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THE GREEN ISSUE Find Your Inner Forester SUSTAINABLE BUDGETING Be a Better Recycler


YOU'LL GO BATTY FOR OUR FALL FESTIVAL THIS YEAR with a NEW location and NEW activities! Wear your best costume, bring your trick-or-treat bag and meet us at the festival!

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 26, 2018 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. City Hall Municipal Complex 10500 N. Military Trail PBG

OUR FIRST EVER “TRUNK-OR-TREAT" FOOD TRUCKS • PHOTO BOOTH • ROCK CLIMBING WALL INFLATABLE CORN MAZE OUTDOOR MOVIE SCREEN FEATURING “HOCUS POCUS” LIVE MUSIC BY BURNT BISCUIT!

The City of Palm Beach Gardens supports children with food allergies. While at our event, look for the teal pumpkins for non-food treats.


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PRODUCTION

Public Media Relations Division CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Joe Corrao Candice Temple

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CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

Kim Seng

Candice Temple Danny Whilden

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CONTACT US

signaturecity@pbgfl.com Signature City Questions: 561.799.4152 Main City Line: 561.799.4100 F A L L

Signature City magazine is a free publication produced quarterly by the City of Palm Beach Gardens Public Media Relations Division. Signature City is mailed to every household in Palm Beach Gardens, as well as distributed at City facilities.

Get Social! Follow us on your favorite social media sites

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2 Fall Festival- The Remix! 4

Going Green in the Gardens

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City Briefs: Coffee & Conversation with the Mayor

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Calendar of Events: Pull Out Poster!

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Featured Art

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City Social

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@CityofPalmBeachGardensCityHall

F E A T U R E S

@CityofPalmBeachGardensRecreation

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Find Your Inner Forester

@SandhillCraneGolf

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Guide to Better Recycling

@GardensGreenMarket

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The Green Wave

@CityofPBG

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Sustainable Budgeting: FY ’19 Budget Details

@PBGardensFire @PBGPD @CityPBG @cityofpbgardens

ON THE COVER: For those who have visited Frenchman’s Forest Natural Area, our cover image is a familiar sight. The tree covered walkway leads to a serene and inviting observation platform. Visitors can enjoy breathtaking lake views while being serenaded by the symphony of jumping fish, nearby. COVER PHOTO: Kim Seng

Signature City magazine is printed on recycled paper. FA L L 2018

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Going Green in the Gardens Dear Residents,

Welcome to the “green” issue of Signature City magazine. The City recognizes the importance of reducing its carbon footprint and promoting sustainability for future generations and the future of our beautiful blue planet. This issue includes updates on initiatives and energy-saving products used by City staff to save energy, money and natural resources. 

Joe Corrao, Public Services Director

As a long-standing employee for the past 28 years, I have seen advances in technology change every facet of our operations. From LED lighting, automotive technologies, HVAC efficiencies, solar power and recycling. The trends are many, the technology is ever evolving. The implementation of these new technologies and trends is both exciting for us and vastly beneficial to our residents. When I began my career with the City, green initiatives were few and far between. Our society was not as environmentally conscious and technologies were undeveloped. In the 1990’s, we began to integrate compressed natural gas (CNG) powered automobiles and even installed our own CNG fueling station at Public Works. At the end of the 90s, technologies in the automotive world allowed us to scale back from V8 engines and we started to utilize

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SIGNATURE CITY: City of Palm Beach Gardens

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more fuel efficient V6 engines. To this day, our entire fleet of marked police cars run on V6 engines. This year marks the first time in our history that we have implemented the use of fully electric cars. Our fleet of eight vehicles are used by Code Compliance and Fire Inspectors. Car charging stations have been installed at City Hall and our future expansion of charging stations will include City parks and public facilities. You may also have noticed the City has a different glow at night. This is because we have begun converting all our street lights to the new LED technology. As we progress through the years, newer technologies will be introduced to us and we will explore them, test them, and, if it makes sense, embrace them so we can provide a cleaner, efficient and sustainable City for all to enjoy. We are proud of our efforts, but never satisfied and always looking for new ways to save money, energy and keep our City clean. Please join us in our efforts and enjoy this “green” issue of Signature City magazine. Best regards, Joe Corrao Public Services Director


CITY BRIEFS

Coffee & Conversation with the Mayor

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t’s not a bistro. It’s City Hall! Join Palm Beach Gardens Mayor Maria Marino at this informal and informative gathering as she hosts residents, students and the business community for Coffee and Conversation with the Mayor. It’s all part of our recognition of Florida City Government Week, taking place October 22-28. LOCATION: Palm Beach Gardens

City Hall Lobby

ADDRESS:

10500 N. Military Trail

DATE: Monday, October 22, 2018 TIME:

9:30 a.m.

Find us on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram at @CityofPBG and follow the #FLCityWeek hashtag for all of our Florida City Government Week activities! For a full schedule of #FLCityWeek activities visit www.pbgfl.com/FLCityWeek.

Safety Tips from Fire Rescue • A smoke alarm should be on the ceiling or high on a wall. Keep smoke alarms away from the kitchen to reduce false alarms. They should be at least 10 feet (3 meters) from the stove.

