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THE DESIGN AND REAL ESTATE CRAZE:

LARGER THAN LIFE DESIGN, LAVISH ESTATES AND TRAVEL INSPO TAKE OVER THIS ISSUE

WE ASK THE QUESTIONS AND INSPIRED MENTORS IMPART THEIR WISDOM

YYZ

LAX

LEWIS HOWES

Publications Mail Agreement # 40026675

FROM THE SCHOOL OF HARD KNOCKS TO THE SCHOOL OF GREATNESS

SUMMER 2017 | US / CDN $10.00

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L U X U R Y O N A N E W P L AY I N G F I E L D

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eshaping of the luxury markets in Toronto and Ottawa is evident when browsing the list of projects by Mizrahi Developments. Since inception, Mizrahi has aimed to create communities that envelop bespoke living options that consist of old-world craftsmanship and elegance. With a team of skilled professionals, Mizrahi has elevated the standards of living and continues to set this benchmark for future projects. CORPORATE OFFICES 125 HAZELTON AVENUE, TORONTO, ONT. 416 922 4200

www.mizrahidevelopments.ca OTTAWA PRESENTATION GALLERY 1451 WELLINGTON STREET WEST, OTTAWA, ONT. 613 798 4663

www. 1451 wellington.ca

COMPLETION 2017

COMPLETED 2015 COMPLETED 2011

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Mizrahi Developments proudly celebrates a decade of producing some of the most revered mixed-use architecture in North America

R E SPON SI B I L I TY | INTEGRITY | INSPIRATIO N | VISIO N

O N W O PE N

OTTAWA

COMING FALL 2017

PRE-REGISTER www.onebloorwest.com

REGISTER www.1451wellington.ca

PRESENTATION GALLERY NOW OPEN

SOLD OUT 7 UNDER CONSTRUCTION 2017

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Experience your favourite restaurants in a whole new way with mobile order & pay. Order from your phone, then skip past the line for pickup. Say goodbye to lineups, loose change and paper receipts. Plus, you earn Ritual Rewards on every order. We believe there should be such a thing, as a free lunch. Make every day extraordinary. Download Ritual for Free.

TORONTO

NEW YORK CHICAGO

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SUMMER 2017 • VOLUME 21 • ISSUE 2 Publisher/Editor-in-Chief MICHELLE ZERILLO-SOSA michelle@dolce.ca Director of Operations ANGELA PALMIERI-ZERILLO angela@dolce.ca

ART DEPARTMENT Co-Founder/Creative Director FERNANDO ZERILLO fernando@dolce.ca Web Project Manager STEVE BRUNO Senior Graphic Designer CHRISTINA BAN Junior Graphic Designer AXL VALDEZ Web Designer YENA YOO Web Developer JORDAN CARTER

EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT Fashion & Home Decor Editor MICHELLE ZERILLO-SOSA Beauty & Travel Editor ANGELA PALMIERI-ZERILLO Copy Editor and Proofreader CATHARINE CHEN, FRANCETOAST EDITING Senior Writer REBECCA ALBERICO Writer DANIEL CALABRETTA Contributing Writers STEPHANIE CLARKE, DAVE GORDON, IDA HSIANG, RICK MULLER, DONNA PARIS Contributing Photographers MATT AUSTIN, PAULA BARATA, CHUCK CHOI, HAYES DAVIDSON AND JAMES EUWING, GABRIEL DE LA CHAPELLE GEOFF FITZGERALD, ROBIN GARTNER, PETER GIODANI, BRYAN GROULX, MAX JAMALI, HAMID KOOTVAL, JESSE MILNS, CARLOS A. PINTO, BELA RABA, JOHN RUSSO, KOSKI SYVÄRI, PAUL WARCHOL Social Media Manager SARAH KANBAR

VIDEO DEPARTMENT Videographer CARLOS A. PINTO

ADVERTISING Director of Marketing ANGELA PALMIERI-ZERILLO angela@dolce.ca Director of New Business Development SUSAN BHATIA susan@dolce.ca Senior Account Manager MARIO BALACEANU Account Manager CHRISTINA BONO

ADVERTISING INQUIRIES T: 905-264-6789 Toll-Free: 1-888-68-DOLCE info@dolce.ca • www.dolcemag.com Office Administrator MARIA RIGAZZI Front Cover LEWIS HOWES Photo By ROBIN GARTNER

Dolce Magazine is published quarterly by Dolce Media Group, 111 Zenway Blvd., Suite 30, Vaughan, Ont., L4H 3H9 T: 905-264-6789, Toll-Free: 1-888-68-DOLCE, F: 905-264-3787, info@dolce.ca, www.dolcemedia.ca Publication Mail Agreement No. 40026675. All rights reserved. Any reproduction is strictly prohibited without written consent from the publisher. Dolce Magazine reaches over 900,000 affluent readers annually through household distribution across Canada. Dolce Magazine is also available to over 100 million digital consumers of Magzter Inc. and Issuu. Inquiries about where else Dolce Magazine is available for sale may be directed to Dolce Media Group: info@dolcemedia.ca or 905-264-6789. The yearly subscription fee is CDN $34 and US $48. Send cheque or money order to Dolce Media Group, 111 Zenway Blvd., Suite 30, Vaughan, Ont., L4H 3H9, Canada The opinions expressed in Dolce Magazine are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the publisher or advertisers. Dolce Media Group does not assume liability for content. The material in this magazine is intended for information purposes only and is in no way intended to supersede professional advice. We are proud to be a Canadian company that has successfully published magazines for the past 21 years without any government funding or financial assistance of programs to cover editorial costs. It has all been possible thanks to the wonderful support of our readers and advertisers. ISSN 1206-17780 Next Issue: Fall 2017 ©2017 Dolce Media Group. Printed in Canada. Follow us at:

twitter.com/dolcemag

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@dolcemag

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PUBLISHER’S NOTE

ALLOW YOUR

greatness TO TAKE FLIGHT

Michelle Zerillo-Sosa Publisher/Editor-in-Chief

TO OUR CHILDREN WE GIVE TWO THINGS, ONE IS ROOTS... THE OTHER IS WINGS.

dedication, sheer hard work, joy and gratitude, they, too, can hustle their way to creating an amazing life and reaching their full potential. I confess that I myself have a few self-help books on my nightstand — the type that promise great things, but for some reason you never make it past chapter two. So what I find particularly refreshing about Howes is that he says greatness means different things to different people. It does not necessarily mean learning how to acquire more wealth. It can also mean learning how to have more gratitude, how to attract more love, how to be more mindful. There is no single solution or formula to achieving your dream. You need to learn how to fly on your own. The key is testing those wings … and Howes shares pointers for what could be the flight of your life. As you read the interviews in this edition, you will notice that we have kept a lot our stories in bare Q-and-A format; our intention is to allow readers to be empowered by the “greats”, who, regardless of the challenges of their everyday lives, are making an impact on the world. I hope you enjoy the stories we have brought you in this issue of Dolce Magazine. May you find or redefine your own role in your everyday life and in the world. Wishing you much love and gratitude,

Michelle Zerillo-Sosa Publisher/Editor-in-Chief

michelle@dolce.ca @dolcetweets |

@amorebagstoronto

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PHOTO BY CARLOS A. PINTO

H

ave you ever asked yourself, “What is my role in this world?” Lewis Howes, our cover man, believes that “everyone has a role”; that everyone is born with wings, but some just don’t know they can fly yet; that the key to finding your happiness or greatness is to spread those wings and learn to fly. Eight years ago, however, this probably wouldn’t have been Howes’s outlook, let alone something he was preaching to others looking to make their dream a reality. Back then, he didn’t have much of a role besides crashing at his sister’s, feeling sorry for himself after his dream of being a pro football player had dissipated due to injury. A blow like that can shatter not only one’s dreams, but also one’s identity. I thought of this on my first meeting with Howes as he hugged me, lifting me right off my feet. Was this all-American, model-like gentleman mesmerizing everyone in the room with his intoxicating positive energy really the same man who had, as Ellen DeGeneres said when she introduced him on her show, “spent two years broke and living on his sister’s couch”? Howes, recognized by former president Barack Obama as one of the top 100 entrepreneurs under 30 in the country, is certainly no couch potato today! On his podcast The School of Greatness (ranked top 50 on iTunes with over 35 million downloads), he empowers anyone who is struggling in their life by discussing the tools and habits of leading doctors, CEOs of billiondollar companies and other greats, who share how they achieved greatness and success in their own careers. Every day, Howes helps people facing adversity by showing them that through


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CONTENTS

74

GARDEN VARIETY: Shimmering diamonds and polished pearls that speak for themselves

SUMMER 2017 / VOLUME 21 / ISSUE 2

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53

GREAT EXPECTATIONS:

Successful entrepreneur, best-selling author and podcast host Lewis Howes overhauls the traditional formula for success and brings it back to love and gratitude

PORTUGUESE CUISINE PICKS UP STEAM: The Presidential Train offers the ultimate gourmet experience for the sophisticated foodie

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OBJECTS OF DESIRE:

A page designed with the distinguished Dolce reader in mind — taking the ordinary to extraordinary

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TRANSATLANTIC FASHION WEEK:

31

SWEET CITY ESCAPE:

Iris Apfel sets sail aboard the Queen Mary 2

This 86-acre rural estate in Caledon, Ont., will make you forget all about those big-city dreams

22 12

DOLCE WAS THERE: Up close and personal at the hottest events of the season

A JOURNALIST’S PASSION: Lisa LaFlamme discusses her path to becoming an award-winning chief anchor for CTV National News, and shares intimate details about some of her most emotional assignments

ON THE COVER Photographed by Robin Gartner / Best-selling author and entrepreneur, Lewis Howes 26 HANYA’S HOPE: Developer and entrepreneur Hanya Kizemchuk lays the groundwork for a new initiative focused on helping young women and children survivors of abuse 28 HAUTE CONVERSATION: David Dixon uses fashion to open the lines of communication about ovarian cancer More stories inside ...

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“VISION IS THE POWER TO SEE WHAT’S AHEAD, AND THE ABILITY TO CREATE IT” - Dr. Steve Gupta, President and CEO of the Gupta Group Through an exciting series of residential projects, the Gupta Group transforms urban city living while surpassing all expectations. Each of the Gupta Group’s residential projects offer an unparalleled level of added value, along with personal touches to ensure high quality living.

3100 Steeles Ave. E., Suite 601 Markham, Ont. 905-940-9409 www.guptagroup.ca 11 summer 2017

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DOLCE WAS THERE

1451 WELLINGTON

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Mizrahi Developments’ 1451 Wellington, a brand new condominium in Ottawa’s west end, celebrated the grand opening of its presentation gallery on May 11 — ushering in a new era of rened, elegant living in Westboro. This 12-storey masterpiece is the byproduct of Sam Mizrahi’s determination and commitment to excellence. The presentation gallery mirrors the beauty of the suites to will be developed. The gallery transports the buyers into the prospective units and provides them with the feeling that they’re already home. Spacious rooms, thick moulding and premium nishes line the presentation gallery, offering a sense of intrigue and anticipation. Brian Gluckstein, Principal of Gluckstein Design and Henry Burstyn, associate director of Page + Steele / IBI Group Architects were on hand to present their creative vision for this landmark design. www.1451wellington.ca

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1. Micki and Sam Mizrahi with Jayne Watson; CEO, National Arts Centre Foundation 2. 3D Model of the 1451 Wellington Residence at the Presentation Gallery 3. Fernando Zerillo of Dolce Media Group and Eddy Cook 4. Michael Budovitch, Henry Burstyn, Katherine Grechuta, Ted Forbert and Janice Moe 5. Elizabeth Figueroa Strom, Brian Gluckstein and Michelle Bégin 6. David Barry, Azita Hekmati; Miele Business Development Manager and Joshua Lax; Vice President, Development of Mizrahi Developments 7. Guest celebrating with Noreen Meijias-Bennett (right) 8. Wendy Childs, Ian Creighton, Peter Sacoutis, Eric Larose and Cathy Mitchell 9. The Mizrahi Developments’ Ottawa team; Derek Nzeribe, Anna D’Aoust, Tamira Kollar, Cailey Clow, Sam Mizrahi, Micki Mizrahi, Jonny Cracower and Samantha Szirtes

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DOLCE WAS THERE 3

PORSCHE DESIGN TOWER

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Porsche Design Group and Dezer Development announced the grand opening of The Porsche Design Tower Miami, the rst of its kind. The luxury 60-storey highrise development features a patented and innovative automobile elevator system, which quickly transports residents and their cars to their home high above. Other amenities of the 132-unit building include plunge pools and outdoor summer kitchens. www.porsche-design.com

PHOTOS BY TIMUR EMEK

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1. Porsche Design Tower Miami 2. Jan Becker, CEO of Porsche Design Group 3. Dr. Marija, Dr. Oliver Porsche, Daniela Wieninger and Dr. Lutz Meschke

The 7th annual amfAR gala was hosted in Sao Paolo, Brazil, this past April. Celebrities, international superstars and supporters from around the globe were in attendance to honour Brazilian artist Vik Muniz, and his dedication to the ght against AIDS. The event raised over $1.3 million for amfAR’s AIDS research initiatives. www.amfar.org

PHOTOS BY RAFAEL NEDDERMEYER

AMFAR SAO PAOLO

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1. Guests enjoying the 7th annual amfAR gala 2. Katie Holmes

AAFA’S 2017 DESIGNER OF THE YEAR

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PHOTOS BY GETTY IMAGES

Coach’s executive creative director, Stuart Vevers, took home the 2017 Designer of the Year award at the American Image Awards on April 24. Vevers, who joined the fashion magnate in 2013, has been tasked with reforming Coach’s brand, including Coach 1941, a new ready-towear handbag. Hundreds of industry leaders, celebrities and media were in attendance for the awards ceremony, including actor Emma Roberts as well as designers Kenneth Cole, Ruthie Davis and Norma Kamali. www.wewear.org 1. Stuart Vevers, executive creative director of COACH 2. Emma Roberts 3. Stuart Vevers and model

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DOLCE WAS THERE

This past April, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Health Minister Jane Philpott were presented with daffodils to mark the Canadian Cancer Society’s (CCS) Daffodil Month. It was the 60th annual CCS Daffodil Month, dedicated to those battling all forms of cancer. The daffodil is symbolic of resilience and strength. It’s a month that’s recognized nationwide. The CCS also announced its renewed partnership with Loblaw Companies Ltd. www.cancer.ca/daffodil

PHOTO COURTESY OF CANADIAN CANCER SOCIETY

FIGHTING CANCER AT THE GROCERY STORE

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, Health Minister Jane Philpott, Japji Bhullar

