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Volume 3 Issue 2/Spring 2012 (Display until July 1, 2012) WillametteValleyLife.com

The Covered Bridges of the Willamette Valley

Interview: Asleep At The Wheel’s Dan Walton

The Willamette Valley’s Fastest Growing Family Publication Spring 2012 • Willamette Valley Life

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May 2012 Iris Art Show Schreiner's Iris Gardens Display 3-Mayor's Prayer Breakfast 5-Keizer Heritage Center Iris Reception

Place

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12-Distinguished Young Women Program

Iris & AG Showcase Crown the Hound Helicopter Rides 19-Iris Festival Parade Keizer Iris Run 5K & KIDZ 3K Mayor's Pet Parade

13-Firefighters Mother's Day Breakfast

Rev up @ the Renaissance

17-19-Library Book Sale

20-Keizer Iris Run Half & 10K

17-Iris Sponsor Recognition Luncheon

Biker's Poker Run

Iris Fest Kick-Off Party 17-20-KeizerFest Tent Funtastic Carnival & Midway 18-Willamette Valley Chamber Greeters

Pleasure Purpose

18-20-Keizer Station Fun Center Exhibitors & Shows

Lakepoint Community Breakfast ZUMBA Tent Party 26-Iris Fields Trolley Excursion 28-Schreiner's Iris Garden Big Band & Chicken BBQ

Iris Golf Tournament Golf Ball Drop & McNary Golf Course 50th Celebration

A KEIZER CHAMBER OF COMMERCE EVENT

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Willamette Valley Life • Spring 2012

503-393-9111


LETTER FROM THE PUBLISHER

Spring Cleaning

CONTENTS

T

he cherry tree just outside my office window has pink blossoms on it. A little early I hear, so that isn’t particularly weird, but now, as of this morning, they have snow on them. It’s like the weather is having a little argument with itself. “It’s spring.” “No, it’s winter.” “No, it’s spring.” Whatever it is, it seems like it’s just another weird season in the Willamette Valley. Spring is also the time that you’re supposed to clean, organize and throw out all the stuff you don’t need anymore (who came up with that idea?). That’s my clever way (maybe not so clever) of segueing into this new issue of Willamette Valley Life. We’ve been doing a little design spring cleaning and have freshened up the look of the magazine. Nothing earth shattering, but a few changes nonetheless. When my wife and I first moved to the Willamette Valley eight years ago,

MEET THE PRESS:

THIS MONTH’S CONTRIBUTORS

Cindy Dauer is a freelance writer and photographer living in Oregon. As a journalist, she has covered a wide variety of topics from arts and entertainment to local news. Recently, her work has appeared in several mid-Valley publications, and her online writing has been viewed around the world. A native of the Northwest, Cindy loves outdoor adventures and exploring local culture. Willamette Valley native Loren Depping is a songwriter, teacher and fledgling pedal steel guitar player. He walks avidly, loves Buck Owens and the Buckaroos, and writes from his home in the Valley’s most underrated town. Salem native Gus Frederick works as a Multimedia Specialist for the Oregon Office of Private Health Partnerships. His background includes working as a graphic artist, animationist, filmmaker and photographer. He currently lives in Silverton, Oregon with his cat and extensive 78 rpm record collection. Jessica Gardner loves the outdoors, enjoys a good cabernet every now and then, and wishes she could fly away in Doctor Who’s TARDIS one day.

I was shocked to see so many covered bridges in the Valley. Let me restate that: I was completely shocked to see any covered bridges in the Valley. If you’re new to the area, or maybe you’ve been here forever and haven’t ventured out to discover these artifacts from another time, you need to put this on your spring and summer bucket list. Writer Loren Depping took a grand tour of them last month and came back with this issue’s feature on page 6. Thank you for picking up Willamette Valley Life. I hope you enjoy reading what we’ve put together, and I hope you enjoy your spring!

Ken Gardner writes for life, financial liberty and the pursuit of member happiness. He has worked in the financial industry for over 10 years and does not have perfect credit…but he’s getting there. Ryan Reichert is originally from Northeast Ohio and relocated to the Willamette Valley to further his career in the wine industry. He has received both his Intermediate and Advanced certifications from the Wine & Spirits Education Trust and is also a certified French wine enthusiast and Spanish Wine Educator. Ryan strives to learn all he can about wine and to share his passion with everyone. nwwhites.com. Tami Richards is a native of Salem. An avid bibliophile, she has a keen interest in the people of the community, both past and present, local and farreaching. She enjoys the Willamette Valley for all the obvious reasons, but her favorite aspect is taking advantage of all the rivers and streams— day-hiking along them, smelling that amazing fresh scent, and searching for waterfalls to photograph.

LOREN DEPPING

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DEPAR TMENT S

FEATURE

4 Valley Floor 8 People & Places 12 Daycation

Covered Bridges of the Willamette Valley

Oregon is home to 52 bridges, the majority concentrated in the Willamette Valley. Writer Loren Depping takes us on a tour of some of his favorites.

14 Music & Entertainment 16 Time Capsule 18 The Vine 20 Your Money ON THE COVER Ritner Creek Covered Bridge Photo: Loren Depping

PUBLISHERS/EDITORS Randy and Dawn Hill

EMAIL publisher@willamettevalleylife.com

ASSOCIATE EDITOR Jessica Gardner

WEBSITE www.willamettevalleylife.com

ART DIRECTION Hill Design Studios

Willamette Valley Life Magazine is published quarterly. Opinions expressed in this magazine are those of the authors and not necessarily those of Willamette Valley Life Magazine. This publication cannot be reproduced in any form without written consent from Willamette Valley Life Magazine. Although we have made very effort to insure the accuracy of the information in this publication, due to the passage of time and the anomalies inherent in the publishing process, we cannot be responsible for errors or incorrect information. Please contact the individual establishments to confirm information.

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS AND PHOTOGRAPHERS Cindy Dauer, Loren Depping, Gus Frederick, Jessica Gardner, Ken Gardner, Randy Hill, Ryan Reichert, Tami Richards ADVERTISING SALES L. Andrew Brown/Concept Marketing Randy Hill PHONE 503.507.1228 MAILING ADDRESS P.O. Box 17264 Salem, Oregon 97305

25,000 copies printed and distributed throughout the Willamette Valley. Copyright 2012 by Willamette Valley LIfe Magazine

One year subscriptions are $16. Send check or money order to Subscriptions: P.O. Box 17264, Salem, OR 97305. Make payable to “Willamette Valley Life.”

