Page 1

CITY of SUFFOLK

ADOPTED OPERATING & CAPITAL BUDGET

FY 2017-2018


Â


The Government Finance Officers Association of the United States and Canada (GFOA) presented a Distinguished Budget  Presentation Award to the City of Suffolk, Virginia for its annual budget for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2016.    In order  to  receive  this  award,  a  government  unit  must  publish  a  budget  document  that  meets  program  criteria  as  a  policy  document, as an operation guide, as a financial plan, and as a communication device.  The award is valid for a period of one year only.    We believe our current budget continues to conform to the program  requirements and we are submitting it to GFOA to determine its eligibility for another award. 


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


FY 2017-2018 Operating & Capital Budget Table of Contents I.

City Manager’s Message ..................................................................................................... i

II.

Budget Document Overview How to Read the Budget Document .................................................................................................. 1 Our City Council ............................................................................................................................... 2 City Council Vision .......................................................................................................................... 3 City Organization Chart ................................................................................................................... .4 Strategic Planning and Budget Development Process ...................................................................... 5 Budget Development Calendar ......................................................................................................... 8 City Financial Structure .................................................................................................................... 9 Summary of Financial and Budget Policy Compliance .................................................................. 14

III.

Fund Summaries and Details Executive Summary By Fund .......................................................................................................... 32 All Funds Revenues and Expenditures Summary ........................................................................... 53 Revenue Analysis ............................................................................................................................ 60 General Fund Revenue Summary .................................................................................................... 69 General Fund Expenditure Summary .............................................................................................. 72 General Fund Specific Revenue and Appropriation Details City Council ............................................................................................................................ 74 City Manager ........................................................................................................................... 76 Budget and Strategic Planning ................................................................................................ 78 City Attorney ........................................................................................................................... 80 Human Resources .................................................................................................................... 82 Commissioner of the Revenue ................................................................................................ 84 City Assessor ........................................................................................................................... 86 City Treasurer .......................................................................................................................... 88 Finance .................................................................................................................................... 90 Purchasing ............................................................................................................................... 92 Registrar .................................................................................................................................. 94 Circuit Court - Judges.............................................................................................................. 96


FY 2017-2018 Operating & Capital Budget General District Court ............................................................................................................. 98 Magistrate’s Office ................................................................................................................ 100 Juvenile and Domestic Relations District Court ................................................................... 102 Court Service Unit ................................................................................................................. 104 Clerk of the Circuit Court ...................................................................................................... 106 Sheriff .................................................................................................................................... 108 Commonwealth’s Attorney ................................................................................................... 110 Police .................................................................................................................................... 112 Police –Emergency Communications.................................................................................... 114 Police Department – Animal Shelter Management ............................................................... 116 Community Development Services ....................................................................................... 118 Fire & Rescue ........................................................................................................................ 120 Fire & Rescue – Emergency Management ............................................................................ 122 Western Tidewater Regional Jail Authority .......................................................................... 124 Public Works ......................................................................................................................... 126 Capital Programs and Facilities ............................................................................................. 128 Social Services ...................................................................................................................... 130 Social Services – Children’s Service Act .............................................................................. 132 Suffolk Health Department ................................................................................................... 134 Western Tidewater Community Services Board ................................................................... 136 School Support ...................................................................................................................... 138 Parks and Recreation ............................................................................................................. 140 Library ................................................................................................................................... 147 Planning and Community Development ............................................................................... 149 Economic Development ........................................................................................................ 151 Tourism ................................................................................................................................ 153 Media and Community Relations .......................................................................................... 155 Virginia Cooperative Extension ............................................................................................ 157 Local and Regional Organizations ........................................................................................ 159 Non-Departmental General Fund .......................................................................................... 161

Capital Projects Fund Specific Revenue and Appropriation Details .................................................. 163


FY 2017-2018 Operating & Capital Budget Debt Service Fund Specific Revenue and Appropriation Details ................................................. 167 Special Revenue Fund Specific Revenue and Appropriation Details Aviation Facilities Fund ........................................................................................................ 170 Downtown Business Overlay Taxing District Fund .............................................................. 173 Road Maintenance Fund ........................................................................................................ 176 Consolidated Grants Fund ..................................................................................................... 180 Transit System Fund .............................................................................................................. 183 Law Library Fund .................................................................................................................. 186 Route 17 Special Taxing District Fund ................................................................................. 189 Enterprise Fund Specific Revenue and Appropriation Details Public Utilities Fund .............................................................................................................. 192 Refuse Fund........................................................................................................................... 201

Stormwater Management Fund ............................................................................................. 204 Internal Service Fund Specific Revenue and Appropriation Details Information Technology Fund............................................................................................... 208 Fleet Management Fund ........................................................................................................ 211 Risk Management Fund......................................................................................................... 214 School Board Component Unit Specific Revenue and Appropriation Detail School Operating Fund .......................................................................................................... 217

IV.

Appendices of Supporting Budget Documents Personnel Summary By Fund ....................................................................................................... 220 Capital Improvements Plan (CIP) ................................................................................................ 223 Long Range Budget Projections ................................................................................................... 289 Debt Service……………………………………………………………………………………. 290 City Government, History and Community Attractions ............................................................... 295 City Demographics and Statistics ................................................................................................. 300 Budget Adoption Ordinance ......................................................................................................... 308 Fee Schedule................................................................................................................................. 311 Glossary of Terms ........................................................................................................................ 336


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


City Manager’s Message


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


i


ii


iii


iv


Budget Document Overview


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


HOW TO READ THE BUDGET DOCUMENT __________________________________________________________________ The Operating and Capital Budget Document consists of four sections detailed below. Comparative historical data, projections, explanatory notes and highlighted information have been included to assist the reader. I.

City Manager’s Message - includes budget highlights and significant changes from the prior year, priorities, goals, short and long term initiatives, and policy guidelines for the Operating and Capital Budget.

II.

Budget Document Overview - includes general and high level information to address:  How to Read the Budget Document  City Council  City Council Vision  City Organization Chart  Strategic Planning and Budget Development Process  Budget Development Calendar  City Financial Structure  Summary of Financial and Budget Policy Compliance

III.

Fund Summaries and Details – includes a summary of significant issues and changes by Fund as well as detailed revenue estimates and appropriations for each Fund.  Executive Summary By Fund  All Funds Revenues and Expenditures Summary  Revenue Analysis  General Fund Revenue Summary  General Fund Expenditure Summary  Fund Specific Revenue and Appropriation Details

IV.

Appendices of Supporting Budget Documents – includes important statistics, details, and definitions supporting the Operating and Capital Budget.  Personnel Summary by Fund  Capital Improvements Program and Plan (CIP)  Long Range Budget Projections  Debt Service  City Government, History and Community Attractions  City Demographics and Statistics  Budget Adoption Ordinance  Fee Schedule  Glossary of Terms

1


CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF SUFFOLK

Linda T. Johnson Mayor At Large Term Expires: 12/31/2020

Leroy Bennett Vice Mayor Cypress Borough Term Expires: 12/31/2018

Michael D. Duman Councilman Chuckatuck Borough Term Expires: 12/31/2018

Timothy J. Johnson Councilman Holy Neck Borough Term Expires: 12/31/2018

Lue R. Ward, Jr. Councilman Nansemond Borough Term Expires: 12/31/2020

Roger W. Fawcett Councilman Sleepy Hole Borough Term Expires: 12/31/2020

Donald Z. Goldberg Councilman Suffolk Borough Term Expires: 12/31/2018

Curtis R. Milteer, Sr. Councilman Whaleyville Borough Term Expires: 12/31/2020 2


TARGETED AREAS PUBLIC SAFETY

Preserve, promote, and continue to invest in public safety.

FINANCIAL STABILITY

Continue practices that ensure strong financial management and fiscal responsibility.

GROWTH MANAGEMENT AND COMPREHENSIVE PLANNING

VISION FOR SUFFOLK SUFFOLK CITY COUNCIL

Suffolk is a vibrant and fiscally strong community leading the region in advancements in education, comprehensive transportation, public safety and diverse economic growth while continuing to preserve its rural heritage and enhancing its neighborhoods and urban centers. Throughout 430 square miles of rich land and pristine waterways, citizens and tourists treasure the beautiful trails, rivers and open spaces. Residents, visitors and merchants delight in the revitalized downtown featuring cultural, educational and recreational opportunities. Diverse shopping, businesses and entertainment venues abound. A sense of harmony and pride permeates this rare community, where crime is low; where schools are cutting edge; where people and goods move safely and efficiently throughout the city; and where citizens receive valuable services and have opportunities to be engaged. Suffolk is the desired destination of the Hampton Roads Region. The City achieves this by focusing on the following:

Use the Comprehensive Plan and Unified Development Ordinance to enable and facilitate private investment in strategic target areas and preserve, conserve, and protect the City's unique natural and agricultural heritage.

CIVIC ENGAGEMENT AND RESPONSIVE CITY SERVICES

Ensure that all citizens have pertinent information in a timely manner and provide convenient and diverse means for citizen input; provide responsive, effective and efficient programs and services to citizens.

EXPANDED ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

Implement strategies that add new businesses and provide jobs for a skilled and diverse workforce, retain and enhance existing businesses, promote entrepreneurship, create a vibrant downtown, and build an economy that expands our tax base.

PUBLIC EDUCATION

Create a structure of shared accountability between the City and Schools to build an educational environment known for excellence.

LEISURE, HEALTH, AND WELLNESS

Implement programs and services designed to improve the health, economic and social wellbeing of citizens.

TRANSPORTATION

Increase capacity and connectivity of our roadways and public transportation system.

AAA RATED STANDARD & POOR’S AND FITCH RATINGS. NERD WALLET - BEST PLACES FOR YOUNG FAMILIES/BEST CITIES FOR VETERANS IN AMERICA - 2015. 9TH BEST COMMUNITY ON BEST PLACES TO LIVE TOP 25 LIST OF “WHERE THE JOBS ARE” – CNN MONEY MAGAZINE – 2012. ONE OF AMERICA’S BEST SMALL CITIES TO LIVE - CNN MONEY MAGAZINE 2010. FAST GROWING CITY, HOME TO FAST GROWING COMPANIES. 3


4

Treasurer

Director of Public Works

Director of Public Utilities

Director of Parks & Recreation

Director of Capital Programs & Facilities

Director of Economic Development

Director of Planning & Community Development

Assessor

Commissioner of the Revenue

Deputy City Manager

City Attorney

Clerk of the Circuit Court

City Manager

Director of Human Resources

Director of Finance

Fire Chief

Chief of Police

Planning Commission

City Council

Citizens

Commonwealth’s Attorney

Other Authorities, Boards, and Commissions

School Board

City of Suffolk FY 2017-2018 Operating and Capital Budget Organizational Chart

Director of Libraries

Director of Social Services

Director of Media & Community Relations

Director of Information Technology

Chief of Staff

City Clerk

Sheriff


STRATEGIC PLANNING AND BUDGET DEVELOPMENT PROCESS __________________________________________________________________ The City of Suffolk’s Annual Capital Planning and Annual Operating and Capital Budget processes begin each year in September and conclude after the final adoption by City Council, prior to June 30th of the following year. The budget process is designed to include an analysis of each department’s budget and to allocate resources across departmental programs based on the strategic plans, goals and directions provided by City Council and a thorough examination of programs and justifications. Each activity that is funded is reviewed by the City’s Director of Finance, the City Manager, and the City Council. Long and Short Term Strategic Planning: The annual Council retreat focuses on the City’s goals, visioning, land use, and important financial matters. Topics include issues associated with the City’s Ten Year Comprehensive Development Plan, and significant service issues from staff and Council. Council develops its vision and a list of priorities and staff provides Council with recommended strategic initiatives to be addressed in the short and long term future of the City. Short and long term strategic initiatives are developed and updated for use in the development of the City’s ten year Capital Improvements Plan (CIP) and Annual Operating and Capital Budget. Long Range Budget Forecast: The Division of Budget and Strategic Planning, in accordance with the City’s financial advisor, produces a Long Range Budget Forecast annually to evaluate the total amount of available resources and anticipated costs over a five year period. It incorporates levels of anticipated revenues over the next five years, the projected levels of operating costs, the anticipated levels of debt service for the Capital Improvements Program and Plan, and the anticipated operating costs associated with all new capital facilities. In turn, the first year of the Long Range Budget Forecast is used as a framework from which to develop the guidelines and targets for the Operating Budget. The Long Range Forecast is used to determine the level of funding the City will have to support its Capital Improvement Program and Plan within the debt policy constraints adopted by the City. Development of the Annual Capital Improvements Program and Plan (CIP): The City of Suffolk begins the development of its Annual Capital Improvements Program and Plan (CIP) in September to address in detail the five year capital program and additional five year planning horizon for needed City capital improvements. A recommended CIP is developed by the City Manager with input from the various departments of the City. The City Manager’s recommended plan is reviewed by a CIP Committee consisting of the two Council elected representatives on the City’s Finance Committee and two designated members of the City Planning Commission. The CIP Committee reviews the proposal and specific projects with the City Manager and directs adjustments and forwards its recommended plan to the full

5


Planning Commission. The Planning Commission reviews, directs, edits, and recommends the document to the City Council who receives the plan, holds a public hearing, edits as necessary and adopts the plan. The CIP process is concluded in February prior to the development of the Annual Operating and Capital Budget. The first year of the adopted CIP is incorporated into the City Manager’s Proposed Annual Operating and Capital Budget. Development of the Annual Revenue Estimates and Operating and Capital Budget: The development of the Annual Operating and Capital Budget begins in November with the assembly of a budget development committee comprised of appointees by the City Manager. The City Manager’s budget committee holds a planning meeting in November to create the budget work plan and calendar with oversight responsibility assigned to the Director of Finance. This work plan is designed to incorporate a rigorous internal review of service areas, work processes, and cost centers in need of strategic analysis to address the efficiency and effectiveness of the City. Community budget meetings are generally held in January to gather public input, suggestions, and comments for the development of the City Manager’s proposed budget. Budget requests for each activity of the City are submitted electronically to the Division of Budget and Strategic Planning for compilation and review by the budget committee. Accountability exists to support every dollar requested with detailed support and explanations. Meetings are held with each department to review their submission and programs and address questions and possible solutions to improve efficiency and effectiveness. Follow-up meetings are later held to review the City Manager’s recommended budget with each department and address any remaining issues. Revenue estimates and projections are developed through a cooperative review by the City’s Treasurer, Commissioner of the Revenue, Assessor, and the Director of Finance. Estimates are derived at the line item level projecting the current year’s revenue and estimating anticipated revenues for the following fiscal year based on both historic trend information and other known revenue factors such as actions of the State General Assembly and City Council, as well as impacts of the current economy on local and State revenue receipts. The City Manager submits a budget message and proposed operating and capital budget to the City Council at least sixty (60) days prior to the beginning of each budget year or July 1st. This budget includes all proposed revenue sources and estimates with recommended expenditures for all funds required to support the City’s operations and capital projects. In accordance with the City Charter, the budget transmitted by the City Manager to the City Council must be balanced, meaning that expenditures recommended by the City Manager must not exceed estimated revenues.

6


Public information meetings are typically held to review the contents of the City Manager’s proposed operating and capital budget with interested residents of the City. Work sessions are conducted with City Council to review the contents of the proposed budget and receive comments and changes as directed by Council. A public hearing is held for Council to receive public comment on the proposed Operating and Capital Budget. Prior to July 1, the City Council makes its final revisions to the proposed budget and adopts the budget by ordinance. Funds are appropriated at the Fund level through an appropriations ordinance. Budgets for all funds are adopted on a basis consistent with generally accepted accounting principles applicable to governmental units. Budgeted amounts reflected in the financial statements are as originally adopted, unless amended by the City Manager or City Council. Appropriations for all funds lapse at the fiscal year end with exception to outstanding encumbrances stated in the adopted appropriations ordinance for all ongoing projects and programs. The City Manager is authorized to amend appropriations by transferring unencumbered amounts within the appropriated funds. Otherwise, amendments that alter the total appropriation of any fund must be approved by the City Council. During the year, the City Council may approve amendments to original appropriations, primarily as a result of various Federal and State grant awards. The City Manager is authorized to reallocate funding sources for capital projects, including bond interest earnings to minimize arbitrage rebates and penalties.

7


CITY OF SUFFOLK, VIRGINIA BUDGET DEVELOPMENT CALENDAR _____________________________________________________________________________ September – February  Capital Improvement Program and Plan development and adoption November

December

Budget Packages Distributed to Departments / Agencies

Budget Requests Due from Departments/Agencies

January - February  Budget Development Committee – Meetings with Requesting Departments / Agents March

April

   

School Board Budget Request Received by City Council Revenue Projection Committee Meetings City Manager Budget Deliberations City Manager’s Proposed Budget Finalized

    

City Manager’s Proposed Budget Presented to City Council City Council Budget Work Sessions Budget Public Information Meetings Public Hearing Advertisement for Proposed Budget City Council Public Hearing on Proposed Budget & Tax Rate Ordinance

Adoption of City and School Budget & Tax Rates by City Council

May

8


CITY FINANCIAL STRUCTURE ________________________________________________________________ Description of Account Structure Accounts of the City are organized on the basis of funds or account groups, each of which is considered a separate accounting entity. The operations of each fund are accounted for with a separate set of self-balancing accounts that comprise its assets, liabilities, fund balances/retained earnings, revenues and expenditures/expenses. The following fund types are used by the City of Suffolk: Governmental Funds Governmental Funds are those through which most governmental functions of the City are financed. The City presents the following major governmental funds: General Fund – The General Fund is the primary operating fund of the City. This fund is used to account for all financial transactions and resources except those required to be accounted for in another fund. Revenues are derived primarily from property and other local taxes, state and federal distributions, licenses, permits, charges for services, and interest income. A significant part of the General Fund’s revenues is transferred to other funds and component units, principally to finance the operations of the City of Suffolk Public Schools. Capital Projects Fund – The Capital Projects Fund is used to account for financial resources to be used for the acquisition or construction of major capital facilities (other than those financed by proprietary fund types). Debt Service Fund – The Debt Service Fund is used to account for the accumulation of resources for, and the payment of, general long-term debt principal, interest and related costs. The City presents the following non-major governmental funds: Special Revenue Funds The Special Revenue Funds account for revenue derived from specific sources (other than major capital projects) that are restricted by legal and regulatory provisions to finance specific activities. Aviation Facilities Fund – The Aviation Facilities Fund accounts for the revenues and expenditures related to the City’s airport. Revenues are derived from fuel sales, the rental of airport hangars and facilities, and the transfer of funding support from the General Fund. Downtown Business Overlay District Fund – The Downtown Business Overlay District accounts for revenues and expenditures related to services provided in the Downtown Business Overlay District. Most revenues are derived from a specific percentage of the annual real estate tax assessments in the Downtown Business Overlay District.

9


Road Maintenance Fund – The Road Maintenance Fund accounts for revenue and expenditures related to maintaining roads city wide. Revenues are derived from the State and sale of service to other funds. Consolidated Grants Fund – The Consolidated Grants Fund accounts for revenues and expenditures involving governmental grant programs. Law Library Fund – The Law Library Fund accounts for the maintenance of a law library. Revenue is derived from court fees. Route 17 Taxing District Fund – The Route 17 Taxing District Fund accounts for revenues and expenditures related to enhanced economic development related services provided in the Route 17 Taxing District. Most revenues are derived from a specific percentage of the annual real estate tax assessments in the Route 17 Taxing District. Transit System Fund – The Transit System Fund accounts for revenues and expenditures of the City’s transit system which includes three full day and three half day routes for a total of six bus routes and ADA service. Revenues are derived from fare collections, State and Federal grants, and the transfer of funding support from the General Fund. Proprietary Funds Proprietary Funds are used to account for activities that are similar to those often found in the private sector. All assets, liabilities, equities, revenues, expenses, and transfers relating to the primary government’s business activities are accounted through proprietary funds. The measurement focus is on the determination of net income, financial position, and cash flows. Proprietary funds distinguish operating revenues and expenses from non-operating revenues and expenses. Operating revenues and expenses generally result from providing services and producing and delivering goods in connection with a proprietary fund’s principal ongoing operations. The principal operating revenues of the proprietary funds are charges for services. Operating expenses include cost of sales and services, personnel, contractual services, and depreciation. Enterprise Funds The Enterprise Funds account for operations that are financed in a manner similar to private business enterprises, where the intent is that costs of providing goods or services to the general public on a continuing basis be financed or recovered primarily through user charges. The City presents the following major enterprise fund: Utility Fund – The Utility Fund accounts for the provision of water and sewer services to City residents. All activities necessary to provide such services are accounted for in this fund, including, but not limited to, administration, operation, maintenance, billing, collections, financing and related debt service and capital assets of the water and sewage systems. The City presents the following non-major enterprise funds:

10


Refuse Fund – The Refuse Fund accounts for the provision of solid waste disposal and recycling services to City residents. Stormwater Utility Fund – The Stormwater Utility Fund accounts for the maintenance and improvements to the City’s stormwater infrastructure. Internal Service Funds The Internal Service Funds account for the financing of goods or services provided by one department to other departments or agencies of the City on a cost-reimbursement basis. The Internal Service Funds are included in governmental activities for government-wide reporting purposes. The excess revenue or expenses of the funds are allocated to the appropriate functional activity. Information Technology Fund – The Information Technology Fund accounts for the City’s technology infrastructure and allocates costs to the various departments or agencies using the service. Fleet Management Fund – The Fleet Management Fund accounts for the financing of vehicles and the related maintenance, repairs and fuel costs of the City and allocates operating costs to the various departments or agencies using the equipment. Risk Management Fund – The Risk Management Fund accounts for the funding and payment of auto, personal liability, general liability, health insurance, and workers’ compensation claims against the City exclusive of the School Board employees. Charges to other funds are based on estimated claims for the year. School Funds – The School Funds are used to account for the activities of the City of Suffolk Public School System. The appropriation by the City consolidates the funding for the existing three School funds. The School Operating Fund is the general accounting fund of the School System. It is used to account for all financial resources except those required to be accounted for in another fund. Revenues of this fund are derived from State and Federal funds and an annual appropriation from the local government. The School Food Service Fund accounts for the revenues and expenditures relating to the operation of school cafeterias. Revenues are derived from state and federal funds and the sale of commodities. The School Grant Fund accounts for revenues and expenditures relating to grants received by the School System directly from the state and federal government. Basis of Accounting The accounting and financial reporting treatment applied to a fund is determined by its measurement focus. All governmental funds are accounted for using the current financial resources measurement focus. With this measurement focus, only current assets and current liabilities generally are included on the balance sheet in the funds statements. Long-term assets and long-term liabilities are included in the government-wide statements. Operating statements of the governmental funds present increases (i.e., revenues and other financing sources) and decreases (i.e., expenditures and other financing uses) in net current assets.

11


The government-wide statements of net assets and statements of activities, and proprietary funds, are accounted for on a flow of economic resources measurement focus. With this measurement focus, all assets and all liabilities associated with the operation of these activities are either included on the statement of net assets or on the statement of fiduciary net assets. Proprietary fund-type operating statements present increases (e.g., revenues) and decreases (e.g., expenses) in net total assets. The fund financial statements of the Governmental Funds (for the primary government and component units) are maintained and reported on the modified accrual basis of accounting using the current financial resources measurement focus. Under this method of accounting, revenues are recognized in the period in which they become measurable and available. With respect to real and personal property tax revenue and other local taxes, the term “available” is limited to collection within forty-five days of the fiscal year-end. Levies made prior to the fiscal year-end but which are not available are deferred. Interest income is recorded as earned. Federal and State reimbursement-type grants are recorded as revenue when related eligible expenditures are incurred. Expenditures, other than accrued interest on long-term debt, are recorded when the fund liability is incurred. Basis of Budgeting The City prepares its annual operating budget providing estimates on the same basis as is used for its accounting and financial reporting noted above in the section entitled “Basis of Accounting”. The City utilizes the following procedures in establishing budgetary data reflected in the basic financial statements: 

The budget is prepared on a “zero base”.

At least 60 days prior to June 30, the City Manager submits to City Council a proposed operating budget for the fiscal year commencing the following July 1. The operating budget includes proposed expenditures and the means of financing them.

The budget is formulated from estimates of revenues and expected expenditures from each department. The School Board is treated as a single expenditure line item.

The City Manager submits the proposed budget to City Council, and recommends an appropriation ordinance and an ordinance levying the tax rates for the ensuing year.

City Council then holds public hearings on the proposed budget. Notice of such public hearing must appear in a local newspaper not less than seven days prior to the hearing.

The budget must be approved by a majority vote of City Council and legally adopted before July 1. If City Council does not adopt the proposed budget before July 1, the City Manager proposed budget as submitted is automatically adopted.

Additional appropriations may be made by City Council only if there is an unencumbered fund balance or additional funding becomes available. Supplemental budget appropriations may be approved during the fiscal year.

12


Formal budgetary integration is employed as a management control device. Annual operating budgets are adopted by ordinance passed by City Council for the General Fund, Capital Projects Fund, the Debt Service Fund, Special Revenue Funds (Aviation Facilities, Consolidated Grants Fund, Downtown Business Overlay District, Law Library, Road Maintenance, Route 17 Taxing District, and Transit System), Enterprise Funds (Utility, Refuse, and Stormwater), Internal Service Funds (Fleet Management, Information Technology, and Risk Management), and the School Operating Fund. The General, Special Revenue, Internal Service and Debt Service Funds’ budgets are adopted on a basis consistent with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. Budgets for proprietary fund types are prepared on the accrual basis of accounting. Beginning fund balances for budgetary basis presentation purposes are adjusted for the carryforward or prior year encumbrances. According to City Code, unexpended and unencumbered appropriations lapse at June 30 of each year. Appropriations that have not been expended or lawfully obligated or encumbered at June 30 are carried forward into the following year’s appropriations to allow for liquidation of the encumbrances. Continuation of previously authorized projects and grants by the City Council not completed as of June 30 of each year are authorized by ordinance to be reappropriated to the following year to allow for completion. Individual grants and projects included in the Consolidated Grants Fund and Capital Projects Fund are budgeted separately from the operating budget. These project authorizations do not parallel the City’s fiscal year and the accounting, encumbering and controlling of the funds are managed and monitored upon the length of each individual grant or project, which may be more than one year.

13


Summary of Financial and Budget Policy Compliance _____________________________________________________________________________ The City of Suffolk has established financial policies to ensure prudent financial practices and accountability of public funds managed by the City. The financial policies include guidelines for Revenues, Budget, Capital Improvements Planning, and Debt. A Finance Committee created by the Suffolk City Council meets on a regular basis to review and monitor compliance. As demonstrated in the attached copy of the City’s financial policies and compliance summary, the City of Suffolk is achieving compliance with its financial policies. Highlights of each major compliance area include: Revenues  City fees and charges have been reviewed and updated in the FY 18 Operating & Capital Budget.  Revenue collections are strong with collection rates between 96% - 99%. Budget  The FY 18 Operating & Capital Budget is balanced with current revenues supporting all current expenditures.  A long range projection of revenues and expenditures is included in the FY 18 Operating & Capital Budget.  The City has met the Unassigned General Fund balance policy goal of 12% of Governmental Fund Expenditures. The City’s Unassigned General Fund balance is 16.1% of Governmental Fund Expenditures.  The projected balance in the Risk Fund is anticipated to be sufficient to provide the required support in the FY 18 Operating and Capital Budget. Capital Improvements Planning  A 10 year Capital Improvements Plan has been prepared and adopted for use in the FY 18 budget year.  The FY 18 Operating and Capital Budget include 3% of General Fund departmental expenditures in cash funding to achieve the policy goal of a 3.1% pay-as-you-go capital funding level. Debt  Debt as a percentage of assessed value is 2.1% for FY 18, below the 4% policy ceiling.  Debt as a percentage of general government expenditures is 8.8% for FY 18, below the 10% policy ceiling.

14


CITY OF SUFFOLK

Financial Policies Adopted: December 5, 2007 Revised: April 1, 2015

FY 18 Budget Status: Responses where appropriate for all compliance requirements for FY 18 are denoted in red.

15


CITY OF SUFFOLK, VIRGINIA FINANCIAL POLICIES

POLICY PURPOSE The City of Suffolk (the “City”) and its governing body, the City Council (the “Council”), is responsible to the City's citizens to carefully account for all public funds, to manage City finances wisely and to plan for the adequate funding of services desired by the public, including the provision and maintenance of facilities. The following financial policies and guidelines establish the framework for the City’s overall fiscal planning and management. 1.01 Policy Goals This fiscal policy is a statement of the guidelines and goals that will influence and guide the financial management practices of the City. A fiscal policy that is adopted, adhered to, and regularly reviewed is recognized as the cornerstone of sound financial management. Effective fiscal policy: 

Contributes significantly to the City's ability to insulate itself from fiscal crisis,

Enhances short term and long term financial credit ability by helping to achieve the highest credit and bond ratings possible,

Promotes long term financial stability by establishing clear and consistent guidelines,

Directs attention to the total financial picture of the City rather than single issue areas,

Promotes the view of linking long term financial planning with day to day operations, and

Provides the Council and the citizens a framework for measuring the fiscal impact of government services against established fiscal parameters and guidelines.

1.02 Policy Implementation and Coordination The City has established a Finance Committee that meets approximately monthly to collectively review financial matters of the City, including the monitoring of financial activity cash and investment management, and compliance with certain policies outlined herein. Members of the Finance Committee include those individuals stipulated by ordinance adopted by City Council. 1.03 Review and Revision These polices will be reviewed for appropriateness and comparability with AAA rated jurisdictions every three years or more frequently if a need for review is identified.

16


CITY OF SUFFOLK, VIRGINIA FINANCIAL POLICIES

REVENUES 2.01 Revenue Diversification The City will strive to maintain diversified and stable revenue streams to protect the government from problematic fluctuations in any single revenue source and provide stability to ongoing services. Current revenues will fund current expenditures and a diversified and stable revenue system will be maintained to protect programs. FY 18 Budget Status: Local revenues are diversified and projected to increase 3.2% or $6.3M in FY 18. The increase is attributable to a 2% increase in real estate tax revenue primarily from growth in assessed values, 18% increase in public service corporation revenue, 5% increase in personal property revenue, and 6% increase in other local tax revenues such as sales and use, meals, lodging, admissions, and business and occupational licenses. 2.02 Fees and Charges All fees established by the City for licenses, permits, fines, services, applications and other miscellaneous charges shall be set to recover all or a portion of the City’s expense in providing the attendant service. These fees shall be reviewed annually with the development of the annual operating budget. FY 18 Budget Status: All city fees and charges are reviewed annually with revisions provided to recoup a fair portion of the City’s expenses associated with the service provision. Various fee increases and adjustments are approved in FY18 to include the airport hanger and storage room rental; fee for garnishment processing; water and sewer rates; right of way encroachment permit, right of way permit, refuse and recycling service, bulk refuse service, bulk refuse service - roll off; and treasurer service fee for out of city processing. The following new fees are recommended including spousal support order and payroll paycard replacement fee; various recreation processing fees, application and setup fees; and treasurer roll back tax interest. 2.03 Revenue Collections The City will strive to achieve an overall property tax collection rate of 100%. FY 18 Budget Status: The City continues to maintain strong local collection rates ranging from 96% to 99% for local taxes and fees with collection rates documented annually in the Comprehensive Annual Financial Report. 2.04 Use of Fund Balance The City’s General Fund equity balance will be utilized to provide sufficient working capital in anticipation of current budgeted revenues and to finance unforeseen emergencies without borrowing. The General Fund equity of the City (Unassigned Fund Balance) will not be used to finance current operations. 17


CITY OF SUFFOLK, VIRGINIA FINANCIAL POLICIES

FY 18 Budget Status: The City’s budget has been balanced with current General Fund revenues supporting all current General Fund expenditures for FY 18. The FY 18 Budget does provide for a draw of $2.5M from the Unassigned Fund Balance to assist with one-time capital project expenses. The $2.5M is anticipated from excess General Fund revenues in FY 17 which will fall to the Unassigned Fund Balance at the end of the fiscal year. 2.05 Restricted Revenue Restricted revenue (such as Medicaid or Asset Forfeiture funds) shall only be used for the purpose intended and in a fiscally responsible manner. FY 18 Budget Status: The City’s budget utilizes restricted revenues strictly for the designated purpose.

BUDGET 3.01 Balanced Budget The provisions of the Code of Virginia shall control the preparation, consideration, adoption and execution of the budget of the City. In addition, the City Charter requires the budget to be balanced with planned expenditures equal to estimated revenues. The City will annually adopt and execute a budget for such funds as may be required by law or by sound financial practices and generally accepted accounting principles. The budget shall control the levy of taxes and the expenditure of money for all City purposes during the ensuing fiscal year. The City budget shall be balanced within all available operating revenues, including the fund balance, and adopted by the City Council. FY 18 Budget Status: The FY 18 budget is balanced for all funds operated by the City denoting appropriate tax rates where applicable to sustain operations. Budget and tax rate ordinances have been appropriately prepared authorizing the appropriation of all required funds. 3.02 Use of Current Revenues to Support Current Expenditures Ongoing and stable revenues will be used to support ongoing operating costs. FY 18 Budget Status: The budget is dependent on stable revenues and conservative revenue projections to support operations. 3.03 Use of One-time Revenue and One-time Expenditure Savings The use of one-time revenues and one-time expenditure savings (excess cash balances) will be used for non-recurring expenditures. FY 18 Budget Status: All one-time revenues are designated to support one-time expenditures. 18


CITY OF SUFFOLK, VIRGINIA FINANCIAL POLICIES

3.04 Review of Fees and Charges Fees established by the City for licenses, permits, fines, services, applications and other miscellaneous charges shall be set to recover all or a portion of the City’s expense in providing the attendant service and reviewed annually with the development of the annual operating budget. FY 18 Budget Status: All City fees and charges are reviewed annually with revisions provided to recover a portion of the City’s expenses associated with the service provision. 3.05 Revenue and Expenditure Projections The City will prepare and annually update a long range (5 year) financial forecast model utilizing trend indicators and projections of annual operating revenues, expenditures, capital improvements and related debt service and operating costs, and fund balance levels. FY 18 Budget Status: A 5 year projection of revenues and expenditures has been prepared using conservative assumptions. This plan includes planned capital improvements, related debt service, operating costs, projected fund balance levels and required real estate tax rate adjustments. This report is provided as an appendix to the budget. 3.06 Budget Performance Monitoring The Finance Budget Division will maintain ongoing contact with the departmental fiscal officers during the process of the budget execution. Expenditure and revenue projections will be developed quarterly and reviewed with Departmental Directors, the Finance Committee of the City Council, the City Manager, and the City Council. The City Manager through the Budget Division of Finance will exercise appropriate fiscal management as necessary to live within the limits of the adopted budget. FY 18 Budget Status: Quarterly revenue and expenditure projections are provided to the City Manager and City Council. All required budget adjustments are reviewed and approved by the City Manager or designee to comply with budget requirements.

3.07 Maintenance of Capital Assets The budget should provide sufficient funds for regular repair and maintenance of capital assets. FY 18 Budget Status: The operating and capital budget provides adequate repair and maintenance funds to support City capital assets.

19


CITY OF SUFFOLK, VIRGINIA FINANCIAL POLICIES

3.08 Fund Balance Levels The City will employ sound financial management principles to include the establishment of an unassigned fund balance sufficient to maintain required working capital and provide a reserve for unanticipated expenditures or emergencies, revenue shortfalls, and other non-recurring uses. The ratio of Unassigned General Fund balance as a percentage of Budgeted Governmental Funds Expenditures (net of the General Fund Contribution to Schools, transfer to other Governmental Funds, and Capital Projects Fund Expenditures) plus budgeted expenditures in the School Operating and Food Service Funds indicates the ability of the City to cope with unexpected financial problems or emergencies. The larger the Unassigned General Fund balance, the greater the City’s ability to cope with financial emergencies and fluctuations in revenue cycles. The City has established a target rate of 12% at the close of each fiscal year as computed on the upcoming budget year. Once the Unassigned general fund balance target is achieved by the City, it is intended to be maintained for the upcoming fiscal year from prior year surpluses and budgeted additions as available before any other needs are addressed. In the event Unassigned Fund Balance is required to be drawn below the 12% target rate due to an emergency (such as a natural disaster) or due to severe economic circumstances, the City will develop a plan to restore the Unassigned Fund Balance over the ensuing two to three years. Compliance with fund balance policy will be reviewed and reported to City Council at least annually in conjunction with the development of the operating budget and with any significant budget amendments made during the fiscal year. FY 18 Budget Status: The FY 18 Unassigned General Fund balance is projected to exceed the targeted 12% by the close of the fiscal year at 16.1%. 3.09 Self-Insurance Rate Stabilization Fund The City will strive to maintain a rate stabilization fund for its insured risks in an amount equal to 20% of anticipated annual premium costs. This rate stabilization fund may be reduced or increased by management based on professional judgment and anticipated claims cost estimates. FY 18 Budget Status: The projected balance in the Risk Fund at June 30, 2017 is anticipated to be sufficient to provide the required $3.5M in rate stabilization funds to support the FY 18 budget.

CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS PLANNING 4.01 Capital Improvement Program In order to prepare and plan for upcoming capital needs, comply with debt ratio targets, schedule debt issuance, and systematically improve capital infrastructure, the City will annually prepare and adopt a minimum five-year Capital Improvements Plan. 20


CITY OF SUFFOLK, VIRGINIA FINANCIAL POLICIES

The adopted Capital Improvements Plan will include major capital improvements and identify estimated revenue sources and annual operational costs for facilities to include anticipated debt service requirements. Capital improvements do not include routine maintenance on existing capital assets. FY 18 Budget Status: A 10 year Capital Improvements and Program Plan (CIP) is prepared and updated annually providing 5 years of detailed projects, revenue sources, debt requirements and annual operating costs. This plan is prepared by the City Manager and reviewed by a committee to include members of the Planning Commission and the City’s elected Finance Committee members. The Plan is reviewed, edited, and recommended by the Planning Commission to the City Council who in turn, reviews, edits and adopts the Plan for consideration of year one projects in the upcoming operating budget proposal. A current CIP was adopted by City Council in February 2017 for use in the FY 18 budget. 4.02 Pay-As-You-Go Capital Improvement Funding The City will develop an escalation plan to accomplish an annual allocation of an amount equal to 3% of the General Fund departmental expenditures (excluding transfers out, grants, fund balance and reserve allocations, debt service, and respective flow-through expenditures) to pay-as-you-go-capital improvements annually. The escalation plan will begin with the FY 08 adopted budget and shall be increased annually for the ensuing five (5) year period until the 3% target is achieved. FY 18 Budget Status: The budget includes $4,585,137 in cash funded projects or 3.1% of General Fund departmental expenditures for FY 18.

DEBT The City Council generally follows the guidelines listed below in making financial decisions on debt issuance. Adherence to these guidelines allows the City to plan for the necessary financing of capital projects while maintaining credit worthiness. In addition, continued adherence to these policies will ensure the City’s strong financial position. The City shall use an objective analytical approach to determine whether it can afford new or additional general purpose debt. This process shall use the City’s standards of affordability. These standards include the measures of debt service payments as a percent of current expenditures and debt as a percent of taxable real estate value. 5.01 Revenue Anticipation Notes (RANS) The City does not intend to issue tax or revenue anticipation notes (RANS) to fund government operations but rather to manage cash in a fashion that will prevent any borrowing to meet working capital needs. 21


CITY OF SUFFOLK, VIRGINIA FINANCIAL POLICIES

The City may issue RANS in an extreme emergency beyond the City’s control or ability to forecast when the revenue source will be received subsequent to the timing of funds needed. Such issuances will be for a period not to exceed a one year period. 5.02 Bond Anticipation Notes (BANS) The City may issue Bond Anticipation Notes (BANS) in expectation of General Obligation or Revenue Bonds when cash is required in order to initiate or continue a capital project or when longterm markets do not appear appropriate but have a clear potential for improvement within the designated BAN time frame. The City will not issue Bond Anticipation Notes (BANS) for a period beyond two years. If the City issues a bond anticipation note for a capital project, the BAN will be converted to a long-term bond or redeemed at its expiration. 5.03 Letters of Credit The City may enter into a letter-of-credit (LOC) agreement when such an agreement is deemed prudent and advantageous. The City will prepare and distribute a request for proposals to qualified banks which includes terms and conditions that are acceptable to the City. 5.04 Lease Purchase Obligations Lease purchase and master lease obligations, including certificates of participation or lease revenue bonds, shall be considered as an alternative to long-term vendor leases. Such debt shall be subject to annual appropriation. 5.05 Public Private Partnerships The City recognizes the value of developing public-private partnerships. As such, public-private partnerships financings that require the City to provide capital or credit enhancement to a project will be considered in light of the following:     

The project is multi-faceted requiring coordinated and/or accelerated development; The project is non-traditional with mixed use of public and private components; The project calls for the bundling of design, construction and operation phases; or There is an urgent need to construct multiple facilities or other public infrastructure simultaneously to keep pace with a rapidly growing population. The project has undergone a rigorous cost-benefit analysis by City Staff (or agents employed by the City for such purpose). If the project ultimately requires City credit enhancement, such obligations will be treated as if debt by the City.

5.06 Compliance with Legal Requirements Pursuant to the Constitution of Virginia (the Constitution), the City is authorized to issue bonds secured by a pledge of its full faith and credit and unlimited taxing power. There is no requirement 22


CITY OF SUFFOLK, VIRGINIA FINANCIAL POLICIES

in the Constitution, the Virginia Code or the City Charter that the issuance of general obligation bonds be subject to the approval of voters of the City at referendum. The issuance of general obligation bonds is subject to a constitutional limitation of ten percent (10%) of the assessed value of taxable real property. The City’s Charter further limits the issuance of general obligation bonds to seven percent (7%) of the assessed value of taxable property. 5.07 Debt Ratio Policies

Debt as a Percentage of Assessed Value This ratio indicates the relationship between the City’s debt and the total taxable value of real and personal property in the City. It is an important indicator of the City’s ability to repay debt, because property taxes are the source of the City’s revenues used to repay debt. A small ratio is an indication that the City will be better able to withstand possible future economic downturns and continue to meet its debt obligations. Debt as a Percentage of General Government Expenditures This ratio is a measure of the City’s ability to repay debt without hampering other City services. A smaller ratio indicates a lesser burden on the City’s operating budget. The numerator shall include debt that is not selfsupporting from a user fee revenue stream. A selfsupporting revenue stream is defined as a revenue stream that provides coverage of all debt service obligations without general fund support (to include tax assessment districts and funds supported by committed state revenues in support of such debt). Any long term financing lease obligations which may be subject to annual appropriation by the City will also be included in the calculations of tax-supported debt service. General governmental expenditures are expenditures reported in the City’s governmental funds (excluding the General Fund Contribution to Schools and the Capital Projects Fund) and expenditures reported in the School Operating and Food Service Funds.

Ceiling

FY’18 Status

4%

2.1%

10%

8.8%

Compliance with the above debt policy ratios will be calculated each fiscal year in conjunction with the budget development process and provided to Council with the proposed annual budget.

23


CITY OF SUFFOLK, VIRGINIA FINANCIAL POLICIES

5.08 Long Term Debt Policy The City will use debt financing for capital improvement projects and unusual equipment purchases under the following circumstances: A. When the project is included in the City’s capital improvement program and/or is generally in conformance with the City’s Comprehensive Plan. B. When the project is not included in the City’s Capital Improvement Program, but it is an emerging critical need whose timing was not anticipated in the Capital Improvement Program, or it is a project mandated immediately by state or federal requirements. C. When the project’s useful life, or the projected service life of the equipment, will be equal to or exceed the term of the financing. D. When there are designated revenues sufficient to service the debt, whether from project revenues, other specified and reserved resources, or infrastructure cost sharing revenues. The following criteria will be used to evaluate funding options for capital improvements: A. Factors that favor pay-as-you-go: 1. Current revenues and adequate fund balances are available. 2. Project phasing is feasible. 3. Debt levels would adversely affect the City’s credit rating. 4. Financial market conditions are unstable or present difficulties in marketing the sale of long-term financing investments. B. Factors that favor long-term financing: 1. Revenues available for debt service are considered sufficient and reliable so that longterm financing can be marketed with the highest possible credit rating. 2. The project for which financing is being considered is of the type that will allow the City to maintain the highest possible credit rating. 3. Market conditions present favorable interest rates and demand for municipal financings. 4. A project is mandated by state or federal requirements and current revenues and fund balances are insufficient to pay project costs. 5. A project is immediately required to meet or relieve capacity needs. There are many different types of long-term debt instruments available. Depending on the specific circumstances, the City will consider using the following types of financing instruments:      

General Obligation Bonds General Obligation Bonds sold to Virginia Public School Authority for School Capital Projects Revenue Bonds Certificates of Participation Lease Revenue Bonds Selected State Pooled-Borrowing Programs for Utility Revenue Bonds, Including Those of the Virginia Resources Authority.

24


CITY OF SUFFOLK, VIRGINIA FINANCIAL POLICIES

5.09 Bond Structure The City shall establish all terms and conditions relating to the issuance of bonds, and will invest all bond proceeds pursuant to the terms of the City’s Investment Policy. Unless otherwise authorized by the City, the following shall serve as bond requirements: 1. Term. All capital improvements financed through the issuance of debt will be financed for a period not to exceed the useful life of the improvements, but in no event will the term exceed thirty (30) years. 2. Capitalized Interest. From time to time certain financings may require the use of capitalized interest from the issuance date until the City has beneficial use and/or occupancy of the financed project. Interest shall not be funded (capitalized) beyond three years or a shorter period if further restricted by law. Interest earnings may, at the City’s discretion, be applied to extend the term of capitalized interest but in no event beyond the term allowed by law. 3. Debt Service Structure. Debt issuance shall be planned to achieve relatively equal payment of principal (declining debt service) while matching debt service to the useful life of facilities. The City shall avoid the use of bullet or balloon maturities except in those instances where these maturities serve to make existing overall debt service level. The City may elect a less rapid or other debt service structure, such as level debt service at its discretion. 4. Call Provisions. In general, the City’s debt will include an early redemption (or “call”) feature, which is no later than 10 years from the date of delivery of the bonds. The City will avoid the sale of non-callable bonds absent careful, documented evaluation by the City in conjunction with its financial advisor with respect to the value of the call option. 5. Original Issue Discount. An original issue discount will be permitted if the City determines that such discount results in a lower true interest cost on the bonds and that the use of an original issue discount will not adversely affect the project funding. 6. Deep Discount Bonds. Deep discount bonds may provide a lower cost of borrowing in certain markets. The City will carefully consider their value and effect on any future refinancings as a result of the lower-than-market coupon associated with deep discount bonds. 7. Derivative Structures. Alternative, non-traditional financing structures such as derivatives are becoming more common in the municipal market. Structured properly, these products frequently provide a means for the City to achieve its goals in a cost effective manner. The City will consider the use of derivatives as a hedge against future interest rate risk or to create “synthetic” fixed rate or variable rate debt, when appropriate. The City will not use derivative structures for speculative or investment purposes. The City will consider the use of derivative structures when it is able to gain a comparative borrowing advantage, and is able to quantify and understand potential risks. Prior to the use of such structures, the City will consider the adoption of a comprehensive Swap and Derivative Management Plan that is consistent and does not conflict in principle with this governing policy. Prior to use of a derivative structure, the City will provide written communication to City Council describing potential risks associated with each proposed derivative structure. 25


CITY OF SUFFOLK, VIRGINIA FINANCIAL POLICIES

5.10 Variable Rate Debt To maintain a predictable debt service burden, the City may give preference to debt that carries a fixed interest rate. The City, however, may consider variable rate debt. The percentage of variable rate debt outstanding (excluding debt which has been converted to synthetic fixed rate debt) shall not exceed 20% of the City’s total outstanding debt and will take into consideration the amount and investment strategy of the City’s operating cash. The City will consider issuing variable rate debt to: a) Match Asset and Liabilities: By issuing variable rate debt the City matches variable interest rates to its short-term investment assets. b) Potentially Lower Debt Service Costs: Historically variable interest rates are less than fixed rate cost of capital. c) Add Flexibility and Diversity to the City’s Debt Structure: Variable rate bonds are traditionally callable every 30 days and can generally be refunded on a fixed rate basis to take advantage of low fixed rates and open up variable rate capacity for higher rate environments. In determining its use of variable rate debt, the City will utilize an analysis from the City’s Financial Advisor evaluating and quantifying the risks and returns involved in the variable rate financing. 5.11 Refinanced Outstanding Debt The Director of Finance with assistance from the City’s Financial Advisor will have the responsibility to analyze outstanding bond issues for refunding opportunities. The City will consider the following issues when analyzing possible refunding opportunities: 1. Refunding Policy. The City establishes a minimum aggregate present value savings threshold of 3% of the refunding bond principal amount. The present value savings will be net of all costs related to the refinancing. Debt service savings may be taken in equal amounts over time or on an upfront or deferred basis, at the City’s discretion. 2. Restructuring. The City will refund debt when it is in the best financial interest of the City to do so. Such refundings will be limited to restructuring to meet unanticipated revenue expectations, achieve costs savings, mitigate irregular debt service payments release reserve funds or remove unduly restrictive bond covenants. 3. Term of Refunding Issues. The City will refund bonds within the term of the originally issued debt. However, the City may consider maturity extension, when necessary to achieve a desired outcome, provided that such extension is legally permissible. The City may also consider shortening the term of the originally issued debt to realize greater savings. The remaining useful life of the financed facility and the concept of inter-generational equity should guide this decision.

26


CITY OF SUFFOLK, VIRGINIA FINANCIAL POLICIES

4. Escrow Structuring. The City shall utilize the least costly securities available in structuring refunding escrows. A certificate will be provided by a third party agent stating that the securities were procured through an arms-length, competitive bid process (in the case of open market securities), and that the price paid for the securities was reasonable within Federal guidelines. Under no circumstances shall an underwriter, agent or financial advisor sell escrow securities to the City from its own account. 5. Arbitrage. The City shall take all necessary steps to optimize escrows and to avoid negative arbitrage in its refundings. Any resulting positive arbitrage will be rebated as necessary according to Federal guidelines. 5.12 Methods of Issuance The City will determine the method of issuance on a case-by-case basis. 1. Competitive Sale. In a competitive sale, the City’s bonds shall be awarded to the bidder providing the lowest true interest cost as long as the bid adheres to the requirements set forth in the official note of sale. 2. Negotiated Sale. The City recognizes that some securities are best sold through negotiation. In its consideration of a negotiated sale, the City shall assess the following circumstances: a. Bonds issued as variable rate demand obligations b. A structure which may require a strong pre-marketing effort such as a complex transaction or a “story” bond c. Size of the issue which may limit the number of potential bidders d. Market volatility is such that the City would be better served by flexibility in timing a sale in a changing interest rate environment 3. Private Placement. From time to time the City may elect to privately place its debt. Such placement shall be considered if other methods are not viable. 5.13 Bond Insurance The City may purchase bond insurance when such purchase is deemed prudent and advantageous. Use of bond insurance shall be based on such insurance being less costly than the present value of the difference between the interest on insured bonds versus uninsured bonds. In the case of a competitive sale, the City may permit bidders for its bonds to purchase bond insurance if such insurance will enhance the market reception and lower the interest rate on the City’s bonds. The City will submit an application for pre-qualification for insurance to facilitate bidders’ ability to purchase bond insurance. The winning bidder in a competitive sale will bear any associated cost with such enhancement. In the instance of a negotiated sale, the City will solicit quotes for bond insurance from interested providers. The City will select a provider whose bid is most cost effective and whose terms and conditions governing the guarantee are satisfactory to the City. 27


CITY OF SUFFOLK, VIRGINIA FINANCIAL POLICIES

5.14 Use of Special Districts The City may consider using special districts such as Tax Increment Financing Districts, Community Development Authorities and special taxing districts to finance projects that:      

Strengthen the employment and economic base of the City; Increase property values and tax revenues; Reduce poverty; Create economic stability; Facilitate economic self-sufficiency; or Assist in implementing the City’s economic development strategies.

Before using such districts, the City will consider the fiscal impact, the market feasibility and credit implications of the project or district. 5.15 Debt Service Reserves If necessary, the City may establish a reserve fund funded from bond proceeds, subject to federal tax regulations and in accordance with the requirements of credit enhancement providers and/or rating agencies. The City may purchase reserve equivalents (i.e., a reserve fund surety or letter of credit) when such purchase is deemed prudent and advantageous. Such equivalents shall be evaluated in comparison to cash funding of reserves on a net present value basis. 5.16 Underwriter Selection Senior Manager Selection. The City shall select a senior manager for any proposed negotiated sales. The selection criteria shall include but not be limited to the following:      

The firm’s ability and experience in managing transactions similar to that contemplated by the City Prior knowledge and experience with the City The firm’s ability and willingness to risk capital and demonstration of such risk and capital availability Quality and experience of personnel assigned to the City’s engagement Financing plan presented Underwriting fees

Co-Manager Selection. Co-managers may be selected on the same basis as the senior manager. In addition to their qualifications, co-managers appointed to specific transactions will be a function of transaction size and the necessity to ensure maximum distribution of the City’s bonds. Selling Groups. The City may establish selling groups in certain transactions. To the extent that selling groups are used, the Director of Finance at his or her discretion, may make appointments to selling groups from within the pool of underwriters or from outside the pool, as the transaction dictates. 28


CITY OF SUFFOLK, VIRGINIA FINANCIAL POLICIES

Underwriter’s Counsel. In any negotiated sale of City debt in which legal counsel is required to represent the underwriter, the appointment will be made by the Senior Manager with input from the City. Underwriter’s Discount. The Director of Finance with assistance from the City’s financial advisor will evaluate the proposed underwriter’s discount against comparable issues in the market. If there are multiple underwriters in the transaction, the Director of Finance will determine the allocation of underwriting liability and management fees. The allocation of fees will be determined prior to the sale date; a cap on management fee, expenses and underwriter’s counsel will be established and communicated to all parties by the Director of Finance. The senior manager shall submit an itemized list of expenses charged to members of the underwriting group. Any additional expenses must be substantiated. Evaluation of Underwriter Performance. The City will evaluate each bond sale after completion to assess the following: costs of issuance including underwriters’ compensation, pricing of the bonds in terms of the overall interest cost and on a maturity-by-maturity basis, and the distribution of bonds and sales credits. Following each sale, the Director of Finance shall provide a report to the City Manager and City Council on the results of the sale. Syndicate Policies. For each negotiated transaction, the Director of Finance will prepare syndicate policies that will describe the designation policies governing the upcoming sale. The Director of Finance shall ensure receipt of each member’s acknowledgement of the syndicate policies for the upcoming sale prior to the sale date. Designation Policies. To encourage the pre-marketing efforts of each member of the underwriting team, orders for the City’s bonds will be net designated, unless otherwise expressly stated. The City shall require the senior manager to:   

Equitably allocate bonds to other managers and the selling group Comply with MSRB regulations governing the priority of orders and allocations Within 10 working days after the sale date, submit to the Director of Finance a detail of orders, allocations and other relevant information pertaining to the City’s sale.

5.17 Consultants Financial Advisor. The City shall select a financial advisor (or advisors) to assist in its debt issuance and debt administration processes. Selection of the City’s financial advisor(s) shall be based on, but not limited to, the following criteria:   

Experience in providing consulting services to entities similar to the City Knowledge and experience in structuring and analyzing bond issues Experience and reputation of assigned personnel 29


CITY OF SUFFOLK, VIRGINIA FINANCIAL POLICIES 

Fees and expenses

Conflicts of Interest. The City requires that its consultants and advisors provide objective advice and analysis, maintain the confidentiality of City financial plans, and be free from any conflicts of interest. Bond Counsel. City debt will include a written opinion by legal counsel affirming that the City is authorized to issue the proposed debt, that the City has met all legal requirements necessary for issuance and a determination of the proposed debt’s federal income tax status. The approving opinion and other documents relating to the issuance of debt will be prepared by counsel with extensive experience in public finance and tax issues. The Bond Counsel will be selected by the City. Disclosure by Financing Team Members. All financing team members will be required to provide full and complete disclosure, relative to agreements with other financing team members and outside parties. The extent of disclosure may vary depending on the nature of the transaction. However, in general terms, no agreements shall be permitted which could compromise the firm’s ability to provide independent advice which is solely in the City’s best interests or which could reasonably be perceived as a conflict of interest. 5.18 City Financial Disclosure The City is committed to full and complete financial disclosure, and to cooperating fully with rating agencies, institutional and individual investors, City departments, and the general public to share clear, comprehensive, and accurate financial information. The City is committed to meeting secondary market disclosure requirements on a timely and comprehensive basis.

30


CITY OF SUFFOLK, VIRGINIA FINANCIAL POLICIES

UTILITY FUND It is the intent to reflect the financial policies of the Utility Fund to provide for adequate cash management and bond coverage for the operation of the system. 6.01 Independence The Utility Fund will maintain financial independence from the General Fund by: a. Continuing the funding of all Utility Enterprise Fund revenue requirements from the Utility Enterprise Fund, thereby receiving no financial support from the General Fund. b. Issuing self-supporting debt payable solely from the Utility Enterprise Fund. 6.02 Unrestricted Cash and Long Term Investments Balance It is the intent of the Utility Enterprise Fund to have adequate cash reserves to provide for ninety days of operating activity including debt service. Current unrestricted cash and cash equivalent balances plus operating long term investments will be at a target percentage rate of 25% of the operating expenses less depreciation expense plus current debt expenses (principal and interest). If the Unrestricted Cash and Long Term Investments Balance fall below the target level, the utility system will have twenty four months to bring the balance back in line with the target level. 6.03 Amortization The Utility Fund will continue to amortize bond issues so the useful life of the project being financed is not exceeded. 6.04 Debt Service Coverage Ratio Net Revenues should be at least 1.15 times the annual debt service requirement. Net Revenues shall be defined as operating revenues plus availability charges plus interest income plus contributions from Western Tidewater Water Authority less operating expenses plus depreciation and amortization. Excess revenues will be available to first build and maintain the Utility enterprise Cash and Cash Equivalents plus Long Term Investments then secondly to provide equity funding for future capital projects. Over time adherence to this policy will reduce the overall amount of debt issued by the City for various utility projects. 6.05 Asset Replacement and System Extension After the completion of the City’s new water treatment facility (estimated completion is 2015), the City will review the amount of funds being set aside for replacement and/or extension of all Utility system assets such that new assets will not be 100 percent debt financed.

31


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


Fund Summaries and Details


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


CITY OF SUFFOLK, VIRGINIA ADOPTED FY 2017-18 OPERATING AND CAPITAL BUDGET Annual Operating and Capital Budget by Fund

Budget 2014-2015

Fund General Fund

$

180,198,458 $

Budget 2015-2016 188,925,129 $

Budget 2016-2017 195,841,288 $

Adopted Budget 2017-2018

Prior Yr. % Change

202,168,028

3%

Capital Projects Fund

56,380,000

47,226,414

68,081,823

68,386,582

0%

Debt Service Fund

27,436,032

28,252,717

30,012,458

27,179,729

-9%

170,000

170,000

167,973

176,222

5%

1,300,000

1,400,000

1,400,000

1,855,432

33%

674,215

664,410

654,567

424,594

-35%

Transit System Fund

1,053,621

1,037,454

1,140,759

1,624,388

42%

Aviation Facilities Fund

1,053,814

1,094,116

1,037,558

1,026,872

-1%

41,460

44,562

41,774

41,561

-1%

Road Maintenance Fund

25,005,775

28,542,592

27,822,616

26,186,245

-6%

Fleet Management Fund

14,898,056

11,623,704

12,212,043

15,559,912

27%

5,452,162

6,055,406

7,762,072

8,666,702

12%

Risk Management Fund

17,253,725

19,357,600

20,507,505

21,429,654

4%

Utility Fund

46,716,280

46,474,656

49,984,650

52,684,425

5%

Stormwater Fund

6,139,840

7,223,975

6,298,975

6,114,296

-3%

Refuse Services Fund

6,817,756

5,957,441

6,121,438

7,595,277

24%

148,125,620

151,431,945

157,382,210

161,536,936

3%

538,716,817 $

545,482,122 $

586,469,710 $

602,656,857

Downtown Business Overlay District Route 17 Special Taxing District Grants Fund

Law Library Fund

Information Technology Fund

School Fund Total Funds Budget

$

32


33

.06 .07 .08 .29

.33

_______________General Government ______________Health and Welfare ______________________Debt Service ______________________Public Safety

__________Education & Related Debt

Total______________________________$1.00

.005 .005 .02 .02 .03 .04 .05

_______________Local and Regional _______________Non Department __________Community Development __________________Capital “Pay Go” ______________________Public Works ___________________________Judicial ________Parks, Recreation & Culture


34

Debt Service Fund $27,179,729

Capital Projects Fund $68,386,582

General Govt. $10,918,596 Judicial 8,513,410 Public Safety 59,334,427 Public Works 5,021,574 Health &Welfare 14,782,727 Education 56,383,718 Parks, Rec. & Cultural 10,753,501 Community Development 3,885,800 Local and Regional Orgs. 980,916 Non-Departmental Fringe Benefits/Insurances 610,000 Transfer to Funds 30,983,361 $202,168,028

General Fund $202,168,028

Major Gov’t. Funds

Governmental Funds

SUMMARY CHART

Transit System Fund $1,624,388

Route 17 Taxing District Fund $1,855,432

Law Library Fund $41,561

Grants Fund $424,594

Road Maint. Fund $26,186,245

Downtown Business Overlay District $176,222

Aviation Fund $1,026,872

Special Revenue Funds

Stormwater Fund $6,114,296

Refuse Services Fund $7,595,277

Utility Fund $52,684,425

Enterprise Funds

$602,656,857

Operating & Capital Budget

Risk Management Fund $21,429,654

Fleet Management Fund $15,559,912

Information Technology Fund $8,666,702

Internal Service Funds

School Funds $161,536,936

Component Unit

TOTAL EXPENDITURES


City of Suffolk Adopted FY 2017-18 Operating and Capital Budget General Fund - Executive Summary Current R.E. Tax Rate: Adopted R.E. Tax Rate:

$ $

1.07 1.07

Adopted Tax Rate Adjustment: Reassessment Tax Rate Impact to Citizens:

$ $

0.02

% Change

General Fund

Adopted Revenues:

$

202,168,028

3.2%

Adopted Expenditures:

$

202,168,028

3.2%

Unfunded Gap:

$

(0)

PRIMARY BUDGET GOALS: 1 2 3 4 5

No Real Estate Tax Increase Support for Suffolk Public Schools Employee Compensation and Critical Personnel Resources Investment in Quality of Life Compliance with Financial Policies

OTHER IMPORTANT BUDGET ITEMS TO NOTE:  Provides a 1.2% Cost of Living Adjustment (COLA) effective July 1, 2017 for all full and regular part-time employees, grant employees, Constitutional Officers and their employees, and Council Appointees, who were hired before April 1, 2017.  Provides for six new FTEs • Firefighters (3) • Police Officer • Accreditation Manager • PSAP Manager  Provides approximately $100,000 for the Tourism Division to assume operations of the Train Station Museum.  Includes NO layoffs, furloughs, or pay reductions to existing personnel.  Provides additional $2,000,000 in local support for Suffolk Public Schools.  Provides $525,583 for additional school related debt service associated with the new elementary and middle school, operations center, and HVAC projects.  Provides $4,585,137 for transfer to the Capital Projects Fund to comply with the capital pay-go financial policy.

FINANCIAL POLICY COMPLIANCE STATUS:  Unassigned Fund Balance as % of Govtl' Funds - 12% minimum  Capital Cash "Pay-Go" - 3% min. of General Fund Expenses  Debt as % of Assessed Value - 4% maximum  Debt as % of General Govt. Expense - 10% maximum

16.1% Projected 3.1% Projected 2.1% Projected 8.8% Projected

35


SUMMARY OF BUDGETED REVENUE CHANGES FROM PRIOR YEAR:  Revenue Gains / (Losses) : - Local Tax - Miscellaneous/Fees - State Revenue & Aid - Federal Revenue & Aid - Other

$

6,326,740

$

6,003,723 (163,605) 7,390 122,851 356,381

SUMMARY OF BUDGETED EXPENDITURE CHANGES FROM PRIOR YEAR:  Expenditure Increases / (Decreases): - Personnel & Benefits - Purchased Services - Professional Services - Repairs and Maintenance - Maintenance Service Contracts - Printing and Binding - Advertising - Juvenile Detention Services - Information Technology - Fleet - Risk - Utilities - Postage - Telecommunications - Lease of Equipment - Lease of Buildings - Travel & Training - Dues and Memberships - Codes - Marketing - Office Supplies - Uniforms - Books & Subscriptions - Other Operating Supplies - Merchandise for Resale - Copier - Special Programs - Capital Outlay - Regional Jail Detention Costs - Health & Welfare - Social Services - Local Organization Contributions - Regional Organization Memberships - Local Contribution to Schools (including lease payment) - Debt Payments - Transfer to Other Funds (Aviation, Capital, Debt, Grants, Transit)

$

6,326,740

$

1,873,575 (149,157) 82,751 (2,640) 156,765 2,237 10,200 (4,000) 633,331 767,399 141,728 (124,074) 5,580 70,680 28,869 79,425 49,492 6,597 (10,000) 10,000 33,060 65,841 8,235 16,961 11,300 3,981 45,081 7,810 15 (71,910) (64,000) 1,092 2,016,680 (1,863,900) 2,487,736

$

6,326,741

TOTAL INCREASED SERVICE REQUIREMENTS:

36

3%

3%


City of Suffolk Adopted FY 2017-18 Operating and Capital Budget Capital Projects Fund - Executive Summary % Change

Capital Projects Adopted Revenues:

$

68,386,582

0%

Adopted Expenditures:

$

68,386,582

0%

Unfunded Gap:

$

Increase / (Decrease) from Prior Fiscal Year:

-

$

304,759

Includes:  $5,060,000 in Public Utility bond funding for recommended essential water/sewer projects.  Includes GO Bonded Projects of the following: Education: HVAC/Chiller Replacements New Middle School New Elementary School Operations Facility Parks & Recreation: Bennett's Creek Recreation Center Shoreline Stabilization Project Public Buildings & Facilities: Godwin Courts Building Improvements Public Safety: Fire & Rescue Storage Building Transportation Safety: Local Urban Roadway (TBD) Local Urban Intersections (N Pkwy/Bennetts Pasture Rd, Kings Hwy/Godwin Blvd, Rt17 Ctrittenden Rd) Oak Ridge/Colonial Ave Connector Pruden Center Signal & Turn Lanes Shoulders Hill Rd/Rt 17 Intersection Pruden Blvd Culvert Improvements Old College Drive Drainage

2018 Bond $ $ 1,000,000 7,635,964 5,114,390 4,000,000 2,000,000 1,875,000 1,175,000 600,000

$

 Cash Pay-Go Funding to leverage significant grant support of the following projects: Aviation: Obstruction Removal Runway 4-22 Rehabilitation Covered Terminal Entranceway Transportation Safety: Bennett's Creek Channel Dredging

% Grant

Grant $

$

$

1,000,000 1,500,000 350,000 400,000 705,200 163,250 207,500 27,726,304

Cash Pay-Go 3,500 100,000 8,100 261,000 372,600

$

1,500,000

50%

400,000 2,563,756 163,250 207,500 4,834,506

50%

Grant $ $

$

171,500 4,900,000 21,900

98% 98% 73%

270,110 5,363,510

51%

 $24.1M or 35% of proposed capital project expenses funded by State/Federal dollars.

FINANCIAL POLICY COMPLIANCE STATUS:  Capital Cash "Pay-Go" - 3% min. of General Fund Expenses

50% 50%

3.1% Projected

37


City of Suffolk Adopted FY 2017-18 Operating and Capital Budget Aviation Facilities Fund- Executive Summary % Change

Aviation Adopted Revenues:

$

1,026,872

-1%

Adopted Expenditures:

$

1,026,872

-1%

Unfunded Gap:

Increase / (Decrease) from Prior Fiscal Year:

$

-

$

(10,686)

Includes:  Administrative and operational services and facilities to the general aviation community. Division maintains and operates the Suffolk Executive Airport to include runways, taxiways, hangar facilities, apron and tie down facilities, fueling facilities, required navigational equipment, and the airport café.  A transfer of $75,700 to support Airport operations from the General Fund to a Special Revenue Fund under the management of the Department of Economic Development.

38


City of Suffolk Adopted FY 2017-18 Operating and Capital Budget Downtown Business Overlay Tax District Fund - Executive Summary

Current Tax Rate: Adopted Tax Rate:

$ $

0.105 0.105

Adopted Tax Rate Adjustment:

$

-

% Change

DBOD

Adopted Revenues:

$

176,222

5%

Adopted Expenditures:

$

176,222

5%

Unfunded Gap:

Increase / (Decrease) from Prior Fiscal Year:

$

-

$

8,249

Includes: ďƒ˜ Funding to foster economic development in Downtown Suffolk. Revenues provide for beautification enhancements to the downtown business district, sidewalk and street sweeping, and refuse services.

39


City of Suffolk Adopted FY 2017-18 Operating and Capital Budget Law Library Fund - Executive Summary % Change

Law Library

Adopted Revenues:

$

41,561

-1%

Adopted Expenditures:

$

41,561

-1%

Unfunded Gap:

Increase / (Decrease) from Prior Fiscal Year:

$

(0)

$

(212)

Includes: ďƒ˜ Funding to provide the general public and legal community access to current legal and consumer protection information at no cost. A special fee of $4.00 is levied on civil court cases in the General District and Circuit Courts. This fee is held in a separate fund for the purpose of providing the public and Officers of the Court with a reliable network of legal information and educational support. This fund also supports community outreach efforts, legal publications, the salaries of support staff, and operating costs of the library.

40


City of Suffolk Adopted FY 2017-18 Operating and Capital Budget RT. 17 Tax District Fund - Executive Summary

Current Tax Rate: Adopted R.E. Tax Rate:

$ $

0.24 0.24

Adopted Tax Rate Adjustment:

$

-

% Change

RT. 17 Tax District

Adopted Revenues:

$

1,855,432

33%

Adopted Expenditures:

$

1,855,432

33%

Unfunded Gap:

Increase / (Decrease) from Prior Fiscal Year:

$

$

(0)

455,432

Includes:  Funding for purposes of the taxing district to foster economic development in the northern region of the City to promote economic development and business attraction in the district.  Transfer of debt service for payment of financed transportation improvements in the taxing district.  Transfer of $1.5M to the Capital Projects Fund for the Point Place Roadway Extension project.

41


City of Suffolk Adopted FY 2017-18 Operating and Capital Budget Road Maintenance Fund - Executive Summary % Change

Road Maintenance

Adopted Revenues:

$

26,186,245

-6%

Adopted Expenditures:

$

26,186,245

-6%

Unfunded Gap:

Increase / (Decrease) from Prior Fiscal Year:

$

(0)

$

(1,636,371)

Includes:  State Road Maintenance revenue based on City lane miles of: 1,220.90 secondary and 413.83 primary.  Addition of 1 FTE - Construction Inspector I to address work load increases.

42


City of Suffolk Adopted FY 2017-18 Operating and Capital Budget Debt Fund - Executive Summary % Change

Debt

Adopted Revenues:

$

27,179,729

-9%

Adopted Expenditures:

$

27,179,729

-9%

Unfunded Gap:

Increase / (Decrease) from Prior Fiscal Year:

$

(0)

$

(2,832,729)

Includes:  Current annual debt service for General Government and RT17 Taxing District Projects.  Includes GO Bond Revenue for the following projects: Education: HVAC/Chiller Replacements New Middle School New Elementary School Operations Facility Parks & Recreation Shoreline Stabilization Project Bennett's Creek Recreation Center Public Buildings & Facilities: Godwin Courts Building Improvements Public Safety: Fire & Rescue Storage Building Transportation: Local Urban Roadway Construction (TBD) Local Urban Intersections (N Pkwy/Bennetts Pasture Rd, Kings Hwy/Godwin Blvd, RT17/Crittenden Rd) Oak Ridge/Colonial Ave Connector Pruden Center Signal & Turn Lanes Shoulders Hill Road/RT17 Intersection Pruden Blvd Culvert Improvements Old College Drive Drainage

$

1,000,000 7,635,964 5,114,390 4,000,000 1,875,000 2,000,000 1,175,000 600,000

$

1,000,000 1,500,000 350,000 400,000 705,200 163,250 207,500 27,726,304

FINANCIAL POLICY COMPLIANCE STATUS:  Debt as % of Assessed Value - 4% maximum  Debt as % of General Govt. Expense - 10% maximum

2.1% Projected 8.8% Projected

43


City of Suffolk Adopted FY 2017-18 Operating and Capital Budget Public Utilities - Executive Summary % Change

Public Utilities

Adopted Revenues:

$

52,684,425

5%

Adopted Expenditures:

$

52,684,425

5%

Unfunded Gap:

$

Increase / (Decrease) from Prior Fiscal Year:

(0)

$

2,699,775

Includes:    

New customer revenue projection of 400 ERUs (Equivalent Residential Units) Eliminate 1 FTE - Office Assistant Addition of 1 FTE - Safety Officer II The following rate structure adjustments are proposed effective July 1 : FY 17 Water per 100 cubic feet Sewer per 100 cubic feet Water Availability Charge - Single Family Sewer Availability Charge - Single Family

FINANCIAL POLICY COMPLIANCE STATUS:  Utility Fund Financial Independence of the General Fund  Unrestricted Cash and Long Term Investments Balance at 25% of operations  Bond amortization not to exceed useful life of projects financed  Debt Service Coverage Ratio of 1.15 or greater

$ $ $ $

FY 18 9.03 6.97 5,520 6,000

$ $ $ $

9.20 7.21 5,520 6,000

% Change 1.9% 3.4% 0% 0%

Yes 76.0% Yes 1.16

44


City of Suffolk Adopted FY 2017-18 Operating and Capital Budget Stormwater Fund - Executive Summary

Current Monthly Fee per ERU: Adopted Monthly Fee per ERU:

$ $

6.00 6.00

% Change

Stormwater

Adopted Revenues:

$

6,114,296

-3%

Adopted Expenditures:

$

6,114,296

-3%

$

0

Unfunded Gap:

Increase / (Decrease) from Prior Fiscal Year:

$

(184,680)

Includes:  Mandated provision of Stormwater management services citywide to include mosquito control services.  Addition of 1 FTE - Civil Engineer III.

