Page 1

Here We Grow Again! Police Foundation Expands

Turfgrass Science in the Gardens


For more information or to become a GreenMarket Vendor, contact us at 561.630.1100 or recinfo@pbgfl.com. 2

SIGNATURE CITY: City of Palm Beach Gardens

l pbgfl.com


PRODUCTION

Public Media Relations Division

6

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Reggie Boyd Dr. Kenneth A. Scheppke Candice Temple Tommy Thurman Danny Whilden

16

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

S P R I N G

2 0 1 9

2 The SUMMER Gardens GreenMarket

Mike Sperduto Candice Temple Danny Whilden

4 A Message from Our Volunteers 5

What Should I Do If I’m Having a Stroke?

CONTACT US

10

Calendar of Events: Pull Out Poster!

13

Turfgrass Science in the Gardens

signaturecity@pbgfl.com Signature City Questions: 561.799.4152 Main City Line: 561.799.4100 Signature City magazine is a free publication produced quarterly by the City of Palm Beach Gardens Public Media Relations Division. Signature City is mailed to every household in Palm Beach Gardens, as well as distributed at city facilities.

Get Social! Follow us on your favorite social media sites

10

F E A T U R E S

6

Joining Forces to Support Public Safety

8 What’s Behind the New Look? 12

Featured Art: Downtown Carousel

15

Here We Grow Again!

16

The Great State of Florida

17

City Social

@CityofPalmBeachGardensCityHall @CityofPalmBeachGardensRecreation @SandhillCraneGolf @GardensGreenMarket @CityofPBG @PBGardensFire

Signature City magazine is printed on recycled paper.

@PBGPD @CityPBG @cityofpbgardens

ON THE COVER: Spring is in full bloom in Palm Beach Gardens! This orchid smiles down from a palm tree located at City Hall.

17


A Message From Our Volunteers

I

have always been extremely interested in the Police community. In my younger years I grew up around my local police officers, and since then, I’ve remained extremely interested in their work. I asked myself how can I be involved in a program working alongside our local police officers?

Reggie Boyd has volunteered with the City’s Citizens Mobile Patrol program for a year.

When I met a Palm Beach Gardens Police Volunteer, he explained to me the Citizens Mobile Patrol and the general mission of the program. The importance of the program and the Police Department’s need for more volunteers caught my attention. I immediately applied and received training to become a Palm Beach Gardens Police Volunteer! My current role involves driving a mobile patrol vehicle equipped with lights, a police with cancer, he worked as a Palm Beach Gardens fire/medic. Following his death, I have volunteered as the Post Advisor for the Gardens Fire Rescue Learning-for-Life Explorer program. I also work as the Chairman of the Advisory Committee for the Police and Fire Explorers, which has about 640 youth in 7 counties.

Tommy Thurman has volunteered with the Explorers program for the past 13 years.

M

y love for volunteerism is closely connected to my son’s passion for his career in fire service. My son, Shawn, and I were extremely close. Before he passed away in 2005 after a long battle

I work with the Fire Explorers to administer the program along with the City’s fire personnel. I interact with the youth of our community by interviewing the participants, coordinating competitions, scheduling public appearances for the honor guard, and other ceremonial participation. Our Explorers are required to complete 3 hours of community service each week. To achieve this, we meet with them every Monday and ensure they complete ride time and take part in a variety of community events such as Thanksgiving meal preparation, the Holiday Joy Drive, Public Safety Day and other special functions outside of the fire station. It’s exciting to watch a kid come in the door

radio, and a computer. I am always in direct contact with the Police dispatch center as well as officers on patrol, acting as the eyes and ears alongside them. Our safety is paramount. We never get involved with suspicious activity; our role is only to report what we observe. We frequently interact with local citizens in a friendly and positive manner. The most rewarding part of our role is the “Thank you for your service" we receive from the community. I proudly wear my uniform, and the appreciation from both officers and citizens makes it all worthwhile. Reggie Boyd Citizens Mobile Patrol Palm Beach Gardens Police Boys Scouts of America Learning for Life and go from not knowing what a fog nozzle is, to see them get their certificate from fire school 5 years later. When the kids excel, it makes me feel better. Being involved as a volunteer has had an extremely positive impact on my life. Every time I go to the station, I feel a little bit closer to my son. If it hadn’t been for the Fire Department and getting involved with the Explorers, it would have become very easy for me to feel hopeless after Shawn’s death. On Father’s Day, I even receive calls from some of my Fire Explorers. If you’re going to be a volunteer, give it 100%. Go into it with the attitude that you are going to make a difference. I wanted to volunteer to make my son proud. I think we have accomplished that mission. Tommy Thurman Exploring Program Director Palm Beach Gardens Fire Rescue Boys Scouts of America Learning for Life

For more information on volunteer opportunities with the City of Palm Beach Gardens, visit pbgfl.com/Volunteer. 4

SIGNATURE CITY: City of Palm Beach Gardens

l pbgfl.com


What is a Stroke?