Smoke Alarms • Install smoke alarms in every bedroom. They should also be outside each sleeping area and on every level of the home. • It is best to use interconnected smoke alarms. When one smoke alarm sounds, they all sound. • Test all smoke alarms at least once a month. Press the test button to be sure the alarm is working.

• People who are hard-of-hearing or deaf can use special alarms. These alarms have strobe light and bed shakers. • Replace all smoke alarms when they are 10 years old.

Home Maintenance • Clean dryer filters of lint after each load. • Have dryer vents cleaned on a regular basis. • Store flammable liquids in approved

containers, away from heat sources.

Fire Extinguishers • Have at least one fire extinguisher on each floor of your home.

Electrical Safety • Replace worn, old or damaged electrical cords. • Do not run electrical cords under rugs or furniture.

• Learn the proper use and maintenance for fire extinguishers.

• Immediately shut off and have an electrician replace switches or receptacles that are hot to the touch.

Cooking

• Discard and replace light bulbs that flicker or do not burn steady.

• Do not leave the stove unattended when cooking. • If you must leave the kitchen be sure to turn off the stove.

{Tips provided by the National Fire Protection Association}

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FIND YOUR INNER FORESTER A Conversation with Mark Hendrickson About Urban Forestry

Written by Candice Temple Photo by Kim Seng

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hen Mark Hendrickson moved to south Florida in 1989, he was excited to begin working for the City of Palm Beach Gardens. At the time, the forester roles were part of the Public Works Department and the young government of Palm Beach Gardens was just beginning to create its Planning and Zoning Department at City Hall. Eight short months after taking the job, Hendrickson was thrilled to be offered what he calls a “cool position” as the City Forester. Achieving this position was a milestone for the man whose love of forestry and the outdoors had begun many, many years earlier. “I was born to be a forester,” Hendrickson says confidently of his chosen career path.

VALUE YOUR ROOTS As a young child growing up in College Park, Maryland, Mark loved the outdoors and spent a lot of free time “playing out in the woods”. Naturally, he became a Cub Scout, and this led to a lengthy career in Scouting that continued until he went to college. Upon his father’s insistence that he go to college, Mark scrambled to figure out exactly what he was going to study. He would go on to attend North Carolina State University, where the first forestry college in the United States had established a solid scholarly reputation and much of the forestry experience was centered around the paper industry. At 6

SIGNATURE CITY: City of Palm Beach Gardens

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“I was born to be a forester,” Hendrickson says confidently of his chosen career path. large buffers, parkways and preserve areas. The original streets of Palm Beach Gardens were named for trees and this established the culture for how the City would grow. It affected everything from landscape codes to environmental codes to sign codes. The codes are very specific, which is why it is very distinguishable when you are walking, riding or driving along and enter “The Gardens.” Seventy-five percent of a development’s landscape plan must be made up of the “Preferred Species List.” This list, of both native and non-native plants, has been fine-tuned over the years to create a balance of plants that are both attractive and thrive easily in our local climate.

On a chilly January day, the City Forester takes a moment to show a lizard friend a bit of warmth during the City’s Arbor Day celebration.

the time, there were no courses taught in urban forestry, but Mark gained experience during his time with the North Carolina Forest Service. As one of the few field foresters that would go into Wilmington, he cut his teeth in urban forestry by helping County residents who needed management plans for a block of woods that they owned. That unassuming beginning soon grew into an understanding of how an urban environment and the natural landscape can achieve harmony. As career decisions brought him to Palm Beach Gardens, he began his near thirty-year career with employees and elected officials who constantly referred to the “garden city” principles that were established by the City’s founder John D. MacArthur. “Back then, I was working with people that had been with the City since 1959, almost since it was established,” Mark recalls. “I knew people that got the City to that point, particularly the City Council who in 1983 decided to get a forester using funds from a State grant. From that point we did what we could to make our landscape codes the best in Florida, as far as I’m concerned.” The “garden city” concept planted a seed for what would come to be a City known for its

SEEK BALANCE Today, Mark spends time working with the residents and businesses advising on the City’s ordinances; what they mean and how they are applied. It’s his job to focus on details like mulch, but perhaps not for the reason you may think. It all ties back to the core reasons for our codeshealth, safety and welfare. To the common eye, mulch may appear to be in place for ornamental reasons. From a City Forester’s point of view, a mulched tree is beautiful because it creates a stable tree that drains properly, is insulated from extreme temperatures and is free of erosion issues. “It’s not just pigeonholing landscaping for landscape’s sake or just environment,” he adds. “It all comes together with all our codes being applicable and working to create what I think has become a beautiful City.”

He attributes that success to a fortunate balance over the years that has taken the work of staff, elected officials and developers. Although the City has grown rapidly in the last thirty years, many undeveloped areas still remain. In fact, just this year the City reached a significant milestone. With the addition of Avenir, our City now contains 51% of land in its jurisdictional boundaries in conservation. “Over fifty percent of the City is in conservation status, but when you consider all of the golf courses that we have and the parkways that are just open space,

First Signs of Fall. Among many other native plants, the aptly named Beautyberry lends its rich purple hue throughout Frenchman’s Forest Natural Area.

and the lake systems, we’re probably in the sixties percentage-wise,” he estimates. Now that the 4,700-acre development has been approved and construction is underway, the finished product is the result of a master undertaking of collaboration. By working with the developer of Avenir, Landstar Development, Palm Beach Gardens was able to condense the density of the project into the (continues)

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lower end of the parcel and save the northern end for a conservation area and nature preserve. This has led to over half of the site, 2,407 acres, being set aside for conservation.

