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publisher’s note

What comes from the book is knowledge.What comes from the heart is wisdom

SPRING 2013 • Volume 17 • Issue 1 FALL 2012www.dolce.ca • Volume 16 • Issue 3 PUBLISHER/EDITOR-IN-CHIEF www.dolce.ca

— Garth Brooks

MANAGING EDITOR

Michelle Zerillo-Sosa • michelle@dolce.ca

Madeline Stephenson • madeline@dolce.ca DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS

Angela Palmieri-Zerillo

T

he above quote sums up this issue of Dolce Vita. Much like the gentleman Hal Jackman on our front cover, his stare — which can come across as scolding, intimidating, even — pins you in your place, daring you to open this magazine. His message, however, is from the heart, meant to ignite within our readers’ passion to give it all you got, and why not? Growing up in a family where charity and philanthropy were second nature, his presence is one that commands undivided attention. “We are all products of past influences,” he says on page 32. I personally love this statement. We live in a society that is too often ready to invest in material things that will not love us back. This is not what’s important. The pleasure that comes with being a benefactor is that “There’s a sense of accomplishment, a sense of pride, but there’s also a sense of humility,” explains Mattamy Homes founder Peter Gilgan (see story “Not a Drop of Water,” on page 40). Another favourite of mine is the story of Margaret McCain (see page 38). She divulges that her mother had a problem with managing her money — she loved giving it away! The philanthropic individuals found in this issue demonstrate such empathy and compassion towards all humankind. This is their passion. This is how they live their dolce vita. The beauty of Dolce is that it shares the many interpretations of what the sweet life can be.When we visited the home of the National Ballet of Canada’s revered principals Heather Ogden and Guillaume Côté, we knew that the couple’s spark would ignite your love for deep commitments, whether it’s for a loved one or the arts (story on page 50). As you leaf through this issue, the exotic escapes — made of pristine beaches and graceful vessels — might add another hue to the beautiful life you are blessed with. The key to living la dolce vita, however, is remembering that it’s not possessions that make this world a better place, but compassion of the heart and the passion that lives within each one of us. I have to admit: making a difference in people’s lives has been pulling at my heartstrings for quite some time. Art — a passion that is so close to my heart — has inspired my own philanthropic journey. I’m honoured to announce that my new collection of vintage doctor bags under the label Amore Bags will be launching this fall. These one-of-a-kind accessories are refurbished with passion and self-expression. With every bag sold, a portion of proceeds will go to support the international medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders. I encourage you to visit www.AmoreWithoutBorders.com to support a cause that is dedicated to bringing quality care to people in need. Stay tuned for more details. Until next time, listen to your heart!

ART DEPARTMENT CO-FOUNDER/CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Fernando Zerillo • fernando@dolce.ca SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Christina Ban GRAPHIC DESIGNERS

Marianna Osko, ´ April Ware WEB PROJECT MANAGER

Steve Bruno EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT BEAUTY & TRAVEL EDITOR

Angela Palmieri-Zerillo FASHION & HOME DECOR EDITOR

Michelle Zerillo-Sosa COPY EDITOR

Simona Panetta PROOFREADERS

The Editing Company, Toronto; Simona Panetta SENIOR WRITERS

Michael Hill, Simona Panetta, Madeline Stephenson CONTRIBUTING WRITER

Amanda Storey CONTRIBUTING EDITORS

Charles Khabouth, Monica Pedersen INTERN

Daniele Franceschi CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

Cass Bird, Renata Kaveh, Yao Kouadio, Jesse Milns, George Pimentel Photography, Christoph Strube CONTRIBUTING HAIR/MAKEUP

Gianluca Orienti/judyinc.com, Jeya Singh, Christina Kolovos, Aniya Nandy CONTRIBUTING STYLISTS

Caterina Minthe, Nalinie Budhu

VIDEO DEPARTMENT VIDEOGRAPHER & EDITOR

William Lem REPORTER

Madeline Stephenson PUBLISHER

ADVERTISING DIRECTOR OF NEW BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

Susan Bhatia • susan@dolce.ca DIRECTOR OF MARKETING

Angela Palmieri-Zerillo • angela@dolce.ca ACCOUNT MANAGERS

Mario Balaceanu, Roshan Victor ADVERTISING INQUIRIES Vintage leather valise by Amore Bags. www.amorebags.ca

Michelle Zerillo-Sosa Publisher/Editor-In-Chief

@dolcetweets

T: (905) 264-6789 Toll-Free: (1-888) 68-DOLCE info@dolce.ca • www.dolce.ca OFFICE ADMINISTRATOR

Dina Mastrantoni FRONT COVER

Henry N. R. (Hal) Jackman, Photo By Christoph Strube 6

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guest editors

SPRING 2013 • Volume 17 • Issue 1 www.dolce.ca

add flavour to your life

DOLCE VITA MAGAZINE • SPRING 2013 VOLUME 17 • ISSUE 1

Dolce Vita Magazine is published quarterly by Dolce Publishing Inc. 111 Zenway Blvd., Suite 30 Vaughan, Ont., L4H 3H9 T: (905) 264-6789 • Toll-Free: (1-888) 68-DOLCE F: (905) 264-3787 • info@dolce.ca www.dolce.ca Publication Mail Agreement No. 40026675

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CHARLES KHABOUTH GUEST ENTREPRENEUR EDITOR Since the 1980s, Charles Khabouth has remained a major player in hospitality and entertainment, breaking new ground in Toronto’s club and dining scene. In “God is in the Details” (page 68), the prescient founder and principal of INK Entertainment pulls back the curtain on his rise to social-scene sovereignty, and explains why being authentic is key to any project. After all, it’s all in the details.

All rights reserved. Any reproduction is strictly prohibited without written consent from the publisher.

DISTRIBUTION & CIRCULATION

Dolce Vita Magazine reaches over 900,000 affluent readers annually through household distribution and newsstand sales across Canada and selected Barnes & Noble stores in the United States. Inquiries about where Dolce Vita Magazine is available for sale should be directed to Disticor Magazine Distribution Services: (905) 619-6565 The yearly subscription fee is $16.80. Send cheque or money order to Dolce Publishing Inc. 111 Zenway Blvd., Suite 30, Vaughan, Ont. Canada L4H 3H9 ISSN 1206-17780 NEXT ISSUE: SUMMER 2013

MONICA PEDERSENGUEST GUEST DESIGN EDITOR Interior designer Monica Pedersen knows just how draining a day on the links can be. She’s always felt the 18th hole should feature a table and chairs as a reward for a rough round. In “Make It Beautiful,” (page 61), the host of HGTV’s Designed to Sell shares the tale of how she made this happen for the final shoot of her book, Monica Pedersen Make It Beautiful. The result is a setting that would make any duffer smile. 8

DOLCE VITA MAGAZINE

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Every business can benefit from a boost. When a company’s story is left untold, its measurement of success is often a reflection. citylifeTV.ca is the quickest and most creative way to connect with your audience and show the world what you have to offer. As your virtual passport, citylifeTV.ca takes you behind the scenes of the city’s sexiest events, coveted cars and booming businesses. IT’S TIME TO TELL YOUR STORY … IN HD

The opinions expressed in Dolce Vita Magazine are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the publisher or advertisers. Dolce Publishing Inc. does not assume liability for content. The material in this magazine is intended for information purposes only and is no way intended to supersede professional advice. We are proud to be a Canadian company that has successfully published magazines for the past 17 years without any government funding or financial assistance of programs to cover editorial costs. It has all been possible thanks to the wonderful support of our readers and advertisers.

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paved their own successes and are now paying it forward. In “Hooked on Philanthropy” (page 38), a candid Margaret McCain imparts some valuable lessons passed down from her mother, and in “Not a Drop of Water” (page 40), Mattamy Homes CEO Peter Gilgan reveals the distilled ideologies that inspired a $40-million donation to the SickKids Centre for Research and Learning. For our cover story, “An Hour with the Honourable Hal Jackman” (page 32), we sit down with the philanthropist and former financier who’s guiding humanity with humility. While many of us may not have the means to give away millions, there are meaningful messages in each of these benefactions. We hope this spring issue of Dolce delivers them. Sincerely,

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editor’s note

In January, Emmanuelle Gattuso and broadcast mogul Allan Slaight made history with their landmark $50-million gift to the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre. It was the largest known private donation towards cancer research in Canada, but for those who know Gattuso, it likely wasn’t a surprising announcement. When I interviewed the breast cancer survivor last year for a profile in our sister publication, City Life Magazine, I was moved by her palpable positivity and spirit of generosity. Gattuso, who’s also the honorary chair of the annual Lunch with Margaret and George (page 16), personifies a philanthropic gusto engrained in our Canadian culture. In this issue, we set out to gain perspective from others who, like Gattuso and former Dolce cover subjects Hilary Weston and Michael Lee-Chin, belong in the nation’s expansive benefactor bracket — individuals who have


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28 42 32

53 Departments ON THE COVER

32 An Hour with the Honourable Hal Jackman: A candid conversation with Toronto’s voice of reason

SUCCESS STORY

50 Sweet Dreams: At home with the National Ballet of Canada’s Heather Ogden and Guillaume Côté 72 The Epicure: Joe Bastianich’s thirst for food and wine gives way to a culinary empire

ART & DESIGN

50

62 Swingers’ Club: Admittance to the world’s hottest golf resorts 80 Corvette Stingray: The Corvette’s inspiring evolution leads us to the 2014 Stingray

BEAUTY

26 Pretty in P!nk: Celebrity hair artist Marcia Hamilton’s hair dos and don’ts

FASHION

REAL ESTATE

24 Fabric of Time: William Banks-Blaney leads the throwback frock pack 42 A Model Business: How Fotini’s corporate ladder climb led to the catwalk 48 Rough Luxe on the Runway: Calgary designer Paul Hardy wears his heart on his sleeve

20

80 •

AUTOMOTIVE & SPORT

TRAVEL

38 Hooked on Philanthropy: The McCain matriarch shares an unforgettable anecdote 40 Not a Drop of Water: Billionaire homebuilder Peter Gilgan imparts his undiluted principles

DOLCE VITA MAGAZINE

68 God is in the Details: Guest entrepreneur editor Charles Khabouth turns expectations on their head 76 Judging by the Cover: Can packaging be just as powerful as its contents?

28 In Diamond’s Ring: Navigating the mind of a legendary architect in the midst of his magnum opus 61 Make It Beautiful: Guest design editor Monica Pedersen adds style to the golf course 78 Eggshells and Honesty: Deconstructing the neon world of British artist Kyle Bean

PHILANTHROPY

12

BUSINESS

SPRING 2013

www.dolcemag.com

59 The Heart of the Caribbean: Dolce heads south to unearth another side of Aruba

FOOD & WINE

70 Savoir Fare: Pusateri’s in-house nutritionist shares her nutrient-rich Superfood Salad 64 Distinct Dwellings: Whether it’s high city style or a beachfront escape, these properties signal a new level of luxury

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6 Publisher’s Note 10 Editor’s Note 14 Dolce Was There

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Dolce was there

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2 1. CTV’s In Fashion host Glen Baxter and Olympic gold medallist Rosie MacLennan 2. Reach for the Rainbow founder Donna Trella; Paul Pellegrini, president of Sussex Strategy Group and chair of the Reach for the Rainbow board of directors 3. LEFT TO RIGHT: Honorary chair Lindsay Duffield, president 4 of Jaguar Land Rover Canada; honorary chair James Aird, senior VP and CFO, The Daniels Corporation; honorary patron Byron Messier, managing partner, Forstar Capital; Donna Trella; honorary chair Ian Cunningham, managing vice-president and CFO, head of U.S. retail partnerships, Capital One Canada; Global Toronto’s Susan Hay; honorary chair Rick Reid, president and CEO, Tech Data Canada; premier patron Aris Kaplanis; honorary chair Jeffrey Puritt, president, TELUS International 4. Lindsay Duffield, president of Jaguar Land Rover Canada, and wife Ruth Duffield, board of directors, Reach for the Rainbow; Susan Hay and partner Randy Marshall.

T

he 26th annual Crystal Ball welcomed over 1,200 guests at the Metro Toronto Convention Centre. The black-tie gala wowed supporters with entertainment, dinner, auctions and famous faces. As attendees celebrated the children of Reach for the Rainbow, the 2012 Crystal Ball raised $1 million for the non-profit organization, which helps to integrate children with disabilities into recreational opportunities across Ontario. Charity founder Donna Trella, recently awarded with the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal for her achievements, was overwhelmed by the support. www.thecrystalball.ca / www.reachfortherainbow.ca

PHOTOS BY DANIEL FREY, V&H EVENT PHOTOGRAPHY

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OYAL DE VERSAILLES

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he newly modernized Royal de Versailles flagship boutique was recently unveiled at its posh Bloor Street West location. R de V co-owners Gail Burnett and Mike and Irit Shay, along with representatives from Rolex, Omega and Piaget, indulged the invite-only crowd with a celebration fit for royalty. Extravagant cocktails, delicate canapés and a live DJ, violinist and saxophonist pillowed the high-end brands available at R de V, a purveyor of the world’s finest jewelry and watch collections. www.royaldeversailles.com

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1. The Royal de Versailles flagship boutique in Toronto 2. Royal de Versailles co-owner Gail Burnett (centre) with Toronto Argonauts footballers Mike Bradwell (left) and Chad Owens 3. Marlene Del Zotto; Irit Shay, co-owner, Royal de Versailles; Liz Tory 4. Sassoun Sirmakes; Adom Knadjian, president, Backes and Strauss, with wife Takoush Knadjian; Hratch Kaprielian, CEO, Franck Muller 5. Mark Gelfand; Irit Shay, co-owner, Royal de Versailles; Janet Gelfand 6. Adom Knadjian, president, Backes and Strauss; Mike Shay, co-owner, Royal de Versailles; and Hratch Kaprielian, CEO, Franck Muller 7. Marina Kim and Peter Doucet.

3

7

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PHOTOS BY GEORGE PIMENTEL PHOTOGRAPHY

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Dolce was there

THE

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1. Cherry Tabb, CEO and co-founder, and Dr. Sheldon Herzig, co-founder and medical director 2. Alex Wilson, Diane Wilson and Cherry Tabb 3. Kimberly Fawcett, para-athlete; Anne Mroczkowski, Global News anchor; Robin Turack, business development, The Herzig Eye Institute 4. Dr. Jennifer Hibberd and Kees Van Winters 5. Dr. Catherine Eplett and Dr. Sheldon Herzig.

4

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UNCH WITH MARGARET AND GEORGE 3

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he city’s style darlings graced the interiors of Toronto’s Shangri-La Hotel for an afternoon of fashion, fare and frolic at the 2nd annual Lunch with Margaret and George fundraiser. From philanthropic socialites and fashion lovers to fashion editors and committee members, more than $160,000 was raised to benefit cancer research at The Princess Margaret Cancer Foundation. Notable attendees included Catherine Hill, the Policaro coterie and honorary chair Emmanuelle Gattuso. Hostess Lisa Corbo, co-owner of George C boutique, shimmered in a 1920s-inspired number from Derek Lam, whose spring/summer 2013 runway collection sashayed its way through the lunching crowd. www.thepmcf.ca

6

1. Lunch with Margaret and George committee members Giani Tariello, Emmanuelle Gattuso, Lina Policaro, Kelly Rosen and event co-chair George Corbo 2. Paul Alofs, president and CEO, The Princess Margaret Cancer Foundation; Canadian businessman Rob McEwan 3. Supporters Sarah and Paul Policaro 4. Event co-chair Lisa Corbo and fashion entrepreneur Catherine Hill 5. Sylvia Mantella, fashion collector and director of branding and image at Mantella Corporation 6. Models spring into this season’s collection from Derek Lam.

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PHOTOS BY GEORGE PIMENTEL PHOTOGRAPHY

L

3

Dr.

