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NYC

RANKING EVERY MEMBER OF THE CITY COUNCIL WITH COLD, HARD MATH

THE FIFTY OVER FIFTY THE LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENTS OF LEGENDARY NEW YORKERS

CIT YANDSTATENY.COM

@CIT YANDSTATENY

January 27, 2020


Celebratingÿtheÿpeopleÿthatÿmakeÿ ourÿcommunityÿaÿbetterÿplace.

Congratulationsÿtoÿallÿtheÿ2020ÿ50ÿOverÿFiftyÿ awardees,ÿincludingÿourÿvery own,ÿRalph Bumbaca. Wellÿdone!

MemberÿFDICÿ|ÿTDÿBank,ÿN.A.


January 27, 2020

City & State New York

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EDITOR’S NOTE

JON LENTZ Editor-in-chief

IN 2017, WE PUT TOGETHER a list of the best and worst members of the New York City Council. Unlike most of our rankings, which rely on interviews with insiders and are inherently subjective, this one was based on hard numbers, such as attendance and legislative activity. Melissa Mark-Viverito, then the council speaker, came out on top, followed by then-City Councilman Jumaane Williams at No. 2. Unsurprisingly, all of the top lawmakers on that list have eyed other offices at one time or another. Mark-Viverito fell short in a crowded race for public advocate and is now running for Congress. Williams lost a bid for lieutenant governor, but bounced back to win that public advocate race. Daniel Garodnick, No. 3, opted not to mount a primary challenge against Mayor Bill de Blasio, and now runs the Riverside Park Conservancy. Ben Kallos, No. 4, is still in the council, clocking in at No. 6 this year, and he has launched a run for Manhattan borough president. And No. 5? That was Elizabeth Crowley, who was knocked out of office later in 2017 but is now making a comeback bid for Queens borough president. With campaign season heating up – and with many other council members entering the fray – we decided to bring back the best and worst lawmakers list for the current crop of city representatives.

CONTENTS STATE BUDGET … 8

Cuomo takes “progressive” literally

ERIC ADAMS … 10 “Go back to Iowa” – bumble or brilliant? THE BEST & WORST NYC LAWMAKERS … 12 We ranked them all. With math.

50 OVER 50 … 20

Some of the most distinguished leaders in New York

WINNERS & LOSERS … 62

CELESTE SLOMAN; AEDKA STUDIO/SHUTTERSTOCK

Who was up and who was down last week


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CityAndStateNY.com

January 27, 2020

replacement will have big shoes to fill.

“Go back to Iowa, you go back to Ohio.” –Brooklyn Borough President and mayoral hopeful Eric Adams, telling Midwestern gentrifiers in New York City to go back where they came from, via the New York Post

TRAIN DADDY IS LEAVING US FOR REAL

After two years on the job, wildly popular New York City Transit President Andy Byford has once again tendered his resignation to the Metropolitan Transportation Authority,

and this time it seems like he’s leaving for good. Byford had reportedly told the MTA he would resign in October of last year, saying he was fed up with meddling by Gov. Andrew Cuomo and didn’t want to oversee layoffs and service cuts. Ultimately, the MTA managed to convince the

Brit to keep calm and carry on, but that only lasted so long. Byford is credited with turning around the city’s subway system after Cuomo declared a state of emergency in 2017. He’s considered one of the best in the world at what he does – reviving troubled transit systems – so his

BYE-FORD New York City erupted in a bout of collective mourning on Thursday, when the news broke of beloved Train Daddy Andy Byford’s resignation. The New York City Transit president was one of the few public officials who was as popular outside political circles as he was among policy geeks. His departure was memorialized in the Daily News’ Friday cover, with Byford pulling a train’s emergency brake “in case of reduced responsibility.”

“At its best, democracy can give you Andy Byford. At its worst, powerhoarding can take him away.” – New York City Councilman Brad Lander, in a tweet on the departure of the New York City Transit president

Facing a massive $6.1 billion budget gap fueled in part by Medicaid spending, Cuomo presented lawmakers with his fiscal year 2021 executive budget. He avoided splashy new spending initiatives or tax hikes, and decided to stick with what he knows: a new Medicaid Redesign Team that is supposed to find $2.5 billion in savings. The other $4 billion in savings will come from a variety of belt-tightening measures, including a $1.8 billion decrease in funding for localities and projecting more robust tax revenue. Cuomo made a series of other proposals as well, like renewing his push for recreational marijuana, legalizing e-bikes and e-scooters, and instituting mandatory paid sick leave statewide.

IMPEACHMENT MANAGERS MAKE THEIR OPENING ARGUMENTS

President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial was in full swing last week as the U.S. Senate decided on trial rules and the Democratic impeachment managers began their arguments about why Trump should be removed from office. Rep. Jerrold Nadler made a splash before the opening

MARC A. HERMANN/MTA; A KATZ, LEV RADIN/SHUTTERSTOCK; WILLIAM ALATRISTE/NEW YORK CITY COUNCIL

CUOMO MAKES HIS BUDGET PITCH


January 27, 2020

arguments even started, as he and his colleagues debated with the president’s defense team over the rules of the trial. Chief Justice John Roberts admonished both Nadler and the defense for their lack of decorum before the Senate in the wee hours of Wednesday morning. A couple of moderate Republican senators were also unhappy with Nadler’s implication that they would be complicit in a cover-up if they did not permit new witnesses. Rep. Hakeem Jeffries had a viral moment as well when he quoted the Notorious B.I.G. on the Senate floor.

SHELDON SILVER IS STILL GOING TO PRISON …

Former Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver got a little

City & State New York

bit of good news last week when judges overturned part of his 2018 corruption conviction. But it was largely outweighed by the bad news, which was that the judges still upheld most of the ruling. That means he’s still going to prison, despite his best efforts. Silver has managed to remain a free man pending appeal since he was first convicted in 2015. Those charges were thrown out by a higher court in 2017, thanks to a 2016 U.S. Supreme Court ruling. Silver was retried and found guilty again in 2018, but he once again appealed the decision and still hasn’t seen a day in the clink. But even with the minor win, he’s exhausted his get out of jail free cards, and he’s finally headed to the big house.

… AND SO IS CHRIS COLLINS

Former Rep. Chris Collins is also headed to prison, and since he pleaded guilty, he won’t be appealing his insider trading conviction. So unlike Silver, who put off his prison time for years pending appeal, Collins should be on his way soon. A judge decided to give the disgraced congressman a 26-month prison sentence and a $200,000 fine.

THE

WEEK AHEAD

WEDNESDAY 1/29 The Legislature holds a hearing on health care and Medicaid issues in the governor’s proposed budget. The meeting begins at 9:30 a.m. in Hearing Room B of the Legislative Office Building in Albany.

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Cuomo’s budget, by the numbers $178.6 billion: That’s Gov. 3%: Despite the deficit, Cuomo Andrew Cuomo’s proposed total spending in the upcoming state budget, a relatively small 1.2% increase over this year’s $176.5 billion budget, and well within Cuomo’s oft-stated pledge to keep government spending growth below 2%.

hopes to increase both education and Medicaid spending by that much. Instead of enacting cuts, Cuomo said he plans to close the budget gap by reducing the rate of spending growth.

$2.5 billion: Cuomo is once again

expects to have in the reserves – about $600 million less than the current year, with the state planning to use money it has received from legal settlements on capital projects.

assembling a so-called Medicaid Redesign Team, which he last did in 2011, with the goal of finding that much in savings from the state’s administration of the federal health care program for low-income New Yorkers. It’s likely to be a difficult goal. State Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli released a Medicaid audit on Jan. 17 and only found ways to save $800 million.

0: Cuomo promised “zero impact

on local governments” from the Medicaid redesign – as long as those city and county governments stayed within a 3% cap on growth.

$826 million: The planned

increase in local education spending, which Cuomo deemed the “largest Foundation Aid increase of my administration.” When Cuomo faced a $10 billion budget deficit in 2011, he actually cut school aid by $2.7 billion. This year, he promised no cuts and proposed raising education spending to $28.5 billion – the largest line item in the budget.

THURSDAY 1/30 The Legislature hosts a budget hearing at 9:30 a.m. in Hearing Room B at the Legislative Office Building on human services, a sector targeted for funding reductions by the governor.

INSIDE DOPE

State lawmakers are holding 13 hearings to examine issues relevant to the state budget. Testimony from these hearings will inform their negotiating positions with the governor.

$5.9 billion: The amount Cuomo

$1.8 billion: Could cuts be

coming? Beyond Medicaid savings and a boost in expected tax receipts, Cuomo hopes to close the budget gap through this much in “local assistance savings.” That means Cuomo will ask for cuts of up to 1% to local grants, but those cuts would exclude public assistance and Social Security payments.

$3.27 billion: Cuomo’s exec-

utive budget is balanced, but at what cost? Even with billions in expected future cost-savings, the state predicts a budget gap this big for fiscal year 2024.

April 1: The first day of the next

fiscal year, when the new budget goes into effect. Cuomo and the state Legislature have been good about hitting – or at least, nearly hitting – their budget deadlines in recent years, but a marathon, latenight session is routine at this point. –Jeff Coltin

THURSDAY 1/30 City & State hosts a New York in Transit Summit starting at 9 a.m. at the Museum of Jewish Heritage in lower Manhattan. New York City Transportation Commissioner Polly Trottenberg keynotes.


PROGRESSIVE VS. PROGRESSIVE CityAndStateNY.com

January 27, 2020

AS NEW YORK TILTS LEFT, THE LEFT IS FIGHTING ITSELF.

BY REBECCA C. LEWIS

PLASTIC BAG BAN

DEMOCRATS SEIZED CONTROL of the state Legislature and passed a slew of long-stalled priorities last year, but that doesn’t mean everything is hunky-dory in leftyland. Here are some policies that have spurred progressive infighting.

GESTATIONAL SURROGACY

In New York right now, a woman can’t be paid for carrying a baby to term. Many progressives wanted to change the law in order to lower barriers to parenthood for gay couples. But several female legislators, like Assemblywoman Deborah Glick, the first openly gay person elected to the state Legislature, asserted that it commodifies women by putting a price on their wombs and bodies.

In New York City, efforts to reduce the use of plastic bags took years to pass, then was overturned by the state. Lawmakers like New York City Councilwoman Inez Barron, a proud leftwing radical, opposed a fee on bags over the contention it would hurt low-income New Yorkers. State Sens. Brad Hoylman and Liz Krueger in 2018 introduced a bill that would ban plastic bags and place a fee on any other single-use carryout bags. Ultimately, the 2020 budget banned most plastic bags, but did not include a mandatory fee on paper bags.

FUR BAN

DECRIMINALIZING SEX WORK

Proponents of decriminalizing sex work like democratic socialist state Sen. Julia Salazar say it would remove the stigma and make it safer for those doing it voluntarily. Others, like National Organization for Women New York City President Sonia Ossorio, argue it would lead to an increase in sex trafficking and would protect pimps. The topic has not yet been debated in earnest in Albany.

BANNING MENTHOL CIGARETTES

Progressives, like New York City Council Speaker Corey Johnson, wanted to take a stand on animal rights issues by banning fur in the city. Most of his colleagues agreed. The proposal garnered swift backlash, including from black ministers, because of fur’s cultural significance – a sign of achievement for members of the black community.

New York City Councilman Fernando Cabrera introduced a ban on the sale of menthol cigarettes, citing concerns over health and children becoming addicted to nicotine through flavored tobacco products. But the Rev. Al Sharpton said a ban would disproportionately hurt black people and result in a larger illicit cigarette market – and more police interactions like the one that led to the death of Eric Garner. The opposition was enough to stop Johnson from backing the bill or bringing it to the floor for a vote.

ALEX LAW; NEW YORK CITY COUNCIL

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January 27, 2020

City & State New York

Someone who owns a two- or three-family home shouldn’t be lumped into the same category as someone who owns thousands of apartments.

A Q&A with Manhattan Borough President candidate

MARK LEVINE What are the top one or two priorities that will be central to your campaign? Tackling the homeless crisis, top of the list, through a multipronged strategy that includes doing even more to keep more vulnerable families in their apartments, in part by expanding our first-inthe-nation right to counsel law. We have to make sure that when we do build new affordable housing, much more of it is specifically earmarked for families who are homeless or at risk of homelessness. In addition to tackling the homeless crisis, I want to work to protect mom and pop stores. I want

to ensure we have balanced development policies in place so that we can protect our neighborhoods while continuing to build muchneeded housing that the city does lack. And I want to protect and strengthen green space and parkland in the borough. Looking at the powers of the borough president – a position that some criticize as largely ceremonial – how will you make the case to voters that you’ll be able to keep your campaign promises? There are significant powers in land use, in

running the community boards, in the ability (to direct) capital funding towards cultural institutions, and appointments to pretty much every board in the city. But in the end, it amounts to a powerful platform for entrepreneurial activism, a platform to put forward an agenda for the future of this borough over the next five to 10 years, and to organize and implement that vision – not that much different from what I’ve been able to do in the City Council, except at a much larger level.

An advocacy campaign including City & State First Read provides a targeted way to reach decision makers in New York government and politics. Campaigns Include:

ADVOCACY MESSAGING OPEN-HOUSE PROMOTIONS NEW HIRE ANNOUNCEMENTS Contact us at advertising@cityandstateny.com for advertising and sponsorship opportunities.

What prompted your pledge to not accept donations from real estate developers? I’m running for an office that is, in many ways, defined by its power (over) the land use process. To avoid even the appearance of conflict, I’ve decided to forgo contributions from developers. Why just developers and not the rest of the industry, such as brokers and landlords? Brokers, for the most part, are middle-class New Yorkers, and they have no kind of power over development decisions which are shaping our borough. And the

borough president has no particular power over the work of real estate brokers. It’s developers who are coming to the borough president’s office, often, for land use actions. In the case of landlords, because of my right to counsel (law) and so many other tenant issues, you won’t be surprised that I don’t get landlord money. I think that someone who owns a two- or threefamily home shouldn’t be lumped into the same category as someone who owns thousands of apartments. And I think most fair people would make that distinction as well.

