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homestead ja c k s on h ole a rc h it e c t u re + interiors + art

h o mest eadma g.com 1

20TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION


N O GA TI RI SC

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ND 307.734.7512

LA W

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CA

LA mountainscapesjh.com


INTERIOR DESIGN STUDIO

1921 MOOSE WILSON ROAD, STE 102 WILSON, WY 83014 307.733.8582 | DWELLINGJH.COM


SERVING OUR CLIENTS’ BEST INTERESTS PO Box 1636 | 1230 N. Ida Ln. | Wilson, WY 83014 | dembergh.com | (307) 733-0133


HANDCAST BRONZE HARDWARE | 12 FINISH OPTIONS 485 W. Broadway, Jackson, WY Monday - Friday 8am to 5pm or by appointment. 307 732 0078 Exclusive regional distributor of rockymountainhardware.com | rmhshowrooms.com


970 W Broadway #216, Jackson, WY 83001

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jhbuilder.com

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307.734.5245


ART ON THE FLOOR The Perlman Project, a bespoke rug studio in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, crafts beautiful artisanal rugs using 100% Tibetan wool.

Clockwise from top left: The Snake River, N-1, Serape, H-2


50 S King St #201 | Jackson, WY 83001 designassociatesarchitects.com


Cay u s e We s t e r n A m e r ic a na

Fine Co wboy, Native American & National Park Antiques by appointment only

255 N Glenwood Ave, Jackson, WY . 307-739-1940 .

cayusewa . com


BONTECOU CONSTRUCTION HONESTY. INTEGRITY. EXPERIENCE.

Since 1978

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homestead

TABLE OF CONTENTS

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LANDSCAPE AS ART: AGROSTIS, MOUNTAINSCAPES, CLEARWATER RESTORATION Incorporating the building materials of the home it surrounds, this landscape design balances open, expansive exteriors with inwardly focused spaces.

DESIGN INSPIRATION, PEOPLE + PROFILES

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RIDGELINE RESONANCE: WARD + BLAKE ARCHITECTS A vanguard design for Jackson Hole nearly two decades ago serves as a resilient testament to form and function.

TRUSSES OF TRUST: BERLIN ARCHITECTS, JACQUE JENKINSSTIREMAN, TWO OCEAN BUILDERS Clients invite their team to dream big while designing a standout residence for their extended family on a unique Shooting Star property.

LETTER FROM THE HOMESTEAD TEAM Twenty Years. We were ready to reflect. However, if you had told us a year ago, when we began planning this 20th anniversary issue of Homestead, that in the final stages we would instead be considering the overall importance of the very concept our magazine is dedicated to exploring—shelter—we would have hesitated. In our two decades of distribution, we have never doubted the essential value of showcasing the design spectrum of our valley’s homes, from architecture and construction to interiors and landscaping. And yet, as we continued with our editorial calendar throughout the COVID-19 lockdown, we felt shaken with the rest of the world. Like everyone else in the valley, we did what we could do amid the disorientation, amid our kids’ remote classes, amid headline-reading and handwashing. And with every passing

week, we found ourselves ever more in awe of our community. We marveled at the ways our neighbors channeled their fears into compassion, the imposed pause into productivity: the support services they marshalled, the creative daily lifestyle solutions they embraced, the home offices they established, the sacrifices they made, both large and small. We felt pride amid the pandemic. And as for our core mission, we felt more committed than ever to inspire our community to make our homes the very best reflections of ourselves. Shelter, in Teton terms, has always meant more than a roof over our heads; it’s carried connotations of choice and determination, of willing a home in Jackson Hole into existence, of making space for living consciously both outdoors and in. This 16 16


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POETRY BY DESIGN: WRJ DESIGN, ANKENY ARCHITECTURE, SHAW CONSTRUCTION An artfully imagined guesthouse creates a grand, yet welcoming sense of space within its square footage limitations.

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ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING, INTERIOR DESIGN: A BRIEF HISTORY AND 20 YEARS OF HIGHLIGHTS

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TWENTY YEARS OF HOMESTEAD Over the past 20 years Homestead has showcased the evolution of architecture, interior design and building in Jackson Hole.

THE GRANDEUR OF SIMPLICITY: PLATT DANA ARCHITECTS, SEVEN GENERATIONS CONSTRUCTION A New York City-based architect designs unique spaces in her family’s classic yet modern mountain getaway.

expanded sense of shelter perhaps has made us, as a community, more adaptable to its 2020 recontextualization. Even more so now, sheltering in this place stirs a sense of gratitude for being able to hunker down in such a unique setting. At our core, Jackson Hole is a resilient community. We band together. We support each other. These are the valley’s qualities that we proudly display in the pages of Homestead, expressed not just through the beautiful shelters we design, but also through the lives we design them for. Now—more than ever—we feel so grateful for the lasting opportunity to share this magazine with our readers. We feel grateful for our publishing team, whose commitment to the magazine this year represents only the most recent expression of their creative investment in the valley. We appreciate

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FALL ARTS FESTIVAL HIGHLIGHTS One of the premier cultural events in the Rocky Mountain West celebrating the arts, the Jackson Hole Fall Arts Festival boasts an exceptional array of events.

the unwavering support of our advertisers, many of whom have been a part of the Homestead family for much of our 20 years in publication. So, while sheltering in place has made us all reconsider our relationship to home, we feel confident in affirming our belief that there is in fact no place we would rather call home than Jackson Hole. With deep gratitude, The Homestead Magazine Team:

Latham + Megan Jenkins, Mindy Duquette, Martha Vorel, Liz Prax and all of the dedicated writers and photographers who have brought life to our pages for the last 20 years

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Vispring makes supremely comfortable beds, and has done since 1901. Only the finest natural materials, inside and out. Designed for durability. Crafted for comfort. Made for the very best sleep.

ONLY FOUND AT LINEN ALLEY | 185 SCOTT LANE | JACKSON, WY 83001 | 307-734-7424


LINENALLEY.COM

FROM OUR HOME TO YOURS

The special, day-to-day memories we build with family and friends are the moments that bring a home to life. Two heritage companies synonymous with beauty and quality come together in an exciting collaboration. The Matouk Schumacher Collection combines Matouk’s impeccably crafted linens with Schumacher’s extraordinary prints for beautiful bedding and styles that capture the very best of both brands.

ETOILE BATH COLLECTION

Crafted from a blend of fine, luxurious longstaple cotton and natural modal, the Etoile collection offers extra softness, durability and absorbency to dry faster than pure cotton towels. If you haven’t yet it is time you discover the quality of the luxurious Yves Delorme robes. The techniques of Jacquard weaving, embroidering and fabrication reveal an excellence in savoir-faire.

When you’re outfitting your home, the linens you choose should fit the life you live. For the most restful sleep, select the style of bed linens that best suits your slumbering needs. Finding just the right sheets that feel great every time you climb into them and help you sleep better is a true luxury.


homestead PUBLISHER LATHAM JENKINS, publisher and founder of Homestead and Jackson Hole Traveler. His idea for Homestead began in 2001 in response to the expanding number of exceptional home-design projects in our valley. His goal was to provide a platform to showcase these works of art and give others a chance to admire them.

SALES DIRECTOR Homestead’s sales and marketing director, MINDY DUQUETTE, has been with the publication since its inception in 2001. Mindy feels fortunate to forge partnerships with so many of the valley’s multi-talented artisans.

EXECUTIVE EDITOR MEGAN JENKINS is the executive editor of Homestead, as well as the coordinator of the Jackson Hole Showcase of Homes. She loves creating opportunities for patrons to experience the residential masterpieces of the magazine.

EDITOR/ COPY EDITOR LIZ ILIFF PRAX has enjoyed supporting the work of talented local writers in Homestead magazine since 2015.

CREATIVE DIRECTOR After working on the magazine from 2003 to 2008, MARTHA VOREL reunited with Homestead in 2016. She is excited to be a part of the 20th edition.

802 W. Broadway | P.O. Box 4980 Jackson Hole, WY 83001 307.733.8319 info@circ.biz circ.biz

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homestead j a c ks o n ho l e a rc h i t e c t u re + i n t e r i o r s + a r t

SUMMER AGROSTIS INC. CLEARWATER RESTORATION MOUNTAINSCAPES

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h o m es tead m ag . co m

20TH ANNIVESARY EDITION

PHOTO Krafty Photos

2020 COVERS

ja c k son hole a rc hite c ture + i nt e r i o r s + a r t

20TH ANNIVESARY EDITION

PHOTO David Agnello

h om estead ma g .c o m

68 WINTER JACQUE JENKINSSTIREMAN DESIGN BERLIN ARCHITECTS TWO OCEAN BUILDERS

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Zachary Dymond Barnett Christine Baum Sasha Finch Elizabeth Clair Flood Julie Fustanio Kling Katy Niner David Porter Liz Prax Melissa Snider Melissa Thomasma CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS David Agnello Arthur Blue Baxter Design Studio Katie Cooney Tuck Fauntleroy Audrey Hall Latham Jenkins Doug Kahn Aaron Kraft Krafty Photos New Thought Digital Media Cameron Nielson Lindley Rust Trevor Tondro

PAST CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS David Agnello Chris Bezamat Tony Ching J. Curtis W. Garth Dowling Mark Estabrook Jim Fairchild Tuck Fauntleroy Taylor Glenn Audrey Hall Seth Hughes Latham Jenkins Ron Johnson Aaron Kraft Samantha Livingston Matthew Millman Cameron Neilson Ed Riddell Sargent Schutt Lark Smothermon Howard Stoddard David Swift Roger Wade Paul Warchol

BEAUTIFUL LANDSCAPES START HERE

Open Year Round gift • garden • café 208.354.8816 • 2389 S. Hwy 33 • Driggs, ID

www.mdlandscapinginc.com

Homestead is published annually by Circ Design Inc. Homestead is fully protected by copyright and nothing that appears may be reproduced wholly or in part without written permission from the Publisher. While every care has been taken in the compilation and reproduction of information contained herein to ensure correctness and currency, such information is subject to change without notice. The Publisher accepts no responsibility for such changes or for typographical or other errors. 23


“First Republic has really grown with our family. They make us feel at home — no matter where we are.” J O H N H E R R , CEO, Avetta M AY H E R R , Mother and Community Volunteer

545 West Broadway, Jackson (307) 264-7888 (855) 886-4824 | firstrepublic.com | New York Stock Exchange symbol: FRC MEMBER FDIC AND EQUAL HOUSING LENDER


S un V alley

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J ackSon H ole

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l ouiSiana

www .F armer P ayne a rcHitectS . com


A SHOWROOM WORTH FINDING

525 W ELK AVE #4, JACKSON, WY 83001

+ ASTJH.COM

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Home Integration Lighting Systems + Fixtures

Whole-House Audio

Media Rooms + Home Theater

DESIGN • SALES • INSTALLATION • SERVICE 1010 South Park Loop Rd, Ste #2 • Jackson, Wyoming 83001 info@JacksonHoleAV.com • JacksonHoleAV.com • (307) 733-2629

Window Treatments


TIME SUSPENDED IN BEESWAX & FIRE Incandescent landscapes rendered in layers of molten wax fixed by fire.

pamela gibson

artist

pamelagibsonartist.com

Visiting Artist July 15 - August 30 “Give the Buried Flower a Dream” (after Robert Frost) | 84” x 24” Encaustic on panel, fired shellac, seeds, burned dress patterns, shredded memories, graphite. Detail: seeds, fired shellac.

955 Alpine Ln, Jackson, WY (307) 734-9111 jacksonmattressshop.com

sharibrownfield.com


photos by Gibeon Photography, architecture by Pearson Design Group HEADQUARTERS/CUSTOM PACKAGES 406.763.9102 39 JAYS WAY, GALLATIN GATEWAY, MT

NORTH YARD/RETAIL OUTLET 406.585.5953 81601 GALLATIN RD, BOZEMAN, MT

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www.mountainlanddesign.com Salt Lake City | Provo | Jackson | Boise | Sun Valley


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DYNIA.COM

G E N E R A L C O N T R AC TO R

MILLIRONTIMBERWORKS.COM

B U I L D I N G T H E F U T U R E . R E S T O R I N G T H E P A S T.


PHOTO DAVID AGNELLO

DESIGN INSPIRATION


DESIGN INSPIRATION

ENDURING ETHOS STORY KATY NINER | PHOTOS AUDREY HALL

Impeccable execution of clients’ dreams has been the driving force behind Dembergh Construction for more than three decades.

CONSTRUCTION

DEMBERGH CONSTRUCTION DEMBERGHJH.COM

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ratitude infuses every aspect of the business Dembergh Construction has built over the course of its 32 years creating custom residences in Jackson Hole: gratitude for clients who have entrusted them to manifest their dream homes; gratitude for the eclectic community of tradespeople in the valley, including the craftsmen whose relatives immigrated from Mexico and who now enhance the custom realm of fine home building; and gratitude for the opportunity to continue learning and growing as professionals in a place they love and share with their families. “Dembergh is grateful,” says partner Don Frank. “We have been allowed to become the craftsmen that most craftsmen dream of becoming because our clients have allowed us to grow, to learn and become masters of refined vision and design. We thank them. They have allowed us to live here, fulfill

our professional goals and provide a lifestyle for our families. We hold that relationship in very high regard.” From its founding in 1980 in Sun Valley, Idaho, the firm struck a singular silhouette in the industry. Founder Peter Dembergh channeled the diligence and drive he developed as an Ivy League student and a Navy officer into the realm of building residential projects in a ski town. “He had a stand-and-deliver work ethic,” Frank says. “You first had to perform and produce, and then you played as a reward.” In 1988, Dembergh migrated to Jackson at the introduction of a Sun Valley architect. “When that project was done, the community recognized that a serious guy had arrived—a guy with the capacity to run an orderly, organized, predictable and professional job site.” That ethos endures amid the many changes experienced by the

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LEFT A Wilson residence epitomizes the mountain modern aesthetic that defines most of Dembergh Construction’s recent projects. BELOW A buckrail fence juxtaposes the sleek lines of its exterior, while stone and metal create angular interest inside.

firm and the industry at large. Then, as now, Dembergh was committed to using the best materials and the best methods available. In the ’80s, that meant constructing traditional log and timber homes. Now, a mountain modern aesthetic prevails—place-inspired exteriors sheathing lighter interiors. Methods have evolved as well: To start, changes are no longer scrawled in pencil on two-by-fours. Today, every tradesperson has an iPad, and clients are updated in real time—all to optimize time and money. “As the years and decades have evolved, we followed the design community,” Frank says. “We need to be research nimble: finding the best sustainable materials, learning from the consultants who define cutting-edge building science—all toward assembling homes that are durable, beautiful and comfortable to live in, but also sustainable.” Frank, with his partners, Ed Harrison, Bryan Korpi and Mike Prichard, are committed to the distinctive culture at Dembergh. “We are servants of our clients’ best interests. Think of a custom home builder as an R&D department,” he says. “We want to be innovative, and we want to improve our capacity to serve. The most important part of that is to be humble enough to know there’s always more to learn; collaborative enough to listen; and confident enough to provide our repository of three decades of experience to guide our clients to not only spend their time and money well, but to participate in a way that gets them from the idea of building a home in Jackson Hole to settling into a fulfilling life with our community of families in the valley.”

