Page 1

P E O P L E

M U S I C

A R T

D I N I N G

E X P L O R E

W I N E

FREE

PLACES TO GO...PEOPLE TO SEE...THINGS TO DO

Volume 3 Issue 4/Fall 2012 (Display until January 1, 2013) WillametteValleyLife.com

Raptor Rapture Page 8

Western Oregon By Foot Page 11

Fall 2012 • Willamette Valley Life

1


Order Your Teardrop Today! Teardrops NW brings you the finest custom made teardrops at the best possible price... Built to order in the northwest • Weatherized for the Northwest • Hand crafted with quality materials.

Order now for winter discounts

TRUST MATTERS.

LPL Financial James A. Kuxhaus, CFP ® Financial Advisor

ESPECIALLY WHEN IT’S YOUR MONEY.

530 Center St. NE Suite 415 Salem, OR 97301-3754 (503) 364-9358 Office (503) 364-9382 Fax james.kuxhaus@lpl.com www.jamesk-lpl.com

Have you ever wondered who your financial consultant really works for? I work strictly for you. I work hard to build a relationship of trust by providing thoughtful, unbiased guidance and placing your interests first. Invest with a knowledgeable financial consultant who’s on your side; someone who truly cares whether your investments are right for you. Call today for more information or to schedule a consultation.

Member FINRA/SIPC MKT-06061-0410 Tracking #6417747

Now starting at

$6,250 • Best Camping Experience :) • No Set up required :) • Very Easy to Tow :)

Order Now!

Tater’s Cafe Great Food • Great Prices • Great Service

Welcome to our comfortable Dallas café.

 Call for ordering details: 503.385.1227

Taking orders now for Spring delivery (as little as 4 weeks based on orders) Like Us

2164 Davcor St. SE, Salem • TearDropsNW.com

We’re a family friendly, independently owned authentic American style café with a wonderful feel and look inside. We also offer a very beautiful outside garden-like area for dining as well.

Now Open for Dinner Thursday-Saturday Catering Available: 503-623-3335 683 SE Jefferson St, Dallas, OR • Hours: 6am-2pm Mon-Wed; 6am-9pm Thurs-Sat; 6am-3pm Sun

2

Willamette Valley Life • Fall 2012


LETTER FROM THE PUBLISHER

Farewell to Summer

I

don’t know about you, but I’m not ready for summer to be over. There are so many things I’ve put off because something else got in the way. I only made it to the beach a couple of times this summer. And the hammock on the back deck? I think I took a swing in it once or twice. I’m trying not to beat myself up over it, but in the land where the sun doesn’t shine nearly long enough throughout the year, I should probably be given a fine of some kind. For all of you who procrastinated and ended up in the same boat as me, this issue has some great ideas to help you ease slowly into the next season. Mention the word “raptor” and what do you think of? If you’re anything like me, I bet the first thing that popped into your mind was a velociraptor from the film Jurassic Park. Nope. The raptors I’m talking about reside at the Cascade Raptor Center near Eugene and are birds of prey. Freelance writer Sara Grant got an upclose look at a few of these amazing birds at a recent trip to the Raptor Center. You can read about what she learned in this issue. Writer Suzanne Reingans is an avid hiker and explorer of all things outdoors

MEET THE PRESS:

here in the Willamette Valley. This lady knows her hiking trails, and to prove it she has provided a short list of some of her favorite hiking trails within a day trip of The Valley. Salem rocks! Yes, you heard me right. Back in the 1960s a local teacher by the name of Ed Dougherty got tired of hearing from his students that there was nothing to do in Salem, so he started booking dances at Walker Middle School in 1962. Before he knew it, he was a major concert promoter bringing national acts to Salem like the Doors, Sonny and Cher, The Yardbirds and many more music legends of the time. Writer Cindy Dauer sat down recently with Mr. Dougherty, and he shared some of his favorite memories of a very unique time period in The Valley’s music history. As the summer winds down and fall moves in, get out of the house. Enjoy the sunshine we have left and the beautiful fall leaves that are popping up everywhere. See you in the New Year with our third anniversary issue!

Cindy Dauer is a freelance writer and photographer living in Oregon. As a journalist, she has covered a wide variety of topics from arts and entertainment to local news. Recently, her work has appeared in several mid-Valley publications, and her online writing has been viewed around the world. A native of the Northwest, Cindy loves outdoor adventures and exploring local culture.

Sarah Horner is a freelance writer, photographer and winemaker. Eight years of experience in the local wine industry allowed her to explore the rich culture the Willamette Valley offers. The sights, sounds and stories of the region inspire her and she enjoys sharing her discoveries with readers. Sarah lives with her husband, two teenage boys and miscellaneous pets.

Jessica Gardner loves the outdoors, enjoys a good cabernet every now and then, and wishes she could fly away in Doctor Who’s TARDIS one day.

Suzanne Reingans is a homeschool mom who likes reading and writing and living a home-centered life in her native town of Dallas, Oregon. Between rain showers, she hikes or mountain bikes in the Coast Range hills west of town. This fall, she looks forward to mushroom hunts in the mossy forests with the local mycological society, and eating the treasures she finds.

Born and raised in the Willamette Valley, Sophie Hawley is a food blogger and enthusiastic food-eater who adores breakfast, cheese and local wine. She lives with her tall husband and miniature dachshund, and enjoys attending Spartan training to combat her caloric intake. During the week she keeps books for a local non-profit organization.

Opal Creek

8

FEATURE

Raptor Rapture

THIS MONTH’S CONTRIBUTORS

Ken Gardner writes for life, financial liberty and the pursuit of member happiness. He has worked in the financial industry for over 10 years and does not have perfect credit…but he’s getting there.

CONTENTS

Ryan Reichert is originally from Northeast Ohio and relocated to the Willamette Valley to further his career in the wine industry. He has received both his Intermediate and Advanced certifications from the Wine & Spirits Education Trust and is also a certified French wine enthusiast and Spanish Wine Educator. Ryan strives to learn all he can about wine and to share his passion with everyone. nwwhites.com.

One can learn about raptors, or birds of prey, in books or by researching online, but who better to teach us about these amazing birds than the birds themselves? At Cascades Raptor Center in Eugene, close to 60 raptors–including various eagles, owls, hawks and others– do just that, serving as ambassadors and educators for their species.

PHOTO BY SUZANNE REINGANS

DEPAR TMENT S

4 Valley Floor 11 Daycation 17 Music & Entertainment 19 The Vine 20 Your Money 21 Eat

ON THE COVER “Demetre” Eurasion Eagle Owl Photo: Cascades Raptor Center

PUBLISHERS/EDITORS Randy and Dawn Hill

EMAIL publisher@willamettevalleylife.com

ASSOCIATE EDITOR Jessica Gardner

WEBSITE willamettevalleylife.com

ART DIRECTION Hill Design Studios

Willamette Valley Life Magazine is published quarterly. Opinions expressed in this magazine are those of the authors and not necessarily those of Willamette Valley Life Magazine. This publication cannot be reproduced in any form without written consent from Willamette Valley Life Magazine. Although we have made very effort to insure the accuracy of the information in this publication, due to the passage of time and the anomalies inherent in the publishing process, we cannot be responsible for errors or incorrect information. Please contact the individual establishments to confirm information.