PCC COCKTAIL RECEPTION

Friends and supporters gathered at former Hockey Night in Canada anchor George Stroumboulopoulos’s house on Mar. 10 for a cocktail reception in support of Prince’s Charities Canada (PCC). As an organization, PCC aims to improve and promote education, responsible business, environmental sustainability, the lives of underprivileged youth as well as supporting indigenous communities and the armed forces. www.princescharities.ca

PHOTOS COURTESY OF PRINCE’S CHARITIES CANADA

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1. Melissa Grelo, Matthew Rowe, Amanda Sherrington, George Stroumboulopoulos 2. Kevin McGurgan, Raj Kothari and Brian Lawson

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FERRARI 812 SUPERFAST Ferrari’s most powerful production car, to date, made its rst public debut back in April at Auto Shanghai. The Ferrari 812 Superfast reaches new heights in terms of power and control. With a new 6.5-litre V12 engine and, for the rst time, Electric Power Steering, this Ferrari offers unparalleled handling and sheer power output. This model will be delivered to customers in the fourth quarter of this year. 812superfast.ferrari.com

1. Ferrari 812 Superfast engine 2. Ferrari 812 Superfast

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ART

Art City Plans are in the works to erect an entrepreneurial makers’ district, to give artists and designers a place to work, meet and grow WRITTEN BY DANIEL CALABRETTA

PHOTOS BY HECTOR VASQUEZ PHOTOGRAPHY

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he construction of a 30,000square-foot, $27.3 million artistic entrepreneurial hub is underway in Toronto’s East Bayfront area and is set to open next fall. Artscape – a Toronto-based not-for-profit organization aimed at producing creative spaces – recently unveiled its plans for the Artscape Daniels Launchpad, an arts and design district that will provide creators with affordable access to technology, tools, innovative entrepreneurship programs, funding and business opportunities. “When somebody walks in the door and becomes a member of Launchpad, they’re going to have access to a fully decked-out multidisciplinary production studio. It’s an opportunity to go in there and practise their craft, rub shoulders with many people, to build collaborations and seek out opportunities,” says Tim Jones, Artscape CEO. Launchpad will be a membership-based place, containing multiple facilities and tools. Jones compares Launchpad’s concept to that of a gym, in which you pay a monthly membership and get shared access to facilities. “Instead of elliptical machines and weight training, you’ll have 3D printers, woodshop and jewellery-making equipment and audio-visual recording facilities, and instead of a personal trainer you’ll have a mentor.”

The 30,000-square-foot facility will contain studios equipped for digital design, jewellery making, woodworking and much more

The idea for this development grew out of years of research and collaboration with postsecondary institutions and Toronto trade and service organizations. “We actually learned a lot about the struggles artists have to sustain themselves, or build an organization or company.” In fact, studies have shown that artists are much

more likely to hold multiple jobs to sustain themselves than people in other industries. Jones also dispels the notion that artists are not good businesspeople. He describes them as “natural entrepreneurs,” who are constantly figuring out “how to do a lot for very little, on tight timelines, and pulling off kind of miracles.” He notes one of the objectives of this development: “A lot of artists can act like social entrepreneurs. They may not be interested in business, in and of itself, but it can be a way to empower them to do what they want to do and make the change they want to make through their art.” Jones says that part of the goal is to facilitate success in an artist’s career and help them continue to be self-sustaining. “There are a lot of creative businesses looking to have access to creative people. We’re going to build a marketplace of opportunities and resources.” Creative people have an impact on the social and cultural fabric of a metropolis, and, according to Jones, contribute to city building. “Artists are, in their nature, not only entrepreneurs, but also place-makers,” says Jones. “When they move into neighbourhoods they bring all kinds of energy and vibrancy. That shapes the quality, story, look, feel and reputation of a place.”

www.artscapelaunchpad.ca

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mosconemarble.com w e a r e t h e f a br ic a t o r s

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OBJECTSof

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If the return of a warm summer breeze isn’t enough to awaken inspiration, these vibrant finds will spark the flame

TEXT BY REBECCA ALBERICO

PHOTO BY CHRIS VASSALOS OF GALVANIZED STUDIO

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SWEAT IN STYLE: Train with the Polar M430 — a timepiece that tracks your run, and your vitals, in a heartbeat | www.polar.com STAY GOLDEN: This gilded die comes in a stunning set of two by Ugloft, and is the perfect addition to your next card night | www.ugloft.com STORY TILES: Hopson Grace collaborated with artist Marga van Oers to celebrate Canada’s 150th through narrative tiles | www.hopsongrace.com STEP OUT IN STYLE: This bold Ines Di Santo trumpet gown makes its debut in the Spring 2018 Bridal Collection | www.inesdisanto.com TUTTI FRUTTI: Charlotte Olympia draws inspiration from the vibrancy of Brazil for her Let’s go Bananas! Collection | us.charlotteolympia.com DARING DESIGN: Warm and visually complex, this Dawn Chapnick Designs living room has many contrasting patterns and textures creating a visual and emotional energy | www.dawnchapnick.com

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PLUSH POWDER ROOM: Natural geological processes inspired this luxurious Lapiaz freestand washbasin | www.maisonvalentina.net OUI OUI, GIVENCHY: The designer’s summer-forward hat, captured by photographer Frank Horvat in 1958 | www.izzygallery.com UNIQUE BLENDS: Nespresso introduces a new Explorations collection for its original line of machines, including limited edition coffees from Laos and Kenya | www.nespresso.com CASCADING BRILLIANCE: These Elisabetta Franchi earrings ooze luxury with strings of rhinestones | www.elisabettafranchi.com

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NO OLTRE LIKE IT: Advanced aerodynamics give this Bianchi OLTRE XR3 a competitive advantage | www.bianchicanada.com HOSTESS WITH THE MOSTESS: Instaworthy Florentine chargers in gold, pink and green botanicals by Casa De Perrin | www.casadeperrin.com CALIFORNIA DREAMY: Wine and dine at 1 Pico, the upscale Santa Monica hotspot at Shutters on the Beach | www.shuttersonthebeach.com RX ASAP: Even model Gigi Hadid has been spotted with this soft silicone iPhone case by ban.do | www.bando.com MAKING HISTORY: Porsche 959, a threevolume boxed set, is the perfect coffee-table accessory for a car lover | www.chapters.indigo.ca

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MEDIA

Lisa LaFlamme replaced Lloyd Robertson as chief anchor and senior editor of CTV National News in 2011

PHOTO BY JESSE MILNS

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The award-winning Canadian journalist Lisa LaFlamme reflects on her career as a broadcast journalist and talks to Dolce Magazine about her path to success, international reporting and the evolution of the medium WRITTEN BY RICK MULLER | INTERVIEW BY REBECCA ALBERICO

O

ftentimes, the early foundation of one’s life forms the path forward. You need look no further for evidence of this than Lisa LaFlamme, one of Canada’s most visible citizens who, in the face of frustration while trying to break into her chosen field, stayed true to her dreams and followed her passion for journalism to rise to the very top as chief anchor and senior editor of Canada’s most watched newscast, CTV National News with Lisa LaFlamme. Born in Kitchener to David and Kathleen LaFlamme, she graduated from St. Mary’s High School and then the University of Ottawa. She began her career at local CTV station, CKCO Television in Kitchener as a copy writer and script assistant, then became news reporter at CFCA/AM109, and eventually rose to television reporting and an anchor position at CKCO. She became co-host of Canada AM in September 2001 and she worked as a parliamentary correspondent for CTV News Channel and as a national affairs correspondent for CTV National News with Lloyd Robertson before being named his successor as chief anchor of the national news on September 5, 2011. LaFlamme is one of Canada’s most accomplished and honoured journalists, with five Canadian Screen Awards since 2014 in the Best News Anchor and Best National News categories for her work on CTV National News. In 2016, LaFlamme was made a Member of the Order of Ontario. LaFlamme recently sat down for an interview with Dolce Magazine in her office just after a lunch with her dear friend, fellow University of Ottawa alumnus and the host of TV’s Jeopardy, Alex Trebek.

DOLCE MAGAZINE: What’s the best advice you’ve ever received? LISA LAFLAMME: That was from my father, who said, “Don’t follow a paycheque; follow your passion.” Because in those early days, when I couldn’t get a job in journalism, I stuck to it. I think if you follow a paycheque, it will come back to haunt you, perhaps as a mid-life crisis, and luckily I haven’t had to go through that. I’ve been able to follow a passion that’s taken me all over the world and even in my own backyard, because that’s the beauty of journalism − it’s everywhere around us. It’s always growing and always changing and we’re in a major state of flux right now, and

together, we are all going to figure out how to keep storytelling alive and viable and credible, and that’s the challenge.

“I’VE BEEN ABLE TO FOLLOW A PASSION THAT’S TAKEN ME ALL OVER THE WORLD AND EVEN IN MY OWN BACKYARD, BECAUSE THAT’S THE BEAUTY OF JOURNALISM – IT’S EVERYWHERE AROUND US”

DM: Where did this passion for journalism come from? LL: I used to love to write stories as a kid, and I remember in Grade 9 going to my guidance counsellor and telling her I wanted to be a … I don’t think I used the word “journalist,” but something along those lines. She told me, “Okay, you need physics.” Now I can tell you, in 29 years in this business, I’ve never used physics, but I took it anyway and barely passed. I’ve just always loved asking questions and hearing the answers, and it’s been a privilege for me over the years to be able to tell someone’s story. When somebody puts their faith in you to tell their story, that’s really a relationship you can’t beat, and you have to honour that in a truthful and upfront way. DM: Have you had someone you considered a mentor in your career? LL: In the industry, certainly Lloyd Robertson, who has been a guide and listening post and such a fabulous friend. Through life at every juncture, there is a mentor for that moment, getting us to the next step or phase of our lives. I’ve been very fortunate to have so many people, for whatever reason, put their faith in me to help me keep telling stories. DM: Technology has changed a lot in recent years. How have all the new platforms and social media transformed your industry? LL: There are now more ways to tell a story, which is great. I think that with all the great things we’ve seen about social media, there is also this horrifying side, and it can be like rat poison — like Twitter, for example. It can be both things. There is so much negativity. I have chosen to weed out what is constructive criticism and what is somebody just vamping. DM: Technology has certainly increased the feedback. It used to be a one-sided broadcast, but now it’s so much more interactive. LL: And I love that. I love that people are watching. In the old days I’d get letters. Now it’s not really emails, but tweets. But the interactive nature of it makes us all the more accessible, which I think is a good thing.

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DM: Your show is much more than a national newscast. Tell us about a typical workday. LL: It starts the minute you wake up. I listen to BBC World at 7 a.m., then switch to CBC News Network — I’m always watching everything. We have our first meeting at 11 a.m., but it’s an ongoing conversation all day long. I physically come into the office at 2 p.m., and we have meetings, and then we write the show from 5:15 p.m. until 10 o’clock. I am literally still writing until the floor director yells “Three minutes!” and I have to run to the set. It’s the same thing every night — I’m going to push it to the deadline every day. But I have such an incredible team. It really is a family here, and I’m very lucky to be working with such a beautiful group of funny, interesting and intelligent people. DM: Do you just shut down when you get home at night? LL: I try to, but I’m usually listening to podcasts, like The Daily from The New York Times, This American Life or Alec Baldwin’s Here’s the Thing; it depends what mood I’m in. But at that hour I don’t want anything too interesting or I won’t sleep … so I usually fall asleep to Alec Baldwin, which is a compliment. DM: You are so busy with the broadcast, doing interviewing, writing and research. What do you do in your free time? LL: It very often includes binge-watching on a Saturday. I love to watch whatever the hottest thing is, especially during the wintertime. We have a cottage, and I have a Labrador retriever, and every day I walk my dog for 90 minutes through the woods. It’s great therapy to be out there. I have lots of great friends and a very full and balanced life — knock on wood. If anything, I wish there were just a little more time to just do nothing and relax. That’s the challenge. But I’m extremely happy. DM: Are any of your family members in the media or news business? LL: No, not at all. My father had a construction company, and sadly he died six years ago. I have three sisters, whom I talk to every single day. They are my best friends and my touchstone for reality and honestly, the funniest women on the planet. They are all in the Kitchener/Waterloo area. DM: You’ve covered stories all over the world. Have any experiences stood out to you? LL: It’s hard to choose just one story, because it depends. I do remember I had the opportunity to go to Iraq and visit a refugee camp where these women had literally just escaped after two years of being ISIS brides. And honestly, when you are sitting in the middle of a Northern Iraqi desert with these beautiful women and hearing these stories, you realize your responsibility. I’ll never forget this one woman — all she had was her iPhone with a photograph of her three daughters, who never got

out and are still there. Just imagine the value of that iPhone — that is it until those girls, please God, are released. Just recently, Vimy in France was incredible. Thirty thousand Canadians flew to this corner of northern France to celebrate something that happened 100 years ago. One of the most beautiful monuments to our own people and troops is nearly 4,000 miles away in a field in France. That was very emotional. We were with Roméo Dallaire and double amputee Paul Franklin, and Canadians were just hugging them and crying and thanking them, so that was amazing. If I ever get on a plane and say, “Well, that was a bore,” then I don’t think I’ve done my job, either. Because if I think it was a bore, then how do you think the viewer would have seen it? I think for every experience, I hopefully am able to pull something out of it.

DM: You’ve interviewed so many famous people. Is there one person or interview that stands out as the most memorable? LL: Wow, that’s always a challenge, as I’ve had so many fascinating interviews. Benjamin Netanyahu was absolutely fascinating. Colin Powell, right when the U.S. was about to invade Iraq, and he believed they had weapons of mass destruction, was a fascinating interview. But sometimes, it’s also a person on the street who you interview and who will move you. Of course, it’s always interesting to interview a prime minister, as you can challenge them on things that Canadians are interested about. I do get nervous before these because I feel if I’m not nervous beforehand, it’s like I don’t respect my audience. I don’t take anything lightly, and nothing just rolls off your back. I’m confident in my ability because before I interview anyone, I’ve done a mile of research. But you never really know how anything is going to go until the camera starts rolling.

DM: In these interesting times, what do you see as the future of news broadcasting? LL: That’s a great question that I wish I could answer. I’m nervous for the industry, as I see the challenge newspapers are having and know we are not far behind. It’s a struggle, and I can’t predict, to be honest. I like to believe there will always be a market for a traditional news broadcast. We get over a million viewers a night, but I know more and more people are not watching it the way our parents did. But journalism will never

die, storytelling will always be there — it’s just a question of how will the message be conveyed. It’s very difficult to predict, but then, who could have predicted that we could have a phone conversation and see each other [at the same time]? So I have to believe that whatever great innovations got us here will somehow also get us to the next level, and journalism will always, somehow, be a part of that. www.ctvnews.ca/ctv-national-news

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YOUR ROME AWAY FROM ROME FOR

YOUR HOME

Since 1986, we have continued the family tradition of offering the finest service to match the finest in European furnishings. We would like to thank our customers for their continued loyalty and look forward to serving you in the future. Visit our showroom and enjoy!