Spring 2012 • Willamette Valley Life

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VA L LE Y F LOOR

Bell at Bach

Garden of Gentle Breeze

G

arden of Gentle Breeze is a green oasis crisscrossed by footpaths, three gentle ponds and the soothing sounds of small waterfalls. After studying abroad in Tokyo, Corvallis resident Jay Gray returned to Japan many times over the years, making a point to visit some of the ancient Japanese gardens there. A dream to develop a garden on Gray’s property in Corvallis became reality with help from Mike Riddle of Trillium Landscape and Masa Mizuno, one of the Directors of Landscape for the Portland Japanese Garden. Garden of Gentle Breeze features

S

uperstar violinist Joshua Bell will be featured at the 2012 Oregon Bach Festival. Featuring three masterworks by Felix Mendelssohn, the festival opens June 29 in Eugene and June 30 in Portland. Helmuth Rilling, in his 42nd and penultimate year as artistic director, conducts both concerts. Bell’s OBF debut was announced at the January 22 annual meeting of the Friends of the Festival. The Festival also announced a return of Juilliardtrained, piano-playing siblings The 5 Browns, headlining a July 12 musical tribute to Hollywood in Eugene’s Silva Concert Hall. Bell and the Browns join a lineup that already includes harpsichordist/ conductor Matthew Halls, keyboardist

Memorial Weekend In The Wine Country

Angela Hewitt, the Portland Baroque Orchestra, organist John Scott, and pop orchestra Pink Martini. Based at the University of Oregon in Eugene, with a four-concert series in Portland, the OBF expands to five other Oregon cities and thirty ticketed concerts in 2012—the broadest reach in its history. A recipient of the Avery Fisher Prize, and the newly named Music Director of The Academy of St. Martin in the Fields, Bell will perform Mendelssohn’s Violin Concerto, the composer’s most celebrated contribution to orchestral music. Bell takes Mendelssohn one daring step further by performing his own cadenza—the work’s climactic extended solo.

H

op in your car (don’t forget your designated driver) May 26–28, 2012, for the 22nd annual Memorial Weekend in the Wine Country when more than 150 wineries and tasting rooms will be open across the Willamette Valley. This a great opportunity to visit some of the region’s small, family-owned wineries rarely open to the public as well as larger wineries and tasting rooms. Taste new wines from your favorite labels, sample from the barrel with winemakers, and enjoy specialty food pairings and live music. Take part in a vineyard tour or enjoy a picnic, all while savoring the region’s acclaimed Pinot Noir, Pinot Gris and other exciting wines. For more info and a listing of wineries, visit willamettewines.com.

Valley place names 101: Say it like a Valleyite

Y

ou’re in a strange place with strange place names, and you want to fit in and not blow your cover. In the Willamette Valley, where strange place names are the norm rather than the exception, this is an even bigger challenge. Whether you’re a newcomer or a long time resident who still can’t pronounce some of these places correctly, we’re here to help. Here’s a few of the most difficult to get right (in no particular order). 1) Willamette: wil-LAMM-met (the second syllable is pronounced like “lamb”) 2) Abiqua: AB-ih-kwa 3) Champoeg: sham-POO-ee 3) Eugene: yoo-JEEN (the stress goes on the second syllable, not the first) 4

4) Gervais: JER-vis 5) Scio: SIGH-oh 6) Monmouth: Mon-muth 7) Molalla: Muh-lah-lah 8) Chemeketa: Chem-eh-keh-tuh 9) Chemawa: Chem-ah-wah 10) Philomath: Fill-low-muth

Willamette Valley Life • Spring 2012

both a tea garden and strolling garden. Admission to the garden is free and open to the public. For more information about the garden, hours and directions, visit gardenofgentlebreeze.com.

You Wonderful Ewe

T

he Linn County Lamb and Wool Fair will celebrate its 77th anniversary with a three day festival, May 18–20, 2012, in the Willamette Valley town of Scio. This year’s attractions include a little something for everyone, featuring a motorcycle and car show, street dance, quilt and flower show, tractor show, fiber arts show, and fleece contest. Activities for kids include a pie eating contest, talent and pet shows, and Hula Hoop contest. For more information, visit lambfair.org.


S P R I N G

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C A L E N D A R

April, May, June

informational booths, and displays focused on actions to keep our environment healthy. earthdayoregon.com. 27–28 – The Oregon Garden Brewfest – Silverton. Last year’s attendees enjoyed a multitude of seasonal and flagship beers from over 30 breweries, live music and Northwestern cuisine. This year’s event is set to be even bigger with more breweries and music. oregongarden.org.

March 31 through April 30 – Wooden Show Tulip Festival

APRIL March 31 through April 30 – Wooden Show Tulip Festival – Woodburn. Bring your family and enjoy over 40 acres of tulips and daffodils. Delight in a variety of daily and weekend activities along with the Tulip Farm’s beautiful fields. 503.634.2243. woodenshoe.com/tulip-fest. 1–30 – Dundee Hills Passport Tour – Various locations. The Dundee Hills Passport grants holders 50-100% off tastings at over 25 participating wine tasting rooms, along with special offers from area restaurants, shops, inns and B&Bs. Receive a stamp at each location and create a memorable keepsake with your passport. dundeehills.org. 4–5 – Red Lips & Tulips Founders Day Festival – Canby. This celebration features Gypsy jazz music and homemade Hungarian goulash. New releases of reserve wines with European style foods will be available for the beginning of the vineyard season and the blessing of the vines. 503.651.3190. stjosefswinery.com/events-tastings. April 6 through May 28 – Grand Ronde Women “Our Story” – Salem. Women have always held vital and varied roles among Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde, whose members descend from many Northwest bands. This exhibition celebrates the women of the Grand Ronde community, past, present and future. 503.585.7012. willametteheritage.org. 7 – MEGGA Hunt – Springfield. This egg hunt goes beyond the ordinary with live entertainment, crafts, the Willamalane Train and more than 20,000 prize eggs. 541.736.4544. willamalane.org. 7 – Brownsville Easter Egg Hunt – Brownsville. Children are encouraged

to bring their own baskets to find multi-colored eggs in Pioneer Park. 541.928.0831. historicbrownsville.com 13 – Shakesperger’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream – Eugene. Presented by Bridgeway House, come watch hopes and dreams blossom as children and young adults affected by autism perform in this original showcase. These parodies, crafted by the performers themselves, offer a unique perspective of the comedies and tragedies of William Shakespeare. 541.682.5000. hultcenter.org. 13 – Silverton Ladies Night Out – Silverton. Come one, come all for an exciting evening under the big top! Shop at more than thirty unique vendors with quality products, win amazing prizes, nosh on tasty treats, sip signature cocktails and dance the night away with friends. 503.873.5615. silvertonladiesnightout.com. 14 – Farm Fest and Draft Horse Plowing Competition – McMinnville. Experience old-time farming as 16–20 teams of draft horses and mules get the ground ready for planting and compete in a plowing competition. Enjoy blacksmith, sawmill and steam engine demonstrations as well as music, food, kids’ activities, agricultural and historical displays, and more. 503.434.0490. odhba.org and yamhillcountyhistory.org.

