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Dayton’s

Best

Schools

OUTSTANDING EDUCATORS PAGE 50

UNIQUE SCHOOL PROGRAMS PAGE 56

MONTGOMERY COUNTY EDUCATIONAL SERVICE CENTER PAGE 60

PRIVATE SCHOOL LISTINGS PAGE 62

SPRING VALLEY ACADEMY PAGE 66

GUIDE TO COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES PAGE 68

INDIANA WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY PAGE 90

DAYTON MAGAZINE . August/September 2019

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2019 Dayton Magazine is now proud to honor some of the amazing teachers in the Miami Valley as Outstanding Educators!

50

DAYTON MAGAZINE . August/September 2019


Terra Spears Northmont Middle School WEB (Where Everybody Belongs)

N

orthmont Middle School’s Terra Spears says that what she most enjoys about her job is being able to be the person she needed while growing up. “I come from a background of trauma, inequity, no parents, failing grades in middle school. So to be able to be the person that I needed is just, it gives me wings,” she says. Spears is able to provide that support through the school’s WEB (Where Everybody Belongs) program. Created by the Boomerang Project, WEB is a middle school orientation and transition program that builds connections between seventh and eighth graders and assists students in building their confidence and leadership skills. “Every year I recruit seventh graders who are natural leaders, who are good students, who are kind and helpful and their teachers recommend them for my class (for the following year),” she says. “(The next year) … my eighth grade leaders are paired with two or three (other) group leaders with about 13 to 15 seventh graders. They do activities and they get to know each other and then they stay with those seventh graders throughout the entire year and they meet with them.” In addition to meeting with their seventh graders, the eighth grade leaders meet regularly with Spears for a leadership class. “We’ll practice the activities that they’re going to do with their seventh graders but most of it is self-reflection and self-growth. Who do I believe myself to be? What is my path in life? What makes me happy? What doesn’t make me happy? Just a lot of circle discussions, and social, emotional leaning opportunities,” she says. But that’s just one of Spears’ many responsibilities. She also developed and leads a new student and parent program, as the school receives, on average, one to two new students a week. She introduces them to their teachers, gets them set up with their school iPads, explains the paperwork and

provides information on any community resources the family may need. “I give them my information and I reach out periodically and say, ‘Is there anything that we can do to help you?’” she says. Spears also monitors the school’s Catch Up Café, which lets students work on late or missing homework for up to 70 credit during lunch; does restorative justice with troubled students, which encourages them to think about what they’ve done, its impact and what they would do next time; and leads professional development activities

that address equity with her colleagues. While Spears has many responsibilities she says she loves them all because of the impact they have on students. “I have this saying and I just recently, in the last maybe two years, have been able to really implement it with fidelity and it is, ‘I cannot help you until you are ready.’ And to see when a kid is ready to make changes in their life it is the most powerful thing. It’s just powerful to see a kid turn around,” she says.  CORINNE MINARD DAYTON MAGAZINE . August/September 2019

51


Sheena Burns Esther Dennis Middle School at Grafton Kennedy English language arts

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DAYTON MAGAZINE . August/September 2019


S

heena Burns teaches school. She also teaches life. Bu r ns, a si x t h g rade Eng l ish language arts teacher at Esther Dennis Middle School at Grafton Kennedy in the Northridge Local School District, loves to provide her students with experiences outside of what they would normally be able to experience. And that’s not much for many of her students. The poverty rate in the community hovers around 90, some students wear the same clothes to school every day and 100 of the students get free and reducedprice lunches. But students in Burns’s classes experience many of the same adventures as those children in financially secure homes. One of those experiences is attending plays. Burns is able to secure scholarships for her students so they can attend events at the Victoria Theatre three times a year. Another experience Burns provides students is the ability to attend one of Tim Horton’s Foundation Camps. The camp

