Page 1

DISTRICT DIRECTOR ELECTIONS

MEMBER HIGHLIGHT TANYA DAVIS

CANADA'S FIRST STUDENT LEADERSHIP SUMMIT

Canadian Institute of Transportation Engineers Quarterly Newsletter

VOLUME 40 : NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2018

Edmonton's 100 Street Funicular and Frederick G. Todd Lookout provides mechanized river valley access and a barrier free pedestrian link between the river valley trails and downtown core. Check it out on the Funicular Technical Tour at the 2018 Annual Conference.

CITE ANNUAL CONFERENCE Get all the details on what you can look forward to in Edmonton – keynote speakers, technical program and tours, social events, and more!

AUTONOMOUS VEHICLES Two feature articles explore how government, industry, and transportation professionals can prepare for a future with autonomous vehicles


VEHICLE, CYCLIST, AND PEDESTRIAN DETECTION For more than 40 years, North Line has been your source for safe, effective intelligent traffic solutions.

North Line

We have the solution. northlinecanada.com +1 905-985-2120


in this edition Volume 40 : Number 1 Spring | April 2018

features 13 Edmonton 2018 CITE Annual Conference Preview 14 Registration & Accommodations 15 Schedule at a Glance 17 Keynote Speakers 18 Exhibitors 19 Conference App

19 Technical Sessions 23 Technical Tours 25 Special Events 26 CCG / PTV Workshop 27 Sponsors

29 A Future with Autonomous Vehicles Bruce Belmore presents an overview of AV development and offers guidance on the roles that those in industry and government can play in shaping the AV future 37 The Driverless Car is Coming: How One Municipality is Getting Ready Ryan Lanyon shares how the City of Toronto is preparing for autonomous vehicles 43 Member Highlight: Tanya Davis Meet the Atlantic Provinces Section's Secretary-Treasurer CITE news & business

regular columns

5

1 President's Ponderings 3 District Director's Message 56 Welcome New Members

10 28 45 51

2017 Financial Statement & 2019 Budget District Director Elections: Meet the Candidates Student Leadership Summit Section News Student Chapter News

57 Advertising Directory 58 CITE Contacts

29 13 PO Box 25118 • 1221 Weber Street East • Kitchener, ON N2A 4A5 © 2007-2018 Canadian Institute of Transportation Engineers


president's p on d e r ing s

Hello Everyone, There are a lot of great initiatives occurring at CITE and 2018 is shaping up to be another exciting year. This quarter, I want to focus on our young professional and student members, one of the fastest growing segments of our CITE membership. As most employers know, attracting young professionals to the transportation industry is a good thing as we are facing a talent shortage to address growth and retirements.

EDWARD SOLDO, P.Eng., FITE

Canadian District President president@cite7.org

CONNECT WITH ONE OF CANADA'S STUDENT CHAPTERS Carleton University Lakehead University McGill University McMaster University Mohawk College MontrĂŠal-QuĂŠbec Chapter Queen's University Ryerson University University of Alberta University of British Columbia University of British Columbia - Okanagan University of Calgary University of Manitoba University of New Brunswick University of Saskatchewan University of Toronto University of Waterloo York University

1

TRANSPORTATION TALK | SPRING 2018

The attraction and retention of highly creative problem solvers and critical thinkers to address the evolving transportation environment is a significant challenge given the competition from other engineering and planning branches. A sustained effort is required to promote the transportation profession as a preferred career choice, coupled with a coordinated partnership with universities and colleges to develop and expand transportation programs. All member organizations have a role to play in contributing to the success of our profession through the provision of internships, scholarships, mentorship programs, and sponsoring/collaborating on transportation research programs. I would encourage our members to get involved with the student chapters. Reach out to your local chapter, volunteer to present topics of interest in transportation and traffic engineering, offer to provide mentoring to students on school projects and student presentations, or help enable student chapter trips within your organization. I recently had the opportunity to participate on the judging panel for the annual Student Presentation Competition hosted by the Toronto, Hamilton, and Southwestern Ontario sections at Western University. The level of student talent in the transportation engineering and planning departments from Windsor, Waterloo, Mohawk College, and McMaster was quite impressive. ITE currently has over 130 student chapters around the world. The purpose of these chapters is to introduce students to the transportation profession and supplement their classroom and laboratory experiences with real life experiences by fostering the close association of students with the profession and ITE. In Canada, we have 18 active student chapters across the country. I am pleased to announce that, at our last Board of Directors meeting, York University was granted a student chapter charter!


p re s id e nt ' s p o n d er ings

York University recently established a Civil Engineering department and offers courses in Transportation Engineering, Urban Transportation Planning, Road Safety Engineering, and Transportation Economics. Congratulations to Erik Nevlan, Ansom Thomas, Davin Utama, and Ravichandra Rampure for the role they played in establishing the student chapter and for being the inaugural chapter executive. A special thanks to Dr. Kevin Gingerich for his role as the faculty advisor. Our preparations for the 2018 CITE Annual Conference in Edmonton are well underway. With the theme Fostering Community, the Local Arrangements Committee is working on delivering a technical program, tours, and social events that will bring together the best and brightest from across Canada’s transportation community. The robust program focuses on the future of rapid technological advancement and a changing climate. Find out what there is to look forward to with the conference preview starting on page 13. As part of the conference, there are a number of student related activities that I would highly encourage our student membership to attend. Thanks to the efforts of representatives from the University of Manitoba and University of Alberta, there will be a Student Leadership Summit on June 2-3. The goal is to provide students from various universities with an opportunity for professional development and fellowship. Student chapters from across Canada will also be participating in our annual CITE Collegiate Traffic Bowl, all of them striving to be crowned the CITE Champion and moving on to compete at the ITE Collegiate Traffic Bowl as part of the Joint ITE International and Midwestern/Great Lakes Districts (MWITE/GLITE) Annual Meeting and Exhibit in Minneapolis, MN on August 20-23. Let’s see if my alma mater, McMaster University, can repeat as CITE Champions. Just a reminder that CITE is active on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook. We are experiencing steady growth on these social media channels and they are a great way to keep up on CITE news, job postings, and interesting links. Follow us at: @itecanada linkedin.com/company/canadian-institute-of-transportation-engineers facebook.com/itecanada Hope to see many of you at the Edmonton conference. If there is anything you want to share about CITE, or have any questions that I can help out with, please feel free to drop me an email at esoldo@cite7.org.

EDWARD SOLDO, P.Eng., FITE Canadian District President

SPRING 2018 | TRANSPORTATION TALK

2


di s tric t d i re c tor ' s m e s s a g e

Spring is upon us, although the recent winter blast we’ve experienced in Southern Ontario seems to suggest otherwise. Hopefully we can move on to some better weather soon! It's going to be a busy spring and summer at ITE with many events on the agenda and valuable resources recently made available or being developed in the coming months. • The 2018 ITE Annual Meeting and Exhibit is set for Minneapolis, MN from August 20 to 23, 2018. If the event is anything like its predecessors, the meeting will showcase the latest developments in transportation and offer an unparalleled opportunity to network with and learn from peers. In addition to the strong GENE CHARTIER, technical program slated, five workshops are now scheduled – two on Monday, M.A.Sc., P.Eng., FITE August 20 (Building Smarter Communities through Better Transportation and Canadian District Director Shelley Row’s Make an Impact – Proven Techniques to Present Technical Topics to director@cite7.org Non-Technical Audiences) plus three in the afternoon on Thursday, August 23 (Speed Management Resources and Experiences, Interactive Highway Safety Design Model, and Streamlining Multimodal Infrastructure Delivery). There will also be a robust family program for anyone planning to bring along their significant others. Check ITE’s meeting website ite.org/annualmeeting for real-time updates. • ITE is providing support for the National Rural Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) Annual Conference + Exhibit taking place in Scottsdale, Arizona from October 21 to 24, 2018. The conference will provide participants a one-stop resource focusing on ITS implementation in local communities and the opportunity to hear new and thoughtful perspectives from a wide variety of ITS topics. Check the meeting website nationalruralitsconference.org for the latest information. • ITE has released a statement on Connected and Automated Vehicles (CV/AV) in response to the fatal March 2018 collision involving a self-driving car and a pedestrian in Arizona. ITE supports the advancement of technology in all areas of transportation and particularly in the development of CV/AV but advocates that proper oversight and due diligence be exercised in its deployment. See the ITE website for further information. • The 10th Edition ITE Trip Generation Manual Bundle is available for purchase in both digital and hard copy formats on the ITE website. This 10th Edition of ITE’s landmark publication features new data and database enhancements. The bundle includes: ŰŰ Volume 1: Desk Reference – Description of new urban and person-based trip data, key instructional information, sample plots and significant changes from the previous edition ŰŰ Volume 2: Land Use Data Plots – Three volume set of land use descriptions and plots for all land use/ time period/independent variable/setting combinations ŰŰ Trip Generation Handbook, 3rd Edition – Guidance on the proper techniques for estimating person and vehicle trip generation rates, evaluating mixed-use developments and determining pass-by trip and truck trip generation ŰŰ ITETripGen Web-based App (only available with the purchase of a bundle) – Desktop application that allows electronic access to the entire trip generation dataset with numerous filtering capabilities including site setting (i.e., rural, suburban, urban), geography, age of data, development size, and trip type (person or vehicle trips) • ITE is in the process of updating the Parking Generation informational report. This initiative is being closely coordinated with the planned update of the Shared Parking publication developed by the National Parking

3

TRANSPORTATION TALK | SPRING 2018


d i s tr ic t d ire c to r ' s m e ssage

Association and the Urban Land Institute. A joint call for data has been issued with a deadline of June 1, 2018. The updated Parking Generation report is expected to be available in early 2019. • ITE continues to develop and expand upon the Vision Zero Website and Safety Resources Toolbox. The Toolbox was recently upgraded with additional tagging and new resources continue to be curated and added. Work also continues within the Vision Zero Task Force to refine and execute their Communications Plan in conjunction with the ITE Advocacy Committee. The committee has also finalized an action plan consisting of a series of short- and medium-term deliverables aimed at sharing speed management tools and resources. A series of webinars focused on Vision Zero concepts and individual success stories is also underway, with the first held on November 30, 2017. • ITE, with assistance from researchers at Iowa State University, has recently completed a Rural Transition Zone ePrimer under a task order contract with the U.S. Federal Highway Administration (FHWA). This document is intended to mesh with the newly updated Traffic Calming ePrimer. • The current series of ITE Talks Transportation Podcasts on Transportation and Health will conclude with the April 24, 2018 episode featuring Matthew Dyrdahl from the City of Minneapolis and Amber Dallman from the Minnesota Department of Transportation speaking on cycling and pedestrian initiatives in their community. The next series will focus on Vision Zero, starting with a speaker on the new Road to Zero report that is being released in late April. So far, ITE’s podcasts have attracted 8,210 plays and 20,747 downloads since starting just over a year ago. • ITE plans to unveil its new and improved website this summer. The site will feature a new design and improved navigation. To close with some Canadian District news, the University of Manitoba (U of M) and University of Alberta (U of A) Student Chapters are pleased to be hosting the first Canadian District Student Leadership Summit in Edmonton, AB on June 2 and 3, 2018 immediately preceding the 2018 CITE Annual Conference. The summit will feature sessions and workshops to improve professional skills and prepare students for entering the workforce. The organizing committee co-led by Student Chapter Presidents Abby Scaletta (U of M) and Suliman Gargoum (U of A) are doing an amazing job assembling an outstanding program for their peers. Find out more on page 28 and visit the summit website for further information. Corporate sponsorship opportunities are available by contacting Auja Ominski at treasurer@iteumanitoba.ca. Finally, CITE is holding an election this spring for the position of District Director. Information about the candidates vying for the position is provided in this edition of Transportation Talk. Voting closes on May 6, 2018. Eligible members have been emailed information about how to cast their ballots and will be sent reminders as the close of voting approaches. Please contact Steven Garner, CITE Administrator at cite_admin@cite7.org, if you have not received yours. Please exercise your right (and privilege) of membership in ITE and participate in the election. Let’s fill the (virtual) ballot box! If there is anything you want to share about ITE, feel free to drop me an email at director@cite7.org. See you in Edmonton!

GENE CHARTIER Canadian District Director

SPRING 2018 | TRANSPORTATION TALK

4


Canadian Institute of Transportation Engineers | 2017 Financial Statement & 2019 Budget

Dear CITE Members, I am pleased to share with you both our 2017 Financial Statement and our 2019 Budget. These documents have been reviewed by the CITE Executive Committee and the CITE Board before bringing them to you, our membership, for discussion and approval at our Annual General Meeting (AGM) in Edmonton in June. 2017 was a busy year for the CITE membership, some of which is reflected in our financial statements. Along with a successful joint conference with ITE International in Toronto last August, our first Youth Summit was held in Calgary in June. It was a fantastic opportunity to bring together students and young professionals from across the country to inspire one another and to provide them with a broad perspective on the transportation field. Our income in 2017 is much as we expected despite a small decline in advertising revenue. Money in the budget was shifted at the decision of the Executive and with the support of the Board to fund the summit in Calgary with the understanding that the money allocated to our technical projects was not likely to be spent over the course of the year. Most of that reallocation appears as costs for the summit itself and some appears as additional executive travel since the Executive took the opportunity to meet in person and to interact with the students and young members participating in the summit. Overall, the difference between our income and our expenses is smaller than we had estimated in developing the 2017 budget. Our Accountants at Wilkinson Rogers LLP have reviewed our financial statements and find that "nothing has come to our attention that causes us to believe that the financial statements do not present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Canadian Institute of Transportation Engineers as at December 31, 2017, and the results of its operations and its cash flows for the year then ended in accordance with Canadian accounting standards for private enterprises." At the end of 2017, our financial position is positive. Our organization continues to grow and our member companies continue to make use of our advertising services through the website, Transportation Talk, and our job ads. The incorporation of CITE is complete (finally!) and the associated transfer of assets has also taken place. As directed by our Executive, our Board and our Membership, and with the advice of our bookkeeper, we transferred a significant portion of our cash into reserve based on our 2017 financial position. We have reached a point where we carry over 50 percent of our annual budget in reserve – a significant goal set out in the recommendations of the Financial Review Committee back in 2010. Looking ahead to 2019, we anticipate another healthy year, financially. The Local Arrangements Committee in Ottawa is busy planning what should be another memorable CITE conference. It was with great pleasure I turned over the cheque book to incoming Treasurer Ryan Vanderputten earlier in 2018. We are in good hands under Ryan’s financial leadership. If you have any questions about the 2017 financial statement or the 2019 budget, please feel free to contact me or Ryan and we would be happy to speak with you. Sincerely,

JULIA SALVINI, P.ENG. Vice President, Canadian Institute of Transportation Engineers vicepresident@cite7.org

5

TRANSPORTATION TALK | SPRING 2018


Canadian Institute of Transportation Engineers | 2017 Financial Statement

INCOME STATEMENT INCOME

2015 ACTUAL Advertisements Annual Conference Award/Scholarship Donations Currency Exchange

2017 BUDGET

2017 ACTUAL 77,700.00

75,650.00

92,625.00

83,000.00

151,809.30

232,247.13

-

-

4,500.00

5,500.00

5,500.00

5,500.00

12,384.12

22,801.66

5,000.00

20,428.28

Interest Income

6,520.86

1,989.70

6,000.00

1,797.91

John Vardon Scholarship

1,940.00

236.83

2,000.00

390.00

50,882.62

72,050.90

75,000.00

72,164.38

-

-

26,050.00

-

Membership Dues (District and Section) Transfer from Reserves

TOTAL INCOME

EXPENSES

2016 ACTUAL

$ 303,686.90

$ 427,451.22

$ 202,550.00

$ 177,980.57

Administrator

9,512.47

16,498.58

20,000.00

23,308.56

Awards – Awards/Scholarships

5,064.15

6,128.63

4,500.00

6,027.15

Awards – Travel

5,999.04

6,306.01

7,000.00

5,884.52

-

-

-

Bad Debt

9.00

Bank Charges

3,484.86

3,533.15

4,000.00

2,458.56

Bookkeeping

2,018.50

2,320.74

2,500.00

7,446.25

CITE Appointee Travel

4,033.34

4,104.49

7,000.00

6,450.78

CITE Elections Communications and Marketing Conference Expenses Conference Sponsorship Director Expenses excite Expenses