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS AND PHOTOGRAPHERS Cindy Dauer, Jessica Gardner, Ken Gardner, Sophie Hawley, Sarah Horner, Suzanne Reingans, Ryan Reichert ADVERTISING SALES L. Andrew Brown/Concept Marketing Randy Hill PHONE 503.507.1228 MAILING ADDRESS P.O. Box 17264 Salem, Oregon 97305

25,000 copies printed and distributed throughout the Willamette Valley. Copyright 2012 by Willamette Valley LIfe Magazine

One year subscriptions are $16. Send check or money order to Subscriptions: P.O. Box 17264, Salem, OR 97305. Make payable to “Willamette Valley Life.”

Fall 2012 • Willamette Valley Life

3


VA L LE Y F LOOR

Wine Country Thanksgiving

T

he Willamette Valley Wineries Association hosts two annual, county-wide events: Wine Country Thanksgiving and Memorial Weekend in the Wine Country. Help celebrate the 30th annual Wine Country Thanksgiving, November 2325, 2012, when more than 160 wineries open their doors to kick off the winter wine tasting season. Enjoy this unique opportunity to visit some of the region’s small, family-owned wineries that are often closed to visitors, as well as larger wineries and tasting rooms. Taste from the barrel with winemakers, sample new releases and older vintages, and enjoy specialty food pairings, live music and other special activities. Most wineries are open to the public 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tasting fees vary by location. Visit willamettewines.com for more details.

Oregon Trail Band Christmas Concert

F

ormed by Marv Ross in 1991 at the request of the Oregon Trail Council to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the trail, The Trail Band is an 8-piece ensemble that creates an energetic blend of brass and string arrangements of traditional and original music. Hundreds of public and private appearances across America and Japan, plus seven successful albums have established The Trail Band as the premiere historic music ensemble from the Northwest. Appearing with The Trail Band will be special guest, Linda Hornbuckle. This year’s concert will be held on December 2, 2012, from 6:00–8:00 p.m. at the McMinnville Community Center. For more info and ticket prices, visit downtownmcminnville.com.

Play In The Rain Day

L

ooking for something fun to do with your family on a rainy (or perhaps even sunny) Saturday in November? Visit Mount Pisgah Arboretum for the 5th annual Play in the Rain Day. This fun, all-ages family event happens on Saturday, November 10, 2012. Visitors will discover how fun, easy and rewarding it is to spend time outdoors in nature—in ALL kinds of weather. More than 2,000 people attended last year. Play in the Rain Day will happen rain or shine, so dress for the weather. Call 541.349.7501 or visit youthinnature.org for more details.

48th Annual Gem and Mineral Show

I

f you’re a rock hound or just like sparkly things, plan to attend the 48th annual Gem and Rock Show, October 27 and 28, 2012, at the Clackamas County Fairgrounds. The show is held indoors, is wheel chair accessible and geared toward families and individuals interested in rocks, gems, minerals and fossils. There will be lapidary arts and jewelry making demonstrations as well as hands on activities for children. An hourly fluorescent show will highlight the many examples of minerals that glow under black light. Vendors will offer gemstones, jewelry, rough and polished stone, beads, fossils and minerals for sale. In addition, they will offer books for adults and children on topics related to the earth sciences as well as lapidary and jewelry making tools. The event begins Saturday 9:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m. and Sunday 10:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m. For more information, contact 503.691.6395 or visit clackamettegem.org.

“I love the way your magazine creates a sense of place and connects us with our home. There are few places more beautiful or comforting than the Willamette Valley, and I appreciate the way you introduce readers to opportunities here.” ~ Nadene LeCheminan

4

Willamette Valley Life • Fall 2012


F A L L

2 0 1 2

C A L E N D A R

October, November, December Shock Community Project. There are a variety of events, many free, for all ages. From pumpkin carving to Thriller dancing, roller derby to the Rocky Horror Picture Show, ghost stories to zombie mobs, there’s something for everyone! cultureshockproject.org/13nights.

OCTOBER Late September to October 31 – October Weekends at Lone Pine Farms – Junction City. Fun fall activities including the famous pumpkin patch, haunted corn maze, and cow train trail roller coaster ride. 541.688.4389. lonepinefarms.com. Every Saturday in October – Family Harvest Days – Silverton. The Oregon Garden will be featuring fun, festive and educational harvestthemed activity stations in the garden. Family Harvest Days will start at 10 a.m. and end at 4 p.m. each Saturday. Activity stations will include tractors from Linn Benton Tractor Co., gourd bowling, pumpkin painting, the history of scarecrows and more. You can also enjoy the Scarecrows in the Garden, which will be on display the whole month of October. oregongarden.org. 1-31 – Colonial Harvest Days – Pleasant Hill. Celebrate the harvest season with a unique fall experience for the entire family. Each weekend enjoy live music, face painting, food

Willamette Valley Fruit Company Harvest Festival - October2-28

venue and more. 541.746.5161. northernlightschristmastreefarm.com. 2-28 – Willamette Valley Fruit Company Harvest Festival – Salem. This year’s collaboration involves Marion-Polk Food Share who will be gearing up for the busy holiday season of preparing food boxes for over 8,200 local families. The local food bank feeds over 12,000 hungry children each month and under new direction, has found a way to deliver food boxes containing more nutritious and well-balanced meals. To support the MPFS mission, the Girl Scouts will be hosting an official Food Drive event at the Harvest Festival on October 13th in their honor. In addition to the corn maze, enjoy the pumpkin patch, gourds, barrel train, mini zip-line, corn crib, hay mountain, pumpkin launchers, a handful of new games and activities, and great food! 503.362.8678. wvfco.com. Saturdays through 11/21 – Corvallis Farmers Market – Corvallis. Corvallis’ downtown

hosts two outdoor farmers markets bursting with the Willamette Valley’s best fruits, vegetables, cut flowers, nursery plants, baked goods and other delights. Meet the growers, listen to live music, partake of samples and cooking demonstrations, or pick up expert tips on gardening and health. 541.740.1542. locallygrown.org. 20 – The 14th Annual Harvest Festival and Pumpkin Merriment – Salem. Celebrate all things harvest with this fantastic, fun-filled festival! Plan for cider pressing, animal petting, pumpkin carving, costume making, face painting and picture taking. Festival entertainment includes explosive pumpkin science and a music performance by LuAnn Ritts with her band Cash and Company. 503.371.3631. acgilbert.org. 19-31 – 13 Nights of Halloween – Salem. The 13 Nights of Halloween is a festival full of Halloween activities organized by the Culture

 NOON TO 8PM

 

FAMILY HARVEST DAYS 10am-4pm. Fun,



harvest themed activities. Free with Garden admission.



SCARECROWS IN THE GARDEN

Daily in October - Showcasing locally designed scarecrows throughout the Garden. Free with Garden admission.

