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TAKE ME AWAY

Australia | Apr-May 2016

THE ART OF TRAVEL ➔ Comedian and Triple J morning co-host Matt Okine gives us his hot tips and pet peeves

EASTERN PROMISE

W E E K E N D WAR R IOR S

T H E S AVA N NAH WAY

Explore Bali’s quieter east coast

Two very different travellers visit Melbourne

Adventure road tripping from Cairns to Darwin


WELCOME ON BOARD

Thanks for flying with us International flights to Bali signal a new era

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elcome on board and thank you for choosing to fly Tigerair today. In this issue we celebrate a milestone for Tigerair Australia, with the launch of our first international direct services from Melbourne, Adelaide and Perth to Bali from March 23. Tigerair customers flying to Bali will have the pleasure of travelling in our newly refurbished Boeing 737-800 aircraft, with generous extra economy legroom seating available for a small fee – which provide among the most spacious economy legroom of any aircraft flying internationally. Passengers on board our Bali flights will also have access to a mix of free and paid in-flight entertainment for use on their own devices for the first time on Tigerair Australia services. The new services to Bali mark an important next phase of growth for Tigerair Australia as the airline’s transformation continues. In 2015, Tigerair Australia achieved significantly enhanced on-time performance and industry-lowest cancellation rates with Tigerair being twice as reliable as our key competitor during 2015. On top of these results, our latest customer survey showed that Tigerair customer satisfaction is at an all-time high. Our transformation is well and truly underway.

“Tigerair Australia is also now a preferred partner with the Flight Centre Travel Group” In further terrific news, Tigerair Australia recently announced a fiveyear sponsorship extension as the official airline partner of Melbourne Storm Rugby League Club. As part of this announcement, we named a Tigerair Australia A320 aircraft after Storm, Queensland and Australia skipper Cameron Smith. Next time you fly Tigerair, be sure to check if you’re on board the Cameron Smith A320! There’s no secret to securing the best value fares with Tigerair – simply plan ahead and book early as fares increase as demand grows and the travel date gets closer. To keep up to date with all our latest news, special deals and competitions, stay tuned to the Tigerair website, sign up to our e-newsletter and ‘Like’ our Facebook.

Tigerair Australia is also now a preferred partner with the Flight Centre Travel Group, meaning you now have access to Tigerair’s full suite of products and consistently great value airfares when booking your next holiday at your local Flight Centre. It has never been easier to fly Tigerair and your support is much appreciated as it allows us to grow the airline while continuing to pass on great value fares to our customers. Happy travels and we look forward to welcoming you on board again.

Rob Sharp, CEO

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CONTENTS

Destination directory Inside this issue… wherever you're going, we've got you covered THE POINTY END

Post-kayaking refuel stops VILL AGE CAFE RESTAUR ANT & BAR Ideal stop for an all-day breakfast. 366 Shute Harbour Road, Airlie Beach; villagecafe.com.au

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FISH D’VINE For a great seafood meal, or a flaming tiki drink, this is the spot. 303 Shute Harbour Road, Airlie Beach; fishdvine.com.au

BOHEMIAN RAW If you like your dinner with a side order of amazing views. Shingley Drive, Airlie Beach; bohemianraw.com.au

MR BONES

Paddle the Whitsundays in a kayak

F E AT U R E

journey to the east

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Explore Bali's more tranquil eastern coast

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F E AT U R E

For Airlie Beach’s best pizza. 263 Shute Harbour Road, Airlie Beach

BREEZE BAR

Then we hit the open water. “And there’s our northerly, ladies and gentlemen!” announces Lion. Away from the protection of the harbour we’re reminded that we are in fact sea kayaking, and if we wanted to take the lazy option we would have caught a boat. Cranking up the pace, we head to Repair Island, 500 metres offshore and one of 74 islands in the Whitsundays. As we gaze up at pines that have peppered this patch for the best part of 100 million years, a flatback turtle pops up to see what we’re looking at. “You know, in Germany it’s an exciting day if you see a deer,” says Lion matter-of-factly. “But here, you’re so lucky - there are just so many cool animals.” He’s absolutely right, but along with the cool animals are those pesky little buggers, perhaps emasculated by their size, intent on zapping the odd tourist between November and May to prove who’s king of the water: the jellyfish. So after dragging our kayaks onto the rough sand of White Rock Island for a snorkel, we slip into sexy black full-body lycra suits and flippers before

If you like your refuelling to be a little more liquid, grab a cocktail. 1a/293 Airlie Esplanade, Airlie Beach; facebook.com/breezebarairlie

ENCOUNTER waddling towards the water like a blundering group of aquatic ninjas. In the silent underwater world, schools of silver fish dart before us with perfect choreography, and a stingray thumps its wings on the seabed. When we emerge from the water we find a seagull closely monitoring cheese and crackers on a picnic rug. Famished, and to the disappointment of our onlooker, we honour the company’s policy to ‘leave no trace’ by demolishing every last crumb before making for our final stop at Cane Cockies Beach on the mainland; a local secret around 2.5km north-west.

WORDS Emily McAuliffe

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hether you wake up in the Whitsundays as an outdoor adventurer keen to explore or a dusty partygoer keen to recover, a good dose of salt air will serve you well. I have decided to get my salt-air fix via a half-day tour with Salty Dog Sea Kayaking. I’m picked up at 8:30am sharp in Airlie Beach by company owner, Neill, and am joined by a young couple on their honeymoon. When we arrive at the Shute Harbour jetty, a 10-minute drive away, we lock our bags in the Salty Dog office and German guide, Lion, gives a quick safety briefing. “Now, if you fall out, there’s no crocs, so you can just chill, yeah?” he says with arms extended, eyes closed and head tipped back. Despite only moving to Australia two weeks ago, he’s got the laid-back Aussie style nailed. With an eager clap of his hands, Lion checks our paddle grip then pushes our kayaks into the clear water, which sparkles like a giant blue disco ball in the sun. Around us, yacht masts sway like metronomes keeping time in a place where time doesn’t matter.

paddle the w h i t s u n d ay s

As we approach the secluded stretch of sand, the shadows of our kayaks glide along the ocean floor and it seems like we’ve paddled into a postcard. Given the beach’s restricted boat and vehicle access, thanks to its shallow waters and thick bushland, we’re reminded why we didn’t take the lazy option. For more information visit saltydog.com.au.

Explore this tropical paradise on a kayak

t ig e r a ir f l ie s to the Whitsunday Coast from Sydney tigerair.com.au

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top end gear

E A S T C O A S T B A L I

We drive The Savannah Way from Cairns to Darwin

E A S T C O A S T B A L I

CAIRNS TO DARWIN

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CAIRNS TO DARWIN

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ustralia has many outback roads, but this 3,700km route will inspire you, challenge you and, at times, render you speechless. You can spend your nights at sprawling cattle stations, at rough-and-ready roadhouses or camping under a sky full of stars. The Savannah Way goes all the way from Cairns to Broome but I flew into Cairns and out of Darwin, taking in about two-thirds of this epic drive. From the easternmost point in Cairns you’ll begin the gradual climb up the Gillies Range, a 19km highway with 263 twists and turns. This westward route takes you through tropical tablelands where sugar-cane fields and cloud-capped mountains eventually give way to flat, red dust-covered lands and the sweeping grass plains of the Gulf Savannah. Pull in for a rest or a meal at Ravenshoe (Queensland’s highest town) or Mount Garnet, another half an hour up the road. Consider spending the night at the Undara Lava Lodge (undara.com.au), home to the world’s largest lava tubes, where you can explore these natural geological wonders while enjoying the hospitality of a unique outback setting, or spend the night in an old train carriage.

Journey to the east Things can get hectic in Kuta, Legian and the hotspots of southern Bali. But in the island’s tranquil east, time marches at a gentler pace. Ian Lloyd Neubauer gives us eight great reasons for visitors in Bali to see the other side of the Island of the Gods... ti g e ra ir.co m

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dust and sunsets The Savannah Way has a great mix of tropical and desert landscapes

POINT Y END

the splurge

adventure drive The Savannah Way cuts across the top of Australia.

Splash out on a harbourview apartment on Cockatoo Island

DARWIN

The Savannah Way weaves its way between the tropics and the desert, from Cairns to Darwin and beyond. Bridget Mahony took a drive along this dusty dirt track known as “Australia’s Adventure Drive” CAIRNS

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Route of the author

BROOME

Savannah Way

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Tiger Tales_CHIA-BAILEY_200x260mm.pdf

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25/02/16

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THE POINTY END

The Tale End: travel stories about Adelaide

the tale end

Travel is all about stories This issue we look at Adelaide and surrounds

Adelaide has so much to do these days – there is now such a rich range of bars, restaurants and street art. At Orana and Street ADL (285 Rundle St, Adelaide; restaurantorana.com, streetadl.com), a bar and restaurant are combined with chef Jock Zonfrillo making the most of indigenous produce. Orana means ‘Welcome’ in Aboriginal dialects, and that is exactly how this place makes you feel.

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During a recent visit, we found this amazing cafe on the outskirts of Adelaide called Mister Sunshine’s (32 George St, Thebarton; facebook.com/ MisterSunshines). Inside, it is all retro chairs and crockery like your grandparents would use, but the meals are amazing and the service is really friendly. We had arrived with no idea where to go and one of the staff planned out a whole day’s itinerary for us!

Bestow your skin Nature’s fresh energy WITH

- MONIQUE LONG

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Hike the wilds of Tassie’s Maria Island

Chia & Kiwi Seed Superfood Serum

- TRENT VAN DER JAGT

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$6O,OOO

Antipodes donates from sales of this serum to World Wide Fund for Nature - New Zealand ®

2 At Adelaide Zoo our kids saw pandas for the first time. It’s the only zoo in Australia that has them, and the habitat is amazing. It’s so easy to see them; they were just hanging outside chomping on bamboo without a care in the world. We loved the capybaras too – they look like chilled-out giant rats and we had never seen them in an Aussie zoo before either.

Nation wide in Australia: Priceline, David Jones, Myers, Terry White Chemist, Malouf pharmacies, National Pharmacies, independent health stores

WORDS JO STEWART

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Top end gear

T HE WAT E R P A L A C E Can’t afford to live in a palace even for one night? No dramas, because you can still afford to visit one. Around 5km north of the town of Karangasem, the Tirta Gangga Water Palace charges only $2 for admission. Constructed in 1948 by the last king of eastern Bali, Anak Agung Agung Anglurah Ketut Karangasem, Tirta Gangga showcases an eclectic mix of Balinese and Chinese architectural kitsch. There are three separate complexes with fish ponds, hand-carved wooden footbridges, frightening sculptures of demons and deities and fully functional stone fountains set among 12 hectares of manicured tropical gardens. This may also be the only museum palace in the world where visitors are allowed to cool off in the king’s old swimming pool. ê

Mount Surprise, Georgetown and Croydon are all in fairly close proximity, which makes a day’s drive to Normanton comfortable after a good night’s rest. In Normanton you’ll find the historical Gulflander Train (Matilda St, Normanton; gulflander.com.au) that was built to connect the once-bustling river port of Normanton with the rich gold fields of Croydon. You’ll see it rolling along on the original heritage-listed steel rails and sleepers from 1891 – just not every day of the week. In the tourist season the train does a two-hour return trip to Critters Camp, which works well if you’re short for time.

here are hundreds of reasons to visit Tasmania’s Maria Island. There are the glorious beaches with hardly a human in sight, the incredible mountains just made for climbing, the eerie ruins of buildings made by convicts hundreds of years ago and an unpolluted night sky full of billions of stars. A visit to Maria Island offers the rare chance to be immersed in a world without traffic lights, skyscrapers, cars or powerlines, and an opportunity to breathe in some of the freshest air your lungs will ever take in. Despite all these very worthy reasons to visit Maria Island, one of the greatest is the opportunity to get up close and personal with Australia’s native wildlife. Maria Island’s isolation and lack of development has enabled Australian native

animal populations to flourish, mostly because the animals are free to roam without the danger of ending up as roadkill or hunted by introduced species (like cats and foxes) that have devastated wildlife populations on mainland Australia. Maria Island has no permanent human population so it is, indeed, where the wild things are. Completing the iconic Maria Island Walk is one of the best ways to see all of the famed creatures that call this windswept island home, because over four days of walking you get to cover lots of terrain, all home to some of Australia’s best-known birds, marsupials and reptiles. After walking along the beach, ambling on bush tracks, scrambling up scree fields and climbing mountain terrain, we see everything ê

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- KATE FRASER

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DE S T IN AT ION ME L BOUR NE

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DASH

A nine-year-old about town exploring a new city

ENCOUNTER

weekend warriors ONE

DESTINATION,

TWO

DIFFERENT

ADVENTURES

Weekend Warriors: see Melbourne two ways

JOHN

A visitor from Florida checking out Melbourne's US food trend

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Editorial & Art Editor Paul Chai Art Director Jon Gregory Creative Director Stephanie Goh Sub Editor Adam Scroggy Production Manager Ian Scott Cover photo Daniel Boud

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Advertising Commercial Manager Joe Bird (02) 9186 9104 jbird@citrusmedia.com.au For all advertising enquiries please email tigertales@citrusmedia.com.au Printed by Bluestarweb

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Management Financial Controller Stuart Harle Director Jim Flynn Publisher Steve Maidens (02) 8188 3670 steve@citrusmedia.com.au Tiger Tales is published on behalf of Tigerair by Citrus Media, PO Box 20154, World Square NSW 2002 Tel. (02) 9186 9186 citrusmedia.com.au

go hiking in maria isl and Spend four days in the Tasmanian wilderness

© 2016 All rights reserved. Reproduction or distribution in any form, in whole or in part, is prohibited without prior written permission from the copyright holder. Citrus Media is not responsible for the views and opinions of contributing journalists. Although the advice and information in this book are believed to be accurate and true at the time of going to press, neither the authors nor the publisher can accept any legal responsibility or liability for any errors or omissions that may have been made.