ABOVE This custom wine cellar and tasting room required embedding the structure within a craggy slope in Teton Village.

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DESIGN INSPIRATION

DARING TO BE MODERN STORY ELIZABETH CLAIR FLOOD | PHOTOS DAVID AGNELLO

RIVER CHANNEL RESIDENCE: The client wanted the bedroom to be the most important space in this 2016 house. By elevating the room and cantilevering it over the property, Dynia created a space that overlooks a pond, the Snake River and the Grand Teton.

ARCHITECTURE

DYNIA ARCHITECTS DYNIA.COM

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wenty-five years ago, Stephen Dynia established himself as the first architect in this valley with the sole mission of designing contemporary buildings. At the time, most clients imagining living out their romantic frontier dreams hired local architects to design log houses. The mayor even threatened to pass a law requiring future buildings be log in order to preserve Jackson Hole’s character. Despite the community’s strict, clearly nostalgic affinity for this Western style, Dynia, a schooled and passionate modernist, jumped in, determined to build homes and commercial structures that connected with nature. Tired of corporate politics in his years designing international skyscrapers with the New York office of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, he looked to reconnect with an architecture of concept and craft learned while studying at the Rhode Island School of Design. Encouraged by his friend and colleague Lisa Carranza, he moved to Jackson in 1993. A diehard urban dweller, Dynia welcomed a challenge. “It was the

ABOVE SHOSHONE RESIDENCE: In this 2008 home, the simplicity of midcentury modern furnishings—including two Le Corbusier lounge chairs and an Eames chair—allows the outside in without interrupting the view. Dynia strives to create a seamless connection between interior and exterior space.

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contrast of building modern buildings in a rural area,” he says. “It was almost like a dare.” But not a dare he took lightly. Young and determined, Dynia set about learning everything he needed to know to create enduring architecture in a daunting climate. Awe of the natural beauty and a desire to connect to the land as well as the community informed his designs, which highlighted glass, sleeker lines and rusted patinas. At first, the going was tough. Despite threats and doubts from locals, this architect relied on trusting clients and his own intuition. A passionate student, Dynia turned the dare into a life passion to understand community, to explore new materials and building techniques and to bring what he loved about modern to the mountain. When he could, he sought out collaboration, connecting with other architects and the community through charettes and lectures on art and design. And, as it turns out, his own research uncovered a noteworthy predecessor. In 1938, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe designed a simple-style steel-and-glass home spanning a creek on the Snake River Ranch. Sadly, the modernist building was never completed; only remnants of a foundation remain today. Dynia explored juxtapositions. He pitched rusted metal siding next to more natural materials; contrasted intimate interior spaces with large windows framing vast views. He wowed people with a Kelly home built with the living space upstairs, turned heads with earthy materials and steel at the hip Terroir and Range restaurants, and surprised us with his downtown two-story cubes with rooftop gardens. Throughout his career, some people remained suspicious. A headline for a newspaper story about his 810 West Housing, a 36-unit mixed-income housing project clad in metal, read: “Art or Pigsty?” In 2004, Dynia landed his dream job, the lead designer for the 500-seat Center for the Arts theater, a building that would inspire and become a place where the community could explore and experience culture together. More recently, he expanded his business, opening a Denver office, where he has the opportunity to design buildings that engage the public beyond private residences. His focus today hasn’t changed. “I’m constantly challenged with the question: What is architecture for Jackson in the 21st century? How do you respect the environment and make a great village?” Dynia Architects now looks to employ green strategies that mitigate architecture’s imposition on the landscape. These include, among other things, denser housing solutions to address the local housing crisis. The recipient of numerous awards and an active participant on boards and juries throughout the region, Dynia seeks out thoughtful engagement in the culture around him and remains committed to his modernist quest. His latest endeavor is as adjunct professor at the University of Colorado Graduate School of Architecture, where he has the opportunity to share a lifetime of experience designing buildings. “In all my projects, I want to respect the past while addressing the 21st century, which is constantly presenting new challenges.” 

TOP RIGHT RIVER CHANNEL RESIDENCE: Giant picture windows frame exquisite views from this modern bedroom. BOTTOM RIGHT CRAIGHEAD RESIDENCE: The placement of structural pillars on the exterior of this 1999 home allows the windows to span uninterrupted. From a distance, the house reads as a pavilion held up by external columns.

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DESIGN INSPIRATION

INTERIOR DESIGN

SNAKE RIVER INTERIORS

PHOTO TUCK FAUNTLEROY

SNAKERIVERINTERIORS.COM

SNAKE RIVER INTERIORS

CELEBRATES 20 YEARS OF DESIGN STORY CHRISTINE BAUM PHOTOS TUCK FAUNTLEROY + LINDLEY RUST + CAMERON NIELSON

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lthough design trends come and go, Snake River Interiors has always approached each project with the intention of creating stylish interiors, exempt from the whims that dictate popular trends. Over the past two decades, the enduring elements of SRI’s designs have created spaces that exude a livable luxury that stands up to the demands of modern life, without sacrificing beauty. By eschewing trends and embracing the realities of daily family life, they’ve created refined interiors that are not only beautiful, but sustainable for years to come.

SRI’s interior designers fulfill many roles in their clients’ lives. Giving life to the hopes and dreams that people have for their homes requires a designer to have empathy, a true love of helping others, and a solid understanding of people’s values and how they want to live and express themselves through their homes. This combination of qualities, combined with a passion for creating beautiful and functional interiors, is the guiding force that shapes SRI’s design process. The firm’s approach to design has helped to form lasting relationships with clients that span over

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ABOVE Elisa Chambers, owner and principal designer of SRI, at home with her children. LEFT A thoughtfully designed master bedroom that exudes livable luxury.

PHOTO CAMERON NIELSON

multiple house projects and even multiple generations. As lives have changed and families have expanded and grown, SRI-designed homes have represented a common thread within the families it has served.   Over the course of 20 years, SRI designers have also developed strong relationships with the vendors and manufacturers who provide the furnishings for the homes they design. They choose to work with manufacturers who share their commitment to sustainability through sound sourcing and manufacturing practices. It is through these longlasting relationships that SRI has built a worldwide community of like-minded businesses that share a passion for bringing beautiful and ethically produced products to clients’ homes and to the design firm’s retail showroom, Twenty Two Home.   SRI’s continued passion for designing interiors is made possible by the relationships its designers have cultivated. They’ve earned the trust from their clients to engage with them and learn the intimate details of how they live, so they can design the spaces that support and inspire their clients to live their best lives. 

PHOTO LINDLEY RUST

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From Concept to Completion


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DESIGN INSPIRATION

LUXURY VILLAS, LUXURY SERVICES

THE CLEAR CREEK GROUP TAKES CARE OF HOMES AS IF THEY WERE ASSETS OF ITS OWN. STORY JULIE FUSTANIO KLING PHOTOS KATIE COONEY, NEW THOUGHT DIGITAL; AARON KRAFT, KRAFTY PHOTOS

ABOVE Amenities abound at The Clear Creek Group’s properties, from stocked ponds—perfect for fly-fishing—to lawn games and outdoor fireplaces. TCCG has something to suit every taste.

PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

THE CLEAR CREEK GROUP THECLEARCREEKGROUP.COM

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ith 155 homes in the valley’s most sought-after locations, The Clear Creek Group has built a sterling reputation with discerning homeowners of some of the most distinctive properties in Jackson Hole. “Our focus is on the most beautiful homes and the highest level of service available,” says Morgan Bruemmer, who prides himself on 15 years of luxury property management. “Our responsibility is to the homeowner, so it is our job to achieve the level of quality, consistency and service that our clients have come to expect.”

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LEFT Dining with your family is as important as ever, and The Clear Creek Group homes’ beautifully equipped kitchens make preparation as eventful as the meals themselves! BELOW TOP With a stable of well-vetted private chefs and expert, local shopping services, The Clear Creek Group’s concierge team helps its homeowners and villa rental guests enjoy every moment in Jackson Hole.   BELOW BOTTOM The seasoned caretaking team is competent, professional and on call round-the-clock.

WHY HOMEOWNERS CHOOSE TCCG

The Clear Creek Group’s objective is to take the burden out of home ownership. When its owners arrive, it should feel like a vacation; it should be a vacation. TCCG’s customized concierge service prioritizes everything from airport shuttles and package delivery to bill payment, all via a one-stop online portal through which owners can organize family vacations as they review their monthly statements. The Clear Creek Group has developed an all-inclusive program for villa rental representation, and homeowners are typically able to rent their homes as often or as seldom as they desire. When clients return to their Jackson Hole homes, they can expect everything to be pitch-perfect. In addition to a virtual assistant, The Clear Creek Group’s staff sets the bar high for housekeeping and caretaking, which, alongside an expansive suite of services, includes round-the-clock response. Combined, these afford the homeowners peace of mind and the ability to relax and enjoy their beautiful properties with friends and family.  “Homeowners have just one point of contact at the firm, so there is never confusion, and communication is streamlined,” says TCCG’s development associate, Carly Kelly. “Unlike many property management firms, we have a maintenance supervisor on staff who is proactive with preservation and enhancements—asset management. We recognize our clients’ homes are a significant investment, one we are responsible for when they aren’t there.”

WHY VACATIONERS KEEP COMING BACK

For guests, renting from The Clear Creek Group is like staying with a local family with connections. Should they choose, the refrigerator will be stocked, lift tickets at the ready, and dinner reservations booked. The aroma of freshly baked chocolate chip cookies, by Buttercream, and a bottle of wine from Il Borro, an Italian property that shares a close, personal relationship with The Clear Creek Group, make guests feel at home as soon as they walk in the door. Return guests are the lifeblood of the firm’s villa rental program. Strong relationships are not just one of the primary reasons for guest loyalty; they’re the main reason TCCG’s staff likes to come to work. “It’s fun that our team is able to help families enjoy unique and memorable times together,” Kelly says.

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DESIGN INSPIRATION

MOUNTAIN MODERN

REVISITED STORY LIZ PRAX | PHOTOS DAVID AGNELLO

The hard corners of the Hubbardton Forge lighting add an industrial layer to the mountain contemporary look provided by the colorful area rugs and local artwork.

INTERIOR DESIGN

COLLEEN MCFADDEN-WALLS INTERIOR DESIGN CWID.COM

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very CMWID project produces a unique design that reflects the homeowner’s personality. “I help them get to the look that’s completely their own,” Colleen McFadden-Walls says. After having a retail presence in Jackson Hole for two decades, she is now Belle Cose at Home’s preferred interior designer. Her job, she explains, is giving clients the confidence to discover their own design aesthetic with every item and element they consider.

ABOVE Walls’ JH portfolio represents over 22 years of commercial and residential projects with people from all over the globe. She is also currently working on projects in exciting locations like Maui, Turks and Caicos, Anguilla and San Francisco. “I’m grateful for those opportunities,” she says.

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ABOVE This multifunctional TV room can be converted into a guest room by removing the sofa’s cushions and pulling down the Murphy bed stored behind it. The bookshelf above the sofa serves as the bed’s base.

This project is a perfect example. A spec home built on a beautifully landscaped piece of property south of Jackson, it had simple, clean lines, but uninspiring finishes. “The clients hired us to furnish the home and add some architectural elements to provide a more custom look,” Walls says. She and her design associate, Kathie Harrington, introduced the homeowners to different concept photos to get a sense of their taste. The three takeaways: They liked projects that used mixes of geometric and distinctly colorful area rugs. They wanted the overall look to be close to modern, but still comfortable, warm and welcoming. And they liked red. “We started with area rugs that provided a contemporary mountain look as well as the color that gave it personality,” says Harrington. “We also brought color in through the artwork, purchased from local galleries, while staying neutral everywhere else.” A sprinkling of retro and industrial pieces added a nontraditional twist to the mountain contemporary feel. During the process of helping clients define their aesthetic, Walls says, “I feel it’s my responsibility to make sure they get the utmost in quality. I don’t like to buy catalog furniture or imported pieces. I like to use local artisans and American-made furniture. The integrity of the project is very important to me in that aspect.” The result? A home perfectly suited to the clients that is unlike any other in Jackson Hole.

ABOVE TOP To give the living room a central architectural focus, floating bookshelves and a linear gas fireplace with a charcoal-textured porcelain surround were added. Walls says, “The accent wall behind them provides another dimension.” The wood-and-steel bar stools (in facing page photo) lend an industrial touch, complementing the modern version of the Windsor back dining chairs. ABOVE The more private space of the family room combines multiple textures and accents: wood, metal, leather—and nubby bouclé fabrics to provide warmth.

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COULOIRCONSTRUCTION.COM


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DESIGN INSPIRATION

MODERN PARK ARCHITECTURE

PROGRESSIVE DESIGN IN GRAND TETON NATIONAL PARK PHOTOS TREVOR TONDRO + BAXTER DESIGN STUDIO

ABOVE Split shed roofs orient this home toward the stunning views of the Teton range. These same roof forms direct tremendous snow loads away from the entry and preserve the view through walls of glass below.

