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ALBERHILL DISTRICT

1.0

Alberhill District

1.1

Introduction

The Alberhill District is generally bordered to the west, north, and northwest by the Northwest Sphere District. The County of Riverside touches its northern border, while the North Central Sphere District is adjacent to the east. The Business District, Country Club Heights District and Lake View District are all adjacent to the south. The location of the Alberhill District is shown on Figure AH-1. The Alberhill District is characterized by rolling terrain and vacant lands within the higher elevations located in the north, east and Entrance to Alberhill District southwest. Much of the topography in the central areas, east and west of Lake Street, has been substantially altered as a result of the Alberhill District’s long history of extractive/mining activities. Mining operations in the Alberhill District began roughly the same time that the region’s first railroad, the Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railroad, was completed in the 1880s. A segment of the railroad originally passed through the central portion of the Alberhill District. These events helped shape the growth of the District. Mining operations have continued to exist since the late 19th century and occupy a significant portion of the Alberhill District. Through the years, Pacific Clay Products Company has purchased the local mines and has become the sole operating clay mine in the region. Most of the Alberhill District, including Pacific Clay, is within the City. Specific plans have been approved for the Alberhill District and those plans govern land use designations for these areas. The Alberhill District is planned to transition from a concentrated mining area into a network of residential, commercial, industrial, and mixed-use communities. The main focus will be a coordinated and balanced set of communities with supporting uses that maintain a high quality of life. The goals and policies contained within the Alberhill District Plan reflect the general intentions of the City adopted specific plans for those areas. Should a discrepancy or conflict exist between the goals and policies of this General Plan and a specific plan, the adopted specific plan shall prevail.

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ALBERHILL DISTRICT

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City of Lake Elsinore Alberhill District Land Use Plan Figure AH-1


ALBERHILL DISTRICT

BACKSIDE OF FIGURE

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ALBERHILL DISTRICT

1.2

Description

The Alberhill District encompasses nearly 4,240 acres and primarily consists of extractive uses, vacant lands, and emerging construction of residential and commercial uses as well as a community park. The extractive uses are generally located within a half mile from Lake Street, which transects the center of the Alberhill District in a north/south direction. The majority of remaining areas are comprised of vacant lands with the exception of a few small pockets of residential areas and a limited amount of commercial uses adjacent to Interstate 15. Currently, Lake Street and Interstate 15 are the two most significant roadways passing through the Alberhill District. Surrounding uses primarily include vacant lands, conservation areas, residential communities, and pockets of industrial and commercial activities. The Northwest Sphere District, County of Riverside, and North Central Sphere District to the west, north, and northeast respectively, include vacant lands with limited amounts of residential uses. The Business District to the southeast along Interstate 15 is the City’s main commercial and industrial area. The Country Club Heights District and Lake View District to the south include residential communities within close proximity to the lake. The Cleveland National Forest borders the Alberhill District to the southwest. The Alberhill District contains the 1,374-acre Pacific Clay Products facility, owned by Castle & Cooke. The Pacific Clay Products area was annexed into the City in 2008. The area was subject to a legal settlement agreement in 2004 between Riverside County and Castle & Cooke that removed the property from the MSHCP program. The Pacific Clay Products area includes a pre-annexation development agreement adopted in 2003 between the City and Castle & Cooke. The pre-annexation development agreement became effective upon annexation in 2008. The development agreement provides, in part, that the Pacific Clay Products area is subject to a specific plan prepared by Castle & Cooke and processed through the City.

1.3

Land Use

1.3.1

Unique Attributes

The Alberhill District’s most unique attribute is its extractive activities. No other area within the City has the concentration or quality of natural resources as those located within the Alberhill District. Because of the richness and abundance of resources, much of the Alberhill District has been disturbed by mining activities. Once the resources have been fully extracted, the land is typically ready for development. As such, large tracts of land are available for new development.

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ALBERHILL DISTRICT 1.3.2

Planned Land Use

The Alberhill District is at a crossroads and is poised to transition from a region with large quantities of extractive activities to a series of master planned communities that incorporate large areas designated as open space and preservation as well as areas excluded from MSHCP conservation. Significant areas of educational, commercial, and business park activities will also be present. Most of the central and lower lying areas of the Alberhill District contain extractive uses. These areas will include the largest share of residential, Extractive Activities commercial, and institutional uses with additional housing located to the southwest. Vacant lands occur in higher elevations and in the rolling terrain located in the north, east and southwest areas of the Alberhill District. These areas will include existing lower density housing, open space, and conserved lands. Lake Street, which transects the center of the Alberhill District, provides access to Interstate 15, and will continue to be the primary north-south corridor located adjacent to or within close proximity to most of the commercial and institutional uses. The Lake Street and Temescal Canyon Road/Interstate 15 intersections are strategically important economic focal points for the Alberhill area. Approximately twenty percent (20.36%) of the area within the Alberhill District will have perpetual open space. The primary land use is residential, with high density, hillside, low density, low-medium density, medium density and residential mixed use totaling over fifty percent (52.96%) of the entire Alberhill District. Almost half of the District (43.9 %) is covered by City-approved specific plans. Table AH-T1 below summarizes the distribution of land use designations within the Alberhill District. Chapter 2.0, Section 2.3 of the General Plan defines each land use designation in terms of the allowable uses, density and intensity standards. Figure AH-1 illustrates the distribution and location of the land use designations.

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ALBERHILL DISTRICT Table AH-T1. Distribution of Land Uses—Alberhill District General Plan Land Use Designation

No. of Acres

Commercial Mixed Use

Percentage of Total Land Area

172.5

4.07%

General Commercial

91.6

2.16%

Hillside Residential

216.9

5.11%

Low Density Residential

546.2

12.88%

Low-Medium Residential

216.0

5.10

Medium Density Residential

197.2

4.65%

High Density Residential

122.4

2.89%

54.5

1.29%

Public/Institutional

422.7

9.97%

Open Space

336.7

7.94%

Residential Mixed Use

Specific Plan

1,862.9

43.9%

Total

4,239.6

100.0%

1.3.3 Goal 1

Overall District Goal and Policies The primary goal of the Alberhill District is to support and maintain a healthy transition from extractive/mining activities to a network of residential communities with a balanced mix of residential, commercial, light industrial, business professional, and institutional/public uses that provide a sense of place and high quality of life.

Policies AH1.1 Continue to encourage proper reclamation and enhancement of areas impacted by extractive/mining activities for the public’s health, safety and welfare. AH1.2 Consider the preservation of vacant lands in areas with high elevations in the north, east and southwest in order to provide an adequate amount of conserved lands, open space and wetland areas. AH1.3 Encourage proper land use compatibility between mining activities and surrounding uses.

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ALBERHILL DISTRICT AH1.4 Impose conditions, as necessary, on mining operations to minimize or eliminate the potential adverse impact of mining operations on surrounding properties and the environment. AH1.5 Encourage new non-mining land uses adjacent to existing mining operations to provide an adequate buffer with a buffer distance from mining operations based on an evaluation of: noise, aesthetics, drainage, operating conditions and operating hours, biological resources, topography, lighting, traffic and air quality. AH1.6 Periodically revise and update the City’s surface mining reclamation ordinance to ensure the most recent SMARA developments are reflected in the City’s code. Implementation Program As part of project review and the CEQA process, the City shall evaluate and impose conditions as necessary that address land use compatibility and balance, preservation of wetlands and suitable open space, and appropriate buffers and distance between mining operations and new non-mining land uses. Agency/Department

1.3.4

Engineering and Community Development Departments

Extractive Activities/Reclamation

Existing extractive activities within the Alberhill District include coal and clay mining and are generally located within a half mile from Lake Street. Additional extractive activities outside of the Alberhill District are located in the Business District and the North Central Sphere District to the southeast and east, respectively. The Alberhill District has the largest share of extractive activities in the City. Pacific Clay Products Company (Pacific Clay) has become the largest mining company in the region and is planning to reclaim some of the existing mining activities within the Alberhill District for the development of new housing and supporting uses in approximately ten (10) years. Pacific Clay is also planning to expand mining activities in the neighboring districts to the east and southeast within approximately three (3) years, followed by new development and supporting uses.

1.4

Urban Design

The Alberhill District consists primarily of extractive activities with a few residential and commercial uses. Although the area does not provide current visual urban design examples that embody a strong sense of place desired in residential communities, the City-adopted specific plans provide examples of high quality design standards. The primarily residential district to the south, the Lake View District, provides good examples of design standards at densities similar to those permitted in the specific plans that govern development in the

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ALBERHILL DISTRICT Alberhill District. Sustainable design standards that incorporate open space/preservation areas will be critical in achieving a high quality of life.

1.4.1 Goal 2

Goals and Polices Create a strong urban design that would support the Alberhill District as a distinct community.

Policies AH 2.1 Through the project and CEQA processes create strong connections to Lake Street between neighborhoods and community supporting uses. AH 2.2 In areas outside approved specific plans, the City should strive to establish design standards that are consistent with the Alberhill District’s adopted specific plans in order to ensure a standard design motif for new developments. AH 2.3 Consider the establishment and construction of a series of pedestrian routes as part of the City’s trail system from residential areas to Lake Street’s commercial and institutional uses and to the open space and MSHCP areas to the north, west, and southeast areas of the Alberhill District. AH 2.4 Support the placement of community identification signs along the commercial/ institutional uses and intersections along Lake Street and I-15. AH 2.5 Encourage the use of distinctive trees along Lake Street identified in the City’s Street Tree Program. Implementation Program The City shall utilize the development review process to assess pedestrian routes and their connectivity to community centers, and the use of community identifiers in design motifs, signage, and street trees. Agency/Department

1.5

Engineering and Community Development Departments

Historic Preservation

“The Alberhill District has a long history in the mining industry, which began in the 1880’s.”

The Alberhill District has a long history in the mining industry which began in the 1880’s, the same time the region’s first railroad, the Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railroad, was completed. The mining industry began with John D. Huff’s founding of the Southern California Coal and Clay Company in the 1880’s. Huff’s company later became a part of a newly established community, Terra Cotta, within the Alberhill District, which was later considered to be one of area’s most important suburban towns. The mines at Terra Cotta operated until the 1940’s until Pacific Clay Products

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ALBERHILL DISTRICT Company acquired them. Pacific Clay subsequently purchased the Alberhill Coal and Clay Mine and became the sole operating clay mine in the region. The railroad along with various mining opportunities greatly increased immigration to the lake area in general. The Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railroad passed through the central areas of the Alberhill District in a northwest/southeast direction. Portions of Lake Street and Coal Road within the Alberhill District are generally aligned with a section of the railroad that has since been removed. Historic ranching and homesteading sites are located to the northern and eastern areas of the Alberhill District within proximity of the railroad line. The Alberhill School, a locally recognized historic resource, is located along Lake Street and served the area from its inception in 1912 until it was abandoned in 1964.

1.5.1 Goal 3

Goals and Polices Preserve and enhance the cultural and historical resources of the Alberhill District.

Policies AH 3.1 Support the relocation and restoration of the Alberhill School as a 20,000 square foot community center promoting education awareness of the District’s cultural heritage including mining, homesteading, the railroad, and the Terra Cotta town. AH 3.2 Support educational awareness programs that inform residents and visitors of the District’s cultural heritage. AH 3.3 Encourage the use of signs within recreational areas along Lake Street depicting the Alberhill District’s historical and cultural significance. Implementation Program The City shall support programs for the preservation, educational awareness, enhancement or maintenance of key historic or cultural sites in the Alberhill District. Agency/Department

Community Development Department

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ALBERHILL DISTRICT 1.6

Transportation/ Circulation

The Alberhill District’s circulation network consists of two major roadways, Interstate 15 and Lake Street, and a series of residential and dirt roads. Interstate 15 generally borders the Alberhill District along its northern and eastern boundaries with access points from Lake Street in the north and Nichols Road in the east thereby providing convenient access to other areas of the City along the interstate further south. Lake Street transects the center of the Alberhill Lake Street (2007) District in a north/south direction and will continue to be the main roadway connecting new developments within the area to Interstate 15 to the north and other districts further south. Traveling in a southerly direction, Lake Street turns into Grand Avenue within the primarily residential Lake View District to the south where it intersects with Lakeshore Drive, the major roadway along the northeastern side of the lake that provides access to the Historic Downtown District. Existing residential roadways serve a single-family neighborhood located to the west of Lake Street at the southern end of the Alberhill District. A series of dirt roads, including Nichols Road, are located to the east of Lake Street and provide access to some of the Alberhill District’s extractive activities. Nichols Road is planned to be the main east/west roadway transecting the Alberhill District. As the Alberhill District transitions from an area with extractive activities into a series of residential neighborhoods, the existing circulation system will have to be improved to adequately serve new demands. The Circulation Element in Chapter 2.0, Section 2.4 of the General Plan identifies standardized roadways as well as the addition of alternative transportation routes such as bikeways. The Circulation Element’s Truck Route Map follows portions of Lake Street within the Alberhill District. The following table, AH-T2 reflects the Circulation Element’s Roadway Plan and Bikeway Plan for the Alberhill District.

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ALBERHILL DISTRICT Table AH-T2. Roadway Plan and Bikeway Plan—Alberhill District Roadway Name

From

To

Roadway Classification

Bikeway Classification

Nichols Road

Lake Street

Collier Avenue

Major

Class II

Nichols Road

Lincoln Street (N.)

Lincoln Street (S.)

Secondary

Nichols Road

Lincoln Street (S.)

Lake Street

Major

Class II

Lincoln Street

Nichols Road

Lake View District

Secondary

Multi-Purpose

Lincoln Street

Nichols Road

Temescal Canyon Road

Major

Lake Street

Walker Canyon Road

Road “A”

Augmented Urban Arterial

Class II (south of I-15)

Lake Street

Road “A”

Lake View District

Urban Arterial

Class II (south of I-15)

Walker Canyon Road

Lake Street

East of Lake Street

Collector

Alberhill Ranch Road

Nichols Road

Lake Street

Collector

Alberhill Ranch Road

Lake Street

Lincoln Street (S.)

Secondary

Temescal Canyon Road

Northwest Sphere District

Lake Street

Urban Arterial

Terra Cotta Road

Nichols Road

Lakeshore Drive

Secondary

1.6.1 Goal 4

Class II

Goals and Polices Support a multi-modal transportation system with connections to new development, Interstate 15, recreational and open space areas, and districts to the south that serve the needs of residents.

Policies AH 4.1 The interchange at Lake Street and I-15 shall be improved to meet the future traffic demand and satisfy the minimum level of service required by the City. AH 4.2 Through the project and CEQA processes identify and require improvements to Lake Street and Nichols Road as the most significant roadways within the Alberhill District for transit, landscaping, pedestrian travel, and bikeways.

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ALBERHILL DISTRICT AH 4.3 Through the project and CEQA processes require the construction or expansion of roadways serving new developments located east and west of Lake Street. AH 4.4 Lake Street shall be constructed in accordance with Urban Arterial standards. AH 4.5 Encourage the use of traffic-calming measures within commercial and institutional developments along Lake Street when recommended by traffic studies. Implementation Program The City shall assess development projects and impose conditions for safe connectivity between residential areas and services. Agency/Department

1.7

Engineering and Community Development Departments

Parks and Recreation

As the Alberhill District transitions into a series of neighborhoods with supporting uses, it will be vital to create and maintain adequate recreation and open space opportunities to promote quality of life within the Alberhill District. Recreational facilities are designated along or within close proximity to Lake Street and Nichols Road. A 20-acre park which includes a 15,000 square foot City recreation center, several soccer fields, play areas, basketball courts, a tot lot, and a 5,500 square foot Boys & Girls Club is located along Lake Street within the Alberhill District. The design of the Boys & Girls Club was intended to resemble the nearby historic Alberhill School, built and designed by a local mining company. The design of the Boys & Girls Club provides a connection to the Alberhill District’s historical significance. There are also several existing parks/recreational facilities within approximately one mile of the Alberhill District. In the Lake View District to the south there are four (4) parks, Summerlake Park, Oak Tree Park, Machado Park, and McVicker Canyon Park. The Lake Elsinore Campground/Recreational Area and boat launching facility are both located adjacent to the lake’s northern boundary and are within a short drive from the Alberhill District.

1.7.1 Goal 5

Goals and Polices Encourage a wide variety of open space and recreational opportunities that are integrated within adopted master planned communities and future developments.

Policies AH 5.1 Encourage the creation of an extensive system of open space and preservation lands throughout the Alberhill District to ensure a healthy balance between development and the natural environment.

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ALBERHILL DISTRICT AH 5.2 Support joint-use of recreational facilities with the Lake Elsinore Union School District AH 5.3 Pedestrian and hiking trails shall be considered between neighborhoods and surrounding open space and MSHCP preservation areas.

Implementation Program As part of the project review, CEQA and MSHCP processes the City shall assess open space and recreational opportunities in order to achieve a healthy balance of land uses within the District. Agency/Department

Parks & Recreation and Community Development Departments

AH-14


BALLPARK DISTRICT

2.0

Ballpark District

2.1

Introduction

The Ballpark District is located in the south central portion of the City of Lake Elsinore, just north of the City limit line in this area. The Ballpark District is northwest of the City of Wildomar, northeast of the East Lake District, west of the Lake Elsinore Hills District, and southeast of the Riverview District. The Ballpark District is bordered on the east by Lakeshore Drive/Mission Trail and on the south by Malaga Road. The San Jacinto River runs along the northern and western border of the Ballpark District generally parallel to Entrance to Diamond Stadium Diamond Drive. Mission Trail, which runs in a roughly north-south direction, serves as a main thoroughfare, carrying traffic from the neighboring unincorporated areas of Wildomar and the East Lake District to the freeway and other parts of the City. The topography of the Ballpark District is mostly flat. The Ballpark District takes its name from Diamond Stadium, a first class minor league baseball stadium constructed in 1994. It is home to the Lake Elsinore Storm professional baseball team, an affiliate of the San Diego Padres. The area was once the site of the first train depot in Lake Elsinore, however no train tracks or structures from that era remain.

2.2

Description

The Ballpark District comprises approximately 123.2 acres and is made up of a mix of existing commercial, tourist, entertainment facilities, and the stadium. The District’s general commercial uses are mainly service-oriented facilities. The Ballpark District is surrounded by pre-existing and older commercial developments. In line with the City’s vision for the 21st century that it serve as both a getaway for those seeking an escape from the adjacent heavily urbanized areas and as a place where thrill seekers visit to take advantage of the wide variety of extreme sport opportunities offered in the City and the surrounding area, the Ballpark District will be an integral place for this “Dream Extreme” vision to be fulfilled. The Ballpark District will offer a dynamic mix of commercial, entertainment and residential uses.

BP-1


BALLPARK DISTRICT

2.3

Land Use

2.3.1

Unique Attributes

The most outstanding attribute of the Ballpark District is the Diamond Stadium. The stadium represents an activity center that creates unique recreation and entertainment opportunities for the Ballpark District in particular and the City as a whole. The venue features a variety of special events year round. In addition to the stadium, the motocross facility, airstrip, gliders, hang gliding activities and lake are all a short distance from the Ballpark District. The District’s easy access to the freeway and Historic District support tourism and make this district the entertainment center for the City.

2.3.2

Diamond Stadium

Planned Land Use

A mix of land uses is planned for the Ballpark District. The District is surrounded on three sides by commercially designated properties. Mixed-use commercial is designated along the west side of the Mission Trail corridor as it passes along the Ballpark District and near the casino. The combination of the commercial mixed-use and tourist-oriented uses is intended to create a distinctive entertainment destination. The residential uses within the mixed-use will help sustain the commercial and entertainment activities for the longterm. “The most outstanding attribute of the Ballpark District is the Diamond Stadium.”

The main portion of the Ballpark District is governed by the Diamond Specific Plan. This primary land use is applicable to approximately seventy-one percent (71%) of the total number of acres within the Ballpark District. Table BP-T1 below summarizes the distribution of land-use designations within the Ballpark District. Chapter 2.0, Section 2.3 of the General Plan defines each land use designation in terms of the allowable uses, density, and intensity standards. However, the Diamond Specific Plan standards prevail for those lands within it. Figure BP-1 illustrates the distribution and location of the land-use designations.

Table BP-T1. Distribution of Land Uses - Ballpark District General Plan Land Use Designation No. of Acres

Percentage of Total Land Area

Commercial Mixed-Use

36.1

29.3%

Specific Plan

87.2

70.7%

123.2

100.0%

Total

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City of Lake Elsinore Ballpark District Land Use Plan Figure BP-1


BALLPARK DISTRICT

BACKSIDE OF FIGURE

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BALLPARK DISTRICT

2.3.3 Goal 1

Overall District Goal The primary goal of the Ballpark District is to redevelop the area into a vibrant “Dream Extreme” mixed-use entertainment, commercial, and residential district by capitalizing upon the opportunities associated with Diamond Stadium.

Implementation Program With the Diamond Specific Plan in place, the City shall support land use applications consistent with the Specific Plan uses, design, development standards and guidelines, circulation, and public spaces. Agency/Department

2.4

Community Development and Engineering Departments

Urban Design

The Ballpark District will embody the Dream Extreme theme and incorporate contemporary design elements to reflect that progressive vision. The streetscape should include the use of neon light standards, street art and creative landscaping, industrial design/Bauhaus architecture, and other features that promote a vibrant entertainment destination. Design should foster a sense of creativity, adventure and excitement. Future development of the Ballpark District should include the provision for parks and other public spaces.

2.4.1 Goal 2

Goals and Policies Create a contemporary theme within the Ballpark District, by incorporating design elements that create a progressive entertainment image.

Policies BP 2.1

Support the establishment of design guidelines for the Ballpark District that encourage pedestrian-oriented development.

BP 2.2

Encourage commercial and entertainment development in mixed use areas along street frontages.

BP 2.3

Encourage the construction of community gateway identification signs at the I-15 and Diamond Drive interchange and main points of entry to the “Ballpark District” and surrounding neighborhoods.

BP-5


BALLPARK DISTRICT

Implementation Program Through the project development and CEQA processes, utilize street frontages effectively, provide public plazas, and include traffic calming techniques, where feasible, that promote a vibrant, pedestrian-friendly venue. Support creative signage, both onsite and offsite, that promote activities within the Ballpark District. Agency/Department

2.5

Community Development and Engineering Departments “Ballpark District is the site of the original railroad station stop which marked the beginnings of the City.”

Transportation/Circulation

The roadway network throughout the Ballpark District consists of major corridors and supporting collector roadways. Portions of the circulation system within the Ballpark District are underutilized, while other areas are heavily impacted by high traffic volumes. As the Ballpark District develops with an increase in population and intensity of uses, freeway access, roadway capacities, provision of parking and pedestrian circulation will need to be enhanced. Diamond Drive is a key circulation roadway through the Ballpark District. This major route provides direct access to and from the Interstate 15 corridor. Mission Trail has also been identified as a major roadway and carries high traffic volumes by serving the Ballpark District as the primary north-south vehicular connection from the Eastlake District and Wildomar and the unincorporated area known as Lakeland Village. Finally, Lakeshore Drive serves as the main east-west route, connecting the eastern portions of the City to the Historic Downtown District. The Circulation Element in Chapter 2.0, Section 2.4 of the General Plan identifies standardized roadways as well as the addition of alternative transportation routes such as bikeways. The Circulation Element’s Truck Route Map follows portions of Diamond Drive, Lakeshore Drive, and Mission Trail within the Ballpark District. The following table reflects the Circulation Element’s Roadway Plan and Bikeway Plan for the Ballpark District.

Table BP-T2. Roadway Plan and Bikeway Plan—Ballpark District Roadway Name

From

To

Roadway Classification

Bikeway Classification

Lakeshore Drive

Riverview District

Mission Trail

Urban Arterial

Class II

Mission Trail

Lakeshore Drive

East Lake District

Urban Arterial

Class II

Diamond Drive

Auto Circle Drive

East Lake District

Major

Class II

Malaga Road

Diamond Drive

Mission Trail

Major

Class II

BP-6


BALLPARK DISTRICT

2.5.1 Goal 3

Goals and Policies Through project development and CEQA processes continue to improve the near-by street system for the Diamond Drive and Railroad Canyon Road interchange improvement, especially the intersection of Auto Center Drive and Diamond Drive, Railroad Canyon Road, Grape Street, and southbound on-ramp to I-15, as recommended by traffic studies.

Policies BP 3.1

Encourage the use of traffic-calming measures along roadways that provide pedestrian access to Diamond Stadium as recommended by traffic studies.

BP 3.2

Continue to conduct necessary studies in coordination with Caltrans in order to make interchange improvements at I-15 and Diamond Drive/Railroad Canyon Road.

BP 3.3

Lakeshore Drive and Mission Trail are designated Urban Arterials. As future volumes increase and the Level of Service falls below “E,� these existing four lane streets shall be widened to six lanes, the full width of Urban Arterials.

BP 3.4

Continue to pursue a citywide trail system that integrates regional trails and provides connections to Diamond Stadium and the Lake Edge Parkway multi-purpose trail.

Implementation Program With the approval of the Diamond Specific Plan, support land use applications whose designs address and implement the circulation plan and trail systems identified in the Specific Plan. Agency/Department

2.6

Engineering Department

Parks and Recreation

Diamond Stadium is the centerpiece of the Ballpark District and a catalyst for future recreational opportunities throughout the District. Together, the Stadium and other sports businesses it can attract will create a synergetic venue for the City. The East Lake District to the southwest is generally undeveloped, but the Links at Summerly golf course has been constructed and operational, to the west of the Ballpark District. The proximity of the lake just to the northwest and the recreational amenities it provides offer significant recreational opportunities for the Ballpark District. As the District transitions into active entertainment, commercial and recreational uses, it will be important to emphasize linkages to the Lake and nearby facilities.

BP-7


BALLPARK DISTRICT

2.6.1 Goal 4

Goals and Policies Promote the stadium, “Dream Extreme� sports activities, and other recreational opportunities in the Ballpark District and provide linkages to the Lake and other park and recreation amenities.

Policies BP 4.1

Encourage strong connections between usable recreational networks and facilities within the Ballpark District and surrounding City communities.

BP 4.2

Encourage recreational uses and attractions that contribute to a comprehensive network of pedestrian trails, providing access from the Ballpark District to Diamond Stadium, the lake, the Lake Edge parkway and other nearby recreational facilities.

Implementation Program With the Diamond Specific Plan in place, support land use applications that are consistent with the permitted uses and uses permitted by conditional use permit identified in the Specific Plan, and that incorporate the linkages, networks, trails and public spaces that are designed to connect the Specific Plan to surrounding communities, the lake, and other nearby recreational facilities. Agency/Department Community Development, Engineering and Lakes, Parks & Recreation Departments

BP-8


BUSINESS DISTRICT

3.0

Business District

3.1

Introduction

The Business District is located within the central area of the City and is generally bordered by the North Central Sphere District to the northeast, the Lake Elsinore Hills District to the east, the Historic Downtown District to the south, Country Club Heights District to the west, and the Alberhill District to the northwest. The location of the Business District is depicted on Figure BD-1. Rolling hills separate the Business District along the western boundaries with the Country Club Heights District. Steep slopes and higher elevations exist in the north along the boundaries with the Alberhill District and the North Central Sphere District. The Business District is generally a flat level area that is aligned with Interstate 15 (I-15) and the Temescal Wash, a floodway and floodplain west of and parallel to I-15. The Temescal Wash flooded in 1980 causing the condemnation of more than 100 homes in the Country Club Heights District. The flood damage extended to some of the neighboring businesses causing millions of dollars in damages. The developed area within the Business District is relatively new and has the strongest concentration of industrial and commercial uses within the City. Sections of the Atchison, Topeka, & Santa Fe Railroads that passed through the Business District during the 1800’s have been removed. In addition, a historic ranching and homesteading site with previous ranching and homesteading activities is located nearby the route where the railroad once existed. The main focus of the Business District is to support its position as the industrial and commercial hub of the City while ensuring that new development does not encroach upon the floodway and that development maintains an orientation towards this natural resource as a pedestrian corridor. Adequate stormwater management systems should be incorporated for all future development within this floodplain. A pedestrian corridor (Channel Walk) is planned within the floodway area and partially constructed.

3.2

Description

The Business District contains approximately 1,322.7 acres, which primarily consist of industrial and commercial uses. Existing industrial and commercial uses include the Lake Elsinore Outlet Center, Home Depot, Target, Costco, industrial parks, and limited manufacturing sites. Most of the industrial uses are concentrated in the southern areas of the Business District southwest of I15 and south of the Business District’s main northwest/southeast roadway, Collier Avenue. Commercial uses are easily accessible from I-15 at the intersection of Central Avenue/SH 74 and I-15.

BD -1


BUSINESS DISTRICT

This Page Left Intentionally Blank

BD -2


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City of Lake Elsinore Business District Land Use Plan Figure BD-1


BUSINESS DISTRICT

BACKSIDE OF FIGURE

BD -4


BUSINESS DISTRICT Vacant/open space areas are primarily located to the northwest, north, and northeast with additional open space areas scattered throughout. Approximately 217.6 acres of the open space areas encompass the Temescal Wash 100-year floodplain and floodway. The Temescal Wash floodway has been channelized south of State Highway Route 74 but remains in its natural state north of the highway. The Business District is essentially surrounded by scattered housing and vacant/open space areas with a limited amount of public/institutional, commercial, and industrial uses. The North Central Sphere to the north encompasses low density housing with a limited amount of industrial, commercial and public/institutional uses. The Lake Elsinore Hills District to the southeast mostly includes beautiful open terrain. This district has several City-adopted specific plans which include thousands of new housing units and supporting uses. The Historic Industrial Use in the City Downtown District to the south contains a variety of uses most of which include a mix of residential, commercial, and industrial uses. The Country Club Heights District to the west is a sparsely developed residential community nestled within rolling hills. The Alberhill District to the northwest includes a significant amount of extractive mining activities.

3.3

Land Use

Conveniently located in the north central areas of the City along I-15 and State Route 74, the Business District serves as the primary employment and shopping center for the City and surrounding areas. Maximizing the Business District’s potential to provide a healthy supply of new employment opportunities is critical to achieving a better jobshousing balance in the region.

3.3.1

View from Country Club Heights overlooking the Business District.

