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tigertales

TAKE ME AWAY

Australia | February – March 2017

JOURNEY’S TRENDS

➔ Melbourne Comedy Festival star Becky Lucas gets to grips with what’s new in travel

BEYOND THE BAROSSA

W E E K E N D WAR R IOR S

RAISING THE ROOF

Discover Adelaide’s lesser-known wine regions

Two very different travellers take on Canberra

Al fresco drinking in Melbourne’s rooftop bars


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lycamobile.com.au UNLIMITED Plan S: You must have a minimum account balance of $29.90 to activate the UNLIMITED Plan S. The plan enables you to make unlimited standard national calls to Australian mobile and landline numbers and send unlimited standard SMS to Australian mobile numbers, unlimited minutes to 10 countries: China, Canada, India, Hong Kong, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Singapore, UK and USA, and access up to 3GB plus 3 GB Bonus data (Bonus Data will be expired on 15 February 2017) for 28 days, all while in Australia. When you activate the UNLIMITED Plan S, you cannot use any other Pay As You Go tariff or Saver tariff. Other services such as roaming, data usage exceeding bundle data allowance, or premium service numbers (e.g. 1900 numbers) will be charged at our standard rates (data is charged at $0.07/MB – see: lycamobile.com.au for our current rates). You can have only ONE plan per mobile number at any one time. If there is enough credit in your Lycamobile account, your plan will automatically renew at the end of the 28 days period. If you do not want your plan to renew, dial *190# and follow the instructions to cancel the plans auto renewal. The Lycamobile service is only for personal use. If you use the service unreasonably (e.g. fraudulently or for business purposes), we may suspend or cancel your service. These rates and inclusions are current as of 06/11/2016. We may remove this plan by giving 7 days’ notice on our website at lycamobile.com.au. Any plans already activated at time of withdrawal will continue until expiry of 28 days from activation.


WELCOME ON BOARD

An exciting year ahead for Tigerair Welcome on board and thank you for choosing to fly Tigerair

T

his year is shaping up as another exciting one for Tigerair Australia, with a number of significant announcements. In 2017, Tigerair will mark its 10th year of flying in Australia, and our list of destinations we fly to also continues to grow, with seven new routes launched last year, including Melbourne-Canberra in December. A further two routes (Brisbane-Whitsundays and BrisbanePerth) have been announced and commence March 23 and June 1, 2017, respectively. Watch this space for more exciting developments in this area as we continue to evolve in line with consumer demand. In recent times, there has also been a focus on continuing to add new products and innovations to make booking and flying Tigerair better than ever before. In the past couple of months, we have introduced mobile boarding passes for the first time, further simplifying the Tigerair experience by enabling you to use your mobile device to book,

“Tigerair's list of destinations that we fly to continues to grow, with seven new routes launched last year, including MelbourneCanberra in December� check in and board your Tigerair flight. Another exciting product enhancement introduced in recent times enables Tigerair customers to make an accommodation reservation at the same time as booking a flight at Tigerair.com.au, thanks to our partnership with Booking.com. If you want the best-value deals from Tigerair, remember to plan ahead and book early, as fares will generally rise as demand increases closer to the travel date. Sign up for our free e-newsletter or follow us on social media

(Twitter: @TigerairAU, Facebook: facebook.com/tigerairaustralia, Instagram: @tigerairaustralia) to keep up to date with all news and special deals from Tigerair Australia. Thank you once again for flying Tigerair today. We truly value your ongoing support and look forward to welcoming you on-board again in the near future.

Rob Sharp, Tigerair Australia CEO

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CONTENTS

Destination directory Inside this issue‌ wherever you're going, we've got you covered

39

ENCOUNTER

ENCOUNTER

PRISON ART

REEF SLEEP

See the stunning art inside Fremantle Prison.

Get the Great Barrier Reef all to yourself.

F E AT U R E

T R AV E L T R E N D S Melbourne Comedy Festival's Becky Lucas.

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59 66

F E AT U R E

WILD BUNCH Discover Adelaide's hidden wine regions.

Editorial & Art Editor Paul Chai Art Director Yamin Spendlove Creative Director Stephanie Goh Sub Editor Adam Scroggy Production Manager Ian Scott Cover photo Becky Lucas, photographed by David Rouse

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Advertising Commercial Manager Joe Bird (02) 9186 9104 jbird@citrusmedia.com.au Printed by Bluestar Web

Two different weekends in Canberra.

Management Financial Controller Stuart Harle Director Jim Flynn Publisher Steve Maidens (02) 8188 3670 steve@citrusmedia.com.au Tiger Tales is published on behalf of Tigerair by Citrus Media, PO Box 20154, World Square NSW 2002 Tel. (02) 9186 9186 citrusmedia.com.au

Š 2017 All rights reserved. Reproduction or distribution in any form, in whole or in part, is prohibited without prior written permission from the copyright holder. Citrus Media is not responsible for the views and opinions of contributing journalists. Although the advice and information in this book are believed to be accurate and true at the time of going to press, neither the authors nor the publisher can accept any legal responsibility or liability for any errors or omissions that may have been made.


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THE POINTY END We have your next great travel stor y

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top bars ê Meet the f o o gy 's r ps e n y r

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anberra êGet the G er C rea ov t Ba r r i er


THE POINTY END

T HE R OUND-UP W HAT E V E R YO U ' R E I N T O, T H E R E ' S P LE N T Y T O S E E A N D D O

E X HIBI T ION S

F E S T I VA L S

DAV I D H O C K N E Y: CURRENT Curated by the National Gallery of Victoria in collaboration with David Hockney, this exhibition includes paintings, digital drawings, photography and video works from one of the world’s most influential living artists. Melbourne, until March 13; ngv.vic.gov.au

AD E L A I D E F E S T I VAL The festival program has highlights like the 2017 version of the play Secret River (pictured), based on Kate Grenville’s 2005 novel, punk performance piece MDLSX from Silvia Calderoni and a night of opera from US musician Rufus Wainwright. Adelaide, March 3-19; adelaidefestival.com.au

AD M A N: WAR H O L BEFORE POP February sees the opening of the Art Gallery of New South Wales’ peek into the early life and career of Andy Warhol. Adman: Warhol before pop is a rare opportunity to see some of Warhol’s earliest work drawn from The Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh. Sydney, until May 28; artgallery.nsw.gov.au

F OOD C HAL AWA N Get down to Fitzroy for some “croctails” at Thai restaurant Chalawan (the name means crocodile in Thai). The Ta-Pao-Thong Bellini puts an Asian twist on the classic; pair it with Thai bites like crisp calamari with creamy salted egg aioli and an ocean trout curry. Melbourne; chalawan.com.au

P E R F OR M A NC E G LE N N S H O R R O C K A N D B R I A N C AD D Celebrating a half-century of making music, two Aussie music legends once again take the stage at Perth’s Astor Theatre in March. Expect all the hits like Little Ray of Sunshine, Ginger Man and Reminiscing. Perth, March 18; astortheatreperth.com

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M E LB O U R N E I N T E R NAT I O NAL C O M E DY F E S T I VAL The country’s biggest belly laughs return to the Victorian capital with regulars like Paul Foot, the Raw Comedy national open-mic night and British comedian Josie Long’s new show Something Better (for more see feature, page 66) Melbourne, from March 26; comedyfestival.com.au

KOOZA The Cirque du Soleil team presents Kooza at the Big Top at Melbourne’s Flemington Racecourse. The show is being touted as a return to a more traditional form of circus performance, though it will be given the Cirque du Soleil twist. Melbourne, until March 26; cirquedusoleil.com

D O U B LE B AY M AR K E T This eastside market in Sydney specialises in fresh organic produce but also has stalls that offer plants, flower and eco-friendly arts and crafts. Grab a coffee from the coffee cart and a spinach and cheese gozleme while you browse. Sydney, Thursday mornings; facebook.com/ DoubleBayMarket


IT’S MY

LIFE BLOOD Lucinda Dennis, age 28 Fashion and lifestyle blogger, spicedfox.com

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THE POINTY END

Spend an evening on Melbourne’s rooftops

WORDS PAUL CHAI

“W

ho doesn't like drinking beers in the sunshine?” asks Lara Whalley, venue manager at the Corner Hotel in Richmond (pictured above). “Sitting in a rooftop beer garden watching trains roll into the city with a refreshing drink in your hand is what Melbourne summers are all about!” Late last year, the Corner (57 Swan Street, Richmond; cornerhotel.com), one of Melbourne’s venerable rock pubs, relaunched its rooftop bar. It made food the focus with head chef Shannon Rice filling the menu with pub grub share plates – like a whole Korean fried chicken or 12-hour beef short ribs – as well as goodies from the new outdoor kitchen and barbecue.

In the CBD, the latest rooftop bar offering is Good Heavens that opened in December, a proudly retro place from the team behind Fancy Hank’s, one of the city’s best barbecue joints. Hank’s moved to Bourke Street in October and with it finally came a rooftop space to play with. “People can never get enough of a good rooftop,” says Daragh Kan from Good Heavens. That has meant a summer of rooftop fun for Melbourne drinkers, so we have provided you a perfect night of skipping from one rooftop to another. Start at Madame Brussels (59 Bourke Street; madamebrussels.com), the crazy old aunt of Melbourne rooftop bars. Madame Brussels ê

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THE POINTY END

Sleep in the sky NOTEL You can sleep on a rooftop in a silver Airstream caravan, courtesy of Notel, a quirky hotel concept that launched last year. There are six caravans with ensuites on the roof of a Melbourne carpark; or for the full experience, get the Airstream with Benefits (which comes with a hot tub). 388 Flinders Lane, Melbourne; notelmelbourne.com.au

ST JEROME'S THE HOTEL From Jerome Borazio, he of the Midas touch and Laneway Festival, comes a glamping option on the roof of Melbourne Central shopping complex. Spend the night in a safari-style tent, grab drinks at the small bar area and meet your fellow campers. Melbourne Central, 271 Little Lonsdale Street, Melbourne; stjeromesthehotel.com.au

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“Good Heavens is the kind of bar that Fancy Hank would open if he went to Miami”

MELBOURNE'S NEWEST ROOFTOP BAR , GOOD HEAVENS, DOESN'T TAKE IT SELF TOO SERIOUSLY AND LOVES A GOOD FLUORO COCKTAIL

is a permanent rooftop garden party full of fake grass, pastel-coloured lawn chairs and parasols with a cheeky drinks list like the Madame’s Fruity Double D Cups and the popular Love Juice – a mix of Bacardi, berries, apple juice topped off with sparkling wine. Next, walk a few doors down to Good Heavens (Level 2, 79 Bourke Street; facebook.com/goodheavensrooftop), which is billed as “the kind of bar that Fancy Hank would open if he went to Miami.” The drinks

list reads like a rehab ward for fluoro 80s cocktails with the Harvey Wallbanger, Pina Colada and Blue Lagoon all getting a do-over. Food is nachos, chicken ribs and simple bar snacks, or head downstairs to Frank’s if you’re feeling the need for something meatier. A short walk to Russell Street brings you to Rooftop at QT (133 Russell Street; qthotelsandresorts.com), the new rooftop bar at Melbourne’s QT Hotel. Opened late last year, Rooftop at QT has a huge, succulent garden terrace looking onto the city’s buildings, and bar staff are sending out signature cocktails like the Tom Kha Gai Margarita, which adds coconut, sage and chilli to the classic drink. Just a cocktail umbrella’s throw from QT is Bomba (103 Lonsdale Street, Melbourne; bombabar.com.au), a sleek New York-inspired joint with copper stools and a retractable roof to fend off the unpredictable Melbourne weather. Bomba is the rooftop space for the Spanish restaurant below, which means spot-on cocktails and great tapas. Try a classic margarita, made with a wide range of top-shelf tequila, and pair it with leek and manchego croquetas and a spicy patatas bravas. Finish the night at Ferdydurke (239 Lonsdale Street; ferdydurke.com.au) a poster-covered party spot with the entry in Tattersalls Lane. Drinkers ascend the stairs and grab themselves an alcove, or a spot on the balcony, where they share jugs of sangria: either Pineapple & Sage, or Watermelon, Chilli & Pomegranate. You can share the super-sized melted cheese sandwiches (zappiekanki) too, or have a Little Lebowski pulled pork burger. Tunes are loud and the crowd is out for a big night, but if you really want to kick on after here, dance it off in Section 8, the groundfloor sister bar behind Ferdydurke.

t ig e r a ir f l ie s to Melbourne from 10 destinations; tigerair.com.au

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THE POINTY END

Why I live in

p er t h Musician Katy Steele, formerly lead singer with Little Birdy, has a new solo album, Human, that mixes her distinctive vocals with a more electronic sound than previous outings. Katy has been on the road a lot, but returns to Perth regularly to recharge. What makes Perth a great place to live? The super slow pace makes for a relaxed lifestyle. Where are the best places to get a good meal/drink? I like Aisuru Sushi (208 William Street, Perth; aisurusushi.com.au), Bread and Common in Fremantle (43 Pakenham Street, Fremantle; breadincommon.com.au) and Brika in Highgate (3/177 Stirling Street, Perth; brika.com.au). For a drink, I like to get a vino at The Bird (181 William Street, Northbridge; williamstreetbird.com) or Late Night Valentine (446 Beaufort Street, Highgate; latenightvalentine.com). Where do you go to wind down? I like walks in the forest or a swim in the ocean. Nothing seems to heal more than a swim in the ocean. Where do you go for inspiration? I like to visit galleries to see some art, see live music, and I find cooking quite inspirational. I like to just use whatever spices and ingredients I have lying around and see what I can create. What is the one thing a tourist must do? Go see Rick Steele play at the Grosvenor Hotel (339 Hay Street, Perth; thegrosvenorperth.com.au) on a Wednesday night, then grab a bottle of prosecco and head to Kings Park for the evening. Tell us something only a local would know. Jessie’s Curry Kitchen on Beaufort Street in Mount Lawley (facebook.com/JessiesCurryKitchen) is good, homely Indian/Malay food. Super lovely couple who make delicious, humble food.