503.874.8100

IN THE REDISCOVERY FOREST

20 – Nearby Nature’s Haunted Hike – Eugene. Help Nearby Nature celebrate night creatures. Enjoy a pumpkin-lit hike in Alton Baker Park and meet an entertaining costumed owl, bat, frog, spider and more. Each hike lasts an hour. Also, check out live owls and vultures from the Cascades Raptor Center and enjoy crafts, snacks, displays and a raffle! Rain or moonshine at Alton Baker Park. Registration required. 541.687.9699. nearbynature.org. 26 – Mad Scientists’ Halloween Extravaganza – Eugene. Put on your costume and join in some hauntingly mad Halloween fun. Witness spooky science demonstrations and eerie experiments in the mad scientist’s lab, win prizes in the horrifying Halloween Carnival, and try your hand at launching a pumpkin projectile with a trebuchet! 541.682.7888. sciencefactory.org. 28 – Halloween with Harry – Corvallis. Celebrate Halloween with the stirring music of Harry Potter. 541.752.2361. cosusymphony.org. 31 – Safe and Sane Halloween – McMinnville. The McMinnville Downtown Association will hold its annual Safe & Sane Halloween. Hay rides, games, Halloween photos, free cartoons at the Moonlight Theater and trick-or-treating on Third Continued on page 5

Live Reindeer Festive Holiday Decor Artisan Vendors Family Photos Crafts & Hot Holiday Beverages Included with regular Garden admission

The Oregon Garden, 879 W. Main St, Silverton, Oregon 97381. www.oregongarden.org

Fall 2012 • Willamette Valley Life

5


F A L L

2 0 1 2

C A L E N D A R

October, November, December Continued from page 5

animal charities. Great for Christmas cards! 503.831.1222. oldmillfeed.com.

Street. Donation of non-perishable food items requested to benefit the local food bank. 503.472.3605. downtownmcminnville.com.

23-24 – Polk County Craft Festival – Rickreall. Two buildings with over 100 vendors featuring wreaths, ornaments, ceramics, gift baskets, fudge, cowboy art, baked goods and much more. 503.623.3048. co.polk.or.us/fair.

NOVEMBER 1-30 – The Art and Tradition of Kimono – Salem. The Willamette Heritage Center partners with the Oregon Nikkei Legacy Center present “The Art and Tradition of Kimono.” A kimono is a traditional Japanese robe made of silk and is the national costume of Japan. Willamette Heritage Center at The Mill. 503.585.7012. willametteheritage.org. 2-3 – Christmas in Historic Silverton Bazaars – Silverton. Holiday bazaars and shopping at various locations throughout Silverton. 503.873.5615. silvertonchamber.org. 7 – Artist talk: Daniel Heffernan Video Exhibit – Linfield Gallery, Linfield College campus, McMinnville. An artist talk by video artist Daniel Heffernan will be presented on November 7, at 5 p.m. at the Linfield Gallery on the Linfield College campus. The presentation will be followed by a reception. The show will run from October 15 through November 17. For more information, call 503.883.2804 or visit infield.edu.

Daniel Heffernan artist talk - November 7

10 – Veteran’s Day Parade – Albany. One of the largest Veteran’s Day parades west of the Mississippi River. The parade starts at 11 a.m. 541.981.2390. albanyvisitors.com. 10 – Play in the Rain Day – Eugene. Looking for something fun to do with your family on a rainy (or perhaps even sunny) Saturday in November? Visitors will discover

6

Willamette Valley Life • Fall 2012

DECEMBER

Santa’s Parade - November 23

how fun, easy and rewarding it is to spend time outdoors in nature—in all kinds of weather. 541.349.7501 or 541.344.8350. youthinnature.org. 11 – Salem Collectors & Flea Market – Salem. Salem’s oldest antique show and flea market. Over 150 vendors selling collectibles, antiques, jewelry, glass, pottery, toys, furniture, tools, home decor and much more! salemcollectorsmarket.com. 23-25 – Celebration on the Territorial Thanksgiving Wine Trail – Various South Willamette Valley Wineries. Enjoy beautiful venues, specials on wine, live music and wonderful food all weekend long in the wine country. 541.221.8592. southwillamettewineries.com. 23 – Santa’s Parade and Caroling and Tree Lighting– McMinnville. Bring your family downtown to celebrate the start of the Christmas Season with an old-fashioned holiday parade. Highlights include horses, floats, tractors, dance troupes, and the McMinnville Garden Club “Rakettes” high-stepping along. Plan to come early and stay late for holiday shopping and food at some of your favorite downtown shops and restaurants. Caroling and the tree lighting ceremony begin at 5 p.m. downtownmcminnville.com

December 1 to January 1 – Night Time Magic – Albany. Wander through one of Albany’s three nationally registered historic districts after dark to see the magical effect of over 200 historic homes lit with white lights for the holidays. 541.928.0911 or 800.526.2256. albanyvisitors.com. 1 – Springfield Christmas Parade – Springfield. In its 60th year, the Springfield Christmas Parade is a time-honored community tradition the Springfield citizens anticipate every year. It has gained the notable reputation of being the “oldest and coldest” (and sometimes “wettest”) parade in Oregon. Enjoy floats, a Tuba Carol Concert and more. 541.988.0955. springfieldchristmasparade.org. 2 – Trail Band Christmas Concert – McMinnville. The Trail Band will perform for this annual Christmas kickoff at the McMinnville Community Center at 6 p.m. 503.472.3605. downtownmcminnville.com. 8 – Festival of Lights Holiday Parade – Keizer. The Festival of Lights Holiday Parade is the largest nighttime illuminated holiday parade west of the Mississippi!

The whimsical holiday experience has become a family tradition for thousands of Oregonians since 1989 and continues to grow exponentially each year, reaching Keizer and the surrounding areas to make this a truly regional Pacific Northwest event. folholidayparade.org. 8-9 – Silver Falls Christmas Festival – Sublimity. Engage in various Christmas themed crafts such as wreaths, cards, gingerbread houses and ornaments. Learn how the park changes during the winter. Enjoy refreshments, storytelling for kids, live music and appearances by Santa and JR Beaver. Sponsored by the Friends of Silver Falls and Silver Falls State Park. 503.874.0201 or 503.873.8735. oregonstateparks.org. 8-9 – Salem Saturday Market’s Holiday Market – Salem. Over 200 artisans with thousands of handcrafted food, gift and decor creations. With 15,000 visitors, the Holiday Market is the largest all hand-crafted holiday market in Oregon. salemsaturdaymarket.com. 19-23 – Willamette Heritage Center Magic at the Mill – Salem. Features thousands of twinkling holiday lights, music, shopping, and entertainment for all. 503.585.7012. willametteheritage.org.

For more Willamette Valley events, visit our website at willamettevalleylife.com To submit your Valley event for consideration, send your event listing to publisher@willamettevalleylife.com

17 – Pet Photos with Santa – Dallas. Pet Photos With Santa is an annual fundraiser for animal charities. For a donation of $6 or more, you receive a distinctive photo of your pet (or pets) with Santa. 100% of your donation goes to local Festival of Lights Holiday Parade in Keizer - December 8


Proudly Presents

Ticket Office Location

145 Liberty St. NE, Suite 102, Downtown Salem

(503) 485-4300

Pentacle Theatre Location West of Salem off Hwy 22 at 324 52nd Ave. NW www.pentacletheatre.org

Fall 2012 • Willamette Valley Life

7


   B Y

8

Willamette Valley Life • Fall 2012

S A R A H

G R A N T


20% OFF Entire Purchase!