639.78

-

700.00

6,319.50

3,539.78

118,890.43

206,032.77

-

10,000.00

3,726.84

-

6,541.62

-

-

-

5,000.00

12,421.34

12,007.40

12,000.00

6,378.51 972.91

-

-

-

18,036.84

14,594.34

22,000.00

31,257.70

5,157.24

5,157.24

5,500.00

5,942.36

-

4,141.64

4,000.00

3,856.28

John Vardon Scholarship

4,000.00

3,000.00

6,000.00

3,000.00

Membership Support Programs

3,471.37

7,812.52

3,500.00

3,511.87

Executive Expenses Insurance International Initiatives

Miscellaneous Postage, Mailing Service Printing and Copying Revenue Canada Penalties and Interest

7.34 517.13 99.98 1,763.94

250.00

724.66 101.53

600.00

851.89

-

-

-

-

Section Dues Distribution

-

-

-

5,387.84

Student Chapter Rebates

3,750.00

5,000.00

4,000.00

5,750.00

Student Presentation Competition

3,200.00

1,600.00

3,500.00

1,600.00

Telephone, Telecommunications

1,360.28

1,094.02

2,000.00

900.82

TLC – Administration

5,616.98

5,071.15

9,000.00

4,053.14

TLC – Technical Project Devevelopment

1,274.45

-

10,000.00

-

23,500.00

-

26,000.00

-

-

10,000.00

5,000.00

-

Traffic Bowl

6,275.50

7,859.65

8,500.00

10,000.00

Transportation Talk

6,651.00

6,062.50

10,000.00

6,750.00

TLC Projects TLC Project – TAC Sponsorship

Website

12,686.15

5,396.44

15,000.00

3,938.44

Youth Summit

-

-

-

30,513.27

TOTAL EXPENSES

$ 265,760.61

$ 338,087.24

$ 202,550.00

$ 191,509.31

$ 37,926.29

$ 89,363.98

NET INCOME (LOSS)

-

$ (13,528.74)

SPRING 2018 | TRANSPORTATION TALK

6


Canadian Institute of Transportation Engineers | 2017 Financial Statement

BALANCE SHEET December 31 2015

December 31 2016

December 31 2017

Scotiabank Chequing

70,392.89

123,219.47

99,133.79

Scotiabank Conference

79,853.20

112,199.56

112,199.56

ASSETS CURRENT ASSETS Chequing/Savings/Cash

Cash Total Chequing/Savings/Cash Total Accounts Receivable

-

-

-

150,246.09

235,419.03

211,333.35

2,000.00

3,432.21

-

Other Current Assets Conference Prepayments

TOTAL CURRENT ASSETS

-

$ 152,246.09

-

$ 238,851.24

10,000.00

$ 221,333.35

INVESTMENTS John Vardon Scholarship Scotia GIC Cash Holdings

56,941.53

-

-

103,084.17

124,258.59

126,036.75

20,008.61

57,765.42

57,785.17

TOTAL INVESTMENTS

$ 242,494.38

$ 182,024.01

$183,821.92

TOTAL ASSETS

$ 394,740.47

$ 420,875.25

$ 405,155.27

-

157.74

47.55

-

157.74

47.55

LIABILITES CURRENT LIABILITIES Accounts Payable Total Acounts Payable

OTHER CURRENT LIABILITIES Overpayments

-

(76.97)

GST/HST Payable

926.87

-

(2,004.08)

Total Other Current Liabilities

926.87

-

(2,081.05)

TOTAL LIABILITIES

-

$ 926.87

$ 157.74

$ (2,033.50)

EQUITY Capital Gain (loss)

-

-

-

Retained Earnings

355,887.31

331,353.53

420,717.51

37,926.29

89,363.98

(13,528.74)

TOTAL EQUITY

$ 393,813.60

$ 420,717.51

$ 407,188.77

TOTAL LIABILITIES & EQUITY

$ 394,740.47

$ 420,875.25

$ 405,155.27

Net Income

GST REBATE/OWED

7

TRANSPORTATION TALK | SPRING 2018

– $ 926.87

$ 2,004.08


Canadian Institute of Transportation Engineers | 2019 Budget

2019 BUDGET 2017 ACTUAL

2018 BUDGET

2019 BUDGET

77,700.00

83,000.00

75,000.00

-

INCOME Advertisements Annual Conference Award/Scholarship Donations Currency Exchange Interest Income John Vardon Scholarship Membership Dues (District and Section) Transfer from Reserves

TOTAL INCOME

200,000.00

255,000.00

5,500.00

5,500.00

5,500.00

20,428.28

10,000.00

16,000.00

1,797.91

3,000.00

3,000.00

390.00

3,000.00

-

72,164.38

82,000.00

65,000.00

-

12,100.00

-

$ 177,980.57

$ 398,600.00

$ 419.500.00

EXPENSES Administrator

23,308.56

20,000.00

25,000.00

Awards – Awards/Scholarships

6,027.15

6,000.00

6,000.00

Awards – Travel

5,884.52

7,000.00

7,000.00

Bank Charges

2,458.56

4,000.00

4,000.00

Bookkeeping

7,446.25

2,500.00

2,500.00

CITE Appointee Travel

6,450.78

7,000.00

7,000.00

CITE Elections

100.00

100.00

Communications and Marketing

3,726.84

10,000.00

6,000.00

Conference Expenses

6,541.62

185,000.00

236,400.00

Conference Sponsorship

5,000.00

-

-

Director Expenses

6,378.51

16,000.00

16,000.00

972.91

10,000.00

10,000.00

excite Expenses Executive Expenses

-

31,257.70

24,000.00

24,000.00

Insurance

5,942.36

5,500.00

6,000.00

International Initiatives

3,856.28

4,000.00

4,000.00

John Vardon Scholarship

3,000.00

3,000.00

3,000.00

Membership Support Programs

3,511.87

3,500.00

3,500.00

250.00

250.00 750.00

Miscellaneous Postage, Mailing Service

851.89

750.00

Section Dues Distribution

5,387.84

12,000.00

-

Student Chapter Rebates

5,750.00

4,000.00

4,000.00

Student Presentation Competition

1,600.00

3,500.00

3,500.00

Telephone, Telecommunications TLC – Administration

900.82

2,000.00

2,000.00

4,053.14

10,000.00

10,000.00

TLC – Technical Project Devevelopment

-

20,000.00

-

TLC Project – TAC Sponsorship

-

10,000.00

10,000.00

10,000.00

10,000.00

10,000.00

-

6,000.00

6,000.00

Transportation Talk

6,750.00

6,500.00

6,500.00

Website

3,938.44

6,000.00

6,000.00

Youth Summit

30,513.27

-

-

TOTAL EXPENSES

$ 191,509.31

NET INCOME (LOSS)

$ (13,528.74)

Traffic Bowl Training Committee Expenses

$ 398,600.00 -

$ 419,500.00 -

SPRING 2018 | TRANSPORTATION TALK

8


N O W AVA I L A B L E ! CIT E e le c ti on s

Canadian Guide to Traffic Calming SECOND EDITION

U P D AT E D N AT I O N A L R E F E R E N C E O N T R A F F I C C A L M I N G P R I N C I P L E S A N D A P P L I C AT I O N S

Changes and additions include: ● Recognizing EDUCATION & ENFORCEMENT as valid, and/or preferred alternatives to physical measures; ● Describing measures applicable to ARTERIAL ROADS & RURAL ROADS;

The

Canadian

Guide

to

Traffic

Calming (Second Edition) presents

education,

traffic

emerging technologies and measures.

calming

as

a

method

to

reduce the speed and/or volume of non-local traffic infiltrating into neighbourhoods. It explains principles

● Adding TRAFFIC CALMING DEVICES

and suggests a process for introducing

some well-accepted and others ready

and implementing traffic calming,

to be further tested and evaluated; and; ● Referencing PERFORMANCE OUTCOMES where new information has become available since the first edition. Click here to learn more about what’s new in this edition

restriction, gateways, enforcement,

and

describes

the

applicability,

effectiveness, and design principle for a wide range of traffic calming devices. The devices are categorized in terms of

vertical

deflection,

horizontal

deflection, roadway narrowing, surface treatment, pavement markings, access

shared

space,

and

This second edition reflects changes in road conditions, attitudes toward vulnerable road users, and available technologies, and valuable experience regarding the efficacy of options. It was created through a partnership between the

Transportation Association

of

Canada (TAC) and the Canadian Institute of Transportation Engineers (CITE). GET YOUR COPY IN THE TA C B O O K S T O R E T O D AY !

V i s i t t h e TA C B o o k s t o r e t o v i e w t h e Ta b l e o f C o n t e n t s a n d p u r c h a s e : h t t p : / / w w w. t a c - a t c . c a / e n / p u b l i c a t i o n s / p t m - t r a f c a l m 1 8 - e


CIT E e l e c t io ns

Your Candidates for CITE DISTRICT DIRECTOR The Canadian Institute of Transportation Engineers (CITE) is holding an election for the position of District Director. The successful candidate will represent the Canadian District on the ITE International Board of Direction and serve as a member of the CITE Executive Committee for a three-year term commencing January 1, 2019. Electronic ballots were emailed to eligible voters on Friday, April 6, 2018. Eligible members in good standing as of January 1, 2018 are invited to vote and encouraged to exercise their right as ITE members. Voting is open until 11:45 PM Pacific Daylight Time, Sunday, May 6, 2018. If you have not received your ballot, please check your SPAM/Junk folder. If you still have not received a ballot, please contact Steven Garner, District Administrator at cite_admin@cite7.org. All other questions regarding the election can be directed to: Gene Chartier, M.A.Sc., P.Eng., FITE Canadian District Director and Chair, CITE Nominating and Elections Committee Email: director@cite7.org

The following are your candidates, listed in alphabetical order by last name: Andy Harvey City of Mississauga (Toronto Section) Jen Malzer City of Calgary (Southern Alberta Section) Biographies of the candidates appear in this issue of Transportation Talk on pages 11 and 12 and are posted on the CITE Elections website (cite7.org/elections). Further information about the duties and responsibilities of the District Director position is available at www.cite7.org/about-cite/governance/executive/ director/

VOTING CLOSES MAY 6

Election results will be announced prior to the 2018 CITE Annual Conference.

SPRING 2018 | TRANSPORTATION TALK

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CIT E e le c ti on s Andy Harvey, MBA, P.Eng., PMP Director of Engineering and Construction, City of Mississauga Toronto Section Who am I? I am a dedicated transportation professional with over 30 years of progressive experience in local and regional governments and transportation consulting. I am currently the Director of Engineering and Construction at the City of Mississauga. I have been fortunate to have had the opportunity to work with and build strong relationships with various levels of government, transportation and safety organizations, and a multitude of other stakeholder groups. Why am I running? The position of District Director on the ITE International Board of Directors (IBOD) provides an exciting opportunity to serve the CITE District and its membership in a very meaningful way. CITE is a very diverse district with a large geographic area hosting various chapters and sections with some similar and some very distinct needs. It is fortunate that CITE has strong leadership at the CITE Executive and Chapters throughout the nation. Similarly, ITE International also has strong leadership and insight. My approach is to act as a liaison between the CITE District and the ITE International and to build upon the great work that has been done. My objective will be to ensure that the Canadian story is heard and that board decisions have considered the Canadian perspective so that informed decisions can be made. ITE International has developed clear and comprehensive documents, including a new Strategic Plan (2018 – 2020) that will guide the organization into the future. These documents provide direction and effectively form the job description of the IBOD and its directors. The exciting part for me is that the areas of focus and the objectives really resonate with me. Prime areas of focus for me include: • Membership – The power of the institute is in its membership. Creating value-added services for members can help to advance careers and attract more members for solid organizational growth. Encouraging diversity and fostering inclusion is not only the right thing to do, it will also bring in new ideas and possibilities. • Collaboration – There are many organizations in the transportation industry. A key to efficiency and accountability is knowing who does what and working together to ensure that there are no major gaps in the needs and no duplication of efforts. • Technical Knowledge – Needs and technology change and in order to remain relevant and be value added, it is essential that technical knowledge be current and of high quality. Highlights of volunteer service: • • • • •

CITE member in good standing since 1986 (initially a student member at Queen’s University) Ontario Traffic Council (Past President, Vice President, Director of Traffic Engineering) Past Member of Mohawk College Transportation Engineering Technical Advisory Board (2005-2010) Served on the CITE Toronto Section Executive (2000-2001) CITE representative on the Transportation Association of Canada (TAC) Geometric Design Standing Committee (GDSC). • Representative on the TAC Traffic Operations Management Standing Committee (TOMSC) • Author of various reports and presentations, including CITE Toronto Section 2014 Spring Luncheon presenter and 2016 CITE Annual Conference paper and presentation.

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TRANSPORTATION TALK | SPRING 2018


CIT E e l e c t io ns Jen Malzer, M.Sc., P.Eng. Transportation Engineer, The City of Calgary Southern Alberta Section It has been my pleasure serving CITE for more than 15 years, including as CITE President between 2015 and 2017. I have truly enjoyed my time on the national executive and the chance to connect with Sections and Student Chapters across Canada. I am proud of the accomplishments of our Board and Executive over my time serving and here are just a few examples I led or supported: • • • •

Hosting CITE’s first Youth Summit in 2017 Creating a conference mentorship program Updating CITE’s strategic plan in 2015 Implementing new financial practices and creating a healthy reserve fund in accordance with Financial Review Committee recommendations • Supporting international efforts in the creation of a Road Safety Certification Board • Increasing collaboration with the Transportation Association of Canada including creating five new CITE appointee roles and funding new joint projects • Supporting our annual conferences including a very warm Kelowna conference, our joint ITE conference in Toronto and our upcoming conference in Edmonton As a brief outline of my professional career, I am fortunate to work as a transportation engineer in the Liveable Streets Division at The City of Calgary. My focus is on implementing Calgary’s Pedestrian Strategy and leading complete street retrofit projects. Last year I was awarded the 2017 Sustainable Urban Transportation Award by the Transportation Association of Canada for a project related to tactical urbanism, one of the new tools we are exploring to balance mobility in Calgary. I have worked mainly in the public sector, having spent 7 years as a Senior Transit Planner with Calgary Transit and one year with our Roads operations group. I also worked at MMM (now WSP) and as a sessional lecturer at the University of Calgary teaching The Transit City. I first joined ITE as the inaugural president of the Manitoba Student Chapter where I graduated with my Masters in Transportation Engineering. Since that time, I’ve enjoyed being part of CITE’s growth – new members, student chapters and Sections. I recently started becoming more involved with ITE International in my role as president while participating in the 2017 ITE / CITE joint conference in Toronto. It was clear that ITE’s priorities align with those I have come to know and value serving CITE. Further, I feel my individual skill set and the work I do with The City of Calgary align with ITE’s focus areas. Since the conference, I have expanded my participation with ITE including: • Co-Chair, Women of ITE Sub Committee (current) • Co-Chair, ITE Diversity Committee (current) • Participant, LeadershipITE Class of 2018 My hope, if I am selected as CITE’s District Director, is to continue to connect our CITE members. I would promote our Canadian initiatives and, in turn, find collaboration opportunities that help more CITE members participate on ITE committees. My ITE and project work crosses diverse professional groups, including the 2017 Walk21 Steering Committee, and I can support ITE as it moves towards being an inclusive organization for all transportation professionals.

SPRING 2018 | TRANSPORTATION TALK

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CITE ANNUAL CONFERENCE SHAW CONFERENCE CENTRE DOWNTOWN EDMONTON

fostering community Welcome to the Edmonton 2018 conference preview! We have put together the latest news about this year’s annual CITE Conference, waiting for you in Edmonton, Alberta from June 3 - 6, 2018. The Northern Alberta Section of ITE is looking forward to welcoming you to our city, where our rapidly changing transportation landscape presents an exciting setting to talk about how transportation professionals are shaping our communities. Our technical program is one of the strongest and most varied in recent years, with nearly 100 presentations in four concurrent streams. The program includes several workshops, a Pecha Kucha, and two “innovation lab” sessions. We will cover most everything current and noteworthy in the industry, including two sessions on gender issues in transportation and city building as well as a session on CASE (Connected/Automated/Shared/Electric) topics to complement our partnership with the Conference Board of Canada's Automated Vehicles 2018: Planning for Urban and Rural Transitions conference starting on Wednesday June 6. We have a variety of technical tours to choose from including several bike tours and walking tours that will take you through Edmonton’s Downtown and Southside Bike routes and the growing Ice District Arena area as well as down to our newly opened Walterdale Bridge. We have also identified several LRT tours where you can see our expanding transit network take form. Please peruse this edition of Transportation Talk to learn more about the conference and check out the website at cite7.org/2018-Edmonton to register and see what else we have to offer!