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MORE ENTERTAINMENT Find out what comedian Becky Lucas thinks about recent travel trends.

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SEE K AT Y STEELE Katy takes her new album Human on the road starting on February 16 in Adelaide, and she plays the Perth International Arts Festival in her home town. For more information on the tour, visit katysteele.com.


An experience rich in heritage. Built in 1899, The Perth Mint is Australia’s oldest operating mint and Perth’s premier destination to experience the magic, allure and wonder of gold. • Come and experience Australia’s rich golden history. • See the world’s largest gold coin – weighing 1 tonne and worth over $50 million. • Witness the wonder of a traditional gold pour. • Touch gold bullion worth more than $500,000. • Marvel at real Australian coins being minted before your eyes. • Purchase unique West Australian treasures including exquisite Argyle Pink Diamonds and Kailis Australian Pearls. Tax free sales available.

Open 7 Days – 9am to 5pm Gold Exhibition – Shop – Café

perthmint.com.au/visit


THE POINTY END

THE SPLURGE

QT HOTEL Melbourne

W

hy it’s worth it: Opened late last year, the first Melbourne outing for the QT group has the expected quirks of the QT brand but comes tailored for the local market. The vibe of the Russell Street address is one of the historic rag trade that used to exist in the “Paris End” of Collins Street. But there are other noteworthy additions like the hundreds of books

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used to make a wall as you walk up the entrance staircase, and the cheeky lifts that come with a variety of random ribald observations made by the lift’s recorded voice. Bang for your buck: You go to QT to be wowed by design in ways you didn’t expect. In the public spaces this means risqué wall murals and hand-


picked vintage plates adorning the walls, acres of naked flesh covering the stalls of the toilets and loads of well-curated public art. You could spend the whole weekend in the hotel’s walls or in QT’s very own laneway (this being Melbourne) that has a small bar called Hot Sauce serving Korean food. The digs: The rooms are simple but with thoughtful flourishes such as the small rugs from Melbourne artist James Beattie, whose geometric designs subtly reference the famous Melbourne street art. QT sports its

THE PL ACE TO BE Robert Marchetti's modern Euro bistro, Pascale Bar & Grill, is the perfect spot to start and end your day during your stay at QT.

own special mattress, the QT Gel Bed, an exercise in comfort that comes covered with specially selected rugs and throw pillows. A freestanding clawfoot bath sits in the corner of the room, and the minibar is stocked with local brews and chocolates from Chocamama, which my kids nag us to visit every time we set foot in the CBD. Must-do experience: Apart from grabbing a drink at their Rooftop at QT bar (see Melbourne Rooftops story, page 13), the signature restaurant Pascale Bar & Grill has to be your dinner spot, especially when you live upstairs. The main dining space at QT has a large, open kitchen; comfy, retro-style armchairs; and plenty of exposed concrete above. The “Paris End” of Collins Street features again in the Euro-inspired cuisine of executive chef Robert Marchetti. The damage: A QT King room starts at $350, or try the bed-and-breakfast rate starting at $410, where you can start the day in Pascale. 133 Russell Street; qthotelsandresorts.com

t ig e r a ir f l ie s

WORDS PAUL CHAI

to Melbourne from 10 destinations; tigerair.com.au

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THE POINTY END

Spice it up at Sydney’s Central Park

WORDS CONNOR MCLEOD

W

hen Sydney property developers tell you they’ve created an “urban village” or a “mixed-use development”, there is often cause for concern. These manufactured suburbs have a high failure rate in a city that’s still trying to get Darling Harbour right after 40-odd years of renovation. But the Harbour City’s newest such precinct, Central Park, has finally got the mix right. The area, right next to Central train station where the old Kent Brewery once stood, is now a mix of high-rise apartments, parklands and restaurants and bars, but at its heart is something Sydney has needed for years – a permanent hawker market, called Spice Alley. Sydney’s climate

is made for outdoor eating, and this is a city that loves its Asian food. The idea seems well overdue. Located in Kensington Street, this collection of Asian street food specialists is housed in a series of 19th-century heritage terraces that were once owned by the Kent Brewery and used to house coopers, brewers and other key staff. Marcus Chang is the CEO of developer Greencliff, a Singapore-based property group that is responsible for Spice Alley, its first foray into a commercial development. Like many Singaporeans, the team at Greencliff are food mad, so food stalls made sense. “People had tried previously and failed,” Marcus says. “But being able to put it into an old setting like terraced houses ê

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THE POINTY END from the 1800s has helped, and Chippendale feels like a natural extension of Chinatown.” Selecting the stallholders was also relatively easy. “We love our food and every time the team from Singapore was in town we would go looking for the most authentic street food at places like Ginger & Spice in Neutral Bay,” Marcus says. Alex Lee – the chef behind Ginger & Spice – has now opened Alex Lee Kitchen, the first stall in Spice Alley, which is turning out some of the lightest, fluffiest roti (Indian flatbread) in town teamed with a rich, deep Malaysian-style chicken curry to dip it in. Lee’s style is nonya cuisine, a fusion of south-east Asian cooking styles, and he also turns out Chatterbox Chicken Rice, his take on the national dish of Singapore: steamed chicken breast, rice poached in chicken stock and a mix of fresh vegetables and a side of chicken soup. It’s a simple dish that can incite passionate debate in the Lion City, and I would happily hold Lee’s dish up against Singapore’s finest. Next door, Old Jim Kee is a little slice of Singapore with authentic char kway teow (stir-fried noodles), a rich, soy sauce-based noodle dish with fresh prawns and spicy chunks of Chinese sausage – though he also serves the less-traditional “Singapore Noodles”, an Aussie-only creation from the dark days of RSL Chinese restaurants that gets a welcome makeover here. Thai stall Bang Luck is run by Tiw Rakarin from Vietnamese chain Mama’s Buoi and puts out some great pad Thai and green curries, as well as slow-cooked pork ribs and dumplings. The fourth and final stall, Hong Kong Diner, is the real dumpling king here, though. This stall, run by the team behind Liverpool Street’s Chef’s Gallery, has an all-day yum cha menu with cha siu bau (BBQ pork buns) and sesame prawn toast, but the standouts are the prawn dumplings with a thin, almost translucent skin and no shortage of fresh prawn meat, and the

PERMANENT NOODLE MARKETS Previously Sydneysiders had to queue at the transient annual summer noodle markets in Hyde Park, but now they can get hawker-style food anytime.

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fish dumplings, soft white fish centres with a prawn tail for decoration. In traditional hawker style, drinks and coffees are served separately at a small kopitiam (Singaporean-style coffee shop). A big draw for Spice Alley is also the fact it is cashless, with diners using Tap & Go or a specially designed Kopi-Tiam Cashcard, which allows families to let the kids loose to pick food without worrying about cash. After such a feast you can walk it off by touring the rest of Central Park. Just across from Spice Alley is the park with the public artwork Halo by artists Jennifer Turpin and Michaelie Crawford as its centrepiece –

“Being able to put Spice Alley into a heritage setting like these old terraces really helped”


Where to stay A new boutique hotel is the perfect base for a foodie weekend away.

THE OLD CL ARE HOTEL Set in the one-time Chippendale boozer and the adjacent Kent Brewery site, this boutique hotel has been lovingly restored by Peng Loh, a Singaporean businessman with a passion for doing up heritage properties, such as his Hotel 1929 in Singapore’s historic Keong Saik Road. The new Old Clare is a fine example of Loh’s quirky and original style with a lobby bar called simply The Clare, a rooftop pool, and clever rooms like the C.U.B Suite, which is located in the old Carlton and United Breweries boardroom on the Kent Brewery site. Dining options include Automata in a converted adjoining warehouse and Kensington Street Social from Michelin-starred chef Jason Atherton. The Old Clare Hotel, 1 Kensington Street, Chippendale; theoldclarehotel.com.au

SPICE ALLEY HAS BROUGHT A TRADITIONAL H A W K E R - S T Y L E M A R K E T T O S Y D N E Y, W H E R E YOU CAN MIX AND MATCH STREET FOOD FROM DIFFERENT ASIAN CULTURES

a huge, 12-metre-diameter, yellow ring that turns and tilts in the Sydney breeze. The park is packed full of skaters filming their antics, kids paddling in fountains and couples wandering through the lush greenery heading for the more obvious food offerings on-site, like Ribs & Burgers and Doughnut Time. We bump into friends who’ve just come from a wine and cheese afternoon at Italian restaurant Olio, also on Kensington Street. “We have been open for a year but it is always changing,” Marcus says. “We are opening East Side Grill [from Hong Kong celeb chef Stanley Wong] this year and you have the Old Rum Store [a pop-up private kitchen] and Bistro Gavroche.” Kensington Street in Central Park may just prove that the best way to create a new buzzy precinct is to appeal to the taste buds. For more information, visit kensingtonstreet.com.au and centralparksydney.com.

t ig e r a ir f l ie s to Sydney from eight destinations; tigerair.com.au

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AVAILABLE AT MYER,


THE POINTY END THE FEAST 1 0F 2

WHAT IS GYPSY BREWING ALL ABOUT? Hiring out space in an established brewer can help kick-start a new brew

WORDS PAUL KRISTOFF ILLUSTRATION KEV GAHAN, THE ILLUSTRATION ROOM

A

few years ago, there weren’t too many people who had heard the term “gypsy brewing”, but as craft beer becomes more popular in Australia, it’s a term you hear far more often. At its core, gypsy brewing means that aspiring brewers – who want to produce beer to sell commercially, but don’t have the capital or time to set up their own brewery – hire out spare space at an established bricks-and-mortar brewery. It’s a concept that has become popular because it benefits everyone. For the gypsy brewer, it’s a chance to see if brewing beer commercially is really for them, and as there isn’t a huge capital outlay, it’s an easy way to take risks and experiment. For the bars and pubs that stock gypsy brews, it’s an opportunity to offer something different, and for the consumer it’s an opportunity to try new and exciting beer that might have never made it to market. The existing brewery charges the gypsy brewer a fee to hire out space that would have otherwise been unused, and in doing so, gets to help out an up-and-coming player in the game. It’s a great example of how the craft beer scene in Australia

is really community focused rather than competitive – everyone wants to increase the size of the proverbial pie. I recently spoke to gypsy brewers Jacqui, Tim, Maggie and Dion from CoConspirators Brewing, who decided to start brewing beer commercially after their passion for brewing led them to win several home brewing competitions. They all have day jobs, and told me that one of the reasons gypsy brewing was perfect for them was that it gave them the opportunity to learn things from other brewers that they might not have discovered until much later – or not at all – had they been brewing solo. After a successful few years, many gypsy brewers open their own brewing facilities and become fully fledged breweries in their own right. ê

G Y P S Y BRE WER S Also known as contract brewing, the practice of gypsy brewing has found favour around the world where some of the brewers like Mikkeller (see main article) have become full time gypsy brewers. Mikkel Borg Bjergso formed Mikkeller in 2005 and now works with some of the biggest breweries in the world.

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THE POINTY END In fact, many breweries that hire out space for gypsy brewers started out as gypsy brewers themselves and are now “paying it forward”. But while some prefer to continue to operate as gypsy brewers, others have chosen a completely different path. Take Melbourne’s BrewCult as an example; co-owner and head brewer Steve “Hendo” Henderson loves gypsy brewing and has built a solid reputation and high demand over the past few years. However, instead of moving to the assumed next level and opening a BrewCult brewery, Hendo has instead opened the BrewCult Bar, which serves all of the current BrewCult beers on tap. It’s a great example of the flexibility gypsy brewing provides, and proves there really are no rules. The downside, of course, is that there’s only so far you can grow without your own facilities. But sometimes this restriction just becomes a matter of perspective. One of the world’s most renowned gypsy brewers, Mikkeller, brews beer in facilities all over the world and is able to use the scale of the facilities in which he brews to offer his creations to beer lovers in over 40 countries around the world. Gypsy brewing is a fantastic concept, and some of Australia’s best brewers today are either gypsy brewers or started as such. As you would guess, due to the nature of gypsy brewing, it’s not possible to provide you with breweries to visit, but here are some great craft beer spots that support Australia’s gypsy brewers and often feature their beers on tap.

BrewCult Bar (Brunswick, VIC) The aforementioned BrewCult is perhaps the only example of a gypsy brewer bar in Australia. It opened in November 2016 and offers punters the chance to sample all of BrewCult’s core range beers, along with seasonal and one-off creations, and a few beers from other independent brewers. Hendo lives just around the corner, so there’s a good chance you’ll be able to meet and have a chat with the brewer.

