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A fun family event featuring: Trick-or-Treating on the trail with all your favorite costumed characters Children’s activities Live music by Burnt Biscuit Food and drink items available for purchase

r you t e org s and f e t n’t Do ostum -trea r c k-o g! c i tr ba

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SIGNATURE CITY: City of Palm Beach Gardens

The City of Palm Beach Gardens supports children with food allergies. While trick-ortreating on our trail, look for the teal pumpkins for non-food treats!

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12 PRODUCTION

Public Media Relations Division CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Allyson Black Candice Temple Danny Whilden CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

Chrissy Brahney Photography Candice Temple CONTACT US

signaturecity@pbgfl.com 561.799.4152 Signature City magazine is a free publication produced quarterly by the City of Palm Beach Gardens Public Media Relations Division. Signature City is mailed to every household in Palm Beach Gardens, as well as distributed at city facilities.

Get Social! Follow us on your favorite social media sites

@CityofPalmBeachGardensCityHall @CityofPalmBeachGardensRecreation @SandhillCraneGolfCourse

F A L L

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2 0 1 7

2

Fall Festival

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Reflections on Hurricane Irma

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City Briefs

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Calendar of Events: Pull Out Poster!

14 Tree Lighting Festival

@GardensGreenMarket

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City Social

@CityofPBG @CityPBG @cityofpbgardens @PBGardensFire

F E A T U R E S

@PBGPD

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6 City Report Card: 2017 Resident Opinion Survey Results 9

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Featured Art

12 The Future of Transportation in Your City 15 Hurricane Irma Update

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R E F L E C T I O N S

O N

H U R R I C A N E

able to witness the true use of this Category 5 rated building that houses our I.T. Department and the North County Dispatch center for our police and fire.

Palm Beach Gardens Mayor Maria Marino

A

s we resume our normal lives post Hurricane Irma, I can’t get over how lucky we are on so many fronts. Piles of debris around the city are the only reminders of Irma, a storm that wiped out Key West and other small island nations to our south east. On Friday, September 8, I wondered if life as I had known it was going to be the same after the weekend. In my 30+ years here, this was the first time I was overwhelmed with such a feeling of uncertainty bordering on panic. Looking at my townhouse, built pre-Hurricane Andrew and without shutters, I started to collect those items in my home that couldn’t be replaced. Slowly and methodically I went through each room, carefully packing those “priceless” items and began filling my car. Leaving our City was not an option so I backed my completely packed car into the garage. The logic was, if the storm blew in the garage door (also non-Hurricane rated) it would damage the front end of the car, something that could be replaced, and protect those items in the trunk that couldn’t. After speaking with our City Manager Ron Ferris, it was suggested I spend this uncertain time in the Emergency Operations Center (EOC) adjacent to City Hall. Having toured this building on several occasions, I was now 4

SIGNATURE CITY: City of Palm Beach Gardens

What met me when I walked in the door was a room filled with concerned, yet caring people from our maintenance man John to Finance Director Allan. A large conference room that has been set up for holiday toy drives and stroke awareness lectures was now an Emergency Command Center. Divided into sections such as Police, Fire, Procurement, Accounting, Planning and Zoning, Code Enforcement and Communications, it was staffed with many members of those departments. Members who made sure their families were safe first before they made their way to the EOC, a building that would be home for a long, nerve wracking weekend. Never having been through this at the EOC, I didn’t know what to expect. What I experienced is nothing short of a model that other cities and counties should be using, a real “How To Manual of Preparedness”. The first item of business was a joint meeting with each department reporting on what needs were being met or resources being used. For example, our Head of Procurement Km! Ra reported the amount of fuel on hand to power all the city vehicles and how long that fuel would last if there was no additional delivery. We then determined when the next update meeting would occur and the many after that. Then, it was back to the business of running a city and keeping all our residents safe and informed. Power was still on and food was being prepared. Charts were placed on the walls describing the different zones in the city where police and fire would be monitoring. All fire stations where being manned by not only their respective first responders but City support staff as well. Our City even had an armored vehicle manned with SWAT officers and SWAT medics that can

