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MACK AVENUE CORRIDOR DEVELOPMENT PLAN February 2016 Prepared for MACC Development by City Form Detroit In collaboration with Residents, Business Owners, Mack Alive!, District 5 City Council, Taproot Investments, The Villages CDC, Michigan Community Resources, Pingree Park Community Association, Riverview Block Club, Parker Street Block Club, Maxwell Block Club, Charlevoix Village Association, Sheridan Block Club, Mt. Zion Baptist Church, Greater Christ Baptist Church, Genesis Lutheran Church, GenesisHOPE Community Development Corporation, Mt. Calvary Missionary Baptist Church, St. Augustine & St. Monica, and Mack Avenue Community Church


INTRODUCTION Building on the momentum of the businesses and institutions along the Mack Avenue corridor, MACC Development is leading planning efforts for comprehensive physical and economic development for Mack Avenue between East Grand Boulevard and Fischer, an area in the 48214 zip code between Indian Village and Pingree Park, two stabilizing and densely populated neighborhoods. City Form Detroit, a Detroit-based urban design practice, assisted MACC Development in this planning effort. A stakeholder-driven process incorporating existing condition and market analysis informed the project. More specifically, an analysis of existing conditions for how the corridor supports a “complete neighborhood� was conducted as well as stakeholder meetings that informed opportunities for the corridor and its buildings. Additionally, the University of Michigan Ross School of Business Detroit Impact Team collaborated on the project by completing a market analysis and business opportunity recommendations for Mack Avenue. The project’s data-driven, stakeholder-informed, and place-based approach to planning aims to be a model for attracting and retaining residents, creating economic development opportunities, and building community.

MACK AVENUE CORRIDOR DEVELOPMENT PLAN

The Mack Avenue Corridor Development Plan is a comprehensive physical and economic development framework for the Mack Avenue commercial corridor. MACC Development is leading this project in collaboration with residents, business and property owners, and church and community leaders.

This report outlines the resulting framework plan for Mack Avenue with a focus on development uses, activation opportunities, and implementation strategies for buildings, open space, and streets at a district scale. Specific strategies include a Neighborhood Center, Alternative Land Uses, Placemaking, and a Non-Motorized Transportation route that supports bike and pedestrian infrastructure. The resulting vision is that Mack Avenue will be a model for a new kind of commercial corridor in Detroit that integrates local businesses and innovative reuse of vacant land along a pedestrian and bike friendly street. Stakeholder Meeting, 11/5/2015

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EXISTING CONDITIONS Technical analysis in tandem with community dialogue helped assess the needs and assets from which to build a stronger “complete neighborhood” centered on Mack Avenue. Complete neighborhoods are self-sufficient by virtue of having diverse housing options, retail and service amenities, educational opportunities, high-quality parks and public spaces, jobs, and economic development opportunities all within a 20-minute walking distance (1/2 mile) or accessed by reliable public transit. (The 1/2 mile distance was taken from the center of the project boundary: Mack and Van Dyke.) Posing questions such as, “What is the role of the corridor’s open spaces?” or “Where can I open a business successfully?” combined with place-based physical and market analysis and other planning initiatives such as the Lower Eastside Action Plan and the Detroit Future City Strategic Framework, helped inform recommendations for strategic investment along the corridor. The asset analysis centers on opportunities and what is present in the project’s impact area. Major assets for Mack Avenue include the following: Swanson Funeral Home, Genesis Lutheran, MACC Development, Garvey Academy, Mt. Zion Baptist Church, Cesar Chavez Academy, Greater Christ Baptist Church, Pingree Park and Pingree Park neighborhood, Nichols Elementary, Detroit Waldorf School, and the historic Indian Village neighborhood. Alternatively, the needs assessment centers on what is missing along the corridor and includes the following: safety and beautification towards enhancing walkability and fresh grocery and fast-casual dining options. With 49% of the land vacant along the corridor, there are also opportunities for alternative land uses for the open space. The analysis of existing conditions of Mack Avenue and its surrounding neighborhoods lays the foundation for a framework that supports a more self-sufficient community where one’s needs and wants are in a 20-minute walkable or bikable distance.

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The corridor is a thirteen block stretch on Mack Avenue, consisting of churches, businesses, and vacant land and properties.

Existing street view of Mack Avenue


ASSETS

VE NA

E RR

Latham Playground

WA

MACK AVENUE CORRIDOR DEVELOPMENT PLAN

Pingree Park Foodtown

Park

K AC

ST

E AV

M

Cesar Chavez Academy

Mc

1/2 M I. W

ER

CH

DIUS RA G N Pingree KI AL

FIS

Dueweke Park

Southeastern High School

Nichols Elementary School Thomas Mollicone

East Village

E AV

Mt. Zion

Swanson Funeral Home

Detroit Enterprise Academy

AN

Greater Christ Baptist

Sylvester Field

MACC Development Detroit Waldorf School N VA

AV E

ST

Boggs School

N

Garvey Academy Kercheval-Parker

JE

FF

Butzel Playground

SO

GR

KE

KE

E AV

H

RC

Indian Village

AL EV

ER

Genesis Lutheran

DY

ATI OT AVE

L EL

Kettering

Hutchinson@Howe

CL

Sylvester-Seyburn

Kercheval Businesses

Islandview

Agnes St Businesses

Indian Village Market

Parks/Playgrounds

The Collective

Grocery/Market

ND

RA

EG

West Village

MT

VD BL

Churches & Institutions Schools

LIO EL

Retail

TS T King High School

Detroit Academy of Arts and Sciences

O

TR

DE

R

IVE

R IT

Belle Isle

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05 EXISTING USES KEY

Institutional Commercial I - Retail/Service Institutional Commercial II - Restaurant/Bar Commercial I - Retail/Service Residential Commercial II - Restaurant/Bar Mixed Use Commercial/Residential Residential Parking VacantUse Commercial/Residential Mixed Parking Parking G ate reate rC rC hris hris tB t apt Bapt ist i Ch st Ch urc urc h h