45


City of Suffolk Adopted FY 2017-18 Operating and Capital Budget Transit Fund - Executive Summary % Change

Transit

Adopted Revenues:

$

1,624,388

42%

Adopted Expenditures:

$

1,624,388

42%

Unfunded Gap:

Increase / (Decrease) from Prior Fiscal Year:

$

$

-

483,629

Includes:  Outsource of service delivery Virginia Regional Transit Authority.  Capital acquisition of (1) 24 passenger bus, paratransit vehicle, (2) shelters, and signs.  Addition of 1 FTE - Transit Manager contingent upon receipt of Federal funding.  Enhanced hours and service proposed contingent upon receipt of Federal funding.

46


City of Suffolk Adopted FY 2017-18 Operating and Capital Budget Refuse Fund - Executive Summary

Current Monthly Fee per Household: Adopted Monthly Fee per Household:

$ $

16.50 19.50

% Change

Refuse

Adopted Revenues:

$

7,595,278

24%

Adopted Expenditures:

$

7,595,278

24%

$

0

$

1,473,840

Unfunded Gap:

Increase / (Decrease) from Prior Fiscal Year:

Includes:  $3 per month fee increase to address cost requirements of trash disposal per agreement with the Southeastern Public Service Authority (SPSA).  Provides for Citywide Refuse, Recycling, Bulk Refuse pick up and Landfill post closure planning and management.  Provides for Citywide residential refuse and recycling pick-up to an estimated 29,500 households.  Compliance plan for State 25% citywide recycling requirement.

47


City of Suffolk Adopted FY 2017-18 Operating and Capital Budget Grants Fund - Executive Summary % Change

Grants

Adopted Revenues:

$

424,594

-35%

Adopted Expenditures:

$

424,594

-35%

Unfunded Gap:

Increase / (Decrease) from Prior Fiscal Year:

$

$

-

(229,973)

Includes: ďƒ˜ $350,000 in local cash match funds to leverage State and Federal grant opportunities for the City. ďƒ˜ Annual Allocations for CDBG and HOME funds are anticipated from the Federal Government, therefore, budget only includes portion of receipts for Section 108 loan of $74,594.

48


City of Suffolk Adopted FY 2017-18 Operating and Capital Budget Fleet Fund - Executive Summary % Change

Fleet

Adopted Revenues:

$

15,559,912

27%

Adopted Expenditures:

$

15,559,912

27%

$

0

$

3,347,869

Unfunded Gap:

Increase / (Decrease) from Prior Fiscal Year:

Includes:  Consistent cost estimate for fuel of $2.10 per gallon (govt. secured rate).  Replacement of fleet equipment exceeding standards for replacement due to cost and safety factors.  $3M cash funding from Fleet Fund Balance for vehicle replacements and additions.

49


City of Suffolk Adopted FY 2017-18 Operating and Capital Budget Information Technology Fund - Executive Summary % Change

Information Technology

Adopted Revenues:

$

8,666,702

12%

Adopted Expenditures:

$

8,666,702

12%

Unfunded Gap:

Increase / (Decrease) from Prior Fiscal Year:

$

$

(0)

904,630

Includes: ďƒ˜ Funding to provide for technology support services citywide for: - information technology disaster recovery - website maintenance - telecommunications, radio and tower services - network infrastructure - internet services - numerous and varied hardware and software program support

50


City of Suffolk Adopted FY 2017-18 Operating and Capital Budget Risk Fund - Executive Summary % Change

Risk

Adopted Revenues:

$

21,429,654

4%

Adopted Expenditures:

$

21,429,654

4%

$

0

$

922,149

Unfunded Gap:

Increase / (Decrease) from Prior Fiscal Year:

Includes:  Mandated coverage of workman's compensation, public safety "line of duty" benefits, and employee drug and alcohol screenings.  Mandated provision of health insurance benefits to employees with employer/employee cost sharing formula.  Mandated funding of required contribution to retiree benefits per GASB 45 OPEB ruling.

FINANCIAL POLICY COMPLIANCE STATUS:  Projected compliance for Risk Stabilization Reserve of 20% of anticipated claims.

Yes

51


City of Suffolk Adopted FY 2017-18 Operating and Capital Budget School Operating Fund - Executive Summary % Change

Schools

Adopted Revenues:

$

161,536,936

2.64%

Adopted Expenditures:

$

161,536,936

2.64%

$

-

$

4,154,726

Unfunded Gap:

Increase / (Decrease) from Prior Fiscal Year:

Includes:  Increase of $2,000,000 in local contributions.

Request Includes: Request : $

 Additional local appropriation request for funding of $2,000,000.

Recomdtn: 2,000,000 $ 2,000,000

Operating Fund

Year to Year Comparative Data Adopted FY 17 Requested FY 18 Adopted FY 18 $ 137.1 $ 141.3 $ 141.3

Lease of Building

$

0.5 $

0.5

$

0.5

0.00%

Grant Fund

$

11.6 $

11.4

$

11.4

-1.72%

Food Services Fund

$

8.1 $

8.3

$

8.3

2.47%

Operating Request: $

157.3 $

161.5

$

161.5

2.67%

School Debt Service: $

11.8 $

10.6

$

10.6

-10.17%

Total School Funding: $

169.1 $

172.1

$

172.1

1.77%

% Change 3.06%

Student Population: September Enrollment: Average Daily Membership: * Spending Per Pupil:

14,383 13,800

14,284 13,800

14,284 13,800

-1% 0%

12,254

12,471

12,471

1.77%

* calculation includes all revenue of State, Federal, Local, Grants, and Other

52


Summary of Revenues and Expenditures for All Funds FY 2016 - FY 2018

*FY 2016 Actual REVENUES General Property Taxes Other Local Taxes Permits, Fees, and Regulatory Licenses Fines and Forfeitures Use of Money and Property Charges for Services Miscellaneous Revenue Recovered Costs Revenue from the Commonwealth Revenue from the Federal Government Fund Transfers In Long Term Debt Issuance Fund Balance TOTAL REVENUES EXPENDITURES - by Function General Government Judicial Public Safety Public Works Public Utilities Health & Welfare Education Parks, Recreation & Cultural Community Development Other Public Services Non-Departmental Debt Fund Transfers Out TOTAL EXPENDITURES

$

$

$

FY 2017 Budget

118,079,540 42,507,743 1,626,684 1,042,219 1,310,811 98,928,844 8,155,471 986,436 128,978,418 21,670,126 92,690,042 44,523,251 560,499,583

$

46,017,493 8,473,069 56,171,775 49,739,827 21,590,951 12,215,727 157,489,530 11,561,161 6,027,777 6,376,690 15,801,302 65,237,531 92,690,042 549,392,874

$

$

FY 2018 Budget

119,360,410 40,450,000 1,235,800 1,040,000 2,420,247 103,745,141 3,928,477 682,082 137,532,432 19,543,223 95,352,793 50,834,105 10,345,000 586,469,710

$

39,990,082 8,343,319 57,961,168 72,003,589 39,274,438 14,914,566 185,084,315 10,872,808 3,951,665 4,432,290 8,427,626 47,861,050 93,352,793 586,469,710

$

$

123,174,734 42,875,000 1,424,550 790,000 2,249,593 110,445,447 4,750,824 789,386 149,603,166 24,898,601 99,210,861 32,786,304 9,658,391 602,656,857

$

42,970,112 8,554,971 60,486,564 82,349,030 31,412,969 14,782,727 180,869,064 15,203,501 5,600,800 9,088,103 5,661,649 48,966,506 96,710,861 602,656,857

Projected Unassigned/Unrestricted Fund Balance - June 30, 2017

$

98,317,772

Projected Unassigned/Unrestricted Fund Balance - June 30, 2018

$

88,007,388

$

$

*FY 2016 Actual amounts are tied to the City's Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (CAFR) and do not reflect receipts carried forward from prior years or unexpended funds for future years.

53


City of Suffolk All Funds Revenues and Expenditures Summary FY 2017 - 2018 Operating and Capital Budget

General Fund REVENUES General Property Taxes Other Local Taxes Permits, Fees, and Regulatory Licenses Fines and Forfeitures Use of Money and Property Charges for Services Miscellaneous Revenue Recovered Costs Revenue from Commonwealth Revenue from Federal Government Fund Transfers In Long Term Debt Issuance Fund Balance TOTAL REVENUES EXPENDITURES - by Function General Government Judicial Public Safety Public Works Public Utilities Health & Welfare Education Parks, Recreation & Cultural Community Development Other Public Services Non-departmental Debt Fund Transfers Out TOTAL EXPENDITURES

$

$

$

$

121,371,160 42,875,000 1,060,800 540,000 688,946 3,477,364 666,000 537,180 20,901,005 5,200,507 4,850,066 202,168,028

10,918,596 8,513,410 59,334,427 5,021,574 14,782,727 10,753,501 3,885,800 980,916 610,000 87,367,079 202,168,029

Downtown Business Overlay Taxing District Fund

Aviation Fund $

$

$

$

266,172 685,000 75,700 1,026,872

945,826 30,000 51,046 1,026,872

$

176,222 176,222

$

$

176,222 176,222

$

Unassigned/Unrestricted Fund Balance June 30, 2016

56,491,224

-

-

Projected Unassigned/Unrestricted Fund Balance - June 30, 2017

57,041,823

-

-

Appropriations from the Unassigned/Unrestricted Fund Balance during the year - FY 18

(2,500,000)

Projected Unassigned/Unrestricted Fund Balance - June 30, 2018

$

54,541,823

$

-

$

-

54


City of Suffolk All Funds Revenues and Expenditures Summary FY 2017 - 2018 Operating and Capital Budget

Law Library Fund

Transit Fund REVENUES General Property Taxes Other Local Taxes Permits, Fees, and Regulatory Licenses Fines and Forfeitures Use of Money and Property Charges for Services Miscellaneous Revenue Recovered Costs Revenue from Commonwealth Revenue from Federal Government Fund Transfers In Long Term Debt Issuance Fund Balance TOTAL REVENUES EXPENDITURES - by Function General Government Judicial Public Safety Public Works Public Utilities Health & Welfare Education Parks, Recreation & Cultural Community Development Other Public Services Non-departmental Debt Fund Transfers Out TOTAL EXPENDITURES

$

$

$

$

66,750 8,500 252,627 485,000 811,511 1,624,388

1,606,361 18,027 1,624,388

$

$

$

$

Debt Service Fund

41,561 41,561

41,561 41,561

$

27,179,729 27,179,729

$

$

27,179,729 27,179,729

$

Unassigned/Unrestricted Fund Balance June 30, 2016

-

-

-

Projected Unassigned/Unrestricted Fund Balance - June 30, 2017

-

-

-

Appropriations from the Unassigned/Unrestricted Fund Balance during the year - FY 18 Projected Unassigned/Unrestricted Fund Balance - June 30, 2018

$

-

$

-

$

-

55


City of Suffolk All Funds Revenues and Expenditures Summary FY 2017 - 2018 Operating and Capital Budget

Utility Fund REVENUES General Property Taxes Other Local Taxes Permits, Fees, and Regulatory Licenses Fines and Forfeitures Use of Money and Property Charges for Services Miscellaneous Revenue Recovered Costs Revenue from Commonwealth Revenue from Federal Government Fund Transfers In Long Term Debt Issuance Fund Balance TOTAL REVENUES EXPENDITURES - by Function General Government Judicial Public Safety Public Works Public Utilities Health & Welfare Education Parks, Recreation & Cultural Community Development Other Public Services Non-departmental Debt Fund Transfers Out TOTAL EXPENDITURES

$

$

$

$

1,279,475 47,544,900 560,050 3,300,000 52,684,425

23,052,969 50,000 4,276,502 21,360,133 3,944,822 52,684,425

Information Technology Fund

Fleet Mgmt. Fund $

$

$

$

12,559,912 3,000,000 15,559,912

14,875,794 106,056 266,409 311,652 15,559,912

$

8,666,702 8,666,702

$

$

8,254,426 152,060 77,588 182,629 8,666,702

$

Unassigned/Unrestricted Fund Balance June 30, 2016

25,615,350

9,089,153

(263,820)

Projected Unassigned/Unrestricted Fund Balance - June 30, 2017

24,146,089

7,589,153

(259,974)

Appropriations from the Unassigned/Unrestricted Fund Balance during the year - FY 18

(3,300,000)

(3,000,000)

Projected Unassigned/Unrestricted Fund Balance - June 30, 2018

$

20,846,089

$

4,589,153

$

(259,974)

56


City of Suffolk All Funds Revenues and Expenditures Summary FY 2017 - 2018 Operating and Capital Budget

Risk Mgmt. Fund REVENUES General Property Taxes Other Local Taxes Permits, Fees, and Regulatory Licenses Fines and Forfeitures Use of Money and Property Charges for Services Miscellaneous Revenue Recovered Costs Revenue from Commonwealth Revenue from Federal Government Fund Transfers In Long Term Debt Issuance Fund Balance TOTAL REVENUES EXPENDITURES - by Function General Government Judicial Public Safety Public Works Public Utilities Health & Welfare Education Parks, Recreation & Cultural Community Development Other Public Services Non-departmental Debt Fund Transfers Out TOTAL EXPENDITURES

$

$

$

$

19,929,654 1,500,000 21,429,654

21,367,091 12,121 50,442 21,429,654

Route 17 Taxing District Fund $

$

$

$

Refuse Fund

1,627,352 228,080 1,855,432

1,855,432 1,855,432

$

7,009,688 250,206 335,384 7,595,278

$

$

7,256,935 20,659 82,647 235,036 7,595,277

$

Unassigned/Unrestricted Fund Balance June 30, 2016

6,121,237

-

2,185,270

Projected Unassigned/Unrestricted Fund Balance - June 30, 2017

7,087,194

-

2,206,780

Appropriations from the Unassigned/Unrestricted Fund Balance during the year - FY 18 Projected Unassigned/Unrestricted Fund Balance - June 30, 2018

(1,500,000) $

5,587,194

(335,384) $

-

$

1,871,396

57


City of Suffolk All Funds Revenues and Expenditures Summary FY 2017 - 2018 Operating and Capital Budget

Road Maintenance Fund REVENUES General Property Taxes Other Local Taxes Permits, Fees, and Regulatory Licenses Fines and Forfeitures Use of Money and Property Charges for Services Miscellaneous Revenue Recovered Costs Revenue from Commonwealth Revenue from Federal Government Fund Transfers In Long Term Debt Issuance Fund Balance TOTAL REVENUES EXPENDITURES - by Function General Government Judicial Public Safety Public Works Public Utilities Health & Welfare Education Parks, Recreation & Cultural Community Development Other Public Services Non-departmental Debt Fund Transfers Out TOTAL EXPENDITURES

$

$

$

$

Stormwater Mgmt. Fund

363,750 250,000 15,000 1,199,500 24,500 2,000 23,431,495 900,000 26,186,245

24,081,201 164,396 1,940,648 26,186,245

$

$

$

$

5,939,296 175,000 6,114,296

5,364,914 289,855 459,527 6,114,296

Capital Projects Fund $

1,506,774 19,605,940 4,707,500 9,560,137 32,786,304 219,927 68,386,582

$

$

2,080,000 1,152,137 25,572,390 8,360,000 19,332,128 4,450,000 1,715,000 5,505,000 219,927 68,386,582

$

Unassigned/Unrestricted Fund Balance June 30, 2016

-

811,169

-

Projected Unassigned/Unrestricted Fund Balance - June 30, 2017

-

506,707

-

Appropriations from the Unassigned/Unrestricted Fund Balance during the year - FY 18 Projected Unassigned/Unrestricted Fund Balance - June 30, 2018

(175,000) $

-

$

331,707

$

-

58


City of Suffolk All Funds Revenues and Expenditures Summary FY 2017 - 2018 Operating and Capital Budget

Grants Fund REVENUES General Property Taxes Other Local Taxes Permits, Fees, and Regulatory Licenses Fines and Forfeitures Use of Money and Property Charges for Services Miscellaneous Revenue Recovered Costs Revenue from Commonwealth Revenue from Federal Government Fund Transfers In Long Term Debt Issuance Fund Balance TOTAL REVENUES EXPENDITURES - by Function General Government Judicial Public Safety Public Works Public Utilities Health & Welfare Education Parks, Recreation & Cultural Community Development Other Public Services Non-departmental Debt Fund Transfers Out TOTAL EXPENDITURES

$

$

$

$

Schools Fund 74,594 350,000 424,594

350,000 74,594 424,594

$

$

$

$

Grand Total

4,010,120 1,300,000 85,412,099 14,431,000 56,383,718 161,536,937

161,536,936 161,536,936

$

$

$

$

123,174,734 42,875,000 1,424,550 790,000 2,249,593 110,445,447 4,750,824 789,386 149,603,166 24,898,601 99,210,861 32,786,304 9,658,391 602,656,857

42,970,112 8,554,971 60,486,564 82,349,030 31,412,969 14,782,727 180,869,064 15,203,501 5,600,800 9,088,103 5,661,649 48,966,506 96,710,861 602,656,857

Unassigned/Unrestricted Fund Balance June 30, 2016

-

-

100,049,583

Projected Unassigned/Unrestricted Fund Balance - June 30, 2017

-

-

98,317,772

Appropriations from the Unassigned/Unrestricted Fund Balance during the year - FY 18 Projected Unassigned/Unrestricted Fund Balance - June 30, 2018

(10,810,384) $

-

$

-

$

87,507,388

59


REVENUE ANALYSIS General Fund The General Fund is the primary operating fund of the City. It provides the financial resources for the majority of City programs and services including general administration, capital programs, courts and judicial services, economic development, planning, zoning, and inspections, health and social services, libraries, public safety, public works, parks and recreation, and tourism. General Fund revenue is comprised of general property tax revenue (60%), other local tax revenue (21%), revenue from fees and charges (4%), state revenue (10%), federal revenue (3%), and fund transfers (2%). General Fund revenue is projected to increase 3.2% over the previous year budget in FY 18 to $202.1M. General Fund Revenue

General Property Taxes Other Local Taxes Revenue from Fees and Charges State Revenue Federal Revenue Fund Transfers

FY 15 Actual

FY 16 Actual

FY 17 Budget

FY 17 Projected

FY 18 Adopted

$ 110,618,848 39,723,172 7,582,384 19,817,211 5,006,075 3,326,310

$ 116,745,216 42,507,743 8,130,215 19,813,487 5,153,630 2,345,591

$ 117,792,437 40,450,000 7,133,895 20,893,615 5,077,656 4,493,685

$ 119,545,766 42,695,621 7,300,424 22,209,330 5,147,061 2,493,685

$ 121,371,160 42,875,000 6,970,290 20,901,005 5,200,507 4,850,066

$ 186,074,000

$ 194,695,882

$ 195,841,288

$ 199,391,887

$ 202,168,028

General Fund Revenue

General Property  Taxes  60%

Other Local  Taxes  21%

Fees & Charges 4%

State 10%

Federal 3% Fund Transfers 2%

60


General Property Taxes General property taxes account for approximately 60% of General Fund revenue and consist of taxes on real estate, personal property (i.e. airplanes, boats, cars, trucks, trailers, mobile homes, recreational vehicles and machinery and tools), public service corporation taxes, and penalties and interest. Real estate tax revenue is the City’s largest source of revenue, comprising 48% of General Fund revenue. A 2% or $2.1M increase in real estate tax revenue is projected in FY 18. The assessed value of real estate increased 2.06% in the latest reassessment. Assessed value growth of existing properties accounted for 1.56% of the increase, while new construction garnered .50% of the total increase in assessed value. The real estate tax rate will remain unchanged at $1.07 per $100 of assessed value in FY 18. Personal property tax revenue, which accounts for nearly 10% of General Fund revenue, is projected to increase 5% over the FY 17 budgeted amount or $900,000 in FY 18. The projected increase is based on analysis of current assessed values and historic trends.

61


Other Local Taxes Other local taxes include levies on sales and use, communications sales, utilities, business licenses, motor vehicle licenses, bank stock, recordation and probate, tobacco, admissions, lodging and meals. Other local tax revenue is projected to increase 6% or $2.4M in FY 18. Local taxes driving the 6% increase include admissions (20%), lodging (18%), sales and use (11%), business licenses (9%), motor vehicle licenses (4%), and meals (3%). New office, commercial, retail, and restaurant developments in central and northern Suffolk have bolstered local tax revenue in recent years. Continued economic growth and development is anticipated in the next fiscal year. Revenue from Fees and Charges Revenue from fees and charges account for 3% of all General Fund revenue and consist of permits, privilege fees, and regulatory licenses; fines & forfeitures; revenue from the use of money and property; charges for services; miscellaneous revenue; and recovered costs. Revenue from fees and charges is projected to slightly decrease by 2% in FY 18. A decrease of 36% is anticipated in fine & forfeitures and a 3% decrease in revenue from use of money. These decreases are due to trend estimates over the past three years. However, some of the decreases will be offset by a 6% increase in permits, privilege fees, and regulatory licenses, a 2% increase in charges for services and a 3% increase in total recovered costs. Â

Permits, Privilege Fees, and Regulatory Licenses Revenue from permits, privilege fees, and regulatory licenses consists of revenue from animal licenses, land use applications, land transfers, zoning, use and ordinances, building and weapons permits, borrow pit fees, and fishing and other miscellaneous permits. Based on current trends revenue from permit, privilege fees and regulatory licenses are projected to increase 6% or approximately $60,000 in FY 18. The increased revenue is due to building and weapons permits which are trending higher.

62


Fines & Forfeitures Revenue from fines and forfeitures is comprised of General District Court fines, parking fines and violation fees, and false alarm violation fees. Revenue from fines and forfeitures is projected to decrease by 36% or $300,000 in FY 18 due to a decrease in General District Court fines based on current trends. Revenue from Use of Money and Property Revenue from the use of money and property consists of interest earned on investments, bond proceeds, and the rental of City facilities. A 3% decrease or $21,153 is projected in FY 18. The decrease is primarily due to adjustments in antenna space rental due to current trends. Charges for Services Charges for Services includes fees and charges for emergency medical service, court security, animal adoptions, recreation and special events, grave openings, and sale of service revenue to other City funds. Revenue from Charges for Services is projected to increase 2% or $80,450 in FY 18. The increase is primarily due to sale of service revenue for capital project management and police weights and measures services provided by the General Fund to other City funds. Miscellaneous Revenue Miscellaneous revenue is comprised of delinquent tax collection fees; tourism gift shop sales; gifts, donations, and contributions and payments in lieu of taxes from the Suffolk Redevelopment and Housing Authority. Miscellaneous revenue is projected to remain flat at $666,000 in FY 18. Recovered Costs Recovered costs include reimbursements from other localities, the Suffolk School Board, and the Department of Social Services. Recovered cost revenue is projected to increase 3% or $17,098 in FY 18 due to reimbursements from the school division for public safety services. State Revenue Revenue from the Commonwealth of Virginia represents approximately 10% of General Fund revenue and includes non-categorical aid, shared expenses, and categorical aid. State revenue is projected to remain flat at $20.9M in FY 18. Non-Categorical Aid The City receives various sources of non-categorical aid from the Commonwealth of Virginia including motor vehicle carrier, mobile home titling, rolling stock, deeds/grantors, and vehicle rental tax revenue, as well as House Bill 599 (police operational aid) and personal property tax relief funding. Non-categorical aid is projected to slightly increase by 1% in FY 18. Shared Expenses The City receives funding from the Commonwealth of Virginia Compensation Board for the shared expenses of operating state-assisted local offices including the offices of the Commonwealth’s Attorney, Sheriff, Commissioner of the Revenue, Treasurer, Voter Registrar, and Circuit Court Clerk. State shared expense revenue is projected to increase slightly by 1% in FY 18.

63


Categorical Aid The City receives categorical aid from the Commonwealth of Virginia for specific locally administered programs and services including social services, public safety, courthouse maintenance, and library services. Categorical aid is projected to decrease 3% in FY 18 to $4.4M based on state aid estimates for social services programs. Federal Revenue The City receives federal revenue for emergency services, the food stamp program, and temporary assistance for needy families. Federal revenue is projected to increase 2% or $122,851 to approximately $5.2M in FY 18.

Other Funds In addition to the General Fund, the City also has 16 other funds which account for the proceeds of revenue sources that are legally restricted to expenditures for specified purposes. These funds include the Capital Projects Fund, the Debt Service Fund, seven special revenue funds (Aviation, Consolidated Grants, Downtown Business Overlay Taxing District, Road Maintenance, Law Library, Route 17 Special Taxing District, and Transit), three enterprise funds (Utility, Stormwater Utility, and Refuse), three internal service funds (Fleet Management, Information Technology, and Risk Management), and one discreetly presented component unit, the Schools Fund. Capital Projects Fund The Capital Projects Fund budget for FY 18 is $68.3M which represents no change over FY 17. The Capital Projects Fund derives revenues from the issuance of bonds, state and federal grants, and fund transfers. The Capital Projects Fund is supported by the following funding sources: $27.7M general obligation bonds (40%), $24.3M state and federal funds, (36%), $5.2M transfer from other funds (8%), $5.0M public utility bonds (7%), $4.6M general funds cash (7%), and $1.5M cash proffers (2%).

Capital Projects Fund  Revenue Sources FY 2017‐2018

General Obligation  Bonds 40%

Public Utility  Revenue  Bonds 7%

State and  Federal Grants 36%

General Fund  Cash 7% Transfer from  Cash Proffers Other Funds 8% 2%

64


Debt Service Fund The Debt Service Fund is used to account for the payment of general long term debt principal, interest, and related costs associated with projects that are debt financed. Revenues in this fund are derived through the transfer of funds from the General Fund, Route 17 Special Taxing District Fund, and the Consolidated Grants Fund. The Debt Service Fund budget will decrease 9% in FY 18 to $27.2M. Special Revenue Funds Special Revenue Funds provide for revenue derived from specific sources other than major capital projects that are restricted by legal and regulatory provisions to finance specific activities. Downtown Business Overlay Taxing District Fund The Downtown Business Overlay Taxing District (DBOD) provides for revenues and expenditures related to enhanced services provided in a specifically designated area of downtown Suffolk. Revenues are derived from an additional real estate tax levy of $.105 assessed on properties located within the district’s boundaries. The projected DBOD revenue for FY 18 is $176,222 or 5% increase over FY 17. The increase is attributable to an increase in the assessed value of real estate of 6.58% in the DBOD per the most recent real estate reassessment. Road Maintenance Fund The Road Maintenance Fund accounts for revenues and expenditures related to the maintenance of roads and bridges. Revenues are derived primarily from the State Urban Street Maintenance Program and sale of services to other funds. The Road Maintenance Fund budget for FY 18 is $26.2M, a 6% decrease over FY 17. The reduction is due primarily to a decline in developer traffic signal contributions and decreased reliance on fund balance for capital projects in FY 18. State revenue, which is based on a funding formula accounting for roadway miles in the City, is projected to remain flat at $23.4M in FY 18. Consolidated Grants Fund The Consolidated Grants Fund accounts for revenues and expenditures of grant and local matching funds provided for various programs and services. Budgeted revenue includes a transfer from the General Fund, which is used for required local matching funds to state and federal grants accepted and appropriated during the fiscal year, as well as a portion of federal Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) entitlement funds used for debt payments against a HUD Section 108 loan acquired by the City to revitalize the Fairgrounds section of downtown. The Consolidated Grants Fund budget for FY 18 is $424,594, a 35% decrease over FY 17 due to a reduction in CDBG entitlement funds needed for the City’s required Section 108 loan payment. Law Library Fund The Law Library Fund provides for the operation, maintenance, and purchase of legal materials for the Suffolk Law Library. Revenues are obtained through the collection of fees on court cases processed in the Circuit and General District courts. The Law Library Fund budget for FY 18 is $41,561, a 1% decrease over FY 17. Route 17 Special Taxing District Fund The Route 17 Special Taxing District Fund accounts for revenues and expenditures related to enhanced economic development and transportation services provided in a specifically designated area of northern Suffolk. Revenues are derived from an additional real estate tax levy 65


of $.24 assessed on properties located within the district’s boundaries. The projected revenue for FY 18 is $1.8M or a 33% increase over FY 17. The increase is attributable to an increase in the assessed value of real estate of 4.66% in the Route 17 Special Taxing District per the most recent real estate reassessment. Aviation Facilities Fund The Aviation Facilities Fund accounts for the revenues and expenditures of the Suffolk Executive Airport. Fund revenues are comprised of fuel sales (66%), rental of facilities such as airport hangars (26%), miscellaneous revenue to include an airport usage fee (1%), and the transfer of funding support from the General Fund (7%). The Aviation Facilities Fund budget for FY 18 is approximately $1M, a 1% decrease over FY 17. Transit Fund The Transit Fund accounts for the revenues and expenditures of Suffolk’s transit service, which is outsourced to the Virginia Regional Transit Authority (VRTA), and includes six bus routes and ADA service. The Transit Fund derives revenues from General Fund transfers (50%), state and federal funding (45%), and fare collections (5%). The Transit Fund budget for FY 18 is approximately $1.6M, a 42% increase over FY 17 due to an increase in federal funding. Enterprise Funds Enterprise funds are used to account for operations that are financed and operated in a manner similar to private business enterprises. The intent of enterprise funds is for the costs of providing goods or services to the general public to be financed or recovered primarily through user charges. Utility Fund The Utility Fund provides for water and sewer services to City residents and businesses. All activities necessary to provide these services are accounted for in this fund, including, but not limited to, administration, operation, maintenance, billing, collections, capital financing and related debt service and fixed assets of the water and sewer systems. The Utility Fund is designed to be self-sustaining. The Utility Fund budget for FY 18 is approximately $52.7M, a 5% increase over FY 17. The Utility Fund derives revenues through charges for water and sewer service, water and sewer availability charges, bulk water sales, meter service charges, hydrant rentals, capital contributions from development, capitalized interest, bond rebates, special fees, sale of services, and miscellaneous revenue. Water and sewer rates will increase $.17 (water) and $.24 (sewer) monthly per 100 cubic feet in FY 18 to address state and federal regulatory mandates and system growth. Stormwater Fund The Stormwater Fund provides for the operation, management, construction and maintenance of stormwater facilities, as well as mosquito control services. A stormwater fee of $6.00 per month is assessed on all residential units. Commercial businesses pay a multiple of the equivalent residential unit. The stormwater fee is a result of the Federal Clean Water Act of 1972 and amendments thereafter which require cities to make improvements to reduce the amount of pollution from stormwater runoff. No federal or state funding is provided to offset the cost of the water quality measures. The Fund earns additional revenue through permit and inspection fees paid by developers based on a percentage of hard surface coverage required for development and the sale of services such as engineering services to other City funds. The Stormwater Fund 66


budget for FY 18 is approximately $6.1M, a 3% decrease over FY 17. The reduction is due to decreased utilization of the Stormwater Fund Balance for capital improvements in FY 18. Refuse Fund The Refuse Fund accounts for the revenues and expenditures of the City’s refuse collection and recycling services which include citywide refuse, recycling, and bulk refuse pickup. The Fund is designed to be self-sustaining through revenue generated by fees for refuse collection, the sale of trash cans, and sale of service to other City funds. The Refuse Fund budget for FY 18 is approximately $7.6M, a 24% increase over FY 17. The City is increasing the refuse collection fee by $3.00 a month from $16.50 to $19.50 per month in FY 18 to address tipping fee expenses of the regional landfill operator, the Southeastern Public Service Authority (SPSA). Internal Service Funds Internal service funds are used to account for the operational cost of services provided to other city departments. Revenue is derived from charges on a cost reimbursement basis. The internal service funds include the Fleet Management Fund, Information Technology Fund, and Risk Management Fund. Information Technology Fund The Information Technology Fund provides for the operation and maintenance of the City’s technology infrastructure including computer, software, and telephone systems. The cost of operating these systems is allocated to the various city departments and agencies on a cost reimbursement basis. The Information Technology Fund budget for FY 18 is approximately $8.7M, a 12% increase over FY 17. Fleet Management Fund The Fleet Management Fund accounts for the revenue and expenditures of the City’s centralized fleet management program including vehicle and equipment acquisition, maintenance, repairs, and fuel. Operating costs are allocated to city departments and agencies that use fleet equipment and assets on a cost reimbursement basis. The Fleet Management Fund budget for FY 18 is approximately $15.6M, a 27% increase over FY 17. The increase is attributable to the increased utilization of unrestricted fleet fund balance for vehicle and equipment replacements and additions, as opposed to debt financing. Risk Management Fund The Risk Management Fund provides for the funding and payment of auto, general liability, health and worker’s compensation claims against the City. The Fund derives revenue from the allocation of costs to City departments based on insured asset values, the number of employees per department, and estimated premiums and claims for the year. The Risk Management Fund budget for FY 18 is approximately $21.4M, a 4% increase over FY 17. Discretely Presented Component Unit Discretely presented component units are reported separate from the primary government to emphasize that they are legally separate from the City. The Schools Fund is a discretely presented component unit. Schools Fund The Schools Fund provides for the activities of the Suffolk Public School System. The appropriation by the City consolidates the funding for the existing three School funds including 67


the School Operating Fund, School Food Service Fund, and School Grants Fund. Revenues are derived from local, state, federal, and other sources. The School Operating Fund budget for FY 18 is approximately $161.5M, a 3% increase over FY 17. The increase in Schools funding is primarily due to a $2.1M increase in state funding for education and a $2M increase in local funding.

68


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


General Operating Fund


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


CITY OF SUFFOLK, VIRGINIA ADOPTED FY 2017-18 OPERATING AND CAPITAL BUDGET GENERAL FUND Revenue Summary

2014-2015 Actual

Revenue Type

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Adopted

Budget % Change

GENERAL PROPERTY TAXES Real Property Public Service Corporation Taxes Personal Property Penalties and Interest on Taxes

$

87,868,430 $ 91,844,007 $ 3,470,735 3,902,017 18,072,965 19,803,303 1,206,718 1,195,890

94,692,437 $ 3,400,000 18,600,000 1,100,000

96,871,160 4,000,000 19,500,000 1,000,000

2% 18% 5% -9%

Total General Property Taxes

$

110,618,848 $ 116,745,216 $

117,792,437 $

121,371,160

3%

9,500,000 3,400,000 4,300,000 6,900,000 2,300,000 525,000 1,400,000 1,900,000 250,000 1,275,000 8,700,000

10,500,000 3,300,000 4,400,000 7,500,000 2,400,000 575,000 1,450,000 1,950,000 300,000 1,500,000 9,000,000

11% -3% 2% 9% 4% 10% 4% 3% 20% 18% 3%

40,450,000 $ 158,242,437 $

42,875,000 164,246,160

6% 4%

35,000 15,000 2,500 200,000 700,000 40,000 65,000 3,000 300

0% 0% 0% 0% 8% 33% 0% 0% 0%

1,060,800

6%

300,000 100,000 140,000

-50% 0% 0%

OTHER LOCAL TAXES Sales and Use Tax Public Facilities Tax Rebate Communications Sales Tax Utility Taxes ( Electric / Gas) Business License Tax Motor Vehicle License Tax / Fee Bank Stock Tax Recordation & Probate Tax Tobacco Tax Admissions Tax Lodging Tax Meals Tax Total Other Local Taxes TOTAL LOCAL TAX REVENUE

9,397,170 3,492,721 4,509,480 6,928,327 2,301,259 529,855 1,456,396 1,391,263 215,019 1,172,193 8,329,490 $ $

9,904,693 3,115,672 4,478,378 7,680,254 2,449,544 564,037 1,466,044 2,050,259 318,348 1,484,031 8,996,483

39,723,172 $ 42,507,743 $ 150,342,020 $ 159,252,959 $

PERMITS, PRIVILEGE FEES, AND REGULATORY LICENSES Animal License Land Use Application Fee Land Transfer Fee Zoning, Use and Ordinance Fee Building Permits Weapons Permits Borrow Pit Fees Fishing Permits Miscellaneous Permits Total Permits, Privilege Fees, and Regulatory Licenses

39,598 16,150 2,616 205,037 730,894 39,268 72,909 3,280 400 $

1,110,151 $

37,209 39,070 3,002 232,107 808,985 51,097 79,675 2,718 360 1,254,223 $

35,000 15,000 2,500 200,000 650,000 30,000 65,000 3,000 300 1,000,800 $

FINES & FORFEITURES General District Court Fines Parking Fines and Violation Fees False Alarm Violation Fees Total Fines & Forfeitures

682,247 165,197 138,548 $

985,992 $

488,168 156,741 186,315 831,224 $

600,000 100,000 140,000 840,000 $

540,000

-36%

250,000 100,000 217,471 18,000 70,000 28,800 4,675

0% 0% 0% 0% 0% -42% 1%

688,946

-3%

REVENUE FROM USE OF MONEY AND PROPERTY Interest on Investments Interest on Bond Proceeds Human Resources Building Rent Municipal Center Building Rent Park Facility Use Fees Recreational Building Rental Antenna Space Rental Vending Machine Commission Other Rentals Total Revenue from Use of Money and Property

185,397 54,388 75,503 95,528 18,912 76,332 47,128 15,559 14,927 $

583,674 $

187,033 151,312 3,000 217,634 18,165 83,681 28,800 17,005 4,229 710,858 $

250,000 100,000 217,471 18,000 70,000 50,000 4,628 710,099 $

69


CITY OF SUFFOLK, VIRGINIA ADOPTED FY 2017-18 OPERATING AND CAPITAL BUDGET GENERAL FUND Revenue Summary

2014-2015 Actual

Revenue Type

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

93,580 5,787 21,311 107,826 13,202 31,466 16,772 1,766,606 71,069 958,793 18,239 36,505 70 249,038 100,000 1,280 95,325

50,000 5,787 18,000 120,000 9,000 25,000 10,000 1,820,516 80,000 900,000 20,000 44,000 100 81,511 100,000 28,000 85,000

2017-2018 Adopted

Budget % Change

CHARGES FOR SERVICES Excess Fees - Circuit Court Clerk Sheriff's Fees (Serving Court Papers) Court Appointed Attorney Fees Court Security Fee Commonwealth Attorney's Fees Police Fire & Rescue EMS Fee Animal Control Fees Recreation & Special Event Fees Library Fines and Charges Tourism Special Event Fees Charges for Planning & Community Development Sale of Service - Capital Projects Administration Sale of Service - Road Maintenance (Police Weights & Measures) Sale of Service - Road Maintenance Fund (Landscape by P&R) Grave Openings Total Charges for Services

64,045 5,787 22,648 130,163 4,171 29,542 14,802 1,744,688 75,643 932,010 17,373 32,971 85 341,000 88,834 2,030 81,600 $

3,587,391 $

3,586,869 $

3,396,914 $

60,000 5,787 18,000 120,000 9,000 30,000 15,000 1,848,519 70,000 900,000 18,000 45,500 100 114,458 125,000 28,000 70,000

20% 0% 0% 0% 0% 20% 50% 2% -13% 0% -10% 3% 0% 40% 25% 0% -18%

3,477,364

2%

3,000 2,000 5,000 400,000 250,000 6,000

0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0%

MISCELLANEOUS REVENUE SRHA - Payment in Lieu of Taxes Sale of Salvage/Surplus Property Sale of Real Estate Delinquent Tax Collection Fee Miscellaneous Revenue Sales - Tourism Total Miscellaneous Revenue

28,290 7,733 436,071 337,772 6,646 $

816,511 $

4,518 12,532 741,023 293,185 6,835 1,058,093 $

3,000 2,000 5,000 400,000 250,000 6,000 666,000 $

666,000

0%

5,000 441,680 500 90,000

0% 4% 0% 0%

537,180 6,970,290

3% -2%

15,000 350,000 130,000 2,853,819 10,169,730 130,000 -

0% 0% 0% 3% 0% 0% -

13,648,549

1%

RECOVERED COSTS Reimbursement - Other Localities Reimbursement - School Board Reimbursement - Community Service Board Reimbursement - Jury Duty Compensation Reimbursement - Social Services Total Recovered Costs TOTAL REVENUE FROM FEES / CHARGES

2,668 398,728 781 96,486 $ $

498,664 $ 7,582,384 $

2,731 406,863 171,671 1,441 106,241 688,947 $ 8,130,215 $

5,000 424,582 500 90,000 520,082 $ 7,133,895 $

REVENUE FROM THE COMMONWEALTH - NON CATEGORICAL AID Motor Vehicle Carrier Tax Mobile Home Titling Tax Tax on Deeds - Grantors Tax Rolling Stock Tax Police House Bill 599 Personal Property Tax Relief Vehicle Rental Tax Local Fines Reversion Local Aid Commonwealth Contra Rev Total Non-Categorical Aid

16,245 373,283 134,775 2,764,800 10,169,730 139,424 (213,192) $

13,385,064 $

33,714 279,231 141,214 2,764,800 10,169,730 194,746 (38,378) 13,545,057 $

15,000 350,000 130,000 2,764,800 10,169,729 130,000 13,559,529 $

70


CITY OF SUFFOLK, VIRGINIA ADOPTED FY 2017-18 OPERATING AND CAPITAL BUDGET GENERAL FUND Revenue Summary

2014-2015 Actual

Revenue Type

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

1,001,955 906,612 164,058 208,918 88,860 509,050

1,015,746 915,754 165,792 209,544 45,000 484,579

2017-2018 Adopted

Budget % Change

SHARED EXPENSES Commonwealth Attorney Sheriff Commissioner of the Revenue Treasurer Registrar Circuit Court Clerk Total Shared Expenses

988,646 889,838 160,929 203,644 46,007 550,712 $

2,839,777 $

2,879,452 $

2,836,414 $

1,026,702 933,199 166,610 213,431 46,399 491,630

1% 2% 0% 2% 3% 1%

2,877,971

1%

CATEGORICAL AID Asset Forfeiture Funds Jurors' Fees Courthouse Maintenance Fees Public Assistance Grants Comprehensive Services Act Property Seizure Program - Police Wireless E911 Grant Miscellaneous Grants Four for Life Grant - EMS Fire Programs Fund Economic Development Incentive Program Library Aid Total Categorical Aid TOTAL STATE REVENUE

$ $

5,825 16,076 43,638 1,899,764 713,201 16,196 227,893 1,378 43,740 267,978 200,000 156,682

21,355 23,502 40,862 1,887,487 627,093 62,774 221,430 80 80,663 268,082 155,649

20,000 40,000 2,726,408 1,011,706 200,000 76,080 268,082 155,396

20,000 40,000 2,691,613 908,115 200,000 80,663 274,489 159,605

0% 0% -1% -10% 0% 6% 2% 3%

3,592,370 $ 19,817,211 $

3,388,978 $ 19,813,487 $

4,497,672 $ 20,893,615 $

4,374,485 20,901,005

-3% 0.0%

9,791 32,944 4,943,272 20,067

27,593 24,478 5,080,507 21,052

5,057,656 20,000

5,180,507 20,000

2% 0%

5,200,507

2%

REVENUE FROM THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT - NON CATEGORICAL AID Criminal Justice Services Grants Property Seizure Program - Police Public Safety DEA Overtime Public Assistance Grants Refuge Revenue Sharing (Dismal Swamp) TOTAL FEDERAL REVENUE

$

FUND TRANSFERS Transfer from Fund Balance Indirect Cost Return: Transfer from Road Maintenance Fund Transfer from Transit Transfer from Aviation Fund Transfer from Debt Transfer from Utility Fund Transfer from Stormwater Fund Transfer from Refuse Fund Transfer from Fleet Management Fund Transfer from Information Technology Fund Transfer from Risk Management Fund TOTAL OTHER REVENUE

$

TOTAL REVENUES

$

5,006,075 $

5,153,630 $

-

-

705,009 40,311 920,756 576,133 322,327 208,427 222,378 237,993 92,976

552,851 52,860 610,253 343,910 256,247 228,352 212,758 88,360

3,326,310 $

5,077,656 $

2,000,000

593,220 14,207 58,979 663,551 318,352 237,746 351,523 186,427 69,680

2,500,000

571,885 18,027 51,046 644,822 284,527 235,036 311,652 182,629 50,442

2,345,591 $

4,493,685 $

4,850,066

186,074,001 $ 194,695,882 $

195,841,288 $

202,168,028

-

-4% -13% -3% -11% -1% -11% -2% -28% 8% 3.2%

71


CITY OF SUFFOLK, VIRGINIA ADOPTED FY 2017-18 OPERATING AND CAPITAL BUDGET GENERAL FUND Expenditure Summary Budget 2014-2015

2015-2016

2016-2017

2017-2018

%

2017-2018

%

Actual

Actual

Budget

Request

Incr

Adopted

Change

GENERAL GOVERNMENT City Council

$

City Manager

423,319 $

417,451 $

472,235 $

503,235

7% $

394,306

-17%

1,003,532

1,005,431

1,045,092

1,045,091

0%

1,063,872

Budget & Strategic Planning

218,198

265,554

330,399

330,399

0%

333,847

1%

City Attorney

985,654

998,677

1,049,367

1,049,459

0%

1,044,867

0%

1,057,063

1,042,454

1,041,977

1,147,013

10%

1,138,291

9%

904,521

959,041

1,104,831

1,109,887

0%

1,164,031

5%

Assessor

1,406,210

1,456,020

1,616,641

1,836,004

14%

1,677,130

4%

Treasurer

1,406,256

1,417,098

1,544,149

1,644,579

7%

1,590,695

3%

Finance

1,428,724

1,291,551

1,489,955

1,510,358

1%

1,686,315

13%

Human Resources Commissioner of the Revenue

2%

Purchasing

319,946

316,253

332,780

385,551

16%

341,615

3%

Registrar

576,158

479,037

460,927

480,627

4%

483,627

5%

9,729,581 $

9,648,568 $

10,488,353 $

10,918,596

4%

Total General Government

$

11,042,203

5% $

JUDICIAL Circuit Court Judges

181,947

181,264

200,358

201,557

1%

206,448

3%

General District Court

62,597

47,817

61,618

91,618

49%

62,618

2%

Magistrate's Office

15,827

18,444

17,355

17,355

0%

17,355

0%

Juvenile & Domestic Relations Court

14,210

12,587

15,304

16,854

10%

15,854

4%

Court Services Unit

918,000

747,991

977,435

977,435

0%

973,435

0%

Clerk of the Circuit Court

1,306,232

1,378,890

1,385,295

1,481,937

7%

1,460,532

5%

Sheriff

2,288,987

2,407,204

2,552,090

2,680,677

5%

2,644,433

4%

Commonwealth's Attorney

2,814,744

2,934,893

3,092,092

3,193,608

3%

3,132,735

1%

7,602,545 $

7,729,091 $

8,301,546 $

8,661,041

4% $

8,513,410

3%

Total Judicial

$

PUBLIC SAFETY Police Police - Emergency Communications Animal Shelter Management Community Development Services Fire and Rescue Fire and Rescue - Emergency Management Western Tidewater Regional Jail Total Public Safety

$

19,439,938

19,183,162

21,882,042

22,754,242

4%

22,989,758

5%

1,553,879

1,585,326

1,751,671

1,920,090

10%

1,964,927

12%

804,829

835,998

882,032

940,857

7%

984,525

12%

2,235,426

2,256,477

2,473,466

2,526,466

2%

2,505,934

1%

24,167,057

24,945,506

25,584,202

28,123,449

10%

26,485,504

4%

13,944

28,160

33,347

42,792

28%

39,727

19%

3,797,045

4,303,091

4,364,037

4,364,052

0%

4,364,052

0%

59,334,427

4%

52,012,117 $

53,137,721 $

56,970,798 $

60,671,948

6% $

PUBLIC WORKS Public Works - Administration Capital Programs & Facilities Total Public Works

$

873,075

885,475

911,888

1,034,723

13%

1,031,121

13%

3,491,334

3,483,316

3,805,122

3,925,283

3%

3,990,453

5%

4,364,409 $

4,368,790 $

4,717,010 $

4,960,006

5% $

5,021,574

6%

72


CITY OF SUFFOLK, VIRGINIA ADOPTED FY 2017-18 OPERATING AND CAPITAL BUDGET GENERAL FUND Expenditure Summary Budget 2014-2015

2015-2016

2016-2017

2017-2018

%

2017-2018

%

Actual

Actual

Budget

Request

Incr

Adopted

Change

HEALTH & WELFARE Social Services

10,219,988

9,993,234

12,100,955

12,110,954

0%

12,245,979

1%

1,470,615

1,101,341

1,692,459

1,397,100

-17%

1,401,538

-17%

Western Tidewater Health District

840,000

840,000

840,000

840,000

0%

840,000

0%

Western Tidewater Community Service Board

281,152

281,152

281,152

295,210

5%

295,210

5%

12,811,755 $

12,215,727 $

14,914,566 $

14,643,264

-2% $

14,782,727

-1%

51,114,708

54,096,838

54,367,038

56,383,718

4%

56,383,718

4%

51,114,708 $

54,096,838 $

54,367,038 $

56,383,718

4% $

56,383,718

4%

Children's Services Act

Total Health & Welfare

$

EDUCATION Transfer to School Operating - Local Support Total Education

$

PARKS, RECREATION & CULTURAL Parks and Recreation - Administration Parks and Recreation - Office on Youth Parks and Recreation - Parks, Gateways & Maint. Parks and Recreation - Grounds Maintenance Parks and Recreation - Support Services

1,311,869

1,491,836

1,659,372

1,666,772

0%

1,773,348

7%

124,532

139,394

100,236

191,274

91%

103,754

4%

1,915,422

2,135,010

2,239,583

2,333,731

4%

2,229,747

0%

513,422

484,570

543,898

633,264

16%

553,192

2%

451,020

482,421

649,505

789,438

22%

670,859

3%

Parks and Recreation - Recreation

2,172,309

2,304,281

2,209,415

3,047,906

38%

2,308,800

4%

Library

2,548,828

2,613,660

3,045,798

3,587,432

18%

3,113,800

2%

9,037,401 $

9,651,173 $

10,753,501

3%

Planning and Community Development

1,117,821

1,060,857

1,510,085

1,695,416

12%

1,547,193

2%

Economic Development

3,773,943

2,491,756

836,812

838,512

0%

840,993

0%

Tourism

551,942

552,216

602,425

646,289

7%

716,579

19%

Media and Community Relations

612,701

643,701

683,812

707,140

3%

712,506

4%

52,704

51,865

68,530

68,400

0%

68,530

0%

6,109,111 $

4,800,394 $

3,701,665 $

3,955,757

3,885,800

5%

972,117

987,235

985,411

1,581,773

61%

980,916

0%

972,117 $

987,235 $

985,411 $

1,581,773

61% $

980,916

0%

Total Parks, Recreation & Cultural

$

10,447,808 $

12,249,817

17% $

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

Virginia Cooperative Extension Service Total Community Development

$

7% $

OTHER PUBLIC SERVICES Local and Regional Organizations Total Other Public Services

$

NON-DEPARTMENTAL Non-departmental Transfer to Funds (Capital, Debt, Transit, Aviation)

1,848,129

466,002

587,569

610,000

4%

610,000

4%

32,191,869

32,024,848

30,359,524

31,028,278

2%

30,983,361

2%

34,039,998 $

32,490,850 $

30,947,093 $

Total Non-departmental

$

31,638,278

2% $

31,593,361

2%

Total General Fund Expenditures

$ 187,793,742 $ 189,126,386 $ 195,841,288 $ 205,787,805

5% $

202,168,028

3.2%

73


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


CITY COUNCIL DESCRIPTION The City Council is the legislative and policy making body of the City Government. It establishes policies, sets goals and priorities, and interprets and represents the needs of the community to ensure the economic, social, educational, and physical quality of the City. The City Council is supported by the City Clerk whose office is responsible for the preservation and maintenance of the legislative record; recording and publishing City Council minutes; serving as an information center to address inquiries from citizens, municipal departments, and agencies; the management of boards and commissions; and fulfilling research requests. FY 2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Prepared 100% of City Council retreat, regular meeting, special meeting, and work session minutes in accordance with the Code of Virginia.

Complied with 100% of Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests within five working days as prescribed by the Code of Virginia.

Prepared and disseminated 100% of City Council ordinances and resolutions within five days of approval.

Expanded the availability of electronic records internally and externally. FY 2018 OBJECTIVES 

To prepare 100% of City Council meeting minutes in accordance with the Code of Virginia.

To comply with 100% of Freedom of Information Act requests within five working days as prescribed by the Code of Virginia.

To disseminate 100% of City Council ordinances and resolutions within five days of approval.

To prepare all boards and commissions records accurately and to prepare all ceremonial items as requested and approved by City Council.

To expand the availability of electronic records both internally and externally.

STATISTICS/PERFORMANCE MEASURES Number of City Council meetings held Average time to post Council actions to City website Percentage Council Member attendance at public meetings Number of public inquiries received Average response time to public inquiries

FY 16 Actual 46 2 days 100% 1,800 2 days

FY 17 Projected 48 2 days 100% 2,000 2 days

FY 18 Estimate 48 2 days 100% 2,200 2 days

74


Department: City Council Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 100-1111051100.02 52100 52210 52400 53100 53500 53600 54100 54500 55210 55230 55500 55810 55840 56001 56012 56017 56026

Salaries and Wages FICA VRS Retirement Group Life Professional Services Printing and Binding Advertising Information Technology Risk Management Postal Services Telecommunications Travel and Training Dues & Association Memberships Code Expense Office Supplies Books and Subscriptions Copier Costs Special Events

Total Operating Expenditures

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Change

$

237,279 17,759 16,959 1,360 20,907 91,111 459 6,413 4,405 550 8,377 4,764 265 2,718 9,993

$

248,699 18,544 17,397 1,496 495 13,610 87,450 974 7,613 11,387 355 2,946 2,521 3,964 -

$

252,903 19,347 14,328 1,702 5,000 11,910 108,659 1,000 7,208 10,000 500 20,000 5,500 4,178 10,000

$

252,903 19,347 14,328 1,702 20,000 500 1,000 11,910 108,659 1,000 7,208 20,000 500 20,000 5,000 4,178 15,000

$

423,319

$

417,451

$

472,235

$

503,235

2017-2018 Adopted

0% $ 0% 0% 0% 300% 0% 0% 0% 0% 100% 0% 0% -9% 0% 50% 7%

$

% Change

258,889 19,805 14,989 1,780 5,000 13,288 22,169 1,000 7,208 15,000 500 10,000 5,500 4,178 15,000

2% 2% 5% 5% 0% 12% -80% 0% 0% 50% 0% -50% 0% 0% 50%

394,306

-17%

56026 - Special Events: Christmas Party, & Peanut Fest City Reception and special event sponsorships Personnel Summary

Range

Class Mayor Councilman City Clerk 127 Deputy City Clerk

Number of Full-Time Positions

2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

2017-2018 Adopted

1 7 1 1

1 7 1 1

1 7 1 1

1 7 1 1

1 7 1 1

10

10

10

10

10

75


CITY MANAGER DESCRIPTION The City Manager is the Chief Executive Officer of the City of Suffolk and is responsible for the day-today administration of City Government. The City Manager recommends policy alternatives to the City Council and implements the policies and priorities established by the governing body in accordance with the City Charter, City Code and Ordinances, and State and Federal regulations. Other essential activities and duties include oversight of operating departments, coordination of legislative affairs with state and congressional leaders, and serving as a liaison to businesses, community organizations, and various local and regional boards and commissions. FY 2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Affirmed strong bond ratings on the City’s general obligation bonds (AAA/Aa1).

Awarded the Distinguished Budget Presentation Award and Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting from the Government Finance Officers Association (GFOA).

Initiated capital improvement projects to improve the quality of life of citizens including the new elementary school and middle school projects, various roadway and intersection improvements, public safety enhancements, and storm drainage and utility improvements.

FY 2018 OBJECTIVES 

To improve the overall efficiency and effectiveness of City Government by continuing to refine the City’s administrative and business practices. (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

To continue strengthening the City’s financial position by adhering to adopted financial policies and best financial management practices and encouraging job growth and capital investment in the community. (Financial Stability)

To ensure the delivery of high quality services and programs to the citizens of Suffolk. (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

STATISTICS/PERFORMANCE MEASURES Bond Rating: Moody’s Standard & Poor’s Fitch Fund Balance at/above 12% per City Financial Policies GFOA Certificate of Excellence in Financial Reporting GFOA Distinguished Budget Presentation Award Number of jobs created Private Investment

FY 16 Actual

FY 17 Projected

FY 18 Estimate

Aa1 AAA AAA 15.8%   600 $85M

Aa1 AAA AAA 15.8%   800 $100M

Aa1 AAA AAA 16.1%   800 $100M

76


Department: City Manager Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 100-1211051100.02 51100.04 51100.14 52100 52210 52400 53100 53200 54100 54200 54500 55210 55230 55410 55500 55810 56001 56012 56017 58200

Salaries and Wages Salaries and Wages - Overtime Transportation Expense FICA VRS Retirement Group Life Professional Services Temporary Help Service Fees Information Technology Fleet Risk Management Postal Services Telecommunications Lease/Rent of Equipment Travel and Training Dues and Association Memberships Office Supplies Books and Subscriptions Copier Costs Capital Outlay

Total Operating Expenditures

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Change

2017-2018 Adopted

% Change

$

608,997 222 19,750 46,125 89,732 8,372 88,505 570 32,469 3,644 64,450 342 8,775 1,055 12,699 40 4,229 505 13,051 -

$

649,374 70 9,800 43,935 87,840 8,400 62,400 48,471 2,016 61,826 727 8,044 6,079 2,835 3,145 205 10,264 -

$

672,214 13,200 51,424 74,145 8,806 50,000 46,293 2,556 76,649 1,000 9,439 1,000 20,000 2,833 2,500 1,500 11,532 -

$

672,214 13,200 51,424 74,145 8,806 50,000 46,293 2,556 76,649 1,000 9,439 1,000 20,000 2,833 2,500 1,500 11,532 -

0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% -

$

676,811 13,200 51,776 74,652 8,866 60,000 48,497 3,037 77,228 1,000 9,439 1,000 20,000 2,833 2,500 1,500 11,532 -

1% 0% 1% 1% 1% 20% 5% 19% 1% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% -

$

1,003,532

$

1,005,431

$

1,045,092

$

1,045,091

0%

$

1,063,872

2%

53100 - Professional Services: Legislative Services Personnel Summary

Range

Class

146 145 133 130 125 121

City Manager Deputy City Manager Chief of Staff Senior Administrative Analyst Administrative Analyst Administrative Assistant Executive Secretary

Number of Full-Time Positions

2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

1 1 1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1

1 1 1

7

-

-

2017-2018 Requested

2017-2018 Adopted 1 1 1

-

1 1 1 -

2 1 1

2 1 1

1 1 2

1 1 2

7

7

7

7

77


BUDGET AND STRATEGIC PLANNING DESCRIPTION The Division of Budget and Strategic Planning provides financial and management information, control, and guidance to the City Council, City Manager, and City departments. The primary responsibilities of the division include the development and execution of the Annual Financial Plan and multi-year Capital Improvement Program, oversight of City department budgets and funds, strategic financial planning and fiscal impact analysis. FY 2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Achieved 100% of the City’s financial policy goals through the adopted annual operating budget.

Awarded the Distinguished Budget Presentation Award from the Government Finance Officers Association (GFOA) for the eighth consecutive year reflecting the achievement of the highest principles in governmental budgeting.

FY 2018 OBJECTIVES 

To develop a balanced budget in compliance with the City Charter and within local and state mandated timeframes for financial plan development. (Financial Stability)

To provide quarterly budget status reports to the City Manager, City Council, City Departments, and citizens of Suffolk within 30 days of the end of each quarter. (Financial Stability)

To review and submit at least 95% of budget adjustment requests for processing within 48 hours of receipt from city departments. (Financial Stability)

STATISTICS/PERFORMANCE MEASURES Balanced Budget prepared within prescribed timeframes GFOA Distinguished Budget Award received Financial Policies: Budgeted capital projects meet 3% “Pay Go” policy Debt as a percentage of assessed value at/below 4% Debt as a percentage of general gov’t expenditures at/below 10% Fund Balance at/above 12% per City Financial Policies Variance in actual to projected General Fund revenue Percent of budget transfers reviewed/processed within 48 hours

FY 16 Actual  

FY 17 Projected  

FY 18 Estimate  

3.0% 2.1% 9.5% 15.8% 3.1% 100%

3.0% 2.2% 9.5% 15.8% 3.0% 100%

3.1% 2.1% 8.8% 16.1% 3.0% 100%

78


Division: Budget & Strategic Planning (Department of Finance) Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 100-1244051100.02 52100 52210 52400 53600 54100 54500 55210 55230 55500 55810 56001 56012 56017 58200

Salaries and Wages FICA VRS Retirement Group Life Advertising Information Technology Risk Management Postal Services Telecommunications Travel and Training Dues and Association Memberships Office Supplies Books and Subscriptions Copier Costs Capital Outlay

Total Operating Expenditures

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Change

2017-2018 Adopted

% Change

$

121,596 8,782 18,045 1,447 2,867 16,864 36,609 48 1,105 182 690 1,359 8,604 -

$

172,317 12,723 23,424 2,055 1,820 11,114 35,134 26 850 690 696 4,706 -

$

228,465 17,478 25,200 2,993 2,000 10,079 32,739 100 1,387 2,000 1,200 1,500 200 5,058 -

$

228,465 17,478 25,200 2,993 2,000 10,079 32,739 100 1,387 2,000 1,200 1,500 200 5,058 -

0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% -

$

230,387 17,625 25,412 3,018 2,000 10,900 33,061 100 1,387 2,000 1,200 1,500 200 5,058 -

1% 1% 1% 1% 0% 8% 1% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% -

$

218,198

$

265,554

$

330,399

$

330,399

0%

$

333,847

1%

Personnel Summary

Range

Class 138 Assistant Director of Finance - Budget 133 Budget Analyst 130 Budget Associate

Number of Full-Time Positions

2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

1 2 1

1 2

1 2

4

-

3

2017-2018 Requested

2017-2018 Adopted 1 2

3

1 2 -

3

3

79


CITY ATTORNEY DESCRIPTION The City Attorney is the head of the Department of Law and chief legal advisor of the City Council, the City Manager, and all departments, boards, commissions, and agencies of the City including the Economic Development Authority. The Department of Law institutes and defends all legal proceedings which it deems necessary and proper to protect the interests of the City of Suffolk. FY 2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Successfully represented the City in court against a frivolous lawsuit and claims.

Finalized contracts for the development of a portion of the old Obici site; 55-acre Economic Development Authority site for the Point at Harbour View development; Emser Tile and Peet’s Economic Development Incentive Program agreements, and construction management and cost participation agreement with the City of Chesapeake for the Nansemond Parkway/Portsmouth Boulevard Project

Provided an attorney for all Planning Commission, Economic Development Authority, Wetland’s Board, and Historic Landmarks Commission meetings.

Provided monthly trainings for Department of Social Services personnel to include staffing current cases and researching legal issues for circumstances that the family services workers encounter.

Provided training to the Police Department regarding civil liability issues concerning encounters with persons with mental illness.

FY 2018 OBJECTIVES 

To limit the use of outside counsel unless there is no attorney in the office with the legal proficiency required to provide the service or if a conflict of interest exists. (Financial Stability)

To respond to requests for legal services to City Council, departments, boards, and commissions in a timely manner. (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

To provide training to City staff on legal issues affecting the City. (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

STATISTICS/PERFORMANCE MEASURES Number of requests for legal services Number of contract reviews Number of court appearances Number of real estate matters handled: Deeds Easements Closings

FY 16 Actual 1,852 567 123

FY 17 Projected 1,875 576 127

FY 18 Estimate 1,880 580 135

8 26 26

12 30 40

12 35 45

80


Department: City Attorney Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 100-1221051100.02 52100 52210 52400 53100 53100.11 53600 54100 54500 55210 55230 55500 55810 56001 56012 56017

Salaries and Wages FICA VRS Retirement Group Life Professional Services Legal Services Advertising Information Technology Risk Management Postal Services Telecommunications Travel and Training Dues and Association Memberships Office Supplies Books and Subscriptions Copier Costs

Total Operating Expenditures

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Change

2017-2018 Adopted

% Change

$

666,183 48,015 98,862 7,637 5,761 3,292 32,633 83,443 1,175 7,150 7,273 3,097 4,623 4,982 11,527

$

671,699 47,850 92,638 8,183 2,483 3,432 576 52,564 80,046 1,149 5,619 11,644 3,927 3,957 3,987 8,923

$

707,922 54,156 78,084 9,274 5,000 3,544 1,000 49,737 98,105 1,500 6,977 10,000 5,633 5,000 4,000 9,435

$

707,922 54,156 78,084 9,274 5,000 3,636 1,000 49,737 98,105 1,500 6,977 10,000 5,633 5,000 4,000 9,435

0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 3% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0%

$

701,220 53,643 77,345 9,186 5,000 3,636 1,000 51,848 99,444 1,500 6,977 10,000 5,633 5,000 4,000 9,435

-1% -1% -1% -1% 0% 3% 0% 4% 1% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0%

$

985,654

$

998,677

$

1,049,367

$

1,049,459

0%

$

1,044,867

0%

Personnel Summary

Range

144 135/138/140 130 127 124 120

Class City Attorney Deputy City Attorney Assistant City Attorney I-III Paralegal Administrator Legal Services Coordinator Paralegal Legal Secretary

Number of Full-Time Positions

2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

2017-2018 Adopted

1 1 3 1 1 1 1

1 1 3 1 1 1 1

1 1 3 1 1 1 1

1 1 3 1 1 1 1

1 1 3 1 1 1 1

9

9

9

9

9

81


HUMAN RESOURCES DESCRIPTION The Department of Human Resources provides support to the City Manager and City departments in the recruitment, hiring, development, and retention of employees. These services are provided through data collection, needs projection, recruitment, selection, retention, general training, advice to management, and review of human resources policies and procedures. The Department oversees ongoing programs related to employee health and welfare, employee recognition, and employee relations with internal and external customers. FY 2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Implemented NeoGov Onboarding technology to facilitate the process for communicating City vision, mission, and policies with applicants, and streamlining the orientation process with new hires.

Implemented City Council approved recommendations from the Evergreen Solutions Compensation Study, resulting in the adjustment of pay grades consistent with the market, and compression adjustments for eligible employees.

Expanded the leadership skills and knowledge of the workforce through senior and middle management training and network opportunities, training classes for general employees, and the implementation of a new administrative assistant certification program.

FY 2018 OBJECTIVES 

To maintain a well-trained and engaged workforce now and in the future through comprehensive training and development opportunities for all employees. (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

To develop and implement policies and programs to support competitive compensation practices that are consistent with the City’s fiscal condition. (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

To develop and implement employee engagement and recognition initiatives based on employee focus group feedback. (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

To implement a technology solution for managing, tracking and evaluating employee performance using performance management and evaluation tools. (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

STATISTICS/PERFORMANCE MEASURES Employee Turnover Rate New Hires Percent of Vacant Positions  Training Programs:  Number training programs provided for City staff Number of participants    

FY 16 Actual 6.8% 310 14.4% 13 341  

FY 17 Projected 6.5%  320  14.5%    12  300   

FY 18 Estimate 5.8% 280 10%   14 400

82


Department: Human Resources Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 100-1222051100.02 51100.04 51100.06 52100 52210 52400 52820 53100 53200 53500 53600 54100 54500 55210 55230 55500 55810 55841 56001 56012 56017 58200

Salaries and Wages Salaries and Wages - Overtime Salaries and Wages - Part-time FICA VRS Retirement Group Life Tuition Assistance Professional Services Temporary Help Service Fees Printing and Binding Advertising Information Technology Risk Management Postal Services Telecommunications Travel & Training Dues and Association Memberships Service Awards Office Supplies Books and Subscriptions Copier Costs Capital Outlay

Total Operating Expenditures

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Change

$

590,918 273 41,594 46,544 81,421 6,975 85,483 10,691 220 3,225 53,612 91,420 5,709 6,459 12,968 2,477 6,220 5,592 5,264 -

$

488,242 82 23,192 37,938 64,669 5,970 97,209 465 3,594 183,079 87,737 6,848 5,284 11,312 2,426 14,468 5,953 75 3,911 -

$

503,745 30,719 40,887 55,563 6,599 65,000 10,000 183,194 76,641 3,500 6,994 18,000 980 25,000 8,000 3,000 4,155 -

$

538,169 41,170 59,360 7,050 36,000 65,000 10,000 183,194 76,641 3,500 6,994 35,800 980 68,000 8,000 3,000 4,155 -

$

1,057,063

$

1,042,454

$

1,041,977

$

1,147,013

2017-2018 Adopted

7% $ -100% 1% 7% 7% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 99% 0% 172% 0% 0% 0% 10%

$

% Change

513,870 31,088 41,689 56,680 6,732 30,000 65,000 10,000 236,471 77,132 3,500 6,994 18,000 980 25,000 8,000 3,000 4,155 -

2% 1% 2% 2% 2% 0% 0% 29% 1% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% -

1,138,291

9%

55500 - Travel & Training: City wide training. Personnel Summary

Range

Class 144 138 135 135 130 130 122

Director of Human Resources Assistant Director of Human Resources Training Manager Human Resources Manager Human Resources Generalist Administrative Analyst Human Resources Assistant

Number of Full-Time Positions

2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

1 1 1 2 2 1 2

1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1

10

-

-

2017-2018 Requested

2017-2018 Adopted 1 1 1 1 2

-

1 1 1 1 2 -

2

2

2

1

7

7

8

7

83


COMMISSIONER OF THE REVENUE DESCRIPTION The Office of the Commissioner of the Revenue is required by Section 15.2-1600 of the Code of Virginia. The Commissioner of the Revenue is an elected official whose responsibilities are to assess individual personal property, business personal property, and machinery and tools for taxation and issue City business licenses and administer special taxes on meals, lodging, cigarettes, and admissions. The Office also processes state income and estimated tax returns, assesses public service corporations, maintains the City’s personal property record and assessment books, enforces City business license codes, and assists individuals and businesses with tax and license inquiries, as well as with income and estimated tax inquiries. FY 2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Assessed all personal property and other local taxes in accordance with the Code of Virginia and Suffolk City Code.

Achieved 100% compliance with the state income tax audit.

Responded to all customer inquiries within one business day or less.

Initiated resolutions to problems within one business day.

Enrolled all eligible staff deputies in the Career Development Program

of the Commissioners of the Revenue Association of Virginia. FY 2018 OBJECTIVES 

To assess all personal property and other local taxes in accordance with the Code of Virginia and Suffolk City Code. (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

To achieve 100% compliance with the state income tax audit. (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

To respond to all customer inquiries within one business day. (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

To initiate resolutions to problems within one business day. (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

To enroll all eligible staff deputies in the Career Development Program of the Commissioners of Revenue Association of Virginia. (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

STATISTICS/PERFORMANCE MEASURES Number of Tax Accounts: Meals Lodging Admissions Business Licenses Personal Property

CY 14 Actual

CY 15 Actual

CY 16 Actual

350 17 4 5,079 129,377

334 14 4 5,268 131,889

363 16 9 5,627 139,263

84


Department: Commissioner of the Revenue Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 100-1231051100.02 51100.04 51100.06 52100 52210 52400 53500 53600 54100 54500 55210 55230 55500 55810 56001 56012 56017 58200

Salaries and Wages Salaries and Wages - Overtime Salaries and Wages - Part-time FICA VRS Retirement Group Life Printing and Binding Advertising Information Technology Risk Management Postal Services Telecommunications Travel and Training Dues and Association Memberships Office Supplies Books and Subscriptions Copier Costs Capital Outlay

Total Operating Expenditures

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Change

2017-2018 Adopted

% Change

$

516,235 113 28,482 38,950 74,203 6,112 4,590 289 51,582 109,613 14,834 6,375 5,657 1,130 21,956 1,575 19,509 3,316

$

549,608 13 27,729 41,376 73,482 6,458 4,543 346 85,622 105,202 16,398 5,137 4,578 950 24,393 1,538 11,669 -

$

605,572 29,931 48,616 66,795 7,933 5,100 350 133,085 130,542 14,500 7,633 6,000 1,160 31,000 1,660 14,955 -

$

605,572 29,931 48,616 66,795 7,933 6,100 400 133,085 130,542 16,100 7,633 6,000 1,530 32,850 1,845 14,955 -

0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 20% 14% 0% 0% 11% 0% 0% 32% 6% 11% 0% -

$

614,817 30,290 49,351 67,814 8,054 5,100 350 175,229 132,112 16,100 7,633 6,000 1,530 32,850 1,845 14,955 -

2% 1% 2% 2% 2% 0% 0% 32% 1% 11% 0% 0% 32% 6% 11% 0% -

$

904,521

$

959,041

$

1,104,831

$

1,109,887

0%

$

1,164,031

5%

Personnel Summary

Range

Class

138 132 125 127 124 122 121 118

Commissioner of the Revenue Chief Deputy Commissioner of the Revenue Auditor Business Tax Investigator Deputy Commissioner of the Revenue IV Deputy Commissioner of the Revenue III Deputy Commissioner of the Revenue II Deputy Commissioner of the Revenue I Customer Service Representative

Number of Full-Time Positions

2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

1 1 1 1 1 1 3 2 1

1 1 1 1 1 1 3 2 1

1 1 1 1 1 1 3 2 1

12

12

12

2017-2018 Requested

2017-2018 Adopted 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 3

12

1 1 1 1 1 1 3 3 12

NOTE: Comp Board provides partial salary reimbursement for 9 of 12 full time positions with reimbursement by the State and contribution by the City for the balance for operations.

85


CITY ASSESSOR DESCRIPTION The purpose of the City Assessor’s Office is to discover, list, and value all real property in the City of Suffolk. Real estate values are based on local market conditions and governed by Section 58.1-3200 of the Code of Virginia, which requires assessments to reflect one hundred percent of market value. FY 2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Refined reporting methodology and electronic approval process for exonerations, supplements and assessment updates.

Continued conversion efforts and conducted training for all office staff on the Vision Appraisal CAMA System.

Continued quantitative inspection tracking for the purpose of International Association of Assessing Officers standard compliance and workflow monitoring.

