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From Politics to Philanthropy, from Design to Finance Meet 20 Iconic Changemakers WINTER 2016

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COLLECTOR’S EDITION | WINTER 2016/17 • VOLUME 20 • ISSUE 4 Publisher/Editor-in-Chief MICHELLE ZERILLO-SOSA michelle@dolce.ca Director of Operations ANGELA PALMIERI-ZERILLO angela@dolce.ca

ART DEPARTMENT Co-Founder/Creative Director FERNANDO ZERILLO fernando@dolce.ca Web Project Manager STEVE BRUNO Senior Graphic Designer CHRISTINA BAN Junior Graphic Designer AXL VALDEZ Web Designer YENA YOO Web Developer JORDAN CARTER

EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT Fashion & Home Décor Editor MICHELLE ZERILLO-SOSA Beauty & Travel Editor ANGELA PALMIERI-ZERILLO Proofreader NINA HOESCHELE Writers REBECCA ALBERICO, AMANDA STOREY Contributing Writers VINCE ADRIANO, MANDY ALLEN, LORI COHEN, STEPHANIE CLARKE, TINO GAGLIANO, DAVE GORDON, CEZAR GREIF, IDA HSIANG, SARAH KANBAR, ALESSANDRA MICIELI, RICK MULLER Contributing Photographers GEOFF FITZGERALD, ROBIN GARTNER, WARREN HEATH, ANDRES HERNANDEZ, MAX JAMALI, CHAI LIZENG, JESSE MILNS, CHRIS NICHOLLS, BEN PELOSSE, CARLOS A. PINTO, GEORGE PIMENTEL, TOM SANDLER Social Media Manager SARAH KANBAR

VIDEO DEPARTMENT Videographer CARLOS A. PINTO

ADVERTISING Director of Marketing ANGELA PALMIERI-ZERILLO angela@dolce.ca Director of New Business Development SUSAN BHATIA susan@dolce.ca Senior Account Manager MARIO BALACEANU Account Manager CHRISTINA BONO

ADVERTISING INQUIRIES T: 905-264-6789 Toll-Free: 1-888-68-DOLCE info@dolce.ca • www.dolcemag.com Office Administrator ALESSANDRA MICIELI

Dolce Magazine is published quarterly by Dolce Media Group, 111 Zenway Blvd., Suite 30, Vaughan, Ont., L4H 3H9 T: 905-264-6789, Toll-Free: 1-888-68-DOLCE, F: 905-264-3787, info@dolce.ca, www.dolcemedia.ca Publication Mail Agreement No. 40026675. All rights reserved. Any reproduction is strictly prohibited without written consent from the publisher. Dolce Magazine reaches over 900,000 affluent readers annually through household distribution across Canada. Dolce Magazine is also available to over 100 million digital consumers of Magzter Inc. and Issuu. Inquiries about where else Dolce Magazine is available for sale may be directed to Dolce Media Group: info@dolcemedia.ca or 905-264-6789. The yearly subscription fee is CDN $34 and US $48. Send cheque or money order to Dolce Media Group, 111 Zenway Blvd., Suite 30, Vaughan, Ont., L4H 3H9, Canada The opinions expressed in Dolce Magazine are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the publisher or advertisers. Dolce Media Group does not assume liability for content. The material in this magazine is intended for information purposes only and is in no way intended to supersede professional advice. We are proud to be a Canadian company that has successfully published magazines for the past 20 years without any government funding or financial assistance of programs to cover editorial costs. It has all been possible thanks to the wonderful support of our readers and advertisers. ISSN 1206-17780 Next Issue: Spring 2017 ©2016 Dolce Media Group. Printed in Canada. Follow us at:

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V U J O V I C REAL ES TAT E P ROF ES S I ON AL

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PUBLISHERS’ NOTE

THE SPARK

FIND TO IGNITE THE FIRE IN YOUR SOUL

Michelle Zerillo-Sosa

Fernando Zerillo

Publisher/Editor-in-Chief

Co-Founder/Creative Director

T

here are two important days in your life: the day you were born, and the day you discover why. Although my brother Fernando Zerillo and I were born on separate days and years, we share the date of why we were born. It was a cold November day back in 1996. We had just published our first issue of Dolce Vita Magazine. That was the day we both realized our “raison d’être,” which was and still is the gift of sharing people’s stories of success, how they never take today for granted, how they use the obstacles they’ve faced to shape their future. These same individuals have fire in their souls. Their quests for success and change don’t allow them to sleep — their vision and passion fuels them to reach their dolce vita. Call it curiosity or just a crazy idea, but when my brother and I started Dolce Magazine in our parent’s basement, we never stopped to think if it was going to turn a profit. All we wanted was to make a difference in the community by bringing news that was positive, relevant and useful, maybe even be inspired and empowered ourselves, but ultimately bring these stories right to people’s doorsteps. No cost for subscriptions, no expectations — just one neighbourhood and one community at a time. The only thing we asked for was a bit of one’s time to read the publication, and nothing more. It was a crazy idea all those years ago, especially when you consider that we didn’t want to use newsprint

because we knew Dolce was meant to look and feel like a glossy, luxury publication. While our first edition was barely 12 pages and there was colour only on the outside cover, we took great care and effort in producing our first edition. With no government funding and no money to speak of, we were equipped with passion and the vision that one day Dolce would be the go-to luxury lifestyle magazine for those looking to live a more fulfilling life. Yes, it would have beautiful spreads showcasing real estate properties, automotive, fashion and jewels. I say “would have” because discussing what we wanted to feature was always part of late-night conversations I shared with Fernando. Looking back, it was all wishful thinking at the time, but the one thing that was our pride and joy — even within that first edition — was

“PASSION WAS OUR FUEL, AND WE WERE CONVINCED THAT IF YOU DO WHAT YOU LOVE THE PRODUCT OF YOUR LOVE AND PASSION GUARANTEES SUCCESS” the exclusive interviews of successful individuals who were living la dolce vita. These stories of successful, self-made entrepreneurs were the fuel that would ignite our passions for this crazy project even more. This is especially true when you consider the many sleepless nights of writing, designing and organizing distribution we devoted to the magazine while we both worked full-time jobs elsewhere. Our reward came in the form of being able to hold our first, and then second, and then

third edition in our hands — something tangible that exemplified our hard work, and that was spreading knowledge and igniting the dreams of our readers. What especially kept us going were the times we would walk into a local business and see a copy of the issue in an office newsstand, or when we would receive calls from potential advertisers wanting to buy an ad in the next issue. Passion was our fuel, and we were convinced that if you do what you love the product of your love and passion guarantees success. This belief and principle have been the secrets to our success. Over the last 20 years we’ve attracted a tribe of talented individuals, who work with us on each issue with the same intensity as my brother and I once did on that cold November night in our parents’ basement. I cannot thank them enough for making our vision their own. And thank you to the long-standing support of our readers and our advertisers, who appreciate the value that comes from picking up or being part of an issue of Dolce. Today, after two decades in the industry, we once again ask everyone for one thing: a bit of your time to indulge in our pages, and to share what you’ve learned with others, to be inspired to become an agent of change — a changemaker! We especially hope that you read our story on 20 influential changemakers hailing from various fields and industries, whose drive and passion have shaped their communities and our world. These individuals contain a certain type of character that resonates with our own philosophy on life and business, and we hope that it sparks the fire in your soul as it does to us. Story on p. 33. With that said, cheers to a sparkling holiday season and a promising year ahead as you dive into the pages of our special 20th anniversary edition.

Michelle Zerillo-Sosa Publisher/Editor-in-Chief

michelle@dolce.ca @dolcetweets |

@amorebagstoronto

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CONTENTS COLLECTOR’S EDITION | WINTER 2016/17 / VOLUME 20 / ISSUE 4

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CHÂTEAU DE GUDANES

Step inside the historic French home that the world has fallen in love with

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XX CHANGEMAKERS One-on-one with 20 international movers and shakers

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ICED OUT FOR THE HOLIDAYS

changemakers

Outshine the snow in this collection of handpicked gems

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OH, THE DRAMA

THE NEW KING

Indulge in winter’s sultrier side with bold, sophisticated trends

Catching up courtside with tennis royalty Andy Murray

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PARIS IN THREE DAYS

THE ART OF COOKING

Indulging in French fare with Berluti, Krug and Hennessy

The chef’s table meets the artist’s easel in this Cape Town studio

90 THE LANGUAGE OF FLOWERS Because who says florals are strictly a spring thing? 98 CARSON KRESSLEY The megawatt personality on his fabulous new book More stories inside ...

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Fashion-forward products from across the globe, hand-picked by our lighting design specialists.

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19 www.dolcemag.com | DOLCE MAGAZINE


DOLCE WAS THERE 1

POLICARO ACURA RE-OPENING

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The Policaro Automotive Family recently unveiled a new look for their flagship dealership, Policaro Acura (formerly Acura 2000). The Acura dealership is located on the busy Queen St. in Brampton, where not only the grand re-opening took place, but also the new 2017 Acura NSX made its shiny debut to commemorate Policaro Acura’s makeover. www.policaroacura.ca

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1. The Brampton dealership unveiled its stunning new look at the event 2. Refreshments were served to complement the chic new atmosphere 3. Sarah and Paul Policaro 4. Tony Policaro, Karman Enick and Giancarlo Policaro 5. Yuichi Murata, Sogo Nakata, Paul Policaro and Takashi Ohira 6. The new 2017 Acura NSX also made its debut at the event 7. Gary Gill, Lina Policaro and Emile Korko 8. John Dubreuil and Guest 9. Jerry Chenkin

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LUNCH WITH MIKE TYSON

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PHOTOS BY AZZURE PHOTOGRAPHY

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Boxing icon and actor Mike Tyson was out in Kleinburg on Oct. 8 for an exclusive lunch event hosted at Avenue Cibi E Vini. Following a champagne reception, Tyson graced the 100 guests in attendance with a talk on business and his life. The special edition, Iron Fight by Havoc Motorcycles, was also unveiled.

1. Mike Tyson, Hunter Milborne and Richard Dolan 2. Mike Tyson and Richard Dolan 3. Mike Tyson, Chiara and Robert Megna 4. Mike Tyson and Fernando Zerillo

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21 www.dolcemag.com | DOLCE MAGAZINE


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DOLCE WAS THERE

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DIWALI – A NIGHT TO SHINE

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PHOTOS BY GEORGE PIMENTEL

The Fairmont Royal York Hotel in Toronto was the setting for this year’s Diwali — A Night To Shine, which took place on Saturday, Nov. 5. The sixth annual event honoured the South Asian holiday of Diwali with a dazzling colourful fundraising gala in support of increasing quality of resources in emergency medicine and the Donald K. Johnson Eye Institute at Toronto General and Toronto Western Hospitals. www.tgwfh.ca

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1. Mala Chopra and Dr. Anil Chopra 2. Dr. Michael Baker and Sam Ajmera 3. Dr. Peter Pisters, Richard Wachsberg and Dr. Anil Chopra 4. Raj Kothari, Shaila Kothari, Michelle Zerillo-Sosa and Sergio Sosa 5. Reetu Gupta, Rahmi Gupta, Steve Gupta, Reema Balaram and Shelley Gupta 6. Richard Wachsberg and Nathalie Wachsberg 7. Pradeep Sood and Annu Sood

2

The fourth annual Angels Catwalk for SickKids took place on Nov. 17 at Steam Whistle Brewery in Toronto. The fashion show boasted the latest looks, from designers such as Stephan Caras, Shan Swimwear, Philip Menswear and more. The event raised over $780,000 towards funding research and treatment care for those suffering from Paediatric Acute Liver Failure (PALF). Ashley’s Angels was inspired by the story of nine-year-old Ashley Logan, who suffered from PALF and received a liver transplant. angelscatwalk.ca

PHOTOS COURTESY OF ASHLEY’S ANGELS CATWALK

ASHLEY’S ANGELS CATWALK FOR SICKKIDS

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1. Live art creation was part of the entertainment at this year’s event 2. Ashley Logan and sister Julia Logan 3. Guests mingling during the course of the evening

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DOLCE WAS THERE 4

GRAND CRU – UHN

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The 12th annual Grand Cru Culinary Wine Festival was hosted once again in support of the University Health Network UHN on Oct. 29, 2016. The fundraiser unifies medical professionals and serves incredible gourmet dishes and fine wines, creating an unparalleled culinary experience. This year’s efforts raised $1.5 million, which will fund various areas at Toronto General Hospital and Toronto Western Hospital. www.tgwhf.ca

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PHOT PH H OS BY T TOM SA S ND NDLE DLE R

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1. Dr. Raja Rampersaud and Samina Rampersaud 2. John Embry, Nancy Embry and Dr. Bryce Taylor 3. Chief of Police Mark Saunders, Stacey Saunders, Ellen Halpern, Todd Halpern, Loretta Rogers, Linda O’Leary, Kevin O’Leary, Barbara Hackett and Mayor John Tory 4. Colin Taylor, Chef David Hawksworth and Clare Sellers 5. Dr. Adrienne Hood, Dr. Edward Cole, Vanessa Kimel and Ron Kimel 6. Dr. Shaf Keshavjee and Salah Bachir

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Celebrities such as Billy Baldwin, Patrick Adams and Gary Leeman united on Nov. 4 and 5 to assist in raising funds for SickKids, to kick off Rally For Kids with Cancer 2016 in Toronto. For nine years, the rally has raised over $18,000,000 in support of research and treatment for patients. Over the course of two days, high-end performance cars competed in a scavenger hunt. “The Qualifiers” draft party kicked off the festivities, followed by the “Start Your Engines” brunch hosted at Real Sports, and finally the main scavenger hunt event. www.rallyforkids.com

1. Billy Baldwin, Damon Allen, Leo Stakos, Shaun Jalili and Steve Anthony 2. Trevor Guthrie, Jamielee and Patrick J. Adams

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PHOTOS COURTESY OF RALLY FOR KIDS WITH CANCER

RALLY FOR KIDS WITH CANCER 2016


where does real confidence come from? Her braids or her band? At Havergal College, we believe YLHSJVUÄKLUJLJVTLZMYVT^P[OPU;OH[»Z^O`^L»YL LUJV\YHNPUNNPYSZ[VZOHYL[OL[OPUNZ[OH[YLHSS`TH[[LY [V[OLT!#RealGirlThings See more at RealGirlThings.ca WINTER winter 2016 2016/17

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SPORTS

THE NEW KING

Tennis has a new golden boy, and he knows how to make a racket. Dolce caught up with Andy Murray, the Brit who smashed the Rio Olympics, before his next grand slam WRITTEN BY CEZAR GREIF

Q. You come from a family where professional sports looms large. Did you always know you would be doing this as your job? Did you have a plan B? I loved playing sports growing up, I’d play absolutely anything. My grandfather was a professional football player, and my mum was a coach and ex-professional tennis player, so tennis was an easy route for me to pursue. I actually played a lot of football up until I was about 13 or 14 years of age, however I eventually had to

make the decision on which one I was going to try seriously. I had trials for Glasgow Rangers, so if tennis hadn’t worked out, I would probably have tried hard to forge myself a career in professional football. Q. Can you describe the town of Dunblane, where you come from? I read that your grandparents still live there and that you maintain ties to the community to this day. Dunblane is where I was brought up and has a special place in my heart. Although I only get to visit two or three times a year, it’s somewhere that holds some of my best memories. I got married there last year to my wife, Kim, and my grandparents and father still live there. I recently bought and renovated an old hotel there as well (Cromlix House). My brother got married at the hotel a few years back and plenty of friends and relatives use the Albert Roux restaurant attached to the hotel, so that’s great. The support the town has given me over the years has been nothing short of incredible, and I’ll always be grateful for that. Q. You decided to leave home at 15 to go train in Spain. I’m wondering how you came to that decision? Leaving home is never an easy decision, but again it was another moment in my life where I knew that if I wanted to succeed and seriously chase a career in professional tennis, I needed to

ensure I had the best possible setup around me. Sánchez-Casal is somewhere that I had heard a lot about, and a lot of the best tennis players in the world were training on clay courts every day, something which the UK doesn’t have. After a lot of talking with my parents I decided that if I wanted to be the best I had to go and train with the best, so I left home for Barcelona. The decision turned out pretty good! Q. When it was announced that Ivan Lendl was going to be your coach, people were surprised for various reasons, not least because of the perceived differences in personality. How familiar were you with him before making that decision? Had you seen his epic matches against Borg and McEnroe? I think people were surprised, because not many players at that time had many “big name” ex-players as coaches. People kept talking about our differences at the beginning but a lot of people forgot that Ivan lost three or four grand slam finals before he managed to find the breakthrough. At that time I had lost a few finals, and I was looking for someone who could help me get over the line. Ivan was an incredibly hard worker as a player and he knew straight away how to get the best out of me. He had some incredible matches during his career, he is probably one of the greatest players from that era of tennis, so I definitely knew it was the right appointment.