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I R M A

safely respond in high winds. The safety and security of our residents and businesses was number one on everyone’s mind. The sharing of communication by City Staff, County Staff, the Governor’s Office, FPL and other necessary entities was amazing. Learning how electric was coming back on line or debris was going to get hauled off was eye opening. As I say again, SAFETY was the main issue. Having a curfew in place, something I have never experienced in the city, was so important. Many roads were covered by down trees and powerlines. Police road blocks were immediately put in place and bucket loaders were dispatched from the fire stations to clear these areas as quickly as possible. By 11:00 PM Sunday evening, September 10, all our trucks were ready to spring into action and at 7:00 AM Monday, September 11, our debris haulers started the now arduous task of picking up what is estimated to be almost 60,000 cubic yards of debris. A process that is slated to take 30 to 45 days. Luckily for us, the Hurricane just turned out to be Mother Nature giving us an expensive pruning. Our exemplary staff gave their all to a City they call home and some of those even left the safety of Palm Beach Gardens to aid those less fortunate in the Keys. A 7-member Fire Rescue team traveled down the first day after the storm to help in any way they could. Additionally, two of our emergency dispatchers joined the efforts by stepping up to relieve worn out dispatchers working in the Keys. They brought back a better understanding of just how much devastation was felt in the Keys and important lessons that can now be added to our toolbox. The City of Palm Beach Gardens, leading by example. Thank you to our staff who go above and beyond every day and whom I consider family.


CITY BRIEFS CALEA ACCREDITATION Public Information Session

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t’s that time, again! The Palm Beach Gardens Police Department is up for reaccreditation. A team of assessors from the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies, Inc. (CALEA), will arrive Monday, November 6, 2017, to examine all aspects of the Palm Beach Gardens Police Department’s policies and procedures, administration, operations, and support services. As part of the on-site assessment, agency employees and members of the community are invited to provide comments at a public information session. Monday, November 6, 2017 5:00 PM to 7:00 PM City Council Chambers 10500 N. Military Trail

Good News! Signature City magazine was the recent recipient of a national 2017 Savvy Award for Graphic Design! Savvy Awards Winners were announced during a ceremony by the City-County Communications and Marketing Association (3CMA) to recognize the best in the nation for outstanding local government achievements in communications, public-sector marketing and citizen-government relationships. The City of Palm Beach Gardens also won a Savvy Award for its Public Service Announcement video for Stroke Awareness Month: Time=Brain.

DRAW A MAP OF YOUR HOME with

all members of your household, marking two exits from each room and a path to the outside from each exit. An escape plan guide can be found on NFPA’s website at www.nfpa.org. PRACTICE YOUR HOME FIRE DRILL

twice a year. Conduct one at night and one during the day with everyone in your home, and practice using different ways out. TEACH CHILDREN HOW TO ESCAPE on their own in case

you can’t help them. MAKE SURE THE NUMBER OF YOUR HOME is clearly

marked and easy for the fire department to find.

NATIONAL FIRE PREVENTION WEEK

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ctober 8-14, 2017 is National Fire Prevention Week and the theme of this year’s campaign is “Every Second Counts: Plan 2 Ways Out!”, which aims to emphasize and highlight the importance of developing fire escape plans. The National Fire Prevention Association (NFPA) has provided some important tips to assist in the preparation of an escape plan:

Close doors behind you as you leave – this may slow the spread of smoke, heat, and fire. Once you get outside, stay outside. Never go back inside a burning building. For additional information and resources for fire prevention, visit www.nfpa.org/fpw.

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CITY REPORT CARD: - 2017 Resident Opinion Survey Results -

GRADING PROCESS How did residents grade the City of Palm Beach Gardens? From June 19 through July 5, 2017, Downs & St. Germain Research conducted telephone interviews with 400 randomly selected households in the City of Palm Beach Gardens for our Resident Opinion Survey, which is like a city report card. Participants within households were selected via the Hagan-Collier technique that randomizes who among the oldest male, youngest male over 18, oldest female and youngest female over 18 would be chosen. This technique guards against a disproportionate number of older and female participants. For complete results of the Downs & St. Germain Research conducted telephone interviews via computerized telephone procedures. Interviews were conducted from 5:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. weekdays, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturdays, and noon to 9 p.m. on Sundays. Ten percent (10%) of the completed interviews were validated through callbacks by interviewer supervisors. Up to four calls were attempted to reach selected households to ensure integrity of the sampling process.