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Wayward Brewing Co (Camperdown, NSW) Gypsy brewing for four years in Sydney’s inner west, Wayward Brewing Co has since moved into an old converted warehouse. As well as housing their brewery, the warehouse also features a welcoming beer hall featuring 12 taps. Most of these feature Wayward’s own beers, but there are always a few set aside to showcase local gypsy brewers like Merchant Brewing Company and Doctor’s Orders Brewing.

The Scratch (Milton, QLD) Brisbane’s The Scratch was opened with the aim of sharing owners Ben Nichols and Kieran Ryan’s passion for “weird, wild, wonderful and interesting beers”. The tap selection here is constantly rotating and often features beers from local gypsy brewers like Brewtal Brewers and Croft Brewing Company. If you’re hungry, you’re even allowed to bring your own food.

Petition Beer Corner (Perth, WA) Since opening in 2015, Petition Beer Corner has established itself as one of Perth’s premier craft beer venues. Across its 18 taps you can find craft beers from around the world, but thankfully it’s not just the big names that are featured and it’s not uncommon to find beers you’ve never heard of from gypsy brewers across Australia and further abroad. The food here, while pricey, is also very good.

NOLA Craft Beer & Whiskey (Adelaide, SA) Located in the former stables off Rundle Street, NOLA is a New Orleans-influenced bar with 18 taps showcasing beers from South Australia’s independent breweries and those further abroad. There are also over 70 American and Australian whiskeys along with Creole and Cajun food. Keep an eye out for beers on tap from local gypsy brewers Molly Rose Brewing and Malt Fiction.

THE FEAST 2 0F 2

"GYPSY BREWING IS A GREAT EXAMPLE OF HOW THE CRAFT BEER SCENE IN AUSTRALIA IS REALLY COMMUNITY FOCUSED RATHER THAN COMPETITIVE. EVERYONE WANTS TO INCREASE THE SIZE OF THE PIE" THE CITY L ANE Paul Kristoff is the editor-in-chief of food, travel and culture online magazine The City Lane, and he is one third of the craft-beer podcast team Brunswick Beer Collective. Visit thecitylane.com and brunswickbeercollective.com to find out more.


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THE POINTY END

T HE P L AY L I S T Pack these on your next trip away

TECH

IPHONE “So I can take photos and talk to my family.”

AHEAD OF THE PACK

APP

WHATSAPP “No matter where I am, I can talk to friends and message them.”

Gontran Cherrier, French artisan baker

THUNDAMENTALS

EVERYONE WE KNOW

interview paul chai albums matt shea

Ü Parisian baking star Gontran Cherrier has nearly 30 outlets around the world, and he opened his first Australian store last year in Melbourne's Collingwood. The bakery displays Gontran’s trademark killer croissants, and is the first outlet to offer a cafe. Early 2017 has been busy as he has been in Australia tweaking the localised menu, as well as perfecting the use of native ingredients like lemon myrtle in his baking, and taking part in festivals in Melbourne. That all adds up to a lot of travel. “On average I spend one week away every five weeks of the year,” Gontran says. The creative baker is usually found in the window seat on a plane (“I can take pictures from the sky. My phone is full of them!”) and his most recent holiday was in Ibiza and Formentera in Spain. “I like that travel changes the way you think and broadens your mind,” he says. “I love the feeling of discovery and meeting new and different people. Plus, travel gives me ideas for new products in my boulangeries.” Gontran Cherrier, 140 Smith Street, Collingwood; gontrancherrier.com.au

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After the introspection and all-round excellence of 2014’s So We Can Remember, Thundamentals return to more familiar ground. The Blue Mountains crew are in a giddier place here, the songs both heart-warming and hilarious. Ideal for… exploring the Blue Mountains National Park GE AR

MY CHOPARD WATCH “I like to keep an eye on what time it is back home so I know when my baby son is asleep and awake.”

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TECH

LAPTOP “To work and stay in contact with friends and business colleagues.”

3 GE AR

SUNGLASSES “I travel to lots of sunny places!”

PVT

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THE POINTY END

See the art of Fremantle Prison

WORDS TIM RICHARDS

“A

rt is an interesting thing inside a prison,” says guide Janine Della Bosca. “Is the prison supposed to be punishing you or rehabilitating you? There’s a tension between the two when it comes to art.” That tension was never greater than in the early 1990s, when Fremantle Prison was about to close. In the heart of Perth’s port city on the Indian Ocean, this grim, convict-built establishment seemed designed to deliver punishment. But a glimmer of light broke through into the dark, cramped cells in those final days. A number of prisoners with artistic talent were allowed to

paint and draw on their walls, and this art can now be viewed on a special monthly tour. On this hot day, Fremantle Prison has a stark quality, the bright sunshine making its rough-hewn limestone walls glow. Our guide is a cheerful woman sporting pink hair and a warder-like uniform of blue shirt and black trousers. She’s an artist herself, with sympathy toward the prisoners who left their marks on the prison’s walls. Leading us into an exercise yard once used by prisoners convicted of the most serious offences, Janine tells us about the Aboriginal inmate and artist Peter Cameron. He was the driving force ê

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THE POINTY END

Better than porridge Check out these spots for a quick bite near Freo Prison

BREAD IN COMMON A lively restaurant serving innovative dishes and its very own house-baked bread. 43 Pakenham Street; breadincommon.com.au

RAW KITCHEN Delicious vegan food served in an atmospheric, industrial space. 181a High Street; therawkitchen.com.au

99 PALLETZ An airy cafe with retro furniture and an inventive menu. 177 High Street; no website

STRANGE COMPANY Smooth cocktail bar in a quiet side street. 5 Nairn Street; strangecompany.com.au

THE ODD FELLOW Cool, contemporary bar and live music venue. 9 Norfolk Street; theoddfellow.com.au

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behind the large mural on the far wall, which unusually includes elements from three different Indigenous traditions. There’s a representation of the Wagyl, a local creator spirit taking the form of a snake; a Wandjina creator spirit from the Kimberley region; and an “x-ray” fish design from Arnhem Land in the Northern Territory. As the prisoners came from different regions, their art could be blended in this unconventional way. Stepping through to another exercise yard, this one for long-termers, we find urban scenes that reflect the harsh lives of the prisoners: drinking in pubs, taking part in a bank robbery. After this grit, it’s refreshing in the next yard to see beautiful murals featuring Australian bush scenes. These were painted in the tradition established at Carrolup, a former government-run Aboriginal camp and school in the state’s south-west. For a brief period in the 1950s, the Carrolup style became famous, with exhibitions held across Australia. Then we head indoors. The first cell we crowd into is decorated with drawings resembling traditional tattoo art: skulls, snakes and demons surrounding a sketch of a clock without hands, an apt symbol for “doing time”.

“Bobby Thornton’s 1989 mural of a Chinese dragon fighting a peacock is vibrant in its colours and energy”


PUNISH OR REHABILITATE? FREMANTLE PRISON OFFERED INMATES THE CHANCE TO TURN THEIR PRISON TIME INTO ART

In Reggie Moolarvie’s cell, we’re treated to colourful bush scenes. In this drab, tiny space, they seem like a window to freedom. There’s more variety as we range up and down the prison’s narrow gangways to cells on different levels. Bobby Thornton’s 1989 mural of a Chinese dragon fighting a peacock is vibrant in its colours and energy; Peter Cameron’s cell bears a serpent produced in dot-painting style; and a detailed Cubist portrait on a corrugated iron door was left behind by Shane Finn. There’s even a rare sample of art from the convict era – covered in plaster, but since revealed. James Walsh, a forger, was first admitted to the prison in 1854 and made finely detailed sketches of people and angels on his cell walls. Later in life, we’re pleased to hear, Walsh became a successful artist. Though this institution was as grim as it gets, it seems good could come from it after all. Fremantle Prison’s Art Tour takes place at 4pm, first Saturday each month. Fee $26 adult, $22 concession, $16 child. For more information, fremantleprison.com.au.

t ig e r a ir f l ie s to Perth from Melbourne, Sydney, Denpasar, and Brisbane starting June 1; tigerair.com.au

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Winner of the IFEA World Festival & Event City Award for 7 years in a row! For more great events go to sydney.com


THE POINTY END

THE PASSENGER

TRAVEL & DRIVING 1 0F 2

A round-table chat with three different travellers. This issue’s topic: road trips Paul Chai, road tripper

of the final shootout between the Kelly Gang and the police is better than any museum. Though the quirky Ned Kelly’s Last Stand is well worth ducking into; this often-divisive theatrical take on the bushranger legend is nutty and original – full of ghostly projections, loud gunfire and scary jumps – if a little unhinged, and is something you’ll only find by taking a detour on a road trip. You find these places because road trips let you be spontaneous and follow your nose. When you’re on a road trip, the scenery doesn’t just shoot past the window; you’re looking at the subtle

changes in the landscape for hours. You can see epic cloud formations, watch the scrub turn to forest and keep a look out for local wildlife. We put down all the screens and books at sunset on a long drive and give a prize to the first person to spot a roo hopping through the fields by the side of the road. The time in the car together leads to good chats and can help you reconnect with friends and family, because life at home is just too hectic sometimes. A road trip allows you to slow down and catch up with what is ê going on in each other’s lives.

ILLUSTRATION GREGORY BALDWIN, THE ILLUSTRATION ROOM

A fly-drive holiday is perfect for me. As a regular road tripper I know the ways in and out of my city pretty well, so to fly into somewhere new and then hit the road is a great way to start a holiday. On a long drive you see more of the country, you can stop at places of interest, find out-of-the-way cafes and uncover historic spots you didn’t know existed. A few hours out of Melbourne we always stop in Glenrowan, where Ned Kelly had his last stand. My parents used to stop here on road trips to Sydney, and now I stop with my kids. Standing right at the site

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THE POINTY END TRAVEL & DRIVING 2 0F 2

Road trips are a perfect excuse to make a playlist, and to discover music we often don’t find time to listen to at home. Music is as essential to road trips as petrol and car snacks: you need the upbeat for daytime, some moodier night tunes, and some classics to keep you singing along when you get the halfway-there blues. Cheaper flights have opened up some of the most classic road trips Australia has to offer, so discover the Great Ocean Road, take the back roads from Melbourne to Sydney, or climb into the Victorian alpine region. Just hit the road.

Connor McLeod, road blocker Road trips are necessary sometimes, but they are never fun. They are romanticised in movies with ideas of freedom and escape, but really they are just a collection of boredom, fatigue and bad takeaway food. Where’s the freedom in the whole car being forced to pull over when one person needs a loo break? Where’s the escapism in being trapped in a tin can for hours on end with nothing to do but stare out the window or zombie out in front of Facebook or Instagram? Yes, road trips are much celebrated as a place to listen to music, but realistically, the more people you have in the car the less likely you are to agree on the soundtrack. Road trip playlists are for car advertisements. One part of road trips that movies never talk about is the traffic. The “wide

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open road” of myth is usually preceded (and followed) by the “slow-crawling road full of cars”. Even in the sticks you get trucks to overtake, people who can’t decide whether to overtake you or let you overtake them, and caravan drivers doing 70kmh in the right lane. I also hate the obsession of most road trip drivers to “make good time”. This seems to be an endless calculation of how long to stop, when to get back on the road, and whether or not to stop in a town for food or wolf down a takeaway burger on your lap while you drive. This goes against the pukeworthy idea that “the journey is more important than the destination”, and yet most people I’ve road tripped with are all about making good time. I realise that road trips can take you great places, but to me they’re a necessary evil, not a thing to be celebrated or deified. Just wake me up when we get there.

Sarah Mitchell, happy passenger I can do a road trip, but only as a passenger. The driver has the boring bit, but as long as I can check Facebook, rule the tunes and read then I’m happy to hit the road with a mate or two.

"ROAD TRIPS ARE ROMANTICISED IN MOVIES, BUT THEY ARE JUST A LOT OF BOREDOM AND FATIGUE"

I don’t really get the excitement surrounding road trips, but the down time in a moving car can be useful. Technology has made road trips a place where I can check emails, watch a movie on my laptop or catch up on some bingewatching on TV. I realise these things aren’t part of the celebrated canon of the free-wheeling road trip, but I love the ability to get stuff done while driving. I may actually love road trips even more when we’ve perfected the driverless car; then I can go on a solo road trip, clear any backlog of work, and catch up with mates via Skype instead of having to sweat it out with them on the road. On the rare occasions I’m not connected, a road trip can give you time to think, something we often lose in day-to-day life – some blue-sky time to plan or dream without having to think about anything important. Again, this suits the passenger but perhaps not the driver. As a passenger I can take a nap, let my eyes wander or rock out without keeping my eyes on the road. I really don’t know why a driver would be a big fan of road trips as the whole things seems like work. Get me out and about, drive me somewhere fun, but I can’t get behind the road trip as an event – more of a means to an end. That said, if I end up somewhere fun with an empty inbox and some Instagram moments, then that’s okay by me.