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PHOTOS BY CHAI LIZENG

A

ndy Murray is relaxed. Even after a nine-hour flight from London to Beijing, when he has to do a photo shoot the afternoon of his arrival. Even after training for two hours on the court the very same day. So long for jet lag! This has been a fantastic year for the Brit, with a victory at Wimbledon and a gold medal at the Rio Olympics, and a possible No. 1 one ranking by the end of the year. He has played more matches this year than any other player, worrying some tennis experts that his body wouldn’t be able to keep up. As they say, strike while the iron is hot. We sat down with Murray to discuss his career and coach Ivan Lendl’s terrible jokes.


After taking home the gold medal during the Rio Olympics, Andy Murray is unstoppable

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Q. Can you detail how his training methods differ from other coaches? Is there a side of him you experience while training with him that the public doesn’t know? Not really, Ivan is just Ivan. He’s not really like anyone you’ll ever meet. He knows how to work me incredibly hard, but he also knows when I just need someone to listen to my concerns, and he’s great at that. He’ll always ask me if there’s anything I want to work on (which he normally already knows about anyway!). He’s a great guy and he’s a lot of fun to be around, which makes the training a lot easier. He needs to work on some of his jokes though, most of which aren’t printable here! [Laughs]

“IT HELPS ME WHEN I SHOW EMOTION ON THE COURT. IN MY OPINION IT’S NOT ALWAYS GOOD TO KEEP THOSE FEELINGS BOTTLED UP”

Q. Compared to the era of Lendl, it does seems like players play much longer nowadays, sometimes playing into their mid-30s. I wonder if you ever talked to him about this. How do you explain that players can play so much longer? Is it because of the way they prepare themselves, the rackets? It’s very difficult to compare our eras of tennis because the differences between now and then are huge. There’s a lot more on offer to players now that can help them to play longer. Players use physiotherapists more than ever because players are recognizing the importance of recovery — and also that it takes a lot more than just training to keep your body in perfect condition. There’s a lot more emphasis now on being strong and flexible than there was back then, and obviously both of those are important to fitness and health later in your career. The technology on offer is also crucial; back then, players’ rackets were heavy, rarely customized and pretty basic, whereas now, it’s totally different, some of the technology in tennis rackets now is incredible. There have also been advances in nutrition. Lots of small improvements in these different areas add up. Q. From an outsider’s perspective, it seems that professional tennis is now as much about mental strength as it is about pure technical skills. A player like Djokovic seems to play even better for the important points. You show your emotions more, but you’re still able to be one of the best in the world. What is your mental preparation to be able to compete at this extremely high level? I think it’s important to remember that every player is different. It helps me when I show emotion on the court. In my opinion it’s not always good to keep those feelings bottled up, so I let them out on the court. If I’m frustrated after a point, I sometimes let the emotion out, but it’s vital that I am focused for the next point and

The Scotland native says Muhammad Ali was one of his greatest inspirations

don’t let the emotion affect that. You have to make sure you always believe in yourself and that comes from working as hard you can, especially when you’re not on the court. To be able to compete at the highest level, you need to train harder than anyone else, and that’s something I think I do which really helps me when I’m playing in a long and difficult match.

Q. Do you have a specific routine to deal with the constant pressure, both on the court and off the court? I just try and keep everything the same. Me and my team always have a routine on match days that we rarely change, I’ll always do the same warm-up, the same drills in practice and eat around the same times before each match. I know that if I do all these things I’ll be in the best possible position I can be to win the match. Ensuring that I have worked as hard as I can to put myself in the best possible position to win the match is all I need to know, to go into a match confident. Q. For a time, before your Grand Slam successes, you had the unique task of carrying the nation, Great Britain, on your shoulders. How did you deal with this? Did you ever think it was unfair? Pressure is good, it makes you want to always better yourself. People always asked me about how I dealt with the pressure of the whole country wanting me to win Wimbledon and whether it affected me. If I’m honest, I enjoyed the pressure, in a way, it was nice to know that so many people wanted me to succeed and cared about the result. It’s the same with nerves. I enjoy having nerves as it keeps me focused and on edge and ready to play my best. Q. Do you think success, particularly your Grand Slam titles, has helped you be more relaxed than before? It’s important not to get too carried away, no matter how successful you have been. You have to focus on one match at a time, it can be easy to look ahead or look back at other results. The main thing is to just focus on your own game. As long as you’ve prepared yourself as best you can for every tournament and give your all, you can always walk off the court with your head held high, whatever the pressure or the outcome. Q. You’re maybe the first professional male tennis player to have been coached by a woman, Amélie Mauresmo. People talked about it a lot at the time. Did you notice anything different between being coached by men and being coached by a woman? No, every coach has different attributes, but that’s down to their style of coaching. Gender makes absolutely no difference to their ability. Q. What do you think still needs to be done to break the gender barrier in the game? That’s a very difficult one to answer, because right now there aren’t many female coaches in the men’s game. People need to be more accepting and recognize that gender doesn’t make a difference to ability and professionalism.

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Q. I know you are No. 1 at the ATP. When did becoming No. 1 start becoming a goal for you? Did it only start when you reached No. 2, or was that always in the back of your mind? Being No. 1 in the world is something that every player dreams about. Aside from winning Grand Slams it’s the pinnacle of the game. To be able to say that you’ve been the best at what you do in the whole world isn’t something that many people can say. It’s always been a goal for me, I’ve just been unfortunate that so many of the guys around me have been playing so well and so consistently. It’s always been at the back of my mind, but I’ve never tried to focus on it too much, I’ve just made sure that I keep focusing on the moment, making sure I prepare for every match and tournament as best I can, to give myself the best chance of winning, and then hopefully the ranking will take care of itself! Q. I’ve read that you have a passion for boxing, is it true? I love boxing. Muhammad Ali is, in my opinion, the greatest sportsman that has ever lived, and his career has always fascinated me. He was an incredibly hard worker in and out of the ring, which is something I’ve tried to replicate in my career. If there’s ever boxing on I’ll always make sure I watch it, particularly with the British fighters. British boxing is incredibly strong right now, and we have world champions in a lot of divisions, which is great for the sport. I’m not sure I’d ever have the courage to get in the ring though, it’s a brutal sport. Q. In terms of fashion, we’ve seen you dress up a bit more in recent years. Can you define your style and the men’s brand you like to wear? As I’m always somewhere between the tennis courts, the gym or the comfort of a hotel room, it’ll probably come as no surprise that I love to wear comfortable clothes most of the time. It’s important that I wear functional gear during the day, thankfully Under Armour make some great clothing. They’ve just released UA Sport, which I’m wearing in the photographs. It debuted at New York Fashion Week, so it’s a bit more luxurious than traditional sportswear. When the time is right, though, I do enjoy putting on a good suit. There are plenty of brilliant British tailors. Q. I know you’re involved with charities, can you tell me a bit more about that? It’s always been really important to me to give back where I can, and I’m really fortunate to be able to work with some amazing charities. I’m really passionate about animal welfare, so I’ve worked with the World Wildlife Fund and United for Wildlife for a number of years now. A lot of my work with them focuses around

conservation and putting a stop to the illegal wildlife trade. We are incredibly lucky to live on a planet that has some of the most amazing species on it, and we should do everything we can to protect them and not exploit them. As well as animal welfare, I’m also passionate about protecting the children of the world, particularly those that live in areas that are dangerous or caught up in war. UNICEF does some incredible work caring for and supporting child refugees that have been displaced through conflicts, and being able to help reunite children with their families and provide them with shelter and food is something that is really important to me. The images of the last few years have shocked everyone, but it particularly hit home with me as a new father, so toward the end of last season, for every ace I served, I made a donation to UNICEF’s efforts in the refugee crisis in Europe. Putting an end to malaria is something that is also incredibly important to me. Over a million people die each year from it but it’s a preventable disease and one that we hope will be eradicated in my lifetime, so I also work with Malaria No More, which does lots of work in this space. I don’t just work with charities in an ambassadorial role; I recently participated in my own charity tennis exhibition match (Andy Murray Live), which was a great success. We raised a phenomenal amount of money for UNICEF and a local charity called Young Peoples Futures, it’s something that we hope to take around the world eventually and raise as much money as we can wherever we go! Q. What do you see yourself doing in the future? Do you think you will try coaching? Or do something completely different? I’m not really sure at the moment, I still have a good few years left to play in my career, so I haven’t thought too much about it. I still think my best tennis is ahead of me, I’ve had one of my best years this year, and I still think I can do better and that gets me really excited. I think in the first instance, I’ll definitely take some time away from the game, just so that I can enjoy some down time with my family. That’s the one thing about being a professional sportsman that is tough: you spend long periods of time away from your family, so I think as soon as I stop playing tennis, I’ll spend as much time as I possibly can at home. Maybe after a break I could get into coaching as it’s something that interests me. I also have set up my own management agency, so working with young talent in other sports is also of interest and I have plenty of knowledge to pass on. Right now though I’m pretty focused on being the best I can be as a player on the court and a father and husband off of it. www.andymurray.com

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No matter how great the dream is, the bee is a symbol that we can accomplish anything we put our minds to. MEET OUR ICONIC

XXchangemakers From politics to philanthropy, from design to finance, meet 20 influencers who are forces to be reckoned with.

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PHOTO COURTESY OF AIR CANADA

Rovinescu was recently named Outstanding CEO of the Year for 2016 by the Financial Post

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XX changemakers

CALIN ROVINESCU PRESIDENT AND CEO OF AIR CANADA

WRITTEN BY RICK MULLER / FILES FROM AMANDA STOREY

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ometimes it’s hard to remember just how serious the financial crisis that hit the world in the fall of 2008 really was. Entire industries, such as the automotive sector, were under serious threat of failing altogether. Another industry that faced a life-and-death struggle was the airline industry, as companies tightened rules on business travel and families put aside those vacation plans. It was at this key moment on April 1, 2009, that Calin Rovinescu took on the job as president and CEO of Air Canada. As the saying goes, “timing is everything.” He was the first Canadian president of Air Canada since Claude Taylor in 1992. “When I originally took the job, the economy was in a slump and airlines around the world were struggling, so my immediate task was to stabilize the company,” he says. “Since then, we’ve grown much stronger and advanced the company well down the path to long-term, sustainable profitability. Today, our team’s focus is more on opportunities to refine our service and grow our business, particularly international expansion.” Canada can be extremely proud of what this changemaker has accomplished in his seven years of piloting Air Canada. It has become one of Canada’s most successful international businesses. It has also become a global brand ambassador for the country. There is not a 21-year-old kid, backpacking around the world for the first time at some faraway airport, who sees the maple leaf on a big Air Canada jet and doesn’t feel like they are seeing a piece of “home.” Air Canada has that type of emotional impact on internationally travelling Canadians. rom modest beginnings as Trans-Canada Airlines in 1937, Air Canada is the national flag carrier, a founding member of the Star Alliance and the largest airline in Canada, serving 182 destinations worldwide. It is now the world’s tenth-largest passenger airline by

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“IT STILL ENERGIZES ME EVERY DAY TO BE IN THIS ROLE AND TO THINK ABOUT WHAT A MODERN, SERVICEORIENTED AIRLINE OF TOMORROW NEEDS TO LOOK LIKE” fleet size, with 169 planes and another 122 on order. Headquartered in Montreal, it has grown to have 28,000 employees, passenger revenues of $13.8 billion in 2015 and, along with Air Canada Express and Air Canada Rouge, today averages more than 1,530 scheduled flights daily. But the airline industry was not on Calin Rovinescu’s early flight path as he began his career as a young law partner. An invitation to a lunch changed all of that. “One of my major assignments as a young lawyer was advising on the privatization of Air Canada, and I was invited to lunch by Claude Taylor, who was then chairman of Air Canada,” says Rovinescu. “He really was a remarkable individual and I remember being struck that he would generously spend time with a young lawyer and seriously listen to what I had to say.”

Rovinescu stayed close to many airline news for many years, including the hostile takeover bid of Air Canada by Onex Corporation and American Airlines. Finally, he found the allure of the complexities and depth of the airline business too hard of an opportunity to pass up — and he joined Air Canada in April of 2000. And, just nine years later to the month, he became its president and CEO. he airline industry is one of the most competitive in the world, and changes in technology affect it more than most other businesses. Airplanes are getting bigger, with the A380 now having two complete, full-length decks carrying up to 600 passengers. The domino effect on that radical change is enormous, from how to load in catering, how to clean and service an airliner that large, between flights, and how to load and unload passengers, all while keeping as close to schedule as possible. For in such a customeroriented business, the worst possible words are “my flight’s delayed.” Keeping on schedule is something Rovinescu is following closely on his career path as well. When asked by Dolce Magazine what is next for him, he doesn’t hesitate to say how satisfied he is. “I am often asked what is next in my career path,” he says. “But I find the satisfactions and challenges of working in this industry and at Air Canada are as strong as they’ve ever been. It still energizes me every day to be in this role and to think about what a modern, service-oriented airline of tomorrow needs to look like.” When the opportunity for Rovinescu to retire might happen is anyone’s guess, but the chances of doing some travelling for pleasure might surely emerge. And of those 182 worldwide destinations, which ones are his favourites? Without hesitation he answers with London, England, Australia and the Greek islands. Inspiring choices for an inspiring business leader.

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PHOTO BY CHRIS NICHOLLS

Weston received the honour to serve as the first Chancellor of what is known as the Order of Ontario in 2001, and worked as a Member of the Order of Canada in 2003

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XX changemakers

HILARY WESTON

FOUNDER, THE HILARY M. WESTON FOUNDATION FOR YOUTH AND FORMER 26TH LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR OF ONTARIO

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hen it comes to expression — the transmittance of ideas, emotions and dreams — few mediums are as universally beloved and all-pervasive as the ever-expanding field of art. More than any other industry, art has become something to be treasured and revered throughout history. Almost anything that displays or demands an intense mastery is said to transcend into an art form, after all, and ingenious words are said to paint a picture. It is a love of art that has partially defined Hilary Weston’s life. And, much like a work of art, Weston’s avid philanthropy, strategic business sense and genuine love of life have created a legacy that will reap happiness and wonderment for generations to come. t began, as these things tend to do, in a busy hub of fashion and culture. Hilary Weston, then Hilary Frayne, was born in Dublin, Ireland. Her youth was a vibrant one full of culture, reading, and eventually a deep love of fashion and art. She toured much of the world with family friend Sybil Connolly, acting as both model and muse. It was while working as a fashion model that she met Galen Weston, her future husband, and the two were wed in England just a few short years later. She worked with him to create what would eventually be known as the Primark brand, something that they essentially raised from the ashes of a floundering store in Ireland. Today, it is one of the most successful retailers in Europe, and Weston credits her time spent modelling for Connolly as the reason for her intense love of fashion, stating that “it was through that experience … that I began to truly appreciate the design process as well as the dedicated precision of the tailors and seamstresses of the day.” While the above alone would count as a significant achievement in anyone’s lifetime, the Westons quickly moved on to even bigger things. In the early 1970s, they moved to Toronto, a place their entire family seems happy to call home. Weston notes that “I arrived in Canada when my

WRITTEN BY STEPHANIE CLARKE / FILES FROM AMANDA STOREY

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“DURING MY TERM I TRAVELLED FROM ONE END OF THE PROVINCE TO THE OTHER … IT WAS A GREAT JOY FOR ME TO CONNECT WITH THOSE COMMUNITIES” baby daughter Alannah was only six weeks old. I had no idea then that I would still be living here for over 40 years. Canada is a wonderful place to bring up children and even though they have been partially educated in America and England they’re inherently proud of their Canadian heritage.” Truly, her family is a worldly one that is sometimes lovingly referred to as the “Royal Family of Canada.” It should be noted, of course, that it is not the wealth that makes the family so endearing to the country, but rather the good that they’ve brought to the area — and Weston in particular has been responsible for bringing quite a bit of attention to public service. eston’s public service and community improvement efforts began shortly after arriving in Canada. In 1979, she founded what is known as the Ireland Fund of Canada, a non-denominational and non-partisan organization that worked to promote peace in Ireland. She also served the Mabin School as its founding chair, and she co-founded the Canadian

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Environment Educational Foundation as well as chairing its activities. n January 24, 1997, Weston was named the 26th Lieutenant Governor of Ontario. She worked as a representative of the queen in Ontario, and as such was responsible for the Crown’s representation as well as constitutional roles in the area. Weston’s time as Lieutenant Governor was a fruitful one that saw the philanthropist bring attention to groups and causes relating to youth, volunteers and women’s issues. Much of the current awareness around community public service in these areas is the result of Hilary’s efforts, which were exhaustive. She even donated her annual salary while in office in order to help create job training and business internships through First Connection for 88 students while also working to help better the plight of homeless children living on the streets. In 1998, Weston created an award known as the Lieutenant Governor’s Community Volunteer Award to call attention to community leaders that worked tirelessly for their causes. The award was later expanded to recognize outstanding volunteers of the student variety in Ontario secondary schools. Weston held the position until March 7, 2002, and says about her time in office that “it was a great honour to be appointed Lieutenant Governor of the province of Ontario. During my term I visited nearly every single constituency and I travelled from one end of the province to the other … it was a great joy for me to connect with those communities and to be received with open arms.” Weston continued her philanthropic work after exiting office, and has been awarded a number of honours and honorary degrees throughout her time in Canada. She received the honour to serve as the first Chancellor of what is known as the Order of Ontario in 2001, and worked as a Member of the Order of Canada in 2003. She has also been recognized by a number of postsecondary institutions around the world, and continues to raise awareness of the importance of public service even today.

