

28% 22%

14%

12%

23% 17%

21%

12%

50% 42%

46% 38%

38%

34%

57%

27% 16%

16% 8%

8% 2%

Cultural and Performing Arts

Health/ Wellness (n=87)

(n=86)

Historical/ Cultural/ Education/ Preservation

Nature and Environmental

Sports/ Fitness (n=76)

(n=78)

Lifeskills and Personal Development

Aquatics (n=70)

(n=71)

Public Safety and Awareness (n=69)

(n=84)

Special Needs/ Therapeutic Recreation

Social Services/ Resource Referrals

Summer/ Schools Out/ After School Programs

(n=70)

(n=64)

(n=63)

Who Would Participate (Among households with children under 5 years old who ‘Would’ or ‘May or May Not’ participate in each activity Base

74

77

74

61

47

38

28

43

30

32

6

Children

0%

0%

1%

3%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

Adults

7%

8%

7%

5%

6%

5%

0%

7%

3%

3%

0%

Seniors

78%

86%

81%

90%

92%

82%

82%

74%

83%

84%

67%

Anyone

4%

1%

1%

2%

4%

5%

0%

0%

7%

3%

0%

Refused

14%

7%

11%

5%

2%

11%

18%

19%

7%

9%

33%

Q2. Would you or any other members of your household consider participating in the following programs or activities if offered by the City of Winter Park? Additionally, please indicate who in your household would be most likely to participate in the given program/activity.

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park – Parks and Recreation Survey

58


Household Composition â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Seniors Only Specific Programs/Activities Most Likely to Participate In (Among those responding in households with seniors only)

First Choice Base

Total 97

All Choices

Total

(Multiple responses accepted)

Health/Wellness

29%

Base

97

Cultural & Performing Arts

20%

Health/Wellness

62%

Sports/Fitness

12%

Cultural & Performing Arts

56%

Historical/Cultural/Education/Preservation

10%

Historical/Cultural/Education/Preservation

55%

Nature & Environmental

9%

Nature & Environmental

38%

Aquatics

4%

Sports/Fitness

30%

Special Needs/Therapeutic Recreation

4%

Special Needs/Therapeutic Recreation

20%

Lifeskills & Personal Development

2%

Lifeskills & Personal Development

19%

Summer/Schools Out/After School Programs

0%

Aquatics

14%

Social Services/Resource Referrals

0%

Public Safety & Awareness

14%

Public Safety & Awareness

0%

Social Services/Resource Referrals

9%

Other

0%

Summer/Schools Out/After School Programs

3%

None

9%

Other

0%

None

9%

Q3. In which FOUR of the programs or activities from the list above would your household be most likely to participate?

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Parks and Recreation Survey

59


Household Composition – Seniors Only Time Period Most Likely to be Utilized (Among those responding in households with seniors only) (n=91)

First Choice

All Choices (Multiple responses accepted)

67% 58%

54%

31%

29%

21%

20% 15% 7%

Weekday morning

Weekday afternoons before 3 p.m.

Saturday mornings

6% Weekday afternoons after 3 p.m.

4% Weekday evenings after 6 p.m.

13%

13%

3%

3%

2%

Sunday afternoons

Saturday afternoons

Saturday evenings

2%

0% Weekday evenings before 6 p.m.

9% 0% Sunday evenings

Q7. What would be the THREE time periods that persons in your household would most likely utilize the City of Winter Park’s recreational programs or activities?

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park – Parks and Recreation Survey

60


Household Composition â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Seniors Only Communication Methods (Among those responding in households with seniors only)

First Choice Base

Total 92

All Choices

Total

(Multiple responses accepted)

Direct mail to your home

45%

Base

98

Email

28%

Direct mail to your home

77%

Neighborhood newspaper

10%

Email

46%

Major newspaper

10%

Neighborhood newspaper

42%

Television

3%

Major newspaper

39%

City of Winter Park website

2%

Television

37%

Text message

1%

City of Winter Park website

17%

Radio

1%

Radio

14%

Social networking sites (Twitter, Facebook, etc.)

0%

Text message

5%

Social networking sites (Twitter, Facebook, etc.)

4%

Q8. Please indicate below the methods that the City of Winter Park can use to successfully communicate its recreational program and activity offerings to you and your household.

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Parks and Recreation Survey

61


Demographics

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Parks and Recreation Survey

62


Survey Respondent Demographics

Total

Total Base

400

Base

400

Household Composition (continued)

Household Composition 8%

25-34 years

12%

5%

One

8%

Two

3%

Two

5%

Four

#

Three

#

10%

35-44 years

15%

One

6%

One

8%

Two

3%

Two

7% 27%

Under 5 years One

5-9 years

Three

#

45-54 years

10-14 years

10%

One

17%

One

8%

Two

11%

Two

3%

55-64 years

30%

Four

#

One

17%

15-19 years

10%

Two

12%

One

7%

Three

#

Two

3%

65-74 years

21%

Three

1%

One

13%

20-24 years

7%

One

5%

Two

2%

One

9%

#

Two

4%

Three

Two 75+

Three Refused

9% 13%

# 5% # = Less than 0.5%

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Parks and Recreation Survey

63


Survey Respondent Demographics

Total Base

400

Length of Residency

Total

Base

400

Household Income

1 to 5 years

22%

Under $25,000

8%

6 to 10 years

13%

$25,000 but under $50,000

13%

11 to 20 years

25%

$50,000 but under $75,000

13%

21 to 30 years

14%

$75,000 but under $100,000

11%

31 to 40 years

14%

$100,000 but under $150,000

18%

More than 40 years

12%

$150,000 but under $200,000

10%

Don’t know/Refused

1%

$200,000 or more

17%

Average (in years)

20.32

Home Ownership

Refused Average (in thousands)

12% $117.5

Own

84%

Gender

Rent

15%

Male

37%

Don’t know/Refused

1%

Female

54%

Refused

10%

Race Caucasian/White

90%

African-American/Black

4%

Hispanic/Latino

3%

American Indian or Alaskan Native

#

Asian or Pacific Islander

#

Other

2%

Refused

2%

Profile Marketing Research

City of Winter Park – Parks and Recreation Survey

# = Less than 0.5%

64


Appendix B ‐ Seasonal Prime Time and Non‐Prime Time Programming Space  Matrix     

Strategic Recreation Facilities Plan     

121


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City of Winter Park, Florida Community Center Programming Matrix Program Areas