Exc Exc lu Re R lu vel evelsively sively atio atio Ha H n C n C ir & air & hur hur Bo B ch ch dy ody of H of H olin olin ess ess

Gre

E ow lbow Lou Lou ng e ng e

BEALSBEALS ST ST

PULFORD ST FISCHER FISCHER ST ST

BURNS BURNS ST ST

SENACA SENACA ST ST

IROQUOIS IROQUOIS AVE AVE

SEMINOLE SEMINOLE ST ST

MAXWELL MAXWELL ST ST

PARKER PARKER ST ST

VAN DYKE VAN DYKE ST ST

SEYBURN SEYBURN ST ST

BALDWIN BALDWIN ST ST

TOWNSEND TOWNSEND ST ST

SHERIDAN SHERIDAN ST ST

FIELDFIELD ST ST

E GRAND E GRAND BLVD BLVD

PULFORD ST

Arm Arm stro stro ng n Plu g Plu mb mb in g in g Z’s Z’s Am Am azi a ng zing Sa S vin avin gs gs MA MA CC CC De De vel vel opm opm D& D& ent ent DM DM ovi ovi ng/ ng/ Sto Sto rag rag e e

Elb

Ge Ge ne s ne s is B is B a pt a pt ist i Ch st Ch urc urc h h

D ine ivine Tem Tem ple ple Me Me nta nta l Sc l Sc ien ien ce ce

M ck ack Ga Ga rag rag e e

F ST &ST ire i Se re Se rvic rvic e e

Gre Gre ate ate rC rC hris hris tB t apt Bapt ist i Ch st Ch urc urc h h Co Co mm mm uni uni t t y y Frie Frie Ga G ndl ndl rden arden yA yA uto uto Tec Tec h h

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Da D iry airy - I c e Ic e Cre Cre am am

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Sw Sw a ns a ns on o F un n F un era era lH l om H om e e

CORRIDOR PROGRAMMING


MACK AVENUE CORRIDOR DEVELOPMENT PLAN

7% Mixed-Use 7% Commercial - Restaurant/Bar

33%

Commercial - Retail/Service

30% Vacant

3% Residential

20%

Institutional - Churches

EXISTING BUILDING USES ON CORRIDOR

1% Productive Landscape

49% Vacant Land

30% Parking

20% Structure

EXISTING LAND OCCUPANCY ON THE CORRIDOR

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OWNERSHIP

A1

A1 A2 A3 A4 A5 A6 A7

A2

A3

A4

A5

A6

A7

B1

B2

B3

806 E Grand Blvd, Swanson Funeral Home 794 E Grand Blvd, Swanson Funeral Home 7231 Mack Ave, Swanson Funeral Home 7237 Mack Ave, Swanson Funeral Home 7243 Mack Ave, Swanson Funeral Home 7249 Mack Ave, Swanson Funeral Home 3619 Field St, Swanson Funeral Home

B4

C1

C2

C3

C4

C5

C6

D1

D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6 C1 C2 C3 C4 C5 C6 B1 B2 B3 B4

D2

D3

D4

D5

D6

7601 Mack Ave, Taxpayer 7617 Mack Ave, City of Detroit - P&DD 7619 Mack Ave, City of Detroit - P&DD 7627 Mack Ave, Wright, Eric 7631 Mack Ave, City of Detroit - P&DD 7639 Mack Ave, City of Detroit - P&DD

E1 E2 E3

E1 E2 E3 E4 E5 E6 E7

7401 Mack Ave, Divine Temple Mental Science 7413 Mack Ave, City of Detroit - P&DD 7417 Mack Ave, 4 Ward 4 Detroit Properties LLC 7427 Mack Ave, City of Detroit - P&DD 7435 Mack Ave, City of Detroit - P&DD 7445 Mack Ave, City of Detroit - P&DD

E8 E9 E10 E11 E12

VAN DY KE S T

SEY B U R N S T

BALDWI N S T

TOWN S EN D ST

SHER I DA N S T

FI ELD S T

E G R A N D B LVD

NORTH ELEVATION

E4

E5 E6

E7

E8

E9

F1

E10 E11 E12

7701 Mack Ave, MI Land Bank Fast Track Authority 7709 Mack Ave, City of Detroit - P&DD 7713 Mack Ave, City of Detroit - P&DD 7719 Mack Ave, City of Detroit - P&DD 7721 Mack Ave, City of Detroit - P&DD 7727 Mack Ave, City of Detroit - P&DD 7733 Mack Ave, Gordon, Jimmie 7739 Mack Ave, City of Detroit - P&DD 7749 Mack Ave, City of Detroit - P&DD 7761 Mack Ave, City of Detroit - P&DD 7763 Mack Ave, City of Detroit - P&DD 7769 Mack Ave, City of Detroit - P&DD