CONTEMPORARY | MODERN LIVING | CLASSIQUE

2663 Steeles Ave. W., Toronto, ON | 416.667.0080 www.martindanielinteriors.com summer 2017

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PHILANTHROPY

Hanya’s Hope After a lifetime of success, Hanya Kizemchuk is paying it forward through her new foundation that will provide vital resources to young survivors of abuse and sex trafficking

Hanya Kizemchuk was photographed at the 200 Russell Hill Presentation Centre in Toronto / Lori Morris Designs, House of LMD

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PHOTO BY ROBIN GARTNER | HAIR AND MAKE-UP: DAVID GOVEIA / JUDY INC.

WRITTEN BY IDA HSIANG | INTERVIEW BY REBECCA ALBERICO


PHOTO BY BRIAN BOSSERT

Kizemchuk met Aerosmith’s Steven Tyler at an event in Toronto late last year and recently auctioned a stay at her Naples, Florida, home for his charity, Janie’s Fund

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n her 60 years, Hanya Kizemchuk has worn a surprising number of hats, as a model turned real-estate investor turned entrepreneur. But her latest project, Hanya’s Hope Foundation for child survivors of abuse and trafficking, is, she says, her most meaningful yet. In the ’80s, Kizemchuk walked the runway for designers like Karl Lagerfeld, Jil Sander and Claude Montana, and back home in Toronto she appeared in the pages of Chatelaine and Flare. By her estimation, she was also the first Canadian model to sport a buzzed-short hairdo, given to her by Aldo Coppola in Milan, to set her apart from the pack. But when real estate started booming in the late ’80s, she nimbly changed tack. She got her real estate licence and used her well-trained eye and adventurous spirit to sell houses in neighbourhoods like Rosedale and Moore Park, converted a 48-unit Forest Hill apartment building into a co-ownership and even sold her own home in Mississauga to then-superstar Blue Jay Vernon Wells. But when her daughter came along, her agent hours clashed with family life. So she pivoted again, this time into property development, buying, renovating and selling properties, until finally in 2014, she founded Spinout Cycle, an innovative spinning gym in Liberty Village that allowed members to track their progress digitally. Kizemchuk was just starting to think about expanding the business when, unexpectedly, her ex-husband, the father of her daughter, died. Life as she knew it screeched to a halt. The couple had always maintained a close relationship, and in grieving, Kizemchuk found that, despite success in her business life, where she most wanted to be was by her daughter’s side.

“AFTER GOING THROUGH A DARK PLACE AND DARK TUNNEL, MYSELF AND WITH MY FAMILY, AND LOOKING DEEPER INTO MYSELF, I REALIZED THAT I WAS REALLY INTERESTED IN HELPING OTHER CHILDREN” “It was a very emotionally draining and stressful time and I understood that I couldn’t be in all these places. I had to choose what had to go. And I just walked into the spin studio one day and shut it down,” says Kizemchuk. She had opened its doors only seven months earlier, but the decision was firm. Grief had illuminated her path, and what had become clear to Kizemchuk was that the world was full of children left to face life’s adversities on their own. She knew that she wanted to focus her efforts on helping others in need. “After going through a dark place and dark tunnel, myself and with my family, and looking deeper into myself, I realized that I was really interested in helping other children.”

Out of that revelation came the idea to start a foundation focused on the plight of children who are survivors of sexual abuse and sex trafficking. Already an active philanthropist, Kizemchuk is now leveraging her connections to help get her charity off the ground. Last September she rubbed elbows with Steven Tyler in Toronto at a fundraiser for his own charity, Janie’s Fund. He put her in touch with his team and from there the idea grew to loosely fashion Hanya’s Hope after Angie’s List — a hugely successful U.S.-based site that features crowd-sourced reviews — for all types of children in need. Hanya’s Hope will primarily be a resource for charities, giving them quick access to professionals and aides such as women’s shelters, social workers and legal aid and connect them with numerous charitable organizations globally. “Hanya’s Hope is in its infancy, but I really hope it will become a hub for all matters pertaining to child advocacy, whether it’s children of alcoholism or abuse or whether it’s anti sex trafficking. In the U.S. alone, sex trafficking is the third-largest underground ‘business’ after drugs and arms and approximately 30 million children are involved.” Those staggering statistics are what propel Kizemchuk, who sees her foundation as a connector between children’s charities around the world, something that “draws them all in and becomes a power force. Because worldwide, there’s no one really doing that right now.” Kizemchuk has never been one to flinch at a challenge, but this act of her life feels different from the rest. It was, she says, preceded by a “shift” within herself. “I have realized that I was actually born to do exactly this. My journey has brought me to this door and I’m walking through it.” www.hanyashope.ca

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FASHION

HAUTE

CONVERSATION Toronto designer David Dixon is two decades into a career that keeps giving — to the fashion industry and beyond

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t’s been a whirlwind start to 2017 for Toronto-based fashion designer David Dixon. In April, Dixon was honoured with the Fashion Impact Award at this year’s Canadian Arts & Fashion Awards (CAFA). “Being recognized this year by CAFA and my peers was truly a surprise, as well as an honour that went far beyond my work professionally, just as a designer,” says Dixon. “I was overwhelmed by the support.” His award-winning Gene Collection was conceived in late 2015 to spark conversation about the role genetics plays in screening for ovarian cancer. The Gene Collection, which debuted in 2016, featured denim and encouraged women and their families to talk to their healthcare providers about their family genetic history and potential risk for the disease. “Ovarian Cancer Canada gave me the incentive to create a vision that went far beyond what I felt was a collection for a season, to become a conversation for a lifetime for many.”

The designer’s nine-minute presentation video of the collection garnered a jaw-dropping 40 million impressions and lit up the trending topics across social media platforms. Dixon says that the inspiration for a collection often reflects where he fi nds himself in a given moment. “It could be inspired by a place I visited, a person who left an impression, history, visions of the future or sometimes the most common, day-to-day actions that we participate in.” The last person to truly inspire him was his sister, Susan Dixon, who passed suddenly in 2015. The CAFA award was a notable feat for the homegrown gown designer, but Dixon says he’s more than happy to take the lows that come with the highs. “In my career, any highlight for me is a moment where I feel a change has happened and a lesson [was] learned for the better.” Dixon’s humbleness is far from a front; it’s his true nature as a giver, a lover and a creator. “My parents taught me and my siblings that it is easier to give than to ask, and I hold that

with tremendous responsibility,” says Dixon. “If I feel I have the voice or the platform to bring attention to something that I feel strongly about, through fashion or personally, I will be involved.” Appropriately, Dixon chooses to spread messages of awareness through fashion. He believes it to be a medium of communication all its own. “I found that through fashion I was able to use design and clothing as my voice,” says Dixon. “Being tremendously introverted and shy, this allowed me to ‘speak’ and express myself.” Dixon praises the language of couture as one of the most commonly used non-verbal methods of communicating outside of touch. “Having designed for over 20 years, the one thing that remains constant is that voice within me to communicate through the work that I do. The passion for what I do is something I cannot seem to turn off.” Whether it is designing a collection, mentoring

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PHOTO BY ROBIN GARTNER

WRITTEN BY REBECCA ALBERICO


David Dixon is president of the Board of Directors for the Toronto Fashion Incubator

“I FOUND THAT THROUGH FASHION I WAS ABLE TO USE DESIGN AND CLOTHING AS MY VOICE”

at the postsecondary level or raising awareness for initiatives he feels strongly about, Dixon says we can anticipate his continuation of a story and dialogue he hopes will make people feel great, look great and do great things. Dixon’s advice to emerging designers and other people who want to enter the world of fashion is that you have to really love it. “It is a difficult business, and there will be many no’s along the way,” he says. “Surround yourself with people who believe in you, have a strong point of view, listen and really cultivate what your voice will be and how it will be heard.” It’s advice that Dixon gets as good as he gives. “I want to keep evolving and doing what I love to do — God willing.”

www.daviddixon.ca @daviddixoninc

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A DV E R TO R I A L

relationship ends at the door when it comes to money, but we don’t see it that way. We’re really here to support what happens in their lives. In this industry, if we get clouded by the fact that we see numbers on the screen, it just becomes about tracking money and keeping score. The reality is, money is not just money. Money is someone’s life and someone’s future, and we cannot lose the connection we have to that.

Partners Jason Pereira, Kathleen Peace and James Collins are committed to the meticulous planning involved in ensuring the financial success of each of their clients

Q: What reactions do you get from new clients when they start to see everything fall into place? A: We are aware this process can be

overwhelming, so we do it over a period of time, breaking it up into bite-sized meetings. What’s the reaction? They see the immediate difference from where they were before. Our value is visible to them. Oftentimes, whether our options are the same price or cheaper than previous conventional options, they see a massive difference in value from what they were receiving before. Some clients actually feel upset about what they’d received before.

This financial planning firm believes in the value of developing a relationship with clients before touching a single dollar

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oodgate Financial Inc. has been flourishing as an independent financial planning firm for the past decade — managing millions of dollars in investable assets for approximately 350 families within the Toronto area. Led by three senior partners and financial consultants — Jason Pereira, Kathleen Peace and James Collins — this firm of highly accomplished financial industry experts has garnered signifi cant attention and accolades in the public sphere. Pereira, one of the main partners at Woodgate, has received numerous awards, including having been named one of the Top 50 Advisors in Canada for the past three years and Americas Region Winner of the 2015 PlanPlus Global Financial Planning Award. He also teaches financial planning at Toronto’s York University. Woodgate’s success is not limited to Pereira, however. The three partners combined hold more than 10 financial designations. Woodgate has “one of the most credentialed teams in the country,” as Pereira describes.

Not only are they qualifi ed, Woodgate advisors also fully immerse themselves in their clients’ financial affairs so they can offer the best guidance and advice. The comprehensive analysis and recommendations that Woodgate provides further assist customers in navigating their financial world. Woodgate aims to place its clients on the best path to attaining all of their financial goals and dreams. Q: What is the difference between Woodgate and all the other financial planning firms out there? A: Institutionally, everybody says they care about

their clients. But when you start asking what that actually means, it’s not necessarily a lot of attention to detail. They don’t necessarily do a lot for clients. So for us, caring is one thing. We do demonstrate that however possible. We pay a lot of attention to their personal landmarks in life. When things go wrong, we do what we can to lend help through our network — like through referrals to medical professionals or clinics. A lot of the time with other firms, the

friends with strong, dynamic women and playing a part in their continued success. Female entrepreneurs are typically the most demanding; that’s how they’ve made their money in their businesses. I’m a business owner myself and I understand their needs and the demands on their time. Meetings and calls take place on the go, in their office, or in a casual setting. It’s whatever and whenever works for the client. Q: When is the right time for people to enlist your services? A: The best fit for us is when someone has

reached a level of complexity in their financial lives where they feel like they can’t manage it all anymore. If you have a million dollars in investable assets, especially if you’re in your 40s and 50s, it’s probably because you’re very successful at doing what you’re doing. We have a lot of business owners and executives as well. Their time is so much better spent in their jobs. They can create more wealth running their businesses, doing what they’re really good at, than trying to figure this out, which is not a part-time job. You can’t do this as efficiently as we can in your spare time by reading a couple of newspapers on the weekend. So really, when they get to the point of “I have too much to do,” that’s where we come in. We’re looking for people who want to delegate.

www.woodgate.com

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PHOTO BY CARLOS A. PINTO / DOLCE MEDIA GROUP

WOODGATE FINANCIAL

Q: You have been working with a surging number of female entrepreneurs as of late. From an industry perspective, what are your thoughts? A: It’s been exciting. I love working and being


REAL ESTATE Stoneridge Hall offers uninterrupted views of farmland and cityscape vistas of Toronto in the distance

SWEET CITY ESCAPE Stoneridge Hall, an 86-acre estate in Caledon inspired by Georgian homes along the eastern seaboard, offers more than 13,000 square feet of living space with a view of the Toronto skyline (squinting required)

PHOTOS BY BRYAN GROULX

WRITTEN BY RICK MULLER

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From the outside in, this luxurious estate was designed with the clean lines of the Doric style in mind

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arely if ever in the Greater Toronto Area has there been a real estate of fering as exclusive as Caledon’s Stoneridge Hall, set amid 86 acres of rolling fa r m la nd w ithin a n hour of downtown Toronto. “You simply cannot match the combination of the superb setting, proximity to golf, skiing, riding and the quality of its design, created by Joe Brennan of Toronto and Palm Beach,” says broker John Dunlap of Moffat Dunlap Real Estate, who has Stoneridge Hall currently listed for $11.8 million. “The owners found the property 15 years ago by happenstance, simply by driving around the countryside,” says Dunlap. “They quickly fell in love with its sweeping views and recognized how rare it was to find such scenery so close to [the city].” After two years of planning, the owners were ready to build with designer Brennan. Their inspiration was the grand Phipps estate on Long Island, N.Y., known as Old Westbury Gardens. They also gathered their ideas from fine Georgian homes all along the eastern seaboard and in the U.K. and combined their favourite elements to create Stoneridge Hall. The result is a 13,725-square-foot stunner that features seven en suite bedrooms and 14 bathrooms, set high on the Niagara Escarpment in the Caledon Hills, affording unspoiled vistas of the surrounding farmland, all the way south to the downtown Toronto skyline. The property is half an hour from Pearson Airport and minutes from Caledon Ski Club and Devil’s Pulpit Golf Course. A generous Georgian-style entrance hall provides a grand introduction to the 5,375-square-foot ground floor. This level also contains a reception area, great room, piano apse and 380-square-foot kitchen. The kitchen features custom cabinetry, a large centre island, marble countertops, two Miele dishwashers, two Miele ovens and two Subzero built-in refrigerators and freezers. There is also a 165-square-foot eat-in breakfast area with French doors opening to the West Terrace garden, the perfect place to start a summer’s day.