Finalized comparative aerial analysis preparation of existing properties (CONNECT Assessment)

FY 2018 OBJECTIVES 

Finalize plans regarding the phase out of the existing Appraisal Plus CAMA System. (City Engagement and Responsive City Services)

Continue with implementation of Vision Appraisal Tablets for electronic documentation of property inspections. (City Engagement and Responsive City Services)

To develop a comprehensive building permit database. (City Engagement and Responsive City Services)

To continue application of standardized techniques for land valuation and attribute difference adjustments. (City Engagement and Responsive City Services)

STATISTICS/PERFORMANCE MEASURES Real Property Parcels Assessed Single Family Urban Single Family/Suburban Multi Family Commercial/Industrial Agricultural (20-99 acres) Agricultural (>99 acres) Number of Sales Transactions Number of Qualified Sales Median Residential Sales Price Number of Foreclosures

FY 16 Actual

FY 17 Projected

FY 18 Estimate

2,625 31,656 66 2,479 1,297 417 3,433 1,057 246,800 283

2,619 31,939 112 2,424 1,301 418 3,820 1,110 260,000 274

2,625 32,125 112 2,436 1,309 418 4,200 1,200 260,000 250

86


Department: City Assessor Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 100-1232051100.02 51100.04 51100.06 51100.27 52100 52210 52400 53000.16 53200 53500 53600 54100 54200 54500 55100 55210 55230 55500 55810 56001 56011 56012 56017 58200

Salaries and Wages Salaries and Wages - Overtime Salaries and Wages - Part-time Special Compensation FICA VRS Retirement Group Life Purchased Services - Refuse Collection Temporary Services Printing and Binding Advertising Information Technology Fleet Risk Management Utilities Postal Services Telecommunications Travel and Training Dues and Association Memberships Office Supplies Uniforms & Wearing Apparel Books and Subscriptions Copier Costs Capital Outlay

Total Operating Expenditures

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Change

2017-2018 Adopted

% Change

$

767,995 1,553 55,667 110,711 9,110 162 1,439 707 220,526 17,125 151,442 3,598 20,555 7,085 15,490 2,987 4,343 578 5,011 10,126 -

$

832,358 1,077 60,422 116,601 10,194 8,756 2,370 697 184,735 19,419 153,959 18,549 6,332 17,200 3,878 3,988 1,505 5,146 8,834 -

$

958,803 2,100 73,509 105,756 12,560 7,000 780 174,806 22,366 187,167 23,000 8,149 17,000 3,245 5,500 1,500 4,000 9,400 -

$

1,133,002 2,100 86,675 124,970 14,842 7,500 780 174,806 22,366 187,167 23,180 8,149 24,000 4,920 5,500 1,500 5,147 9,400 -

18% 0% 18% 18% 18% 7% 0% 0% 0% 0% 1% 0% 41% 52% 0% 0% 29% 0% -

$

952,127 2,100 72,998 105,020 12,473 7,000 780 222,714 22,434 202,688 23,180 8,149 19,000 4,920 5,500 1,500 5,147 9,400 -

-1% 0% -1% -1% -1% 0% 0% 27% 0% 8% 1% 0% 12% 52% 0% 0% 29% 0% -

$

1,406,210

$

1,456,020

$

1,616,641

$

1,836,004

14%

$

1,677,130

4%

53500 - Printing and Binding: Assessment notices. Personnel Summary

Range

138 134 131 131 126/127/130 127 125 123 121 121 119

Class Assessor Deputy Assessor Real Estate Valuations/Cama Analyst Residential Appraiser Supervisor Commercial Appraiser Appraiser I-III Customer Service Manager Senior Land Records Technician Land-Use Compliance Coordinator Land Records Technician Executive Secretary Office Assistant

Number of Full-Time Positions

2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

1 1 1 1 2 6

1 1 1 1 2 6

1 1 1 1 2 7

2017-2018 Requested

% Change

1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 2 9 1 1 1 1 1 1

17

17

18

21

-

-

-

2017-2018 Adopted 1 1 1 1 2 6 1 1 1 1 1 17

87


CITY TREASURER DESCRIPTION The scope of the Treasurer's Office includes the collection of state and local funds, the disbursements and investment of local funds, and the accounting of those funds. The Treasurer is responsible for all activities related to the receipt, deposit, investment, reconciliation, and disbursements of funds. The integrity of the operation of the Treasurer's Office revolves around the proper use of government accounting. This ensures that the public funds entrusted to the Treasurer's care are monitored in a fiscally responsible manner. The Treasurer is personally responsible for the locality's funds. The legal authority for the Treasurer's duties is grounded in the Constitution of Virginia, the Code of Virginia, local ordinances and charter provisions, case law from court decisions, and opinions of the Attorney General. FY 2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Maintained a current 3 year combined real estate and personal property tax collection rate of 99.46%.

Continued management of the collection of storm water maintenance and refuse fees with a 98% collection rate.

Continued to assist in maintaining the City’s bond rating at AAA and issuance of debt.

Continued management of the State Set-Off Debt Collections program providing for the collection of over $7.9M over the last 10 years.

FY 2018 OBJECTIVES 

To update and expand the E-Treasurer services and the Treasurers webpage for efficiency and improved customer service. (Financial Stability)

To complete the successful hardware/software conversion from the Bright/AS400 software to the webbased PCI software. (Financial Stability)

To continue to implement and use the State Set-Off Debt Collections Program and DMV Block processes for the collection of taxes or other charges owed and to help improve revenue results. (Financial Stability)

To continue to implement and use the Virginia Employment Commission (VEC) Automated File Transfer Process for the collection of taxes or other charges owed, via Notice of Tax-Lien and Demand for Payment under Section 58.1-3952 of the Code of Virginia. (Financial Stability)

STATISTICS/PERFORMANCE MEASURES Tax Collection Rate: Real Estate Personal Property Storm Water Maintenance Fee Vehicle License Fee Refuse Collection Fee Number of Online Payments processed Debt Set Off: Number of claims filed Value of claims filed Amount of claims collected

FY 16 Actual

FY 17 Projected

FY 18 Estimate

98% 97% 98% 89% 97% 22,725

98% 95% 98% 90% 97% 23,000

98% 95% 98% 90% 97% 23,000

53,202 $23.2M $971,000

26,000 $24M $980,000

27,000 $24M $980,000 88


Department: City Treasurer Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 100-1241051100.02 51100.04 51100.06 52100 52210 52400 53300 53500 53600 54100 54200 54500 55210 55230 55410 55500 55810 56001 56012 56015 56017 58200

Salaries and Wages Salaries and Wages - Overtime Salaries and Wages - Part-time FICA VRS Retirement Group Life Repair and Maintenance Printing and Binding Advertising Information Technology Fleet Risk Management Postal Services Telecommunications Lease/Rent of Equipment Travel and Training Dues and Association Memberships Office Supplies Books and Subscriptions Merchandise for Resale Copier Costs Capital Outlay

Total Operating Expenditures

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Change

$

725,617 2,610 7,402 54,168 107,573 8,659 126 1,816 166,948 1,329 137,035 123,352 9,416 100 4,788 1,918 13,902 1,130 20,218 18,151 -

$

776,723 39 15,365 58,220 107,357 9,277 126 120 1,976 104,780 1,230 131,520 139,936 7,790 10,544 1,985 12,224 2,202 14,046 21,638 -

$

836,749 30,162 66,319 92,293 10,961 1,000 1,600 137,182 12,312 174,139 106,000 10,968 650 5,000 2,535 15,000 1,330 16,600 23,348 -

$

917,573 30,162 72,502 101,208 12,020 1,000 1,800 137,182 12,312 174,139 106,000 10,968 750 7,100 1,985 16,600 1,330 16,600 23,348 -

$

1,406,256

$

1,417,098

$

1,544,149

$

1,644,579

2017-2018 Adopted

% Change

10% 0% 9% 10% 10% 0% 13% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 15% 42% -22% 11% 0% 0% 0% -

$

841,008 30,524 66,672 92,763 11,017 1,000 1,800 180,674 6,100 176,156 106,000 10,968 750 7,000 1,985 15,000 1,330 16,600 23,348 -

7%

$

1,590,695

NOTE: Comp Board provides partial salary reimbursement for 11 of 17 full time positions with reimbursement by the State and contribution by the City of the balance annually for operations.

Personnel Summary

Range

Class

133 133 130 127 124 122 121 121

Treasurer Compliance Manager Chief Deputy Treasurer I - Accounting Chief Deputy Treasurer I - Operations Deputy Treasurer IV Deputy Treasurer III Deputy Treasurer II Deputy Treasurer I Executive Secretary

Number of Full-Time Positions

2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 2

1 1 1 1 2

-

-

2017-2018 Requested

2017-2018 Adopted 1 1 1 1 5 1 2 6

-

4 5 1

4 5 1

4 5 1

15

16

16

18

1 1 1 1 4 3 5 16

89

1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 0% 13% 32% -50% 1% 0% 0% 15% 40% -22% 0% 0% 0% 0% 3%


FINANCE DESCRIPTION The Department of Finance provides for the general accounting, payroll, accounts payable, accounts receivable, and timely and accurate financial reporting of City funding. The Department is responsible for the issuance of general obligation and revenue bonds and other structure debt, as well as the administration of debt. FY 2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Received an unmodified audit opinion for the FY 2015-2016 audit.

Received the Government Finance Officers Association (GFOA) Award for Excellence in Financial Reporting for the FY 2015 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (CAFR) representing the thirty-first consecutive year that the City has received this award.

Received award from the Association of Government Accountants for the FY 2015 Citizen-Centric Report.

Received a GFOA award for Outstanding Achievement In Popular Annual Financial Reporting.

Affirmed the City’s strong bond ratings of AAA/Aa1 with Fitch, Standard & Poor’s, and Moody’s rating agencies.

FY 2018 OBJECTIVES 

To continue receiving the annual Government Finance Officers Association (GFOA) award for the City’s Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (CAFR). (Financial Stability)

To implement the Fraud, Waste, and Abuse Hotline. (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

To maintain the City’s strong bond ratings with the major rating agencies. (Financial Stability)

STATISTICS/PERFORMANCE MEASURES Annual Audit: Audit Opinion Received GFOA Certificate of Excellence Received Number Transactions Processed: Accounts Payable Payroll Value of Transactions Processed: Accounts Payable Payroll

FY 16 Actual

FY 17 Projected

FY 18 Estimate

 

 

45,125 24

40,690 24

40,690 24

$197M $68.2M

$184M $70.8M

$184M $70.8M

 

90


Department: Finance - Administration and Accounting Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 100-1242051100.02 51100.04 51100.06 52100 52210 52400 53100 53100.02 53200 53500 54100 54500 55210 55230 55500 55810 56001 56012 56017

Salaries and Wages Salaries and Wages - Overtime Salaries and Wages - Part-time FICA VRS Retirement Group Life Professional Services Accounting and Auditing Services Temporary Help Service Fees Printing and Binding Information Technology Risk Management Postal Services Telecommunications Travel and Training Dues and Association Memberships Office Supplies Books and Subscriptions Copier Costs

Total Operating Expenditures

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Change

$

845,698 594 61,626 114,756 8,532 41,254 101,650 13,457 80,564 127,848 7,758 5,557 3,955 1,600 4,430 9,443

$

698,923 567 50,631 92,172 6,871 18,265 133,135 15,099 106,485 140,180 9,255 4,879 4,069 870 3,742 225 6,183

$

795,591 60,863 87,754 10,422 34,860 130,700 13,215 136,040 184,997 9,000 6,552 5,631 1,600 4,430 635 7,665

$

795,591 60,863 87,754 10,502 55,380 130,700 14,215 136,040 184,997 7,758 6,552 5,631 1,645 4,430 635 7,665

$

1,428,724

$

1,291,551

$

1,489,955

$

1,510,358

2017-2018 Adopted

% Change

0% 0% 0% 1% 59% 0% 8% 0% 0% -14% 0% 0% 3% 0% 0% 0%

$

919,173 70,317 101,385 12,041 55,380 130,700 14,215 182,379 165,168 9,000 6,552 5,631 1,645 4,430 635 7,665

16% 0% 16% 16% 16% 59% 0% 8% 34% -11% 0% 0% 0% 3% 0% 0% 0%

1%

$

1,686,315

13%

Personnel Summary

Range

Class 144 138 135 135 133 132 131 130 127 124 123 121

Director of Finance Assistant Director of Finance - Comptroller Financial Reporting and Compliance Manager Accounting Manager Senior Administrative Analyst Senior Accountant Payroll Administrator Accountant Senior Payroll Technician Payroll Technician Senior Accounting Technician Executive Secretary

Number of Full-Time Positions

2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1 3 1 2

1 1

3 1 2

-

1 1

1 1 1 1

-

-

1 -

3 2 1

3 2 1

16

17

15

-

2017-2018 Adopted

1 3 1 2 1 2 2 1

-

2017-2018 Requested

3 1 2 1 2 2 1

3 1 2 1 2 2 1

15

16

91


PURCHASING DESCRIPTION The Division of Purchasing provides a centralized system for the management of public funds expended for the procurement of materials, supplies, equipment, professional consulting and other services, and construction via competitive pricing of the appropriate product quality for timely delivery. The Division also provides for the transfer or disposal of surplus property and administers the City’s purchasing card program. FY 2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Facilitated the sale of surplus items resulting in over $160,000 in proceeds in the first half of FY 17.

Initiated new and revised contracts for goods and services including services for the Children’s Services Act (CSA) program, repair facility for Suffolk Transit vehicles, medical oversight director for police, emergency pump and haul service, traffic software, environmental records review, vehicle washing and detailing, and intelligent transportation systems.

Conducted outreach to Small, Women, and Minority (SWAM) owned businesses through attendance at various SWAM business fairs and individual meetings with SWAM vendors.

Provided three training classes to departments on City purchasing policies and procedures, the Virginia Public Procurement Act, and the purchasing module of the City’s financial software system.

FY 2018 OBJECTIVES 

To provide training to City departments to ensure proper ethics, fiscal accountability, and adherence to procurement laws and policies. (Financial Stability)

To respond to internal and external customers in a timely fashion to ensure a high level of customer service. (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

To leverage the City’s purchasing power and encourage new vendor participation by disseminating bids and request for solicitations using the City’s website and third party purchasing websites. (Financial Stability)

STATISTICS/PERFORMANCE MEASURES Number of Procurement Instruments Issued: RFP IFB RFQ Purchasing Card Transactions Dollar Value of P-Card Transactions Number of Purchase Orders Dollar Amount of Purchase Orders Surplus Revenue

FY 16 Actual

FY 17 Projected

FY 18 Estimate

21 51 10 19,404 $6.0M 1,177 $72.7M $434,684

25 60 15 22,279 $6.6M 1,399 $89.6M $332,000

30 65 15 24,000 $7.0M 1,600 $95.0M $332,000

92


Division: Purchasing (Department of Finance) Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 100-1253051100.02 51100.04 51100.06 52100 52210 52400 53200 53600 54100 54500 55210 55230 55500 55810 56001 56012 56017

Salaries and Wages Salaries and Wages - Overtime Salaries and Wages - Part-time FICA VRS Retirement Group Life Temporary Help Service Fees Advertising Information Technology Risk Management Postal Services Telecommunications Travel and Training Dues and Association Memberships Office Supplies Books and Subscriptions Copier Costs

Total Operating Expenditures

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Change

2017-2018 Adopted

% Change

$

198,449 14,908 26,649 2,362 543 18,383 36,544 285 2,583 5,515 6,290 2,146 5,290

$

196,938 14,717 26,263 2,356 3,008 980 19,010 35,073 325 2,115 2,683 6,161 2,498 217 3,911

$

208,992 15,988 23,052 2,738 1,000 16,646 43,514 500 3,096 4,500 5,800 2,500 300 4,155

$

252,926 19,349 27,898 3,313 1,000 16,646 43,514 500 3,096 4,500 5,854 2,500 300 4,155

21% 21% 21% 21% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 1% 0% 0% 0%

$

214,258 16,391 23,633 2,807 1,000 18,582 44,041 500 3,096 4,500 5,854 2,500 300 4,155

3% 3% 3% 3% 0% 12% 1% 0% 0% 0% 1% 0% 0% 0%

$

319,946

$

316,253

$

332,780

$

385,551

16%

$

341,615

3%

Personnel Summary

Range

Class 135 130 127 120

Purchasing Agent Senior Buyer Buyer Purchasing Associate

Number of Full-Time Positions

2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

2017-2018 Adopted

1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1

1 1 2 1

1 1 1 1

4

4

4

5

4

93


REGISTRAR DESCRIPTION The Registrar is appointed by the City of Suffolk Electoral Board whose three members are appointed by the Circuit Court Judges. The Registrar is responsible for carrying out directives from the State Board of Elections and the Suffolk Electoral Board to ensure all eligible citizens the right to vote. The duties of the Registrar’s Office include arranging and supervising primary, general, and special elections at the local, state, and federal levels, registering voters, and maintaining registration records that reflect up to date information. FY 2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Implemented citizen outreach demonstrations on optical scan Image Cast Evolution Voting Machines and mobile voter photo identification.

Reviewed and revised the training program for officers of election to effectively train the officers in the use of electronic poll books, optical scan Image Cast Evolution Voting Machines, voting equipment and forms used on Election Day.

Provided outreach programs to assist citizens in completing voter registration and absentee ballot application forms.

FY 2018 OBJECTIVES 

To maintain the integrity of the election process and make sure that the citizens of the City of Suffolk continue to receive their election information in a timely manner. (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

To conduct elections under the guidance of the Electoral Board in accordance with Federal and State laws in an efficient and equitable manner to ensure fairness and accuracy in all elections. (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

To provide information, materials, and assistance to candidates. (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

To provide voter registration information and materials, distribute literature and develop programs to educate the general public concerning registration as well as encourage voter registration. (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

STATISTICS/PERFORMANCE MEASURES Number of Registered Voters Percent of Election Results certified within 3 days of an election Number of Polling Precincts

FY 16 Actual 61,500 100% 28

FY 17 Projected 62,000 100% 28

FY 2018 Estimate 62,500 100% 28

94


Department: Registrar Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 100-1320051100.02 51100.04 51100.06 51100.27 52100 52210 52400 53100 53300 53600 54100 54500 55210 55230 55410 55420 55500 55810 56001 56017 58200

Salaries and Wages Salaries and Wages - Overtime Salaries and Wages - Part-time Special Compensation FICA VRS Retirement Group Life Professional Services Repair and Maintenance Advertising Information Technology Risk Management Postal Services Telecommunications Lease/Rent of Equipment Lease/Rent of Building Travel and Training Dues and Association Memberships Office Supplies Copier Charges Capital Outlay

Total Operating Expenditures

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Change

2017-2018 Adopted

% Change

$

90,399 1,863 35,227 63,319 9,362 13,415 1,076 45,227 463 12,786 18,459 4,808 3,533 814 1,800 4,485 200 7,928 8,620 252,375

$

93,504 2,158 37,388 130,143 9,963 12,941 1,113 1,000 68,991 1,579 26,808 17,681 26,889 3,307 3,450 4,280 360 9,608 7,875 20,000

$

128,920 26,010 107,871 20,104 14,220 1,689 58,500 1,900 29,257 21,880 15,000 4,018 4,500 4,700 3,700 325 10,000 8,333 -

$

128,920 26,010 107,871 20,104 14,220 1,689 60,000 1,900 29,257 21,880 15,000 4,018 4,500 4,700 3,700 325 10,000 8,333 18,200

0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 3% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% -

$

134,851 26,322 107,871 20,582 14,874 1,767 60,000 1,900 31,272 33,612 15,000 4,018 4,500 4,700 3,700 325 10,000 8,333 -

5% 1% 0% 2% 5% 5% 3% 0% 7% 54% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% -

$

576,158

$

479,037

$

460,927

$

480,627

4%

$

483,627

5%

Personnel Summary

Range

Class General Registrar 124 Deputy Registrar 120 Assistant Registrar

Number of Full-Time Positions

2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

1 1

1 1

1 1 1

1 1 1

1 1 1

2

3

3

3

-

2

2017-2018 Requested

2017-2018 Adopted

95


CIRCUIT COURT - JUDGES DESCRIPTION The Circuit Court is the trial court of general jurisdiction in the Commonwealth of Virginia. The Circuit Court has jurisdiction over: 1) Civil Actions involving monetary claims over $4,500, by appeals from the General District Court, by original jurisdiction, and contesting the validity of a City or municipal ordinance or corporate bylaw, and involving equitable proceedings; 2) Criminal Cases including all felonies punishable by confinement in the penitentiary and misdemeanor charges originating from a grand jury indictment or appeal from the General District Court or Juvenile and Domestic Relations District Court, or from state and local administrative agencies or boards. The Circuit Court also handles any case for which jurisdiction is not specified in the Code of Virginia. Additionally, the Circuit Court convenes grand juries to consider bills of indictment, charging people with serious crimes. The Circuit Court may also convene special grand juries to investigate criminal activity in the community or malfeasance of governmental agencies or officials. The City of Suffolk provides additional local funding support for this State function. FY 2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Fully utilized technology provided by the Supreme Court of Virginia to improve the management of civil and criminal case loads.

Improved utilization of Fifth Judicial Circuit procedures and staff in order to improve the rate of case closure within Supreme Court of Virginia guidelines.

FY 2018 OBJECTIVES 

To leverage technology to provide for the efficient management and pace of caseloads.

To observe the highest standards of conduct to ensure the integrity of the courts are preserved and that the duties performed by court staff reflect a devotion to serving the public.

To continue to improve on the efficiency of concluding civil and criminal case filings with the time guidelines established by the Supreme Court of Virginia.

STATISTICS/PERFORMANCE MEASURES Civil Cases Criminal Cases Other Cases

CY 14 Actual 747 2,866 1,564

CY 15 Actual 827 3,091 1,688

CY 16 Actual 729 3,321 1,987

96


Department: Circuit Court - Judges Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 100-2110051100.02 51100.06 52100 52210 52400 53300 54100 54500 55210 55230 56001 56012 56017

Salaries and Wages Salaries and Wages - Part-time FICA VRS Retirement Group Life Repair and Maintenance Information Technology Risk Management Postal Services Telecommunications Office Supplies Books & Subscriptions Copier

Total Operating Expenditures

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Change

2017-2018 Adopted

% Change

$

126,253 9,690 18,736 1,502 655 18,290 832 3,094 1,596 179 1,119

$

128,471 9,865 17,780 1,529 17,554 900 2,447 1,811 179 728

$

141,743 10,843 15,634 1,857 440 21,786 1,200 3,951 2,000 903

$

141,743 10,843 15,634 1,857 440 21,786 1,200 3,951 3,000 200 903

0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 50% 0%

$

146,476 11,205 16,156 1,919 400 22,038 1,200 3,951 2,000 200 903

3% 3% 3% 3% -9% 1% 0% 0% 0% 0%

$

181,947

$

181,264

$

200,358

$

201,557

1%

$

206,448

3%

Personnel Summary

Range

Class Court Administrator - Civil Court Administrator - Criminal

Number of Full-Time Positions

2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

2017-2018 Adopted

1 1

1 1

1 1

1 1

1 1

2

2

2

2

2

97


GENERAL DISTRICT COURT DESCRIPTION The General District Court is responsible for the trial of misdemeanor cases, traffic infractions, preliminary hearings in felony matters, and civil cases and suits up to $15,000. The General District Court has three divisions (criminal, traffic, and civil) and is responsible for maintaining the records and accounts of each of these divisions. The City of Suffolk provides additional local funding support for this State function. FY 2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Managed case flows in an efficient manner by conferring with judges, attorneys, and public and private agencies to ensure adequate service levels are provided to the public.

Effectively managed resources to adequate response to service demands.

Trained staff by staying current with proposed/enacted legislation, and the use of online resources.

ensure

FY 2018 OBJECTIVES 

To provide safe and secure court facilities and a customer friendly court system.

To effectively manage resources to instill confidence in the court system among the general public.

To leverage technology to expand and enhance the provision of court services.

STATISTICS/PERFORMANCE MEASURES Number of Criminal Cases Number of Traffic Cases Number of Civil Cases

CY 14 Actual 3,594 15,677 9,563

CY 15 Actual 3,519 13,355 9,973

CY 16 Actual 3,250 9,959 9,229

98


Department: General District Court Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 100-2120053100 53100.10 53300 54100 55230 55410 55810 56001 56012 56017 58200

Professional Services Court Appointed Attorney Fees Repair & Maintenance Information Technology Telecommunications Lease/Rent of Equipment Dues and Association Memberships Office Supplies Books and Subscriptions Copier Capital Outlay

Total Operating Expenditures

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Change

2017-2018 Adopted

% Change

$

1,000 28,904 323 2,431 1,663 1,729 2,030 6,358 7,770 10,389

$

480 28,198 1,869 1,261 240 2,801 5,616 7,353 -

$

5,000 35,000 3,051 2,500 1,500 3,000 4,000 7,567 -

$

8,000 40,000 3,051 3,000 2,000 3,500 4,500 7,567 20,000

60% 14% 0% 20% 33% 17% 13% 0% -

$

5,000 35,000 3,051 2,500 1,500 3,000 5,000 7,567 -

0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 25% 0% -

$

62,597

$

47,817

$

61,618

$

91,618

49%

$

62,618

2%

99


MAGISTRATE’S OFFICE DESCRIPTION The Magistrate’s Office serves as an immediate buffer between law enforcement and citizens and can authorize or deny law enforcement the ability to detain individuals suspected of crimes. In addition, the Magistrate provides services in disputes involving citizens versus citizens. These functions are available 24 hours per day. The Magistrate conducts hearings as the first step in the legal process to determine whether there is probable cause to move forward in one of the following statutory procedures: to issue arrest or search warrants in criminal cases; to issue a temporary detention order in either civil, medical, or criminal cases; or to authorize pretrial seizures in civil matters. Where individuals have been arrested, Magistrates are called upon to conduct bail hearings to determine whether they should be committed to jail or released, and, if released, the conditions of release. Magistrates preside over hearings, maintain order and proper decorum, administer oaths, define issues, interpret and explain pertinent laws, take testimony, question parties, and issue or decline to issue the legal process requested. The City of Suffolk provides additional local funding support for this State function. FY 2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Provided in-service training and Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) training to local law enforcement officers.

Addressed safety and security issues at the Magistrate’s Office with the City and Western Tidewater Regional Jail.

Conducted financial eligibility hearings for 5th Judicial District criminal cases.

FY 2018 OBJECTIVES 

To conduct neutral and impartial hearings for both the public and law enforcement related to arrests, searches, emergency protective orders, bail, emergency custody orders, and temporary detention orders. (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

To work effectively with the community including judges, clerks, law enforcement agencies, jails, and community services boards in addition to the citizens of the 5th Judicial District who are served by the Magistrate’s Office. (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

To engage in continuing legal education and training of all staff members, as well as local law enforcement agencies. (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

STATISTICS/PERFORMANCE MEASURES Number of Arrest Warrants and Summonses Issued Number of Search Warrants Issued Number of Emergency Custody Orders Issued Number of Temporary Detention Orders Issued Number of Emergency Protective Orders Issued Number of Commitments, Recognizances, and Releases Issued

CY 14 Actual 6,551 332 415 482 1,031 9,657

CY 15 Actual 6,095 625 444 520 990 8,191

CY 16 Actual 6,677 615 478 527 1,135 8,360

100


Department: Magistrate Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 100-2130053300 54100 55230 55420 55810 56001 56017 58200

Repair and Maintenance Information Technology Telecommunications Lease/Rent of Building Dues and Association Memberships Office Supplies Copier Costs Capital Outlay

Total Operating Expenditures

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Change

2017-2018 Adopted

% Change

$

147 1,105 9,000 600 1,512 3,463 -

$

850 9,000 600 1,551 3,654 2,789

$

400 1,387 9,000 700 2,000 3,868 -

$

400 1,387 9,000 700 2,000 3,868 -

0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% -

$

400 1,387 9,000 700 2,000 3,868 -

0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% -

$

15,827

$

18,444

$

17,355

$

17,355

0%

$

17,355

0%

101


JUVENILE AND DOMESTIC RELATIONS DISTRICT COURT DESCRIPTION The Juvenile and Domestic Relations District Court has jurisdiction in matters involving juvenile delinquency, juvenile traffic infractions, adult criminal matters with a juvenile victim, children subjected to abuse or neglect, family abuse, family or household members charged with an offense against a family or household member, protective orders, child and/or spousal support, custody and/or visitation issues, abandonment of children, foster care and entrustment agreements, court-ordered rehabilitative services, court consent for certain medical treatments, commitment of mentally ill or retarded children, petitions filed by school boards against parents, and judicial by-pass for authorization of abortions by minors. The Juvenile and Domestic Relations District Court Clerk’s Office is the administrative arm of the court. The Clerk of Court is the court’s chief administrative officer and is accountable to the presiding judges for all office functions, including personnel matters, finance, court housekeeping, maintenance of court records and information systems, assisting with outside liaison, preparation of budgets, and conducting research and planning in relation to court operations. The City of Suffolk provides additional local funding support for this State function. FY 2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Continued to work effectively and efficiently to process high caseloads with limited manpower and resources.

Effectively accommodated a high volume of custody and visitation matters with a high clearance rate.

FY 2018 OBJECTIVES 

To continue working efficiently and effectively to process high caseloads with limited staffing and resources.

To maintain the court’s continuance rate at or below the state rate.

STATISTICS/PERFORMANCE MEASURES Juvenile Cases: Number of new Juvenile Cases Number of Juvenile Cases Concluded Average Number of Hearings per Juvenile Case Juvenile Case Continuance Rate Domestic Cases: Number of new Domestic Cases Commenced Number of Domestic Cases Concluded Average Number of Hearings per Domestic Case Domestic Case Continuance Rate

CY 14 Actual

CY 15 Actual

CY 16 Actual

1,693 1,602 2.36 94.6%

2,254 2,153 2.41 95.5%

2,059 2,065 2.22 103%

1,380 405 3.08% 88.4%

1,824 583 3.13% 96.7%

2,354 2,592 3.00 101.0%

102


Department: Juvenile and Domestic Relations District Court Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 100-2161053100.10 53300 54100 55230 55410 55500 55810 56001 56012 56017

Court Appointed Attorney Fees Repair & Maintenance Information Technology Telecommunications Lease/Rent of Equipment Travel & Training Dues and Association Memberships Office Supplies Books and Subscriptions Copier Costs

Total Operating Expenditures

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Change

2017-2018 Adopted

% Change

$

125 853 6,581 235 2,308 13 4,095

$

18 5,442 537 419 2,400 116 3,654

$

600 8,386 400 400 1,500 150 3,868

$

600 500 8,386 400 500 400 2,000 200 3,868

0% 0% 0% 0% 33% 33% 0%

$

600 8,386 400 400 2,000 200 3,868

0% 0% 0% 0% 33% 33% 0%

$

14,210

$

12,587

$

15,304

$

16,854

10%

$

15,854

4%

103


COURT SERVICE UNIT DESCRIPTION The Fifth District Court Service Unit is a local organizational unit of the Virginia Department of Juvenile Justice which aims to protect the public through a balanced approach of accountability and comprehensive services that prevent and reduce delinquency through partnerships with families, schools, communities, law enforcement, and others, while providing opportunities for delinquency youth to become responsible and productive citizens. The City of Suffolk provides local funding to support the operation and detention costs associated with this State function. FY 2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Partnered with the Western Tidewater Community Services Board to offer services and referrals for court involved young people.

Partnered with Suffolk Public Schools to host Truancy Reduction Committee hearings aimed at addressing and improving attendance patterns of identified school age children.

Maintained compliance with Virginia Department of Juvenile Justice standards as related to contacts with persons on probation, parole, and in direct care.

FY 2018 OBJECTIVES 

To refer high risk youth in jeopardy of commitment to the Chesapeake Juvenile Services Detention Facility for enrollment in the post-dispositional program. (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

To divert a minimum of 28% of all juvenile delinquency/status offense intakes to an in-house diversion program or to the Juvenile Conference Committee (JCC). (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

To ensure probation and parole case contact compliance per Department of Juvenile Justice Standards exceeds 98%. (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

STATISTICS/PERFORMANCE MEASURES Number of Juveniles receiving services Number of Juveniles placed in Secure Detention Average Length of Stay in Secure Detention (days) Average Cost per Day for Secure Detention

FY 16 Actual 759 59 30.1 $190

FY 17 Projected 760 55 30.6 $190

FY 18 Estimate 760 55 25.0 $190

104


Department: Court Services Unit Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 100-2165053845 54100 55230 58200

Juvenile Detention Costs Information Technology Telecommunications Capital Outlay-Additions

Total Operating Expenditures

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Change

2017-2018 Adopted

% Change

$

914,244 441 3,315 -

$

739,718 2,549 5,725

$

973,275 4,160 -

$

969,275 4,160 4,000

0% 0% -

$

969,275 4,160 -

0% 0% -

$

918,000

$

747,991

$

977,435

$

977,435

0%

$

973,435

0%

105


CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT DESCRIPTION The Clerk of the Circuit Court is required by 15.2-1600 of the Code of Virginia and the Rules of the Supreme Court of Virginia. The Clerk of Court is charged with the custody, safekeeping, and proper indexing of legal and quasi-legal papers deposited in the Clerk’s Office. The Clerk's Office is responsible for the filing of civil suits, docketing and filing of criminal actions, and the filing of divorce suits and adoption petitions. Additional services provided by the Clerk's Office include recording land records and plats, probating wills, administering various oaths' of office, issuing marriage licenses, recording military discharge forms (DD-214's), and recording assumed business names. The Clerk is also an acceptance agent for the U.S. Department of State and accepts passports applications on its behalf. FY 2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Achieved compliance with internal control and operations in accordance with the Commonwealth of Virginia Auditor of Public Accounts standards and state laws, regulations, and policies.

Collected taxes and fees associated with the legal recordation of land records and completed turnaround of documents within 24 hours of presentation.

Secured grants to aid in the conservation of historical records.

Implemented new jury management system to include automated processing of questionnaires and an online juror portal.

FY 2018 OBJECTIVES 

To provide direct administrative support to the judges in court proceedings with 100% accuracy. (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

To collect taxes and fees associated with the legal recordation of land records and complete turnaround of documents within 24 hours of presentation. (Financial Stability)

To perform all 800 plus mandated duties placed upon the Clerk of Court within the guidelines established by the Code of Virginia. (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

STATISTICS/PERFORMANCE MEASURES Criminal Cases commenced Civil Cases commenced Wills/Estates initiated Judgments Deed/Land Instruments Finance Statements Fictitious Names Marriage License Notary Qualifications Concealed Handgun Applications Passport Applications

CY 14 Actual 2,862 1,096 328 6,073 13,374 225 321 519 291 1,218 1,136

CY 15 Actual 3,085 1,136 383 5,706 13,367 157 375 426 306 1,478 1,328

CY 16 Actual 2,955 1,124 415 6,286 14,879 183 414 409 345 1,625 1,356

106


Department: Clerk of the Circuit Court Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 100-2171051100.02 51100.04 51100.06 52100 52210 52400 53100 53100.10 53100.16 53300 53500 54100 54500 55210 55230 55410 55500 55810 56001 56012 56017 58110 58200

Salaries and Wages Salaries and Wages - Overtime Salaries and Wages - Part-time FICA VRS Retirement Group Life Professional Services Legal Services - Court Appointed Legal Services - Jurors and Public Defenders Repair and Maintenance Printing and Binding Information Technology Risk Management Postal Services Telecommunications Lease/Rent of Equipment Travel and Training Dues and Association Memberships Office Supplies Books and Subscriptions Copier Costs Capital Outlay-TTF Capital Outlay

Total Operating Expenditures

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Change

$

710,394 19 41,154 53,831 104,830 8,454 3,294 3,318 43,131 11,145 18,382 25,775 128,127 10,756 9,311 3,072 1,887 500 12,639 761 11,903 77,678 25,871

$

717,922 25 40,475 54,477 99,055 8,192 4,430 8,690 36,038 31,794 165,781 122,942 11,000 6,821 3,072 2,246 640 14,482 449 15,651 29,497 5,210

$

733,175 42,729 59,357 80,869 9,605 4,000 5,000 52,000 22,612 163,018 152,358 11,000 9,916 3,072 2,000 750 15,000 722 17,042 1,070

$

756,271 71,300 63,309 97,105 9,983 5,000 10,000 52,000 22,612 163,018 152,358 12,000 9,916 3,072 2,500 890 15,000 475 17,042 18,086

$

1,306,232

$

1,378,890

$

1,385,295

$

1,481,937

2017-2018 Adopted

3% $ 67% 7% 20% 4% 25% 100% 0% 0% 0% 0% 9% 0% 0% 25% 19% 0% -34% 0% 1590% 7%

$

% Change

765,347 55,035 62,759 84,418 10,026 5,000 10,000 52,000 22,612 169,344 154,216 12,000 9,916 3,072 2,500 890 15,000 475 17,042 8,880 1,460,532

53100 - Professional Services: APA Audit Costs. Personnel Summary

Range

138 127 121/122/124/127 125

Class Clerk Chief Deputy Court Clerk Deputy Court Senior Accountant Deputy Court Clerk I-IV Senior Deputy Court Clerk

Number of Full-Time Positions

2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

1 1

1 1

1 1

10 2

10 2

14

14

2017-2018 Requested

2017-2018 Adopted

10 2

1 1 1 8 3

1 1 1 8 3

14

14

14

NOTE: Comp Board provides partial salary reimbursement for 12 of 14 full time positions with reimbursement by the State and contribution by the City of the balance annually for operations.

107

4% 29% 6% 4% 4% 25% 100% 0% 0% 4% 1% 9% 0% 0% 25% 19% 0% -34% 0% 730% 5%


SHERIFF DESCRIPTION The Sheriff’s Department performs the duties for civil process ordered by the Courts and provides security for the Courthouse and all courts while in session. The Sheriff’s Department may provide transportation for certain juvenile prisoners awaiting trial or commitment to state facilities and adult citizens under temporary detention orders or civil commitment to a state hospital. FY 2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Provided security for 1,590 court sessions without incident.

Partnered with the City and Suffolk Public Schools on several community events and continued to provide support to other law enforcement agencies and City departments.

Made over 20,000 citizen contacts through the Sherriff’s Office Community Outreach Program including the distribution of firearms safety gun locks, missing child identification kits, and over 8,000 brochures outlining the services provided by the Suffolk Sheriff’s Office.

FY 2018 OBJECTIVES 

To serve all civil summons and other court notices and requests within the specific dated guidelines set forth on each individual summons to 100% of the court’s request. (Public Safety)

To provide court security personnel for all sessions of court held within the Mills E. Godwin, Jr. Courts Building. (Public Safety)

To provide a safe and secure environment for all persons conducting business or visiting the Mills E. Godwin, Jr. Courts Building by searching 100% of persons entering the courts building during hours of operation. (Public Safety)

To provide transportation for juvenile offenders, adult inmates, civil commitment of violent sexual predators, and temporary detention orders as directed by court orders. (Public Safety)

STATISTICS/PERFORMANCE MEASURES Number of Civil Process Papers served Number of Security Searches conducted at Court Building entrance Number of Inmates held in Court Building lock-up Number of Juvenile Transports Number of Mental Health Transports Number of Protective Orders served

CY 16 Actual 108,201 187,482 3,618 475 40 345

CY 17 Projected 104,000 185,000 3,250 440 30 510

CY 18 Estimate 104,500 185,000 3,250 440 30 600

108


Department: Sheriff Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 100-2181051100.02 51100.04 51100.06 52100 52210 52400 53100 53300 53500 53600 54100 54200 54500 55210 55230 55410 55500 55810 56001 56011 56012 56014 56017 56026 58200

Salaries and Wages Salaries and Wages - Overtime Salaries and Wages - Part-time FICA VRS Retirement Group Life Professional Services Repair and Maintenance Printing & Binding Advertising Information Technology Fleet Risk Management Postal Services Telecommunications Lease/Rent of Equipment Travel and Training Dues and Association Memberships Office Supplies Uniforms & Wearing Apparel Books and Subscriptions Other Operating Supplies Copier Costs Special Events Capital Outlay

Total Operating Expenditures

$

$

2015-2016 Actual

1,240,188 25,251 223,691 107,903 180,282 13,713 155 75,133 131,349 245,751 4,796 11,095 410 2,173 1,818 7,063 9,197 144 8,876 -

$

2,288,987

$

2016-2017 Budget

1,277,745 32,129 241,810 113,470 175,570 14,201 125 190 121,781 112,625 236,611 5,700 11,310 734 3,062 1,836 7,042 10,493 144 16,414 9,311 14,900

$

2,407,204

$

2017-2018 Requested

1,397,064 208,714 122,842 154,096 18,302 1,000 250 500 136,287 123,950 311,592 5,700 19,877 1,356 5,000 3,000 7,000 10,000 500 15,000 10,060 -

$

2,552,090

$

% Change

1,397,064 25,000 270,000 129,443 154,096 18,302 1,000 250 500 500 136,287 123,950 311,592 5,700 19,877 1,356 10,200 3,500 8,000 20,000 500 18,000 10,060 500 15,000

2017-2018 Adopted

0% $ 29% 5% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 104% 17% 14% 100% 0% 20% 0% -

2,680,677

5%

$

% Change

1,407,730 211,219 123,850 150,976 18,441 1,000 250 500 500 178,614 150,233 319,128 5,700 19,877 1,356 5,000 3,500 7,000 11,000 500 18,000 10,060 -

1% 1% -2% 1% 0% 0% 0% 31% 21% 2% 0% 0% 0% 0% 17% 0% 10% 0% 20% 0% -

2,644,433

4%

NOTE: Comp Board provides partial salary reimbursement for 21 of 25 full time positions with reimbursement from the State and contribution by the City of the balance annually for operations.

Personnel Summary

Range

138 136 135 129 125/126/127 121 120

Class Sheriff Chief Deputy Sheriff Deputy Sheriff - Captain Deputy Sheriff - Lieutenant Deputy Sheriff - Sergeant Deputy Sheriff I-III Executive Secretary Secretary

Number of Full-Time Positions

2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

1 1 1 5 15 1 1

1 1 1 1 5 14 1 1

1 1 1 1 5 14 1 1

1 1 1 1 5 14 1 1

1 1 1 1 5 14 1 1

25

25

25

25

25

-

2017-2018 Requested

2017-2018 Adopted

109

1%


COMMONWEALTH’S ATTORNEY DESCRIPTION The Office of the Commonwealth’s Attorney prosecutes criminal offenses in the City of Suffolk. The Office prosecutes cases in the Juvenile and Domestic Relations Court, the General District Court, and the Circuit Court. It also prepares briefs for the Virginia Court of Appeals and the Virginia Supreme Court. In addition, the Office investigates cases and advises other City law enforcement personnel during investigations as to the substance and procedure of the criminal law. The Office also issues opinions on conflict of interest matters and is responsible for the collection of unpaid fines and court costs. In addition to prosecuting felony cases, the Office also prosecutes all misdemeanor cases in which a crime victim requests assistance, all drunk driving cases, certain domestic violence cases, all crimes that occur in schools, and all misdemeanor and traffic appeals to Circuit Court including violations of local ordinances. FY 2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Achieved continued success in the aggressive prevention, education, and prosecution of gang violence including gang violence presentations to all middle and high schools.

Continued the successful implementation of the Cold Case Homicide Prosecution Program.

Held the Suffolk Commonwealth’s Attorney’s Citizens Academy and CSI Camp for children ages 12 to 15 years old.

Provided the Victim Witness Program serving over 4,816 victims and witnesses.

FY 2018 OBJECTIVES 

To present the Commonwealth’s Attorney’s gang deterrence presentation to all Suffolk middle and high schools. (Public Safety)

To attain a 95% approval rating from victims and/or witnesses involved in cases assisted by attorneys and victim witness staff of the Commonwealth’s Attorney’s office. (Public Safety)

To provide over 20 hours of classroom training and materials to over 115 police officers, fire and rescue, and other law enforcement agency personnel. (Public Safety)

To promote community outreach awareness and crime prevention by attending 146 community outreach events. (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

STATISTICS/PERFORMANCE MEASURES Circuit Court defendants prosecuted Circuit Court indictments prosecuted Victims and Witnesses assisted Community Outreach events attended Hours of instruction provided to local law enforcement

FY 16 Actual 649 1,568 4,816 140 10,5 hrs.

FY 17 Projected 668 1,615 4,960 143 15 hrs.

FY 18 Estimate 688 1,663 5,109 146 20 hrs.

110


Department: Commonwealth's Attorney Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 100-2210051100.02 51100.04 51100.06 52100 52210 52400 53100 53300 53600 54100 54200 54500 55210 55230 55420 55500 55810 55854 55855 55860 56001 56012 56017 58200

Salaries and Wages Salaries and Wages - Overtime Salaries & Wages - Part-time FICA VRS Retirement Group Life Professional Services Repair and Maintenance Advertising Information Technology Fleet Risk Management Postal Services Telecommunications Lease/Rent of Building Travel and Training Dues and Association Memberships Asset Forfeiture - State Asset Forfeiture - Federal Community Outreach Crime Prevention Office Supplies Books and Subscriptions Copier Capital Outlay

Total Operating Expenditures

$

$

2015-2016 Actual

1,865,436 96,283 140,544 274,107 22,472 279 24 125 59,614 19,057 218,488 5,263 10,619 1,530 8,668 10,630 154 27,064 16,873 2,110 35,407 -

$

2,814,744

$

2016-2017 Budget

1,925,954 98,132 144,403 262,591 22,829 126 24 85 161,760 22,219 209,714 6,836 9,799 765 3,390 11,055 13,661 2,190 39,360 -

$

2,934,893

$

2017-2018 Requested

2,009,169 107,575 161,931 221,611 26,320 3,500 3,120 500 167,935 21,492 261,809 6,500 12,980 1,530 7,230 11,125 21,000 3,500 43,264 -

$

3,092,092

$

% Change

2,089,169 107,575 168,051 230,435 27,368 3,500 3,120 500 167,935 21,492 261,809 6,500 12,980 7,230 11,850 1,530 21,000 8,300 43,264 -

2017-2018 Adopted

4% $ 0% 4% 4% 4% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% -100% 0% 7% 0% 137% 0% -

3,193,608

3%

$

% Change

2,020,355 108,866 162,885 222,845 26,467 3,500 3,120 500 181,862 25,881 265,331 6,500 12,980 7,230 11,850 21,000 8,300 43,264 -

1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 0% 0% 0% 8% 20% 1% 0% 0% -100% 0% 7% -

3,132,735

1%

NOTE: Comp Board provides partial salary reimbursement for 17 of 25 full time positions with reimbursement from the State and contribution by the City of the balance annually for operations.

Personnel Summary

Range

144 135/138/141 138 136 127 124

Class Commonwealth's Attorney Deputy Commonwealth's Attorney Assistant Commonwealth's Attorney I-III Chief Administrative Manager Chief Investigator Community Outreach Coordinator Legal Assistant

Number of Full-Time Positions

2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

2017-2018 Adopted

1 3 9 1 1 1 8

1 3 9 1 1 1 8

1 3 9 1 1 1 8

1 3 10 1 1 1 8

1 3 9 1 1 1 8

24

24

24

25

24

111

0% 137% 0% -


POLICE DESCRIPTION The Suffolk Police Department is committed to law enforcement excellence and public service through partnership with the community. The Department seeks to improve the quality of life for citizens by focusing on the primary responsibilities of suppression of crime, apprehension of criminal offenders, and recovery of property, while providing proactive crime prevention and community policing services. FY 2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Completed crisis intervention training or mental health first aid with 100% of its officers and dispatchers.

Implemented Comp Stat, a monthly meeting that focuses department members on where crime is occurring and encourages leaders to take an active role in addressing crime proactively.

Began utilization of predictive policing software and initiated a study with Old Dominion University to evaluate intelligence led policing software.

Started Chew with the Blue Program at Booker T. Washington Elementary School whereby police officers eat lunch with third and fourth grade students.

Implemented fairness in policing training addressing bias for all sworn personnel.

FY 2018 OBJECTIVES 

To improve roadway safety by participating in the Virginia Chiefs Challenge Initiative. (Public Safety)

To hold two open houses and implement a middle and high school recruitment initiative. (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

To conduct a resource analysis study. (Public Safety)

STATISTICS/PERFORMANCE MEASURES Average Response Times: Priority 1 Calls Priority 2 Calls Priority 3 Calls Clearance Rate (Part I Offenses) Motor Vehicle and Traffic Enforcement: Traffic Citations DUI Arrests Motor Vehicle Crashes Traffic Fatalities

FY 16 Actual

FY 17 Projected

FY 18 Estimate

6:00 12:50 25.56 30%

5:46 12:31 27:16 23%

5:51 12:45 29:00 25%

9,284 167 2,311 10

7,840 275 2,438 5

8,000 325 2,525 7

112


Department: Police Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 100-3110051100.02 51100.04 51100.06 52100 52210 52400 53000.16 53100 53300 53500 54100 54200 54500 55100 55210 55230 55410 55420 55500 55810 55842 56001 31700-56007 31710-56007 56011 56012 56014 31715-56014 56017 56026 58100 58200

Salaries and Wages Salaries and Wages - Overtime Salaries and Wages - Part-time FICA VRS Retirement Group Life Purchased Services - Refuse Collection Professional Services Repair and Maintenance Printing and Binding Information Technology Fleet Risk Management Utilities Postal Services Telecommunications Lease/Rent of Equipment Lease/Rent of Building Travel and Training Dues and Association Memberships Rewards Office Supplies Property Seizure Confiscation Program Uniforms & Wearing Apparel Books and Subscriptions Other Operating Supplies DARE Copier Costs Special Events Capital Outlay - Replacements Capital Outlay - Additions

Total Operating Expenditures

$

9,290,863 1,261,138 90,195 775,147 1,333,968 110,294 324 167,193 14,278 13,949 1,120,935 1,776,507 2,285,518 129,248 6,614 153,799 27,973 97,238 5,013 15,628 28,260 1,754 90,299 172,215 1,339 99,297 78,518 7,632 284,804

$ 19,439,938

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

9,537,287 1,317,333 84,155 801,540 1,288,364 115,241 324 180,983 12,981 8,017 1,106,329 1,625,599 2,181,998 136,346 7,775 144,294 72,015 93,569 3,958 16,000 28,824 43,848 38,330 108,223 1,858 100,789 81,513 11,677 33,991

$ 10,799,601 820,228 888,917 1,183,659 141,475 284 168,086 15,500 11,000 1,961,154 2,290,162 2,618,999 160,000 8,000 262,921 81,858 103,000 4,692 16,000 30,000 118,522 2,000 100,000 85,764 10,220 -

$

11,009,856 1,182,388 152,858 944,400 1,214,387 144,229 284 202,394 20,500 11,737 1,961,154 2,290,162 2,618,899 160,000 8,000 262,921 708 120,172 4,922 16,000 30,000 138,563 2,000 100,000 85,764 9,940 60,368 1,636

2% 44% 6% 3% 2% 0% 20% 32% 7% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% -99% 17% 5% 0% 0% 17% 0% 0% 0% -3% -

$

11,289,240 820,228 926,374 1,234,165 147,889 284 152,394 20,500 11,737 2,160,397 2,522,651 2,682,431 160,000 8,000 262,921 81,858 120,172 4,922 16,000 30,000 138,563 2,000 100,000 87,091 9,940 -

5% 0% 4% 4% 5% 0% -9% 32% 7% 10% 10% 2% 0% 0% 0% 0% 17% 5% 0% 0% 17% 0% 0% 2% -3% -

$ 19,183,162

$ 21,882,042

$

22,754,242

4%

$

22,989,758

5%

$

2017-2018 Requested

% Change

2017-2018 Adopted

% Change

51100.04 - Overtime: Holiday, Court, Inclement Weather, Staffing, Cycle, On Call, CIT Drop Off Center, Special Events 53100 - Professional Services: Promotional assessment, polygraph, medical/psych./fitness for duty Evals; false alarm billing services; PPE testing; CALEA Accred.; vet services; biohazard disp 53300 - Repair & Maintenance: Software/Hardware system maintenance and radar repairs. 55500 - Travel & Training: HRCJA training of new officers; recertification of officers; specialized training for officers 56014 - Other Operating Supplies: ammunition, dog food, recruiting and safety supplies, crime scene processing materials. 56026 - Special Events: Youth Public Safety Academy Department: Police Personnel Summary

Range 144 141 138 136 132 130 130 130 125/127/128/129 127 127 124 124 124 121 120 120 119

Class Chief of Police Deputy Chief of Police Police Captain Police Lieutenant Police Sergeant Forensic Supervisor Evidence Technician Supervisor Administrative Analyst Police Officer I-III/Master Police Officer Records Management Supervisor Accreditation Manager Forensic Technician Evidence Technician Crime Analyst Executive Secretary Secretary Accounting Technician Police Records Technician

Number of Full-Time Positions

2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

2017-2018 Adopted

1 3 4 10 23 1 1 147 1 4 2 1 1 1 13

1 3 4 10 23 1 1 147 1 4 2 1 1 1 13

1 3 4 10 23 1 1 147 1 4 2 1 1 1 13

1 3 4 10 23 1 1 151 1 1 4 2 1 1 1 13

1 3 4 10 23 1 1 148 1 1 4 2 1 1 1 13

213

213

213

218

215

113


POLICE – EMERGENCY COMMUNICATIONS DESCRIPTION The Police – Emergency Communications Division is the Public Safety Answering Point (PSAP) for all landline and wireless non-emergency and 911 calls. The Division receives and dispatches all police and fire and rescue related calls, monitors, and dispatches on-call City agencies, state police, and state game commission agencies. In addition, the Division furnishes information from the National Crime Information Center and Virginia Criminal Information Network relating to wanted persons, license checks, and general broadcasts from all criminal justice agencies across the nation. FY 2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Trained an additional 30% of dispatchers/call takers in crisis intervention team or mental health first aid training to more effectively assist the mentally ill population.

Maintained emergency ring times between 0 to 10 seconds 97% of the time.

Completed approximately 65% of the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement (CALEA) communications standards and standard operating procedures.

FY 2018 OBJECTIVES 

To ensure that 95% of calls meet or exceed communication operator performance. (Public Safety)

To continue training dispatchers in crisis intervention and mental health first aid. (Public Safety)

To conduct outreach with local elementary schools to educate students about the proper use of 911. (Public Safety)

STATISTICS/PERFORMANCE MEASURES Calls for Service: Self-Initiated Calls received from Officers Calls from Citizens Number of calls reviewed by Supervisors Percent of reviewed calls meeting or exceeding expectations

FY 16 Actual

FY 17 Projected

FY 18 Estimate

86,475 43,659 1,325 97%

84,321 47,577 1,440 97%

85,134 49,757 1,320 98%

114


Division: Police Emergency Communications (Department of Police) Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 100-3140051100.02 51100.04 51100.06 52100 52210 52400 53100 53300 54500 55230 55500 55810 56011 56014

Salaries and Wages Salaries and Wages - Overtime Salaries and Wages - Part-time FICA VRS Retirement Group Life Professional Services Repair and Maintenance Risk Management Telecommunications Travel and Training Dues and Association Memberships Uniforms & Wearing Apparel Other Operating Supplies

Total Operating Expenditures

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Change

2017-2018 Adopted

% Change

$

928,061 106,283 5,581 75,494 132,341 12,341 298 2,257 246,538 29,401 5,569 92 5,000 4,623

$

922,956 97,628 5,323 74,106 123,503 11,375 16,240 475 236,619 84,664 4,442 4,000 3,994

$

1,126,309 24,857 88,064 124,232 14,755 8,850 2,500 293,658 54,221 6,000 225 4,000 4,000

$

1,182,379 108,607 98,760 130,416 15,489 18,850 2,500 293,658 54,221 6,985 225 4,000 4,000

5% $ 12% 5% 5% 113% 0% 0% 0% 16% 0% 0% 0%

1,242,107 24,857 96,923 136,075 16,272 18,850 2,500 298,432 113,701 6,985 225 4,000 4,000

10% 0% 10% 10% 10% 113% 0% 2% 110% 16% 0% 0% 0%

$

1,553,879

$

1,585,326

$

1,751,671

$

1,920,090

10%

1,964,927

12%

$

51100.04 - Overtime: Holiday, Inclement Weather, Staffing Personnel Summary

Range

Class 132 132 128 123/124 121

Police Sergeant PSAP Manager Communications Lead Operator Communications Operator I-II Call Taker

Number of Full-Time Positions

2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

1

2016-2017 Budget

3 20 3

3 20 3

3 20 3

27

27

27

28

-

1

2017-2018 Adopted 1 1 3 20 3

-

1

2017-2018 Requested

-

1 1 3 20 3 28

115


POLICE DEPARTMENT - ANIMAL SHELTER MANAGEMENT DESCRIPTION The Animal Shelter Management Division of the Suffolk Police Department investigates all reports concerning domestic animals within the City, provides 24 hour services for emergency situations involving animals, houses and cares for all animals coming into the facility in accordance with the Code of Virginia, implements an adoptive and redemptive services program, and educates citizens regarding domestic animal laws and regulations. FY 2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Issued 10 public service announcements to keep our citizens informed about issues relating to animal care.

Held at least two external adoption events per month in an effort to increase the percentage of animals adopted.

Trained 17 new volunteers for a total of 73 trained volunteers engaged in a variety of activities including adoption events, animal foster care, and staff assistance at the animal shelter.

Extended hours of operation two days per week to offer greater accessibility for citizens.

FY 2018 OBJECTIVES 

To continue implementing the public awareness campaign to inform citizens on animal care issues via social media, website, and other modes of communication. (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

To seek new ways to improve adoption rates of shelter animals through partnerships with area businesses and nonprofit organizations and through social media. (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

To expand customer service initiatives by reaching out to civic leagues, homeowners associations, and neighborhood watch groups regarding animal control issues. (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

STATISTICS/PERFORMANCE MEASURES Number of Adoptions Percent of Adoptions to number of animals received Number of Redemptions Number of Animal Foster Homes Number of Citizen Calls for Service Self-Initiated Calls for Service

FY 16 Actual 823 37% 288 21 3,077 1,904

FY 17 Projected 840 38% 290 24 4,095 2,239

FY 18 Estimate 850 39% 295 27 4,250 2,513

116


Division: Animal Shelter Management (Department of Police) Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 100-3510051100.02 51100.04 51100.06 52100 52210 52400 53000.02 53000.16 53100 53300 54200 54500 55100 55230 55410 55500 55810 56001 56011 56014 56015 56017 58100 58200

Salaries and Wages $ Salaries and Wages - Overtime Salaries and Wages - Part-time FICA VRS Retirement Group Life Purchased Services - Road Maintenance (incineration) Purchased Services - Refuse Collection Professional Services Repair and Maintenance Fleet Risk Management Utilities Telecommunications Lease/Rent of Equipment Travel and Training Dues and Association Memberships Office Supplies Uniforms & Wearing Apparel Other Operating Supplies Merchandise for Resale Copier Costs Capital Outlay - Replacements Capital Outlay

Total Operating Expenditures

$

2015-2016 Actual

308,573 36,235 24,594 43,321 3,700 5,000 945 103,268 1,014 82,418 95,455 37,655 5,957 17,197 1,047 270 1,187 3,000 26,955 3,004 4,034 -

$

804,829

$

2016-2017 Budget

321,664 28,571 25,416 42,728 3,803 5,000 963 121,703 401 97,818 91,445 39,733 2,462 17,849 538 297 1,273 3,000 27,472 3,219 644

$

835,998

$

2017-2018 Requested

372,845 3,286 28,774 41,125 4,884 15,000 1,000 111,000 1,000 88,683 112,075 38,000 7,187 19,166 1,000 300 1,300 3,000 25,539 3,000 3,868 -

$

882,032

$

% Change

372,845 22,253 37,700 33,109 41,125 4,884 15,000 1,000 111,000 1,000 88,683 112,075 38,000 7,187 1,000 550 1,300 3,000 28,000 3,000 3,868 14,278 -

15% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% -100% 0% 83% 0% 0% 10% 0% 0% -

940,857

7%

2017-2018 Adopted

0% $ 577%

$

% Change

386,868 3,286 38,152 29,847 42,672 5,068 15,000 466 111,000 1,000 132,548 113,547 38,000 7,187 19,166 1,000 550 1,300 3,000 28,000 3,000 3,868 -

4% 4% 4% 0% -53% 0% 0% 49% 1% 0% 0% 0% 0% 83% 0% 0% 10% 0% 0% -

984,525

12%

51100.04 - Overtime: Holiday, Inclement Weather, Staffing, On Call 53100 - Professional Services: Vet services. 56014 - Other Operating Supplies: pet food and supplies, cleaning supplies. Personnel Summary

Range

Class 130 130 121 116

Chief Animal Control Officer Animal Shelter Manager Animal Control Officer Animal Caretaker

Number of Full-Time Positions

2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

2017-2018 Adopted

1 1 5 3

1 1 5 3

1 1 5 3

1 1 5 3

1 1 5 3

10

10

10

10

10

117

4% 0%


COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT SERVICES DESCRIPTION The Community Development Services Division of the Department of Planning and Community Development is responsible for all building permitting and inspections, housing and property maintenance inspections, and enforcement and zoning administration including inspections, enforcements, and customer service. FY 2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Completed 10 demolitions of dilapidated and derelict properties for blight abatement and facilitated 18 demolitions by property owners.

Provided efficient plan review, permitting, and building inspection services for new construction within the City including major economic development initiatives with 14,899 inspections conducted and 417 plan reviews.

Conducted 6,961 property maintenance inspections in response to codes violations.

FY 2018 OBJECTIVES 

To provide plan review and conduct building inspection services within two business days in support of new construction activities. (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

To resolve code compliance violations within 45 calendar days through the initiation of court actions and voluntary and involuntary codes compliance. (Public Safety)

To provide property maintenance and zoning inspections and enforcement within two business days. (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

STATISTICS AND PERFORMANCE MEASURES Building Permits: New Residential Permits Single Family Multi-Family Residential Addition, Alteration and Repair Permits New Commercial Permits Commercial Addition, Alteration and Repair Permits Code Enforcement: Code Compliance Inspections Percent of Code Violations resolved in 45 days or less Inspections: Requests for Inspections Percent of requests for inspections performed within two business days

FY 16 Actual

FY 17 Projection

FY 18 Estimate

348 285 63 235 38 114

351 288 64 237 38 115

355 291 64 240 39 116

6,134 79%

6,195 80%

6,257 81%

15,360 99%

15,514 100%

15,669 100%

118


Division: Community Development (Department of Planning and Community Development Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 100-3450051100.02 51100.04 51100.06 52100 52210 52400 53100 53100.30 53175 53600 54100 54200 54500 55210 55230 55500 55810 56001 56012 56014 56017

Salaries and Wages Salaries and Wages - Overtime Salaries and Wages - Part-time FICA VRS Retirement Group Life Professional Services Professional Service - Demolition Neighborhood Improvements Advertising Information Technology Fleet Risk Management Postal Services Telecommunications Travel and Training Dues and Association Memberships Office Supplies Books and Subscriptions Other Operating Supplies Copier Costs

Total Operating Expenditures

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Change

$

1,253,804 313 91,068 184,623 15,420 44 148,942 42,702 1,526 102,969 89,705 245,108 12,856 15,288 5,316 1,605 7,889 5,959 10,289

$

1,292,658 16 93,976 177,322 15,954 130,613 46,431 1,645 127,807 82,693 235,170 11,738 14,632 7,442 1,650 7,002 900 329 8,500

$

1,377,657 105,391 151,956 18,047 1,000 150,000 60,000 3,000 176,349 76,402 290,923 15,336 17,887 8,000 1,400 9,000 1,000 1,000 9,118

$

1,377,657 105,391 151,956 18,047 1,000 200,000 60,000 3,000 176,349 76,402 290,923 15,336 17,887 9,000 1,400 10,000 2,000 1,000 9,118

$

2,235,426

$

2,256,477

$

2,473,466

$

2,526,466

2017-2018 Adopted

0% $ 0% 0% 0% 0% 33% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 13% 0% 11% 100% 0% 0% 2%

$

% Change

1,360,065 104,045 150,015 17,817 1,000 200,000 60,000 3,000 134,112 117,841 293,298 15,336 17,887 9,000 1,400 9,000 2,000 1,000 9,118

-1% -1% -1% -1% 0% 33% 0% 0% -24% 54% 1% 0% 0% 13% 0% 0% 100% 0% 0%

2,505,934

1%

53170 - Professional Service - Demolition: Demo of unsafe structures and public nuisance. 53175 - Neighborhood Improvements: Removal of trash, debris, weeds, grass, inoperable vehicles and nuisances in violation of City ordinances. 56014 - Other Operating Supplies: Protective clothing for inspectors. Personnel Summary

Range

Class 138 135 133 133 130 127 127 125/127 124/125 125 124 123 120 119

Assistant Director of Community Development Zoning Administration and Enforcement Manager Housing/Property Maintenance Official Building Official Plans Reviewer Customer Service Manager Assistant Zoning Administration and Enforcement Coordi Building Inspector I-II Zoning Inspector I-II Housing/Property Maintenance Inspector Senior Permit Technician Permit Technician Secretary Office Assistant

Number of Full-Time Positions

2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

2017-2018 Adopted

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 7 2 4 1 3 1 1

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 7 2 4 1 3 1 1

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 7 2 4 3 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 7 2 4 3 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 7 2 4 3 1 1 1

26

26

26

26

26

119


FIRE AND RESCUE DESCRIPTION The Suffolk Department of Fire and Rescue provides fire prevention, fire protection, public education, emergency management, and emergency medical care and transportation to the citizens of Suffolk 24 hours per day, 365 days per year. The Fire Prevention Bureau of the Department of Fire and Rescue performs fire prevention and education, commercial fire inspections, new construction plans review in conjunction with the City Building Official, and fire/arson investigations in order to determine cause and origin. FY 2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Acquired and placed into service a new ladder truck.

Conducted a full scale mass casualty exercise.

Implemented new training management software.

Developed a Citizen’s Fire and Emergency Medical Services Academy.

Coordinated with City departments to begin the renovation of Fire Station 1 on Market Street in downtown Suffolk.

and

records

FY 2018 OBJECTIVES 

To establish a well-managed Fire and Rescue department with demonstrated fiscal responsibility and increased community involvement. (Public Safety)

To improve operations by improving standard operating procedures (SOPs), working toward accreditation, and review and evaluation of the Insurance Service Office (ISO) report. (Public Safety)

To ensure a highly trained and committed workforce by updating the career path policy, revising the entry level hiring process, encouraging health and wellness, certifying an additional Virginia Education Coordinator, and establishing quarterly training drills. (Public Safety)

STATISTICS/PERFORMANCE MEASURES Calls for Service Average Response Time Number of Fires Number of Fire Casualties Fire Prevention: Plan Reviews Fire and Life Safety Surveys Target Hazard Inspections Investigations Arson, Bomb Threats, Threats to Burn Community Outreach: Fire Safety House Presentations Youth Public Safety Academy sessions Fire/Life Safety Camps

FY 16 Actual 11,183 6:48 136 0

FY 17 Projected 11,518 6:51 138 0

FY 18 Estimate 11,864 6:54 140 0

234 N/A N/A 82 30

250 100 195 90 35

256 200 200 95 40

42 23 3

45 23 4

50 23 4 120


Department: Fire and Rescue Budget Detail

Account Number: 100-3210051100.02 51100.04 51100.06 52100 52210 52400 53000.16 53100 53100.22 53200 53300 53320 53500 54100 54200 54500 55100 55210 55230 55410 55420 55440 55500 55645 55700 55810 55843 56001 56007 56007.12 56011 56012 56014 56017 58200

Salaries and Wages Salaries and Wages - Overtime Salaries and Wages - Part-time FICA VRS Retirement Group Life Purchased Services - Refuse Collection Professional Services Medical Services Temporary Help Service Fees Repair and Maintenance Maintenance Service Contracts Printing and Binding Information Technology Fleet Risk Management Utilities Postal Services Telecommunications Lease/Rent of Equipment Lease/Rent of Building Fire Hydrant Rental Travel and Training Four for Life - EMS Support VFD Operations Dues and Association Memberships Fire Programs Fund Expense Office Supplies Repair and Maintenance Supplies Educational Supplies Uniforms & Wearing Apparel Books and Subscriptions Other Operating Supplies Copier Costs Capital Outlay - Additions

*

*

Total Operating Expenditures

2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Change

2017-2018 Adopted

% Change

$ 11,492,700 2,819,018 507,989 1,066,565 1,701,550 137,165 5,425 131,157 27,047 16,768 5,622 23,853 1,540 833,070 1,303,923 3,014,485 175,943 743 52,933 176,987 117,000 24,861 70,394 104,000 18,940 134,054 4,235 6,968 5,073 106,217 1,453 33,115 26,113 20,150

$ 11,809,478 3,068,551 499,826 1,112,444 1,623,244 141,562 5,689 236,097 51,195 8,185 11,247 84,929 630 789,583 1,289,931 2,865,229 176,403 1,200 60,838 151,714 117,000 32,524 87,876 107,500 18,939 386,338 3,759 10,660 4,099 102,866 1,511 34,132 34,642 15,685

$ 13,735,222 1,587,449 1,172,184 1,513,234 179,931 4,879 181,000 35,900 12,000 65,439 1,160 1,097,344 1,278,663 3,376,038 214,200 850 98,148 176,987 140,000 27,250 76,080 107,500 19,735 268,082 4,600 13,000 6,500 110,000 1,730 41,000 38,097 -

$

13,854,769 3,100,920 574,744 1,341,078 1,528,181 181,497 5,700 181,733 38,740 12,300 87,204 1,160 1,097,344 1,278,663 3,376,038 220,626 850 107,963 176,988 140,000 40,525 76,080 107,500 20,025 254,034 5,060 15,000 8,000 154,800 1,830 46,000 38,097 50,000

1% 95% 14% 1% 1% 17% 0% 8% 2% 33% 0% 0% 0% 0% 3% 0% 10% 0% 0% 49% 0% 0% 1% -5% 10% 15% 23% 41% 6% 12% 0% -

$

14,168,111 1,587,449 1,205,300 1,557,409 185,602 8,011 181,733 38,740 12,300 87,204 1,160 1,124,714 1,539,743 3,406,927 220,626 850 98,148 176,988 140,000 40,525 80,663 60,000 20,025 274,489 5,060 15,000 8,000 154,800 1,830 46,000 38,097 -

3% 0% 3% 3% 3% 64% 0% 8% 2% 33% 0% 2% 20% 1% 3% 0% 0% 0% 0% 49% 6% -44% 1% 2% 10% 15% 23% 41% 6% 12% 0% -

$ 24,167,057

$ 24,945,506

$ 25,584,202

$

28,123,449

10%

$

26,485,504

4%

51100.04 - Overtime: Holiday, FLSA, Inclement Weather, Special Events 51100.06 - Part-time: EMS Paramedics 53100 - Professional Services: Dept. of Forestry contracts for forest fire prevention & suppression; independent ladder testing services & EMS billing; firefighter entrance testing. 53110 - Medical Services: OSHA required annual medical eval.'s & medical director services. 55440 - Fire Hydrant Rental: Fire hydrant rentals and maintenance charges from Public Utilities. 56007 - Repair & Maintenance Supplies: Supplies to maintain building facilities, tools and equipment. 56014 - Other Operating Supplies: Medical supplies, emergency food supplies, & janitorial supplies for facilities. * Amounts for Four for Life and Fire Programs are estimates of grant funds to be received and are offset by anticipated revenues in the General Fund **Above includes supplemental funding for volunteer organizations of approximately $557,705 annually

Department: Fire and Rescue Personnel Summary

Range

Class

144 141 137 137 134 132 130 129 127/128/129 125/126

Fire Chief Deputy Fire Chief Fire Marshal Battalion Chief Fire Captain Fire Lieutenant Administrative Analyst Public Education Specialist-Fire Investigator Firefighter I-II/Senior Firefighter/ Firefighter-Medic I-II/Master Firefighter/Fire Inspector/Fire InvestigatorInspector 121 Executive Secretary 119 Office Assistant

Number of Full-Time Positions

2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

1 2

1 2

1 3

2017-2018 Requested

2017-2018 Adopted

7 19 30 1 1

7 19 31 1 1

8 19 31 1 1

7 20 31 1 1

1 3 1 7 19 31 1 1

188 1 2

187 1 2

185 1 2

188 1 2

188 1 2

252

252

252

255

255

-

-

-

1 3 -

121


FIRE AND RESCUE – EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT DESCRIPTION The Emergency Management Division of the Suffolk Department of Fire and Rescue is responsible for disaster preparedness and seeks to lesson the impact of natural and man-made disasters on the Suffolk community through effective mitigation, planning, emergency response, and recovery. This is accomplished through a comprehensive all-hazards emergency management program aimed at coordinating local, state, and federal resources during a disaster. FY 2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Assisted in the review and development of 12 emergency plans for businesses and institutions within the City.

Conducted educational outreach to residents and businesses through presentations at events such as Peanut Fest, civic league, and homeowner association meetings.

Completed all work elements required by Local Emergency Management Performance Grant.

Provided City staff and key partners with numerous notifications of potentially inclement weather and situational awareness briefings.

the

FY 2018 OBJECTIVES 

To administer a comprehensive all-hazards emergency management program aimed at coordinating local, state, federal, and private resources to address natural and man-made disasters through preparedness, response, recovery, and mitigation. (Public Safety)

To assist with the development of emergency plans and exercises for businesses and institutions within the City. (Public Safety)

To complete all work elements required by the Local Emergency Management Performance Grant. (Public Safety)

To provide educational outreach to residents and businesses. (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

To encourage citizens, visitors, and City employee participation in the annual Statewide Tornado and Earthquake drills. (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

STATISTICS/PERFORMANCE MEASURES Number of training exercises held Percentage of City staff with emergency responsibilities receiving at least one class annually

management

Percent compliance with State/Federal emergency management mandates

FY 16 Actual 3

FY 17 Projected 3

FY 18 Estimate 3

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

122


Division: Emergency Management (Department of Fire & Rescue) Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 100-3550054100 55210 55230 55500 55810 56001 56012 56014 56017 58200

Information Technology Postal Services Telecommunications Travel and Training Dues and Association Memberships Office Supplies Books and Subscriptions Other Operating Supplies Copier Costs Capital Outlay

Total Operating Expenditures

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Change

2017-2018 Adopted

% Change

$

4,685 1 4,420 584 75 1,182 2,997

$

23,130 3,398 744 887 -

$

24,125 50 5,547 900 75 1,250 1,400 -

$

24,125 50 5,547 9,800 520 1,250 1,500 -

0% $ 0% 0% 989% 593% 0% 7% -

23,130 50 11,947 1,800 150 1,250 1,400 -

-4% 0% 115% 100% 100% 0% 0% -

$

13,944

$

28,160

$

33,347

$

42,792

28%

39,727

19%

$

123


WESTERN TIDEWATER REGIONAL JAIL AUTHORITY DESCRIPTION The Western Tidewater Regional Jail Authority is a regional partnership of the cities of Suffolk and Franklin, and the counties of Isle of Wight and Southampton, which provides incarceration services to enhance the safety and security of the residents of these localities. The City of Suffolk supports the regional jail’s operations through a local funding contribution based on inmate population served. FY 2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Established new inmate insurance program with Sentara/Optima resulting in significant savings.