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CityAndStateNY.com

January 27, 2020

RETREAT OR RE Cuomo’s budget adopted his critics’ causes on health care, education and bail – as he touted his own definition of “progressive.”

by Z A C H W I L L I A M S

That emphasis on pragmatism was on display Tuesday with Cuomo’s announcement that he would abide by a long-standing agreement for the state to cover localities’ share of Medicaid cost increases that have accumulated in recent years. He proposed an $826 million increase in funding for public schools while aligning with lawmakers who have been calling on him to overhaul the state’s education funding formula. Cuomo said that the state’s newly implemented bail reform law – an issue he avoided in his State of the State – should be amended. But the details of each of these proposals show that the governor is not only emphasizing collaboration, but co-opting the messaging of his critics to pro-

MIKE GROLL/OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR

E

ARLIER THIS MONTH, Gov. Andrew Cuomo suggested in his State of the State address that he would close a $6.1 billion budget gap that is driven largely by Medicaid spending by shifting costs to local governments. The fears of local officials, lawmakers and activists were only heightened in the subsequent days about what other tactics the governor might use to balance the state’s spending plan. Yet the $178.6 billion budget proposal that Cuomo delivered on Jan. 21 contains some major provisions that, in some ways, come as no surprise. A new Medicaid Redesign Team is tasked with finding $2.5 billion in savings by the budget deadline of April 1. Another $2 billion in savings is being sought through funding reductions to local assistance programs and state agencies. Revising projected tax receipts is helping to move the state $2 billion further out of the hole – not least because tax revenues in recent months exceeded projections by about $1.3 billion. At first glance, Cuomo’s spending plan appears to mark a retreat by the governor on hot-button issues like Medicaid funding, education and bail reform. But his political maneuvering in addressing the budget deficit also serves one of the greatest purposes for the three-term governor: demonstrating not only that he can get things done, but that he, a left-of-center liberal, is the real progressive in the state Capitol. Though Democratic lawmakers and Cuomo have been at odds at times, his budget address made efforts at comity. “We are in this business to make friends not enemies,” he said. “We are also in this business to make change. And we had the guts to do it on the criminal justice system and bail reform. And we had the guts to do it on health care. We need the guts to do it on education.” On those three big issues, Cuomo also sees a larger ideological debate over what progressivism means in New York politics in 2020. “Those are the three fundamental systems. They track the national dialogue,” he told City & State in an interview following the budget address. Many define “progressive” by how far to the left someone is on the political spectrum. The governor sees it more in practical terms, as a state of getting things done – literally making progress. “It’s less the spectrum, more the fundamental definition,” Cuomo added.


January 27, 2020

City & State New York

EAL PROGRESS?

mote his personal brand of progressive politics. On health care spending, a revived Medicaid Redesign Team – chaired by Northwell Health President and CEO Michael Dowling and Dennis Rivera, the former leader of 1199SEIU – is tasked with finding $2.5 billion in savings with a few parameters that include avoiding cuts to beneficiaries and local governments. Municipalities, however, could face a new incentive to keep costs from increasing under Cuomo’s proposed budget. “You have to manage the program and it can’t go above 3% growth,” Cuomo said. “If it goes above 3%, the local government pays.” So while Cuomo is not scrapping the existing deal between the state and localities on

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Medicaid, he is adding a new clause that limits how much liability the state will take on moving forward. Following months of criticism over the governor’s budgetary sleight of hand that shifted Medicaid costs from one fiscal year to the next, the Medicaid task force will also scrutinize long-term factors driving Medicaid spending increases that have been more than double the 3% limit that Cuomo wants. “Localities have a limited ability to control Medicaid spending,” said Andrew Rein, president of the Citizens Budget Commission. “There is real money there but they don’t have a lion’s share of control. It is more policy-driven than administrative-driven, (but) localities having skin in the game is reasonable.” Rather than facing an outcry for transferring billions of dollars in Medicaid costs on local governments – a scenario that appeared likely earlier this month – Cuomo devised a way to make local governments play ball according to his rules in order to address health care spending in a structural way. “Counties stand ready to work with a Medicaid Redesign Team to assist the state with reforming its Medicaid program,” John Marren, president of the New York State Association of Counties, said in response to the proposed budget. As with Medicaid, Cuomo is looking to resolve another thorny political issue – education – by adopting proposed funding changes lawmakers have advocated for in recent months. Democratic state lawmakers say they want to change the Foundation Aid funding formula, which is the main way that the state funds public schools. While Cuomo is proposing $826 million in new education spending this year, lawmakers have been pushing for $2 billion that they claim is owed to schools across the state following a 2006 state court decision in the case of Campaign for Fiscal Equity v. State of New York. The details of the case are complicated, but at the heart of the governor’s position is the belief that total education spending is not the issue. The problem is the discrepancy in per-pupil spending between school districts, some of which are supported by more robust local property tax bases. More than 80% of the proposed $826 million increase will go to “high-need” school districts, according to the governor, though the total 3% increase in education spending means that $200 million in savings would come at the expense of increases to other “low-need” districts. The governor has emphasized this approach to equity in recent years. What is different this time around is that he is calling for changes to the Foundation Aid formula – which lawmakers say has never been fully funded – and the decades-old “shares agreement” among lawmakers that directs 38% of school funding to New York City, 13% to Long Island and the rest to upstate and New York City’s northern suburbs. Lawmakers say that Foundation Aid, whatever its faults, is the right place to start addressing inequities in public education. The frame of the debate in upcoming budget talks, however, will nonetheless move toward Cuomo and his newly announced effort to focus on the shares agreement. “That is the governing formula,” the governor said. “That’s how it works” – and what he said he wants to change. Then there is bail. There has been a frenzy of criticism since the new criminal justice reforms took effect Jan. 1. Some criminal defendants have been accused of committing additional crimes after avoiding jail pretrial without posting bail. Polling by Siena College last week showed that the majority that had once favored bail reform now thinks it is bad for New York. “Reform is an ongoing process,” Cuomo said on Jan. 21. “It’s not that you reform a system once and then you walk away.”


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CityAndStateNY.com

January 27, 2020

The genius of ‘Go back to Iowa’ by J E F F C O L T I N & B E N A D L E R

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N WEDNESDAY MORNING, before the political and economic power brokers at an Association for a Better New York breakfast, Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams admitted that he made a mistake the previous Monday when he inveighed against gentrifiers at the National Action Network’s Martin Luther King Jr. Day rally. “The sentence was a gaffe,” he assured the audience. But were Adams’ comments a misstep, or do they – along with his friendly presentation to a centrist, pro-business organization two days later – fit right in to his 2021 mayoral campaign strategy? New York City is only one-third white, and there already are two white candidates from Manhattan – City Comptroller Scott Stringer and City Council Speaker Corey Johnson – who are well-posi-

tioned to appeal to the young gentrifier class, having backed some of its preferred insurgent candidates. Instead of competing with them for that vote, Adams may have a lot more to gain by appealing to working-class and middle-class New Yorkers of color. At first glance, shouting, “Go back to Iowa! You go back to Ohio! New York City belongs to the people that was here and made New York City what it is,” as Adams did on Monday, is an odd look for the ex-Republican former cop. But, in a weird way, it works. While progressive transplants on Twitter derided Adams for sounding like a nativist, he hit notes that might simultaneously appeal to both conservative whites and many black New Yorkers by uniting them around something they can agree on: that the people who came here after them are the worst. Adams’ mayoral pitch could emphasize the fact that he was here through the bad old days. Born in Brooklyn and raised mostly in Queens, Adams wasn’t just here, he was a part of the turnaround. He served in the NYPD while crime rates fell from record highs, and he put down roots, buying homes in Bedford-Stuyvesant and Prospect Heights that have skyrocketed in value. It’s a story that could appeal to some of the city’s older and more moderate Dem-

STOMPINGGIRL/SHUTTERSTOCK

Progressive transplants have other candidates, so Eric Adams is looking elsewhere for votes.


January 27, 2020

ocrats, and Adams hasn’t been shy about that. When he famously said, in a private meeting, that he would “out-white” his mayoral rival, New York City Comptroller Scott Stringer, Adams wasn’t talking about the white progressives, many of them transplants, who helped elect democratic socialist candidates like Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and state Sen. Julia Salazar. Adams was talking about outer-borough white voters in neighborhoods like Bayside, Bath Beach and Bensonhurst – many of them homeowners like him, who might worry about the crime rate rising or their property taxes soaring. “I know I’m a New Yorker! I protected this city!” Adams said at the National Action Network. “I have a right to put my voice in how this city should run!” Voters are going to be intrigued by Adams’ comments, political strategist Basil Smikle told City & State. “Race and class are inextricably connected to gentrification and the changes that we’re seeing in the city right now. So there may be another way to say it, or another way to spin it, but I think the substance of it is real,” Smikle said. “It starts a dialogue that, even if unevenly embraced initially, I think it will get traction down the road.” While Stringer and Johnson are battling for the support of the growing progressive electorate that seems tied to much of the city’s change, Adams’ comments are just the latest sign that he is potentially ceding that ground to them. Last month, at the opening of a senior center for poor and LGBT New Yorkers, Adams said, “I can’t celebrate a building that is not going to be inclusive.” Adams may have little to lose with this rhetoric. “Who is it going to turn off? Progressives, who (Adams) is not going to get anyway,” one Democratic insider told City & State, referring to his inflammatory speech on Monday. “I don’t think it really hurt him all that much.” Adams’ Martin Luther King Jr. Day comments weren’t targeted directly at conservative whites, but at a population of longtime residents, many of them black, that may have similar and over-

City & State New York

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lapping anxieties: losing political power, and possibly a home, as the city changes. Taken literally, Adams’ initial statement mistakes the prime driver of population growth and demand for housing citywide, which is foreign, not domestic, in-migration. Nor do transplants typically come from the Midwest. Domestic migrants come to New York City mostly from its own suburbs, both in-state and from New Jersey and Connecticut, and from big states like Florida and California. But New Yorkers leave for those same places in even greater numbers. As the Manhattan Institute’s Kay Hymowitz noted in the Daily News, “The Department of City Planning estimates that between 2010 and 2018, the city saw a net 768,306 New Yorkers leave the city, while 479,960 arrived from foreign shores. Thirty-seven percent of New York City residents are foreign-born. That number also applies to Brooklyn, Adams’ home borough.” Overall, the city has become less white and more Latino in recent decades. But in specific neighborhoods, including Adams’ own Bedford-Stuyvesant and the National Action Network’s Harlem home, demographic data or a walk around makes it clear that mostly white, white-collar newcomers are driving up the cost of living and changing the community’s character. And the cheers of the crowd at the National Action Network – almost exclusively black New Yorkers, most of whom had likely lived in the city for a long time – proved it. Like any politician, Adams knows how to tailor his pitch to the crowd in front of him. The crowd at Wednesday’s Association for a Better New York breakfast skewed much whiter than at the National Action Network, and was likely much wealthier. Adams defended his comments saying there was “real pain on the ground” and that he has “a real concern on what gentrification is doing for this city,” but it wasn’t about race. “Gentrification is not a color. It’s a mindset,” he said. “You can’t be Christopher Columbus and believe that you discovered New York. We were here.” Like at the National Action Network, the remarks earned Adams loud applause.


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CityAndStateNY.com

January 27, 2020

Ranking every member of the City Council with cold, hard math


January 27, 2020

O

VER THE NEXT two years, dozens of New York City Council members will be hitting the campaign trail. A number of them will try to keep their seats in 2021. Many more will reach the term limit of the office, and they may want to continue serving as an elected official elsewhere. Some are running this year for seats in the U.S. House of Representatives or for Queens borough president. Others are eyeing posts that will open up next year, like the rest of the borough president offices or the more powerful city positions of mayor or comptroller. As voters consider their options leading up to the elections, what better way to evaluate these sitting lawmakers than to scrutinize their current records? That’s one reason why we’re bringing back our ranking of New York City Council members.

THE CRITERIA

We used five criteria to assess each member: the number of bills introduced, the number of bills signed into law, attendance, and responsiveness to questions from constituents and from the media. We selected these criteria because they are reasonable – and because they are measurable.

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To determine how good each lawmaker is at lawmaking, we first tallied all of the bills signed into law last year. We then ranked each

City & State New York

council member based on the number of new laws for which they were the prime sponsor, from most to least. We included any bills signed in 2019, regardless of when they were introduced.

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While bill signings signal effectiveness, we also wanted to reward effort – so we conducted the same analysis for bills introduced by lawmakers in 2019, regardless of where those measures ended up.

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A prerequisite for any job is actually showing up, so our third measure is attendance. We counted all the meetings that each council member attended, including committee meetings, and how many he or she missed. While some absences were explained – for medical reasons, funerals or family leave – they were all included in our analysis.

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Some council members would protest that there’s more to the job than showing up and passing laws – and they’d be right. Many of them pride themselves on providing stellar constituent services. While we can’t realistically stand outside every district office to survey local residents who swing by – or check to see if the offices are actually open – we took another approach. To assess responsiveness to constituents, we sent an anonymous email late last year to every office with a simple question: “Hi – do you have any information about how to be counted in the 2020 census? Thanks!” Some lawmakers responded within minutes, often with helpful information. We set a low bar, counting any response – even requests for an address for verification, or suggestions that we contact our congressman, or autoreplies with a phone number to call – as long as it came in within seven days. Still, fewer than half responded.

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Similarly, we came up with a test to see how quickly each member would respond to a press inquiry: a request to submit the officeholder’s latest headshot. We were lenient in grading this test too, with any reply at all within seven days qualifying as a response, even if we never got a photo. However, 19 members didn’t even write back.

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THE TOTALS

Finally, we took the rankings for each measure and calculated an average score, weighting each factor equally. For example, if a single council member was theoretically No. 1 on all five measures, he or she would get a score of 1. The overall scores, ordered from lowest to highest, gave us our final ranking.

SOME CAVEATS

Unlike our 2017 rankings, we dropped the number of Google search results of each member’s name, in part because it leaves out online mentions in languages other than English. We also dropped Twitter followers as a measure, since it could penalize older lawmakers who are less adept with social media – and because less than a quarter of American adults even use Twitter. We omitted Jumaane Williams, who only served a few months in 2019 before becoming public advocate, and we left out his successor, Farah Louis, since she didn’t serve a full year either. By design, this list leaves out certain factors, such as the significance of legislation. Considerations such as whether a bill becomes a landmark law or makes a technical fix, or whether it’s widely acclaimed or highly controversial, would inject subjective judgments into the analysis. Critics of a libertarian bent might argue that more legislation is not better. While it’s a fair point, the productiveness of a lawmaker still tells us something useful about their proactiveness. We also declined to draw a line on various types of absences, to avoid judging which ones are acceptable and which ones aren’t. One troubling result that can’t be ignored is that four of the five worst lawmakers are racial minorities, while all of the best lawmakers are white. This is a worrisome outcome. We reflected on how to eliminate any potential sources of bias – which is partly why we removed Google results and Twitter followers. After thinking long and hard, we felt that the criteria we used are the best available. Public servants who are paid by taxpayers ought to show up, listen to their constituents, identify issues that should be addressed, craft policy responses, and be transparent with the press. The complete rankings, as well as the results for every single council member, are posted online at cityandstateny.com. –With reporting by Jeff Coltin, Jon Lentz and Madeline Lyskawa


HOW WE RANKED 14

CityAndStateNY.com

January 27, 2020

THIS RANKING OF New York City Council members is based on five criteria. Here’s who came out on top – and on the bottom – in each individual measure. To see the full lists and to learn more about our methodology, go to cityandstateny.com.