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PHOTO BY GEOFF FITZGERALD

Mansbridge has been one of the most travelled correspondents in television history

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XX changemakers

PETER MANSBRIDGE “CANADIAN BROADCASTER, CHIEF CORRESPONDENT FOR CBC NEWS AND ANCHOR OF THE NATIONAL

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ver the past 20 years in Canada, one person has been viewed by more Canadians than any other person, and it’s not a queen, prime minister or even Wayne Gretzky or Drake. It’s Peter Mansbridge, anchor of CBC’s The National since 1988. Do the math. The National draws an average of three million viewers per week. Multiplied by 20 years, that’s more than 30 billion sets of eyes who have tuned in over the past 20 years to watch Peter Mansbridge. Most notably, it is Mansbridge that Canadians immediately turn to as the credible, authoritative voice of big news, making him an influential national changemaker these past two decades. ot a bad legacy for a guy discovered making flight announcements at age 19 in Churchill, Man., which caught the ear of a CBC executive. Lana Turner sitting at a diner counter in Hollywood has nothing on that story. But in the ever-evolving world of technology, perhaps the advancements in communications are the most radical, touchable and visible — and Peter Mansbridge, as Canada’s foremost communicator, is seeing it firsthand and can provide us with the most intelligent insight. “I grew up with three-channel, black-andwhite TV,” says Mansbridge in an exclusive interview with Dolce Magazine. “I’ve seen it all, from the birth of cable to five hundred channels to mobile digital on demand. I will say this, though: Canadians want massive amounts of information now and they get it, and I think that’s a very good thing.” This is indeed an incredible time in technology, and specifically communications, and Mansbridge welcomes it. “All the advancements in technology are good for our business,” says Mansbridge. “But I say this only if they are handled properly and that’s the challenge. Where are we going to be? I honestly don’t know but I will tell you that I am as excited

WRITTEN BY RICK MULLER / FILES FROM AMANDA STOREY

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“CANADIANS WANT MASSIVE AMOUNTS OF INFORMATION NOW AND THEY GET IT, AND I THINK THAT’S A VERY GOOD THING”

as the next person trying to figure out what the next ‘big thing’ will be.” ansbridge takes a very personal look back at his career when asked by Dolce, a particularly reflective time for him as it has been announced he will retire following his coverage of Canada’s 150th anniversary on July 1, 2017. “I’ve gotten to work with real professionals in the very top level of television and journalism, how fortunate is that?” says Mansbridge. “I’ve worked with great women and men who really know how to do their jobs. This has afforded me incredible opportunities across the country and around the world to cover amazing stories. I have literally been everywhere — far beyond announcing flights out of Churchill, Man.” Born in London, England, in 1948 and moving to Ottawa as a child, Mansbridge joined the CBC in 1975 as the network’s Saskatchewan correspondent for The National,

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eventually relocating back to Ottawa in 1976 as a parliamentary reporter. Following a decade of political coverage, he became the substitute anchor for Knowlton Nash and was so valued by the CBC that Nash retired as anchor to keep any American network from stealing Mansbridge. He debuted as the sole anchor of The National on May 1, 1988. An avid golfer and involved with many charities, he is the father of three children and has been married to actress Cynthia Dale since 1998; they live quietly in Stratford, Ont., far away from the media spotlight. “I am a journalist,” he says. “That’s the way I want to be seen, not as a TV celebrity.” ansbridge has been one of the most travelled correspondents in television history and an eyewitness to some of history’s most important events. “With this comes memories,” he says. “I’ve been on exciting stories and some very horrible stories. These cause emotions and the challenge is to tell these stories well, which is my job.” Mansbridge remains remarkably grounded and modest, always striving for something new and expanding his horizons. “I don’t think you ever realize you’ve accomplished all your goals as a journalist,” he says. “You always want to get to that next story and find new ways of telling stories. There’s always a new challenge and I hope I’ll always look at things that way.” When asked by Dolce what he has learned that he wished he knew 20 years ago, Mansbridge doesn’t hesitate in pointing to technology and the sheer pace of change. “I wish, like we all did, that we had a better sense of where technology was taking us all,” says Mansbridge. “I honestly couldn’t tell you what is one year down the road or five years, but I will say it’s all good.” As he moves on to the next phase of his life, Mansbridge retains his sense of optimism and embraces the challenges before him. And as always, he will remain a communicator.

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XX changemakers

EMMANUELLE GATTUSO PHILANTHROPIST AND CANCER SURVIVOR

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“WHEN YOU GO THROUGH AN EXPERIENCE THAT COULD END YOUR LIFE, YOU REALIZE HOW IMPORTANT IT IS TO LIVE EVERY DAY TO ITS FULLEST AND LIKE IT’S YOUR LAST”

That ethos of ensuring others have all the help and resources they need has become Gattuso’s goal and lifelong mission. It tells you everything you need to know about this woman, who is able to summon the strength from her own harrowing experience to aid others. he donations, contributions and charitable acts she and her husband have partaken in, starting with $1.5 million given to the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre in 2001, have improved care for countless cancer patients, helping keep thousands of families together. After experiencing the long wait times between a cancer warning and a possible diagnosis, which is an average of 5.3 weeks, Gattuso made it a priority to support Dr. David McCready’s pilot project to reduce wait times for women — with a $20 million donation to help turn it into a full-fledged clinic. She and her husband also donated a whopping

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$50 million to Princess Margaret in 2013 to help support personalized cancer medicine. attuso’s passion for enriching the lives of those afflicted with cancer knows no bounds, and perhaps that is best summed up with her approach to charitable work: “If you are fortunate enough to have the means to help other people and organizations, then I find you have a duty to help.” That speaks volumes. She doesn’t help for her own personal satisfaction, but rather as an obligation. She wants to do everything she can to help those who are struggling to realize there is a light at the end of the tunnel and there are so many people in their corner, rooting for them. There is no magic recipe to handling an illness like cancer, but, as Gattuso stresses, “you can’t generalize because everyone handles a diagnosis differently, but a positive outlook and surrounding yourself with friends and family are so, so important.” What having cancer taught Gattuso was to appreciate every moment she has here on Earth by remembering an old adage: “It’s such a cliché but it’s so true: when you go through an experience that could end your life, you realize how important it is to live every day to its fullest and like it’s your last.” And that is exactly what Gattuso has done. She is currently heavily involved with Camp Oochigeas, a summer camp for children stricken with cancer that offers over one thousand kids each year an opportunity to enjoy enriching experiences, referred to as the “Magic of Ooch.” “Find something that speaks to you and people who are passionate,” Gattuso urges of people who are looking for a charity to engage with, while emphasizing that financial aid is not the only way to give back. “Volunteer, and do all kinds of things that will help other people.” This is the unique makeup of Emmanuelle Gattuso. A cancer survivor with a joie-de-vivre toward life who has made it her vocation to help others who are suffering. There are few like her, and she deserves all the praise in the world for it. Whether she accepts the credit or not.

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WRITTEN BY TINO GAGLIANO / FILES FROM AMANDA STOREY

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ery few have the ability to absorb a life-altering event, the kind that turns your world upside-down, and build it into a lifelong commitment to helping others who find themselves in that very same position. Emmanuelle Gattuso is of that rare breed. Being on the receiving end of three words everyone hopes to never hear a doctor say — “you have cancer” — Gattuso took this news and dedicated her life to ensuring others faced with that same phrase have the resources and opportunity to receive the best care possible. She used her personal experience with the disease to help both improve the lives of those afflicted and find the cure. That determination to not only fight through personal adversity but also commit her life to ensuring millions of cancer patients get the help they need is why she and her husband were named Philanthropists of the Year in 2012 by the Association of Fundraising Professionals, and why she was named one of 2013’s Women of Action by the Israel Cancer Research Fund. It is also why Dolce Magazine has named Emmanuelle Gattuso one of the 20 most influential individuals in our society. attuso has, unfortunately, had a long history with cancer. She was confronted with the disease in 2003, when she was diagnosed with breast cancer after being told doctors noticed something off in a routine mammogram. All this followed the passing of her father in 2001, then both her best friend and mother in 2002. All from cancer. “I thought, this was too much for one person” she recalls thinking back on receiving her diagnosis, “I thought there’s no way God would do this to me, but lo and behold.” It seemed God would have a different plan for her. After going through treatment, Gattuso was spurred on to help others experiencing what she went through. “Having cancer prepared me to want to do more,” she explains. “I knew what breast cancer was like, and it gave me more motivation to make sure to help others as much as I can.”


PHOTO BY MAX JAMALI

Gattuso is a cancer survivor that has donated $50 million to Princess Margaret Cancer Centre

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XX changemakers

CRAIG KIELBURGER FOUNDER OF WE CHARITY

“AT THE ROOT OF EVERY CHALLENGE THE WORLD FACES [IS] HOW WE EDUCATE CHILDREN”

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proudest moments during the early years of his work were the times that he and his friends almost quit. They were young activists in a time when society largely ignored the importance of engaging youth in social issues, and they encountered the kind of reaction you might expect. In school, for example, Kielburger was teased for his beliefs. “It wasn’t cool,” he says, referencing the way his group was perceived by others. The difficulties almost led Kielburger and the friends that helped form his initial activist group to give up. They didn’t give up, however, and today Kielburger speaks to stadiums full of roughly 35,000 people about his dreams, his goals and his work. Transcending cultural differences as well as the not insignificant issue of distance, he has managed to create a movement that unites people all over the world. Kielburger is proud of those moments that tested his resolve because he persevered, and his commitment grew stronger as a result. The early days of uncertainty helped lead to the massive success that he currently experiences. Perhaps one of the most truly remarkable aspects surrounding Kielburger’s success is his

ability to see “the big picture.” Even as a youth, he envisioned a world where people focused on the good of everyone instead of simply their own benefit. Regardless of the fact that he had not personally experienced the kind of hardship faced by child workers and their families, he understood that the issue was a global one. Instead of waiting around for the adults he knew to do something about it, Kielburger took up the mantle and began championing the cause. He recognized that young people could make a real difference in the world, and that belief has shaped his work for decades. It is also this belief that has led to the renaming and restructuring of his organization. ielburger founded Free the Children in 1995 with his older brother and a few friends who also believed in the cause. For the past two decades, the organization has operated under this name. According to Kielburger, however, the time has come for a change. The scope of his vision has widened, and his organization must adapt to accommodate it. That’s why he’s changing the name to WE. “It speaks to the fact that our work is so much more than just what the name ‘Free the Children’ implied,” he says, elaborating on the shifting focus of the group. He continues, “At the core of it, [the group]’s trying to bring people together to create change.” Kielburger wants to shift the global perspective on youth involvement in world issues. Kielburger believes his goal can be accomplished by educating youth around the world about the kinds of conditions that people are facing, and encouraging them to get involved. “We’re going to light a spark to go around the world,” he says, excited at the prospect. And why wouldn’t he be? Kielburger has already created a generation that values youth involvement at a global level. “At the root of every challenge the world faces,” Kielburger says, is “how we educate children.” His efforts to educate children on the importance of engaging globally, then, are incredibly important and have created a worldwide impact that will last for generations to come.

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ducating today’s youth on the importance of empathy and human rights is a hot topic in the world at large. And while there are all manner of reasons why taking the time to teach children about things like the importance of community service is a good idea, there is one that is perhaps somewhat underutilized. It’s a concept that has kept Craig Kielburger working passionately for over two decades, building a momentum that shows no signs of stopping. Dolce Magazine visited the successful social entrepreneur to talk about his success and how he hopes to channel it into creating even more opportunities to help build stronger children and stronger communities. t all started with a newspaper article. That’s what caught 12-year-old Craig Kielburger’s attention. The article was about Iqbal Masih, a Pakistani boy, also 12 years old, who advocated for human rights and was murdered in response. Despite his young age and the distance between them, Kielburger felt a connection to that boy. He sought more information regarding the circumstances around the death and the overlying issues of human rights. This bright mind came to the conclusion that something had to be done to stop oppression and violence. And while that would be remarkable on its own, Kielburger did even more than that. He reached out to other students and teachers alike, and he attempted to find a solution to help children and their families out of bad situations. Kielburger’s passion for engaging youth in world issues in order to create a better global society was ignited with that newspaper article, and has proved to be incredibly strong. For over two decades, Kielburger has worked tirelessly to create a worldwide initiative focused on creating safer communities, and the results have been astounding. That’s not to say it was always easy, of course. When asked about his proudest moment related to his activism and outreach work, Kielburger had a rather unusual answer to share. He said that his


PHOTO BY CARLOS A. PINTO

Kielburger began changing the world at the age of 12

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PHOTO BY CARLOS A. PINTO

Traill was named a Change Agent of 2016 by Canadian Business

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RHIANNON TRAILL PRESIDENT AND CEO, THE ECONOMIC CLUB OF CANADA

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ou know you’re officially interesting when you’re a mother, an entrepreneur, the president of the internationally renowned Economic Club of Canada, constantly rubbing elbows with the most powerful elites in the world — and still in your 20s. Basically, when you’re Rhiannon Traill. On paper, when you learn about Traill’s accomplishments in her youth camp that gives scholarships to young entrepreneurs every August, her success in launching the Junior Economic Club series and launching the first financial literacy tool kit that addresses and helps the Inuit people of North Canada — you can’t help but be impressed by her overall passion to be a resource for the young Canadian voice in the financial world. It’s easy to forget that she hasn’t even had her 30th birthday yet. eeks shy of graduating from Ryerson University, Traill happened to have a chance meeting with one of the founders of the Economic Club of Toronto, who invited her into an entry-level coordinator position. It was the height of the economic crisis and she knew how hard a good job was to come by. Making an executive decision, Traill decided to defer her master’s degree and take the job. From there, a series of events happened that catapulted Traill from entry-level to president of the organization in a few short years. Her own ambition and enthusiasm granted her the role of VP after just two years and when the president of the club at the time had his own ambitions and success in running for public office, it was Traill who was hand-selected to take over. She was still very young and a very new mother, but with a strong support system in her family, she dove into the role head-first, an act that she recalls as “the scariest thing I’d ever done, to be honest.” Besides having to adjust to the new roles in her life, Traill also speaks very candidly about the discrimination she faced due to her age and the role she was in. She clarifies that she sees much more “age-ism” than sexism in her career, but doesn’t let it throw her off track. While in the beginning, she believed in “laying low” and letting

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“TRUE HAPPINESS AND CONFIDENCE COMES FROM WITHIN AND WHATEVER YOU DREAM OF IN LIFE, IT CAN BE YOURS IF YOU’RE WILLING TO GO OUT AND GET IT ON YOUR OWN” her work speak for itself, she now approaches the situation with a confident and positive aspect that resonates. “I understand that I’m extremely privileged to be the age that I am and be a part of these conversations. So, if I have to prove myself, then that’s OK,” she says. “I know I belong in the room and that I have something valuable to say. If I walk into a room and people are questioning me because I look too young, then I understand that I have to set it up so people understand why I’m here and what I’ve been able to accomplish since I got here.” nd it is this conviction and confident point of view that has allowed Traill to accomplish all that she has. Besides a successful national rebranding of the Economic Club of Canada and starting a Junior Economic Club series that’s six programs deep with a threeyear waiting list, Traill also has her hand in a variety of projects, all of which involve her passion for

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giving the youth of Canada a “seat at the table,” as she says. “Especially when it comes to important economic conversations and ideas, their voice needs to be heard,” she adds enthusiastically. Traill and her team of very busy and very passionate women also have a youth camp every August that allows young entrepreneurs to partner up, receive mentoring on building a business plan and then pitch their ideas to a panel of CEOs as a competition for scholarships and grants. But Traill and her vision do not stop there. When Traill says that she is passionate about educating the Canadian youth and giving them a resource, she means all of Canada. Her latest development is a financial literacy tool kit that focuses on the Inuit population and provides lesson plans and games that address many of the financial obstacles in the community. Traill is rightly very proud of the program and the connections and relationships forged during the project. We wanted a real and complete program,” says Traill. “It’s being developed to live on the website of Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, which is the national voice for Inuit in Canada. Their organization will host the tool kit on their website and it’s being translated into Inuktitut as well right now so it will be available in Inuktitut, as well as French and English.” And with all those things to clutter up her schedule, she’s still not done! With a TV show in the works that brings together young, concerned Canadians and high-profile people to discuss their economic concerns (she also writes, produces and hosts this show), expanding her Inuit financial literacy program with an “exchange program” camp, and continuing to progress and expand the national platform of the Economic Club of Canada and the Junior Economic Club, this young mom is doing it all! And while she cites so many people being her inspiration throughout her journey, we are truly inspired by her. “I wish I knew that the only person you can hold responsible for your own happiness is yourself,” Traill says. “True happiness and confidence comes from within and whatever you dream of in life, it can be yours if you’re willing to go out and get it on your own.”