Excludes bird and squirrel food and optics Sale ends 12/31/12 Not to be combined with other offers or coupons

Cascades Raptor Center resident “Freyja” is a Peregrine Falcon

ne can learn about raptors, or birds of prey, in books or

by researching online, but who better to teach us about these amazing birds than the birds themselves? At Cascades Raptor Center in Eugene, close to 60 raptors–including various eagles, owls, hawks and others–do just that, serving as ambassadors and

(503) 363-9744 • 1210 Commercial Street SE • Salem, OR 97302 Sale ends 12/31/12 - Not to be combined with any other offers or coupons

educators for their species. a wide variety of groups of all ages, to further foster understanding of raptors. The Center’s on-site hospital is where up to 200 orphaned, sick or injured raptors are cared for each year. Kept away from public view to receive specialized medical care and rehabilitation, the goal is to release the birds back to their native habitat. Staff are trained to conduct as much of the patient care as possible and are supported by a group of local veterinarians who generously volunteer their time to help with the birds’ care. The veterinarians, who must receive federal certification to care for wildlife, will take birds who need surgery offsite, but staff try to manage as much of the care as possible since the doctors’ time is donated. The 24-hour hotline is an important resource to the public to either gain more information about birds of prey or to report an injured or distressed bird. It’s critical to get expert advice before approaching or touching wildlife: the CRC website offers important information to help determine whether a raptor does need human intervention. If in doubt, the hotline staff will help assess the situation and send help for the bird if necessary. Cascades Raptor Center is a

Since 1 955

1375 Cross Street SE � Salem, OR 503-581-1181 � 503-581-1182 fax Custom Forms, Stationary, Business Cards, Flyers, Brochures, Yard Signs, Promo Items, Banners, and much more...

w w w.ab c printerssale m.co m

We’ve Moved

Founded in 1987 by executive director and raptor enthusiast, Louise Shimmel, Cascades Raptor Center (CRC) sits on a wooded hillside in southeast Eugene. Through rehabilitation and public education, the Center’s mission is to foster a connection between people and birds of prey. Shimmel explains that there are three key components of the center, each equally as important as the other: the educational nature center, a clinic and a 24-hour hotline. The nature center is designed to help people understand raptors and how to live in harmony with them. The permanent resident raptors, those that cannot be returned to the wild, can be viewed by visitors. These birds either suffered extensive injuries or were imprinted by humans, making survival in the wild impossible. These are the “teachers” of the Center. Expert handlers work with the birds outside of their enclosures to demonstrate behaviors, answer questions and to allow people to see them more closely. Kit Lacy, CRC’s education director, encourages people to visit the center, which is open year round, by expressing her passion for raptors: “Through my work with these fascinating birds, I can see why humans have had relationships with raptors for thousands of years.” Additionally, CRC offers educational outreach programs, visiting schools and

Reach thousands of Willamette Valley residents Advertise in the upcoming Winter 2013 Anniversary issue For advertising rate information call 503.507.1228

Continue on page 10

Fall 2012 • Willamette Valley Life

9


Greystone Terrace

GREAT LOCATION! NEW COMPLEX!

12 month lease @ $550 - $99 1st Month OAC 5324 Skyline Road S. Salem, OR 07306 SPACIOUS LIVING! 32 one bdrm apartments, washer/dryer hookup, frost free refrigerator, dishwasher, self cleaning oven, disposal, patio with storage area. Off-street parking, on-site laundry facility. W/S/G paid. Sorry, no pets. These are very new units approx 740 sq. ft., light and bright, in a quiet smaller complex. As seen in Rental Guide Magazine. Pick up a copy today to see more fine properties.

Directions: South Salem, south on Commercial St to slight right onto Liberty Rd. S. Aprx 2.2 miles to right on Kuebler Blvd. S. left onto Skyline Rd. S.

1-866-756-1564 NorthwestPacific.HomesandLand.com

TIMOTHY GREENFIELD

 The New Willamette Valley Life Magazine Gift Ghop

Enjoy browsing through our assortment of products that capture the beauty and pride of Oregon’s Willamette Valley. The online Gift Shop allows you to shop at your convenience, 24-hours a day. All transactions are fully secure.

An American Kestrel

Willamette Valley Wall Calendar

Celebrate the beauty of the Willamette Valley every month with our new Willamette Valley 2013 Wall Calendar!

It’s The Wil-lam-it !

Are you tired of hearing your beloved Willamette Valley mispronounced? Help teach the newcomer to your area in a quick and effective way!

W W W. W I L L A M E T T E VA L L E Y L I F E . C O M / S T O R E

10

Willamette Valley Life • Fall 2012

Cascades Raptor Center Raptor Rapture: Continued from page 9

non-profit agency and depends on more than 120 volunteers as well as donations to fund its important work. The greatest expense is food. Unlike with domestic animals, there is no “Raptor Chow,” and CRC works with a variety of breeders to provide mice, rats, rabbits, fish, quail, chickens and insects to feed the birds. Raptors require nutrition gained from consuming the entire animal, so the prey is served whole. For storage considerations, the prey are mostly dead when served, but for some of the patients in the clinic, live prey is offered both to train them in hunting as well as to demonstrate they can hunt for themselves. Funding for Cascades Raptor Center comes from admission to the nature center, proceeds from gift shop sales, monetary donations, grants, benefits,

and from its adoption program. The public can “adopt” one of the resident raptors for a year. Adoption fees range from $65 to $300 and include a oneon-one visit with the chosen raptor and its handler. The Center always needs volunteers and has a “wish-list” of items that can be donated to help the raptors. Cascades Raptor Center 32275 Fox Hollow Road Eugene, OR 97405 541.485.1320 eraptors.org Sarah Horner is a freelance writer, photographer and winemaker. Eight years of experience in the local wine industry allowed her to explore the rich culture the Willamette Valley offers. The sights, sounds and stories of the region inspire her and she enjoys sharing her discoveries with readers. Sarah lives with her husband, two teenage boys and miscellaneous pets.


DAYC AT I ON

Western Oregon By Foot BY SUZANNE REINGANS

F

all is prime hiking time in western Oregon. Biting insects, hot weather and crowds have disappeared. In their places, cool mists, solitude and fall treasures, such as mushrooms, await the autumn trail explorer. The following four hikes are easy to reach from the Willamette Valley. A walk through these unique natural areas offers you west-side Oregon treasures: ancient forests, views of blue waves and white beaches, vistas of snowy peaks, colored autumn leaves, waterfalls and trickling streams.

Opal Creek Less than an hour’s drive east of Salem, the hike to Opal Creek is an easy riverside walk that tours a towering forest of 500-year-old trees and leads to two points of interest: pristine Sawmill Falls and farther down the road, Jawbone Flats, a depression-era mining camp. From the trailhead gate, the rustic road crosses Gold Creek, on a 60foot-high bridge, and then continues high above the Little North Santiam River, winding through impressive oldgrowth trees. Along the way, you will see the entrance to an abandoned mine shaft and the rusting machinery of an old lumber mill. The hike to 30-foot Sawmill Falls is 4 miles, out and back; the hike to Jawbone Flats is 7.1 miles, out and back. To get to Opal Creek: from Interstate 5 exit 253 in Salem, drive on East Santiam Highway for 23 miles to Mehama’s second flashing yellow light. Opposite the Swiss Village Restaurant, turn left on Little North Fork Road for 15 paved miles and an additional 1.3 miles of gravel. At a fork, veer left on road 2209. Then drive 4.2 miles to the parking area.