Achieved 100% compliance rating with all standards from the Department of Corrections, U.S. Marshall’s Service, the Bureau of Prisons, and Suffolk Health Department.

Completed an energy performance contract resulting in a 50% reduction in utility bills.

Provided 40 different programs to help reduce recidivism including anger management, GED, family skills and substance abuse programs among others.

Received the Award for Excellence in Financial Reporting for the first time in the history of the Western Tidewater Regional Jail.

FY 2018 OBJECTIVES 

To increase the federal inmate count.

To identify cost saving/production enhancing technologies and training to improve efficiency and reduce costs to member localities.

To continue to enhance programs that reduces recidivism and provide inmates more options upon their release.

To foster improved working relationships with other regional jails to facilitate collaborative agreements, contract negotiations, and new technologies that can be cooperative utilized to decrease costs.

To enhance staff training and education programs in an effort to become one of the premier jails in the state.

124


Department: Western Tidewater Regional Jail Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 100-3320057001 Required Jurisdiction Contribution Total Operating Expenditures

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Change

2017-2018 Adopted

% Change

$

3,797,045

$

4,303,091

$

4,364,037

$

4,364,052

0%

$

4,364,052

0%

$

3,797,045

$

4,303,091

$

4,364,037

$

4,364,052

0%

$

4,364,052

0%

Above represents required local contribution to operate the regional jail facility. Local jurisdiction costs are apportioned based on % of local inmate population

125


PUBLIC WORKS DESCRIPTION The Department of Public Works provides a wide range of services in support of the economic vitality and quality of life of the City of Suffolk and its citizens including fleet management, refuse collection, stormwater management, mosquito control, roadway maintenance, traffic engineering, and transit services. FY 2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Completed negotiations with the Southeastern Public Service Authority (SPSA) to finalize a long term agreement for waste disposal and to create a lasting host agreement for the regional landfill.

Completed sidewalk, streetscape, and functional roadway improvements to the North Main Street corridor in partnership with developing commercial enterprises.

Secured state and federal funding assistance for numerous transportation and transit related projects and operations.

Replaced three structurally deficient bridge structures on Arthur Drive and Pittmantown Road.

Provided critical services during two major tropical events and one major snow event.

FY 2018 OBJECTIVES 

To provide sound oversight of all funds administered by the Department with special attention to ensuring that refuse and stormwater utility and special revenue funds are used expressly for their intended purpose. (Financial Stability)

To identify opportunities for transportation improvements and enhancements, as well as opportunities for funding. (Transportation)

To respond to citizen requests for information and to proactively reach out to communities where significant projects will be undertaken. (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

STATISTICS/PERFORMANCE MEASURES Number of lane miles resurfaced Average time to repair reported potholes Percent of Priority 1 Traffic Signal requests repaired within 4 hours Tons of Refuse Collected Tons of Curbside Recycling Collected Transit Ridership (non-ADA)

FY 16 Actual 62 72 hrs.

FY 17 Projected 48 72 hrs.

FY 18 Estimate 48 72 hrs.

100%

100%

100%

36,542 5,326 101,616

40,000 5,800 107,800

43,000 6,100 113,700

126


Department: Public Works - Administration Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 100-4110051100.02 51100.04 51100.06 52100 52210 52400 53000.02 53000.06 53000.43 53000.44 53000.45 53100 53130 53600 54100 54200 54500 55210 55230 55500 55810 56001 56012 56014 56017 58200

Salaries and Wages Salaries and Wages - Overtime Salaries and Wages - Part-time FICA VRS Retirement Group Life Purchased Services - RM Dirt Roads Purchased Services - Stormwater - Engineering Purchased Services - RM Salary Allocation Purchased Services - RM Streetlight Installation Purchased Services - RM Impact Analysis Professional Services Landfill Closure Monitoring Advertising Information Technology Fleet Risk Management Postal Services Telecommunications Travel and Training Dues and Association Memberships Office Supplies Books and Subscriptions Other Operating Supplies Copier Costs Capital Outlay

Total Operating Expenditures

$

$

2015-2016 Actual

166,004 11,979 24,635 1,976 30,000 340,000 45,000 20,000 15,000 13,494 122,122 47,674 6,125 21,353 898 3,311 814 420 1,251 1,018 -

$

873,075

$

2016-2017 Budget

173,498 12,149 23,972 2,062 44,853 400,000 45,000 1,200 137,104 16,841 3,218 18,236 1,435 3,307 86 1,391 120 1,003 -

$

885,475

$

2017-2018 Requested

177,810 13,602 19,612 2,329 60,000 400,000 45,000 20,000 15,000 15,000 88,500 250 15,843 4,917 24,059 700 3,704 1,700 750 1,500 500 1,110 -

$

911,888

$

% Change

177,810 13,602 22,831 2,347 130,000 450,000 45,000 20,000 15,000 15,000 88,500 250 15,843 4,917 24,059 500 3,704 1,500 750 1,500 500 1,110 1,034,723

2017-2018 Adopted

0% $ 0% 16% 1% 117% 13% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% -29% 0% -12% 0% 0% 0% 0% 13%

$

% Change

179,957 13,767 19,849 2,357 130,000 450,000 45,000 20,000 15,000 15,000 88,500 250 16,627 3,497 22,052 700 3,704 1,000 750 1,500 500 1,110 -

1% 1% 1% 117% 13% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 5% -29% -8% 0% 0% -41% 0% 0% 0% 0% -

1,031,121

13%

53000 - Purchased Services: To cover misc. local transportation needs outside VDOT reimbursement regulations and engineering services. 53100 - Professional Services: Surveying / Engineering services. Personnel Summary

Range

Class 144 Director of Public Works 121 Executive Secretary

Number of Full-Time Positions

2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

2017-2018 Adopted

1 1

1 1

1 1

1 1

1 1

2

2

2

2

2

127

1%


CAPITAL PROGRAMS AND FACILITIES DESCRIPTION The Department of Capital Programs and Facilities is responsible for the administration and management of capital projects, building maintenance, and custodial functions. As part of its capital project management functions, the Department coordinates with City departments, user groups, and approval agencies; develops project plans and budgets; oversees land acquisition, consultant selection, contract negotiation and monitoring, architectural and engineering consultants and contractors; and manages contract payments, fees, and project expenditures. The Department’s building maintenance and custodial functions include the provision of general building maintenance and custodial services, HVAC systems maintenance, and the repair of electrical, plumbing, and other building systems. FY 2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Initiated renovation work at Fire Station 1 on Market Street.

Coordinated the cleanup and renovation of damage sustained to the Municipal Building due to Hurricane Matthew.

Began the design process for the Bennett’s Creek Recreation Center.

FY 2018 OBJECTIVES 

To provide cost effective and quality building maintenance and custodial services for City departments and agencies. (Financial Stability)

To plan and facilitate the design, renovation, and construction of City buildings and facilities to enhance service delivery by City departments for the benefit of citizens. (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

STATISTICS/PERFORMANCE MEASURES Building Maintenance and Custodial: Number of Buildings maintained Square Footage of Buildings maintained Number of Service Requests Building Maintenance Custodial Average Response Time to Service Requests Capital Projects: Percent of Capital Building Projects completed on time/within budget

FY 16 Actual

FY 17 Projected

FY 18 Estimate

44 1,035,000

44 1,035,000

44 1,035,000

1,625 825 1 day

1,750 950 1 day

1,750 1,100 1 day

90%

90%

90%

128


Department: Capital Programs & Facilities Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 100-43250 51100.02 51100.04 51100.06 52100 52210 52400 53000.16 53100 53300 53320 54100 54200 54500 55100 55210 55230 55410 55500 55810 56001 56011 56014 56017 58200

Salaries and Wages Salaries and Wages - Overtime Salaries and Wages - Part-time FICA VRS Retirement Group Life Purchased Services - Refuse Collection Professional Services Repair and Maintenance Maintenance Service Contracts Information Technology Fleet Risk Management Utilities Postal Services Telecommunications Lease/Rent of Equipment Travel and Training Dues & Association Memberships Office Supplies Uniforms & Wearing Apparel Other Operating Supplies Copier Costs Capital Outlay

Total Operating Expenditures

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Change

2017-2018 Adopted

% Change

$

888,691 20,957 155,322 78,276 128,950 10,610 8,340 3,296 131,193 230,366 33,090 51,164 299,606 753,089 54 6,993 530,207 53 2,395 11,505 140,469 6,710 -

$

929,362 20,088 145,140 80,389 126,462 11,061 9,158 13,326 137,535 209,143 92,968 62,895 282,660 566,724 47 6,651 499,765 68 2,008 10,552 259,895 7,079 10,341

$

977,987 194,689 89,710 107,872 12,812 6,896 140,000 360,000 72,059 57,797 436,546 634,689 100 7,258 534,415 1,000 2,000 12,000 150,000 7,293 -

$

1,014,137 168,479 90,470 111,859 13,285 6,896 140,000 465,000 72,059 57,797 436,546 634,689 100 7,258 534,415 1,000 2,000 12,000 150,000 7,293 -

4% -13% 1% 4% 4% 0% 0% 29% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% -

$

992,997 197,025 91,037 109,528 13,008 11,322 140,000 465,000 89,327 74,395 458,060 634,689 100 7,258 534,415 1,000 2,000 12,000 150,000 7,293 -

2% 1% 1% 2% 2% 64% 0% 29% 24% 29% 5% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% -

$

3,491,334

$

3,483,316

$

3,805,122

$

3,925,283

3%

$

3,990,453

5%

Personnel Summary

Range

Class 144 138 130 127 124 123 121 120 120 114

Director of Capital Programs & Buildings Assistant Director of Capital Programs & Buildings Facilities Maintenance Manager Facilities Inspector General Services Supervisor Building Maintenance Technician Executive Secretary Secretary Custodial Supervisor Custodial Worker

Number of Full-Time Positions

2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Change

2017-2018 Adopted

% Change

1 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 2 12

1 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 2 12

1 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 2 12

1 1 1 1 1 4 1 1 2 12

1 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 2 12

24

24

24

25

24

129


SOCIAL SERVICES DESCRIPTION The Department of Social Services administers a variety of federal and local financial assistance and human services programs. The Department’s services are categorized into five broad service areas: Financial Services, Employment Services, Foster Care Services, Child/Adult Prevention/Protection Services, and Community Corrections. FY 2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Maintained a 99.8% timeliness of processing standard exceeding the state benchmark of 97% for assistance and benefit applications.

Achieved a program participation rate of 82.9% for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) exceeding the state benchmark of 80%.

Became the first workforce center in the country to partner with the Manufacturing Skill Institute enabling the Suffolk Workforce Development Center to administer the nationally recognized manufacturing technician certification.

FY 2018 OBJECTIVES 

To process benefit applications at or above the state standard of 97% and maintain low error rates. (Leisure, Health, and Wellness)

To protect vulnerable children and the elderly from abuse and neglect by responding to 98% of valid investigative reports within state mandated guidelines. (Leisure, Health, and Wellness)

To continue the Department’s focus on preventative measures to decrease the number of children entering foster care. (Leisure, Health, and Wellness)

To provide citizens and businesses with access to workforce development and employment services. (Expanded Economic Development)

STATISTICS/PERFORMANCE MEASURES Number of Persons/Households receiving SNAP Percent of eligible households receiving SNAP Number of Persons/Households receiving TANF Number of households receiving Medicaid Number of Children in Foster Care Percent of TANF recipients in employment activities Number of visitors at Workforce Development Ctr. Number of persons in Community Corrections Program Average Length of Supervision time

FY 16 Actual 12,088 82.9% 899 14,195 13 51% 14,642 822 253 days

FY 17 Projected 12,000 83.0% 879 14,300 15 52% 16,000 850 255 days

FY 18 Estimate 11,900 84.0% 869 14,400 15 55% 15,000 850 255 days

130


Department: Social Services Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 100-5310051100.02 51100.04 51100.06 51100.27 52100 52210 52400 52600 53100 53300 54100 54200 54500 55210 55230 55300 55420 55500 55667 55676 55677 55701.02 55701.04 55701.06 55701.08 55701.10 55701.12 55701.14 55701.16 55701.18 55701.22 55701.24 55810 56001 56017

Salaries and Wages Salaries and Wages - Overtime Salaries and Wages - Part-time Leave Compensation FICA VRS Retirement Group Life Unemployment Professional Services Repair and Maintenance Information Technology Fleet Risk Management Postal Services Telecommunications Insurance and Bonds Lease/Rent of Building Travel and Training Early Childhood Development Commission Summer Youth Program Suffolk Workforce Development (lease) Auxiliary Assistance - Blind, Aged & Disabled Aid to Dependent Children Aid to Dependent Children - Foster Care Fuel Assistance Healthy Families Other Local Only Title XX Purchased Services Adoption Payments Employment Services Program Quality Initiative Program General Relief Dues and Association Memberships Office Supplies Copier Costs

Total Operating Expenditures

$

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Change

2017-2018 Adopted

% Change

4,462,515 79 275,235 61,609 346,994 647,226 53,018 19,491 30,928 1,124 235,435 54,651 949,387 67,857 40,678 2,295 1,219,517 20,193 61,077 119,511 67,872 220,730 1,910 271,421 435 46,218 221,853 396,156 126,482 17,188 12,500 605 45,198 122,600

$

4,609,841 350 311,495 356,863 621,218 54,575 756 31,011 2,198 279,894 54,241 910,964 65,006 38,170 2,326 1,170,875 15,505 59,159 102,800 22,391 202,411 144 195,944 41,558 178,679 398,525 97,745 17,188 12,000 2,157 28,347 108,899

$

4,999,177 264,245 100,000 402,652 551,409 65,489 19,490 34,365 1,128 499,625 56,938 1,128,222 72,850 52,392 2,886 1,166,011 21,812 60,000 140,000 85,968 300,560 2,500 603,285 500 93,507 288,110 600,860 252,685 17,188 12,000 1,525 82,453 121,122

$

4,999,177 264,245 100,000 402,652 551,409 65,489 19,490 34,365 1,128 499,625 56,938 1,128,222 72,850 52,392 2,886 1,176,011 21,812 60,000 140,000 85,968 300,560 2,500 603,285 500 93,507 288,110 600,860 252,685 17,188 12,000 1,525 82,453 121,122

0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 1% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0%

$

5,049,343 267,416 100,000 406,732 556,943 66,146 19,490 34,365 1,128 546,395 64,448 1,142,705 72,850 52,392 2,886 1,176,011 21,812 60,000 140,000 85,968 300,560 2,500 603,285 500 93,507 288,110 600,860 252,685 17,188 12,000 1,525 82,453 123,776

1% 1% 0% 1% 1% 1% 0% 0% 0% 9% 13% 1% 0% 0% 0% 1% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 2%

$ 10,219,988

$

9,993,234

$ 12,100,955

$

12,110,954

0%

$

12,245,979

1%

2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

1 2 1 1 4 5 28 1 1 1 6 32 1 1 3 14 1

1 2 1 1 4 5 28 1 1 1 4 34 1 1 3 14 1

1 2 1 1 4 5 28 1 1 1 4 34 1 1 3 14 1

1 2 1 1 4 5 27 1 1 1 4 34 1 1 1 3 14 1

1 2 1 1 4 5 27 1 1 1 4 34 1 1 1 3 14 1

103

103

103

103

103

Above costs are offset by estimated State/Fed Revenues of: $7,872,120

Personnel Summary

Range 144 138 135 132 132 130 126/128/130 130 129 128 126/128 123/126/127 124 123 123 120 119 119

Class Director of Social Services Assistant Director of Social Services Financial Manager Social Services Information Technology Administrator Family Services Worker Supervisor II Financial Services Coordinator Family Services Worker I-III Administrative Analyst Workforce Center Coordinator ECDC Coordinator Self Sufficiency Worker I-II Financial Services Case Manager I-III Clerical Support Supervisor Senior Accounting Technician Fraud Investigator Accounting Technician Screening Clerk Office Assistant

Number of Full-Time Positions

2017-2018 Requested

2017-2018 Adopted

131


SOCIAL SERVICES – CHILDREN’S SERVICES ACT DESCRIPTION The Children’s Services Act (CSA) was implemented by state legislation as a collaborative system of services and funding that is to be child-centered, family-focused, and community-based when addressing the strengths and needs of troubled and at-risk youth and their families. The CSA is administered by a City Council appointed board comprised of representatives from Social Services, Juvenile Court Services, the Community Services Board, the Health Department, Public Schools, the Police Department, a Private and Public Provider, and Parent Representative. The Department of Social Services serves as the fiscal agent and supervises the CSA Division staff. FY 2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Reduced the number of children in congregate care from 28% to 24%.

Reduced the length of stay of children in congregate care placements from an average of 14 months to an average of 7 months.

Negotiated with the Western Tidewater Community Services Board to provide case support for families without case management.

FY 2018 OBJECTIVES 

To provide rehabilitative services to 80% of the Comprehensive Services Act (CSA) population in a non-residential setting. (Leisure, Health, and Wellness)

To achieve improved sustained participation of at least 80% of the stakeholders for the Community Planning Management Team (CPMT) as well as the Family Assessment and Planning Team (FAPT). (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

To maintain the average cost per day for CSA services at or below the average state cost per service. (Financial Stability)

STATISTICS/PERFORMANCE MEASURES Comprehensive Services Act (CSA) Program: Number of children receiving CSA services Average Cost per day for CSA services

FY 16 Actual

FY 17 Projected

FY 18 Estimate

40 $64

45 $64

50 $64

132


Department: Children's Services Act Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 100-5350051100.02 51100.04 51100.06 52100 52210 52400 53000.08 54500 55701.10

Salaries and Wages Salaries and Wages - Overtime Salaries and Wages - Part-time FICA VRS Retirement Group Life CSA Purchased Services Risk Management Healthy Families

Total Operating Expenditures

$

$

2015-2016 Actual

104,814 75 26,661 9,640 14,783 1,247 1,295,189 18,207 -

$

1,470,615

$

2016-2017 Budget

106,597 7 27,433 9,890 14,365 1,268 924,305 17,476 -

$

1,101,341

$

2017-2018 Requested

113,924 35,629 11,441 12,566 1,492 1,495,425 21,982 -

$

1,692,459

$

% Change

2017-2018 Adopted

113,924 35,629 11,441 12,566 1,492 1,200,066 21,982 -

0% 0% 0% 0% 0% -20% 0% -

$

1,397,100

-17%

$

% Change

116,979 36,057 11,707 12,903 1,532 1,200,066 22,294 -

1% 2% 3% 3% -20% 1% -

1,401,538

-17%

Personnel Summary

Range

Class 131 CSA Coordinator 126 CSA Management Specialist

Number of Full-Time Positions

2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

2017-2018 Adopted

1 1

1 1

1 1

1 1

1 1

2

2

2

2

2

Above costs are offset by estimated State/Fed Revenues of: $908,115

133

3%


SUFFOLK HEALTH DEPARTMENT DESCRIPTION The Suffolk Health Department is part of the Western Tidewater Health District which includes Isle of Wight County, Southampton County, the City of Franklin, and the City of Suffolk. The Health Department aims to achieve and maintain personal and community health by emphasizing health promotion, disease prevention, and environmental protection. The City of Suffolk provides local funding to support the operation of the Suffolk Health Department as well as matching funds for the Healthy Families Grant program. FY 2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Provided Immunization services to 444 citizens and maternity care and pregnancy testing to 87 women who are in need of obstetrical care.

Served 38 clients with 405 visits as part of the Healthy Families Program which is designed to provide intensive in-home visitation for overburdened families.

Attained a 99% client satisfaction rating.

FY 2018 OBJECTIVES 

To increase male involvements in pregnancy prevention and planning efforts to improve statewide family planning involvement. (Leisure, Health, and Wellness)

To increase the number of teens served in family planning clinics and in community education settings. (Leisure, Health, and Wellness)

To continue to enter 100% of immunization records for children less than 6 years of age into the Commonwealth’s Web Vision Immunization Registry System. (Leisure, Health, and Wellness)

To ensure that 100% of children in the Healthy Families program have a primary health care provider within two months of enrolling in the program. (Leisure, Health, and Wellness)

To reduce environmental and communicable disease hazards at food establishments, hotels, swimming pools, migrant labor camps and campgrounds. (Leisure, Health, and Wellness)

STATISTICS/PERFORMANCE MEASURES Males participating in pregnancy planning/prevention programs Teens served by Family Planning Clinics Percent of Immunization data entered in State Webvision system Percent of children with primary health care provider within two months of enrollment Percent of food establishments inspected by due date

FY 16 Actual 252 194 100% 100%

FY 17 Projected 254 194 100% 100%

FY 18 Estimate 256 194 100% 100%

67%

67%

67%

134


Department: Support of Western Tidewater Health District Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 100-5110055610 Transfer to Western Tidewater Health District Total Operating Expenditures

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Change

2017-2018 Adopted

% Change

$

840,000

$

840,000

$

840,000

$

840,000

0%

$

840,000

0%

$

840,000

$

840,000

$

840,000

$

840,000

0%

$

840,000

0%

135


WESTERN TIDEWATER COMMUNITY SERVICES BOARD DESCRIPTION The Western Tidewater Community Services Board provides ongoing mental health, substance abuse, and mental retardation related services to the children and families of the City of Suffolk. Treatment services include ongoing medical, counseling, and support services. Most of the Western Tidewater Community Services Board’s consumers are underinsured families with children and adult members suffering from chronic and pervasive disabilities. The City of Suffolk provides local funding to support the operation of the Western Tidewater Community Services Board. FY 2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Provided mobile crisis support and prevention to 122 citizens through the Child REACH team.

Conducted onsite mental health counseling and psychiatric services at the Western Tidewater Regional Jail.

Implemented a youth and youth adult training program designed to increase functional skills and appropriate behavior for individuals with serious mental illness.

FY 2018 OBJECTIVES 

To ensure that services provided are available, timely, and efficient. (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

To ensure that services provided are effective and meet individual needs. (Leisure, Health, and Wellness)

To maintain performance in key risk management indicators. (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

To ensure that the community services board is operationally sound and maintains a high quality workforce. (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

STATISTICS/PERFORMANCE MEASURES Number of Persons Receiving Mental Health Services Number of Persons Receiving Intellectual Disabilities Services Number of Persons Receiving Substance Abuse Services

FY 16 Actual 2,090 451 613

FY 17 Projected 2,152 465 631

FY 18 Estimate 2,217 479 650

136


Department: Support of Western Tidewater Community Service Board Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 100-5210055620 Transfer to Western Tidewater CSB Total Operating Expenditures

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Change

2017-2018 Adopted

% Change

$

281,152

$

281,152

$

281,152

$

295,210

5%

$

295,210

5%

$

281,152

$

281,152

$

281,152

$

295,210

5%

$

295,210

5%

137


SCHOOL SUPPORT DESCRIPTION Each year, the Suffolk City Council appropriates local funding in support of Suffolk Public Schools. This funding is used by the school division for the operation of its 11 elementary schools, 4 middle schools, 3 high schools, and 1 alternative school and lease expenses for the Suffolk School Administration office and print shop. Additional local funding is provided in the Capital Projects Fund and Debt Service Fund budgets for school related capital projects and debt service.

Local Support                                                                School Operating Expenses $60.0 $50.0

$46.1

$48.5 $45.0 

$45.0

$44.1

FY 10

FY 11

FY 12

$47.1

$50.2

$50.2

FY 14

FY 15

$54.1

$54.3

FY 16

FY 17

$56.3

$40.0 $30.0 $20.0 $10.0 $0.0 FY 08

FY 09

FY 13

FY 18

Source: City of Suffolk, Division of Budget & Strategic Planning Budgeted Local Support for Schools (excluding Capital and Debt)

138


Department: Support of Schools Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 100-6001055420 Local Support for Lease/Rent of Building 55640 Support of Schools Total Operating Expenditures Total School Fund Revenues: State / Federal / Other Transfer from General Fund - Local Support Total Operating Revenues: Total School Fund Expenditures: Instruction Administration and Attendance Health and Psychology Pupil Transportation Operation and Maintenance Food Services Technology

$

509,899 50,604,809

$ 51,114,708

2015-2016 Actual $

526,785 53,570,053

$ 54,096,838

2016-2017 Budget $

2017-2018 Requested

2017-2018 Adopted

% Change

534,837 53,832,201

$

551,517 55,832,201

3% 4%

$

551,517 55,832,201

3% 4%

$ 54,367,038

$

56,383,718

4%

$

56,383,718

4%

$

105,153,218 56,383,718

2% 4%

$

105,153,218 56,383,718

2% 4%

$

161,536,936

3%

$

161,536,936

3%

2% 5% 2% 3% -1% 2% 7%

$

$

Local Support - Lease / Rent of Building Local Support Reduction to REQUEST: Total Operating Expenses:

% Change

$

119,416,427 3,656,944 1,946,852 8,053,735 12,778,020 8,272,120 6,861,321 551,517 -

3% -

161,536,936

3%

$

119,416,427 3,656,944 1,946,852 8,053,735 12,778,020 8,272,120 6,861,321

2% 5% 2% 3% -1% 2% 7%

551,517 -

3% -

161,536,936

3%

139


PARKS AND RECREATION DESCRIPTION The Department of Parks and Recreation provides a variety of high quality recreational and leisure programs for the citizens of Suffolk. The Department is responsible for maintaining over 1,800 acres of parkland including 4 regional parks, 21 community parks, 14 athletic fields, and 60 city gateways; administration of the East Suffolk Recreation Center, Whaleyville Community Center, and 6 joint-use recreational facilities; the Office on Youth; and the Suffolk Art Gallery. The Department is organized into the divisions of Administration; Parks, Gateways, and Facilities Maintenance; Support Services; Grounds Maintenance; Office on Youth and Recreation. FY 2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Completed the Sleepy Hole Park fishing pier and canoe and kayak launch, the Constant’s Wharf Park canoe and kayak launch, Boston Park, the Lake Meade Trail, and the Suffolk Seaboard Coastline Trail (Shoulders Hill Road to Chesapeake line segment).

Increased participation in therapeutic recreation programs by 50%.

Implemented a beginner swim lessons scholarship program.

FY 2018 OBJECTIVES 

To ensure the financial stability of parks and recreation programs. (Financial Stability)

To complete the master bicycle and pedestrian trail plan. (Leisure, Health, and Wellness)

To enhance civic engagement by improving online registration, preparing a marketing and branding plan, and standardizing offerings and service delivery. (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

STATISTICS/PERFORMANCE MEASURES Parks: Number of Regional Park Visitors Total Park Acres maintained Recreation: Number of Recreation and Community Center Members Number of Youth participating in Youth Athletic Programs Number of Seniors participating in Senior Programs Suffolk Initiative on Youth (SIY): Number of Out of School Youth Programs Number of Youth participating in Prevention Programs Suffolk Art Gallery: Number of Adult Classes/Programs Number of Youth Classes/Programs Number of Exhibitions Business Services Number of Special Event Applications Processed Number of Volunteer Hours

FY 16 Actual

FY 17 Projected

FY 18 Estimate

254,708 1,824

300,000 1,826

325,000 1,826

983 1,604 1,220

1,000 1,800 1,372

2,015 3,400 1,524

13 582

14 640

15 704

18 10 7

24 13 7

29 15 7

79 7,724

85 8,500

90 9,500 140


Department: Parks and Recreation - Administration Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 100-7110051100.02 52100 52210 52400 54100 54200 54500 55100 55210 55230 55500 55810 56001 56012 56014 56017

Salaries and Wages FICA VRS Retirement Group Life Information Technology Fleet Risk Management Utilities Postal Services Telecommunications Travel and Training Dues and Association Memberships Office Supplies Books and Subscriptions Other Operating Supplies Copier Costs

Total Operating Expenditures

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Change

$

270,839 20,541 40,356 2,279 277,819 17,273 568,413 10,948 1,077 45,108 2,740 2,875 2,389 489 516 48,209

$

328,187 24,255 45,421 3,493 338,861 16,942 581,076 37,787 3,139 48,169 3,760 1,675 2,329 404 2,264 54,074

$

343,278 26,261 37,864 4,497 423,147 16,867 686,579 11,000 2,000 41,037 2,000 1,600 5,000 500 57,742

$

343,278 26,261 37,864 4,497 423,147 16,867 686,579 11,000 2,000 41,037 6,000 2,000 5,000 500 3,000 57,742

$

1,311,869

$

1,491,836

$

1,659,372

$

1,666,772

2017-2018 Adopted

0% $ 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 200% 25% 0% 0% 0% 0%

$

% Change

352,872 26,995 38,922 4,623 470,870 29,989 718,499 11,000 2,000 45,837 4,000 2,000 5,000 500 2,500 57,742 1,773,348

Personnel Summary

Range

Class 144 138 135 121

Director of Parks & Recreation Assistant Director of Parks & Recreation Principal Planner Executive Secretary

Number of Full-Time Positions

2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

2017-2018 Adopted

1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1

4

4

4

4

4

141

3% 3% 3% 3% 11% 78% 5% 0% 0% 12% 100% 25% 0% 0% 0% 7%


Department: Parks and Recreation - Office on Youth Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 100-7115051100.02 51100.06 52100 52210 52400 53100 53500 53600 55500 56001 56011 56014 56026

Salaries and Wages Salaries and Wages - Part-time FICA VRS Retirement Group Life Professional Services Printing and Binding Advertising Travel and Training Office Supplies Uniforms & Wearing Apparel Other Operating Supplies Special Programs

Total Operating Expenditures

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Change

$

90,426 6,398 13,402 1,075 3,522 23 106 783 335 467 7,996 -

$

92,188 6,564 12,759 1,097 2,436 1,343 334 658 4,657 17,358

$

54,743 4,188 6,038 717 1,500 500 1,200 600 750 5,000 25,000

$

93,932 26,209 9,191 10,361 1,231 3,000 500 750 3,000 600 1,000 10,550 30,950

$

124,532

$

139,394

$

100,236

$

191,274

2017-2018 Adopted

72% $ 119% 72% 72% 100% 50% 150% 0% 33% 111% 24% -

$

% Change

56,653 4,334 6,175 742 1,500 500 1,500 600 750 6,000 25,000

3% 3% 2% 3% 0% 0% 25% 0% 0% 20% 0%

103,754

4%

56026 - Special Events: Special events supported by sponsorships and fees of $3,610. Personnel Summary

Range

Class 130 Youth Outreach Coordinator 124 Therapeutic Recreation Specialist 123 Recreation Specialist

Number of Full-Time Positions

2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

1 -

2016-2017 Budget

1 -

1

1

2

2

2017-2018 Requested

1 -

2017-2018 Adopted 1 1

1

1 -

2

1

142


Department: Parks and Recreation - Parks, Gateways, and Facility Maintenance Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 100-7120051100.02 51100.04 51100.06 52100 52210 52400 53000.16 53000.46 53100 53300 53320 54200 55100 55410 55420 55500 56001 56011 56014 56026 58200

Salaries and Wages Salaries and Wages - Overtime Salaries and Wages - Part- time FICA VRS Retirement Group Life Purchased Services - Refuse Collection Purchased Services - RM Banners Professional Services Repair and Maintenance Maintenance Service Contracts Fleet Utilities Lease/Rent of Equipment Lease/Rent of Building Travel and Training Office Supplies Uniforms & Wearing Apparel Other Operating Supplies Special Programs Capital Outlay

Total Operating Expenditures

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Change

$

668,096 21,320 135,928 59,849 98,602 7,982 30,536 1,367 10,046 48,734 166,967 317,446 248,149 3,474 3,512 509 16,203 76,703 -

$

678,377 27,969 208,231 65,906 93,676 8,076 15,480 2,640 12,123 49,979 220,329 363,820 263,819 1,129 3,977 599 23,499 93,697 1,685 -

$

717,744 127,796 64,684 79,167 9,402 35,000 5,000 10,000 70,000 204,100 410,395 259,385 121,632 15,013 3,000 1,000 15,000 90,000 1,265 -

$

745,617 20,000 238,928 76,848 82,242 9,836 45,000 5,000 10,000 70,000 234,100 410,395 250,000 10,000 3,000 1,500 15,000 95,000 1,265 10,000

$

1,915,422

$

2,135,010

$

2,239,583

$

2,333,731

2017-2018 Adopted

4% $ 87% 19% 4% 5% 29% 0% 0% 0% 15% 0% -4% -92% -100% 0% 50% 0% 6% 0% 4%

$

% Change

690,170 129,330 62,692 76,126 9,041 51,793 5,000 10,000 70,000 234,100 508,846 259,385 10,000 3,000 1,000 15,000 93,000 1,265 2,229,747

53320 - Maintenance Service Contracts: Grass cutting, security service. 56014 - Other Operating Supplies: Safety material and landscape materials. 56026 - Special Events: Special events supported by sponsorships and fees of $650. Personnel Summary

Range

Class 133 131 125 125 122 122 115/119 114

Parks Manager Grounds Maintenance Superintendent Park Superintendent Maintenance Coordinator Recreation Facilities Supervisor Park Supervisor Ground Maintenance Worker I-II Custodial Worker

Number of Full-Time Positions

2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

2017-2018 Adopted

1 1 1 1 1 4 7 3

1 1 1 1 1 4 7 3

1 1 1 1 1 4 7 3

1 1 1 1 1 5 8 3

1 1 1 1 1 3 7 3

19

19

19

21

18

143

-4% 1% -3% -4% -4% 48% 0% 0% 0% 15% 24% 0% -92% -100% 0% 0% 0% 3% 0% 0%


Department: Parks and Recreation - Grounds Maintenance Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 100-7125051100.02 51100.04 51100.06 52100 52210 52400 53000.02 53100 53300 53320 54200 54500 55100 55210 55500 56001 56011 56014

Salaries and Wages Salaries and Wages - Overtime Salaries and Wages - Part-time FICA VRS Retirement Group Life Purchased Services - Road Maintenance Fund Professional Services Repair and Maintenance Maintenance Service Contracts Fleet Risk Management Utilities Postal Services Travel and Training Office Supplies Uniforms & Wearing Apparel Other Operating Supplies

Total Operating Expenditures

$

$

2015-2016 Actual

107,339 6,293 6,716 15,929 1,277 16,930 9,825 251,481 44,155 36,862 1,066 9 1,388 14,151

$

513,422

$

2016-2017 Budget

109,965 8,564 8,020 15,219 1,308 12,115 243,556 63,246 603 518 633 20,824

$

484,570

$

150,242 17,389 12,824 16,572 1,968 260,000 74,904 2,000 -

2017-2018 Requested

2017-2018 Adopted

% Change

$

175,309 17,389 53,202 18,811 19,352 2,297 260,000 74,904 2,000 2,000 8,000

17% 0% 47% 17% 17% 0% 0% 0% 0%

$

152,654 17,389 13,008 16,838 2,000 260,000 79,803 1,500 2,000 8,000

2% 0% 1% 2% 2% 0% 7% -25% 0%

$

633,264

16%

$

553,192

2%

8,000 543,898

% Change

Personnel Summary

Range

Class 125 Superintendent of Cemeteries 115/119 Grounds Maintenance Worker I-II

Number of Full-Time Positions

2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

2017-2018 Adopted

1 3

1 3

1 3

1 4

1 3

4

4

4

5

4

144


Department: Parks and Recreation - Support Services Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 100-7130051100.02 51100.04 51100.06 52100 52210 52400 53300 53500 53600 55100 55500 56001 56011 56014 56026

Salaries and Wages Salaries and Wages - Overtime Salaries and Wages - Part-time FICA VRS Retirement Group Life Repairs and Maintenance Printing and Binding Advertising Utilities Travel and Training Office Supplies Uniforms & Wearing Apparel Other Operating Supplies Special Events

Total Operating Expenditures

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Change

2017-2018 Adopted

% Change

$

233,639 1,405 13,770 18,098 33,933 1,954 10,357 4,754 2,165 1,959 304 9,336 119,345

$

243,989 979 17,187 19,056 33,658 1,390 9,999 7,242 1,521 1,388 1,000 7,036 137,976

$

306,710 5,447 23,880 33,830 4,018 28,000 10,000 10,000 2,000 5,000 2,000 3,000 39,895 175,725

$

366,731 1,500 31,845 30,606 40,450 4,836 28,000 10,000 10,000 2,000 5,000 2,000 3,000 39,895 213,575

20% $ 485% 28% 20% 20% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 22%

324,448 5,512 25,242 35,787 4,250 28,000 10,000 10,000 2,000 5,000 2,000 3,000 39,895 175,725

6% 1% 6% 6% 6% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0%

$

451,020

$

482,421

$

649,505

$

789,438

22%

670,859

3%

$

53600 - Advertising: Marketing for classes, exhibits, and special events. 56014 - Other Operating Supplies: Supplies for exhibits and programs. 56026 - Special Events: Special events supported by sponsorships and fees of $74,400. Personnel Summary

Range

Class 132 Business Manager 128 Recreation Supervisor 128 Marketing and Development Coordinator Special Event Coordinator 121 Accounting Associate I 119 Office Assistant

Number of Full-Time Positions

2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

1 1

1 1

1 3

-

2 1 1

2 1 1

6

6

-

2017-2018 Requested

2017-2018 Adopted 1 3 1

-

1 3 -

1 2

1 2

1 2

7

8

7

145


Department: Parks and Recreation - Recreation Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 100-7135051100.02 51100.04 51100.06 51100.10 52100 52210 52400 53100 53300 53500 53600 54200 55100 55210 55410 55420 55500 55810 55845 56001 56011 56014 56017 56026 58200

Salaries and Wages Salaries and Wages - Overtime Salaries and Wages - Part-time Salaries and Wages - Seasonal FICA VRS Retirement Group Life Professional Services Repair and Maintenance Printing and Binding Advertising Fleet Utilities Postal Services Lease/Rent of Equipment Lease/Rent of Building Travel and Training Dues and Association Memberships Expenses Related to Fee Activities Office Supplies Uniforms & Wearing Apparel Other Operating Supplies Copier Costs Special Events Capital Outlay

Total Operating Expenditures

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Change

2017-2018 Adopted

$

743,724 8,855 564,422 141,712 105,013 103,005 10,136 935 41,672 114 94,881 41,796 978 1,800 4,310 261 238,744 4,605 6,314 23,429 3,094 32,509 -

$

677,463 3,580 643,310 174,376 111,433 89,821 9,544 10,233 57,092 106,017 56,168 63,148 1,800 3,222 655 236,250 3,672 5,051 26,167 25,279 -

$

848,300 503,277 103,396 93,567 11,113 9,000 70,000 2,000 111,470 75,000 72,012 5,100 5,000 655 240,000 5,450 8,000 33,575 12,500 -

$

848,300 1,220,203 158,240 93,567 11,113 9,000 91,600 2,000 111,470 75,000 600 90,412 5,100 5,500 655 260,250 5,450 12,000 33,575 13,871 -

0% $ 142% 53% 0% 0% 0% 31% 0% 0% 0% 26% 0% 10% 0% 8% 0% 50% 0% 11% -

$

2,172,309

$

2,304,281

$

2,209,415

$

3,047,906

38%

$

% Change

890,829 509,316 107,111 98,258 11,670 9,000 79,600 2,000 141,952 75,000 72,412 5,100 5,000 655 240,000 5,450 8,000 33,575 13,871 -

5% 1% 4% 5% 5% 0% 14% 0% 27% 0% 1% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 11% -

2,308,800

4%

53300 - Repair & Maintenance - Pool contract for Cypress Park, misc. 55420 - Lease of Buildings: School facility rental, Joyner Park, and Elk's Lodge for American Legion meetings. 55845 - Expenses Related to Fee Activities: Instructors, officials, and supply costs. 56014 - Other Operating Supplies: Equipment and supplies for programs. 56026 - Special Events: Supported by sponsorships and fees of $4,300.

Personnel Summary

Range

Class 131 128 128 126 126 124 123 119 114

Recreation Manager Recreation Supervisor Athletic Supervisor Recreation Program Specialist Cultural Arts Coordinator Fitness Specialist Recreation Specialist Office Assistant Custodial Worker

Number of Full-Time Positions

2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

1 3

1 3

1 3 1 4

2017-2018 Requested

2017-2018 Adopted

2 8 3 1

2 8 3 1

2 7 2 1

1 3 1 1 1 2 9 2 1

21

21

21

21

-

3

-

3 -

-

1 3 1 1 1 2 10 2 1 22

146


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


LIBRARY DESCRIPTION The Suffolk Library System offers access to a comprehensive collection of materials and works to encourage social, economic, cultural, and intellectual growth. The Library System is comprised of the Morgan Memorial Library, North Suffolk Library, Chuckatuck Library Branch, and the Bookmobile. Additionally, the Library System manages the City’s records management functions. FY 2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Completed the reorganization of the North Suffolk Library to provide a more effective, efficient, and flexible experience for the community with increased internet accessible computers and technology.

Continued implementation of the Libraries Transforming Communities initiative by hosting the Community Conversations series in different areas of the City with diverse audiences.

Provided numerous programs including the Summer Reading Program, Youth and Family Services Storytimes, Baby and Me, Creation Exploration, Young Scientists, and the BARKS Program.

FY 2018 OBJECTIVES 

To expand programs, classes, and events for the community to promote lifelong learning and recreation. (Leisure, Health, and Wellness)

To collaborate with City departments, nonprofits, educational institutions, and other governmental organizations to offer efficient and effective services and programs. (Leisure, Health, and Wellness)

To implement the Libraries Transforming Communities initiative to bring people together to facilitate community conversations. (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

STATISTICS/PERFORMANCE MEASURES Number of Registered Borrowers Circulation Number of Reference Questions answered Number of Computer Sessions Number of Bookmobile stops Number of Adult Programs offered Number of Adults participating in Adult Programs Number of Youth Programs offered Number of Children participating in Children's Programs Number Teen Programs offered Number of Teens participating in Teen Programs

FY 16 Actual 52,405 338,618 26,728 34,041 121 65 7,795 1,172 20,520 94 851

FY 17 Projected 45,000 340,000 28,000 38,000 130 70 7,900 1,300 22,000 100 900

FY 18 Estimate 47,000 345,000 30,000 42,000 150 75 8,100 2,000 25,000 110 1,000

147


Department: Library Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 100-7310051100.02 51100.04 51100.06 52100 52210 52400 53000.16 53100 53200 53300 53500 54100 54200 54500 55100 55210 55230 55420 55500 55810 55846 56001 56012 56017 56026 58200

Salaries and Wages Salaries and Wages - Overtime Salaries and Wages - Part-time FICA VRS Retirement Group Life Purchased Services - Refuse Professional Services Temporary Help Service Repair and Maintenance Printing and Binding Information Technology Fleet Risk Management Utilities Postal Services Telecommunications Lease/Rent of Buildings Travel and Training Dues and Association Memberships Marketing Office Supplies Books and Subscriptions Copier Costs Special Events Capital Outlay

Total Operating Expenditures

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Change

2017-2018 Adopted

% Change

$

1,125,034 17 242,119 100,005 159,723 13,400 3,779 14,296 701 52,367 3,034 98,494 15,891 286,526 56,911 8,553 12,626 17,400 12,283 758 41,181 175,567 37,530 70,632

$

1,211,142 9 240,805 105,995 162,272 14,375 3,798 15,561 80,125 867 108,719 24,950 274,810 59,140 9,029 10,729 17,400 16,844 655 38,340 178,364 34,391 5,341

$

1,483,659 262,948 133,615 163,648 19,436 3,352 95,000 1,000 97,917 54,016 346,395 61,451 5,700 15,279 17,940 7,000 900 26,000 200,000 38,042 12,500 -

$

1,597,539 345,104 148,612 176,209 20,928 3,800 500 89,000 1,000 97,917 54,016 346,395 61,451 9,000 15,279 17,940 9,000 700 9,000 40,500 220,000 38,042 55,500 230,000

8% $ 31% 11% 8% 8% 13% -6% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 58% 0% 0% 29% -22% 56% 10% 0% 344% -

1,518,453 266,103 136,519 167,485 19,892 5,504 89,000 1,000 104,114 49,042 362,276 61,451 9,000 15,279 17,940 9,000 700 30,500 200,000 38,042 12,500 -

2% 1% 2% 2% 2% 64% -6% 0% 6% -9% 5% 0% 58% 0% 0% 29% -22% 17% 0% 0% 0% -

$

2,548,828

$

2,613,660

$

3,045,798

$

3,587,432

18%

3,113,800

2%

$

Personnel Summary

Range

Class 144 138 134 133 129 127 124 121 120 118

Director of Libraries Assistant Director of Libraries Librarian Manager Senior Administrative Analyst Senior Librarian Librarian I, II, III & IV Librarian Library Services Coordinator Executive Secretary Library Assistant I-III Secretary Library Associate

Number of Full-Time Positions

2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

2017-2018 Adopted

1 12 1 15 1 1

1 1

1 1

12 1 14 1 1

1 12 1 14 1 1

4 10 1 1 8

31

31

32

35

1 1 4 1 4

-

-

1 1 4 1 4 4 7 1 1 8 32

148


PLANNING AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DESCRIPTION The Department of Planning and Community Development is responsible for the City’s overall land planning program and building permit, inspections, enforcement, and zoning administration. The Department also manages the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) and HOME Investment Partnership (HOME) grant programs and staffs the Suffolk Planning Commission, Board of Zoning Appeals, Wetlands Board, and Historic Landmark Commission. The Department is comprised of the divisions of Planning and Community Development Services. FY 2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Managed the review and approval of 107 site plans and nine engineering plans.

Completed initial review of village and neighborhood initiative plans to identify completed items and develop recommendations for updates.

Adopted updates establishing four new residential and mixed use zoning classifications in order to implement the 2035 Comprehensive Plan.

Hired a planning consultant to assist the City staff and local stakeholders in preparing an updated Downtown Plan.

FY 2018 OBJECTIVES 

To provide plan review services in an effective and efficient manner that will promote a diverse local economy and enhanced tax base. (Growth Management and Comprehensive Planning)

To provide policies, recommendations, and code amendments and ordinances that help protect and promote the health, safety and welfare of the City and its inhabitants. (Growth Management and Comprehensive Planning)

To provide policies and standards that promote and enhance safe, quality, transportation options. (Growth Management and Comprehensive Planning)

STATISTICS/PERFORMANCE MEASURES Number of Applications Processed: Major Subdivisions Minor Subdivisions Family Transfers Site Plan Reviews Rezoning & Conditional Rezoning Requests Conditional Use Permits Other Reviews (Variance, HLC, Wetlands, Street Vacation, etc.) Percent of site/subdivision plans reviewed within 30 days

FY 16 Actual

FY 17 Projected

FY 18 Estimate

26 45 4 107 16 16 79 90%

25 45 5 110 20 15 80 95%

30 50 10 120 25 20 100 95%

149


Department: Planning and Community Development Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 100-8110051100.02 51100.04 52100 52210 52400 53100 53100.06 53200 53600 54100 54200 54500 55210 55230 55500 55810 56001 56012 56017 58200

Salaries and Wages Salaries and Wages - Overtime FICA VRS Retirement Group Life Compensation of Planning Commission Consulting Services Temporary Help Service Fees Advertising Information Technology Fleet Risk Management Postal Services Telecommunications Travel and Training Dues and Association Memberships Office Supplies Books and Subscriptions Copier Costs Capital Outlay

Total Operating Expenditures

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Change

$

680,703 14 49,111 98,763 8,096 20,250 32,653 21,549 30,633 5,898 129,526 5,221 4,866 5,102 3,742 5,268 885 15,540 -

$

576,170 24 42,031 76,981 6,775 23,550 3,708 5,760 16,420 149,501 5,465 124,272 1,655 4,277 6,113 2,680 3,448 760 11,267 -

$

866,486 66,286 94,422 11,351 29,400 71,700 16,000 136,158 17,193 152,847 7,000 5,923 5,940 4,120 11,000 1,295 12,964 -

$

866,486 66,286 95,573 11,351 29,400 250,000 20,000 136,158 17,193 152,847 7,000 5,923 8,140 3,800 11,000 1,295 12,964 -

$

1,117,821

$

1,060,857

$

1,510,085

$

1,695,416

2017-2018 Adopted

0% $ 0% 1% 0% 0% 249% 25% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 37% -8% 0% 0% 0% 12%

$

% Change

882,255 67,492 97,313 11,558 29,400 71,700 16,000 151,621 5,599 165,274 7,000 5,923 7,000 3,800 11,000 1,295 12,964 1,547,193

Personnel Summary

Range

Class 144 138 136 136 135 127/130 124 123 121 119

Director of Planning & Community Development Assistant Director of Planning Current Planning Manager Comprehensive Planning Manager Principal Planner Planner I-II Senior Graphics Technician Planning Technician Executive Secretary Office Assistant

Number of Full-Time Positions

2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

2017-2018 Adopted

1 1 1 1 3 2 1 2 1 1

1 1 1 1 3 2 1 2 1 1

1 1 1 1 2 3 1 3 1 1

1 1 1 1 2 3 1 3 1 1

1 1 1 1 2 3 1 3 1 1

14

14

15

15

15

150

2% 2% 3% 2% 0% 0% 0% 11% -67% 8% 0% 0% 18% -8% 0% 0% 0% 2%


ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT DESCRIPTION The Department of Economic Development promotes enhanced job opportunities and broadens the tax base of the City of Suffolk through the recruitment and retention of business and industry, maintains and encourages the continuation of a favorable business environment for businesses to locate and expand within the City, and attracts and encourages new national and international businesses to locate and invest in Suffolk. The Department provides staff support to the Economic Development Authority (EDA) and oversees the divisions of Aviation Facilities and Tourism. CY 2016 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Continued to host the ReStored event in Downtown Suffolk to provide opportunities for businesses to operate over a weekend in vacant retail spaces.

Executed a sales agreement for the retail and office component of Obici Place and a contract for the Point at Harbour View site.

600 new jobs created with $85M in capital investment in the City.

CY 2017 OBJECTIVES 

To partner with the Suffolk existing industry base for growth opportunities as well as continue aggressive business development efforts to the seven Suffolk industry targets which include advanced manufacturing, retail, medical, warehousing and distribution, food and beverage processing, hospitality and modeling, simulation and technology. (Expanded Economic Development)

To promote the planned business park locations for future commercial growth opportunities. (Expanded Economic Development)

To continue outreach efforts through monthly e-newsletter distribution, new business announcements, and regular speaking opportunities with civic and business organizations and Suffolk Public Schools. (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

STATISTICS/PERFORMANCE MEASURES Number of Jobs Created Amount of Capital Investment Square Footage of Capital Investment Existing Industry Visits Prospect Visits Number of Marketing Missions

CY 15 Actual 1,803 $185M 1,140,000 411 91 8

CY 16 Actual 600 $85M 850,000 396 103 9

CY 17 Estimate 800 $100M 850,000 400 85 8

151


Department: Economic Development Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 100-8150051100.02 51100.04 51100.14 52100 52210 52400 53100 53500 54100 54200 54500 55210 55230 55500 55671 55810 55846 56001 56012 56017

Salaries and Wages Salaries and Wages - Overtime Transportation Expense FICA VRS Retirement Group Life Professional Services Printing and Binding Information Technology Fleet Risk Management Postal Services Telecommunications Travel and Training Economic Development Investment Program Dues and Association Memberships Marketing Office Supplies Books and Subscriptions Copier Costs

Total Operating Expenditures

$

$

2015-2016 Actual

373,636 3,996 27,677 55,447 4,446 27,450 1,764 56,387 45,611 3,078 5,602 28,239 2,810,400 84,072 233,751 2,084 49 10,254

$

3,773,943

$

2016-2017 Budget

386,722 3,996 28,287 53,522 4,602 3,004 1,696 25,698 43,777 1,804 5,076 23,436 1,717,079 84,942 96,802 2,315 49 8,948

$

2,491,756

$

2017-2018 Requested

402,970 4,000 30,827 44,448 5,279 30,000 4,000 22,963 54,785 3,000 5,897 30,000 87,000 100,000 1,750 350 9,544

$

836,812

$

% Change

2017-2018 Adopted

402,970 4,000 30,827 44,448 5,279 15,000 4,000 22,963 5,199 54,785 2,500 5,897 30,000 89,000 110,000 1,750 350 9,544

0% 0% 0% 0% 0% -50% 0% 0% 0% -17% 0% 0% 2% 10% 0% 0% 0%

$

838,512

0%

$

% Change

410,099 4,000 31,373 45,234 5,372 15,000 4,000 16,562 5,199 55,113 2,500 5,897 30,000 89,000 110,000 1,750 350 9,544

1% -17% 0% 0% 2% 10% 0% 0% 0%

840,993

0%

53100 - Professional Services: Conceptual site plans for commercial / industrial sites. 53500 - Printing & Binding: Promotional material for prospects. 55671 - Economic Development Investment Program: Funds are reserved with accumulating balance reappropriated annually for expenditure. Personnel Summary

Range

Class 144 136 133 130 127

Director of Economic Development Assistant Director of Economic Development Economic Development Manager Business Development Analyst Economic Development Associate

Number of Full-Time Positions

2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

2017-2018 Adopted

1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1

5

5

5

5

5

152

2% 0% 2% 2% 2% -50% 0% -28%


DIVISION OF TOURISM DESCRIPTION The Division of Tourism is the destination marketing organization (“DMO”) of record for the City of Suffolk. The Division works with public and private hospitality industry sectors to develop and implement programs that encourage “More People, Staying Longer, Spending More Money.” The Division operates the visitor center and gift shop seven days a week; distributes collateral to statewide visitor and welcome centers; fulfills daily consumer orders for travel information; oversees group tour operations; manages advertising, marketing, and special events; and promotes product development. CY 2016 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Coordinated a full tour schedule featuring Great Dismal Swamp Safaris, Historic Narrated Suffolk Bus Tours, Legends of Main Street: A Suffolk Ghost Walk, and Cedar Hill Cemetery Strolls resulting in a 10.3% increase in participation over 2015.

Produced the third annual Suffolk Mystery Authors Festival featuring 24 best-selling authors and expanding the festival into a “Month of Mystery” featuring events and activities throughout the City.

Continued to operate the popular Suffolk Farmers’ Market at the Visitor Center Pavilion, increasing sales by 11% over the previous season.

Selected as the location for the Annual Summer Meeting of the Virginia Association of Convention and Visitors Bureaus, hosting tourism and marketing directors from across the state.

CY 2017 OBJECTIVES 

To coordinate and enhance narrated bus, walking, and canoe tours to attract customers and promote Suffolk’s amenities. (Expanded Economic Development)

To enhance online promotional tools to expand advertising and marketing components of current efforts. (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

To oversee the function and promotion of the Suffolk Farmers’ Market. (Expanded Economic Development)

STATISTICS/PERFORMANCE MEASURES Number of Walk-In Customers at Visitor Center Number of visitor information packets distributed Number of interpretive tour customers Number of collaborative meetings hosted Number of sales missions, conferences/tradeshows attended Number of conferences, reunions, weddings serviced

CY 2015 Actual 14,041 1,736 653 80 7 60

CY 2016 Actual 12,400 1,800 720 70 7 55

CY 2017 Estimate 13,000 1,900 750 80 8 65

153


Division: Tourism (Department of Economic Development) Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 100-8155051100.02 51100.04 51100.06 52100 52210 52400 53000.16 53100 53500 53600 54100 54200 54500 55100 55210 55230 55500 55810 55846 56001 56015 56017 56026

Salaries and Wages Salaries and Wages - Overtime Salaries and Wages - Part-time FICA VRS Retirement Group Life Purchases Services - Refuse Collection Professional Services Printing and Binding Advertising Information Technology Fleet Risk Management Utilities Postal Services Telecommunications Travel and Training Dues and Association Memberships Marketing Office Supplies Merchandise for Resale Copier Costs Special Events

Total Operating Expenditures

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Change

$

160,543 676 66,440 16,885 23,824 1,911 330 18,692 38,515 9,993 27,450 16,648 4,178 2,535 2,378 2,120 41,491 4,107 16,362 12,921 83,943

$

164,447 2,092 64,023 17,277 22,759 1,957 372 10,955 19,499 36,146 7,888 26,344 14,357 4,013 2,137 4,575 2,416 41,977 3,912 6,227 11,060 87,781

$

170,015 74,088 18,674 18,753 2,227 142 22,000 2,000 21,000 31,749 12,949 32,745 18,900 6,000 2,219 4,800 2,730 40,000 4,000 6,000 12,435 99,000

$

211,856 74,088 21,875 23,368 2,775 5,000 2,000 21,000 31,749 12,949 32,745 18,900 6,000 2,219 4,800 2,730 40,000 4,000 15,300 12,435 100,500

$

551,942

$

552,216

$

602,425

$

646,289

2017-2018 Adopted

25% $ 0% 17% 25% 25% -100% -77% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 155% 0% 2% 7%

$

% Change

172,271 124,565 22,708 19,001 2,257 233 6,000 2,000 31,000 43,890 14,888 33,132 28,900 6,000 2,219 4,800 2,730 40,000 14,750 17,300 12,435 115,500

1% 68% 22% 1% 1% 64% -73% 0% 48% 38% 15% 1% 53% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 269% 188% 0% 17%

716,579

19%

56026 - Special Events: Costs offset by sponsorships and fees of: $45,500. Personnel Summary

Range

Class 134 132 126 123

Tourism Development Manager Tourism Development Specialist Tourism Coordinator Visitor Center Supervisor

Number of Full-Time Positions

2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

1 1

1 1

1 1

2017-2018 Requested

2017-2018 Adopted

1

1

1

1 1 1 1

3

3

3

4

-

-

-

1 1 1 3

154


MEDIA AND COMMUNITY RELATIONS DESCRIPTION The Department of Media and Community Relations provides communication and public information advice to the City Manager, City Council, and City departments; serves as the City’s spokesperson with news and media outlets; oversees the City’s Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Office, Municipal Access Channel 190, and the City’s website; disseminates information regarding City activities, programs, and services; and coordinates public meetings and forums. FY 2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Continued to provide quality programming and the enhancement of Municipal Channel 190 with specialized graphics and station identification.

Continued production of “Suffolk on the Scene” to provide informative features and highlight City departments and staff.

Produced the State of the City event in-house resulting in annual savings of $30,000.

Coordinated all aspects of the citywide National Night Out event, resulting in the City of Suffolk receiving the 1st place national award for the City’s population category from the National Association of Town Watch.

Provided weekly “What’s Happening in Suffolk” information to media outlets and citywide to keep citizens and employees up-to-date regarding exciting recreational opportunities and other initiatives.

FY 2018 OBJECTIVES 

To continue to answer questions and direct calls regarding meetings and events, provide relevant contact information, and direct callers to appropriate departments and agencies.

To provide timely and accurate responses to FOIA requests. (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

To promote City programs, services, and initiatives via social media, media releases, public service announcements, and Council announcements. (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

STATISTICS/PERFORMANCE MEASURES Number of Public Service Announcements Number of Programs produced on Municipal Channel 190 Number of Followers, Fans, or Subscribers to the City's Social Media Websites Number of FOIA requests received Percent of FOIA requests responded to within mandatory timeframes prescribed by state law Number of citizens to Visit City Hall recorded by Ambassadors

FY 16 Actual 97 107 10,224

FY 17 Projected 90 110 10,760

FY 18 Estimate 90 110 11,475

850 100%

850 100%

850 100%

73,850

75,000

75,000

155


Department: Media and Community Relations Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 100-8165051100.02 51100.04 51100.06 51100.14 52100 52210 52400 53100 53200 53300 53320 53500 53600 54100 54200 54500 55210 55230 55500 55810 55846 56001 56012 56016 56017 58200

Salaries and Wages Salaries and Wages - Overtime Salaries and Wages - Part-time Transportation Expense FICA VRS Retirement Group Life Professional Services Temporary Help Service Fees Repair and Maintenance Maintenance Service Contracts Printing and Binding Advertising Information Technology Fleet Risk Management Postal Services Telecommunications Travel and Training Dues and Association Memberships Marketing Office Supplies Books and Subscriptions Neighborhood College/Leadership Academy Copier Costs Capital Outlay

Total Operating Expenditures

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Change

2017-2018 Adopted

% Change

$

349,206 9,849 17,589 3,500 28,449 50,244 4,164 7,632 641 4,747 26,386 1,141 54,945 443 5,588 171 745 32,248 2,985 214 11,748 68

$

360,115 7,839 18,263 3,500 29,136 48,965 4,285 8,174 2,003 12,624 1,540 46,835 1,819 52,703 609 5,147 507 844 25,120 3,175 277 10,222 -

$

379,066 10,000 20,400 3,500 31,324 41,811 4,966 10,000 17,000 3,000 42,067 4,046 65,436 1,500 6,372 3,000 1,000 25,000 3,000 750 10,574 -

$

379,066 10,000 28,684 3,500 31,958 41,811 4,966 2,000 17,000 20,000 3,000 42,067 4,046 65,346 1,500 6,372 3,000 1,000 25,000 3,000 750 2,500 10,574 -

0% 0% 41% 0% 2% 0% 0% 70% 18% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% -

$

387,374 10,000 28,780 3,500 32,601 42,727 5,075 10,000 17,000 3,000 45,871 7,351 68,030 1,500 6,372 3,000 1,000 25,000 3,000 750 10,574 -

2% 4% 2% 2% 0% 0% 0% 9% 82% 4% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% -

$

612,701

$

643,701

$

683,812

$

707,140

3%

$

712,506

4%

Personnel Summary

Range

Class 144 136 133 133 121 121

Director of Media & Community Relations Assistant Director of Media & Community Relations Video Production Manager Multi-Media Analyst Video Production Assistant Executive Secretary

Number of Full-Time Positions

2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

2017-2018 Adopted

1 1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1 1

6

6

6

6

6

156


VIRGINIA COOPERATIVE EXTENSION DESCRIPTION The Virginia Cooperative Extension Service is a division of Virginia Polytechnic and State University responsible for providing technical information, educational programs, and problem solving consultation in the area of agriculture, 4-H and youth, home economics, natural resources, and community resource development for all citizens. The City of Suffolk provides local funding support for this State function. FY 2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Conducted 4-H youth development programs and projects throughout the City with key focus areas including financial management, leadership, service learning, food, health, and wellness.

Strengthened partnerships with other public service organizations as well as agricultural entities to provide overall Virginia Cooperative Extension programming.

Continued implementation of the food desert program for the citizens in downtown Suffolk, Holland, Chuckatuck, Hobson, and Whaleyville.

Provided training and implementation of the Suffolk master gardener program.

FY 2018 OBJECTIVES 

To increase the profitability and sustainability of small farmers through programs that increase productivity and availability of agricultural technology. (Expanded Economic Development)

To enhance the 4-H youth development program and the master gardener program. (Leisure, Health, and Wellness)

To eradicate food deserts through demonstrations, awareness, and the mobile farmers’ market program. (Leisure, Health, and Wellness)

STATISTICS/PERFORMANCE MEASURES Agriculture and Natural Resources: Number of Programs offered Number of Citizens participating in Programs Number of Requests for Services Youth Programs: Number of Youth participating in 4-H Club (Delivery) Number of Youth Programs offered Number of Youth participating in Youth Programs

FY 16 Actual

FY 17 Projected

FY 18 Estimate

9 612 237

12 650 250

15 700 275

1,625 10 2,825

1,700 12 2,880

1,750 15 3,000

157


Department: Virginia Cooperative Extension Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 100-8350053100 54100 55210 55230 55500 55810 56001 56017

Professional Services Information Technology Postal Services Telecommunications Travel and Training Dues and Association Memberships Office Supplies Copier Costs

Total Operating Expenditures

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Change

2017-2018 Adopted

% Change

$

41,218 441 1,065 3,315 120 310 1,280 4,956

$

42,517 840 2,878 10 310 1,399 3,911

$

56,000 1,100 4,160 1,200 400 1,600 4,070

$

56,000 1,100 3,100 1,200 400 2,500 4,100

0% 0% -25% 0% 0% 56% 1%

$

56,000 1,100 4,160 1,200 400 1,600 4,070

0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0%

$

52,704

$

51,865

$

68,530

$

68,400

0%

$

68,530

0%

158


LOCAL AND REGIONAL ORGANIZATIONS DESCRIPTION The City of Suffolk provides financial assistance to a number of non-profit organizations which provide services on both a local and regional basis. Many of the organizations receive matching grants or support from other localities allowing for more extensive and comprehensive services for Suffolk citizens than the City could afford by acting on its own due to economies of scale.

159


Department: Local and Regional Organizations Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 100-151100Regional Membership Organizations: 55661 Hampton Roads Planning District Commission 55680 Hampton Roads Military and Fed Fac. Alliance 55810 City Wide Dues/ Memberships Local Organization Partnerships: 55655 SRHA 55674 Suffolk Center for the Cultural Arts Local Nonprofit Organization Contributions: 55648 Suffolk Nansemond Historic Society 55651 Senior Services of Southeastern Virginia 55652 ForKids 55653 Food Bank of Southeastern Virginia 55654 The Genieve Shelter 55656 Endependence Center, Inc. 55658 Riddick's Folly 55659 Suffolk Fine Arts Commission 55660 Suffolk Clean Community Commission 55664 Suffolk Sister Cities International 55668 The Children's Center 55670 Tidewater Builders Association 55675 Suffolk Festivals, Inc. 55679 Virginia Legal Aid Society 55681 Western Tidewater Free Clinic 55685 Nansemond Suffolk Vol. Rescue Squad Building Trades Academy CHKD Child Abuse Program Eastern Virginia Medical School Opportunity Inc. Paul D Camp Community College Peanut Soil and Water Conservation District Total Operating Expenditures

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Change

2017-2018 Adopted

% Change

$

69,170 43,235 42,549

$

70,265 43,916 43,850

$

71,669 44,793 47,000

$

72,341 45,213 47,913

1% 1% 2%

$

72,341 45,213 47,913

1% 1% 2%

$

150,000 350,000

$

150,000 350,000

$

150,000 350,000

$

234,775 550,000

57% 57%

$

150,000 350,000

0% 0%

$

10,000 10,000 23,000 20,000 23,000 7,500 20,000 5,000 15,663 5,000 20,000 30,000 8,000 80,000 40,000 -

$

10,000 10,000 23,000 20,000 23,000 7,500 20,000 5,000 12,704 5,000 20,000 15,000 30,000 8,000 80,000 40,000 -

$

10,000 10,000 23,000 20,000 23,000 7,500 20,000 5,000 15,000 5,000 20,000 30,000 8,000 85,449 40,000 -

$

15,000 14,966 35,500 30,000 35,000 15,000 35,000 10,000 24,000 5,000 32,000 75,000 15,000 130,000 40,000 31,500 15,000 15,300 22,040 21,225 15,000

50% $ 50% 54% 50% 52% 100% 75% 100% 60% 0% 60% 150% 88% 52% 0% -

3,500 10,000 23,000 20,000 23,000 7,500 20,000 5,000 15,000 5,000 20,000 30,000 8,000 85,449 40,000 -

-65% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% -

972,117

$

987,235

$

985,411

$

980,916

0%

$

1,581,773

61%

$

160

-


NON-DEPARTMENTAL GENERAL FUND DESCRIPTION The Non-Departmental General Fund includes expenditures that cover the costs associated with a number of City departments including anticipated costs for leave compensation, unemployment payments, and transfers to other funds.

161


Department: Non-Departmental - General Fund Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 100-091400Fringe Benefits & Insurances: 51100.27 Leave Compensation 52100 Leave Compensation - FICA Compensation Vacancy Savings Estimate 52210 VRS 52600 Unemployment Payments 53100 Professional Services 55230 Telecommunications 55821 Employee Funds Expense 58200 Capital Outlay 59902 Contingency Sub-Total:

Transfer to Other Funds / Designations: 50000.211 Transfer to Grants (Local Cash Match) 50000.212 Transfer to Transit Fund (Operating Support) 50000.220 Transfer to Aviation Fund (Operating Support) 50000.310 Transfer to Capital Projects (Cash Fund Projects) 50000.401 Transfer to Debt Service Fund Sub-Total: Total Operating Expenditures

$

2015-2016 Actual

502,704 19,203 332 37,767 70,000 18,123 1,200,000 -

$

$

1,848,129

$

286,518 677,935 135,276 4,539,600 26,552,540

2016-2017 Budget

361,352 26,822 220 39,876 13,934 23,798 -

$

$

466,002

$

296,777 795,395 156,116 4,786,409 25,990,151

2017-2018 Requested

402,569 25,000 100,000 60,000

$

$

587,569

$

% Change

2017-2018 Adopted

420,000 30,000 100,000 60,000

4% 20% 0% 0%

$

$

610,000

4%

350,000 820,832 98,859 2,064,920 27,024,913

$

463,628 736,132 82,368 4,585,137 25,161,013

% Change

420,000 30,000 100,000 60,000

4% 20% 0% -

$

610,000

4%

32% $ -10% -17% 122% -7%

350,000 811,511 75,700 4,585,137 25,161,013

0% -1% -23% 122% -7%

0%

$ 32,191,869

$ 32,024,848

$ 30,359,524

$

31,028,278

2%

$

30,983,361

2%

$ 34,039,998

$ 32,490,850

$ 30,947,093

$

31,638,278

2%

$

31,593,361

2%

162


Capital Projects Fund


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


CAPITAL PROJECTS FUND DESCRIPTION The Capital Projects Fund provides funding for nonrecurring capital expenditures which are primarily financed through transfers from both the General Fund and the sale of General Obligation and Utility Revenue bonds. Supplementing the General Fund and General Obligation and Utility Revenue bond monies are additional funding sources including Federal and State grants, and enterprise fund transfers. In accordance with the City Council’s guiding principles, capital projects are planned and funded by incorporating the total funding requirements for completion, inflation, and operations into future construction costs. FY 2017-2018 CAPITAL PROJECTS 

Parks and Recreation Capital Maintenance Trail Enhancements Sleepy Hole Park Renovation Shoreline Stabilization Bennett’s Creek Recreation Center

Public Buildings Public Building Capital Maintenance Godwin Courts Building Improvements Airport Obstruction Removal Airport Runway 4-22 Rehabilitation Airport Covered Terminal Entranceway Airport Equipment Storage Facility

Public Safety Ambulance Replacement Ambulance Refurbishment Fire & Rescue Storage Building

Public Schools Hazardous Materials Management HVAC/Chiller Replacements New Middle School New Elementary School Operations Facility

Village & Neighborhood Initiatives Village & Neighborhood Improvements Open Space Improvements

Transportation Local Urban Roadway Construction – Comprehensive Plan  Holland Road  Yr. 1-10 Projects To Be Determined Local Urban Intersection Construction – Comprehensive Plan  Nansemond Parkway/Bennetts Pasture Road  Kings Highway/Godwin Boulevard  RT. 17/Crittenden Road Oak Ridge/Colonial Ave. Connector Bennetts Creek Channel Dredging Rail Crossing Improvements Pruden Center Signal & Turn Lanes Shoulders Hill Road/Rt. 17 Intersection Point Place Roadway Extension Public Utilities Overlay Pruden Boulevard Culvert Improvements Old College Drive Drainage

Public Utilities Water Source Development & Treatment Plant Expansion Water Distribution & Transmission System Expansion Water System Upgrades Sanitary Sewer System Upgrades

163


CAPITAL PROJECTS FUND Revenue 2014-2015 Actual Transfer from General Fund (Pay-Go) General Obligation Bonds RT17 - Obligation Bonds State/Federal Aviation Grants State/Federal Parks & Recreation State/Federal Stormwater State/Federal Tourism State/Federal Transportation State/Federal VDOT Revenue Sharing Cash Proffers Miscellaneous Revenue Transfer from RT17 Tax District Transfer from Aviation Transfer from Road Maintenance Fund Transfer from Debt Transfer from PU Transfer from Stormwater Fund Transfer from Fleet Fund Balance

$

Refuse - Obligation Bonds

$

-

Transfer from Public Utility Fund (Pay-Go) Public Utility - Obligation Bonds Miscellaneous Revenue - Public Utilities Total Revenue

4,539,600 31,075,000 617,634 416,740 11,028 57,601 2,858,641 299,198 250,000 500,000 500,000 -

2015-2016 Actual

-

2,608 $

41,128,049

4,786,409 21,627,105 2,710,684 136,074 5,910,140 320,044 260,000 1,950,000 -

$

2016-2017 Budget $

2,064,920 29,493,105 1,197,798 500,000 8,340,000 2,000,000 645,000 -

$

6,500,000

1,000,000 354,394

2,500,000 14,841,000 -

39,054,850

$ 68,081,823

2017-2018 Requested

% Chng

4,585,137 27,726,304 5,093,400 50,000 175,000 18,995,040 1,506,774 1,500,000 1,707,000 175,000 -

122% $ -6% 325% -65% 128% -100% -73% -

-

$

2017-2018 Adopted

-100%

3,300,000 5,060,000 -

32% -66% -

69,873,655

3%

2017-2018 Requested

% Chng

4,585,137 27,726,304 5,093,400 50,000 175,000 18,995,040 1,506,774 1,500,000 175,000 219,927 -

$

% Chng 122% -6% 325% -65% 128% -100% -73% -

-100%

3,300,000 5,060,000 -

32% -66% -

68,386,582

0%

Expenditure Summary 2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Adopted

% Chng

Capital Projects Expenditures

$

33,055,285

$

32,107,070

$ 68,081,823

$

69,873,655

3%

$

68,386,582

0%

Total Expenditures

$

33,055,285

$

32,107,070

$ 68,081,823

$

69,873,655

3%

$

68,386,582

0%

164


CAPITAL PROJECTS FUND Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: Parks

Public Buildings

Public Safety

Schools

Villages

Bennett's Creek Recreation Center $ Parks & Rec - Capital Maintenance Planters Club Improvements Whaleyville Community Center Sleepy Hole Park Renovation Lake Meade Park Trail Parks Maintenance & Storage Facility Canoe/Kayak Launch Construction Trail Enhancements Suffolk Seaboard Trails (Tea21 Grant) Lake Kennedy Park Trail Shoreline Stabilization Project Public Building Capital Maintenance New Municipal Building Municipal Channel Upgrades Godwin Courthouse Security System Police Headquarters Expansion Godwin Courts Buildings Improvements Central Library/W. Washington St Plan Operations Maintenance Facility Great Dismal Swamp Int Center Southwestern Elem Demolition Airport Security Improvements Airport Corporate Hanger Access Rd Airport Parallel Taxiway Airport Parking Expansion Improvements Airport Runway 4-22 Obstruction Remova Airport Taxi Rehab Construction Airport Runway 4-22 Rehabilitation Airport Easement Acquisition & Obstructio Airport Covered Terminal Entranceway Airport Equipment Storage Facility Ambulance Fire Engines Aerial Ladder Truck Fire Station 1 Renovations Lake Kilby Addition Fire & Rescue Storage Building E-911 Equipment Upgrade & Tower Replacement of Analog Security Cameras Hazardous Material Management HVAC/Chiller Replacements Pioneer Elem Replacement Multiple Campus Land Acquisition New Middle School New Elementary School Operation Facility Village & Neighborhood Improvements Open Space Improvements

285,045 337,069 1,565,336 6,451 125,345 13,767 661,542 1,033,725 7,507,340 47,409 870 2,220,590 106,806 6,505,852 41,720 191,828 278,829 151,801 13,978 76,422 23,326 106,311 31,306 3,203,718 1,398 2,865,119 78,043 849,626 -

2015-2016 Actual $

40,648 278,897 1,950 30,793 422,598 57,265 13,750 106,286 25,805 821,347 672,954 1,057,756 11,817 71,268 9,536,655 25,754 2,212,171 55,487 388,529 98,598 830,753 692,496 3,493 1,037,646 67,063 1,285,000 185,632 1,242,338 1,405,288 1,397,987 554,355 -

2016-2017 Budget $

425,000 1,020,000 400,000 191,748 350,000 780,000 790,370 200,000 75,000 1,000,000 12,957,408 13,669,697 250,000

2017-2018 Requested $

2,000,000 425,000 100,000 50,000 1,875,000 905,000 1,175,000 175,000 5,000,000 30,000 300,000 552,137 600,000 75,000 1,000,000 9,142,738 5,114,390 4,000,000 1,250,000 465,000

% Chng $ 0% -11% -100% -100% -100% 541% -100% -100% 0% 0% -29% -63% 86%

2017-2018 Adopted 2,000,000 425,000 100,000 50,000 1,875,000 905,000 1,175,000 175,000 5,000,000 30,000 300,000 552,137 600,000 75,000 1,000,000 9,142,738 5,114,390 4,000,000 1,250,000 465,000

165

% Chng 0% -11% -100% -100% -100% 541% -100% -100% 0% 0% -29% -63% 86%


Transprtn

Local Urban Intrsctn Const-Comp Plan Godwin Blvd/Kings Hwy Intersection RT17/Lee Farm Lane Intersection RT17/Bennett's Pasture Rd Intersection Nansemond Pkwy/Wilroy Rd Intersectio Pender/Washington Intersection N Pkwy/Bennett's Pasture Rd Intersectio RT17/Crittenden Road Local Urban Rdway Const-Comp Plan Holland Rd Improvements Nansemond Pkwy Phase II TBD Suff ITS MasPlan College Drive/Harbourview Blvd (Rt. 17 T Kimberly Bridge Replacement Feasibility S E Washington Streetscape Railroad Crossing Upgrade HSIP Proactive Safety Project Channel Dredging North Division Street Lewis Avenue CMAQ Improvements Harbour View Area Signal Improvements Shoulders Hill Rd/RT17 Intersection Public Utilities Pavement Projects North Suffolk Connector Rt 17 Bridge Road Paving Rt 58 Paving Rt 58 Signal Retiming/Connector Nansemond Pkwy/Shoulders Hill Rd Holland Road Paving Godwin Road Paving W Washington/Henley Pl Improvements Kenyon Road Connector Godwin/RT 58 Ramp Improvements College Dr/Hampton Rds Crossing Connec Harbour Towne Pkwy/Habour View Blvd I Oak Ridge/Colonial Ave Connector Lake View Pkwy/College Dr Sidewalk Pruden Center Signal & Turn Lanes Point Place Roadway Extension Pruden Boulevard Culvert Improvements Old College Drive Drainage RT17 Harbour Towne Pkwy Connector & Wetlan Refuse MSW Transfer Station Stormwater EPA Phase II Stormwater Sadler Pond Improvements Pughsville Drainage Bay TMDL Implementation Projects Rural Stormwater Improvements Old College Dr Ditch Piping Downtown St Upgrades & Drainage Impro Respass Beach Drainage Improvements Oldetown Master Drainage Study Utilities Water Source Development & Treatment P Water Distribution and Transmission Syste Water System Upgrades Operations Maintenance Facility Sanitary Sewer Extensions Sanitary Sewer System Upgrades Non-Residential Sewer Extensions Non-Departmental Transfer to Grants Fund Transfer to Debt Fund Total Operating Expenses

$

13,627 117,293 336,177 -

84,301 328,308 415,390 178,096 21,004 -

500,000 800,000 300,000 -

500,000 2,000,000 500,000

0% -100% 567% -

500,000 2,000,000 500,000

0% -100% 567% -

55,642 484,958 79,750 93,076 3,301 41,072 104,569 92,925 1,708,667 75,000 134,415 95,000 54,550 114,062 441,912 75,018 28,599 26,810 29,684 258,576 3,142 5,916 17,938 24,591 208,445 -

402,800 1,157,778 60,082 11,098 10,545 509,290 151,264 44,555 125,816 226,410 227,855 63,902 27,660 29,534 19,292 80,247 628,392 30,399 16,348 16,132 21,108 23,120 27,078 8,221 2,266,459 5,488 110,179 714 145,587 240 -

6,525,000 1,341,000 65,600 925,000 100,000 80,000 350,000 6,500,000 1,000,000 145,000 9,060,000 1,800,000 250,000 300,000 5,931,000 -

10,683,424 1,000,000 140,400 531,110 3,268,956 3,414,000 350,000 800,000 3,000,000 326,500 415,000 350,000 1,210,000 125,000 825,000 6,200,000 -

64% -100% 114% -100% -100% -100% 0% -100% -100% -100% -87% -93% 230% -100% 5% -

10,683,424 1,000,000 140,400 531,110 3,268,956 1,707,000 350,000 800,000 3,000,000 326,500 415,000 350,000 1,210,000 125,000 825,000 6,200,000 219,927

64% -100% 114% -100% -100% -100% 0% -100% -100% -100% -87% -93% 230% -100% 5% -

69,873,655

-

68,386,582

-

33,055,285

$

32,107,070

$

68,081,823

$

$

166


Debt Service Fund


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


DEBT SERVICE FUND DESCRIPTION The Debt Service Fund is used to account for the accumulation of resources for and the payment of general long term debt principal, interest, and related costs. Revenues in this fund consist primarily of an allocation of the citywide real estate tax revenue.