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XX changemakers

SAM MIZRAHI PRESIDENT AND CEO, MIZRAHI DEVELOPMENTS

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“IF I COULD GO BACK TO MYSELF 20 YEARS AGO AND SAY ONE THING, I THINK IT WOULD BE TO WATCH FOR BIG PROBLEMS, BECAUSE THEY OFTEN DISGUISE VERY BIG OPPORTUNITIES” Complementing Mizrahi’s passion for quality creations is his dedication to respecting the communities he builds in as much as he enriches them. “The very first thing we do when entering a market we’re building in is engage with the community,” says Mizrahi. “The community tells us what they want in that market, and we mirror what that is. So we collaborate with them, and we start to develop and reverse-engineer the building based on what the community is saying to us. We look at how we can benefit the community as a whole so that by us coming into the community, we’re actually benefiting the neighbourhood experience.”

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ike all good businesspeople, Mizrahi has also mastered the art of balance. A husband and father, he’s as much a family man as he is a businessman — and he makes it his priority to build up his loved ones like he builds up his developments. Of course, it’s a challenging feat when you clock 12 hours a day and travel an average of 30,000 kilometres a year (he’s jetted from Dubai to Israel, from France to Italy, from the U.K. to China and beyond). But he attributes his juggling act to simply making it happen. “The balance doesn’t happen organically — you have to make it happen,” says Mizrahi, who has a 10-year-old daughter and an eight-year-old son. “It’s as simple as that. There are incredible time constraints in both my business and in my family, so I make a point of making time for my family. They’re very supportive of my passions, and at the same time I’m extremely supportive of them, so we create the time and the balance together.” izrahi has another passion outside of work: the UJA Federation of Greater Toronto. He’s an avid supporter of the organization, whose mission is to preserve and strengthen the quality of Jewish lives in and around the city, across Canada and internationally. Not only is it a cause that’s close to Mizrahi’s heart, but it’s also through his involvement with the UJA that he’s met some of his dearest friends. Having spent over two decades in the industry, Mizrahi has learned enough to write a book about how to navigate an extremely influential brand through even the toughest of adversities. But the lesson that he cherishes the most is one that can be translated into any industry, any age and any dream: “If I could go back to myself 20 years ago and say one thing,” he says, “I think it would be to watch for big problems, because they often disguise very big opportunities.”

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hen Sam Mizrahi, president of Mizrahi Developments, set his sights on the most famous intersection in the blossoming metropolis of Toronto, he knew it was The One. Today, that corner of Yonge and Bloor is now the future home of One Bloor West, Toronto’s most anticipated retail and residential structure that promises to scrape the sky in the most beautiful way. It’s not just this soon-to-be landmark that has placed Mizrahi on the map as one of the country’s most influential luxury real estate developers. The businessman has made waves in this high-stakes industry since he first set foot in it after years of heading a luxury dry-cleaning business in the city. While he wasn’t always a real estate mogul, building luxury homes has always been on Mizrahi’s radar. “I fell in love with design and architecture and function and form when I was 16 years old,” says Mizrahi. “Real estate gives you the opportunity to create all of those things — to create art, really. The interest really started when I began travelling and looked at buildings around the world, how unique and beautiful they were, and how they formed an important fabric of society.” he Toronto skyline is happy he brought these experiences home with him, along with the mission to blanket the city with unique design. The structures brought to life by Mizrahi and his team seem to speak another language, one that’s new and intriguing to the city and the Greater Toronto Area. By blending old-world heart with modern craftsmanship, style and innovation, Mizrahi Developments unveils residential structures that not only are inspiring to look at, but also challenge the industry to join in taking the city’s structures to the next level.


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Mizrahi is the creative mind behind One Bloor West, the retail and residential tower being constructed at Toronto’s most coveted intersection — Yonge and Bloor

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In 2016 Hadfield, the Canadian astronaut, released his first children’s book The Darkest Dark

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CHRIS HADFIELD CANADIAN ASTRONAUT AND AUTHOR

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hen one is presented with the rare opportunity to pick the brain of retired NASA commander Chris Hadfield, one must be diligent in RSVPing to the correct press conference — i.e., not the kids’ one. But my panic when I find myself sitting among a hundred or so little journalists-to-be quickly dissipates when I discover that this world-famous astronaut is most in his element when surrounded by wide- and starry-eyed kids. Perhaps it’s because their explosive, boundlessly open minds make the perfect container in which to pour his otherworldly wisdom. As they wait for their hero to speak, they’re all sitting on the edge of their seats like they’re about to watch Buzz Lightyear fight Darth Vader (although I imagine it would have been the same at the grown-up conference). classic caricature of a Canadian, Col. Hadfield looks kind, collected and curious — a facade that’s always complemented his role as the country’s own Dr. Manhattan, dweller of the cosmos and navigator of the dark, sparkly “beyond.” Being the first-ever Canadian astronaut to walk in space, Col. Hadfield is studied in classrooms all over the country, among the ranks of Canuck icons like Sir John A. Macdonald, Henrietta Muir Edwards and Jennie Trout. He’s the epitome of this country’s distinct approach to changing the world — that hybrid of humility and boldness that no other nation can quite seem to copy. We’re at WE Day Toronto, the event held annually by WE Charity in support of various youth initiatives around the world, and Col. Hadfield literally just stepped off the stage — after performing an electrifying duet with Gord Downie — and into the conference room. The first junior journalist asks the question that’s on every kid’s mind: what’s it like in space? “It’s like magic,” Col. Hadfield replies. “You’re

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“LET YOURSELF BE VICTORIOUS EVERY SINGLE DAY. IT’S A NICER WAY TO GO THROUGH LIFE” weightless — it’s like you can fly. And every time you look out the window, there’s another continent of the world roaring by. That’s what it’s like on a spaceship.” ol. Hadfield was raised on a farm in Sarnia, Ont. — a small-town boy with dreams that were sky-high (actually, even higher). After watching the Apollo 11 moon landing on TV, the young Hadfield sold his soul to the idea of one day spinning around the Earth in a space shuttle. He took a not-so-baby step toward that goal when he earned his glider pilot’s licence through the Royal Canadian Air Cadets at age 15, eventually becoming an RCAF fighter pilot. In 1992, he was accepted into the Canadian astronaut program by the Canadian Space Agency, and three years later he was on his first of three space flights. As of today, Col. Hadfield has spent a total of six months in space. He’s circled the world more than 2,600 times. He knows the planet like he knows his own backyard, and now that he’s back on solid

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ground — having retired after his final mission in 2012 — he looks at the world through star-studded glasses, constantly channelling the imagination of that little kid from Sarnia who gazed up at the stars and whispered to himself, “Someday.” “When I decided to do what I wanted to do, it wasn’t hard — it was impossible,” says Col. Hadfield. “It didn’t exist. There was no such thing as a Canadian astronaut. But I thought, you know, impossible things happen eventually if you really try and change who you are and put a lot of work into it.” he next junior journalist is handed the microphone. “When did you know you had changed the world, and was it enough?” (Solid question — I’d give it a nine out of 10.) Col. Hadfield ponders this a moment, and the room is overcome by a hush, as though everyone’s sifting through the man’s many accomplishments. He married his high school sweetheart. He made her, and the country, immensely proud. He was the first to make and release music from space, posting his first single “Jewel in the Night” on YouTube on Christmas Eve in 2012, during Expedition 35. He took his extraterrestrial experience, in all its mind-bending majesty, and squeezed it into a little book called You Are Here. He’s donned numerous awards, medals and other honours, from the Order of Canada to the NASA Exceptional Service Medal. “It’s really important to have a long-term plan for how you’re going to change the world, but I think the important part is to not wait until the finish line to recognize that you’ve already made a difference,” says Col. Hadfield. “Set as low a bar of victory as possible. Let yourself be victorious every single day. It’s a nicer way to go through life.” And by the looks on the faces in his crowd, he’d inspired the next generation that even in the most mundane tasks, it’s possible to reach for the stars — and to succeed.

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Cochrane recently had a highway named after him in his home province of Manitoba

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TOM COCHRANE MUSICIAN AND OFFICER OF THE ORDER OF CANADA

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he introductory drumbeats are unmistakable. So too are the opening staccato electric guitar chords and the overlapping harmonica notes. For many, these trigger subconscious cues to turn the volume on high for what has become one of the most recognized, rollicking rock songs of a generation: “Life Is a Highway.” The 1991 megahit not only propelled Canadian Tom Cochrane into a globally known musician, but helped the album from which it came, Mad Mad World, sell three million copies to date. It also earned him a Grammy nomination. Twenty-five years later, the 63-year-old is as much looking back as looking forward — a fourdecade-long career retrospective, an anniversary reboot of Mad Mad World, continued charity work and ambitious writing projects en route. Recently, that lyrical highway turned into a literal one when a section of road was named after Cochrane, leading to Lynn Lake, Man., his place of birth. “That was a cool honour,” he remarks of the homage to his song. “It’s crazy.” he local boy does good has been the culmination of some forty years in the music industry, beginning humbly with an eleven year old who sold his train set to buy his first guitar. As a young adult, stints as a cab driver, a paint shop clerk and a Sears loading dock worker were what he once called “character builders” where “you learn from and draw songs from.” By 1974, his first album Hang On to Your Resistance would be released, concurrent to taking his show on the road wherever it would take him, be it cafés, pubs or seedy bars. (Inevitably, more character building.) He’d join Red Rider in 1979 as their front man and since then has released 17 albums, the latest being 2015’s Take It Home. This year his reboot, Mad Mad World 25, is a remastered edition featuring live cuts and a demo of “Love Is a Highway” — the original version of first solo hit, before it was renamed. (There’s also a coffee table book and tour to follow.) Being one of few who have had the benefit

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“I’M A BIG BELIEVER IN SYNCHRONICITY. THINGS COME IN OUR LIFE AND IT’S UP TO YOU TO EITHER TAKE NOTE OR NOT” of being on the inside of this country’s rock music milieu for so long, Cochrane has noted an evolution of Canada’s artistic identity. Thankfully, it’s been many decades since there were just a lucky token handful of acts — Gordon Lightfoot, Joni Mitchell, Neil Young, Leonard Cohen and few others — whose work transcended the Great White North’s borders. That has given rise to a landscape described as “very diverse musically,” with art that “affects our psyche, our wonder of the world.” Overall, what’s remained consistent is “a lot of tolerance in our music, and social consciousness that’s admirable in our work. Those elements combined create a pretty strong identity in our music … allowing us to have more empathy.” Despite the radical technological shift, it hasn’t changed the goal of the gift of music: to evoke emotions, to stir passions, to provide comfort. Indeed, Cochrane’s no stranger to touching people’s hearts, or helping them through a rough patch, whether it’s through musical compositions or his long-serving charity work. n the mid-1980s, Cochrane began sponsoring a child through World Vision right after joining the collaborative famine-relief singing effort of “Tears Are Not Enough.”

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Soon after, he was invited to Africa “I’m a big believer in synchronicity,” Cochrane notes, the reason for seizing the opportunity. “Things come in our life and it’s up to you to either take note or not.” “It left a huge impression on me. My resolve to help them [World Vision] became galvanized after that; it became stronger,” Cochrane says. Since then he has travelled Africa nine times, and twice through Asia, on behalf of the charitable organization. Meanwhile, the list of volunteering for good causes doesn’t even come close to ending there. Among the many other causes he supports are Parkinson’s research, Amnesty International, War Child, Médicins Sans Frontières, Make Poverty History, World Animal Protection, The United Way and Tree Canada. These good works haven’t gone unrecognized. In 2008, Cochrane was conferred an Officer of the Order of Canada for a lifetime of charity involvement and his contribution to the arts. he National Music Centre in Calgary, in a similar vein, acknowledged the musician’s significant role in the artistic arena with its recent opening of a Tom Cochrane exhibit. “Lo and behold … people are truly interested in archival stuff that goes way back … they were really respectful and reverential about it,” Cochrane says. In an unanticipated turn, curators weren’t the only ones who found the resources compelling. Compiling these materials planted a seed in his head that there just might be enough for an autobiography. “I think it’s important for me to tell the story about where I come from, the music process and my life. I think that’s something people will be interested in, in the next year,” he notes. “I always want to be doing something new. You have to follow that instinct to write, and get stuff off of your chest.” And so, even when most people in their 60s are heading for retirement, it appears as though there’s no off-ramp to Tom Cochrane’s highway, as he continues to be an agent of change.

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PHOTO BY ANDRES HERNANDEZ

With her own collection of accessories, footwear and glasses, 95-year-old Apfel proves age is just a number

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IRIS APFEL FASHION ICON

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hances are, if you know anything about fashion, then you know the name Iris Apfel. If you don’t recognize the name, you will probably recognize the crop of silver hair, the thick-rimmed circle eyeglasses and the pop of colour from her impeccably eclectic taste in clothing and accessories. And if you’re not familiar yet, then right now is a good time to get acquainted with the fashion industry’s most senior and stylish maven, often dubbed the “rare bird in fashion,” and who refers to herself as a “geriatric starlet.” Tongue-in-cheek titles aside, our curiosity has been piqued, and we can’t get enough of the eye-candy that is her choices in bright colours, the way she matches prints, and the stack of bangles and baubles that clank and dangle from her wrists, neck and lobes. We want to know more. In her mid-nineties now, Iris Apfel’s fashion fame didn’t arrive until she was in her eighties, despite her having an interest and eye for fashion that spanned decades prior. n her early years, Apfel cultivated her creative eye through interior design and had a successful business until she and her husband started their small but prestigious fabric company. Throughout this time, Apfel gathered and collected fashion that she loved and in 2005, the Metropolitan Museum in New York decided to throw together a small exhibition of Apfel’s fashion “collection” — although she refers to it simply as “having fun with fashion.” The exhibition was very small and received almost no promotion. Yet, as it is with most beautiful and uncommon things, the eyecatching and enviable clothing collection created its own buzz and spread like wildfire. At 95 years young, we want to know where Iris Apfel gets her exuberance, spark and wit. More importantly, us “younger” people who need three cups of coffee just to make it through lunch really want to know … where does she get the energy? Since 2005, Apfel has gone on to write a book, has made numerous public appearances and has

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“IT’S IMPORTANT TO KNOW WHO YOU ARE AND BE YOURSELF, AND DON’T TRY TO BE SOMEONE ELSE” been cited as the inspiration behind a number of designers and collections. She has also started her own accessories line called Rara Avis, has a footwear brand and handbag collection, an eyeglasses line that takes after her own stylishly iconic pair, had a documentary made about her — aptly named Iris — and is a centrepiece at celeb parties and in the front row at Fashion Week. She’s working with prestigious museums on more fashion exhibitions and is heavily involved in her “fashion camp,” where she teaches youth about all aspects of fashion and the fashion business world, expanding their understandings and interests. pfel’s favourite thing about being a fashion darling is what she inspires in designers and in other women when it comes to fashion chances and personal style. She takes her role as a fashion maven with playfulness and freedom. Says Apfel, “I was never in fashion before, but I love it and I’m doing well at it and being appreciated for it, so I’m ecstatic! What makes me most happy right now is that I’m still here and I’ve been so fortunate at this age to have all of these new careers.” Some other words of wisdom from Iris Apfel

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when it comes to a happy outlook on life? Break the rules! Or, at the very least, bend them. Whether it’s in your career, in life choices or in marriage (Apfel was happily married for 67 years), she believes in being flexible and being true to who you really are. I think anytime you try to follow rules with human behaviour, you get into big problems because nobody is exactly alike. I don’t have any particular rules. Rules are meant to be broken, and every situation is different. I don’t like trends. My style hasn’t changed much over time. It’s just matured. I keep clothes that I love forever! I was married 67 years, and I still have the dress I wore with my husband Carl on our first date. It still looks as wonderful now as it did then. If you know who you are, you don’t have any violent sea changes. It’s important to know who you are and be yourself, and don’t try to be someone else. Part of learning is getting the experience that goes with the answer. When I was 19, I tried to do the things to please my family. And then I decided it was ridiculous and that I was very unhappy. I had to live with myself and not for other people. You’ve got to be happy inside.” And what about keeping that youthful enthusiasm, energy and glow? She claims that her work and fashion projects are her fountain of youth. She muses to us, “Different things make different people happy. For instance, you see all of these advertisements about retiring and going to communities where all day long you play golf and tennis and bridge and you go to dances. That would make me so miserable! But that doesn’t mean it’s not wonderful for those people. It’s all a matter of knowing who you are and what pleases you. You have to do what pleases you. There are no rules to being happy — you just have to learn to think for yourself and in some way be a free spirit. I am very busy! And that’s what I want to be doing, it’s what makes me happy.” And sometimes, amidst the noise and chaos, the truth is really as simple and quiet as that.