ARCHITECTURE

BAXTER DESIGN STUDIO BDSTUDIO.COM

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Over the past 20 years, the firm has designed 10 projects within park inholdings. The BDS team strives for the structures they design to be in unison with the wild Wyoming environment. “We love to think of our projects as landscape architecture—the form of the landscape happens to include a building,” Baxter says. When building amid pristine beauty, BDS exhibits restraint. “It is our responsibility to minimize the impact the building has on its surroundings.” By approaching each structure as a feature within the environment, the architects consider their practice within the lineage of “park architecture,” referencing texts such as an architecture manual published by the National Parks Association in the 1930s. “As we look at these historical values in relation to our modern architecture, it’s surprising what remains relevant,”

he relationship between an experience and its memory is strong. Traveling down a narrow path, sunlight filtering through the trees, gravel crunching underfoot, the smell of pine sap. The anticipation of the journey and the satisfaction of the destination. For those of us who have had the pleasure to explore the national parks, a memory such as this lives in the subconscious waiting for the right catalyst to bring it forward. “Visiting the park is a journey; there is a sense of exploration,” says Chris Baxter, principal architect of Baxter Design Studio. “Our architecture has always been about the experience and procession of the user.” Paramount to this approach Baxter Design Studio mindfully plots the way people move through the site and structure. Upon one’s arrival to the property, the experience becomes guided by the designers.

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TOP RIGHT This simple gable form wraps around the edge of a wetland. The southfacing bar of glass affords solar heat and a never-ending cinematic event of wildlife, seasons and sunsets. CENTER LEFT Modern detailing simplifies the elements of this mudroom entry, revealing the primitive nature of the historic, rustic-textured wall. The simple material palette allows continuous surfaces to blur the threshold between the interiors and the outdoors. CENTER RIGHT Modern forms and details are juxtaposed against site-inspired materials to strike a balance in this composition. The performance of steel and glass joins with the soul of timber and stone. BOTTOM Thoughtfully situated, this modern cabin rests quietly in a grove of lodgepole pines. The play between building and landscape makes it appear that the structure has been here for decades, although this was the cabin’s first winter.

Baxter says. “Modern architecture is oftentimes perceived as cold. We are motivated to create a rich experience for people as they interact with our buildings and the natural environment.” The studio views “modern park architecture” as a new typology conceived by the synthesis of natural influences and advanced building technologies. Each design, in its simplest form, is a quiet viewing pavilion: a comfortable place to observe wildlife, the subtle changes of light throughout the day, and the transition of seasons. As these structures configure to their natural context, BDS seeks opportunities to develop connections between interior spaces and their natural surroundings. Scale and proportion in their work are also rooted in the landscape. Similar to the way historic buildings found their scale from site-harvested materials, BDS utilizes the scale and proportion inherent to the site. Materials are approached in a similar fashion: The studio finds direction from the site to utilize materials that become unified with their locale. Recent commissions have found the firm migrating into town, sites that offer slightly different “inputs” and yet reference the same nature-informed ideals. Whether proximate to town or park, a home must enhance the experience of the property and its natural attributes. In an ultimate nod to the site, Baxter considers the firm’s designs as a contextualization of modern architecture within iconic landscapes.

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FIND MORE THAN A HOME. FIND A WAY OF LIFE.

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There are many reasons to consider a home in Jackson Hole — from the stunning location to the laid-back lifestyle to the financial benefits of living in an income tax-free state. Latham offers expertise in all three areas — real estate services, local lifestyle insight, and relationships with financial advisors who can offer in-depth guidance as you search for more than just a home. Get started at LiveWaterJacksonHole.com


Latham Jenkins Associate Broker | 307-690-1642 latham@livewaterproperties.com


TIME FOR STRENGTH. TIME FOR SPIRIT.

LIVE YOUR LIFE OF HARMONY + LUXURY...

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DESIGN INSPIRATION

A LOCAL LASTING LEGACY STORY DAVID PORTER PHOTOS LATHAM JENKINS

Natural materials abound in Wild West’s product line: Leather furniture, cowhide rugs and tanned lampshades complement any home’s Western design.

FURNISHINGS

WILD WEST DESIGNS NEWWESTFURNITURE.COM

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hile home decorating trends come and go, Wild West Designs of Jackson Hole keeps true to its vision of offering authentic, Westerndesign furniture crafted in shops throughout the U.S. Owner Linda Rumsey says, “Jackson Hole has always been the destination for traditional Western furniture, and it remains one of the last places where a buyer can find this style. At Wild West Designs we offer unsurpassed customer service that keeps our clients coming back for more.”

The Jackson showroom on West Broadway has been open for almost 20 of Rumsey’s 50 years in the furniture business. Her family has deep roots in Wyoming and the surrounding region, and Rumsey knows traditional Jackson Hole. Born in Ogden, Utah, she regularly visited Yellowstone as a child with her father, an avid fisherman. Her grandfather, who owned a cigar shop in Cheyenne, came to Jackson in the summers of the 1930s and ’40s to deal blackjack at the Wort Hotel.

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Wild West’s flagship product: chandelier made out of antlers collected locally from the National Elk Refuge. Chandeliers can be custom made to order.

Wild West Designs www.WildWestD esignsInc.com

140 W Broadway, Jackson Hole, WY • 2037 N Yellowstone, Idaho Falls, ID

LEFT Rustic yet elegant, this wooden dining set emulates the quintessential dining rooms of lodges from the American frontier.

RIGHT Leather armchairs and a distressed wood end table give a home library or living room both ultimate comfort and an authentic Western touch.

Unique Handcrafted Furniture

Today, Rumsey says she owes much of the success of her Jackson store to her manager, Gary Joslin. Joslin, who has been with Wild West for close to a decade, “really takes over,” she says. “He hand-delivers furniture before and after work. Gary exemplifies our commitment to the finest customer service. He goes above and beyond every day.” Rumsey says that Wild West is known not only for its furniture but also for its custom-designed elk antler chandeliers, the company’s flagship product. “We source our antlers locally,” she says. “Every year we buy antlers that the local Boy Scout troop collects from the National Elk Refuge. We use a local product, and we support a great local organization too.” You won’t find a better selection of traditional Western furniture and antler chandeliers than what is on display at Wild West Designs—and Rumsey is here to stay. “We’ll keep going,” she says. “I think Jackson Hole needs us.”

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307.203.2852 • KINSEYARCH.COM B O L D M O U N TA I N A R C H I T E C T U R E

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Perfectly Placed. Uniquely Positioned. Whether buying or selling, imagine your ideal real estate agent. That person should have decades of deep, local knowledge and all the right connections. Factor in a respected community leader with an insider’s perspective on the valley’s real estate services and lifestyle. Now imagine that person publishes Jackson Hole’s premier home design and travel magazines. Say hello to Latham Jenkins. No one is more perfectly placed or uniquely positioned to get the results you want. Frequently described as genuine, creative and honest, Latham loves what he does — and you will too. Get started at LiveWaterJacksonHole.com

Latham Jenkins Associate Broker | 307-690-1642 latham@livewaterproperties.com


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PHOTOS DAVID AGNELLO

DREAM HOMES


DREAM HOME

CRAFT + COLLABORATION

LANDSCAPE AS ART STORY MELISSA SNIDER PHOTOS KRAFTY PHOTOS

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LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

AGROSTIS INC. AGROSTISINC.COM

WATER FEATURE CONSTRUCTION

CLEARWATER RESTORATION CLEARWATERRESTORATION.COM

LANDSCAPE CONSTRUCTION

MOUNTAINSCAPES MOUNTAINSCAPESJH.COM

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nterior and exterior spaces are equally essential when designing a home in a valley with views to spare, like Jackson Hole. Heath Kuszak and Jason Snider, owners of landscape architecture firm Agrostis Inc., worked together with Case Brown, of Clearwater Restoration, and Sean Macauley, of MountainScapes, to provide the owners of this newly built modern home with a one-of-a-kind landscape. When consulting with the architects about the siting of the house, Kuszak and Snider drew inspiration from the site—a former horse pasture—and designed the outdoor spaces around their clients’ desire to be out on the land. “The view to the south is really wide open and expansive, with an agrarian feel,” says Kuszak, “while the north side is more inwardly focused.” A private courtyard on the north side features a bocce court, raised garden beds and a small apple orchard. On the south side, water pools and flows past the home in a series of custom-built steel boxes. Because the house is built primarily of weathered steel, Kuszak and Snider incorporated this material into every aspect of their landscape design. “We turned that weathered steel into every construction material we needed: grates to walk on, pools that hold the water features, as well as edging and lines that define separations between materials,” says Kuszak. Precision in the design demanded an expert level of landscape construction and installation from Clearwater Restoration and MountainScapes. “The installation was more exact than we’re used to as landscapers,” says Macauley. “Our biggest challenge was slowing down a notch and making sure everything was laid out perfectly.” “Using so much metal in the materials dictated that construction had to be precise,” says Brown, who built and assembled the water features on the property, based on Kuszak and Snider’s design. MountainScapes and Clearwater Restoration took their work to the next level, ensuring the details were executed to perfection. True collaboration occurred during frequent site meetings between all members of the design and installation team. “We worked together as a team, bouncing different ideas off of each other as to how to make it all come together,” says Macauley. “The real importance of the details showed when it was all done.” Snider notes that the rigid geometry in the design is softened by incorporating natural materials. “Everything that Case and Sean built

ABOVE Evening light reflects off the still surface of the steel-clad pool. Weathered grate bridges lead from the house to the concrete fire pit terrace beyond.

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ABOVE From steel to stream: The dynamic movement of water connects hardscape to landscape.

LEFT Trees, perennials, grasses and ground covers soften the geometry of the courtyard gardens and the covered entry.

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“We worked together as a team, bouncing different ideas off of each other as to how to make it all come together.” —SEAN MACAULEY

ABOVE Framed by plantings, the bocce court extends the inward focus of the courtyard to the distant view of Mount Glory.

was filled with something organic,” he says, “whether plant materials, gravel or water. There’s a real contrast between the materials we created the spaces with and what actually got filled in.” MountainScapes hand-filled weathered-steel gabion walls: wire work containers that hold not only stones found on-site, but also antiquities the owners brought from their previous home. A small concrete cat and fox are among the surprises visitors to the property may notice as they walk the perimeter. “This was way beyond landscaping a house,” says Brown. “We applied the same level of craftsmanship that went into the house itself.” Kuszak and Snider also accounted for the homeowners’ future plans for art installations around the property. “It’s much more of a landscape to live in as opposed to just look at,” says Snider. “We provided space for things to grow and the landscape to evolve with their tastes. It gives them the opportunity to experience it over a long period of time.”

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A singular yet shallow site in Shooting Star presented as many opportunities as it did challenges. For instance, architect Larry Berlin had to devise a driveway and parking area that did not distract from the mountain views beyond the entrance. “The fun part was designing a really livable plan that fit the site and still created a sense of entry,” he says.

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rust braided together every aspect of this standout residence in Shooting Star: the clients’ trust in the crew, assembled by interior designer Jacque Jenkins-Stireman, and the trust among team members as they confronted site-specific challenges with creativity, reimagining traditional elements through contemporary treatments. Woven together, these strands of trust made anything and everything possible within the amiable yet ambitious family home.

The project rose from the working foundation laid during the clients’ first commission of Jenkins-Stireman’s boutique firm: a cabin within the same development, renovated to suit their large clan. Thrilled with that first foray, the family engaged Jenkins-Stireman in their search for a new homesite. With a lot secured, they charged her with assembling a team of Berlin Architects and Two Ocean Builders. “I was their emissary,” she says. “They were clear in their objectives,

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TRUSSES OF TRUST STORY KATY NINER PHOTOS DAVID AGNELLO + TUCK FAUNTLEROY

Impeccable materials were used throughout the house, epitomized by the Brombal windows manufactured in Italy. “The windows and exterior doors are truly unmatched in quality and appearance,” says Sam Sehnert, of Two Ocean Builders. “You can absolutely feel the difference when you see and operate the units. They feel uniquely substantial yet look uniquely elegant.”

INTERIOR DESIGN

ARCHITECTURE

CONSTRUCTION

JACQUE JENKINS-STIREMAN DESIGN

BERLIN ARCHITECTS

TWO OCEAN BUILDERS

JJSTIREMANDESIGN.COM

BERLINARCHITECTS.COM

TWOOCEANBUILDERS.COM

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ABOVE Characteristic of the entire aesthetic, the kitchen marries traditional elements with contemporary treatments. The drawers and shelves, painted a rich blue (Mysterious by Benjamin Moore) reminiscent of a farmhouse palette, complement the sleek custom china cabinet artfully displaying the owner’s ceramic collection.

LEFT Form surpasses function in the staircase, designed by Berlin to exist as a sculptural element floating between floors and laced by steel.

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not directive about the outcome. They knew how they wanted to use the house, how they wanted to live. It was a seamless conversation that started with the clients telling me to explore my wildest dreams: ‘You know what we love,’ they said. ‘Live it out.’” This invitation to dream—most often issued to, not from, clients—empowered the team to envision fresh adaptations to the distinctive site. Crescent-shaped and shallow, the lot is bordered by creeks, which offer a feeling of remoteness amid the residential development. Also a boon: abundant views in all directions—of the Teton foothills, across the valley to Sleeping Indian, and through the willows to Fish Creek. Jenkins-Stireman thrived in the face of the site’s strictures. Solutions became features, like the fire wall encircling the front façade, screening the parking court. “That’s the fun of it all,” says architect Larry Berlin, “having a challenging site with great views and great light, as well as privacy, water and trees—and then designing the house to be part of the site.” At every turn, the team considered the clients’ extended family. Take the bunk room above the garage—an expansive space that could have assumed utilitarian traits. Instead, the vaulted area exudes play, with two sets of triple-high bunk beds facing a wide sectional sofa, snack bar and custom foosball and pool tables. Each niche serves as its own bedroom replete with shelving, lights and outlets. Dormer windows flood the playroom with light. Oak paneling sheathes the walls and ceiling, creating a clean, continuous embrace. The adults have their own special “play” space. Winemakers and connoisseurs, the clients wanted a bar that felt both cozy and commodious. Thus inspired, the team brainstormed, building on a design idea of a classic gentleman’s lounge. A hybrid haunt took shape, spacious enough for a large wine tasting yet still intimate enough for two. Every element is custom, down to the refrigerated cabinets cooling the varietals—meticulous details that meld into an overall ambiance of gracious hospitality, reflective of the owners themselves, Jenkins-Stireman says. Epitomizing the family ethos, the kitchen welcomes all with its warm blue cabinetry, wide island and upholstered stools. It opens onto adjoining casual dining and family rooms. In an elegant twist on the classic china cabinet, a

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ABOVE “The drinking library was completely custom, down to the refrigeration units used to cool the insulated wine storage cabinets,” Sehnert says. “This was described as the most important room in the house by the homeowner, so everything underwent an extra level of scrutiny, from lighting to sound to temperature and, finally, furnishings.”