167


DEBT SERVICE FUND Revenue 2014-2015 Actual Interest on Investments 2011 VPSA Interest Refund Local Bond Issues Transfer from General Fund Transfer from Road Maintenance Transfer from Grant Fund (CDBG 108 loan) Transfer from Rt 17 Special Taxing District Transfer from Capital Projects Fund Balance

$

Total Revenue

$

2015-2016 Actual

40 295,481 24,600,020 26,552,540 324,214 721,791 -

$

52,494,087

$

2016-2017 Budget

125 297,075 22,896,146 25,990,151 314,410 698,355 -

$

27,024,913 304,567 682,978 2,000,000

$

50,196,261

$ 30,012,458

$

2017-2018 Requested

% Chng

25,161,013 1,368,763 294,521 355,432 -

-7%

-100%

27,179,729

-9%

2017-2018 Requested

% Chng

2017-2018 Adopted $

-3% -48%

$

% Chng

25,161,013 1,368,763 74,594 355,432 219,927 -

-7%

-100%

27,179,729

-9%

-76% -48%

Expenditure Summary 2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Adopted

% Chng

Consolidated Debt

$

52,519,240

$

50,170,383

$ 30,012,458

$

27,179,729

-9%

$

27,179,729

-9%

Total Expenditures

$

52,519,240

$

50,170,383

$ 30,012,458

$

27,179,729

-9%

$

27,179,729

-9%

168


DEBT SERVICE FUND Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 401-95100 59110 Bond Principal 59120 Interest on Bonded Debt 59130/59140 Bond Issuance and Coupon Handling Transfer to General Fund Transfer to Capital Fund Total Operating Expenditures

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

$

40,266,016 10,323,524 508,944 920,756 500,000

$

39,377,723 10,333,850 458,810 -

$

16,311,132 11,201,326 500,000 2,000,000

$

15,979,080 10,700,649 500,000 -

$

52,519,240

$

50,170,383

$

30,012,458

$

27,179,729

% Chng

2017-2018 Adopted

-2% $ -4% 0% -100% -9%

$

% Chng

15,979,080 10,700,649 500,000 -

-2% -4% 0% -100%

27,179,729

-9%

169


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


Special Revenue Funds


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


AVIATION FACILITIES FUND DESCRIPTION The Aviation Facilities Fund is a special revenue fund designed to account for and manage the Suffolk Executive Airport. The fund is supported by revenue generated by airport operations including fuel sales, hangar leases, tie downs, and other services provided to users of the airport as well as state and federal grant funding. The Aviation Facilities Division administers and manages the Suffolk Executive Airport including the operation of runways, taxiways, hangar facilities, apron and tie down facilities, fueling facilities, required navigational equipment, and the airport cafe. FY 2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Completed the parallel taxiway for primary instrument runway.

Updated the Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan and the Spill Prevention Control and Countermeasure Plan.

Finalized taxiway “A” rehabilitation and the terminal building parking lot upgrade design plans.

FY 2018 OBJECTIVES  

To increase traffic flow and fuel sales at the airport. (Financial Stability)

To resurface the primary runway and offer complimentary aircrew ground transportation. (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

STATISTICS/PERFORMANCE MEASURES Number of Airplanes Taking Off/Flying into Airport Number of Businesses located at Airport Percent of Hangar Space Leased Gallons of Fuel Sold at Airport

FY 16 Actual 10,950 5 100% 95,796

FY 17 Projected 11,000 5 100% 95,000

FY 18 Estimate 11,500 5 100% 95,000

170


AVIATION FACILITIES FUND Revenue 2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Chng 6% 0% -27% -17%

$

266,172 675,000 10,000 75,700

0%

$

1,026,872

Interest on Investments Rent of Facilities Sale of Fuel Miscellaneous Revenue State Aviation Maintenance Grants Transfer from General Fund

$

1,172 177,649 652,729 10,337 24,808 135,276

$

1,244 219,535 467,656 10,232 18,328 156,116

$

249,948 675,000 13,750 98,860

$

266,172 675,000 10,000 82,368

Total Revenue

$

1,001,971

$

873,112

$

1,037,558

$

1,033,540

2017-2018 Adopted

% Chng -100% -61% 0% -27% -23% -1%

Expenditure Summary 2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Chng

2017-2018 Adopted

% Chng

Aviation Services

$

952,383

$

801,340

$

1,037,558

$

1,033,540

0%

$

1,026,872

-1%

Total Expenditures

$

952,383

$

801,340

$

1,037,558

$

1,033,540

0%

$

1,026,872

-1%

171


AVIATION FACILITIES FUND (Department of Economic Development) Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 220-150000 51100.02 51100.04 51100.06 52100 52210 52400 53000.16 53300 53300.110 53300.220 53600 53600.110 53600.220 54100 54200 54500 55100 55210 55230 55410 55500 55810 56001 56011 56014 56015 56017 56022 58200 58200.110 58200.220 91400-51100.27 91400-59905 93000-50000.165

Salaries and Wages $ Salaries and Wages - Overtime Salaries and Wages - Part-time FICA VRS Retirement Group Life Purchased Service - Refuse Collection Repair and Maintenance Repair and Maintenance - State Repair and Maintenance - Aviation Advertising Advertising - State Advertising - Aviation Information Technology Fleet Risk Management Utilities Postal Services Telecommunications Lease/Rent of Equipment Travel and Training Dues and Association Memberships Office Supplies Uniforms & Wearing Apparel Other Operating Supplies Merchandise for Resale Copier Fuel Inventory Capital Outlay Capital Outlay - State Capital Outlay - Aviation Special Compensation Local Cash Match Transfer to GF-Indirect Cost

Total Operating Expenditures

$

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Chng

137,260 6,310 2,805 10,988 19,286 1,532 1,033 24,699 22,120 4,954 224 2,146 2,146 20,361 51,556 61,342 29,673 70 1,477 41,317 500 100 171 1,611 5,741 181 1,453 461,019 40,311

$

140,716 8,823 11,919 12,270 19,157 1,674 963 52,298 14,687 2,997 983 3,882 3,882 9,668 46,351 59,483 27,267 77 1,454 42,373 1,060 100 73 1,722 5,065 1,799 277,739 52,860

$

145,008 35,608 13,817 15,994 1,900 909 35,000 10,000 9,304 48,992 49,609 27,300 500 1,724 40,600 1,200 100 500 1,500 5,000 2,000 2,013 500,000 30,000 58,979

$

113,786 1,500 64,000 13,715 12,551 1,491 1,200 36,000 10,000 9,304 48,992 49,609 28,000 500 1,800 40,000 2,000 100 500 1,500 5,000 1,000 2,013 500,000 30,000 58,979

952,383

$

801,340

$

1,037,558

$

1,033,540

2017-2018 Adopted

% Chng

-22% 80% -1% -22% -22% 32% 3% 0% 0% 0% 0% 3% 0% 4% -1% 67% 0% 0% 0% 0% -50% 0% 0% 0% 0%

$

135,383 36,035 13,114 14,933 1,774 1,200 36,000 10,000 10,272 56,246 48,532 28,000 500 1,724 40,000 2,000 100 500 1,500 5,000 1,000 2,013 500,000 30,000 51,046

-7% 1% -5% -7% -7% 32% 3% 0% 10% 15% -2% 3% 0% 0% -1% 67% 0% 0% 0% 0% -50% 0% 0% 0% -13%

-

$

1,026,872

-1%

55410 - Lease of Equipment: Generator and refueler. Personnel Summary

Range

Class 134 Airport Manager 120 Airport Technician

Number of Full-Time Positions

2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

2017-2018 Adopted

1 2

1 2

1 2

1 1

1 2

3

3

3

2

3

172


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


DOWNTOWN BUSINESS OVERLAY TAXING DISTRICT FUND DESCRIPTION The Downtown Business Overlay Taxing District (DBOD) is a special fund created to foster economic development in downtown Suffolk. A specific additional real estate tax levy is assessed on properties in the DBOD. Revenues provide funding for enhanced beautification, refuse, sidewalk, and street maintenance services. The adopted FY 2017-2018 real estate tax rate is $.105 per $100 of assessed value in the DBOD.

173


DOWNTOWN BUSINESS OVERLAY TAXING DISTRICT FUND Revenue 2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Chng

2017-2018 Adopted

% Chng

Real Property Taxes Penalties and Interest Interest on Investments

$

223,536 2,267 841

$

176,713 1,868 411

$

167,973 -

$

170,000 -

1% -

$

176,222 -

5% -

Total Revenue

$

226,643

$

178,992

$

167,973

$

170,000

1%

$

176,222

5%

Expenditure Summary 2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Chng

2017-2018 Adopted

% Chng

Services

$

157,779

$

141,427

$

167,973

$

170,000

1%

$

176,222

5%

Total Expenditures

$

157,779

$

141,427

$

167,973

$

170,000

1%

$

176,222

5%

174


DOWNTOWN BUSINESS OVERLAY TAXING DISTRICT FUND Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 20941310-53000.02 41310-53000.46 41310-53100 41310-55100 42310-53000.16

Purchased Service - RM (Maintenance, Sweepin $ Purchased Service - RM Banners Professional Services Utilities Purchased Service - Refuse Fund

Total Operating Expenditures

$

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Chng

2017-2018 Adopted

% Chng

28,102 2,233 88,978 1,028 37,439

$

33,993 3,092 68,951 730 34,661

$

57,000 69,973 1,000 40,000

$

57,000 72,000 1,000 40,000

0% 3% 0% 0%

$

57,000 61,031 1,000 57,191

0% -13% 0% 43%

157,779

$

141,427

$

167,973

$

170,000

1%

$

176,222

5%

Note: 3100 Professional Services provides for beautification and landscape services.

175


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


ROAD MAINTENANCE FUND DESCRIPTION The Road Maintenance Fund provides for the maintenance of primary and secondary roadways throughout the City of Suffolk including drainage ditches, sidewalks, grass mowing, and litter control. The Division also evaluates, repairs, and upgrades traffic regulatory markings, signage, and traffic signal operations; directs and manages capital and special projects; assists in the review of all site development plans; analyzes impacts relating to current and future transportation issues; administers the City’s street lighting program; and assists in supporting the Roadway Advisory Commission. FY 2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Inspected 75 bridges to meet State and Federal standards and guidelines and replaced three structurally deficient bridge structures on Arthur Drive and Pittmantown Road.

Cleaned/maintained 102,742 linear feet of closed conveyance storm drain system and 496,200 linear feet of open conveyance ditch drainage system.

Managed the construction of the new Public Works Operations Center.

FY 2018 OBJECTIVES 

To provide safe and quality transportation options. (Transportation)

To continue capital street improvements as identified through the neighborhood street initiative program. (Transportation)

To provide quality maintenance service of the City roadway network and supported assets. (Transportation)

STATISTICS/PERFORMANCE MEASURES Roadway: Number of Lane Miles maintained Number of Lane Miles resurfaced Cost per Lane Mile resurfaced Number of Potholes repaired Average Pothole repair time Linear Feet of Open Conveyance Systems maintained

FY 16 Actual

FY 17 Projected

FY 18 Estimate

1,657.36 62 $110,100 9,043 72 hours 814,066

1,596.14 48 $110,100 8,000 72 hours 500,000

1,596.14 48 $110,100 8,000 72 hours 500,000

105 105

107 107

107 107

100%

100%

100%

Traffic: Number of Traffic Signals maintained Number of Traffic Signals receiving preventative maintenance services Percent of Priority 1 Traffic Signal requests repaired within 4 hours

176


ROAD MAINTENANCE FUND Revenue 2014-2015 Actual Sale of Permits Height/Weight Permit Fees Fines & Forfeitures Revenue from Use of Property - SW Mosquito Operations of Street Lights Developer Street Sign Contributions Developer Traffic Signal Contributions Sale of Service - Stormwater (Mosquito) Sale of Service - Capital Projects Sale of Service - Stormwater (Engineering) Sale of Service - DBOD Sale of Service - General Fund (PW Admin.) Sale of Service - Animal Control Sale of Service - Public Utilities Sale of Service - Developer Plan Review Sale of Service - P&R Grounds Maint (Cemetery) Sale of Service - Refuse Salary Allocation Sale of Service - PW Salary Allocation Sale of Service - PW Streetlight Installation Sale of Service - Impact Analysis Sale of Service - Banners Sale of Salvage/Surplus Miscellaneous Revenue Virginia Logo Program Urban Maintenance Funds Insurance Recovery Interest Proceeds Transfer from Fund Balance

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Chng

2017-2018 Adopted

% Chng

A $ B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

31,542 294,920 268,635 54,873 6,000 536 60,000 291,668 300,000 28,102 30,000 5,000 7,800 26,082 16,930 55,000 45,000 20,000 15,000 3,600 9,830 21,672 9,950 21,512,965 1,435 44,757 -

$

37,360 335,100 210,995 43,518 12,600 36,000 60,000 135,914 284,863 33,993 44,853 5,000 9,500 26,540 55,000 45,000 5,732 7,843 271,040 8,450 22,733,072 7,350 47,731 -

$

35,000 200,000 200,000 150,000 6,000 200,000 60,000 200,000 300,000 57,000 60,000 15,000 20,000 30,000 55,000 45,000 20,000 15,000 5,000 5,000 7,500 12,000 23,523,116 2,000 2,600,000

$

70,000 320,000 250,000 150,000 7,500 90,000 60,000 200,000 300,000 57,000 130,000 25,000 20,000 30,000 55,000 45,000 20,000 15,000 5,000 5,000 7,500 12,000 23,126,011 2,000 900,000

100% 60% 25% 0% 25% -55% 0% 0% 0% 0% 117% 67% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% -2% 0% -65%

$

43,750 320,000 250,000 15,000 150,000 7,500 90,000 60,000 200,000 300,000 57,000 130,000 15,000 20,000 30,000 55,000 45,000 20,000 15,000 5,000 5,000 7,500 12,000 23,431,495 2,000 900,000

25% 60% 25% 0% 25% -55% 0% 0% 0% 0% 117% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% -65%

$

23,161,298

$

24,457,455

$ 27,822,616

$

25,902,012

-7%

$

26,186,245

-6%

2017-2018 Requested

% Chng

Total Revenue

Expenditure Summary 2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Adopted

% Chng

Road Maintenance Traffic Engineering

$

19,995,061 4,389,639

$

18,214,623 4,324,589

$ 22,881,244 4,941,372

$

21,330,968 4,571,044

-7% -7%

$

21,405,682 4,780,563

-6% -3%

Total Expenditures

$

24,384,700

$

22,539,213

$ 27,822,616

$

25,902,012

-7%

$

26,186,245

-6%

A - Land use and commercial drive permits issued to public

N - Services provided to Public Utilities

B - Height & Weight Permit Fees

O - Charges to developers for plans review by Engineering.

C - Wide load and overweight citations allocated towards Road Maintenance

P - Services provided to Grounds Maintenance division for cemetery work

D - Revenue for office space at Operations Facility

Q - Services provided to Refuse for salary allocation

E - 7 yr. adv st. light pymts (Dev.) for st. light maint csts for new dev. Pro Rtd Bases

R - Services provided to PW for salary allocation

F - Charges fr developers for new st. signs related to new developments

S - Cost to install street lights

G - Chrgs to developers for inspectn by Traf. Engin. of traf. sgnl constrctn

T - Preliminary plan and traffic impact analysis review

H - Ditch cleaning services to Stormwater - mosquito control.

U - Services provided to P&R for banner placement

I - Services provided to Capital Projects Fund for roadwork.

V - Salvage of damaged guardrail and other miscellaneous metal

J - BMP residential maintenance and enhanced street sweeping services provided to SW Fund

W - Misc services to depts (signs, pavemt markers, research & engineering)

K - Enhanced street sweeping, roadside beautification, and clean up services provided to DBOD

X - Payment for Virginia Logo System Rights on City Right of Way

L - Non-VDOT funded activities - Misc Services (ex. Dirt roads)

Y - State revenue estimate based on 1220.90 lane miles x $12,161 secondary & 413.83 x $20,717 pr

M - Incinerator usage fee for euthanized animals

Z - Insurance recovery for public property accident damage

177


DIVISION: ROADWAY - TRAFFIC ENGINEERING (Department of Public Works) Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 210-4140051100.02 51100.04 52100 52210 52400 53100 53100.26 53200 53300 54100 54200 54500 55100 55210 55230 55500 55810 56001 56011 56012 56014 56017 58200 58210 58215 93000-50000.601

Salaries and Wages $ Salaries and Wages - Overtime FICA VRS Retirement Group Life Professional Services Professional Services - Traffic Signal Inspe Temporary Help Service Fees Repair and Maintenance Information Technology Fleet Risk Management Utilities (Street Lights) Postage Telecommunications Travel and Training Dues and Association Memberships Office Supplies Uniforms & Wearing Apparel Books & Subscriptions Other Operating Supplies Copier Costs Capital Outlay New Street Light Installation Improvements (signals/signs) Transfer to Fleet (cash funded equipment purchases)

Total Operating Expenditures

$

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Chng

2017-2018 Adopted

% Chng

867,338 76,826 67,070 126,475 10,170 130,350 43,665 21,145 255,354 189,062 256,169 1,381,969 683 15,579 10,508 3,158 4,175 9,310 1,049 407,769 10,866 101,449 8,074 391,427 -

$

923,274 72,178 70,586 125,928 10,670 174,399 5,560 22,669 131,825 193,984 245,217 1,404,924 119 16,722 10,540 3,330 3,930 12,225 449 642,888 13,481 127,163 17,676 94,851 -

$

1,091,434 77,077 89,391 120,385 14,298 300,000 200,000 15,000 142,870 165,587 279,228 1,500,000 1,000 12,919 18,000 5,000 4,000 15,000 1,500 643,477 15,205 110,000 20,000 100,000 -

$

1,091,434 77,077 89,391 120,385 14,298 300,000 90,000 15,000 142,870 207,027 279,228 1,500,000 500 12,919 12,000 5,000 3,000 15,000 1,000 404,710 15,205 55,000 20,000 100,000 -

0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% -55% 0% 0% 25% 0% 0% -50% 0% -33% 0% -25% 0% -33% -37% 0% -50% 0% 0% -

$

1,138,292 77,077 92,976 125,554 14,912 300,000 90,000 15,000 153,530 225,528 303,362 1,500,000 500 12,919 12,000 5,000 3,000 15,000 1,000 404,710 15,205 155,000 20,000 100,000 -

4% 0% 4% 4% 4% 0% -55% 0% 7% 36% 9% 0% -50% 0% -33% 0% -25% 0% -33% -37% 0% 41% 0% 0% -

4,389,639

$

4,324,589

$

4,941,372

$

4,571,044

-7%

$

4,780,563

-3%

Personnel Summary

Class

Range 137 136 134 131 130 130 123/125 125 123 123 123 120 120 120 119 118 118

Traffic Engineer Assistant Traffic Engineer Transportation Planning Manager Traffic Signal System Superintendent Sign and Paint Manager Engineering Analyst Traffic Signal Technician I-II Engineering Technician Sign Maintenance Manager Senior Sign Mechanic Paint Crew Leader Sign Mechanic Secretary Accounting Technician Highway Paint Equipment Operator Sign Technician Paint Technician

Number of Full-Time Positions

2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual 1 1

-

2016-2017 Budget 1 1

1 1 1 1 1 1 5 2 1 1 1 2 1

1 1 1 5 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 2

23

1 1 1 5 2 1 1 1 2 1 -

2017-2018 Requested

-

2017-2018 Adopted 1 1 1 1 1 1 5 2 1 1 1 2 1

-

1 1 1 1 1 1 5 2 1 1 1 2 1 -

1 2 3

1 2 3

1 2 3

1 2 3

24

25

25

25

178


DIVISION: ROADWAY - MAINTENANCE (Department of Public Works) Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 210-41200 51100.02 51100.04 52100 52210 52400 53000.06 53000.10 53000.12 53000.16 53100 53100.22 53200 53300 53310 53500 53850.64 54100 54200 54500 55210 55230 55420 55500 55810 56001 56011 56012 56014 56017 56024 58200 91400-59902 93000-50000.165 93000-50000.310 93000-50000.401 93000-50000.601 95100-59120

Salaries and Wages $ Salaries and Wages - Overtime FICA VRS Retirement Group Life Purchase Services - Stormwater Fund Purchase Services - General Fund (landscap Purchase Services - General Fund (Police W Purchase Services - Refuse Fund Professional Services Medical Services Temporary Help Service Fees Repair and Maintenance Repairs - Bridges Printing and Binding Construction Contracts - Hillpoint Meadow Information Technology Fleet Risk Management Postage Telecommunications Lease/Rent of Buildings Travel and Training Dues and Association Memberships Office Supplies Uniforms & Wearing Apparel Books and Subscriptions Other Operating Supplies Copier Costs Street Improvements Capital Outlay Contingency Indirect Costs Transfer to Capital Projects Transfer to Debt Transfer to Fleet (cash funded equipment purchases) Interest

Total Operating Expenditures

$

2015-2016 Actual

2,998,710 503,053 248,259 433,272 35,941 170,000 2,030 88,834 27,932 71,598 85,466 1,642,423 507 306,444 2,119,363 1,106,848 41 6,655 144,397 21,485 4,911 4,977 42,714 306 374,577 19,769 6,382,753 65,787 705,009 2,381,000 -

$

19,995,061

$

2016-2017 Budget

3,213,898 389,279 256,824 432,214 38,276 170,000 1,280 100,000 18,814 33,764 94,769 842,005 145 72,552 314,883 1,672,411 1,040,629 3 6,514 146,400 32,620 1,295 5,757 48,339 331,739 21,267 6,894,496 1,481,599 552,851 -

$

18,214,623

$

2017-2018 Requested

3,853,430 190,638 309,371 425,033 50,480 170,000 28,000 100,000 20,000 100,000 3,500 150,000 2,750,000 1,500 300,520 1,818,811 1,260,315 300 7,696 2,003 40,000 5,000 10,000 60,000 1,000 570,000 23,646 6,150,000 2,930,000 308,018 593,220 648,763

$

22,881,244

$

% Chng

3,893,279 190,638 312,420 429,429 51,002 249,200 28,000 125,000 32,210 75,000 3,500 150,000 2,250,000 1,500 300,520 2,100,642 1,260,315 300 7,696 2,003 35,000 3,000 8,500 60,000 1,000 450,000 23,646 6,220,000 843,000 305,405 550,000 1,368,763

1% 0% 1% 1% 1% 47% 0% 25% 61% -25% 0% 0% -18% 0% 0% 15% 0% 0% 0% 0% -13% -40% -15% 0% 0% -21% 0% 1% -71% -1% -7% 111%

21,330,968

-7%

2017-2018 Adopted $

$

3,960,734 190,638 317,580 436,869 51,886 249,200 28,000 125,000 32,210 75,000 3,500 150,000 2,250,000 1,500 353,859 2,119,308 1,301,210 300 7,696 2,003 35,000 3,000 8,500 60,000 1,000 450,000 23,646 6,220,000 843,000 164,396 571,885 1,368,763 -

-100%

21,405,682

-6%

Personnel Summary

Range 138 137 132/134/136 135 132/134 130 125/126/127 124 124 124 123 120/123 120 120 119 119 116/118 118

Class Assistant Director of Public Works Public Works General Manager Civil Engineer I-III Operations Manager Operations Superintendent I-II Operations Office Manager Construction Inspector I-III Street Crew Leader Maintenance Mechanic - Streets Accounting Associate II Labor Supervisor Heavy Equipment Operator I-II Secretary Accounting Technician Street Sweeper Office Assistant Street Maintenance Worker I-II Skilled Laborer Time Keeper

Number of Full-Time Positions

2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Chng

2017-2018 Adopted

1 1 1 1 7 1 2 14 3 1 31 1 1 3 1 28 1 1

1 1 1 1 7 1 2 14 3 1 31 1 2 3 1 28 1 1

1 1 1 1 7 1 3 14 3 1 31 2 4 1 28 1 1

1 1 1 1 7 1 4 14 3 1 1 35 1 2 28 1 -

1 1 1 1 7 1 4 14 3 1 1 35 1 2 28 1 -

99

100

101

102

102

179

3% 0% 3% 3% 3% 47% 0% 25% 61% -25% 0% 0% -18% 0% 18% 17% 3% 0% 0% 0% -13% -40% -15% 0% 0% -21% 0% 1% -71% -47% -4% -


GRANTS FUND DESCRIPTION The Grants Fund is a special revenue fund that provides required local matching contributions to State, Federal, and private grant funding secured by City departments for various activities, programs, and services for the citizens of Suffolk.

180


GRANTS FUND Revenue 2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Chng

2017-2018 Adopted

% Chng

Transfer from General Fund Transfer from Capital Fund CDBG Annual Allocation HOME Annual Allocation Revenue from the Commonwealth Revenue from the Federal Government Miscellaneous

$

286,518 208,445 463,358 662,966 379,564 436,089 337,223

$

296,777 421,347 583,107 384,803 691,629 54,986

$

350,000 304,567 -

$

463,628 294,521 -

32% -3% -

$

350,000 74,594 -

0% -76% -

Total Revenue

$

2,774,162

$

2,432,650

$

654,567

$

758,149

16%

$

424,594

-35%

2017-2018 Requested

% Chng

Expenditure Summary 2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Adopted

% Chng

Grants Operating Expenditures

$

2,506,943

$

2,296,634

$

654,567

$

758,149

16%

$

424,594

-35%

Total Expenditures

$

2,506,943

$

2,296,634

$

654,567

$

758,149

16%

$

424,594

-35%

181


GRANTS FUND Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 211-91400 59905 Local Cash Match Requirements $ CDBG Funding Allocation: CDBG Administration Geneive Shelter ForKids Homeless Shelter Habitat for Humanity-SHR Western Tidewater Free Clinic SRHA Emergency Repair Program Ches. Bay Presvtn-Septic Pump Out Prg Suffolk - Neighborhood Stabilization Pr HOME Grant Allocation: Lead Agency Admin-Suffolk CHDO-Admin. Isle of Wight Southampton Franklin Other Funding Allocation: Judicial Public Safety Public Works Health and Welfare Education Parks, Recreation and Cultural Community Development 93000-50000.401 Transfer to Debt Fund (CDBG 108 loan) Total Operating Expenses

$

-

2015-2016 Actual $

-

2016-2017 Budget $

350,000

2017-2018 Requested $

463,628

% Chng 32%

2017-2018 Adopted $

350,000

% Chng 0%

53,676 17,366 20,000 30,000 17,803 300 845

67,229 10,000 10,000 17,909 810 1,800 28,401

-

-

-

-

-

84,012 405,412 81,079 3,346 89,117

86,716 115,864 111,992 93,878 126,592

-

-

-

-

-

677,590 316,841 19,088 21,397 344,858 -

705,083 469,665 23,799 110,650 1,837

-

-

-

-

324,214

314,410

294,521

-3%

74,594

-76%

758,149

16%

424,594

-35%

2,506,943

$

2,296,634

304,567 $

654,567

$

$

182


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


TRANSIT SYSTEM FUND DESCRIPTION The Transit System Fund was established to manage transportation services provided to the citizens of Suffolk. This special revenue fund is supported by fare box revenue, State and Federal grants, and a transfer from the General Fund. The City contracts with Virginia Regional Transit (VRT) for the operation of the City’s transit service which includes six bus routes and ADA service. FY 2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Implemented an intelligent transportation system to enable riders access to bus location and arrival times and to allow transit management useful analysis and reporting tools.

Demonstrated gains in ridership across all routes for a second straight year.

Installed four new shelter locations.

Completed the application process for federal funding assistance.

FY 2018 OBJECTIVES 

To provide safe, clean and effective public transit. (Transportation)

To expand public transportation access to commercial, medical and employment centers through extended and weekend hours (Expanded Economic Development)

To complete the federal funding application process and to add additional revenue sources to fund expansions and improvements (Financial Stability)

To collaborate with Parks and Recreation on the bicycle and pedestrian plan in an effort to expand multi-modal connections. (Leisure, Health, and Wellness)

STATISTICS/PERFORMANCE MEASURES Ridership: Green Line (Main St./Godwin Blvd) Orange Line (Lake Kennedy/East Washington) Red Line (Magnolia/East Constance/Main Street) Yellow Line (Holland Road/Saratoga) Blue Line (Harbour View/College Drive/Burbage) Gold Line (Downtown/North Suffolk/HRT Connector) Purple Line (Downtown Saturday) Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Ridership

FY 16 Actual

FY 17 Projected

FY 18 Estimate

33,222 36,049 11,195 9,706 4,007 7,437 N/A 1,537

35,800 36,500 11,300 10,900 4,500 8,800 N/A 1,750

37,000 37,500 11,900 11,200 5,100 9,100 1,900 1,900

183


TRANSIT SYSTEM FUND Revenue 2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Chng 28% 13% 17% -33% 0%

$

66,750 8,500 183,207 69,420 485,000 811,511

28% 13% 17% -33% -1%

-

$

1,624,388

42%

Interest on Investments Fare Collections Miscellaneous VRPT Operating Revenue VRPT Capital Revenue Federal Transit Administration Transfer from General Fund

$

639 53,055 7,571 152,565 206,665 677,935

$

657 67,759 8,218 141,002 49,422 795,395

$

52,100 7,500 156,002 104,325 820,832

$

66,750 8,500 183,207 69,420 485,000 820,832

Total Revenue

$

1,098,429

$

1,062,452

$

1,140,759

$

1,633,709

2017-2018 Adopted

% Chng

Expenditure Summary 2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Chng

2017-2018 Adopted

% Chng

Transit System

$

1,209,090

$

1,033,663

$

1,140,759

$

1,633,709

43%

$

1,624,388

42%

Total Expenditures

$

1,209,090

$

1,033,663

$

1,140,759

$

1,633,709

-

$

1,624,388

42%

184


DIVISION: TRANSIT SYSTEM (Department of Public Works) Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 212-8800051100.02 52100 52210 52400 53100 53300 53600 54100 54200 54500 55100 55230 55500 55810 56014 58200 93000-50000.165

Salaries and Wages - Regular FICA VRS Group Life Professional Services Repair and Maintenance Advertising Information Technology Fleet Risk Management Utilities Telecommunications Travel and Training Dues & Association Memberships Other Operating Supplies Capital Outlay Transfer to GF-Indirect Cost

Total Operating Expenditures

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Chng

2017-2018 Adopted

% Chng

$

887,358 4,558 90 386 205 678 315,814 -

$

953,001 481 678 79,503 -

$

957,522 5,000 500 1,500 850 680 160,500 14,207

$

60,000 4,590 6,618 786 1,177,374 9,500 500 2,400 3,750 25,000 1,500 3,250 850 35,384 288,000 14,207

23% 90% 0% 0% 282% 25% 79% 0%

$

60,720 4,645 6,697 795 1,177,374 9,500 500 14,441 1,355 1,500 1,349 3,250 850 35,384 288,000 18,027

23% 90% 0% 0% 282% 25% 79% 27%

$

1,209,090

$

1,033,663

$

1,140,759

$

1,633,709

43%

$

1,624,388

42%

Personnel Summary

Range

Class 130 Transit Manager

Number of Full-Time Positions

2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

2017-2018 Adopted

-

-

-

1

1

-

-

-

1

1

185


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


LAW LIBRARY FUND DESCRIPTION The Law Library Fund was established to provide the general public and legal community access to current legal and consumer protection information at no cost. A special fee of $4.00 is levied on civil court cases in the General District and Circuit courts. This fee is held in a separate fund for the purpose of providing the public and Officers of the Court with a reliable network of legal information and educational support. This fund also supports community outreach efforts, legal publications, the salaries of support staff, and operating costs. FY 2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Provided the general public, attorneys, professionals with free legal resources.

and

other

FY 2018 OBJECTIVES 

To coordinate with City departments and agencies to enhance awareness of resources available in the Law Library. (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

To maximize the number of individuals assisted by Law Library resources. (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

STATISTICS/PERFORMANCE MEASURES Number of Patron visits: Public Attorney

CY 14 Actual

CY 15 Actual

CY 16 Actual

1,397 2,493

1,402 2,770

1,425 3,064

186


LAW LIBRARY FUND Revenue 2014-2015 Actual Interest on Investments Law Library Fees Miscellaneous Fees

$

Total Revenue

$

2015-2016 Actual

753 39,120 191

$

40,065

$

2016-2017 Budget

664 39,473 819

$

40,955

$

2017-2018 Requested

41,774 -

$

41,774

$

% Chng

2017-2018 Adopted

% Chng

-1% -

$

41,561 -

41,561 -

-1% -

41,561

-1%

$

41,561

-1%

Expenditure Summary 2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Chng

2017-2018 Adopted

% Chng

Circuit Court - Law Library

$

33,543

$

38,896

$

41,774

$

41,561

-1%

$

41,561

-1%

Total Expenditures

$

33,543

$

38,896

$

41,774

$

41,561

-1%

$

41,561

-1%

187


LAW LIBRARY FUND Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 213-2190051100.06 52100 53200 54100 55230 55500 55810 56001 56012 56017 58200

Salaries and Wages - Part-time FICA Temporary Help Service Fees Information Technology Telecommunications Travel & Training Dues and Association Memberships Office Supplies Books and Subscriptions Copier Costs Capital Outlay

Total Operating Expenditures

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Chng

2017-2018 Adopted

% Chng

$

16,463 1,187 88 663 489 13,613 1,040 -

$

14,074 1,077 2,777 510 700 15,578 1,188 2,992

$

20,400 1,561 516 200 20 1,000 16,782 1,295 -

$

20,000 1,530 516 200 20 1,000 17,000 1,295 -

-2% -2% 0% 0% 0% 0% 1% 0% -

$

20,240 1,548 516 200 20 1,000 16,742 1,295 -

-1% -1% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% -

$

33,543

$

38,896

$

41,774

$

41,561

-1%

$

41,561

-1%

188


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


ROUTE 17 SPECIAL TAXING DISTRICT FUND DESCRIPTION The Route 17 Special Taxing District is a special fund created to foster economic development in a specific geographic region of northern Suffolk. A specific additional real estate tax levy is assessed on properties in the Route 17 Special Taxing District. The adopted FY 2017-2018 real estate tax is $.24 per $100 of assessed value for the Route 17 Special Taxing District. The debt service for enhanced road improvements in the taxing district is repaid by the additional real estate tax.

189


ROUTE 17 SPECIAL TAXING DISTRICT FUND Revenue 2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Chng

2017-2018 Adopted

% Chng

Real Property Taxes Penalties and Interest Transfer from Fund Balance

$

1,713,579 5,452 -

$

1,151,190 4,552 -

$

1,400,000 -

$

1,855,432 -

33% -

$

1,627,352 228,080

16% -

Total Revenue

$

1,719,032

$

1,155,742

$

1,400,000

$

1,855,432

33%

$

1,855,432

33%

2017-2018 Requested

% Chng

Expenditure Summary 2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Adopted

% Chng

Route 17 Special Taxing District

$

971,791

$

958,355

$

1,400,000

$

1,855,432

33%

$

1,855,432

33%

Total Expenditures

$

971,791

$

958,355

$

1,400,000

$

1,855,432

33%

$

1,855,432

33%

190


ROUTE 17 SPECIAL TAXING DISTRICT FUND Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 216-8150093000-50000.310 Transfer to Capital Projects 93000-50000.401 Transfer to Debt Service Fund Reserve for Capital/Debt Total Operating Expenses

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

$

250,000 721,791 -

$

260,000 698,355 -

$

682,978 717,022

$

1,500,000 355,432 -

$

971,791

$

958,355

$

1,400,000

$

1,855,432

% Chng

2017-2018 Adopted

$ -48% -100% 33%

$

% Chng

1,500,000 355,432 -

-48% -100%

1,855,432

33%

191


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


Enterprise Funds


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


PUBLIC UTILITIES FUND DESCRIPTION The Department of Public Utilities is responsible for the operation, maintenance, and expansion of the City’s water and wastewater collection systems. The Department is comprised of the Divisions of Administration, Customer Service, Line Maintenance, Maintenance, Engineering and Water Production/Quality which manage and operate the G. Robert House Water Treatment Plant, 146 sanitary sewer pump stations, 352 miles of sewer mains, and 475 miles of water mains. The adopted water rate for FY 2017-2018 is $9.20 per 100 cubic feet. The adopted sewer collection rate for FY 2017-2018 is $7.21 per 100 cubic feet. FY 2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Refinanced approximately $73 million of existing debt and borrowed $18 million of new funding to assist with minimizing future near-term utility rate increases while continuing capital improvement needs.

Enhanced preventive gravity sewer collection system and pump station wet well cleaning, MOM activities, and capital plan sewer system facility upgrades to assist in minimizing sanitary sewer overflows.

Received a gold award from the Hampton Roads Sanitation District for the G. Robert House Water Treatment Plant for achieving discharge requirements for the previous year.

FY 2018 OBJECTIVES 

To maintain compliance with all Utility Fund financial policies. (Financial Stability)

To continue to reevaluate and adjust the Utility Fund 10 Year Capital Improvements Plan to ensure projects are implemented within the appropriate schedule to meet demands and minimize unnecessary financial impacts to the system’s customers. (Financial Stability)

To utilize modeling and enhanced technology to increase efficiencies in the operation of the utility systems and delivery of service. (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

To continue established programs in accordance with Consent Order to minimize sanitary sewer overflows. (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

STATISTICS/PERFORMANCE MEASURES Number of Water Customers Number of Sewer Customers Number of Sanitary Sewer Overflows Number of Plan Reviews Percent of Plan Reviews completed within 30 days Debt Service Ratio

FY 16 Actual 24,868 21,770 71

FY 17 Projected 25,100 22,000 100

FY 18 Estimate 25,400 22,300 65

185 100%

192 100%

190 100%

1.47

1.20

1.16

192


UTILITY FUND Revenue 2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Chng

2017-2018 Adopted

% Chng

Interest Earned Capitalized Interest Reserve Sale of Service - Engineering Water Availability Charges Bulk Water Sales Water Service Charges Water Connection Charges Meter Service Charges Hydrant Rental Sewer Service Charges Sewer Connection Charges Special Fees Sewer Availability Charges 2009 Build American Bonds Rebate Miscellaneous Capital Contributions from Development Transfer from Fund Balance

$

59,771 189,116 2,230,740 3,344,059 18,059,326 78,160 2,101,724 117,790 12,408,269 65,765 449,944 2,282,243 483,568 55,534 565,595 -

$

117,660 148,666 3,274,805 3,249,813 20,013,390 141,835 2,366,600 117,000 13,343,138 407,021 582,351 3,348,679 477,028 258,124 3,682,628 -

$

60,200 1,400,000 175,000 2,070,000 3,462,430 20,254,290 50,000 2,978,100 140,000 13,591,500 50,000 475,000 2,250,000 468,130 60,000 2,500,000

$

60,200 1,219,275 185,000 2,208,000 3,403,800 21,125,600 50,000 2,978,100 140,000 14,504,400 75,000 475,000 2,400,000 460,050 100,000 3,300,000

0% -13% 6% 7% -2% 4% 0% 0% 0% 7% 50% 0% 7% -2% 67% 32%

$

60,200 1,219,275 185,000 2,208,000 3,403,800 21,125,600 50,000 2,978,100 140,000 14,504,400 75,000 475,000 2,400,000 460,050 100,000 3,300,000

0% -13% 6% 7% -2% 4% 0% 0% 0% 7% 50% 0% 7% -2% 67% 32%

Total Revenue

$

42,491,605

$

51,528,737

$ 49,984,650

$

52,684,425

5%

$

52,684,425

5%

2017-2018 Requested

% Chng

Expenditure Summary 2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Adopted

% Chng

Administration Customer Service Line Maintenance Maintenance Water Production Engineering Non-Departmental

$

970,012 1,247,623 3,094,405 3,012,217 7,953,788 1,324,257 31,997,824

$

964,472 1,488,296 3,257,752 3,495,119 8,592,810 1,263,836 31,442,838

$

1,215,956 1,778,558 3,619,206 3,955,893 9,923,420 1,440,406 28,051,212

$

1,223,755 2,033,278 3,692,797 4,199,477 10,484,305 1,490,820 29,559,992

1% 14% 2% 6% 6% 3% 5%

$

1,181,506 2,104,476 3,644,227 4,169,102 10,471,721 1,481,937 29,631,457

-3% 18% 1% 5% 6% 3% 6%

Total Expenditures

$

49,600,125

$

50,505,123

$ 49,984,650

$

52,684,425

5%

$

52,684,425

5%

193


DEPARTMENT: PUBLIC UTILITIES - ADMINISTRATION Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 501-8951051100.02 51100.04 52100 52210 52400 53100 53300 53320 53500 53600 54100 54200 54500 55100 55210 55230 55420 55500 55810 56001 56011 56012 56017 58200

Salaries and Wages Salaries and Wages - Overtime FICA VRS Retirement Group Life Professional Services Repairs and Maintenance Maintenance Service Contract Printing and Binding Advertising Information Technology Fleet Risk Management Utilities Postal Services Telecommunications Lease/Rent of Building Travel and Training Dues and Association Memberships Office Supplies Uniforms & Wearing Apparel Books and Subscriptions Copier Costs Capital Outlay

Total Operating Expenses

$

$

2015-2016 Actual

480,727 263 35,218 0 5,453 217,698 111 115 62,597 16,166 74,698 3,361 122 7,450 46,627 699 5,860 2,574 7,557 2,716 970,012

$

2016-2017 Budget

542,352 561 39,588 2,521 6,037 208,586 40,309 9,934 80,412 176 7,515 11,668 938 4,015 1,397 698 400 7,365 -

$

964,472

$

2017-2018 Requested

574,663 3,060 44,196 63,385 7,528 300,000 200 250 250 72,204 9,883 98,171 500 8,341 10,228 3,000 5,000 5,000 1,500 750 7,846 -

$

1,215,956

$

% Chng

570,891 3,000 43,903 62,969 7,479 300,000 200 225 250 250 75,814 10,180 105,043 500 10,203 10,228 4,000 5,500 5,000 2,200 1,000 4,920 1,223,755

2017-2018 Adopted

-1% -2% -1% -1% -1% 0% 0% 0% 0% 5% 3% 7% 0% 22% 0% 33% 10% 0% 47% 33% -37% -

$

1%

$

% Chng

548,997 3,000 42,228 60,554 7,192 300,000 200 225 250 250 64,134 10,288 99,573 500 8,341 10,228 4,000 5,500 5,000 2,200 1,000 7,846 -

0% 0% -11% 4% 1% 0% 0% 0% 33% 10% 0% 47% 33% 0% -

1,181,506

-3%

53100 - Professional Services: Consulting services. Personnel Summary

Class

Range 144 138 135 132 130 124 123 122 121 119 119

Director of Public Utilities Assistant Director of Public Utilities Utility Operations Manager Data Quality Control Technician Safety Officer II FOG Program Manager Accounting Associate II Stock Room Supervisor Water Distribution Operator Executive Secretary Senior Stock Room Clerk Office Assistant

Number of Full-Time Positions

2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1 9

2016-2017 Budget 1 1 1 1

-

1 1 1 1 -

1 1 -

2017-2018 Requested

1 1 -

2017-2018 Adopted 1 1 1 1 1

-

1 1 1 1 1 -

1 -

1 -

1 1 1

1 1 1

1 1 1

9

9

9

1 1 8

194

-4% -2% -4% -4% -4% 0% 0%


DEPARTMENT: PUBLIC UTILITIES - CUSTOMER SERVICE Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 501-8952051100.02 51100.04 51100.06 52100 52210 52400 53000.16 53100 53300 53320 53500 54100 54200 54500 55100 55210 55230 55420 55500 55810 56001 56011 56012 56014 56017 58200

Salaries and Wages $ Salaries and Wages - Overtime Salaries and Wages - Part-time FICA VRS Retirement Group Life Purchased Services - Refuse Collection Professional Services Repairs and Maintenance Maintenance Service Contracts Printing and Binding Information Technology Fleet Risk Management Utilities Postal Service Telecommunications Lease of Buildings Travel and Training Dues and Association Memberships Office Supplies Uniform & Wearing Apparel Books and Subscriptions Other Operating Supplies Copier Costs Capital Outlay

Total Operating Expenses

$

2015-2016 Actual

498,948 20,953 36,696 0 6,321 400 327,501 10,762 715 43,949 75,229 164,023 660 4,988 12,408 100 252 4,025 5,825 109 16,048 7,049 10,662

$

1,247,623

$

2016-2017 Budget

614,463 26,872 14,016 46,102 (3,261) 6,984 356,943 4,132 828 85,987 80,257 157,432 770 6,011 21,270 920 413 2,853 5,452 50 18,970 6,852 33,980 1,488,296

2017-2018 Requested

% Chng

$

774,442 25,500 16,014 61,196 85,421 10,145 300 344,000 12,000 3,900 4,000 80,035 72,225 217,157 5,800 500 8,136 21,270 1,500 500 3,000 7,500 100 14,000 7,417 2,500

$

894,691 25,500 24,585 72,275 98,684 11,720 300 419,000 12,000 2,700 3,000 84,037 74,391 232,358 5,800 500 15,227 21,270 1,500 500 4,000 7,500 100 14,000 7,640 -

$

1,778,558

$

2,033,278

2017-2018 Adopted

16% $ 0% 54% 18% 16% 16% 0% 22% 0% -31% -25% 5% 3% 7% 0% 0% 87% 0% 0% 0% 33% 0% 0% 0% 3% -100% 14%

$

% Chng

886,834 25,500 16,206 69,794 97,818 11,618 300 419,000 12,000 2,700 3,000 127,318 109,137 252,530 5,800 500 8,136 21,270 1,500 500 4,000 7,500 100 14,000 7,417 2,104,476

53100 - Professional Service: Contracted meter reading service. 56014 - Other Operating Supplies: Hand tools and protective equipment for meter service staff. Personnel Summary

Class

Range 133 130 128 127 124 121/124 122 118 116

Utility Operations Accounting Manager Assistant Utility Operations Accounting M Field Operations Account Manager Customer Service Manager Meter Services Supervisor Accounting Associate I-II Water Distribution Operator Customer Service Representative Water Meter Service Worker

Number of Full-Time Positions

2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

-

2016-2017 Budget 1

2017-2018 Requested

2017-2018 Adopted

1 1 1

1 1 1

1 1 1

6 8

2 2 6 8

3 2 6 8

10 2 8

10 2 8

18

20

22

23

23

1 1 1 2

-

-

-

195

15% 0% 1% 14% 15% 15% 0% 22% 0% -31% -25% 59% 51% 16% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 33% 0% 0% 0% 0% -100% 18%


DEPARTMENT: PUBLIC UTILITIES - LINE MAINTENANCE Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 501-8953051100.02 51100.04 52100 52210 52400 53000.02 53000.16 53100 53110 53300 53320 54100 54200 54500 55100 55230 55410 55500 55852 56001 56011 56014 56017 56024 58200

Salaries and Wages $ Salaries and Wages - Overtime FICA VRS Retirement Group Life Purchased Services - Road Maintenance Purchased Services - Refuse Collection Professional Services Medical Services Repairs and Maintenance Maintenance Service Contract Information Technology Fleet Risk Management Utilities Telecommunications Lease/Rent of Equipment Travel and Training HRSD Interceptors Interest Payment Office Supplies Uniforms & Wearing Apparel Other Operating Supplies Copier Costs Paving & Construction Supplies Capital Outlay

Total Operating Expenses

$

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Chng

2017-2018 Adopted

% Chng

813,397 119,693 66,692 0 9,702 7,800 182 26,616 878,304 78,366 437,217 278,173 2,839 12,995 5,662 1,648 128,313 970 13,733 182,011 3,051 27,040 -

$

819,679 143,045 69,484 16,736 10,476 9,500 25,709 1,043,490 103,799 408,565 275,181 19,005 17,191 6,825 848 128,214 745 16,612 122,341 3,169 17,138 -

$

1,057,187 153,000 92,579 116,608 13,849 20,000 800 28,000 800,000 8,010 91,476 431,351 352,655 14,000 17,415 10,000 4,000 132,000 1,500 19,500 225,000 3,276 27,000 -

$

1,036,526 153,000 90,999 114,329 13,578 20,000 800 28,000 957,000 4,950 96,050 444,292 377,341 14,000 28,807 10,000 4,000 129,000 1,500 20,250 125,000 3,375 20,000 -

-2% 0% -2% -2% -2% 0% 0% 0% 20% -38% 5% 3% 7% 0% 65% 0% 0% -2% 0% 4% -44% 3% -26% -

$

1,015,039 153,000 89,355 111,300 13,297 20,000 800 28,000 7,000 950,000 4,950 98,940 478,162 329,943 14,000 17,415 10,000 4,000 129,000 1,500 20,250 125,000 3,276 20,000 -

-4% 0% -3% -5% -4% 0% 0% 0% 19% -38% 8% 11% -6% 0% 0% 0% 0% -2% 0% 4% -44% 0% -26% -

3,094,405

$

3,257,752

$

3,619,206

$

3,692,797

2%

$

3,644,227

1%

53100 - Professional Services: Miss Utility costs, immunizations, sewer cleaning. 53300 - Repairs & Maintenance: Equipment maintenance, paving, manhole repairs. 55410 - Lease of Equipment: Rental of outside repair equipment. 56014 - Other Operating Supplies: Line equipment supplies, protective equipment. Personnel Summary

Range

Class 132 127 124 120/123 122 118 117

Line Maintenance Manager Assistant Line Maintenance Manager Utility Crew Leader Heavy Equipment Operator I-II Line Maintenance Technician Skilled Laborer Utility Systems Worker

Number of Full-Time Positions

2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual 1 1 3

2016-2017 Budget

3 11 8

3 12 8

3 12 8

27

28

28

28

-

1 1 3

2017-2018 Adopted 1 1 3 4 3 8 8

-

1 1 3

2017-2018 Requested

-

196

1 1 3 5 3 7 8 28


DEPARTMENT: PUBLIC UTILITIES - MAINTENANCE Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 501-8954051100.02 51100.04 52100 52210 52400 53000.16 53100 53300 53320 54100 54200 54500 55100 55230 55410 55500 55810 56001 56011 56014 56017 58200

Salaries and Wages $ Salaries and Wages - Overtime FICA VRS Retirement Group Life Purchased Services - Refuse Collection Professional Services Repairs and Maintenance Maintenance Service Contract Information Technology Fleet Risk Management Utilities Telecommunications Lease/Rent of Equipment Travel and Training Dues and Association Memberships Office Supplies Uniforms & Wearing Apparel Other Operating Supplies Copier Costs Capital Outlay

Total Operating Expenses

$

2015-2016 Actual

778,767 81,312 61,946 (0) 9,305 945 12,152 262,942 60,316 389,483 243,430 295,807 17,301 678,639 (3) 5,964 607 14,168 96,083 3,053 3,012,217

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Chng

2017-2018 Adopted

% Chng

$

803,342 82,722 63,886 13,593 9,574 963 9,856 449,636 107,510 475,635 225,101 289,890 18,229 764,498 305 6,031 583 12,845 157,751 3,169 -

$

953,661 142,800 83,879 105,189 12,493 800 97,000 305,000 6,120 106,704 523,876 291,285 275,000 18,260 850,000 4,000 7,000 2,300 17,250 150,000 3,276 -

$

976,618 142,800 85,635 107,721 12,794 800 8,000 356,500 3,825 112,039 539,593 311,675 275,000 31,501 1,043,000 4,000 14,301 2,300 18,000 150,000 3,375 -

2% 0% 2% 2% 2% 0% -92% 17% -38% 5% 3% 7% 0% 73% 23% 0% 104% 0% 4% 0% 3% -

$

958,152 142,800 84,223 105,684 12,552 1,616 8,000 356,500 3,825 105,262 575,654 293,576 275,000 18,260 1,043,000 4,000 7,422 2,300 18,000 150,000 3,276 -

0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 102% -92% 17% -38% -1% 10% 1% 0% 0% 23% 0% 6% 0% 4% 0% 0% -

$

3,495,119

$

3,955,893

$

4,199,477

6%

$

4,169,102

5%

53100 - Professional Services: Immunizations, Air Vac evaluations. 53300 - Repair & Maintenance: Pump station repairs and vacuum services. 55410 - Lease of Equipment: Lease of portable pumps and generators. 56014 - Other Operating Supplies: Supplies and protective gear. Personnel Summary

Class

Range 132 127 125 124 123 122 118 117

Maintenance Manager Assistant Maintenance Manager Electronics Technician Utility Crew Leader Heavy Equipment Operator II Pump Station Mechanic Skilled Laborer Utility Systems Worker

Number of Full-Time Positions

2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual 1 1 2 2

2016-2017 Budget

9 2 8

9 2 8

9 2 8

25

25

25

25

-

1 1 2 2

2017-2018 Adopted 1 1 2 2 1 9 1 8

-

1 1 2 2

2017-2018 Requested

-

197

1 1 2 2 1 9 1 8 25


DEPARTMENT: PUBLIC UTILITIES - WATER PRODUCTION Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 501-8955051100.02 51100.04 51100.06 52100 52210 52400 53000.16 53100 53300 53320 53500 53600 54100 54200 54500 55100 55210 55230 55311 55410 55500 55810 55853 56001 56011 56012 56014 56017 58200

Salaries and Wages $ Salaries and Wages - Overtime Salaries and Wages - Part-time FICA VRS Retirement Group Life Purchases Services - Refuse Collection Professional Services Repairs and Maintenance Maintenance Service Contract Printing and Binding Advertising Information Technology Fleet Risk Management Utilities Postal Service Telecommunications Well Mitigation Claims Lease/Rent of Equipment Travel and Training Dues and Association Memberships Bulk Water Purchase Office Supplies Uniforms & Wearing Apparel Books & Subscriptions Other Operating Supplies Copier Costs Capital Outlay

Total Operating Expenses

$

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Chng

2017-2018 Adopted

% Chng

1,237,178 152,819 99,461 0 14,832 909 150,965 114,603 300 412 67,871 45,843 333,286 753,568 805 22,538 310,221 10,013 97,704 4,121,041 2,458 13,981 391,763 7,615 3,604

$

1,189,468 131,028 95,416 32,835 14,525 995 112,428 193,058 102 133,884 42,115 318,438 828,770 1,835 25,725 2,853 273,022 9,244 96,552 4,721,111 2,664 13,877 341,122 7,948 3,795

$

1,316,833 153,000 112,442 145,247 17,251 3,750 126,000 50,000 139,000 2,000 2,000 113,975 57,598 348,264 700,000 2,500 17,051 10,000 487,000 6,000 107,610 5,457,650 3,000 17,000 515,000 8,249 5,000

$

1,327,025 150,000 112,992 146,371 17,384 3,750 115,000 99,000 162,450 2,000 2,000 119,674 59,326 372,643 710,000 2,500 31,965 10,000 488,000 9,300 109,228 5,832,700 3,000 18,500 566,000 8,497 5,000

1% -2% 0% 1% 1% 0% -9% 98% 17% 0% 0% 5% 3% 7% 1% 0% 87% 0% 0% 55% 2% 7% 0% 9% 10% 3% 0%

$

1,332,565 150,000 113,416 146,982 17,457 1,615 115,000 99,000 162,450 2,000 2,000 140,316 66,793 353,322 710,000 2,500 17,051 10,000 488,000 9,300 98,506 5,832,700 3,000 18,500 566,000 8,249 5,000

1% -2% 1% 1% 1% -57% -9% 98% 17% 0% 0% 23% 16% 1% 1% 0% 0% 0% 0% 55% -8% 7% 0% 9% 10% 0% 0%

7,953,788

$

8,592,810

$

9,923,420

$

10,484,305

6%

$

10,471,721

6%

53100 - Professional Services: Lab testing services, toxicity and alkaline tests. 53300 - Repairs & Maintenance: Lab equipment maintenance and services contracts; grass cutting, etc. 55853 - Bulk Water Purchase: Portsmouth water purchase. 56014 - Other Operating Supplies: Lab chemicals and supplies. Personnel Summary

Class

Range 137 135 134 127 127 126 125 122/124 122 119 117 114

Water Production Manager Laboratory Manager Assistant Water Production Manager Water Maintenance Supervisor Senior Water Treatment Plant Operator Quality Control Technician Water Maintenance Mechanic Water Treatment Plant Operator I - II Water Distribution Operator (LAB) Office Assistant Utility Systems Worker Custodial Worker

Number of Full-Time Positions

2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual 1 1 1 1 6 4 3 5 2 1 4 1

30

2016-2017 Budget 1 1 1 1 7 4 3 4 1

-

2017-2018 Requested

1 1 1 1 7 4 3 3 2 -

2017-2018 Adopted 1 1 1 1 8 4 3 2 2

-

1 1 1 1 8 4 3 2 2 -

4 1

4 1

4 1

4 1

28

28

28

28

198


DEPARTMENT: PUBLIC UTILITIES - ENGINEERING Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 501-8956051100.02 51100.04 52100 52210 52400 53000.16 53100 53300 53320 53500 54100 54200 54500 55100 55210 55230 55420 55500 55810 56001 56011 56012 56014 56017 58200

Salaries and Wages $ Salaries and Wages - Overtime FICA VRS Retirement Group Life Purchases Services - Refuse Collection Professional Services Repairs and Maintenance Maintenance Service Contract Printing and Binding Information Technology Fleet Risk Management Utilities Postal Service Telecommunications Lease/Rent of Building Travel and Training Dues and Association Memberships Office Supplies Uniforms & Wearing Apparel Books and Subscriptions Other Operating Supplies Copier Costs Capital Outlay

Total Operating Expenses

$

2015-2016 Actual

833,535 19,255 61,891 (0) 9,940 3,045 175 139,900 44,577 142,093 3,125 938 9,758 38,596 3,369 1,113 2,170 3,347 98 697 6,635 1,324,257

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Chng

$

797,032 18,147 59,276 23,040 9,407 1,326 2,155 1,044 109,033 52,329 136,412 488 8,745 29,112 3,278 843 1,087 3,675 994 4,913 1,500

$

855,896 10,200 66,256 94,405 11,212 100 6,000 2,160 500 101,356 53,461 166,021 3,600 600 10,811 29,112 7,500 1,500 5,200 3,750 500 5,000 5,265 -

$

878,465 10,200 67,983 96,895 11,508 100 6,000 1,800 500 106,434 55,065 177,643 3,600 600 16,042 29,112 7,500 1,500 5,200 3,750 500 5,000 5,423 -

$

1,263,836

$

1,440,406

$

1,490,820

2017-2018 Adopted

% Chng

3% 0% 3% 3% 3% 0% 0% -17% 0% 5% 3% 7% 0% 0% 48% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 3% -

$

879,637 20,000 68,822 97,024 11,523 100 6,000 1,800 500 104,132 56,530 162,070 3,600 600 11,771 29,112 7,500 1,500 5,200 3,750 500 5,000 5,265 -

3%

$

1,481,937

Personnel Summary

Range 138 132/134/136 132 130 125/126/127 125 121

Class Utility Engineering Manager Civil Engineer I-III Construction Manager Senior Engineering Technician Construction Inspector I-III Engineering Technician Engineering Aide

Number of Full-Time Positions

2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual 1 5 1

-

2016-2017 Budget 1 5 1

-

2017-2018 Requested

1 4 1

1 4 1 2 5 1

-

5 2 1

5 2 1

15

15

5 3 14

2017-2018 Adopted

-

1 4 1 2 5 1 -

14

14

199

3% 96% 4% 3% 3% 0% 0% -17% 0% 3% 6% -2% 0% 0% 9% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 3%


DEPARTMENT: PUBLIC UTILITIES - NONDEPARTMENTAL Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 501-9140051100.27 52100 52000 52001 52600 54500 55305 55424 55615 55890 58211 59902 59906 95100-59110 95100-59120 95100-59130 93000-50000.165 93000-50000.310 93000-50000.501

Leave Compensation $ Leave Compensation - FICA Pro Rata Reimbursements Western Tidewater Water Authority Unemployment Expense Risk Management Expense Employer Pension Expense Contribution to Reserve WTWA Donation (Well Migation Program Bad Debt Expense Depreciation Contingency Environmental Incentive Reimbursement Bond Principal Bond Interest Bond Coupon & Handling Transfer to GF - Indirect Cost Transfer to Capital Projects Transfer to PU - Capital Projects

Total Operating Expenses

$

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Chng

2017-2018 Adopted

% Chng

46,497 3,535 24,535 62,058 (16,584) 309,228 378,319 5,220,891 508,128 11,477,844 89,250 12,609,060 708,929 576,133 -

$

22,624 1,784 62,156 (3,599) 307,292 178,493 764,619 358,899 12,825,260 634,225 13,890,141 790,693 610,253 1,000,000

$

40,000 3,000 50,000 5,000 284,154 4,976,905 400,000 450,000 150,000 2,723,297 15,705,305 100,000 663,551 2,500,000

$

40,000 3,000 50,000 5,000 338,667 2,884,954 450,000 450,000 75,000 5,121,085 16,139,048 100,000 603,238 3,300,000

0% 0% 0% 0% 19% -42% 13% 0% -50% 88% 3% 0% -9% -

$

40,000 3,000 50,000 5,000 346,886 2,906,616 450,000 450,000 75,000 5,121,085 16,139,048 100,000 644,822 3,300,000

0% 0% 0% 0% 22% -42% 13% 0% -50% 88% 3% 0% -3% 32%

31,997,824

$

31,442,838

$

28,051,212

$

29,559,992

5%

$

29,631,457

6%

200


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


REFUSE FUND DESCRIPTION The Refuse Fund is a self-sustaining enterprise fund created to account for and manage the City’s refuse collection services. The fund generates revenue through a monthly fee for weekly residential refuse collection, curbside recycling, the sale of trash cans, and bulk collection services. The Department of Public Works oversees the City’s refuse collection services. The adopted refuse rate for FY 2017-2018 is $19.50 per month. FY 2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Removed residents.

Continued expansion of curbside recycling to all residents receiving City trash collection, rerouting nearly 5,800 tons of recyclable materials from the regional landfill.

Provided timely trash collection for more than 29,500 residences on a weekly basis, using existing equipment and personnel resources, while adding routes to accommodate new communities.

72,000

special/bulk

collections

for

Suffolk

FY 2018 OBJECTIVES 

To promote and expand the curbside recycling program. (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

To protect the health and safety of the public by providing exceptional and cost effective collection and disposal of municipal solid waste. (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

To provide excellent customer service to refuse customers. (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

STATISTICS/PERFORMANCE MEASURES Tons of refuse collected Tons of recycling collected Recycling participation rate

FY 16 Actual 36,542 5,326 53%

FY 17 Projected 40,000 5,800 55%

FY 18 Estimate 43,000 6,100 57%

201


REFUSE FUND Revenue 2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Chng

Refuse Services Fee Automated Refuse Containers Special Events Weekly Refuse Collection Recycling Bins Sale of Service - DBOD Refuse Collection Sale of Service - RM Refuse Collection Sale of Service - GF Refuse Collection Sale of Service - PU Refuse Collection Sale of Service - Aviation Refuse Collection Sale of Service - Fleet Refuse Collection Bulk Refuse Fees Miscellaneous Revenue Dumpster Service Penalties & Interest Transfer from Fund Balance

$

5,729,376 30,870 3,658 (163) 37,439 27,932 49,841 2,435 1,033 1,036 20,790 3,213 161,586 66,185 -

$

5,720,808 33,520 771 108 14,940 34,661 18,814 35,783 1,958 963 927 22,850 5,482 151,639 89,349 -

$

5,685,372 31,000 40,000 20,000 51,553 5,750 909 1,854 25,000 160,000 100,000

$

7,389,396 31,000 57,191 32,210 77,329 3,231 1,589 1,854 39,250 250,206 -

Total Revenue

$

6,135,230

$

6,132,572

$

6,121,438

$

7,883,256

29%

2017-2018 Requested

% Chng

2017-2018 Adopted

30% $ 0% 43% 61% 50% -44% 75% 0% 57% 56% -100% $

% Chng

6,764,940 31,000 57,191 32,210 77,613 4,431 1,200 1,854 39,250 250,206 335,384

19% 0% 43% 61% 51% -23% 32% 0% 57% 56% 235%

7,595,278

24%

Expenditure Summary 2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Adopted

% Chng

Refuse Services

$

5,980,667

$

5,346,295

$

6,121,438

$

7,883,256

29%

$

7,595,278

24%

Total Expenditures

$

5,980,667

$

5,346,295

$

6,121,438

$

7,883,256

29%

$

7,595,278

24%

202


REFUSE FUND Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 520-42320 51100.02 51100.04 51100.06 52100 52210 52400 53000 53000.06 53000.42 53100.22 53300 53500 54100 54200 54500 55100 55210 55230 55500 55810 56001 56011 56014 56017 58200 58211 91400-55305 91400-59902 93000-50000.165 93000-50000.601 95100-59120

Salaries and Wages $ Salaries and Wages - Overtime Salaries and Wages - Part-time FICA VRS Retirement Group Life Purchased Services - Recycling Purchased Services - Stormwater Purchased Services - Road Maintenance Medical Services Repair and Maintenance Printing and Binding Information Technology Fleet Risk Management Utilities Postal Services Telecommunications Travel and Training Dues and Association Memberships Office Supplies Uniforms & Wearing Apparel Other Operating Supplies Copier Capital Outlay Depreciation Employer Pension Expense Contingency Indirect Costs Transfer to Fleet (Capital Outlay) Interest

Total Operating Expenses

$

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Chng

2017-2018 Adopted

1,087,355 95,443 82,724 0 12,883 1,137,829 28,975 55,000 3,178 37,022 515 62,509 1,602,084 425,271 21,646 179 3,403 2,337 6,691 6,417 18,661 987,204 2,959 9,179 3,362 79,415 208,427 -

$

1,146,530 58,563 11,500 85,292 12,329 13,683 1,212,304 25,000 55,000 734 7,306 1,400 140,129 1,552,911 397,752 16,745 202 3,508 370 6,643 3,909 18,920 86,963 2,903 468 3,362 142,570 256,247 83,054

$

1,365,749 31,212 106,868 150,642 17,891 1,237,460 30,000 55,000 3,500 20,000 1,000 127,682 1,723,904 482,844 22,300 1,000 3,894 500 11,710 10,000 25,000 145,769 3,556 5,000 30,464 237,746 270,747

$

1,365,749 56,000 108,764 150,642 17,891 2,874,135 35,000 55,000 3,500 20,000 1,200 127,682 1,975,494 482,844 22,300 1,000 3,894 1,000 11,710 9,500 21,000 134,000 3,556 5,000 76,002 237,746 82,647

0% 79% 2% 0% 0% 132% 17% 0% 0% 0% 20% 0% 15% 0% 0% 0% 0% 100% 0% -5% -16% -8% 0% 0% 149% 0% -69%

$

1,451,714 56,000 115,340 160,124 19,017 2,489,035 35,000 55,000 3,500 20,000 1,200 151,646 1,993,834 492,564 22,300 1,000 3,894 1,000 11,710 9,500 21,000 134,000 3,556 5,000 20,659 235,036 82,647

6% 79% 8% 6% 6% 101% 17% 0% 0% 0% 20% 19% 16% 2% 0% 0% 0% 100% 0% -5% -16% -8% 0% 0% -32% -1% -69%

5,980,667

$

5,346,295

$

6,121,438

$

7,883,256

29%

$

7,595,278

24%

53000 - Purchased Services - Recycling: Convenience center recycling; Hazardous waste program; TFC recycling 53300 - Repair & Maintenance: Front end dumpster loader repairs; sanitization and repairs of containers 55810 - Dues & Memberships: HRPDC dues for Hampton Roads Clean Community & Debris management. Personnel Summary

Class

Range 130 124 123 121/122 121 116 114

Refuse Supervisor Refuse Field Supervisor Customer Service Supervisor Refuse Equipment Operator I-II Refuse Inspector Refuse Dispatcher Refuse Worker

Number of Full-Time Positions

% Chng

2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual 1

2016-2017 Budget

1 26 2 2 8

1 26 2 2 8

1 26 2 2 8

1 1 1 26 2 2 7

40

40

40

40

-

1 -

1

2017-2018 Requested

-

2017-2018 Adopted

203

1 1 1 26 2 2 7 40


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


STORMWATER FUND DESCRIPTION The Stormwater Fund provides citywide construction inspection services to ensure compliance with Federal, State, and local erosion and sedimentation control laws. The Fund is comprised of the divisions of Stormwater and Mosquito Control which are responsible for site and construction plan review of stormwater related facilities and the operation of the City’s mosquito control program. The adopted stormwater utility rate for FY 2017-2018 is $6.00 per month. FY 2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Submitted the City’s TMDL Action Plan to the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality for Bacteria Reductions in Hoffler Creek, Bleakhorn Creek, Bennetts Creek, Knotts Creek, Shingle Creek, Chuckatuck Creek, the upper Nansemond River, and the Western Branch of the Elizabeth River.