BEST ATTENDANCE COREY JOHNSON

100%

STEVEN MATTEO

100%

ROBERT HOLDEN

98.86%

KEITH POWERS

98.21%

BEN KALLOS

98.17%

WORST ATTENDANCE 67.27%

ERIC ULRICH

64.97%

RORY LANCMAN

64.04%

STEPHEN LEVIN

63.89%

BILL PERKINS

53.06%

ANDY KING

BILLS INTRODUCED

29 18 26

1

HELEN ROSENTHAL

MARK LEVINE

19

DIANA AYALA DONOVAN RICHARDS JOSEPH BORELLI RAFAEL SALAMANCA JR.

1

ROBERT HOLDEN ALAN MAISEL KALMAN YEGER

LAWMAKER WITH ZERO BILLS INTRODUCED: Bill Perkins

11

LAWS ENACTED COREY JOHNSON COSTA CONSTANTINIDES DANIEL DROMM HELEN ROSENTHAL

6

10

MARK LEVINE MARK TREYGER

LAWMAKERS WITH ZERO LAWS ENACTED:

Alan Maisel Bill Perkins Eric Ulrich

Kalman Yeger Karen Koslowitz Rubén Díaz Sr.


January 27, 2020

City & State New York

THEM CONSTITUENT RESPONSE

5 MIN 11 MIN STEVEN MATTTEO

JUSTIN BRANNAN JOSEPH BORELLI

28

Daniel Dromm Ben Kallos Robert Cornegy Jr. Alicka Ampry-Samuel Adrienne Adams Donovan Richards Margaret Chin Ritchie Torres Fernando Cabrera Ydanis Rodríguez Andrew Cohen Rafael Espinal Jr. Vanessa Gibson Mathieu Eugene

COMMUNICATIONS RESPONSE

2 MIN

PETER KOO RUBÉN DÍAZ SR.

5 MIN 8 MIN 26 MIN STEVEN MATTEO

22 MIN

ERIC ULRICH MARK TREYGER

LAWMAKERS WITH NO RESPONSE: Carlos Menchaca Deborah Rose Rubén Díaz Sr. Mark Levine Carlina Rivera Diana Ayala Costa Constantinides Rafael Salamanca Jr. Francisco Moya I. Daneek Miller Inez Barron Mark Gjonaj Andy King Bill Perkins

15

BEN KALLOS

19

Corey Johnson Keith Powers Mark Levine Carlina Rivera Diana Ayala Costa Constantinides Stephen Levin Rafael Salamanca Jr. Paul Vallone Brad Lander

ERIC ULRICH

LAWMAKERS WITH NO RESPONSE: Laurie Cumbo Francisco Moya Jimmy Van Bramer Kalman Yeger I. Daneek Miller Inez Barron Mark Gjonaj Andy King Bill Perkins


CityAndStateNY.com

January 27, 2020

Helen Rosenthal Laws enacted: 11, #1 (tie) Bills introduced: 29, #1 Attendance: 82.98%, #34 Constituent response: Yes Communications response: Yes

T

HE BEST New York City Council member of 2019 is (drumroll, please) … Helen Rosenthal! The Upper West Side lawmaker led the way in total bills introduced last year and tied for having the most laws enacted. As chairwoman of the Committee on Women and Gender Equity, Rosenthal has seized on the #MeToo movement to champion measures protecting women, including a new law tracking the city’s efforts to combat domestic violence and a bill in committee to study gender pay disparities in the city. But the whopping 29 bills she introduced in 2019 address a variety of issues, from tenant rights to the treatment of transgender New Yorkers. The former chairwoman of the Contracts Committee also drafted several bills last year dealing with the city’s processes for awarding government contracts – a record that could come in handy when her run for city comptroller heats up next year. “I got a great team,” Rosenthal told City & State after being told about her top ranking. “That’s all I have to say. I’m lucky.”

JOHN MCCARTEN/NEW YORK CITY COUNCIL; ALI GARBER; AMY LOMBARD

16


2

3

January 27, 2020

Robert Holden

Corey Johnson

Laws enacted: 2, #32 (tie) Bills introduced: 19, #3 Attendance: 98.86%, #3 Constituent response: Yes Communications response: Yes

Laws enacted: 11, #1 (tie) Bills introduced: 12, #19 (tie) Attendance: 100%, #1 (tie) Constituent response: Yes Communications response: No

Coming in at No. 2 is New York City Councilman Robert Holden, who is perhaps best known for opposing homeless shelters and housing the homeless in hotels, and riding those issues to an upset victory over thenCity Councilwoman Elizabeth Crowley. As a Democrat who won on the Republican Party line, he took office in 2018 as an outsider in the largely progressive council. But in an email, Holden credited City Council Speaker Corey Johnson and his

4

staff for treating him “warmly” and appointing him to lead the Committee on Technology. Holden has kept busy drafting bills – even if relatively few pass – while showing up for nearly every meeting. “The work of a lawmaker is so complex that it’s almost impossible to rank their performance,” Holden said. “I take my job and responsibilities seriously and was always taught to show up and be on time. That probably helped me in the ranking.”

It’s not unexpected that New York City Council Speaker Corey Johnson is near the top of our ranking – if there’s any surprise, it’s that he’s not No. 1. Johnson, an early front-runner in the 2021 mayoral race, enjoys some built-in advantages as speaker. He only has to attend the legislative body’s full meetings, making it easier for him to notch a perfect attendance record. John-

5

Mark Treyger

Daniel Dromm

Laws enacted: 10, #5 (tie) Bills introduced: 10, #24 (tie) Attendance: 88.32%, #19 Constituent response: Yes Communications response: Yes

Laws enacted: 11, #1 (tie) Bills introduced: 17, #8 Attendance: 90.91%, #14 Constituent response: No Communications response: Yes

New York City Councilman Mark Treyger, a Brooklyn lawmaker, is the chairman of the Education Committee, another important post. The former high school teacher has sought to boost oversight and transparency of the city’s public schools, including efforts to improve school bus performance. He has also focused on resiliency, a key

New York City Councilman Daniel Dromm, a veteran Queens representative who has been in office for a decade, chairs the influential Finance Committee. Like Rosenthal and Johnson, Dromm was the prime sponsor of 11 laws enacted last year, tied for the most of any lawmaker. He’s also an ally of City Council Speaker Corey Johnson, mak-

issue for his constituents in South Brooklyn.

City & State New York

17

son, who directs the legislative agenda, tied with Rosenthal and two others for the most laws enacted. And while Mayor Bill de Blasio was on the road last year, it arguably opened a policy vacuum that Johnson largely filled.

ing an early endorsement of his mayoral candidacy in May.


CityAndStateNY.com

January 27, 2020

Bill Perkins Laws enacted: 0, #45 (tie) Bills introduced: 0, #50 Attendance: 63.89%, #49 Constituent response: No Communications response: No

L

AST FEBRUARY, New York City Councilman Bill Perkins was taken into custody and transported to a hospital for a psychiatric evaluation after shouting and throwing objects in his Manhattan home, according to press reports. Perkins downplayed his behavior at the time and denied he was evaluated, explaining that he had been “confronting health issues” – in particular drug treatments for colon cancer. But anonymous sources expressed worry about his “lack of presence” and observed “that something is really off with him.” Those concerns may be founded. Perkins didn’t introduce or pass a single bill last year. The longtime Harlem lawmaker, who served in the City Council previously and returned in 2017 after a decade in the state Senate, also skipped more than a third of his meetings. Yet Perkins disputed his last-place ranking. “It’s not about the number of tweets or press stories or even being at every meeting. I will go where I can do the most good, have the maximum impact for my constituents, and often that is in the community and on the streets, and not at City Hall,” he wrote in an email. “From being the only elected who stood up for the Exonerated Central Park 5 to now for the first time bringing participatory budgeting to Harlem, I have always fought hard for this community I love and the people who call it home.”

JEFF REED, WILLIAM ALATRISTE, JOHN MCCARTEN, EMIL COHEN/NEW YORK CITY COUNCIL

18


Andy King

49

48

Laws enacted: 1, #41 (tie) Bills introduced: 3, #43 (tie) Attendance: 53.06%, #50 Constituent response: No Communications response: No

Laws enacted: 0, #45 (tie) Bills introduced: 3, #43 (tie) Attendance: 69.81%, #45 Constituent response: No Communications response: Yes

January 27, 2020

New York City Councilman Andy King suffered a spate of bad press in 2019. In October, he was fined $15,000, suspended for 30 days and removed from all council committees as part of a punishment for offenses including self-dealing, harassing his staff and retaliating against whistleblowers. Fair or not, the probe and the ongoing scrutiny appear to have hampered King, who made little headway legislatively in 2019. He missed about

47

City & State New York

19

Rubén Díaz Sr.

half of his meetings – the worst of any council member – with only a handful of them the result of his suspension. King told City & State that he blamed his situation on a “downtown” agenda, insisting that he is “working hard” and that his “constituents still love me.” “I’ve submitted legislation and some have sat in the queue,” King added. “You see a set of council members whose stuff is always moving forward, and another’s who don’t.”

New York City Councilman Rubén Díaz Sr. has been a magnet for controversy, including when he made remarks critical of the LGBTQ community, which resulted in him losing his chairmanship of the For-Hire Vehicles Committee. But Díaz landed near the bottom of this ranking for other reasons – including his scant legislative record and his poor attendance. Díaz countered that he’s serving his community as an invaluable resource and advocate for

Mark Gjonaj

46

Laws enacted: 2, #32 (tie) Bills introduced: 9, #26 (tie) Attendance: 70.75%, #44 Constituent response: No Communications response: No

Laws enacted: 2, #32 (tie) Bills introduced: 5, #36 (tie) Attendance: 86.76%, #23 Constituent response: No Communications response: No

New York City Councilman Mark Gjonaj has been in the headlines lately for taking donations from alleged members of the Gambino mob family and questionable uses of city and campaign funds. His poor attendance record and lack of responsiveness to media and constituent requests put him near the bottom of this ranking. Gjonaj’s office countered that in 2019 it had handled 1,300 con-

New York City Councilwoman Inez Barron is the only lawmaker to make the bottom five both in 2017 and in our latest rankings. She was slightly below average in terms of bill activity and slightly better than average in attendance, but failed to respond to our media and constituent requests. Barron’s office did not respond to a request for comment.

Inez Barron

stituent cases and attended more than 1,000 community meetings. “One random email from a made-up resident or a headshot request are not accurate or serious measurements of responsiveness,” a spokesman said.

taxi drivers, and by keeping his office “open five days a week, 9-to-5” – although nobody in that office responded to an anonymous constituent request sent by City & State. “I’m No. 1 in constituent services. Ask anyone!” he told City & State. “I’m the only one that has an office for taxi drivers. And then I’m the worst?! Come to the community. Come to my office. See what I do when a crisis comes to the area. My office is open. I don’t think the others are like that.”


50 20 CityAndStateNY.com

Fifty Over Fifty

LAST YEAR, A NEW CROP of legislators swept into Albany. Young and eager, inspired by Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and empowered by the dissolution of the state Senate Independent Democratic Conference, they helped bring about a wave of far-reaching reforms. But it would be a mistake not to acknowledge that today’s buzzy young stars are standing on the shoulders of giants – the leaders who broke barriers, set the stage and made our city and state the greatest in America. This is the fifth year we’ve partnered with AARP to honor 50

of these leaders – some widely known and others who became influential behind the scenes. We also highlight the work of 10 Lifetime Achievement award winners, such as David Paterson and H. Carl McCall, who both paved the way for a whole generation of elected leaders of color. Here are the 2020 50 Over 50 – an inspiration to anyone who wants to make a difference in New York.

l i f e t i m e ac h i e v e m e n t p o r t r a i t g a l l e ry

PUBLISHER’S SECTION

TOM ALLON

City & State President and Publisher

by

guerin blask


0 January 27, 2020

Preet BHARARA

Disti ngu isheD schola r i n r esiDence New York University School of Law DURING THE past few weeks, Preet Bharara has spent a lot of airtime discussing the impeachment of President Donald Trump with other legal experts on his popular podcast, “Stay Tuned With Preet.” He says the impeachment process has piqued people’s curiosity about the legal system. “I think there’s a much greater interest than before in hearing from people who’ve done this work,” Bharara, the former U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York, tells the Detroit Free Press. “I think that’s why these voices have become more important than we’ve ever seen.” During his tenure at the U.S. Attorney’s Office – which ended in 2017 when Trump fired him shortly after being inaugurated – Bharara was dubbed the “Sheriff of Wall Street” for his aggressive prosecution of white-collar criminals. He also secured convictions against high-profile officials like former Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver and former state Senate Majority Leader Dean Skelos. He looks back on that time in his book, “Doing Justice: A Prosecutor’s Thoughts on Crime, Punishment, and the Rule of Law.” “Part of your job, especially as the leader of the office, is to figure out new and lawful ways to keep people safe and to give people their money back and to hold people who violated their oaths of office accountable,” Bharara tells The New York Times in a Q&A about the book last year. “There’s nothing more exhilarating than that.” He has been a scholar in residence at the New York University School of Law since April 2017.