PHOTO BY PAZ REINGANS

Cascade Head This hike, just north of Lincoln City, threads through a Sitka spruce forest, then opens onto a meadow on a high headland where you can see miles of beaches, the Pacific Ocean, and an estuary, stretched before your eyes. Called the lower Nature Conservancy Trail, this walk is a moderate 2.1-mile hike (one way), gaining 1,200 feet of elevation. To get to Cascade Head’s lower trail, drive Highway 101 north one mile from the interchange where highways Fall 2012 • Willamette Valley Life

11


101 and 18 join. Turn left on Three Rocks Road and drive 2.2 miles, then turn left to find the parking lot, which is the Savage Park boat landing area. Dogs and bikes are not allowed on the trail, which is open all year. Hikers during the fall should be prepared for mud.

Mary’s Peak

Drift Creek Falls Pleasant surprises await hikers on the Drift Creek Falls trail in the Oregon Coast Range near Lincoln City. The trail leads gently downward

PHOTO BY SUZANNE REINGANS

Mary’s Peak, at 4,097 feet, is the tallest mountain in Oregon’s Coast Range. On a clear day, from the top of the peak, you will see the Pacific Ocean to the west and the snowy peaks of the Cascades to the east. Visitors have the option of driving to a parking area near the peak and then walking the short 1.5 mile summit trail to enjoy these lofty sights. On the summit, a natural open meadow is bordered by stately groves of old growth Noble firs. Another, longer trail to the summit is an option for those who want a

workout. Beginning at a parking lot called Connor’s Camp, the East Ridge Trail leads 2.75 miles up the east flank of the mountain. Although you may drive to the summit, this hike gives you time to enjoy the botanic wonders of the mountain. The East Ridge trail descends to Connor’s Camp on the same route, for a total of 5.5 miles. To get to Mary’s Peak, follow Highway 34 west from Philomath for 10 miles, then turn north onto Mary’s Peak Road. Continue on Mary’s Peak road for 5.5 miles to reach Connor’s Camp, the trailhead for East Ridge Trail. To reach the peak by car, continue past Connor’s Camp for 4 more miles; the road ends at the summit parking area.

PHOTO BY SUZANNE REINGANS

Opal Creek

12

Willamette Valley Life • Fall 2012


PHOTO BY SUZANNE REINGANS

through a moist west-side forest of old Douglas-fir, Western red cedar and hemlock trees. At 1.5 miles from the start, the hiker will reach two pleasant surprises: a 250-foot long suspension bridge crossing 100 feet above the creek, and a 75-foot waterfall near the bridge, pouring down into Drift Creek. Return to the trailhead using the same route. To get to Drift Creek Falls trail, drive east from the Highway 101 and Highway 18 junction for 4.5 miles (you will be traveling on highway 18). Go south on Bear Creek County Road for 3.5 miles, then continue 7 miles on Forest Service Road 17 to the trailhead. The road is single-lane and mostly paved. Suzanne Reingans is a homeschool mom who likes reading and writing and living a homecentered life in her native town of Dallas, Oregon. Between rain showers, she hikes or mountain bikes in the Coast Range hills west of town. This fall, she looks forward to mushroom hunts in the mossy forests with the local mycological society, and eating the treasures she finds.

Drift Creek Falls

Fabulous Fungi

Vivid orange fungi growing on the underside of a rotting log reward observant hikers.

PHOTOS BY SUZANNE REINGANS

September through November is peak mushroom season in the Pacific Northwest. After the first fall rains, underground networks of fungal fibers produce their fruits: mushrooms. Fall’s fungi are colorful, fanciful and unbelievably weird. Some are shaped like golf balls. Many wear caps, with gills underneath to produce spores. Some look like orange Jell-O or a lion’s mane. Most have scents—almond, antiseptic, cucumber-like, spicy and even garlicky. Remember that picking and handling mushrooms is perfectly safe. But refrain from eating any mushroom unless you are an expert in mushroom identification or have an expert to advise you. Of the hundreds of mushroom varieties in our area, 10 species are deadly poisonous, even eaten in small amounts, and many others cause mild to severe reactions. Inexperienced mushroom hunters should not eat any mushrooms they find in the wild.

Small but abundant, these fungi sprout from rotting wood throughout west side forests.

The milk-white caps of the angel wing mushroom light up the dark, mossy forest in which it grows.

Fall 2012 • Willamette Valley Life

13


S H O P

A N D

D I N E

I N

DALLAS

Just minutes away from your home in the mid-Willamette Valley, Dallas, Oregon is a shopping and touring destination you don’t want to miss! While you’re in the area, explore the city’s many attractions...beautiful parks, wineries, tasting rooms and year-round festivals.

Dallas RadioShack

Heartstrings FLORIST & ARTISANS





Dish Network • Direct TV • Cricket • TV Repair Computer Repair • Installation & Service

comes from the heart...Flowers & gifts for all occasions. 503.831.1410

PagePlus | JVC | Samsung | Bill Pay �������������������������� ���������������������������������������

10% Off Labor

�������������������������

With Coupon

137 SW Court St, Dallas, OR 97338 www.HeartStringsFlorist.com

Dealer Of Dallas

�����������������������

������������������������

503.623.4770

������������

www.dallastvrs.com 988 SE Jefferson St, Dallas, OR 97338

Faith

�������������������������������

Complete Auto Body & Paint Windshield Repair & Replacement Professional RV Collision Service

Christian S C H O O L

Great Facilities...Caring Staff

503.831.1493 503.831.1495 (Fax)

2290 E. Ellendale Ave., Dallas

503.623.6632 Preschool through 8th grade...Call us today! w w w. f c e a g l e s . c o m

www.WhitesCollision.com

Serving the families of Dallas and the surrounding area for 30 years!

SUPER

MARKETS

Dallas 503. 623.8901 121 SW Oak St Dallas, OR 97338

Hours: 7am-10pm Daily

Sheridan 503. 843.3374 135 South Bridge St. Sheridan, OR 97378 Hours: 6am-10pm Daily

Willamette Valley Life • Fall 2012

-Serving You From Dallas to Independence-

Your Local Doggie Vacation Hot Spot!

DALLAS & SHERIDAN

14



4,000 Square Feet of Product!

Where it

    

“How can we help you?”

Free Small Coffee With Purchase of Donut with coupon 7-11am

D A Y C A R E

F O R

D O G S

Free dog nail trim 9-3pm Mon through Sat •Supervised Setting •Exercise/Play •Overnight •Socialization with Friends •Full grooming available •Natural Balance Dog and Cat Food •Fun, fun, fun!

All Animals Are Heavenly

Max & Krispie

503.831.2224

295 W. Ellendale Ave., Dallas Corner of Levens and Ellendale

Mon-Fri 7am to 6pm • Sat 8am-5pm • Sun by appointment


S H O P

A N D

D I N E

I N

DALLAS The quiet, historic town of Dallas is the County seat. The downtown area is home to the historic Polk County Courthouse, City Hall and many historic buildings. Surrounded by vineyards & wineries, most of them with fabulous tasting rooms open through the Spring, Summer & Fall.