PHOTOS BY TEPPO HAAPOJA

1

Sheldon Herzig and Cherry Tabb of The Herzig Eye Institute shared their Vision for LivingTM by launching their newly expanded LASIK, refractive surgery, refractive cataract surgery and retina facility in Toronto. Over 200 guests were invited to explore the new facility and meet The Herzig 3 Eye Institute’s team of world-renowned surgeons. As attendees dined on culinary delights provided by La Société, they heard the inspiring story of para-athlete captain Kimberly Fawcett, one of the first patients at the Institute to undergo the new KAMRA VisionTM procedure for the treatment of presbyopia. www.herzig-eye.com


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BOOK LOVER’S

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oronto’s distinguished blacktie affair brought the city’s brightest literary brains to the Fairmont Royal York Hotel to celebrate the 8 th annual Book Lover’s Ball. The February event featured 60 celebrated authors and raised more than half-a-million dollars for the Toronto Public Library Foundation. “Once you get the narrative flow down, it then begins

to move,” CTV news legend Lloyd Robertson told Dolce of the writing process that led to his memoir The Kind of Life It’s Been. Actress Meg Tilly of Bomb Girls revealed she and her sisters “were veracious readers. That’s how I figured out who I was and what was right and what was wrong.” The shared sentiments of impassioned book lovers filled the air. www.bookloversball.ca

1. Dragons’ Den co-stars David Chilton and Arlene Dickinson 2. Fashion designer Dianna DiNoble 3. The Zoomer — Television for Boomers with Zip host Conrad Black 4. Designer Dianna DiNoble’s novel-inspired fashion show 5. Book Lover’s Ball host Tracy Moore of Cityline and author Vincent Lam 6. President of the Toronto Public Library Foundation Heather Rumball 7. CBC journalists Jian Ghomeshi and Amanda Lang 8. Bomb Girls star Meg Tilly 9. CTV’s W5 host and chief correspondent Lloyd Robertson. 5

2

“We were veracious readers. That’s how I figured out who I was and what was right and what was wrong.” — Meg Tilly

“Once you get the narrative flow down, it then begins to move.” — Lloyd Robertson 6 3

18

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PHOTOS BY GEORGE PIMENTEL PHOTOGRAPHY

Dolce was there

Ball

Watch our Book Lover’s Ball interviews at www.citylifeTV.ca


What’s Your Vision for Life After

40?

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HOLLYWOOD’S

W

ith fashion designers as moms, it’s no wonder that celebrity kids such as Kingston Rossdale, Skyler Berman, Suri Cruise and Harper Beckham are seen in today’s top fashions. “It is too much fun. It is like dressing a live doll,” Rachel Zoe said of dressing her one-year-old son Skyler with husband Rodger Berman. “He has no opinion. Every minute I have to buy things for my son,” she confessed. And not to mention Suri Cruise, who has worn $600 Jimmy Choo heels and carried a $1,700 Dolce & Gabbana Mini Miss Sicily Handbag. Suri’s Top Gun papa, Tom Cruise, has weighed in on her much-talked-about fashion choices — such as heels and lipstick. “Listen, I believe that she [should wear] whatever she wants to wear,” Cruise said. “She dresses herself. I want to encourage her creativity and her own self-expression. I think that’s important for the child’s own identity.” With Harper Beckham’s mom making a name for herself in the fashion industry, it’s no stretch to hear that her wardrobe is full of fancy duds. “She has so many little dresses!” dad David Beckham said of his one-year-old daughter with Victoria Beckham. “I didn’t realize how excited I would get over buying hair bows.” Harper looked cute as a button when we spotted the minifashionista with her posh mama at LAX, sporting a Little Marc Jacobs Isis Even Stripe Dress ($119) and a pair of Chloe tights ($50). The always-stylish Gwen Stefani said she lets her stylish six-year-old son Kingston pick out his own clothes. “At that age they like to be in control of everything, so I let him choose,” the L.A.M.B. designer said. “Luckily, everything in his closet is cute so no matter what he picks, he’s gonna look good. For a while he was into costumes. Now he doesn’t even want to wear shoes.” And last October, Jennifer Lopez and her daughter, Emme, rocked the Chanel fashion show in Paris, France. As it turns out, the pretty preschooler wore more than $2,400 worth of Chanel accessories at the event. For the mommy-daughter date, Emme donned a Chanel brooch worth $310 and toted a Chanel bag worth $2,100. No word on the price tag on the rest of her outfit. CelebrityBabyScoop.com is one of the most popular blogs on the topic and the foremost provider of everything celebrity-baby, featuring baby fashion, baby names, baby trends and up-to-the-minute celebrity baby gossip and pics. Get all the latest news, updates and photos about Hollywood’s most beloved celebrity moms, dads and their babies. Who’s the latest Tinseltown baby? Who’s due next and who just announced a pregnancy? It’s all on Celebrity Baby Scoop.

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DRESSED KIDS

Victoria Beckham with baby Harper Rachel Zoe and tot Skyler Jennifer Lopez with daughter Emme

Suri Cruise

Gwen Stefani with son Kingston

IMAGES COURTESY OF AKM-GSI VIA CELEBRITYBABYSCOOP.COM

WRITTEN BY CELEBRITYBABYSCOOP.COM


FABRIC OF TIME 1

2 PHOTO BY DAVE M. BENETT

From Ossie Clark to Courrèges, William Banks-Blaney’s throwback frocks are leading the vintage pack WRITTEN BY SIMONA PANETTA

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efore his 40-hour skip across the pond to catch friend Rachel Zoe’s show at New York Fashion Week, William Banks-Blaney was dressing dozens of celebrities in vintage couture frocks at the Elle Style Awards, the BAFTA Awards and the preceding WilliamVintage Dinner, a sumptuous black-tie affair he and actress Gillian Anderson co-hosted at the St. Pancras Renaissance Hotel in London, England. “It’s not normally quite this chaotic, but it’s a good sign,” says Banks-Blaney, down with the inevitable fashion flu, a common setback in an industry where fashion professionals work in close proximity. Fortunately for him, there’s respite from the frenzy on the horizon, but not before a reception at 10 Downing Street for the opening of London Fashion Week. “I’m going to the country this evening after tonight’s party and I’m going to sleep for three days,” he guisp. Dubbed “The Vintage King” by Vogue UK, Banks-Blaney is the Britishaccented founder of WilliamVintage, a dress boutique in the London area of Marylebone. Maintaining a curated, covetable collection that spans superlative fashion decades, fine vintage and couture 24

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1. The WilliamVintage Dinner hosted by William Banks-Blaney and Gillian Anderson in association with Adler Joailliers. The actress-turned-fashionista wears earrings in white gold with Colombian emeralds and diamonds by Adler, and a 1970s black silk Halston dress from WilliamVintage 2. A Christian Dior ball gown in pale pink silk with crystal bolero, circa 1960

pieces anywhere from Christian Dior and Ossie Clark to Courrèges and Jean Dessès are all handpicked by BanksBlaney, who scours the world for rare finds in the most unlikely of places. “I was in a little store in Florida about a year ago that really didn’t have anything, and as I was leaving I was like, ‘Are you sure you haven’t got anything out back?’ I just felt in my bones there was going to be something and in the end she said, ‘Oh I’ve got an old cape,’ and she brought this thing out from the backroom of the shop and unfolded it and unfolded it and unfolded it and it was actually the Dior floor-length, red silk velvet 1954 haute couture opera cape, an amazing piece that was about to be cut into cushions. I managed to save that.” www.dolcemag.com

Viewing fashion as a branch of art, Banks-Blaney’s training in art history at the University of Buckingham is as integral to his position as a leading vintage hunter as his confidence that pieces will wind up in his possession. On his last shopping trip, which took him to New York, Palm Beach, Atlanta, Nashville and back to the Big Apple, Banks-Blaney’s instincts were embedded in his knowledge of the past that shaped the cities in which he perused. “I’ll often find an antique fair or consignment store and just ask people, particularly if it’s a new city, but there’s often different locations you can go for different pieces. For example, Chicago had a huge development in wealth in the 1920s and the 1930s, so you can find fantastic art deco pieces there,” says


Banks-Blaney, who began to admire art, antiques and architecture as a child before becoming an interior designer for David Linley. While travelling across the world for home décor pieces, BanksBlaney’s attention would redirect itself to the charm of vintage pieces, which he collected and brought back home for friends and clients. After hosting successful private sales, the opening of WilliamVintage in 2010 was an organic extension of his environment. Providing an edited array of some of the world’s finest vintage couture at his boutique, women no longer have to rifle through racks of clothes (a common happenstance in the vintage market) to own a winning piece of history. Apart from the timeless quality that vintage dresses bring to the boudoir, Banks-Blaney notes that women are taking home pieces with a savvy eye to the future. “I have a couple of clients that say, ‘Well, my husband buys contemporary art, my husband invests in wine, and I’m investing in very good quality vintage clothing.’ They know that if they buy a dress from us it’s a very good example of a designer’s work or just a very good piece — rather than buying pieces from a contemporary collection that in the short term, are of far less value,” says the dapper frock seller, who lists Mary Katrantzou, Erdem, Roksanda Ilincic and the early work of Alexander McQueen as prospective purveyors of vintage collector items. The recently appointed fashion patron for Oxfam, who will edit the charity’s collections, immediately recalls the moment when vintage was revived and brought to the forefront of fashion. As one of the world’s most bankable stars stepped up to the podium at the 73rd annual Academy Awards, wearing a demure couture black column gown with white piping, the dress not only encapsulated old-fashioned Hollywood glamour, but also became a fixture in the red carpet hall of fame. “Twenty years ago, it was so niche and so unknown, and then in 2001, when Julia Roberts wore vintage Valentino to the Oscars, I think that put it on the world stage, and it opened up to a whole new audience. It could be something beautiful and really wonderful to wear.” www.williamvintage.com

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PRETTY IN PHOTO

P!NK

GET THE LOOK: P!NK’S MARILYN MONROE-INSPIRED COIF

THE GUTSY ROCK STAR has proven that even the colour pink can be bold. Now her stylist, Marcia Hamilton, opens up about this season’s hottest trends. WRITTEN BY AMANDA STOREY

Q: What are P!nk’s go-to looks? A: She loves her hair short, especially with her busy schedule. Her go-to is short on the sides and long on the top. Q: What new looks can we expect from her this spring? A: P!nk is always switching it up. She loves to keep folks guessing and stays ahead of trends. Stay tuned and see what she rocks next! Q: What are some of this season’s biggest trends? A: The bob is the hottest cut for spring/ summer 2013 trends. Clean, geometric shapes and lines are flooding the runways. 26

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he first step to achieving the look is to clean your hair with White Sands Orchid Bliss Shampoo and Conditioner. Hamilton uses a pink mybotto inverted bottle holder that allows her to get “all of the shampoo and conditioner out of the bottle, to the very last drop.” Next, she applies a few pumps of volumizing mousse for life and texture evenly from the roots to the tips of P!nk’s hair. After that, she blow-dries her hair with a medium round boar bristle brush. Then she clips extension pieces into the crown of her hair and makes sure to leave the perimeter out. “If your hair is fine or a bit short, I suggest using clipin extensions to achieve P!nk’s Marilyn style,” she explains. “Approximately three pieces should do the trick.” www.dolcemag.com

After that, she sprays the hair with a heat protectant such as White Sands Liquid Texture — Firm, curling the entire head with a medium to large curling iron. If you want streaks for playful colour, Hamilton suggests applying HyperColor Hair Powder with a makeup brush and then setting the style with a medium hold hairspray, while teasing the roots a bit. Marcia Hamilton Jada Pinkett Smith, P!nk, John Legend and Kim Kardashian are among Marcia Hamilton’s star-studded clientele. Known for her spunky, edgy style, Hamilton has made a colourful splash in celebrity beauty. She has appeared on The Ellen Show, The Today Show, E! Entertainment and other shows on NBC, ABC and HBO. www.marciahamilton.com

PHOTOGRAPHY BY DEBORAH ANDERSON

Q: How would you describe P!nk’s style? A: P!nk’s beauty style is fun and edgy, yet effortless. She’s a spunky girl and lets it show in her tough mama swag.


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IN DIAMOND’S ARCHITECT JACK DIAMOND REFLECTS ON HIS CAREER, HIS ATTITUDE TOWARDS DESIGN AND HIS MAGNUM OPUS WRITTEN BY MICHAEL HILL

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can’t find Jack Diamond’s house. Back and forth, the car inches along the snow-lined avenue, my eyes scanning for the address, or anything to distinguish the home of the renowned architect. An unruly imagination had built-up preconceptions of a standout facade that only the mind of a veteran building designer could conjure. Something remarkable. Unforgettable. Perhaps something modern: wrapped in glass, clean and conspicuous. Or maybe something avant-garde with hard, distinct angles and imposing geometrics of unconventional proportions. Something wildly original, impressional, unmistakable. But that isn’t Diamond’s style. Seated next to a crackling fire, one leg casually draped over the other, Diamond outlines his approach to restoring his Moore Park home. In the living room, where he currently sits, the fireplace

RING

and bay window were moved to buildout the room and improve proportion. Raising the staircase on the first landing connected dining room with kitchen. A garage was added underneath the home so they could enter indoors — practical, considering the climate. It’s all about convenience and comfort. No unnecessary flair, nothing overstated or boisterous. “This is a Victorian house with Victorian sensibilities,” the South African–born principal and founder of Diamond Schmitt Architects says flatly. “I extended that. I respected and restored that.” And just like that, all anticipations shatter against sensibility, a respect for historical interests and multiple passes down a quiet, quaint avenue. This is the attitude Diamond wields for all his projects. He rejects the heylook-what-I-built style of more showy starchitects who fashion buildings as monuments to themselves instead of in

the interest of those who use them. It’s a Buddhist-esque mentality, concerned with balance between environment and structure. Buildings, for Diamond, should not disrupt the surrounding cityscape. They should create harmony between their intended use and their users. “I think some architects make this mistake: the building is too important,” he explains in his soft, slightly raspy cadence. “The question for me is, experientially, will you enjoy it?” Tall and handsome, like a leading man from Hollywood’s golden era, Diamond built his 50-year career on this down-toearth approach. He fused security and accommodation at the Israeli Ministry of Foreign Affairs, which won the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada’s Award of Excellence. He manifested St. Michael’s Hospital’s new vision towards health care, shaping a space to facilitate medical practitioners, researchers and

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PHOTO BY RICHARD JOHNSON

PHOTO BY DIAMOND SCHMITT ARCHITECTS

BOTTOM LEFT TO RIGHT: The new Mariinsky Theatre, the first new Russian opera house built since the time of the czars; a view of the stage inside the Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts RIGHT PAGE, LEFT TO RIGHT: La Maison Symphonique de Montréal; the glass and steel bridge connecting St. Michael’s Hospital to the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute; the auditorium of La Maison Symphonique de Montréal


Architect Jack Diamond stands before a backdrop of his watercolour paintings, the focus of his book Sketches: From Here and There

www.dolcemag.com

PHOTO BY TOM ARBAN

PHOTO BY TOM ARBAN

PHOTO BY JAMES BRITTAIN

PHOTO BY JESSE MILNS

educators at the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute. More recently, he’s been busy redeveloping Toronto’s waterfront with Corus Quay, the LEED Gold certified headquarters of Corus Entertainment that utilizes sustainable features such as a four-storey biofilter and rainwater recycling. And of course, he dazzled Toronto with the Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts. This glass-faced structure was designed not only as a premier venue for opera and ballet, but also to convey a sense of accessibility to what is traditionally viewed as highbrow art. “What we found in Toronto is that the transparency removed the mystique and the elitism of the opera as a cultural institution,” says Diamond, who also studied and worked under Louis Khan, one of the world’s most influential modern architects. Awards have flooded the Four Seasons Centre, home to the Canadian Opera Company, helping to breathe new life into the Canadian opera scene. But for Diamond, it was also a key project leading to what is being touted as his magnum opus. Today, Diamond stands at the cusp of completing St. Petersburg’s second Mariinsky Theatre. Set to open in May, just in time for the Russian cultural capital’s renowned White Nights Festival, the Mariinsky II, as it’s come to be known, will be the first opera house built in Russia since the time of the czars. It will increase the capacity