F1 F2

F2

G2

G1

7911 Mack Ave, City of Detroit - P&DD 7937 Mack Ave, Hojeij, Anis Y

G1 G2

8015 Mack Ave, Mt Zion MBC 8039 Mack Ave, Mt Zion MBC

7303 Mack Ave, BAM Enterprises Inc 7314 Mack Ave, Johnson, Alsce Jr. (PR) 7333 Mack Ave, City of Detroit - P&DD 7349 Mack Ave, Sachs, Ralph Gordon

N1

N1 N2 N3 N4

N2

N3

8654 Mack Ave, Revelation Church 8640 Mack Ave, Magnus Property LLC 8620 Mack Ave, Greater Christ Baptist Church 3536 Burns St, Rosen, Zachary & Heisler, Shira

KEY

Private Ownership Public Ownership

07

N4

O1

O1 O2 O3

O2

O3

3545 Burns St, Greater Christ Baptist Church 8500 Mack Ave, Greater Christ Baptist Church 3544 Iroquois St, Greater Christ Baptist Church

P1

P1

8290 Mack Ave, Greater Christ Baptist Church

PARKE R ST

MAXWE LL ST

SEMINOLE ST

IR OQ UOIS ST

BURNS ST

FISCHER ST

SOUTH ELEVATION

Q1

Q1

8200 Mack Ave, Deutsches Haus, LLC

R1

R1 R2 R3 R4

R2

R3

8146 Mack Ave, Deutsches Haus, LLC 8128 Mack Ave, In His Presence 8122 Mack Ave, City of Detroit - P&DD 8110 Mack Ave, Mack 1920, LLC

R4

S1

S2


H6

I4

K4 J1

I4

T2 T3 T4

T3

T4

3535 Van Dyke St, Mt Zion MBC 7930 Mack Ave, Taproot Investments, LLC 7906 Mack Ave, Mt Zion MBC 7900 Mack Ave, Mack Avenue Community Church

S2 S3

8044 Mack Ave, Mt Zion MBC 8028 Mack Ave, Mt Zion MBC 8000 Mack Ave, Mt Zion MBC

FISCHER ST

BURN S ST

K4

L1

L1 L2

L2

M1

8501 Mack Ave, Greater Christ Baptist Church 8545 Mack Ave, Greater Christ Baptist Church

M1 M2 M3 M4 M5

8301 Mack Ave, Greater Christ Baptist Church

U1

U1 U2

U2

7830 Mack Ave, Ghadir Enterprises LLC 7820 Mack Ave, Ghadir Enterprises LLC

V1

V1 V2 V3 V4

V2

V3

V4

W1

W2

W3

W4

X1 X2 X3 X4 X5 X6 X7

7736 Mack Ave, Wright, Donnie 7726 Mack Ave, Taproot Investments, LLC 7716 Mack Ave, Taproot Investments, LLC 7700 Mack Ave, Taproot Investments, LLC W1

S1

K3

M2

M3

M4

M5

8601 Mack Ave, Greater Christ Baptist Church 8609 Mack Ave, Taproot Investments, LLC 8619 Mack Ave, City of Detroit - P&DD 8635 Mack Ave, Friendly Auto Tech LLC 3715 Fischer St, City of Detroit - P&DD

8239 Mack Ave, Deutsches Haus, LLC. 8111 Mack Ave, Mack 1920, LLC. 8115 Mack Ave, Larson, Matthew & Michaline 8131 Mack Ave, Larson, Matthew & Michaline

B EAL S ST T1

T2

K2

8405 Mack Ave, Franklin, Samuella & Anthony 8419 Mack Ave, Franklin, William 8429 Mack Ave, City of Detroit - P&DD 8445 Mack Ave, Siriani, Dolly

K3

I3

T1

K1

K2

I2

S3

SEN ACA ST

J1

K1

I1

VAN DYK E ST

I3

W2 W3 W4

Y1

Y1 Y2 Y3 Y4

7642 Mack Ave, City of Detroit - P&DD 7638 Mack Ave, City of Detroit - P&DD 7610 Mack Ave, City of Detroit - P&DD 7600 Mack Ave, City of Detroit - P&DD X1 X2 X3 X4 X5 X6 X7

E GRAND BLVD

H5

8101 Mack Ave, Excellent Praise World Center 8111 Mack Ave, Mack 1920, LLC. 8115 Mack Ave, The Mack Garage 8131 Mack Ave, The Mack Garage 8137 Mack Ave, City of Detroit - P&DD 8143 Mack Ave, City of Detroit - P&DD

I2

FIELD ST

H4

I1

SHERID AN ST

H3

H4 H5 H6

TO WNSEND ST

H2

H3

B ALDWIN ST

H1

H2

SE YBURN ST

H1

IROQUOIS ST

PAR KER S T

MAXWEL L ST

SEMIN OL E ST

MACK AVENUE CORRIDOR DEVELOPMENT PLAN

Y5 Y6 Y7 Y8 Y9

Y2

Y3

Y4

Y5

Y6

Y7

7342 Mack Ave, Radden William & Grace 7332 Mack Ave, Young, Yvonne 7330 Mack Ave, Dearling, Bert W JR 7324 Mack Ave, Dearing, Bert W Jr 7318 Mack Ave, Johnson, Alsce Jr (PR) 7313Mack Ave, BAM enterprises Inc 7310 Mack Ave, Nottage, Kevin L 7304 Mack Ave, City of Detroit - P&DD 7300 Mack Ave, Gateway to West Africa