How can I Tell if I or a Loved One is EXPERIENCING A STROKE?

WHAT SHOULD I DO if I am Having a Stroke?

S

troke or “brain attack” is a condition in which the normal blood flow to a part of the brain is interrupted either by blockage of an artery or by a ruptured blood vessel. Strokes that are caused by a ruptured blood vessel often cause a sudden severe headache, which people often describe as the worst headache of their life. However, 90% of stroke cases are painless. Risk of stroke can be reduced by quitting smoking, maintaining a healthy lifestyle, lowering cholesterol and blood pressure, along with regular checkups from your primary care physician to modify other risk factors with medications. The brain controls all the activities of our daily life. It allows us to think, see, hear, taste, feel, communicate, move, breathe and coordinate our limbs so we can manage to walk. An ischemic stroke occurs when one of the arteries feeding the brain gets clogged up, usually with a blood clot. The stroke symptoms will be determined by what area of brain that particular artery supplies.

Simple tools have been developed to pick up most strokes. Time is absolutely of the essence, so think “F.A.S.T.” when you think someone near you is experiencing a stroke. “F” is for “Facial Droop”, “A” is for “Arm Weakness”, “S” is for “Speech Difficulties”, and “T” is for “Time to call 911”. Despite public outreach programs, the average time a patient or family member in the South Florida area waits to call 911 after stroke symptoms is nearly 5 ½ hours! 1 Don’t do this! Stroke symptoms become permanent with time. For every minute of delay in stroke care, we lose 1.9 million brain cells and for each hour of delayed stroke care we have a functional increase in age of our brain by 3.6 years.2

The good news is that with early recognition hospital can be a devastating mistake. Our and treatment at a high-quality stroke center, local EMS system has already verified the full recovery from stroke capabilities of each of the FACE is possible. But, quick hospitals in our area. This Is one side of the face action and the right practice helps ensure that drooping or numb? choice of hospital are patients transported by EMS are taken to a hospital with the capabilities that offer the ARM best chance for a good outcome. Is one arm weak or numb? The correct choice of hospital is often more important than the distance to the hospital. In a study of over 35,000 stroke patients in Florida, when EMS drove patients past local hospitals to get to the higher level of care available at a comprehensive stroke center, SPEECH patients received sigIs speech nificantly higher rates of slurred? TIME treatment and faster times If the person from 911 to treatment shows any of these symptoms, despite the extra drive time.3 call 911. both critical to the chancIf you or a loved one suspect you are having es for regaining function. Any concern about a stroke, do not delay. Think “F.A.S.T.”, call a possible stroke, call 911 immediately! 911 and get evaluated at one of our excellent nearby comprehensive stroke centers. Why do we recommend calling 911? First, Medical advances in stroke care have been paramedics can assess, stabilize and quickremarkable over this last decade. But, the ly transport a stroke patient to the closest take home point is the sooner the stroke appropriate hospital. Not all hospitals have patient calls 911 for help, the higher the the capability to treat stroke with the latchances for a good outcome and the lower est advanced therapy. Driving to the wrong the odds of loss of brain function. ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Kenneth A Scheppke, MD, FAAEM is a dual board certified specialist in the fields of Emergency Medicine and EMS. He serves as the State of Florida EMS Medical Director for the Florida Department of Health and serves as the EMS Medical Director for Palm Beach Gardens Fire Rescue. REFERENCES Gardener H, Pepe PE, et al. Need to Prioritize Education of the Public Regarding Stroke Symptoms and Faster Activation of the 9-1-1 System: Findings from the Florida-Puerto Rico CReSD Stroke Registry. Prehosp Emerg Care. 2018 Oct 25:1-8. 2 Saver, J, Time Is Brain – Quantified Stroke. 2005;37:263–266 3 Mueller-Kronast et al. for the FL PR CReSD Investigators and Collaborators, The Impact of EMS Directly Transporting Patients With Suspected Acute Ischemic Stroke to Comprehensive Stroke Centers in South Florida. Stroke 49(Suppl_1) · January 2018 1

SPRING 2019

5


JOINING FORCES

to Support Public Safety by Irwin F. Edenzon

In 2008, the Palm Beach Gardens Police Foundation was established by a small group of local citizens who recognized the need to provide additional financial support to the Palm Beach Gardens Police Department. In July of 2018, during its tenth year of operations, the Board of Directors voted unanimously to change our mission to include support of the Fire Rescue Department. e worked closely with Police Chief Clint Shannon and Fire Chief Keith Bryer to make this happen.