28 – The 9th Annual Flavors of Carlton – Carlton. This gala evening offers local wines paired with delicious Northwest cuisine from the some of the area’s finest chefs, live and silent auctions, original art and more. The evening benefits Carlton Together Cares local youth and community programs. 503.852.4405. carltontogethercares.com.

MAY 1–31 – Keizer Iris Festival – Keizer. Soak up warm spring sunshine as you stroll through 10 acres of gardens. Bring a picnic lunch and marvel at over 500 colorful iris varieties. Different events all month long. irisfestival.com. 5 – Willamette Valley Music Fest – Eugene. All-day music event featuring a wide variety of styles and genres from bluegrass, blues, jazz, rock, indie and alternative. There will also be workshops and children’s activities for those who live to explore music. 541.346.4373. musicfest.uoregon.edu. 12 – Renaissance Mayfest Dinner – Eugene. A fresh, new event where the lords and ladies of the Eugene Vocal Arts Ensemble, in their stunning Elizabethan dress, presents a festive dinner with performances of spring madrigals, guest juggler/jesters and renaissance dancing for all. 541.687.6865. eugeneconcertchoir.org.

12 – Sasquatch Brew Fest – Eugene. A huge beer festival showcasing the vibrant Pacific Northwest brewing industry. Taste unique craft beers chosen specifically by each brewery’s head brewer. northwestlegendsfoundation.org. 18–19 – UFO Festival – McMinnville. UFO Costume Parade, Alien Pet Costume Contest and the Alien Costume Ball at Hotel Oregon. Live music, beer, food and various speakers. Skeptics and believers alike are invited to enjoy all the events happening throughout the weekend. ufofest.com. 19 – Silverton Wine and Jazz Festival – Silverton. Sip wine and listen to jazz while browsing Silverton’s shops. Nationally recognized Northwest jazz musicians will perform with a wide range of jazz styles and a level of talent rarely witnessed in towns of this size. silvertonwineandjazz.com. 19 – Silverton Pet Parade – Silverton. Silverton’s Pet Parade has been going strong since 1932. Each year kids of all ages parade with their pets along Main St. and First St. to Eugene Field School. silvertonchamber.org. 19 – Eugene Scottish Festival – Eugene. Annual event with bagpipes, harps and championship fiddling, county dancers, clans, Scottish Heritage Museum, Scottish food and vendors. 541.688.2218. eugenescottishfestival2012.com. 20 – Asian Kite Festival – Eugene. Enjoy beautiful kites and performances throughout the afternoon at this annual event. Make your own kite, test out its flying skills, and participate in the kite flying competition with fun prizes. 541.913.1965. asiancouncil.org. 26–28 – Memorial Weekend in the Wine Country – Various wineries. More than Continued on page 22

21 – Earth Day – Silverton. A fun filled earth-wise day at the Oregon Garden with exhibitors, hands-on activities, demonstrations, tree give-away, live music, food and more. oregongarden.org. 21 – Eugene Earth Day – Eugene. This environmentally-based event celebrates the Earth and its resources with music and entertainment, educational and

Spring 2012 • Willamette Valley Life

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Covered Bridges TH E

Willamette Valley O F

S T O R Y

A N D

TH E

P H O T O S

B Y

L O R E N

D E P P I N G

E

ven a short stay in the Willamette Valley reveals lasting elements of its people’s heritage. Lush farm land. Varied tree canopies clustered on rolling hills. Idiosyncratic, waterways zigzagging to the Willamette. Picturesque aging, wooden barns. All draw a straight line from the area’s history to its present. One vital heritage marker sometimes overlooked by both residents and visitors, though, is the covered bridge. Oregon is home to a recognized 52 bridges with roofs (those suitable for vehicular traffic, either currently or in the past), the majority concentrated in the Willamette Valley. This ranks the state near the top in this category nationally, and positions it first in the western U.S. “A lot of people don’t even know we have ‘em,” says Bill Cockrell. The author or co-author of three books on the state’s covered bridges, Cockrell is also the current president of the Covered Bridge Society of Oregon. Cockrell, members of the Society, and a number of dedicated residents are largely to thank for keeping these historical treasures intact. Pioneers constructed the area’s first two covered bridges in 1851 and ’52, respectively, in Oregon City. Bridges allowed them to circumvent what many believed to be exorbitant fares charged by ferry owners to traverse waterways. Many bridges were constructed of abundant, durable Douglas fir. The bridges’ roofs and sides, or “house,” helped preserve the wooden trusses in the damp climate, preventing bridges from rotting and extending their lifespans. By the following year, the first two covered bridges had been destroyed by flooding, but by then 6

floodgates of another kind had opened: covered bridge construction became commonplace. Between 1905 and 1925, the growing state boasted an estimated 450 “housed” bridges. This heyday would not last. With the advent of automobiles in the early 1900s, traffic grew heavier. These heavy vehicles began to exceed the covered bridges’ load limits. Ongoing maintenance, both due to traffic and time, became more costly. Without it, though, a covered bridge’s longevity would be greatly reduced. Gradually, building and maintaining wooden bridges sturdy enough to handle the new loads became less and less economically viable. Although steel temporarily became scarce during World War I, reversing the trend, steel and concrete began to replace wood as the construction material of choice. The covered bridges’ days in the sun were numbered. Out of safety concerns, some were relocated away from the heavy traffic loads. Out of expediency, some were demolished. Others simply rotted and fell—victims of weather and neglect. Expensive to maintain, Oregon’s wealth of covered bridges dwindled to 56 bridges by 1977. Recognizing the peril to a meaningful piece of state heritage, a group of enthusiasts took up the structure’s cause the following year. Among them was Bill Cockrell. “I did it just because of

Willamette Valley Life • Spring 2012

Currin Covered Bridge, Cottage Grove

Art became the portal through which people dedicated to the cause might educate the public about what stood in their own back yards, and what they stood to lose, paving a road to saving the bridges. photography,” he said. Originally a photographer of other artifacts representing bygone eras, such as ferries and lighthouses, Cockrell saw something distinct in the old bridges. “I said, ‘Whoa! That’s even neater!’ ” he recalled, realizing the treasure he had discovered with his camera. Caleb Garvin, past president of the Oregon Covered Bridge Festival in

Cottage Grove (see sidebar), agreed. “Careful,” he said, “it is addictive. Pretty soon you’re traveling all over looking for covered bridges.” Art became the portal through which people dedicated to the cause might educate the public about what stood in their own back yards, and what they stood to lose, paving a road to saving the bridges. In 1978, Cockrell and others formed the Covered Bridge Society of Oregon. “Members work with legislators, local governments, news organizations, and historical societies,” the group’s web site reads, “to provide funding, maintenance and protection to save the state’s roofed bridges.” After nearly a decade spreading the word of the bridges’ state significance, the group broke through. In 1987, then state Senator Mae Yih championed a study on the state’s covered bridges. An advisory board formed, composed