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GO YOUR

OWN WAY

GO WHEREVER, WHENEVER IN THE ISUZU D-MAX OR MU-X. Everyone has their own sense of adventure. For some it might just be taking the family to a new camping spot, for others it might mean conquering the most extreme of off-road tracks. Or it may be hitching up the caravan or boat and seeing where the journey takes you. Wherever you choose to go, there’s a nononsense Isuzu ute or SUV built with all the advanced features you need to get you there and beyond. Whatever you do, wherever you go – go your own way.

Discover more at your Isuzu UTE Dealer or isuzuute.com.au

5 star ANCAP safety rating applies to D-MAX 4x4 Crew Cab variants built from November 2013, 4x2 High-ride Crew Cab variants built from November 2014 and all MU-X models. ^5 years or 130,000km whichever occurs first, for eligible customers; excludes accessories and trays. >The Capped Price Servicing Program applies to eligible Isuzu UTE vehicles with a warranty start date after 1 January 2015. The program covers the first 6 scheduled services in line with the scheduled service intervals. Program price subject to change. For full terms & conditions and current pricing go to isuzuute.com.au/service-plus.


THE POINTY END food e fre y ler t cu

guide ê Melbou rne 's s ile nt r ou ot sc di

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Maria Island our la

Huxtaburger's

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freakshake fad finally dead?

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Is the Frankenfood

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THE POINTY END

T HE R OUND-UP W HAT E V E R YO U ' R E I N T O, T H E R E ' S P LE N T Y T O S E E A N D D O

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MUSIC

6 A R T-T O W N In April, Art will fill Chapel Street as the annual ART-Town festival gets local artists to come out of their studios and onto the street. Melbourne is an art-loving town but this accessible event offers the opportunity to stroll Chapel Street where you might run into sculptors plying their trade in shop windows or painters at work in parks. Melbourne. April 2-10; arttown.com.au BUSSELTON FORESHORE MARKETS

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3 SPORT

T IM H O W A N

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ART GALLERY OF SOUTH AUSTRALIA Sport and art collide in the beach and surf photography of Max Dupain, which features heavily in the Public Image, Private Lives: Family Friends and Self in Photography exhibition. Adelaide, until July 3; artgallery.sa.gov.au

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Melbourne gets a world-class jazz joint with the March opening of Bird’s Basement, a club twinned with Birdland New York – the original club of Charlie Parker. Head chef Luigi Buono will be turning out modern Italian paired with craft beer and King Valley wines, and the place opened with Ravi Coltrane, son of the jazz legend John Coltrane. Melbourne, 11 Singers Ln; birdsbasement.com

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ART

Mix sport and good food by taking a short drive from the Margaret River Pro to these markets on the beach at Busselton. They sell the area’s famous local produce as well as clothing and bric-a-brac and you can visit the famous 2km-long Busselton Jetty. Margaret River, every 1st, 3rd and 5th Sunday; busselton.wa.gov.au

March saw the opening of famous dim sum restaurant Tim Ho Wan by the doyen of dumplings, Mak Kwai Pui. Started in Hong Kong, Tim Ho Wan holds a Michelin star for its legendary pork buns, among other offerings, so get down to this new southern diner and grab a plate … or four. Melbourne, 206 Bourke St; timhowan.com.au

B IR D ’ S B A S E M E N T

MARGARET RIVER PRO This is the west’s premier surfing event and it has seen all the greats of the big blue – including Mick Fanning, Kelly Slater and Taj Burrow – tackle these world-class waves. The event gained World Championship status in 2013, is a must for surf fans, and is just a couple of hours south of Perth. Perth, April; worldsurfleague.com

FOOD

PL ANNING ON GOING? If you're heading to one of these events, send us your pictures

#tigerairau

IMAGES: BIRD’S BASEMENT; COURTESY ART TOWN; COURTESY TIM HO WAN.

ROCK & ROLL WRITERS FESTIVAL A festival celebrating the connection between music and the art of writing. Fans of both get together to discuss how the two work together. Speakers include Cold Chisel’s Don Walker and the Hoodoo Gurus’ Dave Faulkner. Brisbane, April 2-3; rockandrollwritersfestival.com


*

The world’s largest car rental company has just landed in Australia. We’re proud to announce our partnership with global car rental giant Enterprise. Don’t worry, you’ll still get the same great Redspot service as always. After all, everything we do, is driven by you. To prove it, we’re giving you 15% off* time and kilometres. Just visit the Redspot counter and quote the code TIGER. *Discount applies to time and kilometres. Valid for April/May collections and subject to availability. Blackout dates apply: 22–25 April, 16. Domestic bookings only.

Driven by you.


THE POINTY END

Throw away your cutlery with Daniel Wilson

WORDS PAUL CHAI

C

hef Daniel Wilson knows a thing or two about hands-on dining. His Huxtaburger franchise is spreading across Melbourne like mayo and tomato sauce on a brioche bun and his guilty-pleasure burgers are keeping a legion of night-time diners happy. “I enjoy eating with chopsticks or cutlery, but there is just something natural about eating with your hands,” Daniel says. “I love it! Especially when you have sauces dripping off your hands.” And that’s exactly how Daniel’s burgers are

designed, like the hot mess that is the Denise, a standard Huxtaburger (wagyu beef, patty, mustard, mayo, tomato sauce, tomato, cheese, lettuce and house-made cucumber pickles) with the addition of jalapenos and sriracha mayo. The secret of Daniel’s burgers is quality produce, brioche buns and condiments that appear to come out of a fire hose; these are gloriously sloppy sandwiches that will soak up beer like a sponge. So, we asked Daniel to give us his no-cutlery dining guide to Melbourne and beyond... ê

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THE POINTY END HUXTABURGER Starting off as the recently closed fine diner Huxtable in Fitzroy, Huxtaburger began in digs in Collingwood before spreading to several outlets including Prahran and the CBD. huxtaburger.com.au

Quail sang choi bau at Flower Drum This sang choi bau is a masterfully wokked mix of quail, lap cheong (Chinese sausage), water chestnuts, spring onion and more served in a perfectly trimmed lettuce with hoi sin sauce. I reckon I could eat 10 of these! 17 Market Ln, Melbourne; flowerdrum.melbourne

Smoked duck liver parfait, pickled cucumber, crisp potato at The Town Mouse I love parfait and this one is perfect. The wafer-thin potato crisps on either side of a decent amount of liver parfait with discs of refreshing pickled cucumber are the perfect way to start any meal. 312 Drummond St, Carlton; thetownmouse.com.au

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“I enjoy eating with chopsticks or cutlery, but there is just something natural about eating with your hands” Grilled pork banh mi from N. Lee Bakery Just along the road from the Collingwood Huxtaburger on Smith Street, this popular Vietnamese bakery is always busy. I put it down to the fresh ingredient and the perfect freshly baked bread. It’s always crispy on the outside and light and fluffy on the inside. 220 Smith St, Collingwood; no website


Anchovy with smoked tomato sorbet at MoVida This classic MoVida dish from chef Frank Camorra is soooo good! A very thin crouton topped with an amazing anchovy and then topped with a small quenelle of smoked tomato sorbet and a few tiny capers. The smoky sweetness of the sorbet works perfectly with the saltiness of the anchovy. The crouton adds the perfect crunch. Also look out for the croquetas and empanadillas here. 1 Hosier Ln, Melbourne; movida.com.au

Chilli Pork Ribs at Nu Nu Chef Nick Holloway’s Vietnamese-style fried pork ribs are so delicious. Squeeze the lime over them then dip in the special salt and enjoy with an ice-cold beer. The fact you’re practically sitting on the beach in idyllic Far North Queensland only adds to the amazing experience. 1 Veivers Rd, Palm Cove; nunu.com.au

Hot Jam Doughnut at American Doughnut Kitchen While I’m not very much of a sweet tooth it’s hard to go past the hot jam doughnuts when I’m doing my weekly shopping at the markets!  Queen Victoria Market, Melbourne; americandoughnutkitchen.com.au

Korean Fried Chicken from Gami Chicken & Beer What’s not to like about fried chicken and beer? I love the original crispy and the spicy equally. The pickled daikon on the side is good for cleansing the palette and also for aiding digestion for when you have too much chicken and beer! 100 Little Lonsdale St, Melbourne; gamichicken.com.au

t ig e r a ir f l ie s to Melbourne and Cairns tigerair.com.au

perfect for hands-on dining Get some pork ribs at Nu Nu (above) or grab some Korean fried chicken at Gami Chicken & Beer.

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THE POINTY END

T HE P L AY L I S T Pack these on your next trip away

WE AR

SARONG

AHEAD OF THE PACK Holly Reid, Ubud festival publicist

“They are so versatile to travel with. You can use one as a rug, a blanket, or even as a spare change of clothes if need be.”

1 KEVIN GATES ISLAH

interview paul chai

Ü Holly moved to Bali two years ago and was completely enchanted with this mysterious archipelago made up of over 17,000 islands. Now based permanently in Ubud, she works as the publicist for the Ubud Writers and Readers Festival and Ubud Food Festival, where she’ s lucky enough to meet some of the country’s best writers, artists and culinary creatives. “I’m constantly on the lookout for new places to explore in between festival gigs, both across Indonesia and Southeast Asia,” she says, “such as Lombok’s Senggigi Beach, which has the most perfect sunsets.” Holly is a window-seat girl because it lets her “watch the tapestry of different landscapes meld together.” And she’s learning to travel light. “I’m perfecting the art of the smoothest check-in and arrival, which means travelling as light as my wardrobe vanity allows,” she says. The 2016 edition of the Ubud Writers and Readers Festival takes place from October 26-30 (ubudwritersfestival.com) and the Ubud Food Festival takes place from May 27-29 this year (ubudfoodfestival.com).

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To his fans in America’s south, Baton Rouge rapper Kevin Gates is a folk hero; a reformed drug dealer who boasts one moment and talks about his mental illness the next. Perhaps it’s this honesty that’s seen Islah shoot up the charts. Ideal for… checking out hip-hop clubs

KIT

FACE MIST “I can’t travel without Sensatia Botanicals Cleopatra’s Rose Facial Mist. It keeps my face feeling fresh.”

TECH

LAPTOP “My fully charged MacBook Pro – some of my most productive work time is actually spent in the air.” RE AD

BOOKS “The latest from the Ubud Writers and Readers Festival bookshelf; there are always hundreds of new titles to choose from.”

2 URTHBOY

THE PAST BEATS INSIDE ME LIKE A SECOND HEARTBEAT Album number five for Urthboy was originally planned as five EPs, each covering a decade between 1950 and 2000. Instead, he’s released something just as ambitious but far more propulsive, Ideal for… exploring Sydney’s inner suburbs

E AT

SWEET TREAT "Something sweet, whether it’s a Kit-Kat or a bag of Haribo; it keeps me from getting cranky!"

3 BAUUER AA

Remember when “Harlem Shake” blew up the internet? Yeah, us neither. Ever since, though, Bauer has been quietly making hay leading up to this, his debut full-length release. And Aa is about as giddy as you might expect. Ideal for… autumn festival season


IT’S ALWAYS BEEN MY

SECRET WEAPON Cody Simpson, age 19 Australian Singer/Songwriter based in Los Angeles

The stress synonymous with a modern lifestyle means our intake of antioxidants and other nutrients needs to be increased to higher levels than we can otherwise obtain from our regular diets. If you are working in a competitive field, going hard and not getting enough sleep your immune system may be compromised and could cer tainly use a boost. Synergy Natural Spirulina is 100% natural wholefood with a vast array of easily absorbable vitamins and minerals. Benefits include increased energy, improved eye and brain health and the ability to remove free radicals and eliminate toxins. To optimise your daily nutritional intake, simply blend Synergy Natural Spirulina with juice and seasonal fruits or your favourite liquid base to make a delicious smoothie, or take as tablets if preferred.

SPIRULINA

f r o m S Y N E R G Y N AT U R A L AVAILABLE in the vitamin section of most Coles, Woolwor ths and Safeway supermarkets, selected Health Food Stores and Pharmacies. Our full range of pack sizes and products can be purchased from our website.

synergynatural.com


Is that a bird? No it’s definitely a plane! Hold on a minute, THAT’S ACTUALLY SOMEONE FLYING AT iFLY! Have you ever dreamed of gliding in the air and experiencing the thrill of weightlessness but just too chicken to hurl yourself out of a plane? Are you adventurous but just not daring enough to take a leap of faith? Then the iFLY Indoor Skydiving experience is the thing for you and it’s as easy as walking through their front door. iFLY has become a mecca for adrenaline seekers and families looking for something extraordinary to do without pushing their limits too far. Indoor skydiving is the simulation of a freefall skydive so you get the same rush of adrenaline without the gut-wrenching fear. You can master the art of flying in a safe, fully controlled environment with iFLY’s state of the art wind tunnels and instead of falling downwards, you are elevated on a cloud of air making it enjoyable and easy to master. With no limitation on skill, Indoor skydiving is fit for both beginners and those with experience, from as young as 3 to as old as 103.

iFLY Indoor Skydiving has already enthralled locals and tourists in the adventure capitals of NSW and QLD – Penrith and the Gold Coast, so it’s only fair that iFLY opens another facility in Perth later in 2016 so that Western Australia can join in too! With indoor skydiving sweeping the nation being the latest thing in action sports and the hottest new attraction, you and your family better jump on the band wagon today and see what all of the fuss is about! So, it’s time to experience something a little special this holiday and head on into iFLY.