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1. The kitchen features custom built-in millwork and decorative glass display shelving 2. The warm oak flooring continues into the great room, which also features imported silk wall coverings 3. Each of the seven bedrooms are filled with bespoke furnishings and antique accents 4. The main lot includes 86 acres of manicured land, formal gardens, fountains, an outdoor pool and ponds 5. Floor-to-ceiling French doors lead from the breakfast nook to the west terrace garden

In the dining room, elaborate ceiling enhancements have been installed, along with a six-arm chandelier and two full-length windows with north-courtyard garden views. The ground floor also includes an east and west wing, a handsome library, a main guest bedroom and two separate and complete bathrooms. Up on the second floor, French doors in the spacious master bedroom open onto a balcony with east garden views. Its two bathrooms have polished marble and limestone flooring. Down on the 4,550-square-foot lower level is a banquet room well-suited to grand entertaining, along with a theatre room, an exercise room, a private spa and a heated, three-bay garage. “The inventory of truly spectacular country properties is very limited and this is what makes Stoneridge Hall so unique,” says Dunlap. “When searching for a country property, it’s really all about the lifestyle. The market is indeed vibrant but you really should attempt to find something unique, and in the ever-expanding urban sprawl that is the Greater Toronto Area, an 86-acre parcel of land within one hour of [the city] is a sound choice and an excellent lifestyle investment.”

www.stoneridgehall.com

summer 2017


BUSINESS

A Little Bit of Zig Canada’s very own advertising man, Terry O’Reilly, has worked with some of the biggest personalities in North America, including Ellen DeGeneres, Alec Baldwin and Martin Short, to name a few WRITTEN BY REBECCA ALBERICO

O’Reilly has created campaigns for top brands including Labatt, Molson, Tim Hortons, Volkswagen, Nissan and the Hudson’s Bay Company

PHOTO BY MAX JAMALI

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o clients, O’Reilly is the man who brings the zig when everyone else is zagging — never settling for the status quo, always pushing boundaries. A fount of knowledge, strategy and creativity, O’Reilly has produced some of the most award-winning advertising in North America. O’Reilly currently hosts the popular CBC Radio One show Under the Influence, a weekly, 30-minute segment tackling all things advertising. He recently released a book titled This I Know: Marketing Lessons from Under the Influence, a howto marketing guide of sorts for the little guy

that is chock full of the most valuable wisdom a marketing veteran of 36 years has to offer. Packed with valuable advice, personal anecdotes and humour, O’Reilly tells readers why creativity is their greatest asset and that analyzing their strategy can transform their business. Dolce sat down with the ad man and gained some impressive industry insight. DOLCE MAGAZINE: What struggles did you initially face when you first broke into the industry? TERRY O’REILLY: When I got the job at the radio station I was the only writer in a radio station that had about 100 to 150 ongoing retail

clients. The salesperson would come in every day with an inch of contracts from various advertisers, and I ended up having to write 20 to 30 radio commercials a day, from not knowing anything about writing a commercial. It was baptism by hellfi re! It was a huge obstacle just to understand things like how to absorb a briefi ng from a client, how to organize my thoughts, how to make a commercial work in 30 or 60 seconds. The great thing was that I didn’t have to answer to anybody but the clients. I was the creative director, so I got to see what worked and what didn’t through instant feedback — from a client after a big sale, for example. I started to

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really understand the medium better because I got the best tutorial possible, and that was huge for me early in my career. I don’t think most people get that kind of an exposure to instant feedback the way I did, and that put me in such a great place for the rest of my career because I started to amass a great understanding of persuasion and marketing early on. It was big for me. DM: Whom do you look up to in the industry? TO: James Webb Young was one of the few ad people from the early 20th century who actually wrote about his experiences. He was a great essayist in advertising. I love and often reread his books. He was really smart and only interested in effective advertising; he wasn’t swayed by anything like being famous or working a big project. He just wanted to know what worked, and that’s why I love his writing. When I eventually made my way back to Toronto from the radio station and a small agency position, I got a job with a big advertising agency in the big leagues and I was lucky enough to fi nd my mentor. The creative director at that agency was Trevor Goodgoll, this very fl amboyant South African guy. He taught me how to present, how to really analyze a marketing problem and the competitors, how to figure out how a product fits into somebody’s life, how to look for a piece of mental real estate that a brand could own and how to really dig to fi nd that insight. So [Goodgoll], without question, was my mentor. I was so lucky because I had that feedback in the early days of radio, then very shortly on the heels of that I worked for someone who really taught me the ropes, who really understood marketing. DM: What persuaded you to write this new book? TO: When I started my own company many years later in 1990, I started working for all the big brands again, while also tackling small brands. I realized that small to medium advertisers typically can’t afford to have a big agency on speed-dial. These companies are spending their precious, hard-earned dollars, so they don’t have big budgets; with a limited amount of money, they’re getting no guidance. I thought, that’s the book I’m going to write. I’m going to write a book taking all the knowledge — or as many lessons as I could put into one book — from my career and from my 12 years of my radio show, and put it in a book that small to medium marketers could really rely on to help them understand how to create an identity, how to stand out in the marketplace, how to zig

when everybody else is “zagging” and that you can be really bold in your marketing without having a big budget. DM: What are your thoughts on creative and out-of-the-box marketing? TO: I think creativity is the most powerful business tool, and I say that on my radio show all the time. I really want marketers to understand that. In order to stand out in the marketplace, in order to stand out from the competition, you need to use creativity. A lot of marketers resist it, and they think — just being straight information, straight price and item —

“EVEN THOUGH I AM 36 YEARS DEEP INTO A CAREER, I WILL STILL LEARN SOMETHING BRAND NEW TOMORROW ABOUT MARKETING, I GUARANTEE YOU”

that creativity is just frivolous. It’s not. It is the way to get noticed, it is the way to make an impact and it is the way to persuade somebody. So when you don’t have a budget, creativity is what you need. DM: How do you best cultivate your own creativity? TO: I think you have to look at the world through fresh eyes. That’s one of the key points. You have to recalibrate the way you look at the world so you can see great opportunities and see interesting things at work. As an ad guy one of the things I do is look at the most awardwinning, most effective advertising in the world. I’m always on the lookout for it — how are they selling tires in Pakistan, or how are they selling Coca-Cola in India — because I want to see what’s working and what knowledge you can gain there. I was standing in the airport the

other day and I was looking at it as a media centre, not as a place where you catch a plane. I’ve recalibrated my thinking, so I’m thinking of interesting ways you could use the airport to advertise a brand. I believe everything is an opportunity to do something creative. DM: What top three elements are crucial when it comes to successful marketing? TO: I love humour. It’s not the only way to do advertising, and I think there are a lot of products that humour isn’t conducive to — like if you were advertising a funeral home, I don’t think it would be the right choice, although there have been some pretty great funeral home ads that have been funny. What I love about humour is, as I say in my book, it is the WD-40 of advertising. In other words, it lubricates the way in. All advertising is an intrusion; it’s an interruption to what people are really there for, and I think humour makes that interruption polite, and it gives something back by making people smile. I would say the second point is getting your strategy right; fi nd a place in the marketplace to stand for something that no one else is. The third thing would be to focus on your greatest area of opportunity. Almost all the clients I’ve worked with have said they need to generate new customers to grow their business, but I always suggest that maybe a greater area of opportunity would be to get your current customers to buy more of your product. If you’re talking to your current customers, it’s a warm call; it’s not a cold call, it’s not a groundzero proposition, and they already like you. DM: You say that “ads give back.” Could you explain? TO: I think there’s an unwritten promise between advertising and the public that was forged many years ago — probably in the ’20s, when marketing started to become an industry — and that is: we’ll pay for the content if you’ll watch our ad. So there’s a give and take. When you read a beautiful magazine like yours, there are ads that pay for your wonderful writers and your photographers. Advertising has to always remember that this is the deal. When advertising breaks that promise, that’s when advertising gets into trouble. For example, when I see ads in movie theatres, I don’t see what I’m getting. The ticket price hasn’t come down — what am I getting in return for having to sit through these movie ads? When advertising breaks that rule,

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My wife would always get that phone call telling her I wouldn’t be home for dinner, or I had to work all weekend even though we had guests coming. Those horrible things. Then, when the industry celebrates, like at an awards show or something, spouses aren’t invited. It takes you away from your family, and then when it’s time to celebrate, they don’t invite your family. Just the nature of the business. So, it’s very hard on families, and I think the rate of divorce in marketing and advertising is extremely high. So, how to contend with that? I give a ton of credit to my wife, because she wouldn’t let me be a bad dad, for starters. Plus, I adore my family. We would be the only family in the audience at awards shows. I didn’t care what anybody thought, because [my family] did without me for so many hours and days and months, the least we could do was celebrate together. That was just sort of our family mantra.

people react the way they do, what triggers certain reactions. How do you change people’s behaviour, how do you persuade someone to just look at an item, how do you make people wear a seatbelt, how do you make them not drink and drive? All of those things involve persuasion, analysis and psychology. That is my sweet spot. That’s why I’m still excited about it at this stage of my career. So if you’re asking me what the sweet spot is, it’s that I never stop learning. Even though I am 36 years deep into a career, I still will learn something brand new tomorrow about marketing — I guarantee you. I can’t get enough of it. I just love it.

that’s when people get annoyed with it, and it’s a black eye for advertising. DM: You mentioned that your work with the Toronto Symphony Orchestra was your favourite project. What was the strategy there? TO: Most symphony advertising, from day one, is just ticket prices, concert events, composer evenings. We didn’t do any of that; we used humour, which the TSO never really used before. We said things like, “You’re afraid to clap at the wrong time, aren’t you?” or “I went to the symphony and I held up my lighter for an encore, and I feel like that was wrong in hindsight.” So we made fun of all the intimidating things that keep people away, and ticket sales soared.

DM: How did you manage to balance work and family life? TO: I’m glad you asked that question, because it’s a really good question that no one ever asks. A couple things you have to know about the advertising industry: First, it is not welcoming of families. For example, you work 60-hour weeks.

DM: In your book you mention the importance of finding “the sweet spot.” How would you define the sweet spot in your life? TO: I think I’ve always been fascinated by the puzzle of marketing, just figuring out why

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VISIT WWW.DOLCEMAG.COM TO WATCH BEHIND-THE-SCENES OF OUR LOS ANGELES PHOTO SHOOT

GREAT

On his journey from bullied outsider to thwarted pro athlete to the eternal optimist behind The School of Greatness podcast, Lewis Howes uncovered an uncanny recipe for success. The bestselling author and entrepreneur learned to treat life like a favourite sport ďŹ lled with coaches that could train him. Howes welcomed Dolce Magazine to Los Angeles for an on-location cover shoot with open arms (literally) and gave us a primer on his winning way WRITTEN BY DONNA PARIS | INTERVIEW BY REBECCA ALBERICO | PHOTOGRAPHY BY ROBIN GARTNER

MAKE-UP ARTIST: SEAN CONKLIN | WARDOBE STYLIST: EVA DANIELLE WITTELS | LOCATION: 18013 SEA REEF DRIVE, PACIFIC PALISADES

EXPECTATIONS

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This October, Howes is set to release his second book The Mask of Masculinity: How men can embrace vulnerability, create strong relationships, and live their fullest lives. Black Lambskin All Saint’s Leather Motorcycle Jacket Grey Ombre Zara Mens Cotton T-shirt

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The School of Greatness podcast was named one of the top podcasts in the world, with more than 35 million downloads. Howes has interviewed a number of influential personalities for its episodes including Tony Robbins, Larry King and Arianna Huffington Black Lambskin All Saint’s Leather Motorcycle Jacket Grey Ombre Zara Mens Cotton T-shirt Distressed AG Jeans TCG Porter High Top Sneaker

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ewis Howes was an easy target, bullied and picked on relentlessly as a kid. Selfdescribed as “tall, skinny and goofy-looking,” Howes found school challenging; he couldn’t understand what he was reading and found it difficult to read aloud, so he was always at the bottom of the class academically. “I didn’t have any friends,” he states. At home, things weren’t any better. Growing up in Delaware, Ohio, Howes was the youngest of four children. He describes his situation as “such a dark world.” Fast forward to today. Howes, 34 years old, has bought several seven figure businesses and sold one. He’s a bestselling author helping others achieve their dreams through his book and podcast, The School of Greatness, which was named one of the top podcasts in the world, with more than 35 million downloads. In fact, in 2013, President Obama himself named Howes one of the top 100 entrepreneurs under 30 in the United States. He’s a former pro athlete and former world record holder in football. And now he plays on USA Team Handball, the national handball team. You may be asking yourself, how did this happen? Perhaps it started here: Every summer, Howe’s parents sent the kids to a Christian summer camp. Howes met kids from a boarding school in St. Louis who were different from the kids in his small town. Fun, creative and welcoming, they inspired Howe, who wanted to make a change. He knew that he didn’t want to end up in prison like his brother. He went home and begged his parents to let him attend the boarding school — which he did, starting in Grade 8. Howes began playing football in his sophomore year. And he was really good at it. Howes channelled all of his energy into his dream of becoming a professional athlete. “My whole life was dedicated to becoming an athlete and playing professional football, because that’s all I cared about,” says Howes. He went on to play football in college and set an NCAA record for the most receiving yards in a single game (418 to be exact), then he left college early to pursue professional football. But after playing only two games of his first season in the Arena Football League (a step below the NFL), he dove to make a catch and hit a wall. Literally. His wrist snapped. Howes was so determined that he played the rest of the season with a broken wrist. But after the last game, he underwent surgery that ended his football career. “When my dream of playing professional football

was over, I was in denial, because I thought that was what I was supposed to be doing,” says Howes. How do you pick up the pieces when your life falls apart? “When I lost my identify [as a football player], it was a depressing time, but I just said, ‘I need to figure out who I am now,’” Howes says. In fact, eight years ago, he was still sleeping on his sister’s couch. “After a year and a half of that, my sister said, ‘Okay, maybe you should get a job, help pay for food.’” Fair enough, thought Howes. He didn’t feel he could stay any longer without supporting his sister. He started looking for a job on Craigslist. “I got an interview, and I was getting ready. And for whatever reason, I was convinced I was going to get the job,” says Howes. “I thought, ‘If I go to this interview, I’m going to get this job, and it’s going to delay me from actually going after what I want. This is not what I want.’ It just wasn’t part of my vision.” And that was the impetus that spurred Howes into doing something about his vision. He didn’t go to the interview that day, and he never applied for another job. “I just said, ‘I need to figure out who I am now. Who am I? Who do I want to be? What do I want to create in the world?’” says the entrepreneur. Howes started out on a journey of self-discovery, reaching out to mentors, finding people who had achieved their dreams, and starting to learn from them. “I started to study them, ask them questions about how they did it. In that process, I started to discover more of what I wanted to do,” he adds. It started with a girl One day, when Howes was still living on his sister’s couch, he was watching the 2008 Olympics on TV when he saw coverage of the handball event. He was hooked. The New York City Team Handball Club had a reputation as the best handball team in the United States. Howes was determined to move there and play on the men’s squad. He spent a lot of time on the Internet trying to find a business model with which he could earn enough money to do so, finally deciding to launch a LinkedIn group for sports executives. It was so successful that he was able to make the move. While Howes was living in New York, he met a girl. “I fell hard for this girl, and it was a bad fall.” In fact, he moved to Los Angeles for her — and on the day he arrived, she broke up with him. The actual breakup wasn’t quite final yet. “It was up and down for the next six months. It was a stressful relationship, but I learned so much about myself, so I’m grateful to her for that.” One day he was driving in Los Angeles, moving about two miles an hour and missing New York that an idea hit him. “I just said, ‘There’s got to

be a better way.’ There are so many people stuck in traffic, stuck in a relationship, stuck in their lives. There has to be a way to inspire or inform people who are commuting all day long, to give them information that can help them move faster in their lives and get there quicker,” says Howes. So he called a few friends who had podcasts. They told him it was a powerful way to connect with people. And right away, Howes knew he would make one. He thought, “I’ve built up some great relationships over the years from sports and from business; I know some amazing influencers.” These people were teaching Howes more than he’d ever learned in school. He also realized, “I wish I could have learned some of these lessons in school when I was growing up, because this would have helped me so much more. That’s how I came up with the name, The School of Greatness, and began to do the podcast.” Lean into your curiosities How does Howes define greatness? “Greatness is discovering and cultivating the unique gifts within you. To pursue your dreams and, in that pursuit, to make the maximum impact that you can on the people around you.” Howes has some smart ideas when it comes to discovering what it is you really want to do on your own road to greatness. He suggests setting aside time to allow yourself to dream. “First, allow yourself to disconnect from your responsibilities and your devices. Go and be in nature, sit by a lake, an ocean, by water. Allow yourself to be calm and peaceful; put yourself in a place of peace. Either be alone while doing this — and then you can be journalling — or you can be with friends and be in a playful state,” says Howes. “When we’re in a playful state, our minds are calm and relaxed. That’s when we allow ourselves to dream the most.” But what if you don’t even know what your dreams are? That’s Okay; you can start by discovering your curiosities. Just start journalling. Ask yourself what things bring you the most joy, what things you get most excited about, what things keep you up late at night. “Ask yourself: What’s the thing that, if I got to do it every day, I would jump out of bed, because I can’t believe that I get the chance to do it every day?” says Howes. “Ask yourself: If I had all the money in the world, what would I be doing? If I could travel, where would I go? Who would I be spending time with? What would my activities be? Who would be there? If I could have a perfect day, what would I be doing and why?” Howes emphasizes that when we lean into our curiosities, we allow ourselves to think, ‘What if?’ “We can feel a certain reaction around these thoughts, and those reactions that you feel most powerful about — those are the things you should