“Frenchman’s Forest is just kind of an oasis because it’s completely built around and if you don’t know it exists, it’s a surprise,” Hendrickson explains. It’s likely that few people know the diverse landscape of the City, combined with the history of its development, the way Mark does. You may find him on any given day checking a landscape buffer or getting up close and personal with a tree.

The northern end of Avenir consists of land that was previously a natural wetland. The early owners used the property for ranching and farming, so much of the natural landscape was converted to pasture land. With City and State codes guiding the process, this area will be mitigated to revive the wetlands and save the uplands. Mark encounters a giant ficus tree on Hood Road at Bonnette Hunt Club.

“Avenir was the donut hole,” says Hendrickson. “There were preserves all the way around it and they weren’t linked because Avenir was at the center point.” This mitigation will provide a critical link that will tie the Hungryland Slough to the Sweetbay Preserve, which are all linked to the Corbett wildlife habitat (also known as the Loxahatchee Slough). Restoring the area also brings on board a missing trailhead of the Ocean-to-Lake Hiking Trail. This 61-mile hiking trail that crosses a mosaic of public lands across portions of Martin and Palm Beach Counties to Lake Okeechobee.

“It’s quite a job to keep a city beautiful. Beauty is high maintenance”

GET LOST IN THE WOODS Not far from bustling shopping districts and residential homesteads, Palm Beach Gardens is dotted with parks and natural areas that exist solely for recreational purposes and leisurely exploration. Perhaps one of the less explored of these is Frenchman’s Forest Natural Area. This 172-acre natural area was conserved in 1995 to protect the historic native eco8

SIGNATURE CITY: City of Palm Beach Gardens

system and ecological diversity of the area and is operated by Palm Beach County’s Department of Environmental Resources Management. It contains a breathtaking blend of pine flatwoods, strand swamp, hydric hammock and tidal swamp. As visitors travel Prosperity Farms Road in Palm Beach Gardens, in a blink they are transported from modern civilization to a raw environment full of natural treasures. Beyond the entrance of the natural area, the sounds of the outside world quickly give way to a symphony of bird calls, squirrel skittering and jumping fish. Occasionally, you’ll come across other trail guests- of the human or animal variety- but largely this area is valued for its untouched beauty and solitude.

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As you traverse the City, there is an almost seamless flow from populated areas to natural areas. Wildlife intermingles with the populous, whether it’s a gator on the golf course or sandhill cranes in your front yard. “We have a lot of wildlife that’s either transient or lives in Palm Beach Gardens and it’s because there’s a good mix between the urban part of the City and the green part of the City,” he says. “Aesthetics just ends up being the icing on the cake if you do all the other things correctly.”

“It’s quite a job to keep a city beautiful. Beauty is high maintenance,” he says with a chuckle. “We go one step further. We’re one of the few cities that also beautifies roadways, beautifies lakes. Even some of the common elements that you wouldn’t normally think of, such as signs.” In 2019, the City will reach a significant milestone when it celebrates its 60th year of incorporation. Mark Hendrickson has been on board half of that time putting solid urban forestry principles in place; improving how the urban and natural areas find ways to coexist. The residents, staff, elected officials and developers to come will determine how the City grows in the next sixty years and beyond.


It’s time to get back to the basics of good recycling As a resident of the City of Palm Beach Gardens, you are doing your part to help preserve our natural resources.

ONCE-A-WEEK RECYCLING COLLECTION Curbside by 7:00 a.m. ALWAYS RECYCLE in YELLOW

PAPER / CARDBOARD Newspaper, magazines, catalogs and flattened cardboard boxes. MAXIMUM SIZE 3 ft x 3 ft flattened corrugated boxes.

ALWAYS RECYCLE in BLUE

GLASS BOTTLES/JARS Clear, brown, green glass bottles and jars. NO LIDS / CAPS PLASTICS /CONTAINERS Plastic bottles, jars, jugs and tubs. Milk and juice cartons. Aluminum cans, pie plates and foil. NO LIDS / CAPS

PLEASE BE SURE TO CLEAN FOOD RESIDUE OFF ITEMS BEFORE RECYCLING NON RECYCLABLE NON RECYCLABLE

NON RECYCLABLE

PLASTICS: Plastic bags, clamshell packaging or plastic utensils.

CONTAINERS: Polystyrene hot/cold cups and/or containers. No food wastes.

NON RECYCLABLE

NON RECYCLABLE

PAPER: Napkins, paper towels, shredded paper, paper cups and/or plates.

HOUSEHOLD ITEMS: Hoses, propane tanks, plastic & metal clothes hangers, mirrors and paint

BULK WASTE COLLECTION

DO NOT INCLUDE HAZARDOUS WASTE

Refers to items which cannot be containerized, bagged or bundled: Refrigerators, ranges, washers/ dryers, water heaters, toilets, sinks and other similar appliances, household goods and minor DIY construction project debris will be picked up ONCE-A-WEEK.