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FERRIS RAFAULI

FOUNDER, FERRIS RAFAULI – GRANDEUR LUXURY HOMES INC.

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“IMPORTANT TO ME IS THE PURSUIT OF CREATING STRUCTURES AND ENVIRONMENTS THAT ARE OPULENT, AWEINSPIRING AND THAT EVOKE A SPECIAL EMOTIONAL FEELING FOR ALL THAT EXPERIENCE IT, WHETHER THEY ARE PASSING THROUGH IT OR LIVING IN IT” from conceptual designs, approval processes and precision construction through to move-in and white-glove service for the life of the house.” ach home Rafauli designs is indeed a work of art in that the homes are original and creative, while incorporating and respecting the practical lifestyle requirements, wants and needs of his clients. This is a rare and unique balance, and something that Rafauli is always trying to enhance with his creative approach to elevated elegance. A signature of his designs is that they have always had a certain passion, edge and flair. “I continue to always push the envelope of

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creativity to the next level with the goal of creating designs that are relevant today and for the next 100 years, but also could have existed 100 years ago,” he says. Not unlike many other notable creative people in creative fields, Rafauli has varied and eclectic tastes when it comes to architecture, just like a Renaissance man named Goethe once had. “I enjoy many different genres, so long as the execution of the authenticity of the intended design is followed through with all layers of the design,” he says. “This includes the architecture, interior design, furniture, construction and surrounding landscaping. Hence with each project I have a passion for designing and building each and every one of these elements, because in my world, I believe it is absolutely necessary in achieving the perfect product.” And like most artists, it is his passion for the pursuit of creativity which drives him. “The truth is I am always pursuing the next ultimate level of luxury designs with each project I finish and each project I start,” he says. “Being in the world of uber-luxury, my focus is on consistency of the highest standards in design, discipline and quality.” afauli’s personal philosophy is based upon advice given to him at a very young age by his mother and his father, a philosophy which continues to guide him to this day. “I believe the simplest philosophies are the best philosophies,” he says. “To always pursue the very best within you with respect to everything that you do, as a professional and a person. Being successful as a professional is not enough, you need to work at being a successful human being as well. Usually you cannot have one without the other.” When asked by Dolce what he knows now that he wished he knew 20 years ago, Rafauli does not hesitate in his answer. “That time is the most valuable commodity and that time does indeed fly by,” he says. “The only way to control time so that is does not pass you by is to try and live a balanced and well-rounded life.”

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ohann Wolfgang von Goethe, perhaps the greatest Renaissance man since the Renaissance, once defined architecture as eine erstarrte Muzik, or “frozen music.” This statement speaks to the soul of another artist, one of the GTA’s most respected designers and builders, Ferris Rafauli, whose philosophy is “the art is the design — the science is the build.” Ferris Rafauli is an iconic architectural designer and artist who conceives, designs and builds ultra-luxury homes and lifestyle creations for elite clientele worldwide. In an exclusive interview with Dolce Magazine, he is very clear about what drives his passion for great design. “I enjoy creating spaces that inspire and arouse all the senses, yet still remain true to classic and formal architecture with strict discipline and arrangement,” he says. “Important to me is the pursuit of creating structures and environments that are opulent, awe-inspiring and that evoke a special emotional feeling for all that experience it, whether they are passing through it or living in it.” his game-changer’s name has been synonymous with iconic designs and precision construction of some of the most notable and luxurious estate homes in Canada for more than 15 years. It has been said that great architecture invites people in, and from his headquarters in Oakville, Rafauli involves himself in every aspect of his projects to ensure they deliver that ultimate combination of not only great architecture, but beauty as well. “High design is one element of beauty, with the other element being the high level of construction and precision required to translate the beauty of the design seamlessly. The two are married and one cannot live without the other,” Rafauli says. “This has contributed to my success as the end product is seamless, from luxurious and opulent creative designs that I create through to precision construction that I execute. This results in the ultimate experience I provide my clients,


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Rafauli is the designer behind Sher Club — Drake’s exclusive lounge in the ACC

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XX changemakers

LARRY ROSEN CEO, HARRY ROSEN INC.

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“I WISH I HAD FORESEEN THE MAGNITUDE TO WHICH THE INTERNET, ELECTRONIC DEVICES AND MOBILE COMMUNICATIONS WOULD IMPACT OUR WORLD”

“Dad is 85 and full of life and energy and he truly is one of a kind, they broke the mould with him,” says Larry. “The best piece of advice he ever gave me was to not expect to be him, to be my own type of leader and CEO. I very much took that to heart, it would never have been possible to be ‘mini Harry,’ and trying to be exactly like a one-of-a-kind personality would never have worked with me.” hangemakers in our world have that innate ability to influence and lead, almost as if they have a different take on the world and their place in it. When you speak to Larry and listen carefully, he rarely talks about “selling clothes” — not what you would expect from a clothier. This reflects how he describes his business. “We’re in the business of assisting men in

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developing a confident personal image for any time, any place or any occasion,” he says. “And you’ll notice there is nothing about selling clothes in that description. It’s about image. We’d all love to say image doesn’t matter but in reality it does. So we’re in the business of assisting men to develop that confident personal image that assists them in so many different aspects of their lives.” ne of Larry’s most passionate beliefs is in building long-term relationships — with customers, vendors, suppliers, banks, landlords and every other person his business touches. “We developed a mission statement a few years ago,” says Larry. “Our statement was, ‘To inspire long-term relationships based upon loyalty, expertise and trust,’ and we live that every day. We invest in training of our clothing advisors, as we like to call them, and I would submit there is probably no other retailer in the world that trains its people as much as we do and it makes a huge difference.” The future is bright for Harry Rosen, with a major renovation of the Bloor Street store planned, some work in other stores across Canada, possibly some acquisitions and, Larry says, international expansion is on the horizon. They are also working on a ‘Virtual Harry’ initiative, whereby their busy customers who don’t have time to come into the store can chat online with their personal clothing advisor. When asked if there was something he wished he knew 20 years ago, Larry replies as so many of us have: “I wish I had foreseen the magnitude to which the Internet, electronic devices and mobile communications would impact our world.” The qualities of Larry Rosen and the Harry Rosen business can best be summed up by having an absolute inner sense of retailing, a passion about the customer and the ability to spot trends before they happen. As it’s been said before, “there’s just something about Harry.”

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hen you think about it, there are very few retailers recognized across Canada by just a single person’s name, and when you mention the name “Harry,” most people immediately think of Harry Rosen, the internationally famous men’s clothier. For the past 20 years, Harry Rosen has been run by his son Larry, who (after a brief stint as a lawyer) joined the company as his father was starting a countrywide expansion. In 1997, Larry took over as president and COO, and in 2000 he became CEO of this most iconic Canadian retailer. “I have been a buyer for the company, ran the company’s marketing and was vice president of corporate affairs,” says Larry. “And in retrospect, I’m very grateful I experienced so many different aspects of the company and am able to work with so many outstanding executives. In fact, of our 900 full-time employees, we have 85 who have been with us for more than 25 years and we are very proud of that.” But what makes Harry Rosen so successful and a staple of Canadian retailing for so many decades when so many other stores have simply disappeared? Perhaps it’s the unique understanding of the business and the customer that is the Harry difference. “Of all businesses out there, retail is the most changing because the consumer is always changing in the way they want to shop and react to merchandise and fashion,” says Larry. “Our brand is about men and understanding men, but men can be 22 or 65, so we have to understand all aspects of their lives and the various stages of their lives, and I think we do that as well as anyone.” eing the son of the founder of the company, and one of Canada’s most famous men over the last 50 years, is something Larry embraces — and it is clear by how he speaks about his father he has the utmost respect for him.


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Rosen was awarded 2014’s Distinguished Retailer of the Year by the Retail Council of Canada, a committee of peers in the Canadian retail industry

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Mantella’s passion for fashion is evident, but her dedication to wildlife showcases her true compassion

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XX changemakers

SYLVIA MANTELLA

PHILANTHROPIST, BRAND MANAGER OF MANTELLA CORPORATION AND CO-FOUNDER OF THE MANTELLA ANIMAL RESCUE AND ADOPTION SANCTUARY

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or Sylvia Mantella, fashion is more than just surface level. “There are many layers to fashion and it’s a very personal thing. I think it’s an outlet for how you feel and how you want to be seen. I dress from one end of the spectrum in jeans and boots, to the other with huge, shiny ball gowns. I think your fashion choices are a way to express yourself, feel empowered and be confident.” Mantella, brand manager at Mantella Corporation, hates the words ‘fashionista’ and ‘socialite’ as they brand people in an untruthful way. And while this influential woman with an infectious smile and natural glow looks every bit the glamorous socialite, she has taken the opportunities she’s been blessed with and shown us that she’s not afraid to use her spotlight as a platform. She’s been called the Fashion Queen of Toronto, and she can be found at fashion weeks in New York, Paris and Milan, proudly wearing stunning designs by Canadian designers such as Mikhael Kale and Greta Constantine. Mantella confides in us that the reason she loves to wear Canadian designers is because of how sad she was to have seen Toronto Fashion Week go and with it, the loss of a platform for so many talented Canadians. Since people take notice of what she’s wearing, this proud Canadian likes to be noticed in headturning Canadian names. hile Mantella’s passion for fashion is evident, her dedication to her wildlife sanctuary showcases true compassion and is where she manifests her opportunities with philanthropy. What started with fostering a baby sloth quickly grew into a lifelong mission. Mantella and her husband, Robert, ended up purchasing a 20-acre estate in Florida, which they converted into a licensed and USDA-regulated animal sanctuary. Complete with full-time, licensed zoologists and an on-site veterinarian clinic, it now houses and cares for a variety of wild and exotic animals, from tigers and hyenas to elephants and rhinos

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“[THE ANIMALS] ARE LIKE MY CHILDREN. I CARE FOR THEM AND WORRY ABOUT THEM AND WHEN THE ANIMAL COMES TO OUR SANCTUARY THEY ARE HERE FOR LIFE” — which she can monitor from anywhere in the world, thanks to the sanctuary’s 140 surveilance cameras. Scrolling through Mantella’s Instagram page (@sylviamantella), it’s easy to get lost in all the amazing pictures of her wearing the latest couture and rubbing elbows with A-list celebrities. But there are also pictures of her fresh-faced and dressed down (“it’s the most stripped-down version of me and I love it”), nuzzling up to wolves and various big cats, koalas and baby monkeys. But as quickly as she can rattle off a list of designer names and celebrities, she is also extremely knowledgeable on the facts and numbers around the problems our wildlife population is having. It’s a true calculation when they say that there will be more no more tigers by 2020,” she says

sadly. “Twenty-five thousand elephants are slaughtered annually for their tusks, 90 per cent of the rhino population was wiped out in the 1970s and to this day there are less than 2,500 rhinos left in the entire world.” As amazing as a life of frolicking with lions and sunbathing with cheetahs may seem to be, it’s not all glamour and fun. A team of trained experts always has to be on hand, Mantella explains, adding that being alert and observant with the animals is a must at all times. But as dangerous as the work can be, Mantella is in it for the long haul. “They’re like my children. I care for them and worry about them and when the animal comes to our sanctuary they are here for life. There is the option of releasing them back to the wild, but with hunting and poaching at higher numbers than ever, it’s not something that we want to risk. So they stay with us for life, and we care for them and make sure they have a good quality of life.” esides her animal rescue sanctuary and work with exotic animals, Mantella is involved in a number of organizations and foundations. Most recently she hosted and was on the board of the AMBI Gala; she co-chairs CANFAR, which successfully raised $1.2 million in just one night at its last event; and she extends her fundraising abilities by collaborating with the Boost Child & Youth Advocacy Centre’s Butterfly Ball, with proceeds going toward eliminating child abuse and violence. She also works closely with Scrubs in the City, which is currently trying to raise half a million dollars for a new MRI machine for the Hospital for Sick Children. She also co-founded the Judy Mantella Foundation with her husband to honour her sister-in-law who passed away from breast cancer, and to help others coping with the disease. Living a life of glitz and glam aside, Mantella breaks the socialite stereotypes with her awareness and action on a number of issues that need a voice or support, along with her willingness to fully involve herself and utilize her opportunities for the greater good.

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Dr. Gupta believes entrepreneurs are born, not made. Currently EGH is a multidisciplinary real estate company with 30 hotels across Ontario and Quebec

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DR. STEVE GUPTA PRESIDENT AND CEO, EASTON’S GROUP OF HOTELS

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e sat down with Dr. Steve Gupta for a quick cup of coffee in the lobby of one of his many hotels. A selfproclaimed entrepreneur with the businesses and buildings to back it up, we want to know how he took a truck stop on the corner of the 401 and turned it into a multidisciplinary real estate company, Easton’s Group of Hotels. r. Gupta laughs and promises to try to condense a 36-year timespan into a few minutes, starting with: “I believe that entrepreneurs are born, not made. And I am a true entrepreneur.” Dr. Gupta states that he always knew that he wanted to have his own business and work for himself, not “someone else.” What started as a visit to England and Canada turned into the decision to stay in Canada and start his own business venture, despite discouragement from friends and family (which included warnings that he’d most likely get frostbite in the freezing Canadian winters). Undeterred, Dr. Gupta made his way over and went immediately for his real estate licence. He was denied due to not having resided in Canada for long enough, but his entrepreneur mindset did not let that be an obstacle and he immediately went for an insurance sales licence, passing all the required IQ and other testing. But then what? He was brand new to the country and didn’t know anyone. “Who do you sell insurance to when you don’t know anyone?” Dr. Gupta muses. It was a slow process of knocking on doors and even having a few doors slammed in his face. But he trudged onward with a goal in mind and after a year, he became the top salesman for the branch and had “won” a first-class ticket to San Diego for a conference. In this instance, Dr. Gupta shows that he’s not just an astute business man but quite possibly the ideal husband as well, sharing that he traded that firstclass ticket in for two economy-class tickets instead,

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“IT’S ABOUT BUILDING RELATIONSHIPS AND THE MARK YOU LEAVE ON PEOPLE. THEY NEED TO FEEL TOUCHED AND TO REMEMBER YOU”

just to make sure he could have his wife by his side. hile becoming the top insurance salesperson, Dr. Gupta always kept his eyes open for real estate and property that he could afford to get his hands on and in ’79, he closed the deal and opened up the gas station that started it all for this real estate conglomerate. This wasn’t just a cut-and-dry and impersonal business deal, however. In fact, Dr. Gupta purchased it from two brothers who had done a superb job with running the gas station. The two brothers, named Easton, stayed on after the change of ownership to continue running the gas station and became good friends with Dr. Gupta — with their name being the inspiration behind the Easton’s Group of Hotels. During the interview, Dr. Gupta’s pride in his

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children and family are evident. His children began working with him while they were in junior high. “They were on payroll when they were young,” Dr. Gupta explains. “Everybody must feel rewarded for what they’re doing.” r. Steve Gupta’s philosophy on treating business relationships like friends and family undoubtedly applies to his actual family as well, and he speaks on the importance of listening and giving unconditionally rather than denying or attaching conditions. “When you start putting conditions, ‘I did this for you, you do this for me,’ where is the love? Where is the sacrifice? Where is the unity? Where’s the affection? It’s not there. If you feel money is important, you’ll fight for money; if you feel our unity and relationship is important, you’ll say the money doesn’t matter.” As a young immigrant with no more than just his dreams and a disciplined ability to selfmotivate, no connections or resources, and yet the only Canadian to launch three new hotels during the recession, there’s got to be a secret to what seems to be Dr. Gupta’s Midas Touch. But while luck and timing may play a small part in the larger sequence of events, instead it’s Dr. Gupta’s extremely simple and relatable approach to people and sincere interactions that is the true reason he’s been able to build a successful empire. On his philosophy on owning businesses, general interactions and why he’s been successful, “It’s about building relationships and the mark you leave on people. They need to feel touched and to remember you. That’s the key. The people I work with, that work for me … there needs to be a chemistry. If there isn’t, then we may do the one deal but then afterwards, I walk away.” And with every working relationship being treated as a personal one, Easton’s Group of Hotels has grown to the point that Canada can look forward at having its own Marriott or Hilton hotel dynasty. And much like the Hilton and Marriott groups, it truly is a family affair.