Call 1300 366 364 or visit ifly.com.au to book now and suit up for the flight of a lifetime!

BOOK NOW! SYDNEY & GOLD COAST

or 1300 366 364


EVER DREAMED OF

FLYING?

SAFE & RFAUGN ES FO 3-103!


THE POINTY END

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We sent a drone to hover above Sydney's historic precinct so you can scope out the hotspots to visit.

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THE SYDNEY HARBOUR BRIDGE BRIDGECLIMB Travellers can climb this Sydney icon; look out for special themed climbs such as during Mardi Gras and the Vivid winter festival. bridgeclimb.com

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PARK HYAT T SYDNE Y You don't get a closer harbour view than this luxury hotel that wraps itself around the shoreline. Or just grab dinner in the hotel restaurant. sydney.park.hyatt.com

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THE ARGYLE Five cocktail bars set over two levels inside an historic building in the Argyle Cut. theargylerocks.com

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MUNICH BR AUHAUS Longtime Rocks party spot the Lowenbrau Keller recently had a name change. lowenbrau.com.au

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QUAY RESTAUR ANT Peter Gilmore’s chef’s hat-winning, boundarypushing fine diner in the Overseas Passenger Terminal. quay.com.au

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SYDNEY OPERA HOUSE See a play, a concert, a talk, or go on a tour of Jorn Utzon's masterpiece. Or just sit back and admire the harbour, drink in hand, at the Opera Bar. sydneyoperahouse.com

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drone's eye view

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HOVERSCAPE AUSTRALIA We'd like you to meet the Tigerair drone, borrowed from aerial photography company Hoverscape. Their team sent this multicopter up over the The Rocks in Sydney to give us this great shot; hoverscape.com.au

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Why I live in

THE POINTY END

BR ISB A NE Comedian Mel Buttle is the co-host of The Great Australian Bake Off and has a regular column in the Brisbane’s Courier Mail newspaper. How has the city changed in the past few years? More laneways, frozen yoghurt and whiskey bars is a pretty accurate summary of where we’re at right now. Where is your favourite place to see comedy? Heya Bar in Fortitude Valley (351 Brunswick St; heyabar.com), it’s on every Thursday night and it’s free. Where do you go for a post-gig snack/relax? If my show goes well or badly, for a celebration or commiseration dinner for one, it seems I always end up at Ben’s Burgers (5B Winn Ln, Fortitude Valley; bensburgers.com.au). They show NBA games and their burgers are very special. I like the classic burger ��� add jalapenos, with a pale ale. And they’re open late. A lot of comedians go and have a curry and debrief at Taj Mahal Indian Cuisine (722 Brunswick St, New Farm; tajmahalindiancuisine.com.au). Do you have a favourite restaurant/bar? My special occasion place is Pearl Cafe in Woolloongabba (28 Logan Rd) – I love their charcuterie plates with a glass of wine. At the moment though, I’m all about getting a banh mi from Kim Thanh Hot Bread (81 Vulture St, West End). My favourite bar for beer is Death Valley (639 Wynnum Rd, Brisbane; deathvalley.camp). They have a permanent food truck parked out the back and it also has a very rock ‘n' roll atmosphere – it’s owned by The Grates. I love the mammoth whiskey selection at Cobbler in West End (7 Browning St; cobblerbar.com). The cocktails are named after quotes from The Castle – it’s so fun ordering an "And can I just say how disenchanted I am with the legal system".

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MORE COMEDY Comedian and Triple J Mornings co-host Matt Okine pens a piece for us on travel etiquette

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CATCH MEL BUTTLE LIVE Mel will be performing her new comedy show Up To Pussy’s Bow at the Melbourne International Comedy Festival until April 17; melbuttle.com.au


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THE POINTY END

Groove along the streets of Melbourne

WORDS EMILY MCAULIFFE

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on’t be deceived. Melbourne’s Seafarers Bridge to Docklands isn’t a bridge: it’s a catwalk. Well, it is for me – along with my 30 fellow divas partaking in a silent disco walking tour of Melbourne. ‘Walking tour‘ is a slight misnomer given there’s little walking taking place – it’s more of a ‘grooving tour‘ when you have Right Said Fred egging you on with “I’m Too Sexy” playing through noise-cancelling headphones. On top of that, there’s a man clad in orange lycra and large diamante-studded sunglasses leading the charge, offering enthusiastic encouragement to his disco disciples who are tuned into a retro playlist: “Woo, yeah! Show us whatcha got! Lovin’ that spin people!”

As we take turns demonstrating our best strut before conga-lining down the Yarra River, the voice of this man – whose rockstar name is Guru Dudu – booms through a transmitter like a game-show host priming an audience. Except, when I momentarily take off my headphones, I realise he’s almost whispering into his mouthpiece, and the only other auditory stimulus is the dull drone of a chopper flying overhead. Thus everyone looks utterly ridiculous lip-syncing to Michael Jackson’s “Don’t Stop ‘Til You Get Enough” while bouncing down the promenade. But right now we don’t care that we’re having a private party in a public place, even if there are iPhone cameras tracking our moves. We can deal with the live-streamed YouTube videos later. ê

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“It’s about getting adults to play,” says Guru Dudu – known for official purposes as David Naylor – of his novel walking tours. “I think people want to break out more than they realise but they need permission, so this gives them an excuse to let loose.” And I think he’s bang on. After spending an hour ‘playing’ in Australia’s secondlargest city, I can confirm there are countless people dying to bust a move, including random pedestrians that get roped into our tour from time to time. Apparently, all people require to get their groove on with a bunch of strangers is a free dance pass and a beat. “There’s just something about the dagginess of the disco that brings people together,” Naylor says. To demonstrate the power of discoinduced unity, Naylor instructs us to gather on the steps of the Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre for what will unfold as the most off-key – yet highly animated – rendition of Queen’s “Bohemian Rhapsody” since Wayne’s World. A crowd gathers, the crowd cheers, and for six short minutes we’re convinced we’re making a valuable contribution to Australia’s talent pool.

guru dudu and his disco disciples The Guru, whose real name is David Naylor, says his tours encourage people to let go and have a bit of fun

Walking tours with a twist FOODIE PERTH Cancel out calories with a walking progressive dinner in Perth. twofeet.com.au

SCARY SYDNEY Feeling energised, we dance towards our starting point at South Wharf, sourcing inspiration from the public along the way with moves such as ‘the rower’, ‘the pram pusher’ and ‘the photographer’. Upon reaching the lawn for a closing celebration of civic dance-party freedom, we draw on the wise words of one of the 90s’ greatest musical philosophers, Ricky Martin: we truly are living La Vida Loca (the crazy life). Guru Dudu runs silent disco walking tours most Friday nights in Melbourne, with private and corporate events also available; gurududu.org

t ig e r a ir f l ie s to Melbourne from eight destinations tigerair.com.au

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Spook yourself in Sydney on a ghost tour of Manly’s Q Station. quarantinestation.com.au

WILD CAIRNS Spot wildlife by tiptoeing through a rainforest near Cairns after dark. waitawhile.com.au

STREETWISE MELBOURNE Learn the rhyme and reason behind Melbourne’s graffiti art. melbournestreettours.com

TIPPLING HOBART Sample wine, whiskey and cider to discover Hobart’s historic old pubs. hobartwalkingtours.com.au


THE POINTY END

THE FEAST 1 0F 2

IS THE FREAKSHAKE DYING OUT? They look sweet on Instagram but leave a sour taste otherwise

WORDS PAUL KRISTOFF ILLUSTRATION KEV GAHAN, THE ILLUSTRATION ROOM

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t all started so innocuously. Patissez, a small cafe in the Canberra suburb of Griffith, posted a photo on Instagram of four milkshakes. Soon, these milkshakes were making waves on social media around the world, with lines for up to 45 minutes outside the cafe. What was so special about these milkshakes? They were served in jars topped with an assortment of sweet delights such as brownies, marshmallows, caramel sauce and pretzels. And, thus, the "freakshake" was born. Others quickly jumped on the idea and soon there were cafes throughout Australia and as far away as London making their own versions of the freakshake. For Melbourne cafe Naughty Boy, demand was so strong that their trade doubled shortly after introducing freakshakes to the menu. What is it that has made this superfreaky milk drink such a phenomenon? One word: Instagram. Social media goes crazy over extreme food and wacky flavour combinations, with food that’s on either end of the super-healthy or super-naughty spectrum always getting attention. Capture those elements in a way that photographs well and the likes and shares will soon follow. But is the freakshake a matter of style over substance? Dessert is great

and everyone has a separate stomach reserved for it come meal time; having said that, some freakshakes contain up to 4,000 kilojoules, 80 grams of fat and 20 grams of sugar in one serving. That’s almost the same number of kilojoules as six full-size Mars Bars. Are they really worth the calories? Sure, many once-in-a-while treats are ridiculously unhealthy, but there’s always that tradeoff between the excess calories involved and the satisfaction of eating something that tastes amazing. The problem is, freakshakes don’t taste amazing. Let’s be honest: when you’re piling so many ingredients atop a drink in a jar, you’re doing it for the visual effect, not for the flavour. When you’re throwing yet another crazy ingredient into the mix, you’re doing it for the wow factor, not for the flavour. When you’re making the shake look more outlandish, you’re doing it for ‘Likes’, not for flavour. And how are you meant to eat these things anyway – take off the toppings and put them on a plate, or eat them with your hands and then drink the shake after? Of course, there are some freakshakes that are more reserved than their extreme brethren, that give primacy to balanced flavours over shock value – but, arguably, these aren’t truly freakshakes. Why not

G R E AT S H A K E S : HIS T OR Y OF T HE MIL K S H A K E

ê

The word ‘milkshake’ was first used in the late 19th century in the US – though these were more like cocktails as they actually had whiskey in them! The modern, non-alcoholic milkshake took off in the 1930s in ‘malt shops’, peaking in popularity in the 50s and 60s.

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THE POINTY END THE FEAST 2 0F 2

“THE AUSTRALIAN PUBLIC GET BORED; THEY WANT TO SEE SOMETHING ELSE” just order a tasty (non-freak) shake, and then another dessert or two on the side? At least you’ll be able to taste each thing properly without getting it all mixed together in some sort of horrid sugary concoction. Freakshakes were created to get attention. While a well-balanced, innovative milkshake and doughnut might taste fantastic, it’s rarely going to put you on the map. Freakshakes exist because of us, and, as such, it’s up to us to say that enough is enough – to choose flavour over hype, and to choose a drink that doesn’t require a detailed attack plan to figure out how to eat. While the owners of Patissez, motherand-daughter combo Gina and Anna Petridis, have recently opened a second Patissez in Canberra and plan to expand internationally (a Singapore store is expected later this year), even they acknowledge that the freakshake wave won’t last forever. “The Australian public and consumers get bored really quickly; they want to see something else. People will keep coming here for [freakshakes], but we need to move on with innovation in other ways as well.”

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It’s time the freakshake died, and arguably that process has already started. But for those who can’t yet picture a world without freakshakes, here’s where to find five of the craziest... Patissez, Canberra To see where it all began, visit Patissez in Griffith or Civic, which has a range of freakshakes on offer – along with some even more extreme ‘Freak of the Week’ flavours. Take, for example, the Pork Star, which combines maple-roasted butternut pumpkin, bourbon-infused whipped cream, maple bacon, puff pastry and maple pumpkin puree. 40 Marcus Clarke St, Canberra; facebook.com/patissez.pty.ltd Naughty Boy, Melbourne This unassuming Princes Hill cafe had been operating under the radar until it introduced Freakshakes to the menu. One of its most popular Instashakes (‘Freakshake’ is actually trademarked by Patissez) is the Pavlova, which combines coconut milk, vanilla and lime, passionfruit curd, meringue, kiwifruit, mixed berries and strawberry fairy floss. 499-501 Lygon St, Princes Hill; naughtyboycafe.com.au XS Espresso, Sydney This Parramatta cafe has its freakshakes “off menu” and there are always one-off creations on the menu. A favourite with locals is the XS Surprise, which is a chocolate milkshake mixed with white chocolate and sprinkles, and topped with fairy floss, honeycomb chocolate and an ice-cream cone filled with a Kinder Surprise egg – perfect with Easter on the horizon. 9a/1183-1187 The Horsley Dr, Wetherill Park; xsespresso.com.au

Babooshka, Perth Offering what is perhaps the most ridiculous freakshake we’ve seen is Babooshka in Northbridge. This towering beast contains three donuts, chocolatecoated bacon, whipped cream and an assortment of lollies and chocolate bits. 7/189 William St, Northbridge; babooshkabar.com.au Molly Bakes, London Things might be dying down in Australia, but in London they’re just getting started. Dalston cafe Molly Bakes introduced freakshakes to its menu this year, with lines of over two hours on launch. One of the most popular flavours has been the peanut butter topped with caramel, cookie dust, popping candy, ice cream, whipped cream, brownie and honeycomb. 450 Kingsland Rd, London; mollybakes.co.uk.

THE CITY L ANE Paul Kristoff is the editor-in-chief of food, travel and culture for online magazine The City Lane, and one-third of craft-beer podcast team Brunswick Beer Collective.