Learn more about the town of Dallas...visit DallasOregon.org

Dallas Automotive Services Done right the first time! Family owned for 33 years in Dallas

Dallas has 7 City Parks, the largest is a 35-acre park with an attached arboretum. There is also an indoor aquatic center with classes, open swim, even a slide & rope swing!

COMPLETE AUTO REPAIR Foreign • Domestic • Tune Ups • Brakes • Computer Diagnostics

503.623.2290

Just off Kings Highway going toward Hwy 22 - 12835 Westview Drive

Friendly, Fast & Helpful!

Cars & Trucks For Sale

11 Bay Repair Shop - Competitive Labor Rates 503.623.6686

812 SE Jefferson St Dallas, Oregon

“Where Customers Send Their Friends” 2011 Chevrolet HHR

$13,798 #11462

1993 Nissan Altima

$1,298 #024551A

10% Off Any Repair Most Makes & Models

Sale ends 12/31/12 Not bo be combined with other offers or coupons

Don’t see it? Ask us to find it! Need new tires? See us! Visit us on the web for many other selections: www.mcmullinmotors.com

STARLIGHT LANES

Bowling is great at Starlight Lanes! We have all new lanes, bumpers, pro shop, food service and lounge. You can also enjoy our full service lottery...

20 Token Party Coupon! Book a party for 10 or more & receive 20 free tokens. (1 customer per coupon) expires 1/1/13 ffer not valid with any other offer

New Game Room! Win Prizes!

394 Main Street, Dallas, Oregon • Call: 503.6234267 Fall 2012 • Willamette Valley Life

15


“” • Caring and friendly staff • Your comfort is our priority • Cosmetic treatments - whitening, bonding and veneers.

LImeberry

Kenneth R. Winokur DMD

We schedule day and evening appointments

When you call, our staff will schedule your appointments and answer your insurance questions.

Call (503) 838-1633

329 S. Main, Independence, OR 97351 IndependenceDental.org

Let us help you with at least one of life’s certainties. •Tax management services

The number one yogurt shop in Oregon invites you to take advantage of our fantastic tasting, healthy alternative to ice cream. We have 40 to 80 toppings and offer no sugar added, gluten free, low and non-fat, and even non dairy flavors! South Salem

West Salem

Woodburn

Dallas

Albany

Lebanon

4555 Liberty Road S., Salem, OR 97302 503.990.6069

109 E. Ellendale Ave. Dallas, OR 97338 503.623.3655

525 W. Taggart Dr, Salem, OR 97304 503.339.7909

548 Pacific Blvd. SW, Albany, OR 97321 541.928.2194

1537 Mt. Hood Ave. #109 Woodburn, OR 97071 971.983.3800

2500 S. Santiam Hwy, Lebanon, OR 97355 541.570.1134

•Accounting services •Estate & trust planning •Tax preparation •Payroll services •Debt & finance advising

Bring a friend & buy one & get one of equal or less value!

Bring the family & get

Coupons not valid with any other offer. Expires 01/01/13

Coupons not valid with any other offer. Expires 01/01/13

Vanlue, PC

Donald G. Vanlue, Certified Public Accountant 503.587.7954 VanlueCPA.com 1174 Cornucopia St. NW, Salem, OR 97304

16

Willamette Valley Life • Fall 2012

www.limeberryyogurt.com Franchise locations available

50% off!


M U S I C & E N T E R TA I N M E N T

Salem Rocks

R

ock stars were a common sight in Salem, Oregon, some 50 years ago. The Doors, The Byrds, The Wailers, The Animals, The Mamas and the Papas, and some of the biggest acts of the time came to play the Salem Armory during the ’60s and ’70s. Along with the rock stars there to play the hottest radio hits, thousands of teenage fans flocked to the state capital for the rock shows. Kids from around the valley and the state would pack The Armory—3,000-plus deep— in an effort to see such popular acts as The Lovin’ Spoonful and Three Dog Night. Those were the earliest days of rock concerts at the Salem Armory, a venue that still draws big name acts to this day. The bands and musicians that came through during those first decades helped put The Salem Armory and the Northwest on the rock ’n’ roll map.

Kids from around the valley and the state would pack The Armory—3,000-plus deep—in an effort to see such popular acts as The Lovin’ Spoonful and Three Dog Night. This October, Ed Dougherty, the man behind those first concerts at the Salem Armory, will celebrate the 50th anniversary of the shows which he started. Dougherty, a Salem-area farm boy turned middle school math and science teacher, remembers hearing his students complain that there was nothing to do in Salem. Dougherty set out to change that and capitalize on the entertainment vacuum. He started putting together concerts or what they called back then, “dances.” Dougherty went on to create EJD

Ed Dougherty with Sonny and Cher

Enterprises and Concert Services, launching a long career in concert and event promotion that would leave its mark on Oregon’s rock ’n’ roll landscape. Almost immediately, the concerts Dougherty hosted at the Salem Armory were successful. Shows sold out and tickets went for $1.25 a piece. More and more bands came to play

The Armory, but the biggest stars to pack the house, with close to 9,000 people (well over capacity), were Sonny & Cher, who played there in 1965. In addition to bringing in big stars, Dougherty helped launch some musical careers as well. Local Salem and Northwest bands like the Chevels, the Live Five, and the Morning Reign got some early breaks booking Fall 2012 • Willamette Valley Life

17


Salem’s Rockin’ ‘60s

Saturday, October 20, 2012

An EJD 50th Anniversary Celebration With Live Music Featuring

MERRILEE RUSH

“ANGEL OF THE MORNING”

JIM VALLEY OF PAUL REVERE AND THE RAIDERS

THE KINGSMAN “LOUIE LOUIE”

THE LIVE FIVE “SHAKE YOUR TAIL FEATHER” PLUS! A special “Sneak Peek” premier of the new documentary film by Salem film producer Chuck Stenberg,

“The Days of EJD and Concert Services” General Admission Seating: $20 advance / $25 at door. Tickets available at all Safeway Tickets West Ticket Centers. Charge by phone: Portland area 503. 225.TIXX; all other areas 1.800.992.TIXX or on the web at www.ticketswest.com. Reserved tables for 8 - $200 (Call Jim Billings at 503.930.7151 or Ed and Jan at 503.364.3123) Doors open at 6:30pm / Show begins at 7:30pm.

SALEM ARMORY AUDITORIUM 2320 17TH STREET NE, SALEM 18

Willamette Valley Life • Fall 2012

shows with Dougherty and acting as the house band. Salem quickly gained a reputation among performers as the place to play, and the list of bands that rocked The Armory grew to include Paul Revere and The Raiders, The Guess Who, and Steppenwolf. But the city nestled in the agrarian Willamette Valley didn’t get the reputation as the place to play by accident. The shows at The Armory were well-run events, keeping the performers, the crowd and the community happy. Dougherty’s concerts continued, and he eventually went from hosting shows at the Salem Armory to booking bands at venues like the Portland Coliseum and the Oregon State Fair. During this time, Dougherty rubbed elbows with the likes of Johnny Cash, The Rolling Stones and more. But while some would be star struck and tempted by the glamorous rock star lifestyle, Dougherty, a staunch businessman, never succumbed to the allure. “People who are in this business and don’t treat it like a business, don’t stay in it very long,” he explains.