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I THINK SOME ARCHITECTS MAKE THIS MISTAKE: THE BUILDING IS TOO IMPORTANT. THE QUESTION FOR ME IS, EXPERIENTIALLY, WILL YOU ENJOY IT?

audience members. “Everybody’s in it together,” he adds. While “contemporary in its expression,” many of the principles of the classical opera house are employed internally. Diamond describes the wood-lined, horseshoe-shaped auditorium wrapping from one side of the stage to the other. “The horseshoe is a very good sociological shape because the audience has a sense of itself.” It improves sightlines while also creating connection between audience and show. “The arms of the building, of these balconies, stretch out to the performers,” he explains. “There’s an embrace of the performers, so they feel close to the audience.” Perhaps the literal and metaphorical cherry-on-top is the unique rooftop amphitheatre. Apart from cathedrals that dot the skyline, St. Petersburg is essentially all on one level. Being so far north, the city also experiences days of no darkness during June — hence the White Nights name. “So we thought, wouldn’t it be wonderful to have a concert on the roof,” says Diamond. “So that’s what we did.” As we tour the rest of his home, the father of two exhibits his framed watercolour paintings (the focus of his book Sketches: From Here and There), which line a simply furnished dining room. He notes a great satisfaction when a painting comes out right: “When

you’ve created something that is no longer a representation of the thing that is there, but as an object itself.” He mentions in passing a former athletic career in track and rugby. When asked, he explains he played for a South African touring rugby team, competing internationally against the likes of France, Wales and Australia. In his studio he reveals a book with page after page of copied, pun-filled newspaper clippings praising his achievements: “Wallabies Cut by Diamond” and “Diamond Is a Gem.” A fond smile forms on the 80-year-old’s face as pride wells from nostalgia. Indeed, there’s a mild sense of ego to Diamond. When your work is so exposed, on display squarely in the public eye, there has to be. It doesn’t, however, come from arrogance. It’s very grounded, self-aware, based in contentment over jobs well done. He’s spent his entire life dedicated to what he loves, honing his skill, investing countless days and nights to his craft — so much so, sometimes he views architecture more as a priesthood. With such devotion comes confidence. Confidence that doesn’t require ostentation. Architecture is a calling, a way of life — Diamond just wants to do it as well as he can. His ultimate goal: to produce “good buildings.” That’s all there is to it? “What else?” www.dsai.ca

The Israeli Ministry of Foreign Affairs

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of the “venerable” Mariinsky, a jewel of Russian arts built in 1860. Like all of Diamond’s projects, the Mariinsky II, whose construction is the centre of the forthcoming documentary The Maestro & The Master, honours the surrounding traditional Russian architecture. However, this eightstorey, 2,000-seat theatre also embraces contemporary manners. “The spaces of all the lobbies are interconnected,” explains Diamond, who notes music as his second love. “So that’s a very democratic position.” Traditionally, opera houses feature separate entrances for patrons of differing classes. By utilizing a single entrance, hierarchical divisions are removed, giving a sense of equivalence and unity amongst


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AN HOUR WITH THE HONOURABLE

HAL JACKMAN Henry N.R. (Hal) Jackman tells us why choosing philanthropy over fast cars, flights to Florence and faux châteaus is the easiest decision he’s ever made INTERVIEW BY MADELINE STEPHENSON / PHOTOGRAPHY BY CHRISTOPH STRUBE

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an otherwise ordinary downtown Toronto office tower, the Hal Jackman Foundation’s 10th-floor University Avenue suite reaches a level of unlikely wonderment. A museum-like foyer where Persian rugs kiss chevron floors and landscape masterpieces coat the walls is just a prelude to the erstwhile lieutenantgovernor of Ontario’s penchant for the arts. The former chairman of investment and insurance holding firm E-L Financial Corporation Limited, whose name is habitually on Canada’s rich lists, seems unmoved by the sizable funds his business successes summoned. Since handing the empire’s reins to his own son, Duncan Jackman, the father of five and visitor at Massey College has become far more focused on inflating the fortune of others. An archetype of civic commitment, the socio-political virtuoso has become a vociferous commentator on business, politics and public service — known to give his two cents, and then some. With a sonorous tone that speaks to attentive ears and an expression so storied you can’t help but attempt to read it, the Officer of the Order of Canada’s imposing presence is unparalleled. The hallway leading to his private quarters is lined with ghosts of Jackman’s past 32

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— portraits so real you can feel their laser-like glare as you brush shoulders along the way. It’s there that the towering 80-year-old, who’s given more than $50 million to academic and arts-based causes, lowers into a salmon-coloured chair, crosses his arms and quietly awaits an overture of words. You’ve had great success in business, but it’s fair to say you’ve become even better known for your commitment to public service. Your passion for the latter is apparent in everything you do. What sparked this philanthropic spirit? I think part of it is your upbringing. You’re brought up in a family that was very committed to public service and charity, and both my mother and father were. It’s infectious, I guess, part of the genes maybe? Both my brothers and sister are very big in philanthropy, too, so it just comes on you. And the tax system is much better now than it used to be — it encourages philanthropy. In a sense, it gives a lot of people the option: do you want to pay taxes or do you want to give it away? For a lot of people, that’s an easy question. I’d rather give it to something I believe in than give it to the government, which might do anything with it. I’ve always given away every year, as far as I can remember, more than I’ve spent on myself and my family. www.dolcemag.com

What other changes can be made to catalyze philanthropy? Well they’re always pressing, I mean you can give stocks and be exempt from capital gains tax but they want to extend it to shares and private companies and real estate and they may be successful. I’m a little skeptical that they’ll get it now because I think that the rich, or the top people, are making way too much money in my opinion. I just don’t think, however it may be justified, it’s in the cards to lower the taxes for the very rich right now. Your mother Mary Rowell Jackman was a devoted philanthropist. Did her charitable actions help engrain similar qualities within you? I guess it did, we’re all products of past influences we’ve had. So our parents and the people we’ve known have an influence on us. It’s hard though for us to pinpoint this or that, but I think probably yes. My father too, he was excessively generous and relative to what he had he gave a lot of money, a lot of money and a lot of things. What did you learn about life and business from your father, Harry Jackman, former Canadian politician and distinguished businessman? I learned a lot of things. I’d say he had a very acute sense of judgment when it came to security values. He certainly encouraged my interest in politics,


Henry N.R. (Hal) Jackman has become a respected pundit on Canada’s corporate and political affairs

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The Oracle of Ontario: Henry N.R. (Hal) Jackman

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I HAVE NO REGRETS ABOUT ANYTHING I’VE DONE. I THINK I’D DO IT ALL THE SAME

which I’ve always been interested in, and he was very generous. Going back to the ’90s, what was your most memorable moment as the 25th lieutenantgovernor of Ontario? What I look back on most of all was that you were dealing constantly with volunteer effort. It could have been anything: building a new park, getting a fire engine for the volunteer fire brigade or building a wing in the hospital, something like that. So you always see the best of people because when they’re acting in a community sort of way to do something, collectively together, the problems they

may have among themselves, I’d never see that. I’d never go to any bad meetings. I’d always kid to the premiers, [Mike] Harris and Bob Rae, they’d go to bad meetings, I’d never go to bad meetings. Your most notable benefaction was a $30-million endowment to the University of Toronto in 2007, which made headlines as the largest commitment ever made by an individual to the humanities at a Canadian university. Why have you been so generous to U of T over the years? Well that’s where I graduated from. I gave a lot of money to a lot of things up there but the big thing was $30 million to the humanities and $10 million — $11 www.dolcemag.com

million actually — to the law school. I graduated from the law school and it made me chancellor, and I was chancellor for six years. Now I’m visitor of Massey College, which I’ve also given money to. That’s my university. U of T has a huge advantage over the other colleges because it’s right in the centre of the city. It’s close to the banks, it’s close to the theatres, the opera, the ballet, the libraries, everything is within short walking distance to the University of Toronto, and the medical hospitals are all right there. So that makes a difference as to why the place is excellent — it attracts good people. DOLCE VITA MAGAZINE

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You actually earned a reputation as Canada’s most underpaid CEO when you controlled E-L Financial Corporation Ltd. Why didn’t you take a bigger cut? Yeah I was, well that’s what it was. There was this [feature] that ranks people that are underpaid relative to the size of their company, I guess, but some of them, how do they get to make $20 million? It’s absurd, obscene, I mean I wouldn’t know what to do to spend it, I couldn’t. I really couldn’t. I mean what do you do? You start to develop a lifestyle, I guess you could if you bought a house in the Hamptons or maybe in Toronto. You could get a huge palace out in Oakville or someplace, you could do it and then do it in different other cities. You could spend it and have a personal household staff of 20 or 30 people and chauffeurdriven cars and jet airplanes, you could spend it. But there’s no kick in that. I don’t understand it. With philanthropy, I don’t know that I’m that much more generous than anybody else, but there, it’s going to make a difference. Do you believe in altruism? I would get more kick, I think, out of my last big gift, which was $11 million to the [U of T] law school. I get a bigger kick out of that than buying a jet airplane, I can tell you that! Or a yacht. I can 36

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tell you this: particularly when you’re lieutenant-governor, you recognize so many people who give donations, and then as chancellor there were some very large major gifts when I was there and it’s amazing. I never met anybody who cried or wept about a gift. They’re all delighted. I’ve never seen anyone or any member of the family have a negative feeling about a gift. What are some of the principles of the Hal Jackman Foundation? The Hal Jackman Foundation, which is relatively small — it’s not small, it’s getting bigger — is basically run by my daughter Victoria. It’s almost exclusively the arts, creative arts, particularly visual arts, and she does a lot of stuff. But that’s hers, the rest [of the kids] are trustees, and if I have anything left they’ll get it. Describe your current economic outlook. In the eye of the global financial crisis you were reasonably bullish and quite accurate in regards to Canada. What is your position today? I think we’ll struggle through. Our government’s giving mixed signals, particularly in the United States. The Central Bank of Bernanke says we’re going to have quantitative easing, keep interest rates low, stimulate the economy, and banks have got to loan the money, meanwhile Hillary Clinton and others are saying the trouble with Americans is that they don’t save enough, they spend too much. Those are mixed signals, you see, those are inconsistent signals and I think that’s what’s spooking the economy. There’s a paralysis of leadership. If you had a magic wand, what would you change? I don’t have to do that — I’m an old guy, I’m retired so I don’t have to do that. I just sit back and think. And I stopped speculating. I’m not going to be prime minister of Canada, they’re not going to elect me. Is there an average day for Hal Jackman? I don’t race to get downtown early in the morning. It depends, leisurely I walk to the office for exercise; I live in Rosedale. I don’t do much. I talk to nice people like you, I have a lot of friends, we have www.dolcemag.com

MAJOR GIFTS BY HAL JACKMAN The Jackman Humanities Building and the Jackman Humanities Institute at U of T $30 million The U of T Faculty of Law $11 million The Canadian Opera House Corporation $5 million Canadian Opera Company $1 million National Ballet Company $1 million York University (Philosophy) $1 million Massey College $1 million Dictionary of Old English $500,000 Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies $300,000 Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) $1 million www.haljackmanfoundation.org

lunch. There are lots of things to do in the city. I don’t really do any business. What is the most meaningful gift you’ve ever received? I’ve got a really nice family and five children and six grandchildren so that’s pretty good. When you’re older, things like that become more important. Looking back on your life, what’s been the source of your sweetest moments? I don’t know that I can say I’ve had a moment, but I have no regrets about anything I’ve done. I think I’d do it all the same.

THIS INTERVIEW HAS BEEN EDITED FOR LENGTH AND CLARITY.

How does it feel to be in a position to be able to give back and have such a major impact on your city? I don’t feel any different than I would if I didn’t. But I mean, you have to do something if you have some money. What do you do with it? What can you do? You’re going to die, and I’m an old man; you have to do something. Now I guess some people would have an apartment in Rome and Paris, a place in Florida and Palm Springs, I don’t have any of that. I don’t have it because it doesn’t appeal to me; it was not really a conscious decision to give to the humanities building or buy a place in Arizona. I never had that choice, it just never occurred to me. I love Canada, I love Toronto; I think it’s the greatest city in the world. I have a farm just outside here and that’s it. I don’t have any fancy place in any other country and I can’t understand these big salaries these guys make. I never made that.


HOOKED ON

PHILANTHROPY MARGARET McCAIN ON WHY SHE GIVES AND REFUSES TO QUIT WRITTEN BY MICHAEL HILL / PHOTO BY JESSE MILNS

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argaret McCain’s mother had a problem managing her money: she loved giving it away. “She was incorrigible,” McCain says with a chuckle, recalling the predicaments that wild munificence brought. The family farm sunk into deep financial trouble over it, and was to be sold off. The family gathered at the Nova Scotia estate, sat down the matriarch, the late former senator Margaret Norrie, and detailed how they planned to manage what little money she had left. Then, the doorbell rang. Norrie left the room to answer it. She was gone several minutes. Upon her return, McCain’s brother asked who it had been. A neighbour, Norrie replied. And what did he want? “‘Oh, he needed a little money to feed his kids before the next paycheque,’” McCain recites, laughing. Norrie gave him $100 even though she was hanging by a financial thread. “That’s what she was like,” McCain remembers. “It was part of our culture.” For McCain, the first female lieutenant-governor of New Brunswick, philanthropy, even in its most grassroots form, has always permeated life. Norrie’s sense of selfless beneficence has remained a cornerstone of McCain’s stance towards community involvement to this day. 38

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Since the passing of her husband — the late Wallace McCain, co-founder of McCain Foods, also known for his generous spirit — in 2011, McCain has adopted a similar give-it-all-away attitude. With a little more strategy, mind you. In that year and a half, McCain estimates she’s given $50 million to various Canadian foundations and institutions — including educational and research bodies, such as the University of Toronto and the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research; community support initiatives, such as the Canadian Women’s Foundation and the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health; and hospitals, like Princess Margaret and St. Michael’s — both through the Margaret & Wallace McCain Family Foundation and of her own accord. “After I die, the rest of it goes back to society, too,” she adds. McCain explains she chooses to give in two ways. Strategically, where you give to and become intimately involved in specific areas, becoming an advocate, supporter and promoter of a cause; and charitably, where money is given without immersion. “I think you have to have some kind of balance,” she explains. “You can’t say no to boy scouts that come to the door, or food banks that need help. I can’t say no to them, especially when they involve women and children.” www.dolcemag.com

For McCain, being involved doesn’t come as a challenge. “The first thing you have to do is figure out what you feel passionately about,” she says. McCain’s passion is early childhood development initiatives, specifically ones in Atlantic Canada. Next, explore those interests and search for avenues where you would like to make a difference. Finally, inform yourself on that topic: What does it need? How can it be facilitated? Where can I help? When you become more informed, you become involved. And then, as McCain explains, you’re hooked. “Once you start investing in an organization or an issue, you never really let go.” www.mwmccain.ca


Homebuilder and philanthropist Peter Gilgan at the Mattamy Athletic Centre in Toronto

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DROP OF WATER MOONLIGHTING AS A MAJOR BENEFACTOR, MATTAMY HOMES FOUNDER PETER GILGAN SEES THE GLASS HALF FULL WRITTEN BY MADELINE STEPHENSON / PHOTO BY JESSE MILNS

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t’s been almost a year since Peter Gilgan made the single largest private donation to a children’s hospital in Canadian history. “Didn’t you hear? I took it back,” he playfully jests about the $40 million he donated to the SickKids Centre for Research and Learning. Removing the lid to let his herbal tea cool while sitting in the open-concept café on the second floor of the Mattamy Athletic Centre, the benevolent builder opens up about the faculty of philanthropy. Wearing a pale gingham dress shirt under a classic black sport coat, the low-profile founder of Canada’s largest 40