City & State New York

21


22 CityAndStateNY.com

Lorraine CORTÉS-VÁZQUEZ com m ission er

New York City Department for the Aging LORRAINE CORTÉS-VÁZQUEZ is a seasoned public servant who has held key positions in the Assembly and in the administration of then-Gov. David Paterson. But she says one of her most important career moves was taking a hiatus from government work. She advises early-career civil servants to do the same. “Get out for a while because you start believing your own methods,” says Cortés-Vázquez, who took over in April as commissioner of the New York City Department for the Aging. “You’ll come back a better, stronger government servant.” Cortés-Vázquez is speaking from experience. After serving as chief of staff to then-Assemblyman Roberto Ramirez, she spent six years in the nonprofit world, as president of the Hispanic Federation, and then joined Cablevision as its vice president of government and public affairs. Now Cortés-Vázquez is working to ensure the city is prepared to meet the needs of its rapidly aging population (the number of residents age 60 or older is expected to surpass 1.8 million by 2030), a task made even more challenging by the current slate of services that were designed decades ago. Meanwhile, the aging population has changed: More people are retiring later, living longer after retirement, and choosing to stay in their homes rather than move to assisted living. “People are working well into their 70s, some into their 80s,” Cortés-Vázquez says. “It is a matter of reshaping, redesigning and recreating what has been the mindset of what is an aging service network.”

PUBLISHER’S SECTION

January 27, 2020


“Education, at its heart, is about bringing people together, providing new thinking and spearheading discoveries that solve for society’s challenges, and fostering civic-minded students who contribute to the communities in which they live.”

– H. CARL MCCALL SUNY congratulates Chairman Emeritus H. Carl McCall on his Lifetime Achievement award


24 CityAndStateNY.com

January 27, 2020

Ronnie ELDRIDGE

H o s t , “ E l d r i d g E & C o .” CUNY TV POLITICS HAS BEEN part of Ronnie Eldridge’s life pretty much from the moment she was born – on the birthday of Franklin D. Roosevelt. Despite a résumé peppered with some of the biggest names in New York’s political history, she insists she didn’t plan to embark on a political career after graduating from college in 1952 with a degree in government. “It was a whole different generation. I was a housewife,” Eldridge remembers. “When I graduated from Barnard, it was – ‘What are you going to do?’ You’re going to work for a little while, then you get married.” Eldridge spent nine years working as a research assistant at CBS. She really wanted to work in the news business, she says, “but they didn’t really hire women.” In the 1960s, she joined her local Democratic club, where she volunteered as a district leader during the reform movement, eventually working on Robert F. Kennedy’s 1968 presidential campaign. She went on to work as a special assistant to New York City Mayor John Lindsay and later served in Gov. Mario Cuomo’s Cabinet and as a longtime member of the New York City Council. As the host of CUNY television show “Eldridge & Co.,” which has been running since 2002, Eldridge brings a local lens to various topics, including politics, community organizing and education. “It’s been a very full life and I’ve been very lucky,” says Eldridge, who was married for decades to the late newspaper columnist Jimmy Breslin. “And it hasn’t been boring.”

PUBLISHER’S SECTION


GT L AW.COM

Greenberg Traurig congratulates our friend and colleague Ed Wallace for being named one of City & State’s Lifetime Achievement award winners. We admire your leadership and commend your continued dedication to the City of New York. Congratulations to all City & State honorees.

G R E E N B E RG T RA U R I G, L L P | AT TO R N E Y S AT L AW | 2100 AT TO R N E YS | 41 LO CAT I O N S WO R L DW I D E °

MetLife Building | 200 Park Avenue | New York, NY 10166 | 212.801.9200 W O R L D W I D E LO CAT I O N S Greenberg Traurig, LLP

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GT_Law

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United States, Europe, Middle East, Asia,

Greenberg Traurig is a service mark and trade name of Greenberg Traurig, LLP and Greenberg Traurig, P.A. ©2020 Greenberg Traurig, LLP. Attorneys at Law. All rights reserved. Attorney Advertising. Contact: John L. Mascialino in New York at 212.801.9200. °These numbers are subject to fluctuation. 33714

Latin America


26 CityAndStateNY.com

Ethan GETO

P r i n c i Pa l Geto & de Milly INSPIRED BY HIS parents’ commitment to serving the community, Ethan Geto started working on political campaigns when he was in his teens – and in the process he met none other than Eleanor Roosevelt. “She led this group that was spearheading this reform movement to get rid of the old, the corrupt Democratic machines,” Geto says. He remembers working alongside the legendary former first lady, “campaigning and doing strategy and working to defeat some of the bad actors.” After an early role in the administration of New York City Mayor John Lindsay (as assistant commissioner for the Department of Buildings), in 1969 Geto went to work for another reform movement leader: then-Bronx Borough President Robert Abrams. He stayed on, as press secretary and campaign manager, until Abrams was elected state attorney general in 1978. In the meantime, other campaigns came calling and Geto answered, taking leave from his job as needed. In 1977, he went to Florida to help defend a local ordinance that banned discrimination based on sexual orientation. Though the law was repealed by voters, “We got the gay rights issue on the national political agenda,” he says. Since founding his firm with partner Michele de Milly in 1980, Geto has tackled a variety of projects but focuses on two main practice areas: social services and real estate development. “It’s hard for me to get my arms around it,” he says of the past 40 years. “The nonprofit sector obviously has grown a lot.”

PUBLISHER’S SECTION

January 27, 2020


The team at Brown | Weinraub congratulates one of our founding partners, Patrick E. Brown. Pat is quite simply one of the best attorneys in the space of state government policy. For almost 40 years, Pat has been a key advisor to judges, governors, businesses, labor organizations, colleges and universities. And since 2001, he has been a great partner and friend to us all.

50 State Street – Albany, NY 518 427 7350 | brownweinraub.com

Government Relations | Strategy | Healthcare Consulting & Advocacy Corporate and Legal Affairs


28 CityAndStateNY.com

January 27, 2020

David R. JONES

P r e s i d e n t a n d C eO Community Service Society of New York DAVID R. JONES spent an early part of his career going back and forth between working in corporate law – where he logged countless hours handling cases for big-name clients – and political campaigns. It didn’t take him long to figure out his true calling. “I loved the law,” he says, “but I found much more excitement ultimately doing public service.” Jones, who was particularly interested in working on racial equality and civil rights issues, soon left the legal field to work as a special adviser to New York City Mayor Ed Koch, handling issues ranging from urban development to education to immigration reform. Since 1986, he has led the Community Service Society of New York’s advocacy efforts on behalf of low-income communities. But he still keeps a hand in law overseeing the organization’s various legal initiatives, including a recent effort to “get people’s records expunged after a certain amount of time so they can go back and get work.” When it comes to career advice for younger generations, Jones says passion is key. “No matter what you put your energies into, unless you’re passionate about it, it’s very hard to sustain the kind of hours that it’s going to take to do professional work, whether you decide to be a corporate lawyer or a civil rights lawyer,” he says. “I see the people who are happiest – doing both the for-profit and not-for-profit – are the ones who are deeply passionate about what they’re about.”

PUBLISHER’S SECTION


Cozen O’Connor Public Strategies congratulates Katie Schwab on being honored as one of New York’s most distinguished leaders.

Mark L. Alderman Chairman (202) 912-4846 | malderman@cozen.com 750 attorneys | 30 offices copublicstrategies.com

© 2020 Cozen O’Connor


30 CityAndStateNY.com

H. Carl McCALL

For m e r S tat e C o m p t r ol l e r a n d SU n Y C h a i r m a n H. CARL MCCALL may be newly retired – he stepped down from his role as SUNY chairman last year after 50 years in public service – but instead of slowing down, he has already started writing his next chapter. Literally. The former state senator, state comptroller, ambassador to the United Nations and Port Authority commissioner is working on a memoir looking back on the lessons he learned from mentors who played a role in shaping his career. He’ll write about former Rep. Charles Rangel, former Gov. David Paterson and former New York City Mayor David Dinkins, among others. “There’s nothing like lived experience,” he says. “When someone has actually been through something, they have something valuable to pass on.” Of course, McCall has plenty of experience of his own, and he’s excited to start sharing it with students at Hunter College as part of a course that looks at the intersection of education, politics and race. McCall developed the course based on his decades of experience working in education, including at SUNY and in his earlier role as president of the New York City Board of Education. It will be his first time venturing into the classroom since he taught briefly at a Boston area high school about 60 years ago. “I’m particularly looking forward to the engagement with the students and learning from them,” McCall says. “There are young people today who have thoughts and experiences that are very different from what I’ve probably been used to.”

PUBLISHER’S SECTION

January 27, 2020


Congratulations to all of City & State’s 50 Over Fifty honorees who have committed their lives to making New York a better place. We are thrilled that our Chairman, Bart M. Schwartz, is being recognized for his unwavering committment to serving the community. Bart, you will always be our Guidepost.

guidepostsolutions.com


32 CityAndStateNY.com

Luis MIRANDA

F o u n d i n g Pa r t n e r MirRam Group WHEN LUIS MIRANDA was a teenager living in Puerto Rico, he started closing his letters with two words that have become his trademark: “Siempre, Luis.” He wanted to say, “I’m here always” – available if needed, he recalls. He could not have known he was beginning a family tradition that would span three generations. His son, Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Lin-Manuel Miranda, and his 18-year-old nephew, Miguel, have both adopted the letter closing. During his wide-ranging and prolific career, Miranda has served as a special adviser to New York City Mayor Ed Koch, was the founding president of the Hispanic Federation and helped manage the U.S. Senate campaigns of Hillary Clinton, Charles Schumer and Kirsten Gillibrand, among many other roles. His life is now the subject of a documentary titled “Siempre, Luis,” which will premiere at the Sundance Film Festival this year. The film follows Miranda as he helps bring “Hamilton” to Puerto Rico and raises money for hurricane relief, all while running Letitia James’ successful campaign for state attorney general. What’s next for Miranda? He’s been spending a lot of time in Florida, working on voter registration campaigns. He is trying to identify Latino populations that have the potential to shape “the political future of cities and states outside of New York,” he says. “It’s what I want to dedicate my time to.”

PUBLISHER’S SECTION

January 27, 2020


Be proud

Berkeley College graduates are part of the diverse workforce that keeps New York thriving.

Jeffrey Mejia Digital Client Strategist, ForceBrands

Kallie McGrath AmeriCorps VISTA School Success Associate, New York Cares Alexis Gonzalez Staff Accountant, Four Sigmatic

Michael J. Smith President of Berkeley College City & State 50 Over 50 Honoree

Edwin Fleurant Technical Analyst, FDNY

Michelle Dunn-Dawes Manager of Laboratory Services, New York City Transit

Nancy Robles-Guess Executive Vice President, Operations and Compliance Officer, Eastern Funding, LLC

Shakim Richardson Graduate Student, NYU Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development; Second-Grade Teacher, Achievement First Endeavor Charter School, Brooklyn, NY


34 CityAndStateNY.com

Charles John O’BYRNE

E x E c u t i v E vi c E P r E si dE n t f or Pol ic y Related Companies ASK CHARLES JOHN O’BYRNE to describe his career and he sums it up in one word: “nonlinear.” He’s been, among other roles, a human rights lawyer, a Jesuit chaplain, a teaching fellow, a speechwriter to the Democratic leader of the state Senate and secretary to Gov. David Paterson. “I have always been attracted toward organizations and institutions that are mission-driven and support a set of values that resonate with my own values,” he says. “I also think I find intellectually stimulating environments to be the most attractive – places which respect the importance of serious thinking about challenging issues.” A native of Manhattan and a Columbia graduate, O’Byrne credits his parents with inspiring him to pursue “a wide range of intellectual, social and cultural interests” and stressing “the importance of work and the duty to be productive members of society.” In addition to the varied positions he has held throughout his career, he has been active in many philanthropic organizations, including as a past co-chair (and current executive committee member) of the Hetrick-Martin Institute board of directors. In his current role at Related Companies, O’Byrne oversees a range of assignments involving government affairs on the federal, state and local levels, including political strategy on development projects, legislative issues and community relations. His advice for someone just beginning their career? “Always seek advice and always be open to learning from people who are smarter than you.”

PUBLISHER’S SECTION

January 27, 2020


CONGRATULATIONS! GOVERNOR DAVID PATERSON AND ALL HONOREES FOR CITY & STATE’S 50 OVER 50 Thank you for your continued commitment to New Yorkers.


36 CityAndStateNY.com

David PATERSON

S e n i o r Vi c e P r e S i d e n t a n d SPe c i a l a dV i S e r Las Vegas Sands WHEN FORMER GOV. David Paterson joined the Moldaver, Paterson, Lee and Chrebet Group’s financial asset management team at Stifel Nicolaus after leaving office, he quickly learned a lot about finance. “Within two years I became a director of finances in our firm,” says Paterson, who was governor from 2008 to 2010, following Eliot Spitzer’s resignation. “(I) really learned a lot about how the world operates around government and how the private sector views things, and some of the contributions that the private sector makes.” In his current role at Las Vegas Sands, Paterson is pushing lawmakers to expand downstate gambling – a position he finds both challenging and exciting. “For the first time I’m on the other side of the table – because I was usually the one listening,” he says. “You have an idea. You think it can work, but you’re going to have to persuade very responsible people – the legislators know their stuff and so do the leaders and the governor – you’re going to have to persuade them that this is a good move for the state.” Paterson, who is legally blind, has made history several times during his career – including in 2004, as the first visually impaired person to speak at the Democratic National Convention. He joined the faculty at Touro College in 2013, where he has taught government and public health courses. He now teaches a class on black-Jewish relations.

PUBLISHER’S SECTION

January 27, 2020


How You Move Inspires Us. Congratulations to

Louis A. Shapiro, HSS President and CEO, and all the City & State 50 Over 50 Honorees.


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January 27, 2020

Ed WALLACE

Co-Chairma n Greenberg Traurig WHEN ED WALLACE was working as an attorney at The Legal Aid Society in the 1970s, he had a client whose apartment door had been removed by the landlord. It was a Friday in August, and Wallace knew that trying to resolve the issue only through legal channels would take a long time. “How do I help this guy?” he recalls thinking. Wallace looked in the Yellow Pages, bought a door and installed it himself. “I think it’s better to try to find practical solutions than ideological solutions,” he says. “Assess the problem and solve the problem.” Wallace, who majored in English at Columbia and once planned to pursue a doctorate in literature, veered toward law instead, on the advice of a mentor. He went on to Fordham School of Law and to The Legal Aid Society, then served in the New York City Council as an at-large member representing Manhattan and then as chief of staff to the council president. Switching to the private sector, he served as a vice president at real estate investment trust Boston Properties for several years before joining Greenberg Traurig in 1995. In recent years, Wallace has worked on securing government approval for high-profile projects, including Columbia University’s 17-acre expansion into West Harlem, Fordham University’s new Lincoln Center campus and New York University’s major expansion into Greenwich Village. They are among his proudest accomplishments. How does Wallace deal with the inevitable obstacles that are part of the job? Just like he’s done throughout his career: He looks for a practical solution.