7400 Mack Ave, City of Detroit - P&DD 7412 Mack Ave, City of Detroit - P&DD 7418 Mack Ave, City of Detroit - P&DD 7426 Mack Ave, City of Detroit - P&DD 7430 Mack Ave, City of Detroit - P&DD 7432 Mack Ave, City of Detroit - P&DD 7440 Mack Ave, City of Detroit - P&DD

Y8

Y9

Z1

Z1

7200 Mack Ave, Genesis Lutheran Church

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STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT Stakeholder engagement was an integral component of the planning process to gain input and feedback on the project from local residents, business owners, property owners, and church and community leaders. The engagement included larger community stakeholder meetings combined with individual stakeholder meetings to obtain a variety of perspectives. The first of three community stakeholder meetings held focused on Goals + Objectives with a discussion on “What are your goals for the corridor?” and “How can the corridor better support your organization, business, or household?” This meeting also addressed Programming + Use topics such as “What activities should the corridor include?” and “Where should the activities go?” Assets and needs of the corridor and surrounding neighborhoods as well as strengths and weaknesses were uncovered by the discussion.

“There’s a momentum in Detroit that we believe can be combined with true neighborhood development along the lower-east side.” - Jonathan Demers, MACC Development

The top priority goals that emerged from the stakeholder engagement include a desire for more food options (fastcasual restaurants and grocery stores in walkable distance that provide fresh food options); family entertainment and fitness, a computer learning center, connected green spaces, a library, an entrepreneur resource center as well as improved safety and retail options. Furthermore, a community center/gym/movie theatre at the former Macedonia Church, an improved grocery store at the Amazing Z’s site, a family space in the open space near Dairy Ice Cream, and a crosswalk at Burns Street for students attending Nichols Elementary and Detroit Waldorf School were all suggested.

Stakeholder Meeting, 11/5/2015

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PRIORITY GOALS

MACK AVENUE CORRIDOR DEVELOPMENT PLAN

25%

20%

18%

12%

1. Food Options - Restaurants - Grocery

1. Family Entertainment

1. Computer Learning Center

1. Connected Green Spaces - Storytelling

10%

7%

5%

3%

1. Entrepreneur Resource Center - Co-working - Pop-Up Retail

1. Safety - Crime Down

1. Entertainment - Movie Theater

1. Farmers Market

2. Retail Options - Strip Mall

2. Good Crosswalks

2. Fitness

2. Mark Twain Library Branch

2. Fix Abandoned Schools - Adaptive Re-Use

3. Fast Food 4. Entrepreneurship Opportunities

Percentages of Priority Goals Voiced at Stakeholder Meeting, 11/5/2015

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FRAMEWORK PLAN Based on the analysis and stakeholder engagement, the Mack Avenue Corridor Development Plan was developed as a framework for creating a new kind of commercial corridor in Detroit that integrates local businesses and innovative reuse of vacant land along a pedestrian and bike friendly street. The framework plan shown on the opposite page illustrates for four key project strategies: Neighborhood Center, Alternative Land Uses, Placemaking, and Non-motorized Transportation. Additionally, neighborhood connector streets connecting key assets and improved pedestrian crossings are identified. A summary of each project strategy is described below with additional descriptions included in the following pages: 1. NEIGHBORHOOD CENTER Create a neighborhood center leveraging existing assets and emerging opportunities. 2. ALTERNATIVE LAND USES Implement alternative land use strategies including green infrastructure and stormwater management strategies on vacant land. 3. PLACEMAKING Create public spaces for people to come together by programming vacant and underutilized land through placemaking interventions. 4. NON-MOTORIZED TRANSPORTATION Implement non-motorized transportation on Mack Avenue between East Grand Boulevard and Fischer Street.

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Mack Avenue will be a model for a new kind of commercial corridor in Detroit that integrates local businesses and innovative reuse of vacant land along a pedestrian and bike friendly street.


IN

G

R

A

D

IU

S

R NO

VE

LL

CT

Pingree Park

A

L

K

MACK AVENUE CORRIDOR DEVELOPMENT PLAN

RA

GU

ST

E

Cesar Chavez

CA

NF

IEL

D

ST

E RU

DI

SA

LE

LV

ES

TE

R

ST

CT

KEY FRAMEWORK

SE

1/

2

M

I

W

SP

SY

NA CA

OQ

Sylvester-Seyburn Park

UO IS ST

Existing Community Asset (Institutions, Businesses, Parks)

CH

Greater Christ Baptist

FIS

Kettering

ER

RN S

Mt Zion Baptist

OQ

MI NO

EL

ER

T L S

RK ST

S ST

UR

WI

E

Waldorf School

ST

ST

ST

E

AV

ST

HE LE

CH

AR

Enhanced Non-Motorized Transit Route (Bike & Pedestrian Improvements) Vehicular “Slow Zone”

E

Improved Pedestrian Crossing LE

VO

IX

ST

N

D

A

Existing DDOT Bus Stops (31 Mack line) Eastbound Westbound Existing Traffic Lights

R

G

IN

ST

Islandview

S

LD

BO

L RT

IU

AN

ST

ID

ND

ER

SE

N

WN

ST

LD

N

BA

TO

SH

E

FIE

AV

GO

E TH

Placemaking Sites Non-Motorized Transit Route (Bike Improvements)