Planned Land Use

Land uses have been allocated to support the Business District as the City’s main employment and shopping hub. Most of the vacant/open space areas and existing retail uses in the north have been designated for limited industrial uses with the exception of the Temescal Wash floodway which is designated as natural open space. Remaining limited industrial uses are designated in the southwestern sections of the Business District. General commercial uses are designated in the central areas along and near Central Avenue. The Business District

BD -5


BUSINESS DISTRICT professional uses are limited to the south area within existing vacant/open space areas adjacent to the western sides of I-15 along Collier Avenue. In addition, the southwesternmost section of the Business District has been designated as public/institutional to support the City’s existing waste water treatment plant. Mining activities may occur within the Business District, which shall follow applicable policies discussed in the Alberhill District. The primary constraint on development within the Business District is the Temescal Wash floodplain and floodway. It will be important, as development occurs, to prohibit development within the floodway to prevent encroachment into flood-prone areas. Development may occur within the floodplain if deemed appropriate by governmental agencies with jurisdiction over the resource. The primary land uses are limited industrial and general commercial with approximately thirtytwo percent (32%) and sixteen percent (16%) respectively, of the total number of acres. Table BD-T1 below summarizes the distribution of land uses within the Business District. Chapter 2.0, Section 2.3 of the General Plan defines each land use designation in terms of the allowable uses and density and intensity standards. Figure BD-1 illustrates the distribution and location of planned land use.

Table BD-T1. Distribution of Land Uses—Business District General Plan Land Use Designation

No. of Acres

Percentage of Total Land Area

80.5 Business Professional

6.08%

Commercial Mixed Use

17.8

1.35%

Floodway

217.6

16.45%

General Commercial

218.2

16.49%

36.6

2.77%

High Density Residential Hillside Residential

0

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0

424.2.

32.07%

8.9

0.68%

257.9

19.5%

Recreational

3.8

0.28%

Specific Plan

46.8

3.5%

Total

1,322.7

BD -6

100.00%


BUSINESS DISTRICT 3.3.2 Goal 1

Overall District Goal, Policies and Implementation Program The primary goal of the Business District is to encourage its position as the industrial and commercial hub of the City and to ensure that new growth respects the environmental sensitivity of the natural wetlands, floodway and floodplain.

Policies BD 1.1

Support intensification of commercial and industrial uses in order to provide additional shopping options and higher paying employment opportunities for residents.

BD 1.2

Encourage the orientation of new developments within the floodplain towards the floodway while satisfying all regulations governing the development within these areas.

BD 1.3

Use the floodway as a natural resource and as a pedestrian corridor.

BD 1.4

Through the project and CEQA processes ensure land use compatibility between any mining activities and surrounding uses as discussed in the Alberhill District.

Implementation Program The City shall support land use applications whose uses and designs are consistent with the goal of the Business District. Agency/Department Community Development, Parks and Engineering Departments

3.4

Urban Design

The existing urban design of the Business District is comprised of big box retail centers, such as Home Depot, Target, and Costco and a variety of older and newer industrial structures with minimal orientation towards the Business District’s largest natural amenity, the Temescal Wash. It will be important to establish a set of design standards that require consistent motifs throughout the various designated areas in order to establish a greater sense of place. Through future design, the opportunity exists to incorporate the floodway and floodplain into the pattern of development. The Channel Walk is a major project underway which will include approximately 70 acres at completion and will provide a recreational pedestrian corridor adjacent to the Temescal Wash floodway between the southern edge of the Historic Downtown to the south, through the Business District, and ending at the Alberhill District to the north. Future developments close to the floodway should provide a strong connection to the Channel Walk project thereby creating a central connected pedestrian corridor that passes through the entire District in a northwest/southeast direction. In addition, new growth shall also have a

BD -7


BUSINESS DISTRICT strong connection toward the Business District’s major roadways including State Route 74, Collier and Central Avenues.

3.4.1 Goal 2

Urban Design Goal, Policies and Implementation Program Support a vibrant commercial and industrial hub with high quality developments that have a strong orientation towards major corridors.

Policies BD 2.1

Through the project and CEQA processes continue to enhance the visual quality of new development and major transportation corridors.

BD 2.2

Encourage a strong connection to the Channel Walk project.

BD 2.3

Through the development review process, promote attractive building and street signage with the “Dream Extreme” logo, streetscape, and parking improvements as new development occurs.

Implementation Program Support projects that are consistent with the goals of the Business District, and that are designed with consideration for quality, orientation, attractive signage and streetscapes. Agency/Department Community Development and Engineering Departments

3.5

Historic Preservation

Most of the existing development within the Business District is relatively recent. As such, few historical resources remain. A section of the Atchison, Topeka, & Santa Fe Railroad passed through the Business District’s northern areas generally along a portion of Collier Avenue. However, the railroad was eventually dismantled and removed. A historic ranching and homesteading site is located nearby the old railroad in the northern section of the Business District between Collier Avenue and I-15. Although the Business District does not contain many historical resources, it has been situated between two areas of historic development, the Alberhill District to the north and the Historic Downtown District to the south. The Alberhill District has supported a significant amount of mining activities that have operated since the late 19th century. The Historic Downtown District to the south maintains the largest concentrations of historic structures and is just a short drive away.

BD -8


BUSINESS DISTRICT 3.5.1 Goal 3

Historic Preservation Goal, Policies and Implementation Program Encourage programs that promote educational awareness of the Business District’s cultural heritage in relation to neighboring districts

Policies BD 3.1

Through the project and CEQA processes recognize the historic ranching and homesteading site as future development occurs, and encourage the location of information in a public space onsite.

BD 3.2

Encourage the location of pedestrian signs within the Channel Walk describing the historical importance of the Atchison, Topeka, & Santa Fe Railroad, the historic ranching and homesteading site in the area, and other historical sites in nearby districts.

Implementation Program

3.6

None.

Transportation/Circulation

The roadway network throughout the Business District is comprised of several citywide major corridors and small local roadways providing access to internal business areas. I-15 is the City’s and the Business District’s largest roadway. I-15 passes through the Business District in a northwest/southeast direction. Collier Avenue also serves as an important north/south circulation route providing access roughly parallel to I-15 between Nichols Road to the north, Central Avenue in the central areas, and Main Street in the Historic Downtown District to the south. Direct access to I-15 is possible from Central Avenue and Nichols Road. State Route 74 is the City’s and the Business District’s largest east/west corridor and includes sections of Riverside Drive, Central Avenue, and Collier Avenue as it passes through the Business District in a generally east/west direction. Many of the smaller roadways are not through routes and terminate in various business park centers. The major corridors currently carry large traffic volumes, and efficient traffic flow is often restricted. Extensions and connections in several of the roadways that run parallel and/or perpendicular to I-15 are needed in order to provide better accessibility to the adjacent uses and I-15 from within the Business District. The cross-section for Central Avenue will maintain the existing 134-foot right-of-way and the 110-foot roadway, but the number of future lanes shall increase from 6 to 8; the Class II bike lane shall be removed and replaced with a Class II bike lane on Riverside Street/Nichols Road. Also, a Class III bikeway and multi-purpose trail will be required on both sides of the outflow channel. With increasing importance as an industrial and commercial hub the Business District’s existing circulation system will have to be improved to adequately serve new demands. The circulation

BD -9


BUSINESS DISTRICT element in Chapter 2.0 of the General Plan identifies standardized roadways as well as the addition of alternative transportation routes such as bikeways. The circulation element’s Truck Route Map follows portions of Riverside Road, Collier Avenue, and State Route 74 within the Business District. The following table reflects the circulation element’s Roadway Plan and Bikeway Plan for the Business District.

Table BD-T2. Roadway Plan and Bikeway Plan- Business District Roadway Name

From

To

Roadway Classification

Bikeway Classification

Nichols Road

Alberhill District

Collier Avenue

Major

Class II

Nichols Road

Collier Avenue

North Central Sphere District

Urban Arterial

Class II

Collier Avenue

Nichols Road

Riverside Drive

Major

Class II

Collier Avenue

Riverside Drive

Central Avenue

Urban Arterial

Class II

Collier Avenue

Central Avenue

Chaney Street

Major

Class II

Baker Street

Nichols Road

Riverside Drive

Collector

Pasadena Street

Riverside Drive

Third Street

Secondary

Chaney Street

Collier Avenue

Historic Downtown District

Major

Enterprise Way

Collier Avenue

Baker Street

Collector

Strickland Avenue

Enterprise Way

Historic Downtown District

Collector

Riverside Drive

Country Club Heights District

Collier Avenue

Urban Arterial

Central Avenue

Pasadena Street

I-15

Major

Central Avenue

I-15

Lake Elsinore Hills Augmented Urban District Arterial

BD -10

Class II


BUSINESS DISTRICT 3.6.1 Goal 4

Transportation/Circulation Goal, Policies and Implementation Program Provide a safe and comprehensive roadway network for vehicular, truck, bicycle, and pedestrian traffic throughout the Business District.

Policies BD 4.1

Continue to pursue the improvement of the Central Avenue (SR74)/I-15 and Nichols Road/I-15 interchanges in order to reduce congestion and delay. Consider the preparation of necessary studies in coordination with Caltrans in order to make interchange improvements.

BD 4.2

Through the project and CEQA processes, continue to improve the near-by street system for the Central Avenue interchange improvement, especially an over-crossing of I-15 at Riverside Drive and the intersections of Collier Avenue/Central Avenue, Riverside Drive/Collier Avenue, Dexter Avenue/Central Avenue, and Cambern Avenue/Central Avenue.

BD 4.3

Through the project and CEQA processes, continue to pursue the improvement of the near-by street system for the Nichols Road interchange, especially the intersection of Collier Avenue/Nichols Road.

BD 4.4

Through the project and CEQA processes, continue to pursue the improvement of Riverside Drive in accordance with the Circulation Element.

BD 4.5

Encourage and support the integration of enhanced streetscape features including landscaping, street furniture, lighting, and pedestrian/bikeway routes into the Business District’s roadway design.

BD 4.6

Encourage the creation of an environmentally pedestrian/bicycle trail along the Channel Walk project.

sensitive

and

accessible

Implementation Program Support land use applications whose designs provide safe roadways that connect to adjacent networks for vehicular, truck, bicycle and pedestrian traffic. Agency/Department Engineering, Parks and Community Development Departments

3.7

Parks and Recreation

There are no existing recreational facilities located within the Business District. The sole public/institutional use within the District is the Lake Elsinore Cemetery. Although, the main

BD -11


BUSINESS DISTRICT focus of the Business District is to promote and provide for economic development, the provision of public recreational spaces is important, and should include improved pedestrian/bikeway corridors along the major roadways and an integrated pedestrian/bikeway trail within the Channel Walk project.

3.7.1 Goal 5

Parks and Recreation Goal, Policies and Implementation Program Connect the pedestrian/bikeway corridors along the major roadways within the Business District to the Channel Walk project.

Policies BD 5.1

Support the completion of the Channel Walk project.

BD 5.2

Encourage expanded open space areas, bike lanes, and sidewalks along major corridors within the Business District.

Implementation Program Through the development and CEQA processes, ensure that project design incorporates pedestrian/bikeway corridors as well as connection to the Channel Walk project. Agency/Department Parks, Engineering and Community Development Departments

BD -12


COUNTRY CLUB HEIGHTS DISTRICT

4.0

Country Club Heights District

4.1

Introduction

The Country Club Heights District is located within the central area of the City, generally bordered by Nichols Road to the northwest, Chaney Street to the southeast, and Lakeshore Drive to the southwest (Figure CCH-1). State Route 74/Riverside Drive runs through the center of the District. The lake is located just beyond the adjacent Lake Edge District to the southwest and Temescal Wash, a 100-year flood plain that has been partially improved with a concrete channel borders the length of the northeastern boundary.

“The hilly area lying just north of Downtown, with its commanding views of the Lake, and proximity to both entertainment and employment uses offers attractive amenities that create significant development potential.”

The Country Club Heights District is juxtaposed between the residential neighborhoods of the Alberhill District to the north, the City’s mixed use residential and commercial Riverside District to the west, the heart of the City in the Historic Downtown District to the south, and the main industrial and commercial area in the Business District to the east. The Lake Edge District surrounds the lake along the northeast, northwest and a corner of the southwest boundary of the lake. The Country Club Heights District to the southwest is a hilly area lying just north of downtown. The District has commanding views of the lake, and is in close proximity to both entertainment and employment, two significant amenities that attract interest from the development community. Development potential within the Country Club Heights District is constrained by a number of environmental issues, which include steep topography, a shortage of public services, difficulty providing infrastructure for those services, and limited access. The Country Club Heights District is distinctly marked by its steep hillsides, views of the lake and the City, and is a key part of Lake Elsinore’s history. The issues mentioned above have presented development constraints for Country Club Heights since its historic beginnings dating back to 1912. The area was the target of an elaborate land scheme promoted in Los Angeles. The Mutual Benefit and Loan Society of Los Angeles acquired two (2) pieces of dry, “hill-land” within a few miles north of “town-land” that the Press claimed was not worth ten (10) cents an acre. The Mutual Benefit and Loan Society offered to give a 25x100-foot lot to anyone who asked; however, the person receiving the lot had to pay ten (10) dollars for a membership in the society, and one dollar per month dues for five (5) years. In 1923, the Clevelin Realty Corporation, headed by Henry Schultz, began selling additional lots in Country Club Heights and launched an unprecedented for its size real estate sales promotion in the area. Later, in 1925, W.R. Covington and Associates of Santa Monica purchased 650 feet of lake frontage and three blocks of slightly improved land across Poe Street from Warm Springs Park. A clubhouse, swimming pool, and other facilities projected to cost $200,000 were built on this property. No records have been found to provide the date when a fire destroyed

CCH-1


COUNTRY CLUB HEIGHTS DISTRICT the clubhouse, but remnants of the burned structure and surrounding trees examined in 1942 indicate that the fire must have occurred soon after the building was constructed. Noteworthy sites in the Country Club Heights District include the Bredlau Castle, built on a hilltop of Country Club Heights in 1926 by Henry Schultz, who had originated the Clevelin development. The beautiful building overlooking the lake was the site for many social gatherings. The Castle is over 9,000 square feet, including a hidden room with a sliding bookcase door that was used during Prohibition. In October of 1928, Aimee Semple McPherson, a Aimee’s Castle, circa 1935 renowned, noted evangelist, built a palatial (Photograph used by permission of Lake Elsinore Historical home in Country Club Heights, which has since Society) won fame as “Aimee’s Castle.” Aimee’s Castle served as the evangelist’s part-time home until 1939 when it passed to new ownership. Since then it has changed hands many times. As additional growth occurs in the City, the Country Club Heights District will continue to transition into a unique estate community.

4.2

Description

The County Club Heights District contains approximately 995 acres with lots varying in size from 171 square feet to 6.5 acres. There are a number of existing dwelling units spread throughout the Country Club Heights District but it remains largely undeveloped due to severe environmental constraints. There is a limited roadway network throughout the Country Club Heights District that ranges from dirt roads and narrow, oneway paved roadways, to the heavily used Riverside Drive, which runs through the central portion of the District. A number of the constraints, View of Lake Elsinore from Country Club Heights such as provision of water and sewer services, limited access roads, natural physical characteristics of steep hillsides and potential fire hazards (as determined by Riverside County Fire) present more significant challenges.

CCH-2


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City of Lake Elsinore Country Club Heights District Land Use Plan Figure CCH-1


COUNTRY CLUB HEIGHTS DISTRICT

BACKSIDE OF FIGURE

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COUNTRY CLUB HEIGHTS DISTRICT

4.3

Land Use

4.3.1

Unique Attributes

The unique characteristics of the Country Club Heights District include its steep topography, proximity and views of the lake, mountains and City environs, and central location to the downtown area. The Country Club Heights District is equally unique considering its limited provision of sewer and water services caused partially by the steep terrain. The Country Club Heights District is also the sole remaining area of the City that is serviced by the Elsinore Water District, a small water service district. The steep topography has also constrained development of adequate transportation infrastructure. Access to much of the Country Club Heights District is extremely limited due to only a small number of internal roadways with no direct access to some individual lots. Some of the dirt roads that currently exist were not created in the City’s right of way. The Gunnerson Street Pond is within the Country Club Heights District and is located in an area designated as floodway which will restrict any future development. Lastly, the Country Club Heights District is comprised of a large number of various sized lots, some of which are larger and developable, but many contain extremely steep slopes of greater than 25 percent, making development difficult. Currently, legally created parcels within the Country Club Heights District can be individually sold, leased, or financed and developed even though they may not meet today’s subdivision minimum lot sizes. However, all new construction must meet current City development standards.

4.3.2

Planned Land Use

The Country Club Heights District is an area with a number of issues associated with the development of individual substandard lots. For example: inadequate roads and access raise issues of traffic, fire response and public safety; small parcels with inadequate area for septic fields raise water quality issues; and small Hillside Residence in Country Club Heights parcels on steep slopes raise erosion, public safety, fire hazard, and aesthetic issues. The primary land use designations are low density residential and hillside residential at approximately seventy-seven (77%) of the total number of acres. Table CCH-T1 below

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COUNTRY CLUB HEIGHTS DISTRICT summarizes the distribution of land use designations within the Country Club Heights District. Chapter 2.0, Section 2.3 of the General Plan defines each land use designation in terms of the allowable uses and density and intensity standards. Figure CCH-1 illustrates the distribution and location of the land use designations.

Table CCH-T1. Distribution of Land Uses—Country Club Heights District No. of Acres

Percentage of Total Land Area

2.3

0.23%

10.3

1.03%

0.1

0.01%

Hillside Residential

467.5

46.98%

Low Density Residential

301.0

30.25%

Low-Medium Residential

121.0

12.16%

Medium Density Residential

53.2

5.34%

Neighborhood Commercial

15.3

1.53%

Public Institutional

21.8

2.19%

2.7

0.27%

General Plan Land Use Designation Business Professional Floodway High Density Residential

Residential Mixed Use Total

4.3.3 Goal 1

995.2

100.00%

Country Club Heights District Goal and Policy The primary goal of the County Club Heights District is to develop as a lower density residential estate neighborhood, maximizing the lake views and historical character of the area while preserving the integrity of the natural features.

Policy CCH 1.1 Consider the establishment of policies and development standards that create buildable residential lots. Implementation Program Through the design review and CEQA processes, the City shall encourage the establishment and precedence for an estate neighborhood.. Agency/Department

Community Development Departments

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COUNTRY CLUB HEIGHTS DISTRICT 4.4

Urban Design

The existing character of the Country Club Heights District consists of scattered homes with an eclectic mix of styles, ranging in size and age. The areas along the west-facing hillsides and ridgeline (Skyline Drive and Sunnyslope Avenue) contain larger houses with attractive and distinct architecture. Residential structures along the east-facing slopes and in the small valleys along the base of the hills tend to be small, of simple design and in somewhat poorer condition. The existing narrow roadways are both paved and unpaved with many terminating into deadends at random points. The historical remnants (such as the ornamental concrete streetlamps), commanding views of the lake, hillsides, and general notoriety associated with the Country Club Heights District create significant potential for successful low density residential estate development. In 2030, the Country Club Heights District is envisioned to be a distinctive residential neighborhood with preserved hillsides, narrow, tree-lined, winding roadways, and scenic views of Lake Elsinore set apart as a “village in the hills� community.

4.4.1 Goal 2

Goal and Policies Encourage new development that preserves and enhances the distinct Country Club Heights District character.

Policies CCH 2.1 Consider the development of design guidelines that will integrate the historical character of the Country Club Heights District and ensure unique District design in all residential, landscape and roadway development. CCH 2.2 Through the project and CEQA processes require conformance with hillside development policies to preserve the natural topography of the Country Club Heights District. CCH 2.3 Encourage the installation and construct of community identification signs/gateway monuments and street lamps at the main points of entry to the Country Club Heights District and neighborhoods. CCH 2.4 Through the project and CEQA processes require lots to have direct access to a Citymaintained roadway and to provide a private access-way with a width of no less than 16-feet. CCH 2.5 Allow legal non-conforming lots to develop with appropriate set backs, lot coverage, septic or sewage disposal systems, emergency vehicular access capabilities, and appropriate drainage techniques.

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COUNTRY CLUB HEIGHTS DISTRICT CCH 2.6 Through the project and CEQA processes require Country Club Heights District roadways to conform to the existing topography as much as possible to provide safe and adequate access yet maintain the country character. Implementation Program Through the design review and CEQA processes, the City shall support land use applications that preserve and enhance the character and identity of the Country Club Heights District, and that meet the requirements for safe access. Agency/Department

4.5

Community Development and Engineering Departments

Historic Preservation

The Country Club Heights District has a rich history including its inception as the target of a land scheme out of Los Angeles. Considering that the initial subdivision of land gave away parcels “for free” in return for membership fees and dues, and the subsequent division of land by the Clevelin Realty Corporation in 1923, the area has seen little development with the exception of a few residential homes and the construction of the Country Club from which the District receives its name. Country Club Heights Streetlight

The few remaining (unofficial) historic characteristics consist of old streetlamps, a number of foundations and chimneys, and Aimee Semple McPherson’s Castle. No places or sites listed on the National Register of Historic Places, California Points of Historical Interest or the Riverside County General Plan were identified as a significant historical resource, nor do any registered significant transportation routes exist in the area. Aimee’s Castle, located on Skyline Drive is recognized as a locally significant historical resource.

4.5.1 Goal 3

Goal and Policies Restore and enhance the historical characteristics of the Country Club Heights District as development occurs.

Policies CCH 3.1 Encourage the restoration of the ornamental concrete streetlamps to working condition. New identical streetlamp features shall be fabricated and placed at key entrances to the Country Club Heights District.

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COUNTRY CLUB HEIGHTS DISTRICT CCH 3.2 Encourage the preservation of the integrity of the design, character and structure of Aimee’s Castle as a locally significant historic resource. Implementation Program Through the design review process, the City shall support land use applications that preserve and enhance the character and identity of the Country Club Heights District. Agency/Department

4.6

Community Development Department

Transportation/Circulation

The roadway network throughout the Country Club Heights District is heavily constrained by topography and existing public right-of-ways (ROWs) and provides limited access because of incomplete roadways and substandard and improperly aligned rights-of-way. Improving the circulation system within the Country Club Heights District is necessary in order to develop the area. A redesign of the circulation system is recommended. The circulation system is currently comprised of internal local streets with substandard widths that provide access to more traveled roadways, such as Chaney Street, Riverside Drive, Gunnerson Street, and Lakeshore Drive.

4.6.1

Local Roadways

Many of the Country Club Heights District’s ROWs cannot be developed due to terrain constraints, but the City may support developments that would result in practical road improvements. Much of the paved roads, where slopes exceed ten percent (10%), have paved widths of less than twenty feet (20’) with no shoulders. The City’s standard is forty feet (40’) of paved width on a ROW of sixty feet (60’). However, most of the street ROWs have a width of only forty feet (40’). As Unpaved Roadways in Country Club Heights a result, recommended guidelines for Country Club Heights local streets include minimum pavement width of 34 feet, minimum radius of 250 feet, design speed of 25 MPH, and no street parking allowed.

4.6.2

Lakeshore Drive

The new special roadway cross section depicted on Figure 2-2 in Section 2.4 of the General Plan has been created specifically for Lakeshore Drive between Riverside Drive and Chaney Street. Preservation of the existing ROW is important due to topography, adjacent small lots, and the

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COUNTRY CLUB HEIGHTS DISTRICT lake frontage. Three (3) intersections are proposed including Manning Street, Lawrence Way, and Wilson Way. The circulation element identifies standardized roadways as well as the addition of alternative transportation routes such as bikeways. The circulation element’s Truck Route Map follows portions of Riverside Drive, which is a segment of State Route 74. The following table reflects the circulation element’s Roadway Plan and Bikeway Plan for the Country Club Heights District.

Table CCH-T2. Roadway Plan and Bikeway Plan—Country Club Heights District Roadway Name

From

To

Roadway Classification

Gunnerson Street

Lakeshore Drive

Riverside Drive

Collector

Chaney Street

Trelasen Avenue

Lakeshore Drive

Secondary

Strickland Avenue

Riverside Drive

Chaney Street

Collector

Class II

Lakeshore Drive

Riverside Drive

Manning Street

Secondary

Class II

Lakeshore Drive

Manning Street

Chaney Street

New Special Roadway

Class II

Lakeshore Drive

Terra Cotta

Riverside Drive

Urban Arterial

Class II

Riverside Drive

Riverside District

Business District

Urban Arterial

Class II

4.6.3 Goal 4

Bikeway Classification

Goal and Policies Provide a safe and comprehensive roadway network for vehicular, bicycle, and pedestrian traffic within the Country Club Heights District, with additional access points into/out of the area.

Policies CCH 4.1 Consider road cross-sections that are unique to the Country Club Heights District as necessary and used for local roadways in areas south of Riverside Drive to Chaney Street and the areas enclosed between Gunnerson and Riverside Drive. CCH 4.2 Consider a new special roadway cross section for Lakeshore Drive between Riverside Drive and Chaney Street and locate intersections at Manning Street, Lawrence Way, and Wilson Way.

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COUNTRY CLUB HEIGHTS DISTRICT CCH 4.3 Consider a pedestrian sidewalk along Lakeshore Drive that integrates a multi-purpose trail along Lakeshore Drive. CCH 4.4 Encourage a minimum sight-distance of 250 feet within the Country Club Heights District. CCH 4.5 Consider the roadway network to include one-way streets where ROW or buildable widths are limited. CCH 4.6 Through the project and CEQA processes integrate roadway and other public services infrastructure as development occurs to create efficient use of land. CCH 4.7 Consider the feasibility of assuming control of the entire segment of State Route 74, located within the Country Club Heights District. Implementation Program Through the design review and CEQA processes, the City shall support land use applications that provide safe access and the efficient use of land. Agency/Department

4.7

Engineering Departments

Parks and Recreation

The proximity of the lake along the western edge of the Country Club Heights District, and the recreational amenities it provides, offers the main recreational opportunities for Country Club Heights. As the District develops into an estate community, easy access to the lake through pedestrian trails, walkways, and bikeways, rather than population-based provision of park space should be emphasized. Development of trail systems can be integrated into the framework of the multi-purpose trail proposed within Lakeshore Drive and link the Alberhill District to the lake through the Country Club Heights District. The opportunities for smaller pocket parks exist within the Country Club Heights District, which could be developed to provide opportunities both for neighborhood connection as well as public views of the lake. Larger park sites such as community or regional parks are restricted by the Country Club Heights District’s natural features such as topography and wetlands.

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COUNTRY CLUB HEIGHTS DISTRICT 4.7.1 Goal 5

Goal and Policies Provide an active open space and recreational system, which provides connections to the City environs and preserves the natural features by connecting the Country Club Heights District to usable recreational networks within the City through the creation of open space and recreational opportunities, maximizing key view sheds, maintaining hillsides, and preserving the integrity of the Temescal Wash wetlands and drainage areas.

Policies CCH 5.1 Through the project and CEQA processes develop a comprehensive pedestrian trails network that both provides access from the Country Club Heights District to the lake and Historic Downtown District as well as provides a linkage to those areas from the Alberhill District. CCH 5.2 Consider the development of a minimum of one park at a key scenic view shed site to provide an opportunity to feature the views of the lake. Through the design review and CEQA processes, the City shall Implementation Program support land use applications that provide active open space and recreation areas which maximize viewsheds to the lake. Agency/Department

4.8

Parks & Recreation and Community Development Departments

Community Services and Utilities

The topography of the Country Club Heights District limits the ability to adequately provide public services and utilities to its residents. Historically, the Country Club Heights District has been unable to supply sufficient wastewater services, constrained by topography, and has limited water infrastructure delivery systems. The adequate provision of services is an issue that needs to be addressed in order to allow development to occur within the Country Club Heights District.

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COUNTRY CLUB HEIGHTS DISTRICT 4.8.1

Goals and Policies

Goal 6a

Provide adequate, consistently responsive, efficient and customer-oriented public safety services and facilities.

Goal 6b

Support private utility companies and public utility districts to provide adequate levels of utility services to the Country Club Heights District residents and businesses, and ensure that necessary infrastructure is constructed.

Policies CCH 6.1 Encourage the pursuit of innovative techniques to deliver adequate public services in a cost-effective and responsive manner. Implementation Program Through the design review and CEQA processes, the City shall support land use applications that provide efficient and innovative public safety services and facilities. Agency/Department

Community Development and Engineering Departments

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COUNTRY CLUB HEIGHTS DISTRICT

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EAST LAKE DISTRICT

5.0

East Lake District

5.1

Introduction

The East Lake District, named after the East Lake Specific Plan, covers an approximately 3,240-acre area at the southeastern end of Lake Elsinore. It is generally bordered by the Historic and Riverview Districts to the north, the Ballpark District to the northeast, Corydon Street and Mission Trail to the southeast, the Lakeland Village District Sphere to the southwest, and the lake to the northwest (Figure EL-1). The East Lake District lies at the southwestern corner of both the City limits and Sphere of Influence (SOI) boundary.

“The East Lake District is primarily governed by the approved East Lake Specific Plan, its development agreements and amendments.”

The East Lake District is partially developed, and a generally flat area that does not contain any registered historic structures. However, portions of the East Lake District were utilized during prehistoric times by Native American Indians as flaking and grinding stations. In addition, an historic ranching and homesteading site is located just outside the East Lake District along the border with the Lakeland Village District to the southwest. More recently, the East Lake District has also been home to popular motocross, skydiving, gliderplanes and hang gliding activities. Throughout the City’s history, Lake Elsinore has alternated between severe floods and droughts. Most of the East Lake District lies within a 100-year floodplain adjacent to and southeast of the lake. As a result, the East Lake District has been significantly impacted during wet seasons and high water levels in the lake. Major floods occurred in 1884 and in 1916. In 1969, seven (7) inches of rain fell in eleven (11) days and severely flooded the lake’s shores. The East Lake District’s proximity to the lake and flood storage is a key consideration in all planned development. The City is looking forward to significant community growth in this area in the near future. As development occurs within the East Lake District, the challenge will be to create a cohesive environment between the mix of residential neighborhoods, commercial centers, recreational facilities, floodplain, and open space areas that contain valuable biological resources. The East Lake District is primarily governed by the approved East Lake Specific Plan, its development agreements and amendments. The rules, regulations, and purposes of the East Lake Specific Plan coincide with the goals and policies established for the East Lake District.