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THE POINTY END

Get the Great Barrier Reef all to yourself

WORDS AND PICTURES DEBORAH DICKSON-SMITH

T

he Great Barrier Reef is famous – world famous – so you would be forgiven for thinking that, these days, if you want a Great Barrier Reef experience, you will be in the company of 200 others on a hectic day trip. And it’s true that, in some places, the reef plays host to hordes of visitors for just four hours each day – so, short of chartering your own private yacht, how do you visit the reef in the other 20 hours you have left? Called “Reefsleep”, Cruise Whitsundays offers this very experience on its Reefworld platform, moored on the edge of Hardy Reef 40km off the Whitsunday Islands. Not only do you get to see the reef as the reef would like to be seen – a colourful yet tranquil ecosystem; a friendly “Reef Society”

going unhurriedly about its daily business – but you also get to sleep out in a swag under the stars in the silence of the outer reef. The day starts the same as it does for day guests: Cruise Whitsundays’ fast and stable Seaflight catamaran collects passengers from either Airlie Beach, Daydream Island or Hamilton Island, before pulling alongside the Reefworld pontoon at 11am on the dot. The pontoon springs to life like a clockwork toy town, and the day guests are busy trying to fit in all the activities. There’s snorkelling to be done, and diving opportunities to be had. The glass bottom boat departs every half-hour, and scenic helicopter flights depart every 20 minutes for that famous “Heart ê

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of the Reef” fly-by. Then, at 2:45pm the horn sounds announcing the 3pm boat departure. As the boat disappears, fast becoming a dot on the horizon, the silence is deafening. We have the pontoon all to ourselves – seven guests, a dive guide and our hostess. What should we do now? Try an introductory “Discover Scuba Dive”? Go for a snorkel? Soak up the sun? Maybe... nothing? Three of the group opt for the Discover Scuba Dive, possibly because, as snorkellers, they see the divers below getting better facetime with the Napoleon wrasse and angelfish; or maybe because the pontoon’s gantry allows newbie divers to submerse slowly, making an easy transition into the watery world. This is a beautiful part of the reef. And while five dives off the same pontoon sounds excessive to non-divers, be assured, every dive is different. Our first is a drift dive: one of those where you’re almost blown like a tumbleweed through the marine landscape. Half way through, we’re overtaken by a huge school of

THE POINTY END

“The reef is a different place at night; coral polyps are in full bloom, fire urchins glow in the dark, and while some fish hide, others are out to play”

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SLEEP ON THE REEF Reeflseep offers guests the chance to see this natural wonder at their own pace once the day trippers have left the pontoon – and then rise to bacon and eggs.

See the “Reef Three” Where else can you dive with these guys?

A F LY I N G P E R S I A N C A R P E T Hardy Reef is home to a diverse range of marine life – especially colourful nudibranchs and flatworms, like the flying Persian carpet flatworm.

W AT C H A T I T A N A N D ANGEL DANCE A titan triggerfish and an angelfish, that is. These two were actually circling around a scrap of food.

SEE TURTLES SOARING ACROSS THE SK Y Well, almost – as you watch the resident turtles swim around the pontoon, you'll also glimpse a few white puffy clouds reflected in the perfectly flat, still water.

bumphead parrotfish, which then turn round and swim back over us. They’re so dense that they visibly darken the waters around us. The sun sets as we head off for our third dive of the day, and the other five passengers head for the top deck for sunset drinks. The reef is a different place at night; coral polyps are in full bloom, fire urchins glow in the dark, and while some fish hide under the coral to sleep, others are out to play. We return to the pontoon, greeted by the aromas of a sizzling barbecue, and before long our three-course dinner is served. In the distance, lightning strikes along the coast momentarily light up the horizon, but so far away we don’t hear a sound. The only noise close by is the occasional plop in the surrounding blackness, as small fish are chased by big fish and the resident turtles nibble at the algae on the pontoon. While we enjoy a few more drinks, our hostess quietly sets up the swags on the top deck under the stars. Turning in, the swags are comfortable, and the ocean breeze regulates the temperate so it’s just right. Overhead, the Milky Way arcs across the sky, creating again that feeling of expansiveness; space to dream. We wake up the following morning, greeted by a milky white sun that’s struggling to get itself through the haze and into the sky proper. The sea is so glassy flat, ice-skating seems more appropriate than snorkelling. We head out for an early-morning dive, getting to see the reef as it comes to life for the day, while our host once again fires up the barbecue. Bacon and eggs have never smelt so good. After breakfast, we contemplate how we can make the most of having the reef to ourselves for the remaining few hours, knowing that at 11am toy town starts up again. But we’ve had our time on the reef, and – at least for those moments – it was all ours. If you would like to roll a swag out in the middle of the Great Barrier Reef, you can find out more at cruisewhitsundays.com.

t ig e r a ir f l ie s to the Whitsunday Coast from Sydney, and from Brisbane starting on March 23; tigerair.com.au

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THE POINTY END

We sent a drone to hover above Parliament House in Canberra so you can scope out the hot spots to visit... 1

PARLIAMENT HOUSE You may not be able to roll down the lawns anymore due to security concerns, but you can still visit the heart of democracy in Australia, watch Question Time and see bills debated by politicians. aph.gov.au

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NATIONAL MUSEUM Visit one of the best collections of historic artefacts in the country and see the current exhibition Kaninjaku: Stories from the Canning Stock Route, showing the route's impact on the Indigenous community of the region. Until June, 2017 nma.gov.au

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L AKE BURLEY GRIFFIN Much of Canberra's city life takes place around the banks of the famous lake. visitcanberra.com.au

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MOUNT AINSLIE Walk, cycle or drive to the lookout at the top of Mount Ainslie and you can get a look at one of the country's most heavily designed cities – as well as plenty of local wildlife. visitcanberra.com.au

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BARTON Named after Sir Edmund Barton, our first Prime Minister, this suburb is a foodie destination with a great range of cafes and restaurants. visitcanberra.com.au

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drone's-eye view 3

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pa r l i a men t hou se C A NBERR A

DRONES FOR HIRE We'd like you to meet dronesforhire.com.au – Australia's largest online directory of drone operators. Their team sent us this stunning drone shot of Parliament House. To get images of your house, construction site, or even to map a large area, visit dronesforhire.com.au.

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THE POINTY END

Discover Sydney’s secret garden

WORDS JO STEWART

S

itting on a smooth, flat rock looking out over Sydney Harbour with the unmissable white sails of the Sydney Opera House glittering in the distance, I’m trying to imagine what it would feel like to see a fleet of large boats approaching, when I’d never seen a sail boat before in my life. Of course, it’s an impossible feeling for me to accurately muster up, but an important one to attempt to understand: what the local Indigenous people must have felt when European settlers descended upon Sydney more than 200 years ago. I’m sitting with Jody Orcher, an Indigenous guide who is taking me around Sydney’s Royal Botanic Garden as part of the garden’s Aboriginal

Heritage Tour. She explains that because this is the site where some of the first moments of contact were established between Indigenous and European societies, this area holds incredible historic and cultural significance – something many people don’t think about or realise as they go about their day. There are packs of runners pounding the pavement, parents pushing prams and tourists posing for selfies with majestic fig trees. I wonder how many of them stop to consider the Indigenous heritage of the area? Many people feel they have to head to the Top End for an Indigenous encounter, but on this tour they are right under the noses of Sydney City residents and visitors. ê

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THE POINTY END

“You don't need to head to the Top End for a great Indigenous experience” Over the course of an hour and a half, we wander around the sun-dappled gardens, learning about local Indigenous culture and customs along the way. At no point does it feel like a lesson; instead, it feels like a chat with an old friend. Jody explains that while her ancestors were not from this part of Sydney, she’s been given the okay to share the knowledge of the people whose country we stand on. She shows me plants that are perfect for weaving baskets, tree bark that was used to make carriers for newborn babies, and rocks that were used to sharpen spears. I’m also shown a small green leaf that when mixed with water acts as a natural antiseptic. Pulling off a few leaves, we find a tap and then rub the leaves between our hands to develop a light foam, just as Indigenous people would have done thousands of years before. As a keen cook (who is well on her way to launching her own line of jams and seasonings using native fruits and botanicals), Jody also gives me the low-down on the local bush tucker – and Sydney has plenty of it.

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The details While walking along, she grabs some lemon myrtle leaves that, when infused in hot water, make a soothing tea perfect for relieving sore throats. With the native flavours of bush foods like lemon myrtle, finger lime, saltbush and Kakadu plum creeping onto menus in restaurants around Australia, bush tucker is hitting the mainstream in a big way, and Jody plans to be a part of that scene once she launches her own bush tucker range. In a “here’s something I prepared earlier” moment, Jody pulls out a wagon full of items crucial to Indigenous life. There’s clapping sticks for ceremonial use and flat stones for grinding seeds and plants. While I’m having a poke through the collection, Jody sneaks off to the kitchen and boils some water for us to share some tea made with the leaves she picked along the way. Before Mr Thomas Twining and the Tetley Brothers ruled the tea merchant game, this is how it was done. And, dare I say, the tea tastes as good – if not better – straight from the tree.

t ig e r a ir f l ie s to Sydney from eight destinations; tigerair.com.au

Discover Sydney's Indigenous history

Aboriginal Heritage Tours run at Sydney’s Royal Botanic Garden every Wednesday, Friday and Saturday from 10am – 11:30am, excluding public holidays. Suitable for all ages, the tour costs $39 per person and bookings are advised. Book online at the Royal Botanic Garden website: rbgsyd.nsw.gov.au


AFTER 6'3 6'1 5'11

5'11

BEFORE

5 10cm TALLER

www.TALLER.com.au

TM


Big day out: around Australia in 24 hours There is a time and a place for everything. We travel around the country for a full day and find out exactly when and where you want to be

WORDS CONN0R MCLEOD

PHOTO DESTINATION NSW

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DAY TRIPPING

T

ravel is all about serendipitous moments – being in the right place at the right time – but that is a lot harder than it sounds. Still, with a bit of help you can try to time your visits right, whether it is a dawn swim at one of Sydney’s famous beaches or a late-night snack at one of Melbourne’s best-known party spots. For the purposes of this story we take our lead from The Beatles – we’ll follow the sun – from the crack of dawn to the wee small hours of night, and see where it takes us.

4AM – FISHING TRIP Kangaroo Island Guests are getting set to climb aboard the Kangaroo Island Fishing Adventures (kangarooislandadventures.com.au) charter boat, but these early birds are not in search of worms – they are chasing tuna, pink snapper, leatherjackets and King George whiting. Set on a private harbour at Western River this fishing charter company also has private cottages nearby so you can come home and make your very own seafood barbecue – fresh fish teamed with Kangaroo Island produce like cool-climate wines, local cheese and even local gin. It’s worth getting up for.

5AM – BONDI BEACH SWIM Sydney One of the world’s most famous city beaches, Bondi’s famous stretch of sand can be busier than a department store on Black Friday most days. But come at dawn and you’ll have a bit more space and you’ll see the beach at its tranquil best.

6AM – THAT FIRST COFFEE Melbourne Melbourne’s early-morning coffee junkies start lining up about now for that first caffeine hit of the day. Try Sbriga (3/280 King Street; sbriga.com.au) or Little Bean Blue (15 Little Collins Street; facebook.com/LittleBeanBlue). ê

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7AM – FISH MARKETS Sydney The chefs have already been and gone but punters still come early to the Sydney Fish Markets (sydneyfishmarket.com.au) at opening time to secure the freshest catch. Our pick: the stand-alone seafood store, Claudio’s (pictured right), at the market entrance.

8AM – BEACH YOGA Perth On Swanbourne and City Beach in Perth early risers are saluting the sun at a beach yoga or Pilates class. Beach Pilates (beachpilates.com.au) offers a range of classes for all levels.

9AM – HANG GLIDING Brisbane Novice gliders are taking a morning tandem flight from the summit of Mount Tamborine with Hang Glide Queensland (hangglidequeensland.com.au), the less adventurous are just watching from down below.

11AM – KILLER BRUNCH Hobart Brunch is a national pastime but you will find Hobart foodies at Pidgeon Hole (93 Goulburn Street, West Hobart; pigeonholecafe.com.au), a petite cafe serving up dishes like baked eggs with Weston Farm ham.

10AM – GET YOUR ART ON Everywhere The nation’s art lovers are passing through the doors of our great galleries. Try the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra (Parkes Place, Parkes; nga.gov.au), Melbourne’s National Gallery of Victoria (180 St Kilda Road, Melbourne; ngv.vic.gov.au) or QAGOMA in Brisbane (Stanley Place, South Brisbane; qagoma.qld.gov.au).

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TAKE TO THE SKIES AROUND MT. TAMBORINE

12PM – WATERFALL SWIM Coffs Harbour At Dangar Falls, just north of Dorrigo, keen walkers are hiking to the falls and cooling off with a dip.

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What’s on at the Australian War Memorial From Family Tours to special exhibitions, exploring the Discovery Zone to Drop-in Craft, there is something for everyone at the Australian War Memorial.

Last Post Ceremony At the end of each day, the Memorial farewells visitors with its moving Last Post Ceremony. At each ceremony the story behind one of the 102,000 names on the Roll of Honour is told. The ceremony begins with the singing of the Australian National Anthem, followed by the poignant strains of a Lament, played by a piper. Visitors are invited to lay wreaths and floral tributes beside the Pool of Reflection. The Ode is then recited, and the ceremony ends with the sounding of the Last Post.