No paint cans, pesticides, pool chemicals, engine oil, tires, auto parts or demolition debris.

Please remove large appliance doors - it’s the law!

Contact the Solid Waste Authority at (561) 640-4000 or visit 7501 N. Jog Rd, West Palm Beach, FL 33412 for information on how to dispose of household hazardous waste.

For your collection schedule visit www.pbgfl.com or call Waste Management at (800) 824-8472 • Local Public Works (561) 804-7026

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CaleNdar of EVents OCTOBER THRU NOVEMBER 25 GardensArt Exhibition: Hard-Edged Abstracts by William Finlayson Dawn to Dusk at Sandhill Crane Golf Clubhouse

OCTOBER 7-13, 2018 Fire Prevention Week

OCTOBER 7, 14, 21, 28 The Gardens GreenMarket 8 a.m.-1 p.m. at City Hall

OCTOBER 8-NOVEMBER 15 GardensArt Exhibition: Oil on Canvas by Tony Kolens Monday-Friday, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Meet & Greet: October 11, 5:30 p.m.-7 p.m City Hall Lobby

OCTOBER 15 Parks and Recreation Advisory Board Meeting 6 p.m. – 8 p.m.

OCTOBER 16 Art in Public Places Advisory Board Meeting 5:30 p.m. – 7 p.m. at City Hall

OCTOBER 19-21 Palm Beach Gardens Classic Soccer Tournament All City Multipurpose Fields Hosted by Palm Beach Gardens Youth Athletic Association

NOVEMBER 1 City Council Meeting 7 p.m. at City Hall

NOVEMBER 3-5 USTA Boys & Girls 18, 16 Singles and Doubles Sat-Mon 8:30 a.m.-7 p.m. at Tennis Center

OCTOBER 20 Adult 1-Day Mixed Doubles & Lunch 10:30 a.m. at Tennis Center

NOVEMBER 12 Veterans Day (Observed) City Hall Administrative Offices Closed

NOVEMBER 13 Juke Box Bingo $25.00 Reservations required: 561.630.1172 The Sandhill Crane Ballroom, Sandhill Crane Golf Club

OCTOBER 22

NOVEMBER 13

Coffee & Conversation with the Mayor 9:30 a.m. at City Hall

Planning and Zoning Appeals Board Meeting 6 p.m. at City Hall

OCTOBER 23 Code Enforcement Special Magistrate Hearing 2 p.m. at City Hall

OCTOBER 24

NOVEMBER 17

Breckenridge Bliss by Manon Sander

Trivia/Dinner Buffet -$25.00 The Dancing Crane Ballroom, Sandhill Crane Golf Club Reservations Required: 561.630.1172

The Gardens GreenMarket 8 a.m.-1 p.m. at City Hall

OCTOBER 25

NOVEMBER 8

Jumpstart’s Read for the Record 2018 10 a.m. at Riverside Youth Enrichment Center

Canasta Tournament 11 a.m.-4 p.m. at Burns Road Recreation Center

OCTOBER 26

NOVEMBER 10

Fall Festival 6:30 p.m.-8:30 p.m. at City Hall

Veterans Day Ceremony & Concert 9 a.m. at City Hall

OCTOBER 27

NOVEMBER 10

Youth 1-Day Developmental Singles Tourney 11:30 a.m. at Tennis Center

Adult 1-Day Singles Tournament 11:30 a.m. at Tennis Center

OCTOBER 29-DECEMBER 5 GardensArt Exhibition/ Reception: Acrylic Paintings by Julia Rose & Oil Paintings by Manon Sander Call for viewing hours: 561.630.1100 Reception: October 30, 6 p.m.-7:30 p.m. Burns Road Recreation Center 10

NOVEMBER

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NOVEMBER 4, 11, 18, 25

NOVEMBER 10 Jamie’s Angels Special Needs Tennis 1 p.m. at Tennis Center

NOVEMBER 11 Veterans Day Special: All Veterans receive a 15% Discount on Everything. Cannot be combined with any other offer or promotion The Dancing Crane Restaurant

Adult 1-Day Mixed Doubles & Lunch 10:30 a.m. at Tennis Center

NOVEMBER 19-JANUARY 3 GardensArt Exhibition Paintings by Lynne Solomon Monday-Friday, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. at City Hall Lobby

NOVEMBER 22 Thanksgiving Buffet 11 a.m. – 3 p.m. Adults ($54.95), Children 6-12 ($19.95), Children Under 6 (no charge) Reservations Required: 561.630.1172 The Dancing Crane Ballroom, Sandhill Crane Golf Club

NOVEMBER 22-23 Thanksgiving Holidays City Hall Administrative Offices Closed

NOVEMBER 24 Youth 1-Day Developmental Singles Tourney 11:30 a.m. at Tennis Center

NOV. 26 – DEC. 23 Gardens Police and Fire Foundation Annual Holiday Joy Drive Take your unwrapped toy donation to City Hall or any PBG Fire Station