Full Capacity YP=Youth Programs

FP=Family Programs

TP=Teen Programs

ODI=Open Drop In

Prime Time

AP=Adult Programs

R=Rentals

Non-Prime Time

SP=Senior Programs

Sept - Nov

12 weeks

Not Available Large Multi-purpose A

PT Capacity Hrs

60% PT Capacity Hrs

NPT Capacity Hrs

20% NPT Capacity Hrs

Monday

N/A

SP

AP

R

SP

SP

SP

R

YP

TP

FP

R

AP

YP

AP

YP

144

86

0

0

Tuesday

SP

SP

AP

R

SP

SP

SP

R

YP

TP

FP

R

YP

AP

AP

TP

84

50

0

0

N/A

SP

AP

R

SP

SP

SP

R

YP

TP

FP

R

AP

YP

AP

AP

96

58

60

12

Wednesday Thursday

7-8 am 8-9 am 9-10 am 10-11 am 11-12 pm 12-1 pm 1-2 pm 2-3 pm 3-4 pm 4-5 pm 5-6 pm 6-7 pm 7-8 pm 8-9 pm 9-10 pm

SP

SP

AP

R

SP

SP

SP

R

YP

TP

FP

R

YP

AP

AP

SP

180

108

84

17

Friday

N/A

SP

AP

R

SP

SP

SP

R

YP

TP

FP

FP

FP

FP

FP

FP

84

50

48

10

Saturday

N/A

R

YP

YP

YP

TP

TP

FP

FP

R

R

R

R

N/A

N/A

ODI

0

0

0

0

Sunday

N/A

N/A

N/A

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

R

108

65

216

43

Large Multi-purpose B

PT Capacity Hrs

60% PT Capacity Hrs

NPT Capacity Hrs

20% NPT Capacity Hrs

Monday

N/A

SP

R

AP

SP

SP

SP

R

YP

TP

FP

R

AP

TP

AP

YP

120

72

0

0

Tuesday

SP

SP

R

AP

SP

SP

SP

R

YP

TP

FP

R

YP

AP

AP

TP

108

65

36

7

N/A

SP

R

AP

SP

SP

SP

R

YP

TP

FP

R

AP

TP

AP

AP

96

58

60

12

Wednesday Thursday

7-8 am 8-9 am 9-10 am 10-11 am 11-12 pm 12-1 pm 1-2 pm 2-3 pm 3-4 pm 4-5 pm 5-6 pm 6-7 pm 7-8 pm 8-9 pm 9-10 pm

SP

SP

R

AP

SP

SP

SP

R

YP

TP

FP

R

YP

AP

AP

SP

180

108

84

17

Friday

N/A

SP

R

AP

SP

SP

SP

R

YP

TP

FP

FP

TP

TP

TP

FP

84

50

12

2

Saturday

N/A

R

YP

YP

YP

TP

TP

FP

FP

R

R

R

R

N/A

N/A

ODI

0

0

0

0

Sunday

N/A

N/A

N/A

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

R

108

65

216

43

Small Multi-purpose A

PT Capacity Hrs

60% PT Capacity Hrs

NPT Capacity Hrs

20% NPT Capacity Hrs

Monday

N/A

SP

AP

SP

R

AP

AP

R

YP

TP

FP

R

AP

YP

AP

YP

144

86

0

0

Tuesday

SP

SP

AP

SP

R

AP

AP

R

YP

TP

FP

R

YP

AP

AP

TP

84

50

36

7

N/A

SP

AP

SP

R

AP

AP

R

YP

TP

FP

R

AP

YP

AP

AP

156

94

120

24

Wednesday Thursday

7-8 am 8-9 am 9-10 am 10-11 am 11-12 pm 12-1 pm 1-2 pm 2-3 pm 3-4 pm 4-5 pm 5-6 pm 6-7 pm 7-8 pm 8-9 pm 9-10 pm

SP

SP

AP

SP

R

AP

AP

R

YP

TP

FP

R

YP

AP

AP

SP

60

36

84

17

Friday

N/A

SP

AP

SP

R

AP

AP

R

YP

TP

FP

FP

FP

FP

FP

FP

84

50

12

2

Saturday

N/A

R

YP

YP

YP

TP

TP

FP

FP

R

R

R

R

N/A

N/A

ODI

0

0

0

0

Sunday

N/A

N/A

N/A

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

R

108

65

216

43

Small Multi-purpose B

PT Capacity Hrs

60% PT Capacity Hrs

NPT Capacity Hrs

20% NPT Capacity Hrs

Monday

N/A

SP

AP

R

SP

AP

R

R

YP

TP

FP

R

R

TP

AP

YP

96

58

0

0

Tuesday

SP

SP

AP

R

SP

AP

R

R

YP

TP

FP

R

R

AP

AP

TP

84

50

36

7

N/A

SP

AP

R

SP

AP

R

R

YP

TP

FP

R

R

TP

AP

AP

132

79

0

0

SP

SP

AP

R

SP

AP

R

R

YP

TP

FP

R

R

AP

AP

SP

60

36

84

17

Friday

N/A

SP

AP

R

SP

AP

R

R

YP

TP

FP

FP

TP

TP

TP

FP

84

50

12

2

Saturday

N/A

R

YP

YP

YP

TP

TP

FP

FP

R

R

R

R

N/A

N/A

ODI

0

0

0

0

Sunday

N/A

N/A

N/A

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

R

216

130

216

43

Wednesday Thursday

Gym Cross Court 1

7-8 am 8-9 am 9-10 am 10-11 am 11-12 pm 12-1 pm 1-2 pm 2-3 pm 3-4 pm 4-5 pm 5-6 pm 6-7 pm 7-8 pm 8-9 pm 9-10 pm

PT Capacity Hrs

60% PT Capacity Hrs

NPT Capacity Hrs

20% NPT Capacity Hrs

Monday

N/A

ODI

SP

SP

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

YP

YP

YP

YP

N/A

YP

288

173

0

0

Tuesday

ODI

ODI

SP

SP

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

YP

YP

N/A

N/A

N/A

TP

0

0

12

2

Wednesday

N/A

ODI

SP

SP

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

YP

YP

YP

YP

N/A

AP

0

0

0

0

Thursday

ODI

ODI

SP

SP

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

YP

YP

YP

YP

N/A

SP

60

36

60

12

Friday

N/A

ODI

SP

SP

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

YP

YP

N/A

N/A

N/A

TP

FP

0

0

0

0

Saturday

N/A

YP

YP

YP

YP

YP

YP

YP

YP

R

R

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

ODI

168

101

300

60

N/A

N/A

N/A

ODI

ODI

ODI

N/A

N/A

R

R

R

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

R

Sunday Gym Cross Court 2

7-8 am 8-9 am 9-10 am 10-11 am 11-12 pm 12-1 pm 1-2 pm 2-3 pm 3-4 pm 4-5 pm 5-6 pm 6-7 pm 7-8 pm 8-9 pm 9-10 pm