DREAM HOME

LEFT Berlin delighted in tackling the design conundrum of the outdoor shower, succinctly described by Sehnert: “The challenge was creating a space that felt open and outdoorsy but still private.” BELOW “In the bunk room, integrating the two sets of triple-high bunk beds and floorto-ceiling white oak paneling took a lot of thought and planning with the cabinet company, carpenters and design team,” Sehnert says.

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built-in steel case displays a ceramic serving collection under soft spotlights, simultaneously evoking an art gallery, farmhouse pantry and the casements of the surrounding windows. Showcasing the views throughout the house became paramount, particularly in the front hall, which could have taken on grandiose proportions considering the scale of the house at six bedrooms and bathrooms (plus two half-baths). A typecast formal entry would have detracted from the mountain sightline, so the team created an intimate but elaborate vestibule defined by exquisite juxtapositions of materials: a steel door accented by glass, opening onto a beloved piece of art. Set to the side of the house, the foyer greets visitors with a view corridor of the Tetons framed by interior glass walls. Modern pairings of materials continue throughout the interior. Brombal windows—minimalist steel-framed panes from Italy—set an Old World-meets-contemporary tone. “They allowed the rest of the architecture to shine,” Jenkins-Stireman says. Inventive interpretations of traditional treatments abound. Instead of rote barnwood paneling, white oak was milled to perfection, and plaster takes on sleek effect sans trim or baseboards. Organic accents—pendant clusters custom-made by a New York artist—transform stairwells into sculptural passages, replete with floating treads. Even the mudroom suggests singularity with a real, forest-perfumed birch veneer. A dining terrace extends the great room, nearly doubling the expanse. And a second deck does the same to the kitchen and family room, allowing for casual grilling and indoor/outdoor


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living. In a final stroke of knife-edge genius, an outdoor shower strikes the delicate balance between feeling both open to nature and private, by way of stone-and-slatted walls. Hot tubs and fire pits, attached to suites, make for quiet moments in situ. “We are always exploring ways in which finish materials can interact,” says Sam Sehnert, of Two Ocean Builders. “Those details take a collaborative effort to work through successfully, and we had an outstanding team to do that on this project. The owners played a key role as well by encouraging us to explore unique solutions in design and assembly.” A dream come true from every exquisite angle, including the perspective of every party involved.

ABOVE When designing a residence, Berlin strives to create a balance between “a variety of spaces: ones that are warm and cozy, and others that are more dramatic and transparent to the outside.” The great room epitomizes the latter with its panoramic views and ample seating. RIGHT No interior detail escaped the imagination of Jacque Jenkins-Stireman. Real birch veneer lines the walls of the mudroom, lending woodsy aromatics to the functional threshold space.

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RIDGELINE

RESONANCE STORY KATY NINER PHOTOS DAVID AGNELLO

Stepped within the hillside, the home, finished in 2003, unfolds as a series of rectangular rooms bordered by concrete decks and a continuous channel of water. Built of cedar, glass and concrete, it is a study of textures.

ARCHITECTURE

WARD + BLAKE ARCHITECTS WARDBLAKE.COM

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ridgetop residence, vanguard at the time of its construction 17 years ago, remains a milestone for Tom Ward and Mitch Blake, the principals of Ward + Blake Architects. Back then, the schematic design drew disapproval from neighbors initially. Now it serves as a blueprint for a Western aesthetic wholly inspired by site. “It was a groundbreaking house in a lot of ways, which made it absolutely unsavory as far as the homeowners association was concerned,” Ward says. “We were trying to answer a lot of questions that Mother Nature proposed,” such as the steepness of the slope and the exposure of the site. These challenges, paired with the clients’ request—that every room have a view to the Tetons—and the county’s height restrictions, resulted in design solutions

at once singular and sensational. “We did not adhere to conventional ideas of what the West was or should be,” Ward says. And yet, raising that question—“What is Western?”—is precisely what moved the association to reconsider the plan in 2001. To shift the discussion, an empathetic resident pointed to a clause in the association’s covenant calling for architecture that reflects the “intrinsic value” of the site; by this criteria, the project could be considered a success in its site specificity. Within the course of the conversation, the neighbors recognized the logic and history embedded within the design. While not referencing log cabins (as so many new Jackson Hole homes did at the time), the house did harken back to “soddies”: the huts early valley settlers built out of sod blocks—the natural

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materials available—that served as rudimentary refuge. “Those humble agricultural structures were inherently honest: quick, functional and survivaloriented,” Ward says. “They are appealing to us because they represent pure forms and almost pure function.” He recalls the discursive shift as: “Why don’t we do the same? We understand things differently now, but we can use the same natural materials, compose them in a totally different fashion and yet still

ABOVE Designed to complement— rather than compete with—the panorama, every room is oriented toward the outdoors, including the kitchen, where cabinets are nestled below the countertops so as not to distract the eye. RIGHT Wildflowers further camouflage the sod roof, allowing for infinity views upstairs, despite being stacked above lower floors.

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LEFT The owner, an antiques dealer, let the site set her palette of beiges, rusts and steel blues. Paintings and pottery by local artists further reference place. BELOW An artfully balanced aesthetic finds as many curved lines as straight, and as many organic forms as sleek modern silhouettes.

relate historically.” Aversion assuaged, the neighbors granted the project unanimous approval. The architects trace the project’s innovation back to their clients, who, two decades on, remain rooted in their butte refuge—evidence of its enduring resonance. “They were very open-minded. They allowed us to pursue our ideas as we saw fit,” Ward says. He considers the project a laboratory for experimenting with different responses to physical challenges. The sod roof, level with the road, serves as

an extension of the site itself, changing its seasonal palette in tandem with the craggy hillside. To further blend in, he went to great lengths to match the color of the concrete walls with the surrounding outcropping, tinting the concrete multiple times to achieve the precise shade of the ridgetop. An elegant (yet complex) recirculating water feature—inspired by Italian architect Carlo Scarpa—rings the house in cascading channels and reflection pools. The sound masks the traffic noise that rises from the valley floor, and the aqua dynamics provide a counterpoint to the exposure of

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Humble structures are appealing “because they represent pure forms and almost pure function.”

ABOVE A deck facing a stainless steel trough, part of the integrated water feature encircling the home in reflected light and movement, provides dynamic respite from the exposure of the arid site.

—TOM WARD

the arid site, mitigating heat. The landscaping, done by David Weaver, set a precedent for using indigenous plants and requires minimal maintenance. Following the association’s restrictions and the couple’s call for views, Ward designed a butterfly roof—a feature that has since become a firm signature. Instead of a cavernous cathedral ceiling, a butterfly configuration sets a humanscaled frame around the panorama, allowing for vista vignettes rather than overwhelming sweeps. The architects carried the material restraint of the exterior inside, providing a quiet palette for one of the clients—an antiques dealer—to design her interiors. A resilient testament to form and function, the residence remains responsive to its site—sustainably respectful of its constraints and continually celebratory of its sentinel position. “It’s not a haven where you can ignore your environment,” Ward says. “The environment is always tapping you on the shoulder.” Attuned to nature and longevity, Ward + Blake Architects often reference that context and the resulting concepts. “Circling back to the whole notion of a laboratory: We have been refining and discussing the same major points of that house ever since we did it,” Blake says. “We don’t have the level of hubris to think we have all the answers, so we are always asking ourselves: ‘What would we do differently?’ We strive to create buildings that will stand the test of time and not look too trendy.” “That’s why they call it the practice of architecture,” Ward says. “We are always turning the rock to see what’s underneath. It’s a privilege to have something like that house happen. We were lucky enough to try things with that design. I think it’s as valid now as when we first built it.”

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POETRY BY DESIGN STORY ZACHARY DYMOND BARNETT PHOTOS DAVID AGNELLO

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INTERIOR DESIGN

ARCHITECTURE

CONSTRUCTION

WRJ DESIGN

ANKENY ARCHITECTURE + DESIGN

SHAW CONSTRUCTION

WRJDESIGN.COM

ANKENYARCHITECTURE.COM

SHAWCONSTRUCTION.NET

Ankeny’s calculated positioning of windows seizes on sky views and not those of the highway to the north, while WRJ pulls the slate tones from the wood and windows for this composition in blue.

“A poem compresses much in a small space and adds music, thus heightening its meaning.” —E.B. WHITE

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hat E.B. White, renowned author of such classics as Charlotte’s Web and a five-decade contributor to The New Yorker, alludes to in this quote is the implicit jewel craft that arises when an artisan is tasked with creating beauty within a confined space, be it the artist who finds her genius painting on tiny canvases or the poet who, limited by the framework of a sonnet, turns word craft into song, verse into aria. White’s observation, however, could just have well pertained to a recently built guesthouse in Indian Springs, a 1,000-square-foot affair (limited in size by county regulations) designed by architect Shawn Ankeny in collaboration with Rush Jenkins of WRJ Design and Chase Beninga of Shaw Construction. What Ankeny artfully imagines is a boutique collection of grand moments, of compression as well as

expansion, the two playing off each other while allowing Jenkins’ refined eye to harmonize within. And, with Shaw’s seamless translation into forward-thinking craftsmanship, the end product is a sum greater than the parts and an experience photographs cannot wholly capture. The music lifts and flows. “When you’re limited by square feet, having an understanding of the classical principles of architecture is crucial to the success of the project,” explains Jenkins. “Shawn’s approach to creating those moments of space was genius. No detail goes unnoticed. We’ve done six or seven houses together now, and I’m very grateful for how gracious and collaborative she is. She’s incredibly talented, with a great eye for what she’s looking for.” This little cottage rests on the edge of a hillside overlooking a bucolic

LEFT A masterstroke of harmony is achieved when Ankeny, Shaw and WRJ unite to embrace their focal point with line, form and color.

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spring creek, which widens below, as well as an expansive ranch meadow and mountain beyond. The field is hayed in early summer and grazed after that, and the owner, a fisherman, walks down the hillside and through a gate in a split-rail fence to join the creek and throw his line. “What I remember about working on that project,” recounts Beninga, “was the handcrafted nature of every piece—and the amount of detail required to put it all together. When you’re building a guesthouse, you’re fitting a lot into a small footprint, so it requires extensive coordination and teamwork. We had a fairly conservative budget to meet, as well. Shawn and Rush are both meticulous, as are we, so it made it easier because they had a very clear vision of what they wanted.” In the opening stanza, a pathway of regional flagstone leads in through an envelope of native perennials to a cozy front porch, the pitched logs and wide chinking tying in seamlessly with that of the main house. This little porch, 6 feet by 7, sets the tone immediately. It has just the right size and southwest-facing temperament for enjoying the late afternoon sun, either by curling up with a book or husking half a dozen ears of local corn. The moments are just beginning, however, as this rustic doorway leads into a petite foyer, allowing for a moment to breathe, set down groceries and remove shoes before the eye begins to take in the main room and what awaits there—and what awaits is volume and serenity. “By keeping the foyer out of the main room, that helped with the sense of space,” explains Ankeny. “And, as you see, though we were confined by square footage, this didn’t limit our ability to go up. Those pitched ceilings and vaulted spaces are where we found our volume. The main room peaks at slightly over 14 feet and carries your eye right

ABOVE Welcome home. Landscape architecture by Agrostis Inc. frames this rustic moment, and all of it together—the native perennials, the flagstone, the 19th century Swiss chair and wide chinking on a dark exterior— set the tone for what awaits.

LEFT With a nod to the traditional Syrian chest of drawers, this ornate, linen-lined nailhead dresser, by Bernhardt Furniture, adds Western flair in keeping with the red barn painting, by Lee Riddell, and wood-lined interior.

RIGHT In exquisite stillness, a splash of color resonates a long way. Here in this bedroom beneath Ankeny’s vaulted ceiling, WRJ adds accent with a scarlet tufted headboard, also by Bernhardt, and a distressed red writing desk of aged oak, by Four Hands.

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DESIGN INSPIRATION

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on through to the expansive, 9-foot-high, floorto-ceiling windows and glass doors to the east, framing what appears like a painting of fields, mountain and sky beyond. That is the focal point. To make this happen, we bumped out that end of the room by 6 feet and created a dormer so that we could raise the windows and doors by a foot to bring in more view. The result is that, when you sit there in those wonderfully comfortable vintage club chairs, you feel your surroundings wrapping around you, with all of that light and space and nature.” The bedrooms then spread like wings along the ridgeline on either side of the main room through compressed hallways emerging into vaulted spaces of their own, a technique Ankeny learned from studying Frank Lloyd Wright early in her schooling at Harvard. Intentionally, the bedroom windows facing north and south are positioned at heights that allow for more light and ask the viewers to lift their gazes toward tree lines and mountains. Again, floor-to-ceiling windows looking east over the valley accentuate light and space. What is most mesmerizing about all of this is how WRJ Design and Shaw Construction then work within the meter of Ankeny’s vision: not with oversized shapes and tones or visual clutter, but with harmony. The entirety of the interior is a treatment of long, unbroken lines of grayblue reclaimed snow fencing, a wood that has by all appearances been saturated in an eternity of sun and wind and stars beneath Wyoming skies. And its effect, in concealing all of the shapes that would otherwise command the eye, such as the refrigerator, the dishwasher and the microwave, is both soothing and pastoral. Viewed from the foyer, the main room becomes a composition of both rhyme scheme and geometric alliteration in line, form and color. The round oak dining table aligns visually with the three-tiered black rust chandelier above, while the sofa, club chairs and antique coffer, with their low, rectangular profiles, subtly balance the room. And the natural Belgian linen drape stacks fall within the framing of the doors and windows, creating an appearance of continuity in glass while accentuating the view, with the light on the ceiling triangulating and rolling in across the dormer. “The word ‘harmony’ is important here,” Jenkins emphasizes. “Harmony does not mean being the focal point. Oftentimes, you’ll find furniture that is too large for a room, or base moldings or textures that scream, ‘Look at me!’ I sang a cappella in school, and real harmony is about listening to the voice next to you, about fitting in and not standing out. Working with Shawn and Chase was like that. We found our harmony in creating these beautiful, intimate moments: sophisticated in their simplicity; rustic and elegant. This house wraps around you like a warm blanket because we chose to find that harmony.”