OCTOBER S M T W T F S

NOVEMBER

S M T W T F S

DECEMBER

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JANUARY

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7 8 9 10 11 12 13

4 5 6 7 8 9 10

2 3 4 5 6 7 8

6 7 8 9 10 11 12

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11 12 13 14 15 16 17

9 10 11 12 13 14 15

13 14 15` 16 17 18 19

21 22 23 24 25 26 27

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20 21 22 23 24 25 26

28 29 30 31

25 26 27 28 29 30

23 24 25 26 27 28 29

27 28 29 30 31

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NOVEMBER 27

DECEMBER 6

Code Enforcement Special Magistrate Hearing 2 p.m. at City Hall

City Council Meeting 7 p.m. at City Hall

NOVEMBER 27-JANUARY 6 GardensArt Exhibition: Violeta Lucce Hand-Painted Art Couture & Paintings on Silk Dawn to Dusk at Sandhill Crane Golf Clubhouse

NOV. 30 – DEC. 5 Little Mo International Sat-Wed 8:30 a.m.-6 p.m. at Tennis Center

NOV. 30-DEC. 17 Santa’s Mailbox Burns Road Recreation Center

DECEMBER 6 National Gazpacho Day - $2.50 a Bowl The Dancing Crane, Sandhill Crane Golf Club

DECEMBER 8 Adult 1-Day Singles Tournament 11:30 a.m. at Tennis Center

DECEMBER 11 Planning and Zoning Appeals Board Meeting 6 p.m. at City Hall

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THE DANCING CRANE SPECIAL EVENTS Every Thursday- All You Can Eat BBQ Buffet 5:00 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. ($24.95) Every Friday- All You Can Eat Prime Rib 5:00 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. ($24.95) Every Saturday- Date Night 4:00 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. (2nd Entrée 25% off, Happy Hour all day long) Every Sunday- Sunday Brunch 10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. DECEMBER 31

JANUARY 6, 13, 20, 27

Boots & Bling New Year’s Eve Celebration with Beau and Lori 8 p.m. – 1 a.m. Reservations Required: 561.630.1172 Sandhill Crane Ballroom, Sandhill Crane Golf Club

The Gardens GreenMarket 8 a.m.-1 p.m. at City Hall

JANUARY 8-FEBRUARY 18

Gardens Holiday Bazaar 11 a.m.-8 p.m. at Burns Road Recreation Center

Registration for Winter Classes Begins at 8 a.m. Online at pbgrec.com/login or in person at the Burns Road Recreation Center

JANUARY

GardensArt Exhibition/Reception: Abstract Paintings by Judith Shah Dawn to Dusk Reception: January 16, 5 p.m.-7 p.m. Sandhill Crane Golf Clubhouse

JANUARY 1

JANUARY 12

NOVEMBER 30

DECEMBER 15

Ladies 'Nine then Wine' Event 2:30 p.m. at Sandhill Crane Golf Club

New Year’s Day City Administrative Offices Closed

Adult 1-Day Mixed Doubles & Lunch 10:30 a.m. at Tennis Center

Public Safety Day Municipal Complex 10 a.m. - 2 p.m.

NOVEMBER 30

NOVEMBER 30 Tree Lighting 6 p.m.-8 p.m. at Burns Road Recreation Center

DECEMBER DECEMBER 1 12th Annual Mayor's Veterans Golf Classic 8:30 a.m. at Sandhill Crane Golf Club

DECEMBER 12

JANUARY 12

DECEMBER 15

Adult 1-Day Mixed Doubles & Lunch 11:30 a.m. at Tennis Center

Jamie’s Angels Special Needs Tennis 1 p.m. at Tennis Center

JANUARY 13 The Gardens GreenMarket 17th Anniversary Celebration 8 a.m.-1 p.m. at City Hall Cake Cutting at 10 a.m.

DECEMBER 17-JANUARY 15 GardensArt Exhibition: Photography by Phoenix Marks Call for viewing hours @ 561.630.1100 Burns Road Recreation Center

JANUARY 21 Martin Luther King, Jr. Day City Administrative Offices Closed

DECEMBER 1

DECEMBER 22

Gardens Holiday Bazaar 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Burns Road Recreation Center

Youth 1-Day Developmental Doubles Tourney 11:30 a.m. at Tennis Center

DECEMBER 2, 9, 16, 23, 30

DECEMBER 25

JANUARY 3

The Gardens GreenMarket 8 a.m.-1 p.m. at City Hall

Christmas Day City Administrative Offices Closed

City Council Meeting 7 p.m. at City Hall

DECEMBER 29

JANUARY 5

Youth 1-Day Developmental Singles Tourney 11:30 a.m. at Tennis Center

Adult 1-Day Singles Tournament 11:30 a.m. at Tennis Center

DECEMBER 5 Reception & Fashion Art Experience for Violeta Lucce 6 p.m.-8 p.m. at Sandhill Crane Golf Clubhouse

I M P O RTA N T ADDRESSES:

Burns Road Recreation Center: 4404 Burns Road City Hall: 10500 N. Military Trail

PBG Tennis Center: 5110 117th Court N. Sandhill Crane Golf Club/ The Dancing Crane Restaurant: 11401 Northlake Blvd.

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the green wave Since its inception, the City of Palm Beach Gardens has been committed to its “garden community” persona. As technology and “green” practices have evolved, the City has been at the forefront of embracing these changes. In the process, it has been a good steward of the environment and saved tax dollars.