PUBLISHER’S SECTION


Formed in 1972, Related is one of the largest owners of affordable housing, and has over $60 billion in real estate assets owned or under development, including mixed-use, residential, retail and office

RE LATED.COM HUDSON YARDS PUBLIC SQUARE AND GARDENS

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properties in premier high-barrier-to-entry markets and the recently opened Hudson Yards.

BOSTON

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CHICAGO

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SAN FRANCISCO

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LOS ANGELES

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Related applauds our esteemed colleague Charles John O’Byrne, recipient of City and State’s 50 Over 50 Lifetime Achievement Award.

SOUTH FLORIDA

Congratulations!


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January 27, 2020

Adrienne Adams

Dwayne M. Andrews

Stuart Appelbaum

John Bennett

Pr esideNt Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union Stuart Appelbaum has been reelected five times since he was first elected president of RWDSU in 1998. Last year, the union was a leading voice opposing Amazon’s nowshelved plan to build a second headquarters in New York City. More recently, Appelbaum applauded Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s decision to phase out the subminimum wage for more than 70,000 tipped workers, saying it would go a long way to prevent wage theft in the car wash industry. PUBLISHER’S SECTION

s e N i o r Vi C e P r e s i d e N t a N d G e N e r a l C o u N s e l Patrick B. Jenkins & Associates A government relations professional with more than 15 years of experience, Dwayne M. Andrews says he is “proud of being able to take the valuable lessons taught to me by my mentors and former colleagues – Floyd Flake, Geraldine Ferraro, Peter Peyser, Kenneth Fisher and Stuart Shorenstein – and using them to help my collegiate friend, Patrick Jenkins, build a well-respected and highly sought-after firm.”

P r e s i d e N t a N d C eo CDPHP John Bennett leads one of the nation’s top-rated health plans, which regularly receives high marks for both employee and member satisfaction. Bennett recently announced the expansion of CDPHP’s patient care program at St. Peter’s Hospital in Albany, stressing the company’s commitment to providing quality care. A fellow at the American College of Cardiology, Bennett is a co-founder and past CEO of Prime Care Physicians, helping grow the multispecialty practice to 100 physicians.

J. STAR PHOTOGRAPHY; RYAN A. DAY; RWDSU; CDPHP

N e w Yo r k C i t Y C o u N C i lw o m a N Elected to the New York City Council in November 2017, Adrienne Adams is the first woman to represent the 28th District in Queens. She won her seat with the backing of Gov. Andrew Cuomo. The former chairwoman of Queens Community Board 12 says she hopes to inspire others to fight for gender equity, saying, “If there is no seat at the table for you, create that space for yourself.”


January 27, 2020

City & State New York

Leonard Boxer

Patrick Brown

Ralph Bumbaca

Thomas P. Butler

Pa r t n e r Stroock A partner at Stroock & Stroock & Lavan LLP, Leonard Boxer heads the firm’s real estate practice and is among New York City’s most prominent real estate attorneys. He began his career doing trust and estate law in the 1960s. Known for his ability to see complex real estate transactions through to completion, Boxer oversaw a 2001 acquisition of the World Trade Center site and the development of Starrett City, the nation’s largest federally subsidized housing development.

SUBMITTED; MARIA POOLE PHOTOGRAPHY; TD BANK; BUTLER ASSOCIATES

n e w Yo r k C i t Y M a r k e t P r e s i d e n t TD Bank Tapped to serve as TD Bank’s regional vice president for commercial lending in the New York metropolitan area a decade ago, Ralph Bumbaca oversees a team serving a range of business owners. “My proudest moment is leading a group of banking professionals that truly cares for the well-being of all New Yorkers and our communities,” he says. Bumbaca also helps run a nonprofit agency that provides services to people with developmental disabilities.

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C o -f o u n d e r Brown & Weinraub Before co-founding consultancy Brown & Weinraub in 2001, Patrick Brown led the in-house legal team at the state Court of Appeals. In the 1980s, he advised then-Gov. Mario Cuomo on legal and public policy matters. “The advice I try to impart to new lawyers and lobbyists is: Read original source material,” he says. “Ours is a profession which rests on the written word. Attempts at divining meaning without context are, at best, foolhardy.”

Pr esident Butler Associates Public Relations Thomas P. Butler says he was proud last year when the Public Relations Society of America’s New York chapter honored his firm’s campaign spotlighting a cluster of male breast cancer survivors. “Their story of struggle was told internationally … reaching tens of millions,” Butler says. “One great outcome was Memorial Sloan Kettering (Cancer Center) agreeing to lead a major genomic study of this male breast cancer group to identify a root cause and treatment.”


42 CityAndStateNY.com

James W. Cahill

Mark Cannizzaro

Pr esident Council of School Supervisors & Administrators Longtime educator Mark Cannizzaro began his career as a physical education teacher in Staten Island, moving on to administrative roles and eventually working his way up to the top position at the Council of School Supervisors & Administrators. Asked to impart advice to young people entering his profession, Cannizzaro cautions: “Your actions and words will have a profound effect on your students, so choose them wisely. … You have the power to change and save lives!”

BUILDING & CONSTRUCTION TRADES COUNCIL; RACHEL ELKIND

Pr esident New York State Building & Construction Trades Council A union member for more than 50 years, James W. Cahill says his proudest professional achievement is serving as the president of his union, which represents more than 200,000 unionized construction workers across New York state. “The biggest change in New York that I have seen in the last three decades has been the advancement of on-the-job safety,” says Cahill, a longtime advocate for safe work sites.

January 27, 2020

PUBLISHER’S SECTION


January 27, 2020

Frank V. Carone

E x E c u t i v E Pa r t n E r Abrams Fensterman An influential figure in the Brooklyn Democratic Party and New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio’s longtime ally, Frank V. Carone had been head of Abrams Fensterman’s Brooklyn office for five years when he was promoted to name partner in 2017. Last year, Carone was sworn in as president of the Brooklyn Bar Association. “We’re a borough with immigrants from all over the world,” he said after the ceremony. “We want to make them feel welcome and empowered.”

City & State New York

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Mario Cilento

Pr EsidEnt New York State AFL-CIO Mario Cilento started working at the New York State AFL-CIO in 1992 and was elected as its president in 2011. He helped lead a successful campaign to defeat the 2017 constitutional convention ballot proposal, which at the time seemed like an uphill battle based on early polling. With Cilento at the helm, the state federation in March 2019 launched its “Union Strong” podcast, which reached more than 10,000 listeners in its first year.

Kasirer congratulates all of the this year’s wonderful 50 Over 50 recipients especially, David Jones of Community Service Society of New York, a client whom we are proud to represent, and our own Peter Krokondelas!

DANIEL MARINO PHOTOGRAPHY; EL-WISE NOISETTE

Kasirer is the #1 lobbying and government relations firm in New York. We advocate on behalf of a wide range of clients who seek local expertise in navigating the City.

321 Broadway, 2d Fl New York, NY 10007 T: 212 285 1800 F: 212 285 1818 kasirer.nyc


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Louis J. Coletti

January 27, 2020

P r e s i d e n t a n d C eO Building Trades Employers’ Association Louis J. Coletti has led the Building Trades Employers’ Association since 1997. He says his proudest achievements are “being a co-founder of the construction skills program, which gives preference to NYC high school graduates in getting into building trades apprentice programs, and the recent reauthorization of the (state minority- and women-owned business enterprises) law, which provides a foundation for growing MWBE contractors.”

Doug Cotter

Pr esident Grant Associates A leader in workforce development for nearly 20 years, Doug Cotter has spent more than half of that time with Grant Associates, and the past four years as the company’s president. He used to serve as the president of 4Evolution Staffing, a boutique employment agency. Cotter has delivered presentations on workforce development issues to the U.S. Administration for Children and Families and the New York Association of Training and Employment Professionals.

Keeping Brooklyn Healthy

The Brooklyn Hospital Center congratulates our very own

Gary G. Terrinoni President & Chief Executive Officer

121 DeKalb Avenue • Brooklyn, NY 11201 • 718.250.8000 • www.tbh.org

PUBLISHER’S SECTION

SUBMITTED; GRANT ASSOCIATES

for his recognition in City & State’s “50 Over 50” edition


January 27, 2020

City & State New York

Rick Cotton

Ex Ecuti v E Dir Ector Port Authority of New York and New Jersey Rick Cotton’s 2017 appointment as executive director of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey came at a time of unprecedented mass transit usage. Now, after decades of “underinvestment in transportation infrastructure and a lack of vision that ultimately saddled the state with appallingly subpar legacy facilities,” Cotton says, “we are making huge investments in projects that build 21st century, world-class transportation facilities.”

Leecia Eve

vi c E P r E s i D E n t o f P u b l i c Po l i c y Verizon Communications Leecia Eve joined Verizon Communications in 2013, after working as Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s deputy secretary for economic development and as an adviser to Joe Biden and Hillary Clinton when they were U.S. senators. Eve, who has led the company’s public policy initiatives in New York, New Jersey and Connecticut, recently lost a bid to be state attorney general. She previously served as senior vice president and general counsel of Empire State Development.

CSA salutes the honorees on the PORT AUTHORITY; ANTHONY ALVAREZ PHOTOGRAPHY

CITY & STATE 50 Over 50 List including CSA’s President Mark Cannizzaro

Council of School Supervisors & Administrators LOCAL 1: AMERICAN FEDERATION OF SCHOOL ADMINISTRATORS, AFL-CIO 40 RECTOR ST., 12th FL., NY, NY 10006 T: 212 823 2020 | www.csa-nyc.org MARK CANNIZZARO President HENRY RUBIO executive vice President ROSEMARIE SINCLAIR First vice President

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Felice Farber

Kenneth J. Fasola

c eo Magellan Health Kenneth J. Fasola joined the managed care insurer and pharmacy benefit manager after three decades in the health care industry, most recently as the head of HealthMarkets, one of the largest health insurers in the U.S. Fasola, who was previously the CEO of UnitedHealth Group division Secure Horizons, said in a press release that he plans to meet with stakeholders “to refine our strategy and lead this company into the next phase of growth.”

BRIA DONOHUE; SUBMITTED

S e n i o r D i r e c t o r , P o l i c y a n D e x t e r n a l a f fa i r S The General Contractors Association of New York As the head of legislative and government affairs for a trade association that has been building roads, bridges and subway tunnels for over a century, Felice Farber has a lot to say about infrastructure. “New York City’s quality of life, and its ability to compete in a challenging global economy, continues to depend on its level of sustained investment in the city’s infrastructure,” Farber says. She previously served as special counsel to the city’s transportation commissioner.

January 27, 2020

PUBLISHER’S SECTION


January 27, 2020

Jay Hershenson

Vi c e P r e s i d e n t f o r c o m m u n i c at i o n s a n d m a r k e t i n g a n d se n ior a dV i s e r t o t h e P r e s i de n t Queens College “I am deeply committed to enhancing the role of public higher education as a positive transformative force in the lives of the people of New York,” says Jay Hershenson, adding that being the son of an immigrant motivates him “to do everything possible to ensure quality educational opportunities for students of all ages, ethnicities, and backgrounds.” He previously served for 32 years as a CUNY vice chancellor.

City & State New York

Helen S. Jarrett

mobi l i z at io n c o or di nat or a n d e x e c u t i V e b oa r d m e m be r Communications Workers of America Local 1180 Helen S. Jarrett’s role at the Communications Workers of America Local 1180 consists of moving more than 9,000 union members “in different directions for numerous actions,” she says. A civil servant for 38 years and community activist for 25 years, Jarrett began her career in 1981 as an office aide at the NYPD. “One of the best parts of working at CWA Local 1180 is being able to meet, engage and interact with our members,” she says.

Proud to join the groundbreakers. The obstacle-tacklers. The paradigm-shifters ANDRE BECKLES; MARCI ROSENBLUM

Spectrum is proud to support the City and State 2020 50 Over Fifty Awards: The Age Disruptors.

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January 27, 2020

Mark A. Kirsch

Pa r t n e r Gibson Dunn A top litigator focusing on complex securities, white-collar and antitrust litigation, Mark A. Kirsch has represented financial giants like Goldman Sachs, Citigroup and Merrill Lynch. In the 1990s, Kirsch served as an assistant U.S. attorney in the Eastern District of New York, focusing on complex financial crimes. “Obsessive preparation is the best predictor of success,” he says. “You can’t control if others are smarter. You can control whether they outwork you.”

Peter Krokondelas

Vi c e P r e s i d e n t Kasirer After beginning his career in 1989 as an assistant to the Bronx borough president, Peter Krokondelas has worked to elect candidates at all levels of government – including managing Eliot Spitzer’s successful gubernatorial campaign. He now manages campaigns for organizations including Cornell University and Walgreens Co., and previously helped win city approval for the Domino housing development in Brooklyn. “More than any individual accomplishment, I value the many friendships I have made over the past 30 years,” he says.

Queens College Interim President William Tramontano congratulates all of

who make New York a better place.

An outstanding education. An unmatched experience. It’s a Queens thing.

qc.cuny.edu

PUBLISHER’S SECTION

Comm_CityStateAd_1_24_20 ver2.indd 3

1/21/20 4:46 PM

GIBSON, DUNN & CRUTCHER; SUBMITTED

City & State’s “50 Over 50”


January 27, 2020

Bob Master

City & State New York

A s s i s tA n t t o t h e Vi c e P r e s i d e n t Communications Workers of America District 1 A seasoned union organizer and a central member to the founding of the state Working Families Party, Bob Master counted helping his 150,000-member union win strikes against NYNEX in 1989 and against Verizon in 2016 among his proudest achievements. “My advice to young people joining the labor movement today is to take the long view,” he says. “The struggle to revive and invigorate the labor movement will be a long and unpredictable one.”

Félix V. Matos Rodríguez

ch A ncellor City University of New York As CUNY’s first minority chancellor, Félix V. Matos Rodríguez strives to help pave the way for others. “My experiences have shown me, time and again, the incredible power that educators have in opening the doors of opportunity,” says Matos Rodríguez, who credits his grandmother, a longtime public school teacher, with creating opportunity for his family. Matos Rodríguez previously served as president of Queens College and Hostos Community College.