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TRANSPORTATION TALK | SPRING 2018


join the conversation • #2018CITE

REGISTRATION INFORMATION REGISTRATION TYPE

Early Bird

After May 15

Regular – Full Conference......................$650....................................... $700 Student – Full Conference..................... $100........................................$100 Single Day..........................................................$325........................................$375 Regular – CCG/PTV Workshop............$165........................................$190 Student – CCG/PTV Workshop............. $85........................................ $110

EVENT TICKETS

Early Bird Deadline is May 15! Register now at cite7.org/2018-Edmonton

Conference Banquet (June 5)............................................. $95 per ticket

REGISTRATION NOTES • Full Conference registration conference banquet ticket.

CANCELLATIONS AND REFUND POLICY includes

one

• Single Day registration also includes lunch. • Students must provide a valid ITE student member number for Student registration. • GST (5%) will be applied in addition to prices noted above.

• 100% REFUND: if request is received in writing 15 days or more prior to the start of the conference. • 50% REFUND: if request is received in writing 7 to 14 days prior to the start of the conference. • 0% REFUND: if request is received in writing less than 7 days prior to the start of the conference. Email requests for refunds to cite_admin@cite7.org.

CONFERENCE VENUE & WHERE TO STAY Our conference venue, the Shaw Conference Centre, sits on the North Saskatchewan Riverbank with great access to Downtown Edmonton’s growing food and entertainment district. For accommodations, we have partnered with the Courtyard Marriott Downtown Edmonton hotel, located a convenient 3 minute walk from the Shaw Conference Centre. Book your room by May 11, 2018 to receive our special conference rate of $179.00/night. To book a guest room please visit the hotel website here or call 1-780-423-9999 and tell them you are booking for the CITE 2018 Conference to secure this rate for your stay. Rates are quoted on a per room, per day basis and are net, noncommissionable. Please note that applicable taxes and fees are not included in the above rates.

SPRING 2018 | TRANSPORTATION TALK

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SCHEDULE

#2018CITE • FOSTERING COMMUNITY • #2018CITE • FOSTERING

MONDAY, JUNE 4

8:00

10:00 10:30

REGISTRATION & INFO DESK OPEN

12:00

1:30

Continental Speakers’ Breakfast Breakfast Foyer Salon 3

8:30

OPENING KEYNOTE • Salon 10/11/12 Greg Zeschuk

10:00

BREAK & EXHIBITION • Salon 8

10:30

Salon 2 Salon 4 Salon 5/6 Salon 9 Urban Resilience Travel Demand ITE Corridors Planning Modeling in Leadership & Climate Edmonton Town Hall Change

LUNCH • Salon 10/11/12 Michael Sanderson & Bruce Belmore

12:00 Bike Tours sponsored by:

President & President Elect, ITE International Geometric Design: Transforming Stroads & Structures

Gender & Community Building: Projects & Processes

Active Transportation: Hot Spots • Walking • Winter

Young Minds Present: Student Paper Awards Preview

BREAK & EXHIBITION • Salon 8 CITE COLLEGIATE TRAFFIC BOWL

1:30

3:00 3:30

Salon 11/12 4:30

4:30

5:00

5:00

WELCOME RECEPTION Marriot Courtyard Patio, 1 Thornton Ct NW

6:00

104 St, between 102 Ave & 103 Ave Sponsored by:

7:00

Sponsored by:

LeadershipITE Canadian Alumni Reception

5:30

STREET HOCKEY CHALLENGE

STUDENT MIXER

BREAK & EXH Technology & Transportation Rapid Implementation

LUNCH • Sa CITE Annual A Collaborating With a Tiger Team: Innovation Lab

BREAK & EXH Measuring Effectiveness

Sponsored by:

5:30

7:15

Salon 2 Traffic Operations: Integrating Bikes and LRT

Edmonton Community Builder

3:00 3:30

8:00

Bike Tour S1 South Side

Salon 2 Registration Required

8:30

REGISTRATION & INFORMATION DESK OPEN

CANADIAN CAPACITY GUIDE TRAINING & PTV VISTRO SOFTWARE WORKSHOP

7:30

REGISTRATION & INFORMATION DESK OPEN

7:30

7:00

MORNING RUN

MORNING RUN

7:00

TUESDAY, JUN

LRT Downtown Walking Tour

SUNDAY, JUNE 3

7:00 Sponsored by:

Metro Billiards, 10250 106 St 8:00

8:00

LATE

LATE

Location TBA. By invitation.

ANNUAL BAN

Fort Edmonton Transportation d Entrance. Please eventmobi.com/


AT A GLANCE

COMMUNITY • #2018CITE • FOSTERING COMMUNITY • #2018CITE • FOSTERING COMMUNITY • #2018CITE • FOSTERING COMMUNITY • #2018CITE

NE 5

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 6

Parking: New Tricks for an Old Dog?

Pecha Kucha: Multi-Topic Sampler

Bike Tour D2 Downtown

Gender and City Building: Social Innovation Lab

10:30 11:00

12:00

alon 10/11/12

Awards

Salon 4 Garbage • Goods • Commercial Vehicles

Salon 3 Salon 5/6 Geometric Design: Major Facilities + Roundabouts

BREAK • Foyer Active Transportation: Cross-Canada Check-Up

Transportation Safety: Planning Planning: & Design Conversation Circles Safety: Vision Zero Hackathon

LUNCH • Salon 10/11/12 • Joint with Automated Vehicles 2018 The Hon. Brian Mason

ITS (Intelligent Transportation Systems)

CASE (Connected Automated Shared Electric)

Data Analytics & Travel Patterns

NQUET

n Park departing from the Shaw Conference Centre, Jasper Avenue e check Conference App for departure times: /cite2018

Funicular Tour 1

Rules of the Road

1:30

Event Traffic Management

3:00 3:30

Funicular Tour 2

Demand Modeling and Microsimulation

HIBITION • Salon 8 Placemaking

Salon 2 Transit & Transportation Planning in Rural & Smaller Community Contexts

Speakers’ Breakfast

Alberta's Minister of Transportation

Bike Tour S2 South Side

Geometric Design: Guidelines & Street Classifications

Continental Breakfast Foyer

Automated Vehicles 2018 Sessions

HIBITION • Salon 8

10:00

INFORMATION DESK

8:30

Ice District Walking Tour

Salon 4 Salon 5/6 Salon 9 Communicating Safety: Stats & TLC: Activity • Educating • Beyond Update & CCG Engaging Healthy Living: Designing & Redesigning Our Communities

8:00

LRT Southeast Valley Line Bus Tour

Salon 3

Walterdale Bridge Walking Tour

7:30

Speakers’ Breakfast

Bike Tour D1 Downtown

CITE ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING • Salon 1

MORNING RUN

7:00

Continental Breakfast Foyer

fostering community

4:30 5:00 5:30

LEGEND REGISTRATION & INFORMATION CITE EVENT / WORKSHOP

7:00

8:00

SPECIAL EVENT MEALS & BREAKS TECHNICAL SESSIONS TECHNICAL TOUR CBoC Automated Vehicles 2018 Conference BY INVITATION ONLY

LATE

Note: This schedule is current as of 17 May 2018. For the latest updates, go to eventmobi.com/cite2018.


Edmonton 2018 • fostering community

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

MICHAEL SANDERSON President, ITE International

GREG ZESCHUK Edmonton Community Builder We are pleased to confirm that our keynote will be delivered by Greg Zeschuk. Originally trained as a medical doctor (UofA Med ’92), Greg teamed up with two classmates and formed the video game company BioWare in 1995. For the next 17 years, BioWare would create many of the industry’s most beloved role-playing games (Baldur’s Gate, Star Wars Knights of the Old Republic, Dragon Age, Mass Effect) and form partnerships with LucasArts/LucasFilm, Microsoft, and Electronic Arts. BioWare was purchased by Electronic Arts in 2007. BioWare grew to seven studios across the globe before Greg and his business partner Ray Muzyka departed the company in 2012. After BioWare Greg started a YouTube channel called The Beer Diaries focused on craft beer. This led to a desire to start a brewery in his hometown of Edmonton. Greg dabbled in land development to build the award-winning Ritchie Market, housing his brewery (Blind Enthusiasm Brewing Company) and restaurant (Biera), and the Monolith, housing Blind Enthusiasm’s barrel-aging facility. Greg now operates his companies while focusing on contributing to the community via hosting charitable events and participating in local festivals and fundraising efforts. He also serves on a number of private, public, and not-for-profit boards. We look forward to hearing more of his story and being inspired to activate our passions in our communities.

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TRANSPORTATION TALK | SPRING 2018

Michael Sanderson is President and CEO of Sanderson Stewart, recognized in 2014 as America’s Small Business of the Year by the United States Chamber of Commerce and twice recognized by the Zweig Group as one of the Best Firms to Work for in the Architecture/Engineering industry. Michael is an ITE Fellow and has served in numerous ITE leadership roles, formerly serving as president of the Montana Chapter, Intermountain Section, and Western District, and as an international director.

BRUCE BELMORE Vice President & President Elect, ITE International As the director of Western Canada Transportation Planning with WSP, Bruce is regularly involved in projects and trying to innovate with transportation solutions. With 30 years of experience in the transportation industry, Bruce has had the pleasure of undertaking a broad range of projects to improve mobility and safety. Bruce has served as President of the Canadian District, Saskatchewan Section, and as International Director.


join the conversation • #2018CITE

THE HON. BRIAN MASON Alberta's Minister of Transportation

Brian Mason currently serves as Minister of Transportation and as Government House Leader with the Legislative Assembly of Alberta. Brian previously served as Minister of Infrastructure. He was first elected as the Member of the Legislative Assembly for Edmonton-Highlands-Norwood in a 2000 by-election, and is the longest serving Member of the 29th Legislature. Brian previously served as leader of the New Democrats from September 18, 2004, to October 18, 2014. Before his election to the Alberta Legislature, Brian served as City of Edmonton Councillor for ward 3. He was first elected in October 1989 and won three subsequent civic elections. As a member of city council for 11 years, Brian gained a reputation as a tough and effective voice for his constituents.

EXHIBITORS

SPRING 2018 | TRANSPORTATION TALK

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Edmonton 2018 • fostering community

TECHNICAL SESSIONS

Note: This schedule is current as of 21 April 2018. For the latest schedule, go to eventmobi.com/cite2018.

Session 2 | 1:30 – 3:00

Session 1 | 10:30 – 12:00

MONDAY, JUNE 4 Stream A

Stream B

Stream C

Stream D

URBAN CORRIDORS

RESILIENCE PLANNING & CLIMATE CHANGE

TRAVEL DEMAND MODELING IN EDMONTON

ITE LEADERSHIP TOWN HALL

ǬǬ An Integrated Modelling Approach for LRT Projects: A Case Study of Edmonton’s Valley Line LRT ǬǬ Investigating Urban-scale Macroscopic Fundamental Diagram: Simulation Findings for Edmonton’s Urban Network

An opportunity for members to hear from and share their views with ITE International Leadership. ITE’s President Michael Sanderson and other Executive Committee members will share details about specific initiatives and look for feedback from members on these initiatives as well as other issues. Included in this session may be a Coordinating Council representative who highlights key Council activities and solicits feedback on transportation equity or another emerging initiative.

ǬǬ Main Streets Mobility in Edmonton ǬǬ Memorial Drive Left Turn Lane Reversal System ǬǬ Land Use Vision Informing Transit Mode: Lessons Learned From the Dundas Connects Master Plan

ǬǬ Resilience in a Transportation System: A Whole System Approach ǬǬ Resilient Infrastructure Planning, Risk-Based Analysis Methodoloy ǬǬ Vulnerability assessment of transportation network of northeastern Alberta under scenario of extreme events ǬǬ Modelling network resilience to prepare for climate change

GENDER & GEOMETRIC DESIGN: COMMUNITY TRANSFORMING STROADS BUILDING: PROJECTS & STRUCTURES & PROCESSES ǬǬ Burrard Bridge Renewal and Transportation Improvement Project ǬǬ The Northeast False Creek Project – From Viaducts to Great Streets ǬǬ Transforming Toronto’s “Spaghetti” Junction into a Complete Streets Solution ǬǬ JASPER AVENUE - You've never seen like this before!

ǬǬ A City's First Two Way Cycle Track: Does it Bring Out More Women, Children & Seniors? ǬǬ Transit for Women in Rural Communities: Linking Connection, Community and Safety ǬǬ Gender issues related to City building

ǬǬ Building Long-Term Dynamic Traffic Assignment Model: Challenges and Applications ǬǬ Staging Development of Edmonton Citywide Dynamic Traffic Assignment Model

ACTIVE TRANSPORTATION: HOT SPOTS • ECONOMICS • WALKING • WINTER ǬǬ City of Vancouver Cycling and Pedestrian Spot Improvement Program ǬǬ Behavioural Observations of Street Designs and Retail Economic Success ǬǬ Walk CNV : Making Good Places for Walking Even Better ǬǬ Ottawa's Winter Cycling Network - Happy 3rd Birthday!

CONFERENCE APP The Edmonton 2018 conference app will be your one stop shop for all conference information. Be sure to download the mobile app or bookmark eventmobi.com/cite2018 in your mobile browser to: • Get real time event updates and notifications • Create a personalized event schedule • Learn about speakers, sponsors, and attendees • And more! 19

TRANSPORTATION TALK | SPRING 2018

Updated: 21 April 2018


join the conversation • #2018CITE Note: This schedule is current as of 21 April 2018. For the latest schedule, go to eventmobi.com/cite2018.

TECHNICAL SESSIONS

Session 3 | 8:30 – 10:00

TUESDAY, JUNE 5 Stream A

Stream B

TRAFFIC OPERATIONS: INTEGRATING BIKES AND LRT

COMMUNICATING • ENGAGING • EDUCATING

ǬǬ Traffic Signal Coordination for Cyclists: A Case Study in Vancouver, BC ǬǬ Impact of light rail crossings on vehicle travel times ǬǬ Back-in Angled Parking to Balance Parking Needs and Bike Lanes ǬǬ LRT Crossing Assessment Framework

TECHNOLOGY & TRANSPORTATION

Session 4 | 10:30 – 12:00

ǬǬ Exploring how to Plan for the Technologial Revolution

RAPID IMPLEMENTATION ǬǬ Lighter, quicker, cheaper infrastructure for adaptive approaches to community traffic calming and pedestrian safety ǬǬ Responding to Growth and Change: Rapid Implementation of all Ages and Abilities Bicycle Networks

ǬǬ School lead Tactical Urbanism and Public Engagement as part of Sustainable Transportation Projects ǬǬ ActivateYYC: Microgrants that Reinvent Transportation Engineering ǬǬ Connecting Calgarians to the cycle tracks: How and why to create an integrated communications and education plan for active modes projects ǬǬ Are You Roundabout Ready? A Multifaceted Public Education Strategy

GENDER & CITY BUILDING: SOCIAL INNOVATION LAB ǬǬ Overcoming the Exclusive City

Stream C

Stream D

SAFETY: STATS & BEYOND

TECHNICAL LIAISON COMMITTEE (TLC): ACTIVITY UPDATE

ǬǬ Meta-Analysis of the Traffic Safety Effect of Reversible Lanes ǬǬ Statistical Forecasting of Traffic-Related Pedestrian Fatalities in the United States ǬǬ The use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) for innovative road safety analyses ǬǬ Moving beyond Safety Performance Functions for motor vehicles – a proactive multimodal approach

ǬǬ Canadian Capacity Guide and other updates

PARKING: NEW TRICKS FOR AN OLD DOG?

PECHA KUCHA: MULTI-TOPIC SAMPLER

ǬǬ Parking in Parkland: Accessibility to Edmonton's Ribbon of Green ǬǬ City of Vancouver – West End Parking Strategy ǬǬ Lessons in Parking Data Analysis ǬǬ Future-Proofing our Parking Strategies

ǬǬ Design Options for Transit Terminal Access Near a Steep Hill ǬǬ The "Traffic Bowl": the Transportation Impacts of Hillside Sprawl ǬǬ Credit River Active Transportation Crossings ǬǬ The Role of Automated Parking Systems and Conventional Parking Garages as De-centralized Storage Depots for Autonomous Vehicles ǬǬ Gender Differences in Travel Behaviour ǬǬ Gordon Dr / Casorso Rd Intersection Cycling Improvements ǬǬ Empowering Communities - Engage 106-76

HEALTHY LIVING: DESIGNING & REDESIGNING OUR COMMUNITIES ǬǬ Designing Healthy Living - Chief Public Health Officer’s Report on the State of Public Health in Canada 2017

SPRING 2018 | TRANSPORTATION TALK Updated: 21 April 2018

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Edmonton 2018 • fostering community

TECHNICAL SESSIONS

Note: This schedule is current as of 21 April 2018. For the latest schedule, go to eventmobi.com/cite2018.