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Howes is an Advisory Board member for Pencils of Promise, a charitable organization that creates schools, programs and global communities to promote accessible education for all Dark Grey Theory trench coat Light Grey Cotton Zara Mens T-shirt Distressed AG Jeans Black Leather John Varvatos High-Top Sneaker

[BUILDING SCHOOLS] GIVES SO MUCH MORE MEANING AND IMPACT TO MY WORK, BECAUSE I KNOW THAT EVERY INTERVIEW I DO AND EVERY BOOK AND PRODUCT I SELL IS GOING TO SOMETHING BIGGER THAN JUST ME MAKING MONEY

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lean into.” Then ask yourself what the next step should be, and the next step after that, and so on. Greatness starts with love and gratitude First, you have to take care of yourself. “I used to do daily affirmations when I was sad and uncertain about myself, because I used to really beat myself up a lot and think I wasn’t good enough and think I wasn’t worthy,” says Howes. “I had this constant inner suffering that I faced until my early 20s. I started to get better in my late 20s, and now I feel like I’ve started to improve; I feel like I have a lot of tools and self-love, so I’m not staring in a mirror and telling myself, ‘You’re awesome’ and all these good things. I did that because I didn’t have any other solutions on how to get out of it.” Now it’s different. “I take care of my health, I put good foods into my body, and I take time to relax,” says Howes. “I constantly fill myself up with things that make me feel better, not worse.” To that end, Howes meditates every day as a form of self-love and practises forgiveness. “I used to hold onto grudges and be upset at people all the time. But when I don’t forgive someone else, it’s like I’m poisoning myself and expecting it to hurt someone else, because when we don’t forgive, we cause ourselves more stress and anxiety,” says Howes. “So I’ve learned to forgive for myself; it’s a daily practice of forgiving myself and forgiving others so I can have freedom and peace.” Years ago, Howes realized the importance of giving back. “I started thinking of education because kids need the opportunity to create their dreams, so I partnered with an organization called Pencils of Promise to build schools around the world,” says Howes. So far, Howes has built five schools personally, and more than 40 by bringing in other influences to help build schools, too. “It gives so much more meaning and impact to my work, because I know that every interview I do and every book and product I sell is going to something bigger than just me making money.” Howes says it really gives him perspective to see happy, joyful people that don’t have as much as we do in other countries around the world. “I live in one of the richest zip codes in the world, and I see so many people who are miserable,” says Howes. “It keeps me grounded, and that’s why gratitude is such an important part of my life.” In high school, Howes remembers reading a quote often attributed to Theodore Roosevelt: “Nobody cares how much you know until they know how much you care.” That really resonates with Howes, who says that if you’re a good person, you show up as connected, loving and present. He claims Maya Angelou said it best: “I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.” That’s exactly how he tries to live his life now, as a grateful person. At the photo shoot for this article, Howes asks an assistant to take some uneaten panini back to

the office for his staff to enjoy, ever mindful of others and loath to senselessly waste food. And he has no time for complaining either, despite spending hours with the camera crew in the hot California sun. In fact, Howes is all smiles. “I’m very blessed and very grateful that I get feedback every day from readers and listeners,” says Howes. “For me, knowing that pursuing my dreams and showing people how I’m doing it, that this is a catalyst for some people, giving them permission to go for it — this is what I’m grateful for.” Finding a balance Howes is always on the go. “I travel a lot; I do speaking events. Last year I was in Iceland for a week and India for two and a half weeks. Since I play with the U.S. national handball team, I was in Brazil and Argentina for that, and I was in Guatemala for Pencils of Promise,” says Howes. Still, he manages to find a balance. “I have a great team that supports me and supports the vision to impact the world in a positive way; everyone has a role,” he adds. What’s coming down the pipeline for Howes? Right now, he’s finishing up a new book and working on a documentary. “I’d like to interview The Rock and Will Smith,” says Howes. “I’ve worked with Ellen [DeGeneres] and her team is amazing — we’re going to be doing more work together. In due time I’ll be working with more people like The Rock and Oprah,” he adds. Asked to complete the sentence “My life would not be complete without …” he answers simply, “inner peace.” Asked for his definition of la dolce vita, the sweet life, Howes replies, “At the end of the day, it’s saying you gave your best, and you’re fully used up in your in pursuit of every dream imaginable, and you at least went for it,” says Howes. “In that process you experience all the love and connection that you possibly could.” This August marks 10 years since the entrepreneur’s surgery for his sports injury, and he feels like he’s just getting started. “These 10 years in the pursuit of my dreams have been the most beautiful experience of my life, and I’ve achieved a lot. But I feel like I’ve just done the legwork and now I can do some amazing things in the world,” says Howes. “I don’t know how long I’m going to be around, I don’t know if I’m going to be around tonight; anything can happen. I’m going to make sure that my life means something.” Don’t be afraid to ask for help It’s tough to know where to start, how to make the first move. One thing to keep in mind: People like to help. Howes began by approaching local leaders when he was living in Columbus, Ohio. One such mentor was Chris Hawker, an inventor from Columbus, Ohio, who has marketed many of his ideas. “I really got to study what it meant to come up with ideas,” Howes says. “What’s a great

idea? How do you package an idea into something tangible that’s a solution for people? How do you brand it? How do you market it?” He connected with other business leaders as well. “I just found the person who was great at it and then studied how they did it.” Or he would simply ask them what they thought he should do, and they would coach him. When he confided that he was terrified of speaking in public, he was told to join Toastmasters, an organization that helps people become more effective communicators and leaders. “So every week for a year, I took a public speaking class and studied and made a fool of myself and was terrified, but I took action, practised and got better,” Howes says. He did the same thing when he wrote his book. “I found a mentor who had written five books previously, and he just said, ‘Here’s what you need to do,’ so I took action.” It’s essential, he says, to be open to getting help. “I look at my life as a sport. In order to be a great athlete, you need great coaches, and you need to be coachable. That’s the only way I was able to get to where I am today,” says Howes. “I apply my sports background to life — with relationships, business, making money, branding, marketing, with my health, whatever it may be.” He deliberately sought out people who could help him. “I found them on LinkedIn and other social media, I went to events all the time, I became a sponge and took immediate and massive action to do what I needed to achieve those results.” Be clear with your dreams Picture this: If we aren’t clear in our vision of the amount of money we want to make, the people we want to spend time with, etc., then we’re going to be bouncing around in life like pinballs in a machine. “When we’re clear, then we have a compass we can move toward,” says Howes. Without vision, it’s easy to get stressed, anxious and even depressed, he adds. “I try to keep it simple: What do I want? Why do I want it? When do I want it to happen by?” By answering those questions, Howes says that we can create guidelines for our lives, make easier decisions and, when opportunities come our way, say yes or no very quickly, depending on whether it supports our vision. That’s not all. Howes suggests we need to set expectations for ourselves, but be sure that we are communicating them to others. “The more expectations you have, the more let down you’re going to be if someone doesn’t meet the expectations,” says Howes. “So I think we should have expectations and be sure to communicate them. When you are clear, then there’s a mutual understanding in relationships with family, friends and co-workers. It’s when we aren’t clear that there are letdowns,” he adds. www.lewishowes.com @LewisHowes

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INTRODUCING ...

BRILLIANCE AND BEAUTY Multiple international award-winning interior design firm dazzles with extensive first-class portfolio, breathing a harmonious balance of elegance and comfort into each masterful design.

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PHOTO BY CHUCK CHOI

REAL ESTATE

U.N. PLAZA The exclusive new residential tower offers a window on the city’s skyline, the East River and Midtown Manhattan’s motley past WRITTEN BY RICK MULLER

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www.50unp.com

PHOTO BY HAYES DAVIDSON AND JAMES EUWING

Location, location, location” may be real estate’s most abiding mantra, but nowhere are the words more sacred than in midtown Manhattan. That’s where you’ll fi nd 50 United Nations Plaza, a 44-storey luxury property that overlooks the East River and landmarks like the Empire State and Chrysler buildings and is set among some of the best retail, restaurant and cultural offerings in the city. It’s also the fi rst residential tower in the U.S. to be designed by acclaimed British architect fi rm Foster + Partners, in collaboration with Zeckendorf Developments and Eyal Ofer’s Global Holdings. The lobby of the tower makes a stunning fi rst impression. The expansive vestibule features granite, marble and walnut, along with a 20-foottall waterwall and a circular fi replace. Beyond the lobby is a spa that contains a 75-foot-long pool for the exclusive use of residents. Another luxurious feature, given the location, is the parking space that comes with each apartment, along with gated entry, valet service and a landscaped motor court. The tower itself contains 88 generously sized suites being offered in one-, two- and threebedroom confi gurations ranging in size from 1,147 to 3,004 square feet. Full-floor penthouses with five bedrooms and two staff rooms are also available and sit at 5,893 square feet each. In the most rarified air, high atop 50 United Nations Plaza, is one of the city’s most exclusive residential addresses: the 10,000-squarefoot duplex penthouse, currently listed at $70 million. The suite features a handcrafted 10,000-pound stainless-steel staircase, an infi nity-edge pool with spectacular views of the Manhattan skyline, a 75-foot-long living room and a 400-square-foot terrace. With both city and East River views, occupants of the opulent unit will have the pleasure of looking down at their building’s namesake, the United Nations Headquarters across the street. It sits on a 17-acre parcel assembled in the 1940s by William Zeckendorf Sr., who also happens to be the grandfather of the developers behind 50 United Nations. Seventy-odd years ago, the area was little more than a collection of slaughterhouses, but Zeckendorf Sr. saw something there that no one else did: potential. In 1946, he sold the parcel to the Rockefellers, who donated it to the United Nations, a historic deal that ably proved another real-estate truism: Only one thing trumps location, and that’s foresight.

50 United Nations Plaza hosts 88 customized condominiums and is the first U.S. residential tower designed by acclaimed British architectural firm Foster + Partners

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PHOTO BY HAYES DAVIDSON AND JAMES EUWING

Floor-to-ceiling windows offer incredible views of New York’s East River and surrounding skyscrapers

PHOTO BY PAUL WARCHOL

Luxury abounds in the nearly 10,000-squarefoot duplex penthouse with a private infinity pool and countless amenities

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PHOTO BY GABRIEL DE LA CHAPELLE

The 95-year-old is always accessorized from head to toe. In the famous words of Apfel: “More is more and less is a bore”

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FASHION

Cunard’s second Transatlantic Fashion Week sets sail with Iris Apfel Style icon Iris Apfel, Welsh designer Julien Macdonald and other personalities widely celebrated in the global fashion industry are set to come on board Cunard’s Queen Mary 2 enroute to the New York shows WRITTEN BY STEPHANIE CLARKE

L

uxury cruise ship line Cunard has announced that global fashion influencer Iris Apfel is set to join the group of fashion icons who will come on board the Queen Mary 2 for the brand’s second annual Transatlantic Fashion Week, to be held between August 31 and September 7, 2017. At the age of 95, Apfel is internationally recognized for her unabashed maximalism and across-the-board influence. While her fashion choices have been featured in museum exhibitions and her own documentary, Iris, the style icon herself has appeared in numerous campaigns for brands such as Kate Spade, Macy’s and Swarovski, among others. Easily recognizable in her eye-catching round glasses, Apfel has had a considerable impact on the use of oversized accessories, such as necklaces and bangles, and colourful, flashy clothing. During Transatlantic Fashion Week, businesswoman Apfel will host a Q-and-A session and is expected to screen her self-titled documentary. The short fi lm explores her creative influences, her taste in fashion and her free-spirited decisions. Apfel was honoured at the recently concluded Canadian Arts & Fashion Awards held at the Fairmont Royal York. Paying tribute to individuals who have contributed to the Canadian fashion industry, the celebrity-packed annual gala celebrated the achievements of the 2017 winners and honourees.

These included Apfel, who received the fi rst International Style Icon Award, which recognizes her unique style as well as her contribution to the industry. Fashion designer Jason Wu presented the award.