Middle East and Afghanistan exhibition A new exhibition on Australia’s involvement in the Middle East is now on display within the existing Conflicts 1945 to today galleries. This display looks at Australian involvement from the Gulf War through Iraq and Afghanistan, and includes some 220 items from the Memorial’s collection.

For Country, for Nation exhibition Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander stories of military service in times of war and peace are told in a new exhibition at the Australian War Memorial. For Country, for Nation explores themes of remembrance and tradition through family histories, objects, art, and photographs.

Find out more at awm.gov.au

Explore

the Cyclist shop

SHOP.CYCLIST.COM.AU


DAY TRIPPING

1PM – PORK ROLL TIME Sydney At Marrickville Pork Roll (236A Illawarra Road, Marrickville; no website) the line of workers on lunch break is growing as they jockey for the famous banh mi full of crisp barbecue pork, crunchy vegetables and secret sauce.

2PM – QUESTION TIME Canberra Keen citizens are sitting down to an afternoon session at Parliament House (Parliament Drive, Canberra; aph.gov.au) to watch the MPs take questions. Check times before visiting as parliament needs to be in session, but it is a great way to see what our pollies get up to.

MELBOURNE’S COFFEE DRINKERS S TAR T E ARLY

3PM – GETTING THE BILL Sydney It’s been a long, languorous lunch for diners at Quay (quay.com.au), Peter Gilmore’s famous digs in the Overseas Passenger Terminal. Their four-course lunch degustation might have included palm heart congee with pearl oyster, abalone and black vinegary laver – but, by now, diners are starting to file out.

4PM – SWEET TREAT Melbourne At Queen Victoria Market (513 Elizabeth Street, Melbourne; qvm.com.au) the churro van sits on Peel Street. Fans of the sweet Spanish doughnuts get them freshly cooked, crunchy, and with a side order of salted caramel sauce – and they prepare to get themselves covered in plumes of icing sugar.

5PM – SUNSET CRUISE Darwin Guests are getting ready to board Sea Darwin’s (29 Stokes Hill Road, Darwin; seadarwin.com) Suns et Cruise around Darwin Harbour. They cruise around and watch the sun set over Fannie Bay, and feast on a dinner ê of fish and chips on Cullen Bay Beach.

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! W O N E L ON SA

WEBSITE womensfitness.com.au SUBSCRIBE magshop.com.au/womens-fitness IPAD EDITION au.zinio.com/womensfitnessAU


DAY TRIPPING

6PM – SUNDOWNER Perth Drinkers are raising a glass to the end of another day at seaside spots like Bathers Beach in Fremantle (47 Mews Road, Fremantle; bathersbeachhouse.com.au), where cocktails include a kiwi margarita, which adds some kiwi fruit to the classic drink.

7PM – EVENING RUN Brisbane Runners are legging it along the banks of the Brisbane River as the final rays of sun turn the water a dark orange. Favourite trails include the waterside boardwalk at New Farm that is lined with huge fig trees.

8PM – SHOW TIME Everywhere Theatregoers are heading out to a night at the theatre. They might be hitting a musical in Melbourne, like Book of Mormon at the Princess Theatre (163 Spring Street, Melbourne; marrinergroup.com.au), going indie at the Sydney Theatre Company’s Wharf Theatre for murder ballad The Bleeding Tree (from March 9, The Wharf, 4 Hickson Road, Walsh Bay; sydneytheatre.com.au) or seeing Every Brilliant Thing at Queensland Performing Arts Centre (March 8-11, Melbourne Street & Grey Street; qpac.com.au).

9PM – CULINARY WOWING Melbourne One of the hottest tables in town, if not the country, is Ben Shewry’s Attica (74 Glen Eira Road, Ripponlea; attica.com.au). By now, guests are halfway down the rabbit hole of the degustation menu that might include simple descriptions – like marron, quandong, pearl or salted red kangaroo and bunya bunya – but complex flavours and artistic presentation.

10PM – NIGHTCAP Adelaide At Gondola Gondola (1 Peel Street, Adelaide; gondolagondola.com.au) in the small bar-heavy strip, drinkers are ordering a Japanese whisky or top-end sake in this modern Asian diner. ê

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DAY TRIPPING

1AM – SLICING IT UP Sydney Revellers in basement rock joint Frankie’s Pizza (50 Hunter Street, Sydney; frankiespizzabytheslice.com) are getting peckish, so they have moved from the postercovered band room to the adjoining late-night pizzeria to grab a Dante’s Inferno – spicy sausage, tomato, mozzarella and leeks. All that rock ‘n’ roll karaoke makes a person hungry.

2AM – SINGING UP A STORM Melbourne There’s more traditional karaoke going on here, where someone is belting out a rousing rendition of Robbie Williams’s Angels in one of the colourful rooms at KBox Karaoke (52 La Trobe Street, Melbourne; kbox.com.au).

3AM – HEADING HOME Melbourne

“Travel is all about those serendipitous moments – timing is everything” 11PM – BOOK SHOPPING Melbourne The city’s biggest and best-loved bookshop is Readings in Carlton (309 Lygon Street, Carlton; readings.com.au) that is open until 11 at night. Shoppers are browsing the walls and walls of books, checking out the staff picks and falling in love with the written word.

12AM – STARGAZING Cairns The clear night sky of Far North Queensland is ideal for astronomy, so amateur stargazers head to Thala Beach Nature Reserve observatory (5078 Captain Cook Highway, Oak Beach; thalabeach.com.au) where they can use the binoculars and large telescopes to spot red giants, star clusters and planets.

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SUNRISE TO SUNSE T, THERE IS ALWAYS A RIGHT PL ACE TO BE

Revellers at Collingwood’s late-night hot spot Le Bon Ton (51 Gipps Street, Collingwood; lebonton.com.au) might be ordering an Uber (they needn’t rush; the kitchen stays open til 5am on Friday and Saturdays), but they’ve already ordered chilli cheese fries, a brisket sandwich and cocktails like the Le Bon Ton martini.

t ig e r a ir f l ie s to 12 destinations across Australia; tigerair.com.au


HOLIDAY MUST-DO Wildlife galore, shows to amaze, closer experiences, segways for safaris, high-ropes to dare, & fun to be had!

Established in 1947, Currumbin Wildlife Sanctuary was one of the Gold Coast’s first wildlife tourism parks. As a not-for-profit, funds are re-invested back into the Sanctuary and one of Australia’s largest wildlife hospitals.

28 Tomewin Street, Currumbin, 4223.


CANBERRA’S FAVOURITE WEEKLY MARKET

EVERY SUNDAY 10am-4pm * ESTABLISHED

1994

*

Located minutes from the Parliamentary Triangle, visit the Old Bus Depot Markets — a showcase of talented creatives plus the vibrant atmosphere of our award winning, contemporary urban market.

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CERTIFICATE OF EXCELLENCE 2016

WINNER AUSTRALIAN TOURISM AWARDS HALL OF FAME

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obdm.com.au

Shows & PresentationsM

orning Session Afternoon Session

NSW Summer School Holidays ONLY

Dolphin & Seal Kissing

9:30am

12:30pm

3:30pm

Marine Magic Presentation

10:00am

1:00pm

4:00pm

10:45am

1:45pm

4:45pm

11:15am

2:15pm

-

Penguin, Turtle & Fish Feeding REPTILE WORLD

* Only In School Holidays


DE S T IN AT ION C A NBE R R A

S UE

is a travel writer who grew up in Canberra, now rediscovering its natural surrounds.

weekend warriors ONE

DESTINATION, TWO DIFFERENT K ANG ARO OS VS CULT URE

ADVENTURES

N ATA L IE

is an interstate visitor keen on Canberra’s cultural offerings.

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WEEKEND WARRIORS

TREES COMPA N Y The National Arboretum Canberra (Forest Drive, Weston Creek; nationalarboretum.act.gov.au) is an audacious project: they’re growing 100 forests from across the globe. It’s my new go-to spot – the view over Australia’s Bush Capital is fabulous.

ON ROO WATCH TIME FOR A WA L K One of my favourite walks, Mount Ainslie, starts behind the Australian War Memorial (Treloar Crescent, Campbell; awm.gov.au). It’s not easy, but there’s a good chance of seeing kangaroos, and the view across Lake Burley Griffin to Parliament House is postcard-worthy.

Late afternoons are a good time for kangaroo spotting. Mount Ainslie is reliable, but even the lawns of the Government House (home to the Governor-General) are known to have eastern greys. I usually try the lookout off Lady Denman Drive.

S UE

visits a baby forest, spots kangaroos and grabs some fish and chips.

f r id ay

12:00

13:00

16:00

THE A R T OF COFFEE I really enjoyed wandering the National Portrait Gallery (King Edward Terrace, Parkes; portrait.gov.au) and I’ve still got time for a late coffee (the cafe closes at 4:30pm) and a look at their excellent gift/book shop.

A R T OF THE M AT TER First stop has to be the National Gallery of Australia (Parkes Place, Parkes; nga.gov.au). So many major names, including Matisse, Monet, and Jackson Pollock – this is the home of his controversial Blue Poles piece. I could spend all afternoon here, but after a quick browse I grab a bite in the cafe, in part for the view over to Lake Burley Griffin.

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SCUL P TURE S TROL L It’s just out the back of the building, but the Sculpture Garden feels like one of the NGA’s hidden secrets. By visiting between 12:30 and 2pm, I catch the mist from the Fog Sculpture wafting through the bushland.


DESTINATION CANBERRA

S TARG A ZING ON THE MOUNTAIN Good timing. Mount Stromlo Observatory (Cotter Road, Weston Creek; facebook.com/ MtStromlo) is running its monthly open night. These only happen outside Daylight Saving, but in summer, there are Friday Astronomy On Tap sessions instead: drinks, dinner and debates.

YACHT S UP I head to the lake to laze on the lawns outside the Canberra Southern Cross Yacht Club (Lotus Bay, Mariner Place, Yarralumla; cscc.com.au/yacht-club). Perhaps I should I get into sailing? Kayaking seems less work, and another good option. The Paddle Hub just across the bay has kayaks for rent (canberra.ymca.org.au/sailing).

SE A FOOD DINNER Still at the Yacht Club, it’s time for fish and chips. Downstairs and outside is the place to be. The kids run on the grass while the adults enjoy a glass of wine. Ducklings paddle past. Cute.

17:00

18:30

17:30

N ATA L IE

visits the National Gallery, the Portrait Gallery and has a monster drink.

A MONS TER C A L L I pop downstairs for a quick drink at Monster Kitchen and Bar (monsterkitchen.com.au). Cosy but stylish; no wonder it’s popular.

T WICE THE L UXUR Y I check in at Hotel Hotel, my home for the weekend (New Acton, Nishi, 25 Edinburgh Avenue; hotel-hotel.com.au). As the flagship property in Canberra’s newest cultural precinct, New Acton, Hotel Hotel’s interiors were created by designers and artists.

NIGHT AT THE THE ATRE An easy 15-minute stroll to catch a performance at The Canberra Theatre (Civic Square, London Circuit; canberratheatrecentre.com.au). I’m keeping dinner light – just a snack now from the Theatre’s Foyer Bar, as I’ve booked an Asian meal at the nearby (and much-lauded) AKIBA (akiba.com.au) after the show.

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ON THE HUNT FOR A PL AT Y PUS Binoculars poised, I’m sitting quietly hoping to see platypus. Later in the day is better – they don’t like the full sun, but I’ve been lucky here before, especially if it’s cloudy. Tidbinbilla is also a top spot for a BBQ too; just watch the emus.

GE T TING SOME SUPPLIES It’s early but the Capital Region Farmers' Market at EPIC (Flemington Road and Federal Highway, Kenny; capitalregionfarmersmarket.com.au) is already humming. I pick up BBQ and picnic supplies for the weekend’s outings and drag myself away quickly.

N ATURE TIME I love the drive to Tidbinbilla Nature Reserve. (141 Paddys River Road, Paddys River; tidbinbilla.act.gov.au). Just 40 minutes from the city, it’s a relaxing, if winding, bush drive. My first stop on the 54.5 square kilometre reserve is the large koala enclosure. It's a perfect way to see them in their natural habitat.

S UE

visits a farmers' market, goes bobsledding and resists a yabby jaffle.

S AT UR D AY

08:00

10:30

12:00

A R T S IN THE BUSH Time to go bush. I drive 20 minutes (15km) to the western fringe of Canberra to check out the not-for-profit Strathnairn Arts Association (90 Stockdill Drive, Holt; strathnairn.com.au), set in a converted 1920s homestead.

CUP OF THE DAY Early breakfast at The Cupping Room (1/1-13 University Avenue; thecuppingroom.com.au). Canberra’s cultural precincts are ever widening, and this is a good example – it’s between New Acton and the CBD in a former no man’s land for foodies. My tip? Arrive early on a weekend; queues start early.

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SHOPPING IN BR A DDON Canberra’s hippest shopping culture is at Lonsdale Street in Braddon. I’m here for the small homewares, furniture and gifts at Handsomepretty in the Ori building (handsomepretty.com.au).


DESTINATION CANBERRA

SE A SON A L DINNER OL D-SCHOOL CINEM A BOBSL EDDING IN THE FORES T After a stop at Gibraltar Falls (near Woods Reserve), I head to Corin Forest (1268 Corin Road, Paddys River; corin.com.au), where the Southern Hemisphere’s longest alpine sled course sits amongst the eucalypts. It’s crazy fast, but I slow down to check out a kangaroo.