ABOVE By expanding the east end of the main room by 6 feet, Ankeny, Shaw and WRJ create a retreat of weathered snow fencing and vintage club chairs that “wraps around you like a warm blanket.” LEFT Cleverly hidden within this farmhouse kitchen façade lie a refrigerator, microwave, dishwasher and deep pullout drawer for pots and pans.

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THE GRANDEUR OF SIMPLICITY STORY MELISSA THOMASMA PHOTOS KRAFTY PHOTOS

ARCHITECT

CONSTRUCTION

PLATT DANA ARCHITECTS

SEVEN GENERATIONS CONSTRUCTION

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or an architect accustomed to orchestrating renovations on New York City brownstones, designing and building a home in The Aspens in Jackson Hole was a welcome departure from the norm. Hope Dana— principal architect at the award-winning Platt Dana Architects, based in New York—collaborated with Seven Generations Construction to build this sleek, effortlessly welcoming house as her family’s own mountain getaway.

Constructed in a neighborhood with strict architectural guidelines, the exterior of the four-bedroom, three-bathroom home is clad in rough-hewn cedar and rust-toned window frames. Its appearance meshes gracefully with both the neighborhood and the wooded landscape surrounding it. “The more of the outside that you can bring in, the better,” explains Dana, describing her approach to designing the 3,000-square-foot house. Framing window

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views in the heart of New York City, she adds, is driven by a balance between showcasing beauty and maintaining privacy, but, in Jackson Hole, it’s much more focused on celebrating the spectacular natural panorama of the valley. “As a small, boutique firm, every project is a labor of love,” she says. “But part of the joy of this project is that there was no client to answer to.” Her collaboration with Seven Generations Construction—a local, full-service building company with a focus on sustainability and efficiency—brought her vision to life.

LEFT In the shadow of the Teton range, ample outdoor space flows seamlessly into the warmth of the indoor space in this Platt Dana Aspens home. ABOVE The elegant, contemporary kitchen by HenryBuilt includes custom millwork. The clean lines and simple palette seem to create frames through which the color and vibrancy of the natural world outside pour in. RIGHT Flanked by a striking staircase with black steel balusters and handrails, the doubleheight entryway embodies the ambiance of the home: at once classic and modern, made to feel spacious through efficiency and functionality.

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Eight-inch horizontal ash wall boards and floorboards, accented with the whimsical Random Pendant Light from Moooi, create an open, bright feeling even in a small home, a contemporary reflection of the forest and mountain peaks that surround it.

Matt Somers, owner of Seven Generations Construction, built the house according to Dana’s drawings and specifications. “The process reflects how thoughtful she was in the design,” he observes. “It’s not just a bunch of canned details. In this environment, you’re able to open things up to bring nature in, and this house shows that really well.” Somers reflects that the deeply unique nature of Dana’s design made for an intriguing and rewarding building process. “As each room finished, you could stand in the doorway and see the vision come to life. And you’d think, ‘This is going to be so cool.’” Ultimately, the home became a unique feather in Seven Generations’ cap. “In the end, I feel a lot of pride in this project— in the way it looks, the quality of construction. This is one of the more contemporary interiors that we have built, but it’s still warm, comfortable and inviting,” Somers says. The palette of the home is calm and understated, and, though the square

footage is minimal, the efficiency of design lends it an elegance and grandeur. Pale ash wall boards and floorboards contribute to the spacious ambiance and offer sophisticated contrast to the dark accents throughout the home. The combination is evocative of the community’s namesake—the aspen—a compelling contrast of light and dark, long lines and intuitive punctuation. “I wanted it to feel easy,” says Dana. “The term hygge” [pronounced “HUEguh”]—a Danish word embodying feelings of peace and contentment—“was trending when I was selecting materials, so I aimed to bring that into the space. It’s quiet, but lush and in deference to the outdoors.” From the moment one steps through the front door, the home feels, as Dana describes, easy. The double-height entry hall with large-format porcelain tile feels at once classic and modern: peaceful, contemporary energy with a subtle Western flourish. The open living, dining and cooking space is anchored by a wood-burning fireplace, clad in cleft-faced bluestone.

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With the balance of wood and stone cast against the backdrop of the Tetons, immersed in the woodlands of the valley, Dana has created a space that thoughtfully pays homage to the timeless natural beauty of the land. The Aspens home is a stunning representation of how Platt Dana Architects approaches each of its projects, whether a turn-of-thecentury brownstone on a busy metropolitan avenue or a modest mountain retreat. “We always take a deeply personalized approach to designing houses. Our work reflects the personality and needs of our clients, with equal attention to the smallest details and to the overall house design,” says Dana. This house has inspired Dana, and she is enthusiastic to explore more design projects in the area. Her intuitive perception of space, timeless style and dedication to understanding each client’s distinct vision create stunning results: homes that are visually breathtaking and yet wholly welcoming. And if that doesn’t represent the spirit of Jackson Hole, what does?

TOP The focal point of the living room, the stone fireplace is an echo of a classically Western space. Offering a textural contrast to the sleek, modern paneling and interior design, it creates a visually compelling anchor to the open-plan living, dining and kitchen space. BOTTOM With limited square footage, designer Hope Dana utilized efficiency, simplicity and functionality to create a sense of elegance and grandeur. Even small rooms in the Aspens home seem spacious and inviting.

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MOLESWORTH • MISSION • NAVAJO RUGS • WESTERN AMERICANA NATIVE AMERICAN BEADWORK • POTTERY • BASKETS

Fighting Bear Antiques • Terry and Claudia Winchell (307) 733-2669 • store@fightingbear.com • www.fightingbear.com 375 South Cache • PO Box 3790 • Jackson, Wyoming 83001


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20 YEARS OF DREAM HOMES STORY LATHAM JENKINS

CELEBRATING 20 YEARS OF HOMESTEAD MAGAZINE

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eafing through Homestead’s 20 years of covers is like taking a walk back in time. When I started this magazine in 2001, my vision was to showcase these works of art, which are rarely seen by those who have an appreciation for great design. It was also to create a resource guide for those looking to build or redesign, a platform for professionals to share their work from year to year. Jackson Hole brings out the artist in us all, generating a desire to capture, frame and share our inspirations in many mediums and, in this case, our living spaces. Our valley attracts a tremendous talent pool of designers that unite together in each home project to assure that the shape, forms, lines, colors and textures all materialize into another work of art on our landscape. From the beginning, we hired local salespeople, writers, photographers and designers. (Four of the original Homestead members—Mindy Duquette, Martha Vorel, my wife, Megan, and I—still make up the core of today’s team.) Then, as now, our dream was to produce elegant, sophisticated, coffee table-worthy keepsakes that also serve as invaluable resources, offering local insights, ideas and information to help Jackson Hole residents pursue their own home design dreams. As you peruse the following pages, we hope you’ll enjoy walking down memory lane with us. Be well,

Founder and Publisher

2001

2020 homestead 2020

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JACKSON, WY | WRJDESIGN.COM Photograph by William Abranowicz

2001 The timber frame construction of this home by Strout Architects creates an elegant living space. Reclaimed hand-hewn timbers are used to articulate the dramatic grand hall, and to frame the more intimate spaces. PHOTO: CONRAD JOHNSON

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20TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION

2020 Spring/Summer MountainScapes, Clearwater Restoration and Agrostis Inc. combine natural materials with geometric designs to surround this modern home with inventive, enjoyable exterior spaces. PHOTO: KRAFTY PHOTOS

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2002

2003

2003 For this dramatic Tucker Ranch dining room, Laurie Interiors started with an antique Bijar carpet from Kismet Rug Gallery and a custom-made oak drop-leaf table. Gold wallpaper laid in from torn strips is the perfect backdrop for White Horse IV by Kiki Martinez. PHOTO: DAVID SWIFT

2002 Harker Design: The magnificent stone and log fireplace enhanced by generously proportioned chenille sofas and rich hand-rubbed woods creates a timeless casual elegance in this mountain residence. PHOTO: ROGER WADE

2005

2004

2004 This beautiful Teton Village home demonstrates that elegance, sophistication and Western style can coexist. The Red Chair designers have expertly blended polished and rustic textures. The mantel features the work of Tal Walton from the Legacy Gallery. PHOTO: LARK SMOTHERMON

2005 Harker Design approaches each home and each room with the goal of creating spaces that are uniquely suited to the client, now and well into the future. From antique furniture to customdesigned pieces, Harker designers blend styles, colors and textures. PHOTO: ROGER WADE

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2007

2006

2007 Strout Architects and Harker Design create an unequaled and extraordinary, livable Western vacation home atop Gros Ventre Butte, combining traditional materials with contemporary design in a quiet, hospitable way. PHOTO: DAVID SWIFT

2006 From the rich colors and textures of fabrics and paint to custom-designed lighting and unique accessories, Laurie Waterhouse and her experienced team of designers aim to create a room that showcases each client’s singular personal style. PHOTO: DAVID SWIFT

2009

2008

2008 Respect for place and a desire to create a timeless home that leaves a lasting impression drives Dan Schou Construction, Harker Design and MD Nursery to complete the dream that is Ellen Creek. PHOTO: CAMERON NIELSON

2009 Ellis Nunn & Associates and Pioneer Log Homes take tradition to a whole new level. Two families. One Dream. And nothing but lodgepole pine. PHOTO: ROGER WADE STUDIO

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2011

2010

2011 Pocket Ranch, a home designed to be one with the environment, is a collaboration between Strout Architects, Teton Heritage Builders and Laurie Waterhouse Interiors. It offers a glimpse at how a dwelling becomes part of the ecosystem. PHOTO: DAVID SWIFT

2010 An airy and captivating floor plan is the key to this Western contemporary design by Teton Heritage Builders. Three Rivers Stone, expansive windows and exposed steelwork create an atmosphere that’s both Western and contemporary. PHOTO: ROGER WADE STUDIO

2013

2012

2012 Clean lines and a blend of textural elements come together in this home designed by Stephen Dynia in collaboration with Dynamic Custom Homes. This masterpiece displays an ever-evolving play of space, light, unusual angles and dynamic views. PHOTO: CAMERON NIELSON

2013 Embracing Stephen Dynia’s portfolio of innovative design, this treasure is open yet intimate. Interior designer Jacque JenkinsStireman used natural colors and textures that speak to the outdoors, while John Walker, of Mill Iron Timberworks, made it all come together. PHOTO: DAVID AGNELLO

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2014

2015

2014 Snake River Interiors owner Elisa Chambers gives a personal tour of her home. A mix of grand and intimate spaces showcases the family’s lifelong collection of exquisite works. The home is a warm living environment for the family of six— functional yet aesthetic. PHOTO: CAMERON NIELSON

2015 Grace Home Design and Jackson Hole Contracting take us through a complete home remodel. Our cover home opens up to a vivid canvas of confident choices, ingenious renovations and picture-perfect detailing. PHOTO: DAVID AGNELLO

2017 MEDIA KIT 2016

homestead jackson hole architecture + interiors + art

ARCHITECTURE Dream Homes

Danish modern chairs and a custom sofa encircle a coffee table made by a local craftsman. The adjacent breakfast table—a WRJ

design—shines beneath Holly Hunt pendants, which are siblings to the chandelier above the kitchen island, also Holly Hunt.

INTERIOR DESIGN

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2016 2016 Spring/Summer After the retreat of a wildfire, a property Homestead is is Jackson Hole’sFall/Winter An exquisite chandelier and sleek steel fireplace LANDSCAPING ART anchor this complete interior remodel, bringing city style—with a renewed by an extraordinary home, its roofing melding with thepremier resource for those building or decoratingtwist­­ a home. —to Jackson Hole. Expertly executed by Howells Architecture landscape. Despite its modern design and size, the home’s profile delivers a blend of western + Design, Dembergh Construction, Kate Binger, of Dwelling, and fits into the contours of the property. Ward + Blake Architects, Itand contemporary design from Willow Cox Construction, ek Reedy Interiors. PHOTO: PAUL WARCHOLarchitects, builders, and interior Creek Woodworks. PHOTO: DAVID AGNELLO designers to art, artists, and galleries. At Homestead we recognize the changing design sense in the Rocky Mountain West and our readers’ desire 93 it. Advertise in to embrace Homestead and join us where


20 YEARS OF HOMESTEAD

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2017 Spring/Summer This hillside residence blends mountain lodge with urban convenience. A hand-selected team including New West Building Company, Enclosure Architecture, Trauner Fay Designs and Frederick Landscaping contributed to produce this meticulously-crafted home. PHOTO: DAVID AGNELLO

2017 Fall/Winter A striking home designed by Richard Keating issued a challenge to all involved—spurring the new owners to embrace contemporary and their designers, WRJ Design, to achieve warmth amid the angularity. PHOTO: ED RIDDELL

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2018 Spring/Summer Simple lines, clean details and walls of windows. Chris Lee, of Design Associates, captures incredible Teton views from every room in this stunning residence, which feels as though it is entirely made of glass. PHOTO: KRAFTY PHOTOS

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2018 Fall/Winter If every house speaks a different language, the latest design by Berlin Architects is fluent in the echoes of the Tetons. This home embodies rustic turned contemporary. The interior space resounds with natural light and views. PHOTO: JIM FAIRCHILD

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2019

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GN.COM

OWICZ

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homestead j a c k s on h o l e a rc h i t e c t u re + i n t e r i o r s + a r t

j a c k s o n h o l e a rc h i t e c t u re + i n t e r i o r s + a r t

20th ANNIVERSARY EDITION

20th ANNIVERSARY EDITION

ISSUE 20

JACKSON, WY | WRJDESIGN.COM

ISSUE 20

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2019 Fall/Winter JLF Architects, Big-D Signature and Verdone Landscape Architects transform an 1890s dairy barn into a contemporary home on the range. PHOTO: AUDREY HALL

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2019 Spring/Summer WRJ Design. Expert sourcing leads to an interior design rich in history, culture, craftsmanship and nature in a majestic mountain home. PHOTO: WILLIAM ABRANOWICZ

Photograph by William Abranowicz

homesteadmag.com

20TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION

2020 Spring/Summer MountainScapes, Clearwater Restoration and Agrostis Inc. combine natural materials with geometric designs to surround this modern home with inventive, enjoyable exterior spaces. PHOTO: KRAFTY PHOTOS

hom esteadm ag.com

20TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION

2020 Fall/Winter Jacque Jenkins-Stireman, Berlin Architects and Two Ocean Builders paired modern materials with traditional treatments in a home designed to suit both the unique site and the clients’ extended family. PHOTO: DAVID AGNELLO

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20 YEARS OF REFLECTION + INSPIRATION STORY ZACHARY DYMOND BARNETT + ELIZABETH CLAIR FLOOD

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ince Homestead’s inception in 2001, homebuilding design in Jackson Hole has evolved significantly. And yet, some goals and challenges have remained the same. For this special anniversary issue, we interviewed a wide range of our valley’s top design experts to get a sense of where we were then as a community and how far we’ve come in the ensuing two decades.