Indian Village

AL

YB

VD M

K AC

Thomas Mollicone Park

BE

SE

BL

Swanson Funeral Home

Genesis Lutheran

ST

XW

LE

MA

PA

MACC Development

ST

Neighborhood Node Alternative Land Use Sites

ST

SE

ST

ST

D

IS

KE

N

ND

OR

Nichols Elementary

UO

DY

UR

RA E G P

F UL

ST

IR

N

YB

Sylvester Field

Neighborhood Center

ST

BU

ST

VA

LV

ER

SE

SY

T ES

PLAN KEY

Neighborhood

ST

T T S

IR

ST

R UA

Boggs School

1/

2

M

I

W

A

L

K

Neighborhood Connector Streets (Pedestrain Priority Streets) Two-way Conversion

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NEIGHBORHOOD CENTER The Neighborhood Center strategy aims to leverage existing assets and emerging opportunities to create a place where the community can come together for recreation and commerce and where daily needs and wants can be met. Posing the questions such as “Where can we concentrate our resources and create synergy along the corridor?� helped inform recommendations for strategic investment at a concentrated institutional and commercial activity hub on Mack Avenue between Baldwin and Parker Streets and at supporting neighborhood nodes anchoring the corridor. The proposed neighborhood center includes leveraging momentum at existing buildings such as The Commons (existing gathering space and future coffee bar, coin laundry, and entrepreneur resource center) as well as D&D Storage (existing storage facility and thrift store, emerging co-working space and/or small business incubator). Future development in the neighborhood center could also include fresh food options through a restaurant or market, and a new banquet/meeting space. There are also opportunities for new activities and businesses on open space on Mack Avenue. This could include alternative land uses such as an orchard and partnering with Mt. Zion Baptist Church to hold placemaking activities on its properties. Secondary neighborhood nodes, one centered on Mack and Field Street and anchored by Genesis Lutheran Church and Swanson Funeral Home, and another at Mack and Seneca Street anchored by Greater Christ Baptist Church, would anchor the edges of the project boundary. As development opportunities emerge, they should be concentrated in these three areas whereby creating a density of activity that promotes walkability.

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REAR PARKING

FUTURE DEVELOPMENT Gathering Space Banquet/Meeting Space Small Business

Bike Lane

CONCERT/FESTIVAL

SE

OUTDOOR MOVIE

YB

UR

N

ST

CK

A

M

PUBLIC ART

E AV

VA N

DY

KE

ST

Crosswalk

REAR PARKING

ORCHARD Crosswalk

PLAY AREA

AL

OUTDOOR SEATING + SHADE Bike Lane

SE

ORCHARD NON-MOTORIZED TRANSPORTATION Bike Lanes BA Pedestrian Crosswalks L Traffic Calming DWI N

YB

ST

BE

UR

N

ST

FUTURE REDEVELOPMENT Restaurant/Market Fresh Food Options

SS

T D+D STORAGE Exg. Storage Small Business Start-Ups Co-Working Entrepreneur Resource Center/Learning Center

THE COMMONS Coffee Bar + Coin Laundry MACC Development Co-Working Entrepreneur Resource Center/Learning Center

Enlarged Neighborhood Center


Friendly Auto Tech Community Garden MACK AVENUE CORRIDOR DEVELOPMENT PLAN

Dairy - Ice Cream

Greater Christ Baptist Church Mt. Zion Baptist Church

O

O

D

CE

NT

FUTURE REDEVELOPMENT

Mack Garage

ER

NEIGHBORHOOD NODE

NE

IG

HB

OR

H

Mack’s Vandyke Mini Mart

NEIGHBORHOOD CENTER

FUTURE REDEVELOPMENT Restaurant/Take-out ORCHARD NON-MOTORIZED TRANSPORTATION Bike Lanes Pedestrian Crosswalks Traffic Calming

Swanson Funeral Home

Elbow Lounge Islandview Farmer’s Market Genesis Lutheran Church

FUTURE DEVELOPMENT Gathering Space Banquet/Meeting Space Small Business

NEIGHBORHOOD NODE

D+D STORAGE Exg. Storage Small Business Start-Ups Coworking Entrepreneur Resource Center/Learning Center THE COMMONS Coffee Bar + Coin Laundry MACC Development Coworking Entrepreneur Resource Center/Learning Center FUTURE REDEVELOPMENT Restaurant/Market Fresh Food Options

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Friendly Auto Tech Community Garden

ALTERNATIVE LAND USES

SE

TREE FARM

PU

O LF

R

ST

TO SH

Swanson Funeral Home

G

R

AN

15D

B

Islandview Farmer’s Market

LV

D

Genesis Lutheran Church

FI

EL

D

N

TREE FARM

ER

Elbow Lounge

E

W

Mack Garage

SE M

M

AC

K

ST

ID

AN

ST

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AX

M

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EL L RAIN GARDEN S T

E AV

D+D Storage

N

PA

DY

KE

RK

ER

UO

IN

OL

E

ST

ST

ST

PROPERTY OWNERSHIP KEY Public

ST

OQ

EDGE MAKER

B E REAR PARKING AL S Z’s Amazing Savings ST SE Y ORCHARD B U RN BA ST LD ORCHARD W I N ST SE

BU

RAIN GARDEN

VA

D

ST

IR

Future Development Gathering Space

TREE FARM

CA

MEADOW

Mack’s Vandyke Mini Mart

POCKET PARK

NE

Dairy - Ice Cream

Mt. Zion Baptist Church

ORCHARD

SC

RAIN GARDEN

POCKET PARK

The implementation of alternative land use strategies can be a useful approach to the stewardship of vacant land on Mack Avenue while also serving as a tool for community building. The community should weigh which alternative land use ideas illustrated on the following page should be implemented on Mack Avenue. Possible strategies include community gardens, pocket parks, rain gardens, and orchards. These approaches can also serve as green infrastructure to address manage stormwater runoff.