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EAST LAKE DISTRICT

This Page Left Intentionally Blank

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EAST LAKE DISTRICT

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Sources: City of Lake Elsinore, County of Riverside

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City of Lake Elsinore East Lake District Land Use Plan Figure EL-1


EAST LAKE DISTRICT

BACKSIDE OF FIGURE

EL-4


EAST LAKE DISTRICT

5.2

Description

The East Lake District is a low-lying area, with elevations of up to 1,263 feet above mean sea level in the 100-year flood elevation. The majority of the East Lake District is currently undeveloped but does contain a limited mix of industrial, single-family residential, active recreational uses, wetland habitat, and floodway. Active recreational uses include an airstrip, motocross facilities, runways for skydiving and gliderplanes and a landing pad for parachuting/hang gliding. With the East Lake’s Shoreline implementation of the East Lake Specific Plan, an 18-hole golf course has been developed within the central portion of the East Lake District. There is a limited roadway network throughout the East Lake District that ranges from the heavily used thoroughfares, Lakeshore Drive and Mission Trail, the newly constructed Corydon Road, and dirt roadways leading to the airstrip and motocross recreational sites. A number of constraints, including natural resources and 100-year floodplain elevations, may be addressed through a combination of resource conservation and engineering techniques during the construction phase of development. In order to stabilize the level of water in Lake Elsinore, many of the components which implement the Lake Elsinore Management Project (Project) are located within the East Lake District. The Project is a phased construction program for lake stabilization and associated improvements that was implemented in the late-1980s by a joint powers authority called the Lake Elsinore Management Authority. Components of the Project within the East Lake District include: a pumping station planned to be installed behind the levee, a 48-inch conduit, acreage set aside as open space and an overflow weir to provide for excess flood storage, a linear riparian habitat along with man-made wetlands area to provide for habitat and migration routes, two wells to be drilled north of the wetlands, incorporation of existing project wells into individual Planning Areas, and importation of reclaimed water. The levee was constructed across the lake in 1995 to reduce the size of the water surface and minimize evaporation. The levee also helps provide flood protection for the East Lake District. The presence of the 100-year floodplain and flood management places constraints on development within the East Lake District. Any fill or dredged materials discharged into wetlands or within the high-water mark of a stream will require a Section 404 permit from the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers (ACOE). In the process of obtaining a 404 permit, the extent of development may be limited by the ACOE at the project specific level to avoid jurisdictional wetlands. Impacts to smaller drainages that constitute jurisdictional wetlands should be addressed at the project specific level.

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EAST LAKE DISTRICT 5.3

Land Use

5.3.1

Unique Attributes

The East Lake District is uniquely defined by its proximity to the lake and the fact that it is home to the extreme sport activities within the City. Key recreational facilities for these sports are Skylark Field Airstrip, the Glider Launch Field, Skydive Elsinore facilities and the Lake Elsinore Motocross Park. Lying just south of the lake, the District also falls within the 100-year floodplain. Due to its elevation, the East Lake District contains a substantial amount of open space and recreational areas including a wetlands area to the northwest and a golf course towards the northeast.

5.3.2

Planned Land Use

The East Lake Specific Plan land use plan provides for the ultimate development of 7,000 residential dwelling units and a combination of commercial, recreational and open spaces uses. The primary land uses are within the East Lake Specific Plan (ELSP), which comprises 89% of the acreage in the East Lake District. Within the ELSP, 35.15% of its area is devoted to residential uses of various densities, and 40% of its area is designated for active and passive open space. The District also contains 98.7 acres within the floodway. Table EL-T1 summarizes the distribution of land uses designations within the East Lake District. Chapter 2.0, Section 2.3 of the General Plan defines each land use designation in terms of the allowable uses and density and intensity standards. Figure EL-1 illustrates the distribution and location of the land use designations.

Table EL-T1. Distribution of Land Uses—East Lake District General Plan Land Use Designation

No. of Acres

Floodway

98.7

General Commercial

Percentage of Total Land Area 3.05%

1.1

0.03%

High Density Residential

13.4

0.41%

Limited Industrial

22.2

0.69%

153.1

4.73%

Medium Density Residential

20.7

0.64%

Neighborhood Commercial

4.2

0.13%

Public Institutional

2.8

0.09%

Low-Medium Residential

Recreational

30.4

Specific Plan

2,893

Total

3,239.5

EL-6

0.94% 89.3% 100.00%


EAST LAKE DISTRICT 5.3.3 Goal 1

Overall District Goal and Policies Integrate the future residential and commercial development with the recreational and open space land use framework to create a cohesive master planned community.

Policies EL 1.1

Through the project and CEQA processes require adequate noise buffers between residential, commercial and active recreational facilities such as the airstrip and motocross.

EL 1.2

Through the project and CEQA processes implement an efficient street system in order to accommodate proposed development and recreational uses.

EL 1.3

Through the project and CEQA processes provide a variety of recreational opportunities in concert with the City’s image as a recreational “Dream Extreme” destination.

EL 1.4

Through the project and CEQA processes strive to balance the recreational needs of local residents and visitors with the regional and local need for housing.

EL 1.5

Through the project and CEQA processes incorporate open space as an integral component of the overall community.

Implementation Program With the East Lake Specific Plan in place, the City shall support land use applications consistent with the Specific Plan uses, design, development standards and guidelines, circulation, and public spaces. Agency/Department Departments

5.4

Community Development, Engineering, and Parks and Recreation

Urban Design

The character of the East Lake District is defined by the existing recreational facilities, hang gliding, paragliding, soaring, skydiving, and motocross that have for years drawn visitors from around the world to Lake Elsinore and the East Lake District. Preserving the recreational character of the East Lake District will be important as development occurs. In addition, an important element of the landscape is East Lake’s rich biological resources. In terms of both visual quality and recreational opportunity, a strong connection to these resources and open space areas will be a key aspect in enhancing East Lake’s character and sense of place. Other uses in the area such as the residential area in the southwest corner and industrial area at the southeastern border along Corydon Road do not connect to surrounding land uses. However,

EL-7


EAST LAKE DISTRICT these uses can become part of the master planned community as the planned development takes place and envelop these areas.

5.4.1

Goals and Policies

Goal 2a

Goal 2b

Preserve the open space and recreational character of the area while developing the master planned community according to the goals and objectives of the East Lake Specific Plan and the goals and policies of the East Lake District Plan.

Lake Elsinore Motocross Park

Establish a community with a unique sense of place within the context of surrounding development in the East Lake District’s master planned society.

Policies EL 2.1

Preserve MSHCP, wetlands, and other valuable environmental resources in the area consistent with the East Lake Specific Plan.

EL 2.2

Through the project and CEQA processes require the dedication of the wetland areas and important habitat to the Elsinore Area preserve of the MSHCP.

El 2.3

Through the project and CEQA processes require development to create bikeway and pedestrian links between the built community and open space and recreational areas to provide direct access from the East Lake District and surrounding community.

EL 2.4

Through the project and CEQA processes require development to create a comprehensive community image that is reflected in its land use, architectural, and landscape elements.

Implementation Program Preservation of habitat in the East Lake Specific Plan is governed by the “Back Basin 770 Conservation” agreement mapped by the Regional Conservation Authority. With this agreement in place, the City shall support land use applications consistent with this agreement and map. Agency/Department

Community Development Department

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EAST LAKE DISTRICT 5.5

Transportation/Circulation

The street system within the East Lake District currently consists of limited access to recreational facilities and Corydon Street in part due to the limited amount of development within the East Lake District. The roadways, which form or are in close proximity to the northeastern and southeastern areas of the East Lake District, include Malaga Road, Mission Trail and Corydon Street. Grand Avenue is the major roadway to the south and southwest, but is located within the Lakeland Village Sphere District. The future roadway network is planned to be an efficient system that will improve traffic flow throughout the area. The East Lake Specific Plan calls for the future development of a system of local streets and collectors, connecting to the surrounding circulation network. Internal circulation will include a number of local streets in no specific east-west or north-south organization that are as yet, unidentified by name. Two (2) larger roadways will be the westerly extension of Malaga Street, which will flow in an east-west direction through the northern portion of the East Lake District, and the westerly extension of Bundy Canyon Road to align with the southern extension of Diamond Drive. Alternative forms of transportation are encouraged in the East Lake District by the provision of mass transit opportunities, bicycle lanes, and a pedestrian, bicycle, and equestrian trail network throughout the community which connects to the regional trail system. These alternative transit opportunities have been integrated into the overall framework of the East Lake District without sacrificing efficient movement of people or goods. The circulation element in Chapter 2.0, Section 2.4 of the General Plan identifies standardized roadways as well as the addition of alternative transportation routes such as bikeways. The circulation element’s Truck Route Map follows portions of Mission Trail and Corydon Street, which form the eastern and southeastern boundaries of the East Lake District. The following table reflects the circulation element’s Roadway Plan and Bikeway Plan for the East Lake District.

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EAST LAKE DISTRICT Table EL-T2. Roadway Plan and Bikeway Plan—East Lake District Roadway Name

From

To

Roadway Classification

Bikeway Classification

Diamond Drive

Ballpark District

Corydon Street

Major

Class II

Lakeshore Drive

Main Street

Mission Trail

Urban Arterial

Class II

Lakeshore Drive

Kline Street

Main Street

Collector

New/To Be Determined

Diamond Drive

Mission Trail

Five (5) New Collectors

Malaga Road

Diamond Drive

Mission Trail

Major

Class II

Mission Trail

Ballpark District

Lemon Street

Urban Arterial

Class II

Palomar Street

Skylark Drive

Corydon Street

Collector

Stoneman Street

Palomar Street

Lakeland Village District

Collector

Skylark Drive

Palomar Street

Lakeland Village District

Collector

5.5.1 Goal 3

Goal and Policies Enhance pedestrian circulation, particularly between higher density residential and commercial areas and active or passive recreational facilities. Develop a trail system that will join parks and recreational areas, schools, and commercial activity centers in the District and link to the surrounding community including the Ballpark District.

Policies EL 3.1

Through the project and CEQA processes incorporate strong linkages to the surrounding activities including Diamond Stadium located in the neighboring Ballpark District into development design.

EL 3.2

Through the project and CEQA processes integrate and align future roadways with the built circulation infrastructure in order to provide for efficient use of land and traffic movement.

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EAST LAKE DISTRICT EL 3.3

Conduct necessary studies in coordination with Riverside County and Caltrans to make the Olive Street/I-15 undercrossing an interchange to enhance circulation in the District.

Implementation Program With the approval of the East Lake Specific Plan and its amendments, the City shall support land use applications whose designs address and implement the circulation plan and trail systems identified in the Specific Plan. Agency/Department Departments

5.6

Engineering, Parks and Recreation, and Community Development

Parks and Recreation

The East Lake District currently comprises a collection of extreme sport recreational facilities. There are no existing traditional parks but the area does include the motocross site, various trails along the lake edge and the glider/skydiving airstrip facility. In addition, several new park and recreational facilities are proposed. Diamond Community Park is a proposed 15-acre facility in the north and would contain sports fields, tot lots, restrooms, a concession center, and parking. Sky Divers Summerly Neighborhood Park is a proposed 5-acre facility in the northeast and would contain a baseball field, picnic tables, restrooms, a concession center, and parking. Waterbury Park is a proposed 12-acre facility and would contain a lake, active/passive recreational uses, and a future Community Center location. Serenity Park is a 2.1-acre facility to the south and contains a tot lot, tennis court, open space areas, and picnic tables. Because the East Lake District encompasses such rich open space and recreation resources and opportunities, the maintenance and availability of these resources for future residents of the East Lake District, surrounding City, and visitors, should guide the pattern of development. These resources offer opportunities for a wealth of public spaces bringing citizens together in a variety of ways that promote a sense of community.

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EAST LAKE DISTRICT 5.6.1 Goal 4

Goal and Policies Provide an open space and recreational network visually and physically integrated to development areas and provide a balance between development and the conservation and preservation of areas with unique environmental or aesthetic value.

Policies EL 4.1

Support the enhancement of usable recreational networks throughout the East Lake District by ensuring that connections between such community elements as open space, parks, schools, recreational facilities, and the residential and commercial areas are required during the development and CEQA processes.

EL 4.2

Encourage the enhancement of existing facilities such as the airstrip and motocross that are critical to the continuation of extreme sport activities.

EL 4.3

Through the development and CEQA processes require recreational activities oriented to local residents and visitors.

EL 4.4

Through the development and CEQA processes require an open space and park system to satisfy the active and passive recreational needs of the community.

EL 4.5

The southern shoreline of Lake Elsinore within the East Lake District shall be preserved for public access and enjoyment.

Implementation Program With the East Last Specific Plan in place, the City shall support land use applications that provide a balance between development and preservation areas, and between development and unique recreational opportunities in the East Lake District Agency/Department

Parks and Recreation and Community Development Departments

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HISTORIC DISTRICT

6.0

Historic District

6.1

Introduction

The Historic District is located in the center of the City, bordered by the Business District to the north, the Lake Elsinore Hills District and Interstate-15 (I-15) to the northeast and east, the Riverview District to the southeast and south, the Lake Edge District to the west, and the Country Club Heights District to the northwest. The location of Historic District is shown on Figure HD-1.

“Historic District has been the focal point of the City since its incorporation in 1888.”

The Historic District’s topography is generally flat with a gentle downward slope towards the Lake offering breathtaking views of the lake and the Santa Ana Mountains. The Historic District is bordered by several physical barriers. Hills to the north and northeast form the boundaries with the Business District and the Country Club Heights District. Hills to the southwest help form most of its boundary with the Riverview District. I-15 forms its northeastern and eastern boundaries. There is no physical barrier between the Historic District and the Lake Edge District. The lake is located within just a short walk just beyond the Lake Edge District all along the western border. The Historic District has been the focal point of the City since its incorporation in 1888. Today, several registered and non-registered historic buildings exist within the Historic District providing a rich variety of structures that help contribute a strong sense of place and connection with the past. The City has invested significant resources into preserving important historical structures and improving the appearance of the Historic District. A three-block segment of Main Street was improved with a comprehensive urban design program of streetscape improvements in Downtown Clock the late 1990s, including landscaping, diagonal parking (with pop-outs), enhanced paving and sidewalk improvements. In 2009, the City drafted a comprehensive Downtown Master Plan. The plan addresses the entire Main Street corridor extending from Interstate 15 south to the shoreline of the lake and approximately two blocks east and west of Main Street. The main concept of the plan is to reconnect the existing downtown area with the lakefront by realigning and extending Main Street to the water. In addition, five distinct walkable mixed-use neighborhoods will be created leading to a world class waterfront park and pier. The plan has the potential to transform the downtown area into a regional destination with landmarks, land uses and amenities that will create a viable, livable and memorable place that the citizens of Lake Elsinore can be proud of for many generations to come.

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HISTORIC DISTRICT

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City of Lake Elsinore Historic District Land Use Plan Figure HD-1


HISTORIC DISTRICT

BACKSIDE OF FIGURE

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HISTORIC DISTRICT

6.2

Description

The Historic District encompasses a relatively small area with approximately 474 acres and is home to City Hall, the public library, several historic structures, a fire station, a post office, and a police station. Many of the area’s historic structures and civic uses are located along or close to Main Street, Heald Avenue, and Graham Avenue Most of the Historic District has been developed. Few vacant undeveloped areas remain in this District. Several rehabilitation and redevelopment opportunities exist for older commercial and residential structures, which will help to revitalize the area.

City Hall circa 1930s

Main Street and Graham Avenue are the two (2) main roadways that intersect at the core of the Historic District. Main Street has also recently been designated as part of the Historic Highway 395. The State has provided certification and signs for the full length of this historic roadway. Main Street/Historic 395 still serves as the main transportation route for the District. The road runs generally in a north-south direction through the center of the Historic District, and connects the area to the I-15. Uses along or within close proximity to Main Street include several public institutional uses including the City Hall, the Cultural Center, the Lake Community Center, the Youth Opportunity Center, the Police Station, Fire Station, Post Office and Library. Other uses found in this general area are neighborhood commercial uses, residential uses and some industrial uses. Graham Avenue serves as the Historic District’s main east-west connection route and provides access between Lakeshore Drive to the west and northwest that has a mix of office, commercial and residential uses. Additional residential uses are found to the south and southeast of the Graham Avenue/Main Street intersection. There is an improved outflow concrete channel known as Temescal Wash running just northwest of Main Street. The City has plans for a pedestrian trail or “Channel Walk” that will meander along this Wash possibly from the Lake, through the Historic and Business Districts to the boundary of the Alberhill District. Surrounding uses primarily include housing, recreation, industrial activities, and vacant areas, The Country Club Heights District to the northwest is a residential district and is situated in higher elevations with steep slopes. The Business District to the north primarily contains various industrial activities. Beyond the industrial uses is the City’s central commercial area. The Lake Elsinore Hills District, which lies east of I-15, primarily contains large expanses of natural vacant open space areas but includes City-approved specific plans. Once these specific plans are developed, thousands of housing units and supporting uses will be added to the City’s statistics. The Riverview District to the south and southeast contains a limited amount of recreational, residential, and commercial uses. The Lake Edge District to the west includes

HD-5


HISTORIC DISTRICT some recreational areas, scattered residential uses a public park, popular fishing beach and boat launch facility.

6.3

Land Use

6.3.1

Unique Attributes

The Historic District is uniquely situated as the physical and cultural heart of the City with the major share of historic structures and civic uses. The Historic District contains a pedestrian friendly Main Street, which passes through its center, one of Southern California’s largest natural lakes within walking distance, and access to I-15. These unique elements place the Historic District in a position for additional revitalization and to become the City’s premier destination for civic, commercial, and cultural activities.

6.3.2

Parade on Main Street

Planned Land Use

The greatest variety and intensity of uses continue to be generally designated along or within close proximity to Main Street since it is the Historic District’s major corridor and contains the largest variety of existing uses. To ensure consistency with the Downtown Master Plan and its five distinct neighborhoods, two new land use designations have been created. The Gateway Commercial designation has been established to encourage the development of a consolidated office park at the northern end of Main Street creating a strong gateway into downtown off Interstate 15. The Downtown Recreational designation has been established to create a special lakeside recreational environment at the southern end of Main Street along the waterfront. This area will serve as an extension of the historic downtown. Portions of the central area along Main Street have been designated as residential mixed-use or high density residential allowing for multi-family residential development downtown. Other areas have been designated commercial mixed-use allowing for commercial, civic and cultural uses to be mixed with lower residential densities. Lastly, portions of the area have been designated general commercial allowing for more intensive commercial development to occur. Most of the areas to the east and west of Main Street include a variety of residential uses with higher densities. Additional housing will bring more people who consume goods and services, which will, in turn, stimulate construction of a variety of uses within the corridor. The Graham Avenue corridor connects to Main Street’s central areas and provides a mix of housing, office uses and commercial uses. As mentioned several public institutional uses are found along this roadway.

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HISTORIC DISTRICT

Strong connections with the recreational areas in the Lake Edge District to the west and western portions of the Riverview District to the south along Lakeshore Drive are crucial to the success of the Historic District. The proposed mixed use areas will help provide a transition to the recreational uses to the west and south along Lakeshore Drive. Recreational uses including the Channel Walk, that has been previously mentioned, have been designated along and nearby the Temescal Wash outflow channel, the major watercourse that passes through the Historic District’s central areas west of Main Street in a north/south direction before reaching the lake. The primary land uses located in this District are low-medium residential, medium density residential, and high-density residential with approximately twenty-five percent (25%), sixteen percent (16%), and thirteen percent (13%), respectively of the total number of acres. Table HDT1 below summarizes the distribution of land-use designations within the Historic District. Chapter 2.0 of the General Plan defines each land use designation in terms of the allowable uses and density and intensity standards. Figure HD-1 illustrates the distribution and location of the land-use designations.

Table HD-T1. Distribution of Land Uses - Historic District General Plan Land Use Designation

No. of Acres

Percentage of Total Land Area

Business Professional

19.9

3.03%

Commercial Mixed Use

37.1

5.64

Floodway

18.6

2.83%

General Commercial

10.3

1.56%

High Density Residential

83.4

12.69%

Hillside Residential

21.1

3.21%

Low-Medium Residential

163.4

24.88%

Medium Density Residential

106.8

16.26%

Neighborhood Commercial

8.6

1.30%

Open Space

3.1

0.47%

Public/Institutional

67.3

10.24%

Downtown Recreational

39.8

6.06%

Residential Mixed Use

65.5

9.97%

Gateway Commercial

10.6

1.62%

1.5

0.24%

Limited Industrial Total

656.8

HD-7

100.0%


HISTORIC DISTRICT 6.3.3 Goal 1

6.4

Overall District Goal The primary goal of the Historic District is to create a true nucleus of the City, which represents the physical and symbolic heart and the civic, commercial, and cultural center, highlighted by its connection to the lake. Goal 4 of the General Plan’s Community Form (Chapter 2.0) preserves the rich historical heritage of the City of Lake Elsinore by maintaining and ensuring the continuation of the Historic District area as the premier civic, commercial, and cultural center. See this Chapter for Policies and Implementation Program.

Urban Design

“…the historical structures in the south central and west central areas provide a clear connection to the past and a strong sense of place unmatched anywhere else within the City…”

The existing character of the Historic District is primarily made up of a mix of historic structures and a variety of more recently developed commercial and residential uses. Although some residential and commercial developments are in need of rehabilitation or redevelopment, the historical structures in the south central and west central areas of the Historic District provide a clear connection to the past and a strong sense of place unmatched anywhere else within the City and surrounding areas. In addition, the Historic District is just a short walk from the lake, the City’s most prized water resource and destination for waterfront recreational activities. The Downtown Master Plan outlines five distinct neighborhoods having their own specific theme and feel regarding architectural styles, signage and streetscapes. The Gateway neighborhood located between Flint Street and Interstate 15 will consist primarily of professional office buildings, some as much as six stories tall. Just south of the Gateway area the Garden neighborhood will consist primarily of multi-family residential uses enabling residents to live and shop downtown. Just north of the Historic area, the Cultural neighborhood will divert Main Street around a traffic circle Storefront Business along Main Street containing a public library and museum. The area will also include a performing arts center supplemented by mixed-use retail and residential uses. The Historic neighborhood, spanning from Heald Avenue to Prospect Street consists of

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HISTORIC DISTRICT the City’s existing downtown commercial core. The historic facades of retail buildings in the area will be preserved while the buildings will be upgraded with a mixture of uses. The Waterfront neighborhood, located between the Historic area and the lakefront saves the best for last with a new City Hall and Civic Center, town square, retail space, restaurants and a mixeduse development. A large waterfront park is also anticipated along with a pier and resort hotel complex all serving to extend the existing downtown area to the lakefront. It will be important to ensure that development located along or nearby major mixed-use corridors, recreational uses, and public/institutional uses maintain an orientation towards the public realm in order to promote pedestrian circulation. The ongoing Channel Walk project, a pedestrian/recreational corridor adjacent to the Temescal Wash outflow channel, will provide the major contiguous pedestrian route parallel to and a few blocks west of Main Street. When completed, Channel Walk will provide access between Lakeshore Drive to the south along the border with the Lake Edge District through the Historic District, the Business District, and the Alberhill District to the northwest. View corridors of the lake and Santa Ana Mountains should be incorporated and preserved where possible. In addition, public spaces will require expansion and revitalization. Streetscape improvements will be essential to foster pedestrian access and safety. Public art will be a feature that will further define and identify the sense of place in the Historic District.

6.4.1 Goal 2

Urban Design Goal, Policies and Implementation Program Support mixed-use corridors with a pedestrian orientation towards the public realm, enhance public views of the lake and Santa Ana Mountains by establishing view corridors with appropriate development standards, and capture new public views where possible as lakefront sites are redeveloped.

Policies HD 2.1 Through the project and CEQA processes, create a strong connection between Main Street and the public/institutional uses and commercial uses north and south of Lakeshore Drive. HD 2.2 All Historic District development shall adhere to the design guidelines established through the Downtown Master Plan, and the 1994 Historic Elsinore Architectural Design Standards. HD 2.3 Through the project and CEQA processes, ensure an attractive destination with a diversity of uses and activities while offering pedestrian safety and mobility. HD 2.4 Encourage the concept of commercial mixed use along Main Street.

HD-9


HISTORIC DISTRICT HD 2.5 Through the project and CEQA processes pursue the design and construction of community identification signs and gateway monuments at the main points of entry to the Historic District. HD 2.6 Through the project and CEQA processes improve roadways with additional trees, landscaping themes, widened and contiguous sidewalks, functional public furniture, additional decorative lighting, and “This architecture maximum on-street diagonal parking. and historical HD 2.7

Strongly encourage the use of architectural designs that are “true to form” with the architectural designs selected and allowed by the Downtown Master Plan and the Historic Elsinore Architectural Design Standards.

context should set the tone and styling of future development in the area.”

HD 2.8 Through the project and CEQA processes create an integrated and memorable relationship of architecture, public space, and open space in developments immediately adjacent to the Temescal Wash outflow channel, the future Civic Center, and recreational areas. HD 2.9 Pursue the development of a new Civic Center complex within proximity to Main Street and the lake. Public and cultural facilities such as City Hall, an open-air public plaza, and a theatre shall be encouraged. HD 2.10 Pursue the preparation and adoption of a Downtown Master Plan which follows the boundaries of the Downtown Overlay area. Implementation Program During project design review, utilize the guidelines, standards, techniques, and measures provided in the Downtown Master Plan and the Historic Elsinore Architectural Design Standards. Where the two documents conflict, the Downtown Master Plan shall take precedence. Agency/Department

6.5

Community Development and Engineering Departments

Historic Preservation

The City of Elsinore was established in the 1880s soon after Franklin Heald purchased Rancho La Laguna in 1883. During the late 19th century, waves of immigration to the City began as people were attracted by mining and recreational opportunities. In addition, the Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railroad was completed in the 1880s thereby providing access to the general area. The Historic District witnessed a large share of development during the City’s early years. The remaining structures within the Historic District illustrate its position as the main commercial, residential, and civic hub since the City’s incorporation. The historic structures within the

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HISTORIC DISTRICT Historic District depict the unique architecture of that era. This architecture and historical context should set the general tone and styling of future development in the area. In the 1980s, the Riverside County Historical Commission designated the Historic District a local historic district focusing on the areas around Main Street, Heald Avenue, and Graham Avenue where some of the earliest development occurred. The County of Riverside has also officially recognized the Historic District. The City will continue to work to protect its local cultural heritage and structures of merit within the Historic District. There are several remaining historic buildings in the Historic District. The Crescent Bath House/Chimes Building and the Grand Army of the Republic are listed in the National Register of Historic Places. The Elsinore Women’s Club and the Grand Army of the Republic are listed in the California Points of Historical Interest. Several sites are also listed in the Riverside County General Plan as significant historical resources including the following: the Masonic Lodge, train depot, First Presbyterian Church, Pioneer Lumber Company, and Lake Theatre. In addition, many historical homes of interest are also located within the Historic District. Though not recognized on any historical lists, the gazebo in City Park also has contributed to the history of downtown.

6.5.1 Goal 3

Historic Preservation Goal, Policies and Implementation Program Continue to restore and enhance the historical structures within the Historic District as development occurs. Maintain the history of the Historic District through restoration and expansion of existing historical structures. Educate and promote the significance of the Historic District’s structures.

Policies HD 3.1 Support the expansion of the Lake Elsinore Historical Society’s Museum located along Main Street. HD 3.2 Encourage new development to incorporate historical architectural features into building facades and require projects to conform/abide by the architectural design standards as defined in the Downtown Master Plan and the Historic Elsinore Architectural Design Standards. HD 3.3 Encourage the preservation of all historic structures located within the Historic District, including those located outside the core downtown area. HD 3.4 Consider the development and adoption of specialized design guidelines particular to the Historic District overlay. Implementation Program Through the development review and CEQA processes consider the incorporation of historical architectural features and encourage preservation of

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HISTORIC DISTRICT historic structures. Adopt the Downtown Master Plan as a set of standards and guidelines to implement the Historic District overlay area objectives. Agency/Department

6.6

Community Development Department

Transportation/Circulation

The circulation network throughout the Historic District consists of two (2) main corridors and a series of less traveled roadways primarily configured in a gridiron pattern. Main Street and Graham Avenue are the two (2) main roadways which intersect at the core of the Historic District. Main Street serves as the main transportation route and generally runs in a northsouth direction through the center of the Historic District, and provides access to I-15. Graham Avenue serves as the main east-west connection route and provides access between Lakeshore Drive to the west and northwest, Main Street in the south central areas, and residential uses to the east. Improving the circulation system design will be critical to the development of the area. The network is somewhat constrained by roadways which carry higher traffic volumes that suddenly terminate, emptying traffic onto small internal roadways. Other roadways remain either unpaved and/or require additional sidewalk infrastructure. A series of contiguous routes providing better access for vehicular and pedestrian circulation to the major corridors is needed. It will be important to ensure a minimum standard for roadways throughout the Historic District. The ongoing Channel Walk project, a pedestrian/recreational corridor adjacent to the outflow channel known as Temescal Wash, is a good example of alternate pedestrian routes that residents, employees, and visitors may use to access the Historic District. The circulation element identifies standardized roadways as well as the addition of alternative transportation routes such as bikeways and pedestrian trails. The bikeways and pedestrian trails are intended to provide links between the residential neighborhoods and supporting uses in and around the area. The circulation element in Chapter 2.0, Section 2.4 of the General Plan identifies standardized roadways as well as the addition of alternative transportation routes such as bikeways. The circulation element’s Truck Route Map follows portions of Collier Avenue, Flint Street, Main Street, and Lakeshore Drive and the entire length of Spring Street. Table HD-T2 reflects the circulation element’s Roadway Plan and Bikeway Plan for the Historic District.

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HISTORIC DISTRICT Table HD-T2.

Roadway Plan and Bikeway Plan—Historic District

Roadway Name

From

To

Roadway Classification

Bikeway Classification

W. Lakeshore Drive

Chaney Street

Graham Avenue

Secondary

Class II

W. Lakeshore Drive

Graham Avenue

Limited Street

Collector

Class II

Limited Street

W. Lakeshore Drive

Spring Street

Collector

Class II

Main Street

Collector

W. Graham Avenue W. Lakeshore Drive Heald Avenue

Chaney Street

Main Street

Collector

Summer Avenue

Chaney Street

Main Street

Collector

Pottery Street

Chaney Street

Rancho Street

Collector

Class II (Silver Street to Main Street) Class II (Collier Avenue to Main Street)

Collier Avenue

Chaney Street

Spring Street

Secondary

Main Street

Camino del Norte

Flint Street

Major

Main Street

Flint Street

W. Lakeshore Drive

Collector

Langstaff Street

Pottery Street

Limited Street

Collector

Lewis Street

Flint Street

Graham Avenue

Collector

Spring Street

Graham Avenue

W. Lakeshore Drive

Secondary

Rancho Street

Pottery Street

Flint Street

Collector

Spring Street

Flint Street

Graham Avenue

Collector

Spring Street

Collier Avenue

Flint Street

Secondary

Flint Street

Spring Street

Franklin Avenue

Secondary

Lakeshore Drive

Riverview District

Main Street

Urban Arterial

Lakeshore Drive

Main Street

Spring Street

Collector

Flint Street

Chaney Street

Lewis Street

Collector

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Class II (Limited Street to Riverview District); Class III (Limited to Lake Elsinore Hills District)

Class II Class II


HISTORIC DISTRICT 6.6.1 Goal 4

Transportation/Circulation Goal, Policies and Implementation Program Consider a circulation system that allows pedestrian connectivity throughout the Historic District with an emphasis on access to public spaces, recreational areas, and major roadways; along with developing an efficient circulation pattern with roadway standards that provide for higher traffic volumes parking demands in appropriate areas while maintaining a friendly pedestrian environment.