provides free transportation and free room and board to support children from disadvantaged circumstances between the ages of 12 to 16. There they learn skills like leadership, resilience and responsibility, empowering them to believe in their own potential and change their stories for the better, according to Tim Horton’s website. One of the students was amazed by what it looked like outside of Dayton, says Burns. “He had never been outside of the city limits.” On another visit the student was able to attend a celebration where steak was served. “That kid was like, ‘Oh my gosh, I’ve only seen steak on TV. So this is what steak is!’” says Burns. She enjoys that she gets to be part of a village that is raising kids. “It’s all about the kids, seeing the smiles on their faces and hearing, ‘Gosh, I’ve never done this before. This is so cool!’” she says. “That just warms my heart.” It’s also her dream job. Burns says her earliest memories are of playing games and pretending to be a schoolteacher. That may

be because her maternal grandfather was a principal in Middletown where she grew up. “I’m sure that kind of maybe played a role in it.” While teaching may be part of her DNA, teaching children English and writing is part of her passion. Books, she says, can take students to places they may never be able to visit physically and even experience the perspective of others. That is important because it teaches her students how to communicate. “I feel like that is my way of helping my kids kind of learn to express themselves,” she says. Burns also isn’t afraid to show her students that she is still learning. A co-founder of the school’s Green Thumb Club, Burns admits her strong suit is not gardening. “I’m actually learning with the kids which is really cool and fun for them,” she says. It shows students that even though she earned college degrees and now works as a teacher she continues to be a lifelong learner. “I think it’s a good example for the kids.”  ERIC SPANGLER

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53


Judi MacLeod Chaminade Julienne Special education

OUR HOME IS A

TOP-TIER

national Catholic research university

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97%

of students find success within six months of graduation

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DAYTON MAGAZINE . August/September 2019

4-YEAR TUITION PLAN provides peace of mind — and the same net tuition all four years plus no fees

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“Cool School” for our commitment to environmental protection


J

udi MacLeod has never strayed too far from Chaminade Julienne Catholic High School in her career. After graduating from the school in 1988 she went on to pursue her degree in elementary special education from the University of Dayton. She spent a few years teaching in Eaton and for Dayton Public Schools before an opportunity opened up at her high school alma mater in the summer of 1999. When Chaminade Julienne was beginning to build its Cuvilly special education program it needed a teacher to lead it. Someone called MacLeod to let her know, leading to her applying and quickly getting the job. MacLeod started with three students in a little classroom and a blank slate upon which to create an inclusive program that would become the Cuvilly department. Twenty years later she now oversees a department of three staff members, two classrooms, three offices and 110 students. But MacLeod is more than her role— she’s a vital part of the Chaminade Julienne family. As one nomination recommend-

ing her for one of Dayton’s Best Educators put it, “CJ would not be CJ without Judi.” She serves as the school’s bowling coach, moderates the sign language performance group Hands in Harmony, works with the Scouts of America and organizes social events for her special education students. That last aspect is what really drives MacLeod’s passion. She first worked with children and adolescents with special needs when she was just a kid herself. When she was in Girl Scouts a visiting instructor taught her troop sign language, which started her on the path to where she is today. “From there, while I was in Girl Scouts, I got opportunities to work with troops that were severely special ed,” she recalls. “I was a peer mentor as well as a leader… kind of like a camp counselor working with kids with special needs. I did that for three or four years and I loved every minute of it.” That led to babysitting children with special needs and volunteering when she was in high school. By the time she was enrolled at the University of Dayton

her love of helping special needs children and her family’s history in teaching came together in the perfect way. When she returned to Chaminade Julienne she brought both the passion formed in her youth and the experience she had built up since graduating. Ever since, she’s provided a positive environment at school for her students as well as opportunities to grow within and beyond Chaminade Julienne. By never putting preconceived limitations on students with special needs she encourages and challenges them to achieve great things like graduating from college, holding meaningful careers and creating happy, fulfilling lives for themselves. “It’s just an amazing opportunity as a professional,” she says. “It is the best job in the whole wide world. “I wake up every morning and I’m excited to go to school and I go to bed and I can’t wait get up the next morning to go back to school.”  KEVIN MICHELL

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55


DAYTON | 2019 BEST SCHOOLS

Life Lessons CLUBS AND PROGRAMS OUTSIDE OF THE STANDARD CURRICULUM CREATE UNIQUE EXPERIENCES FOR STUDENTS

BY NOAH TONG AND KEELY BROWN

C

reating enriching environments where students can learn about life beyond the standard curriculum is one of the hallmarks of some of our Best Schools. Here are just a few examples of how schools go above and beyond to teach students lessons in life.