FI

Private

Greater Christ Baptist Church

IS

ST

HE

RN

R

S

ST

ST


MACK AVENUE CORRIDOR DEVELOPMENT PLAN

ORCHARD The Orchard strategy creates organized spaces on available land for growing fruit or nut trees. Orchards provide multiple benefits, including their ability to soak up water during storm events and economic development opportunities.

RAIN GARDEN The Rain Garden strategy captures stormwater and slowly releases it into the soil, keeping it from entering the sewerage system. This landscape includes a mixture of native and nonnative plants.

COMMUNITY GARDEN The Community Garden strategy provides opportunities for local food production, economic development, and stormwater management.

MEADOW The native Meadow strategy will add color to the corridor while creating habitat. The native perennials in this strategy will capture, hold, and absorb stormwater.

REAR PARKING The Rear Parking strategy is accessible from the alley and makes vehicles less visible from the street. This makes for a better appearance from the street, and also protects vehicles. The paved parking pad allows water to infiltrate the ground instead of running quickly into the street and into the sewerage system.

TREE FARM or shade maker The Tree Farm strategy creates organized spaces on available land for growing trees that can later be sold and transplanted to another site. Neighborhood-based tree nurseries provide multiple benefits including their ability to soak up water during storm events and reduce DWSD drainage charges on commercial lots.

EDGE-MAKER The Edge-Maker strategy provides a landscaped barrier to alleys, side roads, and adjacent properties, creating a visual screen and helping to prevent illegal dumping while improving the stormwater performance of a commercial lot. Flowering vegetation brings life and color to lot edges.

POCKET PARK The Pocket Park strategy provides smallscale public green space along with opportunities for community activities and stormwater management.

+ All strategies adapted from Detroit Future City Working with Lots Field Guide

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COMMUNITY EVENTS OUTDOOR SEATING + SHADE

SE

NE

CA

Dairy - Ice Cream

Placemaking is about programming public spaces for people. Placemaking activities can be a great way to generate excitement within the community around a place. They can help the community redefine and reimagine Mack Avenue as a place that is welcoming, hospitable, and fun for residents. They can also help galvanize the community to reinvent vacant land in ways to better support the neighborhood. The community should weigh which placemaking ideas illustrated on the following page should be implemented and where. Clustering activities rather than spreading them out will better help to define hubs for people to gather and meet.

SE

Mack Garage

Mt. Zion Baptist Church

Future Development Gathering Space

OUTDOOR GAMES

M

M

AC

K

E AV

OUTDOOR SEATING + SHADET S D R PUBLIC ART F O L PU

TO

Swanson Funeral Home

Elbow Lounge

E

G

R

AN

17D

B

LV

OUTDOOR MARKETPLACE / FI EL COMMUNITY EVENTS D Islandview ST Farmer’s Market

D

Genesis Lutheran Church

ID

AN

ST

W

N

VA N ART PUBLIC DY KE

BE OUTDOOR SEATING + SHADE AL S POP-UP FOOD COURTS T SE YB U RN PUBLIC ART BA ST LD W IN ST SE

N

D

AX

W

OUTDOOR MARKETPLACE

PA

OUTDOOR MOVIE

D+D Storage The Commons

ER

SC

RK

ER

EL

L

M

OL

E

OQ

UO

ST

ST

ST

ST

PROPERTY OWNERSHIP KEY Public

ST

IN

Private

HE

R

ST

BU RN COMMUNITY EVENTS S ST

IR

Mack’s Vandyke Mini Mart

COMMUNITY EVENTS

ST

OUTDOOR GAMES

COMMUNITY EVENTS

SH

FI

Community Garden

PLACEMAKING

COMMUNITY EVENTS

Friendly Auto Tech

Greater Christ Baptist Church

IS

ST


MACK AVENUE CORRIDOR DEVELOPMENT PLAN

OUTDOOR MOVIES The Outdoor Movies strategy would convert one vacant grassy lot with proximity to a blank wall, power source, and pop-up food court to an outdoor movie theater. A summer movie program could be developed.

POP-UP FOOD COURT The Pop-up Food Court strategy would dedicate an underutilized lot for a temporary food court. Arrange outdoor seating, hold informal musical performances, and invite neighborhood entrepreneurs to prepare food for sale.

COMMUNITY EVENTS The Community Events strategy could include temporal, family-friendly events such as picnics and barbecues, pop-up food carts, outdoor church, movies, concerts, and festivals.

PUBLIC ART The Public Art strategy could include art shows and installations, projected art, performances, music, and theater.

OUTDOOR SEATING + PLAY AREA The Outdoor Seating + Play Area strategy could include recreational amenities such as play equipment, movable seating, lounge chairs, pop-up tents, a picnic shelter or pavilion, and plantings adjacent to or within an active space.

DOG PARK The Dog Park strategy would provide a place for people and dogs to exercise and socialize. Amenities such as seating and shade could also be included.