Larwood Covered Bridge, near Scio

of state legislators, the State Bridge Engineer, representatives of local agencies and the State Historic Preservation Office, as well as Bill Cockrell, who spoke for the public. “I knew the history of the various covered bridges and could explain that to the other committee members,” he said. “I wanted to make sure that the committee members recognized the historical importance of covered bridges.” They did. Their work led to the creation of the Oregon Covered Bridge Program, passed by the legislature in 1988. The program “drew on a mix of lottery and state funds,” said Chris Leedham, who administered the program at the committee’s direction. All Oregon covered bridges are “owned by either private entities or local agencies or communities,” Leedham explained, not the state. Without help, bridge preservation efforts would have been financially out of reach in most localities. From 1989–1999, the state invested about $1.5 million in its covered bridges, an amount matched by local agencies, Leedham said. These funds touched

most, if not all, of the iconic bridges, funding repairs, restorations or relocations. “Bill Cockrell was a big part of that,” Leedham acknowledged. The program sunsetted after 1999 due to Oregon’s budget woes. The following year the federal government stepped in, authorizing the National Historic Covered Bridge Preservation Program. This program has allocated $3–10 million annually in national grants “to assist States in carrying out the rehabilitation, repair and/or preservation of historic covered bridges” (defined as one listed or eligible for listing on the National Register for Historic Places), according to the federal law in which it is contained. Numerous Oregon covered bridges have benefitted from these grants, particularly those in the Willamette Valley. One example is the massive Chambers Railroad Bridge in Cottage Grove, which received the entirety of the grant requested by its community (over $1.3 million) in 2008. Grant availability was reauthorized again for 2011, and is part of federal budget negotiations for 2012. Cockrell and fellow heritage proponents view the funding as imperative. “I liken (the covered bridge) to home milk delivery or barbershop shaves,” he said. “It’s something that if we don’t take care of it, it’s gonna be gone.” Anywhere you are in the Willamette Valley, a covered bridge still stands a short distance away. Getting to know them with one’s own eyes is the first step to ensuring their continued preservation—and to honor the work of the people in whose good hands they have been.

11th Annual Oregon Covered Bridge Festival

I

nterested in an excursion through Willamette Valley covered bridge country, but not sure where to begin? Or maybe you’ve already seen a bridge or two and just want more. Consider attending the 11th annual Oregon Covered Bridge Festival, held over the weekend of October 6–7 in Cottage Grove at the new Bohemia Park. The two-day festival promises a variety of events. Tours of the area’s six covered bridges, either guided or self-guided, are a must. A complete bridge tour covers a distance of about 25–30 miles, depending on the route. That’s roughly one to two hours of driving time, again depending on stops. Route maps are available at area bookstores and the Cottage Grove Public Library. Attendees will be able to get a look at the completely restored Chambers Railroad Bridge. The city of Cottage Grove, which purchased the bridge in 2006, was awarded a federal grant of more than $1.3 million in 2008 to aid in its restoration. According to its web site, the city has provided matching funds of more than $136,000, and many residents have donated by rounding up their water and sewer bills to the next dollar (or more). Repair on the bridge began in February 2010. Most of the restoration is now complete, and a new tin roof was applied in February. You can read more at cottagegrove.org/chambers.html. Past festivals have included food booths, live entertainment, children’s activities, timber competitions and attendance by classic car groups. “We do all handcrafted stuff,” 2011 festival president Caleb Garvin said. “The last few years, we had about 30 booths. We’re hoping that we can get about 50 this year with the bigger area” at the new Bohemia Park. A highlight of 2011’s fair slated to return this year is “punkin’ chunkin’.” Engineering meets medieval brute force as the festival employs a “trebuchet”— similar to a catapult—built with timbers from the old Chambers Railroad Bridge, and a second actual catapult to hurl pumpkins over a distance. This year, spectators will be treated to a competition as participants enter their own homemade pumpkin launchers, going up against the fair’s apparatuses. Those rocketing their pumpkins furthest receive cash and prizes. For the first time, the festival will also sponsor a covered bridges relay. Teams of up to five participants may run or walk. The route begins at the new Bohemia Park, winding among the covered bridges and around Dorena Lake via the Row River Trail, an old rail line. “It’s just gorgeous,” said Rosemary Douglas, marketing director for race organizer Smith Rock Race Group. Upon reaching Culp Creek, teams turn around and head back to the new Bohemia Park, a distance of just over 30 miles. The relay takes place on Saturday, October 6, and registration costs $60 per person. To register, go to active.com. This is the festival’s fourth year in Cottage Grove after six years in the Scio/ Stayton area and one in Albany, Garvin said. Asked about goals for this year’s festival, Garvin set his sights on satisfied attendees. “We’ve been averaging 3–5,000 people for the last few years,” he figured. “I’d like to see about 6–7,000 people there” [this year]. “I’d like to see the punkin’ chunkin’ really take off. We’d like to get some competition in there, and I think we will.” For more information about the Oregon Covered Bridge Festival and events, visit the festival’s web site at ocbfestival.com.

Dorena Covered Bridge, near Dorena Lake

Spring 2012 • Willamette Valley Life

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P E OP L E / P L AC E S

Soul to Sole

W

hat happens when you pair the founder of a high-demand Information Technology Service company with an exercise scientist who is laying the groundwork of using vibration therapy to better people’s health? In the case of Nathanial Darnell of ITS Health Sciences and Professor Junggi Hong of Willamette University, what you get is a wellness outreach that is making great strides in getting the less fortunate people in the local community back on their feet. This pairing is what you might refer to as the IT environment promoting community enrichment. In 2008, Nate Darnell co-founded Sole Solutions of Salem in order to provide foot care, an often overlooked health issue, to the homeless, veterans and the underprivileged. Meeting once a week at the Union Gospel Mission, Sole Solutions of Salem, with the aid of volunteer nurses, has treated hundreds of people who have needed foot services for everything from hygiene and illness related problems, such as fungal issues and MRSA, to amputee treatment. In 2011, Darnell teamed up with Dr. Junggi Hong, and together they are developing ways in which they can combine their tools and knowledge to create a healthier community. Using their collective skills, they are developing a technological means for preventative measures towards common and avoidable ailments. Darnell comes to the homeless and underprivileged with first-hand experience in homelessness. While attending college in Maryland, Darnell had only enough money from his two jobs to cover his tuition costs and was without a home for two years. He lived in storage rooms, bicycle lockers, laundromats, libraries and trains. When he began volunteering as an EMT, he found a home at the fire station. It was a family member’s illness that brought Darnell back to Salem, and what he brought along with him from Maryland was a gift of $5.00 that a befriended homeless woman had given to him with the request that he invest it in something positive. With that $5.00, Darnell soon began serving the homeless in Salem in a manner much akin to that of Jesus Christ of whom the Union Gospel Mission teaches: by washing their feet. The feet are washed with simple antibacterial solutions and treated with 8