MIAMISBURG HIGH SCHOOL For a high school program launched in 2016, Miamisburg High School Theater is already experiencing success on stage. The crew took home nine awards for its production of the The Addams Family at the first Miami Valley High School Theatre Awards, far more than any other individual

school earned on the night. Andrea Hubler, parent booster and one of the original architects of the theater program, helped write a business plan that was presented to the school board since “students at Miamisburg didn’t have anywhere to go to grow out of children’s theater programming at the time.” Through The Addams Family, and previous productions such as Into the Woods and High School Musical Jr., Hubler believes the theater program has a profound effect on the educational and social development of students at Miamisburg. “They develop so many marketable skills for the future,” says Hubler. “Students must

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DAYTON MAGAZINE . August/September 2019

A

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Miamisburg High School recently launched a theater program for students that has proven to be popular and successful.

think on their feet and react to different situations quickly in theater.” “A lot of them have found their people,” says Hubler. “But the coolest thing is seeing kids connect. Some are jocks, some are musicians, some don’t participate in anything else, but midway through you see them connect with each other.”

Decide where to start your Sunday Funday at

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The Miamisburg High School’s production of The Addams Family garnered nine awards at the first Miami Valley High School Theatre Awards.

The Miamisburg High School Theater, searching for additional funds to create more award-winning shows, encourages other students and families in the community to attend the shows.

NORTHMONT HIGH SCHOOL Northmont City Schools recognizes that being a student can be complicated and

confusing, which can often lead to interpersonal conflict between peers. To resolve issues that may arise Northmont looks toward high school student leaders in Matt Maiken’s peer facilitation class. Students, who must apply with teacher recommendations to enroll in the course, also educate elementary students on the dangers of bad influences like drugs and alcohol.

The first nine weeks of the course are spent developing student leadership ability, such as listening and emotional intelligence skills. Then, “we turn them loose to be of services to others,” says Sheree Cof f ma n, st udent assist a nt counselor. From t here students w ill mediate conf lict, lead assemblies at elementary schools on bullying and eat lunch with younger students, among other activities. “I understand the power of youth teaching youth,” Coffman says. “A 16-year-old can be more impactful in delivering a message.” Students in the peer facilitation class are required to complete 20 community service hours every quarter. Volunteer activities include assisting local nonprofit organizations such as House of Bread. The goal is for this program to “prepare students so they have can have a bigger impact,” says Tony Thomas, superintendent. “At graduation this year,” he says, “there was a student that has anxiety in front of large groups. A girl who happened to be

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57


DAYTON | 2019 BEST SCHOOLS

To resolve interpersonal conflicts Northmont High School relies on high school student leaders in Matt Maiken’s peer facilitation class.

a peer facilitator was sitting beside him. She walked him through everything and he ended up having a great experience. If she didn’t have that training he might not have had a positive experience.”