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SIGNATURE CITY: City of Palm Beach Gardens

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2017 Resident Opinion Survey visit our website at www.pbgfl.com/residentsurvey.


TOP REASONS FOR LIVING IN PALM BEACH GARDENS RANK

REASON

PERCENTAGE

1

Proximity to Family

22%

2

Upscale Community

18%

3

Proximity to Job

13%

94% OF RESIDENTS RECOMMEND LIVING IN PBG *those who would not recommend PBG cite cost of living as their #1 reason for not doing so

TOP CONCERNS ABOUT LIVING IN PALM BEACH GARDENS RANK

REASON

PERCENTAGE

1

Traffic

29%

2

No Concerns

18%

3

Growth and Development

15%

Crime

15%

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CITY SERVICES AVERAGE RATE OF RESIDENTS’ OVERALL SATISFACTION WITH QUALITY OF CITY SERVICES (4.30 OUT OF 5)

AVERAGE RATE OF RESIDENT SATIFACTION WITH DEPARTMENTS

• Two in three residents (69%) think the City is providing all the services it should be.

Department

• One in five residents (21%) cites more activities and clubs as the most desired additional service.

Fire 4.78

• Seven in ten residents (72%) are unwilling to pay additional taxes for additional services.

Police 4.41

• Eight in ten residents (80%) believe that the City should continue to provide all current services.

Parks & Recreation

Ranking (out of 5)

4.49

• Residents who believe that there are services the City should stop providing cite growth and development (2% of all residents) most often. • A number of residents (44%) believe that they should not be assessed user-based fees for services. • 91% believe Parks & Recreation services are vital to the community.

TAXES 8 in 10 (78%) feel the return on taxes is excellent, very good or good Most residents (92%) have not taken action to be involved in the City’s budget process.

RESIDENT DEMOGRAPHICS

CITY CUSTOMER SERVICE

Typical Palm Beach Gardens Resident

22% of residents have contacted the City in the last 6 months

• 54 years old

TOP 3 DEPARTMENTS CONTACTED IN THE LAST 6 MONTHS RANK

DEPARTMENT

PERCENTAGE

1

Police

10%

2

Growth Management

4%

3

Parks & Recreation

3%

PERCEIVED FRIENDLINESS OF CITY STAFF

4.45 out of 5 EFFECTIVENESS OF CITY STAFF

4.10 out of 5

• Lived 16 years in Palm Beach Gardens • Owns a home (83%) • 2016 household income of $95,300 • Full time resident (96%)

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CITY COMMUNICATION AVERAGE EFFECTIVENESS OF CITY COMMUNICATION

3.59 out of 5 AVERAGE EFFECTIVENESS OF COMMUNICATION OF SIGNATURE CITY MAGAZINE

3.88 out of 5 • Mail (44%) is the preferred method of receiving information from the City with email (33%) being a close second. • Most residents (81%) are not aware of phone broadcasts of City Council meetings. • Seven in ten residents (69%) are not aware of online streaming of City Council meetings. • Three in four residents (74%) are not aware that City Council meetings are posted online. • Most residents (90%) have never attended a City Council meeting. • 7% of Residents who have attended a City Council meeting do so to keep informed of City activities and policies. • Most residents (84%) are aware of the City of Palm Beach Gardens’ website, but fewer than half of those aware (53%) have actually visited the website. • Most residents who visit the City’s website seek Parks & Recreation information (43%) or general information (38%). • Most residents (92%) would add nothing to the City website. • Nearly two-thirds of residents (63%) get their local news from television. • A little over half of residents (55%) are aware of Signature City magazine.

GROWTH & DEVELOPMENT • Seven in ten residents (70%) favor more government-purchased green space. • Seven in ten residents (72%) favor more science and high-tech project development to support jobs in the City. • One in four residents (23%) favors more density growth if limited to taller buildings in the I-95 and PGA corridor. • About half of residents (53%) are in favor of a wider range of housing types to accommodate the City’s work force. • Nearly three in four residents (74%) rate satisfaction with growth and development in restaurants/ entertainment as a four or five on a five-point scale.