CITY CLERK GOES PAPERLESS In August 2002, the City Clerk’s Office took a bold step and introduced the paperless agenda. They eliminated the huge binders full of paper that were provided to Council members and City staff for Council meetings. In addition to the cost of paper, the City eliminated the cost of binders, index tabs and the man hours to assemble and disassemble the binders. That’s not all! Since each meeting must be recorded the only method at the time was to use a dual-cassette recorder which required at least two cassette tapes per public meeting. By transitioning to digital recordings, to date the City

HERE’S THE BREAKDOWN SINCE 2002

has eliminated the use of 7,303 audio tapes & the

Total # of Electronic Agendas Eliminated:

cost of formatting these tapes for transcription.

Total Sheets of Paper Saved:

Today, Council members, as well as the public,

Total Savings To Date:

access the agenda and all back up materials

Total # Of Audio Tapes Eliminated:

through a link to the City’s online records. Palm

Total Savings To Date:

Beach Gardens has assisted 10 other cities with going paperless and nearly two dozen cities with their digital recordings. 12

SIGNATURE CITY: City of Palm Beach Gardens

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TOTAL PAPERLESS/DIGITAL SAVINGS:

352 223, 831 $835,786.53 7303 $162,741

$998,527.53


DRAINAGE Our City is a Bird and Wildlife sanctuary. By ordinance, it is unlawful for a person to intentionally kill or harm any bird or animal wildlife within the City.

STORMWATER IMPROVEMENTS In 2015, the City began an extensive Stormwater Maintenance & Repair Operations Program designed to provide stormwater mitigation and water quality treatment for the removal of nutrients prior to discharge into the C-17, C-18, and the Intracoastal drainage basins. To ensure proper runoff and

LED (LIGHT-EMITTING DIODE) LIGHTING

discharge, the City implemented a progressive program that includes evaluation, mapping, inspections, repairs,

LED Upgrades -Both to interior building and Parking Lots

and cleaning of its pipelines, swales and detention/retention areas. The

• Riverside Youth Enrichment was

program helps prevent sedimentation

retrofitted with LED lights throughout the entire facility • The entire City Campus, City Hall, Fire, Police and Gardens Park have all had the parking lot lights converted to LED. Savings are estimated at approximately $300 annually.

FPL LED Street Lights Upgrades Program All street lights that are owned by FPL within the City boundaries are currently being changed to LED, annual savings is projected to be $25,000 annually. No cost to the City.

Sports Field LED upgrades Gardens District Park & the expansion to Gardens Park Baseball will be equipped with LED Sports Field Lighting. Our 5-year plan also includes LED upgrades to the

in the canal systems which ultimately

SOLAR

drain into intracoastal state waters,

FPL Solar Panels

prevent future environmental hazards,

A solar canopy has been installed

such as possible sinkholes and localized

at Joe Russo Park which not only

flooding of commercial and residential

provides covered parking to residents,

properties citywide. For a second time,

but feeds electricity back into the FPL

the City was successful in achieving

grid to off-set power usage. The solar

a $250,000 legislative appropriation

panels were no cost to the city.

by the State of Florida for this vital environmental program.

Two Solar Trees have been installed

Retrofitting 285 feet of stormwater

in the Splash Playground at Burns

infrastructure on Gardens Parkway

Road Community Center. These not

will lead to decreased flooding and

only provide shade to residents, but

enhanced water quality discharge into

feed electricity back into the FPL grid

adjacent lakes.

to off-set usage. The trees were no cost to the city.

Allamanda Weir to collect debris that

Bus Shelter Solar Compactor Program

Sports Field Lighting at Plant Dr Park

13 sets of solar

(Pickleball), Mirasol Park, Gardens Park,

power trash

Oaks Park (Tennis), Lilac Park (Baseball)

and recycling

and PGA Park (Tennis/Basketball)

compactors have been ordered for

Pedestrian Crosswalk Program

all City installed

Pedestrian crosswalks have been installed at strategic locations

Installation of a trash baffle on

bus shelters. This

impacts the quality and improves the aesthetics of the canal system.

CANAL MAINTENANCE PROGRAM As part of the canal maintenance program, the Honeysuckle Canal embankment was reestablished, and canal dredged. This provides stabilization to our maintenance platform and increases storage for stormwater runoff into the system.

throughout the City, specifically near

will allow compaction of trash and

Future stormwater initiatives will be

recreation and schools. LED Lights are

prolong pick-up intervals at the

permeable pavement which infiltrates

activated by the pedestrian to allow for more visibility and a safer crossing.

locations. Cans are provided by Waste Management at no cost

and treats stormwater runoff as it percolates into the ground.

to the City.

(continues)

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FACILITIES Energy Management System upgrades

51% of land in the City’s jurisdictional boundaries is in conservation.

Because of our south Florida locale, cooling and dehumidification of outside air is one of the most expensive costs. An Energy Management System is used in City office buildings and facilities to

ALTERNATIVE FUEL VEHICLES

monitor and automatically adjust HVAC equipment. This enables the heating and cooling of buildings to operate

Electric Cars

UP AHEAD

at optimal efficiency. By using an EMS

• As of June 2018, 8 Leased electric

Look for electric vehicle charging stations

System to reduce energy costs, the City

throughout the City in parks and facilities!

is also lowering electricity usage and

Waste Management, our contracted

reducing our carbon footprint. Since

cars are in service by Code Compliance and Fire Inspectors and 4 charging stations have been

waste hauler, has purchased a Fleet of

upgrading to an Energy Management

Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) powered

System, the City has saved an average of

garbage trucks exclusively to be utilized in

$18,500 in energy costs annually.