Visit thecitylane.com and brunswickbeercollective.com to find out more.


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THE POINTY END

Hike the wilds of Tassie’s Maria Island

WORDS JO STEWART

T

here are hundreds of reasons to visit Tasmania’s Maria Island. There are the glorious beaches with hardly a human in sight, the incredible mountains just made for climbing, the eerie ruins of buildings made by convicts hundreds of years ago and an unpolluted night sky full of billions of stars. A visit to Maria Island offers the rare chance to be immersed in a world without traffic lights, skyscrapers, cars or powerlines, and an opportunity to breathe in some of the freshest air your lungs will ever take in. Despite all these very worthy reasons to visit Maria Island, one of the greatest is the opportunity to get up close and personal with Australia’s native wildlife. Maria Island’s isolation and lack of development has enabled Australian native

animal populations to flourish, mostly because the animals are free to roam without the danger of ending up as roadkill or hunted by introduced species (like cats and foxes) that have devastated wildlife populations on mainland Australia. Maria Island has no permanent human population so it is, indeed, where the wild things are. Completing the iconic Maria Island Walk is one of the best ways to see all of the famed creatures that call this windswept island home, because over four days of walking you get to cover lots of terrain, all home to some of Australia’s best-known birds, marsupials and reptiles. After walking along the beach, ambling on bush tracks, scrambling up scree fields and climbing mountain terrain, we see everything ê

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from Tasmanian Devils to pademelons, and all the greats of the marsupial world. Apart from the devils, wallabies, roos and echidnas, scores of handsome wombats populate Maria Island. There are wombats everywhere. We see wombats munching on fields of green grass, wandering precariously close to cliff edges, and one even snoozing in a bed of flowers by the shore on a sunny day. While all wombats are pretty darn cute, those on Maria Island could win a beauty contest (if wombat beauty contests were an actual thing). With lustrous coats, shining eyes and happy little faces, Maria Island wombats are total heartbreakers. One was seemingly happy to pose for cameras while a gentle breeze rustled his hair.

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“Maria Island offers the rare chance to be immersed in a world without traffic lights, skyscrapers, cars or powerlines” Apart from all the marsupials, there’s plenty of avian action to keep bird nerds twitching as well. Several flocks of plucky Cape Barren geese waddle about freely. Cockatoos screech up a storm in the trees above. And the mysterious forty-spotted pardalote lives up to its name of being one of Australia’s rarest birds by briefly making an appearance then promptly disappearing from view, not unlike a smaller version of Kevin the hard-to-pin-down tropical bird featured in Pixar’s Up. At night, our wildlife spotting opportunities are replaced with feasting on an impressive showcase of Tasmania’s best produce while we rest our legs after a day of exploring. Our guides overindulge us with oysters, cheese, olives and some of Tassie’s best beer and wine, the perfect accompaniment to a night under the stars. Sleeping in small eco-huts connected to the dining room, compost toilets and bush (solar-powered) shower by a series of wooden boardwalks, we’re close enough to the shore to hear the waves crashing at night – an instant, all-natural sleeping pill. Known as one of the world’s greatest walks, the Maria Island Walk delivers sunshine and starlight, fresh food and even fresher air… and enough photogenic wombats to use up all the available memory on your iPhone. Find out more at mariaislandwalk.com.au

More Tasmanian walks BAY OF FIRES LODGE WALK An epic four-day walk between the camps and lodges of the remote Bay of Fires area. Go self-guided or travel with a guide and group. bayoffires.com.au

THE OVERLAND TRACK This is the country’s most famous alpine walk situated in the Cradle Mountain-Lake St Clair National Park. It’s a 65km, six-day affair, or you can just walk sections of the track for a shorter experience. parks.tas.gov.au

THE FREYCINET PENINSUL A Pound sand along Coles Bay or climb the Hazards mountain range to discover the beautifully hidden Wineglass Bay. wineglassbay.com

t ig e r a ir f l ie s to Hobart from Melbourne tigerair.com.au

GET TING BACK TO NATURE ON MARIA ISL AND Walking along a pristine beach (above) and the hut accommodation (top); Opposite: The island's natural beauty

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THE POINTY END TRAVEL & THRILLS 1 0F 2

THE PASSENGER A round-table chat with three very different travellers. This issue: adventure travel

ILLUSTRATION GREGORY BALDWIN, THE ILLUSTRATION ROOM

Connor McLeod, anti-adventurer Travel used to be an adventure in, and of, itself; you didn’t need to add white-water rafting and bungee jumping to get a kick out of getting on a plane. Before the advent of smartphones you’d get a fair shot of adrenaline just from trying to meet up with each other in foreign countries. Having flown to Paris from Sydney in the pre-iPhone era I spent a fairly tense half-day trying not to look weird as I sat in a cafe waiting for my friend, who was travelling from London. His flight had been

delayed, but I had no app to tell me that – I just had to wait and hope he showed. Travelling to Laos in the late 90s was an adventure. The country was just opening up and the adrenaline on that trip came from a brief encounter with a Filipino piano player. He invited my friend and me to a basketball game the next day, and we obliged. It turned out to be Philippines National Day – a huge event where the guests of honour were the Filipino consulate staff – and their basketball umpire called in sick. As the only other Westerner present, I was asked if I’d step into the ref’s shoes despite having played only three games of high-school basketball in my life. What could I say? I made a few controversial calls, but we all ended up celebrating together afterwards.

Motorsports? Trying not to lose sight of our Romanian tour guide as I followed him across ice-covered roads to our accommodation in Transylvania was enough excitement for one day. Or cleaning up a rogue roo in a hatchback as we drove across the Nullarbor Plain. Adventure travel seems designed for the social media age, where it’s no longer good enough to have travelled to a place; you have to have mountain biked it, abseiled it or run a marathon in it. I prefer the organic adventure that travel brings; I don’t need to pimp my holidays with manufactured thrills and spills.

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“I WOULD GO MAD SITTING ON A BEACH FOR A WEEK. I HAVE TO DO SOMETHING” Sarah Mitchell, pro-adventurer I lead a pretty healthy and active existence, so when I go on holidays it makes sense to me to include as much outdoor activities as I can. They started off as hiking and walking mountain trails, but they ended morphing into more extreme sports like bungee jumping, ziplining and white-water rafting. Why? It just seemed like a natural extension of exploring a country. It allowed me to experience Queenstown like never before by leaping off a bridge. I was able to explore the forests or Thailand by dangling above them on a zipline. I could get to know the Tully River in Cairns very intimately, one bump at a time. Travel is about getting outside of your comfort zone, and that for me is doing something crazy like jumping from a plane in Picton or doing a four-day walk in Tasmania.

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I would go mad sitting on a beach for a week. I have to be doing something and I love the people you meet when you add some adventure to your travel. People who do adventurous activities are usually friendly, up-for-it folks who want to squeeze every possible skerrick of excitement out of their lives. Doing something out of the ordinary also binds you together; you can only talk to someone about skydiving if they’ve been skydiving. They have to know what it’s like to fly. I love the feeling at the end of a crazy travel day when you have nothing left – you just slink back to your accommodation and have the best night’s sleep of your life. I come back from adventure holidays feeling fitter and more relaxed knowing I’ve challenged myself and won. I love adventure travel.

Paul Chai, part-time adventurer My idea of adventure travel used to be staying somewhere without a mini-bar. I really didn’t see the point of doing something dangerous while you were on holidays – “taking a break” isn’t meant to be taken literally. But some activities are both adventurous and give you a better understanding of, or perspective on, your destination. On a recent trip to Western Australia I went quad biking in the Boranup Forest in the Margaret River region. The bikes of Eco Adventures Margaret River may be a hoot to ride, but they’ve also been specially designed to travel the delicate trails of this national park without doing as much harm as a bike or car. They’re electric bikes that were designed especially for this purpose, and they give you a far more intimate tour of the giant karris and secret sinkholes of this amazing forest. The tours also come with an iPad full of information so you end up

TRAVEL & THRILLS 2 0F 2

exhilarated, informed and eco-friendly – my type of adventure travel. It was similar with a recent trip to Mount Buller in the Victorian Alps. I’m usually a skier, but this time I was exploring in the summer and I gave mountain biking a go. Mountain biking is a more intimate way to feel the mountain; you don’t just slip over the surface like when you’re skiing. On a mountain bike, you feel every twist and turn and go places you’d never get to on skis. I explored the Delatite Trail, which is an old logging track used by bikers, horse riders and walkers. These are wild trails; rock-strewn, stick-covered and with river crossings where you ride across the trunks of fallen trees. I scared off a copperhead snake, spotted trout in the river and saw gang-gangs flying overhead. I saw a more intimate side of the alps and it was due to my form of transport. Sometimes doing something adventurous is just a great, organic way to see a place – and sometimes the most daring thing I want to do is order a second pina colada while I sit by the pool.


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THE POINTY END

THE SPLURGE

HARBOUR VIEW APARTMENT Cockatoo Island, Sydney

W

hy it’s worth it: Against the shiny facade of Sydney Harbour, Cockatoo Island’s rugged, industrial look provides a stark contrast. Over two centuries, the 18-hectare island housed a convict prison, reformatory girl’s school and, most recently, a sprawling shipyard. Boat building ended in 1991 and, after a UNESCO World Heritage listing in 2010, tourism is now the primary industry. With its multi-level maze of

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pathways, tunnels and precarious stairways, intrigue lurks around every corner. Nature meets history on an epic scale. Bang for your buck: Accommodation comes in a few guises. For a fun night under canvas, pitch your own tent or “glamp” on the shoreline. But for a refined stay, choose one of the refurbished buildings perched atop the island’s upper levels


WORDS ROB GRANT PHOTOS COCKATOO ISLAND, ROB GRANT

and gaze down, just a little smugly, at the campers below. The best choice is a harbour view apartment, with their million-dollar views from well-appointed balconies. Pour a glass of your favourite drop and soak up the tranquility, as stars appear over the shimmering water. After the last ferry departs, at around 11pm, only a few rogue seagulls remain to break the silence. In the morning, start the BBQ early and enjoy sunrise over the Harbour Bridge. The digs: The apartments have stories to tell, as they originally housed the island’s launch driver and coxswain. Original features, such as iron fireplaces and wooden sash windows, are lovingly restored. The interiors are modern, minimalist and stylish; all-white fittings and polished wooden floorboards create a classic atmosphere. Facilities are top-notch and include a large-screen TV, entertainment system, fully equipped kitchen and washer-dryer. Must-do experience: Grab a torch and take a spooky stroll around the island at night. The decrepit outlines of the ancient industrial equipment have a sinister aura after dark. Truly brave souls can walk the lengths of two underground tunnels that bisect the island. Peer beyond the ‘Do not enter’ signs at your own peril.

from boat building to tourism Sydney’s Cockatoo Island was once a prison, then a shipyard, and now it attracts travellers keen to soak up its unique industrial island setting

The damage: Both apartments sleep four and cost $470 per night on weekends (min. two night stay) and $370 midweek. Add $35 for a Breakfast Pack and $45 for a BBQ Pack (each feed two). Regular ferries serve the island. Or treat yourselves to a water taxi at $120 each way (for up to 10 people). cockatooisland.gov.au

t ig e r a ir f l ie s to Sydney from eight destinations tigerair.com.au

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hether you wake up in the Whitsundays as an outdoor adventurer keen to explore or a dusty partygoer keen to recover, a good dose of salt air will serve you well. I have decided to get my salt-air fix via a half-day tour with Salty Dog Sea Kayaking. I’m picked up at 8:30am sharp in Airlie Beach by company owner, Neill, and am joined by a young couple on their honeymoon. When we arrive at the Shute Harbour jetty, a 10-minute drive away, we lock our bags in the Salty Dog office and German guide, Lion, gives a quick safety briefing. “Now, if you fall out, there’s no crocs, so you can just chill, yeah?” he says with arms extended, eyes closed and head tipped back. Despite only moving to Australia two weeks ago, he’s got the laid-back Aussie style nailed. With an eager clap of his hands, Lion checks our paddle grip then pushes our kayaks into the clear water, which sparkles like a giant blue disco ball in the sun. Around us, yacht masts sway like metronomes keeping time in a place where time doesn’t matter.

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Then we hit the open water. “And there’s our northerly, ladies and gentlemen!” announces Lion. Away from the protection of the harbour we’re reminded that we are in fact sea kayaking, and if we wanted to take the lazy option we would have caught a boat. Cranking up the pace, we head to Repair Island, 500 metres offshore and one of 74 islands in the Whitsundays. As we gaze up at pines that have peppered this patch for the best part of 100 million years, a flatback turtle pops up to see what we’re looking at. “You know, in Germany it’s an exciting day if you see a deer,” says Lion matter-of-factly. “But here, you’re so lucky – there are just so many cool animals.” He’s absolutely right, but along with the cool animals are those pesky little buggers, perhaps emasculated by their size, intent on zapping the odd tourist between November and May to prove who’s king of the water: the jellyfish. So after dragging our kayaks onto the rough sand of White Rock Island for a snorkel, we slip into sexy black full-body lycra suits and flippers

WORDS EMILY McAULIFFE

Paddle the Whitsundays in a kayak


Post-kayaking refuel stops VILL AGE CAFE RESTAUR ANT & BAR Ideal stop for an all-day breakfast. 366 Shute Harbour Road, Airlie Beach; villagecafe.com.au

FISH D’VINE For a great seafood meal, or a flaming tiki drink, this is the spot. 303 Shute Harbour Road, Airlie Beach; fishdvine.com.au

BOHEMIAN RAW If you like your dinner with a side order of amazing views. Shingley Drive, Airlie Beach; bohemianraw.com.au

MR BONES For Airlie Beach’s best pizza. 263 Shute Harbour Road, Airlie Beach

BREEZE BAR If you like your refuelling to be a little more liquid, grab a cocktail. 1a/293 Airlie Esplanade, Airlie Beach; facebook.com/breezebarairlie

before waddling towards the water like a blundering group of aquatic ninjas. In the silent underwater world, schools of silver fish dart before us with perfect choreography, and a stingray thumps its wings on the seabed. When we emerge from the water we find a seagull closely monitoring cheese and crackers on a picnic rug. Famished, and to the disappointment of our onlooker, we honour the company’s policy to ‘leave no trace’ by demolishing every last crumb before making for our final stop at Cane Cockies Beach on the mainland; a local secret around 2.5km north-west.