YELLOW SPRINGS HIGH SCHOOL Yellow Springs High School continues to inspire students to take on the world by creating a club—dubbed Global Connections—dedicated to creating opportunities

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DAYTON MAGAZINE . August/September 2019

for student-designed, passion-driven, multicultural-learning experiences through international travel. H ig h school st udent s have ta ken multiple trips since the club’s inception


four years ago, says Eli Hurwitz, library media specialist and adviser for Global Connections at Yellow Springs High School. Forty-five students have traveled to Rome, Paris and Peru to experience new cultures and experiences. Next year, Global Connections will venture to Rome and Athens, Greece, next year during spring break. “For some of our students this is not just the first time outside of the country, but the first time outside of Ohio,” says Hurwitz. “It’s a big change, but it gives all of our students an opportunity to become bigger and better people.” While abroad, students complete research projects on the country to earn school credit. The assignments encourage students to study the countries’ culture in order to learn more about the local customs. However, students don’t just research and experience new cultures—they build friendships that will last a lifetime. “Going overseas together like this and experiencing the world like this creates a brand new level of understanding

5

between these students,” says Hurwitz. “They’ve experienced the world and t hey ’re sha r ing somet h ing t hat t he rest of the rest of their peers haven’t shared yet.”

BELLBROOK HIGH SCHOOL Bellbrook High School assists all students in their quest for knowledge and has now extended that support to members of the LGBTQIA (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer or questioning, intersex and asexual) community. The high school recently founded a Gay Straight Alliance Club to create a space for students who need it. Before starting the club, Bellbrook H i g h S c ho ol c onduc t e d e x t en s i v e research and found that students in schools that had a Gay Straight Alliance organization felt the school was safer. All students—even those who are not a part of the club or don’t identify as somebody in the LGBTQIA community— agreed, explains Paige Lewis, the school’s English teacher and Gay Straight Alliance adviser.

The club meets monthly to discuss the needs of students, how to better support the school and focuses on acts of service for local groups in the community. In meetings, students discuss their own experiences and what they’ve been through in order to support each other. “They’re so willing to put themselves out there,” says Lewis. “They’ll share w ith one another to say, ‘This is my experience—the kinder we can be to people the better, because we don’t really know what they’re dealing with outside of school.’” The club is open to all students who are look ing for a comfortable space where they can make new friends and branch out. “I t h i n k w h at ’s c o ol a b out (G a y Straight Alliance) is the group of people that have come together are not kids that would traditionally be hanging out or spending time together,” says Lewis. “It created this space for a hodgepodge of people to come together and become friends.” n

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59


DAYTON ›› SUPPORT

Behind the Scenes

Classroom activity at the Montgomery County Educational Service Center’s Hearing Impaired School.

Montgomery County Educational Service Center provides needed assistance to school districts BY BETH L ANGEFELS

P

ublic school districts often need to draw on additional resources to ensure they meet state requirements and are continually improving their programming. In Ohio, so called Educational Service Centers are more than 100 years

60

DAYTON MAGAZINE . August/September 2019

old, but the structure has changed dramatically as the times change. Shannon Cox, associate superintendent of the Montgomery County Educational Service Center says that though every county in Ohio had an Educational Service Center when they were first developed there are now 52 in the state. “Some have gone out of business and some have combined,” she says. “But every school district in the state is served by an (Educational Service Center) regardless.” Cox just completed her 10th year with the Montgomery County Educational Service Center and today oversees the programming and services. She says that though Educational Service Centers were originally governing authorities over all public schools in Ohio today they have transformed into full service educational centers offering programs and services

ranging from professional development to grant writing to even providing school bus drivers. “Anything a school district may need we are able to provide,” Cox says. “Or we can connect them with other resources.” The Montgomery County Educational Service Center has a mission, in fact, to support all its major stakeholders, including all educational providers, students, parents and the public. And with Montgomery County home to 16 public school districts, the Miami Valley Career Technology Center and numerous chartered and unchartered community schools, this Educational Service Center is one of the largest in the state. “We offer a big continuum of services,” Cox says. “We also serve districts in Darke, Clarke, Greene, Miami and Preble counties and have very good relationships with