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XX changemakers

JEANNE BEKER

STYLE EDITOR, THE SHOPPING CHANNEL AND MEDIA PERSONALITY

“IF YOU LOVE PEOPLE, OBVIOUSLY YOU’RE GOING TO LOVE FASHION, BECAUSE [IT’S] A GREAT FORM OF SELFEXPRESSION”

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Those visionary qualities showed themselves again in 1979, when Beker introduced The NewMusic to the screen. “Putting music on television in that way was unheard of. And this was pre-MTV, remember.” The five-minute entertainment reports that she and J.D. Roberts would put together every night on the 6 and 10 o’clock news broke the ice for the surge of infotainment that is now so prevalent in our culture. n her opinion, that same media landscape she saw success in has morphed into something “totally different” today. “You used to have to go somewhere with a whole production crew of people to gather your story,” she recalls. “Now you can become your own reporter if you’ve got a Twitter and Instagram account.” Beker has taken the transformations of the media landscape in stride throughout her career,

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always managing to stay ahead of the tide. Her influence on the international fashion scene has perhaps been her biggest accomplishment to date, with the reasoning behind first entering the industry being exactly what you’d expect from Beker: “If you love people, obviously you’re going to love fashion, because fashion is a great form of self-expression.” eker figured out what she wanted her career to look like a long time ago. She’s made that vision a reality, innovating wherever she feels she can insert her passion of communicating with people. “I’ve kept interested just by really concentrating on my love of people and my intrigue with the human condition. It’s the very thing that would compel any storyteller to keep on telling stories.” Perhaps her love for people shines through most fiercely in her famed interviews. Whether it’s actors, designers, musicians or entrepreneurs, Beker has captivated her audience by finding out where her subjects “live” while interviewing them. “Not physically,” she jokes, “just kind of where they’re at. I want them to feel at ease and give me a look at the best possible facets of themselves that they could present.” In her mind, an interviewer’s role is “to merely be a storyteller there to facilitate their story.” So what’s next in the story of Jeanne Beker? It sounds like 2017 will be a year of reintroduction for the 2014 Order of Canada appointee. “I’m working with Bell Media in reinvigorating our archives. We’re going to dust them off, digitize and repurpose them and bring them back in new and exciting ways. We want to be able to continue telling the story of fashion and how it’s evolved over, certainly, these past 30-odd years, and how it will continue to evolve beyond.” Even today, Beker’s passion — communicating people’s stories — continues to shine through and fuel her desires. To this media magnate, that is what makes the world tick, and she has no plans to stop telling those stories anytime soon.

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ursuing your passion is a noble endeavour. There’s excitement that comes with discovering what you were meant to do, and actively working to make that passion a reality is a feat worthy of praise. The resolve, persistence and courage it takes to make your passion a reality is what gives that venture the respect it deserves. No one knows that better than Jeanne Beker. As a journalist, media personality and fashion entrepreneur, the famed Fashion Television host has pushed to build an illustrious career by bringing together the two variables of that elusive winning formula: passion and determination. That’s why Jeanne Beker is one of Dolce Magazine’s top 20 influencers. er long and esteemed career started to find its footing when, at 16, she landed an acting gig on CBC’s Toby. From there, she fell in love with media and connecting with people. That was where she discovered her passion. “I just love people,” she explains when asked about her chosen career path. “If you love people, you’re going to love communication, and the art and craft of communication.” That early realization is what launched Beker’s career, giving her the determination to find a niche in the media industry and begin building the illustrious career she has today. The first of a long list of demonstrations showcasing Beker’s resolve took place when she was just breaking into the industry, in St. John’s, Nfld., and was interested in reporting on the arts. This was generally a new concept in the ’70s, and the CBC didn’t have a foothold in the market. Beker saw an opportunity and sprang for it: “I talked my way into the radio station to create a consumer’s show. I thought, I know a lot about the arts, maybe they can approach arts as a consumer subject, like, is it worth it to spend five bucks on that new record? So I really sort of wormed my way into CBC Radio that way.”


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Beker is working with Bell Media to make vibrant use of the company’s rich media archive

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XX changemakers

SUSUR LEE

CHEF, RESTAURANTEUR AND TV PERSONALITY

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“I’M VERY FORTUNATE TO HAVE MY KIDS [BE] PART OF THE BUSINESS. WE HAVE BOTH A CHEF AND FATHER RELATIONSHIP, AND SHARE PASSION FOR THE BUSINESS AND THE FOOD.” moment and sitting back in awe of his kids, saying “they’ve got it” as they overcome the multitude of unexpected challenges the restaurant industry throws at you on a daily basis. For the internationally acclaimed chef in a career flush with awe-worthy moments, this is easily what he is most proud of. “I get up every day and get excited by planning a menu, or trying something new.” There isn’t a mundane moment to be had. He is either pushing a boundary or finding a new flavour combination to be explored. The details that help make a restaurant experience special, from unexplored culinary combinations to restaurant atmosphere to possible flower arrangements on each and every table, help him stay focused. He calls them the “Little Big Things,” adding, “It’s hard work, but I love it.” As a face of Toronto’s restaurant scene for over 20 years, there’s no question Lee has had a significant impact on this city’s position as a global

culinary destination. His passion for his family’s hometown is undeniable: “I love Toronto, and I love Canada. This is my way of giving back to this city and my customers.” Ultimately, he wants Toronto to be a must-visit hot spot for foodies the world over. What he sees now among younger generations is an interest in food that goes beyond merely what the menu says: “They are really interested in food these days, educating themselves about both the restaurant culture and food. It’s really great to see.” To stay on top of those trends, Lee — and his family — make it a priority to travel and continue learning about global cuisine by “getting lost in the culture of a city and taking in restaurant concepts and influential styles anywhere we can.” ne appetite that seems never to be satiated is Lee’s own; he is constantly trying to discover new ways to please customers. What’s next for the celebrity chef? He’s keeping his cards close to the chest, but a new restaurant is coming up the pipeline with his favourite business partners. “I’m working on a new project with my sons” is all the details he’ll spare. “I cannot say more yet.” He will also be celebrating the 10-year anniversary of his stylish watering hole Lee in the new year. Rather than revelling in the muchdeserved spotlight, he will be inviting worldrenowned chefs to come celebrate with him and join in on the festivities by cooking for a few lucky patrons. He sees more value in sharing his triumphs with friends, celebrating the joy of food alongside passionate colleagues, rather than celebrating himself. This is why the master chef hailing from Hong Kong has been so successful. It is also why, rather than his success in becoming a TV personality and world-renowned master chef, what he is most proud of in his life is being able to watch his sons succeed. Mum’s the word on which celebrity chefs Lee will invite to his celebration. All he is willing to say is that some “really great chefs” will be surrounding him. You can bet his family will too.

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t is no secret that Susur Lee is one of, if not the most prominent culinary icon Canada has ever known. From his humble beginnings as a 16-year-old apprentice in Hong Kong’s Peninsula Hotel, the man extolled by Food and Wine Magazine as one of the “Ten Chefs of the Millennium” in 2000 hasn’t taken his foot off the gas pedal since, and has built an influential restaurant empire worthy of global recognition. Today, the gastronomic extraordinaire boasts six world-renowned restaurants, five of which call Toronto home — Lee, Bent, Luckee, Fring’s and Lee Kitchen at Pearson International Airport — while simultaneously juggling various television appearances, most notably as a judge on Food Network Canada’s scrupulous and painstaking Chopped Canada. He has risen to fame through a tireless workrate, uncapped creative passion and extraordinary love of food that has resonated with countless hungry customers the world over. If you ask him today how he continues push culinary boundaries, exploring new flavours at every turn, he would respond with one word: family. o know Susur Lee is to know those who stand both behind and beside him. With a list of accomplishments anyone would be envious of, his answer to, “What are you most proud of in your career?” may not be exactly what you expect: “My sons” is the reply, quickly followed with, “I’m very fortunate to have my kids [be] part of the business and helping make decisions. We have both a chef and father relationship, and share passion for the business and for the food.” Back when Levi (now 26) and Kai (24) were kids, Lee jokes how he used to babysit them in the kitchen at his restaurant. “They used to make pizza dough on the floor in the kitchen while I cooked.” Today, they follow in their father’s footsteps, making crucial business decisions both in and out of the kitchen, standing tall side by side with their now business partner/father. After playing such a crucial role in the success of family-backed restaurant Bent on Dundas West, Lee often finds himself getting lost in the


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Lee is the mastermind behind Toronto restaurants Bent, Lee, Fring’s and many other widely loved cuisine hubs

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Kelly has more than 400,000 Twitter followers — six times the number of city constituents he serves

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XX changemakers

NORM KELLY

TORONTO CITY COUNCILLOR AND GOVERNOR GENERAL’S AWARD RECIPIENT

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orm Kelly, Toronto’s former standin mayor, is a Twitter virtuoso, a chum of rapper Drake, a former parliamentarian, a teacher, a historian, the inspiration behind a clothing line called We the Norm, and a former Realtor. A Renaissance man, of sorts. The household name recognition, though, came in large part from assuming a role in the wake of another politician’s notoriety. t the zenith of the Rob Ford scandals, City Council in Nov. 2013 voted to shift many of the mayor’s powers to Kelly, the deputy mayor, until a new council took office a year hence. As the mayor in Ford’s absence, Kelly was thrust into the spotlight. Among the first order of business in his new role was to reach out using social media, presenting the Twitterverse with an array of informative tips, wit — and even refereeing a hip-hop quarrel. “When I became de facto mayor of Toronto I made a conscious decision to be more engaged online. Tons of politicians have social media channels but they come with a robotic and cold tone. I wanted to be more ‘human’ and show people that we have lives and opinions outside of politics.” That “humanization” he sought worked like a charm, and probably better. Just prior to becoming deputy mayor in 2013, he had 1,200 Twitter followers — today, the count exceeds 400,000 (six times the number of city constituents he actually serves). So impressed were they by his clever social outreach that Twitter Canada last year voted him Canada’s Most Valuable Tweeter. It certainly helped Kelly’s profile that he rode on the coattails of two celebrities: Toronto rapper Drake and American rapper Meek Mill. The two artists sniped at each other on Twitter in the summer of 2015, with Kelly poking in with his own two cents. Jumping into the fray helped Kelly became the social media “it” boy (or man), the topic of a myriad of internet memes, while simultaneously

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“TONS OF POLITICIANS HAVE SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS BUT THEY COME WITH A ROBOTIC AND COLD TONE. I WANTED TO BE MORE ‘HUMAN’”

(and bizarrely) developing his own cred in hiphop circles. And while Drake fist-pumped Kelly, Kelly high-fived Drake, who in turn helped Toronto boost its image. “Drake has raised Toronto’s profile internationally. And people, who visit us as a result, fall in love with us and tell all their friends and family,” Kelly notes. Not a bad cost-free publicity initiative. Legend has it that during his teaching days, Kelly would often arrange desks in rows that emulated parliament seating, ruling government and opposition facing each other, requiring students to stand (like MPs do) when asking a question. t’s no surprise, then, that the political history major launched into politics, in 1974, elected alderman of Scarborough (a one-time

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suburb of Toronto). Six years later, he moved to federal politics, winning a seat as a Liberal in Scarborough Centre. While a Member of Parliament during Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau’s purview, he led the Special Committee on Visible Minorities in Canadian Society. It was on that committee he helped draft the report Equality Now, with 80 propositions to enhance life for visible minorities. fter losing his seat in 1984, he spent a decade in real estate, learning the fine art of negotiating, making deals, and bringing people of varying needs together — skills that would invariably be revisited in a different milieu with his renewed political career in the 1994 municipal elections. Though he championed multiculturalism in the 1980s, in the ’90s he took a fiscally conservative view of funding programs to promote it. Reports say that he believed the multicultural experiment did more to divide than unite Canadians. Still, a uniter at heart, he was an early proponent of the “megacity” — the merging of Toronto with five suburbs. In that spirit, too, disparate parts of the city have benefited from his efforts over the years, from his involvement in rejuvenating Regent Park to initiating the renewal of Billy Bishop Airport in downtown Toronto. Kelly keeps his plate full — sitting on scores of committees and boards, including the economic development committee and the boards of Toronto Centre for the Arts, the Canadian National Exhibition and the Toronto Symphony Orchestra. With the benefit of four decades of public service, combined with his common touch of today’s generation, Norm Kelly is uniquely qualified to offer young, budding politicianhopefuls some choice advice: “Don’t put your foot in the water, jump in! There are tons of opportunities for anyone to get involved. You can volunteer on a campaign, intern in an office or simply set up a meeting with a politician in your area and voice your desire to get involved.”

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PHOTO COURTESY OF LORI MORRIS DESIGNS

Morris is inspired by designers like Dolce&Gabbana, and appreciates the parallels between fashion and interior design

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XX changemakers

LORI MORRIS FOUNDER, HOUSE OF LMD™

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arrying classic with modern, or Zen with glam, renowned interior designer Lori Morris has no rules when it comes to bringing spaces to life — two periods or styles can absolutely coexist in perfect harmony when she is at the helm of a project. Morris became intrigued by interior design at a young age, and she hasn’t looked back since her very first project: designing her bedroom at the tender age of 10. She studied at the International Academy of Merchandising and Design in Toronto and founded Lori Morris Designs (LMD) in 1987. ith nearly 30 years of experience in the industry, this creative maven has developed a style all her own and has banished the traditional boundaries of design. “You can’t have any limits or boundaries to your creative process,” says Morris, “because then, if that’s the case, you can’t really express a true vision of artistry.” Her firm is an extension of her vision and mandate for bespoke design and limitless creativity. Perhaps this is why the Dundas, Ontario native finds herself jet-setting from the Greater Toronto Area to Miami and everywhere in between. Morris’s clientele is drawn to her innate ability to cultivate breathtaking spaces — think marblecarved fireplaces, stunning inlays and brass accents, plus unique décor and statement pieces to boot. Morris says working abroad is exciting because of the creative energy that each new environment imparts — whether it’s the lush green landscape of Muskoka, where LMD opened up it’s newest branch to better service cottage clientele, or the breezy blue Gulf Coast. Interestingly enough, Morris draws inspiration from design of all genres — package, landscape, architectural, but most of all fashion design. Dolce&Gabbana is one of her favourites, but it’s not a piece of clothing or particular collection that grabs her attention, it’s the undeniable parallel between interior design and fashion. “I love that

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“I’M ALWAYS STARTING THE TREND, NOT FOLLOWING THE TREND. SOMETIMES WHEN YOU’RE A TRENDSETTER YOU GET NERVOUS THAT IT’S NOT RIGHT OR WON’T BE ACCEPTED, [BUT] I’M SO MUCH MORE CONFIDENT ABOUT EVERYTHING” they see design very similarly to the way I do — the mixtures of the textures and the patterns and the layers,” says Morris. “I’ll look at some fabulous couture gown that they have made and I’ll think to myself, ‘Oh, that looks like my drapery,’” she laughs. Even with her “sky’s the limit” approach to executing a design, Morris always considers the client’s vision first and foremost. “If I feel a client is making a wrong decision in the process I will

guide them accordingly, but I will not influence them to enjoy a style that is not within their comfort zone.” Morris describes LMD’s process as streamlined, with a hands-on approach from inception to completion. Like any craft, it takes years to learn from the obstacles that come with being fresh in the industry — especially when you enter with a vision as unique as Morris’s. “I’m always starting the trend, not following the trend. Sometimes when you’re a trendsetter you get nervous that it’s not right or won’t be accepted,” says Morris. However, it’s not something she bothers to think twice about anymore. “I’m so much more confident about everything.” he out-of-the-box visionary loves and embraces the unique approach that sets her apart in the industry. Morris admits that her field is very emotionally driven, so one must always be passionately involved. “I think if you’re not it shows in your work,” says Morris. “For me, every little detail is my concern — whether it be the end of a hinge on a door, to the handle, to every seven-layer fringe on the pillow,” says Morris, “I need to know that everything is perfect.” Although she hasn’t tried her hand at another artistic medium just yet, Morris feels like she would be a good painter. The designer frequently scours the globe for the perfect pieces to add the finishing touch on her clients’ spaces, so she definitely has an eye for fine art. Morris admits that, in any facet of her life, whenever she’s exposed to any other creative elements it always helps to stimulate her own creative process. Through her love of layers and comprehensive design, Morris is sure to continue to produce spaces that stand the test of time for years to come. “What keeps me striving more is just my pure innate love for design and creativity as an artist,” says Morris. “I’m always creating.” Morris is excited to share that she and her team are currently working on launching an LMD line of furniture, textiles and décor for the world to enjoy.