7-8 am 8-9 am 9-10 am 10-11 am 11-12 pm 12-1 pm 1-2 pm 2-3 pm 3-4 pm 4-5 pm 5-6 pm 6-7 pm 7-8 pm 8-9 pm 9-10 pm

60

36

0

0

PT Capacity Hrs

60% PT Capacity Hrs

NPT Capacity Hrs

20% NPT Capacity Hrs

Monday

N/A

ODI

SP

SP

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

YP

YP

YP

YP

N/A

YP

288

173

0

0

Tuesday

ODI

ODI

SP

SP

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

YP

YP

N/A

N/A

N/A

TP

0

0

12

2

Wednesday

N/A

ODI

SP

SP

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

YP

YP

YP

YP

N/A

AP

0

0

0

0

Thursday

ODI

ODI

SP

SP

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

YP

YP

YP

YP

N/A

SP

60

36

60

12

Friday

N/A

ODI

SP

SP

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

YP

YP

N/A

N/A

N/A

TP

FP

0

0

0

0

Saturday

N/A

YP

YP

YP

YP

YP

YP

YP

YP

R

R

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

ODI

168

101

300

60

N/A

N/A

N/A

ODI

ODI

ODI

N/A

N/A

R

R

R

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

R

Sunday Gym Full Court

7-8 am 8-9 am 9-10 am 10-11 am 11-12 pm 12-1 pm 1-2 pm 2-3 pm 3-4 pm 4-5 pm 5-6 pm 6-7 pm 7-8 pm 8-9 pm 9-10 pm

60

36

0

0

PT Capacity Hrs

60% PT Capacity Hrs

NPT Capacity Hrs

20% NPT Capacity Hrs

Monday

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

R

YP

0

0

0

0

Tuesday

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

AP

AP

AP

TP

0

0

0

0

Wednesday

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

R

AP

84

50

0

0

Thursday

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

AP

SP

0

0

0

0

Friday

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

AP

AP

AP

N/A

FP

0

0

0

0

Saturday

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

R

R

N/A

N/A

ODI

0

0

0

0

Sunday

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

R

R

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

R

72

43

0

0


City of Winter Park, Florida Community Center Senior Meeting Rm

PT Capacity Hrs

60% PT Capacity Hrs

NPT Capacity Hrs

20% NPT Capacity Hrs

Monday

N/A

ODI

SP

SP

SP

SP

SP

SP

SP

SP

ODI

SP

SP

ODI

N/A

YP

0

0

0

0

Tuesday

ODI

ODI

SP

SP

SP

SP

SP

SP

SP

SP

ODI

SP

SP

ODI

N/A

TP

0

0

0

0

Wednesday

N/A

ODI

SP

SP

SP

SP

SP

SP

SP

SP

ODI

SP

SP

ODI

N/A

AP

0

0

0

0

Thursday

ODI

ODI

SP

SP

SP

SP

SP

SP

SP

SP

ODI

SP

SP

ODI

N/A

SP

576

346

144

29

Friday

N/A

ODI

SP

SP

SP

SP

SP

SP

SP

SP

ODI

SP

SP

ODI

N/A

FP

0

0

0

0

Saturday

N/A

ODI

SP

SP

SP

SP

SP

SP

SP

SP

ODI

SP

SP

N/A

N/A

ODI

0

0

288

58

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

R

Sunday Youth Meeting Rm

7-8 am 8-9 am 9-10 am 10-11 am 11-12 pm 12-1 pm 1-2 pm 2-3 pm 3-4 pm 4-5 pm 5-6 pm 6-7 pm 7-8 pm 8-9 pm 9-10 pm

7-8 am 8-9 am 9-10 am 10-11 am 11-12 pm 12-1 pm 1-2 pm 2-3 pm 3-4 pm 4-5 pm 5-6 pm 6-7 pm 7-8 pm 8-9 pm 9-10 pm

0

0

0

0

PT Capacity Hrs

60% PT Capacity Hrs

NPT Capacity Hrs

20% NPT Capacity Hrs

Monday

N/A

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

YP

YP

YP

YP

YP

YP

N/A

YP

384

230

108

21.6

Tuesday

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

YP

YP

YP

YP

YP

YP

N/A

TP

0

0

0

0

Wednesday

N/A

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

YP

YP

YP

YP

YP

YP

N/A

AP

0

0

0

0

Thursday

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

YP

YP

YP

YP

YP

YP

N/A

SP

0

0

0

0

Friday

N/A

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

YP

YP

YP

YP

YP

YP

N/A

FP

0

0

0

0

Saturday

N/A

ODI

YP

YP

YP

YP

YP

YP

YP

YP

YP

YP

YP

N/A

N/A

ODI

60

36

288

58

N/A

N/A

N/A

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

R

Sunday Teen Classroom

7-8 am 8-9 am 9-10 am 10-11 am 11-12 pm 12-1 pm 1-2 pm 2-3 pm 3-4 pm 4-5 pm 5-6 pm 6-7 pm 7-8 pm 8-9 pm 9-10 pm

0

0

0

0

PT Capacity Hrs

60% PT Capacity Hrs

NPT Capacity Hrs

20% NPT Capacity Hrs

Monday

N/A

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

TP

TP

ODI

ODI

TP

TP

ODI

YP

0

0

0

0

Tuesday

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

TP

TP

ODI

ODI

TP

TP

ODI

TP

192

115

0

0

Wednesday

N/A

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

TP

TP

ODI

ODI

TP

TP

ODI

AP

0

0

0

0

Thursday

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

TP

TP

ODI

ODI

TP

TP

ODI

SP

0

0

0

0

Friday

N/A

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

FP

0

0

0

0

Saturday

N/A

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

N/A

N/A

ODI

204

122

708

142

N/A

N/A

N/A

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

R

Sunday Fitness Room

7-8 am 8-9 am 9-10 am 10-11 am 11-12 pm 12-1 pm 1-2 pm 2-3 pm 3-4 pm 4-5 pm 5-6 pm 6-7 pm 7-8 pm 8-9 pm 9-10 pm