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new homebuilding firm looks more like a Brooks Brother than a construction CEO. Leisurely leaning back in his chair, Gilgan explains the confluence of emotions that comes with being a major benefactor. “There’s a sense of accomplishment, a sense of pride, but there’s also a sense of humility that you just think about how lucky you are to be able to do this, and in its own way it’s a humbling thing because it’s some higher power that let this happen, you know?” says the former accountant who spearheaded Mattamy Homes in the late ’70s and has since built more than 50,000 residences in Canada and the U.S. www.dolcemag.com

His gentle voice competes with the clangour of Saturday students dropping dumbbells in the background, unaware that the man who helped finance their fitness centre is sitting just a few feet away. Gilgan, who gifted Ryerson University $15 million towards the transformation of the old Maple Leaf Gardens in 2011, doesn’t crave the attention but he is aware of its impact. In the few short months it’s been open, the number of students actively involved in athletics and recreation has gone up over 400 per cent according to Ryerson’s president, Sheldon Levy. “It’s had a cultural change. People are talking


about sports on campus, the teams are doing well and people feel tremendous pride in the university,” says Levy. Philanthropy’s ink has always dripped beyond the dotted line for Gilgan. At the request of his good friend Tim Hockey, president and CEO of TD Canada Trust and chair of the SickKids Centre for Research and Learning’s $200-million fundraising campaign, he agreed to join the volunteer cabinet to help raise the rest. “I find it tough to ask people to give money, I find it very awkward,” says Gilgan, who does it anyway. “A lot of folks haven’t had enough experience at the good that can come from their contributions. I’m blessed to have had the experience with a couple of folks that have said to me over the years, ‘The thing I’m most grateful for from you, Peter, is you’ve taught me how to give and it’s opened up a whole new aspect of my life.’ To me that’s cool.” As someone who knows what it’s like to be on the other end of the line, Gilgan has learned that giving must be gauged. “You can’t just jump in with your heart, you’ve got to use your brain or you’ll just blow your money out the doors, and that’s no fun.” Prior to stepping up as SickKids’s lead donor, Gilgan familiarized himself with every aspect of the imminent $400-million facility. After attending a tea party with the head of research and meeting several scientists, he was sold by their transformative vision and innovative infrastructure that emphasized community aspects embedded in his own corporate culture. Instead of isolating independent departments, researchers and scientists from various specializations would be encouraged to interact. “The idea of being able to collaborate is so obviously fundamental. They’ve taken diseases or problems or abnormalities that are related somehow and they’ve grouped them so that those floors are adjacent to each other,” says Gilgan, who earned the title of Canada’s Entrepreneur of the Year in 2007 from Ernst & Young. “I really got excited when I saw how thoughtful people had been in planning this facility.” “He’s all about design and functionality,” says Ted Garrard, president and CEO of the SickKids Foundation. Scheduled to open in

September 2013, the 21-storey tower on Bay and Elm streets will transform SickKids into the No. 1 child health research institute in the world, housing 2,000 of the medical field’s leading scientists. “There’s no doubt that we had many people respond in terms of being inspired by his commitment and it’s always important having people publicly acknowledge their gifts as examples

YOU JUST GO TO A PLACE WHERE YOU HAVE THE MOST AMAZING CONVERSATION WITH YOURSELF. AN HOUR LATER YOU SNAP OUT OF THE TRANCE AND SAY, ‘THAT’S WHAT I’M GOING TO DO’ of what we can do philanthropically,” Garrard adds. “He’s just a very, very thoughtful, decent human being that it’s become a real pleasure to know because he inspires everything that’s good about humankind.” “I think people give me too much credit,” says the father of eight, who focuses on health and wellness, education and global humanitarian issues through The Peter Gilgan Foundation. In 2005, he founded an annual fundraiser called Tour de Bleu where a group of 40 likeminded fund-racers cycle from Ferndale on Lake Rosseau in Muskoka to the destinations of carefully selected causes they support. The event has raised more than $4 million to date. “It’s a great forum to get people together in a spirit of camaraderie, although we all try to kill each other,” he says with a laugh. For www.dolcemag.com

the second consecutive year, 2013 funds will go towards the Mattamy National Cycling Centre, a new velodrome that will be used for the 2015 Pan Am/ Parapan Am Games and beyond. Some of Gilgan’s best ideas have come to him while biking. It’s during those times that his stream of consciousness is acutely focused on his surroundings: the rush of water unleashed by melting snow, the peaks and valleys that mimic the motions of life, the empirical elements of nature we often take for granted. “You just go to a place where you have the most amazing conversation with yourself,” he says. “An hour later you snap out of the trance and say, ‘That’s what I’m going to do,’ and it’s crystal clear.” These epiphanies aren’t prescribed, but the avid cycler is fortunate to experience them often. What does the sweet life mean to Peter Gilgan? “Wow,” he says, taking a deep breath. “It’s your family, your loved ones, your good friends. That’s the sweet stuff. It’s who you’re with, what you’re doing, the quality of your conversations.” A certain cocktail also helps. “I have a weakness for a Bombay Sapphire Martini, just one,” he reveals, leaning in to impart the specifics of his covert concoction. “Stirred, not shaken. No vermouth, absolutely frozen glass, not a drop of water — not a drop of water! You stir it with super cold ice and get it out of there real quick before it starts to melt. That water just pollutes the gin, it makes a big difference,” he says, with the hand gestures of a bartender. “I know James Bond said it, and I know it looks good, but just cold ice, out of there before it melts.” It’s now two o’clock and Gilgan, who’s learned to mix a little leisure into his 18-hour workdays, is off to an exhibit at the Loch Gallery in Yorkville to support one of his favourite Canadian artists, Philip Craig. In many ways, that methodical martini speaks volumes about the concentrated CEO. It’s precisely that measured attention to detail that got Gilgan to the top of his trade. Whether it’s business, homebuilding or philanthropy, his principles are never thinned or weakened by unnecessary additives. The Gilgan you see is the Gilgan you get, not a drop of water more. www.mattamyhomes.com/tourdebleu DOLCE VITA MAGAZINE

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A MODEL

BUSINESS EXPLORING THE DOLLARS AND SENSE OF FASHION WITH CANADIAN DESIGNER FOTINI WRITTEN BY MADELINE STEPHENSON

PHOTO BY JESSE MILNS

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Fotini Copeland is wearing a self-designed, gunmetal grey sweater dress at the Four Seasons Hotel Toronto

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obert Burke hasn’t forgotten the day Fotini Copeland walked into his NYC consulting firm. The former senior vice-president of fashion and PR for Bergdorf Goodman met the Greek-Canadian designer in 2010 when she sought his industry expertise on launching her eponymous label. “She was unique,” says the chairman and CEO of Robert Burke Associates, whose clients include Marc Jacobs, Marchesa and Vera Wang. “She was extremely well studied about brands and had a very distinct point of view. Her desire was to be an international brand, so she approached it, as she does everything, in a very strategic, thoughtful way.” Two and a half years later, in the elevator ride up to the sixth floor of the Four Seasons Hotel Toronto, the mononymous designer is a duality of business and pleasure. Redolent of a modern-day Hitchcock blond in kneehigh Gucci boots and a custom-print blouse from her personal collection, Fotini reveals that in Greek, her name means light. The serendipity is striking. Born in Athens, raised in Toronto and based in New York, Fotini is a fusion of Grecian gusto, Canadian compassion and American ambition. At seven, she was fixated on tracing women’s silhouettes from paper doll cutouts and colouring on clothes with


little blue box, powerful branding is the seam that keeps labels from falling apart. “Today, it’s not enough to just be creative. You need to be able to have an understanding of the market, of business, of branding,” says Burke. “The days are long gone where it was just being creative for creative sake, and [Fotini] had very much approached it as a creative person, but also as a business person.” Fashion, with its figurative fantasies and runway sugar rushes, requires a continuous flow of revenue to make it to the masses. Even now, in her early stages, she has a strong sense of her identity and target market. “I understand my woman and I listen to her,” says Fotini, who admires the bold, sexy flavours of Tom Ford. “You have to persevere and, again, this is where you really need to understand

TODAY, IT’S NOT ENOUGH TO JUST BE CREATIVE. YOU NEED TO BE ABLE TO HAVE AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE MARKET, OF BUSINESS, OF BRANDING

Fotini spring/summer 2013 1. Emmanuelle dress 2. Veronique blouse 3. Jacqueline dress

PHOTOS BY JAY MARROQUIN

crayons. “It was my favourite thing to do on rainy days. I had a beautiful veranda that I used to sit on and I would just go out and escape and dream,” she says, sinking into a chaise in a private quarter of the boutique hotel. By eight, she was using a Barbie sewing machine and glue to bring her creations to life. Taking direction from her strict hotelier father, Fotini put fashion aside and spent several years flexing her corporate muscles at Merrill Lynch, Molson and finally as the director of communications at a major store fixture business. It was the latter role that reignited her pursuit to turn paper doll reveries into reality. “That was what pulled the trigger to say to me ‘You need to go back and follow your dream.’” To study the trade, Fotini travelled to Italy and spent time at corsetry

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— Robert Burke houses in Bergamo, Bologna and Como, working with experienced artisans in beautiful ateliers. “It’s just that old-school way of creating and understanding the construction,” she says. After three years of research and hands-on experience, Fotini was ready for her next move. She now credits her dad for encouraging her to sharpen her business acumen before breaking into one of the most cut-throat industries. “You need to have that creativity, but you also need to have an understanding of what it takes to grow a business and do proper market research, understand the fundamentals of going into an industry before just saying ‘I’m going to make pretty clothes,’ it’s just not the way the world works.” So, in the midst of the global financial crisis, she began developing a business model for a corseted-inspired line women would fall in love with. From Missoni’s unmistakable zigzags, Pucci’s psychedelic swirls and Tiffany’s

financially and economically what your position is going in as an entrepreneur, so yes, it was a long haul but I was determined and here I am.” Her third collection, spring/summer 2013, which showed at Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week in New York, is a feminine, amorous ode to France, featuring hand-cut rose petals and wisteria prints on silk chiffon and organza gowns. “A big part of it was the watercolourists and the impressionists,” she says. “It was almost like painting a canvas.” “She’s very clear on whom she wants to appeal to and how they live and how they dress, what they do,” says Burke. Her corseted, laser-cut, peplum Cleopatra gown gave the brand a boost when comedian Amy Poehler wore it to much fanfare at the 2012 Met Ball Costume Institute Gala. Though she’s heading back to New York City to finish up her fourth collection, Fotini feels the time is right to expand. “I’m still growing the business in the U.S. but I most definitely am very excited to come www.dolcemag.com

to Canada. This is my home and I’m very proud of it,” she says of her imminent plans to showcase her collection to Canadian retailers. Every now and then Fotini thinks about that little girl who spent hours dreaming on her veranda. “I’ve learned my perseverance and strength have really been a part of who I am today, and not just career wise, I think personally I’ve had to overcome certain obstacles and ensure that I’m doing what I really want now and living it for myself.” www.fotini-nyc.comTue diam, secte conullam ing DOLCE VITA MAGAZINE

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The sun is setting on mundane hues: tap into Scapa’s Trancoso Colour collection and kick some inspiration into your wardrobe with an electrifying colour palette of magenta, green and sky blue

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ind your earthly paradise tucked away in the bold folds of Scapa Fashion’s summer 2013 collections. Awash in rich, luxurious colours and irresistibly daring patterns, the world-renowned Dutch fashion house is ready to transport your style — and your senses — to adventurous new heights www.scapafashion.com

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Crisp and classic, this white-hot ensemble from the Trancoso Colour collection blends timeless style with one of the year’s freshest trends — feminine frills

ESCAPE WRITTEN BY AMANDA STOREY

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Shine in the middle of the crowd with this sparkle-kissed dress from Scapa’s Flor Tropical collection

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ROUGH LUXE

THE RUNWAY

CALGARY DESIGNER PAUL HARDY DECONSTRUCTS FASHION WITH TRANSCENDENT EFFECT WRITTEN BY SIMONA PANETTA / PHOTOGRAPHY BY PHIL CROZIER

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hile the who’s who of the industry refer to Paul Hardy as a star of this generation’s Canadian fashion designers, the subdued, self-described recluse hardly fans the flames of his ego. “I always felt like it was a bit of a dangerous thing to buy into your own fame,” says the Calgary designer, who was feted by notable guests at a hometown bash commemorating his decade in fashion last year. “The first five years I was working in the basement of my house and travelling, so there wasn’t much opportunity for me to know what was going on.” Hunkered down in his Inglewood atelier in the Canadian Prairies, far away from the combustible fashion

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hubs of Paris and New York City, Hardy’s ability to forgo a romanticized perception of his work to instead weave transcendent messages through his garments has led to a brilliant career. His spring/summer 2013 collection, “Breaking Amish,” is an evocative reflection of a coming-of-age story; the spiritual journey of a girl purposely without a name so one can find common ground with her experience, explains Hardy. Apart from the collection’s impressive use of leather, silk and tulle, the profundity of his work expresses a voyage of self-realization. “I believe my work is used as a tool to teach me life lessons that I’m learning personally,” says Hardy, who grew up in unostentatious Winnipeg. “That’s really why I design clothes. I’ve always believed that we’re sort of spiritual beings living a human experience.” Before settling in Alberta in 1998, Hardy received a fashion degree from Toronto’s Ryerson University and moved to New York City for six months. After careful consideration, he turned down a Nashville record producer that was willing to financially back his work to instead take a job as a personal shopper at Holt Renfrew in Calgary. Many viewed his move as peculiar, but the unconventional decision to work directly with clients would become the linchpin of his success. “I did a collection once that was based on the idea of not existing at the mercy of your circumstances,” says Hardy, who began the non-profit organization, Reversal of Fortune, partnering with marginalized women in Rwanda. “That was a bit challenging to articulate in a visual form, so what I did was rather than dictate to people how the looks should appear and be worn, we did the runway show where we showed all the tops with no bottoms and then all the bottoms with no tops. The idea was that people wouldn’t be fed a concept that says ‘this is how it’s supposed to be worn,’ it was really about them seeing an individual idea and how they could personalize it.” His ability to understand what a woman is missing from her closet has won him a long list of supporters, including Sarah McLachlan, who endorsed him to design the costumes for Fumbling Towards Ecstasy, an Alberta Ballet performance featuring her music. Referring to the term “rough luxe” to describe his esthetic, Hardy’s appreciation for clothing and spaces that exude comfort and character over polish and pomp are reflected in his work. Blending luxurious fabrics with slightly weathered or distressed pieces in his clothing and interior design projects is his way of constantly reinterpreting design with juxtaposing concepts. “I have some beautiful Victorian chairs from 1860 that I’ve recovered in speckled longhorn with upholstery tacks and lingerie elastic trim. It just makes very vintage pieces new and interesting again,” says the avid traveller, who’s away on work-related trips five months out of the year. He’s currently developing a fall/winter collection of shearling jackets for women and men in Europe, and hopes to add handbags and an online store to his repertoire. Although a decade in the biz has formed the basis of an eminent career, Hardy has had his eye on design since

I’VE ALWAYS BELIEVED THAT WE’RE SORT OF SPIRITUAL BEINGS LIVING A HUMAN EXPERIENCE

he was a young boy. Introduced to the world of haute couture by his Grade 7 teacher, he became transfixed by the Christian La Croix pom-pomfringed jackets she wore to class. “I thought she was the coolest thing because she always came to school wearing a different outfit,” says Hardy of his childhood muse, who he invited to his 10-year celebration. From a lineage of bankers and accountants, his parents encouraged his rare creative gene, bringing him over to the house of his great-aunt Marjorie on his days off from school. The 1940s-power-suit-wearing esthete taught him the techniques of embroidery and cross-stitching, the art of setting a table and how to host a party. “She was very eccentric. Once she got fascinated with the colour pink, so she painted her whole house pink, including the piano and the telephone. I’m definitely a legacy of hers, that’s the only way I can equate it.” www.paulhardydesign.com DOLCE VITA MAGAZINE

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Sweet

DREAMS UNDER COVERS WITH THE NATIONAL BALLET OF CANADA’S REVERED COUPLE, HEATHER OGDEN AND GUILLAUME CÔTÉ WRITTEN BY MADELINE STEPHENSON / PHOTOGRAPHY BY CHRISTOPH STRUBE

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he hardwood stairs squeak ever so softly as Guillaume Côté and Heather Ogden soar up to the bedroom of their rustic industrial Leslieville home. The National Ballet of Canada’s principal pair leap into their king-sized bed, lift the downfilled covers up to their eyes and let out a muffled laugh. Unflinchingly open to this cheeky photo shoot, the newlyweds exchange coquettish witticisms as the camera clicks away. This playful frame is just one case of the consummate couple’s spark that’s setting the ballet world ablaze. 50

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It’s noon on a brisk Monday and having just returned from a three-week tour in Washington, D.C., and Ottawa, Ogden and Côté are still settling in. “There’s a lot of things shoved in cupboards right now, don’t open any doors,” Ogden kids. On Friday they’ll be packing again for a two-week stretch in San Francisco to be guest artists in the Hamburg Ballet’s Nijinsky. The autobiographical melodrama of dance, love and lost dreams is oceans away from this duo’s reality, but Ogden says it’s one of her most emotional roles yet. “They’re husband and wife but it’s not all pretty, you know? He has his demons www.dolcemag.com

and she has hers and they stay married. It’s not storybook at all.” Ogden, who trained at the Richmond Academy of Dance in British Columbia, joined the Toronto-based National Ballet of Canada in 1998, the same year as Côté, who was raised in LacSaint-Jean, Quebec, and who studied at Canada’s National Ballet School after being primed in his parents’ dance studio. “The first year in the company is usually as an apprentice, so it’s like one big audition year,” says Ogden, whose startling talents landed her a contract with one of the most competitive companies in the world.