Policies HD 4.1 Continue efforts to complete the Channel Walk project. HD 4.2 Contemplate the design new parking facilities as an integral feature in the overall design of the Historic District. HD 4.3 In order to support pedestrian activity, mitigate traffic impacts to LOS E during peak hours. HD 4.4 Traffic signals, if warranted, shall be appropriately designed for the downtown landscape. HD 4.5 The intersection of Graham Avenue and Main Street requires signalization according to the General Plan Traffic Study. Monitor the intersection and when the LOS falls below E, the City will prepare for signal installation. Implementation Program Support the objectives of the Downtown Master Plan and Historic District Overlay area. Agency/Department

6.7

Engineering and Community Development Department

Parks and Recreation

The Historic District is home to a variety of recreational facilities primarily located in the south central areas along or within close proximity to Main Street and/or Graham Avenue. In addition, the Channel Walk is a major project underway which will include approximately 70 acres at completion and will provide a recreational pedestrian corridor adjacent to the Temescal Wash between southern edge of the Historic District and districts to the north. The Historic District also provides the main gateway to the lake located just a short walk to the south and

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HISTORIC DISTRICT west which contains a variety of recreational facilities and a future pier with commercial activities. The Cultural Center is located along Main Street and features a performance stage. The Youth Opportunity Center is located along Graham Avenue and includes a community based service organization that provides job skills training and tutoring for persons between the ages of 16-21. The Lake Community Center is also located along Graham Avenue and includes a gymnasium, a volleyball court, drinking fountains, and benches. The Lake Elsinore City Park is located on the Lake Community Center south end of Main Street and encompasses four (4) acres, a horseshoe court, picnic areas, parking, play equipment, and a concession center. City Park is within a half-mile radius of Swick & Matich Park, the Lake Elsinore Senior Activities Center and Lakepoint Park. Swick & Matich Park is seven (7) acres located along the boundary with the Lake Edge District to the west and includes a concession center, parking, sports fields, and shade structures. Yarbourough Park is a three- (3) acre park located along the northwestern areas of the Historic District and offers play equipment, picnic facilities, parking, and sports facilities. As the Historic District develops into an urban hub, easy access to the lake, Channel Walk, major corridors, and the various recreational facilities will be essential to the overall health of residents, visitors, and businesses alike.

6.7.1 Goal 5

Parks and Recreation Goal, Policies and Implementation Program Support a recreational system that is accessible to the City’s residents, employees, and visitors and ensuring a variety of facilities for all ages.

Policies HD 5.1 Consider pedestrian linkages between the Channel Walk project and the nearby Historic District, commercial businesses, recreational facilities, major corridors, the Lake Edge Parkway, and the lake. HD 5.2 Through the project and CEQA processes expand and support facilities within the various community centers.

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HISTORIC DISTRICT HD 5.3 Encourage and pursue the development of additional recreational facilities adjacent to new public development such as the future civic center plaza. HD 5.4 Encourage residential development to incorporate common open spaces on-site, such as courtyards and terraces.

6.8

The Historic District–Main Street Overlay/Special Treatment Area

A Main Street Overlay/Special Treatment Area consists of a set of policies that provide additional tools needed to revitalize the Historic District’s vision for its Main Street corridor. The overlay designation was established with the adoption of this General Plan to address the specific needs of the downtown area and the need to establish development regulations that will facilitate redevelopment and promote a healthy urban environment. This overlay identifies specific policies for the Main Street corridor based on the opportunities and constraints that were identified during the planning process.

6.8.1

Historic District Overlay Policies and Implementation Program

Policies HD 6.1 Pursue the preparation and adoption of a Downtown Master Plan which follows the boundaries of the Main Street Overlay Special Treatment Area HD 6.2 Through the project review and CEQA processes, require new and renovated buildings to reinforce the stylistic characteristics of historic buildings in and around the vicinity of the Historic District. Use of building materials similar to those used during the area’s historic era is required along facades facing Main Street. HD 6.3 Encourage underground parking or parking areas behind the development project, away from Main Street. HD 6.4 Consider density bonuses and reduced parking standards for residential and commercial developments when development provides various amenities including building architectural features, public art, public spaces, and open space areas. HD 6.5 Through the project review and CEQA processes ensure that new developments have a strong orientation towards Main Street and maintain a zero lot line along this roadway. HD 6.6 Encourage the use of landscaping themes, public furniture, signage and lighting fixtures that add to the architectural character of historic structures and are consistent throughout Main Street.

HD-16


HISTORIC DISTRICT HD 6.7 Through the project review and CEQA processes maintain and maximize public views of the lake and the Santa Ana Mountains along Main Street. A maximum building height of four (4) stories shall be maintained to preserve view corridors to the lake and the Santa Ana Mountains. HD 6.8 Consider revising the current Historic Elsinore Architectural Design Standards. Implementation Program

Support and implement the Downtown Master Plan

Agency/Department

Community Development Department

HD-17


HISTORIC DISTRICT

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LAKE EDGE DISTRICT

7.0

Lake Edge District

7.1

Introduction

“More than any other district in the nearby area, the Lake Edge District incorporates the largest share of the shoreline of the Lake.”

The Lake Edge District is located within the central area of the City of Lake Elsinore (City). The Lake Edge District is bordered to the northwest by the Lake View District and to the northeast by the Country Club Heights District. The Historic District, Riverview District, and the East Lake District form the eastern and southeastern borders of the Lake Edge District. The Lakeland Village District, an unincorporated portion of Riverside County located within the City’s Sphere of Influence, is located to the south and southwest. The Lake View Sphere District, also located within the City’s Sphere of Influence, is located to the west. The location of the Lake Edge District is shown on Figure LE-1. More than any other district in the nearby area, the Lake Edge District incorporates the largest share of the lake’s shoreline. As such, the Lake Edge District has a number of inherent challenges (i.e., U. S. Army Corps of Engineers jurisdictional lines, floodway, and floodplains as determined by F.E.M.A.) that must be solved for development to occur. Most of its area is generally flat with one exception. A small section of the western most edge of the Lake Edge District includes portions of the Santa Ana Mountains. The lake and its backdrop of the Santa Ana Mountains to the southwest and west, along with views of the rolling hills to the north and east, offer inspiring vistas that have attracted residents to the area throughout its history. The Lake Edge District area has had a long and eventful history with the lake as a focal point for the Native Americans, Europeans, Mexicans, early founders of the City, and the multitude of visitors and locals that continue to come to its shores for entertainment and recreation. Many developments occurred along or within proximity of the lake’s edge during the second half of the 19th century and the first half of the 20th century. Today, the Lake Edge District encompasses the City’s oldest standing structure, the Adobe Machado House. The preservation of this structure is a high priority for the City. Another structure of interest is the former Elsinore Naval Military Academy building located along Grand Avenue at the southwestern boundary.

LE-1

View of Lake and Santa Ana Mountains


LAKE EDGE DISTRICT Given the prevalence of historic resources in the area, the City is required to conduct SB 18 Tribal Consultation as appropriate. California SB 18 (Government Code § 65352.3) requires that prior to adoption or amendment of a City’s General Plan (or a Specific Plan) proposed on or after March 1, 2005, the City will conduct consultations (as defined in Government Code § 65352.4) with California Native American tribes that are on the contact list of the Native American Heritage Commission. The purpose of the consultations is to preserve or mitigate impacts to places, features, and objects described in sections 5097.9 and 5097.993 of the Public Resources Code that are located within the City’s jurisdiction. The main focus of the Lake Edge District Plan is to create additional opportunities for recreational uses and to provide better access to these uses and the lake for all residents within the City. Lake Edge is envisioned to once again become an integral part of the City representing the history that helped foster the City’s incorporation and development, its promise for future growth and renewal, and a cornerstone of the recreational character of the City.

7.2

Description

“…the lake has The Lake Edge District encompasses 876.2 acres, a range of uses with an flooded in very emphasis towards recreation, custom homes with lake access, commercial wet years and has mixed uses, open space, and several miles of shoreline. A variety of both become a dry public and private recreational facilities are located along the lakebed in drought years.” northwestern, northeastern, and eastern portions of the lake’s shore. Most of the remaining areas along or within close proximity of the shoreline within the Lake Edge District contain open space uses with a limited amount of residential uses and commercial uses. Several of the residential uses in the northern and northeastern areas contain aging single-family homes that provide rehabilitation opportunities. Uses at the western most edge of the Lake Edge District, in the higher elevations, primarily contain open space and residential uses with a limited amount of commercial uses.

Lake Elsinore is the City’s most valuable water resource. The lake is natural in origin and currently contains approximately 3,412 surface acres of water, but has varied widely in size in the past due to hydrologic conditions. As such, the lake has flooded in very wet years and has become a dry lakebed in drought years. The elevation of the lake’s bottom is 1,218 feet above sea level. Water is added when the lake’s water level drops below a minimum of 1,240 feet above sea level. The Lake Edge District encompasses the shorelines surrounding the lake to the west, northwest, north, northeast, east and a portion of the southwestern corner. The lake’s remaining shorelines to the southeast are located within the Riverview District and East Lake District, whereas the shorelines to the south and southwest are located within the Lakeland Village District.

LE-2


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City of Lake Elsinore Lake Edge District Land Use Plan Figure LE-1


LAKE EDGE DISTRICT

BACKSIDE OF FIGURE

LE-4


LAKE EDGE DISTRICT The circulation system comprises the busy perimeter roadways of Riverside Drive, Lakeshore Drive, and Grand Avenue that run parallel to the northwestern, northeastern, and western boundaries respectively of the Lake Edge District. No internal roadway network exists along the lake within the Lake Edge District aside from limited non-through routes and some private and public driveways. In addition, there is no pedestrian route adjacent to the lake that connects the existing uses within the Lake Edge District. Submerged Trees in Lake Elsinore during a

Surrounding land uses are varied since the Lake Wet Year Edge District is in a central location and adjacent to seven (7) districts. Uses to the northwest include a mixed-use corridor along Riverside Drive. Uses to the north primarily include housing and a busy commercial intersection. Uses to the east include housing, vacant and commercial activities. Uses to the southeast primarily consist of scattered residential uses and vacant land areas. Areas to the south, southwest, and west, are primarily residential with supporting commercial land uses located off Grand Avenue.

7.3

Land Use

7.3.1

Unique Attributes

The unique characteristics of the Lake Edge District include its exceptional range of recreational activities, opportunities for additional recreational uses that are accessible and designed for the City’s residents, and its role as a focal point within the City. These characteristics set the City apart from most other jurisdictions in Southern California. The lake provides a variety of water activity amusements including water skiing, wake boarding, speedboat racing, and fishing. It is also one of the largest natural bodies of water in Southern California and offers spectacular views to residents who live nearby, as well as visitors who come to enjoy the area.

7.3.2

Planned Land Use

Although the Lake Edge District contains a variety of unique recreational amenities, there are several opportunities for additional facilities. Most of the lake’s shores within the Lake Edge District, which include the southwestern corner, northwestern, northern, and the southeastern edge have been designated for recreational uses. A long strip of the northeastern edge along Lakeshore Drive between Cowell Street and intersecting with the City’s Lake Point Park and fishing area allows for the development of custom homes. Although located within the City’s Sphere and outside of the Lake Edge District, the Lakeland Village Sphere includes additional recreational designated areas to the southwest.

LE-5


LAKE EDGE DISTRICT Access to all recreational designated areas along the lake is limited. There is currently no pedestrian route that interconnects the recreational designated areas along the lake’s shore. A multi-purpose trail has been proposed along Lakeshore Drive which would link to the campground along Riverside Drive. In order to connect this southern recreational designated area to the northwestern recreational designated shores of the lake, an alternate pedestrian route should be designed along Grand Avenue, which would complete the pedestrian circulation route around the entire Lake. It is important to emphasize that Lakeland Village is located within the City’s Sphere of Influence and as such, the City currently does not have control over the Lakeland Village District unless or until the district is annexed into the City. A new pier is proposed south of the Historic District. The pier will serve as an interesting new attraction for residents and visitors alike. The pier will be designed to replicate the original pier that is considered a historical element of the City. A variety of housing and commercial designations have been assigned to the northwest to help provide further stimulus to the adjacent emerging commercial neighborhood within the Lake View District, which forms the northwest border of the Lake Edge District. The western most portion of the Lake Edge District, southwest of Grand View of Western Shores of Lake Elsinore Avenue, will include open space, housing, from Seaport Boat Launch. commercial mixed-uses, and general commercial uses. As development continues, it will be increasingly important to ensure and manage the water quality and level of the lake. Proposed development within the Lake Edge District will be limited by the 100-year floodplain. A boundary line has been established around the perimeter of the lake at an elevation of 1,260 above mean sea level that will restrict future land uses to locate outside of the established boundary. The primary land use within the Lake Edge District is Recreational, comprising approximately 42.74% of the total number of acres in the District. Secondary uses are Commercial Mixed Use at 13.57%, Low-medium Residential at 14.19%, and Lakeside Residential at 11.57%. Table LE-T1 below summarizes the distribution of land-use designations within the Lake Edge District. Chapter 2.0, Section 2.3 of the General Plan defines each land use designation in terms of the allowable uses and density and intensity standards. Figure LE-1 illustrates the distribution and location of the land-use designations.

LE-6


LAKE EDGE DISTRICT Table LE-T1. Distribution of Land Uses - Lake Edge District

7.3.3

General Plan Land Use Designation

No. of Acres

Percentage of Total Land Area

Commercial Mixed Use

118.9

13.57%

Residential Mixed Use

9.9

1.13%

Floodway

3.3

0.38%

General Commercial

14.4

1.64%

Hillside Residential

125

1.43%

Lakeside Residential

101.4

11.57%

Low-Medium Residential

124.3

14.19%

Medium Density Residential

34.8

3.97%

High Density Residential

33

3.77%

Open Space

57.7

6.59%

Recreational

365.7

41.74%

Tourist Commercial

0.2

0.02%

Total

876.2

100.00%

Overall District Goals and Policies

The primary goals of the Lake Edge District are to:

Goal 1a

Encourage the development of a recreational destination that will bring local residents and visitors to the various recreational and entertainment facilities around the lake; and

Goal 1b

Enhance the accessibility of the recreational designated uses along the lake’s shores.

Goal 1c

Preserve a view corridor along Lakeshore Drive between Chaney and Iowa Street.

Policies LE 1.1

Encourage the development of recreation-serving commercial land uses and the revitalization of existing uses that strengthen the City’s economic base and offer a range of enterprises that serve the needs of residents and visitors.

LE-7


LAKE EDGE DISTRICT LE 1.2

Support new development and redevelopment around the lake that offers a range of housing, commercial, and entertainment opportunities and increased recreational activities for residents and tourists.

LE 1.3

Consider a pedestrian-oriented route (multi-purpose trail) along and within Lakeshore Drive and a multi-purpose trail that connects to the City Campground.

LE 1.4

Encourage the creation of a consistent and integrated development theme along the lake edge.

LE 1.5

Through the project and CEQA processes preserve sensitive environmental habitats and physiographic features, including wetlands and beaches.

Implementation Program Through the development and CEQA processes, the City shall support land use applications that provide recreation-serving and entertainment uses around the lake, and that provide accessibility along the shoreline. Agency/Department Community Development, Engineering, Redevelopment Agency, and Parks & Recreation Departments

7.4

Urban Design

A design motif should be established to ensure a consistent and interesting urban design that takes advantage of the area’s beautiful scenery and amenities while considering the lake’s historical significance in order to establish needed pedestrian and vehicular connections to neighboring uses. It is envisioned that the Lake Edge District will become a vibrant and accessible recreational destination attracting visitors and locals alike to the beauty and activities of the lake that further defines the City’s identity. In addition, mixed-uses designated along Riverside Drive to the northwest will provide a transition and connection between the emerging neighborhood commercial district to the northwest and the recreational uses along the northwestern shores of the lake.

LE-8


LAKE EDGE DISTRICT 7.4.1 Goal 2

Goal and Policies “The Lake Edge

Support a destination that provides a District contains the City’s oldest consistent and rich design motif and standing structure, accessibility with a strong recreationthe Adobe Machado House, located oriented character and emphasis for northwest of the recreational, residential, residential-mixed lake.” use, and commercial uses along or within close proximity to Lake Edge District’s shorelines.

Policies LE 2.1

Support the design of new development at a pedestrian-scale with an orientation towards the lake.

LE 2.2

Encourage the construction of community identification gateway signs at the main points of entry to the Lake Edge District and at regular points along the Lake Edge Parkway.

Implementation Program Through the design review process, promote a consistent and rich design motif with a strong recreation-oriented character. Community Development, Redevelopment Agency, and Parks & Agency/Department Recreation Departments

7.5

Historic Preservation

The Lake Edge District contains the City’s oldest standing structure, the Adobe Machado House, located northwest of the lake. Agustin Machado was the first landowner to call the lake home since the Native Americans occupied the area. Mr. Machado’s seven-room adobe home was built in 1858 and quickly became a local landmark. The Adobe Machado House served as the area’s first postal stop, known as the Butterfield Stage Stop. The stop was one of the relay stations that John Butterfield and his agents used to deliver mail along their 2,700-mile route from California to Missouri. In 1884 Wilson Heald, father of Franklin Heald, founded the town of Elsinore and subsequently built a two-story home within the general area of the Adobe Machado House. The home was built on the corner of what is now Grand Avenue and Riverside Drive. The Adobe Machado House and the Butterfield Stage Stop are recognized as locally significant historical resources. The Elsinore Naval Academy Building is unofficially recognized as a significant historical resource and is located along Grand Avenue approximately a half mile to the south.

LE-9


LAKE EDGE DISTRICT The move to create a resort town, which provided recreational and entertainment opportunities along the lake’s shore, began shortly after the town of Elsinore was founded in 1883. Although the Lake Edge District experienced lake-serving developments during the early 20th century, no historic structures remain today. The Laguna Vista Club House was completed early in the 20th century along the northeast shores of the lake and became the lake’s first lakefront resort. However, the Laguna Vista Club was soon flooded by a rise in the lake’s level. A few years later in 1926, the Clevelin Reality Corporation built a pier along the north shore, which included a dance club, several games, and the Aloha Yacht Club. As the lake’s level rose above the first deck, a second deck was added to the pier. The Aloha Yacht Club subsequently sponsored the largest gathering of speedboats on the lake and held the National Speed Boat Race in 1928 that garnered nine world records. The double-decker pier was later dismantled in the middle of the 20th century. Other developments along the lake’s shores outside of the Lake Edge District included the Mount Elsinore Country Club and the Clevelin Realty Corporation’s “ship pier” on the south shores. In addition, the City’s largest concentration of historic sites is located to the east, within the Historic District. These sites are within walking distance of the Lake Edge District’s eastern boundary.

7.5.1 Goal 3

Goal and Policies Support and promote the historical significance of the lake as development occurs, along with preserving and maintaining the integrity of the Adobe Machado House and the Elsinore Naval Academy Building as locally recognized historic resources.

Policies LE 3.1

Encourage the preservation and restoration of the Adobe House as a visitor’s center to promote the educational awareness of the Lake Edge District’s historic legacies and the evolution of the development of the lake’s shoreline.

LE 3.2

Encourage the placement of signs depicting the historic evolution of the lake and nearby areas within the Lake Edge District in popular recreational areas along the lake’s shores.

Implementation Program Where feasible support preservation and restoration efforts and educational opportunities that bring awareness to the District’s historic legacies. Agency/Department

Community Development and Parks & Recreation Department

LE-10


LAKE EDGE DISTRICT 7.6

Transportation/Circulation

The roadway network throughout the Lake Edge District is relatively limited, consisting mainly of three perimeter roadways and a series of less traveled interior roadways that provide access to recreational and residential uses. Riverside Drive, a portion of State Route 74, also known as the Ortega Highway, forms the northwestern boundary of the Lake Edge District and provides access points to areas northwest of the lake. Lakeshore Drive forms Lake Edge’s northeastern boundary and provides access to the busy “Four Corners” commercial intersection and the residential Country Club Heights District to the north as well as the Historic District to the east. Grand Avenue forms a portion of Lake Edge’s boundary to the west and provides access to residential and commercial uses, and to residential roadways located at the western most areas of the Lake Edge District. Lakeshore Drive has a new special roadway cross section (Chapter 2.0, Figure 2-2), as discussed in the Country Club Heights District. The cross section is to be used for Lakeshore Drive in the Country Club Heights District between Riverside Drive and Chaney Street. Preservation of existing right-of-way is important due to topography and adjacent small lots and lake frontage. The Lake Edge District shares Riverside Drive with the Lake View District. Riverside Drive (SR 74) varies between two and four lanes and has some existing frontage, mostly commercial, in this District. The circulation element calls for an ultimate six lane Urban Arterial roadway. When traffic volume justifies widening Riverside Drive, it will be widened to the full general plan width. The circulation element in Chapter 2.0 of the General Plan identifies standardized roadways as well as the addition of alternative transportation routes such as bikeways. The circulation element’s Truck Route Map follows portions of Grand Avenue, State Route 74 and Riverside Drive. The following table reflects the circulation element’s Roadway Plan and Bikeway Plan for the Lake Edge District.

LE-11


LAKE EDGE DISTRICT Table LE-T2. Roadway Plan and Bikeway Plan—Lake Edge District Roadway Name

From

To

Roadway Classification

Bikeway Classification

Riverside Drive

Grand Avenue

Lakeshore Drive

Urban Arterial

Class II

Grand Avenue

Riverside Drive

Lakeland Village

Urban Arterial

Class II (Riverside Drive to Ortega Highway/S.R. 74); Class II/I (Ortega Highway/S.R. 74 to Lakeland Village)

Lakeshore Drive

Manning Street

Chaney Street

New Special Roadway

Class II

Lakeshore Drive

Riverside Drive

Manning Street

Secondary

Class II

W. Lakeshore Drive

Chaney Street

Graham Avenue

Secondary

Class II

W. Lakeshore Drive

Graham Avenue

Limited Street

Collector

Class II

Limited Street

Lakeshore Drive Outflow Channel

Ortega Highway (State Route 74)

7.6.1 Goal 4

Grand Avenue

Lake View Sphere

Collector Major

Class II

Goal and Policies Encourage the enhancement of primary circulation routes, points of entry, key intersections, and the Lake Edge Parkway by improving public access opportunities to the lake and Lake Edge.

Policies LE 4.1

Consider the possibility of assuming control of the entire segment of State Route 74, located within the Lake Edge District.

LE 4.2

Support the enhancement and/or creation of unifying streetscapes, road signage, and other design features along Lakeshore Drive. Encourage the construction of entry points from each of the adjacent districts to the Lake Edge District.

LE 4.3

Through the CEQA review process ensure that main intersections along Grand Avenue at Riverside Drive and Ortega Highway are improved in order to reduce

LE-12


LAKE EDGE DISTRICT congestion and delay. Full improvement may impact the existing development on the southeast corner. LE 4.4

When the traffic volume justifies, and as development continues, widen Riverside Drive to the full width as detailed in the General Plan, during the development and CEQA processes.

LE 4.5

Through the project and CEQA processes apply the new special roadway cross section (Fig 2-2) for Lakeshore Drive between Manning Street and Chaney Street and locate intersections at Manning Street, Lawrence Way, and Wilson Way.

Implementation Program Through the design review and CEQA processes, the City shall improve public access and primary circulation routes within the District. Agency/Department

7.7

Engineering and Community Development Departments

Parks and Recreation

The Lake Edge District currently contains a variety of recreational facilities located along the northwestern, northeastern, and eastern portions of the lake’s shorelines. The Lake Elsinore Recreation Area Campground and boat launch facility, an R.V. Park, as well as the two private boat launch facilities are located along the northwestern shores of the lake. The Lake Elsinore Recreation Area Campground is open year round. Two fishing beaches are located along the lake’s northeast shores. The Day Use and Beach Area and the Seaport Boat Launch are located to the east within close proximity to the Historic District. As previously discussed, most of the areas along the lake’s shoreline within the Lake Edge District Fishing at the Lake have been designated for recreational uses. In addition, a new pier is being considered to the east and south of the Historic District, which will include additional retail and recreational opportunities.

LE-13


LAKE EDGE DISTRICT 7.7.1 Goal 5

Goal and Policies Through the development review process create recreational opportunities for the City’s residents that maximize access to and use of the lake.

Policies LE 5.1

Through the development review process create a continuous multi-purpose trail designed and designated for pedestrian use (the “Lake Edge Parkway”), around the perimeter of the Lake Edge District.

LE 5.2

Encourage the establishment of pedestrian links between the neighboring districts and the multi-purpose trail..

Implementation Program Through the design review and CEQA processes, the City shall support maximum access to and use of the lake. Agency/Department Community Development, Engineering, Redevelopment Agency, and Parks & Recreation Departments

LE-14


LAKE ELSINORE HILLS DISTRICT

8.0

Lake Elsinore Hills

8.1

Introduction

“Since the late 1980’s, several significant development proposals have been approved.”

The Lake Elsinore Hills District is situated at the eastern edge of the City. The Lake Elsinore Hills District is bordered to the north by the North Peak District, the Meadowbrook and North Central Sphere Districts. The City of Canyon Lake borders the Lake Elsinore Hills District to the east. The City of Wildomar borders the Lake Elsinore Hills District to the southeast and south, and Interstate-15 forms the western boundary. The location of the Lake Elsinore Hills District is shown on the land use map, Figure LEH-1. The Lake Elsinore Hills District encompasses a large and varied terrain including broad plains, rolling hills, steep slopes, sensitive habitats, and watercourses with elevations ranging from 1,300 to 2,170 feet above the sea level. Many areas of the Lake Elsinore Hills District are not readily accessible or developable and have remained vacant. Two large bodies of water located within close proximity of the Lake Elsinore Hills District are the City’s lake to the southwest and Canyon Lake to the east, which is located within the City of Canyon Lake. Some of the higher elevations offer beautiful panoramic views of the City’s lake and the Santa Ana Mountains. The Lake Elsinore Hills District is located in close proximity to some of the most culturally significant areas within the City and general vicinity. The Lake Elsinore Hills District has historically remained mostly undisturbed by development, due to its varied terrain. Areas of historical significance within the Lake Elsinore Hills District include historic mining activities in the north and a historic ranching and homesteading site in the east. Since the late 1980’s, several significant development proposals have been approved. These proposals will heavily influence the Lake Elsinore Hills District’s future. The main goal for the Lake Elsinore Hills District will be to create and maintain a network of balanced communities, which preserve and promote a high quality of life. Most of the acreage within the Lake Elsinore Hills District is covered by City-approved specific plans and tentative maps that include adopted land use designations for all areas within their boundaries. The Cityadopted specific plans establish the standards and development criteria for all areas within their boundaries. The goals and policies contained within this District Plan reflect the general intentions of the City-adopted specific plans. Should a discrepancy or conflict exist between the Lake Elsinore Hills District and an approved specific plan, the City-approved specific plan shall prevail.

LEH-1


LAKE ELSINORE HILLS DISTRICT

This Page Left Intentionally Blank

LEH-2


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City of Lake Elsinore Lake Elsinore Hills District Land Use Plan Figure LEH-1


LAKE ELSINORE HILLS DISTRICT

BACKSIDE OF FIGURE

LEH-4


LAKE ELSINORE HILLS DISTRICT

8.2

Description

Most of the acreage within the Lake Elsinore Hills District has been approved for development. The Lake Elsinore Hills District includes approximately 7,486 acres which primarily consist of four (4) master planned residential communities, currently at different stages of development. The master planned communities are generally located along Rosetta Canyon Drive, Summerhill Drive, Railroad Canyon Road, and Canyon Hills Drive. A completed highway commercial development is also located within the Lake Elsinore Hills District. The primary Natural Landscape in Lake Elsinore Hills commercial node is located in the southern portions of the Lake Elsinore Hills District along Interstate I-15. Surrounding uses primarily include vacant lands and residences. The Meadowbrook Sphere to the northeast primarily encompasses single-family homes on 1–2 acre lots with supporting uses. A few large tracts of land are available for development. The North Peak District to the north is mostly vacant with a similar topography to the Lake Elsinore Hills District. The North Central Sphere to the northwest consists of low-density residential uses with a few pockets of industrial uses. Uses to the east include the residential community within the City of Canyon Lake. These single-family homes surround Canyon Lake. Uses to the south include vacant lands with limited residential uses and the newly incorporated area of the City of Wildomar. Elsinore’s Historic District, Riverview District, and Ballpark District are located adjacent to and west of I15 (the western boundary of the Lake Elsinore Hills District).

8.3

Land Use

8.3.1

Unique Attributes

The Lake Elsinore Hills District’s most unique attributes are that it represents the largest district within the City and that it contains one of the largest and most diverse open space landscape areas. The Lake Elsinore Hills District’s naturally landscaped valleys, peaks, rolling hills, watercourses, riparian habitats, and natural open space provide for a wide variety of view corridors, residential, and recreational opportunities. In addition, unlike other

LEH-5

New Residential Communities in Southeastern Lake Elsinore Hills


LAKE ELSINORE HILLS DISTRICT districts, the area is adjacent to the City’s Historic, Ballpark and Lake View Districts and within close proximity to the amenities and services within these adjacent districts. No other district borders the City’s downtown area and offers such a large and diverse landscape.

8.3.2

Planned Land Use

Most of the area within the Lake Elsinore Hills District is covered by one of several Cityapproved specific plans that include adopted land use designations. The Lake Elsinore Hills District is transitioning from a primarily vacant area with a varied terrain into a series of neighborhoods that incorporate large areas for open space and preservation opportunities with supporting uses generally located along major roadways. Areas outside the boundaries of the specific plans are primarily located in the northern and western areas of the Lake Elsinore Hills District and are designated for residential and commercial uses as well as open space and MSHCP conservation areas. As mentioned, no other district within the City contains as many approved specific plans. As a result, it is important to briefly describe the adopted specific plans that govern development in the Lake Elsinore Hills District in order to better understand how to best integrate uses adjacent to these areas. A list and description of the Lake Elsinore Hills District’s various City-adopted specific plans follows below:

Canyon Hills Specific Plan The adopted Canyon Hills Specific Plan (formerly known as Cottonwood Hills) encompasses approximately 1,969 acres. The Canyon Hills Specific Plan is located at the southeasternmost section of the Lake Elsinore Hills District. Approximately half of the area will be developed as residential along with some institutional and commercial uses; the remaining areas will include recreational and open space uses. Higher density residential uses and commercial uses are planned in the western portions of specific plan whereas lower density residential uses are planned further east in the more remote areas. Approximately half of the 4,275 dwelling units that were entitled by the City have been constructed.