OUTDOOR MARKETPLACE The Outdoor Marketplace strategy could provide market space for small business owners and local entrepreneurs on an underutilized parking lot. Dedicate one day per week to a farmer’s market/food entrepreneur and one to a flea market/ neighborhood entrepreneur, or these could be on the same day for synergy.

OUTDOOR GAMES The Outdoor Games strategy would dedicate a vacant, grassy lot to outdoor games including horseshoes, chess/ checkers, lawn bowling, and other games prioritized by the community. The outdoor games would provide a reason to come to a space, and return.

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NON-MOTORIZED TRANSPORTATION Detroit’s street infrastructure was constructed to support quick and efficient automobile traffic flow into and out of the Downtown, including the east/west commuter streets Mack Avenue, Vernor Highway, Charlevoix Street, and Forest Avenue. This has led to a condition of wide roadways accommodating multiple lanes of traffic often to the detriment of pedestrians and bicyclists. However, with renewed interest in walkable communities at the heart of a larger economic development and neighborhood revitalization strategy, the businesses, organizations, and residents of Mack Avenue are reassessing how they move through the corridor with a recommendation for non-motorized transportation on Mack Avenue. A non-motorized transportation strategy for Mack Avenue aims to achieve a better balance between automobile, pedestrian, and bike users on the corridor. The strategy includes buffered bike lanes that allow bikers safe travel lanes separated from vehicular traffic calming “slow zones,” and improved pedestrian crossings with strategic crosswalks. Additionally, non-motorized transportation, from walking to biking, provides a healthy, no/low cost form of transportation at a fraction of the implementation cost of larger transportation systems. The need for more diverse mobility options takes on greater importance in the 48214 zip code, where 35% of residents do not have access to a motor vehicle. Further, the non-motorized transportation plan for Mack Avenue would connect to Detroit’s Non-Motorized Master Plan, a connected system of protected bike lanes to link neighborhoods, job centers, and destinations throughout the city. MACC Development will be working with the city’s Department of Public Works and the 48214 community to implement this plan to support greater mobility options on Mack Avenue.

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Protected bicycle lanes are part of the larger trend toward creating a safer, more walkable, and more sustainable urban environment in Detroit.

Protected bike lanes, Chicago


MACK AVENUE CORRIDOR DEVELOPMENT PLAN

FUTURE DEVELOPMENT Gathering Space Banquet/Meeting Space Small Business MT. ZION BAPTIST CHURCH

D&D STORAGE Exg. Storage Resale Shop Small Business Start-Ups

FUTURE REDEVELOPMENT Restaurant/Market Fresh Food Options

THE COMMONS Coffee Bar + Coin Laundry Co-Working Entrepreneur Resource Center/Learning Center

Pingree Park

Indian Village MACC DEVELOPMENT

Sidewalk

ORCHARD

Parking Travel Lane Turn Lane Travel Lane

Pedestrain Zone

11’

5’ 2’

Westbound

Westbound

8’

11’

Sidewalk

Eastbound

11’

55’

Mack Ave. Street Width

11’

Pedestrain Zone

2’ 5’

Proposed Non-Motorized Transportation at Neighborhood Center

11’

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IMPLEMENTATION GENERAL ACTION STEPS:

ALTERNATIVE LAND USES ACTION STEPS:

1. Organize a Mack Avenue stakeholder working group to move the action steps forward. 2. Contact City Planning and Development Department to review the Mack Avenue Corridor Development Plan. 3. Contact other partners and funders to review the Mack Avenue Corridor Development Plan.

Create Partnerships: 1. Organize community-based vacant land working group and partner with property owners to identify project list. 2. Engage Detroit Future City to discuss and assist with project implementation. 3. Partner with Eastside Community Network/Land Inc. and Michigan Community Resources to extend alternative land uses on Mack further west and leverage funding opportunities.

NEIGHBORHOOD CENTER ACTION STEPS: Create Partnerships: 1. Work with City of Detroit Department of Public Works to stripe pedestrian crossings for implementation of a “slow zone.” 2. Partner with local churches to hold placemaking activities on their properties. Program Spaces: 1. Complete proposed development projects at The Commons, D+D Storage, and the orchard. 2. Investigate potential for a co-working and/or business incubator spaces in The Commons and D+D Storage. 4. Investigate potential for neighborhood grocery store and “fast-casual” dining options. 5. Pursue placemaking initiatives in the green space between The Commons and D+D Storage. Remove fence and beautify with low cost landscaping. Explore large-scale public art and lighting along east-facing wall of D+D Storage, marking the identity of neighborhood center. Identify Funding: 1. Identify resources for business attraction and neighborhood center projects (CDFI’s, Motor City Match, local foundations, etc.) 2. See more detailed funding sources under separate cover.

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Program Spaces: 1. Utilize Detroit Future City’s “Field Guide to Working with Vacant Lots” to help identify potential projects. 2. Utilize Michigan Community Resource’s “Greenfill Development: A Guide to Repurposing Vacant Lots for Flower Farming Enterprises” to help identify potential vacant lots that could produce economic returns through alternative land uses. Refine the Plan: 1. Develop a specific “Vacant Lot Re-Use Plan” to present to City Planning and Development Department to build support for the projects and identify potential zoning/use conflicts. 2. Present “Vacant Lot Re-Use Plan” to partners and funders. Identify Funding: 1. Identify funding for alternative land use/green infrastructure projects. Possible sources include local foundations, Mini Grants (Detroit Future City), and Rain Gardens to the Rescue grants (Sierra Club/Keep Growing Detroit/Erb Foundation). 2. See more detailed funding sources under separate cover.