“I’VE LIVED QUITE A LIFE OF FASHION AND CAN’T WAIT TO EXPERIENCE STYLE AT SEA”

Headliners for the upcoming Transatlantic Fashion Week 2017 include designer Julien Macdonald, fashion historian Colin McDowell, and fashion industry consultant Gail Sackloff. Models from Storm Model Management will also be in attendance. Macdonald has been widely celebrated for his previous work for Chanel and Givenchy. Now

recognized as a leading U.K. fashion designer, he has a notable clientele that includes celebrities Taylor Swift, Heidi Klum, Beyoncé and Karolina Kurkova, to name a few. McDowell has been acknowledged for his participation in the fashion business over the past three decades, which includes his couture and ready-to-wear designs and his work as a fashion journalist. Sackloff is known for sourcing prominent British fashion designers for Neiman Marcus, Bergdorf Goodman and other American stores. Now in its second year, Transatlantic Fashion Week invites guests to experience the glitzy charm of the Queen Mary 2, the only sailing ocean liner in the world. For seven days, guests will attend runway shows and dining events aboard the Art Deco vessel, as well as exclusive reveals, before docking in New York for Fashion Week. According to Cunard North America senior vice-president Josh Leibowitz, the fashion-centred expedition is an exclusive experience that is designed to deliver both “a personalized sense of occasion while escaping and relaxing.” “I’ve lived quite a life of fashion and can’t wait to experience style at sea,” Apfel said in an announcement released by Cunard. “I look forward to being inspired by the elegance and glamour of life on board, especially the formal nights on my voyage across the Atlantic.”

www.cunard.com

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FOOD & DRINK

VODKA GETS ITS WHEY Pure Milk Vodka is the invention of West Dorset dairy farmer Jason Barber (right) and co-founder Paul Archard (left)

A novel take on the spirit, made wholly of milk from English cows, is garnering praise across the industry. Its owners, of course, claim it’s udderly delicious

O

rdering a White Russian at the bar might be a little redundant — if it’s made with Black Cow Vodka. That’s because Black Cow is made entirely of milk. By sight alone, you’d never be able to tell it apart from Grey Goose, Smirnoff or Finlandia; it’s neither black as its name suggests, nor white as you might expect, but

crystal clear. Flavour-wise, devotees have noted a marked absence of the rough edge so often found in other vodkas. “It has a similar taste to other super-premium vodkas. It has this signature creaminess that comes from the sole ingredient, which is the milk. So, it’s like you would expect from an ultra high-quality vodka. It has this smooth taste,” notes Black Cow founding partner Paul Archard. The British-made premium spirit has fi nally

made its way to Canada in recent weeks and has been added to the shelves of hundreds of LCBO stores in Ontario. What makes this vodka stand out, Archard says, is a “very nice mouth feel” attributable to the lack of minerality. Other vodkas — including high-quality ones — have a higher mineral content, partly due to the spring water used in production and other added ingredients. His, however, has a “very, very soft, rounded taste.”

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PHOTOS BY MATT AUSTIN

WRITTEN BY DAVE GORDON INTERVIEW BY REBECCA ALBERICO


The award-winning Black Cow was launched in 2012 and has won several accolades, including a Gold Medal from the prestigious San Francisco World Spirits Competition

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Archard and his long-time pal, dairy farmer Jason Barber, launched the brand in 2012. Both being DIY, hands-on types — Barber with farm animals and Archard with homemade ciders — they clicked several years ago over drinks, discussing the potential profitability of cider. There must have been something in those drinks, since talk somehow shifted from the family tradition of apple picking to mass cider production, to turning milk into vodka. Barber sought to diversify the yield from his 250-strong cow herd and marry it with his fondness for vodka. The two agreed that, although they knew nothing about the concept, they were willing to grab the proverbial bull by the horns. After two years of trial and error, the team stumbled upon a proprietary blending formula (still secret) that was to their liking. But what has been publicly revealed about the process is that milk is fi rst separated into curds and whey; using a proprietary yeast, the whey is fermented into a “beer,” which is then distilled, treated, triple-fi ltered and fi nished before bottling. “The [whey] we use is something that wouldn’t, effectively, have a great commercial value. It’s almost like we’ve turned what’s left over from the cheese making into something

“WE’VE DONE SOMETHING IN A SUSTAINABLE WAY THAT TASTES DELICIOUS”

else, which is equally excellent,” notes Archard. “We don’t like waste, and we celebrate using the bits of unused milk. We’ve done something in a sustainable way that tastes delicious.” And speaking of cheese, those milk curds are used to create Barber’s Black Cow Vintage Cheddar, an award-winning vintage reserve cheddar, which pairs perfectly with the vodka. Black Cow cheddar has been described as “smooth and nutty,” while Archard comments on the “lovely depth” and the “crystal crunch” from the calcium lactate crystals that form while it ages for 15 months. While cheese is not on the menu for the lactose intolerant, Archard assures us that Black Cow vodka, with less than five parts per million of lactose in it, is safe for people with that particular condition. There’s also good news for those who bristle at mainstream vodka due to its typical throat burn. In store tastings, even people adamantly against vodka have a “holy cow!” moment on discovering the milk vodka’s apparent smooth feel. “That’s when I feel the most happy — when I get someone to try vodka and they don’t think they like it. I see their eyes light up and they go, ‘Hmm, I can drink this.’”

www.blackcow.co.uk

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TRAVEL Guests of the Presidential Train are served a four-course gourmet menu, prepared by Michelin star-awarded chefs

Portugese Cuisine Picks Up Steam A trip on the Presidential Train, a one-of-a-kind culinary rail runner, is Portugal’s most exclusive gastronomic experience

PHOTO BY PAULO BARATA

WRITTEN BY DAVE GORDON

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hat better way to enjoy the Portuguese countryside than to ride a vintage railcar while a leading chef prepares you a gourmet meal? That is the exquisite premise of the Presidential Train, a culinary and country tour that offers

the exotic sights, sounds and tastes of a one-of-a-kind adventure. Four rising stars in the international culinary world present their diverse dishes on these voyages: chefs Esben Holmboe Bang, Rui Paula, Pedro Lemos and João Rodrigues. All four are “celebrated for their innovative take on classic

cuisine,” explains Gonçalo Castel-Branco, founder and curator of the Presidential. Considered by many to be the crown jewel of the Portuguese railway, the Presidential has a storied history of transporting kings, queens and heads of state, including Queen Elizabeth and Pope Paul VI.

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The Portuguese Presidential Train explores the country on a nine-hour journey

Built in 1890, it was elegantly restored in 2010 and is considered both an iconic piece of the nation’s history, as well as a premier luxury experience. The chefs themselves are a huge draw. At age 40, João Rodrigues, head chef at Feitoria in Lisbon since 2009, has won a Michelin star every year since 2011. “Chef João Rodrigues is one of the most talented chefs of his generation,” notes Castel-Branco. Passionate about Asian flavours and gastronomic experimentation since he was a boy, Rodrigues graduated from culinary arts and pastry programs at a Lisbon hotel and tourism school at age 21. In 2007, Rodrigues won Chef of the Year, a major Portuguese professional cooking competition. A year later, as part of the Portuguese senior team for the Culinary Olympics, he won two silver medals for the Mediterranean Culinary Challenge. In 2016 he was granted the titles Chef of the Year and Restaurant of the Year by the Mesa Marcada blog awards. Summing up his approach to food, he explains: “I like to use local products from small producers, everything organic, and a strong Portuguese cultural influence with a twist.… My cuisine is all very natural in order to keep the flavours the most authentic as possible.” Travellers on the Presidential will also enjoy the flavours of Scandinavia. Chef Esben Holmboe Bang, 35, is the head chef and co-owner of Norway’s groundbreaking three-Michelin-starred restaurant, Maaemo. Maaemo was the fi rst Nordic restaurant to ever be awarded two Michelin stars in its fi rst mention in the guide. In addition, Esben was the youngest chef, and the fi rst in Norway, to earn the Michelin guide’s highest honours. Other esteemed organizations have been equally impressed. Maaemo was rated number 61 of the

The Presidential provides the unique opportunity to visit the private estate Quinta do Vesúvio and experience the art of winemaking

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PHOTO BY KOSKI SYVÄRI

Chef Esben Bang: Chef Esben Holmboe Bang, 35, is the head chef and co-owner of Norway’s groundbreaking three-Michelin-starred restaurant Maaemo

PHOTO BY PAULO BARATA

PHOTO BY NELSON GARRIDO

Chef Rui Paula: Chef Rui Paula opened DOC in the Douro Valley in 2007; DOP in the renewed luxury Vidago Palace Hotel in 2011; Rui Paula in the RioMar Recife shopping centre in 2013; and Boa Nova Tea House in Matosinhos in 2014

Chef João Rodrigues: Chef João Rodrigues, head chef at Feitoria in Lisbon since 2009, has won a Michelin star every year since 2011

Chef Pedro Lemos: Portugal’s Chef Pedro Lemos opened his eponymous restaurant, Pedro Lemos, in 2010. He received his rst Michelin star in 2014 and a second in 2015

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3 1. The Presidential Train transported kings, presidents, heads of state and popes for more than a century 2. Chefs of the Presidential will be showcasing some of the best fish and seafood in the region 3. The exclusive nine-hour experience caters to 60 passengers per journey 4. Portuguese cuisine is quickly rising to the top of Europe’s culinary scene 5. Restored in 2010, the train’s original furnishings can be found on display at the National Railway Museum in Portugal 6. Among the award-winning wines that have been selected for this year’s pairings aboard the train are Niepoort, Quinta do Vallado, Quinta Vale D. Maria and Graham’s Ports.

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www.thepresidentialtrain.com

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PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE PRESIDENTIAL

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top 100 restaurants in the world at the 2016 World’s 50 Best Restaurants awards, as well as number 29 of the top 100 restaurants in the world by Elite Traveler magazine. Copenhagen-born Esben was raised in a family that cherished sustainability and agriculture, the source of his culinary inspiration. In fact, he can trace his affinity for cooking to the day his father made kjøttbein, a traditional dish of roasted meat bones, setting it on the table for everyone to eat with their fingers. Esben’s earthy cuisine finds its roots in Norway’s traditions, with local organic produce and native fare. That is the spirit of Maaemo, the Finnish word for “Mother Earth.” Maaemo’s intimate 30-seat restaurant offers a nightly set menu of 20 dishes designed to be a Nordic culinary pageant of culture and food. Among these are skate cooked on the bone with wild garlic and salted butter; green asparagus with buckwheat miso, roses and nettles; mackerel with wild chives; and Røros-butter ice cream with brown butter caramel. “We opened Maaemo to have something that we felt was the right way to let Norwegian nature shine through on the plate,” explains Esben. It’s an intrepid style of cooking that has won him mention in Time magazine and as Elite Traveler magazine’s 2016 Young Chef of the Year. Adding to the eclectic lineup, Chef Rui Paula’s self-taught cooking style evokes his nostalgia for his maternal grandmother’s old recipes and uses locally sourced foods. Paula, now 50, opened DOC in the Douro Valley in 2007; DOP in the renewed Vidago Palace Hotel in 2011; Rui Paula in the RioMar shopping centre in 2013; and Boa Nova Tea House in Matosinhos in 2014. Traditional in spirit yet modern in execution, Paula’s approach isn’t unlike that of Chef Pedro Lemos, the fourth chef aboard the Presidential. Portugal’s Lemos has been touted as one of the most innovative young chefs in that country. Beginning his career at Lisbon’s renowned Pestana Palace, he discovered his penchant and skill for using Portuguese ingredients, and in 2010, he opened his eponymous restaurant, Pedro Lemos. He received his first Michelin star in 2014 and a second in 2015. Tipping his hat to the generations of old, Lemos is inspired by his grandmothers’ kitchen handiworks, celebrating all that Portugal has to offer, from the sea to the fields. Lemos’s delicacies include farm-raised quail with mushrooms; sea bass with baby apples; turnip and chestnut with suckling pig; and rabbit loin and roasted lamb. While on the Presidential, make a list of dishes you’re trying for the fi rst time and be sure to sample everything on the wine list. Then cross this culinary journey off your bucket list.


HEIRESS IN BAVARIA

Swept away for a summer abroad in the most sophisticated and sultry ensembles of the season TEXT BY REBECCA ALBERICO

VISIT WWW.DOLCEMAG.COM TO WATCH BEHIND-THE-SCENES FOOTAGE OF OUR FASHION SHOOT IN GERMANY

Cooler blue and green tones highlight the dresses ultraflirty florals / Dress, Michael Kors Collection; Jewellery, Swarovski

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This daring mix of prints, textures and tones is a surefire showstopper / Outfit and Jewellery, Max Mara; Shoes, Michael Kors Collection

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Gilded wardrobe pieces are the perfect complement to chunky gems and accessories / Outfit, Odeeh; Bangle, Xenia Bous; Jewellery, Tikkun-Schmuck

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EMBRACE WARM SUMMER NIGHTS AND FIERY NEW ROMANCES

The devil’s in the details with this set of timeless pearls / Total Look, Escada

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A structured off-white bodysuit creates the desired neutral canvas for bold, brilliant gems / Outfit, Dimitri; Jewellery, Swarovski

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PHOTOGRAPHER: BELA RABA STYLING: ALEXANDRA DIETL MODEL: EGLE @ MOST WANTED MODELS HAIR & MAKEUP: JOHN ELLIOTT, USING M.A.C. COSMETICS AND ALCINA PROFESSIONAL CREATIVE DIRECTOR: CARSTEN DOPAMIN MAKING OF VIDEO: MARZENA WALICKA POST PRODUCTION: FLORIAN WAGNER LOCATION AND SPECIAL THANKS TO: HOTEL VIER JAHRESZEITEN KEMPINSKI MÜNCHEN WWW.KEMPINSKI.COM/VIERJAHRESZEITEN

Feel like the belle of the brunch in a powdery soft day dress / Dress, Gucci; Jewellery, Tikkun–Schmuck

summer 2017

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PHOTO BY GEOFF FITZGERALD

A DV E R TO R I A L

It’s a family affair, with Marco Corrente, Ferruccio Corrente and Ferro Corrente Jr. spearheading Unique Store Fixtures Ltd.

The company is multifaceted, creating custom-crafted products for both commercial and residential projects

THERE’S SOMETHING UNIQUE ABOUT IT Unique Store Fixtures Ltd. remains an industry leader after more than three decades in business

F

erruccio Corrente, a son of a master ebonist, came to Canada in 1964 and worked alongside world-class designers in the store fixture industry. Due to great popularity and demand, he started his own company in 1983. Ferruccio Corrente, CEO of Unique Store Fixtures Ltd., has watched his business soar to unimaginable heights. Since its establishment 34 years ago, Corrente has been producing award-winning luxury retail and residential interior fixtures: display design, custom millwork, metal and glass fabrication and superior stonework. Along with sons Ferro Corrente Jr. and Marco Corrente, COO and vice-president respectively, Corrente proudly operates his business out of a 100,000-square-foot complex in the heart of Vaughan. North America’s leading millwork services company has held contracts with some of the largest major brands locally and globally, including Tim Hortons, Holt Renfrew, Tiffany and other notable high-end retailers. “Something that makes our company very different from others in the industry is that we fabricate everything in-house,” says Marco. Unique boasts a full woodshop and produces its own metal, glass, stone, granite and acrylic products. With hundreds of thousands of manufacturing jobs being sent overseas in recent years, Marco explains that having all the company’s operations in-house is kind of unique.