W

excited to now expand that partnership to include our Fire Rescue Department,” said Chief Shannon when asked how he feels about the Board’s decision.

“We are so grateful for the outstanding level of community partnership and support we receive from our Police Foundation and are

The Foundation has made a meaningful contribution over the years to help maintain the high level of service that all (continues)

TOP: Suits for Seniors is an 8-week course on leadership, financial literacy, life skills, college & career readiness

PICTURED: (l to r) Palm Beach Gardens Police Chief Clint Shannon and Palm Beach Gardens Fire Chief Keith Bryer work with the Police & Fire Foundation to support their departments.

for high school seniors serving a tri-county area. In Palm Beach Gardens, the program has been implemented in both PBG & Dwyer High Schools. With the help of the Palm Beach Gardens Police & Fire Foundation, the program added its first all-girls class in 2018. Suits for Seniors Girls are pictured here with guest speakers Caren Kittredge, Senior Director of Global Strategic Marketing at Carrier and PBG Mayor Maria Marino. OPPOSITE PAGE: K9 Fargo was purchased two years ago by PBG Police & Fire Foundation. Trained to detect explosives, this Belgian Malinois-German shepherd mix works with Gardens Officer Mike Valerio.

6

l

l

SIGNATURE SIGNATURE CITY:CITY City : of City Palm of Palm BeachBeach Gardens Gardens pbgfl.com pbgfl.com


SPRING 2019

7


Palm Beach Gardens residents have come to expect. Adding the Fire Rescue Department has increased the challenge, but these services are critical to maintaining the outstanding quality of life we enjoy here. Our Foundation has now doubled down on our commitment to help. Keith Bryer, Chief of Fire Rescue provided his perspective on the change. “We are honored to be part of the Police and Fire Rescue Foundation. We are certain

To date, our not-for-profit corporation has raised almost $1 million to help purchase equipment, adopt new technologies, provide funding for training and support community outreach programs. In 2019, we will expand the scholarship program to include the Police and Fire Explorers. The money we raise and the programs we fund make a difference. While the City of Palm Beach Gardens provides solid financial support to both Departments, we fill in the gaps. Our ability to continue our mission has been fortified by broad based

belts. Community outreach programs funded by the Foundation include the “Suits for Seniors” program at both Palm Beach Gardens and Dwyer High Schools, the Ball Stars Basketball Camp and crime prevention and safety programs. The Foundation was the primary sponsor for the 2019 Public Safety Day attended by over 3,000 residents and we support the Joy Drive every year, helping Department volunteers provide toys to kids for the Holidays. These are all programs that allow the Departments to reach beyond its employees and have a real impact on our local community. These community outreach programs help convey important information, build relationships and raise awareness about the outstanding services provided to the more than 100,000 people who live, work and visit in Palm Beach Gardens every day.

At the November 2018 Suits for Seniors Suiting Ceremony, the Palm Beach Gardens Police & Fire Foundation presented its sponsorship check of $15,000 to the program.

that with the Foundation’s support, we will be able to improve our level of service to our residents, as well as benefit our Fire Rescue personnel and their families. We are grateful to Chief Shannon and the Board for allowing us this great opportunity.” To date, our 501(c)(3) not-for-profit corporation has raised almost $1 million to help purchase equipment, adopt new technologies, provide funding for training and support community outreach programs. Additionally, thanks to the generous donations of Board members and other supporters, we have also instituted a tuition reimbursement program for department personnel and a scholarship fund for immediate family members of department personnel. 8