Nathanial Darnell (left) and Dr. Junggi Hong (right)

Nathanial Darnell and Dr. Junggi Hong are working to bring modern technology into a part of the community that desperately needs it with goals of aiding the residents of homeless shelters; preventing debilitating illnesses that prevent, or greatly inhibit, the abilities of the less fortunate; and relieving problems associated with overstressed muscles. salve when needed. The specialized team has gained the attention of health care and veterans organizations. Their services have been requested at Homeless Connect 2011, Veteran’s Stand Down 2011, Veteran’s Day at the Kroc Center, and Polk County Homeless Connect 2012. Professor Junggi Hong has been applying sonic technology to sports science for several years and has had success in using vibration therapy in treating injuries and atrophied muscles. Some of the technologies that Hong incorporates are able to measure a person’s balance, and this information can be used to

Willamette Valley Life • Spring 2012

predict weaknesses in the body and facilitate preventative measures. It is Hong’s hope that he will be able to establish a free pain clinic to aid the underprivileged who suffer with pain. Nathanial Darnell and Dr. Junggi Hong are working to bring modern technology into a part of the community that desperately needs it with goals of aiding the residents of homeless shelters; preventing debilitating illnesses that prevent, or greatly inhibit, the abilities of the less fortunate; and relieving problems associated with overstressed muscles. Lifting spirits by letting people know that they are cared for is an

integral drive of Darnell and Hong. While it is true that shelters have a longstanding history of addressing the needs of the souls of its beneficiaries, it is the aim of Darnell and Hong to address the long term health needs of these individuals. In a recent interview, Darnell summed it up with these words: “[We have] developed a collaborative partnership to pioneer new technologies and protocols, which have the potential to significantly reduce health care costs, improve health and protect the environment.” Sole Solutions of Salem: solesolutionsofsalem.blogspot.com Dr. Junggi Hong: willamette.edu/cla/exsci/faculty/hong Tami Richards is a native of Salem. An avid bibliophile, she has a keen interest in the people of the community, both past and present, local and far-reaching. She enjoys the Willamette Valley for all the obvious reasons, but her favorite aspect is taking advantage of all the rivers and streams—dayhiking along them, smelling that amazing fresh scent, and searching for waterfalls to photograph.


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Spring 2012 • Willamette Valley Life

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P E OP L E / P L AC E S

Lebanon Strawberry Festival

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pring always tastes a little sweeter during strawberry season, especially in the midWillamette Valley. This year will be no exception, with the 103rd annual Lebanon Strawberry Festival set for the first full weekend in June and the Thursday before. The four-day event features a grand parade, carnival rides, live entertainment, a country fair, and all the shortcake, strawberries, and whipped cream you can eat. It’s a nearly non-stop ode to the red sunripened berry, and the festival is a long-standing tradition in the Lebanon community. The festival’s claim to fame is having “The World’s Largest Strawberry Shortcake.” Some 514 cups of sugar, 224 cups of shortening, 192 eggs, 992 cups of flour, 576 teaspoons of salt, 2,048 teaspoons of baking powder, 448 cups of milk, and 18 cups of vanilla go into making the cake. After being showcased in the parade, the cake is cut, topped with berries and cream, and then divided up to make 20,000 servings that are given out during the festival weekend. This year’s strawberry festivities will kick off in Lebanon on Thursday, May 31, with country fair booths ready to browse and the preliminary rounds of the festival karaoke

competition, complete with American Idol-style judges. The fun continues on Friday, June 1, with the junior parade, live music on the stage and classic carnival rides open to the public. On Saturday, the festival run/walk (new to the festival last year) starts the day. The Strawberry 5k Run and One Mile Health Walk can help warm up participants for a day of indulging in the juicy fruit, shortcake and sweet cream. The grand parade, featuring local floats and a fun strawberry theme, follows the Strawberry Run and kicks off the cutting of the shortcake, live music and more. The theme for this year’s parade is “Strawberries Around the World,” adding a little international flair to the down home festivities. Headlining the Lebanon Strawberry Festival, and making several other appearances around the mid-Valley this summer, will be local rock band Fate 55. The band, including Lebanon locals, will make several other appearances at mid-Valley events this summer. Fate 55 will also play the

The festival’s claim to fame is having “The World’s Largest Strawberry Shortcake.” Some 514 cups of sugar, 224 cups of shortening, 192 eggs, 992 cups of flour, 576 teaspoons of salt, 2,048 teaspoons of baking powder, 448 cups of milk, and 18 cups of vanilla go into making the cake. Corvallis Red, White and Blues Festival and the Linn County Fair in July. The band’s coverage of classic songs includes tunes like “Brown Eyed Girl,” “Magic Carpet Ride,” and the Rolling Stone’s “Satisfaction,” among others. The guys of Fate 55 are returning to the Strawberry festival again this year after rocking it last summer.

Headlining the Lebanon Strawberry Festival, and making several other appearances around the mid-Valley this summer, will be local rock band Fate 55

Along with the berries of honor, the festival food court will feature burgers, hot dogs, burritos, ice cream, smoothies and standard fair fare. There’s a little something for everyone, no matter what taste they prefer. You may even catch a glimpse of local royalty—the ladies of the Strawberry Festival Royalty Court have already been crowned this year and always make an appearance, being featured in the parade. The Lebanon Strawberry Festival has always been run by community members, but, in 1982, a non-profit organization was formed to support the festival. A group of 24 volunteers on the festival board of directors help to pull the festival off each year. The festival takes place at Cheadle Lake Regional Park, south of Lebanon off the Santiam Highway. To commemorate the event, be sure to pick up Strawberry Festival T-shirts and souvenirs. For details or more information about this year’s festival, check out the Lebanon Strawberry Festival website at lebanonstrawberryfestival.com. Cindy Dauer is a freelance writer and photographer living in Oregon. As a journalist, she has covered a wide variety of topics from arts and entertainment to local news. Recently, her work has appeared in several mid-Valley publications, and her online writing has been viewed around the world. A native of the Northwest, Cindy loves outdoor adventures and exploring local culture.

Spring 2012 • Willamette Valley Life

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DAYC AT I ON

Destination: Dallas, Oregon Welcome to the “Big D.” No, not that Big D, the other one.

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his “other” Dallas is quite a bit smaller, and a lot more peaceful, yet still offers enough attractions to make it an ideal place to spend a springtime daycation in the Willamette Valley.