0

0

0

0

PT Capacity Hrs

60% PT Capacity Hrs

NPT Capacity Hrs

20% NPT Capacity Hrs

0

Monday

N/A

ODI

SP

AP

ODI

ODI

AP

SP

ODI

TP

ODI

ODI

ODI

AP

ODI

YP

0

0

0

Tuesday

ODI

ODI

SP

AP

ODI

ODI

AP

SP

ODI

TP

ODI

ODI

ODI

AP

ODI

TP

48

29

0

0

Wednesday

N/A

ODI

SP

AP

ODI

ODI

AP

SP

ODI

TP

ODI

ODI

ODI

AP

ODI

AP

60

36

120

24

Thursday

ODI

ODI

SP

AP

ODI

ODI

AP

SP

ODI

TP

ODI

ODI

ODI

AP

ODI

SP

60

36

60

12

Friday

N/A

ODI

SP

AP

ODI

ODI

AP

SP

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

AP

ODI

FP

0

0

0

0

Saturday

N/A

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

N/A

N/A

ODI

600

360

156

31

N/A

N/A

N/A

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

R

Sunday Computer Classroom

7-8 am 8-9 am 9-10 am 10-11 am 11-12 pm 12-1 pm 1-2 pm 2-3 pm 3-4 pm 4-5 pm 5-6 pm 6-7 pm 7-8 pm 8-9 pm 9-10 pm

0

0

0

0

PT Capacity Hrs

60% PT Capacity Hrs

NPT Capacity Hrs

20% NPT Capacity Hrs

0

Monday

N/A

ODI

SP

AP

ODI

ODI

AP

SP

ODI

YP

TP

ODI

AP

ODI

ODI

YP

96

58

0

Tuesday

ODI

ODI

SP

AP

ODI

ODI

AP

SP

ODI

YP

TP

ODI

AP

ODI

ODI

TP

84

50

0

0

Wednesday

N/A

ODI

SP

AP

ODI

ODI

AP

SP

ODI

YP

TP

ODI

AP

ODI

ODI

AP

48

29

120

24

Thursday

ODI

ODI

SP

AP

ODI

ODI

AP

SP

ODI

YP

TP

ODI

AP

ODI

ODI

SP

72

43

72

14

Friday

N/A

ODI

SP

AP

ODI

ODI

AP

SP

ODI

YP

TP

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

FP

24

14

0

0

Saturday

N/A

SP

SP

YP

YP

ODI

YP

TP

TP

FP

FP

ODI

ODI

N/A

N/A

ODI

180

108

408

82

N/A

N/A

N/A

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

R

Sunday Kitchen

7-8 am 8-9 am 9-10 am 10-11 am 11-12 pm 12-1 pm 1-2 pm 2-3 pm 3-4 pm 4-5 pm 5-6 pm 6-7 pm 7-8 pm 8-9 pm 9-10 pm

0

0

0

0

PT Capacity Hrs

60% PT Capacity Hrs

NPT Capacity Hrs

20% NPT Capacity Hrs

0

Monday

N/A

SP

AP

SP

SP

SP

SP

R

YP

TP

R

R

AP

R

R

YP

0

0

0

Tuesday

SP

SP

AP

SP

SP

SP

SP

R

YP

TP

R

R

AP

R

R

TP

48

29

0

0

N/A

SP

AP

SP

SP

SP

SP

R

YP

TP

R

R

AP

R

R

AP

48

29

60

12

Wednesday Thursday

SP

SP

AP

SP

SP

SP

SP

R

YP

TP

R

R

AP

R

R

SP

60

36

264

53

Friday

N/A

SP

AP

SP

SP

SP

SP

R

YP

R

R

R

R

R

R

FP

0

0

0

0

Saturday

N/A

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

N/A

N/A

ODI

0

0

0

0

Sunday

N/A

N/A

N/A

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

R

252

151

300

60

Indoor/Outdoor Stage

PT Capacity Hrs

60% PT Capacity Hrs

NPT Capacity Hrs

20% NPT Capacity Hrs

Monday

7-8 am 8-9 am 9-10 am 10-11 am 11-12 pm 12-1 pm 1-2 pm 2-3 pm 3-4 pm 4-5 pm 5-6 pm 6-7 pm 7-8 pm 8-9 pm 9-10 pm

N/A

ODI

SP

AP

ODI

R

AP

SP

YP

TP

FP

FP

YP

FP

AP

YP

120

72

0

0

Tuesday

ODI

ODI

SP

AP

ODI

R

AP

SP

TP

ODI

YP

FP

TP

AP

AP

TP

96

58

0

0

Wednesday

N/A

ODI

SP

AP

ODI

R

AP

SP

ODI

YP

ODI

FP

AP

AP

AP

AP

84

50

120

24

Thursday

ODI

ODI

SP

AP

ODI

R

AP

SP

YP

ODI

TP

FP

YP

TP

AP

SP

60

36

60

12

Friday

N/A

ODI

SP

AP

ODI

R

AP

SP

ODI

YP

TP

R

R

R

R

FP

60

36

48

10

Saturday

N/A

ODI

ODI

YP

YP

ODI

TP

TP

YP

YP

FP

FP

FP

N/A

N/A

ODI

72

43

156

31

Sunday

N/A

N/A

N/A

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

R

120

72

84

17


City of Winter Park, Florida Community Center Programming Matrix Program Areas

Full Capacity YP=Youth Programs

FP=Family Programs

TP=Teen Programs

ODI=Open Drop In

Prime Time

AP=Adult Programs

R=Rentals

Non-Prime Time

SP=Senior Programs

Dec-Feb

12 weeks

Not Available Large Multi-purpose A

PT Capacity Hrs

60% PT Capacity Hrs

NPT Capacity Hrs

20% NPT Capacity Hrs

Monday

N/A

SP

AP

R

SP

SP

SP

R

YP

TP

FP

R

AP

YP

AP

YP

144

86

0

0

Tuesday

SP

SP

AP

R

SP

SP

SP

R

YP

TP

FP

R

YP

AP

AP

TP

84

50

0

0

N/A

SP

AP

R

SP

SP

SP

R

YP

TP

FP

R

AP

YP

AP

AP

96

58

60

12

Wednesday Thursday

7-8 am 8-9 am 9-10 am 10-11 am 11-12 pm 12-1 pm 1-2 pm 2-3 pm 3-4 pm 4-5 pm 5-6 pm 6-7 pm 7-8 pm 8-9 pm 9-10 pm