As we approach the secluded stretch of sand, the shadows of our kayaks glide along the ocean floor and it seems like we’ve paddled into a postcard. Given the beach’s restricted boat and vehicle access, thanks to its shallow waters and thick bushland, we’re reminded why we didn’t take the lazy option. For more information visit saltydog.com.au.

t ig e r a ir f l ie s to the Whitsunday Coast from Sydney tigerair.com.au

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MATT OKINE

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MATT OKINE

The art of travel Comedian, Triple J breakfast presenter and co-host of the ABC’s How Not to Behave, Matt Okine, shares his travel pointers with us PHOTOS DANIEL BOUD

W

hile being a comedian for 10 years provided plenty of times I could barely keep the lights on, it also offered plenty of opportunities to travel around Australia and the world. Here are a few tips on how to be a total mad dog when it comes to travelling:

Getting to the airport There seems to be a worldwide conspiracy in which governments in every nation do their best to make sure that getting to and from the airport is disproportionately more expensive than the rest of your holiday. Seriously. Sometimes it can feel like the cheapest way to get to the airport would be to build a car from scratch, drive it there yourself, and then attempt to sell your new wheels at the arrivals gate.

Look, whatever your preferred method – be it bus, hire car, or a friend of a friend whom you’ve begged for a lift – my main message to you is this: DO NOT leave airport transfers to the last minute. I was in Peru recently and figured I could just make my own way to the airport as cheaply as possible. The only problem? The airport was two hours away. And two-hour journeys are very difficult to organise when the only Spanish you know is, “Dos grande cervezas?” Two hours and three cars later, I ended up on a service road in the middle of the desert with two very large men suggesting rather sternly that I need to pay a $35 “airport tax” or else I probably wouldn’t be boarding a plane now... or quite possibly ever again. Order official taxi services, book airport bus tickets, or butter up that friend of a friend something chronic, because anything’s better than ending your holiday playing out a scene from Breaking Bad. ê

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MATT OKINE

Packing your bags Some people spend hours meticulously folding each article of clothing to ensure that everything is neatly packed away in their suitcase. Others utilise their last minute before check-out to stuff everything in their bags like they’re professional taxidermists. Well, I’m here to tell you that both of those methods are wrong! You see, it’s all about ‘the roll’. Imagine your pants and tops are like the warm towelettes you get before a meal at a fancy restaurant. Roll them up like the clothing version of a sushi master, and then lay them side-by-side in your luggage. You’ll find that your items are easier to select once you open up your bag, AND rolling provides less definable creases. However you pack your bags though – be it stuff, fold or roll – the most important thing is the weight, because guess what: airlines aren’t as forgiving as your conscience is after the festive season, okay?! They’re gonna care that you’ve packed on a few extra kilos. When an airline says “7kg of carry-on baggage,” they mean 7kg of carry-on baggage. YOU ARE NOT SPECIAL. My friend was adamant they could board a flight with 15kg in their tiny suitcase just by “acting like it’s only 7kg.” Well, guess what? They were acting like a darn goose when they got busted and were made to pay a last-minute luggage fee. And for the people who like to bring a handbag or suitcase the size of my old man’s chicken coup onto the plane ALONG WITH carry-on luggage, then please do us a favour and stash it under the seat in front.

WHAT DO YOU THINK? Travel etiquette: what are your travel dos and don’ts?

@tigerairau

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MR. CASUAL: MATT TRYING TO MAKE HIS BOWLING BALL COLLECTION LOOK LIKE IT WEIGHS LESS THAN 7KG


MATT OKINE

The middle seat

“When an airline says ‘7kg of carry-on baggage,’ they mean 7kg of carry-on baggage. YOU ARE NOT SPECIAL” Watch what you eat Don’t get me wrong, the most important element of travelling for me is finding all the amazing places to shove food into my fat mouth. But with great appetite comes great responsibility… If I’m staying somewhere for any less than a week, then you’re dreaming if you think I want to spend two days holed up in a bathroom just because my tastebuds were fanging for that roadside lassi. And glasses of tap water? Forget it. If in doubt, play it safe. If it’s been cooked or peeled (recently-ish), then it’s all systems go for me. But I avoid salads like a seven-year-old kid avoids… well, salads. It’s all about staying aware. Most people are all across avoiding jugs of H2O straight from the tap, but give them some lettuce that’s been drowned in the stuff and their brain jumps straight out of the crisper. This applies to teeth-brushing too! Check trustworthy travel sites online, and if there’s any risk about drinking the tap water, then buy a 2L bottle of water for $1 and keep it next to the bathroom sink. Rinse and gargle with that, and that only. It’ll be the best $1 you’ve ever spent.

Let’s cut the crap. The middle seat sucks. I know that. You know that. Hell, even the person sitting next to you in the middle seat right now knows that they copped the short end of the straw. You don’t get to lean on anything, you have to get up if the window passenger needs to pee, and if you have to use the amenities, you have to wear the guilt of asking the aisle passenger to move. For the entirety of your flight, I implore you to be overly kind to the middle person. Give them every inch of the armrest. Try to time your toilet breaks as an entire row. Hell, even give them a damn massage if you’ve got their permission. Do whatever you can to ease their agony. It’s the only way to behave. ê

THE LION SLEEPS TONIGHT: MATT DEMONSTR ATING HIS COPING TECHNIQUES FOR WHEN HE GETS THE MIDDLE SEAT


MATT OKINE

Best of the fest THE MELBOURNE INTERNATIONAL COMEDY FESTIVAL RUNS FROM M A R C H 2 3 - A P R I L 1 7. H E R E A R E SOME HIGHLIGHTS:

ABORIGI-LOL Dane Simpson, Karen Edwards and Josh Warrior, from Deadly Funny, perform a late-night showcase. Downstairs Lounge, Grand Mercure Hotel, until April 5-17

TOM BALLARD, THE WORLD KEEPS HAPPENING A new hour of comedy from the The Project regular about “how everything is sinister and confusing and on the verge of collapse.” Melbourne Town Hall, March 24 – April 17

H A N N A H G A D S B Y, D O G M A T I C

Let people know where you are Look. I know you’re a free spirit. I know you think you can disappear and live off the land, becoming one with nature. I get it. You think you’re the guy from Into the Wild. But just remember, that guy ate one wrong berry and it was all over. What I’m trying to say is: it’s 2016, and Facebook isn’t all about making your “friends” hate you by posting pictures of your beachside cocktails along with captions like “Hard day at the office.” It’s actually a really useful tool that should be used to let the closest people in your life know exactly where you are at all times. I was once caught in a stadium riot in Ghana after police shot tear gas into the crowd (in case you don’t know, tear gas is extremely difficult to swallow. Much like the price of mid-strength beers in stadiums back home...), and while I was totally fine and barely even thinking about it once I’d

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A very personal show from Gadsby that attempts to explain how she got to where she is today. ACMI Beyond, March 24 – April 17

left the car park, media outlets have a way of writing fear-inciting headlines. So while I’m eating chichingas on Accra beach an hour later, my family members are freaking out. Look, even if you don’t want to share your exact location, sending a simple private message to yourself will at least let everyone know when you were last “active” on the site, and those kind of signals can mean a lot to people who care about you! We know you’re heading away to take a break, but people care about you. Let them know you’re all good. XO Matt Okine plays the Melbourne International Comedy Festival until April 17. He also has shows in Perth and Sydney in May. See details at mattokine.com

t ig e r a ir f l ie s to Melbourne from eight locations tigerair.com.au

SAR AH MILLICAN, OUTSIDER UK comedian Millican, is a regular on panel shows QI and Have I Got News For You. Melbourne Town Hall, April 2-3

TIM VINE, TIM TIMINEE TIM TIMINEE TIM TIM TO YOU Best-named show in the festival? Expect a puntastic set from this UK comic. Victoria Hotel, March 24 – April 17 For tickets and the full festival line-up, go to comedyfestival.com.au


MATT OKINE

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DE S T IN AT ION ME L BOUR NE

DASH

A nine-year-old about town exploring a new city

weekend warriors ONE

DESTINATION,

TWO

DIFFERENT

ADVENTURES

JOHN

A visitor from Florida checking out Melbourne's US food trend

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WEEKEND WARRIORS

WH AT ’S COOKING ? We travel to Fitzroy Gardens to see Captain Cook’s Cottage (230-298 Wellington Pde, East Melbourne; fitzroygardens.com), built by his mum and dad. It’s a bit spooky inside but still cool.

BL OW OFF SOME S TE A M Time for a quick bike ride around some of the back lanes near our house. I really enjoy biking and Melbourne has some great bike tracks along the railway lines and out at Merri Creek, where I can ride safely.

WH AT A BUMMER After we visit the cottage we go for a walk around Fitzroy Gardens. There are lots of great places to hide and down one of the tracks my brother, Raff, and I found this rock. We think it looks like a bum.

DASH

visits a historic cottage and a science museum

f r id ay

12:00

13:00

16:00

A MERIC A N OBSESSION Melbourne seems to be going nuts for American food – burgers, sliders, barbecue and brisket – so I’m going to eat my way around the city, American style. I start at True North (2a Munro St, Coburg; truenortharcher.com) a rock ‘n’ roll diner with waffles, Texas eggs and a sweet pie of the day. I grab a very late breakfast burrito and head into town.

SHEL LING OUT

RE A DING M ATERIA L I’ll be spending a lot of time in cafes so I go to The Paperback Bookshop (60 Bourke St, Melbourne; paperbackbooks.com.au), an independent book shop in the north of the city, and browse for some reading material.

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I go for a messy but delicious lunch at Miss Katie’s Crab Shack (202 Johnston St, Fitzroy; misskatiescrabshack.com). It’s a great, fun place; but while my waistline is grateful these aren’t American-sized portions, it does feel a bit like a posh take on Louisiana cuisine. Still, the crab is amazing, and I have it with fried green tomatoes and southern fried chicken.


DESTINATION MELBOURNE

ROCKIN’ OUT NO BONES A BOUT IT I love Scienceworks (2 Booker St, Spotswood; museumvictoria.com.au/ scienceworks) because when I grow up I want to be a geologist. My favourite thing is a skeleton riding a bike, it’s hanging up in the ceiling and there’s a bike you can ride to make the skeleton move.

17:00

We drive down to nearby Williamstown, an area in the south-west of Melbourne that has a lot of coastline to play on. We really like the rockpools but they smell pretty bad at low tide.

THE POS T OFFICE We have dinner at our local pub The Post Office (229-231 Sydney Rd, Coburg; thepostofficehotel.com.au). It has free lemonade for kids, so we love it there, and the food is good. I have a burger.

18:30

19:30

JOHN

tours the deep south of America … in Fitzroy

TIKI-TA S TIC NIGHTC A P Who doesn’t like a good tiki bar, America’s kitsch and crazy gift to bar culture? At LuWOW (62-70 Johnston St, Fitzroy; theluwow.com) the sheer volume of tack outclasses many tiki bars back home, save for a few of the originals from the 1950s. It’s great fun and I leave with my very own mai tai mug.

L OC A L DE TOUR I take a break from my home culture and go to the Melbourne Museum (11 Nicholson St, Carlton; museumvictoria.com.au/ melbournemuseum) to learn a bit about the city I’m visiting. There’s an excellent First Peoples gallery that looks at the plight of Indigenous Australians since white settlement in the area.

ROL L WITH IT I’m heading to the Deep South again for a quick dinner with a visit to Po’ Boy Quarter (295 Smith St, Fitzroy; facebook.com/poboymelbourne) where I order a shrimp po’ boy – delicious crisp prawns with creamy mayo on a soft roll. One of many US food joints. ti g e ra ir.co m

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WEEKEND WARRIORS

UP CL OSE WITH A NDY We go to the National Gallery of Victoria (180 St Kilda Rd, Melbourne; ngv.vic.gov.au) to see the Andy Warhol and Ai Weiwei exhibition. It was pretty cool but my favourite bit was the kids’ area called Studio Cats.

RIV ER RUN We’re having a day out in the city today, so we catch the train to Flinders Street Station and then take a walk along the Yarra River into the city.

TIME TO SHOP In the Royal Arcade just off Bourke Street Mall are Gog and Magog, two statues of mythical creatures who chime the big bell every hour. My dad used to come and look at them when he was a kid and now we go and check them out. There’s also a great toy shop in the arcade called Jasper Junior (facebook.com/ JasperJuniorOZ) – they claim to be toy suppliers to Santa but I’m not convinced.

DASH

checks out some art and makes some as well

S AT UR D AY

08:00

10:30

12:00

GETTING ON TRACK I’m from Orlando, Florida so there are no trams in our city. These Melbourne trams look a little like the San Francisco cable cars, so I jump on the City Circle Tram to get a free tour of the city centre. This route uses some of the older trams that have since been replaced by newer, sleeker models and goes past a lot of the city sights.