Session 5 | 1:30 – 3:00

TUESDAY, JUNE 5 Stream A

Stream B

Stream C

Stream D

COLLABORATING WITH A TIGER TEAM: INNOVATION LAB

DEMAND MODELING AND MICROSIMULATION

GEOMETRIC DESIGN: GUIDELINES & STREET CLASSIFICATIONS

EVENT TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT

ǬǬ Calgary’s Tiger Team 101: A Crash Course Collaborating for better Complete Streets

Session 6 | 3:30 – 5:00

ǬǬ Alberta Bicycle Facility Design Guide Workshop ǬǬ St. Albert Complete Streets Guidelines and Implementation Strategy: A Holistic Approach to Growing a City ǬǬ Chestermere Transportation Master Plan: A new way of thinking about street classifications

ǬǬ Event Traffic Management Planning - Mitigating Chaos ǬǬ Rogers Place Arena and Ice District Special Event Management Plan

ITS (INTELLIGENT TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS) ǬǬ Variable Speed Limit System (VSLS) in BC ǬǬ Small City, Intelligent City, Not-Yet-Intelligent Transportation

MEASURING EFFECTIVENESS

21

ǬǬ Demanding Change / Changing Demand ǬǬ Portage and Main Microsimulation – Walls Down, Walking Up ǬǬ How the Creation of a Flexible Yet Specific Model Will Provide Solid Guidance to a Municipality Now, and In Twenty Years

ǬǬ Evaluating Calgary’s urban pilot cycle track network: plan once, measure many ways ǬǬ The Multimodal Transportation Index: application, use and need for city corridors ǬǬ The Edmonton Downtown Bike Network: Initial Usage Insights ǬǬ Capacity Analysis Using Person-delay as the MOE – A Case Study for Policy Decision Making

TRANSPORTATION TALK | SPRING 2018

Updated: 21 April 2018

PLACEMAKING ǬǬ Activating Laneway - Making laneway a placemaking experience while maintaining the functionality of it ǬǬ The Art of Transportation ǬǬ Sustainable Urban Integration: Transit as Citybuilding

CASE (CONNECTED AUTOMATED SHARED ELECTRIC) ǬǬ Modelling Autonomous Vehicles in Calgary's Regional Transportation Model ǬǬ The Gap between Connected and Unconnected Vehicles ǬǬ New Mobility Possibilities – User’s Perspective ǬǬ Charging Up! Edmonton’s Electric Vehicle Jolt

DATA ANALYTICS & TRAVEL PATTERNS ǬǬ Understanding the spatiotemporal patterns of taxi trips using GPS data ǬǬ Importance of Data in Transportation/Traffic Engineering ǬǬ The Evolution of the Traffic Study - Leveraging Data Analytics to Create Better Deliverables and Communicate More Effectively ǬǬ Advantages and Limitations of MAC Address O-D Survey Data Collection


join the conversation • #2018CITE Note: This schedule is current as of 21 April 2018. For the latest schedule, go to eventmobi.com/cite2018.

TECHNICAL SESSIONS

Session 7 | 8:30 – 10:00

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 6 Stream A

Stream B

Stream C

TRANSIT & TRANSPORTATION PLANNING IN RURAL & SMALLER COMMUNITY CONTEXTS

GARBAGE • GOODS • COMMERCIAL VEHICLES

GEOMETRIC DESIGN: MAJOR FACILITIES

ǬǬ Data-driven approach to characterize commercial vehicles movement ǬǬ Pedestrians, cyclists, buses, and passenger cars…but what about the garbage? A Primer on Solid Waste Management for the Transportation Professional ǬǬ City of Calgary Goods Movement Strategy

ǬǬ 25 Avenue LRT Grade Separation Project ǬǬ Canada's First Diverging Diamond Interchange

ǬǬ Smaller Communities Doing More Together: TriRegion Transit Plan ǬǬ Development of Progressive Transportation Master Plans for Rural Municipalities ǬǬ Transportation Planning in Small Communities Lessons from TransPort Moody, Port Moody's New Master Transportation Plan

Session 8 | 10:30 – 12:00

TRANSPORTATION PLANNING: CONVERSATION CIRCLES

ACTIVE TRANSPORTATION: CROSS-CANADA CHECK-UP

ǬǬ Can’t We All Get Along? ǬǬ The State of Active Managing Projects from Transportation In Canada: the Consultant and Canada's First National Government Perspective Active Transportation Report Card ǬǬ The evolution of the role of ǬǬ Okanagan Rail Trail Project Transportation Engineers in development reviews ǬǬ A Study of Adjustable Bike Lane Application in Winter Cities in Canada

GEOMETRIC DESIGN: ROUNDABOUTS ǬǬ Innovative and Unique – The Use of Mini-Roundabouts in Downtown Sundre, Alberta ǬǬ Decision-Making Tool for the Installation of Roundabouts vs Traffic Signals

SAFETY: PLANNING & DESIGN

Stream D

AUTOMATED VEHICLES 2018: PLANNING FOR URBAN & RURAL TRANSITIONS CITE is proud to sponsor the Conference Board of Canada's Automated Vehicles 2018: Planning for Urban and Rural Transitions conference. The full agenda for the conference can be viewed on the CBoC website. CITE delegates will be able to register to attend the morning sessions of the Automated Vehicles 2018 conference on Wednesday, June 6th free of charge. If you would like to attend these sessions, this can be added to your registration for the CITE 2018 conference; you do not have to register separately for the Automated Vehicles conference. Please note that seating is limited to the first 50 registrants.

ǬǬ Development of the Peel Region Road Safety Plan - Lessons Learned ǬǬ Safety Review of Laurier Ave W: a multimodal approach to traffic safety

SAFETY: VISION ZERO HACKATHON ǬǬ Vision Zero Hackathon

SPRING 2018 | TRANSPORTATION TALK Updated: 21 April 2018

22


Edmonton 2018 • fostering community

TECHNICAL TOURS In addition to four consecutive technical streams, we are pleased to be able to offer a variety of technical tours that will get you outside and show you the innovative transportation planning and engineering work that helped transform Edmonton over the past decade.

BIKE TOURS Sponsored by:

FUNICULAR TOURS Edmonton has installed approximately 18 km of all ages and abilities bike routes in the past two years. This includes a variety of facility types – protected on-street lanes with adaptable curbing, permanent curbing, protected with bollards, elevated lanes, bi-directional lanes on one-way roads, and even some bi-directional lanes on two-way roads – infrastructure not seen elsewhere in Alberta! Each has a unique design and operational differences that we will discuss throughout a series of technical tours during the conference. Note: Adults are not required to wear helmets in Edmonton. Helmets will not be provided but you are encouraged to bring your own.

SOUTH SIDE This tour will take you south of Downtown to Edmonton’s expanding bike network. Bike Tour S1: Mon, Jun 4 • 1:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. Bike Tour S2: Tue, Jun 5 • 1:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.

DOWNTOWN See Edmonton’s rapidly implemented protected on-street bike lanes, including unique bi-directional lanes on two-way roads and cycle signalling. Bike Tour D1: Tues, Jun 5 • 8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. Bike Tour D2: Tues, Jun 5 • 10:30 a.m. – noon

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TRANSPORTATION TALK | SPRING 2018

Canada’s newest funicular is in the heart of Edmonton – and right by the Shaw Conference Centre! The City of Edmonton has long sought to improve connectivity for the public between downtown and the North Saskatchewan River valley. The 100 Street Funicular offers an exciting opportunity to access and experience Edmonton’s ribbon of green. It’s an entrance to the river valley for everyone, regardless of age and ability, and a focal point that brings people together in the heart of Edmonton. Hear from the engineers, architects, and designers about the process to take a technology that had never been used in Edmonton (and rarely in North America) and embed it gracefully into the river valley, one of the world’s largest urban parks. This tour is guaranteed to put the “fun” in funicular. Funicular Tour 1: Tues, Jun 5 • 1:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Funicular Tour 2: Tues, Jun 5 • 3:30 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.


join the conversation • #2018CITE

WALKING TOURS ICE DISTRICT WALKING TOUR Near the conference centre, the Ice District tour will take you into Edmonton’s explosive downtown growth and through the 25 acre Ice District Arena area, including the new Rogers Place Arena. Date: Tue, Jun 5 Time: 8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.

LIGHT RAIL TRANSIT TOURS

WATERDALE BRIDGE TOUR Our second walking tour will take you into Edmonton’s River Valley to see the newly opened Walterdale Bridge. On this tour you will learn about the design, construction and delivery of the Walterdale bridge, as well as what the City of Edmonton has planned for the West Rossdale community. Date: Wed, Jun 6 Time: 8:30 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

Edmonton is building LRT at a fast pace and connecting communities across the city. The two LRT tours will focus on completed, in construction, and planned LRT projects. Learn how transit-oriented development (TOD), community-building opportunities, and design challenges influenced corridor selection, hear about infrastructure delivery challenges, and see first hand the integration with land use integration and public art.

DOWNTOWN LRT – WALKING TOUR Date: Mon, Jun 4 Time: 1:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.

SOUTHEAST VALLEY LINE – BUS TOUR Date: Wed, Jun 6 Time: 8:30 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

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Edmonton 2018 • fostering community

SPECIAL EVENTS

STUDENT MIXER AT METRO BILLIARDS

SUNDAY, JUNE 3 WELCOME RECEPTION

Sponsored by:

Join us at the Courtyard by Marriott on Sunday night for a cocktail reception on the patio. Enjoy the sun, beverages and appetizers while you reconnect with old and new friends.

MONDAY, JUNE 4 Sponsored by:

CITE COLLEGIATE TRAFFIC BOWL Come cheer on your alma mater or classmates at the Traffic Bowl featuring 8 teams from across Canada.

STREET HOCKEY CHALLENGE The event you’ve been training for all year! Delegates are invited to meet us as we close down one block of 104th Street for a good old fashioned street hockey game. Equipment is provided.

Sponsored by:

Celebrate your success (or hard work, at Sponsored by: least!) in the Traffic Bowl and Hockey Challenge by joining fellow delegates and students at the annual Student Mixer. Professionals and students can get acquainted over local beers, darts, arcades, and billiards. We will do some fun networking activities so bring your business cards. Metro Billiards is about a 15 minute walk from the hotel and conference area.

TUESDAY, JUNE 5 ANNUAL BANQUET We are excited to announce that the 2018 Annual Banquet will be hosted at Fort Edmonton Park in the historic Blatchford Field Air Hangar. Located in Edmonton’s vast river valley, Fort Edmonton Park is a retreat within the city where you can engage with Edmonton’s history in our current natural resources. The Blatchford Hangar is a reconstruction of the first civic hangar on the site of the first municipal air harbor in Canada. We will be providing transportation between Fort Edmonton Park and the conference centre. Please note that this is a ticketed event and your full registration package includes one (1) banquet ticket. Up to two additional tickets ($95 each) may be purchased online along with your conference registration. For anyone requiring special meal considerations, please make appropriate note during the online registration process.

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join the conversation • #2018CITE

CCG METHODOLOGY & PTV SOFTWARE WORKSHOP The CITE Traffic Engineering Subcommittee and PTV Group are pleased to invite you to a full day training event on Sunday, June 3, 2018 between 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. It will include a morning of discussion on the core principles and basic theory behind intersection capacity analysis – with emphasis on the Canadian Capacity Guide for Signalized Intersections (CCG) – followed by an afternoon workshop using the latest Vistro 6 Traffic Analysis Software from PTV. We would like to take this opportunity to thank PTV, as well as BA Group, WSP Group and Mohawk College, for their contributions to this event.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND AND WHY

BACKGROUND

You may register for this full day event alone or as an add-on to the full CITE 2018 Annual Conference.

This event stems from the recent initiative by PTV to include the CCG as a new analysis option in the PTV Vistro Software, alongside other alternative methodologies such as the Highway Capacity Manual. As described in the Winter 2017-18 Transportation Talk, over the past year, volunteers from the Traffic Engineering Subcommittee have been assisting PTV in testing and refining the CCG analysis component of the PTV Vistro Software and are excited about this recent software release, which will undoubtedly help in promoting and supporting the use of the CCG by providing a modern and functional platform to implement the methodology.

Whether you are affiliated with a governing agency, consulting, or academia, this will be highly beneficial as a refresher or introduction because of its focus on understanding some of the basic methods and procedures of intersection capacity analysis. This also offers an exciting chance to be guided through some of the newest features of the PTV Vistro Software.

HOW TO REGISTER

Registrant

Early Bird

After May 15

General attendee

$165

$190

Student – college/university $85

$110

You are encouraged to register early, as there is limited space available.

REGISTER NOW at cite7.org/2018-Edmonton

COURSE OUTLINE The morning portion of the training will be delivered by Dan Havercroft, B.A.Sc., P.Eng., PTOE, who has over 30 years of experience in traffic engineering instruction. It includes an introduction to the terminology, structure, and procedures of the CCG, along with detailed discussions on saturation flow rates and adjustments, measures of effectiveness and other relevant topics. Note that the CCG is one of the most comprehensive projects undertaken by CITE and it has also been endorsed by the Transportation Association of Canada as a national reference on traffic engineering. Following a short lunch break, an experienced instructor from the PTV Team will lead a workshop on how to analyze signalized intersections using the CCG methodology option in the PTV Vistro Software. Additionally, an overview of how to conduct traffic studies, evaluate development impacts and optimize signals using PTV Vistro will also be covered. The PTV trainers are well versed in intersection capacity analyses and provide numerous software trainings annually.

YOU MAY ALSO BE INTERESTED IN There will also be a short technical session by the Traffic Engineering Subcommittee the morning of Tuesday, June 6 which is intended to complement the in-depth full day session on Sunday by focusing on the broader CCG project, including the story of the methodology along with some highlights of its inclusion in PTV Vistro (left turn treatment, ring barrier control, etc.). Additionally, PTV wishes to extend a welcome to visit them at booth #16 in the Exhibitor Lounge and their other activities during the conference to learn more about the work of the Traffic Engineering Subcommittee and PTV. There is also a demo version of PTV Vistro available on the PTV website where you can give the CCG-related and other software features a try—you may be surprised to find that the CCG is a valid, homegrown alternative methodology which is beneficial to have in your toolkit. To learn more about a limited time discount on the price of PTV Vistro for Canadian practitioners, contact info.us@ptvgroup.com.

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Edmonton 2018 • fostering community

THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS

FOR LEADING THE WAY

DIAMOND

GOLD

SILVER

SPECIAL EVENTS & SERVICES

BRONZE

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TRANSPORTATION TALK | SPRING 2018


PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT NETWORKING

LEADERSHIP

TEAM BUILDING

WHAT IS A STUDENT LEADERSHIP SUMMIT? Student Leadership Summits have the goal of giving students interested in transportation engineering some valuable skills and resources to succeed in their future transportation careers!

WHO IS THIS FOR? The summit is organized by students, for students! We are expecting approximately 50 students to attend from various universities across the country.

WHERE IS IT HAPPENING? University of Alberta Campus in Edmonton, Alberta

WHY SHOULD I ATTEND? The summit gives you an opportunity to build and develop leadership and professional skills that will help you stand out in the workplace. There is also the added benefit of meeting other students and professionals within the transportation profession.

The University of Alberta and the University of Manitoba are excited to be collaboratively hosting the first Canadian ITE Student Leadership Summit!

REGISTRATION DEADLINE: MAY 25 Accommodations are reserved for booking until April 27

WHEN IS IT HAPPENING? Saturday, June 2nd to Sunday, June 3rd, immediately preceding the CITE 2018 Annual Conference in Edmonton

The cost to attend is only $25, which includes breakfast, lunch, and snacks on Sunday June 3rd, and transportation to the CITE Welcome Reception.

GET MORE INFO ON REGISTRATION & SPONSORSHIP AT OUR WEBSITE HERE


feature

A Future with Autonomous Vehicles BY BRUCE BELMORE ITE INTERNATIONAL VICE PRESIDENT

Many people are afraid of the idea of autonomous vehicles, either the thought of driving in them or the belief that a car system could be more effective at the task of driving than they are. Like them or not, autonomous vehicles are on their way in Canada. Municipalities are researching them, entrepreneurs are producing software and hardware for them, universities are developing programs around them, and governments are starting to legislate testing of autonomous vehicles.

29 Steve TRANSPORTATION | SPRING 2018 In 2015, Mahan, whoTALK is legally blind, traveled from a park to a doctor’s office in Austin, Texas without anyone in the driver’s seat of this Google driverless car in the world’s first fully self-driving trip on public roads.