MACK AVENUE CORRIDOR DEVELOPMENT PLAN

PLACEMAKING ACTION STEPS:

NON-MOTORIZED TRANSPORTATION ACTION STEPS:

Create Partnerships and Market Events: 1. Partner with local churches and property owners to hold temporary placemaking activities on their properties. 2. Develop seasonal programming schedule for food, performances, movies, games, and marketplace. Advertise to neighborhood through flyers and social media.

Create Partnerships: 1. Share plan with the Detroit Greenways Coalition to build bike advocacy support for protected bike lanes on Mack Avenue. 2. Share plan with City of Detroit Department of Public Works and participate in the City’s Non-Motorized Task Force. 3. Share plan with the City of Detroit Planning and Development Department. 4. Partner with Detroit Greenways Coalition and Villages CDC to identify funding for plan development. 5. Engage design and engineering consultants to develop nonmotorized plans.

Program Spaces: 1. Pop-up food court: Dedicate one vacant or underutilized lot close to The Commons for a pop-up food court. Arrange picnic tables, chairs, and umbrellas. Create small-scale stage for informal musical performances. Invite neighborhood food entrepreneurs to prepare food for sale. Allow individuals to BBQ or bring picnics. 2. Outdoor movies: Clean up and dedicate one vacant grassy lot with proximity to a blank wall, power source, and pop-up food court and convert to outdoor movie theater. Develop a summer movie program catering to diverse ages. 3. Outdoor games: Clean up and dedicate one vacant, grassy lot to outdoor games, including horseshoe pits, lawn bowling, checkers/chess, or other games prioritized by the community. Include seating, tables, and umbrellas. 4. Outdoor marketplace: Dedicate one underutilized parking lot in close proximity to power and water sources. Program to dedicate at least one day per week to farmers’ market/food entrepreneur and one day to flea market/neighborhood entrepreneurs – these could be the same day to create synergies between markets. Identify Funding: 1. Identify funding for placemaking projects. Possible sources include local foundations and Neighborhood Placemaking grants (CDAD). 2. See more detailed funding sources under separate cover.

Identify Funding: 1. Identify funding for non-motorized transportation projects. Possible sources include local foundations, local safety funds, and federal funding. 2. See more detailed funding sources under separate cover. Note: These represent a summary of action steps. See the more detailed implementation plan under separate cover.

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ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Alicia Diaz, Deutsches Haus, LLC Angela Wilson, Burns / Seneca / Fischer Block Club / Young Detroit Builders Anna Gorzalski, University of Michigan Barb Martin, LEAP / Eastside Community Network / Crain Street Block Club Brie Riley, University of Michigan Carla Tinsley-Smith, Mack Alive! Cassie Hackel, University of Michigan Chris Rabaut, Pingree Park Community Association Cle Sims, Mt. Zion Missionary Baptist Church Cleophus Bradley, Detroit Catholic Pastoral Alliance Colleen Rabaut, Pingree Park Community Association Columbus Guice, Resident Corell B. Jones, Mt. Calvary Missionary Baptist Church Deacon Chris Rabaut, St. Augustine & St. Monica Deandre S. Calvert, Council Member Sheffield Dell Young, CVD Dominique Pecock, MACC Lit Edythe Ford, MACC Development Eric Nielsen, Mack Garage Farhana Arif, University of Michigan Howard Freeman, Parker / Maxwell Block Club Hubert Wiley, Greater Christ Baptist Church Irma Smith, Mt. Cavalry Missionary Baptist Church James Perkins, Greater Christ Baptist Church Jason Hill, Historic Detroit Realty Jeanine Hatcher, Genesis Hope Lutheran Church Jonathan Demers, MACC Development Laura Demers, Resident Libby Levy, ProSeeds Consulting Justin Mast, Resident Kara Black, Business Owner Katie Crimmins, University of Michigan Kyle Marcelis, University of Detroit Mercy Linda Bain, Riverview Block Club

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Lydia Levinson, Michigan Community Resources Mac Farr, The Villages CDC Mae Powe, Parker / Maxwell Block Club Mattie Goshea, Charlevoix Village Association Michelle Lee, Greater Christ Miguel Pope, MEBCA Mike Wimberly, Friends of Detroit Nate Egger, MACC Development / Taproot Investments Nate Shoemaker, Mack Garage Pastor Eric Russ, Mack Avenue Community Church Matthew Bode, Genesis Hope Lutheran Church Ryan Boyd, University of Michigan Sam Butler, Michigan Community Resources Samuel Hill, State Rep 2nd District / Mack Alive! Scott Strand, Clarity 313 Shane Bernardo Sherri Johnson, Wayne County Commission Ted Schultz, MACC Development / Detroit Land Bank Authority Tim Johnson, MACC Development / Next Energy Todd Scott, Detroit Greenways Coalition Todd Smith, Mack Alive! Tormaine Rhodes, Maxwell Block Club Tormaine Anderson, Maxwell Block Club Toyia Watts, Charlevoix Village Association Tyler Vosgerchian, University of Michigan

Thank you to all who participated in the development of the Mack Avenue Corridor Development Plan!


Mack Avenue Corridor Development Plan  
Mack Avenue Corridor Development Plan  
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