WESTERN STYLE | THE EARLY 2000s When this magazine launched in 2001, the large log home still dominated the Jackson Hole landscape, while a new wave of architects was looking for opportunities to employ a more progressive take on Western design. The ’90s had already experienced a few memorable splashes of “modern,” such as Will Bruder’s Riddell Building, Mad River Boat Trips’ wedge structure and Ward + Blake’s integrated designs. And though some of these had set off skirmishes in the press, they’d also bumped the needle toward a more expansive narrative about the future of Jackson Hole design. Recalls architect John Carney, “Steve Dynia and I were always talking about what Jackson would be. Would it be a Disney version of a frontier town? You couldn’t be a complete modernist because you wouldn’t get any jobs. I’d say, ‘Steve, you can’t do that kind of work here, you need gable roofs.’”

Ellis Nunn + Associates and Teton Heritage Builders

Meanwhile, a multitude of second-home buyers, gentleman ranchers and Wall Street moguls were now arriving with hopes of realizing their frontier dreams. As their modern sensibilities combined with a traditional, rustic homage to early Jackson Hole days, a new, more complex Western style emerged. Architects willing to fulfill the more traditional ranch dreams at that time, such as Danny Williams, Roger Strout and Ellis Nunn, along with talented “log dogs” like Callum Mackay and Steve Leonard (now of Wilson Timber and Log), were experiencing a boom. Our Homestead Fighting Bear Antiques

A WALK THROUGH TIME ...

The Red Chair

Gallinger Trauner Designs

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Residents often come to an architect with predetermined ideas­—a rugged log home, a rustic, elegant timberframe lodge, or lately, a contemporary blending of new technology and traditional materials. —HOMESTEAD 2001

Harker Design

issues then celebrated log lodges appointed with early 20th-century furniture, Navajo rugs and elk mounts displayed over large, stone fireplaces. Paintings by landscape and wildlife masters, like Carl Rungius and Conrad Schwiering, as well as work by local maverick and pop artist Bill Schenck, hung on cabin walls. Keeping up with the demand, Jackson interior designers like Elisa Chambers, of Snake River Interiors, Terry Trauner, now with Trauner Fay Designs, Pamela Stockton, of Stockton & Shirk Interior Designs, and others created nostalgic, iconic interiors with bold browns and reds and cowboy imagery. “In 2000, we were replicating what happened here in the 1920s, ’30s and ’40s,” says antique dealer, stylist and leading vendor of the area’s primitive furniture Terry Winchell, of Fighting Bear Antiques. “The way that I saw it was that I should be selling the stuff that was in a Wyoming lodge in the 1920s, whether it was a Charlie Russell painting, a Navajo rug or a Thomas Molesworth club chair.” Jackson was originally a poor town of one-room cabins, sheds and metal Quonset huts. In the early years, it didn’t boast a significant architectural or interior style, except for the sophisticated Western look

Dan Schou Construction

Berlin Architects

Roger Strout Architects

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Laurie Waterhouse Interiors

at local dude ranches like the Rockefellers’ JY Ranch and Struthers Burt’s Bar BC, and lodges like the Old Faithful Inn. These homegrown interiors blended local art with Indian blankets and baskets, simple cowboy pole chairs and tables, and Arts and Crafts furniture by nationally renowned artists Gustav Stickley and Charles Limbert. One of the most influential architects of the early 2000s, Jonathan Foote created fashionable, rustic retreats in keeping with this historic culture to accommodate the gentleman rancher’s desire for a larger, yet more efficient space. Captivated by the local ranch and dude ranch vernacular, Foote used authentic cabins and barns and essentially linked them together to create larger homes that were in keeping with the wide-open, rugged landscape. “When invading this scenery with a house, one of the first concerns I had was how it was going to live in that scenery without spoiling it,” Foote says. By using rustic materials, he invented a successful model for romantics seeking a classic Western hideaway. “The romance with the West at that time really drove our sensibility around place,” says Foote’s then partner, Paul Bertelli. “We felt these buildings needed to look and feel like they belonged in the West.” Danny Williams Architect

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“It was the contrast of building modern buildings in a rural area. It was almost like a dare.” —STEPHEN DYNIA, DYNIA ARCHITECTS

MOUNTAIN MODERN | 2008 - 2020

In the following decade, contemporary homes gained traction as newcomers craved picture windows framing extraordinary landscapes, lighter rooms and more energyefficient buildings. This was in contrast to the perception of log homes as inherently dark, heavy, cumbersome and out of proportion—exaggerated versions of the old homestead, hence the popular jab, “log cabins on steroids.” Commenting on these cowboy interiors at the time, The New York Times style writer Patricia Beard admonished, “The style makes a bow-legged cowgirl shake in her knees.” People were ready for something new. “The log home ended with the crash of 2008,” says Peter Lee, of Teton Heritage Builders. “Log homes haven’t completely gone away, but pre-2008 was the era when people were weaned on John Wayne, and they liked that rustic feel and the idea of the Jackson Hole cabin. There was a transition after the 2008 crash to mountain modern, mountain contemporary. There was timber frame, then timber, then steel eventually. Seventy percent of our business today is steel structures.” “Once styles started to open up and become more contemporary, we felt the lid come off,” says Toby Grohne, of TKG Construction. “The style was partly driven by aesthetics, and I think a lot of it was driven by zoning changes.” In certain neighborhoods, restrictions on roof heights called for lower buildings. Flatter, less gabled roofs helped clients achieve comfortable, two-story homes within the rules. “We started to see the use of reclaimed wood as accents in interiors; spaces were a little bit brighter rather than heavy timbers with exposed fasteners and large trusses,” says Jed Mixter, of Two Ocean Builders. During this time, Dynia continued to challenge the norm with rusted steel, flatter roofs and modern shapes.

Dwelling

E/Ye Design and Henderson Construction

Hoyt + Harger/CTA Architects

Grace Home Design

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Dan Schou Construction and Mountainscapes

Ward + Blake was integrating structures into the landscape with flat or butterfly roofs, while Carney and others expanded on this conversation, meeting a demand for even more modernstyle buildings. “We were all working toward abstract interpretations of the classical West,” Carney says, “all of us moving in our own way to push this thing forward.” As we moved through the 2000s, this transition continued to be peppered with resistance. When Dynia and Carney finished the theater for the Center for the Arts in 2007, an old-timer questioned Carney: “Where are the logs?” Others received similar pushback. “When we started with sod roofs, people thought we’d lost our minds,” recalls Tom Ward, of Ward + Blake Architects. “It was Mitch and Tom naked and barking in the woods. Now people are more open to the concept. They’ve gone from ultra-conservative to conservative to much more open-minded.” As contemporary visionaries stepped forward, the question persisted: Were these buildings in keeping with place? Did they fit into the natural landscape and connect in a cultural context? This has to be asked about how “boxy” things have become in east Jackson, for example, where older homes are being torn down and hauled away at what some locals consider an alarming rate. “I think modern architecture gets a bad rap in that it is agnostic to place,” says Danny Wicke, Carney’s partner at their new enterprise, Prospect Studio. “I don’t necessarily think that is true. You can do a lot of contemporary design that still harkens back to place and the context and can have a relationship with past and present.” Now, as before, this valley provides evolving opportunities for designers. “Jackson is a very E/Ye Design and Henderson Construction

Carney Logan Burke Architects

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Dembergh Construction and Dynia Architects

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young town, and there really isn’t much of an architectural style here,” says Adam Janak, of Northworks Architects, who enjoys exploring many different styles. Recently, with a nod to the past, but also a distinctly modern aesthetic, Janak updated the classic farmhouse style with large windows and simple cedar siding painted black, creating a classic, yet original modern home. Meanwhile, interiors have also evolved. Bertelli, of JLF Architects, continues to create highly sought-after homes that “look like they were built 100 years ago.” He updates these rugged classics with large, European windows, steel, stone and reclaimed timbers, and a more efficient and contemporary sensibility. When paired with the subtle, muted tones and luxury styles of interior designers Rush Jenkins and Klaus Baer, of WRJ Design, authors of Natural Elegance, and Jane Schwab, author of The Welcoming House, these homes exude a serene, timeless quality.

Schreibeis, of Vera Iconica Architecture, notices a change in her clients’ mindsets. “There’s a paradigm shift in our society on a massive scale. And as we move into this new era, we’ve all been trained for this. Every single architect has some green knowledge. Our clients are asking, ‘How will the environment serve and sustain us?’ They are more than ever in the selfrealization stage.” Others notice little change at all. “After the crash, we thought that maybe we’d see behavior toward a little smaller, a little greener,” Lee says. “I even started a side business 10 years ago, called THB Energy Solutions, to retrofit homes with geothermal heat and solar panels. And it was a lackluster business. I’d show clients how they’d get a 14 percent return on their business, and they’d say, ‘Meh!’ I don’t know if I’m going to be here in seven years.” That said, green building materials, renewable woods like bamboo, and recycled materials are being used now more than ever. “The county also holds us to a high standard of constructing energy-efficient buildings,” says Mixter, of Two Ocean Builders. “And, because we’ve now got all these great European windows with their triple glazing, we’re meeting county codes for energy efficiency with bigger glass.” “Building science has evolved toward green across the board,” says

ARE WE SUSTAINABLE? Looking to the future, on everyone’s minds is how we can create sustainable buildings and live more lightly on the land. Our new structures are more energy-efficient than log homes, but are we doing enough? Veronica

Dwelling and Mill Iron Timberworks

Kinsey Architects

Jacque Jenkins-Stireman Interior Design 101

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20 YEARS OF HOMESTEAD

Andrew Miller, of JH Builders. “We are using better materials and processes, so everything is greener. We went to D.C. and got our PHIUS (Passive House Institute U.S.) certification, but there is really only one architect in the valley who is pushing it. But, generally speaking, insulation and materials perform so much better.” Clients are asking about green, “but they don’t always want to make a sacrifice to do it,” says Chris Lee, of Design Associates Architects. “That said, we can build a house that is going to be here a long time, a happier and healthier house, without giving anything up, and they like that.” Grohne notes that, in an effort to minimize waste, more people are remodeling. Others—architects and contractors—report that clients are downsizing. But, while smaller homes under 10,000 square feet are popping up, Bertelli and Peter Lee confirm that they are still building grand family compounds. Just recently, Lee’s company finished an 18,000-square-foot home on the iconic Puzzleface Ranch property. An anomaly, yes, this project stirred controversy and challenged county codes, then surprised our community when the family put their multimillion-dollar home up for sale. Today, our highly talented pool of valley architects and designers feels responsible for building environmentally friendly, enduring homes. “One of the best green things you can do is keep what you are building out of the landfill,” says Mitch Blake, of Ward + Blake Architects.