Back in the city in New Acton, I check out the spectacular wooden stairs leading from the Palace Electric Cinema (2 Phillip Law Street; palacecinemas.com.au) up to Monster Kitchen and Bar. So tempted by their famous yabby jaffle, but dinner awaits.

14:00

I always eat well at Mocan & Green Grout (1/19 Marcus Clarke Street). A local and seasonal focus means the menu is ever changing, and I bring a few friends for dinner as it’s mostly share plates.

17:30

20:00

N ATA L IE

goes shopping in Braddon, goes bush and goes out for Italian.

ITA LIA N FOR DINNER I contemplate dinner at Muse (musecanberra.com.au), also in the East Hotel. Looks great, but instead I end up spending ages in their bookshop, also home to numerous cultural events, before heading next door for Italian at Joe’s Bar (joesateast.com).

RUR A L A R T WORK S After browsing Strathnairn’s public galleries and the sculptures dotted through the gardens, it’s time for a cuppa while enjoying the views across this 9.5-hectare rural property.

S WEE T SURPRISE I head to East Hotel (69 Canberra Avenue, Kingston; easthotel.com.au) for a drink. This is harder than it sounds: first I’m distracted by the “free-range” newsagency in the lobby, then by the hotel’s famous lolly jars.

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E A RLY MORNING WA L K I’m out early for a walk around Mt Majura Nature Reserve, part of the Canberra Nature Parks, the series of hills and ridges found just a stone’s throw from many Canberra homes. Despite it being a mountain, there are plenty of short, flattish tracks here – a nice option for a Sunday.

N ATION A L MUSEUM VISIT CH AI TIME Time for a chai at Ivy & The Fox café (Old Canberra House, 73 Lennox Crossing, Acton; ivyandthefox.com). Hidden up the back of the Australian National University’s campus, the setting is superb: it’s housed in a former residence built in 1913 and surrounded by bushland.

It’s just a short walk from the ANU campus to the National Museum of Australia (Lawson Crescent, Acton; nma.gov.au). I duck in for a look, and then continue exploring this part of the foreshore.

S UE

sips some chai, walks Lake Burley Griffin and gazes at the stars.

S UND AY

09:00

11:00

12:00

BOOK S A ND L UNCH

SMOOTHIE OPER ATOR Breakfast is at Double Shot cafe (7/18 Duff Place, Deakin; doubleshotdeakin.com.au). It’s only a short drive from Parliament House, but most tourists don’t detour this way. They should; the food, the smoothies and the vibe are all excellent.

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G A L L ER Y VISIT I drop in to Canberra’s largest privately run gallery, Beaver Galleries (81 Denison Street, Deakin; beavergalleries.com.au). It has been here since 1975 and has four separate exhibition spaces.

Back near Parliament House, I lunch at Bookplate cafe (bookplate.com.au) at the National Library of Australia (Parkes Place; nla.gov.au). I’m entranced by the stained glass windows and torn between sitting inside to admire them, or heading outside for the view across Lake Burley Griffin.


DESTINATION CANBERRA

SERENE S TROL LING Lake Burley Griffin’s shoreline is over 40km long, so I jump in the car and head for the serene stretch of walking and cycling track that lies between Yarralumla Gallery and the Oaks Brasserie (Weston Park Road, Yarralumla Nursery; ygob.com.au) and Government House, known as Westbourne Woods.

14:00

HEL L O, POSSUM BBQ BY THE WATER Finally, a BBQ. Black Mountain Peninsula (Garry Owen Drive, off Lady Denman Drive, Acton) is a local favourite; I remember coming here a lot as a kid. Then, I liked the playground; today, I’m happy with the views and goodies I bought at yesterday’s Farmers' Market.

16:00

I make a note to admire the stars tonight. Even without a telescope, they’re good in Canberra, thanks to all those trees that are an integral part of the city’s design. Maybe I’ll even take my torch out and look for possums.

19:00

N ATA L IE

A FIN A L E V ENT There's a good chance something interesting will be happening at Smith’s Alternative (76 Alinga Street; smithsalternative.com): it’s open till midnight and is a Canberra institution. It’s ostensibly a bookshop, but they host great events.

HIGH COUR T CONCER T After walking off lunch, it’s time to sit back and take in a free Sunday Concert held in an unlikely cultural institution: the High Court of Australia (Parkes Place; hcourt.gov.au). The high ceilings and vast foyer provide a fantastic backdrop, and I’m glad I’ve booked; these monthly events fill up fast.

gets a shot of coffee, visits the National Library and sees a concert in the High Court.

A R T A ND POLITIC S I nearly forgot Parliament House. (Parliament Drive; aph.gov.au.) I’ve missed today’s last tour (that was at 3:30pm) but mostly I want to check out Arthur Boyd’s 20-metre wide tapestry, Untitled (Shoalhaven Landscape) that sits in the Great Hall.

FANCY AN ADVENTURE? If you want to be one of our Weekend Warriors, get in touch.

tigertales@citrusmedia.com.au

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TRAVEL TRENDS

PHOTOS DAVID ROUSE

Tackling baffling words like “babymoon” and “bleisure”, comedian Becky Lucas takes aim at some recent travel trends – and invents a few of her own.

T

ravelling is one of the easiest things to do these days – so easy in fact that one time I rolled onto my phone in my sleep and booked a four-day luxury cruise through the Galapagos. There was once a time where people used to leave notes on trees asking fellow travellers who might be headed to their village to let their family know they were going to be okay. Now our friends and family start to think something is wrong if we don’t live stream our entire trip on Snapchat.

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No longer are we satisfied with the amazing fact that we are travelling through the sky; we want our travel to be cutting edge and perfectly adapted to our life. I travel a lot and, lately, due to pure frustration, I’ve been collating my own little list of travel trends that I’d like to see. Things like barriers in between the seats so you can take a selfie before you take off without the judging eyes of the passenger next to you (there’s only so many times you can pretend you’re checking to see if there’s anything on your face). Or what about a little sign you can flip over that says whether you’re up for a yarn, or if you want complete silence? You have to be very careful with what you do in those first few moments on a plane. The other day I asked a man called Glenn if I could read his newspaper once he was done with it and I spent the next five hours listening to him tell me about how he’s going back to university

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TRAVEL TRENDS

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TRAVEL TRENDS

“We need a laminated document on planes to explain why the person in the middle seat should be able to claim both armrests”

to study law. If you’re reading this Glenn, best of luck! People love lawyers! There are some other trends I wouldn’t mind starting for my own amusement, like tickling someone under the arms when they go to put their baggage in the overhead compartment, making a formal arrest if someone sneezes more than three times and a laminated document that explains why the person in the middle seat should be able to claim both armrests. Now that I’ve gotten that off my chest, I’d also like to discuss the very popular travel trend, which is the destination wedding. I just recently attended a destination wedding of a couple who were known primarily for their insistence on splitting the dinner bill down to the very last spring

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TRAVEL TRENDS

roll. It went from that to asking that we all pay our own way for a 10-day Bali wedding extravaganza celebrating their love. Don’t get me wrong, it’s not that we don’t all want to go on a holiday to Bali, but now we have to spend a huge portion of that time talking to someone’s red-faced uncle who thinks a kiss on the cheek should go for 20 seconds. Despite the whinging (mine), I actually do end up having a great time, and the best thing is you can drink as much as you want, cry about being single, dirty dance with the wait staff and then literally flee the country like you’re James Bond. This next trend I came across was focused towards expectant parents – and no, the trend isn’t pure terror. It’s the fairly well-established “babymoon”, which is basically a trip that couples take before their baby is born to enjoy their last chance for sleep-filled nights and the opportunity to travel light without the prospect of getting up in the middle of the night and changing a nappy. Unless that’s something your partner is into, in which case, no judgment. This is definitely a trend I’d be willing to get on board with, although I’m nowhere near ready to have kids. I’m more in the stage of life where I think I might be ready to adopt a dog. Though, who am I kidding, I wouldn’t be “adopting” a dog; I’d be trapping a dog in my house so he has to love me and let me take photos of him in little outfits. ê

SEE BECKY LUCAS Becky had a busy 2016 with appearances on the new ABC TV series Fancy Boy and Comedy Up Late and helping to write Josh Thomas’s Please Like Me. This year looks similarly hectic as Becky is currently co-writing Matt Okine’s new comedy series set to debut on Stan this year and performing her third solo show around Australia. Becky’s dates are: Brisbane March 14-19, Canberra March 24-25, Melbourne March 30 – April 23 (as part of the Melbourne International Comedy Festival), Perth May 4-7, and Sydney May 17-21. For more information go to beckylucas.com.au

OM AND OM WE GO Becky Lucas takes a spiritual retreat to help her clear her mind instead of her inbox, part of a new trend where travellers swap late nights out for early mornings doing yoga.

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While I’m still very much about drinking when I’m on holidays… or at the airport… or on the plane… apparently this is becoming a thing of the past for many travellers, who are now wanting to use their time off as a way to get in shape mentally and physically. There is a growing trend to go on holidays where you work on health, mindfulness and physical activity as opposed to typical tourist activities, like heavy drinking and trying to pull off wearing a cowboy hat. Many travellers are now setting out on a spiritual journey that comes from within, and buying a suitcase full of souvenirs appears to be a thing of the past. People now want experiences, not possessions, so prepare for friends to come home with no presents for you but with long stories about meditating on the beach and getting it on

BECKY LUCAS THOUGHT IT WAS TIME TO TAKE A DIGITAL DETOX WHEN SHE TRIED TO “LIKE” AN EMAIL

TECH TOCK , TIME TO DETOX ê

Becky takes a “digital detox”, where travellers ditch their technology and try to get by.

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TRAVEL TRENDS

Best of the fest The Melbourne International Comedy Festival kicks off in March (March 29 – April 23) with international comedians, local talent and a host of great shows. Below is just a sample of what is on offer:

“‘Bleisure’ sounds like the sound you make when someone offers you a third helping of curry after eating too much”

C L A I R E S U L L I VA N : I W I S H I OWNED A HOTEL FOR DOGS

LUKE MCGREGOR: ALMOST FIXED IT

A free-wheeling show that touches on feminism, dogs, the universe, and dogs again. Belleville, March 29 – April 8

Fresh from the ABC comedy Rosehaven with Celia Pacquola. Comedy Theatre, March 29 – April 9

DAR A O’BRIAIN: LIVE

RUBY WAX: FRAZZLED

Host of the UK’s topical panel show Mock the Week and regular on QI. Hamer Hall, April 4

One-woman show based on her bestseller A Mindfulness Guide for the Frazzled. Playhouse, March 30 – April 2

J U D I T H L U C Y A N D D E N I S E S C O T T: DISAPPOINTMENTS with a shaggy-haired yoga instructor. Instead of seeing big groups of muscly guys in Bali wearing singlets and looking like strapped Christmas hams, they’ll be sitting peacefully in a drum circle, confessing their deepest fears to each other and sipping chai tea. It’s not just physical health these retreats are focusing on. A new trend that seems to be emerging is the digital detox where holidaymakers are made to strip themselves of all their electronic devices. As insane as this might seem, many people rave about the benefits of not checking the same three or four apps every two minutes. Weird huh? I don’t know if I’m quite ready to do this one, but two weeks ago I tried to “like” an email, so I could be getting close. “Bleisure” sounds like the sound you’d make when someone tries to offer you a third helping of curry after eating so much you can’t remember how to speak English – so you clutch your stomach and wave them away while groaning “bleiissuuureee”. What it actually refers to is extending a business trip for a few days on either side and enjoying a few relaxing days off. The word bleisure is supposed to be a combination of “business” and “leisure” and it’s no coincidence it also kind of sounds like the start of the word

A double shot of veteran Australian comedians. Arts Centre Melbourne, April 13-22

For tickets and full festival line-up, visit comedyfestival.com.au

L A W R E N C E M O O N E Y: L I K E L I T E R A L LY A new show from the host of Dirty Laundry and The Pub Quiz. Athenaeum Theatre, March 30 – April 23

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TRAVEL TRENDS

“I hope I’ve guided you through some of the real trends happening in travel or inspired you to come up with a few of your own”

“bludger”. I don’t know if this counts so much as a trend or just a fancier way of saying that you’re gonna have a good time on the boss’s dime. To me it sounds like an extension on stopping off at the pub on your lunch break and sinking a few beers before going back to work, and I’m okay with that. In fact, I’m pretty sure I’m engaging in a bit of “bleisure” (still finding it hard to get on board with that word) right now because as I write this I’m scouring the internet trying to find images of dogs and untagging myself from some photos on Facebook of my friends’ destination wedding. I hope I’ve helped guide you through some of

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the real trends happening in travel nowadays, or at least inspired you to come up with a few of your own. Also, if you disagree with my position on people in the middle seat being able to use both armrests, you can write me a note and leave it on a tree, hopefully someone will be heading my way. Or tweet your rebuttal to me @becky_lucas89.

t ig e r a ir f l ie s to Melbourne from 10 destinations; tigerair.com.au

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The wild bunch Go beyond the Barossa, past Coonawarra, and off the beaten track, to find South Australia’s less-visited wine regions. Winsor Dobbin raises a criminally underrated glass of wine to the cellar-door underdogs. PHOTOS TOURISM SA 76

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BEYOND THE BAROSSA

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BEYOND THE BAROSSA

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ine lovers visiting South Australia would probably opt to first visit the famous – and usually busy – Barossa and McLaren Vale regions, then perhaps head for the Clare Valley or Coonawarra. Which means that anyone heading for the Adelaide Hills, Langhorne Creek, Wrattonbully or Kangaroo Island will find themselves far away from the madding cellardoor crowds and perhaps enjoying a tasting conducted by a winemaker or grape grower.