To do

Since Dallas is the county seat for Polk county, a great place to start your trip once you arrive is the Polk County Courthouse which was built in 1898. In the early 1900s the clock tower was used to launch fireworks— until one backfired and caused over $900 in damage. A stroll through the park is not a simple task in Dallas as the town is home to seven city parks to choose from. The largest, at 35 acres, is Dallas City Park and is home to an expansive arboretum and Japanese garden. Another park to check out is the Roger Jordan Community Park home to the Dallas Aquatic Center, which is open daily for swimming lessons, exercise classes and parties. You can travel back in cinema history at the Motor Vu Drive-In, located at 315 Southeast Fir Villa Road. The drive-in has been in continuous operation since 1953 and boasts the largest movie screen (90 feet) in Oregon. The movie season kicks off in April and ends in October.

Where to eat

There are quite a few dining places to choose from in Dallas. Taters Cafe, located at 683 SE Jefferson Street has received raves for its breakfast items and chicken fried steak. Bittersweet Surrender Cupcake Cafe (125 SW Washington St.) has received praise for their baked goods, soups and sandwiches. Courthouse Coffee and Deli is another great spot to grab a bite to eat. Stop in at 156 SE Mill Street.

night in July and August and features top musical talent from around the Valley. The Dallas Summerfest is an event that always draws a large crowd. On tap is a parade that draws upwards of 20,000 people as well as music, food and shopping. For information about where to go and what to see in Dallas, visit the city’s website at dallasoregon.org. N

Area attractions

Baskett Slough National Wildlife Refuge is a wildlife refuge totaling 2,492 acres and is home to many Dusky Canada Geese which nest almost exclusively in the Willamette Valley. The refuge is located at 1099 Hwy 22, just outside of Dallas. The Delbert Hunter Arboretum and Botanical Garden features a living museum of native Oregon plants. The Sounds of Summer Concert Series takes place every Thursday 12

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Willamette Valley Life • Spring 2012

Jefferson

(Left) Motor Vu Drive-in; (Above) Downtown Dallas; (Below) Polk County Courthouse


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M U S I C & E N T E R TA I N M E N T

Swinging with Asleep at the Wheel’s Dan Walton

A

blues, jazz, big band, etc. Was this a difficult style for you to learn or did you have enough of a musical background to fit right in when you joined?

ustin, Texas Western Swing band Asleep At The Wheel has been entertaining audiences around the world for over 40 years. In 2008, Dan Walton, who has deep family ties to the Willamette Valley, became the latest in a long line of stellar musicians to become a member of leader Ray Benson’s band. Dan was kind enough to take some time during the band’s recent tour to answer some questions for Willamette Valley Life readers.

My thing was kind of in the roots of jazz piano: stride and boogiewoogie—and even earlier stuff like Jelly Roll Morton’s neo-ragtime/prejazz kinda stuff. It’s sort of the juice of what the role of the piano really is in a band, or by itself. Basically, jazz piano has sort of grown out of the idea that piano fills out what is needed at any given time, e.g., comping, fills, rhythm, etc. Glen D. Hardin was a master of fleshing out the rhythm section, and really adding to the overall sound of a lead melody. Western swing is basically no exception to the rule. The piano really plays the same kind of role.

Hi Dan, thanks for sitting down with us today. Please tell our readers a little about your background.

Do you have a favorite place that you have performed at since you joined the group?

I grew up in the Pacific Northwest, and spent lots of time in the Willamette Valley when I was young. It is still one of my favorite places. I started playing music when I was pretty young; my parents let me take violin lessons when I was about four to five. I had always been interested in the piano, and when I outgrew my 1/4 size violin I moved over permanently. How long have you been playing piano, and who are some of your influences? I’ve been playing piano for 20+ years now, and I have had many influences in that time: Oscar Peterson, Art Tatum, Teddy Wilson, Fats Waller and Moon Mullican, just to name a few.

I like BB King’s in NYC. I’ve always liked the Opera House in Woodstock, IL. Gruene Hall [in Texas] is always a favorite. San Francisco and Portland are like “home” for me. There are definitely gigs that I look forward to playing again and again.

Do you play any other instruments?

What bands did you play with before joining Asleep at the Wheel?

I can fumble around with just about anything that makes noise. Brass instruments are kind of hard for me. I enjoy playing guitar, bass and mandolin when I’m not playing piano.

Not many. I had a few bands around the Salem/Portland area when I was a young adult. None of it was much related to Western Swing really, but I enjoyed lots of different kinds of music at home. Give us a little back story on how you became a member of Asleep at the Wheel. I had sat in with the band in Portland a few times, when I was going to school in Eugene. When John Michael Whitby made the move to George Strait’s band, Ray Benson asked me to try out for the gig. I went on a small tour with them to Alaska, and everything went great. I was basically in the band from that point. I would imagine Western Swing styled piano playing draws on a wide influence of musical styles like

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Willamette Valley Life • Spring 2012

Asleep at the Wheel has had a few piano players over the years. Has that been intimidating at all? Not so much intimidating, but definitely challenging. I’m flattered to even be considered in the same category as great players like Floyd Domino and Tim Alexander. What has it been like touring with a world renowned music group like Asleep at the Wheel? What are the highs and what are the challenges that you’ve run across? It’s definitely a great job. I’ve gotten to play with great musicians such as Willie Nelson and Lyle Lovett, and songwriters like Gary Nicholson. It definitely has its high points. Not so high points would include being away from home for extended periods of time, and long hours traveling and playing. It’s tough sometimes, but always worth it. It’s really like any other job where you put in “x” amount of work to accomplish your goals.


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It’s definitely a great job. I’ve gotten to play with great musicians such as Willie Nelson and Lyle Lovett, and songwriters like Gary Nicholson. It definitely has its high points.

Do you have time to rehearse much with the band? AATW pretty much never rehearses unless we have some special thing we have to do, like TV or film, where we have to play a specific thing. Other than that, everything you see on stage is being created as you watch it. Live music is best that way. Performance is really an organic thing.

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I know Asleep at the Wheel will be performing at Western University in Monmouth this June 8th. Are you looking forward to performing in the area? Will there be more pressure playing in front of friends and family or no difference at all? Most of those people have already heard me play, so it’s not too daunting. It’s always good to come back to a familiar place. —Randy Hill

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T I M E C A P S U L E

The Davenport Project Celebrating the Life & Times of Homer Davenport, Late of Silverton from Hearst gave him opportunity to pursue his hobbies of animal husbandry. He was particularly fond of fancy game fowl and Arabian horses. To this day, the Davenport Arabians are renowned for their intelligence and gentle manners. TV’s “Mr. Ed” was a descendant of several Davenport Arabians. The Davenport Project will employ two main approaches, keyed specifically to Davenport’s persona and talents. Celebrating Davenport the lecturer, a multi-topic lecture series is planned over the spring months, in multiple venues, primarily in Portland as well as Salem. Several heritage and historical groups in the Metro area,

Homer Davenport was one of the most successful artists Oregon has ever produced. Yet, few outside his hometown are even aware of the impact this selfdescribed “country boy” had on American society in its transition between those decades known as “The Gilded Age” and “The Progressive Era.”