Conducted citizen education and engagement on coastal cleanup, recycling, litter prevention, and stormwater and water quality initiatives.

Continued the illicit discharge detection and elimination program and surface water monitoring on the Nansemond River and its tributaries.

FY 2018 OBJECTIVES 

To provide quality plan reviews and related activities in a timely manner to ensure compliance with regulatory and safety requirements. (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

To provide quality inspection services to ensure compliance with regulatory and safety requirements. (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

To provide for the protection and safety of public health through the suppression, abatement and eradication of mosquito populations.(Leisure, Health, and Wellness)

STATISTICS/PERFORMANCE MEASURES Stormwater Engineering: Development Plans reviewed Development Plan reviews completed within review timeframes Stormwater education and outreach events Mosquito Control: Traps set for the whole mosquito season Acres treated with adulticide Acres treated with larvacide Mosquito Dunks provided to public Tons of tires collected Number of citizen calls for mosquito services

FY 16 Actual

FY 17 Projected

FY 18 Estimate

180 90%

195 90%

200 92%

28

32

36

1,574 58,644 14.2 424 27.9 112

1,600 200,000 20 400 30 125

1,600 200,000 20 400 30 125

204


STORMWATER UTILITY FUND Revenue 2014-2015 Actual Penalties and Interest Interest Earnings Sale of Services - Capital Projects Sale of Services - Road Maintenance Sale of Services - General Fund (PW Admin.) Permit and Inspection Fees Sale of Services - Refuse Stormwater Utility Fee Miscellaneous Revenue Transfer from Fund Balance Total Revenue

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Chng

2017-2018 Adopted

% Chng

$

30,273 10,399 441,922 170,000 340,000 827,566 28,975 4,050,894 83,859 -

$

31,348 6,248 488,066 170,000 400,000 541,399 25,000 4,122,145 92,552 -

$

450,000 170,000 400,000 250,000 30,000 4,353,975 645,000

$

650,000 249,200 450,000 250,000 35,000 4,305,096 175,000

44% 47% 13% 0% 17% -1% -73%

$

650,000 249,200 450,000 250,000 35,000 4,305,096 175,000

44% 47% 13% 0% 17% -1% -73%

$

5,983,887

$

5,876,758

$

6,298,975

$

6,114,296

-3%

$

6,114,296

-3%

A B C D E F G

Expenditure Summary 2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Chng

2017-2018 Adopted

% Chng

Engineering Mosquito Control

$

4,177,876 644,476

$

6,063,204 681,262

$

5,413,490 885,485

$

5,308,781 805,515

-2% -9%

$

5,263,328 850,968

-3% -4%

Total Expenditures

$

4,822,351

$

6,744,467

$

6,298,976

$

6,114,296

-3%

$

6,114,296

-3%

A - Service revenue for management of Capital Projects by Engineering included right of way acquisition. B - Revenue to provide for the cost of Right of Way, Asset Management, permit services to the Road Maintenance Division C - Revenue for general engineering services provided to Public Works . D - Developer fees based on flat rate fees for plan review and inspections. E - Services by Eng'g staff to the Refuse Fund. F - Represents estimated 62,940 ERU's @ $6.00 p/month fee G - Revenue to provide improvements within the Capital Budget.

205


DIVISION: STORMWATER UTILITY - ENGINEERING (Department of Public Works) Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 514-82220 51100.02 51100.04 51100.06 52100 52210 52400 53000.04 53100 53100.18 53200 53500 53600 54100 54200 54500 55210 55230 55420 55500 55810 56001 56012 56014 56017 58200 58211 91400-55305 91400-59902 93000-50000.165 93000-50000.310 93000-50000.601

Salaries and Wages $ Salaries and Wages - Overtime Salaries and Wages - Part-time FICA VRS Retirement Group Life Purchased Services - Road Maint. Fund Professional Services HRPDC Stormwater Management Fees Temporary Help Service Printing and Binding Advertising Information Technology Fleet Risk Management Postal Services Telecommunications Lease/Rent of Building Travel and Training Dues and Association Memberships Office Supplies Books and Subscriptions Other Operating Supplies Copier Costs Capital Outlay - Additions Depreciation Employer Pension Expense Contingency Indirect Costs Transfer to Capital Project Transfer to Fleet (cash funded equipment purchases)

Total Operating Expenditures

$

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Chng

1,585,696 1,777 51,836 118,413 0 18,820 300,000 56,766 25,129 436 279,713 56,178 285,241 770 13,889 60,402 12,725 10,640 12,066 396 3,921 21,845 6,024 37,057 129,808 322,327 500,000 266,000

$

1,738,437 2,414 48,377 130,332 25,203 20,516 284,863 184,090 20,260 7,935 266,363 64,824 334,920 775 20,100 74,628 19,795 10,158 6,572 385 100,164 20,245 32,011 82,625 273,302 343,910 1,950,000 -

$

2,102,941 21,912 160,875 231,954 27,549 300,000 275,000 30,000 251,515 55,429 412,904 1,231 25,493 74,628 20,482 11,667 15,647 1,351 11,881 22,052 134,668 260,960 318,352 645,000 -

$

2,174,504 5,000 44,000 170,098 239,848 28,486 300,000 325,000 30,000 251,515 55,429 412,904 1,231 25,493 74,628 20,482 11,667 15,647 1,351 11,881 22,052 83,250 485,405 343,910 175,000 -

4,177,876

$

6,063,204

$

5,413,490

$

5,308,781

2017-2018 Adopted

3% $ 101% 6% 3% 3% 0% 18% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% -38% 86% 8% -73% -2%

$

% Chng

2,240,750 5,000 44,528 171,800 247,155 29,354 300,000 325,000 30,000 253,134 136,836 461,958 1,231 25,493 74,628 20,482 11,667 15,647 1,351 11,881 22,052 84,000 289,855 284,527 175,000 -

7% 103% 7% 7% 7% 0% 18% 0% 1% 147% 12% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% -38% 11% -11% -73% -

5,263,328

-3%

53000.04 - Purchased Services - Road Maintenance Fund: Residential BMP maintenance and enhanced street sweeping. 55810 - Dues & Memberships: HRPDC dues for Regional Stormwater Phase II. Personnel Summary

Range 138 137 132/134/136 137 135 134 134 132 130 130 130 125/126/127 127 125 125 124 123 123 123 121 121 120 118

Class Assistant Director of Public Works Development Plan Manager Civil Engineer I-III Capital Improvement Project Manager Environmental Programs Manager Real Estate Manager for Acquisition Enterprise Programs Manager Construction Manager Senior Engineering Technician Land Acquisition Agent Environmental Specialist Construction Inspector I-III Asset Manager Land Acquisition Technician Engineering Technician Accounting Associate II Permit Technician Litter Control Coordinator Asset Management Data Technician Land Acquisition Aide Engineering Aide Accounting Technician Customer Service Representative

Number of Full-Time Positions

2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual 1

-

2016-2017 Budget 1

7

-

-

7

-

8 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 8 1 1 5 -

1 1 1 -

1 1 1 -

2 1 1

2 1 1

2 2 1

38

38

41

% Chng

2017-2018 Adopted

1 1 7 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 8 1 1 5 2 1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1 2 1 8 1 1 5

1 1 1 -

1 -

1 1 1 1 1 2 1 8 1 1 5

2017-2018 Requested

-

% Chng 1 1 7 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 8 1 1 5 2 1 1 1 1 1

1

1

42

42

206


DIVISION: STORMWATER UTILITY - MOSQUITO CONTROL (Department of Public Works) Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 514-5131051100.02 51100.04 51100.06 52100 52210 52400 53000.02 53100 53300 53500 54100 54200 54500 55100 55210 55230 55420 55500 55810 56001 56011 56012 56014 56017 58200 93000-50000.601

Salaries and Wages $ Salaries and Wages - Overtime Salaries and Wages - Part-time FICA VRS Retirement Group Life Purchased Services - Road Maint. Fund (Di Professional Services Repair and Maintenance Printing and Binding Information Technology Fleet Risk Management Utilities Postage Telecommunications Lease/Rent of Building Travel & Training Dues and Memberships Office Supplies Uniforms & Wearing Apparel Books and Subscriptions Other Operating Supplies Copier Costs Capital Outlay Transfer to Fleet

Total Operating Expenses

$

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Chng

236,435 29,072 19,542 0 2,811 60,000 34,455 857 473 42,056 39,818 68,908 290 1,993 4,700 640 792 1,710 96,857 1,488 1,580 -

$

255,495 1,490 29,552 21,256 3,809 3,047 60,000 5,000 1,241 62,464 27,688 66,035 253 1,797 4,195 400 1,363 2,448 180 131,718 1,830 -

$

298,765 43,697 26,198 32,954 3,914 60,000 50,000 5,000 800 49,146 36,092 80,862 500 1,450 1,977 3,413 500 1,000 2,500 250 89,423 2,044 95,000 -

$

298,765 43,697 26,198 32,954 3,944 60,000 50,000 5,000 800 49,146 36,092 80,862 500 1,450 1,977 15,000 3,413 500 1,000 2,500 250 89,423 2,044 -

644,476

$

681,262

$

885,485

$

805,515

2017-2018 Adopted

0% $ 0% 0% 0% 1% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% -100% -9%

$

% Chng

313,066 1,500 42,703 27,331 34,531 4,101 60,000 50,000 5,000 800 56,959 57,033 80,386 1,450 1,977 15,000 3,413 500 1,000 2,500 250 89,423 2,044 -

5% -2% 4% 5% 5% 0% 0% 0% 0% 16% 58% -1% -100% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% -100% -

850,968

-4%

Personnel Summary

Class

Range 132 130 120 118

Mosquito Control Superintendent Mosquito Control Biologist Mosquito Control Crew Leader Mosquito Control Technician

Number of Full-Time Positions

2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

2017-2018 Adopted

1 2 1 3

1 2 1 3

1 2 1 3

1 2 1 3

1 2 1 3

7

7

7

7

7

207


Internal Service Funds


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY FUND DESCRIPTION The Information Technology Fund operates as an internal service fund providing computer related and telecommunications services to city departments and other governmental agencies including consultation, analysis, office automation, computer operation, software development, equipment maintenance, networking and Internet, and interactive browser based application development to improve the productivity and effectiveness of user departments and agencies. FY 2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Completed Phase 1 of a vulnerability assessment to identify network weaknesses.

Implemented the Emergency Call Tracking System (ECATS) which provides real time reporting analytics to E-911 dispatch.

Implemented various software programs to improve departmental efficiency including Active 911 paging, civil processing software, web cemeteries, Cityworks Permitting Module, and Cityworks Stormwater Module.

Initiated the City website redesign through CivicPlus.

FY 2018 OBJECTIVES 

To continue to acquire and implement software applications and network accessibility that will benefit the citizens and employees of the City. (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

To continue the maintenance and security levels of our existing ERP system and aggressively pursue new technologies that will provide enhancements. (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

STATISTICS/PERFORMANCE MEASURES Number of Computers maintained Number of Helpdesk requests received Percent of Helpdesk requests closed within 72 hours Percent of Time Network is operational Number of GIS requests for service Number of Website Visits

FY 16 Actual 1,281 8,475 97% 99.9% 230 917,196

FY 17 Projected 1,345 8,899 98% 99.9% 242 963,055

FY 18 Estimate 1,412 9,343 99% 99.9% 254 1,011,208

208


INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY FUND Revenue 2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Chng

2017-2018 Adopted

% Chng

Interest on Investments Sale of Service - Interfund Revenues Sale of Service - Intergovernmental Revenues GIS Data & Maps Miscellaneous Revenue

$

5,396,543 70,762 1,538 5,052

$

16,309 6,040,274 116,014 1,862 8,500

$

7,542,816 219,256 -

$

11,560,754 222,333 -

53% 1% -

$

8,444,463 222,239 -

12% 1% -

Total Revenue

$

5,473,895

$

6,182,959

$

7,762,072

$

11,783,087

52%

$

8,666,702

12%

2017-2018 Requested

% Chng

Expenditure Summary 2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Adopted

% Chng

Information Technology

$

5,938,318

$

7,230,838

$

7,762,072

$

11,783,087

52%

$

8,666,702

12%

Total Expenditures

$

5,938,318

$

7,230,838

$

7,762,072

$

11,783,087

52%

$

8,666,702

12%

Sale of Service - Intergovernmental Revenue - provides service to: Community Corrections, Workforce Development Center.

209


DEPARTMENT: INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 603-1251051100.02 51100.04 51100.06 52100 52210 52400 53100 53200 53300 53320 54200 54500 55100 55210 55230 55240 55410 55420 55500 55810 56001 56012 56014 56017 91400-55305 91400-58225 91400-59902 95100-59120 93000-50000.165

Salaries and Wages Salaries and Wages - Overtime Salaries and Wages - Part-time FICA VRS Retirement Group Life Professional Services Temporary Help Services Fees Repair and Maintenance Maintenance Service Contracts Fleet Risk Management Expense Utilities Postal Services Telecommunications Data Communications Lease/Rent of Equipment Lease/Rent of Building Travel and Training Dues and Association Memberships Office Supplies Books and Subscriptions Other Operating Supplies Copier Costs Employer Pension Expense Loss(Gain) on Disposition of Assets Contingency Interest Indirect Costs

Total Operating Expenses

58100 58110 58200 58211

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Chng

2017-2018 Adopted

% Chng

$

1,352,203 12,484 100,918 99,957 15,817 178,451 125,404 66,333 1,297,923 19,057 237,338 17,138 1,972 27,194 61,306 31,839 55,219 33,225 1,129 9,439 9,598 1,737 237,993

$

1,389,369 11,388 103,543 15,211 16,936 60,242 180,911 111,992 2,252,291 18,285 238,877 15,277 1,929 25,210 128,716 35,990 58,300 46,477 1,839 4,400 338 11,895 135,956 387,595 99,949 212,758

$

1,645,558 8,115 126,506 181,505 21,557 185,000 155,000 3,062,060 24,537 292,420 30,000 800 84,000 130,600 56,690 45,977 35,000 3,000 7,000 1,000 9,637 177,123 97,207 186,427

$

1,645,558 8,115 126,506 181,505 21,557 274,600 155,000 3,745,416 24,537 292,420 30,000 3,000 84,000 130,600 56,690 45,977 35,000 5,000 7,000 1,000 9,637 177,123 97,207 186,427

0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 48% 0% 22% 0% 0% 0% 275% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 67% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0%

$

1,668,030 8,115 128,225 183,984 21,851 274,600 155,000 3,480,416 27,567 310,906 30,000 3,000 84,000 130,600 56,690 45,977 35,000 5,000 7,000 1,000 9,637 152,060 77,588 182,629

1% 0% 1% 1% 1% 48% 0% 14% 12% 6% 0% 275% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 67% 0% 0% 0% -14% -20% -2%

$

3,993,674

$

5,565,672

$

6,566,719

$

7,343,875

12%

$

7,078,874

8%

862,141 2,795,653 781,418

68% 1498% 54%

11,783,087

52%

Expenses Related to Asset Acquisition Capital Outlay - Replacement Non Capital Outlay Capital Outlay Depreciation

Total Annual Budget

2015-2016 Actual

14,295 611,574 686,209 632,566 $

5,938,318

354,414 529,335 781,417 $

7,230,838

513,294 175,000 507,059 $

7,762,072

$

$

81,500 724,910 781,418

-84% 314% 54%

8,666,702

12%

Personnel Summary

Class

Range 144 138 137 135 131/134 134 133 133 131/132/133 132

128 128 124 124 121

Director of Information Technology Assistant Director of Information Technolo Enterprise Systems Manager Network Manager Network Engineer I-II Database Administrator Service Support Manager Project Manager Programmer Analyst I-III Systems Administrator Systems Analyst LAN Administrator Network Coordinator Radio Communications Manager Computer Support Technician Radio & Electronics Technician GIS Technician Executive Secretary Computer Operator Records Management Technician

Number of Full-Time Positions

2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1

-

2016-2017 Budget 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 5 1

3 1 1 1 2 2 3 1 1 1

25

3 1 1 1 4 2 2 1 25

2017-2018 Requested

-

2017-2018 Adopted 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 5 1

1 1 1 4 2 1 1

26

1 1 1 4 2 1 1 -

1 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 5 2 1 4 2 1 1 -

26

26

210


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


FLEET MANAGEMENT FUND DESCRIPTION The Division of Fleet Management is operated as an internal service fund for the purpose of providing equipment and vehicles to City departments. The Division also houses a portion of the school transportation personnel and supplies them with controlled inventory and computerized maintenance records. FY 2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Continued high fleet availability of over 90% and work order completion time of 7 days.

Maintained parts stockroom efficiency by staying on target for an annual inventory turn rate of 4.8.

Preserved an immediate parts fill rate of 83%.

Achieved the A.S.E. Blue Seal of Excellence by the National Institute of Automotive Service Excellence.

FY 2018 OBJECTIVES 

To utilize municipal and state contracts to obtain competitive pricing for the purchase of City assets. (Financial Stability)

To continue to maintain a strong replacement program to ensure fleet customers have safe, proper equipment and lower the expense of repairing an aging fleet. (Financial Stability)

To communicate clearly with departments to understand their fleet needs and better serve the city organization. (Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services)

STATISTICS/PERFORMANCE MEASURES Number of Fleet Work Orders received Average Work Order completion time Percent of time Fleet is available for users Parts Inventory Turns Immediate Parts Fill Rate

FY 16 Actual 4,777 7 days 90% 4.8 83%

FY 17 Projected 5,000 6 days 90% 4.7 80%

FY 18 Estimate 5,000 6 days 90% 4.7 80%

211


FLEET MANAGEMENT FUND Revenue 2014-2015 Actual Interest on Investments $ Sale of Service - Interfund Revenue Sale of Service - Intergovernmental Revenue Sale of Surplus Property Miscellaneous Transfer from RM Fund Maintenance - Equipment Capital Transfer from RM Fund Traffic - Equipment Capital Transfer from Stormwater Engineering - Equipment Capital Transfer from Stormwater Mosq - Equipment Capital Transfer from Refuse Fund - Equipment Capital Transfer from Fund Balance Total Revenue

$

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Chng

2017-2018 Adopted

% Chng

9,091 9,251,504 997,028 224,303 11,018 2,381,000 266,000 -

$

38,699 8,650,270 850,884 363,395 9,308 -

$

9,776,043 936,000 1,500,000

$

11,409,239 1,124,792 -

17% 20% -

$

11,435,120 1,124,792 3,000,000

17% 20% -

13,139,944

$

9,912,555

$ 12,212,043

$

12,534,031

3%

$

15,559,912

27%

2017-2018 Requested

% Chng

Expenditure Summary 2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Adopted

% Chng

Fleet Management

$

10,650,977

$

9,683,931

$ 12,212,043

$

12,534,031

3%

$

15,559,912

27%

Total Expenditures

$

10,650,977

$

9,683,931

$ 12,212,043

$

12,534,031

3%

$

15,559,912

27%

Sale of Service - Intergovernmental Revenue - includes Fleet service to WTCSB, Health Dept., WTRJ, School Transportation, VRT.

212


DIVISION: FLEET MANAGEMENT (Department of Public Works) Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 601-1252051100.02 51100.04 52100 52210 52400 53000.16 53200.00 53300 53320 53500 54100 54500 55100 55210 55230 55410 55500 55810 56001 56007.04 56007.06 56011 56014 56017 91400-55305 91400-59902 95100-59120 93000-50000.165

Salaries and Wages $ Salaries and Wages - Overtime FICA VRS Retirement Group Life Purchased Services - Refuse Collection Temporary Help Service Fees Repairs and Maintenance Maintenance Service Contracts Printing and Binding Information Technology Risk Management Utilities Postal Services Telecommunications Lease/Rent of Equipment Travel and Training Dues and Association Memberships Office Supplies Vehicle & Power Equipment Fuels Vehicle & Power Equipment Supplies Uniforms & Wearing Apparel Other Operating Supplies Copier Costs Employer Pension Expense Contingency Interest Indirect Costs

Total Operating Expenses

$

Expenses Related to Asset Acquisition 58200 Capital Outlay 58211 Depreciation Total Annual Budget

2015-2016 Actual

2017-2018 Requested

% Chng

2017-2018 Adopted

$

819,232 12,419 60,232 14,500 9,771 927 9,883 50,716 18,223 162 83,911 629,003 26,375 44 2,379 20,021 4,290 1,127 1,117 1,101,857 2,276,025 5,723 45,978 8,433 20,522 203,312 228,352

$

941,430 27,050 74,089 103,840 12,333 1,854 40,200 35,000 1,100 77,062 602,982 41,000 150 3,883 41,161 6,000 1,500 4,500 1,722,000 2,226,723 8,000 105,000 8,861 303,273 351,523

$

992,075 27,050 77,963 109,426 12,996 1,854 40,200 15,000 1,100 77,062 602,982 41,000 150 3,883 41,161 6,000 1,500 4,500 1,607,800 2,397,000 8,000 73,000 8,861 303,273 351,523

5% 0% 5% 5% 5% 0% 0% -57% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% -7% 8% 0% -30% 0% 0% 0%

$

990,387 27,050 77,834 108,795 12,974 1,854 40,200 15,000 81,114 597,960 41,000 150 3,883 41,161 6,000 1,500 5,600 1,607,800 2,397,000 8,000 73,000 8,861 106,056 266,409 311,652

5% 0% 5% 5% 5% 0% 0% -57% -100% 5% -1% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 24% -7% 8% 0% -30% 0% -12% -11%

6,258,403

$

5,654,532

$

6,740,514

$

6,805,359

1%

$

6,831,240

1%

5,728,672

5%

3,000,000 5,728,672

5%

12,534,031

3%

15,559,912

27%

10,650,977

(695,908) 4,725,307 $

9,683,931

5,471,529 $

12,212,043

$

$

55410 - Lease of Equipment: Generator 56014 - Other Operating Supplies: Cleaning & janitorial, shop supplies, first aid, safety kleen. Personnel Summary

Range 138 132 128 127 121/124/126 123 121 119 118

Class Fleet & Equipment Services Manager Fleet & Equipment Services Assistant Man Mechanic Supervisor Lead Mechanic Mechanic I-III Stock Room Supervisor Accounting Associate I Office Assistant Stock Room Clerk

Number of Full-Time Positions

% Chng

844,702 25,949 63,531 68,537 9,918 1,036 14,960 12,935 155 96,504 632,636 31,168 43 3,094 26,751 613 1,057 2,116 1,696,663 2,310,253 4,620 22,151 8,604 158,029 222,378

1,293,441 3,099,134 $

2016-2017 Budget

2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

2017-2018 Adopted

1 1 1 2 11 1 1 1 2

1 1 1 2 11 1 1 1 2

1 1 1 2 11 1 1 1 2

1 1 1 2 11 1 1 1 2

1 1 1 2 11 1 1 1 2

21

21

21

21

21

213


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


RISK MANAGEMENT FUND DESCRIPTION The Division of Risk Management operates as an internal service fund which provides for the payment of expenses associated with the City’s general liability, health insurance, and worker’s compensation coverage. The City is self-insured for health insurance coverage. Revenue to support these expenses is obtained from the various funds within the City’s annual operating budget based on a cost reimbursement allocation. FY 2017 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Developed and implemented a Confined Space Program Policy, Lock-out Tag-out Policy, and Shoring and Trenching Policy with involvement from the High-risk Safety Team.

Implemented a new Wellness Program called Mobile Health using an app platform.

Established a process for screening employees who are in an accident during “off hours” for Drugs and Alcohol with Obici Occupational Health.

FY 2018 OBJECTIVES 

To manage rising costs of healthcare through strategic benefit plan design with the integration of wellness programs. (Financial Stability)

To ensure adequate insurance coverage for City assets through an annual audit of City property, buildings, contents, land, equipment, vehicles, and other assets. (Financial Stability)

To improve workplace safety through employee engagement in safety programs, policies, and practices with a strong emphasis on safety training. (Financial Stability)

STATISTICS/PERFORMANCE MEASURES Workers Compensation Number of Claims Filed Total Incurred Property & Liability Number of Claims Filed Total Incurred Safety Number of Audits Completed Number of Employees trained OSHA requirements Health & Wellness Program Percentage of Employees completing Risk Assessments Number of Wellness Programs provided for City staff Number of Wellness Program Participants

FY 16 Actual

FY 17 Projected

FY 18 Estimate

168 $216,000

185 $250,000

195 $275,000

195 $166,762

215 $180,000

225 $200,000

111 288

118 320

125 350

53%

60%

62%

58 2,112

62 2,250

64 2,350

214


RISK MANAGEMENT FUND Revenue 2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Chng 19% $ 25% -100%

Sale of Service - Interfund Revenues Employee Premiums Interest Insurance Recoveries Miscellaneous Revenue Transfer from Fund Balance

$

14,576,239 3,108,272 39,877 251,167 449 -

$

14,058,778 3,147,802 29,973 138,500 5,316 -

$ 16,742,737 2,764,768 1,000,000

$

19,871,678 3,451,129 -

Total Revenue

$

17,976,004

$

17,380,369

$ 20,507,505

$

23,322,806

14%

2017-2018 Requested

% Chng

2017-2018 Adopted

$

% Chng

17,101,726 2,827,928 1,500,000

2% 2% 50%

21,429,654

4%

Expenditure Summary 2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Adopted

% Chng

Risk Management

$

19,124,146

$

18,762,633

$ 20,507,505

$

23,322,806

14%

$

21,429,654

4%

Total Expenditures

$

19,124,146

$

18,762,633

$ 20,507,505

$

23,322,806

14%

$

21,429,654

4%

* Includes funding for OPEB (Post Employment Benefit) funding requirement per GASB 45. * Includes funding for State unfunded Line of Duty Mandate.

215


DEPARTMENT: RISK MANAGEMENT (Department of Human Resources) Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 606-01255051100.02 51000.06 52100 52210 52400 53100 54100 54200 55210 55230 55300 12552-55300 12553-55300 55420 55500 55810 12551-55815 55825 12551-55825 12552-55825 12553-55825 12554-56026 56001 56012 56014 56017 58200 58211 91400-55305 91400-59902 93000-50000.165

Salaries and Wages $ Salaries and Wages - Part Time FICA VRS Retirement Group Life Professional Services Information Technology Fleet Postal Services Telecommunications Insurance Premiums Insurance Premiums - Wcomp + LODA Insurance Premiums - Property/Casualty Lease/Rent of Building Travel and Training Dues & Memberships Post Employment Benefits (OPEB) Insurance Claims Claims Payments - Health Claims Payments - Workers Compensation Claims Payments - Property/Casualty Health & Wellness - Special Events Office Supplies Books and Subscriptions Other Operating Supplies Copier Costs Capital Outlay - Additions Depreciation Employer Pension Expense Contingency Indirect Costs

Total Operating Expenses

$

2015-2016 Actual

240,394 50,079 21,196 15,415 2,656 42,810 13,539 17,144 516 3,660

$

2016-2017 Budget

342,386 47,902 28,616 488 4,059 82,770 21,836 16,499 350 2,715

$

362,053 29,747 29,973 39,934 4,743 65,505 22,998 16,219 500 3,384

2017-2018 Requested $

% Chng

362,053 48,000 31,369 39,934 4,779 111,379 22,998 16,219 500 3,384

0% 61% 5% 0% 1% 70% 0% 0% 0% 0%

2017-2018 Adopted $

% Chng

373,199 30,104 30,853 41,164 4,889 70,000 100,108 16,727 500 3,384

3% 1% 3% 3% 3% 7% 335% 3% 0% 0%

686,772 1,424,611 17,555 5,492 3,006 2,310,000

609,506 1,259,738 21,930 6,191 1,505 1,800,000

644,429 1,260,807 21,930 5,000 2,840 2,280,300

659,101 1,412,369 21,930 7,000 2,840 2,280,300

2% 12% 0% 40% 0% 0%

712,910 1,412,369 21,930 6,000 2,840 2,068,900

11% 12% 0% 20% 0% -9%

12,605,416 973,025 225,142 67,901 707 2,743 1,007 4,894 188,112 107,379 92,976

13,800,435 215,646 166,762 21,787 1,176 382 11,598 4,100 39,200 116,319 50,377 88,360

14,823,840 675,638 111,000 13,895 2,500 2,000 6,000 5,179 7,411 69,680

17,255,643 675,638 198,000 27,600 1,500 1,000 7,000 5,179 50,000 7,411 69,680

16% 0% 78% 99% -40% -50% 17% 0% 0% 0%

15,639,640 600,000 198,000 18,895 1,500 1,000 7,000 5,179 12,121 50,442

6% -11% 78% 36% -40% -50% 17% 0% 64% -28%

23,322,806

14%

21,429,654

4%

19,124,146

$

18,762,633

$

20,507,505

$

$

Personnel Summary

Range

Class 138 135 130 128

Risk, Benefits & Wellness Manager Human Resources Manager Human Resources Generalist Safety Officer I Risk Management Coordinator

Number of Full-Time Positions

2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual 1

2016-2017 Budget

1 1 1

1 1 2 1 1

1 1 2 1 1

4

6

6

-

2017-2018 Requested

2017-2018 Adopted 1 1 3 1

-

1 1 3 1 -

6

6

216


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


Component Unit - School Fund


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


SCHOOL OPERATING FUND DESCRIPTION Each year, the Suffolk City School Board adopts and presents the School Operating Budget to the Suffolk City Council. City Council appropriates the total amount of revenues the School Board expects to receive in order for those funds to be expended by the School Board. Education expenditures are funded primarily through state, federal, and local funding. Suffolk Public Schools operates 11 elementary schools, 4 middle schools, 3 high schools, 1 alternative school, and the Pruden Center for Industry & Technology. The vision of Suffolk Public Schools is that all students will become lifelong learners equipped with the skills, knowledge, and attitudes to succeed as productive citizens in a local, national, and global society. GOALS The Suffolk School Board has adopted goals for Suffolk Public Schools that are aligned with the statutory requirements of the Standards of Quality 22.1-253.13:6. Standard 6. Planning and Public Involvement and the priorities of the Virginia Board of Education. The goals are as follows: 

To improve student achievement and close the academic achievement gaps.

To provide a safe and nurturing environment.

To provide strong leadership for effective and efficient operations.

To advance academic achievement through enhanced instructional delivery gained by professional development.

To strengthen collaboration with stakeholders and increase parent and community satisfaction.

STATISTICS/PERFORMANCE MEASURES School Enrollment (Fall Membership) High School Graduation Rate (4 Yr. Cohort) High School Dropout Rate (4 Yr. Cohort) Percent of Students enrolled in Advanced Placement courses Percent of Students enrolled in Dual Enrollment courses

2014 Actual 14,476 86.4% 8.8% 8.18% 0.0%

2015 Actual 14,365 86.2% 9.6% 8.04% 2.4%

2016 Actual 14,383 87.0% 7.8% 7.05% 2.2%

217


SCHOOL OPERATING FUND Revenue 2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

% Chng

2017-2018 Adopted

% Chng

State / Federal / Other Transfer from General Fund - Local Support

$

92,726,546 51,114,708

$

95,240,443 54,096,838

$ 103,015,172 54,367,038

$ 105,153,218 56,383,718

2% 4%

$

105,153,218 56,383,718

2% 4%

Total Revenue

$

143,841,254

$

149,337,281

$ 157,382,210

$ 161,536,936

3%

$

161,536,936

3%

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Requested

Expenditure Summary 2014-2015 Actual

2015-2016 Actual

% Chng

2017-2018 Adopted

% Chng

School Operating Expenditures

$

142,584,567

$

151,906,222

$ 157,382,210

$ 161,536,936

3%

$

161,536,936

3%

Total Expenditures

$

142,584,567

$

151,906,222

$ 157,382,210

$ 161,536,936

3%

$

161,536,936

3%

218


SCHOOL OPERATING FUND Budget Detail 2014-2015 Actual

Account Number: 205-610000-51000 Instruction Administration and Attendance Health and Psychology Pupil Transportation Operation and Maintenance Food Services Technology

$

Local Support - Lease / Rent of Building Local Support Reduction to Request: Total Operating Expenses

101,524,969 3,355,388 1,736,957 7,959,411 13,340,909 7,196,052 6,960,982

2015-2016 Actual $

509,899 $

142,584,567

109,211,798 3,447,727 1,881,812 9,437,067 12,636,792 7,133,188 7,631,053

2016-2017 Budget $

526,785 $

151,906,222

117,021,452 3,481,726 1,912,569 7,782,603 12,857,858 8,134,000 6,395,017

2017-2018 Requested $

534,837 (737,852) $

157,382,210

$

% Chng

119,416,427 3,656,944 1,946,852 8,053,735 12,778,020 8,272,120 6,861,321

2% 5% 2% 3% -1% 2% 7%

551,517 -

3% -

161,536,936

3%

2017-2018 Adopted $

$

% Chng

119,416,427 3,656,944 1,946,852 8,053,735 12,778,020 8,272,120 6,861,321

2% 5% 2% 3% -1% 2% 7%

551,517 -

3% -

161,536,936

219

2.64%


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


Appendix


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


CITY OF SUFFOLK, VIRGINIA ADOPTED FY 2017-18 OPERATING AND CAPITAL BUDGET Personnel Summary

General Fund: General Government: City Council City Manager Budget & Strategic Planning City Attorney Human Resources Commissioner of Revenue Assessor Treasurer Finance - Administration and Accounting Purchasing Registrar Total General Government Judicial: Circuit Court Judges Clerk of the Circuit Court Sheriff Commonwealth Attorney Total Judicial Public Safety: Police Administration and Officers Emergency Communications Animal Shelter Management Community Development Fire and Rescue Total Public Safety Public Works: Public Works Administration Capital Programs & Facilities Total Public Works Health and Welfare: Social Services Comprehensive Services Act Total Health and Welfare

2014-2015 Budget

2015-2016 Budget

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Budget

2 7 4 9 10 12 17 15 16 4 2 98

2 7 3 9 7 12 17 16 17 4 2 96

2 7 3 9 7 12 18 16 15 4 3 96

2 7 3 9 7 12 17 16 16 4 3 96

2 14 25 24 65

2 14 25 24 65

2 14 25 24 65

2 14 25 24 65

213 27 10 26 252 528

213 27 10 26 252 528

213 27 10 26 252 528

215 28 10 26 255 534

2 24 26

2 24 26

2 24 26

2 24 26

103 2 105

103 2 105

103 2 105

103 2 105

220


CITY OF SUFFOLK, VIRGINIA ADOPTED FY 2017-18 OPERATING AND CAPITAL BUDGET Personnel Summary

Parks, Recreation and Cultural: Parks and Recreation Administration Office on Youth Support Services Parks, Gateway and Facility Maintenance Grounds Maintenance Recreation Library Total Parks, Recreation and Cultural Community Development: Planning Economic Development Tourism Media & Community Relations Total Community Development Total General Fund Special Revenue Funds: Transit Aviation Facilities Road Maintenance Road Maintenance Traffic Engineering Total Special Revenue Funds Enterprise Fund: Public Utilities Administration Customer Service Line Maintenance Maintenance Water Production Engineering Refuse Services Refuse Services Stormwater Utility Engineering Mosquito Control Total Enterprise Funds

2014-2015 Budget

2015-2016 Budget

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Budget

4 2 6 19 4 21 31 87

4 2 6 19 4 21 31 87

4 1 7 19 4 21 32 88

4 1 7 18 4 22 32 88

14 5 3 6 28 937

14 5 3 6 28 935

15 5 3 6 29 937

15 5 3 6 29 943

0 3

0 3

0 3

1 3

99 23 125

100 24 127

101 25 129

102 25 131

9 18 27 25 30 15

9 20 28 25 28 15

9 22 28 25 28 14

8 23 28 25 28 14

40

40

40

40

38 7 209

38 7 210

41 7 214

42 7 215 221


CITY OF SUFFOLK, VIRGINIA ADOPTED FY 2017-18 OPERATING AND CAPITAL BUDGET Personnel Summary

Internal Service Funds: Fleet Management Information Technology Risk Management Total Internal Service Funds Total All Funds

2014-2015 Budget

2015-2016 Budget

2016-2017 Budget

2017-2018 Budget

21 25 4 50 1,321

21 25 6 52 1,324

21 26 6 53 1,333

21 26 6 53 1,342

222


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


CITY of SUFFOLK

CAPITAL

IMPROVEMENTS PROGRAM & PLAN FY 2018-2027


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


Capital Improvements Program and Plan Overview


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


Capital Improvements Program and Plan (CIP) The CIP serves as a planning tool providing a mechanism for the planning and financing of major non-recurring capital infrastructure needs of the City. The CIP is developed annually to plan for the renovation and construction of significant public improvements and major equipment to be purchased over a 10 year period. The first five years serves as the capital improvements program, while the plan covers the 10 year horizon. The CIP is intended to:   

Build facilities to support the City’s public service responsibilities Improve financial planning by comparing needs with resources, operating impacts, and annual tax rate implications Prioritize limited available funds for projects that will have a positive impact for Suffolk citizens

Eligible Projects Projects are eligible for inclusion in the CIP if they meet the following criteria: 

The project cost is at least $50,000. Projects that do not cost at least $50,000 are not eligible for inclusion in the CIP unless they are part of a larger project that meets this threshold. For example, furniture and fixtures which cost less than $50,000, but are part of a larger renovation or new construction project would be eligible.

The estimated service life of the project is at least five (5) years.

Expenditures for items that are annual in nature such as salaries, office supplies, personal computers and software, office furniture, routine maintenance and service contracts, vehicles and equipment or soft or non-durable purchases are not appropriate to include in the capital program. Exceptions are made for ambulances, fire trucks, or similar vehicles and equipment with long service lives or items that are part of a larger project with an estimated value of $50,000 or greater. CIP Development Process The CIP development process begins in September of each year. The Finance Department’s Division of Budget and Strategic Planning sends out CIP request packages and instructions to City departments and agencies at the beginning of September. Requests are typically due back to the Division of Budget and Strategic Planning at the end of September. The requests are compiled and reviewed and compiled by the Budget Division staff and meetings with the requesting departments and agencies are held with the City Manager, Deputy City Manager, Director of Finance, and Budget staff. Following these meetings, the City Manager’s recommended CIP is developed and presented to the CIP Subcommittee which consists of the Mayor, Vice Mayor, and two designated members of the Planning Commission. The CIP Subcommittee meets with the City Manager and requesting departments and agencies to review the recommended CIP and direct any edits or adjustments. The CIP Subcommittee recommended CIP is then presented to the full Planning Commission. The Planning Commission directs any edits or adjustments and the document is then moved forward to the City Council for review. A public hearing to obtain citizen input on the proposed CIP is held by City Council. Following the public hearing, City Council directs any edits and adopts the CIP prior to the development of the

223


annual operating and capital budget. The first year of the adopted CIP is moved forward for consideration as part of the City Manager’s proposed annual operating and capital budget. It is important to note that even if a capital project is included in the adopted CIP, it only moves forward to implementation if included in the adopted operating and capital budget. Financial Evaluation The City places significant emphasis on affordability and adherence to its adopted financial policies in developing the CIP and the annual operating and capital budget. City staff works closely with its financial advisor to determine the City’s debt capacity prior to the development of the CIP. Debt capacity is the amount of debt or bond financing that the City can comfortably borrow for needed capital improvements taking into consideration its existing outstanding debt levels, conservative economic growth forecasts, and anticipated operating expenses. This analysis is focused on the first five years of the CIP. In formulating the proposed CIP, the City strives to maintain bond financing at or below debt capacity levels. Additionally, staff also evaluates the proposed CIP’s ability to adhere to key financial policies of the City including: Capital Pay-Go – The City strives to achieve a target level equal to 3% of General Fund departmental expenditures excluding transfers out, grants, fund balance and reserve allocations, debt service and respective flow-through expenditures toward pay-as-you-go-capital improvements annually. Essentially, this means that the City will cash fund a portion of its planned capital projects. Debt as a Percentage of Assessed Value – The City strives to maintain a ratio of Debt as a Percentage of Assessed Value below 4%. This ratio indicates the relationship between the City’s debt and the total taxable value of real and personal property in the City. The ratio is an indicator of the City’s ability to repay debt which is paid for with property tax revenue. Debt to General Government Expenditures – The City strives to maintain Debt as a Percentage of General Government Expenditures below 10%. This ratio is a measure of the City’s ability to repay debt without hampering other City services. A small ratio indicates a lesser burden on the City’s operating budget. Another important factor that is evaluated as part of CIP development is the financial impact that a capital project will have on future operating costs of the City. The City must evaluate and plan for the ongoing costs of operating a new or expanded capital facility or piece of equipment. As a result, departments and agencies are required to estimate the annual operating cost/recurring expenditures for each project that is submitted for consideration in the CIP. For example, the addition of a new recreation center requires additional staffing, utility, landscaping, and routine maintenance expenses. Similarly, a new school, without the closing of another similar facility, requires the hiring of teachers, support staff, and administrative personnel, utility costs, landscaping, and routine maintenance expenses. Additionally, debt service payments (principal and interest) must be accounted for the bonds issued to finance these projects. These are real costs that will have an impact on future operating budgets. As a result, the CIP includes a fund summary of the estimated annual operating impact of proposed capital projects and the corresponding impact on the real estate tax rate assuming no assessed value growth or growth in other local taxes.

224


Sources of Funding Capital projects are financed by a variety of funding sources including: 

General Fund Revenue – Funding derived from General Fund Revenue (real and personal property taxes, other local taxes such as sales and meals taxes, fines and forfeitures, charges for services, use of money and property, and miscellaneous revenue) is used to fund a portion of general government capital projects. General Fund revenue is the primary revenue source for achieving the City’s Capital Pay-Go policy which strives to ensure that not all general government capital projects are financed with 100% bond funding or debt. General Fund revenue is typically targeted toward capital projects with shorter life spans. This strategy prevents the City from repaying debt for longer time periods than the useful life of an asset. Bonds are typically financed over a 20 to 30 year period. As such, it is to the City’s advantage to pay for projects, such as the capital maintenance of general government buildings and park facilities and amenities, sidewalks, and equipment with General Fund cash.

Bond Financing– A major source of capital funding is municipal bonds or in debt issued by the City to investors on the open financial market. The City has the ability to issue general obligation bonds and revenue bonds. General obligation bonds are backed by the full faith and credit of the City, while revenue bonds finance income-producing projects. The cost of issuing general obligation bonds or revenue bonds is dependent upon the City’s credit rating and market conditions. Maintaining a high credit rating allows the City to obtain lower interest rates. The City receives credit ratings from national credit rating agencies including Fitch Ratings, Moody’s, and Standard & Poor’s.

Fee Revenue – The City may use enterprise fund revenue generated from user fees such as stormwater or public utility water and sewer fees to offset the cost of capital projects specific to these enterprise fund operations. The use of fee revenue allows a portion of capital projects for business type enterprises such as Stormwater and Public Utilities to be cash funded which helps to limit borrowing or debt financing.

State and Federal Funding – The City seeks state and federal grant funds to offset the cost of capital improvements whenever possible. State and federal grant funds are typically available for parks and recreation, stormwater, and transportation improvements.

Private Contributions – Funding derived from private contributions and proffers are dedicated to offset the cost of specific infrastructure improvements such as schools, transportation, public safety, and parks and recreation.

225


Adopted FY 2018-2027 Capital Improvements Program and Plan

FY 18 Public Utilities Fund

$

Fleet Fund Stormwater Fund General Gov't. Fund TOTAL ALL FUNDS

$

FY 19

FY 20

FY 21

FY 22

5 Year Subtotal

8,360,000 $ 12,555,000 $ 16,175,000 $ 26,790,000 $ 10,070,000 $ 73,950,000

6-10 Year Subtotal

10 Year Total

$ 111,505,000 $ 185,455,000

-

-

-

-

2,175,000

2,175,000

12,325,000

350,000

336,000

-

2,000,000

220,000

2,906,000

3,700,000

14,500,000 6,606,000

61,163,655

48,621,390

57,622,955

53,741,756

32,852,761

254,002,517

428,203,543

682,206,060

69,873,655

$ 61,512,390

$ 73,797,955

$ 82,531,756

$ 45,317,761

$ 333,033,517

$ 555,733,543

$ 888,767,060

226


Capital Improvements Program and Plan Summary By Fund


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS PROGRAM & PLAN SUMMARY BY FUND FY 2018 - 2027

PLANNED EXPENDITURES

5 Year Summary Previous Funding

PUBLIC UTILITIES FUND

2017-2018 8,360,000

FLEET FUND

-

2018-2019 12,555,000 -

2019-2020 16,175,000 -

2020-2021 26,790,000

2021-2022

5 Year Subtotal

6-10 Year Subtotal

10 Year Total

10,070,000

73,950,000

111,505,000

185,455,000

2,175,000

2,175,000

12,325,000

14,500,000

2,000,000

220,000

2,906,000

3,700,000

6,606,000

-

STORMWATER FUND

350,000

336,000

GENERAL GOV'T. FUND

61,163,655

48,621,390

57,622,955

53,741,756

32,852,761

254,002,517

428,203,543

682,206,060

TOTAL ALL FUNDS:

69,873,655

61,512,390

73,797,955

82,531,756

45,317,761

333,033,517

555,733,543

888,767,060

-

FUNDING SOURCES Previous Funding Public Utilities Revenue Bonds Transfer from Public Utilities Fund PUBLIC UTILITIES FUND General Obligation Bonds FLEET FUND State Transportation Funds Transfer from Stormwater Fund

2017-2018

2018-2019

2019-2020

2020-2021

2021-2022

5 Year Subtotal

6-10 Year Subtotal

10 Year Total

5,060,000 3,300,000

8,255,000 4,300,000

11,175,000 5,000,000

21,290,000 5,500,000

6,450,000 3,620,000

52,230,000 21,720,000

82,905,000 28,600,000

135,135,000 50,320,000

8,360,000

12,555,000

16,175,000

26,790,000

10,070,000

73,950,000

111,505,000

185,455,000

-

-

-

-

2,175,000

2,175,000

12,325,000

14,500,000

-

-

-

-

2,175,000

2,175,000

12,325,000

14,500,000

175,000 175,000

336,000

-

1,000,000 1,000,000

220,000

1,175,000 1,731,000

1,500,000 2,200,000

2,675,000 3,931,000

350,000

336,000

-

2,000,000

220,000

2,906,000

3,700,000

6,606,000

7,177,750 16,960,690 1,506,774 1,707,000 1,500,000 4,585,137 27,726,304

10,300,000 8,584,752 4,646,268 25,090,370

6,000,000 18,238,000 4,684,955 28,700,000

8,000,000 20,916,207 4,825,549 20,000,000

6,000,000 3,050,000 5,012,345 18,790,416

37,477,750 67,749,649 1,506,774 1,707,000 1,500,000 23,754,254 120,307,090

51,000,000 42,590,220 1,137,364 21,844,877 311,631,082

88,477,750 110,339,869 2,644,138 1,707,000 1,500,000 45,599,131 431,938,172

GENERAL GOV'T. FUND

61,163,655

48,621,390

57,622,955

53,741,756

32,852,761

254,002,517

428,203,543

682,206,060

TOTAL ALL FUNDS:

69,873,655

61,512,390

73,797,955

82,531,756

45,317,761

333,033,517

555,733,543

888,767,060

GO Debt Capacity per Financial Advisor:

30,000,000

30,000,000

30,000,000

30,000,000

30,000,000

2,273,696

4,909,630

1,300,000

10,000,000

11,209,584

STORMWATER FUND State Transportation Funds State/Federal Grant Funds Cash Proffers Transfer from Public Utilities Fund Transfer from Rt. 17 Taxing District Fund Transfer from General Fund General Obligation Bonds

GO Debt Capacity (Shortfall):

Annual Operating Impact

2017-2018

2018-2019

2019-2020

2020-2021

UTILITY FUND - OPERATIONS: ANTICIPATED DEBT SERVICE: UTILITY FUND - CAPITAL CASH:

800,000

506,000 1,000,000

825,500 700,000

1,117,500 500,000

PUBLIC UTILITIES FUND

800,000

1,506,000

1,525,500

1,617,500

STORMWATER FUND:

-

-

-

-

2021-2022 2,129,000 (1,880,000) 249,000 -

GENERAL FUND - OPERATIONS: ANTICIPATED DEBT SERVICE: GENERAL FUND - CAPITAL CASH:

4,520,217

3,546,746 2,772,630 61,131

80,000 2,509,037 38,687

210,000 2,870,000 140,594

350,000 2,000,000 186,796

GENERAL GOV'T. FUND

4,520,217

6,380,507

2,627,724

3,220,594

2,536,796

4.992

7.046

2.902

3.557

2.802

General Fund Real Estate Tax Rate Impact:

227


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


General Government


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS PROGRAM & PLAN GENERAL GOV'T. FUND FY 2018 - 2027

General Government Projects Planned Expenditures

5 Year Summary Previous Funding

2017-2018

2018-2019

2019-2020

2020-2021

2021-2022

5 Year Subtotal

10 Year Total

Parks & Recreation Public Building & Facilities Public Safety Transportation Public Schools Village and Neighborhood Initiatives

4,450,000 7,585,000 1,152,137 26,929,390 19,332,128 1,715,000

4,855,000 4,775,000 7,357,438 28,558,952 3,075,000 -

1,825,000 12,500,000 6,066,155 25,656,800 11,575,000 -

3,125,000 4,260,000 1,490,549 36,291,207 7,075,000 1,500,000

3,075,000 820,000 7,882,761 15,000,000 6,075,000 -

17,330,000 29,940,000 23,949,040 132,436,349 47,132,128 3,215,000

22,755,000 34,190,000 72,822,163 277,916,769 266,807,128 7,715,000

Total General Government:

61,163,655

48,621,390

57,622,955

53,741,756

32,852,761

254,002,517

682,206,060

5 Year Subtotal

10 Year Total

General Government Projects Funding Sources

Previous Funding

2017-2018

2018-2019

2019-2020

2020-2021

2021-2022

State Transportation Funds State/Federal Grant Funds Cash Proffers Transfer from Public Utilities Fund Transfer from Rt. 17 Taxing District Fund Transfer from General Fund General Obligation Bonds

7,177,750 16,960,690 1,506,774 1,707,000 1,500,000 4,585,137 27,726,304

10,300,000 8,584,752 4,646,268 25,090,370

6,000,000 18,238,000 4,684,955 28,700,000

8,000,000 20,916,207 4,825,549 20,000,000

6,000,000 3,050,000 5,012,345 18,790,416

37,477,750 67,749,649 1,506,774 1,707,000 1,500,000 23,754,254 120,307,090

88,477,750 110,339,869 2,644,138 1,707,000 1,500,000 45,599,131 431,938,172

Total General Government:

61,163,655

48,621,390

57,622,955

53,741,756

32,852,761

254,002,517

682,206,060

Annual Operating Impact

2017-2018

Parks & Recreation Public Building & Facilities Public Safety Transportation Public Schools Village and Neighborhood Initiatives

-

546,746 3,000,000 -

15,000 65,000 -

30,000 180,000 -

350,000 -

Total Operating Cost

-

3,546,746

80,000

210,000

350,000

2018-2019

2019-2020

2020-2021

2021-2022

228


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS PROGRAM & PLAN PARKS AND RECREATION FY 2018 - 2027

Parks and Recreation Planned Expenditures Parks & Rec-Capital Maintenance Parks Maintenance and Storage Facility Lone Star Lakes Park Trail Enhancements Driver Complex Sleepy Hole Park Renovation East Suffolk Athletic Fields Water Access-Nansemond River Joint Use Facilities Shoreline Stabilization Project Lake Kennedy Park-Drainage Improvmts Bennett's Creek Recreation Center

5 Year Summary Previous Funding 2,210,000 250,000 50,000 564,975 1,672,117

Total

2017-2018

2018-2019

2019-2020

2020-2021

2021-2022

5 Year Subtotal

6-10 Year Subtotal

10 Year Total

425,000 50,000 100,000 1,875,000 2,000,000

425,000 3,500,000 200,000 50,000 500,000 180,000 -

425,000 500,000 50,000 250,000 100,000 500,000 -

425,000 1,400,000 1,000,000 300,000 -

425,000 50,000 1,300,000 100,000 1,200,000 -

2,125,000 3,500,000 2,100,000 150,000 2,600,000 300,000 1,000,000 1,500,000 1,875,000 180,000 2,000,000

2,125,000 500,000 100,000 1,000,000 200,000 1,500,000 -

4,250,000 3,500,000 2,600,000 250,000 3,600,000 500,000 1,500,000 1,000,000 1,500,000 1,875,000 180,000 2,000,000

4,450,000

4,855,000

1,825,000

3,125,000

3,075,000

17,330,000

5,425,000

22,755,000

Parks and Recreation Funding Sources

Previous Funding

2017-2018

2018-2019

2019-2020

2020-2021

2021-2022

Lone Star Lakes Park Trail Enhancements (50% State) Driver Complex Sleepy Hole Park Renov (Federal) Water Access-Nansemond River State/Federal Grant Funds Parks & Rec-Capital Maint. Trail Enhancements Driver Complex Sleepy Hole Park Renovation Water Access-Nansemond River Lake Kennedy Park-Drainage Improvmts Joint Use Facilities Transfer from General Fund Parks Maintenance and Storage Facility Lone Star Lakes Park Driver Complex East Suffolk Athletic Fields Joint Use Facilities Shoreline Stabilization Project Bennett's Creek Recreation Center General Obligation Bonds

50,000 50,000 425,000 50,000 50,000 525,000 1,875,000 2,000,000 3,875,000

200,000 200,000 425,000 50,000 500,000 180,000 1,155,000 3,500,000 3,500,000

400,000 50,000 50,000 200,000 700,000 425,000 250,000 50,000 300,000 1,025,000 100,000 100,000

600,000 600,000 425,000 200,000 625,000 1,400,000 200,000 300,000 1,900,000

50,000 50,000 425,000 50,000 1,300,000 50,000 275,000 2,100,000 925,000 925,000

Total

4,450,000

4,855,000

1,825,000

3,125,000

3,075,000

Annual Operating Impact

2017-2018

2018-2019

2019-2020

2020-2021

5 Year Subtotal

6-10 Year Subtotal

10 Year Total

1,600,000

50,000

1,650,000

5,430,000

3,375,000

8,805,000

10,300,000

2,000,000

12,300,000

17,330,000

5,425,000

22,755,000

2021-2022

Parks & Rec-Capital Maintenance Parks Maintenance and Storage Facility Lone Star Lakes Park Trail Enhancements Driver Complex Sleepy Hole Park Renovation East Suffolk Athletic Fields Water Access-Nansemond River Joint Use Facilities Shoreline Stabilization Project Lake Kennedy Park-Drainage Improvmts Bennett's Creek Recreation Center

-

546,746

15,000 -

30,000 -

-

Total Operating Cost

-

546,746

15,000

30,000

-

229


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


Parks and Recreation Parks & Recreation - Capital Maintenance The Parks & Recreation capital maintenance program is implemented to ensure that existing and new parks and recreation facilities are kept safe for continued public use and enjoyment. Funding addresses a variety of issues such as risk management mandates, compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA); fire safety and building code compliance; lighting upgrades; and repair and/or replacement of antiquated shelters, restrooms, offices, and storage buildings. Other improvements include drainage, roadway, parking, landscaping, water and sewer connections, and minor alterations. FY 18 $425,000

FY 19 $425,000

FY 20 $425,000

FY 21 $425,000

FY 22 $425,000

FY 23-27 $2,125,000

Total $4,250,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operating impact on the City.

Parks Maintenance and Storage Facility The project is for acquisition and/or development of property for a new maintenance/storage/office compound for the department’s maintenance, building, and ground maintenance/landscaping staff and equipment. FY19 funding is for design and construction. The compound will consist of 22,300 square feet of office and warehouse space along with 127 parking spaces to accommodate parking for different types of vehicles and equipment.

FY 18 $0

FY 19 $3,500,000

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23-27 $0

Total $3,500,000

Operating Costs: The projected annual operating cost of the maintenance storage facility is $15,000 beginning in FY 20.

230


Parks and Recreation Lone Star Lakes Park The project will provide for the design and construction of an office and meeting facility at Lone Star Lakes Park. The funding will also be used to improve internal roads, develop internal trail systems, add ADA accessible parking areas and restrooms, build ADA accessible trails and fishing areas, upgrade existing trails, and utility improvements for water and sewer services.

FY 18 $0

FY 19 $200,000

FY 20 $500,000

FY 21 $1,400,000

FY 22 $0

FY 23-27 $500,000

Total $2,600,000

Operating Costs: The projected annual operating cost of Lone Star Lakes Park is $50,000 for utilities, maintenance contracts and information technology beginning in FY 24.

Trail Enhancements This project will provide for enhancements to existing trails at the City’s regional parks. Funds will be used to install sidewalks, bike lanes and/or trails for safe pedestrian and bicycle travel as major streets are improved to accommodate future growth. The total FY18 allocation is $50,000 in local funds.

FY 18 $50,000

FY 19 $0

FY 20 $50,000

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $50,000

FY 23-27 $100,000

Total $250,000

Operating Costs: This project will not have an operating impact on the City.

231


Parks and Recreation

Driver Complex The project will fund a revision to the current master plan and the design and construction of multiuse athletic fields, ADA water access, ADA accessible trails, parking, road improvements and water and sewer connections at the Driver Transmitter Station property located on Sleepy Hole Road.

FY 18 $0

FY 19 $50,000

FY 20 $250,000

FY 21 $1,000,000

FY 22 $1,300,000

FY 23-27 $1,000,000

Total $3,600,000

Operating Costs: The projected annual operating cost of the Driver Complex is $300,000 for staffing, utilities, lease and rent of equipment, and supplies beginning in FY 24.

Sleepy Hole Park Renovation The project involves the renovation and addition of the 66 acre Sleepy Hole Park. The project will consist of the development of additional parking and access to existing shelters, access and viewing points to the river and lake, expansion of the trail system, connection of public sewer to restrooms, creation of an adventure camp and group camping area, and ropes course. The project will also feature additional amenities such as a dog park, interpretive center, amphitheater, and shelters along the river. FY 18 $100,000

FY 19 $0

FY 20 $100,000

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $100,000

FY 23-27 $200,000

Total $500,000

Operating Costs: The projected annual operating cost of the park renovations is $50,000 beginning in FY 24.

232


Parks and Recreation East Suffolk Athletic Fields This project is for the acquisition and development of property around the East Suffolk Recreation Center for multi-use athletic fields.

FY 18 $0

FY 19 $0

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23-27 $1,500,000

Total $1,500,000

Operating Costs: The projected annual operating cost of the East Suffolk Athletic Fields is $50,000 for utilities, supplies and repairs beginning in FY24.

Water Access –Nansemond River The project will provide for the construction of a pier for fishing and water access to the Nansemond River as well as development of required parking, restroom facilities, and a picnic shelter.

FY 18 $0

FY 19 $500,000

FY 20 $500,000

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23-27 $0

Total $1,000,000

Operating Costs: The projected annual operating cost of the Water Access-Nansemond River is $30,000 for utilities beginning in FY21.

233


Parks and Recreation Joint Use Facilities The project will provide for the continued development of joint-use recreation facilities that are shared with Suffolk Public Schools. The development includes renovation to existing joint use facilities and architecture and engineering for new facilities.

FY 18 $0

FY 19 $0

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $300,000

FY 22 $1,200,000

FY 23-27 $0

Total $1,500,000

Operating Costs: The projected annual operating cost of the joint use facilities is $50,000 for utilities, staffing, supplies and repairs beginning in FY 23.

Shoreline Stabilization Project The project will provide for the shoreline stabilization of approximately 350 feet of shoreline along the Planters Club site and approximately 900 feet of shoreline along the Sleepy Hole Golf Course. Costs include design, permitting, wetland mitigation and construction.

FY 18 $1,875,000

FY 19 $0

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23-27 $0

Total $1,875,000

234


Parks and Recreation Lake Kennedy Park – Drainage Improvements The project will provide for funding to address drainage issues at Lake Kennedy Park.

FY 18 $0

FY 19 $180,000

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23-27 $0

Total $180,000

Bennett’s Creek Recreation Center The project will provide for the renovation of property obtained through a land swap between the City and the U.S. Government on Bennett’s Creek Park Road for a full service recreation center.

FY 18 $2,000,000

FY 19 $0

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23-27 $0

Total $2,000,000

Operating Costs: The projected annual operating cost of the Bennett’s Creek Recreation Center is $546,746 for staffing, utilities, and other operating expenses beginning in FY 19.

235


CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS PROGRAM & PLAN PUBLIC BUILDINGS AND FACILITIES FY 2018 - 2027

Public Building and Facilities Planned Expenditures

5 Year Summary Previous Funding

2017-2018

2018-2019

2019-2020

2020-2021

2021-2022

5 Year Subtotal

6-10 Year Subtotal

10 Year Total

City Airport: Obstruction Removal (2% Local) Terminal Apron Rehabilitation (2% local) Runway 4-22 Rehabilitation (2% local) Covered Terminal Entranceway (27% local) Equipment Storage Facility Airport Layout Plan Update (2% local)

175,000 810,000 -

175,000 5,000,000 30,000 300,000 -

60,000 300,000 100,000 -

600,000 2,500,000 -

350,000

City Buildings: Public Building Capital Maintenance Fire Station No. 1 Site Development Central Library /W.Washington St. Plan Godwin Courts Building Improvements

6,481,760 2,985,166 2,935,000 -

905,000 1,175,000

1,015,000 500,000 2,800,000 -

800,000 8,600,000 -

810,000 3,100,000 -

820,000 -

4,350,000 500,000 14,500,000 1,175,000

4,250,000 -

8,600,000 500,000 14,500,000 1,175,000

7,585,000

4,775,000

12,500,000

4,260,000

820,000

29,940,000

4,250,000

34,190,000

Total

-

835,000 2,800,000 5,000,000 130,000 300,000 350,000

-

835,000 2,800,000 5,000,000 130,000 300,000 350,000

Public Building and Facilities Funding Sources

Previous Funding

2017-2018

2018-2019

2019-2020

2020-2021

2021-2022

5 Year Subtotal

Obstruction Removal (90% Federal) Obstruction Removal (8% State) Terminal Apron Rehabilitation (90% Federal) Terminal Apron Rehabilitation (8% Statel) Runway 4-22 Rehabilitation (90% Federal) Runway 4-22 Rehabilitation (8% State) Covered Terminal Entranceway (73% State) Airport Layout Plan Update (90% Federal) Airport Layout Plan Update (8% State) State/Federal Grant Funds Obstruction Removal (2% Local) Terminal Apron Rehabilitation (2% Local) Runway 4-22 Rehabilitation (2% local) Covered Terminal Entranceway (27% local) Equipment Storage Facility (100% local) Airport Layout Plan Update (2% local) Public Building Capital Maintenance Fire Station No. 1 Site Development Transfer from General Fund Central Library /W.Washington St. Plan Godwin Courts Building Improvements General Obligation Bonds

157,500 14,000 4,500,000 400,000 21,900 5,093,400 3,500 100,000 8,100 300,000 905,000 1,316,600 1,175,000 1,175,000

54,000 4,800 270,000 24,000 73,000 425,800 1,200 6,000 27,000 1,015,000 500,000 1,549,200 2,800,000 2,800,000

540,000 48,000 2,250,000 200,000 3,038,000 12,000 50,000 800,000 862,000 8,600,000 8,600,000

315,000 28,000 343,000 7,000 810,000 817,000 3,100,000 3,100,000

820,000 820,000 -

15,675,000

Total

7,585,000

4,775,000

12,500,000

4,260,000

820,000

29,940,000

Annual Operating Impact City Airport: Obstruction Removal (2% Local) Terminal Apron Rehabilitation (2% local) Runway 4-22 Rehabilitation (2% local) Covered Terminal Entranceway (27% local) Equipment Storage Facility Airport Layout Plan Update (2% local) City Buildings: Public Building Capital Maintenance Fire Station No. 1 Site Development Central Library /W.Washington St. Plan Godwin Courts Building Improvements

Total Operating Cost

2017-2018

2018-2019

2019-2020

-

2020-2021

6-10 Year Subtotal

10 Year Total

-

8,900,200

5,364,800

-

4,250,000

4,250,000

8,900,200

9,614,800

15,675,000 34,190,000

2021-2022

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

350,000 -

-

-

-

-

350,000

236


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


Public Buildings and Facilities City Airport Obstruction Removal The project will provide for the easement acquisition, design and construction/removal of vegetative obstructions surrounding the runway and airport. The obstructions are not on airport property and will require easements in order to remove the vegetation. Previous funding in FY17 was allocated for an environmental assessment. Funding in FY18 will be used for easement acquisition. FY19 and FY20 funding will be for used design and removal. The project will be funded through a combination of federal (90%), state (8%) and local (2%) funds. FY 18 $175,000

FY 19 $60,000

FY 20 $600,000

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23-27 $0

Total $835,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

Terminal Apron Rehabilitation The project will provide for the resurface of the aircraft parking apron (adjacent to the terminal). In 2015, the Virginia Department of Aviation conducted a Pavement Management Study and rated the apron condition as poor. The current pavement is over 25 years old. The project will be funded through a combination of federal (90%), state (8%) and local (2%) funds.

FY 18 $0

FY 19 $300,000

FY 20 $2,500,000

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23-27 $0

Total $2,800,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

237


Public Buildings and Facilities City Airport Runway 4-22 Rehabilitation The project will provide for the resurface of the main runway which has not been overlaid since 1990. The project will be funded through a combination of federal (90%), state (8%) and local (2%) funds.

FY 18 $5,000,000

FY 19 $0

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23-27 $0

Total $5,000,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

Covered Terminal Entranceway The project will provide for the design and construction of a covered entranceway to the terminal. It will provide weather protection for patrons being dropped off or picked up at the main entrance. This project will be funded through a combination of state (73%) and local (27%) funds.

FY 18 $30,000

FY 19 $100,000

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23-27 $0

Total $130,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

238


Public Buildings and Facilities City Airport Equipment Storage Facility The project will provide for the demolition and construction of a ground maintenance equipment storage unit to house airport maintenance equipment. The current storage building is in disrepair and has exceeded its useful life.

FY 18 $300,000

FY 19 $0

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23-27 $0

Total $300,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

Airport Layout Plan Update This project will provide for the update of the Airport Layout Plan to include the last 10 years of airport development. The Federal Aviation Administration and State will support the planning exercise to study the future facility requirements. The project will be funded through a combination of federal (90%), state (8%) and local (2%) funds.

FY 18 $0

FY 19 $0

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $350,000

FY 22 $0

FY 23-27 $0

Total $350,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

239


Public Buildings and Facilities City Buildings Public Building Capital Maintenance A proactive building maintenance program is implemented to protect the City’s significant investment in public buildings. Capital maintenance projects include renovations and repairs to buildings and systems, as well as compliance with Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) requirements. FY18 funding also includes one-time expenses for replacement of the Police Precinct No. 1 HVAC Chiller and FY19 funding includes one-time expenses for the Human Resources Building roof system replacement. FY 18 $905,000

FY 19 $1,015,000

FY 20 $800,000

FY 21 $810,000

FY 22 $820,000

FY 23-27 $4,250,000

Total $8,600,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

Fire Station 1 Site Development The project will provide for the redesign and implementation of site work at Fire Station No. 1. The City recently acquired two parcels adjacent to the fire station which is currently being renovated. Site redesign is necessary to accommodate the two new parcels to maximize parking, vehicular circulation and landscaping at the renovated fire station.

FY 18 $0

FY 19 $500,000

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23-27 $0

Total $500,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

240


Public Buildings and Facilities City Buildings

Central Library/W. Washington St. Plan This project will provide for the design and construction of a New Central Library of approximately 50,000 square feet to be located on West Washington Street, one block east of the new City Hall building. The facility will replace the existing Morgan Memorial Library. FY19 funding will provide for the final design of the new Central Library facility.

FY 18 $0

FY 19 $2,800,000

FY 20 $8,600,000

FY 21 $3,100,000

FY 22 $0

FY 23-27 $0

Total $14,500,000

Operating Costs: The projected annual operating cost is $350,000 for utilities and building maintenance beginning in FY22.

Godwin Courts Building Improvements This project will provide for major building system replacements at the Godwin Courts Building. The Godwin Courts Building is approximately 20 years old and the major building systems have reached their life expectancy. Funding is programmed in FY18 to replace the failing built-up roof system, HVAC controls, variable air volume units, fire sprinkler upgrades and interior finishes upgrades.

FY 18 $1,175,000

FY 19 $0

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23-27 $0

Total $1,175,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City. 241


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS PROGRAM & PLAN PUBLIC SAFETY FY 2018 - 2027

Public Safety Planned Expenditures Fire & Rescue: Fire Engines (Various New Stations) Fire Engines (Replacements) Ambulance (Replacements) Ambulance (Refurbished) Ambulance (Various New Stations ) Aerial Platform Truck Aerial Ladder Truck Fire Rescue Truck (Various New Stations) Fire Rescue Truck (Replacements) Fire Tanker Truck Holland Road Fire/PS Ctr (36 staff) Lake Kilby Station Renovations (Station 4) Fire & Rescue Storage Building Nansmnd & Wilroy Rd Fire Stn (36 staff) Carolina Road Fire Stn (21 staff) College Drive Fire Station (36 staff) Pruden Blvd. Rt. 460 Fire Stn (21 staff) Breathing Air System Police: Firearms Range Police Storage Facility Holland Road Fire/PS Ctr (44 staff) Animal Shelter Parking Lot

5 Year Summary Previous Funding 2,130,740 1,059,150 1,103,631 34,799 995,992

-

Total

2017-2018 332,001 220,136 600,000 -

1,152,137

2018-2019

2019-2020

790,370 348,601 226,740 491,727 1,000,000 1,000,000 -

814,081 366,031 233,543 -

2,000,000 1,500,000 -

4,500,000 152,500

7,357,438

6,066,155

-

2020-2021 240,549 1,000,000 250,000

1,490,549

2021-2022 889,568 366,031 247,765 403,549 1,475,848 500,000 4,000,000 -

7,882,761

5 Year Subtotal

6-10 Year Subtotal

10 Year Total

889,568 1,604,451 1,412,664 1,168,733 403,549 1,475,848 491,727 1,000,000 1,600,000 500,000 5,000,000 250,000

3,863,309 3,033,688 515,043 788,792 1,850,842 1,671,673 1,881,482 1,656,935 1,520,124 8,496,000 4,000,000 4,500,000 4,500,000 250,000

4,752,877 4,638,139 1,927,707 1,957,525 2,254,391 1,671,673 1,881,482 3,132,783 1,520,124 491,727 8,496,000 1,000,000 1,600,000 4,500,000 4,500,000 5,000,000 4,500,000 500,000

6,500,000 1,500,000 152,500

10,345,235 -

6,500,000 1,500,000 10,345,235 152,500

23,949,040

48,873,123

72,822,163

6-10 Year Subtotal

10 Year Total

Public Safety Funding Sources Fire Engines (Replacements) Ambulance (Replacements) Ambulance (Refurbished) Ambulance (Various New Stations ) Fire Tanker Truck Breathing Air System Animal Shelter Parking Lot Transfer from General Fund Fire Engines (Various New Stations) Fire Engines (Replacements) Aerial Platform Truck Aerial Ladder Truck Fire Rescue Truck (Various New Stations) Fire Rescue Truck (Replacements) Holland Road Fire/PS Ctr (36 staff) Lake Kilby Station Renovations (Station 4) Fire & Rescue Storage Building Nansmnd & Wilroy Rd Fire Stn (36 staff) Carolina Road Fire Stn (21 staff) College Drive Fire Station (36 staff) Pruden Blvd. Rt. 460 Fire Stn (21 staff) Firearms Range Police Storage Facility Holland Road Fire/PS Ctr (44 staff) General Obligation Bonds Total

Previous Funding

2017-2018

2018-2019

2019-2020

2020-2021

2021-2022

5 Year Subtotal

332,001 220,136 552,137 600,000 600,000

348,601 226,740 491,727 1,067,068 790,370 1,000,000 1,000,000 2,000,000 1,500,000 6,290,370

814,081 366,031 233,543 152,500 1,566,155 4,500,000 4,500,000

240,549 250,000 490,549 1,000,000 1,000,000

366,031 247,765 403,549 1,017,345 889,568 1,475,848 500,000 4,000,000 6,865,416

19,255,786

45,468,446

64,724,232

1,152,137

7,357,438

6,066,155

1,490,549

7,882,761

23,949,040

48,873,123

72,822,163

4,693,254

3,404,677

8,097,931

-

242


Annual Operating Impact

2017-2018

2018-2019

2019-2020

2020-2021

2021-2022

Fire & Rescue: Fire Engines (Various New Stations) Fire Engines (Replacements) Ambulance (Replacements) Ambulance (Refurbished) Ambulance (Various New Stations ) Aerial Platform Truck Aerial Ladder Truck Fire Rescue Truck (Various New Stations) Fire Rescue Truck (Replacements) Fire Tanker Truck Holland Road Fire/PS Ctr (36 staff) Lake Kilby Station Renovations (Station 4) Fire & Rescue Storage Building Nansmnd & Wilroy Rd Fire Stn (36 staff) Carolina Road Fire Stn (21 staff) College Drive Fire Station (36 staff) Pruden Blvd. Rt. 460 Fire Stn (21 staff) Breathing Air System

-

-

25,000 25,000 -

Police: Firearms Range Police Storage Facility Holland Road Fire/PS Ctr (44 staff) Animal Shelter Parking Lot

-

-

15,000 -

180,000 -

-

Total Operating Cost

-

-

65,000

180,000

-

-

-

243


Public Safety Fire & Rescue Fire Engines The expansion of fire & rescue facilities and aging of existing fire engines requires the acquisition of new and replacement equipment. A systematic approach is used for acquiring new fire engines as new facilities are constructed and replacing old fire engines that have exceeded their life expectancy.

FY 18 $0

FY 19 $790,370

FY 20 $814,081

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $889,568

FY 23-27 $6,896,997

Total $9,391,016

Operating Costs: Additional annual operating costs are not anticipated in the first 5 years of the CIP. The fire engines that will be purchased during this time period are replacement engines. New fire engines planned in FY22-FY27 are associated with new fire stations and will have additional annual operating costs of $39,612 per fire engine.