SP

SP

AP

R

SP

SP

SP

R

YP

TP

FP

R

YP

AP

AP

SP

180

108

84

17

Friday

N/A

SP

AP

R

SP

SP

SP

R

YP

TP

FP

FP

FP

FP

FP

FP

84

50

48

10

Saturday

N/A

R

YP

YP

YP

TP

TP

FP

FP

R

R

R

R

N/A

N/A

ODI

0

0

0

0

Sunday

N/A

N/A

N/A

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

R

108

65

216

43

Large Multi-purpose B

PT Capacity Hrs

60% PT Capacity Hrs

NPT Capacity Hrs

20% NPT Capacity Hrs

Monday

N/A

SP

R

AP

SP

SP

SP

R

YP

TP

FP

R

AP

TP

AP

YP

120

72

0

0

Tuesday

SP

SP

R

AP

SP

SP

SP

R

YP

TP

FP

R

YP

AP

AP

TP

108

65

36

7

N/A

SP

R

AP

SP

SP

SP

R

YP

TP

FP

R

AP

TP

AP

AP

96

58

60

12

Wednesday Thursday

7-8 am 8-9 am 9-10 am 10-11 am 11-12 pm 12-1 pm 1-2 pm 2-3 pm 3-4 pm 4-5 pm 5-6 pm 6-7 pm 7-8 pm 8-9 pm 9-10 pm

SP

SP

R

AP

SP

SP

SP

R

YP

TP

FP

R

YP

AP

AP

SP

180

108

84

17

Friday

N/A

SP

R

AP

SP

SP

SP

R

YP

TP

FP

FP

TP

TP

TP

FP

84

50

12

2

Saturday

N/A

R

YP

YP

YP

TP

TP

FP

FP

R

R

R

R

N/A

N/A

ODI

0

0

0

0

Sunday

N/A

N/A

N/A

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

R

108

65

216

43

Small Multi-purpose A

PT Capacity Hrs

60% PT Capacity Hrs

NPT Capacity Hrs

20% NPT Capacity Hrs

Monday

N/A

SP

AP

SP

R

AP

AP

R

YP

TP

FP

R

AP

YP

AP

YP

144

86

0

0

Tuesday

SP

SP

AP

SP

R

AP

AP

R

YP

TP

FP

R

YP

AP

AP

TP

84

50

36

7

N/A

SP

AP

SP

R

AP

AP

R

YP

TP

FP

R

AP

YP

AP

AP

156

94

120

24

Wednesday Thursday

7-8 am 8-9 am 9-10 am 10-11 am 11-12 pm 12-1 pm 1-2 pm 2-3 pm 3-4 pm 4-5 pm 5-6 pm 6-7 pm 7-8 pm 8-9 pm 9-10 pm

SP

SP

AP

SP

R

AP

AP

R

YP

TP

FP

R

YP

AP

AP

SP

60

36

84

17

Friday

N/A

SP

AP

SP

R

AP

AP

R

YP

TP

FP

FP

FP

FP

FP

FP

84

50

12

2

Saturday

N/A

R

YP

YP

YP

TP

TP

FP

FP

R

R

R

R

N/A

N/A

ODI

0

0

0

0

Sunday

N/A

N/A

N/A

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

R

108

65

216

43

Small Multi-purpose B

PT Capacity Hrs

60% PT Capacity Hrs

NPT Capacity Hrs

20% NPT Capacity Hrs

Monday

N/A

SP

AP

R

SP

AP

R

R

YP

TP

FP

R

R

TP

AP

YP

96

58

0

0

Tuesday

SP

SP

AP

R

SP

AP

R

R

YP

TP

FP

R

R

AP

AP

TP

84

50

36

7

N/A

SP

AP

R

SP

AP

R

R

YP

TP

FP

R

R

TP

AP

AP

132

79

0

0

SP

SP

AP

R

SP

AP

R

R

YP

TP

FP

R

R

AP

AP

SP

60

36

84

17

Friday

N/A

SP

AP

R

SP

AP

R

R

YP

TP

FP

FP

TP

TP

TP

FP

84

50

12

2

Saturday

N/A

R

YP

YP

YP

TP

TP

FP

FP

R

R

R

R

N/A

N/A

ODI

0

0

0

0

Sunday

N/A

N/A

N/A

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

R

216

130

216

43

Wednesday Thursday

Gym Cross Court 1

7-8 am 8-9 am 9-10 am 10-11 am 11-12 pm 12-1 pm 1-2 pm 2-3 pm 3-4 pm 4-5 pm 5-6 pm 6-7 pm 7-8 pm 8-9 pm 9-10 pm

PT Capacity Hrs

60% PT Capacity Hrs

NPT Capacity Hrs

20% NPT Capacity Hrs

Monday

N/A

ODI

SP

SP

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

YP

YP

YP

YP

N/A

YP

288

173

0

0

Tuesday

ODI

ODI

SP

SP

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

YP

YP

N/A

N/A

N/A

TP

0

0

12

2

Wednesday

N/A

ODI

SP

SP

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

YP

YP

YP

YP

N/A

AP

0

0

0

0

Thursday

ODI

ODI

SP

SP

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

YP

YP

YP

YP

N/A

SP

60

36

60

12

Friday

N/A

ODI

SP

SP

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

YP

YP

N/A

N/A

N/A

TP

FP

0

0

0

0

Saturday

N/A

YP

YP

YP

YP

YP

YP

YP

YP

R

R

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

ODI

168

101

300

60

N/A

N/A

N/A

ODI

ODI

ODI

N/A

N/A

R

R

R

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

R

Sunday Gym Cross Court 2

7-8 am 8-9 am 9-10 am 10-11 am 11-12 pm 12-1 pm 1-2 pm 2-3 pm 3-4 pm 4-5 pm 5-6 pm 6-7 pm 7-8 pm 8-9 pm 9-10 pm

7-8 am 8-9 am 9-10 am 10-11 am 11-12 pm 12-1 pm 1-2 pm 2-3 pm 3-4 pm 4-5 pm 5-6 pm 6-7 pm 7-8 pm 8-9 pm 9-10 pm