“We’re more than an insurance company, we’re a health plan.” Congratulations on being named a 50 Over 50 Award winner. John D. Bennett, MD CDPHP® President and CEO

CDPHP is honored to celebrate all of the 50 Over 50 Award winners for their contribution to civic affairs in New York. NYS WORKING FAMILIES PARTY; CUNY

Capital District Physicians’ Health Plan, Inc. | Capital District Physicians’ Healthcare Network, Inc. | CDPHP Universal Benefits,® Inc.

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Michael McKee

Treasurer Tenants Political Action Committee Michael McKee and his political action committee helped Democrats take control of the state Senate in 2018, and he counts expanding rent control throughout the state among his proudest accomplishments. The past three decades has brought activism among tenant rights groups to upstate and more unaffordable housing in New York City after “25 years of weakened rent laws,” McKee says. He urges young people to “take the long view; change does not normally happen overnight.”

January 27, 2020

Michael McKeon

Pa r T n e r Mercury Michael McKeon is a leading expert in crisis communications and public affairs. A former journalist, McKeon advised Rudy Giuliani’s 2008 presidential bid and former Gov. George Pataki’s reelection campaigns in 1998 and 2002. He also served as Pataki’s communications director, helping manage the state’s response after 9/11. However, he isn’t limited by partisanship – he led the Republicans for Cuomo group and his firm has veteran operatives from across the political spectrum.

Communications Workers of America, District 1 salutes all of tonight’s honorees, especially our own

Bob Master

Dennis G. Trainor, CWA District 1 Vice President Gladys Finnigan, Assistant to the VP PUBLISHER’S SECTION

CHUCK DELANEY; SUBMITTED

for his decades of tireless effort fighting for the working people of New York!


January 27, 2020

Jeanne Mullgrav

City & State New York

E x E c u t i v E vi c E P r E s i d E n t Capalino+Company Jeanne Mullgrav has spent decades working in New York City and state government as well as the nonprofit sector. As a former commissioner of the New York City Youth and Community Development Department, she led it through a significant transformation under Mayor Michael Bloomberg. Her career includes stints at The After-School Corp., a nonprofit provider of services to students, and Safe Horizon, which provides services to crime victims.

Jeffrey Rodus

s E n i o r vi c E P r E s i d E n t CMW Strategies Jeffrey Rodus joined the lobbying firm after more than two decades with the New York City Council, where he served as deputy chief of staff to City Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito. “My proudest professional achievement was being the lead negotiator for the City Council … on New York City’s fiscal year 2015 budget,” Rodus recalls. “This and my other experiences at the council have helped many clients navigate the complexities of the budget process to secure city funding.”

CONGRATULATES

DWAYNE M. ANDREWS LEIGH BECKETT; CMW

ON BEING NAMED TO CITY & STATE'S 50 OVER 50 LIST 5 PENN PLAZA 19TH FLOOR NEW YORK, NY 10001 119 WASHINGTON 2ND FLOOR ALBANY, NY 12210 WWW.PATRICKBJENKINS.COM

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January 27, 2020

Patrick Roohan

S e n i o r L e a d e r , d a t a a n d a n a Ly t i c S MVP Health Care A former research scientist and a 30-year veteran of the state Department of Health, Patrick Roohan previously served as deputy commissioner of health for the Office of Quality and Patient Safety. In this role, he oversaw information technology advances and the evaluation of the state’s Medicaid program. Since joining MVP Health Care in 2017, he has focused on helping the regional health plan build its data and analytics capabilities.

THE GREATEST URBAN UNIVERSITY IN THE WORLD

Peter John Sacripanti

c h a i r m a n e m e r i t u S a n d Pa r t n e r McDermott Will & Emery Peter John Sacripanti advises boards and corporations on activist campaigns, whistleblower accusations, commercial disputes, investigations and mass tort allegations. Ranked among the country’s top lawyers by Chambers USA, he began his career as a federal prosecutor with the U.S. Department of Justice. His legal successes include devising an unprecedented legal strategy to restrain the prosecution of more than 200,000 asbestos-related claims against a Fortune 500 company.

Raising the economic security of the people, businesses and communities we serve.

The City University of New York is proud to congratulate on being honored in City & State’s 2020 50 Over 50 Awards: The Age Disruptors January 27, 2020

Congratulations to our colleague, Doug Cotter and all of the City & State 50 Over 50 honorees

grantassociatesinc.com

PUBLISHER’S SECTION

MVP HEALTH CARE; PETER JOHN SACRIPANTI

Chancellor Félix V. Matos Rodríguez


January 27, 2020

Katie Schwab

City & State New York

P r ac t ic e D i r e c t or Cozen O’Connor Public Strategies Katie Schwab brings decades of government experience to her role helping Cozen O’Connor Public Strategies’ clients navigate New York City’s regulatory, legislative and procurement systems. “I would advise young people to approach every professional experience as a learning opportunity, and to invest equally in developing their skills and their relationships,” she says. “We are problem-solvers in this line of work, and mental agility and empathy are two keys to success.”

Bart M. Schwartz

chairman Guidepost Solutions Bart M. Schwartz says his proudest achievement was monitoring the United Arab Emirates’ compliance in returning children to their own countries who were trafficked to become camel jockeys. “This engagement … inspired me to work with anti-human trafficking organizations,” Schwartz says. As the federal monitor appointed to oversee the New York City Housing Authority, he faces the monumental task of repairing the agency’s buildings and reforming its management structure.

COZEN O’CONNOR; GUIDEPOST SOLUTIONS

Abrams Fensterman congratulates Frank V. Carone, Esq. and all of this year's 50 Over 50 honorees!

www.abramslaw.com

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Louis A. Shapiro

P r e s i d e n t a n d C eO Hospital for Special Surgery Louis A. Shapiro is a big believer in the link between internal culture and performance. He is credited with fostering a workplace environment that’s had the Hospital for Special Surgery and its 6,000 employees ranked as the top orthopedics hospital in the country for 10 years running by U.S. News & World Report. Shapiro started out at Allegheny General Hospital in Pittsburgh and held high-level roles in the Geisinger Health System in Pennsylvania.

January 27, 2020

Jeremy Singer

Pr esident College Board Since taking over as president early in 2019, Jeremy Singer has helped set the strategic direction of the nonprofit where he had served as chief operating officer since 2013. His advice for the next generation: Be fluid about career planning. “Life doesn’t unfold on a schedule, and neither do career opportunities,” he says. “Worrying about job titles and promotion timelines will drive you nuts. Find interesting people tackling hard problems and get to work.”

THE RESULTS ARE IN! Since relaunching CityandStateNY.com in early 2018, the results have been staggering. Through the first quarter of 2019, we’re averaging more than twice as many visitors to our site than this time last year, and we continue to grow at a 20% monthly rate. With more original content than ever and priority advertising options available, there’s no better time to reach our powerful audience of political insiders and influencers.

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PUBLISHER’S SECTION

HOSPITAL FOR SPECIAL SURGERY; JEREMY SINGER

YEAR-TO-YEAR GROWTH THROUGH THE FIRST QUARTER OF 2019


January 27, 2020

City & State New York

Michael J. Smith

Pr esident Berkeley College Michael J. Smith has focused on making graduation a priority at the career-focused institution since he was appointed president in 2015. Berkeley College, which offers degrees and certification programs in more than 20 fields and has a global online student base, operates campuses serving more than 5,700 students in New Jersey, Manhattan and White Plains. Before taking the helm, Smith held leadership roles at Berkeley College for 19 years.

Stuart Rabinowitz

Pr esident Hofstra University Stuart Rabinowitz considers the creation of the Zucker School of Medicine, established in 2008 by Hofstra University and Northwell Health, as one of his greatest professional achievements. A member of the university’s faculty for close to 30 years before he was named president in 2001, Rabinowitz became dean of Hofstra University School of Law in 1989 after joining the law school’s faculty in 1972.

CWA Local 1180 Officers Gloria Middleton President Gina strickland 1st Vice President Gerald Brown 2nd Vice President robin Blair-Batte Secretary-Treasurer Lourdes Acevedo Recording Secretary

ELZBIETA KACIUBA; HOFSTRA UNIVERSITY

Members at Large Hilary Bloomfield Denise Gilliam Helen S. Jarrett Lisa Lloyd Debra Paylor Gregory Smith Lenora Smith Venus Williams Hazel O. Worley

Congratulations

Helen S. Jarrett Local 1180’s Mobilization Coordinator & Executive Board Member

congratulates our partner and friend

Mark Kirsch on his accomplishments and recognition by City & State New York’s 50 Over Fifty

On your honor as one of City & State’s 2020

New York City 50 Over 50 Age Disruptors

New York Administrative Employees Local 1180 Communications Workers of America, AFL-CIO 6 Harrison Street, 4th Floor l New York, NY 10013

www.gibsondunn.com

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January 27, 2020

Ramon Tallaj

Gary G. Terrinoni

Anne Welsh McNulty

Joni A. Yoswein

Pr esident John P. & Anne Welsh McNulty Foundation Anne Welsh McNulty says her 30-year career in finance was incredibly rewarding, but it also showed her what is needed in her current line of work, which is “expanding the circle of opportunity for women in male-dominated fields” and “advocating against structural barriers that limit gender equity.” Formerly a managing director at Goldman Sachs, McNulty is also managing partner at JBK Partners, the private investment firm she founded with her late husband in 2001. PUBLISHER’S SECTION

P r e s i d e n t a n d C eo The Brooklyn Hospital Center Gary G. Terrinoni is working to help his hospital keep up with Downtown Brooklyn’s rapid population growth, and one of his goals is to make the 175-year-old Brooklyn Hospital Center an indispensable health care provider. To that end, he’s overseeing a $25 million renovation of the hospital’s emergency department, which cares for about 70,000 patients a year. He previously served in leadership roles at New Jersey’s Kennedy Health System.

P r e s i d e n t a n d C eo Yoswein New York Joni A. Yoswein had significant hands-on experience before she started the government relations consulting firm that bears her name more than two decades ago. She was a member of the Assembly, worked as a senior legislative staffer and as an assistant commissioner at the New York City Department for the Aging. Her firm provides guidance on projects like the city’s first Ikea in Brooklyn, which “set a new standard for development projects across the five boroughs,” she says.

SOMOS; RICK SCHWAB; MCNULTY FOUNDATION; YOSWEIN NEW YORK

Fou n de r a n d C h a i r m a n Somos Community Care After building a reputation as a health care leader in the Dominican Republic, Ramon Tallaj came to New York City at the request of the Archdiocese of New York – and created Somos Community Care, a network of physicians that serve Medicaid recipients. The doctor’s vision? “To see young talented people entering the medical profession become dedicated public servants,” he says. “It’s on us … to help institute change.”


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legalnotices@cityandstateny.com Notice of Qualification of SIMON QUICK ADVISORS, LLC Appl. for Auth. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/10/19. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in New Jersey (NJ) on 06/04/04. Princ. office of LLC: WeWork Tower 49, 12 E. 49th St., NY, NY 10017. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. NJ addr. of LLC: 360 Mt. Kemble Ave., Morristown, NJ 07960. Cert. of Form. filed with State Treasurer, 33 W. State St., Fifth Fl., Trenton, NJ 08646. Purpose: Wealth management. Notice of Formation of NORTH CROWN TOWN LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/11/19. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Jordan J. Metzger, Esq., - c/o Cole Schotz P.C., 1325 Ave. of the Americas, 19th Fl., NY, NY 10019. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

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Notice of Formation of Howard Schwartz Design LLC filed with SSNY on December 18, 2019. Office: NY County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to LLC: 82 Irving Place, 1B, NY, NY 10003. Purpose: any lawful act or activity. NOTICE OF FORMATION OF IAP Partners LLC Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/06/2019. Office location: NEW YORK County. SSNY has been designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. The Post Office address to which the SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him/ her is: Dontzin Nagy & Fleissig LLP, 980 Madison Avenue, 2nd Floor, New York, New York 10075. The principal business address of the LLC is: 390 Park Avenue, 18th Floor, New York, New York 10022. Purpose: any lawful act or activity. Urban Redwood LLC Arts. of Org. filed w/ SSNY 10/31/19. Off. in NY Co. SSNY desig. as agt. of LLC whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 20 W 38th St, 3rd Fl, NY, NY 10018. Purpose: any lawful activity.

January 27, 2020

Notice of Formation of SPOONFUL MANAGEMENT NY, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/27/19. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. Purpose: Employment entity for NY businesses.

Notice of Formation of SOA SIB GROUP, LLC filed with SSNY on November 04, 2019. Office: Richmond County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to LLC: 1324 Forest Ave, Suite 120, Staten Island, NY 10302. Purpose: any lawful act or activity. Notice of Formation of The Royal Dogs, LLC filed with SSNY on October 07, 2019. Office: NY County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to LLC: 82 Irving Place, 1B, NY, NY 10003. Purpose: any lawful act or activity. COPTS 4 RE, LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 12/19/2019. Office loc: NY County. SSNY has been designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 77 Chambers St., 3rd Fl, NY, NY 10007. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. PPaper Design Company LLC filed Arts. of Org. with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/21/19. County: NY. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: The LLC, 462 W 58th St., PHC, NY, NY 10019. Purpose: any lawful act.

LEGALNOTICES@ CITYANDSTATENY.COM

Notice of Qualification of LESAGA HOLDINGS - 213 MAD-I S O N STREET, LLC Appl. for Auth. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/27/19. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Florida on 1/12/17. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Stiphany Law, 80 SW 8 St., Suite 3100, Miami, FL 33130. Florida addr. of LLC: c/o Stiphany Law, 80 SW 8 St., Suite 3100, Miami, FL 33130. Cert. of Form. filed with Secy. of State of the State of Florida, Clifton Bldg., 2661 Executive Center Circle, Tallahassee, FL 32301. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Notice of Qualification of LESAGA HOLDINGS - 522 W 42 STREET, LLC Appl. for Auth. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/9/19. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Florida on 10/2/19. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Stiphany Law, 80 SW 8 St., Suite 3100, Miami, FL 33130. Florida addr. of LLC: c/o Stiphany Law, 80 SW 8 St., Suite 3100, Miami, FL 33130. Cert. of Form. filed with Secy. of State of the State of Florida, Clifton Bldg., 2661 Executive Center Circle, Tallahassee, FL 32301. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Kan & Ted LLC filed Arts. of Org. with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/20/19. County: NY. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Keith Kantrowitz, 845 United Nations Plaza, 42B, NY, NY 10017. Purpose: any lawful act. Notice of Formation of Hermette Productions LLC filed with SSNY on December 6, 2019. Office: NY County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to LLC: 344 West 11th Street, 4W, NY, NY 10014. Purpose: any lawful act or activity.