Single Family Homes within the Canyon Hills Community

Canyon Hills Estates Specific Plan The adopted Canyon Hills Estates Specific Plan encompasses 246.4 acres. The Canyon Hills Estates Specific Plan is located immediately adjacent to the existing southern boundary of the Canyon Hills Specific Plan and is bounded by Hemlock Street to the north, Pine Avenue to the

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LAKE ELSINORE HILLS DISTRICT east, Crooked Arrow Drive and Crab Hollow Circle to the south and west. The Residential component of the Specific Plan has been divided into two subcategories: Single Family Residential-1 (SF-1) and Single Family Residential-2 (SF-2). The SF-1 area will contain a maximum yield of 238 single family detached dwelling units. The SF-2 use will contain a maximum yield of 64 single family dwelling units. The Canyon Hills Estates Specific Plan will also include a 5.4 acre park site, and 149.9 acres of open space. Construction has not yet commenced as of July 2011

Spyglass Ranch Specific Plan The adopted Spyglass Ranch Specific Plan encompasses approximately 260 acres. The project site is located on the east side of Camino Del Norte at its intersection with Main Street. A maximum of 1,035 units were approved consisting of 8 residential estate homes, 515 single-family residential homes, 222 courtyard homes and the option of either constructing 290 multi-family residential units or a commercial shopping center. Remaining acreage will be utilized for a public park and 85.8 acres of open space. Construction has not yet commenced as of July, 2011.

Ramsgate Specific Plan (Rosetta Canyon) The Ramsgate Specific Plan, now known as Rosetta Canyon, encompasses approximately 1,292 acres located in the central and northern areas of the Lake Elsinore Hills District. The specific plan includes residential, MSHCP conservation areas, a school site, and open space areas. Higher density residential uses are constructed and approved for the western area along State Route 74, and the Ridgestone Apartments are already constructed along Ardenwood Drive. Lower density residential uses are constructed and approved for construction in the central and southeastern portions of the specific plan. Approximately one half of the total 2,400 dwelling units entitled have been constructed.

Canyon Creek “Summerhill” Specific Plan Canyon Creek “Summerhill” Specific Plan encompasses approximately 683 acres and is located west of the Canyon Hills Specific Plan west of Railroad Canyon Road, and east of Interstate 15 in the southern portion of the Lake Elsinore Hills District. The specific plan primarily includes residential, open space, recreational, and some commercial uses. Commercial uses are located in the western portions of the specific plan whereas residential, open space and recreational uses are planned further east. The majority of the specific plan is already built; Planning Area 2 along the south side of La Strada remains undeveloped as of July 2011.

Tuscany Hills Specific Plan The Tuscany Hills Specific Plan encompasses approximately 1,010 acres on the northeastern boundary of the Lake Elsinore Hills District. Primary uses include residential and open space with some recreational areas. Most of the southern areas in the specific plan have been built out whereas the northern areas are still undeveloped. As of July 2011, more than half of the total 1,847 dwelling units entitled have been constructed.

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LAKE ELSINORE HILLS DISTRICT Land uses within the Lake Elsinore Hills District but outside of a specific plan area are approximately 8.32% hillside residential, 9.41% low medium residential and 4.33% open space. Table LEH-T1 below summarizes the distribution of land use designations within the Lake Elsinore Hills District. Chapter 2.0 of the General Plan defines each land use designation in terms of the allowable uses and density and intensity standards. Figure LEH-1 illustrates the distribution and location of the land use designations.

Table LEH-T1. Distribution of Land Use—Lake Elsinore Hills District. No. of Acres

Percentage of Total Land Area

9.3

0.12%

207.7

2.78%

8.6

0.12%

General Commercial

75.7

1.01%

Hillside Residential

623.0

8.32%

Low Density Residential

14.4

0.19%

Low-Medium Residential

704.6

9.41%

Medium Density Residential

31.9

0.43%

Neighborhood Commercial

25.6

0.34%

Open Space

323.8

4.33%

Public Institutional

121.2

1.62%

General Plan Land Use Designation* Business Professional Commercial Mixed Use Floodway

Specific Plan

5,340.3

71.3%

Total

7,486.1

100.0%

8.3.3 Goal 1

Overall District Goal and Policy The primary goal of the Lake Elsinore Hills District is to enhance and maintain a network of residential communities that incorporates and protects the natural landscape and MSHCP conservation areas offering a high quality of life.

Policies LEH 1.1 Encourage land uses that are compatible with adjacent Automall Overlay areas at the western edge of the Lake Elsinore Hills District. LEH 1.2 Encourage the clustering of development in order to preserve significant hillsides.

LEH-8


LAKE ELSINORE HILLS DISTRICT Implementation Program Through the project and CEQA review processes, particular attention should be given to those land use applications adjacent to the Automall Overlay areas or that include significant hillsides that may be eligible for preservation. Agency/Department

8.4

Community Development

Urban Design

The Lake Elsinore Hills District is transitioning from a primarily vacant area to a residential community. This transition is largely due to several significant City-approved specific plans. Each of the adopted specific plans incorporates the area’s beautiful topography into the design of their master planned communities. Large areas, including broad plains, rolling hills, steep slopes, sensitive habitats, and/or watercourses, have been incorporated within the various specific plans. Since the various approved specific plans offer their own unique character and amenities, it will be particularly important to provide both vehicle and pedestrian linkages in order to enhance and maintain the quality of life and create a more cohesive residential District. It will also be important to establish architectural guidelines that maintain the distinct character of each community while allowing for a consistent and high quality design. Portions of the Tuscany Hills and Canyon Hills specific plans have already been developed and have provided good examples of high quality design standards that are also reflected in the other specific plans located in the Lake Elsinore Hills District.

8.4.1 Goal 2

Goal and Policies Maximize and maintain view corridors through site planning that are adaptive to topographic conditions as exemplified in the Lake Elsinore Hills District’s City-approved specific plans.

Policies LEH 2.1 Through the project and CEQA processes create strong links between existing uses, approved specific plans, future developments, and the Lake Elsinore Hills District’s open space, MSHCP conservation areas, and recreational areas. LEH 2.2 Encourage and require design standards that maintain the distinct characteristics of each community, while ensuring a consistent and high quality design throughout the Lake Elsinore Hills District. Implementation Program Through the project review and CEQA processes, ensure that specific plans develop consistent with approved design guidelines, and encourage non-specific plan development to emulate the high quality and topographic considerations of neighboring specific plan communities.

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LAKE ELSINORE HILLS DISTRICT Agency/Department

8.5

Community Development Department

Historic Preservation

Most of the Lake Elsinore Hills District is situated between two of the most culturally significant areas within the City and general vicinity. A historic ranching and homesteading site is located to the south of Canyon Lake near Railroad Canyon Road. It will be important to preserve culturally significant areas as the Lake Elsinore Hills District transitions from a rural area to a primarily urbanized area, and to highlight the area’s historical resources as they relate to the City as a whole.

8.5.1 Goal 3

Goal and Policies Preserve and enhance the historical resources within the Lake Elsinore Hills District.

Policies LEH 3.1 Support programs that promote awareness of the historical resources within the Lake Elsinore Hills District. LEH 3.2 Through the project and CEQA processes preserve the Lake Elsinore Hills District’s historic mine location, located near Scenic Crest Drive and Grassy Meadow Drive, as well as the historic ranching and homesteading site located to the southeast near Railroad Canyon Road. LEH 3.3 Through the project and CEQA processes develop a pedestrian/hiking trail which provides access to the ranching and homesteading site and promotes the acknowledgement of its significance in the City’s history.. LEH 3.4 Support the restoration and incorporation of the historic ranching and homesteading site as a visitor’s center that provides historical information about the general vicinity and consider the opportunity to acquire the historic ranching and homestead site for restoration and use as a visitor center or other public facility. Implementation Program During any project or CEQA review, acknowledge the significance of historical sites in the District, and encourage actions that will enhance preservation of use of these sites. Agency/Department

Community Development Department

LEH-10


LAKE ELSINORE HILLS DISTRICT 8.6

Transportation/Circulation

The Lake Elsinore Hills District’s circulation system consists of four (4) major roadways that provide access to less traveled roadways and to the existing residential and commercial developments in the southern, eastern and southeastern areas of the Lake Elsinore Hills District. Most of the remaining areas of the Lake Elsinore Hills District contain open space areas that are not readily accessible but are contained within an adopted specific plan. Interstate-15 generally runs northwest/southeast and borders the Lake Elsinore Hills District to the west. It provides a connection to two (2) of the Lake Elsinore Hills District’s main roadways, State Route 74 and Railroad Canyon Road. State Route 74 runs northeast/southwest borders a portion of the Lake Elsinore Hills District on its northern edge, and provides access to the Rosetta Canyon/Ramsgate Specific Plan area. Railroad Canyon Road runs east/west, is located in the southern portion of the Lake Elsinore Hills District, and provides access to the Canyon Creek, Tuscany Hills, and Canyon Hills Specific Plan areas. Railroad Canyon Road is also a major link between Interstate-15 and Interstate-215 further east of the City. Summerhill Drive is the major roadway that provides access between the Canyon Creek Specific Plan area and the Tuscany Hills Specific Plan area. As the Lake Elsinore Hills District transitions from an undeveloped region into a series of connected master planned communities, significant improvements will be needed to ensure adequate circulation while being sensitive to the area’s topography and MSHCP conservation areas. The Lake Elsinore Hills District’s specific plans include improvements to the following roadways: State Route 74, Summerhill Drive, Greenwald Avenue, Camino Del Norte, Canyon Hills Road, Holland Road, Canyon Hills Road, Lost Road, and Grape Street. New roadways proposed or already improved within the adopted specific plans include: Spyglass Ridge Drive, Camino Del Norte, Rosetta Canyon Drive, Ardenwood Way, Steele New Roadway in Canyon Hills Valley Road, Riverside Street, Elsinore Hills Road, and La Strada Road. The adopted specific plans also include local roads, hiking trails, bike lanes and pedestrian trails. The circulation element in Chapter 2.0 of the General Plan identifies standardized roadways as well as the addition of alternative transportation routes. Table LEH-T2 reflects the circulation element’s Roadway Plan and Bikeway Plan for the Lake Elsinore Hills.

LEH-11


LAKE ELSINORE HILLS DISTRICT Table LEH-T2. Roadway Plan and Bikeway Plan – Lake Elsinore Hills District Roadway Name Diamond Drive State Route 74 Rosetta Canyon Drive (Ramsgate Road) Camino del Norte Camino del Norte

From Interstate 15 Business Park District State Route 74 Business Park District

To Mission Trails North Peak District Elsinore Hills Road Main Street Elsinore Hills Road

Roadway Classification Urban Arterial Augmented Urban Arterial

Bikeway Classification Class II

Secondary Secondary

Main Street Major Elsinore Hills Camino del Norte Road Franklin Street Secondary Canyon Estates Drive Summerhill Drive Franklin Street Secondary Rosetta Canyon Elsinore Hills Road Road Camino Del Norte Secondary La Strata Camino del Norte Summerhill Drive Secondary Grassy Meadow Greenwald Scenic Crest Drive Drive Avenue Collector Railroad Canyon Northern City Augmented Urban Road Interstate 15 Limits Arterial Canyon Hills Holland Road Road Riverside County Major Railroad Canyon Canyon Hills Road Road Holland Road Major Cottonwood Canyon Canyon Hills Road Road Riverside County Collector Canyon Hills Lost Road Riverside County Collector Road Greenwald Via Palermo Avenue Summerhill Drive Collector Meadowbrook Meadowbrook Riverside Drive Sphere District Sphere District Major Canyon Estates Summerhill Drive Drive La Strada Road Major Greenwald Avenue Scenic Crest Drive La Strada Road Secondary Cottonwood Canyon Canyon Hills Railroad Canyon Road Road Road Collector Railroad Canyon Grape Street Road Malaga Road Major

Class II Class III Class III

Class II

Class II Class II Class II

Class II

Class II Class III Class II

Class II

Lost Road is proposed as a Collector to be consistent with the County of Riverside designation. However, the roadway may need to be upgraded to a four-lane roadway due to anticipated future traffic volumes. In the future, Lost Road will be an important link in the area’s

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LAKE ELSINORE HILLS DISTRICT transportation network. As traffic increases on Railroad Canyon Road to its capacity, the traffic load on Lost Road will increase. The City’s concern will be administrating the development of Lost Road. Another issue with Lost Road is that it is built to old secondary street standards in the Canyon Hills Specific Plan area. The City shall develop a strategy to ensure that Lost Road northeast of Grape Street to the existing specific plan street is constructed to a four-lane roadway. The cross-section for Central Avenue will maintain the existing 134 feet right-of-way with a 110 feet roadway, but the number of future lanes shall increase from 6 to 8; the Class II bike lane shall be removed and replaced with a Class II bike lane on Riverside Street/Nichols Road.

8.6.1 Goal 4

Goal and Policies Encourage the development of an adequate multi-modal transportation system including bus routes, bicycle lanes, hiking trails, and pedestrian oriented streets that provides adequate accessibility within the Lake Elsinore Hills District and to neighboring areas and roadways by establishing design standards that ensure a high quality circulation system throughout the Lake Elsinore Hills District that incorporates the existing topography.

Policies LEH 4.1 Through the project review and CEQA processes construct additional east/west roadways providing access from Interstate-15 to the eastern areas of the Lake Elsinore Hills District wherever recommended by traffic studies. LEH 4.2 Consider the development of a strategic plan with the City of Wildomar to ensure that Lost Road northeast of Grape Street to the existing specific plan street is constructed to a four-lane roadway. LEH 4.3 Support completion of Canyon Estates Drive to Camino del Norte at Main Street and for Camino del Norte to continue to Cambern Avenue to finish the connection to State Route 74. LEH 4.4 Through the project and CEQA processes, complete improvements to Rosetta Canyon Road/Elsinore Hills Road from Camino del Norte to State Route 74 in order to provide additional access from one side of the Lake Elsinore Hills District to the other side. LEH 4.5 Through the project and CEQA processes, the City shall continue to pursue funding for improvements to both Central Avenue and Railroad Canyon Road, which will carry substantial future traffic volumes.

LEH-13


LAKE ELSINORE HILLS DISTRICT LEH 4.6 Through the project and CEQA processes continue to plan for the design and construction of the La Strada Road connection from Summerhill Drive to Camino del Norte. Implementation Program The City shall encourage development designs that provide multimodal transportation systems in proposed projects, and that provide accessibility within the District as well as to neighboring areas and roadways. Department/Agency

8.7

Engineering and Community Development Departments

Parks and Recreation

“The Lake Elsinore Hills District encompasses several recreational facilities located within the four (4) existing master planned communities ”

The Lake Elsinore Hills District encompasses a large and varied terrain including broad plains, rolling hills, steep slopes, sensitive habitats, and watercourses. In addition, the Lake Elsinore Hills District encompasses several recreational facilities located within the four (4) existing master planned communities within the north, east, south, and southeast. Tuscany Hills Park is located within the Tuscany Hills Specific Plan area in the eastern portion of the Lake Elsinore Hills District, encompasses five (5) acres, and is located at the intersection of La Strada Road and Summerhill Drive. Amenities at this facility include two (2) baseball fields, a tot lot, picnic facilities, shade structure, and parking area. Summerhill Park is located in the completed Canyon Creek Specific Plan in the southern portion of the Lake Elsinore Hills District at the intersection of Canyon Estates Drive and Summerhill Drive and encompasses five (5) acres. Summerhill Park’s amenities include picnic tables, active turf areas, restrooms, and parking. Creekside Park is located within the Canyon Hills Specific Plan area in the southeastern portion of the Lake Elsinore Hills District. Creekside Park encompasses seven (7) acres, and is located on Canyon Hills Road, west of Railroad Canyon Road. The Rosetta Canyon/Ramsgate Specific Plan, in the northern portion of the Lake Elsinore Hills District, proposes a variety of recreational uses and amenities along and within proximity of Rosetta Canyon Drive including Rosetta Canyon Park. Rosetta Canyon Park houses a fire station, two (2) tennis courts with lighting, two (2) basketball courts with lighting, restrooms, picnic areas, tot lot, dog park, and parking area. Phase 2 of Rosetta Canyon Park will include a four-field baseball/softball complex, and additional tennis courts. Canyon Hills has a future community park totaling twenty two (22) acres that will feature two (2) baseball fields, two (2) soccer fields, outdoor basketball, group picnic pavilions, a water spray park, a restroom and concession structure, two (2) tot lots, and parking. The Tuscany Hills Specific Plan will include a five (5)-acre neighborhood park as part of the North Tuscany Hills development. The park will have two (2) lighted ball fields, a restroom and concession structure, parking, picnic and shade areas, and a tot lot. The adopted specific plans within the Lake Elsinore Hills District have set aside significant areas for parklands and open space areas as depicted in Table LEH-T3. As remaining areas

LEH-14


LAKE ELSINORE HILLS DISTRICT outside of the existing master planned communities and adopted specific plans are developed, it will be important to set aside additional areas for parkland and open space areas similar in scope to the existing specific plans.

Table LEH-T3. Specific Plans – Open Space/Parklands – Lake Elsinore Hills District Adopted Specific Plans

Total Acreage

Total Open Percentage of Open Open Space Parklands Space/Parklands Space/Parkland in Acres Acres Acres Specific Plan

Canyon Hills

1,969.0

951.0

45.0

996.0

50.6%

Rosetta Canyon

1,292.0

702.0

50.0

752.0

58.2%

Tuscany

1,342.0

129.0

8.0

137.0

10.2%

Canyon Creek

478.0

235.0

17.5

252.5

52.8%

Canyon Hills

246.4

149.9

5.4

155.3

63%

Spyglass Ranch

259.6

85.8

6.5

92.3

5,587.0

2,252.7

Totals

8.7.1 Goal 5

132.5

2,384.6

35.6% n/a

Goal and Policies Enhance the natural character of the broad plains, rolling hills, steep slopes, sensitive habitats, and watercourses.

Policies LEH 5.1 Encourage the provision of pedestrian routes that connect existing and future developments with open space and recreation uses. LEH 5.2 Support an extensive system of open space and MSHCP conservation areas throughout the Lake Elsinore Hills District to ensure a healthy balance between development and conservation of the area’s natural environment. LEH 5.3 Preserve a balanced amount of the Lake Elsinore Hills District’s natural landscape of valleys, peaks, rolling hills, watercourses, and sensitive habitats as existing specific plans and additional projects are developed. Implementation Program Through the project and CEQA processes, encourage development designs that enhance the natural topography of the District and provide accessibility to recreational and open space areas. Agency/Department

Parks & Recreation, Community Development Departments

LEH-15


LAKE ELSINORE HILLS DISTRICT

This Page Left Intentionally Blank

LEH-16


LAKE VIEW DISTRICT

9.0

Lake View District Plan

9.1

Introduction

The Lake View District is situated at the northwestern edge of the City. The Cleveland National Forest and the Alberhill District border the Lake View District to the west and north, the Country Club Height’s District borders the Lake View District to the east, and the Lake Edge District and the Lake View Sphere District align the Lake View District’s boundary to the south as shown on Figure LV-1.

“The main focus of the Lake View District is to integrate new and existing residential communities and supporting uses while maintaining a high quality of life.”

The northwestern areas of the Lake View District offer beautiful views of the lake and the neighboring mountains and are characterized by high elevations, steep slopes, and a series of canyons. The remaining areas of the Lake View District are relatively flat in the lower elevations which do not include significant topographic features. Historically, the northern portion of the Lake View District has remained mostly undeveloped with the exception of the La Laguna Estates Specific Plan. Similar to the areas further north, the Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railroad and abundant mining opportunities extant in the late 19th century, brought both residents and visitors to the area. Historic ranching and homesteading, including Torn Ranch, were generally located to the northwest of Machado Street, which was an important roadway lined with beautiful Deodar trees. Most of the lower lying areas of the Lake View District to the north have been recently developed and primarily include single-family homes. The main focus of the Lake View District is to integrate new and existing residential communities and supporting uses while maintaining a high quality of life, and to revitalize the area along Riverside Drive as additional growth occurs. The northwestern areas of the Lake View District are within the boundary of the City-adopted La Laguna Estates Specific Plan, which establishes the standards and development criteria for areas within its boundaries. Four other smaller specific plans are within the Lake View District as well. The goals and policies contained within the Lake View District Plan View of Lake View District reflect the general intentions of the adopted specific plans. Should a discrepancy or conflict exist between the Lake View District Plan and an approved specific plan, the adopted specific plan shall prevail.

LV-1


LAKE VIEW DISTRICT

The Lake View District’s main roadway to the south, Riverside Drive, is a segment of State Highway 74 and serves as the City’s major east/west connection between Interstate 5 and Interstate 15. State Highway 74, also known as Ortega Highway, was opened in 1932 thereby establishing the significant east/west route. Riverside Drive currently is one of the few mixed residential and commercial corridors in the City.

9.2

Description

The Lake View District encompasses approximately 2,935 acres and primarily consists of single-family homes and vacant lands with a limited amount of recreational, commercial, and industrial activities. Vacant lands are mostly located in the northwestern areas within the adopted specific plan boundary, with additional vacant lands in the northeast, southeast, and southwest corners of the Lake View District. Most other areas of the Lake View District have been developed with single-family homes as the McVicker Skate Park dominant use. Many of the existing supporting commercial, recreational, and institutional uses are accessible from one of the Lake View District’s five (5) primary roadways: Riverside Drive, Grand Avenue, Lakeshore Drive, Lincoln Street, and Machado Street. Grocery stores and other retail uses surround or are within close proximity to the intersection of Riverside Drive and Lakeshore Drive which will be known as “Riverside Gateway” (formerly known as “Four Corners”). Uses further southwest and southeast of “Riverside Gateway” include single-family homes. Neighboring uses primarily include: vacant lands, extractive activities, the Cleveland National Forest, residential communities, commercial/retail services, and recreation. The Cleveland National Forest is located directly west of the Lake View District. The Alberhill District to the north generally includes vacant lands and extractive activities. The Country Club Heights District to the east and the Lake View Sphere to the southwest are primarily residential communities. The area southeast of the Lake View District is bordered by the Lake Edge District, which consists of recreational uses.

LV-2


RC E

Specific Plan

Sources: City of Lake Elsinore, County of Riverside

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City of Lake Elsinore Lake View District Land Use Plan Figure LV-1


LAKE VIEW DISTRICT

BACKSIDE OF FIGURE

LV-4


LAKE VIEW DISTRICT

9.3

Land Use

9.3.1

Unique Attributes

The Riverside Drive corridor currently is one of the few mixed residential and commercial corridors in the City

Although the Lake View District offers beautiful views and a variety of housing opportunities, its most unique attribute is its variety of recreational uses and the commercial services and mixed use corridor along Riverside Drive. The Lake View District contains the City’s only skate park known as McVicker Skate Park located within the popular McVicker Canyon Park. In addition, the Lake View District is home to two (2) of four (4) joint-use facilities between the City and the Lake Elsinore Unified School District. The Lake View District also includes other recreational amenities, such as neighborhood parks and passive parks, similar to other facilities throughout the City. A series of canyons and the Cleveland National Forest to the northwest offer opportunities for pedestrian/hiking trails as well. The commercial uses along Riverside Drive are often more accessible for residents living north, northwest, and west of the lake than other significant commercial areas located further east and southeast along Interstate 15 and in the City’s historic downtown. As a result, this portion of the Lake View District serves as a convenient commercial node for residents in this part of the City. As growth continues to increase in and around the Lake View District, the significance of the commercial services will remain important. Increasing demand will provide greater stimulus to revitalize the area. In addition, the Lake View District has the potential to develop in concert with the Lake Edge District to the southeast. The Lake Edge District provides access to recreational areas along the lake.

9.3.2

Planned Land Use

Lower density uses are located in the central, northern, and northwestern areas of the Lake View District. Higher density residential uses, including a limited amount of commercial uses, are located along the mixed-use corridor in the southeastern portion. The variety and intensity of land use designations are greater in the southeastern areas with less intensity and variety of uses further north and northwest. Most of the Lake View District has been developed but vacant lands still exist. The northwestern area falls within adopted specific plans, which include a healthy balance of residential, recreational, and open space uses. The northeastern areas will be located next to residential communities within the Alberhill District. Many of the vacant lands in the central areas are within close proximity to aging residential structures, vacant lots, a new high school, and the busy retail/commercial intersection of Riverside Drive and Lakeshore Drive (Riverside Gateway). These areas provide a mix of exciting rehabilitation, redevelopment, and/or development opportunities that will further stimulate this emerging neighborhood commercial District.

LV-5


LAKE VIEW DISTRICT

The primary land use designations are low-medium and hillside residential with approximately forty percent (40%) and fourteen percent (14%) respectively of the total number of acres. Table LV-T1 below summarizes the distribution of land use designations within the Lake View District. Chapter 2.0, Section 2.3 of the General Plan defines each land use designation. LV-1 illustrates the distribution and location of the land use designations.

Table LV-T1. Distribution of Land Uses—Lake View District General Plan Land Use Designation

No. of Acres

Floodway

Percentage of Total Land Area

15.6

0.53%

107.0

3.65%

22.6

0.77%

Hillside Residential

427.9

14.58%

Low Density Residential

101.9

3.47%

1,184.2

40.35%

167.0

5.69%

0.5

0.02%

Open Space

117.2

3.99%

Public Institutional

128.2

4.37%

Recreational

31.6

1.08%

Residential Mixed Use

32.8

1.12%

General Commercial High Density Residential

Low-Medium Residential Medium Density Residential Neighborhood Commercial

Specific Plan Total

9.3.3 Goal 1

598.7 2,934.8

20.4 100.00%

Overall District Goal and Policies The primary goal of the Lake View District is to provide a revitalized and healthy mixed-use corridor along Riverside Drive with connections to the lake; to ensure adequate public facilities and services to meet the needs of existing and new development and City-adopted specific plans; and to establish policies that create strong links between existing and future

LV-6


LAKE VIEW DISTRICT

residential communities and supporting commercial, entertainment, or recreational uses. Policies LV 1.1

Through the project and CEQA processes strengthen the vitality of the commercial corridor along Riverside Drive and the intersection of Lakeshore Drive and Riverside Drive (“Riverside Gateway”).

LV 1.2

Encourage the redevelopment or rehabilitation of substandard housing.

LV 1.3

Encourage the City’s Redevelopment Agency to utilize it’s funding to help leverage the development of affordable housing projects in areas designated for residential uses northeast of Lakeside High School.

Implementation Program The City shall encourage development that contributes toward a mixed use corridor, access to the Lake, and strong links to existing residential communities. Agency/Department

9.4

Community Development Department

Urban Design

The Lake View District is comprised of both areas that have been largely developed with planned residential communities to the north and higher density and mixed uses to the southeast. As development increases throughout the Lake View District, it will be important to strengthen the linkages within the Lake View District to nearby areas, particularly the southeast. As such, compatible architectural design standards should be encouraged for areas in proximity to approved specific plans in the Lake View District. Designations and design guidelines should also allow for higher density mixed uses along the Riverside Drive corridor in order to enhance and/or create identifiable neighborhoods. The greatest variety of residential and commercial opportunities exists within the southeastern areas of the Lake View District particularly along Riverside Drive. As the mixed-use corridor along Riverside Drive transitions into a neighborhood commercial district, additional opportunities will increase and provide a catalyst for redevelopment and development of the entire area. It will be important to maintain and enhance pedestrian paths to these areas and recreational camping areas just south of Riverside Drive. As the northwestern and northeastern portions of the Lake View District are developed, it will be important to integrate these more remote areas to the central and southeastern areas of the Lake View District. As such, the Lake View District will result in a transition from a higher density and mixed-use area in the southeast to the lower density uses in the central, northern and western areas with strong pedestrian oriented ties throughout.

LV-7


LAKE VIEW DISTRICT

9.4.1 Goal 2

Goal and Policies Promote a residential district to the north that includes a greater variety of residential densities and supporting uses and stronger ties within the Lake View District to nearby areas, and promote a neighborhood commercial district to the southeast with high quality design and compatibility with adjacent commercial, institutional, and residential uses.

Policies LV 2.1

Encourage public facilities and spaces in locations that do not contain steep slopes but do contain views of the lake and surrounding mountains.

LV 2.2

Through the project and CEQA processes ensure compatibility of uses within the mixed use areas of the Lake View District along Riverside Drive and Lakeshore Drive.

LV 2.3

Through the project and CEQA processes identify and enhance the primary gateways of the community.

LV 2.4

Through the project and CEQA processes enhance and establish greater pedestrian linkages throughout the Lake View District and neighboring uses, particularly south of Riverside Drive to the Lake Edge Parkway.

LV 2.5

Consider the development of a set of design criteria to help provide for consistent and high quality development or redevelopment of residential and commercial uses along Riverside Drive and Lake Shore Drive that incorporate the natural setting and surrounding uses.

LV 2.6

Through the project and CEQA processes protect and enhance view corridors of the lake and neighboring mountains from the higher elevations as well as from lower lying elevations elsewhere in the Lake View District.

Implementation Program The City shall encourage development that provides strong ties within the Lake View District to nearby areas, promotes pedestrian linkages throughout the District., and provides high quality design and utilizes the natural setting and blends with surrounding uses Agency/Department

Community Development and Engineering Departments

LV-8


LAKE VIEW DISTRICT

9.5

Historic Preservation

The northwest region of the lake within close proximity to the Lake View District’s southwestern edge was the first area to be inhabited since the Native American Indians. In 1858, Augustin Machado built a 7-room adobe home, known as the Machado Adobe House that immediately became a local landmark. The Machado Adobe House is the City’s oldest standing structure and was the first stop for postal service in the area, and known as the Butterfield Stage Stop. The Machado Adobe House is also located close to the site where Wilson Heald, father of Franklin Heald who founded the town of Elsinore, built a two-story home in 1884. In the latter part of the 19th century, the Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railroad was completed and transected the Alberhill District to the north just as the mining industry was emerging. Particularly as a result of the railroad and mining opportunities, immigration increased in the area. An historic ranching and homesteading site within the Lake View District, known as Torn Ranch, is located to the north of Machado Street. Torn Ranch remains largely intact and is a good example of the historic ranching and homesteading that existed in the area. The main residence of Torn Ranch was built in 1924 with the warehouses constructed later in 1938. In addition, beautiful Deodar trees are located along Machado Street just south of Torn Ranch.

9.5.1 Goal 3

Goal and Policies Preserve and promote the Lake View District’s historical sites.