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HAIR AND MAKEUP: GIANLUCA ORIENTI/JUDYINC.COM. HAIR STYLING FLEXIBILITY AND HEAT PROTECTION ACHIEVED WITH TRESEMMÉ THERMAL CREATIONS VOLUMIZING MOUSSE AND HEAT TAMER PROTECTIVE SPRAY.


Their striking connection came to life in the classic love stories of Romeo and Juliet and Cinderella. “When I first joined the company the first big roles that I danced were with her. We learned how to dance, together,” says Côté, who has a degree in music composition and a Takamine electric-acoustic guitar in the corner of his living room that strums up his rock-star ambitions. Following several years of flirtatious friendship, the two finally realized their partnership went beyond the stage’s perimeters. “I always thought either we’ll date and it’ll be a disaster or we’ll get married. I knew it was going to be the best or the worst,” says Ogden, 32, who has the champagne tendrils of Taylor Swift. “So eventually when the timing was right, we were both single, for me I just started feeling differently about him.” After being separated by a long period of travel, Côté returned and asked Ogden to join him for a casual drink. “Then we kissed and that changed everything,” Ogden gushes. Her husband, a 31-years-young Christian Bale carbon copy, winks. “We were already best friends,” says Côté, who proposed to Ogden on Ponte Vecchio Bridge in 2009 above Arno River in Florence, Italy. “I was in Florence two years before and I remember standing there one day and it was the most beautiful sunset and I remember missing her terribly and I was just like, ‘I think one day if we get engaged it’d be amazing to do it here.’” Ogden still makes Côté perform the proposal for fun (which he politely refuses to do today). “I feel like we’re lucky; we’re so in love. We say it all the time: we’re lucky.” she says. “We’re living la dolce vita — minus the sweets,” Côté adds. They both break into a spell of laughter. Covetous romance aside, today they’re awakening what ballet legends Rex Harrington and Karen Kain once evoked within them. After a recent performance in Ottawa, Côté was approached backstage by a young, bright-eyed fan who expressed his candid veneration in a thoughtful card. “Dear Mr. Côté, it was nice to meet you. I am amazed by how you do all that!! You inspire me. I can’t wait to see you again,” Nigel scrawled in perfect Comic Sans. These moments capture the profundity of their 52

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performances. “You realize you are living the dream because ultimately what we do inspires young people and inspires beauty and it changes people’s lives. It’s a wonderful thing.” Before heading back to the National Ballet to rehearse, Côté opens up his laptop to share his latest feat, Lost in Motion, which went viral on YouTube. “We had one crazy idea, we wanted to make a commercial for male dance,” he says of the high-production, cinematic short film he created with Montreal director Ben Shirinian. “You watch a hockey commercial and it’s just a guy doing a slap shot but somehow he looks like a God because there’s slow-mo and there’s a cool track in the background. So, I was like, ‘What we do is pretty incredible, it just needs to be shown in a different light.’” That light took two-and-a-half years and a major fundraising campaign to ignite, but it caught fire with an online audience of more than 1.3 million and was lauded at the Toronto International Film Festival. It even caught the eye of L.A. Times’ culture writer Jean Lenihan,

who hailed the talent of Canada’s premier ballet company and called the three-minute piece “a fast-spreading international calling card” and “the greatest evocation of a dancer’s springy ballon yet on record.” Huddled around the laptop, Côté’s self-choreographed solo performance leaves us breathless at his sheer defiance of gravity and time-suspending pirouettes. To the instrumental poppoignancy of James LaValle, Côté unspools a performance of a lifetime — one that’s making an international impression. This is the global validation artists like Côté and Ogden have earned. And considering it was just a side project, there’s no question their journeys have more juice. “We’re making a counterpoint now for a female dancer,” he says, gazing at Ogden. She beams at the anticipation of filming her own ballet proclamation. At the crescendo of their careers, two partners appear to be dancing at the transcendental intersection of dreams and destiny. www.national.ballet.ca

I FEEL LIKE WE’RE LUCKY; WE’RE SO IN LOVE. WE SAY IT ALL THE TIME: WE’RE LUCKY — Heather Ogden

www.dolcemag.com


ACHT

THE BOATS AND BEACHWEAR TO MAKE ANY HIGH-SEAS EXCURSION UNFORGETTABLE WRITTEN BY MICHAEL HILL

SPOT

SESSA MARINE C38

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WHITE CAP Norma Kamali ruched Johnny bandeau bikini top; Hi-lo hem skirt in white; BCBG belt in gold; Michael Kors, Red Herring, Debenhams’ Jon Richard, Samantha Manzo and Mudd accessories

GIVE IT A TRI Michi angular Feline cut-out bra in black; Eberjey Beach Glow bikini bottoms; Michael Kors, Red Herring, Debenhams’ Jon Richard, Samantha Manzo and Mudd accessories 54

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PHOTOS BY RENATA KAVEH, STYLED BY CATERINA MINTHE, HAIR AND MAKEUP BY ANIYA NANDY

Crisp and classic, this white-hot ensemble from the Trancoso Colour collection blends timeless style with one of the year’s freshest trends — feminine frills


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With two spacious cockpit layouts available, the Sessa C44 is ideal for high-seas hosting. One option features two couches designed to accommodate up to 12 guests, the second, a 2.3-metre tender garage with launch roller and winch covered by a bathing deck. With two double beds, a wood and leather-finished lounge and sizable rear platform for relaxing dips, this yacht has everything for a great weekend on the water. www.sessamarine.com

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Brimming with style, sophistication and comfort, the Sessa C68 is a mammoth cruiser of open-water luxury. Contemporary elegance flows through all 21 metres of its intricate detailing. A large master cabin with private bathroom adds a high-scale condo feel, while up to three additional cabins accommodate friends. Relax on the dedicated sundeck or grab some shade under its electronic cover. Pull a vintage from the wine cellar and uncork some new memories in the lounge. www.sessamarine.com www.dolcemag.com

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Awarded the Best Motor Yacht below 60 feet in length at last year’s Xiamen International Boat Show, the Sessa Fly54 is a fast yet graceful vessel of contemporary elegance. Its flying bridge balances flawlessly with the yacht’s overall design, facilitating style and pleasure. Grab some vino from the wine cellar and unwind in a plush armchair or sofa. Or, at the end of the day, retire to your luxurious master cabin, lined with cedar and accented by a chromatherapy bathroom. www.sessamarine.com DOLCE VITA MAGAZINE

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PHOTO BY RENATA KAVEH, STYLED BY CATERINA MINTHE, HAIR AND MAKEUP BY ANIYA NANDY

PALM READER Victoria’s Secret retro push-up bra in white; American Apparel nylon tricot high-waist swim brief in shiny peach; Michael Kors, Red Herring, Debenhams’ Jon Richard, Samantha Manzo and Mudd accessories

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PHOTO BY YAO KOUADIO WWW.EDZIN.COM; CREATIVE DIRECTOR: CHRISTINE YU WWW.EDZIN.COM; MODEL: TEA MOIR WWW.CHANTALENADEAU.COM; MAKEUP ARTIST: JEYA SINGH; HAIR STYLIST: CHRISTINA KOLOVOS; WARDROBE STYLIST: NALINIE BUDHU

APPLE MARTINI Hale Bob blouse from Mendocino; BCBG Max Azria watch; Nua Swimwear low-rise Esmeralda bottoms

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BRIGITTE B. Style Stalker snake print Sedgewick tuxedo jacket from Mendocino; Cutler and Gross sunglasses; Nua Swimwear peek-a-boo Ferro suit; Enzo Angiolini gold-embellished peep-toes from Nine West Bloor Street; Necklace from The Bay

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PHOTOS BY YAO KOUADIO WWW.EDZIN.COM; CREATIVE DIRECTOR: CHRISTINE YU WWW.EDZIN.COM; MODEL: TEA MOIR WWW.CHANTALENADEAU.COM; MAKEUP ARTIST: JEYA SINGH; HAIR STYLIST: CHRISTINA KOLOVOS; WARDROBE STYLIST: NALINIE BUDHU

OPTICAL ALLUSION Cutler and Gross premium 1082 Black on Cream Trompe-l’oeil framed sunglasses are now available in a newly commissioned luminescent lime jelly acetate; Top Shop Extra Chunky Chain necklace in silver; Nua Swimwear drop front, back V Cereja Swimsuit in lipstick red


Sitting a mere 1,389 kilometres away from the equator, Aruba shines with warmth

ADVENTURE IN ARUBA

THE HEART OF THE CARIBBEAN A LANDSCAPE OF WATERCOLOUR SUNSETS AND TURQUOISE LIGHTS WRITTEN BY AMANDA STOREY

PHOTO BY ARUBA TOURISM AUTHORITY

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he island of Aruba is a place where genuine smiles beam from local faces; where houses painted mint, magenta and turquoise line the sun-drenched streets; where the word “tourist” seems an improper term for the visitors, who after mere hours of gallivanting through the electric collage of sights and sounds feel to be more at home than on vacation. My weekend-long tour of the island opens with a bang at the Carubbian Festival, an event that travels colourfully through the main stretch of Aruba’s “Sunrise City” in San Nicholas every

Thursday night. An explosion of dialects floats on the warm evening breeze, along with the smell of traditional Aruban cuisine. Vendors stand by their tables selling unique souvenirs, such as engraved wooden pens, plates of coconut candy and cashew cake. Hours later, I am welcomed with a sumptuous queen-sized bed at the luxe Hyatt Regency Aruba Hotel & Casino. It isn’t long before morning tiptoes to life and a new day rides in on the saltwater waves. My first full day turns out to be a bumpy one. On the back of a tour Land Rover, I spend the afternoon rolling www.dolcemag.com

through the island terrain. During my hours with De Palm Tours, I unearth a handful of local secrets — who knew that the island itself is the result of underwater volcanic activity? — and brush elbows with some of the nation’s most treasured attractions, from the eerie wonderment of the collapsed natural bridge to the natural pool at the Arikok National Park. With shaky legs and a sun-kissed smile, I teeter off the luxury SUV and into the evening. The next stop is dinner at Papiamento, a restaurant named for the Aruban language. I am instantly DOLCE VITA MAGAZINE

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thoughts drift through my mind as the seats on the beach slowly begin to fill. Twenty hours later, I buckle into my seat for the flight home. The palm trees out my window shift out of view during takeoff, and before long they are hundreds of feet below me. Craning my neck to peer down at the tiny paradise, I catch a glimpse of the lights

as they flicker to life, welcoming a fresh night of cocada, sequins and dancing in the streets. A cloud erases the island from my view, and it’s as though I’ve awoken from some sort of dream. Settling in, I put on my best Aruban smile and begin counting the days until my return. www.aruba.com

Kayaking the pristine tropical waters is a popular island activity

THE SUN FALLS AND RISES, AND I FEEL THE KISS OF SALT WATER ON MY SKIN AS I PLUNGE OFF THE EDGE OF A CATAMARAN

Aruba’s rich culture, history and landscape make for eye-opening tours

Traditional Aruban cuisine presents an adventure for the palate

PHOTOS BY ARUBA TOURISM AUTHORITY

smitten with the lush, sultry ambiance: an outdoor dining area engulfed by a garden of trees, turquoise light glimmering off a tiled pool, wooden torches playing with candlelight to create a luxurious islandchic vibe. Food, drink and laughter of the highest quality blend together at the table, and at the end of my meal, I find it challenging to set down my fork and slip out of my seat. A few minutes’ drive from Papiamento, the Caribbean Sea Jazz Festival is booming under the stars. By the time I arrive, Fourplay — one of the headlining bands of the long-anticipated festival — is in the midst of lulling a standing crowd to a peaceful sway with a smooth, elegant rhythm. The contemporary jazz quartet is among a lengthy crowd of jazz icons scheduled to perform at the weekend-long festival, including Oscar D’León and Pete Philly, and before the night is over, the legendary Chaka Khan. The sun falls and rises, and I feel the kiss of salt water on my skin as I plunge off the edge of a catamaran. A shock of fluorescent blue and yellow greet me as I blink through my snorkel mask; a field of fish criss-cross before my eyes, browsing contentedly in and out of the largest wreck in the Caribbean, the Antilla. Simmering a mere 1,389 kilometres from the equator, Aruba’s waters have been baked to a luxurious temperature, making the swim feel more like a lukewarm bath in an endless tub. Once back on-board, the catamaran begins gliding in the direction of Aruba’s high-rise district, where the Hyatt and my final night on the island await me. As we inch closer to the beach, I notice strands of white billowing in the soft breeze. Chairs are settled in the sand in neat rows, all facing west where the sun will soon hit the horizon. A woven archway stands in anticipation of a ceremony that will soon begin. I look over a vacant wedding scene before turning to glance behind me. A watercolour sunset is beginning to splash across the sky. As the sun makes its descent, I vow to come back to this island, to relive the beauty and happiness and all else that Aruba stands for; to watch the Caribbean sun touch the water with a loved one sitting next to me. These

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THE INTERIOR DESIGN OF MONICA’S MIND WHAT I LOVE MOST ABOUT MY CAREER is the design aspect of my job. I think about design 24 hours a day. IF I COULD CHANGE SOMETHING ABOUT FUNDRAISERS, it would be that they are budget-friendly so that more money can go to charity. People put too much pressure on themselves for everything to be perfect for social gatherings. Lighten up! It’s about making the effort to be together.

Beautiful MAKE IT

THE TRAITS OF TRUE STYLE are timeless looks, great quality and a great sense of humour. MY DEFINITION OF A STYLISH PARTY includes simple design, fresh flowers, candlelight and fabulous guests. LA DOLCE VITA is about having a smile on your face and bringing joy to others.

REACHING THE 18TH HOLE JUST GOT A LOT SWEETER WITH DESIGN EXPERT AND GOLF ENTHUSIAST MONICA PEDERSEN

MY FAVOURITE BOOK RIGHT NOW has got to be Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me? (And Other Concerns) by Mindy Kaling. Hilarious.

WRITTEN BY MONICA PEDERSEN / PHOTOGRAPHY BY PETER ROSENBAUM

AT THE MOMENT, Jennifer Lawrence is the hottest actress around.