Notice of Qualification of TAMARISK NASSAU PLACE, LLC Appl. for Auth. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/20/19. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 12/18/19. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. DE addr. of LLC: 251 Little Falls Dr., Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Notice of Formation of PGD Management, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/24/19. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Drucker Associates, 158 W. 29th St., 3rd Fl., NY, NY 10001. Purpose: any lawful activities. Notice of Qualification of WB HUNTLEY REDEVELOPMENT LLC Appl. for Auth. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/26/19. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 11/04/19. Princ. office of LLC: 1120 Ave. of the Americas, 4th Fl., NY, NY 10036. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. DE addr. of LLC: 251 Little Falls Dr., Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. filed with Secy. of State, Div. of Corps., PO Box 898, Dover, DE 19903. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Notice of Formation of Catalyst Mental Health Counseling, PLLC filed with SSNY on November, 21 st 2019. Office: NY County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Catalyst Mental Health Counseling, PLLC: 230 W. 72nd St, 4F, New York, NY 10023. Purpose: any lawful act or activity.

Notice of Formation of BTWN LLC, filed with SSNY on September 17, 2019. Office: Kings County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of Process to LLC: 1060 Ocean Avenue, F6 Brooklyn, NY 11226. Purpose: any lawful act or activity. Notice of Formation of DCJ PARTNERS, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/10/19. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Cohen & Cohen, LLP, 767 Third Ave., 31st Fl., NY, NY 10017. The regd. agent of the company upon whom and at which process against the company can be served is Richard N. Cohen, Esq., c/o Cohen & Cohen, LLP, 767 Third Ave., 31st Fl., NY, NY 10017. Purpose: Any lawful activity. NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION of Anthony Sperduti, LLC. Authority filed with SECY. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/14/19. Office loc: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 4/11/19. SSNY designated agent upon whom process may be served & mailed to: 324 Lafayette,St., FL2, NY, NY 10012. Cert. of LLC filed with Secy. of State of DE loc: 401 Federal St, #4, Dover DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity

Notice of Formation of MM Merger Sub, LLC, name changed to: MIDBORO MANAGEMENT, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/19/19. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 333 7th Ave., 5th Fl., NY, NY 10001, Attn: Michael J. Wolfe. Purpose: any lawful activities.

LEGALNOTICES@ CITYANDSTATENY.COM


PUBLIC and LEGAL NOTICES / CityAndStateNY.com

January 27, 2020

NOTICE OF SALE Supreme Court County Of Kings

SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK - COUNTY OF KINGS

AGAINST

U.S. BANK NA, SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE TO WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, SUCCESSOR TO WACHOVIA BANK, NA, AS TRUSTEE, FOR CHASE FUNDING LOAN ACQUISITION TRUST, MORTGAGE LOAN ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-OPT1,

Hyacinth Mcculloch, et al, Defendant

V.

PennyMac Corp., Plaintiff

ISTLYN LEWIS, ET AL.

Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale duly dated 3/7/2019 and entered on 3/14/2019, I, the undersigned Referee, will sell at public auction at the Kings County Supreme Court, 360 Adams Street, Brooklyn, NY on February 06, 2020 at 02:30 PM premises known as 1319E 98th Street, Brooklyn, NY 11236. All that certain plot piece or parcel of land, with the buildings and improvements erected, situate, lying and being in the County of Kings, City and State of New York, BLOCK: 8244, LOT: 21. Approximate amount of judgment is $558,755.81 plus interests and costs. Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed Judgment Index # 514303/2017. Dana L. Jenkins, Referee FRENKEL LAMBERT WEISS WEISMAN & GORDON LLP 53 Gibson Street Bay Shore, NY 11706

COUNTY OF KINGS

---------------------------------------------- x

In the Matter of a Custody/Visitation Proceeding VELERIA PHILLIPS O/B/O JUSTIN PHILLIPS, Petitioner, - against ACS-Kings, OLGA NICOLE PHILLIPS, Respondents. ------------------------------------------- x SUMMONS - Docket #: V-19233-19 IN THE NAME OF THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK: To: ACS-Kings, Brooklyn, NY, and OLGA NICOLE PHILLIPS, address unknown A petition under Article 6 of the Family Court Act having been filed with this Court YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to appear before this court on February 10, 2020 at 11:30 AM Purpose: Return of Process Part 20,10th floor Presiding: Hon. Erik S. Pitchal Location: 330 Jay Street Brooklyn, NY 11201 to answer the petition and to be dealt with in accordance with the Family Court Act. On your failure to appear as herein directed, a warrant may be issued for your arrest. Dated: Brooklyn, New York Notice of Formation of Whitney L. Taussig LCSW, PLLC filed with SSNY on December 17, 2019. Office: NY County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to LLC: 225 Lafayette St. Apt 9C New York, NY 10012. Purpose: any lawful act or activity.

290-292 LEONARD STREET LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 12/10/2019. Office loc: Kings County. SSNY has been designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: High Properties, LLC, 10 East 23rd St., Ste. 700, NY, NY 10010. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose.

NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 1, 2019, and entered in the Office of the Clerk of the County of Kings, wherein U.S. BANK NA, SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE TO WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, SUCCESSOR TO WACHOVIA BANK, NA, AS TRUSTEE, FOR CHASE FUNDING LOAN ACQUISITION TRUST, MORTGAGE LOAN ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-OPT1 is the Plaintiff and ISTLYN LEWIS, ET AL. are the Defendant(s). I, the undersigned Referee will sell at public auction at the KINGS COUNTY COURTHOUSE 360 ADAMS STREET, ROOM 224, BROOKLYN, NY 11201, on February 6, 2020 at 2:30 PM, premises known as 616 EAST 42ND STREET, BROOKLYN, NY 11203: Block 4975, Lot 31: ALL THAT CERTAIN PLOT, PIECE OR PARCEL OF LAND, WITH THE BUILDINGS AND IMPROVEMENTS THEREON ERECTED, SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN THE BOROUGH OF BROOKLYN, COUNTY OF KINGS, CITY AND STATE OF NEW YORK Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed Judgment Index # 515317/2016. Philip Kamaras, Esq. Referee. RAS Boriskin, LLC 900 Merchants Concourse, Suite 310, Westbury, New York 11590, Attorneys for Plaintiff.

THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF CWALT, INC., ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-OA14, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-OA14, Plaintiff against MIRIAM RIVERA A/K/A MIRIAM R. RIVERA; JOE R. RIVERA A/K/A JOE RIVERA; ANA RIVERA; JOE RIVERA, et al Defendant(s). Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered on October 25, 2017. I, the undersigned Referee will sell at public auction in Room 224 of the Kings County Courthouse, 360 Adams Street, Brooklyn, N.Y. on the 6th day of February, 2020 at 2:30 p.m. premises described as follows: All that certain plot, piece or parcel of land, situate, lying and being in the Borough of Brooklyn, County of Kings, City and State of New York. Said premises known as 12 Nichols Avenue, Brooklyn, N.Y. 11208. (Block: 4109, Lot: 112). Approximate amount of lien $ 628,907.05 plus interest and costs. Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed judgment and terms of sale. Index No. 511600-15. Doron A. Leiby, Esq., Referee. Stern & Eisenberg, PC Attorney(s) for Plaintiff Woodbridge Corporate Plaza 485 B Route 1 South – Suite 330 Iselin, NJ 08830 (732) 582-6344 *For sale information, please visit www.auction.com or call 800-280-2832*

LEGALNOTICES@CITYANDSTATENY.COM

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NOTICE OF SALE SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF KINGS THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS CWALT, INC., ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-9T1 MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-9T1, Plaintiff AGAINST PATRICK CARRANO AKA PATRICK CARANO, AKA PATRICK I. CARRANO, KATHLEEN SMITH, et al., Defendant(s) Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale duly dated January 08, 2019 I, the undersigned Referee will sell at public auction at the Kings County Supreme Court, Room 224, 360 Adams Street, Brooklyn, New York 11201, on February 06, 2020 at 2:30PM, premises known as 405 GREENWOOD AVENUE, BROOKLYN, NY 11218. All that certain plot piece or parcel of land, with the buildings and improvements erected, situate, lying and being in the Borough of Brooklyn, County of Kings, City and State of New York, BLOCK 5273, LOT 46. Approximate amount of judgment $855,774.64 plus interest and costs. Premises will be sold subject to provisions of fil! ed Judgment for Index# 7008/14. GREGORY M. LASPINA, ESQ., Referee Gross Polowy, LLC Attorney for Plaintiff 1775 Wehrle Drive, Suite 100 Williamsville, NY 14221 67321

Notice of Qualification of LINK INDUSTRIAL PROPERTIES LLC Appl. for Auth. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/27/19. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 09/06/18. Princ. office of LLC: 233 S. Wacker Dr., Ste. 4700, Chicago, IL 60606. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co. (CSC), 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. DE addr. of LLC: c/o CSC, 251 Little Falls Dr., Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. filed with Secy. of State, Div. of Corps., John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Ownership & Investment in real property & all related activities. Notice of Qualification of Landmark Studio Group LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 12/24/19. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 132 E. Putnam Ave., Cos Cob, CT 06807. LLC formed in DE on 9/16/19. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: Cogency Global Inc., 122 E. 42nd St., 18th Fl., NY, NY 10168. DE addr. of LLC: 850 New Burton Rd., Ste. 201, Dover, DE 19904. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activity

Notice of Qualification of Great Lakes Services, LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 1/3/20. NYS fict. name: Great Wolf Services, LLC. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 350 N. Orleans St., Ste. 10000B, Chicago, IL 60654. LLC formed in DE on 7/9/04. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: Cogency Global Inc., 122 E. 42nd St., 18th Fl., NY, NY 10168. DE addr. of LLC: 850 New Burton Rd., Ste. 201, Dover, DE 19904. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes.

Notice of Formation of BACK WHEN, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/23/19. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 382 Central Park West, Apt. 17H, NY, NY 10025. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

41 W 35 LLC filed w/ SSNY on 11/27/19. Office: New York Co. SSNY designated as agent for process & shall mail to: 1270 Broadway, #709, New York, NY 10001. Purpose: any lawful.


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CityAndStateNY.com / PUBLIC and LEGAL NOTICES

SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF KINGS DEUTSCHE BANK TRUST COMPANY AMERICAS, AS TRUSTEE FOR RESIDENTIAL ACCREDIT LOANS, INC., MORTGAGE ASSET-BACKED PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-QS5, V. CHERYL JOHN; ET. AL. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated November 18, 2019, and entered in the Office of the Clerk of the County of Kings, wherein DEUTSCHE BANK TRUST COMPANY AMERICAS, AS TRUSTEE FOR RESIDENTIAL ACCREDIT LOANS, INC., MORTGAGE ASSETBACKED PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-QS5 is the Plaintiff and CHERYL JOHN; ET AL. are the Defendant(s). I, the undersigned Referee will sell at public auction at the KINGS COUNTY COURTHOUSE 360 ADAMS STREET, ROOM 224, BROOKLYN, NY 11201, on February 20, 2020 at 2:30PM, premises known as 407 HAWTHORNE ST, BROOKLYN, NY 11203: Block 4815, Lot 61: ALL THAT CERTAIN PLOT, PIECE OR PARCEL OF LAND, SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN THE BOROUGH OF BROOKLYN, COUNTY OF KINGS, CITY AND STATE OF NEW YORK Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed Judgment Index # 521360/2016. Lawrence W. Schreier, Esq. - Referee. RAS Boriskin, LLC 900 Merchants Concourse, Suite 310, Westbury, New York 11590, Attorneys for Plaintiff. NOTICE OF SALE SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF KINGS, CITIMORTGAGE, INC., Plaintiff, vs. IBEKLIS OLEA, ET AL., Defendant(s). Pursuant to an Order Confirming Referee’s Report and Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale duly filed on January 17, 2019 and an Order Pursuant to CPLR 2004 Extending the Time to Set Sale filed on December 19, 2019, I, the undersigned Referee will sell at public auction at the Kings County Supreme Court, Room 224, 360 Adams Street, Brooklyn, NY on February 20, 2020 at 2:30 p.m., premises known as 339 Wyona Street, Brooklyn, NY. All that certain plot, piece or parcel of land, with the buildings and improvements thereon erected, situate, lying and being in the Borough of Brooklyn, County of Kings, City and State of New York, Block 3758 and Lot 13. Approximate amount of judgment is $930,919.86 plus interest and costs. Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed Judgment Index # 508809/2014. Aaron D. Maslow, Esq., Referee Knuckles, Komosinski & Manfro, LLP, 565 Taxter Road, Suite 590, Elmsford, NY 10523, Attorneys for Plaintiff Cash will not be accepted.

Notice of Qualification of Nochi Blue LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 1/6/20. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 8/25/17. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 5 Franklin Place, #9A, NY, NY 10013, principal business address. DE address of LLC: National Corporate Services, Inc., 203 NE Front St., Ste. 101, Milford, DE 19963. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, PO Box 898, Dover, DE 19903. Purpose: all lawful purposes Notice is hereby given that a license, number 1324695 for on-premise liquor has been applied for by the undersigned to sell liquor, beer, wine & cider at retail in a restaurant under the Alcoholic Beverage Control Law at 204 E. 13 Street, N.Y. ,N.Y. 10003 for on premise consumption. Soothr Limited t/a Soothr Notice of Formation of 42N Partners LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 12/26/19. Office location: NY County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to the principal business address: 275 Greenwich St., Apt. 3-O, NY, NY 10007, Attn: Donald H. Nathan. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Notice of Formation of WF Industrial VI LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 1/10/20. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 80 8th Ave., Ste. 1602, NY, NY 10011. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: Cogency Global Inc., 122 E. 42nd St., 18th Fl., NY, NY 10168. Purpose: any lawful activity.