SIGNATURE CITY: City of Palm Beach Gardens

financial support from the community and we’re hopeful this will continue to grow. Funding from the Foundation is budgeted to support training and education programs for both Departments, as well as for new technology and equipment. Over the past few years, the Foundation funded the acquisition of K9 “officers,” including Fargo, the latest addition to the K9 team. Additionally, purchase of GPS tracking devices and first aid kits for Police K9s are recent examples of how the Foundation has helped protect them in the field. In partnership with the Mirasol Foundation, inc., tourniquets were provided to Police Officers for deployment on service

l pbgfl.com

All the Foundation’s work over the past ten years was made possible by donations from local businesses and private citizens and, for myself and on behalf of the Board, I thank the residents of Palm Beach Gardens for their support. We’re confident the community will continue to help us serve those who serve and protect us. For more information about the Palm Beach Gardens Police and Fire Foundation, email info@PBGPoliceandFireFoundation.org. ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Irwin F. Edenzon

was appointed as the president of the Palm Beach Gardens Police and Fire Foundation in January 2018. In this capacity, he works with a 9 member board made up of community leaders to create a safer Palm Beach Gardens through support of public safety programs. Irwin is a former president of Ingalls Shipbuilding and is a resident of BallenIsles.


WHAT’S BEHIND THE NEW LOOK? Police Department Rolls Out SUVs by Danny Whilden

The next generation of police cruisers will soon hit the streets of Palm Beach Gardens.

T

he Ford Police Interceptor Utility SUV, a police package version of the Ford Explorer, will soon be the face of the department’s road patrol lineup. The City will gradually rotate aging vehicles out of service in favor of a more practical vehicle lineup capable of meeting the demands of the day-to-day job of patrolling. It was only back in 2011 that Ford discontinued the iconic Ford Crown Victoria, once a staple of police department fleets across the country. The city then made the switch to the Ford Taurus and Dodge Charger in 2015. Last year, Ford announced it would be discontinuing the police sedan and instead focusing its attention on its SUV variant of the police package. This prompted the city to consider the direction it would go for the department’s patrol lineup, as it weighed factors such as cost, safety, and performance. Ultimately, the city decided to transition to SUVs. Unlike the department’s current road patrol models, the Ford Taurus and the Dodge Charger, both of which will eventually be phased out of the department’s fleet, the new SUVs will provide officers ample space and considerably more cargo storage for the array of equipment neces-

sary to carry out their duties. Combine this with improved safety features and upgraded equipment, officers will have a vehicle suited for effective policing, all without compromising functionality and performance. “These vehicles will provide officers the space they need to perform their job efficiently,” says Major Paul Rogers, Commander of the Special Operations Bureau and fleet manager for all the department’s 150-plus vehicles. “This is an officer’s office for 11 to 12 hours a day. They carry a lot of equipment that they must have readily accessible at any given time.” Boasting advanced technology and safety features, each vehicle has been retrofitted with enhanced light packages and reflective decals on the rear bumper, ensuring maximum visibility both day and night. And thanks to traction control improvements,

these vehicles are considerably safer than sedans and are less prone to rollovers. “The focus of these new vehicles is safety. Not only are they safer for the officer, they are more visible to the public,” says Rogers. “The transition to SUVs underscores the importance of safety for both officers and city residents, while also being adaptive to the demands of the profession. This results in a better delivery of service to the residents of Palm Beach Gardens.” Since the new SUVs are being leased, the city will be able to accelerate its vehicle replacement schedule, saving on long-term expenses associated with maintenance, and wear and tear. While new vehicles have already begun to rollout, the department expects the transition to be completed over the next two to three years.

SPRING 2019

9


APRIL

APRIL 23 Code Enforcement Special Magistrate Hearing 2 p.m. at City Hall

NOW THROUGH MAY 1 GardensArt Exhibition: “My Favorite Books” Pre-School Art Display by Riverside Youth Enrichment Center Call for viewing hours: 561.630.1100 Burns Road Community Center

APRIL 24 APRIL 13 Egg Extravaganza 9-11 a.m. (Egg Hunt at 10 a.m.) Gardens Park Soccer Fields

APRIL 25

APRIL 15 Parks & Recreation Advisory Board Meeting 6-8 p.m. at City Hall

APRIL 16 Fallen Angel Variation by Caren Hackman

NOW THROUGH MAY 14 GardensArt Exhibition: “The Art of Yoga” Paintings by Caren Hackman Call for viewing hours: 561.630.1100 Burns Road Community Center

APRIL 4 - MAY 21

Juke Box Bingo 5:30-9 p.m. at The Dancing Crane $25.00 food minimum includes buffet & game Reservations Required at 630-1172 Hands-Only CPR Classes 6:30-7:30 p.m. at Fire Station 61