This fall, Dougherty and EJD Concert Services will celebrate 50 years since the concerts began as well as a career full of successful events and unique experiences. The anniversary celebration, scheduled for Saturday, October 20, is called “Salem’s Rockin’ 60s.” It will feature a sneak preview of the new documentary The Days of EJD and Concert Services made by Salem filmmaker Chuck Stenberg. The 108 minute film chronicles the career of Dougherty through photographs, interviews and radio clips. Headlining the anniversary show will be some of the artists who played The Armory in the ’60s and ’70s, including Merrilee Rush (singing the hit “Angel of the Morning”), Jim Valley (of Paul Revere and The Raiders), and Mike Mitchell (of The Kingsmen). For more information, including ticket prices, call the Salem Armory Auditorium at 503.315.7933. Cindy Dauer is a freelance writer and photographer living in Oregon. As a journalist, she has covered a wide variety of topics from arts and entertainment to local news. Recently, her work has appeared in several mid-Valley publications, and her online writing has been viewed around the world. A native of the Northwest, Cindy loves outdoor adventures and exploring local culture.


T H E V I N E

Pinot Noir’s Many Aromas: Everything but ‘grapes’

T

here are many other fruit aromas to be found in wine, although it is strange to think of anything other than grape. We don’t assess apples referring to pears, but with wine, another agricultural product, we reference other things. I tell new tasters a good “cheat” for white wine is “apple” or “citrus.” They all often have both. You don’t need to know if it’s McIntosh or Meyer ... simply keeping them in mind will help. Often you’ll end up deciphering between varieties of fruits without realizing it. Pinot Noir is equally subject to many aromas. Some vintages are elegant (cooler years) and others bold (warm to hot years). Regardless, Pinot Noir consistently has a range of aromas inherent to the variety. Here we’ll touch on the basic markers of Pinot Noir.

Cherry Red fruit is often the easiest to pick out in many Pinot Noir wines. The most common descriptor is “cherry.” Stick your nose in the glass and smell. No cherries were used in the making of the wine—hopefully—yet many of us identify the sweet fruit smell, our brains translating the aromas into an image we have stored away. Without delving deep into the science of esters and aroma compounds, ask yourself “What kind of cherry?” Are they red, yellow, black? Tart and sour or plump and sweet? Fresh from a tree, cooked into a pie, or dried? These answers will give you an idea of what the vintage was like (cooler years are tart; warmer years are juicy) or of soils found in the vineyards. Just remember cherry. It’s there. Bonus red fruit: try raspberries or cranberries.

Spice The second less obvious component is spice. Just like with fruit, our brains want to recognize other familiar aromas. My favorite components include clove, cinnamon or nutmeg. One or all could be in your glass, with a better chance if the wine spent time in barrel. Depending on the age, grain and toast of the barrel, you’ll perceive various spices. Some wines may show a hint of vanilla. Does it smell like someone baking a (cherry!) pie? Or is it a soft, muted spice of an old holiday decoration? Is it fresh ground or synthetic like chewing gum?

Be the first to announce your wine smells of fresh cherries, with a dash of cinnamon and raked leaves. Watch those around you marvel in wonder. Earth Finally, the most difficult components for people to accept: dirt, leaves and mushrooms. Wine is an agricultural product and is prone to its surroundings. Soils range from loam to silt and influence the fruit with different minerals and nutrients. With softer flavors, Pinot Noir has more subtle and layered characteristics. An earthy note is not uncommon to many of these wines and can range from mineral-like, to damp leaves, to mushrooms on a mossy log. These characteristics are not bad or indicative of a fault. They are simply there and should be embraced: imagine you’re walking through one of Oregon’s splendid forests on a warm fall afternoon or the smell of the pavement after a hard rain. Keep in mind these notes will become more pronounced with age as tertiary characteristics develop and the fruitiness of a new wine softens. Now with your arsenal of aromas you can confidently navigate any tasting room in the Willamette Valley. Be the first to announce your wine smells of fresh cherries, with a dash of cinnamon and raked leaves. Watch those around you marvel in wonder. Some would argue whether understanding exactly why grapes can smell of dirt and apples is important to enjoying the wine. Instead, think about how the flavors layer together and complete a whole sensation on your palate. Cheers. Ryan Reichert is originally from Northeast Ohio and relocated to the Willamette Valley to further his career in the wine industry. He has received both his Intermediate and Advanced certifications from the Wine & Spirits Education Trust and is also a certified French wine enthusiast and Spanish Wine Educator. Ryan strives to learn all he can about wine and to share his passion with everyone. nwwhites.com.

Fall 2012 • Willamette Valley Life

19


YOU R M ON E Y

Auto Makers Raise Their Game

A

ccording to The American Consumer Satisfaction Index (ACSI), auto buyers are increasingly satisfied with both domestic and luxury auto brands. The surprise leader for 2012 is Lincoln with Lexus, Buick, Subaru and Cadillac rounding out the top five.

The survey went on to state that the driving factor for consumer satisfaction is increased quality. All this adds up to a great time to purchase a new vehicle. Here are some tips to make the auto buying process a little easier. Do Your Homework – It may sound obvious, but doing research on the vehicle you’re looking for is a great time saver. Knowing what you want (year, make, model, add-ons) will help in narrowing the number of dealers you work with and allows you to negotiate between dealers. Remember, you are the customer and in control. You wouldn’t just wing buying a home;

rates and terms than banks and are eager to earn your business. Once you’ve obtained pre-approval you can head down to the dealer with confidence and negotiate a much better price. Let the salesperson know up front exactly what you’re looking for and how much you want to pay. When they ask about financing (and they will) let them know you’re preapproved with your credit union and that you’re ready to start negotiating the price. By being prepared ahead of time, you will save time and invariably money. neither should you wing buying a car. Some great websites to research new and used vehicles are: edmunds.com, NADA.com and autobytel.com. Get Pre-Approved – Knowing what your monthly car budget is before going to a dealer is crucial. The best way to figure that out is to get preapproved with your local credit union. Credit unions typically have better

Beware of Add-ons – From GAP (Guaranteed Asset Protection) insurance to extended warranties, dealers make a lot of money on the back end pushing these types of products. In fact, car dealerships hire finance managers to do two main things: 1) secure financing for customers (even when it may not be in the best interest of the customer), and 2) sell these types of ancillary insurance products. Your best bet is to check with the credit union where

you’re getting financing from to see if they offer similar coverage options (often at a much lower cost). If In Doubt, Walk Away – Don’t get pressured into making a purchase. Your willingness to walk away is the ultimate power play in your car buying arsenal. Doing the steps above will put you in a great position before you ever get to the dealer. However, unless you’re willing to stick to your proverbial guns, you will have done all that work for nothing. Bottom line: don’t put yourself in a position to regret your car purchase. With plenty of quality vehicles out there, you should take advantage if you’re in the market for something new. Assuming you’ve done your research, obtained pre-approval and are willing to play hard ball, you can now feel confident to go get your next vehicle. Happy hunting! Ken Gardner writes for life, financial liberty and the pursuit of member happiness. He has worked in the financial industry for over 10 years and does not have perfect credit…but he’s getting there.

$99 Move-In Special! Five Bedroom Townhomes 233 Whitesell Street, Monmouth Adjacent to WOU campus and offers 5 bdrms, 3 baths, oversized living areas, 9 ft ceilings, private patios, balconies, full size washer & dryer, double car garage with openers. Cable, internet, garbage provided. Rent $1275.