CREDIT: WAYMO

This article is intended to provide an overview of the work being conducted in developing autonomous vehicles and establish guidance on the roles of the transportation industry and government for a future with autonomous vehicles.


a fut u re wi th a u to no m o u s ve h icles

CREDIT: AUDI AG

WHAT DO THE LEVELS OF AUTONOMY MEAN?

Audi A8 anticipated to be the first Level 3 autonomous vehicle in Canada

This article was prepared prior to the recent fatal crash in Arizona and acknowledges that, in light of that event, government and industry are reexamining their approach to testing and deployment. While that event is rightly causing the players to reexamine their near term approach, it does not change the longer term trajectory portrayed in this article.

WHO WILL SHAPE THE AV FUTURE? There are many players who play a role in shaping the autonomous vehicle scene. Google, Uber, most major automakers, and other organizations are investing significantly in the advancement of driverless technology. Additionally, many research institutions are partnering with automakers to provide research support, validation, and testing sites. Several universities are also studying the ethical questions associated with driverless cars (e.g., how to determine who gets harmed versus saved in an unavoidable accident). Some of the key players involved in the autonomous vehicle industry includes: • Automakers – Nissan, Mercedes, Tesla, Daimler, Ford, Volvo, Audi • Technology Providers – Google, Uber, Apple, Alibaba, Baidu, Easy Mile, Navya • Research Institutions – multiple engineering colleges in Canada and the U.S. • Manufacturing – a range of hardware systems providers • Insurance agencies – establishing ramifications of fault • Legal advisors – crafting the laws surrounding autonomous vehicle use • Federal government – supports research on safety and policies around autonomous vehicles

There are six levels ranging from 0 (no automation) to 5 (full automation) based on the control of the vehicle and level of human intervention. The three most relevant levels right now are levels 2 to 4. Level 2 cars – like the Tesla Model S and X, and Mercedes-Benz E-Class – never assume responsibility for driving and require you to have a hand on the steering wheel at all times. They have safety enhancements incorporated such as lane-assist and collision avoidance systems. Level 3 cars – like the Audi A8 – allow you to take your hands and feet off the controls and the car assumes responsibility for driving in certain situations. However, you need to remain prepared to take over operation when the car asks. Level 4 cars assume driving responsibilities in certain situations and you will not need to take over at any point. The key difference with this level of autonomy is that the “driver” could safely fall asleep en route. Check out this article in the Spring 2016 edition of Transportation Talk for a detailed summary of the six levels of automation. • State and Provincial governments – jurisdictional legislation enabling testing and use and any need for special licensing • Local and Regional governments – mostly looking to understand the implications of the technology on bylaws, enforcement, and infrastructure. Also provide testing locations. Automakers and technology providers are pushing the technology into uncharted territory, from a legal and technological standpoint. Audi has announced the new A8 sedan, its luxury flagship, which is anticipated to be the first Level 3 autonomous vehicle in Canada and may be released as early as 2018. Some companies don’t see a way to make Level 3 vehicles safe, due in large part to the issue of the hand off between automated system and driver. As a result, companies like Volvo, Ford, and Google are opting to target Level 4 production. Experimental programs and permits in Ontario require vehicles with an automated system of at least Level 3.

WHAT EFFECTS WILL AVS HAVE? There are many unknowns and changes as autonomous vehicle technology progresses and different manufacturers innovate. Questions with significant implications are being asked about the effects of this technology on society. SPRING 2018 | TRANSPORTATION TALK

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feature WHAT EFFECT WILL AVS HAVE ON SOCIETY?

PARKING If the car can drop you off directly at the front door and then go park itself, proximity no longer matters. Land currently occupied by parking lots can be repurposed, and cars can park themselves in facilities under buildings, or elsewhere remotely located. Wasting time looking for parking will be a thing of the past.

ROAD SIGNAGE People need roads signs when they’re driving to know what the speed limit is, what exits are coming up, the names of streets, whether to yield, if there are hazards up ahead – but autonomous cars don’t see signs. They’ll read the GPS map to learn this information.

DRIVER’S LICENCES If the car is driving itself, will we still need to learn how to drive and get a license? While there will likely be a transition period, this classic teenage rite of passage may become obsolete.

CAR INSURANCE If the car is driving itself, who is responsible if it crashes? We’re going to have to reconsider where the liability lies. Since 9 in 10 accidents are caused by the driver, there are going to be far fewer car crashes and that means car insurance should get a lot cheaper.

Source: WSP, Mobility: Transportation Planning in the Age of Autonomous Vehicles

The potential impact of driverless vehicles is vast, with both positive and negative implications. The extent of these impacts will largely be driven by government policy. Potential positive impacts related to autonomous vehicles include: •

Improved public safety. This is the largest positive impact, with the potential elimination of 90% of automobile accidents that are caused by human error.

Improved mobility for the elderly, disabled and youth. By 2031, all baby boomers in Canada will have reached

On one side, you’ve got about 40% of the public who believe that they can hop into a self-driving vehicle and have sufficient knowledge, everything’s good. You’ve got another 40% on the other side who say, ‘that would be very stressful for me’. And then you’ve got 20% in the middle who are going, ‘I think I need to learn more.’ And they’re the wise 20% because vehicle automation is coming very rapidly and everyone needs to know more. Stephen Beatty, Vice President Toyota Canada Inc. on a public perception study by Toyota

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TRANSPORTATION TALK | SPRING 2018

the age of 65. At that time, those age 65 years or older will reach almost 11 million people and 25% of the population. Autonomous vehicles are a benefit to groups with difficulties getting regular access to transportation. •

Improved traffic circulation. Assuming a 90% market share of driverless vehicles, freeway congestion could reduce by as much as 60% due to shared-use daily commutes. Also, traffic circulating on public streets looking for available parking currently accounts for 30% of city traffic. That could potentially be eliminated with shared driverless vehicles.

Reduced need for parking. Self-driving fleets will reduce the need for on-street parking due to ride sharing and vehicle sharing. It is further expected that curbside space in downtowns will need to be reconfigured to have more loading/unloading zones and shared vehicle parking.

Improved personal mobility options and reduced personal mobility costs. Each new self-driving taxi added to the fleet eliminates the need for about 10 privately owned cars. Essentially, people’s mobility options will be increased substantially, so the need to


a fut u re wi th a u to no m o u s ve h icles WILL SELF DRIVING VEHICLES LEAD TO MORE OR LESS CONGESTION? own a private vehicle will be less necessary (at least in most urban and suburban areas). Among other opportunities, driverless cars could provide first mile/last mile transit solutions. •

Reduced emissions. A self-driving, electric taxi in 2030 would produce 90 percent lower greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) than a 2014 gasolinepowered privately owned vehicle, and 63 to 82 percent fewer GHG emissions than a 2030 privately owned vehicle with a hybrid engine.

Increased road capacity and throughput. The ability to constantly monitor surrounding traffic and respond with finely tuned braking and acceleration adjustments should enable autonomous vehicles to travel safely at higher speeds and with reduced headway (space) between each vehicle. Research indicates that the platooning of autonomous vehicles could increase lane capacity (vehicles per lane per hour) by up to 500 percent.

Even in a scenario where the number of vehicles on the road remains the same, the decreased distances between C/AVs will allow greater density and higher speeds that will help alleviate congestion. Advances in communications technologies from vehicle to vehicle - and vehicle to infrastructure systems - will also help regulate lights at busy intersections and optimize traffic flow. Conversely, some experts suggest that people would be more inclined to spend more time in transit if they are being chauffeured. They could also opt to be dropped off at their destination and to send their vehicle off to other locations, to be used by other people, therefore adding unmanned vehicles to the glut on our roads. In that scenario, the result would be more congestion, at worst, or no change at best.

While the jury is still out on what impact self-driving cars will have on congestion and road usage, it is undisputed that driverless vehicles are the future. The adoption of automated technology is part of a revolution in transportation, where autonomous vehicles will become one of several mobility assets available to consumers. The focus will be on the overall mobility capacity of our society, while simultaneously providing effective solutions to many existing transportation problems. Driverless vehicles are an ideal fit for an increasingly mobile world, but the effectiveness of their adoption will depend on direct action from both the public and private sectors. Source: WSP, Mobility: Transportation Planning in the Age of Autonomous Vehicles

Increased vehicle miles travelled (VMT). Additional VMT increases may be realized from induced demand as travel costs fall and greater access to travel options occurs. A latent demand for travel also exists that will be realized with availability of autonomous vehicle fleets.

Increased urban sprawl. Regardless of the mode of available transit, people tend to live an average of 25-30 minutes from where they work. It is predicted that driverless vehicles could travel up to 120 miles per hour on major highways. For this reason, and the ability of people to engage in activities in their vehicles other than driving, it is likely that people will be willing to live even farther from where they work, which could result in reduced accessibility to public services, increased infrastructure requirements, and reduced farmland/ natural land.

CREDIT: FORD MOTOR CO.

Potential negative impacts related to autonomous vehicles include:

Ford’s Self Driving Delivery Vehicle

Job loss. Almost 1 million people are employed in motor vehicle and parts manufacturing. Additionally, truck, bus, delivery, and taxi drivers account for nearly 6 million jobs in Canada and the U.S. These jobs, and others, could potentially be impacted by vehicles that do not need drivers. However, this would likely happen gradually and it is anticipated that many new jobs would also be created with the introduction of autonomous vehicles.

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feature LEGISLATING AV TECHNOLOGY Currently, 21 states, plus the District of Columbia, have passed legislation that allows, to some extent, autonomous vehicles to travel on public roads. States such as Nevada and California are currently testing autonomous vehicles on their streets, while the new autonomous vehicle laws in Michigan are sweeping in mandate. They allow the testing of driverless cars without pedals, steering wheels, or test drivers in the car. They also allow for driverless ride-sharing networks to be established by the likes of Uber and Lyft. They permit, as well, the testing of self-driving truck platoons. They also authorize the sale of autonomous vehicles to the public as long as the car meets federal standards and the company assumes full liability for its vehicles. In a way, the push for AV in Michigan makes a lot of sense. Detroit is the heart of the U.S. auto-making industry and the desire to remain a relevant industry player is apparent.

APPLICATIONS OF CONNECTED/AUTONOMOUS VEHICLE (C/AV) TECHNOLOGIES The company that I work for – WSP – has been heavily involved in autonomous vehicle trials throughout the world, including the following example projects: Metrolinx New Mobility – Metrolinx transportation agency in Ontario selected WSP to outline emerging trends in technology and society and their potential impact on transportation in the Toronto region. Columbus Submission In U.S. Smart City Challenge – Columbus, Ohio won the USDOT’s Smart City Challenge and the city is now ready to harness the power and potential of data, technology, and creativity to reimagine how people and goods move, reshaping its transportation system to become a fully-integrated city. U.S. Department of Transportation’s (USDOT) Connected Vehicle Safety Pilot – WSP led the largest demonstration in the U.S. of the validity of vehicle-to-vehicle infrastructure (V2V) communication. Conducted on the streets of Ann Arbor, nearly 3,000 vehicles were equipped with various

CREDIT: MICHIGAN PHOTOGRAPHY

With a view to safety, it is important to note legislation in Canada differs right now from the U.S. The U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has taken a relatively hands-off approach to the legislation of autonomous vehicles. Rather than focusing on compliance, the NHTSA published a 15-point guideline for manufacturers of autonomous vehicles and makes recommendations on legislation at the state-level. NHTSA has told Google that its self-driving system qualifies as a driver under federal law. The legislative and regulatory framework in Canada,

however, doesn’t allow the same approach as has been approved in the U.S. An autonomous vehicle without a steering wheel and pedals would not be allowed on Canadian roads under the existing Motor Vehicle Safety Act.

Mcity, a test track dedicated to connected and automated vehicle (C/AV) technology located at the University of Michigan

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TRANSPORTATION TALK | SPRING 2018


a fut u re wi th a u to no m o u s ve h icles forms of dedicated short-range communications (DSRC) equipment to evaluate the effectiveness of connected vehicle technology to prevent crashes in an everyday environment. American Mobility C/AV Test Center – The American Center for Mobility will be built in Michigan on more than 335 acres adjacent to Willow Run Airport in Ypsilanti. It will become a national-scale advanced automotive testing and product development center where precautionary testing is done before C/AV vehicles are deployed on the road. Developing & Deploying Roadside Infrastructure at University of Michigan – WSP is deploying roadside infrastructure that communicates with vehicles being tested at Mcity, a test track dedicated to connected and automated vehicle (C/AV) technology located at the University of Michigan. Massachusetts Traffic Signal Upgrades – Traffic signal upgrades in Somerville’s Union Square neighborhood will support connected vehicle technology. German car manufacturer, Audi, is testing its new traffic light information system using the technology. Route Assessments for Fully Automated Driverless Buses – This Australian trial will be key to understanding how driverless buses can be deployed on local road networks. Maryland Connected/Autonomous Vehicle Strategic Support – A unique corridor approach is used for real-world AV testing in Maryland, an Automated Vehicle proving ground. Swedish Drive Me Pilot Project – Swedish pilot project in partnership with Volvo aims to learn about the challenges in the physical and virtual world needed to support the future of personal transport.

CANADA AND AUTONOMOUS VEHICLE TECHNOLOGY While most of the innovations in this emerging sector are coming out of the U.S., Europe, and Japan right now, Canada is entering this burgeoning field. It is anticipated that, with our universities and strong software and industrial manufacturing sectors, we are able to play a role in developing autonomous vehicle technology. Here are but a few examples of Canada’s presence: • Toronto-area parts supplier Magna launched its Max4 Autonomous Driving Platform in August 2017, gaining

interest from most major automakers, as well as technology firms such as Google, Apple and Intel. • General Motors and Uber are actively eyeing up Canada as a testbed for autonomous vehicles. • Ontario is the only Canadian province that currently allows testing of self-driving cars on public roads. With legislation passed on January 1, 2017, Ontario is one of a limited number of jurisdictions in North America and Europe allowing testing at this time. Ontario’s pilot framework does not limit autonomous vehicles to select roads or highways and requires no special permits or plates. • The southwestern Ontario town of Stratford was named by the province as the strategic demonstration hub for autonomous and connected cars. Stratford is working with a Tokyo-based company at a four-acre test facility and received $80M in funding from the province over a 5 year period. • A Lincoln MKZ was exhibited at a tech show in Las Vegas January 2017 that had significant Canadian content, including software developed by the University of Waterloo and BlackBerry’s QNX autonomous vehicle system. • In October 2017, the first Canadian test of a driverless car took place in Ottawa's Kanata North Technology Park, where Mayor Jim Watson was a passenger in the test. The collaboration involves Invest Ottawa, Algonquin College, Carleton University, and the University of Ottawa. Mobile phone maker Nokia is expected to add LTE internet capabilities to the cars. • In early 2018, two of the eight North American universities selected to compete in the AutoDrive Challenge are Canadian. The University of Waterloo and University of Toronto will compete in the autonomous vehicle driving challenge sponsored by the SAE International and General Motors. These students are being challenged to develop a Level 4 self-driving car within three years and then navigate the vehicle on an urban driving course. • The City of Edmonton is moving ahead with driverless vehicle testing and is planning to hire additional staff to prepare for the new technology. They have also provided the University of Alberta with funding to develop a research vehicle and are examining the implications of autonomous vehicles. • Alberta Centre for Advanced Micro Nanotechnology Products (ACAMP), is helping local companies develop

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CREDIT: OTTAWA BUSINESS JOURNAL

feature

The first Canadian test of a self driving car on public roads took place in October 2017 with Ottawa Mayor Jim Watson in the passenger seat.

cutting-edge technology for autonomous vehicles such as Calgary’s NovAtel and Edmonton-based Soltare that has a device to detect emergency vehicle sirens and warns vehicles to pull over. • Vancouver’s transportation master plan anticipates dedicated lanes for autonomous vehicles in the future. • It is expected that many Canadian cities will have connected and autonomous vehicles at the heart of their Smart Cities Challenge submissions. It is reported that Canada could reap $65 billion in potential benefits from autonomous vehicle developments, mainly from fewer collisions, less time in cars, fuel saving and reduced congestion, according to a 2015 report from the Conference Board of Canada. While Canada is still seen as a relative newcomer to the autonomous vehicle field, these examples of technological innovation, industry investment, and university participation show a strong desire to be part of this new economy.