Ambulances The expansion of fire & rescue to include emergency medical services has necessitated the acquisition of additional ambulances to ensure the provision of rapid response to emergency medical incidents. This project identifies a systematic approach for acquiring new ambulances as new facilities are constructed and replacing old ambulances that have exceeded their life expectancy. This project also includes the cost of refurbishing several existing ambulances. FY 18 $552,137

FY 19 $575,341

FY 20 $599,574

FY 21 $240,549

FY 22 $1,017,345

FY 23-27 $3,154,677

Total $6,139,623

Operating Costs: Additional operating costs are not anticipated in the first 5 years of the CIP. The ambulances that will be purchased during this time period are replacement and refurbished vehicles. New ambulances planned for FY 22-FY 27 are associated with new fire stations and will have additional annual operating costs of $37,000 per ambulance.

244


Public Safety Fire & Rescue Aerial Platform Truck The expansion of fire & rescue facilities and aging of existing aerial platform trucks requires the acquisition of new and replacement equipment. A systematic approach is used for acquiring new aerial platform trucks as new facilities are constructed and replacing old aerial platform trucks that have exceeded their life expectancy.

FY 18 $0

FY 19 $0

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23-27 $1,671,673

Total $1,671,673

Operating Costs: A new aerial platform truck programmed for FY23 will have an annual operating impact of $61,668.

Aerial Ladder Truck The aging of existing aerial ladder trucks requires the acquisition of new and replacement equipment. These trucks provide elevated fire streams, facilitate the rescue of occupants from buildings, can be utilized for specialized rescue applications, provide entry and egress for firefighters during operations at buildings or access limited structures/locations, and provide an elevated lighting source during incidents. A systematic approach is used for acquiring new aerial ladder trucks as new facilities are constructed and replacing old aerial ladder trucks that have exceeded their life expectancy. FY 18 $0

FY 19 $0

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23-27 $1,881,482

Total $1,881,482

Operating Costs: A replacement aerial ladder truck programmed for FY25 will not have an operational impact on the City.

245


Public Safety Fire & Rescue Fire Rescue Truck The expansion of fire & rescue facilities and aging of existing fire rescue trucks requires the acquisition of new and replacement equipment. These trucks provide specialty rescue equipment such as air tools, hydraulic tools, cutting tools, cutting torches, and lighting for response to motor vehicle incidents, structure fires, collapsed structures, water rescues, and other incidents. A systematic approach is used for acquiring new fire rescue trucks as new facilities are constructed and replacing old fire rescue trucks that have exceeded their life expectancy. FY 18 $0

FY 19 $0

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $1,475,848

FY 23-27 $3,177,059

Total $4,652,907

Operating Costs: New fire rescue trucks programmed for FY22 and FY23-27 will have an annual operating impact of $45,000 per vehicle.

Fire Tanker Truck The expansion of fire & rescue facilities and aging of existing fire tanker trucks requires the acquisition of new and replacement equipment. These trucks are used for the purpose of transporting large amounts of water to the fire ground to make it available for extinguishing operations. These trucks are especially useful in rural areas where fire hydrants are not readily available and natural water resources are insufficient. A systematic approach is used for acquiring new fire tanker trucks as new facilities are constructed and replacing old fire tanker trucks that have exceeded their life expectancy. FY 18 $0

FY 19 $491,727

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23-27 $0

Total $491,727

Operating Costs: A replacement fire tanker truck programmed for FY 19 will not have an operational impact on the City.

246


Public Safety Fire & Rescue

Holland Road Fire/Public Safety Center The project will provide for the construction of a 14,700 square foot fire station with bays in conjunction with an 12,200 square foot police station and 19,000 square foot shared training facility to include three classrooms, a burn building and other props, training staff offices, a K-9 Training Facility and restroom/shower facilities. The facility will enhance fire protection in the Route 58/460 corridor, helping to reduce response times in the growing areas surrounding the facility.

FY 18 $0

FY 19 $0

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23-27 $8,496,000

Total $8,496,000

Operating Costs: The projected annual operating cost is $2,150,000 beginning in FY 26 to include the addition of 36 new firefighters and utilities.

Lake Kilby Station Renovations (Station 4)

. This project will provide funding for the renovation of Fire Station 4 based on recommendation of staff and a space needs assessment.

FY 18 $0

FY 19 $1,000,000

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23-27 $0

Total $1,000,000

Operating Costs: The projected annual operating cost is $25,000 beginning in FY 20.

247


Public Safety Fire & Rescue

Fire & Rescue Storage Building The project will provide for the construction of a 5,000 square foot Fire & Rescue Storage Building to centralize the storage of EMS supplies, fire prevention evidence, station supplies and reserve apparatus.

FY 18 $600,000

FY 19 $1,000,000

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23-27 $0

Total $1,600,000

Operating Costs: The projected annual operating cost is $25,000 beginning in FY 20.

Nansemond and Wilroy Road Fire Station Funding will provide for the construction of a three bay . to provide fire protection fire station/public safety center and emergency medical services to the growing areas along Nansemond Parkway and Wilroy Road.

FY 18 $0

FY 19 $0

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $500,000

FY 23-27 $4,000,000

Total $4,500,000

Operating Costs: The projected annual operating cost is $2,150,000 beginning in FY 24 to include the addition of 36 new firefighters and utilities.

248


Public Safety Fire & Rescue Carolina Road Fire Station The project will provide for the construction of a three bay fire station/public safety center to provide fire protection and emergency medical services to the growing areas of Route 13 and Route 32 between Downtown Suffolk and the village of Whaleyville.

FY 18 $0

FY 19 $0

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23-27 $4,500,000

Total $4,500,000

Operating Costs: The projected annual operating cost of the project is $1,254,166 including 21 new firefighters and utilities beginning in FY 25.

College Drive Fire Station The project will provide for the design and construction of a three bay fire station/public safety center to provide fire protection and emergency medical services to the highly populated area of Harbour View in Northern Suffolk.

FY 18 $0

FY 19 $0

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $1,000,000

FY 22 $4,000,000

FY 23-27 $0

Total $5,000,000

Operating Costs: The projected annual operating cost is $2,150,000 including 36 new firefighters and utilities beginning in FY 23.

249


Public Safety Fire & Rescue Pruden Boulevard Route 460 Fire Station The project will provide for the design and construction of a three bay fire station/public safety center to provide fire protection and emergency medical services to the growing Pruden Boulevard area of the City.

FY 18 $0

FY 19 $0

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23-27 $4,500,000

Total $4,500,000

Operating Costs: The projected annual operating cost of the project is $1,254,166 including 21 new firefighters and utilities beginning in FY28.

Breathing Air System The project will provide for the acquisition of replacement breathing air systems to refill breathing air cylinders used by firefighters during entry into hazardous environments, such as structure fires, vehicle fires, and hazmat incidents.

FY 18 $0

FY 19 $0

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $250,000

FY 22 $0

FY 23-27 $250,000

Total $500,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

250


Public Safety Police Firearms Range The project will provide for the design and construction of an indoor shooting range. The range will be 100 yards with 8 lanes and sound proof to the surrounding environment. The Police Department currently utilizes the Virginia State Police outdoor range in Walters, Virginia which requires travel time for police officers out of the City. Funding is programmed in FY19 for design and site work with construction in FY 20.

FY 18 $0

FY 19 $2,000,000

FY 20 $4,500,000

FY 21 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 23-27 $0

Total $6,500,000

Operating Costs: The projected annual operating cost of the project is $180,000 beginning in FY 21.

Police Storage Facility The project will provide for the construction of a four bay storage facility in the central area of the City. The Police Department has various assets that are stored in outside conditions. These assets will have a longer service life if stored indoors. FY19 funding will provide for design and construction of the storage facility.

FY 18 $0

FY 19 $1,500,000

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23-27 $0

Total $1,500,000

Operating Costs: The projected annual operating cost of the project is $15,000 beginning in FY20.

251


Public Safety Police Holland Road Fire/Public Safety Center The project will provide for the construction of a 14,700 square foot fire station with bays in conjunction with an 12,200 square foot police station and 19,000 square foot shared training facility to include three classrooms, training staff offices, a burn building and other props, training staff offices, a K-9 Training Facility and restroom/shower facilities. The facility will enhance fire protection in the Route 58/460 corridor, helping to reduce response times in the growing areas surrounding the facility.

FY 18 $0

FY 19 $0

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23-27 $10,345,235

Total $10,345,235

Operating Costs: The projected annual operating cost of the police department’s portion of the project is $2,829,596 beginning in FY 26 to include the addition of 36 police officers and civilians, and utilities.

Animal Shelter Parking Lot The project will provide for the expansion of the Animal Shelter Parking lot. The expansion will accommodate 17 additional parking spaces and a 10 foot by 20 foot concrete pad to park the adoption trailer. Currently there are only 16 parking spaces and one handicap parking space.

FY 18 $0

FY 19 $0

FY 20 $152,500

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23-27 $0

Total $152,500

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

252


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS PROGRAM & PLAN PUBLIC SCHOOLS FY 2018 - 2027

Public Schools Planned Expenditures Hazardous Material Management HVAC/Chiller Replacements New Middle School - 800 pupil New Elementary School - 1,000 student Northern Shores Elementary Addition The Pruden Center Driver Center Operations Facility Mack Benn Jr. Elementary Addition JFK Middle Replacement - 1,200 student Forest Glenn Mid Sch Replacement-800 student John Yeates Mid Sch Replacement-1,200 student Elephants Fork Elem. Replacement Kilby Shores Elem. Replacemen New High School

5 Year Summary Previous Funding * 400,000 2,000,000 22,514,816 23,339,394 -

Total

2017-2018

2018-2019

2019-2020

2020-2021

2021-2022

5 Year Subtotal

6-10 Year Subtotal

10 Year Total

75,000 1,000,000 9,142,738 5,114,390 4,000,000 -

75,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 -

75,000 1,000,000 5,000,000 5,500,000 -

75,000 1,000,000 2,000,000 4,000,000 -

75,000 1,000,000 5,000,000 -

375,000 5,000,000 9,142,738 5,114,390 6,000,000 2,000,000 4,000,000 4,000,000 6,500,000 5,000,000 -

375,000 5,000,000 6,300,000 38,000,000 35,000,000 43,000,000 15,000,000 24,000,000 53,000,000

750,000 10,000,000 9,142,738 5,114,390 6,000,000 2,000,000 4,000,000 10,300,000 6,500,000 43,000,000 35,000,000 43,000,000 15,000,000 24,000,000 53,000,000

19,332,128

3,075,000

11,575,000

7,075,000

6,075,000

47,132,128

219,675,000

266,807,128

Public Schools Funding Sources

Previous Funding

2017-2018

2018-2019

2019-2020

2020-2021

2021-2022

New Middle School - 800 pupil New High School Cash Proffers Hazardous Material Management Transfer from General Fund HVAC/Chiller Replacements New Middle School - 800 pupil New Elementary School - 1,000 student Northern Shores Elementary Addition The Pruden Center Driver Center Operations Facility Mack Benn Jr. Elementary Addition JFK Middle Replacement - 1,200 student Forest Glenn Mid Sch Replacement-800 student John Yeates Mid Sch Replacement-1,200 Elephants Fork Elem. Replacement Kilby Shores Elem. Replacemen New High School General Obligation Bonds

1,506,774 1,506,774 75,000 75,000 1,000,000 7,635,964 5,114,390 4,000,000 17,750,354

75,000 75,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 3,000,000

75,000 75,000 1,000,000 5,000,000 5,500,000 11,500,000

75,000 75,000 1,000,000 2,000,000 4,000,000 7,000,000

75,000 75,000 1,000,000 5,000,000 6,000,000

Total

19,332,128

3,075,000

11,575,000

7,075,000

6,075,000

Annual Operating Impact

2017-2018

2018-2019

2019-2020

2020-2021

2021-2022

Hazardous Material Management HVAC/Chiller Replacements New Middle School - 800 pupil New Elementary School - 1,000 student Northern Shores Elementary Addition The Pruden Center Driver Center Operations Facility Mack Benn Jr. Elementary Addition JFK Middle Replacement - 1,200 student Forest Glenn Mid Sch Replacement-800 student John Yeates Mid Sch Replacement-1,200 student Elephants Fork Elem. Replacement Kilby Shores Elem. Replacement New High School

-

3,000,000 -

-

-

-

Total Operating Cost

-

3,000,000

-

-

-

5 Year Subtotal

6-10 Year Subtotal

10 Year Total

1,506,774

1,137,364

2,644,138

375,000

375,000

750,000

45,250,354

218,162,636

263,412,990

47,132,128

219,675,000

266,807,128

253


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


Public Schools

Hazardous Materials Management Hazardous Materials Management funds are provided to test and abate harmful substances as they are identified as potential problems to students and staff in school facilities.

FY 18 $75,000

FY 19 $75,000

FY 20 $75,000

FY 21 $75,000

FY 22 $75,000

FY 23-27 $375,000

Total $750,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on Suffolk Public Schools.

HVAC/Chiller Replacement This project will provide for the replacement of aging and inefficient HVAC Equipment, ductwork, and DDC system reconfiguration. The replacement equipment will provide more efficient operation and the ability to provide active humidity control in the schools that currently do not have this function.

FY 18 $1,000,000

FY 19 $1,000,000

FY 20 $1,000,000

FY 21 $1,000,000

FY 22 $1,000,000

FY 23-27 $5,000,000

Total $10,000,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on Suffolk Public Schools.

254


Public Schools New Middle School The project will provide for a new 800 pupil middle school in the northern/eastern area of the City to accommodate the citywide growth of the middle school population and to help reduce the use of mobile classrooms and relieve overcrowding at John Yeates and other middle schools serving the northern end of the City. Previous funding was approved in FY16 of $9,557,408 and $12,957,408 in FY17. The new middle school is scheduled to open in the fall of 2018. FY 18 $9,142,738

FY 19 $0

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23-27 $0

Total $9,142,738

Operating Costs: The projected annual operating cost of the new middle school is $3,000,000 including building utilities and staffing beginning in FY 19.

New Northern Elementary School The project will provide for a new 1,000 pupil elementary school in the northern area of the City to accommodate growth as well as relieve current overcrowding and usage of mobile classrooms at existing elementary schools. This new school will allow for the closing of Florence Bowser and Driver Elementary. Previous funding was approved in FY16 of $9,669,697 and $13,669,697 in FY17. The new elementary school is scheduled to open in the fall of 2018. FY 18 $5,114,390

FY 19 $0

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23-27 $0

Total $5,114,390

Operating Costs: The project will not result in substantial operating costs.

255


Public Schools Northern Shores Elementary Addition The project will provide additional classroom space to eliminate overcrowding and use of mobile classrooms at Northern Shores Elementary school. The additional wing would add 10 classrooms. Funding is programmed in FY19 for design with construction funding in FY20.

FY 18 $0

FY 19 $1,000,000

FY 20 $5,000,000

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23-27 $0

Total $6,000,000

Operating Costs: The project will not result in substantial operating costs.

The Pruden Center The project will integrate mechanical systems at the Pruden Center to Suffolk Public Schools systems and make infrastructure upgrades to the building.

FY 18 $0

FY 19 $0

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $2,000,000

FY 22 $0

FY 23-27 $0

Total $2,000,000

Operating Costs: The project will not result in substantial operating costs.

256


Public Schools Driver Center The project will replace the HVAC system, repair underground sewer, upgrade bathrooms and reprogram the school as an Alternative Center.

FY 18 $0

FY 19 $0

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $4,000,000

FY 22 $0

FY 23-27 $0

Total $4,000,000

Operating Costs: The project will not result in substantial operating costs.

Operations Facility The current maintenance building is housed in an old school building with antiquated utilities and no HVAC system. The facility serves as the base headquarters for all maintenance operations as well as receiving, supply inventory storage, textbook center and storage of student records. The new facility will include offices, warehouse space, and trades worker shops, as well as space for the print shop, textbook center, and food services administration.

FY 18 $4,000,000

FY 19 $0

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23-27 $6,300,000

Total $10,300,000

Operating Costs: The project will not result in substantial operating costs.

257


Public Schools Mack Benn Jr. Elementary Addition This project will provide additional classroom space at Mack Benn Jr. Elementary school to eliminate overcrowding and use of mobile classrooms. The additional wing will contain 10 classrooms. Funding is programmed in FY19 for design with construction in FY20.

FY 18 $0

FY 19 $1,000,000

FY 20 $5,500,000

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23-27 $0

Total $6,500,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact.

John F. Kennedy Middle School Replacement This project will replace John F. Kennedy Middle School with a new 1,200 student school. John F. Kennedy Middle School was constructed in 1965 and will be 55 years old in 2020. Funding is programmed in FY22 for design with construction funding included in FY23.

FY 18 $0

FY 19 $0

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $5,000,000

FY 23-27 $38,000,000

Total $43,000,000

Operating Costs: The project will not result in substantial operating costs.

258


Public Schools Forest Glenn Middle School Replacement This project will replace Forest Glenn Middle School with a new 800 student school. Forest Glenn Middle School was constructed in 1965 and will be 58 years old in 2023.

FY 18 $0

FY 19 $0

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23-27 $35,000,000

Total $35,000,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact.

John Yeates Middle School Replacement This project will replace John Yeates Middle School with a new 1,200 student school. John Yeates Middle School was constructed in 1965 and will be 56 years old in 2021.

FY 18 $0

FY 19 $0

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23-27 $43,000,000

Total $43,000,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact.

259


Public Schools Elephants Fork Elementary Replacement This project will replace Elephants Fork Elementary School with a new school. Elephants Fork Elementary School was constructed in 1979 and will be 48 years old in 2027.

FY 18 $0

FY 19 $0

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23-27 $15,000,000

Total $15,000,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact.

Kilby Shores Elementary School Replacement This project will replace Kilby Shores Elementary School with a new school. Kilby Shores Elementary School was constructed in 1979 and will be 44 years old in 2023.

FY 18 $0

FY 19 $0

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23-27 $24,000,000

Total $24,000,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact.

260


Public Schools New High School A fourth high school is proposed to accommodate citywide growth of students in grades 9-12. The new high school is proposed to be a 1,500 student school.

FY 18 $0

FY 19 $0

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23-27 $53,000,000

Total $53,000,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact.

261


CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS PROGRAM & PLAN VILLAGE & NEIGHBORHOOD INITIATIVES FY 2018 - 2027

Village & Neighborhood Initiatives Planned Expenditures Village & Neighborhood Improvements ** Open Space Improvements

5 Year Summary Previous Funding

2017-2018

2018-2019

2019-2020

2020-2021

2021-2022

5 Year Subtotal

6-10 Year Subtotal

10 Year Total

4,393,329

1,250,000

-

-

1,250,000

-

2,500,000

3,750,000

6,250,000

500,000

465,000

-

-

250,000

-

715,000

750,000

1,465,000

1,715,000

-

-

1,500,000

-

3,215,000

4,500,000

7,715,000

Total

Village & Neighborhood Initiatives Funding Sources

Previous Funding

2017-2018

2018-2019

2019-2020

2020-2021

2021-2022

5 Year Subtotal

6-10 Year Subtotal

10 Year Total

Village & Neighborhood Improvements ** Open Space Improvements Transfer from General Fund General Obligation Bonds

1,250,000 465,000 1,715,000

-

-

1,250,000 250,000 1,500,000

-

3,215,000

4,500,000

7,715,000

Total

1,715,000

-

-

1,500,000

-

3,215,000

4,500,000

7,715,000

Annual Operating Impact

2017-2018

2018-2019

2019-2020

2020-2021

2021-2022

Neighborhood & Village Imprvmts * Open Space Improvements

-

-

-

-

-

Total Operating Cost

-

-

-

-

-

** Project includes consolidated funding to address all neighborhood issues to include curb, gutter, and sidewalk improvements.

262


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


Village and Neighborhood Initiatives Village & Neighborhood Improvements The project will provide for the systematic implementation of short and long term strategies and initiatives specified in the 2035 Comprehensive Plan including the adopted Village and Neighborhood Initiatives Plans and other documented neighborhood needs assessments. The funding request represents the continuation of multi-year implementation strategy to prioritize, fund, and complete safety and drainage related projects that are currently underway and new initiatives subject to the objective analysis and evaluation of the Neighborhood Needs Assessment Tool.

FY 18 $1,250,000

FY 19 $0

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $1,250,000

FY 22 $0

FY 23-27 $3,750,000

Total $6,250,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

Open Space Improvements This project provides for the systematic and ongoing implementation of both short and long term strategies and initiatives as specified in the 2035 Comprehensive Plan, including the adopted Village and Neighborhood Initiatives Plans and other documented neighborhood needs assessments. The request of $465,000 in FY18 represents the continuation of a multi-year implementation strategy. The principle focus of which is to acquire lands and construct improvements for the development of neighborhood parks and other similar quality of life improvements. FY 18 $465,000

FY 19 $0

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $250,000

FY 22 $0

FY 23-27 $750,000

Total $1,465,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

263


264

Project

100,000

Feasability Study and Master Plan: Sidewalk, Closed Drainage, and Intersection & Street Improvements (Suburban Dr. and Portsmouth Blvd.)

Feasability Study and Master Plan: Sidewalk, Closed Drainage, and Intersection & Street Improvements (Nansemond Parkway and Portsmouth Blvd.)

Sidewalk, Closed Drainage & Street Improvements (Liberty Street Parking Lot)

Future Projects (As yet to be Determined per Neighborhood Assessment Tool and Assessment of Other Specified Needs)

Suburban Drive and Portsmouth Boulevard Improvements

Nansemond Parkway and Portsmouth Boulevard Improvements

Fairgrounds - Liberty Street Parking Lot Improvements

Future Projects

TOTALS

640,000

Lloyd Place Neighborhood Closed Drainage & Street Improvements - Phase 1A - (N. Improvements Lloyd Street)

-

1,250,000

-

-

-

-

-

-

2018-2019

-

250,000

100,000

160,000

2017-2018

Closed Drainage & Street Improvements - (Cedar Street)

South Suffolk Neighborhood Improvements

FUTURE / PROPOSED VILLAGE & NEIGHBORHOOD IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS (As Determined per Neighborhood Assessment Tool and Assessment of Other Specified Needs)

Community

2019-2020

-

-

-

-

-

-

FY 2017 / 2018 Proposed Budget Request

-

1,250,000

136,000

-

-

1,114,000

2020-2021

VILLAGE & NEIGHBORHOOD IMPROVEMENTS

FY 2018 - 2027 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS PLAN

2021-2022

-

-

-

-

-

-

2,500,000

136,000

250,000

100,000

100,000

1,754,000

160,000

5 Year Subtotal

-

-

-

-

-

3,750,000

3,750,000

2023-2027

6,250,000

3,886,000

250,000

100,000

100,000

1,754,000

160,000

10 Year Total


265

Project

Future Projects (As yet to be Determined per Neighborhood Assessment Tool and Assessment of Other Specified Quality of Life Needs)

Future Projects

TOTALS

Land Acquisition for Neighborhood Park and Similar Improvements

Green Infrastructure / N. Main Street Corridor Improvements

FUTURE / PROPOSED OPEN SPASE & QUALITY of LIFE IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS (As Determined per Neighborhood Assessment Tool and Assessment of Other Specified Needs)

Community

FY 2018 - 2027 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS PLAN

-

465,000

-

-

2018-2019

-

465,000

2017-2018

2019-2020

-

-

-

FY 2017 / 2018 Proposed Budget Request

-

250,000

250,000

2020-2021

OPEN SPACE and QUALITY OF LIFE IMPROVEMENTS

2021-2022

-

-

-

715,000

250,000

465,000

5 Year Subtotal

-

750,000

750,000

2023-2027

1,465,000

1,000,000

465,000

10 Year Total


266

Fairgrounds Liberty Street Parking Lot

Green Infrastructure, Open Space, Land Aquisition and Improvements

2017 - 2018

City of Suffolk Village, Neighborhood, Open Space, and Quality of Life Improvements

( !! ( ! ( ( ! (! ! (

Ăœ

South Suffolk Closed Drainage and Street Improvements

North Lloyd Street Closed Drainage and Street Improvements

Feasibility Study and Master Plan Sidewalk, Closed Drainage, and Intersection Street Improvements (Portsmouth Blvd, Nansemond Pkwy and Suburban Dr.)


CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS PROGRAM & PLAN TRANSPORTATION FY 2018 - 2027

Transportation Planned Expenditures

5 Year Summary 5 Year Subtotal

Previous Funding

2017-2018

2018-2019

2019-2020

2020-2021

2021-2022

6-10 Year Subtotal

10 Year Total

37,413,483 -

10,683,424 1,000,000

5,000,000 10,000,000

12,500,000 9,000,000

12,500,000 10,000,000

10,000,000

40,683,424 40,000,000

50,000,000

40,683,424 90,000,000

600,000 1,000,000 650,000 100,000 222,382 65,600 1,647,871

2,000,000 500,000 500,000 350,000 531,110 140,400 800,000 3,268,956 3,000,000 3,414,000 326,500 415,000 -

2,700,000 3,700,000 2,000,000 2,200,000 2,958,952 -

2,000,000 156,800 2,000,000 -

2,000,000 531,110 57,000 7,203,097 4,000,000

2,000,000 3,000,000 -

4,700,000 500,000 4,200,000 8,000,000 350,000 3,000,000 1,062,220 354,200 3,000,000 15,431,005 3,000,000 3,414,000 326,500 415,000 4,000,000

10,000,000 42,000,000 1,062,220 418,200 42,000,000

4,700,000 500,000 4,200,000 18,000,000 350,000 45,000,000 2,124,440 772,400 3,000,000 15,431,005 3,000,000 3,414,000 326,500 415,000 46,000,000

26,929,390

28,558,952

25,656,800

36,291,207

15,000,000

132,436,349

145,480,420

277,916,769

2017-2018

2018-2019

2019-2020

2020-2021

2021-2022

5 Year Subtotal

6-10 Year Subtotal

10 Year Total

1,000,000 1,000,000 250,000 250,000 400,000 700,000 1,500,000 1,707,000 163,250 207,500 7,177,750 9,683,424 270,110 1,863,756 11,817,290 1,707,000 1,707,000 1,500,000 1,500,000 261,000 140,400 401,400 1,000,000 1,000,000 250,000 350,000 250,000 400,000 705,200 163,250 207,500 4,325,950 26,929,390

5,000,000 1,350,000 1,850,000 1,000,000 1,100,000 10,300,000 5,000,000 2,958,952 7,958,952 800,000 800,000 5,000,000 200,000 1,350,000 1,850,000 1,100,000 9,500,000 28,558,952

5,000,000 1,000,000 6,000,000 12,500,000 2,000,000 14,500,000 1,000,000 156,800 1,156,800 4,000,000 4,000,000 25,656,800

5,000,000 1,000,000 2,000,000 8,000,000 12,500,000 270,110 7,203,097 19,973,207 1,000,000 261,000 57,000 1,318,000 5,000,000 2,000,000 7,000,000 36,291,207

5,000,000 1,000,000 6,000,000 3,000,000 3,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 5,000,000 5,000,000 15,000,000

Local Urban Rdway Constrn-Comp Plan Holland Road Yr. 1 - 10 Projects - TBD

Local Urban Intrsctn Const-Comp Plan N Pkwy/Bennetts Pasture Rd Intrsctn Kings Hwy/Godwin Blvd Rt. 17 Crittenden Road Intrsctn Yr. 2 - 10 Projects - TBD

Oak Ridge/Colonial Ave Connector North Suffolk Connector Bennetts Creek Channel Dredging Rail Crossing Improvements Pruden Center Signal & Turn Lanes Shoulders Hill Rd/Rt 17 Intersection Point Place Roadway Extension Public Utilities Overlay Pruden Boulevard Culvert Improvements Old College Drive Drainage Shoulders Hill Road Widening Phase III

3,300,000 850,000 650,000 -

Total

Transportation Funding Sources Holland Road Yr. 1 - 10 Projects - TBD N Pkwy/Bennetts Pasture Rd Intrsctn Kings Hwy/Godwin Blvd Rt. 17 Crittenden Road Intrsctn Yr. 2 - 10 Projects - TBD Pruden Center Signal & Turn Lanes Shoulders Hill Rd/Rt 17 Intersection Point Place Roadway Extension Public Utilities Overlay Pruden Boulevard Culvert Improvements Old College Drive Drainage Shoulders Hill Road Widening Phase III State Transportation Funds Holland Road North Suffolk Connector Bennetts Creek Channel Dredging Shoulders Hill Rd/Rt 17 Intersection State/Federal Grant Funds Public Utilities Overlay Transfer from Public Utilities Fund Point Place Roadway Extension Transfer from Rt. 17 Taxing District Fund Yr. 2 - 10 Projects - TBD Bennetts Creek Channel Dredging Rail Crossing Improvements Transfer from General Fund Yr. 1 - 10 Projects - TBD Yr. 2 - 10 Projects - TBD N Pkwy/Bennetts Pasture Rd Intrsctn Kings Hwy/Godwin Blvd Oak Ridge/Colonial Ave Connector Rt. 17 Crittenden Road Intrsctn Pruden Center Signal & Turn Lanes Shoulders Hill Rd/Rt 17 Intersection Pruden Boulevard Culvert Improvements Old College Drive Drainage Shoulders Hill Road Widening Phase III General Obligation Bonds Total

Previous Funding

37,477,750

51,000,000

88,477,750

57,249,449

42,540,220

99,789,669

1,707,000

-

1,707,000

1,500,000

-

1,500,000

4,676,200

5,940,200

10,616,400

29,825,950 132,436,349

46,000,000 145,480,420

75,825,950 277,916,769

267


Annual Operating Impact

2017-2018

2018-2019

2019-2020

2020-2021

2021-2022

Local Urban Rdway Constrn-Comp Plan Holland Road

-

-

-

-

-

Yr. 1 - 10 Projects - TBD

-

-

-

-

-

N Pkwy/Bennetts Pasture Rd Intrsctn

-

-

-

-

-

Kings Hwy/Godwin Blvd

-

-

-

-

-

N Pkwy/Wilroy Road

-

-

-

-

-

Rt. 17 Crittenden Road Intrsctn

-

-

-

-

-

Yr. 2 - 10 Projects - TBD

-

-

-

-

-

Oak Ridge/Colonial Ave Connector

-

-

-

-

-

North Suffolk Connector

-

-

-

-

-

Bennetts Creek Channel Dredging

-

-

-

-

-

Rail Crossing Improvements

-

-

-

-

-

Pruden Center Signal & Turn Lanes

-

-

-

-

-

Shoulders Hill Rd/Rt 17 Intersection

-

-

-

-

-

Point Place Roadway Extension

-

-

-

-

-

Public Utilities Overlay

-

-

-

-

-

Pruden Boulevard Culvert Improvements

-

-

-

-

-

Old College Drive Drainage

-

-

-

-

-

Shoulders Hill Road Widening Phase III

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Local Urban Intrsctn Const-Comp Plan

268


Transportation Local Urban Roadway Construction Comprehensive Plan The project will provide funding to undertake various roadway construction projects recommended in the City’s 2035 Comprehensive Plan such as Route 58 Widening. FY18 funding includes state, federal, and local funding.

FY 18 $11,683,424

FY 19 FY 20 FY 21 FY 22 FY 23-27 $15,000,000 $21,500,000 $22,500,000 $10,000,000 $50,000,000

Total $130,683,424

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City. .

Local Urban Intersection Construction Comprehensive Plan The project involves the construction of various intersection improvements to improve traffic flow and safety as recommended in the City’s 2035 Comprehensive Plan. Priority intersection improvements for FY18 include Nansemond Parkway/Bennetts Pasture Road Intersection, Kings Hwy/Godwin Blvd. Intersection, and Rt. 17 Crittenden Road Intersection. FY18 funding includes local matching funds for Revenue Sharing.

FY 18 $3,000,000

FY 19 $8,400,000

FY 20 $2,000,000

FY 21 $2,000,000

FY 22 $2,000,000

FY 23-27 $10,000,000

Total $27,400,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

269


Transportation Oak Ridge/Colonial Avenue Connector This project will provide for the 450 feet of roadway realignment and widening of Colonial Avenue to accommodate new traffic patterns in the Oak Ridge Neighborhood as a result of the realignment of Northbrooke Avenue with the Route 58 improvements. FY18 funding will complete the project.

FY 18 $350,000

FY 19 $0

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23-27 $0

Total $350,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

North Suffolk Connector This project will provide for a new roadway for a new alignment between Nansemond Parkway and Shoulders Hill Road bypassing two at-grade rail crossings. Funding was allocated in FY 17 to conduct a study of this project. The project is anticipated to be funded with 100% federal Smart Scale funding.

FY 18 0

FY 19 $0

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $3,000,000

FY 23-27 $42,000,000

Total $45,000,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

270


Transportation Bennetts Creek Channel Dredging This project will provide for maintenance dredging of the mouth of Bennetts Creek. Funding will provide for the cost of the dredge as well as toll fees for the disposal of dredged material at Craney Island. This project is being funded with 59% Federal (Army Corp of Engineers) and 41% local funding.

FY 18 $531,110

FY 19 $0

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $531,110

FY 22 $0

FY 23-27 $1,062,220

Total $2,124,440

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

Rail Crossing Improvements This project provides for improvements to the quality of a select group of at-grade crossings while working collectively with different railroad companies. Asphalt or wood flange crossings at Liberty Street and Nansemond Parkway would be replaced with concrete panel sections resulting in a smoother ride and reducing traffic backups due to vehicles slowing in order to traverse the crossing. Elevated crossings at Suburban Drive,Wellons Street and Harvest Drive would be replaced with concrete panels and have additional improvements made to reduce or eliminate the steep approaches to the rail crossing.

FY 18 $140,400

FY 19 $0

FY 20 $156,800

FY 21 $57,000

FY 22 $0

FY 23-27 $418,200

Total $772,400

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City

271


Transportation Pruden Center Signal and Turn Lanes This project provides for the installation of a traffic signal and left and right turn lanes on Route 460 at the entrance to the Pruden Center and will include right of way acquisition to address safety concerns related to vehicles entering and exiting the Pruden Center. It is anticipated that 50% of the funding will come from the State Revenue Sharing Program. FY18 funding will provide for design and right of way acquisition.

FY 18 $800,000

FY 19 $2,200,000

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23-27 $0

Total $3,000,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

Shoulders Hill Rd/Rt. 17 Intersection This project provides for improvements to the intersection of Route 17 and Shoulders Hill Road to tie into recently completed improvements south of the intersection. The project will be funded through a combination of local, state, and federal funds.

FY 18 $3,268,956

FY 19 $2,958,952

FY 20 $2,000,000

FY 21 $7,203,097

FY 22 $0

FY 23-27 $0

Total $15,431,005

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City

272


Transportation Point Place Roadway Extension This project provides for roadway connections from Armstead Road and College Drive into the 55 acre EDA development site in Northern Suffolk. FY 18 funding includes 50% State Revenue Sharing Program and 50% funding from the Route 17 Taxing District.

FY 18 $3,000,000

FY 19 $0

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23-27 $0

Total $3,000,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

Public Utilities Overlay This project will provide for an expanded overlay program in coordination with various public utility projects throughout the City. The project will provide for pavement reconstruction or full width overlays to address pavement cuts as a result of water or sanitary sewer installation projects. FY18 funding includes 50% Revenue Sharing Program funds and 50% funding from the Public Utilities enterprise fund.

FY 18 $3,414,000

FY 19 $0

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23-27 $0

Total $3,414,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City

273


Transportation . Pruden Boulevard Culvert Improvements The project provides for the design and construction of upgrades to the culvert crossing under Route 460 (Pruden Boulevard) downstream of the Sadler Pond Dam. Upgrades to the existing crossing will provide capacity to accommodate stormwater flow should the dam be removed or breached. Recent dam breaches have resulted in the closure of Route 460. FY18 funding includes 50% Revenue Share Funds and 50% local matching funds.

FY 18 $326,500

FY 19 $0

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23-27 $0

Total $326,500

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

Old College Drive Drainage The project will provide for the piping of the existing roadside ditch along Old College Drive. FY18 funding will provide for the piping of the existing ditch along Old College Drive from Magnolia Drive to the southern end of Camellia Drive. FY19 funding includes 50% Revenue Share Funds and 50% local matching funds.

FY 18 $415,000

FY 19 $0

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23-27 $0

Total $415,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City

274


Transportation . Shoulders Hill Road Widening Phase III The project provides for the widening of Shoulders Hill Road from approximately 0.3 miles south of Bridge Road to Pughsville Road. The total length is approximately 1.33 miles. The project will widen the corridor from two lanes to a four lane divided roadway with turn lanes, sidewalks, multi-use path and stormwater improvements. The project will continue the roadway section as established at the recently completed Nansemond Parkway-Shoulders Hill Road intersection and is currently under design at the Bridge Road-Shoulder Hill Road intersection. FY21 funding includes 50% Revenue Share Funds and 50% local matching funds. FY 18 $0

FY 19 $0

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $4,000,000

FY 22 $0

FY 23-27 $42,000,000

Total $46,000,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

275


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


Utility Fund


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS PROGRAM & PLAN PUBLIC UTILITIES FUND FY 2018 - 2027

Public Utilities Fund Planned Expenditures

5 Year Summary Previous Funding

2017-2018

2018-2019

2019-2020

2020-2021

2021-2022

5 Year

6-10 Year

10 Year

Subtotal

Subtotal

Total

Water Projects Water Source Development and Water Treatment Plant Expansion Water Distribution & Transmission System Expansion Water System Upgrades

53,362,000

1,210,000

930,000

875,000

1,690,000

20,500,000

125,000

3,150,000

5,400,000

16,000,000

6,050,000

825,000

975,000

1,700,000

400,000

850,000

2,160,000

5,055,000

7,975,000

18,090,000

1,670,000

Subtotal Water Projects: Sewer Projects Sanitary Sewer Extensions

300,000

-

300,000

-

52,080,000

57,605,000

24,675,000

13,050,000

37,725,000

4,750,000

3,475,000

8,225,000

34,950,000

68,605,000

103,555,000

600,000

900,000

1,500,000

7,200,000

8,200,000

8,400,000

8,400,000

38,400,000

42,000,000

80,400,000

Subtotal Sewer Projects:

6,200,000

7,500,000

8,200,000

8,700,000

8,400,000

39,000,000

Total Public Utilities Fund

8,360,000

12,555,000

16,175,000

26,790,000

10,070,000

73,950,000

39,631,000

-

-

5,525,000

6,200,000

Sanitary Sewer System Upgrades

5,200,000

820,000

42,900,000 111,505,000

81,900,000 185,455,000

Public Utilities Fund Funding Sources

Previous Funding

2017-2018

2018-2019

2019-2020

2020-2021

2021-2022

5 Year Subtotal

6-10 Year Subtotal

10 Year Total

Public Utilities Revenue Bonds

5,060,000

8,255,000

11,175,000

21,290,000

6,450,000

52,230,000

82,905,000

135,135,000

Transfer from Public Utilities Fund

3,300,000

4,300,000

5,000,000

5,500,000

3,620,000

21,720,000

28,600,000

50,320,000

Total Public Utilities Fund

8,360,000

12,555,000

16,175,000

26,790,000

10,070,000

73,950,000

111,505,000

185,455,000

Annual Operating Impact

2017-2018

2018-2019

2019-2020

2020-2021

2021-2022

Water Projects Water Source Development and Water Treatment Plant Expansion Water Distribution & Transmission System Expansion Water System Upgrades Subtotal Water Projects: Sewer Projects Sanitary Sewer Extensions Sanitary Sewer System Upgrades Subtotal Sewer Projects: Utility Fund - Capital Cash: Estimated Debt Service: Total Operating Cost

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3,300,000 3,300,000

-

-

-

-

1,000,000

700,000

500,000

(1,880,000)

506,000

825,500

1,117,500

2,129,000

1,506,000

1,525,500

1,617,500

249,000

276


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


Water Projects Water Source Development and Water Treatment Plant Expansion The project provides for the development, upgrades, and expansion of the City’s public water supply sources and treatment plant facilities. Projects include upgrades to the G. Robert House Water Treatment Plant, EDR membrane replacement and the expansion of the surface water plant, Lonestar Lakes and Crump Mill Pond surface dam upgrades, renewal of WTWA ground water permit and Water Source Development charges. Funding in FY 18 is programmed for the Lonestar Lake I culvert abandonment and water source development reservation charges. FY 18 $1,210,000

FY 19 $930,000

FY 20 $875,000

FY 21 $1,690,000

FY 22 $820,000

FY 23-27 $52,080,000

Total $57,605,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

Water Distribution & Transmission System Expansion The project provides for the expansion of the City’s water distribution and transmission systems, inclusive of system storage. Future projects include the southern transmission main from the G. Robert House Water Treatment Plant to Rt. 460, Rt. 460 to Kenyon Road transmission main, and Rt. 10 transmission main from the water treatment plant to Isle of Wight county. Funding in FY18 is programed for the initial phase of the south transmission main land/easement acquisitions.

FY 18 $125,000

FY 19 $3,150,000

FY 20 $5,400,000

FY 21 FY 22 $16,000,000 $0

FY 23-27 $13,050,000

Total $37,725,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City. 277


Water Projects Water System Upgrades The project will provide for the replacement and rehabilitation of aging or undersized water distribution system infrastructure, replacement of aging water meters, replacement of water service lines, and the rehabilitation of the City’s water storage tanks. FY18 funding continues the initial stage of small water main and water service line replacements. FY18 funding also includes the initial design for the replacement of an aging/undersized water line on Forrest Street.

FY 18 $825,000

FY 19 $975,000

FY 20 $1,700,000

FY 21 $400,000

FY 22 $850,000

FY 23-27 $3,475,000

Total $8,225,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

278


279

Water System Upgrades

Programmed Water Projects

Water Distribution & Transmission System Expansion

Programmed Water Projects

Water Source Development & Water Treatment Plant Upgrades

Programmed Water Projects

Projects

Projects

Projects

$5,400,000

2019-2020

Projects

Water Source Development Charge $875,000

$875,000

Projects

Meter Upgrades $200,000

Water Service Line Upgrades $150,000

Water Service Line Upgrades $150,000

Water Tank Rehabilitation (County St Tank) $800,000

Meter Upgrades $100,000

Water Service Line Upgrades $150,000

Neighborhood Replacements Day St. (C) Peanut Park (C) $650,000

Neighborhood Replacements Peanut Park Area (C) Day St. (D) $625,000

Neighborhood Replacements Forest St. (D) $25,000

2019-2020 $1,700,000

2018-2019

Projects

RT 10 Transmission Main (Kings Hwy. to IOW) (C) $3,000,000

$975,000

Meter Upgrades $650,000

Projects

$16,000,000

2020-2021

Projects

Water Source Development Charge $890,000

Crumps Mill Pond Dam & Impoundment Improvements (D) $800,000

$1,690,000

2020-2021

Meter Upgrades $150,000

Water Service Line Upgrades $150,000

Neighborhood Replacements Harrell Dr. Area Upgrage (C) $100,000

$400,000

2020-2021

Projects

Southern Transmission Main Southern Transmission Main Southern Transmission Main Ph. I & Booster Pump Station Ph. I (Moores Farm Ln to Ph. G (Water Plant to Everet's Ph. K (Moores Farm Ln to Exeter Dr.) (L.A.) Rd.) (C.) Exeter Dr.) (C) $150,000 $5,400,000 $16,000,000

$3,150,000

Projects 2019-2020

$825,000

2017-2018

Projects

Southern Transmission Main Ph. G (Water Plant to Everet's Rd.) (L.A.) $125,000

$125,000

2018-2019

Projects

2017-2018

Water Source Development Charge $930,000

$930,000

2018-2019

Water Source Development Charge $910,000

Lonestar Lake I & F Culvert Abandoment (C) $300,000

$1,210,000

2017-2018

Meter Upgrades $150,000

Water Service Line Upgrades $150,000

Neighborhood Replacements Harrell Dr. Area Upgrade (C) Adams/Mullberry St. Area (C) $550,000

$850,000

2021-2022

Projects

$0

2021-2022

Projects

Water Source Development Charge $820,000

$820,000

2021-2022

Projects

Projects

$6,830,000

2022-2023

Meter Upgrades $150,000

Water Service Line Upgrades $150,000

Neighborhood Replacements Adams/Mullberry St. Area (C) $500,000

$800,000

2022-2023

Projects

$0

2022-2023

Projects

Water Source Development Charge $830,000

Crumps Mill Pond Dam & Impoundment Improvements (C) $6,000,000

Capital Improvements Plan Utility Fund FY 2017-2018 through FY 2026-2027 Programmed Water Projects Projects

Meter Upgrades $150,000

Water Service Line Upgrades $500,000

$650,000

2023-2024

Projects

$0

2023-2024

Projects

Water Source Development Charge $760,000

EDR Plant Membrane Replacement (C) $5,000,000

$5,760,000

2023-2024

Projects

Projects

Projects

Meter Upgrades $175,000

Water Service Line Upgrades $500,000

$675,000

2024-2025

Projects

$150,000

2026-2027

Projects

Water Source Development Charge $710,000

Surface Water Treatment Plant 8 MGD Phase III C Expansion (C) $36,000,000

$36,710,000

2026-2027

Southern Transmission Main Ph. H (Rt. 10 to Moores Farm Ln.) (D) $200,000

Projects

Meter Upgrades $150,000

Water Service Line Upgrades $500,000

$650,000

2025-2026

Meter Upgrades $200,000

Water Service Line Upgrades $500,000

$700,000

2026-2027

Projects

Southern Transmission Main Southern Transmission Main Ph. J (Exeter Dr./Gardner Ln. Ph. J (Exeter Dr./Gardner Ln. to to Rt. 460) (L.A.) Rt. 460) (D) $750,000 $150,000

$11,700,000

2025-2026

Projects

Water Source Development Charge $700,000

WTWA Ground Water Permit Renewal (Permit Development) $150,000

$850,000

2025-2026

RT 58 Supply Transmission Main RT 58 Supply Transmission (Rt. 460 to Kenyon Rd. (D) Main (Rt. 460 to Kenyon Rd. (C) $1,200,000 $10,750,000

$1,200,000

2024-2025

Projects

Water Source Development Charge $780,000

WTWA Ground Water Permit Renewal (Permit Development) $150,000

Surface Water Treatment Plant 8 MGD Phase III C Expansion (D) $1,000,000

$1,930,000

2024-2025


Sewer Projects Sanitary Sewer Extensions The project will continue efforts to extend sanitary sewer into existing developed neighborhoods that are currently without sewer service. Identified funding is for minor extensions of sewer service or potential partnerships in pro rata agreements.

FY 18 $0

FY 19 $300,000

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $300,000

FY 22 $0

FY 23-27 $900,000

Total $1,500,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

Sanitary Sewer System Upgrades The project will provide for the renovation, rehabilitation, and replacement of the City’s sanitary sewer system. The system currently consists of 147 pump stations, 352 miles of gravity sewer mains and force mains. In 2007, the Hampton Roads region, inclusive of the City of Suffolk, entered into a Special Order by Consent with the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality. This Order was replaced with a new Order in 2015 to align with HRSD’s recently executed amendment to their Federal Consent Decree. As part of the new Consent Order the City is required to continue its Management Operations and Maintenance (MOM) program to protect against sanitary sewer overflows. FY 18 funding and future funding continues the MOM program, immediate find and fix repairs; and provides for systematic pump station upgrades/replacements. FY 18 $6,200,000

FY 19 $7,200,000

FY 20 $8,200,000

FY 21 $8,400,000

FY 22 $8,400,000

FY 23-27 $42,000,000

Total $80,400,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

280


Programmed Sewer Projects

Sanitary Sewer System Upgrades

Programmed Sewer Projects

Sanitary Sewer Extension Projects

281

Projects

Projects

Projects

Projects

Projects

Projects

Projects

Projects

Projects

Projects

Pump Station & Collection System Upgrades $4,200,000

Pump Station & Collection System Upgrades $4,200,000

Pump Station & Collection System Upgrades $4,200,000

Pump Station & Collection System Upgrades $4,000,000

Pump Station & Collection System Upgrades $4,200,000

Pump Station & Collection System Upgrades $3,000,000

Pump Station & Collection System Upgrades $4,200,000

Pump Station & Collection System Upgrades $2,000,000

Pump Station & Collection System Upgrades $4,200,000

$8,400,000

2026-2027

Projects

Misc. Extensions (C) $300,000

300,000

2026-2027

$8,400,000

2025-2026

Projects

0

2025-2026

$8,400,000

2024-2025

Projects

Misc. Extensions (C) $300,000

300,000

2024-2025

Pump Station & Collection System Upgrades $4,200,000

$8,400,000

2023-2024

Projects

0

2023-2024

MOM Program (System Maintenance Find & Fix Upgrades; Flow Monitoring) $4,200,000

$8,400,000

2022-2023

Projects

Misc. Extensions (C) $300,000

300,000

2022-2023

MOM Program (System Maintenance Find & Fix Upgrades; Flow Monitoring) $4,200,000

$8,400,000

2021-2022

Projects

0

2021-2022

MOM Program (System Maintenance Find & Fix Upgrades; Flow Monitoring) $4,200,000

$8,400,000

2020-2021

Projects

Misc. Extensions (C) $300,000

300,000

2020-2021

MOM Program (System MOM Program (System Maintenance Find & Fix Maintenance Find & Fix Upgrades; Flow Monitoring) Upgrades; Flow Monitoring) $4,200,000 $4,200,000

$8,200,000

2019-2020

Projects

0

2019-2020

MOM Program (System Maintenance Find & Fix Upgrades; Flow Monitoring) $4,200,000

$7,200,000

2018-2019

Projects

Misc. Extensions (C) $300,000

300,000

2018-2019

MOM Program (System MOM Program (System MOM Program (System MOM Program (System Maintenance Find & Fix Maintenance Find & Fix Maintenance Find & Fix Maintenance Find & Fix Upgrades; Flow Monitoring) Upgrades; Flow Monitoring) Upgrades; Flow Monitoring) Upgrades; Flow Monitoring) $4,200,000 $4,200,000 $4,200,000 $4,200,000

$6,200,000

2017-2018

Projects

0

2017-2018

Capital Improvements Plan Utility Fund FY 2017-2018 through FY 2026-2027 Programmed Sewer Projects


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


Stormwater


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS PROGRAM & PLAN STORMWATER FUND FY 2018 - 2027

Stormwater Fund Planned Expenditures Driver Ponding Olde Towne Master Drainage Study Rural Stormwater Improvements Respass Beach Drainage Improvements Pughsville Drainage Improvements

5 Year Summary Previous Funding 1,000,000 145,000 1,250,000

Total Stormwater Fund

2017-2018

2018-2019

2019-2020

2020-2021

2021-2022

5 Year Subtotal

6-10 Year Subtotal

10 Year Total

350,000 -

336,000 -

-

2,000,000

220,000 -

336,000 350,000 220,000 2,000,000

1,000,000 2,000,000 700,000 -

336,000 1,350,000 2,000,000 920,000 2,000,000

350,000

336,000

-

2,000,000

220,000

2,906,000

3,700,000

6,606,000

Stormwater Fund Funding Sources

Previous Funding

2017-2018

2018-2019

2019-2020

2020-2021

2021-2022

Olde Towne Master Drainage Study Rural Stormwater Improvements Pughsville Drainage Improvements State Transportation Funds Driver Ponding Olde Towne Master Drainage Study Rural Stormwater Improvements Respass Beach Drainage Improvements Pughsville Drainage Improvements Transfer from Stormwater Fund

175,000 175,000 175,000 175,000

336,000 336,000

-

1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000

220,000 220,000

Total Stormwater Fund

350,000

336,000

-

2,000,000

220,000

Annual Operating Impact

2017-2018

2018-2019

2019-2020

2020-2021

5 Year Subtotal

6-10 Year Subtotal

10 Year Total

1,175,000

1,500,000

2,675,000

1,731,000

2,200,000

3,931,000

2,906,000

3,700,000

6,606,000

2021-2022

Driver Ponding Olde Towne Master Drainage Study Rural Stormwater Improvements Respass Beach Drainage Improvements Pughsville Drainage Improvements

-

-

-

-

-

Total Operating Cost

-

-

-

-

-

282


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


Stormwater Driver Ponding The project will provide funding to address ongoing drainage issues adjacent to the Seaboard Coastline Trail. Stormwater funds will be used to fund this project in FY19.

FY 18 $0

FY 19 $336,000

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23-27 $0

Total $336,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

Olde Towne Master Drainage Study The project will provide a comprehensive drainage analysis of the Olde Towne area to address ongoing drainage issues in the neighborhood. The study will also be used as a guide for future stormwater retrofit projects implemented in support of the City’s Chesapeake Bay TMDL reduction requirements. FY18 funding is 50% Revenue Sharing funding and 50% local match from the Stormwater Utility Fund.

FY 18 $350,000

FY 19 $0

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23-27 $0

Total $350,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

283


Stormwater Rural Stormwater Improvements The project will provide for various drainage/roadway improvements on rural roads to prevent nuisance flooding and safety concerns. The project will provide for raised roadway elevations and/or drainage improvements at five locations along Copeland Road, three locations on Mineral Spring Road and one location on Glen Haven Drive. Future funding is programmed at 50% Revenue Share funds and 50% local match from the Stormwater Utility Fund.

FY 18 $0

FY 19 $0

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23-27 $2,000,000

Total $2,000,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

Respass Beach Drainage Improvements The project provides for the completion of a stormwater drainage study for the Holly Acres subdivision located off of Respass Beach Road. Limited improvements to address immediate concerns on James Avenue will be completed in conjunction with the study. FY22 funding is programmed from the Stormwater Utility Fund.

FY 18 $0

FY 19 $0

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $220,000

FY 23-27 $700,000

Total $920,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

284


Stormwater Pughsville Drainage Improvements The project will provide for the continuation of drainage improvements in the Pughsville area based on the recommendations of the 2012 drainage study. Approximately 50% of the project funding is anticipated from the State Revenue Sharing Program and 50% local match from the Stormwater Utility Fund.

FY 18 $0

FY 19 $0

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $2,000,000

FY 22 $0

FY 23-27 $0

Total $2,000,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

285


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


Fleet Fund


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS PROGRAM & PLAN FLEET FUND FY 2018 - 2027

Fleet Fund Planned Expenditures Replacement of Fleet Facilities

5 Year Summary Previous Funding -

Total Fleet Fund

2017-2018

2018-2019

2019-2020

2020-2021

2021-2022

5 Year Subtotal

6-10 Year Subtotal

10 Year Total

-

-

-

-

2,175,000

2,175,000

12,325,000

14,500,000

-

-

-

-

2,175,000

2,175,000

12,325,000

14,500,000

6-10 Year Subtotal

10 Year Total

Fleet Fund Funding Sources

Previous Funding

2017-2018

2018-2019

2019-2020

2020-2021

2021-2022

5 Year Subtotal

Replacement of Fleet Facilities General Obligation Bonds

-

-

-

-

2,175,000 2,175,000

2,175,000

12,325,000

14,500,000

Total Fleet Fund

-

-

-

-

2,175,000

2,175,000

12,325,000

14,500,000

Annual Operating Impact

2017-2018

2018-2019

2019-2020

2020-2021

2021-2022

Replacement of Fleet Facilities

-

-

-

-

-

Total Operating Cost

-

-

-

-

-

286


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


Fleet Fund Replacement of Fleet Facilities The project will provide for the relocation of the City’s fleet facilities which are currently located in a shared facility with Suffolk Public Schools on Kenyon Road. The project would involve the design and construction of a building with additional parking and storage areas necessary to accommodate this facility and the purchase of necessary equipment and furnishings required to operate the facility.

FY 18 $0

FY 19 $0

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $2,175,000

FY 23-27 $12,325,000

Total $14,500,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

287


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


Cash Proffer Report


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


CASH PROFFER REPORT This report reflects cash proffers received by the City of Suffolk in Fiscal Year 2015-2016 pursuant to Section 15.2-2303.2 of the Code of Virginia. In FY 16, the City received proffers totaling $300,247.70 for school capital projects. The City did not appropriate or expend any of the proffered funding in FY 16. FY 2015‐2016   Amount              Received Schools New Middle School New High School

Amount Appropriated

$               276,446.44 $                              ‐                    23,801.26                                 ‐ $               300,247.70 $                              ‐

Amount              Expended $                             ‐                                ‐ $                             ‐

The FY 2018-2027 Capital Improvements Program and Plan projects the appropriation of $2,644,138 in received or pledged proffered funds for new middle school and high school projects over the next 10 years.

288


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


289


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


DEBT SERVICE The City of Suffolk maintains a separate Debt Service Fund that tracks long-term debt obligations for General and Special Revenue Fund activities. Debt activity for Enterprise and Internal Service are maintained in the respective individual funds. The Debt Service Fund accounts for the accumulation of resources for and the payment of General and Special Revenue Fund long term debt principal, interest, and related costs. Revenues in this Fund consist primarily of a transfer of the citywide revenues generated from the various general property and local tax revenues of the General Fund. The City borrows money by issuing bonds or bank notes for the acquisition, construction, and renovation of public facilities and infrastructure as well as major equipment purchases. The City uses an objective analytical approach to determine whether it can afford new or additional general purpose debt to include measures of annual debt service payments as a percent of current expenditures and amount of outstanding debt as a percent of taxable real estate value in the City. The rate of interest paid for long-term debt is determined by the competitive aspect of the bond and finance institution market based upon credit ratings from Standard and Poor’s, Moody’s, and Fitch rating agencies. The better the City’s credit rating score, the lower the interest rate charged on the borrowing. The highest credit rating that can be attained is Triple A (AAA or Aaa). The City currently enjoys a strong credit rating with all of these institutions as follows: Rating Agency Moody's Standard & Poor's Fitch

Bond Rating Aa1 AAA AAA

Pursuant to the Constitution of Virginia, the City is authorized to issue bonds secured by a pledge of its full faith and credit and unlimited taxing power. There is no requirement in the Constitution, the Virginia Code, or the City Charter that the issuance of general obligation bonds be subject to the approval of voters of the City at referendum. The issuance of general obligation bonds is subject to a constitutional limitation of ten percent (10%) of the assessed value of taxable real property. The City’s Charter further limits the issuance of general obligation bonds to seven percent (7%) and the City’s Financial Policy further limits to four percent (4%) of the assessed value of taxable property. The City sometimes uses short-term obligations (e.g. Bond Anticipation Notes, Capital Leases, and Lines of Credit) to bridge the time gap between the initiation of a project/purchase and the anticipated bond issuance, when the nature of a purchase precludes the issuance of long-term debt, or when it is fiscally prudent and advantageous.

290


The total debt service required in FY 2017-2018 is as follows:

*General Fund Consolidated Grants Fund **Capital Leases Route 17 Special Taxing District Fund *Public Utility Fund Refuse Fund Road Maintenance Fund Capital Fund

Principal & Interest $25,161,013 74,594 3,737,991 355,432 21,360,133 82,646 1,368,763 219,927 $52,360,499

*Reflects new debt for FY18 of $32,786,304. **FY18 Budget reflects $343,997 interest expense, as opposed to the $3,393,994 of required principal for Fleet and Information Technology capital leases. It has been the City’s practice to use a conservative approach by budgeting for the greater of depreciation or principal consistent with the financial statement presentation basis. The adopted FY 18 budget includes depreciation expenses to adequately cover the $3,393,994 of required principal for capital leases.

The attached schedule provides an overview of the City’s total debt service and obligations.

291


City of Suffolk Long Term Debt Obligations June 30, 2017

Fiscal Year 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 2029 2030 2031 2032 2033 2034 2035 2036 2037 2038 2039 2040 2041 2042 2043 2044 2045 2046

General Obligation Bonds Principal Interest 14,868,915 8,971,056 15,441,146 8,317,963 15,928,161 7,772,943 15,707,316 7,266,622 14,662,319 6,644,238 15,331,323 5,977,683 15,038,328 5,306,910 14,706,341 4,654,785 14,298,355 4,027,184 14,320,000 3,401,122 14,785,000 2,187,398 10,995,000 2,217,620 10,275,000 1,889,146 10,335,000 1,416,339 8,455,000 936,492 8,760,000 643,389 5,595,000 394,244 4,800,000 214,250 2,080,000 62,400 -

Total

226,382,203

72,301,783

Section 108 Loan Principal Interest 193,000 101,521 193,000 91,215 193,000 80,764 193,000 70,187 193,000 59,495 193,000 48,697 193,000 37,812 193,000 26,849 193,000 15,810 178,000 5,135 1,915,000

537,485

Capital Lease Obligations Principal Interest 3,393,994 343,997 2,580,794 290,801 2,076,800 211,888 1,765,000 161,050 1,280,000 89,250 505,000 25,250 11,601,589

1,122,236

Source: City of Suffolk - Debt Service - General Long-Term Debt, Suffolk Department of Finance City of Suffolk - Debt Service - Fleet Management, Suffolk Department of Finance

292


City of Suffolk Long Term Debt Obligations June 30, 2017

Fiscal Year 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 2029 2030 2031 2032 2033 2034 2035 2036 2037 2038 2039 2040 2041 2042 2043 2044 2045 2046

Public Utility Bonds Route 17 Special Taxing District Principal Interest Principal Interest 5,121,085 15,671,548 197,164 158,268 6,376,854 15,433,685 197,164 148,423 6,818,839 15,182,129 188,654 139,516 10,315,684 14,849,602 278,654 131,970 10,765,681 14,386,762 278,654 119,806 11,275,677 13,856,463 283,654 107,524 11,815,627 13,301,214 287,673 94,895 12,345,659 12,758,102 292,673 81,919 12,920,645 12,153,915 297,673 68,646 13,535,000 11,512,048 302,673 54,419 13,930,000 10,854,330 307,673 40,436 14,610,000 10,201,292 125,000 30,944 16,235,000 9,550,735 130,000 27,194 15,655,000 8,959,980 135,000 23,294 16,130,000 8,324,255 140,000 19,244 16,790,000 7,645,337 140,000 14,694 17,465,000 6,944,007 145,000 10,144 18,145,000 6,214,583 150,000 5,250 18,900,000 5,438,457 19,680,000 4,604,112 20,575,000 3,705,929 21,395,000 2,765,676 17,160,000 1,957,851 17,855,000 1,171,656 6,300,000 683,444 3,635,000 355,675 2,800,000 215,350 1,605,000 119,303 1,680,000 40,375 -

Total

361,835,752

228,857,817

3,877,308

1,276,586

Refuse Bonds Principal Interest 82,646 4,541,000 41,323 4,541,000

123,969

Road Maintenance Bonds Principal Interest 720,000 648,763 730,000 634,363 745,000 619,763 770,000 597,413 805,000 558,913 845,000 518,663 890,000 476,413 935,000 431,913 980,000 358,163 1,030,000 336,163 1,070,000 294,963 1,115,000 252,163 1,160,000 207,563 1,195,000 172,763 1,230,000 136,913 1,270,000 96,938 1,315,000 49,313 16,805,000

6,391,138

Source: City of Suffolk - Long Term Debt Service - Utility Fund, Suffolk Department of Finance City of Suffolk - Debt Service Schedule - RT 17 Special Taxing District, Suffolk Department of Finance City of Suffolk - Debt Service Schedule - Refuse Fund, Suffolk Department of Finance City of Suffolk - Debt Service Schedule - Road Maintenance Fund, Suffolk Department of Finance

293


City of Suffolk Long Term Debt Obligations June 30, 2017

Fiscal Year 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 2029 2030 2031 2032 2033 2034 2035 2036 2037 2038 2039 2040 2041 2042 2043 2044 2045 2046 Total

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

Principal 24,494,158 30,059,958 25,950,454 29,029,654 27,984,654 28,433,654 28,224,628 28,472,673 28,689,673 29,365,673 30,092,673 26,845,000 27,800,000 27,320,000 25,955,000 26,960,000 24,520,000 23,095,000 20,980,000 19,680,000 20,575,000 21,395,000 17,160,000 17,855,000 6,300,000 3,635,000 2,800,000 1,605,000 1,680,000

Total Debt Service Interest 25,977,799 24,957,773 24,007,002 23,076,843 21,858,464 20,534,279 19,217,244 17,953,568 16,623,717 15,308,887 13,377,126 12,702,018 11,674,638 10,572,375 9,416,903 8,400,357 7,397,707 6,434,083 5,500,857 4,604,112 3,705,929 2,765,676 1,957,851 1,171,656 683,444 355,675 215,350 119,303 40,375

626,957,852

310,611,013

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

Total 50,471,957 55,017,731 49,957,457 52,106,497 49,843,118 48,967,933 47,441,872 46,426,241 45,313,391 44,674,560 43,469,799 39,547,018 39,474,638 37,892,375 35,371,903 35,360,357 31,917,707 29,529,083 26,480,857 24,284,112 24,280,929 24,160,676 19,117,851 19,026,656 6,983,444 3,990,675 3,015,350 1,724,303 1,720,375 937,568,865

294


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


CITY GOVERNMENT, HISTORY, AND COMMUNITY ATTRACTIONS CITY GOVERNMENT The City of Suffolk is organized under the Council-Manager form of government as defined under the Code of Virginia. The governing body of the City is the City Council which establishes policies, sets goals and priorities, and interprets and represents the needs of the community to ensure the economic, social, educational, and physical quality of the City. The City Council consists of eight members: the Mayor elected at large and one member from each of the seven voting boroughs who are elected for four year terms by the voters of the borough in which the member resides. The City Council appoints a City Manager to act as the administrative head of the City. The City Manager directs the general operation of the city government in order to meet the needs of its constituents in accordance with the policies established by the City Council. The City Manager establishes service priorities and advises City Council members about the financial requirements needed to provide services to the community. Each fiscal year, the City Manager prepares and submits a proposed budget to the City Council, which is consistent with the identified goals and priorities of the City. The City Manager also interacts with various elements of the community, including members of the legislative delegation, the business community, civic organizations, and other government bodies. HISTORY The area around Suffolk, Virginia, which is now an independent city in the Hampton Roads region in the southeastern part of the state, was originally inhabited by Native Americans. At the time of European contact, the Nansemonds lived along the river later known by the same name. Suffolk was first explored by the English settlers based at Jamestown, not long after their arrival. They sought a means to survive the inhospitable environment at Jamestown Island. The area was first part of 1634’s Elizabeth River Shire and then, in 1637, part of Upper Norfolk County, part of which became Nansemond County in 1646. The English created a settlement at Constant’s Wharf (named for Captain John Constant) at Sleepy Hole Point on the Nansemond River, to take advantage of commerce they could conduct along the river. In 1742, authorized by the House of Burgesses, the new town was officially named “Suffolk” after Royal Governor William Gooch’s home county of Suffolk in England. During the American Revolutionary War, the town was burned by the British in 1779. It was totally destroyed after thousands of barrels of turpentine and pitch caught fire in warehouses along the river. Suffolk became an incorporated town in Nansemond County in 1808. As part of Virginia, it sided with the Confederacy in the American Civil War. From May 12,

295


1862, to July 3, 1863, the town was occupied by 25,000 Union troops under Major General John J. Peck. Peck made his headquarters in the Greek revival house now called “Riddick’s Folly”. Graffiti from the occupying soldiers can still be seen on the walls. During this period, Confederate General James Longstreet unsuccessfully besieged the town with 20,000 men between April 11 and May 4, 1863. He was ordered to disengage by General Robert E. Lee to join the Army of Northern Virginia at Fredericksburg. Two months later on July 3, the Union forces abandoned the town for strategic reasons, as decided by General John Adams Dix. Confederate cavalry general Laurence S. Baker is buried in the City’s Cedar Hill Cemetery. Suffolk became a city independent from the surrounding county in 1910. At a practical level, the two remained closely linked, and the county seat remained at Suffolk after the city became politically independent. Thus it remained until 1972 when the county was converted to city status to become the short-lived lost city the City of Nansemond. On January 1, 1974, the City of Nansemond and the City of Suffolk united to become the present City of Suffolk, consolidating with the outlying incorporated towns of Holland and Whaleyville. The end result was a new municipality encompassing a total of 430 square miles, making it the largest city in land area in Virginia. Suffolk celebrated its 400th anniversary in 2008. In 1912, Italian immigrant Amedeo Obici came from Pennsylvania and opened facilities of the Planters Nut and Chocolate Company in Suffolk. He built on the widespread cultivation of peanuts in the area. By 1941, Suffolk had been declared “The Peanut Capital of the World”. The city also became home to Planters’ Mr. Peanut, a world-famous advertising icon. Today, Suffolk remains a major peanut processing center and transportation hub. COMMUNITY ATTRACTIONS

Parks and Recreation 

Four regional parks (Bennett’s Creek, Lake Meade, Lone Star Lakes, and Sleepy Hole) are offered throughout the City with various amenities including open fields, playgrounds, shelters, skateboard spots, tennis courts, and boat ramps with access to the Nansemond River.

Thirteen neighborhood parks are offered throughout the City with numerous amenities including basketball courts, playgrounds, and picnic areas.

296


Parks and Recreation 

The City offers the East Suffolk Recreation Center which has a gym, multipurpose room, and fitness facility, and the Whaleyville Community Center which is a full service recreation center that provides health and wellness programs, for children, youth, adults and seniors. The City has six joint use recreation facilities at various elementary schools throughout the City. Programming varies at each location and includes before and after school programs, summer programs, youth and adult athletic leagues, youth cheerleading, karate, open gym, and various other programs, activities, and special events.

Cultural Amenities Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge The Great Dismal Swamp is the largest intact remnant of a vast habitat that once covered more than one million acres of southeastern Virginia and northeastern North Carolina. The Great Dismal Swamp consists of over 112,000 acres of forested wetlands and Lake Drummond, the largest natural lake in Virginia. It is home to various animals including black bears, bobcats, river otters, rattlesnakes, and 200 species of birds. Visitors may participate in hiking, biking, nature photography, wildlife observation, hunting, fishing and boating. Trails are open year round and swamp safaris and canoe tours are available through the Suffolk Visitor Center. Cedar Hill Cemetery Cedar Hill Cemetery The Cedar Hill Cemetery is a 32-acre historic cemetery in downtown Suffolk located behind the Riddick’s Folly House Museum and Seaboard Station Railroad Museum. The cemetery is an official site of the Virginia Civil War Trails program as it is the final resting place for many Confederate Generals and soldiers. 297


Suffolk Center for Cultural Arts Suffolk High School, built in 1922, has been restored and repurposed as the premier visual and performing arts venue for Suffolk. In the heart of downtown, the classic GreekRevival structure houses a 500 seat theatre which is the stage for concerts, ballets, musicals, dramatic works, symphony performances, films, children’s plays, puppet shows and much more. The 62,880 square foot facility offers studios for dance, painting, sculpting, weaving classes and several other arts related classes. Within the massive three-story Center, there is a ballroom and banquet hall, classroom museum, gifts shop and an on-site restaurant (Mosaic by Holland’s). Riddick’s Folly House Museum and Gift Shop Riddick’s Folly House Museum in downtown Suffolk is the former home of Mills Riddick and served as headquarters for the Union Army during the Civil War. This 1837 Greek Revival home is registered with the Virginia Historic Landmarks Commission and the National Register of Historic Places. The museum is open to the public and features workshops in 19th century arts and crafts and various events throughout the year.

Seaboard Station Railroad Museum The Seaboard Station Railroad Museum is the restored Main Street station, built in 1885, and displays a two-room HO-scale model of Suffolk in 1907. The museum hosts several events annually, including Thomas the Train days for kids, book signings, craft fairs, wreath sales, and holiday open houses.

298


The Suffolk Art Gallery The Suffolk Art Gallery hosts a variety of exhibits and year-round programming including painting, weaving, quilting, and lectures. Annual events include The Suffolk Art League’s Juried Arts Exhibition, The Student Exhibit of Excellence, Suffolk Art Gallery’s Annual Juried Photography Exhibit, and the Suffolk Art League’s open Member’s Show.

299


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


CITY DEMOGRAPHICS AND STATISTICS This section of the FY 2017-2018 Operating & Capital Budget provides a snapshot of key demographic, economic, and social statistics about the City of Suffolk. This information is used to analyze trends that may have an impact on resource allocation decisions and to ensure that the City remains competitive with other jurisdictions in the Hampton Roads region. Population Growth The City of Suffolk continues to be one of the fastest growing localities in the Commonwealth of Virginia; however, growth has not occurred at as fast of a pace in the last few years. Suffolk’s population is estimated at 91,722 residents, which is a 1.4% increase over the previous year. Overall, Suffolk’s population has increased 42.8% since the 2000 Census count.

Source: Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service

Building Permits The number of permits issued slightly decreased over last year. The number and value of permits continues to be down since the height of the housing boom in 2006.

Source: Comprehensive Annual Financial Report for FY 2016 300


Median Household Income Median household income is estimated at $65,499, third highest in the Hampton Roads region and slightly above the State average ($65,015).

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, American FactFinder

Unemployment Rate The average annual unemployment rate has ranged from 3.3% to 4.7% over the last 10 years and generally followed the trends of state and federal unemployment. Suffolk’s unemployment rate of 4.7% for 2016 was higher than the state average (4.0%), but slightly less than the national average of (4.9%).

Source: Virginia Employment Commission  301


Direct Property Tax Rates The graph below provides an overview of direct property tax rates for citywide real estate, personal property, and machinery and tools taxes over the last 10 years. Personal Property and machinery and tools tax rates have remained flat over the last 10 years. The real estate tax rate has ranged from $.94 to $1.07 per $100 of assessed value. Direct Property Tax Rates Per Hundred Last Ten Fiscal Years $4.50

$4.25

$4.25

$4.25

$4.25

$4.25

$4.25

$4.25

$4.25

$4.25

$4.25

$4.00 $3.50

$3.15

$3.15

$3.15

$3.15

$3.15

$3.15

$3.15

$3.15

$3.15

$3.15

$3.00 $2.50 $2.00 $1.50

$.94

$1.00

$.94

$0.91

$0.91

$0.97

$0.97

$0.97

$1.07

$1.03

$1.07

$0.50 $0.00 FY08

FY09

FY10

FY11

City Wide Real Estate

FY12

FY13

Personal Property

FY14

FY15

FY16

FY17

Machinery and Tools

Source: Suffolk Department of Budget and Strategic Planning 

Real Estate Tax Rate The adopted citywide real estate tax rate of $1.07 per $100 of assessed value is the third lowest among the seven largest cities in Hampton Roads. Real Estate Tax Rate Com parison $1.40 $1.22

$1.30

$1.15

$1.20 $1.00

$1.24

$1.05

$1.07

Chesapeake

Suffolk

$1.00

$0.80 $0.60 $0.40 $0.20 $0.00 Virginia Beach

N orfolk

N ew port N ew s

H am pton

Portsm outh

Source: Suffolk Department of Budget and Strategic Planning 302


Personal Property Tax Rate The personal property tax rate is currently $4.25 per $100 of assessed value and consistent with other localities in the Hampton Roads region. Personal Property Tax Rate Comparsion $6.00

$5.00

$5.00 $4.00

$4.00

$4.08

$4.25

$4.33

$4.50

$4.50

$3.00 $2.00 $1.00 $0.00

Source: Suffolk Department of Budget and Strategic Planning 

Real Property – Total Assessed Value As Suffolk has grown in size and stature, the total assessed value of real property has increased from $7.6 billion in FY 2007 to $9.0 billion in FY 2016. However, real estate values have fallen in the last few years and remain stagnant.