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SIGNATURE CITY: City of Palm Beach Gardens

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NOTABLE CHANGES FROM 2015 TO 2017 • Residents’ concerns about traffic have increased. • Residents’ concerns about growth and development have decreased. • Satisfaction with the overall quality of city services has slightly increased. • More residents (from <1% to 2%) cite cost of living as a reason for not recommending Palm Beach Gardens as a place to live. • More residents claim to understand the services provided by the City of Palm Beach Gardens. • More residents believe that the City should provide more activities and clubs. • More residents are unwilling to pay additional taxes for more services provided by the City. • More believe that the City of Palm Beach Gardens should continue to provide all current services. • Fewer residents contacted the City of Palm Beach Gardens. • Fewer residents are aware of telephone and online options available to hear City Council meetings. • More residents are visiting the City website to view information on Parks & Recreation and general information. • More residents receive their local news information from television.


09.11.01 Memorial Plaza

by Danny Whilden

Steel beam #C-89 may be bent, but it stands tall in front of Fire Station #3

O

nce a permanent fixture of the ill-fated World Trade Center Plaza that was destroyed in the terrorist attacks on September 11th, 2001, steel beam #C-89 now calls Palm Beach Gardens home, serving as the centerpiece of the City’s 09.11.01 Memorial Plaza, a memorial dedicated to the thousands of people who lost their lives on that fateful day. Located in the center of the 09.11.01 Memorial Plaza, the distinctive red steel beam consists of two slightly disfigured vertical columns approximately 36 feet in length and weighing nearly ten tons. The columns are remnants of the World Trade Center buildings, the number “C-89” representing the original structural placement of the beam, which was somewhere between the 12th and 15th floors of the World Trade Center South Tower. In 2009, these salvaged steel beams were made available as memorial art pieces, prompting the City of Palm Beach

Gardens to obtain one to be utilized in the construction of a memorial. Designed by Artist Mark Fuller, the plaza was created to reflect the shape of the Maltese Cross, a widely recognized symbol among fire departments. It serves as a symbol of protection and honor, a fitting depiction of the willingness of firefighters to lay down their lives for others, just as many did on September 11th, 2001. Etched on the glass of eight panels surrounding the plaza are the names of the victims. For victims who served as law enforcement officers and firefighters, a shield or Maltese Cross is embedded into the glass panels, adjacent to their respective names. Names of victims who were residents of Palm Beach Gardens are italicized. Lighting is incorporated throughout the plaza, ensuring that the memorial can be seen both day and night. Overlooking the plaza is the nation’s flag, unwavering, unyielding, a symbolic reminder that we will continue to persevere, even in the most troubling of times.

“These acts shattered steel, but they cannot dent the steel of American resolve.” – President George W. Bush.

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CALENDAR OF EVENTS 10

Read for the Record October 19 10 a.m. at Riverside Youth Enrichment Center

OCTOBER OCTOBER 8  The Gardens GreenMarket  8 a.m.-1 p.m. at City Hall   

OCTOBER 8-14

National Fire Prevention Week “Every Second Counts, Plan 2 Ways Out”

OCTOBER 12 City Council Meeting 7 p.m. at City Hall Public Meeting

OCTOBER 15  The Gardens GreenMarket  8 a.m.-1 p.m. at City Hall   

OCTOBER 16-NOVEMBER 16

PBG Resident Photography Exhibition Juried Contest   M-F, 8 a.m.-5 p.m.  City Hall Lobby   

OCTOBER 19 

Read for the Record 10 a.m. at Riverside Youth Enrichment Center   

OCTOBER 19

Mobility Study Workshop 6-8 p.m. at City Hall E.O.C.