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Local road authorities need a good understanding of the impacts of emerging technologies and will… • Create an automated vehicle strategy to address likely market changes in the short, medium, and long term. • Build flexibility into the automated vehicle strategy to allow for staged implementation as technology changes. • Consider new types of mobility within their master plan documents. • Research and learn from recent autonomous tests, pilots, and trials. Identify those locations and road segments locally that might best be suited for early adoption of automated technologies. • Prepare for new vehicle fleets and technologies in conjunction with encouraging new shared mobility and public transit offerings.

PREPARING FOR THE FUTURE

• Develop relationships with industry to understand the technology, implications of collaborating, and impact on municipal right-of way. This process will identify benefits for each partner and the general direction of technology.

While many players will have a role in determining the future of autonomous vehicles, specific groups will largely be responsible for causing action and proactively addressing driverless car use. Below is the role of each of these parties:

• Consider how an automated fleet may be used to fill service gaps or supplement levels of service on busy corridors (e.g., automated buses into downtown from suburban locations).

TRANSPORTATION TALK | SPRING 2018


a fut u re wi th a u to no m o u s ve h icles Local planning agencies need to connect industry and examine future business opportunities and will…

Land-owners, land investors and developers will be a driver for implementation and will…

• Collaborate with other agencies and levels of government on planning policy to consider the effects of automated vehicles and their impacts on mobility.

• Collaborate with the public sector to understand the appetite for change and the changing regulatory environment related to connected and autonomous vehicles.

• Proactively create policies to address the impact of autonomous vehicle use and identify potential new business models for capital and revenue funding around this new mobility. • Consider a ‘mobility index’ in place of a public transit accessibility rating, recognizing that the gap between public and private transport is likely to narrow. • Work to build a framework and messaging around the benefits of shared use. At the same time, prepare for more ‘mobility-as-a-service’ operations (e.g., shared fleet of vehicles such as Car2Go initially and then shared-use autonomous vehicles over time). • Examine how transit use can be strengthened in areas where there is land use densification, increased traffic congestion (including that caused by AVs), and potential for parking repurposing. • Create planning scenarios to test and adapt traditional travel forecasting to an AV future, allowing informed decisions to be made during this transition period. • Establish parking policies that respond to changing curbside needs with the introduction of more pick-up/ drop-off operations.

• Build in flexibility for development and redevelopment proposals by understanding a range of forecast scenarios for varying levels of automation, sharing, and connectivity. Options that allow a rapid response to changes in demand for parking, pick-up, and drop-off activity are likely to be particularly valuable. • Add resilience to major institutional developments (e.g., airports, hospitals, universities) where curbside operations and parking needs will change with technology. Engineers and planners will advise the above groups on transportation network options and new technologies and will… • Estimate travel demand, establish parking requirements, and model demand with an entirely different lens, considering new and emerging mobility options. • Provide advice to clients that is future ready.

YOU CAN PLAY A ROLE If you have not been involved in ITE lately, it is a great starting point for collaborating on autonomous vehicles and smart community initiatives. To better understand your future role in the changing state of transportation, get involved with others in industry through ITE’s initiatives in Transportation and Health, Smart Communities and Vision Zero. All of these working groups have a connection to our autonomous vehicle future.

CREDIT: VOLVO

In addition, CITE has partnered with the Conference Board of Canada to host Automated Vehicles 2018, a two day session on planning for urban and rural transitions to automated technology. This conference will be held immediately following CITE's 2018 Annual Conference in Edmonton and provide an opportunity for delegates to learn more about this emerging field.

Private sector developments, like the partnership between auto manufacturer Volvo and technology company Uber, are pushing the field and require proactive action from transportation professionals to prepare.

Bruce Belmore is the ITE International Vice President and by day is WSP Director of Transportation Planning for Western Canada.

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feature Mark Huberman

Peter Joyce

Glen Pardoe

Ezekiel Dada

Jane Farquharson

Mike Furuya

Catherine Oberg

Christephen Cheng

Jason Dunn

Daniel Fung

Yulia Liem

Kristen Myers

Jason Potter

Tyler Thomson

Amrit Uppal

Heidi Weihs

Janelle Willis

Sean Willis

ANNOUNCING CORPORATE AMALGAMATION & NEW APPOINTMENTS

25 years since inception – Bunt & Associates Engineering Ltd. is pleased to announce corporate amalgamation, new leadership appointments, and the addition of 10 new shareholders. This restructuring represents an exciting time in the evolution of our company with growth opportunities for staff and an expanded and seamless connection to expertise beyond local borders. We are proud to acknowledge the following individuals on their recent appointments: Principals:

Mark Huberman P. Eng. | Board Co-Chair Peter Joyce P. Eng. | Board Co-Chair, Past President Glen Pardoe P. Eng. | President Dr. Ezekiel Dada P.Eng. | Manager of Finance Jane Farquharson P. Eng. PTOE | Regional Manager British Columbia Mike Furuya P. Eng. | Regional Manager Southern Alberta & Saskatchewan Catherine Oberg P. Eng. | Regional Manager Northern Alberta Associates:

Christephen Cheng P. Eng. Jason Dunn P. Eng. Daniel Fung P. Eng. Yulia Liem P. Eng., PTOE Kristen Myers P. Eng. Jason Potter PTP Tyler Thomson RPP, PTP Amrit Uppal P. Eng. Heidi Weihs Janelle Willis P. Eng. Sean Willis P. Eng.

YEARS

CALGARY | EDMONTON | VANCOUVER | VICTORIA

www.bunteng.com


Toro nto p re p a re s fo r AVs

The Driverless Car is Coming

CREDIT: WAYMO

How One Municipality is Getting Ready

BY RYAN LANYON, CITY OF TORONTO

"Will a world of driverless cars be heaven or hell?" asked Robin Chase, co-founder of the international car-sharing company Zipcar, in a 2014 column on the topic. That question resonates with planners, engineers, elected officials, transportation service providers, and even users of transportation systems across the world. The driverless or highly automated vehicle (AV) comes with many promises – most notably increased capacity and ubiquitous mobility for everyone, regardless of income, age, or ability – but achieving those benefits without exacerbating current challenges of traffic congestion, road safety, emissions, and physical activity is a paradox with no known resolution.

Automated vehicles are now on Toronto's streets, in various forms and for a variety of purposes. Partially automated vehicles are providing assistance to licensed drivers in the form of cruise control, automated braking, and other safety features included in newer vehicles. Highly automated vehicles (SAE Levels Three to Five) are being tested on public roads in Ontario through a permit from the Ministry of Transportation. These more advanced vehicles have the potential to reshape our transportation system, and bring us closer to utopia or dystopia. But are municipal governments ready for them?

The automated vehicle comes with many promises but achieving those benefits without exacerbating current challenges is a paradox with no known resolution.

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feature THE ROLE OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT

with so many other issues, decisions made at the local level will weigh heavily on the scale between reaching heaven or hell. How those decisions are made can have a wide-ranging and long-lasting impact.

Cities in Canada have little authority to regulate drivers and, consequently, virtually no ability to restrict or ban automated vehicles. In Canada, vehicle standards are regulated by the federal government through the Motor Vehicle Safety Act, which includes the Canada Motor Vehicle Safety Standards. In Transportation 2030: A Strategic Plan for the Future of Transportation in Canada, the federal government has indicated support for the use of connected and automated vehicles to achieve broader goals in road safety, mobility, congestion reduction, emissions reductions, and economic development. Resources to develop a regulatory framework for automated vehicles have been included in both the 2016 and 2017 federal budgets, and programs that provide funding to spur innovation in industry, non-profit organizations, and other orders of government have recently been announced.

SEEING THE FUTURE IN THE REAR-VIEW MIRROR Cities have been at a crossroads like this before. Urban streets were almost completely devoid of motorized vehicles until the late 19th century, when steam-, electric-, and gasoline-powered cars were first introduced. Clunky, noisy, dangerous, and expensive, there wasn't much appetite to support them at first. But as innovation continued, these new "horseless carriages" became more sophisticated and reliable and new use cases were found for them. With the introduction of Henry Ford's Model T in 1908, they became more affordable and public demand increased. Governments soon fell in line to encourage and support their use.

The use of public roads by all vehicles is governed by provincial authorities, such as through the Highway Traffic Act in Ontario. In January 2016, the Ministry of Transportation of Ontario released a testing framework for automated vehicles at SAE Level Three automation and above. The first successful applicant to this program was announced on November 28, 2016, and the Ministry recently stated that seven companies have been approved for testing. Automated vehicles at Level Three or above may only be operated in Ontario with a permit approved under this testing framework, and may test on any public highway governed by the Highway Traffic Act, including within the City of Toronto.

The first purpose-built road for automobiles, the Long Island Motor Parkway in New York, opened in 1908, and the first divided highway followed in Northern Italy in 1924. By 1927, more than half of American families owned an automobile. At the same time, active modes of transportation, horsebased transportation, and mass transit were in decline. Through a series of small and large changes, and both intended and unintended objectives, urban mobility systems were becoming the near-exclusive purview of the automobile.

It's clear that for other orders of government, vehicle automation is seen as an opportunity to advance broader economic, environmental, and social objectives. Residents in the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area prefer a cautious approach, with almost half of respondents to a 2016 survey indicating that government response to vehicle automation should centre on monitoring the development of the technology; however, there is a strong expectation that regulations will be in place to govern how AVs are used. As 39

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CREDIT: VINTAGE EVERYDAY

The provincial government is also interested in the economic development potential of automated vehicles. The Automated Vehicles Innovation Network was recently formed through the Ontario Centres of Excellence and is supported by the Ministries of Research, Innovation and Science; Economic Development and Growth; and Transportation. The Network will receive $80 million over five years to support an AV demonstration zone (located in Stratford), research and development, talent development, and a central hub for coordination and information sharing.

The Long Island Motor Parkway in 1908


Toro nto p re p a re s fo r AVs Fast forward a century later and local governments are working to reverse this trend. Investment in active transportation and public transit is on the rise. New and innovative options to owning and driving a car, such as carsharing and transportation network companies, are receiving support from most cities. Transportation demand management programs to reduce peak hour traffic congestion and encourage carpooling and working remotely have been in place for decades. Yet all these efforts have barely challenged the hegemony of the car, and early 21st century cities are left grappling with extensive traffic congestion, air quality and climate change impacts, rising obesity rates, inequitable access to mobility, and continued occurrences of serious injury and death from preventable collisions. The past teaches that new technologies bring heaven to some and hell to others if not managed in a way that considers the short-, medium-, and long-term unintended consequences of their adoption.

Learn more about automated vehicles with this primer from Ryerson University: transformlab.ryerson.ca

GETTING A HEAD START The short-term benefits of new advanced driver assistance systems – even just partially automated vehicles – seem obvious and attainable. If the vast majority of collisions are due to human error and that error can be mitigated through redundancy or eliminated altogether, then the number and rate of collisions can only head downward. If transportation can become more affordable by removing the costs of the driver, then mobility should become increasingly more accessible to those who cannot afford to drive. And if you don't need a driver, then the unlicensed should have just as much access to the transportation system as those who can drive. So why shouldn't all governments, especially municipalities, do all they can to support vehicle automation? That is one possible pathway, and the City of Toronto is preparing for it. But what new challenges will automated vehicles bring with them? That concern has been a key consideration driving the City's approach to preparing for AVs. Beginning in 2014, staff in the Transportation Services Division have been monitoring the technological developments, regulations, policy developments, and urban applications of this technology. Each research question begets another, deeper question, so that each inquiry becomes more refined, until a set of options can be identified. For example, asking the straightforward question of "What is an automated vehicle?" can lead to a number of pathways – passenger car, bus, long-haul freight vehicle, maintenance and service vehicle, etc. With each of these at a different stage in the development of automated technology, a

different use case, and a different set of economic incentives and disincentives to automation, the City must investigate further to understand where automation might first appear, and how to respond. This uncertainty has led to a "technologically agnostic" approach to preparations; that is, any research or activities make no assumptions about when, where, or if automation will occur. In a historical context, this is the same as placing no bets on whether cars would be powered by electricity, steam, diesel, or gasoline – all possibilities must be considered. To take such a broad view, a number of diverse perspectives need to be brought to the table. That begins with some initial education and provocative discussion, so a research workshop was conducted by the Canadian Automated Vehicles Centre of Excellence (CAVCOE) in March of 2015 with City staff in Transportation Services, other divisions, and municipal agencies. Later in 2015, Transportation Services partnered with the University of Toronto to research and produce a discussion paper authored by David Ticoll and called Driving Changes: Automated Vehicles in Toronto. The paper was the basis for a subsequent series of research workshops with City and agency staff, focusing on the themes of vehicle automation

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CREDIT: CITY OF TORONTO

feature

Participants in the City's AV consultations select which questions to have City staff answer. Suggestions for the Tactical Plan are also provided and voted on.

and economic development and impact; information technology and data; the built environment; and mobility, safety, and equity. Concurrently, Transportation Services staff developed and are implementing a three-year work plan, from 2016-2018, to build the foundation for preparing for automated and autonomous vehicles. A temporary staff position – the first at any government body in Canada to be solely dedicated to preparing for AVs – was created and filled in late 2016. The work plan has three main goals: • Provide leadership and engagement both within the City of Toronto and externally; • Begin to prepare for automation no matter when or how it is introduced; and • Begin to integrate vehicle automation considerations into operational planning, where appropriate. Highlights from the implementation of the work plan to date include: • The development of a communications strategy around vehicle automation; • A review of the City of Toronto bylaws (Municipal Code) and the potential challenges in enforcement and prosecution relating to automated vehicles; • An exploration of service vehicles, sidewalk delivery robots, and other automated vehicles that are not passenger-oriented; and

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• A series of research activities, undertaken in partnership with local universities, to determine public opinion, potential future scenarios for experiencing the transportation system in the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area, and the lessons learned from the historical transition from horse-drawn carriage to the internal combustion-powered automobile.

KEEPING CLEAR OF THE SILOS At the same time, the City of Toronto formed an Interdivisional Working Group on Automated Vehicles to jointly monitor technological and policy development, share information, and collaborate on cross-divisional initiatives. Twenty-two divisions and agencies are currently participating in the group, including taxi and TNC regulators, city planners, transit services, emergency responders, privacy professionals, public health practitioners, economic development officials, and social service providers. A full list of participating groups and the respective impact on their services from automated vehicles is included in a January 2018 report to Toronto City Council. Over the long-term and with higher levels of disruption from AVs, there may be larger implications beyond the road network for which City divisions and agencies are beginning to prepare. The first step in this process was to review the broader goals already established by City Council and the community. A review of all existing policies, plans, and strategies that could relate to automated vehicles was


Toro nto p re p a re s fo r AVs conducted to compile the established future vision for Toronto – a destination that AVs should drive the City toward, and not away from. From that vision, staff interpreted 10 tactical statements in which AVs could help move the City forward, as well as a few more areas that require additional monitoring. When pulled together, these statements form the framework of a threeyear Tactical Plan on Automated Vehicles for the City of Toronto, covering the following topics: • • • • •

Equity Environmental Impacts Road Safety Modal Shift Transit-centrism

• • • • •

Traffic Management Public Service Vehicles Economic Development Privacy and Security Business Intelligence

The Plan, still in draft form, also calls for additional monitoring in travel demand, land use and built form, workforce transition, traffic and vehicle enforcement, and municipal revenues. A broad range of stakeholder consultations were held in March 2017 to receive feedback on and further develop the Plan, with additional public, industry, and stakeholder consultation to follow. A report to City Council on the final recommended Tactical Plan is expected in 2019.

A NETWORK OF MUNICIPALITIES In addition to partnering with other levels of government and academia, the City of Toronto has been fortunate to network and learn from peer local governments in North America and across the globe. Staff in major municipalities have linked together to ask questions and exchange updates through informal connections. On-going information sharing and collaboration is also facilitated by professional associations such as the Canadian Institute for Transportation Engineers (CITE), the Transportation Association of Canada (TAC), Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) Canada, and the Transportation Research Board (TRB). International organizations like the National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO) are working to establish tools and guidance for municipalities, such as the recently released Blueprint for Autonomous Urbanism. More formally, Toronto's City Council recently endorsed membership in the Municipal Alliance for Connected and Autonomous Vehicles in Ontario (MACAVO) established by the Ontario Good Roads Association and called on the Federation of Canadian Municipalities to include automated vehicle issues in their upcoming annual conference.

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In 2018, the City's Transportation Services division will implement the final year of the "Preparing for Autonomous Vehicles" workplan, focusing on the relationships between infrastructure and automation. With limitations on its ability to regulate vehicle standards and the operation and use of automated vehicles, the City may be able to influence the areas where activities related to automation are more likely to occur through policies such as parking, traffic, and curbside management. Concurrently, the City will continue to look at the broader picture of how highly automated vehicles can help achieve broader social, environmental, and economic goals – and reach that much closer to the promise of a heavenly future brought forward in a driverless car.