LEGALNOTICES@CITYANDSTATENY.COM

January 27, 2020 STORAGE NOTICE

Modern Moving Inc. will sell at Public Auction at 3735 Merritt Avenue, Bronx, NY 10466 At 6:00 P.M. on February 11th, 2020 for due and unpaid charges by virtue of lien in accordance with the provisions of the law and with due notice given all parties claiming an interest therein, the time specified In each notice for payment of said charges having expired household furniture & effects, pianos, trunks, cases, TV’s, radios, hifi’s, refrigerators, sewing machines, washers, air conditioners, household furniture Of all descriptions and the contents thereof, stored under the following names: -AMELIO, CARMINE -CASTILLO, JESUS -DIAZ, SANDRA -FITZGERALD, JOVAN L -HENRY, DEBORAH -KUKADIA, KAYLASH -PENA, VIVIAN -ROSADO, RICKY -STUART, STEPHEN

-SANCHEZ, SASHA -TAVERA, WALKIRA -TIWONI, HABIB -WILLIAMS, NATHANIEL II -WEBB, SHAMEIK/ MACK, ROSEANNE SA-

SUPREME COURT - COUNTY OF KINGS CITIMORTGAGE, INC., Plaintiff -against- JOHN MORALES, et al Defendant(s). Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered herein and dated September 23, 2019, I, the undersigned Referee will sell at public auction at the Kings County Courthouse 360 Adams Street, Room 224, Brooklyn, NY on February 27, 2020 at 2:30 p.m. premises situate, lying and being in the Borough of Brooklyn, County of Kings, City and State of New York, bounded and described as follows: BEGINNING at a point on the northerly side of St. John’s Place, distant 265 feet and 4 inches westerly from the northeasterly corner of St. John’s Place and Bedford Avenue; being a plot 131 feet by 18 feet 8 inches by 131 feet by 18 feet 8 inches. Block: 1245 Lot: 62 Said premises known as 679 ST. JOHNS PLACE, BROOKLYN, NY Approximate amount of lien $825,816.46 plus interest & costs. Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed Judgment and Terms of Sale. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Index Number 13974/2014. SHMUEL D. TAUB, ESQ., Referee David A. Gallo & Associates LLP Attorney(s) for Plaintiff 99 Powerhouse Road, First Floor, Roslyn Heights, NY 11577 File# 7254.1134 {* CITY*} Notice of Formation of TTMH New Rochelle Holdings LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 1/7/20. Office location: NY County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Corporate Creations Network Inc., 15 N. Mill St., Nyack, NY 10960. Purpose: all lawful purposes.

Notice of Formation of NSP Richmond Residential, LLC filed with SSNY on January 10, 2020. Office: Richmond County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to LLC: 58 Bowdoin Street, Staten Island, NY 10314. Purpose: any lawful act or activity.

LEGALNOTICES@CITYANDSTATENY.COM

Formation of Jongro BBQ Franchising, LLC filed with the Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/5/19. Office loc.: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The address SSNY shall mail process to Choi Kyung Rim, 1270 Broadway, Ste. 1107, New York, NY 10001. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Notice of Formation of IDEAANDMAKER LTD filed with SSNY on January 2nd, 2020. Office: 154 Grand Street, NY 10016. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to REGISTERED AGENTS INC. 90 STATE STREET SUITE 700, OFFICE 40, ALBANY, NY 12207 . Purpose: any lawful act or activity. PUBLIC NOTICE AT&T proposes to modify an existing facility (new tip heights 52’) on the building at 364 W 19th St, New York, NY (20200032). Interested parties may contact Scott Horn (856-8091202) (1012 Industrial Dr., West Berlin, NJ 08091) with comments regarding potential effects on historic properties. Name: E M P I R E CSS, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 01/07/2020. County: Richmond County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 65 Broadway #1400, New York, NY 10006-2503. Purpose: to engage in any and all business for which LLCs may be formed under the New York LLC Law. PARERGON PROJECTS LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 07/16/2019. Office loc: NY County. SSNY has been designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 30 E 85th St., 8C, NY, NY 10028. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose.


PUBLIC and LEGAL NOTICES / CityAndStateNY.com

January 27, 2020

PUBLIC NOTICE SprintCom, Inc. proposes a new antenna and equipment installation (facility) atop an existing building at 228 Parker St in Newark, Essex County, NJ. SPRINT also proposes new facilities atop existing buildings in Brooklyn, Kings County, NY at 6 Bay St; 1595 Canarsie Rd; 2350 Ocean Ave; 1429 (aka 1445) Shore Pkwy; and 586 3rd Ave. SPRINT also proposes new facilities atop existing buildings in Manhattan, New York City, NY at 4221 Broadway; 2256 2nd Ave; 200-202 E 60th St; 386 Park Ave S, 508 W 26th St; and 95 W Broadway (aka 125-131 Chambers St). SPRINT also proposes new facilities atop existing buildings in the Borough of Queens at 567 Onderdonk Ave in Ridgewood; 33-10 Queens Blvd in Long Island City; 90-10 Ditmars Blvd in Queens; 86-10 109th St in Richmond Hill; 26-19 Francis Lewis Blvd in Flushing; 72-00 51st Rd in Woodside, SPRINT also proposes new facilities atop existing buildings in Richmond and Westchester Counties 98 Vreeland St in Staten Island and 245 King St in Port Chester, respectively. Lastly SPRINT proposes the replacment of two wood utility poles with a 45’ pole at Hillside Ave & 187th St in Jamaica and a 40’ pole 93rd Ave & 75th St in Woodhaven, both in the Borough of Queens, NY. In accordance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, as amended and the 2005 Nationwide Programmatic Agreement for Review Under the National Preservation Act; Final Rule, SPRINT is hereby notifying the public of the proposed undertaking and soliciting comments on Historic Properties which may be affected by the proposed undertaking. Accordingly, if you would like to provide specific information regarding potential effects that the proposed undertaking might have to properties that are listed on or eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places and located within ½ mile of the above address, please submit the property’s address and your comments to: Charles Cherundolo Consulting, Inc. at 976 Tabor Road, Suite 4B, Morris Plains, NJ 07950 or via email at tcns@cherundoloconsulting.com.

Notice of Formation of Dua Maintenance and Construction, LLC filed with SSNY on December 06, 2019. Office: Kings County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to LLC: 2753 Bath Avenue, 3FL, NY, NY 11214. Purpose: any lawful act or activity. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT A LICENSE, SERIAL # 1321210 FOR LIQUOR, WINE, & BEER HAS BEEN APPLIED FOR BY THE UNDERSIGNED TO SELL LIQUOR, WINE, & BEER AT RETAIL UNDER THE ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE CONTROL LAW AT 347 GRAHAM AVE. BROOKLYN, NY 11211. KINGS COUNTY, FOR ON PREMISE CONSUMPTION. MIGHTY DIAMOND RESTAURANT CORP.

Notice of Formation of Wherever You Go Pictures, LLC filed with SSNY on December 16, 2019. Office: Richmond County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to LLC: 21 Egmont Place, Staten Island, NY 10301. Purpose: any lawful act or activity.

LEGALNOTICES@ CITYANDSTATENY.COM

UNCLAIMED FUNDS! Insurance companies We can publish unclaimed funds for you quickly, easily and efficiently. WANT MORE INFO? EMAIL: LEGALNOTICES@CITYANDSTATENY.COM

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January 27, 2020

CITY & STATE NEW YORK MANAGEMENT & PUBLISHING CEO Steve Farbman, President & Publisher Tom Allon tallon@cityandstateny.com, Comptroller David Pirozzi, Business & Operations Manager Patrea Patterson, Administrative Assistant Lauren Mauro

Who was up and who was down last week

CREATIVE Art Director Andrew Horton, Senior Graphic Designer Alex Law, Graphic Designer Aaron Aniton

LOSERS

DIGITAL Digital Marketing Director Maria Cruz Lee, Project Manager Michael Filippi, Digital Content Manager Amanda Luz Henning Santiago, Digital Marketing Strategist Caitlin Dorman, Digital Marketing Associate Chris Hogan, Web/ Email Strategist Isabel Beebe

CHRIS COLLINS

The House hopefuls scored endorsements from NARAL and the Latino Victory Fund. (Where they used to work, but whatever.)

JESSICA RAMOS & NILY ROZIC They got Cuomo on board for e-scooters. He held out for helmets, like a dork.

DONOVAN RICHARDS

With Van Bramer out, he might as well start planning his Queens BP victory party.

RITCHIE TORRES

His bill would stop all those trendy cashless places from freezing out the poor.

RANKING EVERY MEMBER OF THE CITY COUNCIL WITH COLD, HARD MATH

Looks like the White House won’t rescue the Trump superfan from the big house.

MELISSA QUESADA

The state Latino affairs director allegedly left a baby in the tub to attack the child’s father. An ugly situation for the ex-beauty queen.

THE FIFTY OVER FIFTY THE LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENTS OF LEGENDARY NEW YORKERS CIT YANDSTATENY.COM

@CIT YANDSTATENY

January 27, 2020

Cover Andrew Horton

SHELDON SILVER

Getting part of his conviction overturned won’t keep Shelly out of the slammer.

CY VANCE

The Manhattan DA has every progressive on the island out to boot him out of office.

WINNERS & LOSERS is published every Friday morning in City & State’s First Read email. Sign up for the email, cast your vote and see who won at cityandstateny.com.

CITY & STATE NEW YORK (ISSN 2474-4107) is published weekly, 48 times a year except for the four weeks containing New Year’s Day, July 4th, Thanksgiving and Christmas by City & State NY, LLC, 61 Broadway, Suite 1315, New York, NY 10006-2763. Periodicals postage paid at New York, NY and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to City & State New York, 61 Broadway, Suite 1315, New York, NY 10006-2763. General: (212) 268-0442, subscribe@cityandstateny.com Copyright ©2020, City & State NY, LLC

JAMIE LAMOR THOMPSON; LEV RADIN/SHUTTERSTOCK

ALLISON FINE & MELISSA MARK-VIVERITO

(& WORST) ERS

THE REST OF THE WORST

Vol. 9 Issue 3 January 27, 2020

MAK

THE BEST OF THE REST

EVENTS events@cityandstateny.com Sales Director Lissa Blake, Events Manager Alexis Arsenault, Event Coordinator Amanda Cortez, Editorial Research Associate Evan Solomon

L AW

ANDREW CUOMO The guv has to say bye-bye Byford. Yes, the New York City Transit president is leaving, for real. And apparently it’s because of Cuomo’s micromanaging. Byford tried to resign last year, and though he was persuaded to stay, Cuomo was reportedly livid. Now the governor’s in a bind over who could possibly replace the beloved Train Daddy, who seemed to be singlehandedly reviving the struggling transit system. When the city gets a new train step-daddy, can we still visit Byford on weekends?

ADVERTISING Vice President of Advertising Jim Katocin jkatocin@ cityandstateny.com, Account/Business Development Executive Scott Augustine saugustine@cityandstateny.com, Event Sponsorship Strategist Danielle Koza dkoza@ cityandstateny.com, Sales Associate Cydney McQuillanGrace cydney@cityandstateny.com, Legal Advertising Executive Shakirah Gittens legalnotices@cityandstateny. com, Senior Account Executive William Thomas

NYC

LEBRON JAMES & JOHN ZIMMER The Knicks and Nets have been getting terrorized by LBJ for nearly two decades, so in what we assume is an apology for taking his talents to LA, noted actor and cyclist LeBron James is giving free Citi Bike memberships to low-income 16- to 20-year-olds. Zimmer, who runs Citi Bike’s parent company Lyft, gets a boost too for the bike-sharing service – even if it still hasn’t quite reached the West 135th Street YMCA where James made the announcement.

OUR PICK

OUR PICK

WINNERS

In a month when most Democrats are sucking up to Iowa (like, it’s the best place ever and also please caucus for me), Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams slammed the Hawkeye State, telling local gentrifiers to get outta town. But it was a gut check for many New Yorkers. Which do we hate more: intolerance, or hipsters?

EDITORIAL editor@cityandstateny.com Editor-in-Chief Jon Lentz jlentz@cityandstateny.com, Managing Editor Ryan Somers, Senior Editor Ben Adler badler@cityandstateny.com, Special Projects Editor Alice Popovici, Deputy Editor Eric Holmberg, Senior Reporter Jeff Coltin jcoltin@cityandstateny.com, Staff Reporter Zach Williams zwilliams@cityandstateny.com, Staff Reporter Rebecca C. Lewis rlewis@cityandstateny.com, Tech & Policy Reporter Annie McDonough amcdonough@ cityandstateny.com, Staff Reporter Kay Dervishi


MUSEUM OF JEWISH HERITAGE 36 BATTERY PLACE, NEW YORK, NY 10280 THURSDAY, JANUARY 30, 2020 | 9:00AM-4:00PM New York residents rely on its public transportation systems and roads to get everywhere, with varying degrees of success and frustration. Following the release of the MTA’s five-year capital plan and the continuation of long-planned expansion projects, New York’s systems for moving people and information are poised for a huge makeover. The NEW YORK IN TRANSIT SUMMIT will bring together experts across sectors to assess the current state of New York’s transportation systems, break down recent legislative actions, and look towards the future of all things coming and going in New York.

PANEL TOPICS MOVING NEW YORKERS SAFELY RESHAPING NEW YORK’S TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE CAN ALTERNATIVE TRANSPORTATION METHODS SAVE NEW YORK? HOW TECHNOLOGY IS TRANSFORMING PUBLIC TRANSIT

FEATURED SPEAKERS POLLY TROTTENBERG, Commissioner, New York City Department of Transportation ERIC BEATON, Deputy Commissioner for Transportation and Management, New York City Department of Transportation CATHERINE RINALDI, President, Metro-North PHILLIP ENG, President, Long Island Rail Road GEORGE LATIMER, Westchester County Executive Assemblywoman NILY ROZIC, Sponsored legislation on ebikes and escooters CECILIA KUSHNER, Executive VP for Planning, Development, and Transportation, NYC Economic Development Corporation NYC Councilman RAFAEL ESPINAL JR., Sponsored legislation for ebikes Senator LEROY COMRIE, Chair Corporations, Authorities and Commissions Committee Councilman YDANIS RODRIGUEZ, Chair Committee on Transportation JOSHUA BENSON, Deputy Commissioner for Traffic Operations, New York City Department of Transportation RSVP at CityAndStateNY.com/Events For more information on programming and sponsorship opportunities, please contact Lissa Blake at lblake@cityandstateny.com


The Rules of Aging are Changing. AARP New York congratulates the 2020 50 Over 50 honorees for changing the conversation on aging, challenging outdated beliefs, and sparking new solutions so we can all choose how we live as we age. Join the conversation and inspire others to value people regardless of their age. disruptaging.aarp

AARP New York aarp.org/ny @aarpny

Let’s rethink aging.

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