L A NE WAY L UNCH S TOP

A N A MERIC A N IN PA RIS Well, an American at the “Paris End” of Collins Street anyways. I stop into La Belle Miette (8 Collins St, Melbourne; labellemiette.com.au) for a macaron and a cup of coffee. The name of this place means ‘beautiful small thing’, which describes my snack perfectly.

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Walking down one of Melbourne’s laneways I see what looks like Smokey the Bear. He’s promoting a little laneway bar called Chuckle Park (322, Little Collins St, Melbourne; chucklepark.com.au) and it’s themed around a US national park. The food – authentic Cubano and Reuben sandwiches – comes out of a caravan.


DESTINATION MELBOURNE

WA L L-TO-WA L L A R T We walked through some laneways and found an artist doing some graffiti in Flinders Lane. He gave my brother a crayon and told him to help out.

At the Grub Food Van (87-89 Moor St, Fitzroy; grubfoodvan.com.au) you eat outside next to a big silver caravan. They have the best mint milkshakes I’ve ever had.

S WEE T SUCCE SS My favourite lolly shop ever is in one of these laneways. At Chocamama (6 Degraves St, Melbourne) you can pick any lollies you like and put them in a bag. The best ones are the sherbet bombs.

14:00

GRE AT SH A K ES

17:30

20:00

JOHN

rides a tram and visits the NGV to see a fellow American

SPE A K E A S Y SPEL L Bar Americano (20 Presgrave Pl, Melbourne; baramericano.com) is an oldschool speakeasy that allows just 10 people in at a time. The drinks are serious business so I stick with the classics and order a negroni before leaning up against the wall with the nine other lucky guests.

POPPING IN FOR SOME A R T US pop artist Andy Warhol has an exhibition at the National Gallery of Victoria (Until April 24, 180 St Kilda Rd, Melbourne; ngv.vic.gov.au) along with works from Chinese artist Ai Weiwei. It’s a great exhibition, and while you might expect these two artists to be total opposites, they have much in common.

SOME THING FOR B ACK HOME I spy the souvenir shop called Melbournalia (5/50 Bourke St, Melbourne; melbournalia.com.au). It’s perfect for a tourist like me and has offbeat local gifts for me to take home, like tram T-shirts and necklaces with beer bottles on them.

FANCY AN ADVENTURE? If you want to be one of our Weekend Warriors get in touch.

tigertales@citrusmedia.com.au

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WEEKEND WARRIORS

A NIM A L M AGNE TISM You can scoot under the busy road to Royal Park, which has the zoo in it. My favourite part of the zoo is the Butterfly House – it’s really hot in there and if you stand really still the butterflies land on you. I also like the meerkats.

THE WHEEL LIFE We went for a morning scooter around Princes Park. This is the training ground of my AFL team, Carlton. In the winter we go and watch them play at the MCG (Brunton Ave, Richmond; mcg.org.au).

Y UMM Y TRE AT For a treat, mum and dad take my brother and me to Queen Victoria Market (Corner of Victoria St and Elizabeth St, Melbourne; qvm.com.au). There’s a churro van that parks next to the market and sells these Spanish doughnuts you can dip into chocolate sauce. This time we try them with caramel sauce, and now I’m not sure which one is better.

DASH

goes to a park and hangs at the zoo

S UND AY

09:00

11:00

12:00

CUP OF JOE I’m starting off with a caffeine hit at Code Black Coffee (15-17 Weston St, Brunswick; codeblackcoffee.com.au). These guys roast their own coffee and serve it in a warehouse space that reminds me of some places in New York.

A SLICE OF PIE

S TREE T S A HE A D Is graffiti an American export? Just in case, I stop in at Villain (554 Sydney Rd, Brunswick; villainstore.com), a street clothing store with curios like Breaking Bad and Ghostbusters dolls. Next door is the vinyl store Round & Round Records.

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Okay, so pizza isn’t really American, but we do love it and I can’t pass up a chance to try Melbourne’s best pizza at 400 Gradi (99 Lygon St, East Brunswick; 400gradi.com.au). Johnny Di Francesco is the first Australian ever trained in Naples and it shows with this killer Napoli pizza, one of the best pizzas I’ve ever had.


DESTINATION MELBOURNE HIS TOR Y HOTEL For a bit of a history lesson we go to The Hotel Windsor (111 Spring St, Melbourne; thehotelwindsor.com.au). The man outside says it is the “birthplace of our nation” and Dad explains that this is one of the places where Federation started in Australia.

S TA R AT TR AC TION We take a spin in the Melbourne Star Observation Wheel (101 Waterfront Way, Docklands; melbournestar.com). It goes much slower than you think when you’re on it, but the view from the top is pretty cool.

14:00

16:00

PIZ Z A TO FINISH We finish our day with some local pizza at Cornerstone (105/107 Harding St, Coburg; cornerstonepizzeria.com.au). I get adventurous and try a patate pizza with thin slices of potato and no tomato sauce. I’m not sure about it, but luckily my brother has one with salami on it and he shares it with me.

19:00

JOHN

John gets some pizza and heads to the drive-in

SOUTHERN FA RE WEL L

K EEP ON TRUCKIN’ Set on the site of an old gas (service) station, Welcome to Thornbury (520 High St, Northcote; welcometothornbury.com) is a permanent food truck park with a revolving roster of trucks from Super Taco to Gumbo Kitchen. Having had lunch already, I’m just dropping in for a drink from the bar.

GOING PA RKING

It’s back down south at the latenight fun parlour that is Le Bon Ton (51 Gipps St, Collingwood; lebonton.com.au) an absinthe salon and smokehouse set in an old pub in Collingwood. I order half a pound of pulled pork, slaw and some seasoned fries. I wash it all down with a Sam Adams beer and think Australia does a damn fine job of American food.

At the Village Cinemas Coburg Drive-In (155 Newlands Rd, Coburg North; villagecinemas.com.au) you can choose from three screens for a historic movie experience.

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EAST COAST BALI

Journey to the east Things can get hectic in Kuta, Legian and the hotspots of southern Bali. But in the island’s tranquil east, time marches at a gentler pace. Ian Lloyd Neubauer gives us eight great reasons for visitors in Bali to see the other side of the Island of the Gods... 58

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EAST COAST BALI

T HE WAT E R P A L A C E Can’t afford to live in a palace even for one night? No dramas, because you can still afford to visit one. Around 5km north of the town of Karangasem, the Tirta Gangga Water Palace charges only $2 for admission. Constructed in 1948 by the last king of eastern Bali, Anak Agung Agung Anglurah Ketut Karangasem, Tirta Gangga showcases an eclectic mix of Balinese and Chinese architectural kitsch. There are three separate complexes with fish ponds, hand-carved wooden footbridges, frightening sculptures of demons and deities and fully functional stone fountains set among 12 hectares of manicured tropical gardens. This may also be the only museum palace in the world where visitors are allowed to cool off in the king’s old swimming pool. ê

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EAST COAST BALI

S IDE ME N A fairytale-like village hidden in the Setal Valley, Sidemen is a haven for peace, introspection and great food. The German painter Walter Spies moved here in the late 1930s to escape the commotion of Ubud in Central Bali – a move new-age travellers have been aping for years. They spend their time hiking, meditating, practising yoga and attending Balinese language, painting and cooking classes – or simply immersing themselves in the gentle rhythms of village life. For a onestop shop for all-of-the-above, try Samanvaya (Banjar Tabola, Sidemen, Kec. Karangasem; samanvaya-bali.com) has six bungalows surrounded by velvet-green rice terraces.

W R E C K DI V ING A half-hour drive north of Amed, Tulamben is the jewel in the crown of eastern Bali’s thriving dive industry. It’s also the site of the wreck of the USAT Liberty, an American supply boat that was torpedoed by a Japanese submarine in 1942. Located 25 metres offshore and resting in water that varies from 5-30 metres deep, the USAT Liberty is one of the world’s most accessible wrecks. PADI-accredited operators like Tulamben Wreck Divers (tulambenwreckdivers.com) and Atlantis International (atlantis-bali-diving.com) offer day and night dives at the shipwreck, plus multi-day safaris that take in the nearby Nusa Penida and Gili Selang islands.

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EAST COAST BALI

A ME D A string of fishing villages lining Bali’s easternmost peninsula, Amed is reminiscent of Kuta in the 1970s. From grilled seafood snacks that sell for a dollar to bars decorated with sea shells and small boutique hotels, infrastructure in Amed is low-key, low-impact and mostly locally owned. The beach oscillates in colour from grey to jet black, a remnant of the violent volcanic eruptions that formed the gently meandering coast. The sand is fronted by coral reefs teeming with tropical fish that are among Bali's best snorkelling spots. Rise at dawn to see fleets of triangular-sailed outriggers returning to port with their morning catch, or charter one yourself to trawl for mackerel, wahoo and dogtooth tuna.

The east’s best bites WARUNG OLE Found in Jemeluk, a section of Amed, this beachfront eatery serves wholesome Indonesian cuisine with a strong Mexican accent. Don't miss Chef Iluh's famous beef rendang. Karangasem, Amed, Abang

LOAF CAFE This is where expats living in Candidasa come for their morning coffee and to buy fresh-baked breads and desserts that remind them of home like vanilla slices. Jl. Raya Candidasa, Candidasa

WARUNG ORGANIC Just outside Sidemen, in a bamboo-stilt house, this place takes the highway dinner concept to healthy new heights. The pawpaw curry is amazing. Br. Iseh, Sinduwati, Sidemen

C L IMB MOUN T A G UNG Besakih is not only Bali’s largest temple, but also its most sacred. The title was earned in 1963 when Mount Agung erupted and rivers of lava came within metres of Besakih’s gate. The temple is also the start of the hardest of the three routes used to summit Mount Agung, a two-night odyssey that sees the final leg tackled on all fours. An easier route departs from the village of Selat to tackle the mountain’s southern peak. Discovered by master guide Wayan Widi Yasa (+62 8523 7250 607), it takes only three to four hours to reach the summit. Afterwards, ride down on a mountain bike with Bali Trailblazers (bali-trailblazers.com). ê

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EAST COAST BALI

W HI T E S A ND BE A C H In contrast to the volcanic beaches that typify Bali’s east coast, White Sand Beach, or Pasir Putih to the locals, is an angel among demons. Bookended by dramatic limestone cliffs honeycombed with caves, this coconut-lined half-moon bay is the stuff tropical island postcards are made of. Access is restricted by a heavily rutted track or a half-hour boat ride from Candidasa, east Bali's most-established seaside resort. The difficulty in getting to Pasir Putih has hitherto kept development blissfully at bay, but a row of cafes squatting at the centre of the beach could be harbingers of more to come. ê

A M A NK IL A They’re known as Aman junkies – a super-exclusive club of CEOs, celebrities and royalty who won’t stay anywhere else. Bali is the perfect place to walk in their shoes – if only for one day – for the island has more Aman Resorts (aman.com) than any other place on earth. There's Amandari in Ubud, Amanusa in Nusa Dua and Amankila in a coconut plantation overlooking Candidasa. A timeless marble palace worthy of Cleopatra or Caesar, this 35-room property is centered around Amankila’s famous three-tiered infinity pool that tumbles towards the ocean like cascading rice terraces.

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EAST COAST BALI

UNDE R W AT E R Y O G A Paddle-board yoga. Hot yoga. Aerial yoga. In the never-ending quest to create new and challenging yoga hybrids, Zen Harmony Diving combines elements of yoga, Ayurvedic healing and scuba diving. Using specially designed masks that allow you to respire through both the mouth and nose, it sees divers practise underwater breathing exercises, meditative focus, stretches and yoga poses while swimming with the fishes. Zen Harmony Diving is offered exclusively at Alila Manggis (alilahotels.com/manggis), a Candidasa resort with strong eco credentials. Afterwards, try a ‘zentsu’ water massage. It’s done in a pool.

Places to stay eastside CANDIDASA White cabana beds surrounding a chic beachfront pool and cottages with indoor and outdoor showers from $83 per night make Le 48, Zen and Happy Resort the happiest place in town. Jalan Raya, Candidasa; le48bali.com

AMEN Mykonos comes to Amed at Aquaterrace Bed & Breakfast, a whitewashed micro-resort with seven rooms, two swimming pools and uninterrupted 180° ocean views. Rooms from $60. Selang Bunutan, Amed; aquaterrace-amed.com

TUL AMBEN Twenty-five dollars doesn’t buy divers much back home, but at the Matahari Tulamben Resort, it buys a night in a room with a fan, Wi-Fi, hot water, a pool, beachfront access and unlimited free diving chatter. Jl. Kubu-Abang, Tulamben; divetulamben.com

t ig e r a ir f l ie s to Denpasar, Bali from Perth, Adelaide and Melbourne tigerair.com.au

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cientists from Oxford, UK promise that they can help keep your hair thick and healthy. Their pill TRX2® is currently one of Europe’s best-selling hair supplements and is sold in over 100 countries. TRX2® is a food supplement based on natural compounds and, compared to medicinal products, has no side effects. Also it does what it says. “Your hair will look much bigger; it becomes heavier and thicker. You maintain your healthy hair,” says Dr. Thomas Whitfield, biochemist, Oxford scientist and founder of Oxford Biolabs. Hair treatments often promise a lot without delivering, but TRX2® is backed by cutting-edge science and has been thoroughly tested. The key ingredients in TRX2® are officially recognized by the European Commission as contributing to the maintenance of normal, healthy hair. The effects can be impressive. According to a pre-clinical study* conducted by scientists, TRX2® works for 87% of men and women.