O

ne hundred years ago this May, Oregon lost one of its most successful artists. William Randolph Hearst cartoonist Homer Davenport died from pneumonia, contracted on the NY docks after illustrating the RMS Titanic survivors’ tragic tale. An incredibly lucky, creative and productive life was cut short. Cartoonist, author, Arabian horse breeder and out-spoken freethinking spiritualist, he defied all expectations, save the two that mattered most: from a dead mother barely remembered and a father’s life-long intellectual mentorship. But who the heck was Homer Davenport? In the East-Valley area, the name Homer Davenport is synonymous with Silverton’s annual community festival. But behind the parades, Davenport Races and colorful Arabian horses is a deeper, more complex story. 16

The Davenport Project, comprised of a series of events and exhibits, is designed to tell this story of a life that ended a hundred years ago. Homer Davenport was one of the most successful artists Oregon has ever produced. Yet, few outside his hometown are even aware of the impact this self-described “country boy” had on American society in its transition between those decades known as “The Gilded Age” and “The Progressive Era.” His unique rural Oregon upbringing, along with a supportive and nurturing home life, equipped Davenport with the intellectual tools and the artistic skills needed to hit the ground running. He arrived on the scene during a perfect storm of technology and public sentiment. Advancements in graphic reproduction and distribution systems insured a wide distribution of Davenport’s work. His hefty salaries

Willamette Valley Life • Spring 2012

including the Oregon Cartoon Institute and the Dill Pickle Club, have agreed to assist with promotion and venue suggestions. Out-of-town venues are currently being finalized, but all the lectures will be repeated over the “Homer Weekend” out on the Farm at GeerCrest, August 3–5, 2012. Additionally, several gallery exhibits featuring different aspects of Davenport’s artistic output are on tap.

The main event will be “Wheelhouse Images,” an exhibit, reception and presentation around Davenport’s baseball cartoons he created for sporting goods magnate Albert Spalding’s 1911 book on the history of baseball, America’s Favorite Game. This will occur over the month of August, with a First Friday reception at the Seven Brides Taproom in Silverton on August 3. Another exhibit will feature Davenport’s Arabian Quest images— photos and cartoons regarding his expedition to the Syrian Desert to purchase a small herd of pure bred Arabian horses. Also involved is The Davenport Arabian Horse Conservancy, which will coincide with a lecture. And, finally, to highlight Davenport’s Corporate Trust Cartoons, an exhibit called “Occupy Davenport” is planned. Featuring many of the same images that made him famous, this exhibit will coincide with a lecture on Thomas Nast, Davenport, and the power of the political cartoon. As with any project, more details are available on the Davenport Project website. In this, the centennial of his passing, Davenport’s hometown of Silverton is pulling out all the stops to celebrate their favorite son. And all are invited to come to Silverton and get to know Homer Davenport, late of Silverton.

Salem native Gus Frederick works as a Multimedia Specialist for the Oregon Office of Private Health Partnerships. His background includes working as a graphic artist, animationist, filmmaker and photographer. He currently lives in Silverton, Oregon with his cat and extensive 78 rpm record collection.


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T H E V I N E

Making the most of wine tasting in the Valley ruby to brick, and white wines move from clear or lemon to gold, or straw to brown. Most wines you’ll find in tasting rooms currently will be youthful, so check for a nice bright color.

1. Examine your glass Many wineries in the Willamette Valley have adopted the Oregon Pinot Noir glass which has a large bowl and a slight curve at the rim. For white or more delicate wines, try a smaller glass. Both are designed to concentrate aromas or target a certain point on your tongue when you sip. Don’t ignore the color of your wine. Color can tell you a lot about a wine’s age, the type of growing conditions, or even wine making styles. As wines age, red wines go from purple to

3. Stick your nose in Don’t be shy. Put your nose as far into your glass as you can and take a few good sniffs. Then take your nose out and try to connect the aromas with things you already know. What comes to mind? It’s important to point out that our sense of smell becomes overwhelmed very quickly, dulling your ability to smell something. You can do an easy “reset”: simply smell your hand or your sleeve, and you’ll clear your aroma memory with a familiar scent. Smell the wine deep

2. Swirl it around Swirling wine helps to release aromas by introducing oxygen. Some people like to show off and swirl in the air, but it’s just as acceptable—and much easier—to swirl your glass on a flat surface, moving the base of the glass in small circles. The idea is just to get it moving around.

LPWINES

I

recently took a group of colleagues on a wine tasting trip. The group had a range of experience with wine, a number of them here from overseas, and many had never visited a winery tasting room. So I put together a “cheat sheet” of pointers for everyone to refer to while enjoying their wine. This is not a required list of to-dos when wine tasting, but in terms of assessing a wine beyond simply liking or disliking it, these actions can go a long way. So try it out next time you’re visiting one of the many wineries in the Willamette Valley, and see how it changes your wine tasting experience.

in the glass, but then smell it as you draw your nose away. You’ll often be able to pick up more delicate aromas just above the glass that you won’t get deeper inside. 4. Coat your palate Once you take that first sip, swish the wine around your mouth a few

times—yes, like mouthwash. This may seem silly, but it better exposes all parts of your tongue and other sensory areas of your mouth to the wine. Then you can get a good idea of how heavy the wine feels (is it like water or milk on your tongue?), how tannic it is (do your gums and tongue feel fuzzy?), and what kinds of flavors are present. As with aromas, just try to connect the flavor to something you’re familiar with. Usually your mind will start taking you other places and making flavor connections.

EYELIAM

5. Open your mouth Another moment where you may feel silly—but don’t, you’re just experimenting with your senses!—but after you’ve swallowed your sip, open your mouth wide. This allows air to hit the inside of your mouth, and helps with a couple things. One, if your mouth waters like crazy then you know you’ve just had a high acid wine. Secondly, just like with aromas, the circulation of oxygen helps you taste more. Think about how bland things taste when you have a head cold, and you’ll understand how this works in the opposite manner.

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Willamette Valley Life • Spring 2012

Ryan Reichert is originally from Northeast Ohio and relocated to the Willamette Valley to further his career in the wine industry. He has received both his Intermediate and Advanced certifications from the Wine & Spirits Education Trust and is also a certified French wine enthusiast and Spanish Wine Educator. Ryan strives to learn all he can about wine and to share his passion with everyone. nwwhites.com.