OCTOBER 21 

OCTOBER 27 

Makos Halloween Swim Meet  10 a.m. at Aquatic Complex   

Fall Festival 6 p.m.- 8 p.m. at   Burns Road Recreation Center   

OCTOBER 22 

The Gardens GreenMarket  8 a.m.-1 p.m. at City Hall   

OCTOBER 23-29

Florida City Government Week *see full schedule of activities on back cover

OCTOBER 24 

OCTOBER 28

10th Annual Police Foundation Golf Tournament To benefit the Police Explorers and other youth programs 7 am Breakfast- 8:30 am Shotgun Start PGA National Resort

OCTOBER 29 

City Government Week Photo Contest Finalist’s Reception  6 p.m.-7:30 p.m. at City Hall Lobby   

The Gardens GreenMarket  8 a.m.-1 p.m. at City Hall 

Fall Mah Jongg Tourney/Luncheon  11 a.m.-4 p.m. at Lakeside Center   

NOVEMBER 4-6

OCTOBER 24 

OCTOBER 24

Code Enforcement Special Magistrate Hearing 2:00p.m. at City Hall

OCTOBER 26 Coffee & Conversation with the Mayor 9:00 a.m. City Hall Lobby Fall Festival

NOVEMBER USTA Junior Tournament Level 6 B/G 18-16-Under Singles (FMLC)   And Doubles (SE)  8:30 a.m.-7 p.m. at Tennis Center   

NOVEMBER 2 City Council Meeting 7P.M. at City Hall Public Meeting

NOVEMBER 5 

OCTOBER 20-22

The Gardens GreenMarket  8 a.m.-1 p.m. at City Hall   

Palm Beach Gardens Classic Youth soccer tournament featuring 170+ teams! All weekend long at City parks

Veterans Day Ceremony 11 a.m. at Veterans Plaza Amphitheater 

SIGNATURE CITY: City of Palm Beach Gardens

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NOVEMBER 11


OCTOBER

NOVEMBER

DECEMBER

JANUARY

S M T W T F S

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

1 2 3 4

1 2

1 2 3 4 5 6

8 9 10 11 12 13 14

5 6 7 8 9 10 11

3 4 5 6 7 8 9

7 8 9 10 11 12 13

15 16 17 18 19 20 21

12 13 14 15 16 17 18

10 11 12 13 14 15 16

14 15 16 17 18 19 20

19 20 21 22 23 24 25

17 18 19 20 21 22 23

26 27 28 29 30

24 25 26 27 28 29 30

22 23 24 25 26 27 28

29 30 31

S M T W T F S

S M T W T F S

S M T W T F S

21 22 23 24 25 26 27

28 29 30 31

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DECEMBER 1-6

DECEMBER 10 

Little Mo International  Tennis Tournament  At Tennis Center   

The Gardens GreenMarket  8 a.m.-1 p.m. at City Hall   

DECEMBER 13

DECEMBER 3 

Senior Holiday Luncheon 11:30 a.m. Burns Road Recreation Center   

The Gardens GreenMarket  8 a.m.-1 p.m. at City Hall   

Veterans Day Ceremony: November 11 11 a.m. at the Veterans Plaza Amphitheater NOVEMBER 12  The Gardens GreenMarket  8 a.m.-1 p.m. at City Hall   

NOVEMBER 16

Fall Canasta Tourney/Luncheon 11 a.m.-4 p.m. at Burns Road Recreation Center   

NOVEMBER 22DECEMBER 22 Gardens Police Holiday Joy Drive

Riverside Youth Enrichment Center Thanksgiving Program  9 a.m. at Veterans Plaza Amphitheater   

Code Enforcement Special Magistrate Hearing 2:00p.m. at City Hall

NOVEMBER 20-JANUARY 4

GardensArt Exhibition: Amber Moran  “Celebrating the Sunshine State”   Watercolor & Illustration  Monday-Friday, 8 a.m.-5 p.m.  City Hall Lobby    Amber Moran

Tree Lighting Festival 6 p.m.-8 p.m. at  Burns Road Recreation Center   

The Gardens GreenMarket  8 a.m.-1 p.m. at City Hall   

DECEMBER 7

DECEMBER 31

The Gardens GreenMarket  8 a.m.-1 p.m. at City Hall   

JANUARY JANUARY 6 Adult 1-Day Singles Tournament  11:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. at Tennis Center   