Start TRX2® as early as possible in order to see your results sooner. TRX2® is suitable for men and women of all ages. The crystalline white capsules come in a brown glass bottle, which holds a one-month supply and costs from AUD$76 (USD$58) if ordered online. The manufacturer offers a money-back guarantee when ordered via TRX2®’s official website, and ships worldwide. For 2016, Oxford Biolabs has introduced a new, advanced TRX2® topical solution, for a double impact on hair issues - from the inside and from the outside. There’s a special offer for our magazine readers when ordering via the TRX2® website: www.trx2.com.

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*zinc, selenium, biotin. Visit www.trx2.com to check the 18-month study results ti g e ra ir.co m

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CAIRNS TO DARWIN

Top end gear The Savannah Way weaves its way between the tropics and the desert, from Cairns to Darwin and beyond. Bridget Mahony took a drive along this dusty dirt track known as “Australia’s Adventure Drive”

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CAIRNS TO DARWIN

A

ustralia has many outback roads, but this 3,700km route will inspire you, challenge you and, at times, render you speechless. You can spend your nights at sprawling cattle stations, at rough-and-ready roadhouses or camping under a sky full of stars. The Savannah Way goes all the way from Cairns to Broome but I flew into Cairns and out of Darwin, taking in about two-thirds of this epic drive. From the easternmost point in Cairns you’ll begin the gradual climb up the Gillies Range, a 19km highway with 263 twists and turns. This westward route takes you through tropical tablelands where sugar-cane fields and cloud-capped mountains eventually give way to flat, red dust-covered lands and the sweeping grass plains of the Gulf Savannah. Pull in for a rest or a meal at Ravenshoe (Queensland’s highest town) or Mount Garnet, another half an hour up the road. Consider spending the night at the Undara Lava Lodge (undara.com.au), home to the world’s largest lava tubes, where you can explore these natural geological wonders while enjoying the hospitality of a unique outback setting, or spend the night in an old train carriage.

Mount Surprise, Georgetown and Croydon are all in fairly close proximity, which makes a day’s drive to Normanton comfortable after a good night’s rest. In Normanton you’ll find the historical Gulflander Train (Matilda St, Normanton; gulflander.com.au) that was built to connect the once-bustling river port of Normanton with the rich gold fields of Croydon. You’ll see it rolling along on the original heritage-listed steel rails and sleepers from 1891 – just not every day of the week. In the tourist season the train does a two-hour return trip to Critters Camp, which works well if you’re short for time. ê

dust and sunsets The Savannah Way has a great mix of tropical and desert landscapes

adventure drive The Savannah Way cuts across the top of Australia. Savannah Way

DARWIN

CAIRNS

BROOME


CAIRNS TO DARWIN

Heading west out of Normanton, the next main port of call is Burketown. Situated about 25km inland from the Gulf, it’s named in honour of explorer Robert O’Hara Burke, who died shortly after making the first successful south-to-north crossing of the continent in 1861. Those with an interest in Australian history may consider calling into Burke and Wills’ most northerly camp – Camp 119, about 30 minutes out of Normanton. It’s surreal to stand there, read the history and imagine what it would have been like for them back then – all before returning to the comfort of an air-conditioned vehicle knowing you’ll soon enjoy an ice-cold beer at the Burketown Pub (Beames St, Burketown; burketownpub.com) soon after. To the west is the Lawn Hill National Park, also known as Boodjamulla National Park by the Waanyi people who have inhabited the area for some 30,000 years. The spectacular gorges and emerald-green freshwater pools are a wonderful excuse to stay a while.

The world is quieter on the Savannah Way; you can really feel Australia in your bones. The sky looks bigger, the sun seems brighter, and my respect for the land has never been greater. If you’re ever going to feel a connection to Terra Australis then it’s out here – and nowhere more so than on one of the region’s remote cattle stations. Several stations are now open to visitors and allow you to experience life in this environment first-hand. During a visit to my first ever cattle station I was asked by the station manager if I’d like to go down to the creek to practise a couple of water crossings before having to do one alone the next day. We took the four-wheel drive and the lesson began. Four crossings later I felt great – I was even looking forward to the next day’s crossing further up the river and grateful for the opportunity to learn more about how to drive in this most unforgiving part of the country.

get some outback experiences Burketown is named after the explorer Robert O’Hara Burke and you can visit a working cattle station

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CAIRNS TO DARWIN

“The world is quieter when you’re travelling on the Savannah Way; you can really feel Australia in your bones”

Later, after you’ve had some of your own cattle stations experiences, you can re-join the Savannah Way at Doomadgee and fuel up before pushing on towards Hells Gate Roadhouse, about 50km from the Northern Territory border. Here you’ll find a good campground situated in a setting of lush grass and trees. We took off the following morning and called into Seven Emu Station (Calvert, NT; sevenemustation.com.au) for a lunch break the next afternoon. It’s a beautiful piece of land on the Robinson River, and I’d phoned the station manager the day before to check what the water crossing was like. “Oh it’s real deep,” he said. “Oh,” I said, worried. “Perhaps you could be more specific?” “Well, I saw a duck cross it and it was up to its waist.” The humour is like the dust out there: bone dry. Your next stop could be the town of Borroloola or, for those who don’t mind a longer day behind the wheel, maybe the Heartbreak Hotel at Cape Crawford. You’ll find it 100km from Borroloola at the junction of the Carpentaria and Tablelands Highways. Enjoy a meal and take a flight over the Lost City by helicopter; extending over about 10 square kilometres and estimated to be 1.4 billion years old, the tall, eerie sandstone spires that make up the Lost City – situated in a tricky-to-access section of the Litchfield National Park – are spectacular and intriguing. ê

Road safety tips CHECK WEATHER CONDITIONS A variety of resources will keep you up to date on the weather, like the RACQ (racq.com.au) or Main Roads Western Australia (mainroads.wa.gov.au).

ANIMAL ENCOUNTERS Outback roads can be dangerous at night and sunrise and sunset, when animals are at their most active. Try to drive in daylight only.

ROAD TRAINS This is road-train country, where some trucks can be over 10 cars long. Drive accordingly and only pass when absolutely safe.

WATER CROSSINGS When it rains up here it pours, and you can come across water on the road. Do not cross if the water is fast-flowing or higher than the middle of your car wheel. For a full list of safe driving tips visit savannahway.com.au/roads

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Home to y l n o ’s a i l a r t s Au e v i d e l i d o c o r c

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CAIRNS TO DARWIN

EPIC ROAD TRIP The wide brown landscapes and the historic Gulflander Train at Normanton

Back on the road for another 300km and you’ll arrive in Daly Waters. The Daly Waters Pub (16 Stuart St, Daly Waters; dalywaterspub.com) is a decent place to camp, and is made all the more appealing with its ‘beef 'n' barra barbecue’ every night between April and October, a great chance to sample succulent scotch fillet steak served with authentic wild-caught Northern Territory barramundi. The pub was built in 1930 and is said to be haunted by a ghost called Sarah. The road conditions vary considerably throughout the journey so setting off in the dry season (May to October) is best. After Normanton, the road drops down to only one lane at times, and you’ll have to move off as oncoming vehicles approach.

For the rest of the drive it’s dirt road and you’re constantly judging where best to position the vehicle for a smooth ride, dodging the big rocks, negotiating river crossings and always looking out ahead. As you inch closer to your destination watch for wild pigs bolting across the road into the scrub, brumbies grazing, or wedge-tailed eagles soaring high above as dust rises in the wake of passing trucks. From Daly Waters it’s north to Katherine, and then on to Darwin. But when you arrive you can expect those ever-changing landscapes, the wide-open spaces and the thrill of exploring will remain with you for some time yet. Find out more at savannahway.com.au

t ig e r a ir f l ie s to Cairns from Melbourne, Sydney and Brisbane and to Darwin from Brisbane tigerair.com.au

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ROUTE MAP

Where to next? Tigerair serves 11 destinations in Australia – as well as Denpasar, Bali

denpasar

darwin

tigerair bases cairns

whitsunday coast

brisbane gold coast coffs harbour perth

sydney adelaide melbourne (tullamarine)

FOR AN UP-TO-THE-MINUTE LIST OF OUR DESTINATIONS, VISIT TIGERAIR.COM.AU

hobart

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TIGERAIR NEWS

New Tigerair Australia planes to head to Bali Tigerair’s first rebranded B737 touches down in Melbourne

E

arlier this year Tigerair Australia unveiled the first of three Boeing 737-800s (B737s) set to join the fleet. The new planes will spearhead the airline’s international expansion as flights start to Denpasar, Bali. Tigerair Australia has also recruited over 100 new cabin crew to help with the airline’s growth. Tigerair Australia CEO Rob Sharp said the basing of three rebranded and reconfigured B-737s at Melbourne Airport further demonstrates Tigerair Australia’s commitment to the state of Victoria and says he is excited about the new international route. “Tigerair Australia’s new services to Bali will deliver over 2,500 additional seats through Melbourne Airport weekly,” Sharp said. “As well as more jobs and additional aircraft, today’s announcement provides numerous

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other benefits for the Victorian economy, tourism and consumers.“ The Boeing 737-800 aircraft will provide a mix of free and paid wireless inflight entertainment for use on passenger’s own devices for the international services. Passengers will be able to purchase (or pre-purchase) food and beverages from Tigerair’s extensive inflight menu and purchase extra luggage over and above the 7kg free carry-on luggage allowance if required. Melbourne Airport CEO Lyell Strambi said, “The new international service and additional aircraft are exciting steps in the Tigerair Australia offering and we’re thrilled the newly branded aircraft will call Melbourne home.” Tigerair already employs over 1,100 people Australia-wide and the new B737s will join a fleet of 14 Airbus A320s.

Tigerair announces more Melbourne-Coffs Harbour flights The airline responds to increased demand for coastal getaways Tigerair Australia has announced an additional weekly return service between Melbourne to Coffs Harbour in response to increased demand for more low-cost services to the region. The new Saturday services commences April 9, 2016, departing Melbourne at 10:40am and returning from Coffs Harbour at 1pm. Tigerair Australia Commercial Director, Adam Rowe, said the announcement of a new permanent Saturday service is fantastic news for consumers and tourism in both destinations. “We’ve been pleased with demand for our services on the MelbourneCoffs Harbour route since we first launched the route in December last year,” Rowe said. “The introduction of Saturday flights is in direct response to overwhelming demand from consumers and provides around 18,700 additional visitor seats annually through Coffs Harbour Airport.”

TIGER AIR TEAMS UP WITH FLIGHT CENTRE In another exciting partnership, Tigerair Australia has signed a three-year strategic partnership with Flight Centre Travel Group to proactively promote the airline’s services. The agreement, which is the first between Flight Centre and Tigerair, will see the two parties join forces to coordinate sales and marketing efforts, significantly growing the distribution channels for Tigerair Australia’s airfares and broad range of ancillary products. “Flight Centre has some 1,500 retail and corporate travel shops and businesses in Australia alone and a dedicated sales team of 7,000 people committed to providing the best value airfare and travel deals,” Tigerair CEO Rob Sharp said. “Not only does the partnership open up new sales and distribution channels, but it also helps drive awareness of the newlook Tigerair product and experience.”


TIGERAIR NEWS

Tigerair announces exciting new partnership Teaming with Booking.com creates one-stop shop As part of Tigerair Australia’s new online booking service, customers will be able to access Booking.com’s full range of accommodation options via the airline’s homepage, opening up a world of accommodation options. Adam Rowe, Tigerair Australia Commercial Director, said the partnership takes the hassle out of booking travel and assists the airline to further deliver on its promise of providing customers with greater value, convenience and choice. “Booking.com is a global leader for booking online accommodation, from budget to five-star luxury,” Rowe said. “What will resonate well with our customers is a best-price guarantee for every accommodation booking, no

reservation fees and a free cancellation policy on most bookings. This way our customers can be assured they are getting great value for any type of accommodation they choose.” Tigerair said the partnership will help customers headed not only to Australian destinations but also to its new international route to Bali. Hotel deals from Booking.com are available via the ‘book’ and ‘find

Tigerair still storming the NRL

AIRLIE BEACH PHOTO TOURISM & EVENTS QUEENSLAND

The airline announces a new five-year partnership with Melbourne Storm NRL team

flights’ tabs on the Tigerair Australia website (tigerair.com.au). Booking.com, which is available in 42 languages with properties in over 80,000 destinations in more than 221 countries worldwide, has over 70 million verified reviews written by guests once they have completed their stay, which means customers can feel secure when choosing accommodation online.

Tigerair has extended its deal with the Melbourne Storm from 2016 until the conclusion of the 2020 NRL season, bringing Tigerair Australia and the Storm’s partnership into an eighth consecutive season. To celebrate the announcement of this partnership, a Tigerair Australia A320 aircraft was unveiled at Melbourne Airport, rebadged with Melbourne Storm livery and officially named after Storm, Queensland and Australia skipper Cameron Smith.

“We’re thrilled to be further cementing our association with one of the most successful sporting teams in Australia,” Tigerair Australia CEO Rob Sharp said. “Over the past three years the partnership has proved to be a great fit for Tigerair Australia. Tigerair Australia and Melbourne Storm are both proudly Victorian and we look forward to a stronger and even more successful partnership with the Storm over the coming five years.”