APRIL 19 Good Friday City Administrative Offices Closed

GardensArt Exhibition: “Painting Florida” Oils on Canvas by Sue Appleton Dayton Dawn to Dusk Sandhill Crane Golf Clubhouse

APRIL 11 Registration Begins for Summer Recreation Classes Sign up at www.pbgrec.com/login Burns Road Community Center 10

APRIL 26 Mixed Doubles Tennis & Covered Dish 6-8:30 p.m. at Tennis Center

Seagrapes at the Park by Sue Appleton Dayton

APRIL 21 Easter Brunch The Dancing Crane / The Ballroom @ Sandhill Crane Golf Club 11:30 a.m.- 4 p.m. Adults - $49.95 ++ Children 6-12 - $19.95++ Reservations are required: 561.630.1172

SIGNATURE CITY: City of Palm Beach Gardens

l pbgfl.com

MAY 10

APRIL 27

Rally for the Cure Women’s Doubles Round-Robin & Lunch 10 a.m. at Tennis Center

Youth Recreational/ Developmental Singles 11:30 a.m.- 3 p.m. at Tennis Center

Spring 2019 Dance Recital 7 p.m. at Eissey Campus Theatre

Jamie’s Angels Tennis for Players with Special Needs 1-2 p.m. at Tennis Center

Spring 2019 Dance Recital 2 p.m. at Eissey Campus Theatre

Adaptive “XGLOsive” Tennis 8:30 - 10:30 p.m. at Tennis Center

MAY 11

MAY 12

City Council Meeting 7 p.m. at City Hall

Mother’s Day Brunch The Ballroom at Sandhill Crane Golf Club 11:30 a.m.- 4 p.m. Adults - $49.95++ - Complimentary Mimosas for Mom. Children 6-12 $19.95++ Children under 6 no charge   Reservations are required: 561-630-1172

MAY 5

MAY 12, 19, 26

Cinco de Mayo at The Dancing Crane Food and drink specials all day long! Visit Facebook for details.

Summer GreenMarket at STORE 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. STORE Self Storage and Wine Storage

MAY 2

APRIL 9-14 USTA National Women’s Senior Clay Court Championships 10 a.m.- 6:30 p.m. daily Tennis Center

Budget Oversight Review Board 8:30 a.m. at City Hall

MAY

APRIL 7, 14, 21, 28 The Gardens GreenMarket 8 a.m.- 1 p.m. City Hall Municipal Complex

Administrative Professionals Day at The Dancing Crane Bring your Administrative Professional to lunch - Each Admin lunch ½ price.

MAY 5, 12, 19, 26 The Gardens GreenMarket 8 a.m. - 1 p.m. City Hall Municipal Complex

MAY 14 Planning, Zoning & Appeals Board 6 p.m. at City Hall


APRIL

S M T W T F S

MAY S M T W T F S

JUNE

S M T W T F S

JULY

S M T W T F S

1 2 3 4 5 6

1 2 3 4

1

1 2 3 4 5 6

7 8 9 10 11 12 13

5 6 7 8 9 10 11

2

7 8 9 10 11 12 13

14 15 16 17 18 19 20

12 13 14 15 16 17 18

9 10 11 12 13 14 15

14 15 16 17 18 19 20

19 20 21 22 23 24 25

26 27 28 29 30 31

21 22 23 24 25 26 27

28 29 30

3

4

5

6

7

8

16 17 18 19 20 21 22

21 22 23 24 25 26 27

23 24 25 26 27 28 29

28 29 30 31

30

JUNE 6 City Council Meeting 7 p.m. at City Hall

JUNE 11

MAY 18

MAY 27

Rotary Club of the Northern Palm Beaches Family Golf Tournament 8 a.m. Shotgun Start Sandhill Crane Golf Course

Memorial Day City Administrative Offices Closed

MAY 18-20

Red, White & Splash Memorial Day Bash 10 a.m.- 4 p.m. at Aquatic Complex

USTA Boys & Girls 18, 16, 14, 12-under Singles; BG 10-U Green-Ball Singles 8:30 a.m. -7 p.m. Sat/Sun Tennis Center

MAY 21 Hands-Only CPR Classes 6:30-7:30 p.m. at Fire Station 61

MAY 22 Trivia at The Dancing Crane 5:30 p.m.- Dinner Buffet 7:15 p.m.- Game Starts $25.00 Food minimum includes buffet and game