60

36

0

0

PT Capacity Hrs

60% PT Capacity Hrs

NPT Capacity Hrs

20% NPT Capacity Hrs

Monday

N/A

ODI

SP

SP

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

YP

YP

YP

YP

N/A

YP

288

173

0

0

Tuesday

ODI

ODI

SP

SP

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

YP

YP

N/A

N/A

N/A

TP

0

0

12

2

Wednesday

N/A

ODI

SP

SP

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

YP

YP

YP

YP

N/A

AP

0

0

0

0

Thursday

ODI

ODI

SP

SP

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

YP

YP

YP

YP

N/A

SP

60

36

60

12

Friday

N/A

ODI

SP

SP

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

YP

YP

N/A

N/A

N/A

TP

FP

0

0

0

0

Saturday

N/A

YP

YP

YP

YP

YP

YP

YP

YP

R

R

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

ODI

168

101

300

60

N/A

N/A

N/A

ODI

ODI

ODI

N/A

N/A

R

R

R

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

R

Sunday Gym Full Court

7-8 am 8-9 am 9-10 am 10-11 am 11-12 pm 12-1 pm 1-2 pm 2-3 pm 3-4 pm 4-5 pm 5-6 pm 6-7 pm 7-8 pm 8-9 pm 9-10 pm

60

36

0

0

PT Capacity Hrs

60% PT Capacity Hrs

NPT Capacity Hrs

20% NPT Capacity Hrs

Monday

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

R

YP

0

0

0

0

Tuesday

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

AP

AP

AP

TP

0

0

0

0

Wednesday

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

R

AP

84

50

0

0

Thursday

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

AP

SP

0

0

0

0

Friday

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

AP

AP

AP

N/A

FP

0

0

0

0

Saturday

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

R

R

N/A

N/A

ODI

0

0

0

0

Sunday

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

R

R

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

R

72

43

0

0


City of Winter Park, Florida Community Center Senior Meeting Rm

PT Capacity Hrs

60% PT Capacity Hrs

NPT Capacity Hrs

20% NPT Capacity Hrs

Monday

N/A

ODI

SP

SP

SP

SP

SP

SP

SP

SP

ODI

SP

SP

ODI

N/A

YP

0

0

0

0

Tuesday

ODI

ODI

SP

SP

SP

SP

SP

SP

SP

SP

ODI

SP

SP

ODI

N/A

TP

0

0

0

0

Wednesday

N/A

ODI

SP

SP

SP

SP

SP

SP

SP

SP

ODI

SP

SP

ODI

N/A

AP

0

0

0

0

Thursday

ODI

ODI

SP

SP

SP

SP

SP

SP

SP

SP

ODI

SP

SP

ODI

N/A

SP

576

346

144

29

Friday

N/A

ODI

SP

SP

SP

SP

SP

SP

SP

SP

ODI

SP

SP

ODI

N/A

FP

0

0

0

0

Saturday

N/A

ODI

SP

SP

SP

SP

SP

SP

SP

SP

ODI

SP

SP

N/A

N/A

ODI

0

0

288

58

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

R

Sunday Youth Meeting Rm

7-8 am 8-9 am 9-10 am 10-11 am 11-12 pm 12-1 pm 1-2 pm 2-3 pm 3-4 pm 4-5 pm 5-6 pm 6-7 pm 7-8 pm 8-9 pm 9-10 pm

7-8 am 8-9 am 9-10 am 10-11 am 11-12 pm 12-1 pm 1-2 pm 2-3 pm 3-4 pm 4-5 pm 5-6 pm 6-7 pm 7-8 pm 8-9 pm 9-10 pm

0

0

0

0

PT Capacity Hrs

60% PT Capacity Hrs

NPT Capacity Hrs

20% NPT Capacity Hrs

Monday

N/A

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

YP

YP

YP

YP

YP

YP

N/A

YP

384

230

108

21.6

Tuesday

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

YP

YP

YP

YP

YP

YP

N/A

TP

0

0

0

0

Wednesday

N/A

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

YP

YP

YP

YP

YP

YP

N/A

AP

0

0

0

0

Thursday

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

YP

YP

YP

YP

YP

YP

N/A

SP

0

0

0

0

Friday

N/A

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

YP

YP

YP

YP

YP

YP

N/A

FP

0

0

0

0

Saturday

N/A

ODI

YP

YP

YP

YP

YP

YP

YP

YP

YP

YP

YP

N/A

N/A

ODI

60

36

288

58

N/A

N/A

N/A

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

R

Sunday Teen Classroom

7-8 am 8-9 am 9-10 am 10-11 am 11-12 pm 12-1 pm 1-2 pm 2-3 pm 3-4 pm 4-5 pm 5-6 pm 6-7 pm 7-8 pm 8-9 pm 9-10 pm

0

0

0

0

PT Capacity Hrs

60% PT Capacity Hrs

NPT Capacity Hrs

20% NPT Capacity Hrs

Monday

N/A

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

TP

TP

ODI

ODI

TP

TP

ODI

YP

0

0

0

0

Tuesday

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

TP

TP

ODI

ODI

TP

TP

ODI

TP

192

115

0

0

Wednesday

N/A

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

TP

TP

ODI

ODI

TP

TP

ODI

AP

0

0

0

0

Thursday

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

TP

TP

ODI

ODI

TP

TP

ODI

SP

0

0

0

0

Friday

N/A

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

FP

0

0

0

0

Saturday

N/A

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

N/A

N/A

ODI

204

122

708

142

N/A

N/A

N/A

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

R

Sunday Fitness Room

7-8 am 8-9 am 9-10 am 10-11 am 11-12 pm 12-1 pm 1-2 pm 2-3 pm 3-4 pm 4-5 pm 5-6 pm 6-7 pm 7-8 pm 8-9 pm 9-10 pm