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OZ+NZ SNOW DEALS QUEENSTOWN $599 DEAL* 7 NIGHTS 599pp

$

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• 7 Nights Central Queenstown Accommodation at Reavers Lodge • 5 Day Lift Pass for Cardrona • Continental Breakfast Daily & Group Dinner • Return Queenstown Airport Transfers • In house customer support and Local Host Add on 5 x Return Mountain Shuttles for $165pp. Sept only. *Valid for September departure dates only. Add $145pp - $180pp for departures outside Sept

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2 Night 2 Day lift pass

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Add $95 peak season Add $65 Ski or Board Hire

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• Accommodation at the Snow Valley Resort Jindabyne (Based on 4-7 share room, add $60pp 2 night, $70pp 3 nights & $80pp 5 nights for a 2-3 share room) • Full Access Thredbo lift pass *Not Available 3 July - 15 July, Thredbo My Pass required at a cost of $4 paid locally & available midweek’s only. Off peak: 11 June - 1 July & 22 August - 30 Sep. Peak : 18 July - 19 August

See the specials page @ www.ozsnow.com 1300 989 955


THE TIGERAIR GUIDE TO...

Adrenaline

Whether you’re abseiling, skydiving or trail running, there’s a range of adventure sports across the whole network BY CONNOR MCLEOD

Thrills Skydive the Beach

AJ Hackett Bungy Jumping

Sun, surf and skydiving come together at Skydive the Beach, which launches punters out of planes and onto the golden sands of our coastline. Locations include Sydney, Melbourne, the Great Ocean Road, Perth and Airlie Beach. Australia-wide skydivethebeach.com.au

Leap off a purpose-built bungy tower surrounded by lush Queensland rainforest at AJ Hackett (pictured). There are over 16 different jump styles and you can take the leap of faith off the 50-metre high tower while friends watch you from a nearby specially built viewing platform. Cairns ajhackett.com

iFly Indoor Skydiving Skip the plane ride and get right to the adrenaline rush with a session at iFly Indoor Skydiving. Simply lean forward into the wind tunnel at iFly and you’re floating as if you’re up in the clouds. This exciting adventure sport is also okay for kids from 6+, so take the family or get airborne with a group of mates. Sydney, Gold Coast downunder.iflyworld.com

The Rock Centre Add some excitement to your Top End holiday with indoor rock climbing at the Rock Centre on Doctors Gully Road. With challenging, man-made climbs for all skill levels, this centre is a must-do for adventure travellers who are staying in the northern capital. Darwin facebook.com/rockcentredarwin

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THE TIGERAIR GUIDE TO...

A D R E N A L I N E

THE SPOT

Mt Buller

T

he Victorian alpine resort becomes a mountain-biking and trail-running paradise in the warmer months. Grab a bike from All Terrain Cycles (allterraincycles.com. au) located in the village, then hit the Pump Track, a snaking plastic track for mountain-bike test drives. Or ride one of the many trails from Gang Gangs – a section of single track where you might spot the eponymous local bird, a black cockatoo with yellow head markings – to the mountain-goat-only ascent of Split Rock. There are no real “beginner” trails, but there is the Australian Alpine Epic Trail, the first such trail in this hemisphere – 40km of track that descends from the top of Mt Buller down 1,600 metres into the valley at Mirimbah. The trails around Mt Buller have been designed and built by trail designer Glen Jacobs and they vary in altitude from 600 to 1,700 metres, so

PB tt ii gg ee rr aa ii rr.. cc oo mm 78

if you’re puffed you can always blame the high-altitude terrain! Book a session with Alpine Trail Running (alpinetrailrunning.com.au) where guide Aaron Knight can take you on a guided run (or walk) of the Buller Alpine Summit Walk where you might see wide-ranging views, or be surrounded by a surreal batch of cloud. Aaron says visiting Buller in the summer and exploring by foot gives you greater access to the mountain. He also adds that, while bikes get you places skis can’t go, feet get you places bikes can’t go. Stay in the heart of Alpine Central at the Mt Buller Chalet (mtbullerchalet.com.au), where you can walk straight out on the trails and have easy access to the village. Mt Buller is an easy three-hour drive (248km) from Melbourne and is a must for mountain bikers anywhere in Australia. These are wild trails that will test your skills.  ê

IMBA LOVES BULLER Mt Buller is Australia’s first and only track to receive the official nod from the International Mountain Bicycling Association (IMBA). bike.mtbuller.com.au


A D V E R T O R I A L

“Sand driving is all about momentum, so no matter what, you’re going to want to keep your vehicle moving. ”

No road? No worries. If you’re heading off-road, the last thing you want is to get stuck! Here are some expert sand driving tips from Isuzu UTE Australia...

F

irst up – tyre pressures. As a general rule, go straight down to 16psi – don’t mess around. This will approximately double the width of your tyre’s footprint that contacts the sand, meaning your 4x4 will float across the top of the surface, rather than bog down. Sand driving is all about momentum, so no matter what, you’re going to want to keep your vehicle moving. This doesn’t mean you want to go thundering up every dune you see though – as tempting as they might be. It’s all about finding that sweet spot of throttle input that gives you the perfect balance between maintaining momentum, and excessively spinning your tyres. If you keep one cardinal rule in mind, make it this one. No sudden movements! That means going easy on the throttle and the brakes, and even easier on the steering. Coast to a stop rather than hitting the anchors, which will just cause you to get bogged. A common scenario is your tyres start to dig in, you lose forward momentum. As soon as you feel this happening take your foot off the accelerator – most people try and accelerate which only spins

the wheels and digs you in further. If you catch this situation early enough, reverse back along your tyre tracks which are harder packed sand then have another run at it. Remember these tips and you’ll master sand driving in no time at all. For more 4WD tips check out Isuzu UTE’s I-Venture Club website at www.iventureclub.com.au

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let us tigertain you download our app before you fly How does it work? Tigertainment is Tigerair Australia’s wireless in-flight entertainment system that operates on a ‘bring your own device’ (BYOD) basis. Content Packages Everybody loves free stuff! Tigerair Australia offers complimentary access to popular TV series and a variety of music for the full duration of your flight. Looking for more excitement? $9AUD will unlock access to a select range of Blockbuster comedies, drama and action packed films to help time fly by. Check out the app to see what’s playing this month! Available on Tigertainment can be viewed on Denpasar services operated by B737-800 aircraft type. Device Compatibility complimentary content

premium content

iOS

8.1 or later

8.1 or later

android

4.0.3 or later

4.0.3 or later

windows

not supported

not supported

Connecting to Tigertainment 1. Check below to see if your device is compatible. 2. Download the latest TigerairAU app via the Apple App Store or Google Play prior to the final cabin door closing. TigerairAU will not be available for download after take-off. 3. Connect to our WIFI network – “Tigerair Australia”. No password will be required. 4. Open the TigerairAU application and select Tigertainment (in-flight entertainment). 5. Explore and view the content. 6. To watch our movies, Purchase a voucher from a cabin crew member for just $9AUD. 7. Select your movie and enter your voucher number in the pop-up box. 8. Enjoy unlimited access to Tigertainment!

IMPORTANT! To make sure you don’t miss any of the action, please ensure your device is fully charged prior to the flight as our aircraft do not have charging ports on-board. For audio and charging accessories available for purchase please refer to the tigershop menu in the seatback pocket in front of you. 1.Tigerair’s In-Flight entertainment system (IFE) may include content that is not suitable for everyone, While Tigerair has carefully selected the programmes made available on the IFE to ensure a wide variety of program choices, guests control their own devices and Tigerair accepts no responsibility for any footage shown on IFE programming which may be offensive or distressing to any guest. Guests using the IFE agree to shut their devices down if they find any content on the IFE offensive, or if content is likely to be offensive or distressing to other guests. The content may include MA15+ content, so: a.Unaccompanied guests under the age of 15 are not permitted to use the IFE system and cannot purchase a voucher to access paid content. b. Accompanied guests under the age of 15 may access the IFE system if a parent/guardian travelling with the accompanied guest or making the booking for the guest consents to the accompanied guest accessing the IFE. If we make the IFE available to an accompanied guest under 15 with a parent/guardian’s consent, that parent/guardian agrees that we are making the content available on behalf of, and as the parent/guardian’s agent and they acknowledge that the IFE content may include MA15+ content and consents to the guest under 15 viewing that content. Parents/guardians accept responsibility for monitoring the content viewed by children under the age of 15 years. c. If the parent/guardian does not consent to use of the IFE, the parent/guardian agrees to ensure that any device available to the guest who is under 15 is disabled so the guest cannot receive the content. 2. Tigerair will offer in-Flight entertainment (IFE) (complimentary and paid) on Denpasar services operated on B737-800 aircraft. Content is for single viewing only and guests agree not to share devices. For instructions on how to access paid content, see above or visit www.tigerair.com.au/fly/inflight-entertainment. Paid content is available for $9AUD per person per flight. Vouchers issued to allow access to paid content are for one use only. If you need to switch devices, please contact a crew member. 3. If you purchase paid content, that purchase is non-refundable unless we are required by law to give you a refund, or if the flight you purchased your voucher for is cancelled or schedule changed and meets the schedule change policy conditions that entitle you to a refund of that flight. In order to receive a refund you must request a refund of the IFE fee by contacting us via www.tigerair.com.au. 4. Operation of the IFE system is dependent on certain hardware and software being operational, some of which is provided by third parties, so Tigerair cannot guarantee that the IFE system will be operational at all times. Tigerair is not responsible (i) for any interruptions to the service including, without limitation, those due to acts of nature, power failure, satellite signal failure or any other cause, (ii) if IFE is not available on a flight due to a technical fault or serviceability issues, or (iii) if a guest’s device is unable to connect to the Wireless IFE system. 5. Tigerair’s IFE programming schedules are available at www.tigerair.com.au/fly/inflight-entertainment but that schedule is subject to change at any time without notice. IFE content offered may not always match the content listed on our website. 6. There are no charging ports on-board and Tigerair is not responsible for charging devices. It is the responsibility of the guest to ensure the appropriate IFE application or software has been downloaded on the device and that the activation process is complete prior to boarding the aircraft. It is at the guest’s responsibility to ensure devices are charged sufficiently for the flight. 7. Guest’s using the IFE agree to comply with any and all directions from crew regarding the IFE, including instructions to shut down devices in circumstances reasonably required by Tigerair. 8. All flights are subject to our full terms and conditions; please refer to the fare conditions and conditions of carriage.


THE TIGERAIR GUIDE TO...

A D R E N A L I N E

Family Adventure Park Victoria’s biggest water park, just a bit over an hour from Melbourne, has a lazy river, huge water fun park and non-water activities like rides and mini-golf. To beat the heat, and the crowds, hire one of the 10 VIP cabanas that come with private access to the Lazy River so you can skip the queues. Geelong adventurepark.com.au

Treetop Adventure Park Get amongst the trees in this climbing park suitable for kids aged three and up – the young ones even have their own courses. Then, after mastering their own clip-and-climb adventure, kids can join adults on the more advanced courses which, like skiing, run in difficulty from green to black. Sydney treetopadventurepark.com.au

PHOTOS, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: ADVENTURE PARK, PERTH WAKE PARK, TREE TOP ADVENTURE PARK

Perth Wake Park Visit the only cable wakeboarding park in the west just 30 minutes south of the WA capital. The park offers a range of water fun from beginners to more experienced boarders, and you can retire to the large verandah that overlooks the main lake when you want to take a break. Perth perthwakepark.com.au

Water Paddleboarding

Surfing

Wild Ocean Tasmania

Sea kayak

Learn to stand-up paddleboard (SUP) on the Coffs Harbour waterways with C Change Adventures. The only qualified SUP instructors in this section of the coast, you can learn how to SUP and then go on a guided tour of the stunning coast. Coffs Harbour cchangeadventures.com.au

Learn to surf in one of the most famous strips of sand in Australia. Get a surfing lesson from the Gold Coast Surf School that guarantees small groups of up to just six people in each lesson. Private lessons are also available. Gold Coast surfinparadise.com.au

Get up close and personal with fur seals when you travel on board the Ocean Prowler, which has a world-first sea-view platform allowing you to view these amazing animals while they swim below you. Hobart wildoceantasmania.com.au

Hit the water around beautiful Fitzroy Island and Palm Cove in a sea kayak. This is definitely one of the best ways to get a closer look at sea life like marine turtles and whales (when in season). Cairns cairnsattractions.com.au

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the tale end

Travel is all about stories This issue we look at Adelaide and surrounds

Adelaide has so much to do these days – there is now such a rich range of bars, restaurants and street art. At Orana and Street ADL (285 Rundle St, Adelaide; restaurantorana.com, streetadl.com), a bar and restaurant are combined with chef Jock Zonfrillo making the most of indigenous produce. Orana means ‘Welcome’ in Aboriginal dialects, and that is exactly how this place makes you feel.

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- MONIQUE LONG

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- TRENT VAN DER JAGT

2 At Adelaide Zoo our kids saw pandas for the first time. It’s the only zoo in Australia that has them, and the habitat is amazing. It’s so easy to see them; they were just hanging outside chomping on bamboo without a care in the world. We loved the capybaras too – they look like chilled-out giant rats and we had never seen them in an Aussie zoo before either. - KATE FRASER

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During a recent visit, we found this amazing cafe on the outskirts of Adelaide called Mister Sunshine’s (32 George St, Thebarton; facebook.com/ MisterSunshines). Inside, it is all retro chairs and crockery like your grandparents would use, but the meals are amazing and the service is really friendly. We had arrived with no idea where to go and one of the staff planned out a whole day’s itinerary for us!



Tigertales April-May 2016