MAY 23 Budget Oversight Review Board 8:30 a.m. at City Hall

MAY 25 World’s Largest Water Aerobics Class 9 a.m.- 10 a.m. at Aquatic Complex Youth Recreational/ Developmental Singles 11:30 a.m.- 3 p.m. at Tennis Center

Memorial Day Ceremony 9 a.m. at Veterans Plaza Amphitheater

MAY 28 Code Enforcement Special Magistrate Hearing 2 p.m. at City Hall

JUNE JUNE 1 Gardens Cup Golf Tournament 8:30 a.m. Shotgun Start Sandhill Crane Golf Club More info at pbgfl.com/GardensCup Jamie’s Angels Tennis for Players with Special Needs 1- 2 p.m. at Tennis Center

JUNE 2, 9, 16, 23, 30 Summer GreenMarket at STORE 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. STORE Self Storage and Wine Storage

JUNE 3 - AUGUST 9 Camp Gardens Summer Camps M-F, 7:30 a.m.- 6 p.m. Varied Locations & Times

4th of July Holiday City Administrative Offices Closed

JULY 7, 14, 21, 28

Planning, Zoning & Appeals Board 6 p.m. at City Hall

Summer GreenMarket at STORE 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. STORE Self Storage and Wine Storage

JUNE 14

JULY 9

Family Fun Night Swim 6- 8 p.m. at Aquatic Complex

Planning, Zoning & Appeals Board 6 p.m. at City Hall

JUNE 16

JULY 11

Father’s Day Brunch at The Dancing Crane 11 a.m.- 3 p.m. Bring Dad to Brunch and his entree is ½ price Bottomless Bloody Marys and Mimosas: $15

City Council Meeting 7 p.m. at City Hall

JUNE 18 Hands-Only CPR Classes 6:30-7:30 p.m. at Fire Station 61

JUNE 22 Skate Jam PBG Skate Park Call for hours: 561.630.1100

RECURRING EVENT

Sunday Brunch

Every Sunday at The Dancing Crane 10 a.m. – 3 p.m.

JUNE 25 Code Enforcement Special Magistrate Hearing 2 p.m. at City Hall

JUNE 27 Budget Oversight Review Board 8:30 a.m. at City Hall

JUNE 29 PBG 60th Anniversary Celebration at the Grand Opening of Gardens North County District Park 6 p.m. – dusk Gardens North County District Park

JULY JULY 4 Splash Into the 4th 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. at Aquatic Complex

I M P O R TA N T ADDRESSES Burns Road Community Center: 4404 Burns Road City Hall/Veterans Plaza Amphitheater: 10500 N. Military Trail

PBG Tennis Center: 5110 117th Court N. Sandhill Crane Golf Club/ The Dancing Crane Restaurant: 11401 Northlake Blvd. The Gardens GreenMarket: 10500 N. Military Trail The Gardens Summer GreenMarket at STORE: 11010 N. Military Trail PBG Skate Park 10113 Plant Drive

SPRING 2019

11


Downtown Carousel

by Danny Whilden

L O C AT I O N : 1 1 7 0 1 L A K E V I C T O R I A G A R D E N S A V E , P A L M B E A C H G A R D E N S

Photo by: Mike Sperduto

A R T F E AT U R E B Y : C A R O U S E L W O R K S

W

here in Palm Beach Gardens can you find an alligator, a flamingo, and a panther, all in one place? It might be much closer than you think! Artistry meets entertainment at this oneof-a-kind carousel located in the heart of Downtown at the Gardens. Designed and constructed by Carousel Works, the world’s largest manufacturer of carousels, the Downtown Carousel has all the features you’d expect of a classic merry-goround, but with a unique Floridian twist. Like any traditional carousel, the horse is the most common figure in the Downtown Carousel. But what makes it so unique is its showcasing of the many other natural wonders that call Florida home. Some familiar names include the Loggerhead Sea Turtle, the Great Blue Heron, and the Sandhill Crane, all of which are native to the South Florida region. In total, 27 individually handcrafted figures and three 12