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YOU R M ON E Y

Savin’ to the oldies changed. Nowadays, most people view debt as a way of life. Nothing gets in the way of saving money more than debt, and that’s why staying out of credit card debt is a must. By not using debt as a purchasing tool, and using cash instead, you will save money on interest and will develop sound financial discipline in the process. 3 - View money as a tool. For many Americans, money is viewed as something to constantly strive toward. But how we view money guides our actions. So, while goals of building wealth are important, giving our families peace of mind should be the ultimate goal. Just remember, money simply represents something, whether it is an exchange medium for goods and services, or financial freedom. For example, having three months worth of household expenses in a savings account can be one of the most stress reducing things you ever do for yourself and your family. Also, when money is viewed in the correct light, it can help us make better decisions in the short and long term. Instead of eating out at lunch every day, we could pocket that money for a vacation instead. Viewing money as a means to happiness, and not happiness itself, is an important distinction for everyone to remember.

M

any financial experts have railed at the deplorable savings rate in the U.S. over the last decade. While economists have noted an upturn in Americans’ savings accounts post-recession, we can all improve in this area using principles our grandparenrts used. While saving money sounds so simple, most middle class families know that in reality there are a multitude of challenges that can get in the way. Here are a few ideas to help navigate those challenges.

I suggest setting up sub-accounts at your credit union. First, designate an emergency savings account. Then create as many separate accounts as you need to, depending on your specific savings goals. A few examples are: vacation, college and furniture. No matter what you are saving for, automating the process will force you to strategize with the money you have left over. Just make sure not to touch those monies except for their intended purpose.

1 - Make savings automatic. Nothing will help you save more money than automating the savings process. Even more than creating a budget, setting aside money first thing each month to specific accounts will put you miles ahead in the long run.

2 - If you can’t pay cash, don’t buy it. For much of the early 20th century, most Americans viewed debt as something you only used in true cases of emergency or for very large purchases like a home. But with the advent of credit cards, that mindset

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Willamette Valley Life • Spring 2012

4 - Make saving money a way of life for your family. Finally, one of the best things you can ever do for your children is to teach them the value of saving money early in life. The “time value of money” concept is taught in every finance class in college, but is rarely taught in the average American household. Creating a savings plan with and for your children can put them miles ahead of their peers as they go to college and beyond. Early adult life is littered with potential money pitfalls. Teaching kids now will save you, and them, a world of

For many Americans, money is viewed as something to constantly strive toward. But how we view money guides our actions. So, while goals of building wealth are important, giving our families peace of mind should be the ultimate goal. heartache later. While there are myriad ways to save more, following these tips will get you started on the right path. For more ideas, I recommend a couple of websites: iwillteachyoutoberich.com and fool.com. Both have a plethora of information and are constantly being updated with practical ideas to save money. Also, check out the smart phone app Mint, which packs a variety of financial planning and savings tracking tools to help you be successful. Ken Gardner writes for life, financial liberty and the pursuit of member happiness. He has worked in the financial industry for over 10 years and does not have perfect credit… but he’s getting there.


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S P R I N G

2 0 1 2

C A L E N D A R

April, May, June

Spring 2012 Calendar: Continued from page 5 150 wineries and tasting rooms will be open across the Willamette Valley. Visit some of the region’s small, family-owned wineries rarely open to the public, as well as larger wineries and tasting rooms. Taste new wines from your favorite labels, sample from the barrel with winemakers and enjoy specialty food pairings and live music. willamettewines.com.

29 – Memorial Weekend Bike Ride & Brisket – Canby. This non-serious bike ride starts at the crack of 11 a.m. and ends with BBQ brisket and live music on the patio. 503.651.3190. stjosefswinery.com. May 31–June 3 – Lebanon Strawberry Festival – Lebanon. Located at Cheadle Lake in Lebanon, this event will include parades, fireworks, entertainment, food and the “World’s Largest Strawberry Shortcake.” 541.258.7164. lebanonstrawberryfestival.info.

End of May through Mid-June – Enchanted Forest Summer Comedy Theatre – Turner. The Enchanted Forest Comedy Theatre is well known for its outrageous, wild and crazy musical comedy productions of updated fairy tales with laughs for all ages. 503.371.4242. enchantedforest.com.

JUNE 2–3 – Wilsonville Festival of Arts – Wilsonville. A celebration of the creative spirit featuring more than 100 visual, literary, and performing artists. The festival includes live music, storytelling, and dance on the Main Stage, authors to sign and sell their books, a juried visual arts show and sale, plus great food and drinks. 503682-1446. wilsonvillearts.org. 9–10 and 16–17 – Berries, Brews, & BBQs – St. Paul. French Prairie Gardens hosts their annual Berries, Brews and BBQs Festival. New BBQ Food Carts Battle, strawberry picking, animals, lots of kid’s activities, delicious foods and more. 503.633.8445. FPGardens.com. 2, 9 and 16 – Barrel Tour 2012 – Various South Willamette Wineries. Sit back, relax and enjoy the scenic views while traveling to four spectacular wineries for wine tastings and food pairings. southwillamettewineries. com.

D&D Satellite

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Willamette Valley Life • Spring 2012

15–17 – Pioneer Picnic – Brownsville. Linn County Pioneer Picnic is Oregon’s oldest annual celebration. Family fun with games, food booths, logger jamboree, equestrian events, talent shows and entertainment. 541.928.0831. historicbrownsville.com. 16 – East Valley Wine Fest – Canby. Join a dozen artisan vintners as they celebrate the season with their new releases. Be a judge in one of four wine categories as you

May 18–19 – UFO

Festival – McMin

nville.

pick your favorite new releases. Meet the winemakers and enjoy hard-to-find wines plus live music, food and fun. 503.651.3190. stjosefswinery.com. 23 – Mount Angel Abbey Festival of Arts & Wine – St. Benedict. A fundraising event in support of the Mount Angel Abbey Monastery, Library and Retreat House. Hors d’oeuvres, artisanal Northwest products, silent and oral auction, wine and microbrew tasting, art and music. mountangelabbey.org. 24 – Aurora Strawberry Social – Aurora. Watch quilting and spinning demonstrations, listen to live music and enjoy strawberries and ice cream over a choice of biscuit or cake. The museum will be open to tours. auroracolony.org. June 29–July 15 – Oregon Bach Festival – Eugene. Artistic Director Helmuth Rilling leads international musicians in orchestral, vocal and contemporary concerts and educational programs at this Grammy-winning festival. 800.457.1486. oregonbachfestival.com. 30 – Deepwood Wine and Jazz Fest – Salem. Set in the lovely gardens surrounding the 1894 Queen Anne style historic home, the Deepwood Wine and Jazz Fest blends a double helping of jazz served up with a luxe variety of local wines and pairing of select local gourmet bites. 503-363-1825. historicdeepwoodestate.org. June 30–July 1 – World Beat Festival – Salem. A two day program of international music, dance, food, hands-on crafts, folklore and Dragon Boat races. worldbeatfestival.org.

For more Willamette Valley events, visit our website at willamettevalleylife.com


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Willamette Valley Life • Spring 2012

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Willamette Valley Life