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XX changemakers

DR. BARRY RUBIN MEDICAL DIRECTOR, PETER MUNK CARDIAC CENTRE

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“WE HAVE PATIENTS WHO HAVE BICYCLED FROM HAMILTON TO TORONTO WITH THE HEART PUMP STORED BENEATH THE BICYCLE SEAT. TRULY INSPIRATIONAL, AMAZING STORIES” Thus far, some 45 projects have been funded. One of them was a non-surgical procedure to fix the main valve of the heart, called the aortic valve. Rather than making a 12-inch incision down the breastbone with a saw, an invasive procedure — “and not for everybody” — today, a needle can be placed in the groin to replace the heart valve. ecause investors stepped up with $1 million to study the effectiveness of 40 valves — at $25,000 apiece — the government of Ontario was able to recognize the success and greenlit an additional $3 million a year in funding for these valves. In other words, that initial $1-million investment resulted in a yearly government fund of three times that. With the heart being where his heart is, Dr. Rubin also notes other “radical changes” in treating cardiac issues while working alongside the McEwen Centre for Regenerative Medicine. It is, he says, one of the leading places for stem cell therapies. “Now, when someone has a heart attack, you can’t fix the part of the heart that died — but you can make the rest of the heart work better,” he explains. White blood cells can now be turned into

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stem cells to reanimate dead heart tissues. The issue takes on more importance when statistics come in: heart disease is the leading cause of death worldwide, the second in Canada after cancer. s a member of the Health Canada scientific advisory committee on cardiovascular medical devices, he’s in a unique position to be “in the know” with all things heart-related. “There have been so many advances in so many areas, especially in mechanical heart support — a heart pump to keep them alive. We have patients who have bicycled from Hamilton to Toronto with the heart pump stored beneath the bicycle seat. People got married when they were in the ICU on a heart pump. They went on to have families. Truly inspirational, amazing stories,” he says. Meanwhile, as there’s an eye to the future of medical advances, Dr. Rubin is helping ensure there’s enough medical practitioners to serve us in the future. For the past decade he has served on the Provincial Academic Medicine Steering Committee, representing six thousand doctors in the 17 teaching hospitals in Ontario. Through his lobbying, the Ministry of Health injected a quarter-billion more dollars into the system to ensure an adequate supply of doctors. A pressing need, given the swell about to occur in the province’s aging population. Currently, there are some 30 thousand practising doctors who attended teaching hospitals in Ontario, a recent uptick of a third because of the funding, according to Dr. Rubin. “The teaching hospitals are where the majority of the research occurs, where patients are cared for and improve their care. To be able to support that kind of activity is great.” Notwithstanding the balancing acts of patients, doctors, funders, committees and government, or the high pressure and high stakes of life-and-death situations, for Dr. Rubin there’s a simple “why” to it all. “You do this because you love it, because you can make a difference in patients’ lives and the lives of their families. It’s gratifying. It’s a career, not a job.”

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ying on the operating room table is a 96-year-old man — wide awake, as it happens — whose aneurysm is being fixed by Dr. Barry Rubin. The next day, out of the hospital and like nothing happened, the patient sends a photo of himself practising his golf swing in his apartment. This is, as they say, par for the course of the impact that Dr. Rubin has on people’s lives. “The type of surgery I do is life- and limbthreatening. A broken blood vessel, you fix it, and there’s no feeling like it,” he explains. Whether on an individual level, a hospital level or province-wide, it’s not an exaggeration to say that millions of people have benefited, in some form, from Dr. Rubin’s career. While also a professor of surgery at the University of Toronto, since 2010, he has been the medical director of the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre (PMCC) at University Health Network, where breakthrough discoveries have been made in genetics, cardiac drug treatments and cardiac disease management. The old saying goes, “You almost never see the beaver, but you always see the dam.” The doer is in the background, while the results are in the foreground. That holds true for the Innovation Fund, a groundbreaking endeavour led by Dr. Rubin at PMCC. n a cash-strapped health system with few resources for experimentation, a committee of investors have been corralled to help fund new processes or medical devices. It’s been referred to as something of a Dragons’ Den-esque interaction, with pitches, evaluations and capital. “Because of the donors, we can constantly try out new technologies, and be in a position to move the field forward and change the way patients are cared for,” he notes. “Businesspeople know a winner when they see it.” According to Dr. Rubin, half of the committee are from the health care industry and half from the business world — with the input of “thousands of people to tell us what’s new and innovative.”


PHOTO BY MAX JAMALI

For the past decade Dr.Rubin has served on the Provincial Academic Medicine Steering Committee, representing six thousand doctors

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XX changemakers

JAWAD RATHORE FOUNDER AND CEO, FORTRESS REAL DEVELOPMENTS

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“IF YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TEAM THAT IS PASSIONATE AND COMMITTED, YOU CAN ADAPT TO ANY CHANGE AND SUCCEED” “There’s an old expression, ‘No one ever knows how to give so much, as someone who has had so little,’” says Rathore, a Toronto native who was born to a lower-middle-class family. When his company became successful, there was no question — he and his business partner Vince Petrozza were going to start giving back as much as possible. athore recently spent a night on the streets of Toronto with nothing more than a cardboard box and sleeping bag for the Covenant House Executive Sleep Out. Not only does he participate annually to help raise awareness for homeless youth, he also sits on the executive committee for the event. Rathore also proudly spearheads several other campaigns across the country, including the Children’s Wish Foundation, North York Harvest Food Bank and Canadian Muslim Vote. For Rathore, giving back is not about writing a cheque to the big, faceless charities and turning the other cheek — “it’s about really getting involved

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with grassroots programs and understanding what our money is going to do and how it’s being put to work,” he says. Sports and athletics are also something very near and dear to Rathore’s heart. “There’s a lot of parallel between sports and business — great life lessons can be learned through sports, teamwork, perseverance and hard work.” Fortress supports a number of programs across Canada that give underprivileged youth the opportunity to take part in sports while integrating into the community in a constructive way. is positivity is as contagious as his generosity. I ask Rathore if he’s ever considered giving lectures to youth, to encourage and inspire young minds considering entrepreneurship. Rathore explains that he is happy to impart his wise words onto anyone who is willing to listen. Like most entrepreneurs, he has much to say about the hard work and dedication required to become successful — it truly doesn’t happen overnight. With the economic landscape moving faster than ever before, and with technology at the forefront of most businesses, Rathore suggests a few strategies for success. First and foremost, he encourages young entrepreneurs to stay true to their passion no matter what. “One line my dad said to me was ‘never let a win go to your head, or a loss go to your heart,’” says Rathore. “I think it’s a great message about staying on course and finding something that you believe in very passionately.” Most importantly, Rathore reflects on something he wishes he knew at the start of his career. He stresses that having the right people is more important than having the perfect idea. “Strategy will shift and evolve over time as markets and buyer patterns constantly change,” he says. “If you have the right team that is passionate and committed, you can adapt to any change and succeed.”

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ith an impressive portfolio of over 70 projects in 10 major markets and five provinces across the country, Jawad Rathore, president and CEO of Fortress Real Developments, is one of the most influential businessmen in the Greater Toronto Area. As we begin our interview, I can’t help but sense a calmness in Rathore’s voice. Being at the helm of a billion-dollar company, I wouldn’t have blamed him for rushing the call along — but he didn’t. Rathore made me feel like our conversation was more than just another appointment on his iCal, which he graciously praises his executive assistant for keeping organized. That’s a good businessman, or maybe it’s the good father in him — a true listener. Rathore and his wife have six beautiful children under the age of eight, with the girls dominating the clan 6:2. “I will literally never stop working,” he jokes. he development giant began his journey in 2001, fresh out of York University, and his success spiralled into what Fortress is today: a leading development company with a focus on evaluating and executing real estate opportunities with strong optics in prime areas. His venture brought something new to the table in the world of real estate and development. Today, Fortress has partnered with over 25 builders across the country and boasts more than 10 thousand units in its portfolio. One of the numbers Rathore is particularly proud of is the 22-thousand-plus jobs he’s created from the projects that Fortress has helped catalyze. Although his entrepreneurial success is nothing short of inspiring, it’s Rathore’s heart of gold and philanthropic ambition that really set this businessman apart from the rest. There is much excitement in Rathore’s voice as he tells me about the charity work he is involved in. He attributes his generosity to his humble beginnings and desire to give back to the community that gave to him.


PHOTO BY CARLOS A. PINTO

Fortress has partnered with over 25 builders across the country and boasts more than 10 thousand units in its portfolio

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HOME DECOR

Before Karina and Craig Waters purchased the historic French château in 2013, they never imagined the project would become a social media sensation

CHÂTEAU DE GUDANES When an Australian couple stumbled upon an abandoned 18th century château in the Pyrenees mountain range in France, they never suspected it would become the lovechild of their family — and an item of fascination for the rest of the world. Just days before receiving an award from the Institute of Paris for the restoration project, Karina Waters takes Dolce on a walk through the historic home and shares the tale of its now famous rebirth INTERVIEW BY AMANDA STOREY

Q: How did the château first enter your and your husband’s lives? A: It was 2011 when we first saw it. Craig and I were going on a week’s trip to France to look at some properties, and just before we left our son Ben saw the château online. We’d never been to the Pyrenees, and never been to the mountains, so we followed our curiosity and fell in love with the château the moment we saw it. Two years later, the purchase was finalized, and we started the restoration process.

Q: What’s your vision for the restoration process? A: In the beginning we were really keen to just get the renovations done and bring into the project what we would have done at home in Perth. But after spending more time at the château and understanding the building and its history, we’ve embraced it the way it is and are really enjoying it in all its imperfection. It tells a story of different centuries. So instead of erasing that story, that soul, we’re focusing rather on the renaissance of

it, on bringing it back to life. It’s almost as if those who have passed through [the château] before are standing and watching. It’s a quite spiritual way of thinking, but it’s quite palpable when you’re there. Q: How many people do you have working on the restoration? A: We have the perfect team right now, and it’s magical. There’s three of us doing the hands-on work right now — myself, a restoration expert named David and our 22-year-old volunteer Tim.

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In the 18th century, Château de Gudanes was built on the site of an older 16th century castle

But in the grand scheme of things, everyone in the family is part of the team. My daughter Jasmine is 22 and studying in England, and strangely enough she’s taking units that have to do with the restoration and renaissance of old buildings. My son Ben is 21, and he takes care of the finances and budgets. Then we have other family members helping out with the social media. Besides that, if we ever need to hire an electrician, plumber or carpenter, I source those services in the local village.

Q: What’s the process been like so far? A: Every day is a different story! We laugh along the way and have fun. It’s hard work, but the work is love. I’m learning to do everything, because as the owner of a château I need to know all this stuff. It’s not the same when you get a contractor to do it, because this is our legacy, and that’s how you connect with it. My daughter recently saw me tiling the 120 square-meter vestibule with these really heavy tiles — and she’ll always remember that her mother did that.

Q: What’s your ultimate goal for the château? A: We’ve been brainstorming as a family and realize we have lots of options. We could even open up a B and B if we really wanted! But whatever we decide, it’s going to have to be shared and open to everyone, because really, that’s what the château was built for originally. The cellars, built in the 13th century, were constructed as a refuge for the Qatar people, who were being persecuted. Then the rest of the château was built in the 18th century for entertaining, and philosophers like Voltaire would

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come here. So it’s always had this history of being for everyone, and we want to make sure it remains accessible.

1. Nestled in the Pyrenees mountains in France, right by the Spanish border, Château de Gudanes has become a passion project not only of the Waters, but also of the local community, where the family sources services like plumbing and carpentry 2. Waters jokes that she separates her life story into two chapters: “B.C.” (Before Château) and “A.C.” (After Château) 3. The Waters originally wanted to renovate the entire space, but after spending time in the château and being enchanted by its rustic charm, they decided to instead focus on preserving its history 4. Although there is still much work to be done before the space is liveable, the Waters intend to make the château accessible to the public

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PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE WATERS FAMILY

Q: How has the château changed your life? A: I was leading a life in Perth that was really quite structured. Then suddenly I’m in another hemisphere, in a country where I don’t even speak the language [laughs], and totally immersed in this other life. I’m in the mountains, I’m in nature. And I didn’t even think that I needed this selfrestoration but I think as well as the château being restored, it’s running parallels with my own life. It’s just extraordinary.

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OH, THE DRAMA This season has a darker side, and it’s as fun to play with as freshly fallen snow. Befriend the trend of dark, bold hues and dramatic details — and in a ballroom full of crisp winter whites, be a streak of wild orange, a flash of shimmery magenta or star-splattered purple

Complete Look, Chanel Flash back to mid-century chic with the “femme fatale” fusion of sophistication and playfulness

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Dress, Dolce&Gabbana Don’t shy away from sparkles, winter’s favourite accent. Go bold with shimmer on shimmer on shimmer

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Complete Look, Prada Heat things up in an ensemble that’ll defy any storm: an eyecatching print, fiery hues and knee-high heels

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Dress and Jewellery, Elie Saab Tis the season for a little truth or dare, and one can never go wrong with a deep shade of purple in flowing fabric

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Photographer: Bela Raba / www.belaraba.com Stylist: Stephan Kallaus / www.stephankallaus.com Hair and Make-up: Michael Salmen / www.michaelsalmen.com Model: Nicole / www.vivanc.gr Photographer’s Assistant: Robert Gßnther

Complete Look, Salvatore Ferragamo

Merry meets edgy in bright colours and sharp patterns, all wrapped up together in a striking silhouette

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CROWN JEWELS

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3 ICED OUT FOR THE HOLIDAYS Glitz and glam and nd everything nice. These hese pieces will leave you breathless

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WRITTEN BY REBECCA ALBERICO

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1. Rubies are red and diamonds are true in these 18K yellow gold earrings 2. Find elegance in simplicity with this brilliant tennis necklace 3. These unique marquee diamond ear climbers add necessary dazzle to the most mundane ensembles 4. Spoil your wrist with this diamond-covered rose gold bangle 5. ‘Tis the season for popping the question with rings like this 18K white gold double halo 6. This diamond crossover ring is a staple in all its glitzy gilded glamour 7. Link to luxury with these pavĂŠ-set, diamond-studded treats 8. Become totally enamoured with the morganite and yellow pearshaped diamonds in an 18K white and rose gold setting

All custom jewellery pieces by Mark Lash www.marklash.com

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CROWN JEWELS

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“I NEVER WORRY ABOUT DIETS. THE ONLY CARROTS THAT INTEREST ME ARE THE NUMBER YOU GET IN A DIAMOND” – Mae West

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1. Wrapped in the lap of luxury www.lunandco.com 2. This silver sapphire mosaic ring is truly a work of art www.penwardenjewellery.com

3. The 14K white gold, floral-inspired halo will take your breath away www.penwardenjewellery.com 4. Accented with sky-blue hues www.penwardenjewellery.com

nk 5. A bracelet that dazzles with the perfect pop of pink www.samuelkleinberg.com

ellow 6. Stunning cushioned diamonds with a pinch of yellow www.samuelkleinberg.com

7. Forget gifts, wrap your wrist in diamonds www.lougoldberg.com

8. Shine bright like this gorgeous pink jewel www.valentejewellers.com

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TRAVEL

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PARIS IN THREE DAYS

WITH BERLUTI, KRUG AND HENNESSY

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WRITTEN BY MICHELLE ZERILLO-SOSA

lthough my visit was brief — only three days — and my recollections are somewhat fragmented, due to the series of incredible events that took place in such a short time, I shall forever cherish my time and the people I met in Paris and the Cognac region of France on our Berluti, Krug and Hennessey trip. So here I give you my Coles Notes of the experience. On the trip, we had the opportunity to hear firsthand from the CEOs of Maison Krug, Hennessy and Berluti as to how they continue to write their story of success and fulfill the vision of their founders from generations ago, while implementing new and innovative approaches to staying relevant as brands that are the epitome of luxury and pleasure. One of my favourite memories was our tasting of various Krug champagnes while listening to different types of music — music pairing, they called it. No surprise, since music connects you to emotions and champagne was created to give you pleasure. As the Maison discovered that there is more and more research and interest surrounding the changes hearing can make to the tasting experience, Krug actually began inviting various musicians to visit the House and create music that matched the vintages. Creating colour patinas inspired by the Krug vintages was yet another clever idea that came through the partnership between Krug and Berluti. Next, John Michele, one of the three shoemakers at the Berluti Maison, showed us the process of hand-assembling a pair of Berluti bespoke shoes. It’s a process that begins with taking an appointment in the store or in the Paris workshops on rue Marbeuf. Next, taking the measurements by hand, making a wooden last, choosing your leather (even shark skin) and choosing your patina (blue, please) are all part of the process to achieve a pair of shoes that have absolute comfort and are a truly personalized masterpiece. Then, six months to a year later … your bespoke shoes (not to be confused with ready-to-wear shoes) will arrive at your door, all the way from Paris. Understanding the culture of this brand means understanding that with each pair of bespoke shoes, there is a huge emphasis on quality and perfection.