0

0

0

0

PT Capacity Hrs

60% PT Capacity Hrs

NPT Capacity Hrs

20% NPT Capacity Hrs

0

Monday

N/A

ODI

SP

AP

ODI

ODI

AP

SP

ODI

TP

ODI

ODI

ODI

AP

ODI

YP

0

0

0

Tuesday

ODI

ODI

SP

AP

ODI

ODI

AP

SP

ODI

TP

ODI

ODI

ODI

AP

ODI

TP

48

29

0

0

Wednesday

N/A

ODI

SP

AP

ODI

ODI

AP

SP

ODI

TP

ODI

ODI

ODI

AP

ODI

AP

60

36

120

24

Thursday

ODI

ODI

SP

AP

ODI

ODI

AP

SP

ODI

TP

ODI

ODI

ODI

AP

ODI

SP

60

36

60

12

Friday

N/A

ODI

SP

AP

ODI

ODI

AP

SP

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

AP

ODI

FP

0

0

0

0

Saturday

N/A

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

N/A

N/A

ODI

600

360

156

31

N/A

N/A

N/A

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

R

Sunday Computer Classroom

7-8 am 8-9 am 9-10 am 10-11 am 11-12 pm 12-1 pm 1-2 pm 2-3 pm 3-4 pm 4-5 pm 5-6 pm 6-7 pm 7-8 pm 8-9 pm 9-10 pm

0

0

0

0

PT Capacity Hrs

60% PT Capacity Hrs

NPT Capacity Hrs

20% NPT Capacity Hrs

0

Monday

N/A

ODI

SP

AP

ODI

ODI

AP

SP

ODI

YP

TP

ODI

AP

ODI

ODI

YP

96

58

0

Tuesday

ODI

ODI

SP

AP

ODI

ODI

AP

SP

ODI

YP

TP

ODI

AP

ODI

ODI

TP

84

50

0

0

Wednesday

N/A

ODI

SP

AP

ODI

ODI

AP

SP

ODI

YP

TP

ODI

AP

ODI

ODI

AP

48

29

120

24

Thursday

ODI

ODI

SP

AP

ODI

ODI

AP

SP

ODI

YP

TP

ODI

AP

ODI

ODI

SP

72

43

72

14

Friday

N/A

ODI

SP

AP

ODI

ODI

AP

SP

ODI

YP

TP

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

FP

24

14

0

0

Saturday

N/A

SP

SP

YP

YP

ODI

YP

TP

TP

FP

FP

ODI

ODI

N/A

N/A

ODI

180

108

408

82

N/A

N/A

N/A

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

R

Sunday Kitchen

7-8 am 8-9 am 9-10 am 10-11 am 11-12 pm 12-1 pm 1-2 pm 2-3 pm 3-4 pm 4-5 pm 5-6 pm 6-7 pm 7-8 pm 8-9 pm 9-10 pm

0

0

0

0

PT Capacity Hrs

60% PT Capacity Hrs

NPT Capacity Hrs

20% NPT Capacity Hrs

0

Monday

N/A

SP

AP

SP

SP

SP

SP

R

YP

TP

R

R

AP

R

R

YP

0

0

0

Tuesday

SP

SP

AP

SP

SP

SP

SP

R

YP

TP

R

R

AP

R

R

TP

48

29

0

0

N/A

SP

AP

SP

SP

SP

SP

R

YP

TP

R

R

AP

R

R

AP

48

29

60

12

Wednesday Thursday

SP

SP

AP

SP

SP

SP

SP

R

YP

TP

R

R

AP

R

R

SP

60

36

264

53

Friday

N/A

SP

AP

SP

SP

SP

SP

R

YP

R

R

R

R

R

R

FP

0

0

0

0

Saturday

N/A

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

N/A

N/A

ODI

0

0

0

0

Sunday

N/A

N/A

N/A

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

R

252

151

300

60

Indoor/Outdoor Stage

PT Capacity Hrs

60% PT Capacity Hrs

NPT Capacity Hrs

20% NPT Capacity Hrs

Monday

7-8 am 8-9 am 9-10 am 10-11 am 11-12 pm 12-1 pm 1-2 pm 2-3 pm 3-4 pm 4-5 pm 5-6 pm 6-7 pm 7-8 pm 8-9 pm 9-10 pm

N/A

ODI

SP

AP

ODI

R

AP

SP

YP

TP

FP

FP

YP

FP

AP

YP

120

72

0

0

Tuesday

ODI

ODI

SP

AP

ODI

R

AP

SP

TP

ODI

YP

FP

TP

AP

AP

TP

96

58

0

0

Wednesday

N/A

ODI

SP

AP

ODI

R

AP

SP

ODI

YP

ODI

FP

AP

AP

AP

AP

84

50

120

24

Thursday

ODI

ODI

SP

AP

ODI

R

AP

SP

YP

ODI

TP

FP

YP

TP

AP

SP

60

36

60

12

Friday

N/A

ODI

SP

AP

ODI

R

AP

SP

ODI

YP

TP

R

R

R

R

FP

60

36

48

10

Saturday

N/A

ODI

ODI

YP

YP

ODI

TP

TP

YP

YP

FP

FP

FP

N/A

N/A

ODI

72

43

156

31

Sunday

N/A

N/A

N/A

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

R

120

72

84

17


City of Winter Park, Florida Community Center Programming Matrix Program Areas

Full Capacity YP=Youth Programs

FP=Family Programs

TP=Teen Programs

ODI=Open Drop In

Prime Time

AP=Adult Programs

R=Rentals

Non-Prime Time

SP=Senior Programs

March-May

12 weeks

Not Available Large Multi-purpose A

PT Capacity Hrs

60% PT Capacity Hrs

NPT Capacity Hrs

20% NPT Capacity Hrs

Monday

N/A

SP

AP

R

SP

SP

SP

R

YP

TP

FP

R

AP

YP

AP

YP

144

86

0

0

Tuesday

SP

SP

AP

R

SP

SP

SP

R

YP

TP

FP

R

YP

AP

AP

TP

84

50

0

0

N/A

SP

AP

R

SP

SP

SP

R

YP

TP

FP

R

AP

YP

AP

AP

96

58

60

12

Wednesday Thursday

7-8 am 8-9 am 9-10 am 10-11 am 11-12 pm 12-1 pm 1-2 pm 2-3 pm 3-4 pm 4-5 pm 5-6 pm 6-7 pm 7-8 pm 8-9 pm 9-10 pm