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he golf party was the last shoot I did for Monica Pedersen Make It Beautiful, and one I had been thinking about doing for a long time. I have been married 15 years and one of the best pieces of advice I received before I got married was from my father. He said, “Kid, find a hobby together so that 30 years from now you don’t wake up on a Saturday morning and not have anything to do together.” I took his advice and took up golf with my already golf-obsessed husband. And here is where the party comes in. If you are a golfer or have tried the sport, you’ll understand how difficult learning golf can be. It’s definitely a sport to take on while you are in the blissful newlywed phase of marriage, because it can be tough. During that early learning phase, I remembered the last few holes were always the toughest as I would completely run out of steam.

When I would get to the 18th hole, I usually wanted to sit down and enjoy the view rather than finish the round. (Interestingly, the 18th hole on any golf course is usually the most beautiful, as golf clubs like to really show off their designs and leave the golfer with the desire to come back for more.) I also repeatedly told my husband that there should be a table and chairs set up on the 18th hole as a reward for a fivehour round of golf. My book gave me a reason to bring this idea to life. With a location to die for — Whistling Straits in Wisconsin is a world-renowned golf course owned by the Kohler Company, for whom I am a spokesperson — I put my plan into action. The shoot took place on an unforgettable day and my husband says he will never forget being on the golf course and seeing plaid wingback armchairs drive by in the back of a golf cart. As a designer, for me this was just another day on the job ... www.dolcemag.com

SHADES OF … white. I’d choose this hue over black any day. Monica Pedersen Guest Design Editor Monica Pedersen is an American interior design expert whose work has been featured in top publications. As the host of HGTV’s Designed to Sell, Pedersen also lends her expertise with guest appearances on Bang for Your Buck, Showdown and Dream Home. In 2012, the party planner extraordinaire shared her secrets and DIY enthusiasm on innovative parties anyone can achieve with her book, Monica Pedersen Make It Beautiful (Agate Midway). www.monicapedersen.com

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SWINGERS’Club FROM CALIFORNIA TO SCOTLAND, AIM FOR A HOLE-IN-ONE EXCURSION TO SOME OF THE MOST STUNNING COURSES THIS GOLF SEASON WRITTEN BY MICHAEL HILL

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1. PEBBLE BEACH

2. PREDATOR RIDGE

Monterey Peninsula, California

Vernon, British Columbia

Hugging the coast of California’s breathtaking Monterey Peninsula, Pebble Beach Golf Links is easily a frontrunner for top spot on any avid golfer’s bucket list. Between crashing waves and cliffside holes, this par 72 pulsates with personality. “It’s pretty hard to beat the scenery there,” says Canadian golf course designer Doug Carrick of Pebble Beach’s unmatched majesty. It’s hosted a number of championship tournaments, including five U.S. Opens, but besides some smaller, more demanding greens, Pebble Beach remains a very playable course, Carrick explains. With award-winning accommodations, Pebble Beach is a stunning destination for a golf-themed getaway. www.pebblebeach.com www.dolcemag.com

Nestled amidst the mountainous terrain of Vernon, B.C., overlooking the crystal waters of Lake Okanagan, Predator Ridge Golf Resort Community seamlessly melds landscape and links. Moving from rolling grasslands to wooded valleys and up through rocky terrain, The Ridge Course captures the breadth of this unforgettable vista. “There’s about 400 feet of elevation change on the golf course,” Carrick explains, “so you get some pretty dramatic views from some of the tees,” such as on holes 5 and 6. Relax in private cottages, condo-style villas and award-winning spas after a captivating round. www.predatorridge.com

PHOTO BY JOANN DOST

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PHOTO BY PINEHURST RESORT

PHOTO BY PREDATOR RIDGE PHOTOGRAPHY

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PHOTO BY IAIN LOWE

IMAGE COURTESY OF TROON NORTH

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3. PINEHURST

4. KINGSBARNS

5. TROON NORTH

Pinehurst, North Carolina

St. Andrews, Scotland

Scottsdale, Arizona

Established in 1895, Pinehurst Resort is an American institution. This 8-course golf resort is the largest in North America, exuding stately elegance through its tranquil forest setting and dignified accommodations. Course No. 2 was designed by highly influential course architect Donald Ross and is one of the world’s most renowned. Amateurs will be thankful for No. 2’s wide, forgiving fairways, but intricate slopes and contour placement on and around the greens present challenging approach shots for seasoned vets. “The average golfer, if they play to their ability and play approach shots short of the greens, they can avoid a lot of the trouble around the greens and still have a reasonable score,” Carrick says. “For a good golfer, they have to be in the right position off the tee to be able to attack certain pin positions. So it’s a wonderful golf course from that standpoint.” www.pinehurst.com

Scotland is the Holy Land for any golf enthusiast. St. Andrews: mecca. Many have pilgrimaged to the Old Course at St. Andrews to experience the sport in its purest form. But if you happen to find yourself along the coastline of Fife, satisfied by a respectable round at the “home of golf,” and are itching for something a wee bit contemporary, Kingsbarns Golf Links is not to be missed. Located just south of St. Andrews, and recently ranked the Best Modern Course in Great Britain by Golfweek magazine, Kingsbarns is a modern masterpiece. The spirit of traditional golf meets today’s layout techniques to deliver challenge and fun. Holes run along the coastline with sweeping views accenting each shot. Carrick explains that thanks to strategic design and green layout, Kingsbarns’s character is fresh while honouring the birthplace of golf. www.kingsbarns.com

Considered by many to be Arizona’s finest course and the pinnacle of desert golf — including Golf magazine, which ranked it No. 20 on its list for Top 100 Courses You Can Play — Troon North Golf Club offers a rare and memorable experience, especially for Canadians. Smooth, near faultless fairways lead to vibrant greens, which are made all the more brilliant by the rugged, rocky surrounding of the Sonoran Desert. “It really creates a nice contrast of manicured turf and wild desert landscape,” says Carrick. Errant shots may see balls obscured by large boulders or the odd cactus, but through thought-out design — and careful play — golfers of all skill levels can appreciate a gratifying round. Make your stay in Scottsdale all the more pleasant with a suite at the Four Seasons Resort. www.troonnorthgolf.com

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DWELLING

From the buzzing metropolises of Toronto and New York to the subtropical beauty of Bermuda, these luxury homes rise to the occasion

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PHOTOS BY JP ROUJA OF LOOKBERMUDA

Distinct


PRICES CORRECT AT TIME OF PRESS

CHELSTON ESTATE BERMUDA US$45-million Overlooking the Atlantic Ocean above the reflective glow of Grape Bay Beach, The Chelston Estate — just minutes away from the capital city of Hamilton — is among the finest of beachfront properties in the world. The sprawling Bermudian property sits on 14 acres of verdant grounds that bedrock a 10,000 sq.ft. main house, guest and staff cottages, a saltwater swimming pool complex and beach pavilion. Walled gardens maximize the allure of seclusion, while lush lawns provide the opportunity for families to bask in equestrian, croquet, tennis or golf pursuits in the sun. Inside, Bermudian elements and rare fixtures adorn the airy living spaces, while floor-to-ceiling windows allow generous ocean views. According to Christie’s International Realty, The Chelston Estate was the official Bermuda residence of the U.S. Consul General for 30 years. www.christiesrealestate.com www.sinclairrealty.com

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PHOTOS BY CARY HOROWITZ

Home to some of the world’s most expensive zip codes, New York continues to attract homeowners with its eclectic neighbourhoods and exciting vibe. This three-bedroom home in the Skidmore Owings Merrill condominium at 101 Warren Street extends stunning western views of the Hudson

River with its floor-to-ceiling windows. A welcoming front hall grants access to the living room, kitchen, library and bedrooms, including a south-facing master bedroom complete with oversized walk-in closet and full bath. An around-theclock concierge, fitness centre and spa pillow a relaxed, elegant lifestyle. Located in the trendy Lower Manhattan neighbourhood of Tribeca, 101 Warren Street is a gem in the New York skyline. www.christiesrealestate.com

181 DAVENPORT TORONTO C$400,000 to $8-million An upsurge in the search for sophisticated living has turned up a short list of desirable properties, with 181 Davenport taking the lead. Resonating with the needs of the most discerning of affluent homebuyers, the much-anticipated development is a tribute to timeless culture, its Parisian-inspired design overlooking the Heritage Conservation District in the soughtafter neighbourhood of Yorkville. Providing the amenities you’d expect from a boutique hotel within the customized comfort of a home, the luxurious, 12-storey mid-rise soars above the crowd with 24-7 white-glove concierge service, a fitness retreat, theatre, valet parking, 5,000 sq.ft. of upscale retail and penthouses with sweeping terraces. A four-minute walk from Toronto’s core ensures privacy while allowing for close proximity to the best restaurants, art and entertainment attractions. Boasting the finest in sublime surroundings, the multi-million dollar development, which is set to open its doors in 2015, was designed by the internationally renowned Brian Gluckstein and award-winning architect Sol Wassermuhl of Page + Steele. Taking luxury to the next level has been a primal objective for design-builder Sam Mizrahi, whose beginnings are housed in Forest Hill’s most coveted homes. With his highly successful, sold-out luxury condominium 133 Hazelton Residences in Yorkville, 181 Davenport has launched the CEO of Sam Mizrahi Toronto Developments into the luxury lifestyle stratosphere. www.181davenport.com 66

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PRICES CORRECT AT TIME OF PRESS

101 WARREN STREET NEW YORK US$5.995-million


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$1.8 to over $3 million Private viewing call 905-849-1033 or visit TheRandallResidences.com Prices and specifications correct at press time. E. & O.E.

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GOD IS IN THE DETAILS THE CROWN OF ENTERTAINMENT, INK FOUNDER CHARLES KHABOUTH EXPLORES HOW THE LITTLE THINGS GO A LONG WAY

PHOTO BY PAUL ALEXANDER

WRITTEN BY CHARLES KHABOUTH

evening, but fire starters to an emotional experience. This is something I always felt when I travelled to Paris: a city that has continuously left me wanting more. Bringing a petite piece of this to Toronto was my goal with La Société. I admit: scouring French antique markets for one-of-kind art nouveau trinkets wasn’t a tough gig. One of my go-to spots in Paris is the Hôtel Costes on Rue Saint-Honoré in the 8th Arrondissement district, otherwise known as Place Vendôme. It’s an unapologetically hip spot that exudes cool factor from the moment you walk in. It’s a curio collection of old-world and modern Paris, crowned by the most splendid courtyard restaurant that is tucked away in the chicest of hideaways. Like Hôtel Costes, La Société transports guests to another time and place where romance and decadence are part of

Hospitality juggernaut Charles Khabouth bookends fine dining and entertainment in Toronto

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oming to Toronto from a wartorn Lebanon where my family owned a supper club, my first job was at McDonalds. It was there that I learned the importance of teamwork and consistency. As I matured, my disposition for all things design started to seep its way into all I undertook. I like to make things beautiful. I like to serve things that taste good. One could say I was groomed to host and feed. Canada afforded me the privilege of seeing the world. Travelling is what has inspired my vivid design and hospitality blueprints, enabling me to be an architect of unparalleled spaces that aren’t just the background to an 68

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I LIKE TO MAKE THINGS BEAUTIFUL. I LIKE TO SERVE THINGS THAT TASTE GOOD the landscape — even if it’s just for a few hours. Creating spaces where guests want to stay and savour is an ever-growing trend in modern social culture, as are concept spaces. I have found this to be true with our most recently launched restaurants, Patria and Weslodge. www.dolcemag.com

Like La Société, Patria, which serves up authentic Spanish flavours, and Weslodge, our interpretation of a modern saloon, take great care in sourcing recipes and design elements that elevate the experience. They say God is in the details, which is why we searched for countless hours in obscure antique shops to acquire a variety of vintage crystal glassware and aged silver trays on which to serve Weslodge’s throwback-inspired cocktail menu. Cocktail culture has seen a revival with a focus on a more gastronomic approach to libations and ingredients. It is these enhanced particulars that make a brand resonate with your audience, whether it concerns nightlife, cuisine or cocktail. Engrained in the DNA of any successful property brand is the ability to completely turn expectations on their head. Creating a “game changer” property is more than just setting the bar high, it’s about being authentic in the quest while reshaping people’s ideas and eventually redefining what they thought could possibly be. It’s something I have always strived to achieve, whether it was with Ivory, Toronto’s first real supper club in the ’90s, or INK’s hotel and residence project, Bisha — a brand we will take global. I like to provide experiences that ooze atmosphere and great memories in the making. But this isn’t something that always came easy to me. And it still doesn’t, which is why this business will always keep me on my toes. A question I am often asked is: if I weren’t in the career I am in today, what would I be doing? The answer is that I can’t possibly imagine another life than the one I have RSVP’d to. Which is why, I guess, this life chose me.

Charles Khabouth Guest Entrepreneur Editor As the founder and principal of INK Entertainment, Charles Khabouth has blazed an entrepreneurial path since the 1980s, fuelling Toronto’s hospitality and entertainment scene over the years with hugely successful hot spots. From his forays into nightlife, which include Spice Route, Cube and Uniun, to urbane restaurants Weslodge, Patria, the Storys Building and celebrity haunt La Société, Khabouth’s strategic and trail-blazing feats are embossed in the philosophy of INK, a leading Canadian entertainment and hospitality company. The anticipated Bisha Hotel & Residences marks his recent venture into luxury living. www.ink-00.com


PHOTO BY MARTIN TESSLER

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PHOTO BY MARTIN TESSLER

PHOTO BY GEORGE PIMENTEL

PHOTO PROVIDED BY INK ENTERTAINMENT

1. Classic French bistro La Société in Yorkville, with a location opening in Montreal this spring 2. Theatrical in design and impact, Charles Khabouth applies extensive R&D to his experiential establishments 3. Khabouth reaffirms his club king moniker with the industrial-modern setting and 3-D lighting at Uniun nightclub 4. A Charles Khabouth and Hanif Harji collaboration, Patria on King West imports authentic Spanish ingredients

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Pusateri’s in-house health expert and The Marilyn Denis Show’s resident nutritionist Miranda Malisani shares her Superfood Salad with Dolce at Pusateri’s Bayview Village location

SUPERFOOD SALAD

SAVOIR FARE Resident nutritionist Miranda Malisani of Pusateri’s Fine Foods reveals her classified cooking secrets PRODUCED BY PUSATERI’S FINE FOODS

Q It seems that Toronto’s food and fine dining scene is heading in a healthier direction, what has set this shift in motion? A People are becoming more conscious because they’re realizing that the food they’re eating is starting to have an effect on their bodies. And it’s not just the way we feel; in some cases, it takes an event like an illness to bring about change, but I think that with generations taking care of their parents there’s an understanding that we can prevent some of that through our daily lifestyle habits. People are just looking for that education. Q As Pusateri’s Fine Foods’ resident nutritionist, how do you help shoppers attain that healthy lifestyle? A The original intention was for me to come in and shine a light on the nutritional benefits of the amazing products offered, but we’ve definitely 70

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evolved from there. I spend a lot of time at each store consulting with customers and staff with the whole premise of trying to educate people on how to be healthier. I also work with the chefs at Pusateri’s to create some really awesome new dishes like the organic salad, which combines so many amazing sprouted beans and nuts and seeds and apple cider vinegar — all the things that I love and that taste good. There’s so many quinoa dishes that we’re doing right now! We’re really evolving in that direction of offering not just tasty food but healthy food along with it. I have these ideas and Pusateri’s brings them to life; it’s a beautiful marriage. Q How do you host a spring soiree with a health-conscious curve? A When you’re entertaining you want to supply amazing food. It’s kind of www.dolcemag.com

PHOTO BY JESSE MILNS

INGREDIENTS SERVES 6

3/4 cup 1 cup 1/2 cup 1 tbsp 1/8 cup 1/4 cup 1/4 cup 1 tbsp 1/4 cup 1/4 cup 1/4 cup 1/4 cup 1/4 cup 1/4 cup 2 tbsp 4 tbsp 2 1/2 tbsp 2 tsp

organic pearl barley organic wheat berries red quinoa organic black chia seeds pumpkin seeds organic goji berries walnut halves sacha inchi seeds dried cranberries dried apricots mung beans adzuki beans urid beans soya beans coconut water rice bran oil organic apple cider vinegar agave syrup black pepper and salt, to taste

METHODS

1 In a pot, cover the pearl barley with water and bring to a rolling boil. Reduce the heat and simmer until it is cooked through, 20 to 30 minutes. Drain, rinse with cold water and drain again. Set aside to cool in the fridge. 2 Rinse the wheat berries under cold running water. In a pot, cover the wheat berries with water and bring to a rolling boil. Reduce the heat and simmer for 30 to 40 minutes, or until the wheat berries are cooked through and tender. Drain, rinse under cold running water and drain again. Set aside to cool in the fridge. 3 Add 2 parts water to 1 part quinoa in a pot. Bring to a boil and reduce the heat to a simmer. Cook the quinoa for 20 minutes or until the quinoa is tender and resembles being “popped.” Drain under cold running water and set aside to cool in the fridge. 4 Chop the apricots into bite-sized pieces. Roughly chop the walnut halves. 5 In a large bowl, combine all of the ingredients and mix thoroughly. Adjust the seasonings, to taste. Serve immediately or store in the fridge until ready to use. Recipe designed by Miranda Malisani, RNCP and Pusateri’s chef Bernard Attard


a misconception that healthy food doesn’t taste good. There are so many creative ways to turn a delicious dish into one that has more whole grains and less saturated fat. It’s a matter of swapping ingredients. For example, I recently designed a chocolate fudge cake recipe for Pusateri’s, and instead of having the butter and the white flour, I did a flourless version with pumpkin in it and it’s really moist and creamy. We used dark chocolate as opposed to milk chocolate. If you serve your guests good food and they feel good eating it, and they feel good afterwards, then you have a hit.