Policies LV 3.1 Through the project and CEQA processes preserve Machado Street’s historical Deodar trees where possible. LV 3.2

Consider restoration and integration of Torn Ranch as a community center with educational information regarding the area’s cultural heritage and historical sites.

Implementation Program The City shall encourage development that preserves historical trees and/or restores historical sites. Agency/Department

9.6

Community Development Department

Transportation/Circulation

The Lake View District’s circulation system consists of five major roadways including Riverside Drive, Lakeshore Drive, Grand Avenue, Lincoln Street, and Machado Street along with a series of residential roadways serving existing communities. The five(5) main roadways provide accessibility to the majority of the Lake View District’s uses, less traveled roadways, and nearby districts.

LV-9


LAKE VIEW DISTRICT

Riverside Drive, a portion of State Highway 74, is the City’s major east/west connection and runs parallel along the lake’s northwesterly boundary. State Highway 74 provides access between Orange County and Interstate 5 to the west and Interstate 15 and Interstate 215 to the east. State Highway 74 exists as a state-owned and maintained roadway of which Riverside Drive is a segment. Should the City assume ownership of this roadway, it could gain more control over the streetscape, traffic flow, and other possible improvements thereby enhancing its character throughout the Lake View District and the Country Club District to the northeast. Lakeshore Drive originates in the central area of the Lake View District at the intersection with Grand Avenue and is the main roadway that connects to the District’s retail/commercial node known as “Riverside Gateway”, the lake, and the Historic District to the southeast. Grand Avenue transects the Lake View District in a north/south direction and provides access to Lake Street and Interstate 15 to the north and the Lake View Sphere District to the southwest. Further south, Grand Avenue also serves as the main roadway along the southwestern side of the lake and provides access to Ortega Highway, linking coastal communities to the Inland Empire. Lincoln Street passes through almost the entire length of the Lake View District in a northwest/southeast direction and provides connections between the areas within an adopted specific plan to the northwest and to the recreational areas located within the Lake Edge District just north of the lake. Machado Street runs parallel to the City’s major east/west corridor north of the lake, Riverside Drive, and intersects with Grand Avenue and Lakeshore Drive. The circulation element identifies standardized roadways as well as the addition of alternative transportation routes such as bikeways. The circulation element’s Truck Route Map follows portions of Lake Street and Lakeshore Drive. Table LV-T2 reflects the circulation element’s Roadway Plan and Bikeway Plan for the Lake View District.

LV-10


LAKE VIEW DISTRICT

Table LV-T2. Roadway Plan and Bikeway Plan—Lake View District Roadway Name

From

To

Roadway Classification

Machado Street

Lakeshore Drive

Lincoln Street

Major

Machado Street

Lincoln Street

Grand Avenue

Secondary

Lincoln Street

Machado Street

Grand Avenue

Major

Class II

Lincoln Street

Grand Avenue

Alberhill District

Secondary

Multi-Purpose (portion)

Lincoln Street

Machado Street

Riverside Drive

Collector

Class II

Urban Arterial

Class II

Urban Arterial

Class II

Major

Class II

Urban Arterial

Class II

Collector

Multi-Purpose (along and within proximity to Grand Avenue)

Lake Street Lakeshore Drive Grand Avenue Riverside Drive

Joy Street Terra Cotta Road Grand Avenue

Lakeshore Drive Alberhill District Lake Street

Riverside Drive

Lake View Sphere District Lakeshore Drive Country Club Heights District

Machado Street

Lakeland Village Sphere

Riverside Drive

Lakeshore Drive Alberhill District Riverside Drive

Machado Street

Bikeway Classification

Secondary Collector

Class II

The circulation element shows Lincoln Street from Machado Street to Riverside Drive as a twolane collector. The prior circulation plan showed this roadway segment as a four-lane arterial. The new designation recognizes the fact that most of the Lincoln Street frontage is built and that the roadway is that of a collector. Additionally, the traffic model indicates traffic volumes that justify a collector designation.

LV-11


LAKE VIEW DISTRICT

9.6.1 Goal 4

Goals and Policies Support the enhancement of Lincoln Street as the main linkage between the northwestern areas of the Lake View District and recreational facilities located southeast of Riverside Drive; enhance Riverside Drive as a mixed use corridor connecting the western and eastern areas of the city; ensure a high quality design of the circulation system that adds to the character of the Lake View District; and enhance Grand Avenue as another main linkage, connecting to I-15 via Lake Street.

Policies LV 4.1

Designate Lincoln Street as the main access route connecting the Lake View District’s northwestern areas to the recreational facilities on the north side of the lake.

LV 4.2

Designate Grand Avenue as the main access route connecting the Lake View District to the I-15 corridor via Lake Street and State Route 74.

LV 4.3

Designate Riverside Drive/State Route 74 as the main access route through the Lake View District connecting the western areas to the eastern and southeastern areas of the City.

LV 4.4

Encourage the incorporation of traffic-calming measures such as additional trees and medians within Machado Street and Lincoln Street, to reduce traffic speeds in areas within close proximity to public/institutional facilities and low-density residential areas along this roadway, and within Riverside Drive, to enhance the visual character and walkability of the corridor.

LV 4.5

Continue coordination of improvements and/or maintenance efforts for Machado Street with the Riverside County Transportation and Land Management Agency.

Implementation Program The City shall ensure a high quality design of the circulation system within the Lake View District that contributes character and linkages. Agency/Department

Engineering and Community Development Departments

LV-12


LAKE VIEW DISTRICT

Goal 5

Support a revitalized Riverside Drive and Lakeshore Drive that are consistent with the mixed use corridor’s urban design character.

Policies LV 5.1

Encourage a safe and comprehensive roadway network for vehicular, bicycle, and pedestrian traffic within the Lake View District.

LV 5.2

Through the project and CEQA processes improve traffic circulation and landscaping along Riverside Drive and Lakeshore Drive for both vehicular and pedestrian traffic.

LV 5.3

Encourage the installation and provision of pedestrian connections to areas south and southeast of Riverside Drive and north and northwest of the lake.

LV 5.4

Consider ownership of portions of State Highway 74 from the State of California.

Implementation Program The City shall encourage development that revitalizes and enhances the mixed use corridors, provides a comprehensive roadway network and strong linkages for pedestrians. Agency/Department

9.7

Engineering and Community Development Departments

Parks and Recreation

The Lake View District contains a variety of recreational amenities and open space areas. Four (4) recreational facilities including Machado Park, Summerlake Park, Oak Tree Park, and McVicker Canyon Park exist within the Lake View District. Additional facilities are in the planning stages. Machado Park and Summerlake Park are both joint-use recreational facilities between the Lake Elsinore School District and the City. Machado Park encompasses five (5) acres in the central area of the Lake View District and contains tennis courts, play equipment, open turf area, shaded shelters, barbeques, and picnic facilities. Summerlake Park encompasses fifteen (15) acres in the northern area of the Lake View District and contains soccer fields, basketball courts, a tot lot, barbeques, picnic facilities, Recreational Areas in the Lake View District restrooms, and parking.

LV-13


LAKE VIEW DISTRICT

McVicker Canyon Park and Oak Tree Park are located close to the City-adopted specific plan area to the northwest and are linked to one another by a community trail that passes along a future master planned community. Oak Tree Park includes turf areas, picnic tables, and an equestrian trail on 3.2 acres. McVicker Canyon Park encompasses twenty-six (26) acres and includes a skate park, baseball fields, a turf area, restrooms, and parking. Additional recreational facilities have been provided adjacent to the Terra Cotta Street/Lincoln Street intersection. In addition, the Lake Elsinore Campground/ Recreational Area and boat launching facility are both adjacent to the lake’s northern boundary to the southeast.

9.7.1 Goal 6

Goal and Policies Support a wide variety of open space and recreational opportunities that are linked together within the Lake View District through pedestrian paths that connect neighborhoods to open space and recreational facilities, and promote a mixeduse corridor along Riverside Drive with private, public and joint-use recreational facilities.

Policies LV 6.1

Through the project and CEQA processes construct a series of pedestrian/bicycle routes connecting all recreational facilities as development occurs.

LV 6.2

Encourage the construction of hiking and equestrian trails in the northwestern areas of the Lake View District within the open space corridors and between the Lake View District and the Cleveland National Forest.

LV 6.3

Support joint-use recreational programs.

LV 6.4

Encourage streetscapes within future residential and commercial development and redevelopment along Riverside Drive and Lakeshore Drive that provide a more pedestrian friendly environment.

Implementation Program The City shall encourage development that contributes a wide variety of open space uses and recreational amenities that are linked within the Lake View District through pedestrian paths that connect neighborhoods to open space. Agency/Department Departments

Parks & Recreation, Engineering and Community Development

LV-14


NORTH PEAK DISTRICT

10.0 North Peak District 10.1

Introduction

The North Peak District is located in the northernmost portion of the City. The North Central Sphere District and the Lake Elsinore Hills District form most of the North Peak District’s western and southern borders. Riverside County is located to the northwest, north, and east of the North Peak District.

“The North Peak District contains several historical mines and ranching sites, but most of the area remains pristine with limited opportunities to build and develop.”

The North Peak District is located at the foothills of the San Jacinto Mountains and reflects three basic topographical conditions. The southern areas adjacent to State Highway 74 consist of gently rolling hills and small valleys. The central areas contain an enclosed valley. The northern areas primarily contain relatively flatter topography surrounded by rolling hillsides. Several historic mining locations and historic ranching and homesteading sites lie within the North Peak District, but most of the area remains pristine. The landscape and character of the area may soon change as a result of proposed development. The future master planned communities within the North Peak Specific Plan encompass a large share of the North Peak District’s acreage in the central and northern areas. The North Peak Specific Plan was originally adopted by the City in 1992. An amendment was subsequently submitted and adopted in 1999. City-adopted specific plans establish the standards and development criteria for all areas within their boundaries. The goals and policies contained within this North Peak District Plan reflect the general intentions of the amended specific plan. The main focus of the North Peak District will be to provide a healthy balance between the proposed master planned community and the surrounding topography.

10.2

Description

The North Peak District encompasses approximately 2,295 acres. The overwhelming majority of the North Peak District’s acreage is comprised of rolling hills, steep slopes, and open space areas. Nearly half of the acreage is designated as open space in the MSHCP, which would ultimately limit the built-out environment. Only a few isolated single-family residential uses are located to the north and south. State Highway 74 forms a portion of the North Peak District’s southern border and is the area’s most significant roadway. El Toro Road, which runs in a north-south direction along the western border of the North Peak District, is the primary connection to Interstate-15 via Nichols Road to the southwest. Uses within the adjacent North Central Sphere District to the west and Lake Elsinore Hills District to the south include low-density residential uses with a limited amount of supporting

NP-1


NORTH PEAK DISTRICT uses which are primarily located along State Highway 74. Uses to the north within Riverside County are similar to those of neighboring districts.

10.3

Land Use

10.3.1

Unique Attributes

The North Peak District contains a very limited built environment and a varied terrain. The area provides several opportunities for new housing while conserving areas that are environmentally sensitive. 970 acres within the North Peak Specific Plan have either been dedicated to the Riverside Conservation Authority for open space conservation or left as natural open space in its land use plan.

10.3.2

Planned Land Use

Most of the North Peak District contains a series of steep slopes, valleys, hillsides, and open space areas with very limited development opportunities. As such, residential and recreational land uses have been designated to reflect the amended specific plan while maintaining a healthy balance with the area’s sensitive habitats and varied terrain. Recreational and residential uses have been designated in the lower lying and flatter portions of the North Peak District located in the central and northern areas. A limited amount of commercial uses are located along State Highway 74 to the south. Almost half of the North Peak District, approximately forty-nine (49) percent (49%) of the total acreage, is open space. This percentage includes the 970 acres within the North Peak Specific Plan. Most of the remaining acreage is roughly distributed between residential and recreational uses. Table NP-T1 below summarizes the distribution of land-use designations within the North Peak District. Chapter 2.0, Section 2.3 of the General Plan defines each land-use designation in terms of allowable uses and density and intensity standards. Figure NP-1 illustrates the distribution and location of the land use designations.

Table NP-T1. Distribution of Land Uses—North Peak District General Plan Land Use Designation

No. of Acres

Percentage of Total Land Area

General Commercial

24.8

1.08%

Hillside Residential

336.1

14.65%

Open Space

147.7

6.44%

Specific Plan

1,786..0

Total

2,294.6

NP-2

78% 100.00%


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SA ND

Land Use

CH ER S

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General Commercial

CO AL

NICHOLS

Sources: City of Lake Elsinore, County of Riverside

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Specific Plan

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City of Lake Elsinore North Peak District Land Use Plan Figure NP-1


NORTH PEAK DISTRICT

BACKSIDE OF FIGURE

NP-4


NORTH PEAK DISTRICT 10.3.3 Goal 1

Overall District Goal and Policies The primary goal of the North Peak District is to support a master planned community, strengthen community identity, and preserve hillsides; ensure quality of development by establishing and maintaining an orderly land use pattern that maintains a healthy balance with the area’s natural features; and protect and preserve sensitive natural habitat and prominent natural features using the MSHCP and open space conservation tools.

Policies NP 1.1

Through the project and CEQA processes protect and preserve sensitive natural habitat and prominent natural features using the MSHCP and open space conservation tools.

NP 1.2

Through the project and CEQA processes establish a mix of housing types, community services, and recreational facilities.

NP 1.3

Protect natural slopes in highly visible areas.

NP 1.4

Through the project and CEQA processes cluster residential development around recreational facilities and District open space areas.

Implementation Program The City shall support the development of the North Peak Specific Plan, which provides guidelines and a framework for an orderly land use pattern that preserves natural features and habitats of the District. Through the project and CEQA processes, the City shall encourage community identity and quality development. Agency/Department

10.4

Community Development Department

Urban Design

The future design of the North Peak District will be heavily influenced by the amended specific plan, which includes a mixture of residential uses, supporting recreational amenities, open space areas, and a golf course. It will be important to protect view corridors of the area’s canyons and hillsides while establishing ties between residential uses and recreational facilities, open space areas, Woods Valley

NP-5


NORTH PEAK DISTRICT and conserved lands. Land use designations and locations have been established in the approved North Peak Specific Plan.

10.4.1 Goal 2

Goal and Policies Support the amended specific plan and ensure that it is harmonious with the surrounding environment through sensitivity to site characteristics, existing landforms, topography, vegetation, and MSHCP conservation areas.

Policies NP 2.1

Through the project and CEQA processes encourage adequate buffers between the golf course, residential uses, recreational facilities, open space areas, and conserved lands.

NP 2.2

Protect the natural topography.

NP 2.3

Through the project and CEQA processes require drainage plans to utilize natural features, washes, and ravines where possible. These areas should be integrated into the recreation and open space systems where possible.

NP 2.4

Use native vegetation and approved plant palate where possible throughout the amended specific plan.

NP 2.5

Preserve the natural terrain and include indigenous plants in the landscape design of the golf course development.

Implementation Program The City shall support the development of the North Peak Specific Plan, which provides guidelines and a framework for an orderly land use pattern that preserves natural features and habitats of the District. Through the project and CEQA processes, the City shall encourage community identity and quality development. Agency/Department

10.5

Community Development Department

Transportation/Circulation “Existing

circulation is limited Existing circulation is limited and most of the area is currently not and most of the area accessible. Surrounding roadways providing access to the North Peak is currently not District include State Highway 74 and El Toro Road. State Highway 74, accessible.” the City’s main east/west route, generally runs northeast to southwest along a small portion of the southern border. El Toro Road, which runs in a north-south direction along the western border of the North Peak District, is the primary access to and from the North Peak District. It is currently a narrow, unpaved County of

NP-6


NORTH PEAK DISTRICT Riverside roadway. El Toro Road is referred to as Nichols Road when it reaches the City’s limits to the southwest. Access to and from the North Peak District will need to be improved significantly to sustain development pursuant to the amended specific plan. The circulation element identifies standardized roadways as well as the addition of alternative transportation routes such as bikeways and pedestrian trails. The bikeways and pedestrian trails are intended to provide access between the residential neighborhood and the surrounding recreational activities and to connect to neighboring districts.

10.5.1 Goal 3

Goal and Policy Develop a circulation system with adequate access to all areas within the amended specific plan that minimizes adverse impacts to sensitive land uses and environmental areas.

Policy NP 3.1

Through the project and CEQA processes require Nichols Road/El Toro Road as the primary access route to serve the northern area of the North Peak District.

Implementation Program The City shall support the development of the North Peak Specific Plan and its circulation system that provides access throughout the Plan while minimizing adverse impacts to open space areas. Agency/Department

10.6

Engineering Department

Historic Preservation

The largest concentrations of historic mine locations within the City and Sphere of Influence are located within the North Peak, Meadowbrook, and Lake Elsinore Hills Districts. Four (4) historic mine locations are situated in the North Peak District’s central and south central areas. In addition, the North Peak District also includes three historic ranching and homesteading sites within its central and northern regions. Two historic mine locations have been identified in the northern and northeastern areas within the Meadowbrook District to the east. Principal among these is the Good Hope Mine, which was established in the late 19th century. The Good Hope Mine produced one third of the total value of gold extracted in Southern California, and helped spur a wave of immigration to the area during the late 19th century. The Lake Elsinore Hills District to the south contains one (1) historic mine location situated in close proximity to its northern boundary.

NP-7


NORTH PEAK DISTRICT 10.6.1 Goal 4

Goal and Policies Encourage the preservation and promotion of the historic mine locations, historic ranching and homesteading sites within the North Peak District.

Policies NP 4.1

Support programs that promote educational awareness of the historic mining and ranching activities, and homesteading sites, and the location of a tourist information center in the area.

NP 4.2

Through the project and CEQA processes observe an open space/parking buffer for new development in the vicinity of the historic mine locations.

Implementation Program The City shall support efforts to recognize the significance of historic sites in the District, and shall encourage project designs that buffer new development near historic sites. Agency/Department

10.7

Community Development Department

Parks and Recreation

The overwhelming majority of the North Peak District is comprised of rolling hills, steep slopes, open space areas, and no existing recreational facilities exist. However, the North Peak Community Park is a planned recreational area located in the central portions of the North Peak District and would contain 18 acres of future parkland. Two (2) three-acre parks and two (2) six-acre parks are identified for future development as well. In addition, the amended specific plan calls for development of a golf course. A future community center, Rosetta Canyon Community Center within a park facility partially completed, Rosetta Canyon Community Park, are within close proximity to the southern border of the North Peak District. If funding becomes available, the Rosetta Canyon Community Center would contain a recreational center. The Rosetta Canyon Community Park contains a fire station, two tennis courts with lighting, two basketball courts with lighting, restrooms, picnic areas, tot lot, dog park, and parking area. Phase 2 of Rosetta Canyon Park will include a four-field baseball/softball complex, and additional tennis courts, along with the community center

NP-8


NORTH PEAK DISTRICT 10.7.1 Goal 5

Goal and Policy Provide a strong visual and recreational element within the amended specific plan.

Policies NP 5.1

Through the project and CEQA processes provide both active and passive recreation opportunities for residents and visitors to North Peak that are compatible with its topography and natural amenities.

NP 5.2

Through the project and CEQA processes maintain the urban wildland interface for the developed areas and the dedicated MSHCP conservation areas.

Implementation Program The City shall support development design that provides a strong visual focus, recreational opportunities for District residents and visitors, and effective urban interface with conservation areas. Agency/Department

Parks & Recreation and Community Development Departments

NP-9


NORTH PEAK DISTRICT

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NP-10


RIVERVIEW DISTRICT

11.0 Riverview District 11.1

Introduction

The Riverview District is located within the south-central area of the City, generally bordered to the northwest and north by the Historic District, to the northeast by Interstate 15 (I-15) and the Lake Elsinore Hills District, to the east and south by the Ballpark and East Lake districts, respectively. The location of the Riverview District is shown on Figure RV-1.

“Riverview District’s central location and rich variety of natural resources provide the framework for revitalization and the future growth of the area.”

The Riverview District is a combination of steep terrain and flat areas nestled between a knoll with steep slopes, a major watercourse, and the lake. Higher elevations and steep slopes are located in the northwest areas of the Riverview District which function as a physical border with most of the adjacent Historic District. The San Jacinto River (floodway), located within the Riverview District along the eastern and southern areas, is the City’s major watercourse. The river flows southwest from Canyon Lake through the Lake Elsinore Hills District, the Riverview District, and ultimately empties into the lake. No registered or locally recognized historic structures exist within the Riverview District. The existing built environment was developed relatively recently. The largest concentration of historic sites within the City is located within close proximity to the Riverview District in the adjacent Historic District to the northwest. The main focus of the Riverview District Plan is to create a mixed-use and vibrant neighborhood with a variety of supporting uses and tourist commercial opportunities while supporting auto mall activities in its eastern areas. The Riverview District’s central location and rich variety of natural resources provide the framework for revitalization and the future growth of the area.

11.2

Description

The Riverview District encompasses approximately 432 acres and primarily consists of residential uses, along with commercial, and supporting institutional facilities. The built environment is primarily allocated in the eastern, southern, and central areas. The City’s auto mall center and a multi-family residential development are located in the eastern areas along I15. The southern areas include residential and commercial uses along Lakeshore Drive, a roadway that passes through the Riverview District in an east-west direction. Lakeshore Drive provides a connection to Railroad Canyon Road/Diamond Drive to the southeast which accesses I-15. Lakeshore Drive also provides access to the Historic District to the northwest. A senior center and a recreational facility are located to the west close to the lake and south of Lakeshore Drive. The central areas include a mix of old and newer housing and the Railroad Canyon Elementary School within proximity to three local roadways, Mills Street, Park Way and Avenue 7.

RV-1


RIVERVIEW DISTRICT The Riverview District is surrounded by a variety of land uses and is bordered by four districts. The Historic District to the northwest includes a variety of residential, commercial, recreational, and institutional uses. The emerging residential districts of East Lake and Lake Elsinore Hills to the south and east are governed by adopted specific plans that collectively incorporate thousands of new housing units and supporting uses. In addition, the Ballpark District to the southeast includes Diamond Stadium, with a motocross facility, an airstrip, hang gliding, skydiving and glider activities further south.

11.3

Land Use

11.3.1

Unique Attributes

One of the Riverview District’s most defining characteristics is the auto mall located at the eastern edge. The auto mall provides a significant source of tax revenues for the City. The Riverview District’s proximity to the river and the lake will play an important role in the area’s future. The areas along the river and the lake have waterfront property that will provide a unique urban design and additional recreational opportunities.

11.3.2

San Jacinto River Releasing into Lake Elsinore

Planned Land Use

The northwestern hills have been designated as hillside residential and will offer beautiful views of the lake. The mixed-use and variety of residential designations in the central area will help support and compliment the commercial areas within the District as well as the entertainment activities anticipated in the neighboring Ballpark District across the river to the southeast. The easternmost areas of the District have been designated as general commercial with the intent to support the existing auto mall uses. It is important to mitigate any land use incompatibility issues such as lighting and hours of operation between auto mall activities in the general commercial areas in the eastern portions of the Riverview District with the surrounding residential uses. For example, downward facing and shielded lights can reduce glare at nighttime.

RV-2


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City of Lake Elsinore Riverview District Land Use Plan Figure RV-1


RIVERVIEW DISTRICT

BACKSIDE OF FIGURE

RV-4


RIVERVIEW DISTRICT The primary land uses are twenty-two percent (22%) general commercial, twenty percent (20%) medium density residential, and eighteen percent (19%) hillside residential. Table RV-T1 below summarizes the distribution of land use designations within the Riverview District. Chapter 2.0, Section 2.3 of the General Plan defines each land use designation in terms of the allowable uses and density and intensity standards. Figure RV-1 illustrates the distribution and location of the land use designations.

Table RV-T1. Distribution of Land Uses—Riverview District General Plan Land Use Designation

No. of Acres

Floodway

Percentage of Total Land Area

9.4

2.18%

General Commercial

96.4

22.33%

Tourist Commercial

11.8

2.73%

Hillside Residential

80.2

18.56%

Low-Medium Residential

58.4

13.51%

Medium Density Residential

86.4

20.01%

High Density Residential

10.0

2.31%

4.2

0.97%

Public/Institutional

45.4

10.51%

Residential Mixed Use

29.7

6.88%

431.9

100.00%

Neighborhood Commercial

Total

11.3.3 Goal 1

Overall District Goal and Policies The primary goal of the Riverview District is to stimulate a mixed-use neighborhood with a variety of land uses that incorporate the area’s natural amenities and surrounding uses.

Policies RV 1.1

Encourage the redevelopment and/or rehabilitation of aging structures.

RV 1.2

Through the project and CEQA processes create strong linkages to recreational areas, the lake, the river, and the Ballpark District.

RV 1.3

Through the project and CEQA processes ensure compatibility between the Riverview District’s wide variety of uses.

RV-5


RIVERVIEW DISTRICT RV 1.4

Encourage the establishment of auto sales enterprises along Auto Center Drive.

RV 1.5

Through the project and CEQA processes establish and maintain adequate buffers between auto sale lots and residential uses.

RV 1.6

Through the project design and CEQA processes discourage the establishment of residentially sensitive uses adjacent to buffer existing auto sales lots.

Implementation Program The City shall encourage project designs that rehabilitate existing structures, incorporate and link to the District’s natural amenities, and ensure compatibility with auto mall uses. Agency/Department

11.4

Community Development Department

Urban Design

The Riverview District’s existing built environment primarily lacks any strong unifying or defining characteristics. The community’s mix of limited housing, an absence of public spaces, an auto mall and other commercial activities require the establishment of a strong sense of place. The existing character is most influenced by the auto mall and the surrounding natural amenities that include the river and the lake. As growth continues, it will be important to support an orientation towards the surrounding natural amenities, recreational and institutional facilities, and the Ballpark District to the southeast.

11.4.1 Goal 2

Goal and Policies Encourage rehabilitation, redevelopment, and new development that is integrated with and oriented towards the Riverview District’s natural amenities and community-serving facilities in order to create a distinct mixed-use neighborhood with a variety of commercial uses.

Policies RV 2.1

Encourage rehabilitation, redevelopment, and new development to have an orientation towards the Riverview District’s community amenities and natural features.

RV 2.2

Consider the establishment of urban design guidelines to support a rich and diverse mixed-use neighborhood with a variety of commercial activities that incorporate the area’s amenities, community facilities, and topography.

RV-6


RIVERVIEW DISTRICT RV 2.3

Through the project and CEQA processes incorporate a pedestrian-oriented design that provides public access from the Riverview District to adjacent recreational areas along the lake and the river, and to development activities south of Lakeshore Drive..

RV 2.4

Through the project and CEQA processes create a safe and attractive pedestrian connection route along Lakeshore Drive that connects to the Historic District to the northwest and the Ballpark District to the southeast. Additional pedestrian routes with views of the river shall be established in a north-south direction to establish a strong connection between uses north and south of Lakeshore Drive.

RV 2.5

Through the project and CEQA processes place community identification signs or gateway monuments at the east and west ends of the Riverview District along Lakeshore Drive.

Implementation Program The City shall support project designs that pay particular attention to pedestrian routes, District and neighborhood identities, and compatibility with a wide variety of mixed uses. Agency/Department

11.5

Engineering and Community Development Departments

Transportation/Circulation

The Riverview District’s circulation network encompasses three roadways that provide access to neighboring districts along with an internal and limited network of less traveled roadways. Lakeshore Drive is the Riverview District’s main artery. Lakeshore Drive borders the District in an east-west direction along its southern edge, providing a connection to the Historic District to the northwest and Diamond Drive with access to I-15 in the Ballpark District to the southeast. Auto Center Drive is located within the eastern section of the Riverview District parallel to I-15 and provides access between Franklin Street to the northeast and Diamond Drive to the southeast. Franklin Street is located in the northern and northeastern sections of the Riverview District and provides a popular route between the Lake Elsinore Hills District to the east and the Historic District’s Main Street to the northwest. The remaining internal roadways provide access to many of the existing uses; several remain unpaved or incomplete. There is currently no vehicular access to the Riverview District’s knoll areas, which have been designated for residential uses. The circulation system will need to be enhanced as development continues. The circulation element identifies standardized roadways as well as the addition of alternative transportation routes such as bikeways and pedestrian trails. The bikeways and pedestrian trails are intended to provide routes between the residential neighborhoods and the surrounding recreational and entertainment activities within the adjacent districts (as shown in Chapter 2.0, Circulation Section of the General Plan).

RV-7


RIVERVIEW DISTRICT 11.5.1 Goal 3

Goal and Policies Through the project and CEQA processes provide a safe and comprehensive roadway network for vehicular, bicycle, pedestrian, and bus traffic throughout the Riverview District and adjacent districts.

Policies RV 3.1

Through the project and CEQA processes improve the visual aspects of the roadways through enhanced landscaping and community identification features.

RV 3.2

Lakeshore Drive should be designated as a scenic roadway with unifying streetscape features, road signs, and other design elements which should be encouraged to be constructed the length of the Riverview District boundaries.

RV 3.3

Through the project and CEQA processes roadways, transit, and pedestrian routes shall be improved in order to accommodate new development and greater accessibility throughout the Riverview District as recommended by traffic studies.

Implementation Program The City shall support project designs that provide effective networks for all forms of travel in the Riverview District. Agency/Department

11.6

Engineering and Community Development Departments

Parks and Recreation

The Riverview District contains a variety of natural amenities that will help to create a successful mixed-use neighborhood with a high quality of life. Existing facilities adjacent to but serving the area are the Lakepoint Park and the Lake Elsinore Senior Center south of Lakeshore Drive, within close proximity to the lake to the west. Lakepoint Park offers softball fields, a soccer field, picnic facilities, a concession center, restrooms, and off-street parking. The Lake Elsinore Senior Center is located just north of Lakepoint Park and provides facilities and programs to primarily serve the City’s senior residents.

RV-8

Lakepoint Park


RIVERVIEW DISTRICT Railroad Canyon Elementary School is located centrally within the Riverview District and provides a possible opportunity for a joint-use facility between the City and the Lake Elsinore School District. The provision of additional public recreational space is critical to fostering a stronger sense of community. As development occurs, the provision of public space and recreational facilities will remain important.

11.6.1 Goal 4

Goal and Policies Encourage the expansion or new facilities for recreation within the Riverview District to foster a stronger community character and active outdoor activities.

Policies RV 4.1

Through the project and CEQA processes provide additional public spaces and recreational facilities for the Riverview District’s residents and visitors.

RV 4.2

Through the project and CEQA processes link the Riverview District to other recreational activities along the lake and the river.

RV 4.3

Pursue a joint-use facility with the Lake Elsinore Unified School District at the Railroad Canyon Elementary School facility.