Ryan Lanyon has been working in urban transportation for two decades in the Ottawa and Toronto areas. He serves as the City of Toronto's lead in preparing for automated vehicles and chairs a working group that includes 22 departments and agencies looking at the issue. Ryan also manages the City's street furniture program, a $900 million public-private partnership with Astral Out-of-Home.

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me mb er h i g h l i ght

TANYA DAVIS

P.Eng., PTOE Current employment Strategic Transportation Planning Program Manager, Halifax Regional Municipality Education • Dalhousie University – Bachelor of Civil Engineering, 2001 – Halifax, Nova Scotia • St. Francis Xavier University – Diploma of Engineering, 1998 – Antigonish, Nova Scotia First job in transportation engineering BA Consulting Group in Toronto, Ontario Current city of residence Halifax, Nova Scotia Family I am married to my husband of 15 years, Mike Davis. We have two children, Isaac, age 9, and Scarlett, age 6.

When did you join CITE? I joined CITE in 2001. What positions have you taken on as a member of ITE? I am currently the secretary/treasurer with the Atlantic Provinces Chapter of CITE.

Personal hobbies Travelling, volunteering and playing sports. I have traveled to 30 different countries on four different continents. I grew up playing sports and most recently play dodgeball and fast ball. I also have been part of a volunteer group for the last two years that raises money and travels to the mountains of Guatemala to install stoves in rural homes.

CITE INVOLVEMENT When did you first attend a CITE event? My first experience at a CITE event was while I was at Dalhousie University studying civil engineering in 2000. I was asked to present my senior design project at the local chapter meeting. I remember being excited to be in a room full of transportation professionals. What do you value most about your CITE membership? The thing I value most is the connections and opportunity to network within the industry. Meeting twice a year with transportation professionals at a local chapter level and once at the national conference helps to foster new ideas and grow my network. I have connected with professionals in other provinces on numerous occasions to gain insights on my projects from those who have worked on similar initiatives.

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PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE/ACHIEVEMENTS How would you describe your job to someone you just met at a party? I actually try not to! As most people use our transportation networks, everyone seems to have an opinion on how our city should improve things. So, as an employee of the largest municipality in Nova Scotia, I try to avoid chatting about what I do and focus on learning what others do and how I might learn from their experiences. What is one aspect of your work that you particularly enjoy? I am incredibly fortunate to be able to live in Halifax doing work that I love. I have the opportunity to change how residents and visitors to Halifax travel around our transportation network and I get to work each day with


m e m b e r hig h light great people and an engaged community. But the thing I think I enjoy the most is getting to actually experience the improvements that I help design. Driving through or walking along one of our improved streets or intersections is incredibly rewarding to me. What are one or two projects that you're most proud to have worked on? I am most proud to be part of bringing urban roundabouts to Halifax. In 2013, Halifax saw the installation of two urban roundabouts in the Regional Centre on North Park Street. It included an extensive public and stakeholder engagement process and complicated design features. The two consecutive roundabouts now act as a gateway to Halifax's downtown. The second project is the recently adopted (December 2017) Integrated Mobility Plan. This is Halifax's first comprehensive transportation master plan. I was a team member in developing the plan and now I have the exciting opportunity in my role as Manager of Strategic Transportation Planning to work collaboratively with internal and external stakeholders to implement the plan. I was also involved in the design and execution of the award winning Argyle and Grafton Shared Street Design. It was the first shared street for Halifax. This project won the People's Choice Award for Best Urban Street Transformation in an annual contest held by Streetsblog, an organization that promotes sustainable transport, smart growth, and livable streets in the United States and Canada.

course I would too! But, when it came to making a choice when applying for university, I thought I wanted a more math-based profession and felt that I could get that in either business or engineering. As a 17 year old, how do you choose? I decided on engineering, then civil engineering, and both of my co-op jobs were in transportation engineering. I feel extremely happy and fortunate that I pursued engineering and had the opportunities that I did. What is the most daring thing you've done in your lifetime? I would say either white water rafting down the Zambezi River in Zambia or doing a walking safari in Nepal to search for Rhinos. Both were exhilarating adventures! INTERESTS & PERSPECTIVES Who has had the greatest influence on your life and career? I think my parents. My parents ran a dairy farm in rural Nova Scotia. They both instilled a strong work ethic in me, helped me understand that family and community matter, and that if you work hard and are good to people you will be successful in life. I try to keep that in mind every day.

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During your career to date, have you pursued any professional designations through ITE (such as PTOE)? In 2013, I received my Professional Traffic Operations Engineering designation. I decided to pursue this designation to increase my technical understanding of the field and become a better transportation professional. The learnings have been invaluable as I have transitioned from design, to operations, and now into strategic transportation planning. Please describe what attracted you to the transportation profession? I was attracted to the transportation profession because it gives me the ability to improve how thousands of people experience their city or town every day. GETTING TO KNOW YOU If you did not pursue engineering as a career choice, did you have another career in mind? Of course when I was little, I wanted to be a nurse or a teacher. That is what the women in my family did, so of

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se c tio n n ews GREATER VANCOUVER SECTION The Greater Vancouver section started the year with two events in the spring of 2018. The first event of the year was the annual Student Industry Night, hosted on February 7th by the University of British Columbia’s ITE Student Chapter. The event took place at the Engineering Student Centre and was well attended by both students and industry professionals. The even provided a great opportunity for students to network with processionals and for companies to promote transportation engineering and showcase their areas of expertise. The second event of the year was a lunch meeting held on February 26th. Mike Zipf from City of Vancouver provided an overview of Vancouver’s AAA cycling design guidance while Grace Chiang, co-op student at the City presented her research and learning on interactions of people walking and cycling through plazas and shared corridors. AAA cycling design guidelines state that separation of modes is often desired to enhance comfort for all people. The presentation focused on identifying the influences of cycling routes passing through plazas and other shared spaces.

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Left: Section President Jared Duivestein with Mike Zipf and Grace Chiang presenting from the City of Vancouver Below: UBC Student Industry Night


s e c t io n news SASKATCHEWAN SECTION The Saskatchewan Section kicked off 2018 by announcing several changes to the section Executive Committee. Charlie Billings was elected as the new section president, which resulted in several other changes to the team: Nathalie Baudais is now the Vice President, Destiny Piper is the new Secretary Treasurer, and Sheliza Kelts has taken over as the Communication and Membership Coordinator. Tanya MacDonald remains in her position as the Immediate Past President and Afaf Al Azzawi will retain her role as the Programs Director for another year.

University of Saskatchewan. Special thanks to WSP for sponsoring the event! The Saskatchewan Section is in the midst of planning presentations and other activities for the 2018 season. Details for upcoming events and activities will be forthcoming in the section email communications. If you would like to be added to the Saskatchewan email list, please contact Sheliza Kelts atsaskatchewan@cite7.org.

In February, the Saskatchewan Section hosted a Student & Professional Networking Night at the University of Saskatchewan in Saskatoon. The event, which included free pizza and student door prizes, provided an opportunity for engineering students to meet transportation professionals, make industry connections, and learn about ITE and how to get involved. The event was well attended by both students and professionals, and was an excellent step towards rebuilding a connection with the

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se c tio n n ews LETHBRIDGE CHAPTER In January, the Lethbridge Chapter transitioned roles, and Breanna Jackson moved into the President role, Eric Dyson accepted the Vice-President role, and Jinsong Qi took the position of Treasurer/Secretary. We began the year with an informative webinar hosted by Miovision on the Engineering Applications of Traffic Data Collection. For February, the Chapter partnered with the local APEGA chapter for a presentation on the Lethbridge Capital Improvements Program. Specifically, the City discussed how the program is used to select and fund transportation projects, and some examples of upcoming projects citizens can expect. It was an interesting presentation and an excellent partnership of two local chapters.

Most recently, the Lethbridge Chapter met to listen to a presentation from our very own Jinsong Qi. Jinsong is the Traffic Signal Operations Engineer at the City of Lethbridge, and he presented on similarities and differences in traffic signal controls in Canada, the US, and China. Jinsong’s experience and knowledge allowed for round table discussion following the presentation. Upcoming, the chapter is looking at more guest presenters, and more partnerships with local organizations. Details for upcoming events and activities will be forthcoming in the Chapter’s email invites. If you would like to be added to the Lethbridge Chapter mailing list, please contact Breanna Jackson at jacksonb@ae.ca.

MANITOBA SECTION The Manitoba Section started the year with a new venue for our monthly lunches now held at the Winnipeg Winter Club. The speaker in January was Mark Doucet of the City of Winnipeg Public Works Department, who discussed the City’s recent and ongoing pilot project of Back-In Angled Parking in Winnipeg’s Exchange District. The presentation included a brief background as to how Bannatyne Avenue was selected for the project, insight into the design rationale and challenges, observations on performance, and public feedback. It was interesting to note that several area business owners had some strong objections to the project before it started but have since changed their minds and become supportive of this type of parking arrangement. February’s luncheon featured a presentation by Harald Larsen of Manitoba Infrastructure’s Traffic Engineering Branch. Harald’s presentation provided an overview of the evolution of roadside safety in general, with a focus on how Manitoba Infrastructure has grouped its various barrier systems into

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Rigid, Semi-rigid, and Flexible systems. The presentation contained many video clips of various crash tests both successful and unsuccessful. We rounded out the winter months (we hope!) with a presentation by Garreth Rempel of TRAINFO and MORR Transportation Consulting. Garreth’s presentation focused on the award-winning technology developed by TRAINFO to mitigate traffic delays caused by railway crossing blockages. The presentation highlighted the use of this technology at the current railway underpass project underway on Waverley St in Winnipeg. January 2018 luncheon speaker, Mark Doucet


s e c t io n news SOUTHWEST ONTARIO SECTION 10th Annual Joint CITE Section Student Presentation Competition - Friday March 9, 2018 This year’s annual Joint CITE Student Presentation Competition was hosted by the Southwestern Ontario Section. On the 10th anniversary of Southwestern Ontario participating in this competition, it was appropriate that the event was hosted in London Ontario at Western University for the very first time. A great selection of presentations that featured student presenters from McMaster University, Mohawk College, University of Waterloo and University of Windsor. As a result of a last-minute competitor withdrawal, this year’s competition featured three undergraduate students and two graduate students. In a first for this event, we were also honoured to facilitate an opening presentation from Sarosh Ahmed, an eager Grade 11 student wanting to pursue civil engineering after high school, who delivered a very confident presentation on Traffic Calming. The winner in the graduate category was Anjie Liu from the University of Waterloo for her presentation on Towards Using Traffic Data to Estimate Vehicle Emissions in Real Time. The winner in the undergraduate category was Samantha Leger from the University of Waterloo for her presentation on Evaluating emerging technologies (through the form of electric-bicycles or “e-bikes”) as a tool to address transportation gaps that currently inhibit lifelong mobility and aging in place. We would also like to congratulate the other participants on their excellent presentations – Joseph Dominicis from McMaster University, Eric Bentzen-Bilkvist from Mohawk College, and Dhwani Shah from the University of Windsor.

Section and Doug MacRae of ITE Southwestern Ontario Section for assisting with reviewing of abstracts and shortlisting finalists. A special thanks to CITE for affording ALL presenters to receive a prize in both graduate and undergraduate categories. First place winners received $350 to 400; second place winners received $150 to 200; and the third place winner received $100. As per tradition, the 2018 winners were invited to attend, free of charge, the ITE Toronto Section Spring Luncheon. Next year’s competition is slated to be hosted by the Toronto Section. Stay tuned for more details on this next year.

Participants and judges at the Student Presentation Competition. Front Row (L-R): Dana Elfar, Anjie Liu, Dhwani Shah, Sarosh Ahmed Back Row (L-R): Maged Elmadhoon, Edward Soldo, Eric BentzenBilkvist, Sean Nix, Joseph Dominicis, Samantha Leger

Thanks to Western University for hosting this year’s competition, and to ITE Members from the CITE Executive and the Southwestern Ontario Section for judging the competition: Edward Soldo, Maged Elmadhoon and Dana Elfar. A big thanks to Jason Dahl of ITE Toronto Section, Sean Nix of ITE Hamilton

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se c tio n n ews TORONTO SECTION The Toronto ITE Section had a busy winter season and we are looking forward to more informational presentations and networking in 2018. Toronto ITE Section strives to partner our events with complimentary organizations and municipalities to expand our reach and presentation material diversity. To date we have partnered with the City of Mississauga and our friends at the University of Toronto ITE Section. Our first event of 2018 included a Breakfast Session with the City of Mississauga on the Credit River Active Transportation Crossings. This project is an exciting project demonstrating a multi-level government collaboration between the Ontario Ministry of Transportation, Region of Peel and the City to advance key multi-modal initiatives. The recommended plan illustrated an innovative design to building a beautiful, sustainable city with safe neighbourhoods that support strong, connected and vibrant communities.

ITE Toronto also supported the University of Toronto ITE Student Industry Mixer. The mixer is an evening of networking that gives University of Toronto transportation engineering students as well as other local schools and industry professionals an opportunity to connect and exchange experiences and insights. At the time of writing this article, we are preparing for our annual Spring Luncheon, which will take place at Hart House, University of Toronto, on Thursday, April 5th. Our keynote speaker will be Dr. Alison Smiley of Human Factors North, who will present on Human Factors Issues with Semi-Automated and Automated Vehicles. We are also collaborating with the CITE Traffic Engineering Subcommittee of CITE to co-host a breakfast session at the end of April that will walk through the newly embedded Canadian Capacity Guide for Signalized Intersections (CCG) method in PTV Vistro. We hope to report on both of these events and more in the next issue of Transportation Talk.

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st udent c h a p te r n ews UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA ITEUA saw an eventful winter this year. The Chapter held its annual Student-Industry Mixer and two seminars on heavy vehicle platooning and ITS applications. The first seminar saw Dominique Pierre-Dion, Acting Manager of the Vehicles Program for Transport Canada speak about commercial vehicle platooning. Mr. PierreDion discussed current efforts by Transport Canada towards connected autonomous technology within commercial vehicle platoons. As a cornerstone of the Canadian economy, commercial vehicles have been long considered for improvements in driving efficiency. This topic was addressed by Mr. Pierre-Dion through discussion on commercial vehicle platooning assisted by connected autonomous vehicle technologies. Furthermore, this seminar discussed some of the challenges associated with the implementation of connected autonomous technologies, and guided commentary on where provincial and federal legislature should focus in the foreseeable future. The second speaker was Dr. Zheng Luo, Engineer with IBI Group Edmonton. Dr. Luo discussed the framework of intelligent transportation systems (ITS) in North America, including current technologies and upcoming challenges. This conversation was supplemented with case studies in Canadian provinces, showcasing how IBI Group is working with municipalities towards a smarter, connected future. The Mixer took place on the 15th of March and was a great success. The mixer was heavily attended by both

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students and industry. Nine different industry organizations represented by over 30 professionals participated in the event this year. In addition, over 50 students including 3rd, 4th and 5th year undergraduates as well as PhD and MSc students also attended. Engineersin-Training and Professional Engineers from nonsponsoring companies were also present during the event. The Mixer was held in the University of Alberta’s Donadeo Innovation Center for Engineering, which overlooks the river valley. Thanks to the generous support from industry representatives, food, beverages, and light snacks were all served during the event. ITEUA’s Executive members used their connections to attract sponsors to the Mixer. Additionally, NACITE also assisted to promote the Mixer during it’s recent Luncheon and in its industry mailing list. Outreach to students was conducted through numerous channels within the University, including ITEUA’s student mailing list, the Engineering Employment Center, weekly events listing, posters placed on campus, and announcements made in several undergraduate and graduate courses. Upcoming ITE events including the CITE Student Leadership summit, the Traffic Bowl competition, and ITEUA’s mentorship program were all advertised in the mixer. Students were also reminded to sign up for ITE’s free membership.


s t u d e nt c h a p te r news UNIVERSITY OF MANITOBA Here at the University of Manitoba ITE Student Chapter, we kicked off 2018 with six guest speaker presentations, a community event, multiple social and fundraising events, and our technical trip! For guest speaker presentations, we had: • Craig Milligan from Microtraffic speak on road safety video analysis, • Mark Vogt from WSP present on Winnipeg’s first Woonerf design, • Bjorn Radstrom from Winnipeg Transit discuss public transportation in a three-lecture series, • Al Phillips from A.J. Phillips speak on the economics of transportation engineering, • Stephanie Roller from Transport Canada present on at-grade rail crossing safety, and • Dr. Ahmed Shalaby from the University of Manitoba lecture on transportation engineering failures as a result of pavement design/conditions. We have had six technical tours since the beginning of the year including five during our technical trip in Colombia and one here in Winnipeg. In Bogota, Colombia, our first tour was a self-guided experience of Ciclovia as pedestrians. The following day we were given a tour of the Ciclovia office where we learned about their operations and the positive social impact the city has

experienced from closing off over 100 km of vehicular roadways for cyclist and pedestrian use on every National Holiday and Sunday of the year. We went on a tour of their new Bus Rapid Transit system to learn about the payment system and the various facilities of the network including one underground station. Our final tour in Bogota was a 30 km bike ride tour around the city to explore the diverse cycling infrastructure and how it is used by locals. We travelled to Cartagena, Colombia to tour their port which happens to be the largest port in Colombia! Here we learned about the operations and economics of a marine freight shipyard. Back home, we toured Winnipeg’s Traffic Management Centre to learn about how our city manages signals and traffic through technology. All of the technical tours provided valuable educational experience for the members who attended as students were able to learn how systems in both our city and abroad function, as well as to gain a better understanding and respect for transportation systems. For community events, we have been meeting with external partners for a four-day transportation-themed educational event for students in Grades 8-12 in April. For social/fundraising, we’ve had two Rumor’s Comedy Club fundraising events and two Samosa Sales to raise money for our technical tours and networking events. In February, we had a fun networking event playing board games at a local cafe with some U of M ITE alumni. Be sure to follow along for the summer edition to hear about CITE’s first Student Leadership Summit organized by the University of Manitoba and University of Alberta student chapters. You can learn more about our activities through our quarterly newsletter. Please email secretary@ iteumanitoba.ca to be added to the mailing list. You can also follow us on social media (@iteumanitoba) to learn about current transportation events through our weekly #ITETransportTuesday posts.