Q What’s a golden rule for foodies to live by? A Make sure that you’re combining the right foods when you’re eating. Try to consume those raw living foods that help digestion and avoid as much processed food as possible because it’s just been stripped down. I also really believe in not overcooking vegetables; we want to preserve enzymes in food. If we do have proteins like meats, try to have a raw vegetable with it. I think it’s always great to have a salad with beef or chicken because it helps digest that food. For more information on Miranda Malisani visit www.pusateris.com/nutrition/

PHOTO BY JESSE MILNS

IT’S A MISCONCEPTION THAT HEALTHY FOOD DOESN’T TASTE GOOD

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Joe Bastianich, New York restaurateur, winemaker and judge on MasterChef

THE

EPICURE JOE BASTIANICH STAYS THE PATH OF HIS “BIOLOGICAL IMPERATIVE” WRITTEN BY SIMONA PANETTA / PHOTO BY CASS BIRD

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began in 1989, a year when spending sprees and an emphasis on brand names captured the zeitgeist of the era. A freshly minted Boston College graduate thinking that success was to be found in the narthex of corporate margins, Joe Bastianich gravitated to Manhattan like a kid to a lollipop. Wall Street was his Candy Land, his ticket to freedom from a blue-collar destiny. So he began rather impishly, fibbing on his resumé that he was a wine buyer for Felidia (a portmanteau of his parent’s booming New York establishment) and landing an interview at Merrill Lynch because the man who read his application was a regular at the threestar restaurant. He was eventually hired as a bond trader and given a hall pass into a world where the champagne flowed and the Hermès ties and libertine notches on the belt happened to come with the six-figure territory. All rather titillating and grand on the surface, but in his New York Times bestselling tell-all Restaurant Man, Bastianich explains how the debauchery and greedis-good philosophy imploding around him just wasn’t his particular cup of entrepreneurial tea. Rather, it left him emotionally bankrupt and parching for a life where someone else wasn’t calling the shots on how successful or rich he’d be. A year-and-a-half in and a hefty bonus jingling its way into his bank account, Bastianich jettisoned his job for a one-way plane ticket to a Shangri-La of sustenance. He went to Italy to reconnect to his roots, sipping on vintage wines, dining with vinous companions, tasting the culture that had raised him to understand that one should live to eat rather than eat to live. It was an about-face move that would change the course of his life and legacy. And it made him happier than a bird with a breadcrumb. “It was definitely my soulsearching moment, my professional aha moment,” says Bastianich of the Italian caper that would confirm his inescapable calling. “I knew I had to live my life in wine and food.” It’s not surprising that the thoroughbred epicure followed in familial footsteps, a decision he labels a “biological imperative” in his book. Mother chef Lidia Bastianich heads

an empire of books, cooking shows and restaurants since the opening of Buonavia in the ’70s with his father, the late Felice (Felix) Bastianich. An old-school champion of exceeding patrons’ expectations while drawing his purse strings — the two inherent qualities that make what Bastianich refers to as the “Restaurant Man” in his book — the family patriarch taught Bastianich about service and the fiscal ins and outs of the business; lessons that would take him to the top of the wine and food chain. “Just being solely focused on profit takes the art out of any business, and I think that creativity and passion are what give you success, not the compelling desire for wealth,” says Bastianich, who upon returning from his Italian sojourn partnered with Lidia to open Becco restaurant in 1993. He was 22. A year later, at a James Beard Foundation Journalism Awards dinner she helped organize, Lidia introduced her son to the colourful Mario Batali, who was at the time beginning to pioneer the Italian culinary scene in New York City. “I thought he was a well-organized

worldwide, the secret to their success lies in the foundations of a friendship: a reciprocity of respect, faith in one another and a common passion. “We both trust each other to have opinions about all of the experience, from food and wine to design and execution of service,” explains Batali. “And [we] are smart enough to back down if the other has a better, more informed, or at least arguable position … It is 80 per cent of both our lives, every day of our lives, and we love it, even the shitty days.” In 2012, a lawsuit filed against the two business partners most likely brought on the aforementioned state of mind, a period the duo conquered by “staying the path,” explains Batali. According to The New York Times, the case dealt with tip-skimming allegations at several of their restaurants and was settled for $5.25 million. Parties involved were unable to discuss said amount. Of the challenges along the way, Bastianich handles it sunny side up. “We’ve had lots of big bumps, whether it be litigation, various sources, people detractors. But you know, I think that if you keep pure

JUST BEING SOLELY FOCUSED ON PROFIT TAKES THE ART OUT OF ANY BUSINESS, AND I THINK THAT CREATIVITY AND PASSION ARE WHAT GIVE YOU SUCCESS, NOT THE COMPELLING DESIRE FOR WEALTH — Joe Bastianich guy who understood Italian food,” writes Batali in block letters via email, his choice of letter case a fitting conduit for his larger-than-life personality. The seemingly opposite twosome would go on to become an unstoppable force, dispensing the spirit of Italian fine dining across New York with restaurants that include the legendary Babbo Ristorante e Enoteca, Lupa Osteria Romana and the much-celebrated Del Posto. Expanding their empire (the Batali & Bastianich Hospitality Group) to Las Vegas, Los Angeles, Hong Kong and Singapore for a total of 24 restaurants www.dolcemag.com

to your commitments and serving great food and creating hospitality, that the customers have the final vote, and they vote with their feet,” says Bastianich. “We’ve been lucky enough to have been able to win that battle most of the time.” Bastianich, along with Batali, Lidia, Italian businessman Oscar Farinetti and partners Adam and Alex Saper, spawned another hit in 2010: Eataly, an artisanal Italian food and wine emporium in New York City, with a second location in Chicago anticipated in the fall. In an industry that sees more DOLCE VITA MAGAZINE

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sorry-we’re-closed signs than come-inwe’re-open proclamations, Bastianich is guided by a simple approach to the good road while invoking a dictum of providence. “It’s just a sensibility and respect for hard work and respect for the customers. Luck is when preparation meets opportunity.” And possibly, when one can’t help but be thirsty. When the chance to pursue his entrepreneurial itch of having vineyards he could call his own presented itself, his exploration of Italian varietals as a 20-something corporate quitter kicked into high gear. Interestingly enough, the experience he gained while washing dishes at his parents’ restaurants proved rewarding. When that Wall Street bond trader called him out on his purported role at Felidia, Bastianich, dancing on a pin, tipped the scales in his favour when he was able to distinguish the differences among vintages of Aldo Conterno Barolos. The modern-day Dionysus now has his own name etched on wine bottles as a co-owner of vineyards in Friuli Venezia-Giulia, Tuscany and Piedmont, and a co-creator

of Tritono wine in Argentina. Apart from realizing his grape expectations, Bastianich’s segue into wine has played an integral part in what is now considered a standard element in the high-end restaurant scene. “I think we very much in the last 20 years have been fundamentally integrating wine into the dining experience,” says Bastianich, 44, adeptly applying his hunger for improvement to his own life. The husband and father of three, who quit smoking upon becoming a family man (and also to clear his sensorial palate), is an avid triathlete and guitar-playing enthusiast, who equates the good life to drinking and eating with family and friends. A foremost restaurateur, vineyard owner, author and TV personality on the fiercely competitive MasterChef with fellow chef-judges Graham Elliot and Gordon Ramsay, Bastianich is also the one man that’s just about as petrifying as the latter. Where the British hothead is expected (and gladly so) to slam cooktops and berate fledging chefs with his fiery “bloody hell’s!” and “you have

got to be kidding me’s,” Bastianich infuses a polarizing presence. Calmly and collectively — justifiably so, the man does know what he’s talking about — the erudite word whiz cuts to the core of trembling competitors, all while maintaining icy composure in his tailored suits. “This is a cacophony of dissonant flavours that makes absolutely no sense,” he deadpans to a frontrunner. Her heart lands splat on the stage floor. Moving his subzero eyes onto yet another disastrous dish, he flatly stares down the proverbial underdog of Season 3. “Poorly executed. Not thoughtful. Over elaborate.” Bastianich also joins Carlo Cracco and Bruno Barbieri as a judge on Sky’s MasterChef Italia. A forthcoming show, Hungry, which will piggyback his Restaurant Man memoir, is set to debut sometime this year. “I cook like a badass, but there were too many chefs around me when I was growing up,” says Bastianich. “My mother and Mario, they say too many chefs spoil the soup. So I had to find something else to do.” www.joebastianich.com

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6 7 1. In celebration of a scentenary classic, Guerlain’s perfume pundit, Thierry Wasser, unveils L’Heure de Nuit. This limited edition $270 ode de parfum pays homage to the legendary L’Heure Bleue. www.guerlain.com 2. Jonathan Adler’s needlepoint Tramp pillow is the face of fashionable home décor. www.jonathanadler.com 3. So stunning, you may not want to sink your teeth into Maggie Austin’s artful custom cakes. www.maggieaustincake.com 4. Gus Design Group Inc. certainly wasn’t winging it with its ergonomic Kipling Glider and matching ottoman. www.gusdesigngroup.com 5. The evolution of kitchen culture has led us to Gaggenau, a culinary design trailblazer. www.gaggenau.ca

8 6. A Parisian palace of this calibre belongs in storybooks, but guests can now experience their own fairy tales at Trianon Palace Versailles. www.trianonpalace.com 7. Set with an astounding 739 diamonds weighing a total of 30.35 carats, Lou Goldberg Jeweller’s latest 18-karat white gold cuff is to be coveted. (416) 901-0080 8. Cococozy’s collection of fragrant candles create a mood money can’t buy. www.cococozy.com 9. Place your Fabergé tome atop this hand-polished brass Ulu Convex Table and let the conversation begin. www.jonathanadler.com www.dolcemag.com

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JUDGING BY THE

COVER

INTERNATIONAL DESIGNERS DEMONSTRATE THAT PACKAGING CAN BE JUST AS MEANINGFUL AS ITS CONTENTS WRITTEN BY MICHAEL HILL

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utside-the-box thinking: the fuel of creativity, the propeller of progress. Also the bane of containers, cartons, cases, packages, packets and, of course, boxes the world over. Poor boxes. So misunderstood; so mistreated — always the scapegoat of a tired corporate cliché, always on the short end of a metaphor so trite its very utterance smacks of unimaginativeness. And yet, while boxes must endure the brunt of an unfair stereotype, there are those still willing to take up arms against ignorance. Across the globe, designers forge ahead against gale-force ideologies, shattering the shackles of standardization, breaking free of structures fostering run-of-the-mill product packaging. Designers develop packages that convey more than just catchphrases and strategically manufactured messages. They tell stories with honesty, passion, colour and humour, confident of the product their packaging holds. The medium is ever more the message, and while you should never judge a book by its cover, this list demonstrates that sometimes the cover has just as much to say.

1. Vancouver’s Meat & Bread’s name says it all. This down-to-earth sandwich shop doesn’t mince words about its simple yet scrumptious fare, and its packaging reflects that attitude. Designed by Glasfurd & Walker, the clean, minimal esthetic accents the shop’s masculine vibe and fundamental approach to food. www.meatandbread.ca 2. Wrapped in the wild locks of a Spanish water goddess, Coca i Fitó’s Aloja exudes the energy and passion of Mediterranean life. Illustrated by Oriol Malet and designed by Barcelonan graphic design studio Atipus, this bottle is just as much an experience as is its contents. www.cocaifito.com 3. Traditional handmade French macarons are the speciality at the Confection Oven. This San Diego bakery ferries the old-world attitude of quality over quantity into the present through its delectable pastries and charming, understated packaging designed by Kristin Sartore specifically for the delicate macarons. www.theconfectionoven.com 4. Shaped like a heart carved out of ice, the Humanity Fragrance Second Edition is as much art as it is perfume. Designed by Lance McGregor and Alan Iwamura, and with a limited release of only 168, proceeds from this stunning piece go towards building a new boys’ dormitory at the Rainbow Orphanage in Siem Reap, Cambodia. www.mcmcfragrances.com

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5. Dubbed the “Pearls of Aphrodite,” Blanc Caviar is a novel and pristine reimagining of a classic hors d’oeuvre. The tin, designed by Spanish studio Neosbrand, encapsulates the precious elegance of its contents with polish and poise. www.blancgastronomy.com 6. The power, allure and palpable essence of dark literary greats George Orwell, Edgar Allan Poe, Pierre Choderlos de Laclos and Marquis de Sade are captured in these salient and devious colognes from Polish design studio Ah & Oh. www.ahandoh.com 7. Soso Salt is as simple and unassuming as its egg-shaped container. Spanish designer Eduardo del Fraile used a variety of distinct colours to characterize the intriguing flavour combinations of these natural, high-quality salts. The results are eggs-quisite and salt- sational, even if this joke isn’t. www.sososalt.com 8. Fruita Blanch is a long-standing family business in Spain known for its jams, juices and preservatives. Their latest line of products is made completely of organic, chemical-free fruits. These bare-bones jars and bottles, designed by Atipus, accent this transparency with humble, nothing-to-hide labelling. www.fruitablanch.com

www.dolcemag.com

9. Hudson Made remembers the days when products were actually made by people using ingredients that don’t require a master’s degree in chemistry to pronounce. Hovard Design embraced this age-old philosophy, crafting an intentionally antiquated package made of locally manufactured materials for Hudson Made’s Worker’s Soap. www.hudsonmadeny.com 10. As its jar makes clear, Bee Raw Honey has nothing to hide. Each variety of these all-natural products is made using only one sweet ingredient: honey. This bold, gimmick-less labelling puts the product front and centre. As each flavour is derived from one source of flower, each glows with a distinct yellow or orange. www.beeraw.com 11. According to Megan Cummins: you smell … like a lemon. With the attitude that quality doesn’t mean sacrificing personality, Cummins developed You Smell soap as the total package: attractive and charming. www.yousmellsoap.com 12. San Francisco design studio Office crafted a wide assortment of humorous pirate-themed products to support 826 Valencia, a non-profit writing centre for children in the City by the Bay. Smell like a seafaring swashbuckler with this Eau de Mer (salt water) while supporting young authors in the making. www.826valencia.org 13. The Cullen is a boutique hotel in Melbourne inspired by Australian contemporary artist Adam Cullen. While the hotel is fashioned with many of Cullen’s works, Kristian Mjøset’s Drip series can be found lining bathrooms. These edgy toiletries, such as this spray-can shaving cream, mimic the tools used by street artists. www.artserieshotels.com.au/cullen 14. For the tequila-loving rock star in your life, this guitar head bottle stopper will surely strike the right chord. The result of a collaboration between Patrón and renowned fashion designer John Varvatos, the Patrón Añejo bottle stopper is a rocking centrepiece to any bar. www.patrontequila.com


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A chicken made of eggshells titled What Came First?