WHERE ARE WE NOW? Today, with all of us turned upside down by the COVID-19 pandemic, it is challenging to imagine where current design trends may lead. Clearly, we are seeing a change in the demographics of homeowners as a wave of wealthy 30- and 40-year-olds moves into Jackson Hole. “It’s a younger demographic, and more female,” notes Grohne. “They want to see the Tetons, but they don’t necessarily want to be cowboys or live out in the wild.” These newcomers are more interested in living downtown, where they can find a growing offering of amenities and cultural attractions. This new generation, for the most part, doesn’t necessarily connect to the cowboy myth that dominated the style here 20 years ago. Cowboy accoutrements, fur pillows, skulls and Indian artifacts now seem politically incorrect, says Mary Schmitt, owner of Cayuse Western Americana. “My clients are more interested in historical photographs of this place now than they are in cowboy spurs or wooly chaps,” she says. The trend away from the traditional log cabin continues as

WRJ Design

Carney Logan Burke Associates, Two Ocean Builders, Dwelling and Mountainscapes

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Ellis Nunn Architects, Two Ocean Builders, Willow Creek Interior Design and Mountainscapes


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“Giving life to the hopes and dreams that people have for their homes requires a designer to have empathy, a true love of helping others, and a solid understanding of people’s values and how they want to live and express their most authentic selves through their home.” —ELISA CHAMBERS, SNAKE RIVER INTERIORS

Design Associates and Snake River Interiors

well, says Jenkins. “I grew up in the West, but when we moved back, we had a desire to move beyond the heavy log look. What we saw was an opportunity in our designs to embrace the rugged landscape around us, what we call ‘interroir.’ It is our signature approach. And yes, we see the clientele changing. We’re having to travel a lot more because you need a rich, deep well to draw from when meeting the needs of an evermore sophisticated taste.” Other designers, like Kate Binger, of Dwelling, Jacque Jenkins-Stireman, of Jacque Jenkins-Stireman Design, and Colleen Walls of Colleen McFaddenWalls Interior Design, find clients seeking more original designs with color and contemporary furniture. “We are seeing a trend to incorporate traditional elements, but with a current update,” says Jenkins-Stireman. “Now you can find wools, cashmeres and linens with colorways that are lighter and have more open patterns, so the plaids feel lighter and fresher.” Says Binger, “Current trends are always the driving force of design in any community, but I like to lean heavily on our environment for inspiration for form and function.” JH Builders and Trauner Fay Designs

Teton Heritage Builders and GYDE Architects

Dynia Architects, Jacque Jenkins-Stireman Interior Design and Mill Iron Timberworks 103

Vera Iconica Architecture


20 YEARS OF HOMESTEAD

For the most part, today’s homeowners want more than what is readily available in town. “We are cursed by Pinterest and all the beautiful visions of the world’s showrooms, but with very little in stock,” Grohne says, laughing but obviously thrilled with the challenge. At the time of this issue’s publication, he was trying to help Californian clients choose a white from six different whites over Zoom calls. Emily Janak, of Emily Janak Interiors, says she enjoys collaborating with Jackson Hole clients because they are well-traveled, enthusiastic about living here and open to more eclectic interiors, rather than following

Ward + Blake Architects

trends. Janak references past traditions and established designers in their heyday. “It’s always my goal to create interiors that are relevant for years to come. I really think as a designer you have to push yourself to create things that are not in a catalog, to push it to the next level, to create something more original,” she says. “It’s about striking that balance. You are never going to create a legacy if you create something that is expected.” The enthusiasm and joy that come with building a new home in Jackson Hole exist in balance with the community’s commitment to the valley’s heritage. Recently, young people were moved to save the Café Genevieve block in downtown Jackson, which involved protecting historic buildings and creating space for the community to gather. “We have a lot of talent in this valley, and a lot of high-caliber work is being done here,” Mixter says. What started with the old guard continues. Young designers want to create beautiful, relevant homes, but also an enduring community.

THE FUTURE With all of this, the elephant in the room remains: Will we eventually run out of buildable space? Answers Peter Lee, “Totally. From the day I started in ’96, I’d hear that refrain. Except that every job I’d do I’d drive up to a green field and dig a hole. That isn’t true anymore. Now, our jobs are typically starting with teardowns of houses from the ’90s and before. Houses are getting stripped down and Willow Creek Woodworks

Dubbe Moulder Architects

Stockton & Shirk Interior Design

Howells Architecture + Design, Dembergh Construction, Dwelling and Willow Creek Woodworks 104


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built again for the 21st century. Now we’re seeing build sites with a 25 percent grade, on the cusp of unbuildable. It’s officially happened.” “I think we’ll see more vertical construction and transportation hubs,” says Jamie Farmer, of Farmer Payne Architects. “We’ll see a transfer of density from the outskirts of the county into town to keep us from overflowing.” “As the number of high-end lots with spectacular views decreases, homeowners are focusing more on landscaping,” says Mixter. “It really complements the architecture of a house and reflects the success of the comprehensive project.” Miller says that, “going forward, our vision is possibly 50 percent renovation. We’re seeing a lot of it already, because of the limited availability of land. Homeowners are liking the locations of existing homes, so we expect this to increase in the next 10 years.” “Yes,” agrees Ward, “there’s a pervasive sense we’re running out of land. Smart landowners aren’t developing right now. It’s going to get harder and harder to live here, which is a privilege, not a right. Everyone wants it all: no density but plenty of living space.” Such dilemmas are beyond the solutions that these design experts have to offer, he adds. “History has proven that architects are bad social engineers. We respond

Gilday Architects

Farmer Payne Architects and New West Building Co.

WRJ Design

Dembergh Construction and Dubbe Moulder Architects 105

Jacque Jenkins-Stireman Interior Design


20 YEARS OF HOMESTEAD

Dembergh is grateful. We have been allowed to become the craftsmen that most craftsmen dream of becoming because our clients have allowed us to grow, to learn and become masters of refined vision and design. We thank them. —DON FRANK, DEMBERGH CONSTRUCTION

WRJ Design and JLF Architects

to the times; we don’t decide them. A lot of architects think it’s part of their mission to decide their times. That’s not our mission. Our job is to make incredible houses that people love. That’s all we do—make their underwear ride up when they walk in the door.” Some of Jackson Hole’s experts are looking outside the valley for new inspiration. “I was in Bozeman last fall,” recounts Larry Berlin, of Berlin Architects. “I was so impressed with what I saw there on those back streets: lots of renovations and buildings done in such a way that they respected traditional architecture while adding some wonderful twists, with interesting colors and forms that all blended together really nicely. They had real soul.” As home design here has continued to evolve, the ever-expanding collection of visions and voices has gelled into a vibrant, thoughtful, caring community. “Every project that we get, I am over the moon for the opportunity to work with people here,” says Nona Yehia, of GYDE Architects. “With the quality of this community, you consistently feel gratitude to have that conversation with people who care about design.” Berlin Architects

Iris Designs

Forsyth + Brown Interior Design

Couloir Construction and A43 Architecture 106

Colleen McFadden-Walls Interior Design


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ENHANCING OUR EXTERIORS STORY ELIZABETH CLAIR FLOOD

T

wenty years ago, landscape designers remember giant, mowed lawns circling Jackson Hole’s residences, carpeting large expanses from homes to riverbanks, or unfurling to the base of impressive mountain views. But, with the decrease in available land and the evolution of a more sustainable consciousness, people today desire wilder exteriors, ones that require less maintenance. “I’ve seen a lot more interest in smaller lawns, xeriscape plants and organic solutions for fertilizing, weeds and pests,” says Carrie Baysek, retail manager of MD Nursery & Landscaping for 22 years. Sean Macauley, of Jackson’s Mountainscapes Inc., has observed similar trends. In recent years he has received more requests for smaller lawns softened with wild grasses around the edges. “We are seeing lawns shrink, less bluegrass and more native grasses,” he says. “We are seeing more sustainable designs, so taking into consideration more native plant material and drought-tolerant plants.” Thanks to the studies by environmental group Friends of Fish Creek, clients are also increasingly concerned about the detrimental effects of fertilizer running into local rivers. Now, Macauley and others install “trout lawns”: wide swaths of native grasses between lawns and water. This limits the amount of fertilizers seeping into and polluting our waterways. Over the years, like home styles and fabric colors, flower tastes have also evolved. Historically, Jackson Hole clients with new log homes planted colorful gardens, a cheery respite from long, white winters. Limited by a short growing season, certain classics thrive here, like the old yellow homestead rose, columbine, wood’s rose and willows. “Native plants have always been popular throughout the year,” Baysek says. “We have risk of frost really any day, so it is good to stick with what works.” Today, many valley residents, especially those living in more contemporary homes, desire more geometric gardens appointed with ornamental grasses and a muted color palette. “People want white flowers,” Baysek says. “It’s an interesting trend. They see white all winter, and then they want all white flowers in summer.” But styles will change, she adds. “So many ornamental grasses have been planted in the Jackson Hole landscape in the past five years. I predict in five more years everyone will be sick of them and want them all ripped out—kind of like the huge juniper shrubs used for foundation planting in the 1980s and ’90s that everyone got tired of looking at.”

Clearwater Restoration

Mountainscapes

Jed Mixter, of Two Ocean Builders, has also noticed an increased attention to exterior spaces. “We are running out of primo lots with massive mountain and river views,” he says, explaining that clients now focus their attention on how they will enjoy the outdoor spaces around their homes. How does the east side serve for morning coffee? How does the west side welcome guests for cocktails? Macauley agrees: “We are definitely seeing more attention to outdoor living spaces—a covered porch, a patio with a built-in barbecue or pizza oven.” Currently, garden shops around the valley are seeing a surge in interest in plants and gardening. This summer, in particular, people are looking forward to staying home and enjoying the beauty in their backyards.

MD Nursery + Landscaping 107

Specialized construction and consulting company creating natural settings, biologically functioning

Agrostis Inc. and Mountainscapes


WILSON, WYOMING

307.690.4551

WWW.TETONGARDENS.COM


homesteadmag.com

ARTIST AMY LAY

ART

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ART

GALLERY

NEW WEST FINE ART GALLERY NEWWESTFINEART.COM

The knife-crafting journey of Corey Milligan (left) began in 1996, when he set out to make the perfect kitchen knife. Since then, New West Knifeworks has designed the ultimate array of blades and knife blocks. It is now proud to expand into the latest chapter: the New West Fine Art Gallery, featuring the oil paintings of local artist Connor Liljestrom (right).

CREATIVE COLLABORATION FINE KNIVES + FINE ART STORY MELISSA THOMASMA PHOTOS ARTHUR BLUE

B

eauty isn’t merely something to be admired from a safe distance; in the West, it often emerges in surprising and compelling places. Corey Milligan and Connor Liljestrom both firmly believe that beautiful things are best appreciated through authentic experience and interaction. That’s why their friendship-turned-collaboration on the New West Fine Art Gallery— featuring Liljestrom’s stunning contemporary Western paintings alongside Milligan’s world-class blades and knife blocks—feels both electrically innovative and effortless. “I believe that Connor is poised to be one of the most highly regarded Western contemporary artists in the United States,” says Milligan. It’s not

difficult to see why. Liljestrom’s large-format oil paintings feature bold colors and forms that are inspired by Western heritage and the rugged Wyoming landscape in which he was raised. The painter has cultivated a rich palette, and illustrates hauntingly elegant shapes of Western icons and mythology. The combination is compelling; it is at once an homage to the region’s history and an invitation to contemplate the modern West. While his education is extensive—he studied fine art with an emphasis in oil painting at the University of Wyoming—and his style masterful, Liljestrom wants his work to feel approachable and engaging to all viewers. “The West is a place of beauty; it’s all around us,” he observes. “And we need

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ABOVE Liljestrom turns to the history, landscape and community of Jackson Hole for inspiration on the canvas. “We seek to surround ourselves with beauty,” he says. “Like the art of Corey’s knife blocks or blades, my paintings are another way that we can reflect the world’s outside beauty on the insides of our homes.” When I Was Your Age (67” x 79”) TOP RIGHT With a degree in fine arts from the University of Wyoming, Liljestrom employs bold colors, haunting shapes and echoes of a classic Western motif in his oil paintings. Sleeping Indian I (72” x 60”) BOTTOM RIGHT Utilizing a palette of colors that reflects the Western landscape, Liljestrom’s imaginative images are both approachable and deeply evocative. Bison B. Bison (72” x 60”)

to remember that our surroundings are an important subject we can curate.” Both Liljestrom and Milligan feel a profound connection to the Jackson Hole community and landscape, and draw inspiration from its pristine lands as well as its constant invitations to seek adventure. Whether it’s an exquisitely crafted kitchen blade or an imaginative painting adorning a wall, the two collaborators agree that life is richest when it’s infused with art. Their respective passions have dovetailed in an inspiring way while keeping focused on showcasing visually compelling pieces of functional art. “There’s an inherent value of beauty, especially when it’s fused with functionality,” says Liljestrom. True to both men’s draw to experience-driven interactions with Western heritage and fine craftsmanship, the gallery is home to another unique element of New West Fine Art Gallery: tomahawk throwing. In the alley tucked just behind Liljestrom’s canvases and Milligan’s handcarved wood-and-stone Rock Blocks, visitors have the opportunity to channel their inner mountain men by flinging handmade, traditional weapons at a target. Located at 98 Center Street on Jackson Hole’s historic Town Square, the New West Fine Art Gallery invites visitors to pause and connect, to see the West through Liljestrom and Milligan’s lenses. Their collaboration is an energetic confluence of adventure, reflection and deep appreciation of the West.

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ART

CHAMPIONING LOCAL CREATIVITY THE FALL ARTS FESTIVAL STORY KATY NINER PHOTOS LATHAM JENKINS

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very September, Jackson artists become the toast of the town, fêted for the creative community they’ve cultivated and the artwork they’ve shared with the valley and beyond. Such has been the celebratory core of the Jackson Hole Fall Arts Festival since its founding 36 years ago. While the calendar of events has changed over the decades, the festival’s ethos has endured, a commitment best expressed through the annual featured artist, whose commissioned work graces all promotional pieces, from posters to wine bottles. Committed as ever to championing local creativity, the Jackson Hole Chamber of Commerce plans to adapt this year’s festival—slated for September 9th to the 20th—by shifting focus to online participation and smaller events in galleries, says Maureen Murphy, director of special events for the chamber. For instance, the QuickDraw—a fan favorite that finds intrepid artists racing the clock to produce collectible works—may move indoors, and the culminating auction may welcome online bidders. “No matter the venue or the format,” says Murphy, “the festival will remain a highlight of the Jackson arts scene.”

Artist Kathryn Turner showcasing her work during Palates and Palettes

LEFT QuickDraw Art Sale + Auction, Fred Kingwill painting in plein air. ABOVE Paintings are auctioned immediately following the 90-minute session.