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1. A scenic view of one of the plots where selections of grapes are grown 2. Veronique Gonneville, Michelle Zerillo-Sosa, Maurice Hennessy, Pedro Mendes and Claudia Cusano 3. Château de Bagnolet, Hennessey’s private guest house 4. A very limited number of each Krug vintages are kept in the Krug cellars 5. A shoemaker stitching a pair of bespoke Berluti shoes in the Berluiti maison 6. A bottle of Hennessy XO in the New Hennessy Tour and Visitor’s Centre

Cognac (eau de vie at this stage) tasting happens every day at 11 a.m., like clockwork, at the Hennessy Maison, led by the master blenders. Why, you ask? Because at this hour, all your tastes and senses are heightened. My favourite was the 1979 Hennessy Paradis. On the last evening of our trip, we had an incredibly insightful dinner at Château de Bagnolet, the private Hennessy house, with Mr. Maurice Hennessy. Imagine sitting next to the world’s bestselling cognac producer. With the knowledge that 120 bottles are sold every minute, somewhere in the world, I tried to carry on a conversation while doing the math in my mind. But Mr. Hennessy was describing his reaction and pride at the discovery of yet another musical artist using the Hennessy name in yet another rap song.… So, with a Hennessy in my hand (I think you know the lyric to this song), we continued our conversation about his belief as to why it is important, as parents, to allow our children to follow their dreams and passions and not force them to work in the family business. His candid opinions about life in general may not have been the choice of topics for a publicist. But I valued that evening and our conversation more than any well-written press release on a brand and its ambassador. After all, we are all human and with that comes the realization that luxury and its meaning is not only packaged and aged in a bottle … but in the liberty of speaking your mind truthfully and honestly. Vive la Paris, its people and their quest for living la dolce vita, each and every day. www.hennessy.com www.krug.com www.berluti.com

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DESIGN

Think big and introduce dramatic floral elements that will elevate special gatherings around the table to an extraordinary feast for the eyes and senses WRITTEN BY MANDY ALLEN

PHOTOS BY WARREN HEATH

THE LANGUAGE OF FLOWERS

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ild and expressive, the new flower arrangements draw inspiration from 17th century Dutch botanical paintings, the gothic intrigue of Victoriana and the old-fashioned romance of overgrown secret gardens. In combination with a moody colour spectrum, impasto-style textures, refined furnishings and decorative elements picked straight from the cabinet of curiosities, it’s a style that heralds the revival of dramatic floral presentations using masses of seasonal flowers and gently worn opulence.

THE DARK ARTS What better reason than a special dinner gathering to release your inner production designer and set an evocative, cinematic scene for your guests. Flowers are present everywhere: in vases and unusual vessels, laid out underneath a simple elevated glass top structure, as a moulded jelly centerpiece (for display or eating) and pressed flat and painted white as customised artworks. The moody colour palette and elements such as taxidermy, vintage scientific instruments and Baroque candle sticks rendered modern in matt black are tempered by the natural warmth of wood and pops of jewel-like colour in the form of decorative and functional glassware. The inky distressed feature wall is both an abstract focal point and dramatic backdrop inspired by the ontrend colour washing finish.

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GROWTH SPURT As if having been sprinkled with seeds and left to sprout, this dramatic feature chair is pure romantic whimsy and makes for a far more delightful floral display than a vase. BLOOMING CHAIR HOW-TO • Scour the junk shops for a second hand period or reproduction chair. • Remove the seat upholstery, if possible leaving the frame and any coils intact. • Place pieces of damp oasis inside the seat and arrange your flowers, paying careful attention to building up the height of the display as well as draping a few vines and flowering tendrils down to the floor.

ICE AGE See the beauty of flowers from a different perspective by freezing edible petals in ice cubes. What better way to perk up drinks that with the vibrant colours of rose petals, nasturtium, borage, marigold and pansies.

MAGIC REALISM Create a dramatic optical illusion with this living painting LIVING PAINTING HOW-TO • Find an old, ornate frame and if you like, paint it the colour of your choice. • Stretch a piece of sturdy neutral fabric tautly across the back of the frame and use a staple gun to attach it. • Find a colourful image of a floral arrangement (a painting, not a photograph) and paste it onto the back of your self-made fabric canvas. • Using an art knife, carefully cut out only the top section of the glued on picture but do not remove it completely. Make sure to leave the bottom section attached so you can arrange it so that it looks as if it is spilling out of the bottom of the frame. • Attach a piece of oasis to a tray with strong glue, then mount the tray onto the wall. Position the frame over it. • Begin to form your floral arrangement by placing flowers in the oasis and work until it appears that the painting and flowers are one for a peculiar (in a good way) effect.

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A DV E R TO R I A L

THE GIFT OF WARMTH

Wrap comfort and joy this holiday season, and ring in 2017 in luxury

’T

is the season to curl up by the fire in your cosiest sleepwear, wrapped in a luxurious duvet, throw or blanket from David’s Fine Linens — or to gift one! The Canadian retailer carries an incredible selection of the finest European linens that’s sure to satisfy anyone on your list. It’s no secret that adored Italian textile brand Marzotto Group believes in the “culture of quality,” as per its mission statement. Each one of its lush blankets is crafted of either cashmere or a blend of cashmere, silk and mohair, ensuring a sweet escape from the bitter cold this winter. Another favourite is the snow lynx faux fur throw by St. Pierre. This plush piece makes for the perfect addition to your cosy winter linen

collection and a beautiful accent to any room. Artificially woven from spun yarn, the sumptuous throw gives its owner the feel of genuine fur without harming nature. And for duvet lovers, both St. Genève and Brinkhaus have you covered with duvets that will keep you warm during your long winter slumbers. These high-quality down duvets are hypoallergenic and available in summer, classic and winter weights to bring you comfort through 2017. www.davidsfinelinens.com Renaissance Commercial Plaza 8099 Weston Rd., Unit 25, Woodbridge, Ont. 905-264-7778 Bayview Village Shopping Centre 2901 Bayview Ave., North York, Ont. 416-590-7311 Toll-Free: 1-877-591-1115

YOUR ROME AWAY FROM ROME FOR

David’s Fine Linens curates high-quality linens from the most treasured European brands, including the iconic Marzotto Group, St. Genève and Brinkhaus

YOUR HOME

2663 Steeles Ave. W., Toronto, ON 416.667.0080 www.martindanielinteriors.com

CONTEMPORARY | MODERN LIVING | CLASSIQUE

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CUISINE

Chargrilled aubergine slices with Greek yoghurt, parsley and gochujang (Korean spice paste) butter

Honey Semifreddo with Italian Meringue

Chargrilled red and yellow peppers with pine nuts and Kefalotyri cheese

THE ART OF COOKING

An artist’s studio in Cape Town’s creative hub of Woodstock is also home to Maia du Plessis’s cooking studio, where she dreams up Mediterranean-inspired dishes in a space infused with local artworks

I don’t call myself a chef because I don’t have any formal training,’ says Maia du Plessis, who offers supper club and winetasting experiences from her Woodstock space. ‘It wasn’t really a plan to go into catering, but I was raised by a Greek mother, so I have certainly grown up surrounded and inspired by food. We grew up eating dishes ladled with garlic and ate food my friends had never heard of, which was certainly unusual for 70s South Africa,’ laughs Maia. Maia’s love of fashion found her ‘falling’ into fashion styling and then food styling, and she spent her early working years assisting food stylist Marine Williams. ‘I was exposed to many styles of food, but I also learnt tricks like how to build a rig to get a shot of milk pouring into cereal and

how to use mashed potato instead of ice cream because it doesn’t melt,’ she recalls. After a move to New York in the Nineties, Maia found herself living with expats from South Africa who all had an interest in food, and weekends were spent cooking and discovering new tastes. Having emerged from the chaotic early years of raising twins, Maia’s love of food led her into menu development and consulting. But when her husband Otto du Plessis, a sculptor and foundry man, bought the downtown studio in 2014, Maia’s dream of creating a space for people to experience food was born. The studio, which is now home to her catering company Provisions, it turns out, is a true family affair. Otto’s studio flanks her kitchen and is a hive of creativity. Her brother-in-law, artist

Jop Kunneke, works from another space, as do artists Charles Haupt, Stanislaw Trzebinski and a moveable feast of others. ‘They know not to steal anything from my fridge, but they’re constantly swiping my mixing jars and tools,’ she laughs. Her children Bay and Riley (10) are frequent visitors after school, where they potter around with their father next door. A petite, esoteric beauty, it’s clear that Maia’s kitchen is the heart of this surprising collection of artists and people, and while she nourishes them (she does admit to cooking them lunch regularly), they feed her love of art with exposure to their creations, which are hung on the walls of her kitchen and dining area. ‘I’ve always loved the idea of creating a space where people can enjoy food and experience

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STYLING BY SVEN ALBERDING PHOTOGRAPHS BY WARREN HEATH

WRITTEN BY LORI COHEN


Plyable table, Gregor Jenkin; Cube bench and riempie dining chairs, Vogel; lace throw, H&M Home; light, Charles Haupt for BronzeAge; artworks, Catherine van der Merwe and Stas Trzebinski; crockery, Continental China; bronze bowls, Charles Haupt for BronzeAge

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SPINACH RICOTTA MALFATTI 500g baby spinach leaves, washed and dried 250g ricotta cheese 40g cake flour 1 large egg, beaten 125g Parmesan cheese, (or grana Padano or other hard cheese), grated, plus extra for serving Salt and pepper 200g semolina flour 100g butter, to serve Maia’s friend and guest for her Mediterranean-inspired lunch, Jessica Gamsu, pictured in front of artwork by Jop Kunneke.

Fresh sage, to serve (about 20 leaves) Half a lemon Cook the spinach in a large, deep pan over a medium heat for 2-3 minutes until wilted. Drain and squeeze out all the water. Set aside to cool.

art in a space that is not a gallery,’ says Maia. ‘I host people for lunches, dinners, brainstorming sessions, or whatever they need, and I want them to know that each time they return they will see something new, so the art is always changing and the space is always evolving.’ Of the décor, Maia says the space differs from her personal style ‘which tends to be more cluttered’. The furniture is also sourced from local designers, such as Gregor Jenkin, renowned for his contemporary pieces that give a nod to South Africa’s European and Boer heritages. The aura is clean and comfortable, with a palette of cool greys and toned down white shades, with touches such as a lace throw on the window adding Maia’s undeniable feminine edge. While Maia insists she is not a foodie( and hates the word), her pantry implies otherwise. Her shelves are packed with bottles of olives (store bought!) that Maia infuses with rosemary,

garlic and other spices, and homemade preserved lemons to make her own. The free-range eggs she uses are sourced from Hartenberg wine estate where she curates their menu and trains their restaurant kitchen staff, and her olive oils and many other ingredients are speckled with names of Greek producers she hunts out in South African supermarkets. ‘They just taste better,’ she says. Maia says she loves creating menus for her restaurant clients, and her work with local wine estates has ignited a new passion for wine and food pairing. But for her Provisions clients, she prefers an open brief. ‘I might have an idea for a menu and then change my mind on a whim. It evolves in my head and I’ll wake up in the morning just knowing what I want to create,’ she says. It’s these ever-changing food experiences, and stimulating environment that continues to draw people to her table.

In a large bowl, mix together the ricotta cheese and flour. Stir in the spinach, egg, grated cheese, and seasoning. Stir well until mixed. On a surface floured with half the semolina, roll the malfatti mix into about 25 balls the size of a teaspoon. Bring a pan of water to the boil, add the malfatti and simmer for 2-3 minutes – they will float to the surface when cooked. Drain and keep warm in the pan. Meanwhile, in a small frying pan, melt the butter and gently cook the sage leaves until crispy and the butter is brown, and squeeze in lemon juice. Place the malfatti onto plates, pour the sauce over them, and sprinkle with the extra Parmesan cheese. Serves 6-8

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THE ESSENCE OF ADVANCED HOME AUTOMATION

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CELEBRITY

"Does this book make my butt look big?"�

CARSON KRESSLEY

Emmy-winning television star and New York Times bestselling author Carson Kressley discusses his new book on feeling more confident in your own skin WRITTEN BY SARAH KANBAR

“I want everyone to realize that getting dressed is supposed to be fun and celebratory and it’s not that serious, it’s just fashion”

I

t’s 7 a.m. on a Wednesday morning and I get an email from the Editor-in-Chief informing me that I have an interview at 3 p.m. with Carson Kressley at Teatro Verde, a stylish boutique in Toronto’s swanky Yorkville neighbourhood. “We will discuss details when you get to the office,” she writes. Stress levels begin to rise and, as sheer panic overcomes me, I mutter those haunting but ohso-familiar words: “What am I going to wear?” I bolt to my room and find myself face-to-face with my closet, knowing this is going to be a fight I won’t win. I browse through my closet — no, not in season, I’m too bloated, why did I even buy this? I settle on my “emergency outfit” — a pair of nylons, an oversized chiffon dress and over-theknee suede boots. Head to toe in black. You can’t go wrong with black, right? Black is chic — it says

Carson Kressley’s Serenity Prayer “Beauty gods, grant me the serenity to accept the features I cannot change, the courage to self-tan the things I can, and the wisdom to know the difference … between Botox and filler”

that I’m intellectual, sensual and fierce! I leave the house feeling comfortable but far from confident. When I arrive at Teatro Verde, Kressley can be seen mingling with fans and signing copies of his new book, Does This Book Make My Butt Look Big? A Cheeky Guide to Feeling Sexier in Your Own Skin & Unleashing Your Personal Style… coincidence that I’m here? I think not. More than just a style guide, the book aims

at helping women build their body and fashion confidence. For those of us who just want to step out looking and feeling fabulous, Kressley teaches us that fashion is supposed to be fun; we don’t need to break the bank or our self-esteem every time we get dressed. “If you don’t feel good in your own skin, you’re never going to feel great in your clothes. Focus on what’s working for you and the things about your body that you love; maximize the positives and downplay the negatives.” The book navigates some of the challenges women face daily and offers tips on makeovers, self-care, shopping on a budget and boosting your body image. It also features some of Kressley’s favourite brands, products and beauty sources. Like everything Kressley does, this style guide is far from the ordinary and highlights Kressley’s famously sassy persona. “I wanted to do something that was humorous and lighthearted because I do all of my makeovers that way. I never laugh at someone, I will laugh with them. I think comedy is a great way to take the edge off. I want everyone to realize that getting dressed is supposed to be fun and celebratory and it’s not that serious, it’s just fashion.” Since appearing on Bravo’s hit American reality television series Queer Eye for the Straight Guy, Kressley has gone on to dedicate his life to transforming men and women into the beautiful and confident individuals they aspire to be. Needless to say, I picked up a copy.

www.carsonkressley.com

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THE FOOD. THE DRINKS. THE VIBE. HAVE IT ALL AT XXI CHOPHOUSE

STEAK • SEAFOOD • FINE WINE AND SPIRITS

1 WINTER 2016

winter 2016/17 www.XXIchophouse.com

info@XXIchophouse.com

905 893 CHOP (2467)

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Entertaining made easy.

There’s no simpler way to impress guests with an artfully constructed charcuterie board. Shop Pusateri’s for your perfect holiday party. Thick & Thin Feature a selection of dense crackers (perfect for heavy dippers) and thin crisps, which act as palate cleansers.

Mix Textures Hard, sliced salami blends perfectly with a soft duck pâté and thin, rich prosciutto.

Keep it Classy Luxe up the assortment with Wellington skewers and Lamb Spiducci, eaten straight off the grill.

Keep a sweet & savoury balance 100

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Surprise & Delight Unexpected additions like this sweet potato-topped hummus work wonders with your flavour balance.

A Numbers Game Odd numbers work best for cheese pairings: one sharp, one rich and one for pleasure seekers (ahem, truffle brie).

Large olives are easier to stuff

WINTER winter 2016 2016/17

Be Sensitive While the true artistry of a charcuterie board lies in effortless layering, it’s best to keep allergysensitive items separate.

Avenue Road • Yorkville • Bayview Village RioCan Oakville Place • CF Sherway Gardens • CF Toronto Eaton Centre

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itu t a r g h Wit

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Dolce Collector's Edition Winter 2016/17  
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