JANUARY 7

The Gardens GreenMarket  8 a.m.-1 p.m. at City Hall   

DECEMBER DECEMBER 1-16 Santa’s Mailbox  Burns Road Recreation Center   

DECEMBER 24 

The Gardens GreenMarket  8 a.m.-1 p.m. at City Hall   

City Council Meeting 7 p.m. at City Hall Public Meeting

The Gardens GreenMarket  8 a.m.-1 p.m. at City Hall 

NOVEMBER 28

The Gardens GreenMarket  8 a.m.-1 p.m. at City Hall   

DECEMBER 17 

NOVEMBER 26 

NOVEMBER 18

NOVEMBER 19 

DECEMBER 6

JANUARY 14

Tree Lighting Festival

The Gardens GreenMarket  “Sweet 16” Anniversary Celebration  8 a.m.-1 p.m. at City Hall 

DECEMBER 1 Meet & Greet for Artist Amber Moran  5:30 p.m.-7:30 p.m.  at City Hall Lobby  Exhibition runs through January 4   

DECEMBER 1 XGLOsive Tennis Frenzy  7 p.m. and 8 p.m. at Tennis Center   

DECEMBER 1 & 2 Gardens Holiday Bazaar  Friday 11 a.m.-7 p.m.  Saturday 9 a.m.-4 p.m.  at Burns Road Recreation Center   

I M P O RTA N T A D D R E S S E S :

City Hall: 10500 N. Military Trail Burns Road Recreation Center: 4404 Burns Road Tennis Center: 5110 117th Court North Gardens Park: 4301 Burns Road Veterans Plaza Amphitheater: 10500 N. Military Trail Sandhill Crane Golf Club: 11401 Northlake Blvd.

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THE FUTURE OF TRANSPORTATION IN YOUR CITY by Allyson Black and Natalie Crowley

F

or decades, the City of Palm Beach Gardens has anticipated the construction of a Tri-Rail station within the vicinity of PGA Boulevard. In 2009, the Treasure Coast Regional Planning Council (TCRPC) conducted a Transit Oriented Design (TOD) Workshop for a proposed Tri-Rail station located in the area of PGA Boulevard and Florida East Coast (FEC) Railway Corridor. The focus of the workshop was to analyze and make recommendations for a future transit station. However, since 2009 many changes have occurred in the area, including new developments and the advancement of future passenger travel along the FEC Corridor by Brightline (All Aboard Florida). At this time, the City is in the beginning stages of a process that will design a Tri-Rail Station incorporating new transportation opportunities that don’t currently exist for the public.

Through this $120,000 grant, the City desires to review the recommendations of studies that were performed as a result of the workshop, provide any necessary updates based on recent trends, and most importantly, provide the public another opportunity to provide input in the planning process for a Tri-Rail station. The study will assist recommendations to be included in a Mobility Plan for future implementation for all modes of transportation. The City would like to review current market opportunities and conditions to address a final design of a Master Plan for a Station Area and the immediate surrounding area. The project area for the Palm Beach Gardens Station Area TOD Master Plan is focused on, but not limited to, that area around the intersection of PGA Boulevard and the FEC railroad, extending a half-mile in all directions. This area is generally bound by Kyoto Gardens Drive to the north, Burns Road to the south, Military Trail to the west, and Campus Drive to the east. THE KEY ELEMENTS OF THE PALM BEACH GARDENS STATION AREA TOD MASTER PLAN INCLUDE: • The creation of a physical master plan for the anticipated Tri-Rail Coastal Link Station. • A review of the land use and development regulations in order to accommodate the station. • Provide a Market Overview.

To fund the design of the station and the area surrounding this location, the City applied for grant funding through the South Florida Regional Transportation Authority. The grant is geared toward supporting economic development, ridership, multimodal connectivity and accessibility, increasing transit access for pedestrians and bicycles, and reviewing land use patterns near transit stations.

• Coordination with all relevant governmental agencies. • Palm Tran will still be a main mobility service for users of the future Tri-Rail station.