FOR A SCHEDULE OF THE VAST ARRAY OF CULTURAL EVENTS—OPEN GALLERIES, PALATES AND PALETTES, QUICKDRAW ART SALE + AUCTION­—GO T0

JACKSONHOLECHAMBER.COM

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ANNUAL LIVE AUCTION: SEPTEMBER 18 & 19, 2020 HOWARD TERPNING (1927–), It’s Been a Long Day, 1976 oil on canvas, 24 x 34 inches, Estimate: $200,000–$300,000

CARL RUNGIUS (1869–1959), Wyoming Elk, ca. 1910 oil on canvas, 30 x 46 1/4 inches, Estimate: $150,000–$250,000

ACCEPTING QUALITY CONSIGNMENTS FOR OUR UPCOMING LIVE AND ONLINE AUCTIONS COORDINATOR@JACKSONHOLEARTAUCTION.COM 866-549-9278 | JACKSONHOLEARTAUCTION.COM JACKSON HOLE | SCOTTSDALE | SANTA FE | NEW YORK


homestead

SHOP THE BEST OF THE WEST

WESTERN DESIGN CONFERENCE EXHIBIT + SALE STORY SASHA FINCH | PHOTOS (CLOCKWISE FROM TOP) AUDREY HALL, WRJ DESIGN ASSOCIATES, NEW THOUGHT DIGITAL

E

ach September, the return of the annual Western Design Conference Exhibit + Sale lights up the town of Jackson, Wyoming, attracting thousands of art lovers and buyers during the Fall Arts Festival. For four days the 28,000-square-foot Snow King Event Center is transformed into the largest art gallery and design center in Jackson.  In its 28th year, the WDC Exhibit + Sale has expanded into a must-see event connecting exhibiting artists, from cowboy to contemporary, with the public, as well as other galleries and designers in Jackson. Buyers shop direct, as the WDC takes no commission. A day pass (10 a.m. to 5 p.m.) with complimentary happy hour is just $15. Thursday evening’s Opening Preview Party kicks off the four-day event with a New York-style fashion show, a live auction of art by previous award winners, a Designer Show House, and the full Exhibit + Sale, with juried entries by more than 100 artists on display. While you shop, enjoy five open bars and amazing food stations, all included with a $50 general admission ticket (6 to 10 p.m.) or $125 VIP reserved seat (5:30 to 10 p.m.). The addition of a Designer Show House to the four-day WDC Exhibit + Sale has been a brilliant way to showcase the use of functional art in a residential setting. Last year’s Designer Show House award for Best Interior Design went to Anne Buresh Interior Design. Based in Charlotte, North Carolina, and Jackson, Buresh combines her East Coast sense of elegance with the natural, wild beauty of the West. She will return to curate a room again in this year’s fiveroom Show House.  Also returning is Harker Design, located in Jackson, Salt Lake City and Idaho Falls. Harker has created several Designer Show House spaces, including a spectacular kitchen and living rooms, previously winning Best Interior Design twice.  WRJ Design, a Jackson firm with New York City roots, has designed rooms and a façade for the Designer Show House, and last year published their book Natural Elegance: Luxurious Mountain Living, graciously signing copies at the event.  Previous award winner Jeremiah Young, of Billings, Montana, collaborated with Old

DESIGNER SHOW HOUSE ROOMS CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: Anne Buresh Interior Design, WRJ Design, Harker Design, Forsyth & Brown Interior Design with Allison Merritt, WDC executive director

SCHEDULE + TICKET INFORMATION

WESTERNDESIGNCONFERENCE.COM SAVE THE DATES SEPTEMBER 10-13, 2020 SEPTEMBER 9-12, 2021 • SEPTEMBER 8-11, 2022

Hickory and Pendleton on a bunk room and front porch. Nanette Mattei Interior Design, of Wilson, incorporated native turquoise elements in a contemporary lounge to bring forth the spirit of living in the West. The expansive, rustic porch façade was constructed by B&B Builders of Rigby, Idaho, and furnished with outdoor seating and Native American textiles. If you share a love of art, the West and shopping for one-of-a-kind handcrafted objects to create your own personal statement of natural elegance, join us at the Western Design Conference Exhibit + Sale. 

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When Trust Matters Long Reimer Winegar LLP is a boutique Wyoming law firm with the expertise and sophistication of a firm with national reach. Our experienced and dedicated staff of 20 attorneys is licensed in multiple states and takes a collaborative approach to working with clients, with each other, and with our clients’ trusted advisors. This team is your expert in real estate, trusts, and navigating Wyoming’s unique tax and estate benefits, wherever you may be resident. RE AL E STATE T R A N SAC T I O N E X P E RT S

LRW’s attorneys have a nuanced understanding of every stage of your real estate transaction. We’ll walk you through, step by step, and provide clarity, expertise, and efficiency. Our firm can advise you on financing, construction, development, corporate involvement, tax implications, and investment potential for your real estate transaction.

E STA B L I S H I N G R ES I D E NC E I N WYO M IN G?

Our firm can advise you on establishing domicile here in Wyoming and making the most of our state’s tax and business benefits. We take a team-based and personalized approach to each client and like to say, “We’re here to help, not to take over.” We know you have valued advisors in your home state, and we offer an integrative strategy to create the best outcome for you.

YO UR JAC KSO N H OL E AMB ASSAD O R S

The LRW attorneys know Wyoming and Jackson Hole. More importantly, we have roots in the community and the state. Our partners and staff attorneys have served in leadership positions or on boards at organizations including the Wyoming State Bar Foundation, the College of Law Advisory Board, Equal Justice Wyoming, the Teton County Library Foundation Board, and many others. There is no better partner for your introduction to the valley.

Amy M. Staehr partner astaehr@lrw-law.com

Thomas L. Hartnett associate thartnett@lrw-law.com

Justin Daraie associate jdaraie@lrw-law.com

Jordan S. Chandler associate jchandler@lrw-law.com

270 W. PEARL, SUITE 103, JACKSON WY 83001 | 307.734.1908 CHEYENNE • JACKSON • EVANSTON • PARK CITY, UTAH • DENVER, CO

Erika M. Nash partner enash@lrw-law.com

Christopher M. Reimer partner creimer@lrw-law.com

www.lrw-law.com


homestead

JACKSON HOLE SHOWCASE OF HOMES

RAISING THE BAR FOR THE DESIGN COMMUNITY WHILE SUPPORTING LOCAL CHARITIES STORY JULIE FUSTANIO KLING PHOTOS LATHAM JENKINS

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ach autumn, included in a busy September week during the Fall Arts Festival, Homestead magazine hosts its signature event highlighting the valley’s top professionals in architecture, interiors, building and landscape design: the Jackson Hole Showcase of Homes. The tour benefits local charities, having donated more than $50,000 to Jackson Hole nonprofits since its inception in 2013. It takes people across the valley and across aesthetics, welcoming them to step inside a diverse array of locally designed and built homes and to meet the valley’s top talent. “I’ve been coming for years,” says Imaging Spence, whose home was on the 2018 tour. “I just love seeing the innovation and mix of styles.” The 2019 showcase featured four diverse projects, two in the Shooting Star subdivision, one in east Jackson and one north of Saddle Butte. At the first home on the tour, the feature interior designer Jacque Jenkins-Stireman was most proud of, besides the drinking library she designed for the original owner, was the way Berlin Architects sited the house to maximize its privacy. “When you do a project like this, you worry that it isn’t going to be broadly accepted, but this house sold in one week,” she says. The second home, a Shooting Star cabin designed by JLF Architects and rented out by The Clear Creek Group, had a cadence and coziness that made it inviting for multiple families to nest. The third home boasted mechanized screens detached from aluminum I-beams opening up to the Elk Refuge. Says builder Craig Olivieri, “We’ve done some intricate work but nothing like this before.” Architect Paul Boillot described the project as “an exercise in simplicity and elegance.” The fourth home was an homage to the Tetons, with 12-foot sliding doors and a roofline like an upward nod to the majesty of the mountains. A custom concrete fireplace and coffee table were commissioned by interior designer Kate Binger, of Dwelling.

LOCAL CHARITIES SUPPORTED BY OUR 2019 EVENT: Grand Teton National Park Foundation Jackson Hole Volunteer Fire Department Community Foundation of Jackson Hole One22

ABOVE The blaze of the outdoor fireplace reflected by the steelencased Italian windows in front stunned visitors. LEFT With The Clear Creek Group’s signature concierge service, this home offers privacy and convenience at the same time. “People love staying here,” says TCCG’s Chelsea Beets. “It is an extremely cozy and inviting home.”

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GIVING YOU THE PEACE OF MIND T H AT Y O U R A S S E T S A R E S A F E A N D S E C U R E LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED FOR OVER 19 YEARS

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RESOURCE DIRECTORY

2020

RESOURCE DIRECTORY ARCHITECTURE ANKENY ARCHITECTURE 307-413-0904 AnkenyArchitecture.com BAXTER DESIGN STUDIO 307-690-5860 BDStudio.com BERLIN ARCHITECTS 307-733-5697 BerlinArchitects.com DESIGN ASSOCIATES ARCHITECTS 307-733-3600 DesignAssociatesArchitects.com DYNIA ARCHITECTS 307-733-3766 Dynia.com FARMER PAYNE ARCHITECTS 307-264-0080 FarmerPayneArchitects.com JLF ARCHITECTS 406-587-8888 JLFArchitects.com

BUILDERS + CONTRACTORS BIG-D SIGNATURE 307-733-9822 BigDSignature.com BONTECOU CONSTRUCTION 307-733-2990 BontecouConstruction.com COULOIR CONSTRUCTION 307-699-3949 CouloirConstruction.com DEMBERGH CONSTRUCTION 307-733-0133 DemberghJH.com JH BUILDERS 307-734-5245 JHBuilder.com MILL IRON TIMBERWORKS 307-733-0529 MillIronTimberworks.com SEVEN GENERATIONS CONSTRUCTION 307-413-1909 7GConstruction.com

KINSEY LLC 307-203-2852 KinseyArch.com PLATT DANA ARCHITECTS 646-336-6270 PlattDana.com PROSPECT STUDIO 307-264-2600 prospectjh.com VERA ICONICA ARCHITECTURE 307-201-1642 VeraIconicaArchitecture.com WARD + BLAKE ARCHITECTS 307-733-6867 wardblake.com

SHAW CONSTRUCTION 307-733-8401 ShawConstruction.net TETON HERITAGE BUILDERS 307-733-8771 TetonHeritageBuilders.com TWO OCEAN BUILDERS 307-733-2822 TwoOceanBuilders.com

CABINETRY + CUSTOM MILLWORK WILLOW CREEK WOODWORKS INC. 208-522-2486 WillowCW.com

EVENTS + ORGANIZATIONS JACKSON HOLE FALL ARTS FESTIVAL 307-733-3316 JacksonHoleChamber.com

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JACKSON HOLE SHOWCASE OF HOMES JacksonHoleShowcase.com WESTERN DESIGN EXHIBIT + SALE 307-690-9719 WesternDesignConference.com

FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS FIRST REPUBLIC BANK 307-264-7888 FirstRepublic.com

GALLERIES, ANTIQUES + ARTISTS ALTAMIRA FINE ART 307-739-4700 AltamiraArt.com CAYUSE WESTERN AMERICANA 307-739-1940 CayuseWA.com FIGHTING BEAR ANTIQUES 307-733-2669 FightingBear.com NEW WEST FINE ART GALLERY 307-730-9262 NewWestFineArt.com

SCANDIA HOME 307-733-1038 ScandiaHome.com TWENTY TWO HOME 307-733-9922 TwentyTwoHome.com WILD WEST DESIGNS 307-734-7600 WildWestDesignsInc.com WRJ HOME DESIGN STUDIO + INTERIORS 307-200-4881 WRJDesign.com

LEGAL SERVICES LONG REIMER WINEGAR 307-734-1908 LRW-Law.com

MOVING + STORAGE BLACK DIAMOND MOVING CO. 307-739-8553 BlackDiamondMoving.com

PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

INTERIOR DESIGN

THE CLEAR CREEK GROUP 307-732-3400 TheClearCreekGroup.com

COLLEEN MCFADDEN-WALLS INTERIOR DESIGN 307-413-1508 CMWID.com

OUTPOST 307-690-4790 OutpostJH.com

REAL ESTATE

DWELLING 307-733-8582 DwellingJH.com FORSYTH & BROWN INTERIOR DESIGN 307-200-6608 ForsythAndBrown.com

LIVE WATER PROPERTIES LATHAM JENKINS 307-690-1642 LiveWaterJacksonHole.com

SPECIALISTS

PAMELA GIBSON FINE ART 503-780-3256 PamelaGibsonArtist.com

JACQUE JENKINS-STIREMAN INTERIOR DESIGN 307-739-3008 JJStiremanDesign.com

TAYLOE PIGGOTT GALLERY 307-733-0555 TayloePiggottGallery.com

SNAKE RIVER INTERIORS 307-733-3005 SnakeRiverInteriors.com

CLEARWATER RESTORATION 307-699-3377 ClearwaterRestoration.com

TURNER FINE ART 307-734-4444 TurnerFineArt.com

WRJ DESIGN 307-200-4881 WRJDesign.com

HELIUS LIGHTING GROUP 801-463-1111 HeliusLighting.com

HOME AUTOMATION

LANDSCAPING + LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

JACKSON MATTRESS SHOP + FURNITURE COMPANY 307-734-9111 JacksonMattressShop.com

JACKSON HOLE AV 307-733-2629 JacksonHoleAV.com

HOMEWARES KISMET FINE RUGS 307-739-8984 KismetRugs.com LINEN ALLEY 307-734-7424 LinenAlley.com THE PERLMAN PROJECT 307-264-4143 ThePerlmanProject.com

AGROSTIS INC. 307-413-1883 AgrostisInc.com

ARCHITECTURAL STONE & TILE 307-732-1819 ASTJH.com

MONTANA RECLAIMED LUMBER COMPANY 406-763-9102 MTReclaimed.com

MD NURSERY AND LANDSCAPING 208-354-8816 MDLandscapingInc.com MOUNTAINSCAPES INC. 307-734-7512 MountainscapesJH.com TETON GARDENS 307-690-4551 TetonGardens.com

MOUNTAIN LAND DESIGN 307-200-3313 MountainLandDesign.com TETON ART SERVICES 307-413-3312 TetonartServices.com TRITON INTERNATIONAL WOODS 252-823-6675 TritonWoods.com

ROCKY MOUNTAIN HARDWARE 307-732-0078 RockyMountainHardware.com

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YOU DREAM. WE BUILD.

JACKSON HOLE, WY | BIG SKY, MT tetonheritagebuilders.com


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JACKSON, WY | WRJDESIGN.COM Photograph by William Abranowicz

Profile for Circ Design

Homestead Magazine 2020 - Jackson Hole Architecture, Interior Design and Art  

Homestead Magazine is Jackson Hole’s premier resource for art, architecture, real estate, and interior design. With a focus on the blend of...

Homestead Magazine 2020 - Jackson Hole Architecture, Interior Design and Art  

Homestead Magazine is Jackson Hole’s premier resource for art, architecture, real estate, and interior design. With a focus on the blend of...

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