THE ADELAIDE HILLS The Adelaide Hills, which start just a 20-minute drive from downtown Adelaide, have boomed over the past decade. Depart the South Australian capital via the South Eastern Freeway and within just a few minutes you’re surrounded by vines.

GET AWAY FROM THE CELL AR DOOR CROWDS AND FIND A MORE PERSONAL TOUCH AT K ANGAROO ISL AND OR WR AT TONBULLY

“Within the industry Langhorne Creek is fairly well-known and regarded, but to the general public we fly under the radar a bit” No other major Australian city has so many vineyards within half an hour’s drive, and the Adelaide Hills are dotted with boutique wineries with names like Shaw and Smith, Nepenthe and Hahndorf Hill at the forefront. Here most of the wineries are run by families or smaller producers. This region used to be covered with apple, pear and cherry orchards – and many of them still survive – but wine is now very much the focus, with over 40 cellar doors having popped up in the area. The altitude means there are four distinct seasons, and the Hills have been described as Australia’s most vibrant cool-climate wine ê

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MELBOURNE 100KM 7–9 APRIL 2017 BRISBANE 100KM | 55KM 16–18 JUNE SYDNEY 100KM | 50KM 25–27 AUGUST PERTH 100KM | 50KM 22–24 SEPTEMBER 2017

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BEYOND THE BAROSSA

Where to stay and eat MOUNT LOFTY HOUSE A historic hotel icon with spectacular views of the Adelaide Hills has just opened: HVR – Hardy’s Verandah Restaurant. The restaurant launch is part of a rejuvenation project for the 165-year-old heritage-listed property. 74 Mount Lofty Summit Road, Crafers; mtloftyhouse.com.au

THE OLFACTORY INN

region – although that status would probably be challenged by Tasmania. Although grapes were planted as early as 1839, it was not until 40 years ago that viticulture was revived here. Today, names like Petaluma, Tapanappa, Bird in Hand, The Lane, Tilbrook Estate, K1 by Geoff Hardy, Sidewood, Mike Press and Deviation Road head the charge – but several vineyards also provide cool-climate fruit to the likes of Penfolds, Henschke, Taylors and Wirra Wirra. More adventurous producers, pushing winemaking boundaries, include Ngeringa and Ochota Barrels. There’s something to please all tastes and budgets here. While cooler parts of the district produce some excellent chardonnays, pinot noirs and rieslings, the many microclimates mean the region also comes up with some outstanding sauvignon blancs, superb bubblies and some spicy, peppery shirazes. “This is quite simply a great place to make wines,” says Michael Hill Smith of Shaw and Smith, a Master of Wine who also has vineyard interests in Tasmania. “The cool, dry summer and autumn ripening conditions produce grapes with ideal fruit composition in terms of concentration, spectrum of flavour and natural acidity.” The Hills are great to explore at a leisurely pace; maybe a meander through the hamlets of Crafers, Stirling, Aldgate and Hahndorf, or perhaps south through Mount Barker and

FOR A TRULY LUXURIOUS VISIT TO K ANGAROO ISL AND STAY AT SOUTHERN OCEAN LODGE, ONE OF AUSTR ALIA’S FIRST LUXURY LODGES

This spot offers the closest fine dining to Langhorne Creek – a 15-minute drive away in Strathalbyn. The eatery specialises in seasonal, local produce and features a wine list highlighting boutique producers. 35 High Street, Strathalbyn; theolfactoryinn.com.au

PIPERS OF PENOL A Macclesfield into Langhorne Creek – another region that’s often overlooked in favour of its more famous neighbours.

LANGHORNE CREEK Langhorne Creek is less than an hour from Adelaide and is blessed with a delightful laid-back country ambience. The tiny hamlet, population 668 at the last census, is where Wolf Blass sourced the fruit for many of his early trophy winners, and the region still produces grapes for leading labels including Jacob’s Creek, George Wyndham, Rosemount Estate and Wolf Blass. ê

This place is owned by a member of one of Coonawarra’s leading winemaking families, Simon Bowen, and is regarded as the finest restaurant in the Limestone Coast region. Sample dishes like seared scallops with truffled corn puree, or Parmesan-crusted lamb neck. 58 Riddoch Street, Penola; pipersofpenola.com.au

SOUTHERN OCEAN LODGE The luxury lodge sits on a remote cliff top on Kangaroo Island and was one of Australia’s first luxury lodges. Visitors overlook the Southern Ocean, along with being served benchmark “produce to plate” dishes and having the services of a luxury spa. Hanson Bay Road, Kingscote; southernoceanlodge.com.au

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BEYOND THE BAROSSA But a large majority of the fruit grown in over 6,000 hectares of vines is on-sold to those big names, meaning you’ll rarely see the name Langhorne Creek on wine labels. “The problem we have in gaining recognition is that so much of the fruit produced here is used by the big companies, or in blends that often don’t even mention Langhorne Creek on the label,” says grape grower and winemaker Greg Follett from Lake Breeze, one of the outstanding local producers. “When people visit us they get the chance to learn about our region, characters and places without being hassled into buying – and that’s why we’re putting lots of energy into increasing the awareness of Langhorne Creek and its consistently great wines. “Within the industry Langhorne Creek is fairly well-known and regarded, but to the general public we fly under the radar a bit. We’ve certainly been punching above our weight in the wine shows for years, so the quality has always been here.” Langhorne Creek has a wine history dating back to 1850. It’s best-known for cabernet sauvignon and shiraz, which account for 70 per cent of production, but over recent years considerable experimentation has occurred and a large range of grape varieties are grown, including malbec. “We fill the gap in the market place between cool-climate wines and full-on warmer regions,” Follett says. Among the labels and cellar doors to look out for here are historic, family-owned

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Bleasdale, Bremerton, Lake Breeze, Brothers in Arms (where the Metala vines are some of the oldest in the country), and Temple Bruer, one of the country’s leading organic producers. At Cleggett, you can try the unusual mutant white cabernet known as shalistin. You won’t find many places to stay in Langhorne Creek other than a couple of vineyard cottages, but the hamlet is just 10 minutes from Strathalbyn and a short drive from Mount Barker in the Adelaide Hills. The Bridge Hotel serves excellent pub grub (look out: the portions are enormous), and you can also get a fine meal at The Winehouse (the attractive shared cellar door of Heartland Wines, Gipsie Jack, Kimbolton, John’s Blend by John Glaetzer and Ben Potts that is also home to the Meechi microbrewery) or at rustic Angas Plains Winery. ê

THE GRAPE AND THE GOOD The cellar door at Heartland Wines at Langhorne Creek, one of our underthe-radar Adelaide wineries (above); and the view from the balcony of Southern Ocean Lodge on Kangaroo Island (below).

“When people visit us they get the chance to learn about our region, characters and places without being hassled into buying”


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WRATTONBULLY

“Kangaroo Island is somewhere I can make a very different style of wine – the style of wine I like”

TRY THE FOOD AT PIPERS OF PENOL A, JUST OUTSIDE THE POPUL AR COONAWARRA WINE REGION IN SOUTH AUSTRALIA

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KANGAROO ISLAND Kangaroo Island, Australia’s third-largest island, after Tasmania and Melville Island, was chosen by Jacques Lurton, a member of one of the most famous wine families in France, for his Southern Hemisphere wine experiment. Jacques owns a chateau in Bordeaux, a region where his family is hugely influential, and his decision to pour his heart and soul into his Islander Estate operation on Kangaroo Island was the culmination of a long love affair with Australia. Jacques and his late wife Francoise, who was an artist, visited Kangaroo Island on their honeymoon in 1997. When he decided to establish his own cool-climate Australian vineyard and winery, the choice was between the Adelaide Hills – a much more conventional choice – or Kangaroo Island. “I just had a feeling it was a great spot,” Jacques says. “And I’ve never regretted it. It’s somewhere I can make a very different style of wine – the style of wine I like – and I never have to add acid to the fruit.” Today, Kangaroo Island is regarded as one of Australia’s most promising new wine regions, particularly for reds. There are now more than 30 growers and about 200 hectares of vines, along with several rustic cellar doors, but The Islander Estate is undoubtedly the star winery in a destination reached either by ferry or air.

While most wine lovers will know of Coonawarra, famous for its medium-bodied reds and labels like Wynn’s Coonawarra Estate, the remainder of the Limestone Coast region is rarely written about and certainly much less visited – mainly because it has so few tasting facilities compared to Coonawarra/Penola. For more than 25 million years, Wrattonbully and the rest of the Limestone Coast region lay hidden beneath the sea. When the ocean began to recede approximately one million years ago, 14 stranded coastlines or ranges became visible between the Naracoorte range and the current shoreline. Wrattonbully, to the south of Naracoorte, spans several of these ranges and is home to labels like Terre a Terre and Ruckus Estate, although cellar doors are few and far between as most of the fruit is, like in Langhorne Creek, sold to big companies. At Mount Benson, you’ll find Cape Jaffa Wines, where Anna Hooper makes biodynamically produced single vineyard wines. “We grow fruit in our own biodynamic vineyards and partner with growers who share our commitment to tread lightly in order to minimise environmental impact,” Anna says. Cape Jaffa, to the east, has a cellar door that offers panoramic views over rolling hills and rocky outcrops, along with the wild Southern Ocean. It has wines and olive oils for tasting and purchase, as well as local cheese and almond sales. Padthaway, north of Naracoorte, is home to producers including Browns of Padthaway and Henry’s Drive, with the Riddoch Highway running through the middle. Most of the vineyards are owned or contracted to multinational companies. It’s a place to drive through for a peek at quintessential regional Australia, but Penola is the place to stay.

t ig e r a ir f l ie s to Adelaide from Melbourne, Sydney, Brisbane and Denpasar, Bali; tigerair.com.au


Lady Elliot Island

Situated on the Southern

Great Barrier Reef

Lady Elliot Island

home of the Manta Ray

Turtle Nesting Season Oct - Feb Lady Elliot Island Eco Resort is situated at the Southern end of the Great Barrier Reef. The island is regarded as one of the best snorkelling and diving locations on The Great Barrier Reef and is famous for it’s unspoilt coral reef and amazing array of spectacular marine life. With exceptionally clear water year round, visitors will discover the wonders of this marine national park (Green Zone) and they might even encounter Turtles, Dolphins and our resident Manta Rays.

Turtle Hatching Season Feb - April Whale Sighting Season July - Oct Daytrips & Overnight Stays available with direct flights from Hervey Bay/ Fraser Coast, Bundaberg, Gold Coast & Brisbane (Redcliffe) to Lady Elliot Island.

www.LadyElliotIsland.com.au Phone +61 7 5536 3644

IDE A L E AD re! o See M

Pindarie Ce Pindarie Wines, Barossa

There’s plenty of reasons to come to South Australia... ...and lots of places to visit and enjoy! So why not let Adelaide’s longest running day tour company show you around our great state. Whilst on tour with us explore cellar doors, taste premium local produce, visit historic landmarks and so much more.

Adelaide | Barossa | Kangaroo Island | Murray River | McLaren Vale Call 1300 769 762 or visit adelaidesightseeing.com.au


ROUTE MAP

Where to next? Tigerair Australia serves 12 destinations right across the country

tigerair bases Route starts 23 March 2017 Route starts 1 June 2017

darwin

cairns

whitsunday coast

brisbane gold coast coffs harbour perth

sydney canberra (act)

adelaide

FOR AN UP-TO-THE-MINUTE LIST OF OUR DESTINATIONS, VISIT TIGERAIR.COM.AU

melbourne (tullamarine) hobart

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TIGERAIR NEWS

Tigerair flies into Canberra Travellers now have a low-cost option to get to the nation’s capital

O

n December 8, 2016 a ceremonial water cannon salute marked the arrival of the first Tigerair flight into Canberra. Each passenger on board received a welcome pack and a toy tiger, courtesy of Canberra Airport, the National Zoo and Aquarium, and Visit Canberra. Tigerair’s new services – which run between Melbourne and Canberra – are currently the only low-cost air travel option available to Canberrans and prove timely for Victorians keen for affordable flights to Canberra as the city becomes an increasingly attractive tourism destination due to its rich mix of art, culture, food, exhibitions and world-class events. Tigerair Australia Commercial Director Adam Rowe said the airline

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is pleased with early demand for the new services and looks forward to continuing to partner with Canberra Airport and the ACT Government, through Visit Canberra, to stimulate air travel on the new route. “Tigerair Australia is pleased to have launched the only low-cost services between Melbourne and Canberra, providing over 2,500 additional visitor seats every week through Melbourne and Canberra Airports,” Rowe said. “Tigerair Australia is perfectly placed to stimulate air travel for the Canberra market, and we are confident this route will prove particularly popular among our core group of leisure and smallbusiness customers.”