RV 4.4

Through the project and CEQA processes ensure the provision of adequate additional park facilities as new residential development occurs.

Implementation Program The City shall support project designs that meet or exceed park and recreational needs of its residents, and that link the District to adjacent recreational activities.

RV-9


RIVERVIEW DISTRICT

This Page Left Intentionally Blank.

RV-10


LAKE VIEW SPHERE DISTRICT

12.0 Lake View Sphere District 12.1

Introduction

The Lake View Sphere District is situated within the City’s Sphere of Influence adjacent to the southwestern edge of the City within the jurisdiction of Riverside County. The Cleveland National Forest borders the Lake View Sphere District to the northwest, west, and south. The Lake View, Lake Edge and Lakeland Village Sphere Districts form the northeastern, eastern, and southeastern borders respectively. The location of the Lake View Sphere District is shown Figure LVS-1.

“The main focus of the Lake View Sphere District is to maintain and enhance the residential character of the area as well as to provide development opportunities that are compatible and interconnected with adjacent districts.”

Located at the eastern foothills of the Santa Ana Mountains, the Lake View Sphere District encompasses great differences in topography. Most of the lowerlying elevations are located within the northeastern and eastern areas of the Lake View Sphere District approximately a half-mile from Grand Avenue, which is the main northwest/southeast roadway to the west and southwest of the lake. The remaining areas within the Lake View Sphere District primarily contain higher elevations, steep slopes and canyons. The Ortega Highway is the Lake View Sphere District’s and the City’s main east/west roadway and provides access between Orange County and Interstate 5 to the west and Interstates 15 and 215 to the east. Historically, the Lake View Sphere District has remained mostly undeveloped in part as a result of the steep topography. However, the Lake View Sphere District does include important historical sites, one of the City’s most scenic roadways, and places of local interest. In addition, a village established at the turn of the 19th century, the City’s oldest standing structure, and important agricultural lands are all located in close proximity to the Lake View Sphere District. As growth continues to occur within the City, demand for vacant lands within close proximity to the boundaries of the District will increase. Aside from canyons and steep slopes to the north and south, there are no significant physical boundaries between this area and neighboring districts. As a result, the main focus of the Lake View Sphere District Plan will be to maintain and enhance the residential character of the area as well as to provide development opportunities that are compatible and interconnected with adjacent districts.

12.2

Description

The Lake View Sphere District encompasses approximately 5,735 acres within the jurisdiction of Riverside County. The lower lying northeastern and eastern areas of the Lake View Sphere District primarily include residential uses with an institutional use in the far northeast corner (school). The remaining areas of the Lake View Sphere District, which generally include much

LVS-1


LAKE VIEW SPHERE DISTRICT higher elevations and steep slopes, primarily include vacant lands, open space, and portions of the Cleveland National Forest. Isolated residential areas and a restaurant are located in the western and southern areas within proximity to State Route 74. Neighboring uses in the north, west, and south primarily include open space, vacant lands, and portions of the Cleveland National Forest. The Lake View District to the northeast includes a network of primarily single-family residential communities with several recreational facilities. The Lake View District has one of the few mixed-use corridors in the City located east of Grand Avenue along Riverside Drive, a segment of State Route 74. The Lake Edge District is located east of the Lake View Sphere District between Riverside Drive and the lake and offers a large variety of recreational facilities including the Lake Elsinore Campground/Recreational Facility and a boat launching facility. The Lakeland Village District to the southeast contains similar uses as the Lake View Sphere but encompasses more commercial activities and some industrial uses. Arguably, no other district within the City provides such panoramic and accessible views of the City and the lake.

12.3

Land Use

12.3.1

Unique Attributes

The Lake View Sphere District’s most unique attributes are the viewpoints, particularly from its section of State Route 74 that runs through the District. The Lake View Sphere District’s location adjacent to the western edge of the City’s boundary, high elevations and a meandering highway provide beautiful panoramic views. As the Ortega Highway transverses up and over the Santa Ana Mountains from the Pacific Views from Foothills in Lake View Sphere District coast to the City of Lake Elsinore, the views of the City become increasingly impressive. Throughout the year, this portion of State Route 74 attracts motorcyclists and other commuters from around the world. Arguably, no other district within the City provides such panoramic and accessible views of the City and the lake. The popularity of the Inspiration Point viewing spot and the Lookout Road House restaurant are a testament to this claim.

LVS-2


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City of Lake Elsinore Lake View Sphere District Land Use Plan Figure LVS-1


LAKE VIEW SPHERE DISTRICT

BACKSIDE OF FIGURE

LVS-4


LAKE VIEW SPHERE DISTRICT 12.3.2

Planned Land Use

As older homes are renovated and as vacant lands are developed, the Lake View Sphere District will increasingly serve as a residential district for the area, while providing additional stimulus for the revitalization of the Riverside Drive mixed-use corridor and the recreational facilities along the lake’s northern and northwestern edges. The western areas of the Lake View Sphere District are designated as residential, MSHCP conservation areas, and open space in order to preserve the natural environment and provide residential opportunities that are sensitive to the area’s steep topography and high elevations. The lower-lying and flatter areas are more developed but still offer many opportunities for residential development. These lower-lying areas are designated as low density and low-medium density residential uses. The primary land uses are eighty-three percent (83%) hillside residential, nearly six percent (5.93%) low density residential, and six percent (6.45%) low medium residential. Table LVS-T1 below summarizes the distribution of land uses designations within the Lake View Sphere District. Chapter 2.0 of the General Plan defines each land use designation in terms of the allowable uses and density and intensity standards. Figure LVS-1 illustrates the distribution and location of the land use designations.

Table LVS-T1. Distribution of Land Uses—Lake View Sphere District General Plan Land Use Designation Hillside Residential

No. of Acres

Percentage of Total Land Area

4,778.5

83.32%

Low Density Residential

340.0

5.93%

Low Medium Residential

369.7

6.45%

Open Space

232.3

4.05%

14.6

0.25%

5,735.1

100.00%

Public Institutional Total

LVS-5


LAKE VIEW SPHERE DISTRICT 12.3.3 Goal 1

Overall District Goal and Policies The primary goal of the Lake View Sphere District is to create a series of distinguishable neighborhoods that incorporate the Lake View Sphere District’s topography, maximize the views of the City, and strengthen ties with existing and neighboring uses.

Policies LVS 1.1

Consider the establishment of hillside grading standards for all residential uses particularly in areas that contain steep slopes and canyons.

LVS 1.2

Coordinate with Riverside County to provide multi-use trails and road links to the neighboring districts.

Implementation Program The City shall support opportunities to maximize the unique views of the City and Lake from the Lake View Sphere District vantage points, to coordinate the establishment of multi-use trails in the District, and to develop the area with effective and sensitive hillside grading standards. Agency/Department Departments

12.4

Engineering, Parks & Recreation, and Community Development

Urban Design

The lower-lying areas within the Lake View Sphere District contain the majority of existing development and primarily include a mix of older single family homes and master planned communities, interspersed with pockets of vacant lands. There is not a strong feeling of community identity. As growth continues, a consistent design motif, the creation of identifiable neighborhoods, and the connection of these lower-lying areas to nearby uses will be important. The more remote areas in the northwestern, western and southern areas of the Lake View Sphere District contain very little development. As these areas develop, it will be equally important to establish neighborhoods and design standards particularly in relation to the steep topography and views of the lake.

LVS-6


LAKE VIEW SPHERE DISTRICT 12.4.1 Goal 2

Goal and Policies Support a residential district that includes a variety of identifiable neighborhoods that incorporate the Lake View Sphere District’s topography and views and provides good accessibility to neighboring amenities; create guidelines that will establish identifiable neighborhoods that enhance the Lake View Sphere District’s varied terrain, which includes steep slopes, canyons and portions of the Cleveland National Park; enhance visual linkages of the lake and surrounding landscape by protecting and establishing view corridors; and create pedestrian connections to neighboring Lake View and Lake Edge Districts.

Policies LVS 2.1

Through the project and CEQA processes protect and incorporate view corridors of the surrounding topography including the lake and canyons into an established set of design standards for new residential construction.

LVS 2.2

Orient parks, circulation routes, and public spaces to capture views of the lake where possible.

LVS 2.3

Encourage the enhancement of rest and viewing areas along State Route 74 within the Lake View Sphere District.

LVS 2.4

Encourage the placement of neighborhood signs at the principal ingress and egress points along major roadways including Grand Avenue and State Route 74.

Implementation Program The City shall support project designs that protect and incorporate view corridors, and that promote identifiable neighborhoods within the District. Agency/Department

12.5

Community Development Department

Historic Preservation

The northwestern, western, and southern portions of the Lake View Sphere District contain high elevations and steep terrain that have remained mostly undeveloped. Areas in the northwestern part of the Lake View Sphere District in the vicinity of the Leach Canyon Stream and lower-lying elevations contain a historic ranching and homesteading site. The historic Cariso Truck Trail is a dirt road which connects Grand Avenue to the Cleveland National Forest

LVS-7


LAKE VIEW SPHERE DISTRICT to the west and is located approximately one mile to the south of the historic ranching and homesteading site. State Route 74 was opened in 1932 and serves as the Lake View Sphere District’s main east/west connection and provides access to adjacent places of local historical significance, including Inspiration Point and Lookout Road House. This roadway and its views attract locals and tourists year round. Inspiration Point is a resting spot next to State Route 74 and offers beautiful views of the lake. The Lookout Road House is a local restaurant built in 1945, which quickly became a Lookout Road House local attraction in the City and is one of the most popular places to view the City and surrounding landscape. In addition, there are areas of historical importance to the west, east, and southeast. The El Cariso Village is a mountain community established by pioneer James Stewart at the turn of the 19th century and located to the west of the Lake View Sphere District. The area was previously known to early Spaniards as Potrero de Carrizo which described the type of grass in the vicinity of the valley. As State Route 74 was completed, the community was further developed and now includes the El Cariso Forest Service Station and the El Cariso Campground. The Machado Adobe House, the City’s oldest standing structure, was constructed in 1858 and is located to the east of the Lake View Sphere District in the northwestern area of the lake and is in proximity to the site where Wilson Heald, father of Franklin Heald who founded the town of Elsinore, built a two-story home in 1884. The Lakeland Ranch, one of the largest canning facilities in the state, was developed southeast of the Lake View Sphere District and produced olives, almonds, and citrus.

12.5.1 Goal 3

Goal and Policies Promote the cultural significance of the Lake View Sphere District’s historic ranching and homesteading site, historic trail, and the area’s local viewing spots.

Policies LVS 3.1

Encourage the preservation of the historical ranching and homesteading site.

LVS 3.2

Designate the Cariso Truck Trail as a historic roadway and incorporate the trail as a hiking and equestrian trail with historical descriptions of the early ranching, homesteading, and the El Cariso Village in the area.

LVS 3.3

Through the project and CEQA processes include additional amenities such as public benches, telescopes, and educational information regarding the development of the City, particularly within close proximity to the Lake View Sphere District, at Inspiration Point and the Lookout Road House restaurant.

LVS-8


LAKE VIEW SPHERE DISTRICT Implementation Program The City shall support opportunities to showcase the significance of the District’s historical sites to the City’s past. Agency/Department

12.6

Community Development Department

Transportation/Circulation

The circulation network is most developed in the District’s lower-lying areas and includes a portion of State Route 74, Grand Avenue, and a series of paved and unpaved residential streets that serve the residential uses. The areas within the Lake View Sphere District at higher elevations are largely undeveloped and inaccessible as a result of the topography. Grand Avenue is the main northwest/southeast route along the southwestern and western areas of the lake, provides access to districts further north and southeast, and is located within approximately a half mile of most of the Lake View Sphere District’s residential development in the lower-lying areas. State Route 74 is the Lake View Sphere District’s other significant roadway and arguably one of the City’s well-traveled roadways. It serves as the City’s major east/west connection to Interstates 5 and 215. It intersects with and follows Grand Avenue north until proceeding east along Riverside Drive, which is a segment of State Route 74 north of the lake. As it transverses the mountainous portions of the Lake View Sphere District, the highway offers some of the best panoramic views of the City. Less traveled paved and unpaved roadways are located within the Lake View Sphere District’s residential communities and open space areas and generally intersect with or are in close proximity to Grand Avenue and/or State Route 74. Additional roadways and pedestrian routes will be needed to serve residential growth throughout the Lake View Sphere District. The circulation element in Chapter 2.0, Section 2.4 identifies standardized roadways as well as the addition of alternative transportation routes such as bikeways and pedestrian trails.

Table LVS-T2. Roadway Plan and Bikeway Plan—Lake View Sphere District Roadway Name

From

To

Roadway Classification

Bikeway Classification

Grand Avenue

Lake View District

Machado Street

Major

Class II

Grand Avenue

Machado Street

Riverside Drive

Collector

Class II

Grand Avenue

Riverside Drive

State Route 74 (Ortega Highway)

Riverside County

Alvarado Street

Grand Avenue

Machado Street

Collector

Machado Street

Grand Avenue

Lake View District

Secondary

Lake Edge District Urban Arterial Lake Edge District Divided Collector

LVS-9

Class II


LAKE VIEW SPHERE DISTRICT 12.6.1 Goal 4

Goal and Policies Support a multi-modal transportation system with linkages to neighboring residential, recreational, and open space areas within the Lake View, Lake Edge, and Lakeland Village Districts and the Cleveland National Forest.

Policies LVS 4.1

Through the project and CEQA processes create pedestrian/hiking trails between the northern, western, and southern areas of the Lake View Sphere District to nearby open space areas and the Cleveland National Forest.

LVS 4.2

Consider the widening of Grand Avenue to include a median, bike lanes, curbs, gutter, sidewalks, and additional bus stops.

LVS 4.3

Consider a pedestrian/bicycle linkage between the residential communities in proximity to Grand Avenue and the mixed-use commercial corridor of Riverside Drive, to the recreational areas along the edges of the lake, and to adjacent residential communities within the Lake View District and the Lakeland Village District.

Implementation Program The City shall support project designs that provide trails throughout the District and to nearly open space areas, that provide pedestrian/bicycle linkages, and that widen and enhance Grand Avenue. Agency/Department

12.7

Engineering Department

Parks and Recreation

Open space and recreational areas within the Lake View Sphere District are limited to the Cleveland National Forest and vacant lands in the western and higher elevations of the Lake View Sphere District. Although there are no parks, several recreational facilities are located within close proximity. To the east, the Lake Edge District includes the Lake Elsinore Campground/Recreational Area and boat launching facility. The Lake View District to the northeast includes Machado Park, Summerlake Park, Oak Tree Park and McVicker Canyon Park all within a short drive. Additional recreational facilities are planned for the Lake View District as well. It also contains a newly completed high school situated within a short walk of Grand Avenue along Riverside Drive which contains a track, turf areas and baseball fields and may offer a joint-use public summer aquatics program. The El Cariso Forest Service Station, the El Cariso Campground, and Cleveland National Forest are located to the west. As the Lake View Sphere District transitions into a series of identifiable neighborhoods, it will be increasingly important to provide pocket neighborhood parks and to ensure access to existing and nearby facilities.

LVS-10


LAKE VIEW SPHERE DISTRICT 12.7.1 Goal 5

Goal and Policies Consider a connected system of pedestrian and hiking trails that link residential areas to the Lake View Sphere District’s open space areas and the Cleveland National Forest and similar surrounding uses and recreational facilities.

Policy LVS 5.1

Support joint-use recreational programs with the Lake Elsinore School District.

Implementation Program trail system.

The City shall support project designs that provide a connected

Agency/Department

Parks & Recreation Department

LVS-11


LAKE VIEW SPHERE DISTRICT

This Page Intentionally Left Blank

LVS-12


LAKELAND VILLAGE SPHERE DISTRICT

13.0 Lakeland Village Sphere District 13.1

Introduction

The Lakeland Village Sphere District is situated adjacent to the southwestern edge of the City within the jurisdiction of Riverside County. It is generally bordered to the northwest by the Lake View Sphere and Lake Edge Districts, and to the north by the City’s lake, to the east by the East Lake District, to the southeast the City of Wildomar, and farther west/southwest lies the Cleveland National Forest as shown on Figure LLVS-1.

“The main focus of the Lakeland Village Sphere District will be to revitalize the area with a focus

The Lakeland Village Sphere District is located at the eastern foothills of the Santa Ana Mountains with a similar topography as the Lake View Sphere District to the northwest. The southwest areas are generally inaccessible and encompass high elevations and beautiful canyons with steep slopes of up to 35 percent. In contrast, the northern portions of the Lakeland Village Sphere District generally contain lower elevations and flatter areas. Grand Avenue is the major northwest-southeast route providing access to the Lakeland Village Sphere District, the Lake View Sphere District to the northwest, the East Lake District to the east and the City of Wildomar farther to the south. The northern area’s elevation and slopes increase dramatically due to the sharp rise of the Santa Ana Mountains that offer beautiful views of the City and lake. Historically, the Lakeland Village Sphere District has remained mostly undeveloped as a result of its topography and isolation from other more accessible areas within the City. A few areas within the Lakeland Village Sphere District’s lower lying portions contain historic ranching and homesteading sites, and a historical site is located in the southern mountainous region. The area was also home to one of the largest canning facilities in the state, which later helped establish the name for the Lakeland Village Sphere District. The Lakeland Village Sphere District’s developments are generally located in the northern and lower lying areas and mostly include residential uses.

Lakeland Village Sign along Grand Avenue

The main focus of the Lakeland Village Sphere District Plan will be to revitalize the area with a focus towards the lake. Many residential uses within the Lakeland Village Sphere District are aging, dilapidated, and/or underutilized and provide redevelopment and development opportunities.

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LAKELAND VILLAGE SPHERE DISTRICT

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City of Lake Elsinore Lakeland Village Sphere District Land Use Plan Figure LLV-1


LAKELAND VILLAGE SPHERE DISTRICT

BACKSIDE OF FIGURE

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LAKELAND VILLAGE SPHERE DISTRICT As growth continues to occur in and around the Lakeland Village Sphere District, it will be increasingly important to revitalize and connect this area to adjacent districts and to maximize the Lakeland Village Sphere District’s largest amenity, the lake.

13.2

Description

The Lakeland Village Sphere District encompasses approximately 3,091 acres within the jurisdiction of Riverside County. The Lakeland Village Sphere District’s existing development is located in the lower-lying flatter areas in the northern areas of the District within proximity of Grand Avenue, the major roadway along the southwestern edge of the lake. The southwestern areas of the Lakeland Village Sphere District include much higher elevations and steep slopes. These less accessible areas have experienced less development than the lower flatter areas located close to Grand Avenue.

“Several of the areas in the lower lying portions of the Lakeland Village Sphere District are in need of revitalization and a stronger orientation towards Grand A d th

Existing development primarily includes low-density housing along with pockets of recreational, commercial, industrial, and vacant uses. Newer developments exist but many of the residential and commercial uses were built decades ago and are underutilized, aging, dilapidated, and/or in need of rehabilitation or redevelopment. Enhanced County services (i.e., code enforcement) would help to maintain a higher quality of existing development in the Lakeland Village Sphere District. Neighboring uses to the northwest generally include housing, vacant lands, the Cleveland National Forest, and the lake’s edge. Uses to the north and northeast primarily include the lake and vacant land with limited amounts of housing. The East Lake District is located to the northeast. Land uses include residential, commercial and recreational uses including Skylark Field Airstrip, Glider Launch Field, Lake Elsinore Motocross Park, and an existing Summerly Golf Course. The City of Wildomar is located farther to the south. This area includes low-density housing and supporting uses. The Cleveland National Forest Facing North on Grand Avenue forms the southwestern border of the Lakeland Village Sphere District.

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LAKELAND VILLAGE SPHERE DISTRICT 13.3

Land Use

13.3.1

Unique Attributes

The Lakeland Village Sphere District’s most unique attribute is that it encompasses the only edge of the lake not within the City’s boundary. In addition, this section of the lake is very large, consists of the majority of the lake’s southwestern boundary and has not yet maximized its full potential. Opportunities to revitalize the area and to increase recreational opportunities along the lake would be possible should the City annex the Lakeland Village Sphere District from Riverside County.

13.3.2

Planned Land Use

The planned land uses within the Lakeland Village Sphere District share similar characteristics to the Riverside County land use map. However, the Lakeland Village Sphere District plans for a stronger focus on residential opportunities. Several of the areas in the lower-lying portions of the Lakeland Village Sphere District are in need of revitalization and a stronger orientation towards Grand Avenue and the lake. Aging and/or dilapidated housing and commercial activities as well as vacant lands within a short distance of Grand Avenue and the lake’s edge provide several redevelopment and rehabilitation opportunities. The southwestern areas of the Lakeland Village Sphere District are generally less accessible and more constrained as a result of the steep topography. It will be important to preserve the topography of this area as it is developed. The primary land uses are low medium residential and hillside residential with approximately fifty-five percent (54.92.%) and nearly twenty-five percent (24.65%) respectively of the total number of acres. Table LLVS-T1 below summarizes the distribution of land use designations within the Lakeland Village Sphere District. Chapter 2.0, Section 2.3 of the General Plan defines each land use designation in terms of the allowable uses and density and intensity standards. Figure LLVS-1 illustrates the distribution and location of the land use designations.

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LAKELAND VILLAGE SPHERE DISTRICT Table LLVS-T1. Distribution of Land Uses—Lakeland Village Sphere District General Plan Land Use Designation

No. of Acres

High Density Residential

Percentage of Total Land Area

3.0

0.10%

762.0

24.65%

23.7

0.77%

1,697.7

54.92%

88.4

2.86%

230.0

7.44%

16.8

0.54%

Recreational

165.9

5.37%

Residential Mixed-Use

103.7

3.35%

Hillside Residential Low Density Residential Low-Medium Residential Medium Density Residential Open Space Public/Institutional

Total

13.3.3 Goal 1

3,0912

100.00%

Overall District Goal and Policies The primary goal of the Lakeland Village Sphere District is to promote a residential community with an increased amount of recreational uses along the lake, a revitalized mixed-use corridor, and residential/open space development in the southern areas.

Policies LLVS 1.1 Support a mixed-use corridor along Grand Avenue. LLVS 1.2 Through the project and CEQA processes provide additional recreational opportunities along the lake. Implementation Program The City shall support opportunities to enhance recreational uses along the lake and revitalize the mixed-use corridor along Grand Avenue. Agency/Department

Parks & Recreation and Community Development Departments

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LAKELAND VILLAGE SPHERE DISTRICT 13.4

Urban Design

The Lakeland Village Sphere District is transitioning from a residential area with pockets of aging and/or dilapidated housing and a limited amount of recreational, commercial, institutional, and industrial uses to a larger residential community with an increased amount of recreational uses along the lake, a revitalized mixed-use corridor, and residential/open space development in the southern areas. As the Lakeland Village Sphere District continues to grow, it will be important to establish architectural design standards and identifiable communities that are connected to each other, the lake, and Grand Avenue. The Lakeland Village Sphere District contains one of the largest stretches of the lake’s edge. Residential areas in higher elevations and local residential streets perpendicular to the lake provide beautiful views of the lake but few areas along the lakeshore are accessible to the public. An area at the northeastern edge of the Lakeland Village Sphere District along the lakeshore is designated for recreational facilities. Other recreational areas northwest and east of the Lakeland Village Sphere District along the lake are also designated for recreational opportunities and should be accessible. Grand Avenue is an underutilized and primarily residential mixed-use corridor. Many of the existing uses adjacent to or along Grand Avenue have a weak orientation towards this roadway and do not incorporate a lake setting. Land use designations along the south side of Grand Avenue will offer the greatest variety of development and will be an integral part of the area’s revitalization. This area will include a variety of low to medium density housing and commercial opportunities. Very few other commercial opportunities will be offered along Grand Avenue on the southern side of the lake. As such, this area will provide the greatest amount of commercial activity along the southern shore of the lake. As growth continues in and around the area, greater demand for these services will help provide additional stimulus for revitalization.

13.4.1 Goal 2

Goal and Policies Encourage the revitalization of the Lakeland Village Sphere District with a stronger orientation towards the lake and Grand Avenue while incorporating the area’s beautiful topography.

Policies LLVS 2.1 Consider strong and attractive linkages between the Lakeland Village Sphere District’s neighborhoods, the lake, Grand Avenue, and open space and recreational areas. LLVS 2.2 Through the project and CEQA processes require new residential development in the southern areas of the Lakeland Village Sphere District to incorporate the area’s topography into their design.

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LAKELAND VILLAGE SPHERE DISTRICT LLVS 2.3 Through the project and CEQA processes ensure the compatibility of residential, recreational, commercial and institutional uses along Grand Avenue. LLVS 2.4 Through the project and CEQA processes construct a series of safe pedestrian routes to connect the neighborhoods north and south of Grand Avenue to the mixed-use corridor along Grand Avenue, the lake’s recreational facilities, open space areas, and the Cleveland National Forest. LLVS 2.5 Encourage the location of historic and community identification signs at the northwestern and southeastern ends of the Lakeland Village Sphere District along Grand Avenue and at the mixed-use corridor section of this roadway. LLVS 2.6 Restrict structures within the medium density and residential mixed-use zones along Grand Avenue to three (3) stories or a maximum of 45 ft. Implementation Program The City shall support project designs that provide a stronger orientation towards the lake and Grand Avenue, linkages between neighborhoods and to open space uses, compatibility between a variety of uses along Grand Avenue, and safe pedestrian routes throughout the District. Agency/Department

13.5

Engineering and Community Development Departments

Historic Preservation

The southwestern areas of the Lakeland Village Sphere District have largely been isolated in part because of high elevations, steep slopes and less accessibility in comparison to other parts of the City. As a result, most of the development within the Lakeland Village Sphere District has been located in the lower lying and northern areas. The historic ranching and homesteading sites are generally located in the northwestern areas south of Grand Avenue and southeastern areas on the border with the East Lake District. Another historical site includes the whitewashed letter “E” which symbolizes the first letter of the City’s name and is located in the western and mountainous area of the Lakeland Village Sphere District south of Highway 74. In addition, the Lakeland Village Sphere District was home to one of the state’s largest canning facilities, known as Lakeland Ranch located southwest of the lake. C. H. Albers was the original owner of Lakeland Ranch, which included a few hundred acres of land used to cultivate and can produce such as olives, citrus, and almonds. The area later became known as Lakeland Village in part to remember the importance of Alber’s canning facility.

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LAKELAND VILLAGE SPHERE DISTRICT 13.5.1 Goal 3

Goal and Policies Support programs that promote the cultural significance of the Lakeland Village Sphere District’s historical characteristics and maintain the history of the Lakeland Village Sphere District through preservation of existing historical features and public awareness.

Policies LLVS 3.1 Through the project and CEQA processes preserve the historic ranching and homesteading sites in the northwestern and southeastern areas of the Lakeland Village Sphere District as development occurs in the vicinity. LLVS 3.2 Consider the establishment of a pedestrian/hiking trail leading up to the whitewashed letter “E” in the southern area of the Lakeland Village Sphere District with public benches and a resting area with views of the lake. Implementation Program The City shall support project designs that preserve historical sites in the District and provide trails throughout the District. Agency/Department

13.6

Community Development Department

Transportation/Circulation

The circulation network is limited to the lower lying areas of the Lakeland Village Sphere District on either side of Grand Avenue, the community’s main roadway. Grand Avenue is the major northwestsoutheast route along the southern side of the lake and provides access to the Lake View Sphere District to the northwest and the East Lake District and the City of Wildomar, farther to the southeast. The roadways leading north of Grand Avenue provide access to residential uses and some have direct access and views of the lake. The roadways leading south of Grand Avenue also serve residential uses but ultimately end at an intersection with a similar residential street or end at the foothills of the western area’s steep slopes and vacant lands.

Residential Street Facing Lakeshore from Grand Avenue

The closest freeway access to Interstate 15 is via State Highway 74, which intersects Grand Avenue northwest of the Lakeland Village Sphere District. Highway 74 also provides access

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LAKELAND VILLAGE SPHERE DISTRICT west to Orange County. At the east edge of the Lakeland Village Sphere District, Grand Avenue also intersects with Corydon Street, a significant northeast/southwest roadway east of the lake. Corydon Street directly connects the Lakeland Village Sphere District with the East Lake District and then to Interstate 15 and the Diamond Baseball Stadium in the Ballpark District. The circulation element identifies standardized roadways as well as the addition of alternative transportation routes such as bikeways and pedestrian trails.

13.6.1 Goal 4

Goal and Policies Support a multi-modal transportation system that provides enhanced access to neighboring residential, recreational, and open space areas within the Lake View Sphere District, East Lake District, and the Cleveland National Forest.

Policies LLVS 4.1 Encourage the provision of a safe and comprehensive roadway network for vehicular, bicycle, pedestrian, and public transportation throughout the Lakeland Village Sphere District. LLVS 4.2 Encourage strong and attractive circulation routes between the Lakeland Village Sphere District’s neighborhoods, the lake, Grand Avenue, and open space and recreational areas. LLVS 4.3 Consider designating Grand Avenue as a scenic roadway. The City shall support Grand Avenue Beautification Committee efforts to establish streetscape plans. LLVS 4.4 Support the revitalization of Grand Avenue as the most significant roadway in the Lakeland Village Sphere District. LLVS 4.5 Encourage traffic calming measures at intersections within proximity of the higher density and residential mixed-use areas along Grand Avenue when recommended by traffic studies. LLVS 4.6 Through the project and CEQA processes construct a series of safe pedestrian routes to connect the neighborhoods east and west of Grand Avenue to the mixed-use corridor along the roadway, the lake’s recreational facilities, open space areas, and the Cleveland National Forest. Implementation Program The City shall support project designs that provide multi-modal transportation within the District and to adjacent recreation and open space, that revitalize Grand Avenue and provide safe pedestrian routes to neighborhoods. Agency/Department

Engineering and Community Development Departments.