Source: Comprehensive Annual Financial Report for FY 2016 

303


Allocation of Real Property Values A comparison of real property values from FY 2001 to FY 2017 indicates that residential parcels as a percentage of the overall distribution of parcels by assessed value have increased from 63.2% to 74.2%. Agricultural parcels have declined from 13.6% to 4.0% and commercial parcels dropped from 21.8% to 19.3%. Multifamily parcels have increased from 1.4% to 2.5%. Distribution of Parcels by Assessed Value      FY 2001  FY 2017  Multifamily  1.4%  2.5%  Agriculture  13.6%  4.0%  Commercial  21.8%  19.3%  Residential   63.2%  74.2% 

  Source: City Assessor

Major Real Property Tax Payers Taxpayer Target Corporation 116 Lakeview Parkway, LLC Centerpoint Properties Trust QVC of Suffolk Inc. /CVN Distribution TowneBank The Pergola Group Lake Prince Center Inc. Wal-Mart Stores Boyd Suffolk GSA LLC SGP 115 Lake View

Taxable Assessed Value $58,876,200 55,578,000 51,601,200 43,744,200 40,876,400 39,380,000 33,599,000 31,433,800 31,320,200 27,614,500

Source: Comprehensive Annual Financial Report for FY 2016 

304


Property Tax Levies and Collections Over the last ten years, property tax collections as a percentage of taxes levied have remained consistently strong at approximately 98% each year.

Source: City Treasurer 

Percentage Increase in Tax Revenues By Source The chart below provides an overview of the percentage increase in tax revenue by source.

Source: Comprehensive Annual Financial Report for FY 2016 305


Size of City Government The FY 2017-2018 budget provides for 14.6 full-time positions per 1,000 citizens. Since 2009, the number of full-time positions per 1,000 citizens has gradually declined despite the increase in the City’s population.

Full‐Time Positions Per 1,000 Citizens City of Suffolk Last Ten Fiscal Years 15.8 15.6 15.4 15.2 15.0 FTEs per 1,000  Citizens 14.8 14.6 14.4 14.2 14.0

94,000 92,000 90,000 88,000 Population 86,000 84,000 82,000 80,000 78,000 76,000 74,000

Population

Approved Positions Per 1,000 Citizens

 Source: Suffolk Department of Budget and Strategic Planning 

Support of Schools Funding to support the operation of the school division is provided from local, state, federal, and other sources. Approximately 35% of the schools operating fund is derived from local fund support.

 Source: Suffolk Department of Budget and Strategic Planning    *FY 13’ figures inclusive of $2M one‐time appropriation/local contribution   

306


Principal Employers Suffolk’s employment base is comprised of a diverse mix of business and industry with a workforce of over 40,000 employees. The top employers, excluding the City of Suffolk and Suffolk Public Schools, account for 6,800 employees and 23.5% of the City’s workforce.

Employer Type of Business  Navy Cyber Force  ModSim & Technology  J‐7 Joint Starr  ModSim & Technology  Sentara Health Systems  Medical  CVN Distribution/QVC, Inc.  Warehousing & Distribution  Target   Warehousing & Distribution                                  Wal‐Mart Stores  Retail  Towne Bank  Banking  Food Service Distribution  Sysco Food Services of Hampton Roads  Planters/Kraft Foods  Food Processing  Unilever/Lipton Inc.  Beverage Company      Source: Suffolk Department of Economic Development 

Employees   1,500  1,200  1,061      620     600     450     369     350     350     300  6,800 

307


308


309


310


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


CITY OF SUFFOLK FEE SCHEDULE FISCAL YEAR 2017-2018 Fees AIRPORT Multi Engine T-Hanger (monthly)* Single Engine T-Hanger (monthly)* Large T-Hanger Storage Room (monthly)* Small T-Hanger Storage Room (monthly)* Overnight T-Hanger Overnight Tie Down (waived with fuel fill up) Monthly Single Engine Tie Down* Monthly Multi Engine Tie Down* Jet Starter Service (per hour) Service After Normal Business Hours (call in)* Airport Use Fees Mark-up on Fuel Sales ** Tow Tug

Fiscal Year 2016-2017

Fiscal Year 2017-2018

299.00 229.00 89.00 69.00 35.00 10.00 25.00 25.00 25.00 100.00 250.00/Day Average for all prices 35% (projected) 35.00

319.00 249.00 95.00 75.00 35.00 10.00 25.00 25.00 25.00 100.00 250.00/Day Average for all prices 35% (projected) 35.00

1.00

.25 black & white; .45 color per copy

Cost 50.00 50.00 100.00 50.00

Cost 50.00 50.00 100.00 50.00

7.50 20.00 12.00 1.00 1/3 of state 1/3 of state 4.00 0.25 2.00 25.00 10.00 15.00 varies varies $30/day/juror varies 35.00 5.00 25.00 25.00 1.75

7.50 20.00 12.00 1.00 1/3 of state 1/3 of state 4.00 0.25 2.00 25.00 10.00 15.00 varies varies $30/day/juror varies 35.00 5.00 25.00 25.00 1.75

1/2 of child support guidelines amount

1/2 of child support guidelines amount

100.00

100.00

25.00

25.00

25.00

25.00

100.00

100.00

$5.00/per Child Support Order (per pay) 0.00 $5.00/per Garnishment Order (per pay) 0.00 $5.00 per request $5.00 per request One time penalty of 10% up to 10.00 Annual interest of 10%

$5.00/per Child Support Order (per pay) $5.00/per Support Order (per pay) $10.00 one time fee per summons $3.50 per card for replacement $5.00 per request $5.00 per request One time penalty of 10% up to 10.00 Annual interest of 10%

* Prices consistent with neighboring airports. ** This amount fluctuates depending on our competition

ASSESSOR Copies (KB System) Custom query, tape, CD-ROM (material plus programmers time) (per minute) Land Use Revalidation Fee Land Use Application Land Use Application Late Fee Rehabilitated Structure Application Fee CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Commonwealth's Attorney (misdemeanor) Commonwealth's Attorney (felony) Sheriff's Service Transfer of Real Estate (per parcel) City Grantee City Wills and Administration Law Library Grantor (per $500.00 value) Courthouse Maintenance Jail Admission Fee Courthouse Security Fee Blood Test/DNA Local Interest Local Fines Local Jury Fees Court Appointed Attorney Fees Miscellaneous - Local Cost (CWP) Electronic Summons Criminal or Traffic Case List of Heirs or Affidavit Local Health Care Fund Tranfer/entry fee-Real Estate - Deeds of Partition COURT SERVICES UNIT Parental contribution toward cost of local group home placement FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COMMUNITY CORRECTIONS PROGRAM Offenders referred from a court in the Fifth District (Suffolk, Franklin, Isle of Wight, and Southampton) Offenders referred from a court within the Fifth District and can provide documentation showing SSI disability or welfare benefits Offenders transferred out to a CCP in another jurisdiction Offenders transferred into the Fifth District from a CCP in another jurisdiction FINANCE Child Support Processing Fees Spousal Support Order Fees Garnishment Processing Fees Payroll Paycard Replacment Fee Payroll History Report/Check Reprint Processing Fees W-2 Re-issuance Processing Fees Miscellaneous Bills Miscellaneous Bills

311


CITY OF SUFFOLK FEE SCHEDULE FISCAL YEAR 2017-2018 Fees FIRE & RESCUE

Fiscal Year 2016-2017

Fiscal Year 2017-2018

50.00

50.00

50.00

50.00

50.00 50.00

50.00 50.00

100.00 100.00

100.00 100.00

100.00 100.00

100.00 100.00

200.00

200.00

200.00

200.00

Responsible Party Billed 50.00 50.00

Responsible Party Billed 50.00 50.00

50.00

50.00

Fireworks Permit

150.00

150.00

Tent Permit

50.00

50.00

50.00 (each additional tank 25.00)

50.00 (each additional tank 25.00)

Private hydrant/water line

75.00

75.00

Above/below ground hazmat storage tanks installation 500-2000 gallons capacity, removal of tanks or fill in place any capacity or storage/dispensing system

100.00

100.00

200.00

200.00

No Charge 6.00

No Charge 6.00

40.00 per hour/per person 25.00 per hour/per person

40.00 per hour/per person 25.00 per hour/per person

No Charge 75.00 25.00 per year

No Charge 75.00 25.00 per year

No Charge unless malicious act 50.00 100.00 200.00

No Charge unless malicious act 50.00 100.00 200.00

400.00 650.00 800.00 10.00 per mile

400.00 650.00 800.00 10.00 per mile

Fire Prevention Bureau Plan Review Fire sprinkler system new < 10 w/calcs, or alterations < 10 existing sprinkler heads not located in the most remote area involving new hydraulic calculations 5 foot stub-out for fire protection systems submitted separately from complete fire sprinkler or fire main Fire alarm system alterations where the submittal does not require battery calculations, or the removal of any or all components of nonrequired system Kitchen hood fire suppresion systems installation / alteration Fire sprinkler system new installation 11-20 w/calcs, alterations of 1120 existing sprinkler heads not located in the most remote area involving new hydraulic calculations or removal of any sprinkler heads FM 200 clean agent system installation or alertation Fire alarm new installations or alterations that involve< 5 devices, that require battery calculations Spray paint booth installation / alteration Fire sprinkler systems installation or altreration that involve> 21sprinkler heads Fire alarm systems new installations or alterations > 6 devices, that require battery calculations On-Site Inspection Hazardous Materials Resonse Relocation of up to 20 sprinkler heads Hood/Extinguishing Systems Re-Inspection Fee - All systems failing initial testing shall be charged a re-testing fee. This fee shall include all "no-shows" or cancellations without a 24 hour notice Permits

Above/below ground hazmat storage tanks installation < 499 gallons capacity

Above/below ground hazmat storage tank installation > 2,001 gallons capacity or hazmat storage/dispensing systems Reports Incident or Computer Generated Reports-Residents Incident or Computer Generated Reports-Commercial General Special inspection fee, after hours, weekends, holidays Special event stand-by Burn Permit (Requirements must be met) Residential Commercial Alarm Registration False Alarms (within 180 days) First False Alarm Second False Alarm Third False Alarm Additional False Alarms Emergency Medical Services Basic Life Support (BLS) Advanced Life Support Level I (ALS I) Advanced Life Support Level II (ALS II) Loaded Patient Mileage (LPM)

312


CITY OF SUFFOLK FEE SCHEDULE FISCAL YEAR 2017-2018 Fees Apparatus Use Fee Ambulance Command Unit Brush Truck Tanker Engine Ladder Rescue Rehab Emergency Communication Unit Personnel Firefighter Firefighter/Medic Officers (Captains and Lieutenants) Command Chiefs GENERAL Annual Operating Budget Capital Improvement Budget and Plan Comprehensive Annual Financial Report Copies (photo) (black and white) (each) Copies (photo) (color) (each) Printed Materials Vehicle License Fees-Vehicles under 4,000 pounds Vehicle License Fees-Vehicles 4001-10,000 pounds Vehicle License Fees-Vehicles 10,001-25,000 pounds Vehicle License Fees-Vehicles 25,001-40,000 pounds Vehicle License Fees-Vehicles 40,001-55,000 pounds Vehicle License Fees-Vehicles 55,001-70,000 pounds Vehicle License Fees-Vehicles 70,001-99,999 pounds Motorcycle License Fees-Motorcycles 0-99,999 pounds Trailer License Fees-Trailers 0-10,000 pounds Trailer License Fees-Trailers 10,001-99,999 pounds GENERAL DISTRICT COURT Fines & Forfeitures Sheriff's Fees Court Appointed Attorneys Electronic Summons Criminal or Traffic Case Court House Maintenance Fees Jail Admission Fee GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM Digital Map Data Topographic Data (File Set) Orthophotography (Single Image) Base Map (File Set) Planimetrics (File Set) Zoning (File Set) 8.5" x 11" (ANSI A) 11" x 17" (ANSI B) 17" x 22" (ANSI C) 22" x 34" (ANSI D) 24" x 48" or 24" x 60" 34" x 44" (ANSI E) 36" x 60" or 36" x 72" Entire City Basemap Entire City Aerial Image Specialized Map Services Special Map Production Services (Per Hour) Specialized Data Analysis Services (Per Hour) Individual Orthophotography Tiles 1-5 tiles 6 - 10 tiles

Fiscal Year 2016-2017

Fiscal Year 2017-2018

30.00 per hour 30.00 per hour 30.00 per hour 75.00 per hour 75.00 per hour 125.00 per hour 125.00 per hour 50.00 per hour, plus supplies used 75.00 per hour

30.00 per hour 30.00 per hour 30.00 per hour 75.00 per hour 75.00 per hour 125.00 per hour 125.00 per hour 50.00 per hour, plus supplies used 75.00 per hour

25.00 per hour/per person 30.00 per hour/per person 35.00 per hour/per person 45.00 per hour/per person

25.00 per hour/per person 30.00 per hour/per person 35.00 per hour/per person 45.00 per hour/per person

Cost for reproducing Cost for reproducing Cost for reproducing 0.25 0.45 Cost 26.00 30.00 35.00 60.00 80.00 125.00 150.00 24.00 6.00 22.00

Cost for reproducing Cost for reproducing Cost for reproducing 0.25 0.45 Cost 26.00 30.00 35.00 60.00 80.00 125.00 150.00 24.00 6.00 22.00

varies 12.00 120.00 5.00 10.00 25.00

varies 12.00 120.00 5.00 10.00 25.00

$500.00/set or $100/per layer $7851.00 (High Resolution)/$3821 (DTM) $500.00/set or $100/per layer $500.00/set or $100/per layer $500.00/set or $100/per layer $3.00 $5.00 $10.00 $10.00 $12.00 $15.00 $15.00 $25.00 $50.00

$500.00/set or $100/per layer $7851.00 (High Resolution)/$3821 (DTM) $500.00/set or $100/per layer $500.00/set or $100/per layer $500.00/set or $100/per layer $3.00 $5.00 $10.00 $10.00 $12.00 $15.00 $15.00 $25.00 $50.00

65.00 65.00

65.00 65.00

100.00/tile 50.00/tile

100.00/tile 50.00/tile

2% of monthly premium

2% of monthly premium

HUMAN RESOURCES COBRA administration

313


CITY OF SUFFOLK FEE SCHEDULE FISCAL YEAR 2017-2018 Fees JUVENILE AND DOMESTIC RELATIONS COURT Fines and Forfeitures Sheriff's Fees Court Appointed Attorney Courthouse Maintenance Local Interest Jail Admission Fee Courthouse Security Fee LIBRARY Printer and Photocopier-Black and White (per sheet) Printer and Photocopier-Color (per sheet) Lost Card Lost Book/Materials Lost/Damaged Barcode, RFID Tag, Case, Cover, Artwork or Spine Label Lost Tape or CD PARKS AND RECREATION Athletic Registration Fees Adult Flag Football - Spring & Fall Leagues Adult Kickball Adult Volleyball Adult Softball League Men's Division Women's Division Adult Basketball League (per team) Late Fee Youth Basketball (per participant) Novice-Junior Lil' Dribblers Youth Cheerleading Youth Soccer (per participant) Novice-Junior Tiny Kickz Ball Fields (Tournaments) Rental of Ball fields with Lights (half day) Rental of Ball fields with Lights (full day) Rental of Ball fields without Lights (half day) Rental of Ball fields without Lights (full day) Facilities and Parks Bennett's Creek Park Picnic Shelter Full Day Wedding (up to 4 hours) Stage Constant's Wharf Park and Marina Compass Rose/Boardwalk (Weddings Only) Deposit Compass Rose/Boardwalk (Weddings Only) Per Hour Marina Slips Daily Rate with Electricity 0-24 Feet 25-34 Feet 35-44 Feet 45-54 Feet Monthly Rate with Electricity 0-24 Feet 25-34 Feet 35-44 Feet 45-54 Feet Daily Rate without Electricity 0-24 Feet 25-34 Feet 35-44 Feet 45-54 Feet Monthly Rate without Electricity 0-24 Feet 25-34 Feet 35-44 Feet 45-54 Feet

Fiscal Year 2016-2017

Fiscal Year 2017-2018

Varies 12.00 120.00 2.00 Varies 25.00 10.00

Varies 12.00 120.00 2.00 Varies 25.00 10.00

0.20 0.40 2.00 Cost of Book/Material 5.00 Cost of Replacement Tape or CD

0.20 0.40 0.00 Cost of Book/Material 5.00 Cost of Replacement Tape or CD

320.00 220.00 200.00

320.00 220.00 200.00

350.00 300.00 320.00 15.00 60.00 40.00 60.00 60.00 40.00

350.00 300.00 320.00 15.00 60.00 40.00 60.00 60.00 40.00

60.00 115.00 40.00 65.00

60.00 115.00 40.00 65.00

75.00 0.00 300.00 per day

75.00 20.00 per hour 300.00 per day

150.00 150.00

150.00 150.00

25.00 35.00 45.00 55.00

25.00 35.00 45.00 55.00

120.00 140.00 160.00 180.00

120.00 140.00 160.00 180.00

100.00 120.00 140.00 160.00

100.00 120.00 140.00 160.00

100.00 120.00 140.00 160.00

100.00 120.00 140.00 160.00

314


CITY OF SUFFOLK FEE SCHEDULE FISCAL YEAR 2017-2018 Fees Lake Kennedy Park Shelter Cypress Park Shelter Cypress Park Pool (Rental) Deposit 2-hour rental Group Swim Recreation Centers Birthday Parties 1 to 25 Patrons 26 to 50 Patrons 51 to 100 Patrons Recreation Center Membership Membership Fees Youth (7-17 years) - Per Year Adults (18 and older) - Per Year Seniors (55 and older) - Per Year Visitor Pass Replacement Card Fitness Room (must have membership ID) - Per Month Fitness Room (Seniors) - Per Month Fitness Room (Adults -18 & up) - Per Month Fitness Room (Teens-16 & 17 Yrs Old) - Per Month Non-Membership Fee Unless Otherwise Noted, Non Resident Fees Recreation Center Rentals Application Processing Fee: East Suffolk & Whaleyville - Non Refundable Gymnasium: Must be out by 8p (minimum 4 hour rental) Non-commercial Events Hourly Rate Non resident rate Commercial Events (w/fee or admission) Hourly Rate Non resident rate Deposit on All Rentals Late Fee (per 15 minutes) for not vacating rental on time Multipurpose Room Resident hourly rental rate (minimum 2 hour rental) Non-resident hourly rental rate(min 2 hour rental)

Fiscal Year 2016-2017 75.00 75.00

Fiscal Year 2017-2018 75.00 75.00

150.00 35.00 per hour 35.00 per hour

150.00 35.00 per hour 35.00 per hour

35.00 per hour/ 2 hour max 50.00 per hour/ 2 hour max 100.00 per hour/ 2 hour max

35.00 per hour/ 2 hour max 50.00 per hour/ 2 hour max 100.00 per hour/ 2 hour max

10.00 20.00 5.00 5.00 3.00

10.00 20.00 5.00 5.00 3.00

5.00 10.00 7.00 N/A 25% above resident fees

5.00 10.00 7.00 N/A 25% above resident fees

0.00

25.00

65.00/hr 81.25/hr

65.00/hr 81.25/hr

75.00/hr 93.75/hr 150.00 25.00 per 15 minutes

75.00/hr 93.75/hr 150.00 25.00 per 15 minutes

25.00 per hour 35.00 per hour

25.00 per hour 35.00 per hour

25.00 per hour 35.00 per hour

25.00 per hour 35.00 per hour

75.00 10.00 per hour 10.00

75.00 10.00 per hour 10.00

0.00 25.00 per canoe

20.00 per hour 25.00 per canoe

50.00

50.00

150.00 0.00 0.00 125.00 per hour/ Res. 200.00 per hour/ Non Res. 225.00 per hour/ Res. 300.00 per hour/ Non Res. 25.00 per 15 minutes

150.00 25.00 50.00 per hour (2 hour min/4 hour max) 125.00 per hour/ Res. 200.00 per hour/ Non Res. 225.00 per hour/ Res. 300.00 per hour/ Non Res. 25.00 per 15 minutes

150.00 25.00 per 15 minutes

150.00 25.00 per 15 minutes

25.00/hr

25.00/hr

35.00/hr

35.00/hr

75.00 125.00 0.00 25.00

75.00 125.00 20.00 per hour

Conference Room Resident hourly rental rate (minimum 2 hour rental) Non-resident hourly rental rate(min 2 hour rental)

Lake Meade Park and Tennis Complex Picnic Shelter Full day Tennis Ball Machine Dog Park Membership (Annual Membership) Lone Star Lakes Park Wedding (up to 4 hours) Canoe Rentals (maximum of 6 canoes available) Special Event Application Fee Non-Profit/For-Profit Planters Club Rental Period: 8:00 a.m. to Midnight

Deposit Application Processing Fee Setup Fees Resident hourly rental rate (minimum 4-hour rental) Mon - Thurs Non-resident hourly rental rate (minimum 4-hour rental) Mon - Thurs Resident hourly rental rate (minimum 4-hour rental) Fri - Sun Non-resident hourly rental rate (minimum 4 hour rental) Fri - Sun Late Fee (per 15 minutes) for not vacating rental on time

Suffolk Art Gallery Deposit Late fee per 15 mins. for not vacating on time Non-Commercial events Hourly Rate Commercial events Hourly Rate Sleepy Hole Park Picnic Shelter #1-8 & 10-12 Full Day Picnic Shelter #9 Full Day Wedding (up to 4 hours) Picnic Pack

315


CITY OF SUFFOLK FEE SCHEDULE FISCAL YEAR 2017-2018 Fees Whaleyville Annex Application Processing Fee: East Suffolk & Whaleyville - Non Refundable Deposit Resident hourly rental rate (minimum 4-hour rental) Includes Kitchen and use of Ice Machine Non-resident hourly rental rate (minimum 4-hour rental) Late Fee (per 15 minutes) for not vacating rental on time Custodial Fees (all rental facilities)

Security Services (Suffolk Police Officers) Fee Based Activities Maintenance Equipment Mobile Bleachers - Per Day Stage - Portable Tents - Per Day 10 x 10 20 x 20 Risers - 4' x 8' Steps 4x8 Tables Folding Chairs (each) Unless Otherwise Noted, Non Resident Fees Ground Maintenance Grave Space - Single Lot Grave Opening over 10 years of age - weekdays over 10 years of age - Saturday over 10 years of age - Sunday/Holiday age 1-10 - weekdays age 1-10 - Saturday age 1-10 - Sunday/Holiday infant under 1 - weekdays infant under 1 - Saturday infant under 1 - Sunday/Holiday Cremation (urn burial) Scatter Garden - Scattering of Ashes Scatter Garden - Memorial /Plaque Engraving Funeral after 4:00 pm in addition to above cost

Fiscal Year 2016-2017

Fiscal Year 2017-2018

0.00 150.00

25.00 150.00

50.00 per hour/Res 62.50/hour/Non Res 25.00 per 15 minutes

50.00 per hour/Res 62.50/hour/Non Res 25.00 per 15 minutes

10.50 to 16.00 per hour 30.00 per hour per officer As noted in Leisure Guide

10.50 to 16.00 per hour 30.00 per hour per officer As noted in Leisure Guide

200.00 500.00/per day

200.00 500.00/per day

125.00 200.00 50.00 ea. per day (up to 6) 25.00 per day 25.00 6.00 1.00 25% above resident fees

125.00 200.00 50.00 ea. per day (up to 6) 25.00 per day N/A 6.00 1.00 25% above resident fees

800.00

800.00

850.00 1,050.00 1,050.00 260.00 680.00 860.00 140.00 560.00 800.00 400.00 100.00 225.00 100.00

850.00 1,050.00 1,050.00 260.00 680.00 860.00 140.00 560.00 800.00 400.00 100.00 225.00 100.00

* Please see Suffolk Parks & Recreation Connection brochure on the City's website for other events and rates at the following link: http://www.suffolkva.us/parks/ PLANNING AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT PLANNING Rezoning Requests Conditional Rezoning Requests Conditional Use Permits Comprehensive Plan Amendment Comprehensive Plan Consistency Review Subdivision Variance Requests Wetlands Board Wetlands Board After the Fact Chesapeake Bay Preservation Area Special Exception Request (Administrative) Chesapeake Bay Preservation Area Special Exception Request (Planning Commission) Historic and Cultural Review - Additions Historic and Cultural Review - New Construction Historic and Cultural Review - Administration Historic and Cultural Review - After the Fact Historic and Cultural Review - Administration After the Fact* Borrow Pit Fees Per cubic yard removed semi-annually Street Name Change Request Street Abandonment Encroachment Permits Minor Subdivision Family Transfer

800.00 plus 40.00 acre 1,000 plus 40.00 acre 800.00 plus 20.00 acre 1,000.00 250.00 500.00 250.00 300.00

800.00 plus 40.00 acre 1,000 plus 40.00 acre 800.00 plus 20.00 acre 1,000.00 250.00 500.00 250.00 300.00

50.00

50.00

250.00 150.00 150.00 35.00 250.00 70.00 100.00 0.23 325.00 100.00 100.00 300.00 300.00

250.00 150.00 150.00 35.00 250.00 70.00 100.00 0.23 325.00 100.00 100.00 300.00 300.00

316


CITY OF SUFFOLK FEE SCHEDULE FISCAL YEAR 2017-2018 Fees Preliminary Plat Fee (per lot) Final Plat Fee (per lot) Subdivision Engineering Plan Review Subdivision Engineering Plan Review Revisions Subdivision Determination** Site Plan Review (excludes 1 & 2 family dwelling) plus per acre Site Plan Review - additional revisions (per submittal) Site Plan Waiver Request Maps (each) Printed Map Products Maps-Specialized Map Production Services Aerial Photographs 1" = 1000' 1" = 1600" Base map set Unified Development Ordinance Comprehensive Plan Geodetic Control Network Book Geodetic Control Network Book - Supplement Wetland Mitigation Fee In-Lieu***

Fiscal Year 2016-2017 50.00 with 300.00 minimum 30.00 with 200.00 minimum 40.00 per lot with 200.00 minimum 150.00 90.00 600.00 60.00 150.00 50.00 5.00 50.00 Hour

Fiscal Year 2017-2018 50.00 with 300.00 minimum 30.00 with 200.00 minimum 40.00 per lot with 200.00 minimum 150.00 90.00 600.00 60.00 150.00 50.00 5.00 50.00 Hour

0.25 50.00 Cost 60.00 25.00

0.25 50.00 Cost 60.00 25.00

10.00 1% over market rate to purchase credits in an approved tidal wetlands bank

10.00 1% over market rate to purchase credits in an approved tidal wetlands bank

50.00 2.00% 50.00

50.00 2.00% 50.00

250.00 500.00 1,000.00 2,000.00 4,000.00 5,000.00

250.00 500.00 1,000.00 2,000.00 4,000.00 5,000.00

50.00 2.00%

50.00 2.00%

50.00 50.00 50.00 50.00

50.00 50.00 50.00 50.00

50.00 50.00 70.00 50.00

50.00 50.00 70.00 50.00

75.00 50.00 105.00 60.00

75.00 50.00 105.00 60.00

100.00 60.00 140.00 80.00

100.00 60.00 140.00 80.00

125.00 75.00 175.00 100.00

125.00 75.00 175.00 100.00

150.00 90.00 210.00 120.00

150.00 90.00 210.00 120.00

175.00 105.00 245.00 140.00

175.00 105.00 245.00 140.00

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT Minimum State Levy Extra Inspection Trips (each) Penalty for Working Without Permits Construction Cost $1 - 50,000 50,001 - 100,000 100,001 - 150,000 150,001 - 250,000 250,001 - 750,000 over 750,000 Electrical Permits (new service, temporary service & service changes) Minimum State Levy 1 - 50 amps Single Phase Fee (new) Single Phase Fee (change) Three Phase Fee (new) Three Phase Fee (change) 50 - 100 amps Single Phase Fee (new) Single Phase Fee (change) Three Phase Fee (new) Three Phase Fee (change) 101 - 150 amps Single Phase Fee (new) Single Phase Fee (change) Three Phase Fee (new) Three Phase Fee (change) 151 - 200 amps Single Phase Fee (new) Single Phase Fee (change) Three Phase Fee (new) Three Phase Fee (change) 201 - 250 amps Single Phase Fee (new) Single Phase Fee (change) Three Phase Fee (new) Three Phase Fee (change) 251 - 300 amps Single Phase Fee (new) Single Phase Fee (change) Three Phase Fee (new) Three Phase Fee (change) 301 - 350 amps Single Phase Fee (new) Single Phase Fee (change) Three Phase Fee (new) Three Phase Fee (change)

317


CITY OF SUFFOLK FEE SCHEDULE FISCAL YEAR 2017-2018 Fees 351 - 400 amps Single Phase Fee (new) Single Phase Fee (change) Three Phase Fee (new) Three Phase Fee (change) 401 - 450 amps Single Phase Fee (new) Single Phase Fee (change) Three Phase Fee (new) Three Phase Fee (change) 451 - 500 amps Single Phase Fee (new) Single Phase Fee (change) Three Phase Fee (new) Three Phase Fee (change) 501 - 550 amps Single Phase Fee (new) Single Phase Fee (change) Three Phase Fee (new) Three Phase Fee (change) 551 - 600 amps Single Phase Fee (new) Single Phase Fee (change) Three Phase Fee (new) Three Phase Fee (change) 601 - 650 amps Single Phase Fee (new) Single Phase Fee (change) Three Phase Fee (new) Three Phase Fee (change) 651 - 700 amps Single Phase Fee (new) Single Phase Fee (change) Three Phase Fee (new) Three Phase Fee (change) 701 - 750 amps Single Phase Fee (new) Single Phase Fee (change) Three Phase Fee (new) Three Phase Fee (change) 751 - 800 amps Single Phase Fee (new) Single Phase Fee (change) Three Phase Fee (new) Three Phase Fee (change) 801 - 850 amps Single Phase Fee (new) Single Phase Fee (change) Three Phase Fee (new) Three Phase Fee (change) 851 - 900 amps Single Phase Fee (new) Single Phase Fee (change) Three Phase Fee (new) Three Phase Fee (change) 901 - 950 amps Single Phase Fee (new) Single Phase Fee (change) Three Phase Fee (new) Three Phase Fee (change) 951 - 1,000 amps Single Phase Fee (new) Single Phase Fee (change) Three Phase Fee (new) Three Phase Fee (change) 1,001 - 1,050 amps Single Phase Fee (new) Single Phase Fee (change) Three Phase Fee (new) Three Phase Fee (change)

Fiscal Year 2016-2017

Fiscal Year 2017-2018

200.00 120.00 280.00 160.00

200.00 120.00 280.00 160.00

225.00 135.00 315.00 180.00

225.00 135.00 315.00 180.00

250.00 150.00 350.00 200.00

250.00 150.00 350.00 200.00

275.00 165.00 385.00 220.00

275.00 165.00 385.00 220.00

300.00 180.00 420.00 240.00

300.00 180.00 420.00 240.00

325.00 195.00 455.00 260.00

325.00 195.00 455.00 260.00

350.00 210.00 490.00 280.00

350.00 210.00 490.00 280.00

375.00 225.00 525.00 300.00

375.00 225.00 525.00 300.00

400.00 240.00 560.00 320.00

400.00 240.00 560.00 320.00

425.00 255.00 595.00 340.00

425.00 255.00 595.00 340.00

450.00 270.00 630.00 360.00

450.00 270.00 630.00 360.00

475.00 285.00 665.00 380.00

475.00 285.00 665.00 380.00

500.00 300.00 700.00 400.00

500.00 300.00 700.00 400.00

525.00 315.00 720.00 410.00

525.00 315.00 720.00 410.00

318


CITY OF SUFFOLK FEE SCHEDULE FISCAL YEAR 2017-2018 Fees 1,051 - 1,100 amps Single Phase Fee (new) Single Phase Fee (change) Three Phase Fee (new) Three Phase Fee (change) 1,101 - 1,150 amps Single Phase Fee (new) Single Phase Fee (change) Three Phase Fee (new) Three Phase Fee (change) 1,151 - 1,200 amps Single Phase Fee (new) Single Phase Fee (change) Three Phase Fee (new) Three Phase Fee (change) Over 1,200 amps Single Phase Fee (new) Single Phase Fee (change) Three Phase Fee (new) Three Phase Fee (change) Electrical Permits (additions and repairs) 0 - 30 amps (per circuit) 31 - 60 61 - 100 101 - 200 over 200 amps Pool Grounding Repair Wiring, Apparatus, Fixtures Plumbing Permits Minimum State Levy Each Fixture, Floor Drain, or Trap Each Sewer (sanitary and storm) Each Sewer Replaced or Repaired Each Manhole Each Roof Drain Each Area Drain Each Water Heater Each Water Line (New Residential) Each Water Line (Existing Residential) Each Water Line (Commercial) Each Sewer Line (Commercial) Backflow Preventer Mechanical and Gas Permits Minimum State Levy New Construction for all mechanical apparatus $0 - 3,000 3,001 - 4,000 4,001 - 5,000 5,001 - 6,000 continue at $6.00/$1,000 value of fraction thereof Replacement, Alterations, Repairs and Additions $0 - 4,000 4,001 - 5,000 5,001 - 6,000 continue at $6.00/$1000 value of fraction thereof LPG Tanks and Associated Piping 0 - 2,000 gallons over 2,000 Flammable Liquid Tanks and Associated Piping 0 - 50,000 gallons over 50,000 Fuel Piping Outlet Each Plan Review All Structures 0 - 2,499 square feet 2,500 - 5,000 5,000 - 10,000 10,001 - 30,000 30,001 - 50,000 50,001 - 100,000 Above 100,000

Fiscal Year 2016-2017

Fiscal Year 2017-2018

550.00 330.00 740.00 420.00

550.00 330.00 740.00 420.00

575.00 345.00 760.00 430.00

575.00 345.00 760.00 430.00

600.00 360.00 780.00 440.00

600.00 360.00 780.00 440.00

600.00 plus 25 per 50 amps after 360 plus 15 per 50 amps after 780.00 plus 20 per 50 amps after 440 plus 10 per 50 amps after

600.00 plus 25 per 50 amps after 360 plus 15 per 50 amps after 780.00 plus 20 per 50 amps after 440 plus 10 per 50 amps after

4.00 5.00 7.00 15.00 20.00 55.00 50.00

4.00 5.00 7.00 15.00 20.00 55.00 50.00

50.00 2.00% 7.00 7.00 35.00 7.00 7.00 7.00 7.00 7.00 35.00 100.00 100.00 7.00

50.00 2.00% 7.00 7.00 35.00 7.00 7.00 7.00 7.00 7.00 35.00 100.00 100.00 7.00

50.00 2.00%

50.00 2.00%

50.00 50.00 50.00 55.00

50.00 50.00 50.00 55.00

50.00 55.00 55.00

50.00 55.00 55.00

50.00 50.00 plus $4.00/10,000 gallons

50.00 50.00 plus $4.00/10,000 gallons

50.00 50.00 plus $6.00/25,000 gallons 50.00

50.00 50.00 plus $6.00/25,000 gallons 50.00

75.00 100.00 125.00 175.00 250.00 300.00 350.00

75.00 100.00 125.00 175.00 250.00 300.00 350.00

319


CITY OF SUFFOLK FEE SCHEDULE FISCAL YEAR 2017-2018 Fees Moving Out of City to In City In City to Out of City Within City Through City Accessory Structures 0 - 100 square feet 101 - 300 301 - 600 Demolition One to Two Family Residences Any Residential Accessory Structure All Other Buildings 0 - 60,000 square feet over 60,000 Sign Fees In Addition to Minimum Permit Fee 1 - 40 41 - 80 over 80 Elevator Compliance Card Amusement Ride Inspection Kiddie Ride Major Ride Spectacular Ride Cross Connection Inspection Private Piers, Greenhouses, and Walls $1 - 2,200 over 2,200 Miscellaneous Fees Mobile Homes Modular Classroom Units Tents Chimneys Free Standing Fireplaces/Wood Stoves Stationary Fireplaces Temporary Power Release Inspection Temporary Use Permit Fee Swimming Pools $1 - 2,200 over 2,200 Certificate of Occupancy Residential Commercial Extension of Residential, Commercial and Temp C.O. Temporary Rental Two or More Units (per unit) Reinspection Business License Inspection Board of Building Code Appeal Extension of Permits Tower, Antennas and Like Structures $0 - 4999 value 5,000 - 19,999 20,000 - 99,999 over 100,000 Building Fees (see attached Schedule A) Zoning Permits (includes Farm Affidavits) Home Occupation Permits (zoning review) Health Department Evaluation New Construction Updates Board of Zoning Appeals Administrative Variance Request Chesapeake Bay Special Exception Request Reviewed by Zoning Administrator If Forwarded to Board of Zoning Appeals Written Determination by Zoning Administrator

Fiscal Year 2016-2017

Fiscal Year 2017-2018

525.00 275.00 275.00 100.00

525.00 275.00 275.00 100.00

50.00 50.00 65.00

50.00 50.00 65.00

55.00 50.00

55.00 50.00

100.00 $25/15,000 sq.ft.

100.00 $25/15,000 sq.ft.

50.00 55.00 65.00 50.00

50.00 55.00 65.00 50.00

15.00 25.00 45.00 50.00

15.00 25.00 45.00 50.00

50.00 $2.00/$100 value

50.00 $2.00/$100 value

50.00 55.00 50.00 50.00 50.00 50.00 60.00 35.00

50.00 55.00 50.00 50.00 50.00 50.00 60.00 35.00

50.00 $1.00/$100 value

50.00 $1.00/$100 value

50.00 100.00 50.00 100.00 50.00 30.00 50.00 100.00 250.00 75.00

50.00 100.00 50.00 100.00 50.00 30.00 50.00 100.00 250.00 75.00

20.00 per $1,000 100.00 per $5,000 plus 10.00 per $1,000 250.00 per $20,000 plus 5.00 per $1,000 625.00 per $100,000 plus 4.00 per $1,000 Schedule A (attached) 35.00 35.00*

20.00 per $1,000 100.00 per $5,000 plus 10.00 per $1,000 250.00 per $20,000 plus 5.00 per $1,000 625.00 per $100,000 plus 4.00 per $1,000 Schedule A (attached) 35.00 35.00*

100.00 50.00 500.00 60.00

100.00 50.00 500.00 60.00

50.00 300.00 90.00

50.00 300.00 90.00

320


CITY OF SUFFOLK FEE SCHEDULE FISCAL YEAR 2017-2018 Fees

Fiscal Year 2016-2017 $50.00 plus fees for in-kind services such as Police, Fire, Equipment Rental, etc. 100.00 Cost 25.00

Fiscal Year 2017-2018 $50.00 plus fees for in-kind services such as Police, Fire, Equipment Rental, etc. 100.00 Cost 25.00

75% 50% 25%

75% 50% 25%

75% 50%

75% 50%

75% 50%

75% 50%

75% 50%

75% 50%

75% 50%

75% 50%

Annual Alarm Registration Alarm Registration Renewal Alarm Registration Late Fee (after 30 days) Fee to alarm company for failure to provide alarm user list Reinstatement fee for failure to provide alarm user list Late fee for registration renewal (after 30 days) Use of Automatic Dialer Audible Alarm Violation Reinstatement Fee for failure to provide ARM Failure of alarm company to provide customer False Alarm Prevention checklist

25.00 10.00 25.00 25.00 per working day until compliance 100.00 + 10.00 per registered user 25.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 + 10.00 per registered user

25.00 10.00 25.00 25.00 per working day until compliance 100.00 + 10.00 per registered user 25.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 + 10.00 per registered user

50.00

50.00

Failure of alarm company to provide Alarm Installer checklist Failure of alarm company to provide Alarm Dispatch Records request

50.00 50.00 100.00 25.00

50.00 50.00 100.00 25.00

100.00

100.00

100.00 100.00 50.00 100.00 150.00 100.00 150.00 250.00 50.00 25.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 75.00 100.00 25.00 10.00 10.00

100.00 100.00 50.00 100.00 150.00 100.00 150.00 250.00 50.00 25.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 75.00 100.00 25.00 10.00 10.00

10.00 $10 for first card, and $5 for additional cards 7.00 or cost whatever is greater 20.00 15.00 35.00 Cost, but not less than 15.00 $30.00 plus $20 for annual inspection or reinspection of each vehicle listed

10.00 $10 for first card, and $5 for additional cards 7.00 or cost whatever is greater 20.00 15.00 35.00 Cost, but not less than 15.00 $30.00 plus $20 for annual inspection or reinspection of each vehicle listed

Special Entertainment Permit Junkyard Compliance Inspection (yearly) Unified Development Ordinance Temporary Signs Building Permits: Permit Issued No Inspections Completed Foundation Inspection Completed Framing & Foundation Inspection Completed Electrical Permits: Permit Issued No Inspections Completed Rough-in Inspections Completed Mechanical Permits: Permit Issued No Inspections Completed Rough-in Inspections Completed Gas Permits: Permit Issued No Inspections Completed Rough-in Inspections Completed Plumbing Permits Permit Issued No Inspections Completed Rough-in Inspections Completed * All refunds subject to $15.00 processing Fee-no refunds will be issued for amounts less than $15.00

POLICE

Security Alarm Company Initial Registration* Late fee for Security Alarm Company registration (after 30 days) Security Alarm Company Registration Renewal less than 50 alarm sites in Suffolk* Security Alarm Company Registration Renewal 51+ alarm sites in Suffolk Reinstatement fee for alarm installation/monitoring company General false alarm fee for second response General false alarm fee for third response General false alarm fee for fourth and subsequent response Robbery/panic false alarm for second response Robbery/panic false alarm for third response Robbery/panic false alarm for fourth and all subsequent response Reinstatement fee to alarm user for suspended alarm registration Late fee for failure to pay false alarm fees after 30 days False Alarm fee for non-registered alarm per response Fee to monitoring co. for calling in on suspended/ unregistered alarm site Fee to alarm company for making false statement Fee to alarm company for causing false alarm response per response Fee to monitoring company for failure to verify alarm system signal Fee for appeals per request Local Record Check Accident Report Incident Report Fingerprinting Photographs Chauffeur's License Solicitation Permit Concealed Weapon Permit Computer Generated Reports Certificate of Public Convenience

321


CITY OF SUFFOLK FEE SCHEDULE FISCAL YEAR 2017-2018 Fees Security Services Reclaim Fee (Animal Shelter and Management) Adoption - Feline Adoption Spayed or Neutered with Vaccines (Animal Shelter) Adoption - Canine Spayed or Neutered with Vaccines (Animal Shelter) Adoption - Animal other than Feline or Canine (Animal Shelter) Dog License Fee - Spayed or Neutered (Animal Shelter) Dog License Fee - Not Spayed or Neutered (Animal Shelter) Full Scale Accident Diagram Audio Dispatch Tape/CD CAD Report Color Copy Black & White Copy Photographs on CD Video Tape PUBLIC UTILITIES Bacteriological Tests (each) Delinquency Fees Door tag placement Disconnect/Reconnect of Water Service Meter Removal Finance Charges Illegal Connect/Reconnection of Water Service Water Conservation Reconnection Fees 1st Violation Subsequent Violations Water Rate per 100 cubic feet WTWA Wholesale Water Rate (per 100 cubic feet) WTWA Fixed Capacity Charge (per month) WTWA Meter Service Charge (per month) Water Conservation Service Charge Rate Water Usage Non Metered (per month - 5 ccf)

Fiscal Year 2016-2017 Police Officer/$30 per hour, minimum 2 hours Supervisor/$35 per hour, minimum

Fiscal Year 2017-2018 Police Officer/$30 per hour, minimum 2 hours per hour, minimum

Supervisor/$35

15.00 per day

15.00 per day

75.00 95.00 25.00 5.00 10.00 5.00 15.00 6.00 0.50 0.25 15.00 15.00

75.00 95.00 25.00 5.00 10.00 5.00 15.00 6.00 0.50 0.25 15.00 15.00

35.00

35.00

10.00 25.00 50.00 1.5 % per month with $0.50 minimum 100.00

10.00 25.00 50.00 1.5 % per month with $0.50 minimum 100.00

250.00 500.00 9.03 4.56 222,995.00

250.00 500.00 9.20 4.55 202,454.00

200.00 1.25 x Meter Rate 44.15

200.00 1.25 x Meter Rate 46.00

Meter Service Charge (per month) 5/8 and 3/4 inch meter

8.40 (Billed at $0.276 per day per billing cycle)

8.40 (Billed at $0.276 per day per billing cycle)

1 inch meter 1½ inch meter

21.05 (Billed at $0.692 per day per billing cycle) 42.00 (Billed at $1.381 per day per billing cycle)

21.05 (Billed at $0.692 per day per billing cycle) 42.00 (Billed at $1.381 per day per billing cycle)

2 inch meter 3 inch meter

69.20 (Billed at $2.275 per day per billing cycle) 126.00 (Billed at $4.142 per day per billing cycle)

69.20 (Billed at $2.275 per day per billing cycle) 126.00 (Billed at $4.142 per day per billing cycle)

210.00 (Billed at $6.904 per day per billing cycle) 420.00 (Billed at $13.808 per day per billing cycle) 672.00 (Billed at $22.093 per day per billing cycle) 966.00 (Billed at $31.759 per day per billing cycle)

210.00 (Billed at $6.904 per day per billing cycle) 420.00 (Billed at $13.808 per day per billing cycle) 672.00 (Billed at $22.093 per day per billing cycle) 966.00 (Billed at $31.759 per day per billing cycle)

2,000.00 0.00 2,300.00 2,600.00 3,000.00

2,000.00 0.00 2,300.00 2,600.00 3,000.00

Actual cost x 1.25 50.00

Actual cost x 1.25 50.00

5,520.00

5,520.00

4,970.00 4,420.00 3,865.00 3,310.00 3,900.00

4,970.00 4,420.00 3,865.00 3,310.00 3,900.00

5,520.00 13,520.00 26,950.00 43,120.00 80,850.00 134,750.00 269,500.00 431,200.00 619,850.00

5,520.00 13,520.00 26,950.00 43,120.00 80,850.00 134,750.00 269,500.00 431,200.00 619,850.00

4 inch meter 6 inch meter 8 inch meter 10 inch meter Water Connection Charge (installed by city) 5/8 inch meter 3/4 inch meter 1 inch meter 1½ inch meter 2 inch meter When the size is above those listed a charge equal to actual cost of installation plus 25% Water Connection Charge (installed by developer) Water Availability Charge (residential) Single Family Attached Multi Family (Building with 2 to 4 units) (cost per unit) Attached Multi Family (Building with 5 to 16 units) (cost per unit) Attached Multi Family (Building with 17 to 24 units) (cost per unit) Attached Mulit Family (Building 25 + units) (cost per unit) Mobile Home Park (cost per unit) Water Availability Charge (commercial) 5/8 and 3/4 inch meter 1 inch meter 1½ inch meter 2 inch meter 3 inch meter 4 inch meter 6 inch meter 8 inch meter 10 inch meter

322


CITY OF SUFFOLK FEE SCHEDULE FISCAL YEAR 2017-2018 Fees Installment Payments Down Payment Interest Finance charge New Account Setup Charge Fire Hydrant Meter Deposit Fire Hydrant Flow Test Fee/Water Model Evaluation Sewer Collection (per 100 cubic feet) Sewer Usage Not Metered (per month 5 ccf) Sewer Connection Charge (installed by city) 4 inch lateral size 6 inch lateral size Greater than 6 inch Sewer Connection Charge (installed by developer) Sewer Availability Charge (residential) Single Family Attached Multi Family (Building with 2 to 4 units), (cost per unit) Attached Multi Family (Building with 5 to 16 units), (cost per unit) Attached Multi Family (Building with 17-24 units), (cost per unit) Attached Multi Family (Building 25+ units), (cost per unit) Mobil Home Park (cost per unit) Sewer Availability Charge (commercial) 5/8 and 3/4 inch meter 1 inch meter 1½ inch meter 2 inch meter 3 inch meter 4 inch meter 6 inch meter 8 inch meter 10 inch meter Manual of Cross Connection Policies Plan sheet copies 24" x 36" (per sheet) Copies (black and white (each) Copies (color) (each)

Fiscal Year 2016-2017

Fiscal Year 2017-2018

250.00 Equal to prime rate - July 1 1 1/2 % or $0.50 minimum per month 10.00 300.00 400.00 6.97 34.85

250.00 Equal to prime rate - July 1 1 1/2 % or $0.50 minimum per month 10.00 300.00 400.00 7.21 36.05

1,800.00 3,000.00 actual cost of installation plus 25% 50.00

1,800.00 3,000.00 actual cost of installation plus 25% 50.00

6,000.00 5,400.00 4,800.00 4,200.00 3,600.00 3,900.00

6,000.00 5,400.00 4,800.00 4,200.00 3,600.00 3,900.00

6,000.00 14,800.00 29,500.00 47,100.00 88,100.00 146,800.00 293,400.00 469,300.00 674,600.00 20.00 2.00 0.20 0.35*

6,000.00 14,800.00 29,500.00 47,100.00 88,100.00 146,800.00 293,400.00 469,300.00 674,600.00 20.00 2.00 0.20 0.35*

Engineering Review

Site Plans Review Engineerying Plans Review Engineering Plans/Site Plans Amendments Plats Pump Station Review/Sewer Model Evaluation Single Family Grinder Pump Review/Inspection Engineering Construction Inspection Sanitary Sewer Facilities

$1,500 Base Fee plus $1.50/if for every foot of public water $1,500 Base Fee plus $1.50/if for every foot of public water & sewer mains beyond the initial 250 if no mains plus pump & sewer mains beyond the initial 250 if no mains plus pump station review fee station review fee $2,500 Base Fee plus $.15/if for every foot of public water $2,500 Base Fee plus $.15/if for every foot of public water & sewer mains plus pump station review fee & sewer mains plus pump station review fee $500/Submittal $500/Submittal 200.00 200.00 $2,000 per station $2,000 per station 300.00 300.00

$1.50/LF for every foot of public sewer installed

$1.50/LF for every foot of public sewer installed

$1.50/LF for every foot of public sewer installed $1,500 plus $1.50 for every foot of public water or sewer mains installed

$1.50/LF for every foot of public sewer installed $1,500 plus $1.50 for every foot of public water or sewer mains installed

3,250.00 8,125.00 16,250.00 26,000.00 48,750.00 81,250.00

3,250.00 8,125.00 16,250.00 26,000.00 48,750.00 81,250.00

1,750.00 4,375.00 8,750.00 14,000.00 26,250.00 43,750.00

1,750.00 4,375.00 8,750.00 14,000.00 26,250.00 43,750.00

Water Transmission/Distribution Facilities Site Plan with Public Utilities Environmental Incentive - Water 5/8 and 3/4 inch meter 1 inch meter 1½ inch meter 2 inch meter 3 inch meter 4 inch meter Environmental Incentive - Sewer 5/8 and 3/4 inch meter 1 inch meter 1½ inch meter 2 inch meter 3 inch meter 4 inch meter

323


CITY OF SUFFOLK FEE SCHEDULE FISCAL YEAR 2017-2018 Fees PUBLIC WORKS Traffic Engineering Inspection and Plan Review Site Plan: Engineering Plans: Major Final Subdivision Plats: Traffic Engineering Study Fee Traffic Signal Inspection Fee Inspection Services Golf Cart Study Fee Golf Cart Signs (per location) Right-of-Way Encroachment Permit

Fiscal Year 2016-2017

Fiscal Year 2017-2018

$1,000/application $1,500/application $100/plat $100/hr $18,000 per location $70/hr $1,600/application $250 per location 100.00

$1,000/application $1,500/application $100/plat $100/hr $18,000 per location $70/hr $1,600/application $250 per location 125.00

6.00/mo/ERU

6.00/mo/ERU

2% of engineers cost estimate plus 2% of E&S bond estimate; $1,400 minimum

2% of engineers cost estimate plus 2% of E&S bond estimate; $1,400 minimum

$400/acre;$1,400 minimum not to exceed $8,000

$400/acre;$1,400 minimum not to exceed $8,000

Stormwater and Public Works Engineering Storm Water Utility Fee Inspection Fee for Engineering Plans

Inspection Fee for Site Plans/E&S Only Plans

Stormwater/E &S plan review Site Plan Review Fee

Less than-10,000 sf of disturbance - $460 Less than-10,000 sf of disturbance - $460 10,000-0.5 acre of disturbance -$835 10,000-0.5 acre of disturbance -$835 Greater than 0.5 and up to 1.0 acre of disturbance- $1585 Greater than 0.5 and up to 1.0 acre of disturbance- $1585 (Plans with disturbance greater than 1.0 acre shall add (Plans with disturbance greater than 1.0 acre shall add $250/additional acre of disturbance or any portion thereof) $250/additional acre of disturbance or any portion thereof) The following state fees shall be added accordingly The following state fees shall be added accordingly >1.0-5.0 acres + $756 >1.0-5.0 acres + $756 >5.0-10.0 acres + $952 >5.0-10.0 acres + $952 >10.0-50.0 acres + $1,260 >10.0-50.0 acres + $1,260 >50.00-100.00 acres + $1,708 >50.00-100.00 acres + $1,708 >100.00 acres + $2,688 >100.00 acres + $2,688

Engineering Plan Review Fee

Modification or Transfer of General Permit/Registration Statement for Discharges of Stormwater from Construction Activities

Plan Amendment = $350 $1000 + $1/lf of roadway The following state fees shall be added accordingly >1.0-5.0 acres + $756 >5.0-10.0 acres + $952 >10.0-50.0 acres + $1,260 >50.00-100.00 acres + $1,708 >100.00 acres + $2,688 Plan Amendments = $350

Plan Amendment = $350 $1000 + $1/lf of roadway The following state fees shall be added accordingly >1.0-5.0 acres + $756 >5.0-10.0 acres + $952 >10.0-50.0 acres + $1,260 >50.00-100.00 acres + $1,708 >100.00 acres + $2,688 Plan Amendments = $350

Fees shall be paid pursuant to Virginia Administrative Code Fees shall be paid pursuant to Virginia Administrative Code 9VAC25-870-825 9VAC25-870-825

Annual Maintenance fees for General or Individual Permits for Discharges Fees shall be paid pursuant to Virginia Administrative Code Fees shall be paid pursuant to Virginia Administrative Code 9VAC25-870-830 9VAC25-870-830 of Stormwater from Construction Activities Minor Subdivision Plan Review Fee Major Subdivision Maintenance Agreement Review Fee Single Family E&S Site Plan Review Stormwater Maintenance Agreement Review Fee Pro Rata Share Fees Chowan Watershed Great Dismal Watershed James River Watershed Permits Right of Way Permit plus asphalt (per cubic foot) plus concrete (per cubic foot) Driveway Apron (per square foot) Street Name Signs (private - black and yellow) Street Name Signs (public - green and white)

150.00

150.00

$750 per plat 290.00 150.00

$750 per plat 290.00 150.00

958/acre 263/acre 632/acre

958/acre 263/acre 632/acre

100.00

125.00

Cost Cost 2.50 600.00 600.00

Cost Cost 2.50 600.00 600.00

324


CITY OF SUFFOLK FEE SCHEDULE FISCAL YEAR 2017-2018 Fees Permits (continued) Special Permits for Oversized and Overweight Vehicles Single-Trip Permit Single-Trip House Move Permit Blanket-Term Permit General Engineering Review In-depth Engineering Review Maps - Printed Map Products GIS Tax Map (single map) Other Map Product (single map) Generalized City Base Map (single map) Maps - Specialized Map Services Special Map Production Services (per hour) Specialized Data Analysis Services (per hour) Refuse Collection Automated Refuse Container *Refuse and Recycling Service

Fiscal Year 2016-2017

Fiscal Year 2017-2018

75.00 100.00 300.00 at cost at cost

75.00 100.00 300.00 at cost at cost

See Geographic Information System section for map rates See Geographic Information System section for map rates See Geographic Information System section for map rates

See Geographic Information System section for map rates See Geographic Information System section for map rates See Geographic Information System section for map rates

See Geographic Information System section for map rates See Geographic Information System section for map rates

See Geographic Information System section for map rates See Geographic Information System section for map rates

70.00

70.00

16.50/mo/unit

19.50/mo/unit

Bulk Refuse Service 1-8 CY bulk collection -after 12 free collections

20.00

47.50

9-16 CY bulk collection

50.00

120.00

Evictions

100.00

170.00

50.00

120.00

90.00

170.00

Adult - One way (No Transfer)

1.50

1.50

Adult - All day (Unlimited Transfer)

3.00

3.00

Adult - Monthly Pass

57.50

57.50

Student (6-18 yrs) - One way (No Transfer)

1.00

1.00

Student (6-18 yrs) - All day (Unlimited Transfer)

2.00

2.00

Student (6-18 yrs) - Monthly Pass

37.50

37.50

Disabled and/or Senior (55+ yrs) - One way (No Transfer)

0.75

0.75

Disabled and/or Senior (55+ yrs) - All day (Unlimited Transfer)

1.50

1.50

27.50 3.00

27.50 3.00

25.00 5.00/hour 75.00 15.00/hour

25.00 5.00/hour 75.00 15.00/hour

150.00 50.00/hour 80.00/hour

150.00 50.00/hour 80.00/hour

300.00 100.00/hour

300.00 100.00/hour

60.00/season 100.00/season 40.00/season 15.00/one day

60.00/season 100.00/season 40.00/season 15.00/one day

8.00 6.00

8.00 6.00

10.00 8.00

10.00 8.00

7.00 5.00

7.00 5.00

Bulk Refuse Service - Roll Off Weekdays Weekends * Does not include commercial refuse collection TRANSIT Faires-Regular Bus Service (Not Paratransit)

Disabled and/or Senior (55+ yrs) - Monthly Pass Fare - Paratransit - One way (Qualified individuals only) TOURISM Conference Room (9 am to 5 pm) Non-Profit (first two hours) Additional Hours For-Profit (first two hours) Additional Hours Mulitpurpose Room (6 pm to midnight) Deposit (non-refundable) Non-Profit Event For-Profit Event Visitor Center Pavilion Deposit (non-refundable) Each additional hour (two hour minimum) Farmer's Market Booth Rental (Pavilion) Standard Booth Expanded Booth Exterior (Uncovered) Space One-day Vendor Pass Interpreted Bus Tour Historic District Adult Senior (60+) and Child (3 to 12), Military Interpreted Bus Tour Great Dismal Swamp Adult Senior (60+) and Child (9 to 12), Military Guided Cedar Hill Cementary Stroll Adult Senior (60+) and Child (9 to 12), Military

325


CITY OF SUFFOLK FEE SCHEDULE FISCAL YEAR 2017-2018 Fees Interpreted Canoe Tour Ghost Walk Adult Senior (60+) and Child (9 to 12), Military Guided Nature Walks Adult Senior (60+); Child (9-12): Military Nansemond River Canoe Tours Fee Based Activities Not Described Visitor Center Display Case - Limit of 4 TREASURER Return Check Set Off Debt Distress Collection Fee Copy of Delinquent Report Vehicle Withholding Registration Fee Delinquent Tax Collection (prior to judgment) Delinquent Tax Collection (after judgment) Delinquent Personal Property Collection Fee Attorney or Collection Agency Fees Vehicle License Registration Late Payment Fee Service Fee for Out-of-City processing (per Defendant) For each additional warrant served Roll Back Tax Interest BAI.Net Charge Card Convenience Fee Charge Card Convenience Fees Visa Debit Cards Only Visa Debit Cards; Mastercard Debit or Credit and AMEX $0.01 to $144.00 $144.01 and higher Sturgis Charge Card Convenience Fees

Fiscal Year 2016-2017 35.00

Fiscal Year 2017-2018 35.00

10.00 8.00

10.00 8.00

7.00 5.00 35.00 Cost $100/quarter when available

7.00 5.00 35.00 Cost $100/quarter when available

50.00 30.00 30.00 100.00 20.00 30.00 35.00 30.00 20% 10.00 20.00 12.00 10% 3.0%

50.00 30.00 30.00 100.00 20.00 30.00 35.00 0.00 20% 10.00 28.00 12.00 10% 3.0%

3.95

3.95

3.95 2.75% of payment amount

3.95 2.75% of payment amount

2.2% of payment amount plus .30 transaction fee

2.2% of payment amount plus .30 transaction fee

326


327


328


329


330


331


332


333


334


335


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


GLOSSARY OF TERMS _________________________________________________________________________ Accrual Basis - A basis of accounting in which transactions are recognized at the time incurred, as opposed to when cash is received or spent. Agency Funds – These funds are custodial in nature (assets equal liabilities) and do not involve measurement of the results of operation. Appropriation - A legal authorization to incur obligations and to make expenditures for specific purposes. Assessed Valuation - The valuation set upon real estate by the City Assessor as a basis for levying real estate taxes. Asset - Resources owned or held by the City that has monetary value. Authorized Positions - Employee positions authorized in the adopted budget to be filled during the year. Aviation Facilities Fund – This fund accounts for the revenues and expenditures related to the City’s airport. Balanced Budget – A budget in which current revenues equal current expenditures in accordance with the Code of Virginia. Bond Proceeds – The money paid to the City through the sale of bonds. Bond Rating – A measure of creditworthiness which indicates the City’s ability to meet its financial obligations. Budget - A plan of financial activity for a specified period of time (fiscal year or biennium) indicating all planned revenues and expenses for the budget period. Budgetary Basis - The basis of accounting used to estimate financing sources and uses in the budget. This generally takes one of three forms: GAAP, cash, or modified accrual. Budget Calendar – A timetable showing when particular tasks must be completed in order for the council to approve the spending plan before the beginning of the next fiscal year. Capital Cash Contribution – A payment toward the financing of a project with existing cash flow. Capital Budget - The appropriation of bonds or operating revenue for improvements to facilities and other infrastructure. Capital Improvements Plan - A plan for capital outlay to be incurred each year over a fixed number of years to meet capital needs arising from the City’s long-term needs. Capital Project - Major construction, acquisition, or renovation activities which add value to the City’s physical assets or significantly increase their useful life. Capital Projects Fund – The fund used to account for financial resources to be used for the acquisition or construction of major capital facilities. Cash Basis - A basis of accounting in which transactions are recognized only when cash is increased or decreased.

336


Cash Match - The amount of local funding that is required to support an activity, project, program, or service that is funded in part by State or Federal aid or a private funding source. Categorical Aid – Funding support from State or Federal governments that is targeted for particular categories of the population, programs and services, or for special purposes. Compensation Study – A study commissioned by the City to review pay grades and position salaries and provide recommendations to address salary compression and bring individual position salaries commensurate with the market average. Children’s Services Act – State legislation adopted in 1995 by the Virginia General Assembly to provide a collaborative system of services and funding for at-risk youth and their families. The City administers Comprehensive Services Act (CSA) funds through the Department of Social Services. Community Development Block Grant – A Federal grant which funds local community development activities such as affordable housing, blight removal, infrastructure development, and other public services (e.g. community health, homelessness, poverty) which aim to improve the lives of low income persons and families. Consolidated Grants Fund – The funds accounts for revenues and expenditures involving governmental grant programs. Contingency - A budgetary reserve set aside for emergencies or unforeseen expenditures not otherwise budgeted. Contractual Services - Services rendered to a government by private firms, individuals, or other governmental agencies. Examples include utilities, rent, maintenance agreements, and professional consulting services. Cost-of-Living Adjustment - An increase in salaries to offset the adverse effect of inflation on compensation. Cost Share – The allocation of expenses between two or more government entities. Debt Service - The cost of paying principal and interest on borrowed funds through instruments such as bonds. Debt Service Fund – The fund used to account for the accumulation of resources for, and the payment of, general long-term debt principle, interest, and related costs. Deficit - The excess of an entity’s liabilities over its assets or the excess of expenditures or expenses over revenues during a single accounting period. Department - The basic organizational unit of the City which is functionally unique in its delivery of services. Depreciation - Expiration in the service life of capital assets attributable to wear and tear, deterioration, action of the physical elements, inadequacy or obsolescence. Downtown Business Overlay Taxing District Fund – The fund accounts for the revenues and expenditures related to services provided in the Downtown Business Overlay District. Revenues are derived from a specific percentage of annual real estate tax assessments in the Downtown Business Overlay District.

337


Effective Rate Increase – The difference between the real estate tax rate proposed/adopted and the tax rate that would cause the rate of levy to produce no more than 101 percent of the previous year’s real property tax levies as defined by Section 58.1-3321 of the Code of Virginia. Employee (or Fringe) Benefits - Contributions that are made to meet commitments or obligations for employee fringe benefits. Included are the City’s share of costs for Social Security, the Virginia Retirement System, medical, and life insurance plans. Encumbrance - The commitment of appropriated funds to purchase an item or service. To encumber funds means to set aside or commit funds for a specified future expenditure. Enterprise Funds – These funds account for costs of providing goods or services to the general public on a continuing basis be financed or recovered primarily through user charges. The City of Suffolk has the following enterprise funds: Public Utilities Fund, Refuse Fund, and Stormwater Fund. Equivalent Residential Unit – A measure of the amount of service or impact to the water and sewer utility system that would be required from a typical residence. Expenditure - The payment of cash on the transfer of property or services for the purpose of acquiring an asset, or service or settling a loss. Expense - Charges incurred (whether paid immediately or unpaid) for operations, maintenance interest or other charges. Fee Schedule – The collection of all fees charged by the City for various services. Fiduciary Funds – Funds used to account for assets held by the City as an agent for individuals, private organizations, and other governments. Fiscal Policy – The City’s policies with respect to revenues, spending, and debt management as these relate to government services, programs, and capital investment. Fiscal policy provides an agreed-upon set of principles for the planning and programming of government budgets and their funding. Fiscal Year - A twelve-month period designated as the operating year for accounting and budgeting purposes in an organization. The City’s fiscal year begins July 1, and ends the following June 30. Fixed Assets - Assets of long-term character that are intended to continue to be held or used, such as land, buildings, machinery, furniture, and other equipment. Fleet Management Fund – The fund accounts for the financing of vehicles and the related maintenance, repairs and fuel costs of the City and allocates operating costs to the various departments or agencies using the equipment. Full Faith and Credit - A pledge of a government’s taxing power to repay debt obligations. Full-time Equivalent Position – The number of hours per year that a full-time employee is expected to work, usually 2080 hours. If there are two workers, each of whom works half that number of hours per year, the two workers together equal one full-time equivalent. Fund - A fiscal entity with revenues and expenses which are segregated for the purpose of carrying out a specific purpose or activity. Fund Balance - The excess of the assets of a fund over its liabilities. Fund Transfer - The movement of money between funds of the same governmental entity.

338


Generally Accepted Accounting Principles - Uniform minimum standards for financial accounting and recording, encompassing the conventions, rules, and procedures that define accepted accounting principles. General Fund – The primary operating fund of the City. This fund is used to account for all financial transactions and resources except those required to be accounted for in another fund. General Operating Budget – The primary operating fund of the City which accounts for most tax funded functions such as general government, police and fire protection, parks and recreation, planning and community development, etc. General Obligation Bond - A bond that is backed by the full faith and credit of the government to repay the debt. Governmental Accounting Standards Board - A non-governmental organization which serves as the source of generally accepted accounting principles used by state and local governments. Governmental Funds – Funds through which most governmental functions of the City are financed. The three major funds used are General Fund, Capital Projects Fund, and Debt Service Fund. Grants - A contribution by a government or other organization to support a particular function. Grants may be classified as either operational or capital, depending upon the grantor. HOME Investment Partnership Grant – A Federal grant designed to expand the supply of affordable and decent housing for low income persons and families. Information Technology Fund – The fund accounts for the City’s technology infrastructure and allocates costs to the various departments or agencies using the service. Infrastructure - The physical assets of the City (e.g., street, water, sewer, public buildings, and parks). Intergovernmental Revenue - Funds received from Federal, State and other local government sources in the form of grants, shared revenues, or payments in lieu of taxes. Internal Control - The control or management of a government in accordance with the approved budget for the purpose of keeping expenditures within the limitation of available appropriations and resources. Internal Service Funds – These funds account for the financing of goods or services provided by one department to other departments or agencies of the City on a cost-reimbursement basis. The Internal Service funds for the City include Information Technology, Fleet Management, and Risk Management. Law Library Fund – The fund accounts for revenues and expenditures involving governmental grant programs. Levy - Imposition of taxes for the support of City activities. Line-item Budget - A budget prepared along departmental lines that focuses on what is to be bought. Long-term Debt - Debt with a maturity of more than one year after the date of issuance. Modified Accrual Basis - A basis of accounting where revenue is recorded when measurable and available, and expenditures are recorded when made. Non-Categorical Aid - Revenue from the State or Federal government that may be spent at the local government’s discretion.

339


Objective - Something to be accomplished in specific, well-defined, and measurable terms and that is achievable within a specific time frame. Obligations - Amounts which the City legally may be required to meet out of its resources. They include not only actual liabilities, but also encumbrances not yet paid. Operating Expenses - The cost for personnel, materials, and equipment required for a department to function. Operating Revenue - Funds that the City receives as income to pay for ongoing operations. It includes such items as taxes, fees from specific services, interest earnings, and grant revenues. Operating revenues are used to pay for day-to-day services. Other Post Employment Benefits – An accounting and financial reporting provision of the Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB) requiring government employers to measure and report the liabilities associated with other (than pension) postemployment benefits (or OPEB) such as post-retirement medical, pharmacy, dental, vision, life, long-term disability and long-term care benefits that are not associated with a pension plan. Outsource - The practice of contracting out a service to a private entity. Pay-as-you-go Basis - A term used to describe a financial policy by which capital outlays are financed from current revenues rather than through borrowing. Performance Measure - Indicators that show the amount of work that is accomplished, the efficiency with which tasks were completed, and the effectiveness of a program. Program - A group of related activities performed by one or more organizational units for the purpose of accomplishing a function for which the government is responsible. Proprietary Funds – Funds used to account for all assets, liabilities, equities, revenues, expenses, and transfer relating to the primary government’s business activities. The City maintains two different types of proprietary funds including 1) enterprise funds (public utilities, refuse, and stormwater) and 2) internal service funds (fleet, information technology, and risk management). Rating Agency – An agency which assesses the creditworthiness of bond issuers, such as the City of Suffolk, which issues bonds to assist in financing capital improvement projects. There are three primary rating agencies including Moody’s, Standard & Poor’s, and Fitch. Reassessment Impact - The effective change of the real estate tax burden as a result of the newly assessed value of real property. Refuse Fund – The fund accounts for the provision of solid waste disposal and recycling services to City residents, as well as landfill post closure requirements. Reserve - An account used either to set aside budgeted revenues that are not required for expenditure in the current budget year or to earmark revenues for a specific future purpose. Revenue - Sources of income that finances the operations of city government. Risk Management Fund – The fund accounts for the funding and payment of auto, personal liability, general liability, health insurance, and worker’s compensation claims against the City exclusive of the School Board employees. Charges to other funds are based on estimated claims for the year. Risk Stabilization Reserve – Funding set aside in a special fund by the City for the payment of expenses associated with general liability, health insurance, and worker’s compensation. The City has established a 340


financial policy to maintain a rate stabilization reserve in an amount equal to 20% of the anticipated annual premium costs. Road Maintenance Fund – This fund accounts for revenues and expenditures related to maintaining roads city wide. Revenues are derived from state and sale of service to other funds. Route 17 Taxing District Fund – The fund accounts for revenues and expenditures related to enhanced economic development related services provided in the Route 17 Taxing District. Most revenues are derived from a specific percentage of the annual real estate tax assessments in the Route 17 Taxing District. School Funds – These funds are used to account for the activities of the City of Suffolk Public School System. The funds include the School Operating Fund, the School Service Fund, and the School Grant Fund. Shortfall – The difference between the amount of funding required and the amount available. Special Revenue Funds – The funds that account for revenue derived from specific sources that are restricted by legal and regulatory provisions to finance specific activities. The special revenue funds used by the City are Aviation Facilities Fund, Downtown Business Overlay District Fund, Road Maintenance Fund, Consolidated Grants Fund, Law Library Fund, Route 17 Taxing District Fund, and Transit System Fund. Special Taxing District – A specifically designated geographic area of the City, adopted by ordinance of the City Council, whereby an additional real estate tax is levied on real property owners, above the standard rate, for the provision of additional, more complete, or timely City services. The types of services that can be provided in a special taxing district are outlined in Section 15.2-2403 of the Code of Virginia and include, but are not limited to, beautification and landscaping, garbage disposal, and promotion of business and retail development services. Stormwater Utility Fund – The fund accounts for the maintenance and improvements to the City’s stormwater infrastructure. Tax Levy - The resultant product when the tax rate is multiplied by the tax base. Taxes - Charges levied by the City for the purpose of financing services performed for the common benefit of the people. This term does not include specific charges made against particular persons or property for current or permanent benefit, such as special assessments. Transit System Fund – The fund accounts for revenues and expenditures of the City’s transit system which includes six bus routes and ADA service. Revenues are derived from far collections, State and Federal grants, and transfer of funding support from the General Fund. Unassigned Fund Balance – The City’s “rainy day” fund or reserves which have accumulated via surplus General Fund revenues or unspent General Fund dollars from prior years. User Charges - The payment of a fee for direct receipt of a public service by the party who benefits from the service. Utility Fund – The fund accounts for the provision of water and sewer services to City residents Virginia Retirement System – The Commonwealth of Virginia’s retirement program for public employees.

341


ABBREVIATIONS _________________________________________________________________________ CDBG – Community Development Block Grant CIP – Capital Improvements Plan COLA – Cost-of-Living Adjustment CSA – Comprehensive Services Act DBOD – Downtown Business Overlay Taxing District ERU – Equivalent Residential Unit FTE – Full-Time Equivalent GAAP – Generally Accepted Accounting Principles GASB – Governmental Accounting Standards Board HOME – HOME Investment Partnerships Program OPEB – Other Postemployment Benefits PAY GO – Pay-as-you-Go PP – Personal Property RE – Real Estate RT 17 – Route 17 VRS – Virginia Retirement System

342


THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


City of Suffolk Department of Finance - Division of Budget & Strategic Planning 442 W. Washington St. | Suffolk, Virginia 23434 | (757) 514-4006 www.suffolkva.us

Adopted FY2017 2018 Operating & Capital Budget  
Adopted FY2017 2018 Operating & Capital Budget