SIGNATURE CITY: City of Palm Beach Gardens

chariots dance in unison to the melody of classical circus music for all to enjoy. From the vibrant murals depicting local fauna and marine life, to the custom painted panels depicting native birds in flight, it’s the little details that bring this carousel to life. Every aspect of the carousel had to be carefully considered due to its proclivity to the Florida elements, from the selection of wood, down to the color of paint. Thoughtful consideration was applied to every subtle detail; the team behind the work including artists, woodworkers, electricians, and mechanics. Each person played an important role in designing and constructing the Downtown Carousel, which has become a staple of the entertainment experience at Downtown at the Gardens. Together, this menagerie of Florida wildlife and meticulously crafted works of art illustrate the creative wonders that can be found teeming on our shores or blossoming

l pbgfl.com

in our backyards, making the Downtown Carousel a fun and educational attraction for children and adults alike. Catch a ride on the functional art piece known as the Downtown Carousel between Sunday and Thursday, from 10:00 a.m. and 8:00 p.m., and Friday through Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. Free rides are available every Wednesday from 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m., courtesy of the Palm Beach Children’s Hospital. Ga rde

Downtown Carousel

Kyoto Garde ns Dr

ns

Pkw y


I N T H E C LOS E

L E SS,

GARDE NS

PL AY MORE Day 1

With the addition of five acres of multipurpose fields at Joseph Russo Athletic Complex in 2017, the City took a new approach to its turfgrass science. Turfgrass science is the study of grasses, soils, moisture content, pests and the overall maintenance of athletic fields.

(foreground)

Day60 (background)

ABOVE: City (Russo & The Gardens North County District Park) multipurpose fields

D

ue to a change in the process of constructing its fields, the City has reaped the benefits of updating its approach. For its efforts at J.R.A.C., the City installed 8 inches of 90/10 rootzone mix, allowing us to provide more playtime and less downtime for our user groups. When comparing old methods to current methods in an 18-month period, crews have replaced 118,000 square feet of turf on existing City multipurpose fields. In the same period, zero turf replacements were required at Russo Complex. A healthy root zone is 6-12 inches in depth. Because of this foundation, we can close less, play more and grow a healthier turf stand. The City works together with PBGYAA and Recreation & Parks to limit closures as much as possible. The previous closure schedule required fields to close a total of 16-weeks throughout the year. That was 16 weeks that athletes and the community

require sprigging Latitude 36 Bermuda Grass and takes 1200 bushels per acre.

could not use multipurpose fields while the turf was given time to rest and recover. The City’s Parks and Grounds staff also utilizes these closure periods to perform its routine maintenance practices including, but not limited to aerA healthy root zone is 6-12 inches in depth. The photo on the left ation, verticutting, slicing, shows a shallow root system with compacted soils. The image on topdressing, turfgrass repairs, the right depicts a fibrous root system with porous soils. and scalping in a constant attempt to provide the best possible playing surface for our youth. period with the new fields at Russo Complex, no sod repairs were required. This The City’s previous closures consisted of resulted in improved accommodations for two 8-week periods and required two renthe Palm Beach Gardens Youth Athletic ovations. With the updated approach to Association to welcome more events and turf science, closures have been reduced tournaments. The same approach to Turfto total of 12 weeks. This is done five grass Science is currently underway with times a year for shorter periods (no more the construction of The Gardens North than 2-3 weeks). In our 18-month trial County District Park.

SPRING 2019

13


Book Your Next Event With Us! Let us be your one-stop shop for life’s biggest celebrations! No matter the occasion, we have a venue that’s right for every event and every budget. ANNIVERSARY PARTIES BABY SHOWERS B I R T H D AY PA R T I E S CONCERTS C O R P O R AT E E V E N T G AT H E R I N G S LEAGUES • MEETINGS PICNICS • POOL PARTIES RECEPTIONS REUNIONS TOURNAMENTS

View a full list of available facilities and submit an application for your next event by visiting www.pbgfl.com/facilityrentals. Rates vary based on facility. Call (561) 630-1100 or e-mail recinfo@pbgfl.com for more details. 14

SIGNATURE CITY: City of Palm Beach Gardens

l pbgfl.com


Here We Grow Again! An Update on Current City Construction Projects THE GARDENS NORTH COUNTY DISTRICT PARK

CITY HALL RENOVATIONS & EXPANSION

SUMMER 2019

SPRING 2020

This new park located adjacent to the Palm Beach Gardens Tennis Center & Joseph R. Russo Athletic Complex on 117 Court N. is expected to be completed by June of this year. As construction continues in full swing, patrons can now see structures taking form above ground. These include: Seven regulation size multipurpose fields, two concession stands with restrooms, a playground, splash pad, sidewalk system, nature trails and some turf installation. The total 68-acre park is projected to cost $13 million and is funded by the One-Cent Sales Tax. The City is currently negotiating a Public Private Partnership (P3) Agreement for the development of an indoor recreational facility on the remaining 14 acres.