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st udent c h a p te r n ews MOHAWK COLLEGE

CREDIT: SEBASTIAN BIERNAT

On Friday, March 23rd, the Why Work for Me? guest lecture series resumed with a return visit by Stewart Elkins of Paradigm Transportation Solutions Ltd. If you are interested in offering a guest lecture as part of this guest speaker series, please contact Sean Nix at sean.nix@mohawkcollege.ca.

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Over the next few months, we will be formulating a team to participate at the University of Toronto ITE Student Chapter’s annual Traffic Bowl Trivia Night. While we don’t expect to send a team to Edmonton this Spring, we are hopeful that this year’s Traffic Bowl Trivia Night will expose this year’s team to the logistics of Traffic Bowl such that they can participate in 2019. Stay tuned for more activities in the coming months.

Top: MTO Transportation Management Centre Bottom: Toronto Transportation Management Centre

CREDIT: SEAN NIX

Since the last edition of Transportation Talk, the Mohawk College ITE Student Chapter has managed to balance some extracurricular activities amidst school work. On Monday, March 19th, 26 student members from both the Mohawk College ITE Student Chapter and the McMaster ITE Student Chapter attended a double-header tour of transportation management centres in Toronto. The day started off at the Ministry of Transportation, Ontario (MTO) COMPASS Transportation Management Centre, and continued at the City of Toronto Transportation Operations Centre. Each road authority offered a presentation on the day-to-day operations of each centre, and then offered a full tour of the respective facility.


s t u d e nt c h a p te r news MCMASTER UNIVERSITY The McMaster University chapter hosted a Synchro software session on the evening of January 16th. It was led by the chapter co-president and offered students an introductory tutorial on how to use the Synchro software. On January 27th, the chapter served as a “challenger” at the 2018 Deltahacks hackathon at McMaster University. The chapter presented ideas to prospective hackers to improve the current Sobi Hamilton bike app. After only 24 hours of coding and development, participants Teo Voinea and Nick Morrison successfully completed the challenge. They developed a very innovative Sobi bike share app, which was showcased at the Deltahacks project expo. It was very awe-inspiring as to what projects were accomplished at Deltahacks this year. The chapter was honoured to be a part of it!

To wrap up the academic year, the McMaster chapter joined Mohawk for a trip both the MTO and City of Toronto’s Transportation Management Centers. This was an excellent opportunity for students to mingle, ask questions to transportation experts, and learn what is currently being done to try to keep the city streets and Ontario’s highways running smoothly.

A contingent of students from the McMaster University chapter attended the 2018 U of T Transportation StudentIndustry Mixer. The students had a great time and found it to be a wonderful opportunity to meet with other students and professionals in the transportation industry in the GTHA region. The chapter would like to thank the U of T ITE chapter for hosting the great event. The chapter also hosted a double guest speaker event on March 15th. The theme of the event was railway engineering. John Trickett and Balarama Iyer from Metrolinx delivered wonderful presentations and promoted great student interaction. The chapter would once again like to thank the two speakers and all the students for coming out. Below: Serving as a challenger at Deltahacks hackathon Right Top: Guest speaker event Right Middle: Traffic Operations Centre Field Trip Right Bottom: Synchro software session

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st udent c h a p te r n ews UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO UofT ITE 2018 Transportation Student-Industry Mixer On March 12, 2018, the UofT Student Chapter of ITE held its student-industry mixer, aimed at students with an interest in a career in transportation. A total of 149 students, ranging from undergraduates to PhD students, from seven post-secondary institutions attended the event. Thanks to the work of the members of the student chapter, and with help from our industry sponsors, the event was a great success! UofT ITE 2017-2018 Seminar Series The weekly “Friday Seminar Series” established by the UofT ITE Student Chapter continues to be in full swing. The weekly transportation seminar series is predominantly attended by the students and faculty of the transportation group at the University of Toronto, in addition to industry representatives and students from other institutions. The seminar series provides attendees with the opportunity

UNIVERSITY OF NEW BRUNSWICK The winter term saw two UNB Alumni return to talk to our student chapter about their work in the transportation engineering profession. Jillian DeMerchant, from one of Transport Canada’s collision investigation teams, taught the chapter about how collisions are investigated, what the data is used for, and the changes in direction for the investigations with the onset of driver assistance and autonomous vehicle features. Peter Lougheed from EXP came in to show us the planning and in-field work required to move a 255-tonne power transformer from the Netherlands to central, rural New Brunswick. Both seminars were delivered with powerful visuals that really engaged our membership and provided great examples of work in the transportation engineering profession that isn’t necessarily highlighted in the classroom. We would like to thank both Jillian and Peter for their thought provoking presentations and look forward to more from them in the future!

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to learn about the work currently being done by professionals in the transportation industry, as well as the opportunity to hear from visiting professors discussing their research and graduate students discussing their thesis work. This semester, seminars have been delivered by a wide range of presenters, including UofT faculty, industry professionals, and current UofT graduate students. Professors visiting from other universities, including Professor Panos Papaioannou and Professor Markos Papageorgiou, have also presented at the seminar series this semester. We would like to invite ITE members in the GTHA to consider presenting their work this fall. Presentations are typically 40 minutes, followed by a Q& A session. The seminars take place Fridays from 11:00am to 12:00pm at the Stanford Fleming building on the St. George Campus. For more information or to request a presentation date, please contact us at ite@utoronto.ca


con g rat u l at io ns & we l co me CITE extends a warm welcome to all new Canadian District ITE members who recently joined us! Samuel O. Abiola, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON

Divyansh Jain, University of Windsor, Windsor, ON

Elanakayon Annalingam, York University, Toronto, ON

Jeffrey Jongsma, Stantec Consulting Ltd., London, ON

Daniella Archer, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB

Jaspreet Kaur, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON

Sawraj Singh Bains, British Columbia Institute of Technology, Burnaby, BC

Steven Lund, County of Huron, Goderich, ON

Eric Bentzen-Bilkvist, Mohawk College, Ancaster, ON Ian Cantello, City of Regina, Saskatchewan, Regina, SK Nerissa Karen Cruz, Ryerson University, Toronto, ON Boer Cui, McGill University, Montreal, QC Darcie Dillon, BT Engineering Inc., Ottawa, ON Sam Dinatolo, Parsons Corporation, Markham, ON Linda Duch, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB Adham K. El Sharkawy, York University, Toronto, ON Abdullah Fakhri, York University, Mississauga, ON Tyler J. Fish, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON Arumuga Ganesan, University of Toronto, Brampton, ON Shawn N. Hamilton, Western University, Ottawa, ON

Manoj Sarma Madduri, University of British Columbia, Vacouver, BC Seyedkianoush Mousavichashmi, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON Wade Nellis, City of Grande Prairie, Grande Prairie, AB Michael J. Olfert, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB Milirsan Pugalendiran, York University, Markham, ON Wade D. Quinn, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS Dhwani Shah, University of Windsor, Windsor, ON Sahar Shams, Hamilton, ON Anson Thomas, Toronto, ON Davin Utama, York University, North York, ON Elkan K. Wan, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON

Mina Hassanvand, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB

Welcome to your community of

2,174

Canadian District Members!

Connect with CITE and your fellow members twitter.com/itecanada linkedin.com facebook.com/itecanada

Find news and events from across the country on our website:

cite7.org

SPRING 2018 | TRANSPORTATION TALK

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CITE a dve rconta ti s i n gc ts d i re c to r y Featuring West Block, Edmonton, AB A project of InHouse by Beaverbrook

VEHICLE, CYCLIST, AND PEDESTRIAN DETECTION PARKING MANAGEMENT DISTANCE MEASUREMENT

North Line

We have the solution.

ASSET MANAGEMENT TRAFFIC SIGNS northlinecanada.com +1 905-985-2120

TRANS FORMING CITY AND TOWN

Transit-oriented Development for a Brighter Future

YEARS

CALGARY | EDMONTON | VANCOUVER | VICTORIA

www.bunteng.com

CIMA provides the full range of transportation services for bridges, highways, airports and railways. + Traffic Engineering + Environmental Assessments + Intelligent Transportation Systems + Public Engagement

+ Transportation Planning + Transportation Safety + Functional Design + Detailed Design

Burlington | Calgary | Edmonton | Kitchener-Waterloo | Laval Montreal | Ottawa-Gatineau | Regina | Saskatoon | Toronto

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TRANSPORTATION TALK | SPRING 2018

cima.ca


CIT E co nt ac t s CITE EXECUTIVE President . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Edward Soldo, P.Eng., FITE

Past President . . . . . . . . . . Jen Malzer, P.Eng., MITE

Vice President . . . . . . . . . . Julia Salvini, P.Eng.

District Director . . . . . . . . Gene Chartier, M.A.Sc., P.Eng., FITE

president@cite7.org

vicepresident@cite7.org

pastpresident@cite7.org director@cite7.org

Secretary-Treasurer . . . . Ryan Vanderputten, P.Eng.

secretary@cite7.org

TECHNICAL LIAISON COMMITTEE

tlc@cite7.org

Chair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dwayne Cross, P.Eng.

Committee . . . . . . . . . . . . Mariya Otten-Andrew, P. Eng., PTOE

Vice Chair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kerra Mruss, M.Sc., P.Eng.

Committee . . . . . . . . . . . . Paula Sawicki, P.Eng.

Committee . . . . . . . . . . . . Manoj Dilwaria, B.Eng., M.Pl., FITE

Committee (excite) . . . . . Ryan Martinson, M.Eng., P.Eng.

Dwayne.Cross@novascotia.ca

Kerra.Mruss@wsp.com

MDilwaria@Thorold.com

Mariya.Otten-Andrew@wspgroup.com PSawicki@regionofwaterloo.ca ryan.martinson@stantec.com

Committee . . . . . . . . . . . . Reza Noroozi, P.Eng.

Reza.Noroozi@aecom.com

excite – EMERGING MEMBERS IN CITE

excite@cite7.org

Co-Chair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Garrett Donaher, M.A.Sc., P.Eng.

Outreach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tamas Hertel, P.Eng.

Co-Chair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Heather Goodman, B.Eng., EIT

Innovation . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ryan Martinson, M.Eng., P.Eng.

Development . . . . . . . . . . Jordan Hart-Bishop

Programming . . . . . . . . . . Chun Man, P.Eng.

gdonaher@gmail.com hgoodman@ptsl.com

jhartbishop@gmail.com

tamas.hertel@york.ca

ryan.martinson@stantec.com cman@urbansystems.ca

Engagement . . . . . . . . . . . Khulud Sheeraz

khulud.sheeraz@gmail.com

TRAINING COMMITTEE

training_committee@cite7.org

Chair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vanessa Skelton, P. Eng.

Member . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maryam Tabeshian P. Eng.

Vice Chair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mehemed Delibasic, P. Eng.

Member . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Anna Bauditz, P.Eng.

vskelton@cite7.org

mdelibasic@cite7.org

maryam.tabeshian@wspgroup.com abauditz@stjohns.ca

CITE STAFF District Administrator . . Steven Garner, M.Sc.

cite_administrator@cite7.org

Communications . . . . . . . Evonne Donaher, MAES communications@cite7.org

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CITE conta c ts SECTIONS & CHAPTERS Vancouver Island . . . . . . . Nadine King, P.Eng., PTOE

Manitoba . . . . . . . . . . . . . . David Wiebe, P.Eng., PTOE

Greater Vancouver . . . . . Jared Duivestein, P.Eng.

Southwestern Ontario . . Doug MacRae, P.Eng.

BC Interior . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ian Roth, EIT

Hamilton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Manoj Dilwaria, B.Eng., M.Pl., FITE

Northern Alberta . . . . . . Dallas Karhut, P. Eng.

Toronto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Farhad Shahla, M.Eng., P.Eng., PTOE

Southern Alberta . . . . . . Meera Kopp, P.Eng.

National Capital . . . . . . . . Ian Borsuk, P.Eng.

Lethbridge . . . . . . . . . . . . . Breanna Jackson, E.I.T.

Québec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Paul Bourque, IAITE

Saskatchewan . . . . . . . . . Charlie Billings, P.Eng.

Atlantic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Roddy MacIntyre, P.Eng.

NKing@wattconsultinggroup.com

president@citevancouver.org

cite.bcinteriorchapter@gmail.com

dkarhut@bunteng.com

meera.kopp@calgary.ca

president@manitoba.cite7.org

dmacrae@london.ca

MDilwaria@Thorold.com

Farhad.Shahla@mississauga.ca

jacksonb@ae.ca

president@saskatchewan.cite7.org

cite.ncs.pres@gmail.com

paul@pabeco.com

macintr@halifax.ca

STUDENT CHAPTERS Advisors Presidents Carleton University. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ata Khan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Brooke Jones

ata_khan@carleton.ca

cite.carleton@gmail.com

Lakehead University . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Juan Pernia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jeff Pascua

jpernia@lakeheadu.ca

jpascua@lakeheadu.ca

McMaster University. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Antonio Páez . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Joseph Dominicis & Anastasia Soukhov

paezha@mcmaster.ca itemac@mcmaster.ca

Mohawk College. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sean Nix. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gregory DeTina

sean.nix@mohawkcollege.ca

gregory.de-tina@mohawkcollege.ca

Montréal-Québec Étudiant. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ciprian Alecsandru. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Amir Khatami

ciprian.alecsandru@concordia.ca

info@sitem.ca

Ryerson University. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bilal Farooq. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

bilal.farooq@ryerson.ca

York University. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kevin Gingerich. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Erik Nevland

kging@yorku.ca

nevland@yorku.ca

University of Alberta. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tony Z. Qiu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Suliman Gargoum

zhijunqiu@ualberta.ca gargoum@ualberta.ca

University of British Columbia. . . . . . . . . . . . . Tarek Sayed. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maria Albitar and Omar El Masri

tsayed@civil.ubc.ca

president@ubcite.org

UBC Okanagan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gordon Lovegrove. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jinglei (Victoria) You

gord.lovegrove@ubc.ca

ubcocite@gmail.com

University of Calgary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lina Kattan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Heba Al-Junaidi

lkattan@ucalgary.ca

uofc@gmail.com

University of Manitoba. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jeannette Montufar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Abby Scaletta

jeannette.montufar@morrconsulting.com

president@iteumanitoba.ca

University of New Brunswick. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Eric Hildebrand. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Andrew Northmore

edh@unb.ca anorthmo@unb.ca

University of Toronto. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Marianne Hatzopoulou. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Laura Minet

hatzopoulou@utoronto.ca

ite@utoronto.ca

University of Waterloo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bruce Hellinga. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Zaid Alyami

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bhellinga@uwaterloo.ca

uw.ite.sc@gmail.com

Transportation Talk - Spring 2018  
New