GRANT FUNDING TIMELINE

Feb 2017: City applied for South Florida Transit Oriented Development Grant

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March 2017: City Planning and Zoning Department submitted grant request for design of the Station Area Master Plan

SIGNATURE CITY: City of Palm Beach Gardens

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April 2017: City received recommendation of $120,000 in Treasure Coast Regional Planning Council funding for the Station Area Master Plan

July 2017: City Council approved Resolution for Interlocal Agreement with TCRPC for grant funding


. Blvd PGA

PROPOSED TRI-RAIL STATION AREA

RCABlvd

1 Mile Radius

PUBLIC PARTICIPTION Thursday October 19, 2017

In order to address the unique characteristics in the PGA Boulevard Station Area and to provide the public an opportunity to engage in this process, a public design workshop will be held for City residents on Thursday, October 19, 2017 at 6pm in the City’s EOC training center located at City Hall at 10500 N. Military Trail, PBG. A

separate a session will be held earlier that morning for key stakeholders in the business community. The workshops will include an opening presentation, and “table sessions” where residents will work with facilitators to generate ideas and provide input and feedback into the City’s TOD Master Plan.

PROCESS: Due Diligence/Research Design Workshop (Oct. 19 at 6:00 p.m. at City Hall) Work in Progress Presentation First draft of Master Plan Final Master TOD Plan

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KICK OFF THE HOLIDAY SEASON WITH YOUR FAMILY AND FRIENDS at the Palm Beach Gardens Tree Lighting Festival on Wednesday, December 6 from 6-8 p.m. This fun, family event takes place at the Burns Road Recreation Center, 4404 Burns Road, and features a D.J., children’s crafts and activities, face painting and Santa’s Village on the trail. Join the community as we officially light the City tree. And let’s not forget, the highlight of the evening is a visit from Santa & Mrs. Claus! This is a complimentary event with food and drink items available for purchase. Call (561) 630-1100, or email recinfo@pbgfl.com for more information.

Generously sponsored by Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center.

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SIGNATURE CITY: City of Palm Beach Gardens

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HURRICANE IRMA by Candice Temple

B

efore each hurricane season, local governments begin the process of reviewing emergency management plans and preparing the public for the possibility of serious weather events. This June, the City of Palm Beach Gardens even hosted a Weather the Storm event to bring preparedness to the mindset of residents. At the same time, projections began to swirl about what was in store for the 2017 Atlantic Hurricane Season. As the Weather Channel began making its way through the storm alphabet in June, the whole world watched as Hurricane Harvey devastated the coast of Texas. Anxiety heightened as Hurricane Irma’s predicted track focused in on the entire state of Florida.

PRE-STORM As the approach of Hurricane Irma became more focused on the state of Florida, City

departments began the process of reviewing hurricane preparedness plans. This included tasks such as securing City facilities to minimize damage, fueling City vehicles, testing building generators and charging necessary equipment to full capacity, to name a few. The City activated its Emergency Operations Center on Saturday, September 9 at 2:00 p.m. At that time, several staff members were required to report for duty in the Category 5 rated building that also houses the City’s emergency dispatch operations.

DURING THE STORM As Hurricane Irma made its way closer to northern Palm Beach County it was evident that the hurricane force winds and gusts would be more than our area had experienced in several years. During the storm the City’s fire stations each become a response station. Each has personnel housed at the station in four areas: Police,

Fire, Public Works & Heavy Machinery. The strategic placement of the fire stations enables personnel to respond to emergencies and issues quickly with all the necessary equipment. During the storm, teams sprang into action from the six response stations around town. These crews worked to keep roads open, using heavy equipment, so that police and fire could continue responding to emergencies in safe conditions. As the storm made its way through Palm Beach Gardens, EOC activity became focused around the safety of residents and personnel. In addition, a representative with Ceres Environmental, the City’s debris management vendor, was embedded in the EOC to begin mapping out the plan for how the City would collect and dispose of vegetative and construction debris the storm was bound to leave in its tracks. (continues)

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In the weeks following Hurricane Irma, City emergency personnel aided a portion of the Florida Keys through the Palm Beach County Strike Team. Seven Fire Rescue personnel deployed to the Keys for a week to relieve weary first responders in the region. In addition, two dispatchers from Palm Beach Gardens spent a week in the Keys assisting with operations and allowing the local staff to take time off to recharge. Hurricane Irma Emergency Operations Statistics POLICE