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LAKELAND VILLAGE SPHERE DISTRICT 13.7

Parks and Recreation

The Lakeland Village Sphere District’s existing recreational facilities are few. However, the Lakeland Village Sphere District is within a short drive of existing recreational facilities and has many potential opportunities. Existing recreational facilities include a private boat launching facility located just north of Grand Avenue along the lake’s edge and adjacent facilities include Serenity Park off Palomar Street. Serenity Park includes one tennis court, two (2) half-court basketball courts, a picnic shade structure, picnic benches, a tot lot and parameter fencing. In addition, portions of the Cleveland National Forest are located to the west of the Lakeland Village Sphere District and all along its southwestern border. A popular hang gliding and paragliding launch site is located in the mountains of the western portion of the Lakeland Village Sphere District as well as a landing site near the Grand Avenue and State Highway 74 connection. Existing recreational facilities within a short commute from the Lakeland Village Sphere District are located to the east and northwest including McVicker Canyon Park and the Lake Private Boat Launching Facility Elsinore Campground/Recreational Area and boat launching facility. The lake is the Lakeland Village Sphere District’s most significant potential recreational opportunity. One of the main goals of the Lakeland Village Sphere District is to increase the amount of recreational uses along the lake. As such, a large area has been designated for recreational uses along the southeast edge of the lake, north of Grand Avenue. This area will be connected to planned recreation, open space, and MSHCP areas along the eastern edges of the lake within the adjacent East Lake District and provide a lake edge parkway. The Lake Edge District along the lake to the northwest of the Lakeland Village Sphere District will offer similar opportunities. Open space areas have also been designated to the northwest and southeast and will preserve the natural topography. Butterfield Elementary School is located within the Lakeland Village Sphere District along Grand Avenue. Lakeland Middle School is located within the Lakeland Village Sphere District on Grand Avenue. The recreational facilities at these two schools could possibly be joint-use facilities in the future.

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LAKELAND VILLAGE SPHERE DISTRICT 13.7.1 Goal 5

Goal and Policies Expand and connect recreational facilities along the lake and increase open space areas in the southern areas of the Lakeland Village Sphere District.

Policies LLVS 5.1 Encourage the revitalization of the southern edge of the lake. LLVS 5.2 Encourage the preservation of the natural topography where possible. LLVS 5.3 Encourage streetscapes along the mixed-corridor sections of Grand Avenue. LLVS 5.4 Support joint-use recreational programs. LLVS 5.5 Support hang gliding and paragliding in the area as a recreational resource and tourism generating activity. LLVS 5.6 Through the project and CEQA processes provide recreational facilities along the southeastern edge of the lake, north of Grand Avenue, with the East Lake District connecting this area to recreation, open space, and MSHCP designated areas to the east. LLVS 5.7 Through the project and CEQA processes provide pedestrian routes along the northwestern border to provide a connection to the Lake Edge District’s recreational designated areas along the lake. LLVS 5.8 Through the project and CEQA processes provide pedestrian/hiking trails to open space designated areas within the southern portions of the Lakeland Village Sphere District and to the Cleveland National Forest. LLVS 5.9 Through the project and CEQA processes preserve open space areas at the northwestern and southeastern areas of the Lakeland Village Sphere District. Implementation Program The City shall support project design that enhance the District’s recreational amenities, roadway and trail networks, open space preservation, nd revitalization of land uses. Agencu/Department Departments

Engineering, Parks & Recreation, and Community Development

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LAKELAND VILLAGE SPHERE DISTRICT

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MEADOWBROOK SPHERE DISTRICT

14.0 Meadowbrook Sphere District 14.1

Introduction

The Meadowbrook Sphere District is situated within the City’s Sphere of Influence adjacent to the northeastern edge of the City within the jurisdiction of Riverside County. The Lake Elsinore Hills District surrounds the Meadowbrook District to the west and south. The remaining northern and eastern borders of the District are lands within unincorporated Riverside County. The Local Agency Formation Commission (LAFCO) recently removed a large portion of the Meadowbrook area from the City’s Sphere of Influence. As a result, the Meadowbrook Sphere District was reduced to a much smaller area. The location of the Meadowbrook Sphere District is shown in Figure MBS-1. The Meadowbrook Sphere District contains rolling hills and canyons. A portion of the San Jacinto River traverses its eastern side before it continues south towards Canyon Lake. Greenwald Avenue is the District’s main roadway, running through the center of the District and connecting to State Highway 74 to the north. State Highway 74 provides access to the city of Lake Elsinore, the City of Perris, Interstates 15 and 215, and other areas of unincorporated Riverside County. Greenwald Avenue also borders the District’s southern boundary, on its way toward the City of Canyon Lake to the southeast. Although no registered historical structures exist, there are two historic mine locations nearby, one of which is among the most noted in the surrounding area. The Meadowbrook Sphere District encompasses a rural residential character. Few large tracts of land are available for development. However, growth within the general area is expected to increase, particularly as build-out occurs in the Ramsgate and North Tuscany Hills Specific Plans adjacent to the District’s borders. The demand for available, vacant, and developable land, both large and small, will be important. The main focus of the District Plan will be to maintain and enhance the residential character of the area as well as to provide development opportunities that are compatible and interconnected with adjacent communities. The unincorporated County lands to the north contain a similar distribution of uses and densities that are found within the Meadowbrook Sphere District. The North Peak District to the far west primarily consists of open space areas with a few isolated residential and agricultural uses. The Lake Elsinore Hills District to the west and south primarily consists of open space, rolling hills, and steep canyons. Its several adopted specific plans for new residential subdivisions are in various stages of development. The City of Perris, located to the far east, primarily includes open space and agricultural uses in this area. The City of Canyon Lake, a gated master-planned community, is located to the southeast.

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MEADOWBROOK SPHERE DISTRICT

BACKSIDE OF FIGURE

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MEADOWBROOK SPHERE DISTRICT

14.2

Description

The Meadowbrook Sphere District encompasses approximately 487 acres within the jurisdiction of Riverside County. Land uses throughout the District primarily consist of single-family homes on one- to two-acre lots, as well as vacant lands.

14.3

Land Use

14.3.1

Unique Attributes

The defining characteristic of the Meadowbrook Sphere District is its rural residential character, and its location between the City of Lake Elsinore, Riverside County, the City of Perris and the City of Canyon Lake. The Meadowbrook Sphere District is located in close proximity to State Highway 74, and is therefore easily accessible from nearby communities.

14.3.2

Planned Land Use

As growth continues to occur within the general area and particularly in the City of Lake Elsinore, available developable lands within the Meadowbrook Sphere District will be important and will provide an additional stimulus to create new residential neighborhoods. The primary land uses are low-density residential and hillside residential uses, at nearly sixty percent (59.73%) and thirty-two percent (32.58%) respectively of the total number of acres in the District. Table MBS-T1 below summarizes the distribution of land use designations within the Meadowbrook Sphere District. Chapter 2.0 of the General Plan defines each land use designation in terms of the allowable uses and density and intensity standards. Figure MBS-1 illustrates the distribution and location of the land use designations.

Table MBS-T1. Distribution of Land Uses—Meadowbrook Sphere District General Plan Land Use Designation

No. of Acres

Percentage of Total Land Area

Hillside Residential

171.0

32.58%

Low Density Residential

313.6

59.73%

40.4

7.69%

525.0

100.00%

Open Space Total

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MEADOWBROOK SPHERE DISTRICT 14.3.3 Goal 1

Overall District Goal and Policies The primary goal of the Meadowbrook Sphere District is to create a more integrated community that is compatible with the districts to the south and west.

Policies MBS 1.1

Encourage the establishment of identifiable neighborhoods that are similar to the design of the developments located in the City to the south and west.

MBS 1.2

Through the project and CEQA processes provide enhanced access to the Lake Elsinore Hills and North Peak Districts, and to the recreational uses, open space areas and conserved lands in the surrounding areas.

Implementation Program The City shall support project design that integrates identifiable neighborhoods into the District communities and is compatible with adjacent planned development. Agency/Department

Community Development Department

14.4 Urban Design The Meadowbrook Sphere District is a rural residential community without an urban core or strong feeling of community identity. As growth occurs, it will be important to establish and promote architectural design standards and identifiable neighborhoods that are connected to each other. Provision of public spaces will be important as well.

14.4.1 Goal 2

Goal and Policies Support a residential district with a strong orientation towards the developed areas in the City.

Policies MBS 2.1

Consider the establishment of architectural and development guidelines that will ensure that residential development is compatible with neighboring areas, and that preserve and enhance identifiable neighborhoods.

MBS 2.2

Through the project and CEQA processes create strong and attractive links between surrounding housing, recreational and open space uses, and conserved lands.

Implementation Program The City shall support project design whose architecture and guidelines ensure compatibility with neighboring development, preserves and

MBS-6


MEADOWBROOK SPHERE DISTRICT enhances identifiable communities, and provides links between communities and to open space uses. Agency/Department Departments

14.5

Engineering, Parks & Recreation, and Community Development

Historic Preservation

The largest concentrations of historic mining activities within the City and Sphere of Influence areas are located in the area of the Meadowbrook Sphere, North Peak, and Lake Elsinore Hills Districts.

14.5.1 Goal 3

Goal and Policies Support the preservation of historic mining areas.

Policies MBS 3.1

Support programs that promote educational awareness of historic mine locations and their impact upon the development of the City and general area.

MBS 3.2

Through the project and CEQA processes observe an open space/park buffer of at least 100 feet for new development in the vicinity of historic mine locations.

MBS 3.3

Support programs that promote educational information regarding historic mining activities with the opening of a tourist information center located within the Meadowbrook Sphere District or along State Highway 74.

Implementation Program The City shall support programs that educate, promote awareness, and preserves the historically significant sites within the District. Agency/Department

14.6

Community Development Department

Transportation/Circulation

The circulation network in proximity to the Meadowbrook Sphere District consists of State Route 74, a major transportation corridor, and smaller paved and unpaved residential streets. State Highway 74 is a high volume roadway that provides access to unincorporated Riverside County, the City of Perris, Interstates 15 and 215, and the City of Lake Elsinore. Greenwald Avenue is the main north/south route passing through the central portion of the Meadowbrook Sphere District, as well as bordering its southern boundary. Its intersection with State Highway 74 is signalized. Greenwald Avenue connects the area to the Lake Elsinore Hills

MBS-7


MEADOWBROOK SPHERE DISTRICT District and the City of Canyon Lake. The circulation element identifies Greenwald as a Class II bikeway. Alternative transportation routes are intended to provide access between the residential neighborhoods, surrounding districts and recreational facilities.

14.6.1 Goal 4

Goal and Policies Encourage pedestrian/hiking/biking trails between the residential uses, open space, recreational uses, and conserved lands nearby.

Policies MBS 4.1

Through the project and CEQA processes ensure that adequate transportation system connections exist between residential areas and the nearby recreational and commercial uses.

MBS 4.2

Through the project and CEQA processes establish a series of pedestrian/bicycle routes between residential uses, and adjacent residential communities to the west, south and east.

Implementation Program The City shall support project design that provides trails and access linkages between residential uses and to open space and recreational uses. Agency/Department

14.7

Engineering and Community Development Departments

Parks and Recreation

As the Meadowbrook Sphere District transitions from scattered rural uses to developed neighborhoods, it will be important to provide additional recreational facilities, open space uses, and conserved lands. It will also be important to provide access to similar neighboring uses. The Meadowbrook Sphere District’s only park/open space area is located at its northeast corner. Outside of the District several recreational uses, open space uses and MSHCP conservation areas have been designated or exist within a short commute. The North Peak District to the far west includes a large area designated for MSHCP conservation, as well as a large recreational sports facility. Recreational opportunities in the Lake Elsinore Hills District include facilities within the four master-planned communities of Rosetta Canyon, Canyon Hills, Canyon Creek, and Tuscany Hills. The Rosetta Canyon Community Park, within close proximity to State Highway 74, will feature a large recreational center, ball fields, tennis and basketball courts, hiking trail, dog park, and picnic areas.

MBS-8


MEADOWBROOK SPHERE DISTRICT 14.7.1 Goal 5

Goal and Policies Provide adequate active open space and recreational opportunities within the Meadowbrook Sphere District as development occurs.

Policies MBS 5.1

Through the project and CEQA processes develop a pedestrian/hiking trail system to connect existing and future residential communities with open space uses, recreational facilities, and MSHCP conservation areas. Provide trail signs, maps, and information about the vegetation of these areas.

MBS 5.2

Through the project and CEQA processes incorporate additional recreational facilities within new residential developments.

Implementation Program The City shall support project design that provides open space and recreational facilities within the District, including trail connections. Agency/Department

Parks & Recreation and Community Development Departments

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MEADOWBROOK SPHERE DISTRICT

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NORTH CENTRAL SPHERE DISTRICT

15.0 North Central Sphere District 15.1

Introduction

The North Central Sphere District is situated within the City’s Sphere of Influence just outside the northern edge of the City (Figure NCS-1). The North Peak, Lake Elsinore Hills, Business, and Alberhill Districts border to the east, southeast, south, and west, respectively. The area to the north of the North Central Sphere District falls outside the Sphere of Influence of the City. Large differences in topography occur within the North Central Sphere District trending from north to south. The mountainous topography of the northern portion of the North Central Sphere District varies with steep slopes and canyons. The southern portion of the North Central Sphere District has minor slope variations. The southwestern boundary of the North Central Sphere District is bordered in part by the Interstate-15 freeway. The northern portion of the North Central Sphere District is predominately steep and hilly terrain. Certain parts of the northeastern portion of the area could be suitable for sparse development as a hillside residential area, while the western section should remain in open space and conservation. The main focus of this District Plan will be to preserve the existing natural resources, to ensure that residential development incorporates the beautiful landscape and to make certain that business professional activities are compatible with surrounding land uses.

15.2

Description

The North Central Sphere District encompasses approximately 4,276 acres. The lower lying southern areas of the North Central Sphere District primarily include scattered low density residential uses and open space. Temescal Canyon High School is located along the I-15 Freeway and El Toro Road. The northern part of the North Central Sphere District is primarily designated as rural open space area with a conservation habitat near the western border. The neighboring area to the north of the North Central Sphere District has rural open space designations. The Districts to the west and east of the North Central Sphere District are made up primarily of rural open space that is planned for development. A variety of land uses exist to the south including freeway business, commercial retail, commercial office, and low-medium density residential. The Business District is located to the south and includes one of the highest concentrations of commercial and retail activities in the City.

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NORTH CENTRAL SPHERE DISTRICT

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City of Lake Elsinore North Central Sphere District Land Use Plan Figure NCS-1


NORTH CENTRAL SPHERE DISTRICT BACKSIDE OF FIGURE

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NORTH CENTRAL SPHERE DISTRICT

15.3

Land Use

15.3.1

Unique Attributes

The defining characteristics of the North Central Sphere District include its steep hillsides and significant vacant areas. Open space and MSHCP conservation areas are designated in approximately ten percent (10%) of the North Central Sphere District area.

15.3.2

“The west central portions of the District contain open space and conservation areas, and low density and hillside residential areas, which are not expected to change.�

Planned Land Use

The west central portion of the North Central Sphere District contains open space and conservation areas. The majority of the central sections contain low density and hillside residential areas that are not expected to change. New commercial development has occurred immediately adjacent the North Central Sphere District boundaries along Central Avenue/State Highway 74. Future Business professional uses, which would be located along the north side of State Highway 74 and east of I-15, will provide additional employment opportunities for local residents. Mining activities may occur within the North Central Sphere District, which shall follow applicable policies discussed in the Alberhill District. The primary land uses are hillside residential and low density residential with nearly fifty-nine percent (58.89%) and eighteen percent (18%) respectively of the total number of acres. Table NCS-T1 below summarizes the distribution of land uses designations within the North Central Sphere District. Chapter 2.0, Section 2.3 of the General Plan defines each land use designation in terms of the allowable uses and density and intensity standards. Figure NCS-1 illustrates the distribution and location of the land use designations.

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NORTH CENTRAL SPHERE DISTRICT Table NCS-T1. Distribution of Land Uses—North Central Sphere District General Plan Land Use Designation Business Professional Commercial Mixed Use General Commercial High Density Residential Hillside Residential Low Density Residential Low-Medium Residential Medium Density Residential Open Space Public Institutional Specific Plan Total

15.3.3 Goal 1

No. of Acres 281.0 42.2 42.7 5.2 2,518.0 770.1 22.8 32.4 435.1 52.1 74.5 4,276.1

Percentage of Total Land Area 6.57% 0.99 % 1.00% 0.12% 58.89% 18.01% .53% 0.76% 10.17% 1.22% 1.74% 100.00%

Overall District Goal and Policies Preserve the North Central Sphere District’s mountainous and open space areas to the north and ensure that the business professional and residential uses are planned to be compatible with the surrounding development.

Policies NCS 1.1 Support the protection of the existing natural open space, conservation, and mountainous areas. NCS 1.2 Consider the establishment of a hillside grading ordinance that contains development standards for residential uses in areas containing steep slopes and canyons. NCS 1.3 Through the project and CEQA processes integrate business professional land uses with the surrounding areas. NCS 1.4 Through the project and CEQA processes ensure land use compatibility between any mining activities and surrounding uses as discussed in the Alberhill District. Implementation Program The City shall support project design that preserves mountainous and open space areas and ensures compatibility and integration with surrounding uses.

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NORTH CENTRAL SPHERE DISTRICT Agency/Department Departments

15.4

Parks & Recreation, Engineering and Community Development

Urban Design

The lower lying areas within the North Central Sphere District are the primary areas planned for future development, which will primarily include low density residential uses and business professional uses. As growth occurs, a consistent design style and creation of identifiable neighborhoods will be important.

15.4.1 Goal 2

Goal and Policies Support developments within the North Central Sphere District that incorporate the North Central Sphere District’s topography and views and provide links to neighboring amenities and uses.

Policies NCS 2.1 Through the project and CEQA processes create pedestrian routes to the neighboring North Peak, Lake Elsinore Hills, and Alberhill Districts. NCS 2.2 Encourage view corridors of the City environs, including the lake and canyons, and visual resources shall be incorporated into a set of design standards for new construction. NCS 2.3 Through the project and CEQA processes require the provision of public open space in new residential development. NCS 2.4 Through the project and CEQA processes create identifiable neighborhood signs at key entrance points and along major roadways including State Highway 74. Implementation Program The City shall support project design that incorporates District topography and views, provides links to neighboring amenities, and offers open spaces in development. Agency/Department

Engineering and Community Development Departments

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NORTH CENTRAL SPHERE DISTRICT

15.5

Transportation/Circulation

The circulation network is primarily developed in the lower lying areas. The network includes a portion of State Highway 74 and a series of paved and unpaved residential streets that serve the residential uses. The areas within the North Central Sphere District with higher elevations are largely undeveloped and inaccessible by standard vehicles. State Highway 74 is the main thoroughfare, serving the North Central Sphere District as a northeast-southwest route through the southern portion. The segment of the State Highway 74 within the North Central Sphere District is approximately a half-mile from Interstate-15 to the south. El Toro Road (referred to as Nichols Road within city limits) serves as an east-west route through the central area of the North Central Sphere District and connects the western incorporated areas of the City of Lake Elsinore with the eastern City incorporated area of North Peak District. Less traveled paved and unpaved roadways are located within the North Central Sphere District’s residential communities and a few intersect with State Highway 74. Additional roadways and pedestrian routes will be needed to serve residential growth throughout the North Central Sphere District, and State Highway 74 will likely be widened. The circulation element identifies standardized roadways as well as the addition of alternative transportation routes such as pedestrian trails.

15.5.1 Goal 3

Goal and Policies Support a multi-modal transportation system with enhanced access to neighboring residential, recreational, and open space areas within the North Peak District and the Lake Elsinore Hills District as well as the commercial and industrial areas within the adjacent Business District.

Policies NCS 3.1 Encourage the creation of pedestrian/hiking trails between the central and southern areas of the North Central Sphere District to open space areas to the north. NCS 3.2 Consider the improvements of roadway connections in the North Central Sphere District. NCS 3.3 Through the project and CEQA processes connect hillside residential portions of the North Central Sphere District in the north to the southern part of the area. Implementation Program The City shall support project design that enhances access and linkages through a multi-modal transportation system.

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NORTH CENTRAL SPHERE DISTRICT Agency/Department

15.6

Engineering and Community Development Departments

Parks and Recreation

Designated natural open space and nature preserve uses comprise the northwestern portion of the North Central Sphere District. These areas currently provide passive-type recreational uses, such as hiking and horseback riding, with little or no formal recreational opportunities. There are no existing active open space or recreational facilities located in the District. As development occurs, it should be essential that future developments be conditioned to design and construct parks and recreational facilities as required by local ordinances. The possibility exists for joint-use with the recreational facilities at Temescal Canyon High School.

15.6.1 Goal 4

Goal and Policies Through the project and CEQA processes provide adequate active open space and recreational opportunities within the North Central Sphere District as development occurs.

Policies NCS 4.1 Through the project and CEQA processes develop a pedestrian/hiking trail system that connects existing and future residential communities. Open space areas within the North Central Sphere District and surrounding areas shall include trail signs, maps, and information about the vegetation of the surrounding areas. NCS 4.2 Pursue a joint-use program with the high school facility located adjacent to Interstate15. Implementation Program The City shall support project design that provides open space, recreation facilities, and connecting trail systems in the District. Agency/Department

Parks & Recreation and Community Development Departments

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NORTHWEST SPHERE DISTRICT

16.0 Northwest Sphere District 16.1

Introduction

The Northwest Sphere District is situated outside the northwestern edge of the City, entirely out of the City limits and falling within the City’s Sphere of Influence and in the unincorporated area within Riverside County. The Northwest Sphere District is adjacent to the Alberhill District on its southeastern corner and is generally surrounded by open space around the rest of the Northwest Sphere District border. The Cleveland National Forest and Santa Ana mountains border the Northwest Sphere District on the western edges. I-15 runs northwest to southeast through the Northwest Sphere District (Figure NWS-1).

“The main focus of the Northwest Sphere District Plan will be to increase low and medium density residential areas to accommodate growth, establish preservation areas for natural resources, and increase economic activity along Interstate-15.”

Steep terrain characterizes the Northwest Sphere District across the northern and western portions. A valley cuts through the Northwest Sphere District from the northwest to the southeast. Most alterations to the land occur in the valley in the center of the Northwest Sphere District as the flatter terrain at that location is more conducive to development. The Northwest Sphere District is primarily open space and low-medium residential with a large master planned community located off of Horsethief Canyon Road. The existing vacant land is currently planned to remain designated as preserved open space and MSHCP conservation areas. Low-density residential land uses are planned to expand southward. Currently, there are light industrial and commercial areas located along I-15 that are planned for expansion. The main focus of the Northwest Sphere District will be to increase low and medium density residential areas to accommodate growth, establish preservation areas for natural resources, and increase economic activity along I-15.

16.2

Description

The Northwest Sphere District encompasses approximately 5,190 acres and primarily consists of low-medium density residential, open space, limited agriculture, and some manufacturing and industrial areas near the freeway. The residential areas are centrally located within the Northwest Sphere District between Indian Truck Trail and Lake Street, south of I-15. The vacant lands, which are primarily in the northern and southern portions, contain steep topography. Limited agricultural areas are scattered throughout the central valley. Manufacturing and industrial land uses are mainly located along either side of I-15. I-15 is the most significant roadway that passes through the Northwest Sphere District with

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NORTHWEST SPHERE DISTRICT Indian Truck Trail, De Palma Road, Horsethief Canyon Road, and Temescal Canyon Road also being important residential throughways for access to the freeway. Surrounding land uses primarily include open space surrounding the entire District with the exception of the Pacific Clay Mining area within the Alberhill District to the east. Agricultural lands and manufacturing and industrial areas lie further northwest past the Northwest Sphere District’s boundary edge. Cleveland National Forest borders the Northwest Sphere District to the west and southwest.

16.3

Land Use

16.3.1

Unique Attributes

The Northwest Sphere District’s most unique attributes are its steep hillsides with open space, the central valley with its master planned neighborhoods, and its proximity to the numerous amenities provided within the City. This portion of I-15 will act as a gateway to the City from the north and has potential to be a commercial hub for visitors to the City as they enter or exit.

16.3.2

Planned Land Use

A transitional phase is anticipated for the Northwest Sphere District, as it moves from an area with scattered agricultural and industrial uses and an isolated residential area. Residential areas are expected to develop and expand, and connect to those within the Alberhill District; the manufacturing, industrial, and commercial areas will be focused around I-15. The vacant lands will most likely continue to be designated as open space and MSHCP conservation areas. The primary land uses are open space and low-medium residential, with nearly thirty-six percent (35.84%) and twenty-five percent (25.23%) respectively of the total number of acres. Table NWS-T1 below summarizes the distribution of land use designations within the Northwest Sphere District. Chapter 2.0, Section 2.3 of the General Plan defines each land use designation in terms of the allowable uses and density and intensity standards. Figure NWS-1 illustrates the distribution and location of the land use designations.

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NORTHWEST SPHERE DISTRICT Table NWS-T1. Distribution of Land Uses — Northwest Sphere District General Plan Land Use Designation Floodway

No. of Acres

Percentage of Total Land Area

293.8

5.66%

General Commercial

24.0

0.46%

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14.51%

Limited Industrial

261.2

5.03%

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319.6

6.16%

1,309.3

25.23%

43.3

0.83%

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35.84%

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16.3.3 Goal 1

Overall District Goal and Policies The primary goal of the Northwest Sphere District is to accommodate future growth within the Sphere of Influence, utilize I-15 as an economic generator, create a tourism serving area, become a gateway to the tourism opportunities the City has to offer, and preserve open space for the protection of natural resources.

Policies NWS 1.1 Through the project and CEQA processes create a residential land use network that is compatible with surrounding land uses within and adjacent to the Northwest Sphere District and that is able to accommodate growth while respecting the environment. NWS 1.2 Consider a centralized commercial and freeway business area, maximizing economic potential, while providing necessary services for visitors and residents alike.

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NORTHWEST SPHERE DISTRICT NWS 1.3

Consider conserving the vacant lands in areas with steep slopes and high elevations in the north and southwest in order to help maintain an adequate amount of conserved lands and open space.

Implementation Program The City shall support project design that protects natural resources, accommodates growth by utilizing the I-15 as an economic generator, and creates a gateway for tourism opportunities. Agency/Department

16.4

Community Development Department

Urban Design

As the residential development occurs there will be great potential to provide links to the natural open space areas.

The existing residential areas within the Northwest Sphere District are isolated master planned communities with specific design standards and amenities. The central portion of the Northwest Sphere District will contain most of the residential development, including low-medium density residential development. This development will benefit from vehicular connections between it and the residential areas adjacent to it in the Alberhill District. Residential development in the southern portion of the Northwest Sphere District will include hillside and low density residential. Design standards that protect the topographical character of the land and that take advantage of views will be necessary. As growth occurs, a consistent design style, creation of identifiable neighborhoods, and connection of the residential and commercial areas to nearby uses will be critical. As the residential development occurs there will be great potential to provide linkages to the natural open space areas.

16.4.1 Goal 2

Goal and Policies Support development within the Northwest Sphere District that includes identifiable neighborhoods that will incorporate the surrounding topography and views, while providing linkages to neighboring amenities and uses.

Policies NWS 2.1 Consider the creation of guidelines that will establish identifiable neighborhoods that enhance the Northwest Sphere Districts’ varied terrain, which includes steep slopes and canyons as well as establishing its commercial node along I-15. NWS 2.2 Through the project and CEQA processes create pedestrian links to neighboring open space preserves and Alberhill District.

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NORTHWEST SPHERE DISTRICT NWS 2.3 Through the project and CEQA processes protect the conservation cores and links as described in the MSHCP, while providing educational opportunities such as signage. NWS 2.4 Encourage view corridors of the surrounding landscape, and incorporate visual resources and appropriate topographical considerations into a set of design standards for new residential construction. NWS 2.5 After incorporation, encourage the creation of identifiable neighborhood signs at key entrance points and major roadways. Implementation Program The City shall support project design that incorporates surrounding topography and views, that provide linkages to neighboring amenities and uses, and that offers educational opportunities. Agency/Department

16.5

Community Development Department

Transportation/Circulation

“Support a multimodal transportation system with linkages to the Alberhill District and neighboring commercial, residential, recreational, and open space areas.”

The Northwest Sphere District’s circulation network consists of: I-15 running northwest to southeast, which is the main connection to the City; other districts and communities to the north and west outside the Sphere of Influence; Horsethief Canyon Road and Mountain Road; secondary roads that form the neighborhoods south of the freeway; De Palma Road and Indian Truck Trail, which act as the main access roads to the freeway for the neighborhoods to the south; and Temescal Canyon Road, which serves as the primary road running parallel to I-15 and provides access to the freeway and Lake Street within the Alberhill District to the east. The only freeway interchange within the Northwest Sphere District is at Indian Truck Trail. This interchange has a high traffic volume due to the large residential developments in the area. Lake Street, at the edge of the Alberhill District to the east, also has an interchange within proximity to the residential and commercial areas. The circulation element identifies standardized roadways as well as the addition of alternative transportation routes such as bikeways and pedestrian trails.

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NORTHWEST SPHERE DISTRICT 16.5.1 Goal 3

Goal and Policies Support a multi-modal transportation system with links to the Alberhill District and neighboring commercial, residential, recreational, and open space areas.

Policies NWS 3.1

Through the project and CEQA processes create pedestrian friendly hiking trails between the residential areas to open space areas within the northern and southeastern portions of the Northwest Sphere District.

NWS 3.2

Through the project and CEQA processes incorporate access from major roads, the freeway, and existing residential communities to new development in the south and east portions of the Northwest Sphere District and in Alberhill to the east.

NWS 3.3

Through the project and CEQA processes establish pedestrian, bicycle, and roadway connections between the residential communities within the Northwest Sphere District and adjacent residential communities of the Alberhill District.

NWS 3.4

Consider the design and the improvement of access points to I-15.

Implementation Program The City shall support project design that provides a multimodal transportation system that links Districts and uses. Agency/Department

16.6

Engineering Department

Parks and Recreation

The Northwest Sphere District is comprised primarily of MSHCP conservation areas and open space uses in its northern and southeastern parts of the Northwest Sphere District. There are a few pockets of open space recreation in and just outside the main master planned community that exists off of Horsethief Canyon Road. These areas will be the only opportunities in the Northwest Sphere District for recreational use. Recreational facilities have been provided Luiseno School as parks within the Horsethief Canyon development. The Lake Elsinore Unified School District facility and the Luise単o Elementary School are located within the Horsethief

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NORTHWEST SPHERE DISTRICT Canyon development and could offer joint-use recreational opportunities. As the Northwest Sphere District continues to grow and create identifiable neighborhoods, it will be important to include parks and recreational facilities in new development.

16.6.1 Goal 4

Goal and Policies Provide adequate active and passive open space and recreational opportunities within the Northwest Sphere District as development occurs.

Policies NWS 4.1

Through the project and CEQA processes design and develop a friendly hiking trail system, which provides connectivity to existing residential communities and open space and recreational facilities Northwest Sphere District, such as trail signs that incorporate information about the vegetation of the surrounding areas.

pedestrian and future within the maps and

NWS 4.2

Pursue a joint-use program with the Lake Elsinore School District and the Luise単o Elementary School.

NWS 4.3

Through the project and CEQA processes incorporate recreational space into new developments.

Implementation Program The City shall support project design that provides active and passive open space and recreational facilities within the District. Agency/Department

Parks & Recreation Department

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District Plans - September, 2011