WRITTEN BY MICHAEL HILL

&HONESTY PHOTOGRAPHY: PORTRAIT, KEVIN NIXON; HEN, KYLE BEAN

EGGSHELLS

HOW HUMILITY AND AN ARTS-AND-CRAFTS IDEOLOGY MAKE KYLE BEAN A WANTED MAN

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hat came first, the I’m doing paid work there’s something chicken or the egg? inside of me that feels a bit wrong about According to Kyle saying I’m an artist.” Bean: both. So modest, especially considering Taking a playful the sizable strides he’s already made at philosophical jab at the age-old chicken such an early point in his career. The versus egg dilemma, What Came First? 26-year-old’s work has graced the pages, — a life-sized chicken made of broken and the odd cover, of several prominent eggshells — is one of the many charming, publications, including The New York thought-provoking, handcrafted pieces Times, The Guardian, Wired, GQ and to emerge from the mind of this budding The Atlantic; it has been displayed in English artist. the windows of major London retailers, It’s immensely clever; obvious in such as Selfridges and Liberty, and WRITTEN BY VENDIPIT LOR hindsight and yet glowing with novelty, has been part of marketing campaigns much like the punchline of a well- for Hermès, Louis Vuitton, Rimmel delivered joke. Classifying Bean as and Peugeot. an “artist” then seems only fitting. A smouldering heart made of And yet the “designer specializing in construction paper for an article on handcrafted models, set design and heart disease in Men’s Health magazine; art direction,” as his website specifies, intricately crafted paper watches sliced struggles to embrace the Artist label. in half: commentary on the fragility and Why? fleeting nature of time; a dress made of “Maybe it’s just my understanding of neon-coloured leaves, hanging in the what art is,” he explains over the phone window of Union Jewellery, disintegrating from his home in Brighton, England. in a feigned autumn breeze; a gelatine “When I’m doing personal work I grenade from a collection of harmless might consider myself an artist. When weapons for an article in CUT magazine 78

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— Bean’s work explores, deconstructs and reshapes subjects with a keen eye, sharp wit and youthful curiosity. “When I’m coming up with ideas,” he explains, “I’m very aware that I don’t want it to be something I’ve seen too much before.” It doesn’t have to be completely new, he cautiously adds (always so polite), but he doesn’t want it to feel as if it’s “been done to death.” He chuckles and notes that he also gets quite bored quite easily, and enjoys experimenting with new materials “to mix things up a bit.” A touch of pride would be neither unexpected nor off-putting. But Bean is a man of little pretension, even less arrogance. Honesty is at the heart of his humility, the “ethos” of every project. Whether personal or commissioned work, he strives to be true to himself through both the messages he sends and how they’re delivered. The medium is the message, and like all humble artisans, Bean can’t lie. “I spent a lot of time doing work I was not happy with because it felt like


PHOTOGRAPHY: DRESS, IVAN JONES; HEART, OWEN SILVERWOOD; GRENADE, SAM HOFMAN; INSTRUMENTS, KYLE BEAN

I was trying to be someone else and work in ways that did not feel natural,” Bean explains of his early days at the University of Brighton. Classes featured heavy digital components to ready students for creative industries that rely on software to produce images for public consumption. While he appreciated learning the techniques, the results were unsatisfying. As a child, he enjoyed building models and playing with Lego, and longed for that tactility. “I knew that I wanted to still have that physical connection to the things I was making,” says Bean, who notes Cornelia Parker, Theo Jansen, Fritz Kahn and their surreal works as inspiration. He chose to go against conventionality’s grain, away from increasingly popular digital art, and focus instead on what felt right. While software is still very much part of his process — there are aspects of his work that would be extremely difficult without modern technology, he makes clear — Bean feels at home with his arts-and-crafts ideology. He constructs by hand, generally with easily accessible everyday materials, like construction paper, pencil shavings, match sticks, ice cream — it’s all fair game. But while the materials are often simple, they are always key to the concept.“Quite a lot of the time my approach to a creative brief is to try and come up with a concept where the material is almost part of the message,” he says. Obsolete devices made of cardboard, life-sized instruments made of sheet music, and of course, the eggshell chicken — the materials used say just as much as the object they form. “It’s about observation, and then creating something usually with an element of irony or juxtaposition that just ties together the material with an idea.” Bean understands why titles and labels are often obsessed over — “it makes things easier if we have labels” — but for this humble talent, classifying creativity is unimportant. Labels don’t add or detract from a piece’s quality. Creativity is about curiosity, passion and honesty. If employed, those elements will resonate with audiences. Call him what you will — designer, illustrator, sculptor, artist — Bean is downright creative. And that’s the only label that matters. www.kylebean.co.uk

A disintegrating dress made of neon leaves for a window display at Union Jewellery

This smouldering construction-paper heart was crafted for Men’s Health magazine

This gelatine grenade was part of a collection of harmless weapons for an article in CUT magazine

These life-sized instruments are made of sheet music and were used in Hermès window displays across England in 2009


CORVETTE DOLCE GETS FRONT ROW ACCESS AT THE CANADIAN INTERNATIONAL AUTO SHOW

S

ixty years ago, when Chevrolet first introduced the Corvette to the world, it was as a happy-go-lucky roadster touted for its “fun” design and as a “joy” to drive. It was a car for “Mr. and Mrs. America,” built for the open road, handling “like an angel,” extolled NBC’s Today host Dave Garroway in a 1953 television commercial. Fast forward to 2013. It’s a rainy February afternoon. General Motors’ marketing pros are pitching the latest updates and additions to the GM lineup at the 40th Canadian International Auto Show. The all-electric Spark EV, the Canadian-built 2014 Impala, the 2014 Silverado — it’s all well and good. But what the crowd really craves isn’t some pedestrian, consumerfriendly four-door. They’re waiting for the Canadian debut of something 80

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TINGRAY WRITTEN BY MICHAEL HILL

exotic. A beast, specifically. The one strategically concealed at centre stage. When the near 20-minute parade wraps up and the cover is whisked away, a pristine silver 2014 Corvette Stingray — yes, you heard right, “Stingray” — rolls forward. And, oh, how the times have changed. There is nothing angelic about The 2014 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray’s body has received a what Chevy has created here. hard, sharp makeover. The circular tail lights, staples of past The C7 — as aficionados know it Corvettes, are replaced with Camaro-esque squares, while the four adjacent exhaust tips are gathered more tightly together — is strikingly intimidating. It’s demonic and nasty, demanding of attention. Chevrolet has always maintained a sleek-and-sporty the hood, fenders and panels — for esthetic for their prized two-seater, performance reasons, of course. But but never with such viciousness. The the effect is dramatic nonetheless. The rounded body of the more recent C5 back end, too, has ditched curvature, and C6 versions is gone, replaced dumping the traditional circles for with razor-sharp lines and pronounced rectangular tail lights, à la the fifthangles. Vents and inlets slice across generation Camaro. www.dolcemag.com


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Much like the aforementioned Camaro, the new Corvette is unabashedly forward-looking. A departure from the approachability of past Vettes, it flies in the face of the homage-paying designs sported by other revitalized muscle cars, like the Ford Mustang and Dodge Challenger. Perhaps this is why its styling has been a matter of contention. Some might complain that it’s too Camaro-ish, too modern; out of sync with gearhead nostalgia. Indeed, the C7 is very youth-friendly, like some robot in disguise straight out of a Michael Bay film. And, of course, this was the point. During their conference, Chevy’s marketing gurus made it clear that Millennials had their attention (see the Tru 140S versus the Code 130R concept campaign for more). “Created to oppose the expected, abolish empty traditions and explore the unknown … Purpose alone is sacred,” reads the Corvette’s web page. And to solidify this fact, the tagline of its first official commercial: “Enemy of the same.” This new Vette isn’t a display of technology’s elegance. It’s hard, in-your-face modernism, “a beautiful weapon,” mechanical ferocity. But what is aggressive posturing without power? Chevrolet proclaims that this is the most powerful standardmodel Corvette yet. Its new 6.2-Litre V-8 engine utilizes direct injection 82

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The C7 is the first Corvette to wear the Stingray emblem since 1976. Its future-present styling is an aggressive evolution over classic Vettes

and variable valve timing to deliver 450-horsepower and 450 lb-ft of torque, powering from dead to 60 mph (96 km/h) in less than four seconds. It’s no wonder Chevy felt this Vette was worthy of the Stingray badge, an emblem not seen on a new Corvette since 1976. A six-speed automatic option will be available, but muscle-car buffs will side with the seven-speed manual. Chevrolet also developed its own rev-matching technology for the C7, which detects the slightest movement in the stick, anticipating gear changes to facilitate smoother shifts. Perhaps contentious tech to purists, but everyday drivers will likely welcome the support. The new Stingray also benefits from robust bodywork. Its new aluminum frame is reportedly 57 per cent stiffer than that of current Vettes while also nearly 100 pounds lighter. A carbonfibre hood and roof help lower its centre of gravity. Coupled with a wider stance, longer wheelbase, lower roof, improved aerodynamics and 50/50 weight distribution, the C7 looks poised for solid handling. But while performance numbers may impress, GM claims this Vette will also be its most fuel-efficient. The C6 floated around 9 L/100 kilometres on the highway. The C7 utilizes active fuel management, so expect improved numbers from the C7. www.dolcemag.com

Corvettes of the past have always suffered stark criticism for their spartan interiors. While still quite practical, the Stingray’s cabin feels higher quality without sacrificing driver focus. An eight-inch screen replaces conventional speedometers and tachometers, allowing for three display modes: touring, for navigation and fuel economy; sport, with a dominating tachometer; and race, which displays lap times, G-force and bar graphs tracking revs. Speed is projected onto the windshield in the driver’s line of sight. A drive mode selector, with five modes (weather, eco, tour, sport and track), adjusts 12 variables for different road conditions. A smaller, sporty steering wheel — with mounted paddle shifters — brings improved grip and feel. And a driver-angled, eightinch, high-definition screen with Chevy MyLink mounts the dash. GT seats will also be available for extra support on longer drives, while Competition Sport seats are optimized for track racing. Leather trim, carbon fibre and aluminum also accentuate the cabin. While no price has been set, GM states that if the current C6 is within reach, the C7 will be as well. Love or hate its future-present styling, this fiendishlooking Stingray will ride, resurrected, sometime in the third quarter. The only question now is how wicked it will be. www.gm.ca


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ndensed_bold_abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz`1234567890-=[]\;’,./ ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ~!@#$%^&*()_+{}|:”<>? μ˜øπœ®ß†¨√∑≈¥Ω`¡™£¢∞§¶•ªº–≠“‘«…æ≤≥÷ ÅıÇÎ´Ï˝ÓˆÔÒ˜Ø∏Œ‰Íˇ¨◊„˛Á¸`⁄‹›fifl‡°·‚—±”’»ÚƯ˘¿ —±”’»ÚƯ˘¿|áéíóúâêîôûàèìòùäëïöüÿãñõÁÉÍÓÚÀÈÌÒÙÄËÏÖÜŸÑÃÕÂÊÎÔÛ ”“’‘ '" € $€£¥₩฿руб

d-Light_abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz`1234567890-=[]\;’,./ IJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ~!@#$%^&*()_+{}|:”<>? Δ˚¬μ˜øπœ®ß†¨√∑≈¥ `¡™£¢∞§¶•ªº–≠“‘«…æ≤≥÷ ÅıÇÎ´Ï˝ÓˆÔÒ˜Ø∏Œ‰Íˇ¨◊„˛Á¸`⁄‹›fifl‡°·‚—±”’»ÚƯ˘¿ —±”’»ÚƯ˘¿|áéíóúâêîôûàèìòùäëïöüÿãñõÁÉÍÓÚÀÈÌÒÙÄËÏÖÜŸÑÃÕÂÊÎÔÛ ”“’‘ ‘” € $‚Ǩ¬£¬•‚Ç©‡∏ø—Ä—É–±

d-LightItalic_abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz`1234567890-=[]\;’,./ IJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ~!@#$%^&*()_+{}|:”<>? Δ˚¬μ˜øπœ®ß†¨√∑≈¥ `¡™£¢∞§¶•ªº–≠“‘«…æ≤≥÷ ÅıÇÎ´Ï˝ÓˆÔÒ˜Ø∏Œ‰Íˇ¨◊„˛Á¸`⁄‹›fifl‡°·‚—±”’»ÚƯ˘¿ —±”’»ÚƯ˘¿|áéíóúâêîôûàèìòùäëïöüÿãñõÁÉÍÓÚÀÈÌÒÙÄËÏÖÜŸÑÃÕÂÊÎÔÛ ”“’‘ ‘” € $‚Ǩ¬£¬•‚Ç©‡∏ø—Ä—É–±

d_abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz`1234567890-=[]\;’,./ IJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ~!@#$%^&*()_+{}|:”<>? Δ˚¬μ˜øπœ®ß†¨√∑≈¥Ω`¡™£¢∞§¶•ªº–≠“‘«…æ≤≥÷ ÅıÇÎ´Ï˝ÓˆÔÒ˜Ø∏Œ‰Íˇ¨◊„˛Á¸`⁄‹›fifl‡°·‚—±”’»ÚƯ˘¿ —±”’»ÚƯ˘¿|áéíóúâêîôûàèìòùäëïöüÿãñõÁÉÍÓÚÀÈÌÒÙÄËÏÖÜŸÑÃÕÂÊÎÔÛ ”“’‘ ‘” € $‚Ǩ¬£¬•‚Ç©‡∏ø—Ä—É–±

d-Italic_abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz`1234567890-=[]\;’,./ IJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ~!@#$%^&*()_+{}|:”<>? Δ˚¬μ˜øπœ®ß†¨√∑≈¥Ω`¡™£¢∞§¶•ªº–≠“‘«…æ≤≥÷ ÅıÇÎ´Ï˝ÓˆÔÒ˜Ø∏Œ‰Íˇ¨◊„˛Á¸`⁄‹›fifl‡°·‚—±”’»ÚƯ˘¿ —±”’»ÚƯ˘¿|áéíóúâêîôûàèìòùäëïöüÿãñõÁÉÍÓÚÀÈÌÒÙÄËÏÖÜŸÑÃÕÂÊÎÔÛ ”“’‘ ‘” € $‚Ǩ¬£¬•‚Ç©‡∏ø—Ä—É–±

Let us find a beach you share only with starfish. Let us help you remember what it feels like to be sun-kissed. Let us replace fluorescent lights with a stunning sunset. Let us make time irrelevant for a week.

Comfort You – The ideal package to create fond memories for the entire family. Includes breakfast for two and up to a $50 daily resort credit. For reservations, contact your travel professional, call The Ritz-Carlton at 800-241-3333 or visit ritzcarlton.com/fortlauderdale.

Offer valid at participating hotels through December 31, 2013, subject to availability. Rate is per room/per night based on single or double occupancy, exclusive of taxes, gratuities, fees and other charges; does not apply to groups; cannot be combined with any other offer and is not applicable for Rewards redemption. Advanced reservations are required. Daily breakfast is available in select hotel restaurants and not valid for in-room dining. Credit is applied per night, has no cash value, and is not valid on room rate, alcohol, or third-party services. No refund or credit for unused portion. Void where prohibited. ©2013 The Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company, L.L.C.

Dolce Vita Magazine Toronto Spring 2013  

Dolce Vita Magazine featuring: Hal Jackman, Margaret McCain, Peter Gilgan, Jack Diamond, Joe Bastianich, Fotini, Paul Hardy, Heather Ogden,...

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