Palm Beach Gardens for our contract.

EOC LEED Silver Certified Building

Enterprise leasing of nonemergency

The City of Palm Beach Gardens

cars and trucks over the next five years

Emergency Operations Center, which

will greatly reduce our inventory of old

houses our municipal Information

inefficient cars and trucks and replace

Technology Department and the 9-1-1

them with more fuel efficient, cleaner

Dispatch Center, was constructed in

burning vehicles. Leases are $541.07 per

2010 and is certified LEED Silver. LEED

powered vehicles in Building

month per vehicle and create a significant

stands for Leadership in Energy and

Department and Code Compliance.

cost savings over vehicle purchasing.

Environmental Design and is the most

installed at City Hall. Although City vehicles have priority, these chargers are available for use by the public. • At least two charging stations per location are anticipated to be installed in most City Parks and Facilities. • The City currently uses 5 Hybrid

highly recognized green building rating system in the world.

RECYCLING Recycling Bins are distributed throughout City Parks and City Facilities.

PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION

Staff sorts and deposits recyclable materials into appropriate bins for plastics

Traveling by public transportation uses

and cardboard for collection. Last year, 3735.2 tons of recycling material was collected.

less energy and produces less pollutants

Recycling at City Parks & Buildings

than driving private vehicles. That is just

Scrap Metal

one reason the City is excited about

The City recycles all scrap metals, Steel, Aluminum, Copper and Stainless Steel. The

plans for a future Tri-Rail Station in Palm

scrap is purchased by a local vendor and the City receives monetary compensation for

Beach Gardens. If you’d like to give

the sales and the scrap is recycled for new products. Since August of 2016 the City has

your input and stay up-to-date on the

Sold 78,000 lbs. of scrap and recovered roughly $7000 dollars.

progress of the proposed “PGA Station,” be sure to attend this upcoming Public Information Session:

The City of Palm Beach Gardens has achieved “Tree City USA” certification for 30 years. Tree City USA is a community improvement program aimed at lowering energy costs, creating cleaner air and shade, and storm water control through an urban tree canopy.

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SIGNATURE CITY: City of Palm Beach Gardens

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Tri-Rail Station Planning Initiative Public Information Session Thursday, October 25, 2018 6-8 p.m. Palm Beach Gardens City Hall


Giant Spider Lily by C a n d i c e Te m p l e

R

ivaling surrounding royal palm trees, yet comfortable amongst nearby blossoming hedges, the appropriately named Giant Spider Lily achieves the attention of pedestrians and vehicles as they pass Frenchman’s Crossing Neighborhood Shopping Center on Hood Road. Renowned bronze sculptor Robert St. Croix designed the piece, which stands 19 feet from the ground, to resemble a bundle of blooming spider lilies. The flower canopy of the art piece is made of silicon bronze sheets and cast bronze with the white petals and green stems being powder coated to achieve life-like coloring. Each stem is constructed of bronze tubing that is anchored inside by a stainless-steel rod. With several plant species being given the nickname “spider lily,” the sculpture is designed to replicate the crinum lily. This variation of spider lily can be found alongside streams and lakes in both tropical and sub-

Sculptor: Robert St. Croix

Location: Frenchman’s Crossing Neighborhood Shopping Center

tropical environments around the world. Don’t worry; nothing will blow this exhibit away. The entire piece can be deconstructed and housed inside its corten steel base in the event of a tropical storm or hurricane.

Frenchman’s Crossing

The sculpture is up-lit at night and the petals glisten and shine lustrously in the dark of night. Now, cast in bronze in Palm Beach Gardens, Giant Spider Lily achieves the perennial state for which they are lauded.

Giant Spider Lilies

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FISCAL YEAR ’19 BUDGET SUSTAINABLE BUDGETING: the ability of a government to sustain its current spending, tax and other policies in the long run without threatening government solvency or defaulting on some of its liabilities or promised expenditures.

Approved Millage Rate: 5.6003

NO CHANGE IN OPERATING RATE

PROPOSED RATE 4.41% ABOVE ROLL BACK

FY 2019 Property Valuation

OPERATING RATE = 5.55

DEBT RATE = .0503

ROLL BACK RATE = 5.3154

TOTAL RATE = 5.6003

VALUATION OF PALM BEACH GARDENS PROPERTIES: $11.5 BILLION

NEW CONSTRUCTION: $186 MILLION

REDUCED FROM .1178

REDUCED FROM 5.6678

INCREASE IN EXISTING PROPERTY: 4.41%

OVERALL, TOTAL TAXABLE VALUE: UP 6.1%

RESPONSIVE AND FISCALLY SOUND GOVERNMENT

AT A GLANCE • The budget continues to not levy the following user fees:

ENVIRONMENTAL STEWARDSHIP

• Funding for six additional police officers has

Staff will continue to explore

been provided in the General Fund due to the growth of the City, including recent annexations. • Faced with the potential of losing up to 14 police officers (12% of force) due to the Palm Beach County Sheriff’s Office (“PBSO”) recruitment of municipal police officers throughout Palm Beach County (“County”) at additional increases in salary, the City reopened the salary article of the current collective bargaining agreement and agreed to salary adjustments that will raise salaries to levels comparable to the PBSO.