AFTER THE STORM When Hurricane Irma moved out of the area, many roads were left blocked by fallen trees and other debris. Crews housed at the six fire stations had continued reporting the status of roads to the Emergency Operations Center throughout the night. At one point windspeeds were too high for crews to physically work outdoors. At 7:00 a.m. on Monday, September 11, the City conducted what is called a Rapid Impact Assessment and began its initial push to get debris off roadways. By 9:30 a.m. all roads had been given a classification of: clear, debris, power lines or power lines and debris. By noon the day after the storm, all City roads had been cleared of debris and power lines and were deemed passable for emergency response. Many areas of the City were left without power in the days following Irma. City Hall was able to resume operations and opened for business on Tuesday, September 12. By far, after power outages, the biggest issue of concern among residents was the enormous amount of debris that had been left in Irma’s wake. Citywide debris removal operations started on Wednesday, September 13 at its debris field located behind Mirasol Park. Although the City was divided into seven zones for the purpose of planning and management, 16

SIGNATURE CITY: City of Palm Beach Gardens

the amount of debris varied from zone to zone. The initial objective was to clear the primary streets, then move to neighborhood streets. At an average rate of 3,000 cubic yards a day, within 26 days the City wrapped up its debris operations with a total of 67,294 cubic yards of vegetation and 185 cubic yards of construction and demolition debris. A drone used to capture a bird’s eye view of the debris field revealed that at 12 feet high the City’s efforts collected enough debris to fill in the infield and outfield of almost two baseball fields.

(8 a.m. 9/9 - 8 a.m. 9/12) • Responded to or self-initiated: 2,846 incidents (Calls for Service) • Enhanced Patrols: 2,136 • Calls to NorthCom Regional Dispatch Center in the City’s EOC: 596 (911 calls) & 4,455 non-emergency calls. • Arrests: 6 • Traffic Crashes: 7

FIRE RESCUE (2 p.m. 9/9 - 10 a.m. 9/11) • Calls for residential structure fires: 4 • Brush fire: 1 • Automatic fire alarms: 12 • Public Assistance: 7 • Downed power lines: 5 • Medical calls: 66 TOTAL EMERGENCY CALLS: 95

The vegetative debris alone is estimated to cost the City approximately $1.6 million for collection and disposal. By using debris monitors and careful documentation of the cubic yardage collected by each truck, the City hopes to submit its claim for reimbursement by F.E.M.A. “I wanted to share this photo of the City cleaning my street with chainsaws and a bulldozer about 9am the morning after the storm. Not only did they cut and clear that morning, they were also out DURING the storm at midnight to clear a huge oak tree that fell and was blocking the only road in/out of Siena Oaks.” – Rick Sartory, PBG Resident

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DEBRIS REMOVAL (9/13-10/8) • Vegetative Debris Collected: 67,294 cubic yards • Construction & Demolition Debris: 185 cubic yards • Number of Trucks Employed: 15


Photos: Jerry Rabinowitz

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SIGNATURE CITY: City of Palm Beach Gardens

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City of Palm Beach Gardens 10500 N Military Trail Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33410

JOIN US FOR THESE EVENTS DURING #FLCityWeek: Tuesday, October 24 Resident Photo Contest Reception 6:00 p.m.

City Hall Lobby See the winning photographs on display as part of a special exhibition in City Hall!

Florida City Government Week October 23-29, 2017 My City: I’m Part of It, I’m Proud of It! Celebrating the Work of Municipal Government

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SIGNATURE CITY: City of Palm Beach Gardens

Thursday, October 26 Coffee & Conversation with the Mayor

Friday, October 27 Fall Festival 6:00 p.m. Burns Road Recreation Center Don’t miss one of our favorite community events of the year!

Saturday, October 28 Residents Day at Sandhill Crane Golf Course

9:00 a.m. City Hall Lobby

Open-5 p.m. enjoy resident games on the course! Check in with the Pro Shop. Prizes will be awarded.

Join Mayor Marino to discuss issues, share ideas, ask questions and connect in a friendly, casual environment.

Resident Golf Clinic with our PGA Pro Free small bucket of range balls for each resident with a paid round of golf.

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Signature City Magazine Fall 2017  

Signature City magazine is a free publication produced quarterly by the City of Palm Beach Gardens Public Media Relations Division. Signatur...

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