Recently, the custom fixture brand has garnered another accolade. In March, Globalshop 2017 awarded Unique four times over in the Fixture of the Year category for its extensive work in Bergdorf Goodman, a luxury department story in New York City. “It’s wonderful to be recognized and appreciated by the industry, your peers and the public,” says Ferro. While Unique continues to flourish in the commercial sector, its residential portfolio has grown exponentially as well. Initially making up about 10 per cent of the company’s business, custom residential millwork now sits at par with its retail counterpart. Unique designs and manufactures custom kitchens, bathroom vanities, closets and wall units for midsized to large luxury estates across the GTA. Combining traditional carpentry methods, proficient artistry and premium materials carried out by state-of-the-art technology, clients come home to a truly individualized space. Furthermore, the company’s in-house design and engineering teams are constantly keeping upto-date with the latest trends in fixtures, kitchens and other residential components. Without a stitch of publicity over the past three decades, Unique has thrived by word of mouth. “We get great recommendations,” says Marco. “If clients are referring us to their friends, that’s the ultimate compliment to us.” Perhaps it’s the company’s long-standing reputation for excellence in customer service

and its dedication to quality that further propels its success. “Quality is number one,” says Ferro. “My father always says that if it’s not good enough for him, it’s not good enough for the customer.” Dedication to quality work is one of the many values passed on by their father that the brothers never compromise on. The Unique family, comprised of more than 100 skilled designers and craftsmen, share the company’s philosophy. “We’ve got a great team, and most of our employees have been here longterm, some more than 20 years,” says Marco. Brothers Marco and Ferro are continuously committed to taking Unique Store Fixtures to the next level, bringing satisfaction, pride and enjoyment to each of their valued clients for decades to come. www.uniquestorefixtures.com

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TRAVEL

Yachting Life Elegant accommodations and well-supported R&R are just one side of the yachting life. For die-hards, the real luxury is the freedom to go exploring

PHOTO BY ANDY CAHILL

WRITTEN BY DANIEL CALABRETTA

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PHOTO BY MIKE JONES

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privacy you [can] have with your family,” says Jan Jaap ( J.J.) Minnema, senior sales broker at international yacht retailer, Fraser. “You’re surrounded by people you like and love, have security with the crew you’re used to dealing with — not even the most luxurious resorts in the world can match that.” That said, the appeal of yachting runs deeper than neatly lined caviar trays and bubbling bottles of champagne. What drew Mader to yachting was not the stereotypical associations of elegance and wealth. He was inspired by the freedom, exploration and

PHOTO BY QUIN BISSET

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hen Kitchener, Ont., native Derek Mader was just 12 years old, he built his very fi rst boat with some help from his father. As a young boy, Mader would often go boating with his family on Georgian Bay, just north of Parry Sound. For Mader, it was the visceral feeling of liberty while being on the water that initially appealed to him, among other things. “There’s an old adage that ‘every ship is safe in the harbour.’ Once you get away from the dock, things change. Your mindset changes,” he says. “It’s that feeling of freedom.” Mader was truly introduced to the yachting world in the early to mid 2000s, through numerous summer co-op opportunities, as a student of Georgian College’s marine technology program. Now, at 42, he’s the president and CEO of Executive Yacht Canada. A yacht is a large, mobile, aquatic luxury home in which elegance meets the sea, travelling becomes vacationing, eating becomes dining and rest becomes relaxation. Some who can afford to prefer yachts to hotels. “It’s the ultimate

1. Executive Yacht boasts a massive fleet, including the Sunseeker 95 2. Derek Mader, president and CEO of Executive Yacht Canada 3. Yachts may vary in size but provide comfort and ambience as a portable luxury home 4. Jan Jaap (J.J.) Minnema, senior sales broker at Fraser 5. The Legend has everything from a cinema to a helipad on-board 6. The lounge on the Legend, like most areas of the ship, is very spacious, as designed by Diana Yacht Design

peace of mind it allows. “At the end of the day, whether you’re 12 years old in a small boat or 40 years old in a large yacht, I don’t think the feeling is any different. I think you’re still an explorer,” he says. “I think that’s in everybody.” With shipyards on multiple continents, Mader does his fair share of exploration — he went boating in Capri, Italy, in 2016 and is set to go to Spain this year. Yachting is a lifestyle choice, not just a hobby. “It’s something that people quest for at a very young age,” he says. “I don’t believe that people

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decide at one point that they’re just going to go boating. It’s something that they strive to do, even if they haven’t done it their whole life.” He shares that the yachting lifestyle, as well as the clientele, has changed a lot over the past 20 years. Mader notices that there are now more first-time yacht purchasers than before. “At one time, the lifestyle focused on the recreational property, or luxury yacht. The difference today is that it’s not an ‘instead of ’ purchase. It’s an ‘as well as’ purchase.” Like Mader, Minnema finds the exploration of yachting very intriguing. “The beauty of travelling is that it makes you hungry for more.” says Minnema, noting that the Mediterranean and the Caribbean remain popular destinations for yacht enthusiasts. A boat that ardent yachters and clients of Fraser are gravitating toward is the new Legend, a 253foot expedition yacht that launched last year. Minnema says that its sheer size and the fact that it’s one of the few yachts that has the capacity for so many people are generating interest. “That makes this yacht very special. It’s the only icebreaking-

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hull yacht in the world [as well],” says Minnema. The Legend is booked for charters year round, according to Minnema. On a personal note, he says that travelling through the Northwest Passage is next up on his bucket list. Yachting and its accompanying lifestyle have taken both Mader and Minnema all over the world. And as author Robert Brault once put it, “Life is like sailing. You can use any wind to go in any direction.”

905.264.6789 | info@dolcemedia.ca

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www.executiveyachtcanada.com www.fraseryachts.com

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AVAILABLE THROUGH INTERIOR DESIGNERS AND ARCHITECTS


ART

Digital Bloom

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TM Glass is on a quest to find the most beautiful vases in the world to photograph for her floral series. This year, the artist will be travelling to different museums and private collections globally to source them

VISIT WWW.DOLCEMAG.COM TO WATCH BEHIND-THE-SCENES FOOTAGE OF THE TM GLASS PRIVATE GALLERY TOUR

Toronto artist TM Glass paints old-world treasures filled with fresh florals using a unique digital process that’s just beginning to blossom WRITTEN BY REBECCA ALBERICO

PHOTO BY ROBIN GARTNER

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n the heart of downtown Toronto’s bustling King West neighbourhood is a century-old building — a quaint red-brick corner unit like so many others in the city. But set foot into the 100-year-old abode and you’ll see why this one is different. A quick glimpse of the foyer reveals the true grandeur of this Toronto heritage building — and the private gallery of artist TM Glass. Larger-than-life archival prints of fresh flowers paired with historical vessels line the off-white walls. TM Glass invited Dolce Magazine for an exclusive tour of the gallery and workspace to sneak a peek at the magic behind the masterpieces. At first glance the works appear to be photographed, but, as TM Glass explains, they are entirely digitally produced — the flowers and vases never actually met. This process is called digital painting. The artist explains that digital painting on such a large scale is a relatively new concept utilizing state-of-the-art photo and printing equipment. “I start by photographing the flowers in spring, and I just keep going all the way through to frost. Somewhere in that window, I visit museums to find and photograph beautiful vases,” says TM Glass. “I put them together after the growing season. It becomes a work of the artist to marry the two.” The artist was drawn to this new technique out of a passion for horticulture. “I believe flowers are the most beautiful things in the world,” says TM Glass. “For centuries, artists have been creating vessels to put cut flowers in and trying to make them as beautiful as the flowers.” Further inspiration came from TM Glass’s grandmother. “My fi rst gardening experience was with my grandmother; she had a wonderful garden. To me, it was like a paradise,” explains the artist. “Her garden was fi lled with treasures, and it became my ambition to have one just like it.”

What makes the collection so special is that the flowers starring in TM Glass’s works come from the artist’s personal garden. “I have 10,000 bulbs of narcissus planted in my garden,” says TM Glass. “I’ve planted something for almost every week of the growing season.” Pairing these horticultural gems with the perfect vase is TM Glass’s mission, whether it’s a 1,500-year-old pre-Columbian vessel, or a tulipiere from Holland. The artist works with the curators of a number of local museums like the Gardiner Museum and the Royal Ontario Museum and with private collectors to find the perfect pieces to showcase. “The curators wear white gloves to remove the vases from the cases, and they bring them to a room where we photograph the pieces,” says TM Glass. “This is all behind the scenes; the public doesn’t usually get to go backstage at the museum, and it’s very interesting there because they have many shelves with things that are not on display.” Each vase and flower holds a story of its own, and more often than not, TM Glass has a reason for pairing the two, such as historical period, colour, culture or narrative. As we stroll in and out of various rooms, TM Glass recount the stories of particular vessels and their accompanying flowers. Although a lot of research goes into each of TM Glass’s works, the artist feels that the pieces should speak for themselves. “I think because we live an urban life, most people don’t get connected to nature as much as we’d like. But when we do, we feel wonderful,” says TM Glass. “We get that feeling of walking through a forest, so tranquil − we feel relaxed and happy. When we see a vase of flowers, it gives us that same feeling.” At TM Glass’s most recent exhibition, a woman who was working in a hospital in Toronto but would soon be travelling home to Qatar approached the artist to ask if she could bring a piece home with her. TM Glass recalls her exact words: “Your

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PHOTO BY ROBIN GARTNER

pictures make me happy. I want to have one. I live in another country, and I’m returning, and I’d like to take one with me. I want to feel this happiness in my home country.” A career that has spanned several mediums, the artist has dabbled in everything from sculpting to photography. This current endeavour has gained impressive momentum; the artist’s limited-edition archival prints are selling out. TM Glass produces only 12 prints of each piece (up from the original print run of five). “Any artist, whether a musician or a photographer, always loves to have people enjoy their work, but there’s no guarantee,” says TM Glass. “If the artist writes a song or creates a picture that the artist likes, the artist is guaranteed to have an audience. So I think the most important

TM Glass prefers not to purchase flowers from a florist, but instead digitally paints the blooms she grows herself, such as these June peonies from her garden

“EVERYBODY ELSE IN THE YEARS TO COME WILL BE LOOKING AT WHAT WE DID AND MAYBE THAT WILL BECOME THE NEW CONVENTIONS” person to participate in the process of creating the art, the most important person, is the artist.” TM Glass was inspired by fellow artists Edward Burtynsky, Cindy Sherman who produce painterly photographs that involve digital equipment, each approaching their work with unique style and subject matter. “We have no real image in our minds about what this new digital technology is going to bring to artists,” says TM Glass. “So people are exploring all sorts of avenues, and there’s more than one way to do it.” TM Glass says the artists working in this new medium are lucky in a way, because they have the rare opportunity to invent it. “Everybody else in the years to come will be looking at what we did, and maybe that will become the new convention.” The process is lengthy but, according to TM Glass, worth every second. “Time can expand and contract,” says TM Glass. “When you’re doing something that you love, time expands, and you fit everything in — you only have to meditate a little bit to expand the time.”

www.tmglass.com

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BUSINESS

DARE TO

DAS

The founder of a new Miami Beach talent agency explains the simple idea he’s banking on: that what every model really needs is a mentor INTERVIEW BY MICHELLE ZERILLO-SOSA

Former model Rasheed Alli launched DAS Model Management in Miami Beach this spring

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PHOTOS BY HAMID KOOTVAL

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his spring, Rasheed Alli, a 31-yearold entrepreneur from Columbia, Mo., opened the doors to DAS Model Management in Miami Beach. It’s an agency with a twist, as Alli describes it, one that puts mentorship at the centre of its approach. Listening to Alli describe his own coming-up, it’s easy to see why mentorship matters so much to him. Alli himself is a former model who entered the business young. He was a teen when he signed with Ford in New York and quickly worked his way into campaigns for Ed Hardy and Carrera eyewear. He credits much of his success to the grounding force of his mother and father, whom he refers to as the only people he really liked. “I wasn’t much of a people person,” he notes with a smile. Both parents were former athletes – his father, the Nigerian record holder in long jump and his mother, the world record holder in the 400-metre sprint during the eighties. Under their mentorship, he learned how to make the most of a competitive streak. While modeling, he won a football scholarship to Stanford University, then scored an externship at Goldman Sachs in New York City, followed by an internship at KPMG in San Francisco before forming his first company at the age of 21.


With years of industry experience, Paolo Buonfante holds the position of vice president of operations at DAS

Now, he believes the best way to make clients happy is by nurturing talent fi rst – using mentorship to help his models uncover their strengths. The concept has attracted an impressive roster that includes GUESS face Elizabeth Turner, Sports Illustrated model Samantha Hoopes, Victoria’s Secret’s Ditta Kucsik and 2016’s New Models Today contest winner Michela Begal. In a sitdown with Dolce Magazine, Alli shared his secrets on making it as a model (persistence), his philosophy on success (it’s a moving target) and his special formula for spotting toxic people from a mile away.

Q. When did you realize you wanted to get into modeling? I admired it and the fashion industry from a young age. I would love to formulate my own individual styles and my parents encouraged me to try the modeling business when I was a teenager. I was lucky to have the height and good genes that enabled me to become quite successful, with the right passion and drive to get me there. Q. What is your definition of beauty? Beauty doesn’t stop at the surface; often what’s inside is very visible to the outside world. There are times someone may be beautiful from a far, but like a Monet, with closer observation, many of the impurities and imperfections come to light. Beauty is truly in the eye of the beholder and is a very subjective term. Q. Why do you think society is obsessed with youth and beauty? As a species, we are inherently obsessed with life, and youth is a basic function of life. We look at

beauty as a marker for health in both the physical and mental sense. But beauty can also come with age. I know many beautiful people in their later years who are still youthful in mind, body and spirit. Embracing beauty at any age is the key to staying young.

Q. What is your favourite city to visit? After living and working in San Francisco for a number of years, I have always been drawn to its vibrant culture and liberal outlook on life. Some of the greatest minds come from Silicon Valley, which I greatly admire. The people are genuine and, of course, the restaurant scene is one of the best in the world. I love to return whenever I can. Q. Which fashion designer best reflects your style? It’s a toss-up between Hugo Boss, Marc Jacobs, Adriano Goldschmied. I love that sharp, classic look that all three encapsulate. Q. What would you like to see change in your industry? I think it’s time for models to be treated fairly, and clients to receive the professionalism they pay for. At DAS, our fundamental goal is to provide a personal and courteous service to both our talent and clients. Treating our agency’s models with genuine value and mentoring them in the right way ensures their personal development is of a quality we expect and uphold – allowing them to reach their true potential. Experienced members of our senior management team, who are dedicated towards guiding each model throughout the developmental process, personally implement our mentoring program. As one example, we provide a portfolio of

photography with testing that is not charged to the individual. We invest long-term in our talent, in the same way they invest their time and trust their career with us.