> Utility tax on electric, water, propane and natural gas

> Collection fees for residential curbside solid waste and recycling services

> Storm water assessments

> Fire assessments

> No increase in the Communications Service Tax rate of 3.25%, which is less than the maximum of 5.22%, and which has not changed since 2011 • Funding for operational costs of the new Gardens North County District Park athletic fields and facilities currently under construction on the County-owned property has been provided in the General Fund. These facilities are being constructed using the proceeds from the recently enacted one-cent infrastructure sales surtax. • Funding for the maintenance, repair and operations plan for existing parks and recreation facilities and fields has been provided. • Funding for various capital improvements, including: tennis clubhouse furniture and fixtures ($300,000); sports lighting retrofits ($150,000); irrigation pump replacements ($90,000); golf pavilion ($71,000); and golf bunker replacement ($50,000).

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SIGNATURE CITY: City of Palm Beach Gardens

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opportunities for preserving open green space and will continue growth and development practices that encourage preservation of green space. Examples of the City’s successes in this area include the recent agreement with the County to develop the 82-acre Gardens North County District Park, and the approval of the Avenir development, which set aside approximately 50% (over 2,400 acres) of the total development as a conservation site.


PERSONNEL: New Positions 16 Positions approved 6 Police Officers

FY 2018/2019 BUDGET PROVIDES SPENDING PLAN TO ACCOMPLISH:

1 Police Services Specialist *due to increased demand, western growth & annexations 1 Fire Division Chief of Training

3 Maintenance Positions *for new facilities

• Funding for additional employees to keep up with increasing demand for services

3 Existing part-time Positions being converted to full-time

• Funding for PBA, SEIU and IAFF contracts; adjustments for non-union employees

1 Landscape & Development Compliance Officer 1 Senior Planner for western development *reimbursed by Avenir

• Provides $250,000 (plus $250,000 grant) for fourth year phase of stormwater renovation/ repairs; $250,000 for third year of canal maintenance program

Total Revenues/Sources, General Fund: $118,774,714 Other, $4,160,366

• Maintains operating tax rate flat at 5.55; reduces debt rate from .1178 to .0503

Carryover, $27,229,352

Transfers, $688,779

Franchise Fees, $5,840,000 User Fees, $5,773,010

Intergovernmental, $6,202,000 Licenses & Permits, $3,401,000 Other Taxes, $3,650,000

Ad Valorem Taxes, $61,830,207

Total Expenditures/ Uses, General Fund: $118,774,714 Debt, $4,142,737 Capital, $2,112,330

Reserves, $26,701,993

Operating, $22,403,810

Transfers, $547,858

FINANCIAL FORECAST Maintains operating millage flat at 5.55 through FY 2028 Debt millage reduced to -0- in FY 2020 General Obligation debt paid off in FY 2019 Potential additional $25K homestead exemption is factored beginning in FY 2020 Gradual drawdown of unassigned reserves to $18.7M by FY 2023; increasing to $23M by FY 2028 Budget stabilization reserves reduced to zero by FY 2020 but increase to $7.5M by FY 2028

Personnel, $62,865,986

Use and level of reserves comply with policy

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SIGNATURE CITY: City of Palm Beach Gardens

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City of Palm Beach Gardens 10500 N Military Trail Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33410

HANKSGIV T S IN I H G T MAKE THE FEAST EASY AND

Dine With Us!

$54.95/ADULT $19.95/CHILD (6-12 YRS) 5 YRS OLD & YOUNGER ARE FREE RESERVATIONS ARE REQUIRED 561-630-1172

EVENTS BY SANDHILL CRANE PRESENTS

A G RA N D T HA NKSG I VI NG BU FFE T November 22 / 11:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. THE DANCING CRANE BALLROOM SANDHILL CRANE GOLF CLUB 1 1 4 0 1 N O R T H L A K E B O U L E VA R D PA L M B E AC H GA R D E N S

Menu to Include:

sgiving h an k T l ist! na itio an’s tw d a We’ll serve a tr ef Se Ch dinner with

TURKEY • COUNTRY HAM • CORNBREAD • ANDOUILLE AND OYSTER STUFFING • DRESSING • HARVEST SALAD WITH CRANBERRY VINAIGRETTE PEAR SALAD • CANDIED YAMS • GREEN BEANS • CRANBERRY RELISH AND MUCH MORE IN OUR SIGNATURE DANCING CRANE STYLE

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SIGNATURE CITY: City of Palm Beach Gardens

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Profile for City of Palm Beach Gardens

Signature City Fall 2018  

Signature City magazine is a free publication produced quarterly by the City of Palm Beach Gardens Public Media Relations Division. Signatur...

Signature City Fall 2018  

Signature City magazine is a free publication produced quarterly by the City of Palm Beach Gardens Public Media Relations Division. Signatur...

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