Brand New! WOU Townhomes RentalServicesMonmouth.com

1-866-749-0443

As seen in Rental Guide Magazine. Pick up a copy today to see more fine properties.

What’s for dinner tonight? W

�������������������� ��������������������� ������������������������ �������������������� ����������������������� �������������������� ������������������������� ��������������������� �����������

DINNERSFORWINNERS.WORDPRESS.COM 20

Willamette Valley Life • Fall 2012


E AT

Mushrooms: A Pastry Puff Piece

Mushroom and Gruyère Tart The advantage of browning the shallots and mushrooms and parbaking the crust is two-fold: the mushrooms release their excess liquids in the pan, not on your pretty snack, and it gives the shallots a chance to become delightfully caramelized, bringing their golden-deep flavors to the mix. Dig in!

PHOTOS BY SOPHIE HAWLEY

G

rowing up in a homeschooled family of six, my mother cooked amazing homemade meals for us three times a day. We hardly ever went to restaurants, being fed instead by produce from my mom’s garden, eggs from her hens, and beef from my grandparent’s farm. Everything was made from scratch and so delicious. By age eight or so, I would be asked to cook meals while my mom put her feet up and read a book. I recall facing this chore begrudgingly. Why did mom get to rest and relax while I had to work? It couldn’t have been because of the energy it took for her to raise four kids, teach them school subjects in different grade levels every day, and run the household (as well as feed the chickens). But now, I’m so thankful that in her kitchen I learned everything I needed to know about cooking and eating well—except for how to like eating mushrooms. On Turkey Pot Pie night, you could find me picking the mushroom bits out and scooting them to the side of my plate. I would then be firmly reminded that I was going to eat those mushrooms by themselves, and was that really what I wanted? I didn’t grow to love eating mushrooms until some years later, but now that I adore them, I’m trying to make up for lost time. Gratefully, the Pacific Northwest is rich with boletes, chanterelles, morels and oysters—each fun to eat and fun to say. One of my favorite mushroomshowcasing recipes is a flaky pastry shell with nutty-but-sweet, creamy Gruyère cheese, caramelized shallots, and a hearty layer of tender mushrooms, intense with flavor. Make this tart with any mushroom variety you like and bring it to a party. You’ll make some new friends. (There are also way too many mushroom bits to be picked off! Win.)

• 1 sheet frozen puff pastry, thawed • 1 tablespoon olive oil • 2 medium shallots, thinly sliced • 1 1/2 pounds mushrooms, brushed clean and sliced • 6 ounces Gruyère cheese, shredded • 1/4 cup fresh parsley, chopped • coarse salt and ground pepper On a lightly floured surface, roll out the puff pastry into a large rectangle, about 10 by 14 inches. Transfer to a parchment-lined baking sheet. Lightly score the edges with a knife (without cutting all the way through), then prick the center all over with tines of a fork. Chill in the fridge for at least 10 minutes, especially if your kitchen is warm. Heat oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the shallots and cook, undisturbed, until just beginning to brown. Stir and repeat. Lower heat and continue cooking until shallots are caramelized, about 5 more minutes, lowering heat further if browning too fast. Add the sliced mushrooms to the skillet, raise heat to medium-high

again, and stir occasionally until mushrooms are browned and release their juices. Season with salt and pepper. Place mixture in a strainer over a bowl to drain, and, if you're like me, dip some toast into those tasty juices. Make ahead: store cooled, drained mushroom mixture in an airtight container in the fridge for up to two days. Meanwhile, par-bake pastry at 400°F until just beginning to brown, 8–10 minutes. Don’t worry if it inflates; just prick the center a couple more times with a fork after bringing it

out of the oven. Top with shredded cheese, avoiding edges, then sprinkle with mushroom mixture and parsley. Bake until cheese is melted and crust is golden and crackly, 8–10 more minutes. Cool for a few minutes before slicing into squares with a pizza cutter or long, sharp knife. Born and raised in the Willamette Valley, Sophie Hawley is a food blogger and enthusiastic food-eater who adores breakfast, cheese and local wine. She lives with her tall husband and miniature dachshund, and enjoys attending Spartan training to combat her caloric intake. During the week she keeps books for a local nonprofit organization.

THE GATHERING SPOT open 7 days, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.

  Family friendly, local seasonal food in a relaxed atmosphere Serving breakfast and lunch 8 a.m. - 3 p.m. Monday - Saturday 8 a.m. - 3 p.m. Sunday

 

106 North First Street Silverton, Oregon (503) 874-4888 order@gatheringspotcafe.com www.gatheringspotcafe.com

Fall 2012 • Willamette Valley Life

21




Restaurants • Wineries • Florists • Golf Entertainment • Spa & Fitness • Much More!

Own Your Own Business!!!

The Online Shopping Giant Just For The Salem Area!

Do you want to...Earn a great living? Are you...Self-motivated, energetic, and hard working? Then you are the Man or Woman we are looking for!

We Offer:

•Success Training •Flexible Schedule •No Royalty Fees •Exclusive Territories •New & Existing Client Base •Potential $25K-$50K a year This is an opportunity for a person who wants a business they can own...Not just a job! Join our outstanding team and STAND TALL as a Mountain Man or Woman business owner! All you need is a valid drivers license, reliable vehicle, (Minivan, Wagon, or Mid-size SUV) car insurance and willingness to succeed! Current Routes Available: Grants Pass, Redmond/Sisters/Madras, Hood River/The Dalles, Eugene, Lake Oswego, Troutdale/Sandy, Woodburn/West Salem.

Call Tom Reti at 503.393.3136 or email MtnmanOregon@gmail.com

22

Willamette Valley Life • Fall 2012

Reach thousands of Willamette Valley residents Advertise in the upcoming Winter 2013 Anniversay issue

For advertising rate information call 503.507.1228


2615 Portland Road NE, Salem, OR 97301

Pink House Cafe A “Fun” Social Connection

Open!

Victorian Era Atmosphere Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner Wednesday - Saturday, 7am-9pm Sunday 7am-7pm • Free range chicken • Vegetarian • Homemade Desserts • Gluten Free 242 “D” Street Independence, OR 97351 5 0 3 . 8 3 7. 0 9 0 0

Virgil T. Golden Funeral Service Oakleaf Crematory

BOAT & RV APPEARANCE & RESTORATION SPECIALIST

Virgil or “Tommy” started continues today. We offer preplanning to fit your needs, a central location which serves all cemeteries and mausoleums and a knowledgeable and caring staff. As Virgil or “Tommy” often said, “the impossible only takes a moment longer.” We are your answer in time of need. Rd . nd tla

Hyacinth St. NE

Po r

4240 25th Ave. NE, Salem, OR 97301

25th St. NE

• RV Service & Repair • Specializing in Filon & Gelcoat • Protection, Polishing & Restoration • Interior & Exterior Detailing • Insurance/Warranty Work

503.930.3178

The community legacy of service that

Tom C. Golden, Tom P. Golden Virgil “Tommy” Golden 1895-1990

605 Commercial St. SE Salem, Oregon 97301 • 503-364-2257 vtgolden.com • salemcremations.com Fall 2012 • Willamette Valley Life

23


24

Willamette Valley Life • Fall 2012

Willamette Valley Life