Q. What are some negative things you have experienced in your career that came with a life lesson? Mainly people who expect the most help are usually the ones who give you the most problems, and who never appreciate anything. I have started to identify certain markers of these entitled individuals and steer clear. Q. What advice would you share with someone who aspires to be a model? Don’t give up. If you really want to be a model, there is a market for you. You may have to go to many agencies to find a company with clients that are looking for your look and style, but they are out there. Persistence and determination are qualities agencies always admire. Q. Who is your mentor? I can’t say I have one mentor in particular right now, but my godfather, Tom, continues to be a major influence in my life. Q. Tell us one thing you have learned about success? Success is not absolute but relative, and not something dynamic or static. I think success is constantly improving on where you were the day before. I think once you become complacent you are not successful by any standards. Look at Bill Gates or Warren Buffett. They are in perpetual states of movement and growth.

www.dasmodelmanagement.com

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JEWELLERY

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Garden

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VARIETY

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From muted to marvellous, these unique pieces are sure to jazz up even the most mundane summer ensembles TEXT BY REBECCA ALBERICO

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1. This custom Royal de Versailles piece marries a floral brooch and Tahitian- and South Sea-pearl necklace for a winning design | www.royaldeversailles.com 2. From Carrera y Carrera comes this feminine Baile de Mariposas ring in yellow gold and mother-of-pearl | www.carreraycarrera.com 3. These sparkly treats are the Trillium Diamond studs by Penwarden Jewellery, boasting 2.46 total carat weight of round and marquise-shaped diamonds | www.penwardenjewellery.com 4. CHIMENTO reinterprets bamboo shape in this yellow-gold bracelet with diamonds from the Bamboo Over collection | www.finchcentrejewellers.com 5. Sparkle in these spectacular pink, blue and green diamond drop earrings by Martin Katz | www.martinkatz.com 6. The bold onyx Martin Katz knot cufflinks are accented with two round diamonds and set in 18K yellow gold | www.martinkatz.com 7. Floral-inspired rose gold and white gold rings with diamonds by Pasquale Bruni shine bright in the Bon Ton collection | www.royaldeversailles.com

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Pacic Coast Beauty Fresh-faced and ready to conquer the City of Angels TEXT BY REBECCA ALBERICO

California dreaming / Eyes: Black Cake Eyeliner, Ice and Canvas Eye Colors; Lips: Charm & Sandy Beach Lipstick; Cheeks: Sweet Cheeks Color Creme

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The classic cat eye gets an avant-garde update. MUD’s rich and silky eye shadows have the perfect pigmentation for achieving a longlasting look

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PHOTOGRAPHER: PETER GIODANI STYLIST: SARAH KINSUMBA MAKEUP ARTISTS: SHANNA CISTULLI AND FRANCINE REICH, MUD L.A. MAKEUP USED: MUD HAIR: MISS ROCKABILLY RUBY MODEL: NORA O’NEIL, L.A. MODELS CREATIVE DIRECTOR: MAJA KEŠELJ LOCATION: SIMON HOUSE, BEVERLY HILLS, CA.

In the eyes of the beholder

summer 2017

Smoke show / Eyes: Tea Tree and Moss Eye Colour, Black Forest Eye Pencil, Pyramid and Dulce de Leche; Lips: Bare Lip Glaze over Rustic Lipstick; Cheeks: Glow Cheek Color

www.dolcemag.com | DOLCE MAGAZINE

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DESIGN & REAL ESTATE

HIGHLIGHTS

2. BASALT AND PORCELAIN

Listing Price

$4.7 MILLION

Europe-based decorative lighting f irm Tala recently launched its Basalt and Porcelain collections at Euroluce 2017. The event is dedicated to showcasing the latest and greatest in home lighting solutions. These Basalt and Porcelain products come in various designs, work well with other fi xtures and achieve the perfect balance of light output. The slim and sleek Basalt and Porcelain lighting products will be ready for production this summer. www.talaled.com

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1. 18013 SEA REEF DRIVE, PACIFIC PALISADES With the backdrop of the seemingly endless c r yst a l-blue oce a n, t h i s Pac i f ic Pa l i sade s property is over 17,000 square feet of paradise. The property is ideally positioned, with views spanning from Santa Monica Bay to Catalina Island. Its classic interior is just as awe-inspiring as its exterior. Drawing inspiration from picturesque v iews a nd t he la id- back c oa st a l l i fe st yle , Janet Vargas the visionary behind L.A.-based Azul Staging has executed a design in sync with the property’s surroundings. Vargas has injected oceanic elements and colours both subtle and bold into every room. The signature wall in the house assumes a coastal theme, as a blue-lit core held between two glass planks transports you to the serene depths of the Pacific. The theme continues throughout the home, from lighting to accents and accessories − Vargas leaves no shell unturned. The warm embrace of the Californian sunshine runs throughout the home, thanks to an abundance of skylights. This four-bedroom home is inviting, with a spacious and airy vibe by way of high ceilings and a stunning open-concept design. The home is listed with the Beverly Hills-based realtors Smith & Berg with Partners Trust, and Sewit Eshetu of Rodeo Realty. www.azulstaging.com www.18013seareefdrive.thepartnerstrust.com www.sewitproperties.com

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3. PIZZAVILLE LIBERTY VILLAGE Since 1963, the Contardi family has striven to maintain Pizzaville’s treasured Italian roots through traditional recipes, quality ingredients and a family-oriented ambiance. Today, the brand aims to uphold the same commitment to the quality of its interior design. It’s been just over a month since Pizzaville opened shop in downtown Toronto’s Liberty Village, and this location is notably different from its franchise counterparts, thanks to designer Inna Shaulsky. With this location, Pizzaville draws inspiration for its aesthetic from the surrounding industrial environment. Shaulsky has introduced gorgeous treetrunk tabletops, sleek, polished concrete floors and even an authentic Italian gitoni table. The design incorporates a perfect balance of exposed brick and imported materials, like gorgeous restored woods from Asia. To further honour the historical ambiance of Liberty Village, Pizzaville has replaced its standard stainless-steel shelves with wrought-iron ones and introduced fun accent pieces throughout. www.pizzaville.ca

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Q: What can buyers do to protect themselves in this market?

REAL ESTATE

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ANDRÉ KUTYAN 4. MASHAMBAS SKYSCRAPER Mashambas Skyscraper received f irst-place honours at the 2017 Skyscraper Competition. The development plan proposes a linked and accessible skyscraper, which will serve as an educational centre and marketplace for new farming communities in sub-Saharan Africa. In part, the vital purpose of this development is to increase agricultural opportunities within these regions, in an attempt to curb hunger and promote sustainability. www.evolo.us

5. BISHA A new luxury lifestyle-hotel brand is set to open its flagship location in Toronto this summer. Bisha’s 44-storey structure is set to double as a cultural hub as well, with public spaces such as a 24-hour café, a rooftop bar and restaurant, and an infinity pool. Leathers, quality textiles and natural stone will be used throughout the interior of the building. In addition to 96 luxury boutique-hotel rooms, there will be 355 residential suites within the complex. www.bishatoronto.com

André Kutyan is a real estate sales representative for the Robert Greenberg Team of Harvey Kalles. Kutyan is a top producing sales representative within the Greater Toronto Area and an associate of the Chairman’s Club.

Q: What is your forecast of the real estate market? Will the market cool off? There are numerous factors contributing to market growth moving forward. We are currently experiencing a perfect storm of events, which include a of lack of housing supply, historically low interest rates and high demand (both local and foreign). When combined, these forces heighten unprecedented growth in the housing market. Unless one or more of these factors change, there is only one direction for GTA real estate in the long run: upward. With the provincial government’s recent announcement of new housing measures, there is potential for a slight cooling or leveling of the market. Consumer perception of the effects of these new measures may stall things temporarily, but it is unlikely to achieve the government’s desired outcome.

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First-time homebuyers are going to experience the most difficulty in this market. Many have a fear of missing out; however, my advice to them is to purchase a home or condo only if it’s needed. They should not spend more than they can afford, nor should they assume that a fi rst home or condo is forever. A fi rst-time homebuyer should purchase whatever is within their means today, and their maximum timeline for living there should not exceed five to ten years. Once they are in a better financial position, their second home can be more long-term. For current homeowners, it is prudent to purchase a home prior to selling. Given that inventory is so minimal, there is always the risk of not fi nding what you want and being left homeless.

Q: Do you believe Toronto is in a housing bubble? I do not believe Toronto is in a housing bubble. Instead, it is more of a boom. There is no question that price-to-income ratios are incongruent, and therefore, affordability is a real issue in this city. However, Toronto is a growing metropolis, which is attractive on the world stage. According to the Government of Canada, Ontario admitted 110,015 permanent residents in 2016, which represents approximately 37.12 per cent of the country’s total immigration (296,340). It is safe to assume that most of these people have settled in the Greater Golden Horseshoe (mainly Toronto and the surrounding suburbs). With this type of influx, the GTA’s population will grow by another million people in less than 10 years. If housing is expensive now, wait until 2026. www.andrekutyan.com

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7. 11 HOWARD 6. BALLOON CONCERTO This digital art piece created by Italian graphic designer and artist Federico Picci offers viewers a visual representation of music and sound. Picci shows music in physical form as balloons emulate the ascending and descending notes. www.shop.thecoolhunter.net

Soho-based hotel 11 Howard is a 221-room structure infused with Danish minimalist artwork and a Copenhagen-meets-New York feel. 11 Howard keeps it subtle and simple in its design, without extravagant colours or furnishings. A portion of the hotel’s revenue is donated to the Global Poverty Project, a nonprofit aimed at reducing extreme poverty. www.11howard.com

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BEHIND THE SCENES Zapata still makes time to wipe tables every day at his West Hollywood restaurant, Sur, a popular South American spot that is the setting for reality show Vanderpump Rules, currently in its fifth season

DESIGNERS OF LUXURY BESPOKE JOURNEYS TO ITALY & CROATIA 877-272-2310 OTESCAPES.COM INFO@OTESCAPES.COM

THE LIFE THAT DREAMS

ARE MADE OF

PHOTO BY JOHN RUSSO

OLIVE TREE ESCAPES

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Dolce Magazine talks to the face behind the famous set of Bravo’s popular TV series Vanderpump Rules WRITTEN BY RICK MULLER INTERVIEW BY REBECCA ALBERICO

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man from Argentina with no knowledge of English immigrates to Los Angeles and works as a dishwasher; years later, he owns one of Hollywood’s trendiest eateries that hosts the likes of Madonna, Angelina Jolie and Al Pacino. It may sound like a movie plot, but in this case, that movie would be biographical — it’s the real-life story of Guillermo Zapata, restaurateur, actor, model and reality TV star. “To me, la dolce vita is the American dream, and I am living la dolce vita every day of my life,” says Zapata in an exclusive interview with Dolce from SUR, his West Hollywood restaurant and lounge. “When I moved to Los Angeles I had no fi nancial help from my family, as my father believed that anything you earn in America, you have to earn for yourself. That’s maybe the best thing he could ever have said to me, and I say it to everyone every day. If you speak English and live in America, there is no reason you can’t be successful and productive, if you work hard. Don’t rely on politicians; it’s all up to you.” Zapata originally came from Argentina to Los Angeles on two weeks’ vacation when he was just 22. But the power and vibe of the City of Angels and the potential opportunities convinced him to stay. He took his fi rst job as a dishwasher in a restaurant on Melrose Avenue despite having no friends there, nor any knowledge of English. Learning the language was key to success and advancement in both his restaurant work and his aspiring acting and modelling career. “I went to school in the mornings to learn English and worked in the restaurant at night,” says Zapata. “I got promoted at the restaurant to busboy and then assistant manager, which was paying all my bills, so I focused more on that than acting or

modelling work, and by the age of 28 I was able to open my fi rst restaurant. Interestingly, now with my reality TV show and SUR Restaurant, both those worlds have come together, which is very satisfying.” When Zapata took over SUR, which stands for “Sexy, Unique Restaurant,” he reopened the 2,000 square feet, with a more traditional Argentinian atmosphere and menu. Along with an expansion, Zapata and his wife, Nathalie, made sure that the menu, wine list and overall atmosphere had a global flair that would appeal to all people. But the real growth of SUR came when Zapata and Nathalie were introduced to reality TV stars Lisa Vanderpump and Ken Todd from England. “We had just done an extensive business plan for SUR, which was small but very popular, and our lawyer had heard of this couple who were looking for L.A. investment opportunities, and they loved the location and the plan we had done,” recalls Zapata. “They did their research on me and wanted to meet. And the first day we met, we became partners — it was just meant to be.” Vanderpump and Todd had a plan for how to build and grow SUR; the Zapatas had the expertise and experience in cooking and running a restaurant. It was the perfect combination. SUR is now one of the hottest restaurants in West Hollywood, more than 10,000 square feet in size with a huge bar and lounge area, employing 90 people. In 2012 the four partners were approached by Bravo TV about doing a reality show on SUR, its employees, and the daily dramas, challenges and triumphs of owning and operating a trendy eatery and keeping it on top in a town known to change favourites every month. The show, Vanderpump Rules, is one of the most popular on Bravo and will be entering its fi fth season of production in early June. “Our customers love coming in and seeing the cameras and the excitement,” says Zapata, who has stepped back from being on-camera so much and now has an executive producer role. “Nathalie and I are very involved, as the producers see me as the insider and allow me to come forward with stories and creative ideas.” The work ethic learned in his native Argentina has Zapata up at 6:30 every morning, cooking breakfast for Nathalie and their two daughters, getting the girls to school, going off to the gym, attending auditions, then heading to the restaurant, where he still cleans tables every day. “An owner needs to be visible and very passionate,” says Zapata. “Every day is like my birthday, with the smiles of people and the good energy from SUR,” says Zapata. “I am truly blessed with all the people I have worked with and all my customers.” It sounds like a show with a very happy ending.

www.guillermozapataactor.com www.surrestaurant.com

81 summer 2017

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Fill your senses, not just your shopping cart. SEE FOR YOURSELF, EXPLORE OUR WORLD OF FINE FOODS FOR THE EVERYDAY AND MOST SPECIAL OCCASIONS. SHOP, DINE-IN AND TAKE-AWAY.

6 GTA LOCATIONS: Avenue Road | Yorkville | Bayview Village RioCan Oakville Place | CF Sherway Gardens CF Toronto Eaton Centre pusateris.com

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“Where the fashion people go” - HARPER’S BAZAAR (UK)

SUPERYACHT MARINA LUXURY RESIDENCES INTERNATIONAL SHOPPING AND DINING Five-star Regent Porto Montenegro Hotel Yacht Club featuring a 64m pool, sailing and sports facilities Naval Heritage Museum A year-round calendar of international events

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Dolce Magazine — Summer 2017  
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