New products make flying Tigerair easier Mobile boarding passes and hotel reservations make for hassle-free journeys

Tigerair Australia has announced two new product enhancements designed to make flying with the airline easier and more convenient. For the first time, Tigerair has introduced mobile boarding passes, enabling customers to use their mobile devices to book, check-in and board their Tigerair service. Tigerair passengers that web-check in at tigerair.com.au can choose to receive a mobile boarding pass directly to their mobile device via email or SMS. Tigerair has also introduced an Apple iOS Passbook Wallet version of the mobile boarding pass for iPhone users. In another first for the airline, customers can now add a hotel reservation to their upcoming trip while booking a flight from the Tigerair Australia website. This new feature has been made possible thanks to Tigerair’s ongoing partnership with Booking.com.


TIGERAIR NEWS

Tigerair welcomes Air Force Cadets The low-cost airline had 30 cadets tour its Brisbane base

Tigerair Australia Commercial Director Adam Rowe said today’s announcements are another example of how the airline is continually working to improve the overall customer experience and make flying Tigerair more convenient. “The introduction of mobile boarding passes and the option to secure accommodation at the same time as purchasing a flight with Tigerair are the latest in a long line of product enhancements designed to make flying Tigerair easier and more enjoyable than ever before,” Rowe said. “For the first time, travellers can manage their entire Tigerair journey from the palm of their hand, thanks to the introduction of mobile boarding passes. This important enhancement guarantees our customers have access to a seamless, integrated mobile experience from the time of purchase to boarding.”

Tigerair Australia welcomed a group of around 30 cadets from Squadrons 218 and 219 of the Australian Air Force Cadets for an exclusive behind-the-scenes tour of a Tigerair A320 aircraft at Brisbane Airport in November last year. The tour was aimed at giving the cadets further experience to assist them to make a future career choice, be it in defence or commercial aviation. The cadets were met on arrival by Tigerair pilots, who hosted the tour, and helped get the cadets up close with one of the world’s most popular commercial jets. Tigerair Australia is proud to be an employer of choice and recently announced significant growth in Brisbane, with an additional third A320 to be based in Brisbane from March 2017. Its arrival will create over 50 jobs and facilitate new routes and destinations for consumers, including the new Brisbane-Perth route, which launches in June 2017, and the new Brisbane-Whitsunday route, which launches in March 2017. Michael Williams from the Australian Defence Force said the opportunity was not one the cadets would forget. “Our youth development program focuses on aviation in a military controlled environment for young Australians. Having one of Australia’s commercial airlines open its wings to our cadets was truly a great honour,” Williams said. “Cadets were overwhelmed by the friendly and informative staff of Tigerair, who gave up their time to discuss, show and allow cadets to participate in Tigerair staff roles and duties. Many cadets were so surprised at the safety requirements Tigerair provide its clients for safe travel, and what functions each staff member has to make sure travellers have a comfortable flight.”

“Cadets were overwhelmed by the friendly and informative staff of Tigerair who gave up their time to help them” ti g e ra ir.co m

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Visit Kenzan Japanese restaurant for some of the freshest sushi and sashimi dishes in Melbourne, along with Ă la carte dishes and surprising specials. The restaurant has been in its current CBD location for 35 years, and is the most awarded Japanese restaurant in Melbourne. Enjoy an authentic Japanese dining experience.

JAPANESE RESTAURANT

KENZAN.COM.AU | +61 (0)3 9654 8933

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coolangatta 07 5536 5455

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THE TIGERAIR GUIDE TO...

Classic

Road Trips

Take a driving holiday to see some of Australia’s most famous scenery. BY CONNOR MCLEOD

The Great Ocean Road

Legendary Pacific Coast

Fly into Melbourne and take one of the country’s best-known road trips along the Great Ocean Road. This drive is a classic for a reason: cute seaside towns, stunning coastal clifftops and, yes, the (once were) 12 Apostles. Melbourne visitgreatoceanroad.org.au

Fly into Melbourne or Brisbane and take the windy way between the two cities. Stop off at Avoca Beach, visit Bouddi National Park or stop in at Currumbin Wildlife Sanctuary – there is also the stunning coastal scenery that you miss if you only stick to the freeways. Brisbane pacificcoast.com.au

The Great Alpine Road Fly into Melbourne and head for the hills with this mountain road trip that starts at Wangaratta, about two-and-a-half hours north of Melbourne. Call in at Bright and Milawa, known for their foodie highlights, climb into the mountains of Mount Buffalo National Park, and move onwards to Omeo in Gippsland. Melbourne visitvictoria.com

The Gibb River Road Fly into Cairns and take one of the wildest roads across the Top End and you can wind up in Darwin. This is four-wheel drive country and you need to be prepared, but you’ll see gorges, waterfalls and amazing cattle stations. This is the bucket list outback drive you need to do. Cairns kimberleyaustralia.com

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THE TIGERAIR GUIDE TO...

R O A D T R I P S

Foodie

Margaret River coast Fly into Perth and head south along the road to Margaret River. Here you will find some of the freshest produce, and some of the most amazing chefs, all very close to the famous wineries that first drew foodies to this area. Perth margaretriver.com

The Hunter Valley Fly into Sydney and take the short drive up to the Hunter Valley where you’ll find a range of wineries, top-end restaurants and adventure activities like balloon flights. Head back via Wollombi and stop in at the local pub, home of the famous Dr Jurd’s Jungle Juice (a wine-based drink). Sydney visitnsw.com/destinations/hunter

Yarra Valley Fly into Melbourne and climb through Kangaroo Grounds to the foodie basin that is the Yarra Valley. Here you can sample wine from big and small names, visit the town of Healesville and the nearby Australian native sanctuary, or grab a pie from the famous bakery. Or take a chopper flight across the valley itself. Melbourne visityarravalley.com.au

Cradle to Coast Trail Fly into Hobart and drive to the state’s north-west, where you can pick up the Cradle to Coast Tasting Trail. Here, on a road that takes in the coastal scenery where it meets the Tasmanian forest, you’ll find fresh produce, fine wine and some of the most amazing dairy delights in the country. Hobart tasmaniasnorthwest.com.au

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THE TIGERAIR GUIDE TO...

R O A D T R I P S

THE SPOT

The NSW Central Coast

W

hether you head north from Sydney or south from Coffs Harbour, cruising along the beaches and coastline of the Central Coast is the perfect beach-bum road trip. The Bouddi National Park is full of coastal beauty, whether it’s the jagged cliff faces jutting into the sea, the bushland or the wildlife. The 8km Bouddi Coastal Walk, which includes an easy-to-navigate boardwalk with

amazing ocean views, is one of the best places in the state to see the annual whale migration (May to November), so keep an eye out for these giant mammals leaping playfully out of the water. The Entrance offers some of the best beaches in the area as well as family attractions. The town itself gets its name because it is the entrance to Tuggerah Lake, and you can spend hours wandering the sandy shore

and bluffs just a few minutes walk from town. This is a big family holiday destination and one of the main things to do is the daily feeding of the pelicans. The Entrance has a huge pelican population and each day at 3:30pm they assemble at Pelican Plaza, a section of Memorial Park. A Central Coast road trip can be high-end or cheap and cheerful with breaks at the many caravan parks along the coast.

Food Paragon Cafe

Pot Belly Pies

Miami Bakehouse

Beechworth Bakery

Breaking up the journey from Sydney to Melbourne? Head into Goulburn’s historic Paragon Cafe, which has been dishing out road trip sustenance since the 1940s. Immortalised in a song by Tim Rogers of You Am I, packed full of Art Deco wonders and with an amazingly large menu, this is a must-stop if you're in the area. Goulburn paragoncafe.com.au

Need a rest on the Legendary Pacific Coast drive? Pot Belly Pies in Yamba are not your usual bakery, with a huge range of options outside of the average meat variety. You’re on the coast, so try the prawn pie, or grab a dessert pie like the Chocolate Cointreau Mousse Pie topped with fresh strawberries. Yamba potbellypiesyamba.blogspot.com.au

On the way from Perth to Margaret River stop at Miami Bakehouse, an unassuming shipping container in the middle of a field just off the Forrest Highway. You can try a vanilla slice or a spinach and feta damper, but it’s the gourmet pies that fill the parking lot with cars on any given day; try a garlic prawn pie, or steak and mushroom. West Pinjarra miamibakehouse.com.au

Whether you’re in Beechworth, Ballarat, Echuca or Healesville, this reliable chain of country bakeries will make sure you’re full and ready to hit the road again. There are pies, of course, but you can also fuel up on sandwiches, salads and wraps to avoid the usual road trip fare. Various locations beechworthbakery.com.au

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THE TIGERAIR GUIDE TO...

R O A D T R I P S

Historic

Ballarat Fly into Melbourne and hit the road to the historic gold town of Ballarat. On the way you can make a detour to Mt Macedon and Organ Pipes National Park before arriving in Ballarat, which is full of gold-rush-era buildings, art galleries and Sovereign Hill. Melbourne visitballarat.com.au

The Daintree Fly into Cairns and drive through the ancient rainforest of the Daintree on the Great Barrier Reef Drive. The drive is 140km squeezed between two World Heritage treasures – the Daintree and the Great Barrier Reef – and you can see pristine beaches, huge forest canopies and unspoilt natural beauty. Cairns daintreerainforest.com

Budj Bim Fly into Melbourne and take a three-hour drive west of the city to the home of the Gunditjmara people. The eel farms of Budj Bim are one of the earliest examples of engineering in the world, predating the Egyptian pyramids, and it’s set to become our next World Heritage Listed site, with the government submitting a nomination for its listing in February. Melbourne budjbimtours.com

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Chef Prepared Moredough Kitchens Restaurant Quality Ready Made Meals Range Meals Introducing the

Made Locally & Gluten Free

AUS T

LIAN MADE RA

D

E & OWN

from our kitchen to your table... hearty, nutritious and totally delicious Butter Chicken, Thai Red Chicken, Beef Massaman and Beef Burgundy Available now at your local independent supermarket or gourmet store or call our National Distributor Raw Materials on 1300 305 129

www.moredoughkitchens.com.au


THE TIGERAIR GUIDE TO...

R O A D T R I P S

Family

Taronga Western Plains Zoo, Dubbo From Sydney, it’s a five-hour road trip north-east of the city to reach Western Plains Zoo. The safari-style zoo is dedicated to the conservation of larger animals and in 2016 celebrated the birth of its first African elephant calf. And drop in to the famous Sydney Taronga Zoo for the best view in the city. Sydney taronga.org.au

Australia Zoo From Brisbane, an hour’s drive north, is Australia Zoo, which is still run by the Irwin Family after the tragic death of “Crocodile Hunter” Steve 10 years ago. The zoo features a range of animals including tigers, reptiles – and plenty of crocodiles, of course. The zoo also recently got approval for on-site accommodation. Brisbane australiazoo.com.au

Werribee Open Range Zoo From Melbourne, just under an hour south-west of the city, this zoo focuses on African animals presented in an open-range setting. Take one of the safari tours where you’re driven in an open-sided bus through the savannah grasslands bringing you within metres of zebras, bison and giraffes. Melbourne zoo.org.au

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the tale end

Travel is all about stories Please send your travel photos to us at tigertales@citrusmedia.com.au or #tigerairaustralia HOLBROOK, NSW On a road trip we have to stop at the replica submarine, the HMAS Otway, in the town of Holbrook. The town is bypassed now but the kids love to climb all over it and it breaks up the journey.

T WILIGHT DRIVING, MELBOURNE This is my favourite time to be on a road trip; that time when the sun just disappears but the sky is still bright orange. This is taken on the way to Bright from Melbourne – not by the driver, obviously. CANDICE EVANS

3

JAMES PATRICK

1

2 CENTENNIAL PARK, SYDNEY People think of Centennial as all ducks and ponds, but there's a great walk called Lachlan Swamp, named after Governor Lachlan Macquarie. This area was once the main water supply for Sydney, but now a colony of flying foxes has moved in so it's Guano Central – but still fun to explore. RAY FRASER

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‘‘Our family adventures start here.’’ receive

10

%

off the base rate*

the Reynold

Escape the everyday

Rent with Europcar for 3+ days and receive 10% off the base rate*

Escape the city and explore the country side on your next adventure and receive 10% off the base rate* on a 3+ day vehicle rental.

EAU0121

To book, visit a Europcar counter or call 1300 13 13 90 and quote TIGER. For online bookings visit europcar.com.au/tiger *Terms and conditions apply.

*Vehicles subject to availability. Valid at participating locations across Australia and New Zealand. Valid for booking dates from 01/02/2017 – 31/03/2017. Rental dates 01/03/2017 – 30/04/2017. Blackout dates where offer is unavailable are 1 March 2017 to 5 March 2017 (Australia only) and 12 April to 17 April 2017 (Australia & New Zealand). Offer cannot be used in conjunction with any other promotion. Minimum length of rental must be 3 days to receive this offer. Days are based on a 24 hour rental period. Discount of 10% applies to base rate (time and kilometres) of passenger vehicle rentals only. Visit europcar.com.au/tiger for full Terms and Conditions.


Tigertales Feb - Mar 2017  

Tigertales is the inflight magazine of Tigerair, providing unique and inspirational travel experiences from all across Australia.

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