SP

SP

AP

R

SP

SP

SP

R

YP

TP

FP

R

YP

AP

AP

SP

180

108

84

17

Friday

N/A

SP

AP

R

SP

SP

SP

R

YP

TP

FP

FP

FP

FP

FP

FP

84

50

48

10

Saturday

N/A

R

YP

YP

YP

TP

TP

FP

FP

R

R

R

R

N/A

N/A

ODI

0

0

0

0

Sunday

N/A

N/A

N/A

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

R

108

65

216

43

Large Multi-purpose B

PT Capacity Hrs

60% PT Capacity Hrs

NPT Capacity Hrs

20% NPT Capacity Hrs

Monday

N/A

SP

R

AP

SP

SP

SP

R

YP

TP

FP

R

AP

TP

AP

YP

120

72

0

0

Tuesday

SP

SP

R

AP

SP

SP

SP

R

YP

TP

FP

R

YP

AP

AP

TP

108

65

36

7

N/A

SP

R

AP

SP

SP

SP

R

YP

TP

FP

R

AP

TP

AP

AP

96

58

60

12

Wednesday Thursday

7-8 am 8-9 am 9-10 am 10-11 am 11-12 pm 12-1 pm 1-2 pm 2-3 pm 3-4 pm 4-5 pm 5-6 pm 6-7 pm 7-8 pm 8-9 pm 9-10 pm

SP

SP

R

AP

SP

SP

SP

R

YP

TP

FP

R

YP

AP

AP

SP

180

108

84

17

Friday

N/A

SP

R

AP

SP

SP

SP

R

YP

TP

FP

FP

TP

TP

TP

FP

84

50

12

2

Saturday

N/A

R

YP

YP

YP

TP

TP

FP

FP

R

R

R

R

N/A

N/A

ODI

0

0

0

0

Sunday

N/A

N/A

N/A

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

R

108

65

216

43

Small Multi-purpose A

PT Capacity Hrs

60% PT Capacity Hrs

NPT Capacity Hrs

20% NPT Capacity Hrs

Monday

N/A

SP

AP

SP

R

AP

AP

R

YP

TP

FP

R

AP

YP

AP

YP

144

86

0

0

Tuesday

SP

SP

AP

SP

R

AP

AP

R

YP

TP

FP

R

YP

AP

AP

TP

84

50

36

7

N/A

SP

AP

SP

R

AP

AP

R

YP

TP

FP

R

AP

YP

AP

AP

156

94

120

24

Wednesday Thursday

7-8 am 8-9 am 9-10 am 10-11 am 11-12 pm 12-1 pm 1-2 pm 2-3 pm 3-4 pm 4-5 pm 5-6 pm 6-7 pm 7-8 pm 8-9 pm 9-10 pm

SP

SP

AP

SP

R

AP

AP

R

YP

TP

FP

R

YP

AP

AP

SP

60

36

84

17

Friday

N/A

SP

AP

SP

R

AP

AP

R

YP

TP

FP

FP

FP

FP

FP

FP

84

50

12

2

Saturday

N/A

R

YP

YP

YP

TP

TP

FP

FP

R

R

R

R

N/A

N/A

ODI

0

0

0

0

Sunday

N/A

N/A

N/A

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

R

108

65

216

43

Small Multi-purpose B

PT Capacity Hrs

60% PT Capacity Hrs

NPT Capacity Hrs

20% NPT Capacity Hrs

Monday

N/A

SP

AP

R

SP

AP

R

R

YP

TP

FP

R

R

TP

AP

YP

96

58

0

0

Tuesday

SP

SP

AP

R

SP

AP

R

R

YP

TP

FP

R

R

AP

AP

TP

84

50

36

7

N/A

SP

AP

R

SP

AP

R

R

YP

TP

FP

R

R

TP

AP

AP

132

79

0

0

SP

SP

AP

R

SP

AP

R

R

YP

TP

FP

R

R

AP

AP

SP

60

36

84

17

Friday

N/A

SP

AP

R

SP

AP

R

R

YP

TP

FP

FP

TP

TP

TP

FP

84

50

12

2

Saturday

N/A

R

YP

YP

YP

TP

TP

FP

FP

R

R

R

R

N/A

N/A

ODI

0

0

0

0

Sunday

N/A

N/A

N/A

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

R

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

R

216

130

216

43

Wednesday Thursday

Gym Cross Court 1

7-8 am 8-9 am 9-10 am 10-11 am 11-12 pm 12-1 pm 1-2 pm 2-3 pm 3-4 pm 4-5 pm 5-6 pm 6-7 pm 7-8 pm 8-9 pm 9-10 pm

PT Capacity Hrs

60% PT Capacity Hrs

NPT Capacity Hrs

20% NPT Capacity Hrs

Monday

N/A

ODI

SP

SP

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

YP

YP

YP

YP

N/A

YP

288

173

0

0

Tuesday

ODI

ODI

SP

SP

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

YP

YP

N/A

N/A

N/A

TP

0

0

12

2

Wednesday

N/A

ODI

SP

SP

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

YP

YP

YP

YP

N/A

AP

0

0

0

0

Thursday

ODI

ODI

SP

SP

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

YP

YP

YP

YP

N/A

SP

60

36

60

12

Friday

N/A

ODI

SP

SP

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

YP

YP

N/A

N/A

N/A

TP

FP

0

0

0

0

Saturday

N/A

YP

YP

YP

YP

YP

YP

YP

YP

R

R

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

ODI

168

101

300

60

N/A

N/A

N/A

ODI

ODI

ODI

N/A

N/A

R

R

R

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

R

Sunday Gym Cross Court 2

7-8 am 8-9 am 9-10 am 10-11 am 11-12 pm 12-1 pm 1-2 pm 2-3 pm 3-4 pm 4-5 pm 5-6 pm 6-7 pm 7-8 pm 8-9 pm 9-10 pm

7-8 am 8-9 am 9-10 am 10-11 am 11-12 pm 12-1 pm 1-2 pm 2-3 pm 3-4 pm 4-5 pm 5-6 pm 6-7 pm 7-8 pm 8-9 pm 9-10 pm

60

36

0

0

PT Capacity Hrs

60% PT Capacity Hrs

NPT Capacity Hrs

20% NPT Capacity Hrs

Monday

N/A

ODI

SP

SP

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

YP

YP

YP

YP

N/A

YP

288

173

0

0

Tuesday

ODI

ODI

SP

SP

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

YP

YP

N/A

N/A

N/A

TP

0

0

12

2

Wednesday

N/A

ODI

SP

SP

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

YP

YP

YP

YP

N/A

AP

0

0

0

0

Thursday

ODI

ODI

SP

SP

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

ODI

YP

YP

YP

YP

N/A

SP

60

36

60

12

Friday

N/A

ODI

SP

SP

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