The expansion and renovation of City Hall kicked off in late February when much of the landscaping in front of the building was removed and repurposed elsewhere at City facilities. As the construction fencing went up, access to the Building Department was rerouted to the main entrance of City Hall. All customer service and building department functions will continue as normal. Completion of this $7.02 million project is expected by spring 2020 and will result in the renovation of an existing 9,000 sq. ft and the addition of 17,000 sq. ft.

OPERATIONS CENTER AND JOHNSON DAIRY ROAD SUMMER 2019

The widening of Johnson Dairy Road was completed in late 2018, paving the way for the upcoming completion of the Operations Center. You may also have noticed the new entrance sign for City Hall. At this time, passersby can see the red steel frame of the Operations Center, which is gradually being covered by stucco. This project will be completed by this summer when Public Services and Fleet Maintenance staff will move in to the $6.7 million facility.

TENNIS CENTER CLUBHOUSE SPRING 2020

As the Gardens Tennis program continues to enjoy popularity, the City will soon break ground on a new Tennis Clubhouse. This $4.8 million project will include demolition of the existing clubhouse and construction of a new 2-story, 12,705 square foot Key West style clubhouse. Guests of the facility will enjoy 4,000 square feet of covered terraces at the rear of the building overlooking the center’s 18 courts. The new clubhouse will accommodate the growth of the Gardens Tennis program, as well as be open for all visitors to enjoy its café with indoor & outdoor dining, 2 multipurpose rooms, and outdoor deck for dining and observation of matches. Clubhouse members and regulars

The porte-cochère at City Hall was demolished in midMarch, making way for expansion of the building.

can look forward to the addition of women’s and men’s locker rooms. Construction is expected to be completed by spring 2020. GARDENS PARK BASEBALL FIELDS SUMMER 2020

Once The Gardens North County District Park opens this summer, construction will begin on expansion of the Gardens Park Baseball program. This $2.5 million expansion project will include one new regulation size baseball field, covered batting cages and pitching areas, an artificial turf practice area for simulated infield play, shade structures, and approximately 190 additional parking spaces. Another aspect that will be incorporated into the new baseball field is a 10,000 square foot training facility. The proposed public-private partnership with Cressey Sports Performance Florida would bring world class quality training to Palm Beach Gardens. Construction and operation of the facility will be funded by the private entity at no cost to the City. We look forward the playing ball in the summer of 2020!

SPRING 2019

15


The S TAT E B I R D :

of Florida!

Mockingbird

S TAT E F L O W E R :

S TAT E T R E E :

Orange Blossom

Sabal Palm

S TAT E W I L D F L O W E R :

Coreopsis (Tickseed)

“The Swanee River (Old Folks at Home)” by Stephen C. Foster

S TAT E S O N G :

S TAT E B U T T E R F LY :

S TAT E A N I M A L :

S TAT E S H E L L :

Zebra Longwing

Florida Panther Horse Conch

S TAT E R E P T I L E :

Alligator

S TAT E S A LT WAT E R F I S H :

S TAT E M A R I N E M A M M A L :

S TAT E F R E S H WAT E R F I S H :

16

Largemouth Bass

SIGNATURE CITY: City of Palm Beach Gardens

Manatee

Florida, Where the Sawgrass Meets the Sky

S TAT E A N T H E M :

Sailfish

l pbgfl.com


SPRING 2019

17


18

SIGNATURE CITY: City of Palm Beach Gardens

l pbgfl.com


SPRING 2019

19


City of Palm Beach Gardens 10500 N Military Trail Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33410

MORE THAN GREAT GOLF. Golf Learning Center with TrackMan 4 Indoor HD Simulator

Full-service restaurant with indoor and patio seating

200- guest event venue

Book a Tee Time or Your Next Life Celebration! 561-630-1160 | 11401 Northlake Boulevard Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33410 20

SIGNATURE CITY: City of Palm Beach Gardens

l pbgfl.com

Profile for City of Palm Beach Gardens

Signature City Spring 2019  

Signature City magazine is a free publication produced quarterly by the City of Palm Beach Gardens Public Media Relations Division. Signatur...

Signature City Spring 2019  

Signature City magazine is a free publication produced quarterly by the City of Palm Beach Gardens Public Media Relations Division. Signatur...

Advertisement