Warren, Butler and Hamilton counties as well as others in the state. So, what does this large Educational Service Center offer to school districts to help them offer their own quality, yet cost-effective programs? “We have 300 students in our special needs program,” Cox says. “They come to us for help when they have exhausted all the resources in their home districts.” Cox says the special education services have been the staple of the organization for her entire tenure, but instructional services, including professional development, and help with curriculum, testing and state department requirements is also a large part of what the Educational Service Center does to help districts. “The newest service center we have within the ( Educational Service Center) is the social and emotional learning division,” Cox says. “We just started this on Aug. 1 of last year and we already have $2 million in grant money and 50 people involved.” Cox says the need to help school districts in and around Dayton has continued to grow exponentially over the years, especially with the opioid crisis reaching nearly epidemic proportions. “If we look at our society as a result of opioid abuse we see that more and more children are losing parents to death than ever before,” Cox says. The Educational Service Center offers support to districts that have needs they don’t know how to verbalize. The districts just know that their students need help. That help is provided with the assistance of professional counselors and psychologists who make a game plan, help ensure state dollars are accessible and work with other organizations providing services across the entire county. “We can really be a one-stop shop,” Cox says. “The needs in our classroom are almost insatiable.” Over the past six years, the Montgomery County Educational Service Center has listened to superintendents talk about not only the opioid crisis, but also the rising need for foster care and mental health services for kids, even if they haven’t yet lost a parent. “We had 16 of our superintendents, representatives from the sheriff department and from local police departments here,” Cox says. “We hosted a meeting to raise awareness and encourage collaboration

The Montgomery County Educational Service Center hosts activities and workshops for children.

among this group. We know we can’t solve everybody’s problems, but we can help make things better.” Today the governing body of the state’s schools is the Ohio Department of Education. As such, the department monitors statewide Educational Service Center’s and manages funding, academic standards, achievement testing, teaching licensing and collecting school data. “When the state department says there will be a new requirement and schools are required to start measuring something we can help the districts respond and manage this,” Cox says. But not all school districts are created equal. Montgomery County is made up of very diverse districts, ranging from smaller, rural districts, like Jefferson Township, to large, urban districts like Dayton Public Schools, with an enrollment of 14,000. Regardless of size, navigating the requirements and new mandates can often be confusing. “We make sure to provide resources and connections to all districts,” Cox says. “Even if they aren’t even sure what issues they are facing.” With a full-time staff of 450 and nearly 150 contractors, the Montgomery County Educational Service Center is much larger than most people realize. They have a full teaching staff and, according to Cox, “the same kind of staff members you’d see in a traditional school district.” Cox is looking forward to her next role— that of superintendent of the Educational Service Center after the current superintendent retires Aug. 1. “My board and my superintendent have

been supportive and we started this transition a year ahead,” Cox says. “We went through a strategic plan that will lead the work we do.” Cox herself has developed a five-year plan based on feedback from the Educational Service Center’s major stakeholders and hopes to further strengthen the relationship with the 16 district superintendents. “We need to make certain that our superintendents get time together to help one another,” Cox says. “This group is amazing and I would put them up against any other in the state and across the country.” Cox also wants to form a student advisory council with representation from all the districts. She plans to start with students at the high school level, but eventually hopes to include students of all ages. “We have been providing services in Montgomery County for more than a century,” Cox says. “It’s important to know what this is, what it has been and what it will continue to be.” Captions: Montgomery County Educational Service Center awards scholarships to one senior in each of the school districts in Montgomery County. Montgomery County Educational Service Center hosts many workshops and activities like this for kids throughout the year. Montgomery County Educational Service Center Associate Superintendent Shannon Cox is speaks at the Business Advisory Council dinner. A teacher helps a student with an activity at the Montgomery County Educational Service Center Hearing Impaired School. n DAYTON MAGAZINE . August/September 2019

61


DAYTON ›› PRIVATE SCHOOLS LISTINGS SCHOOL

ADDRESS

PHONE

WEBSITE

GRADE

DENOMINATION

940 E. David Road, Kettering 45429

937-434-4434

alterhs.org

9-12

Catholic

CATHOLIC-ARCHDIOCESE OF CINCINNATI Archbishop Alter High School

Archbishop Alter High School is a co-educational, comprehensive Catholic school that is committed to challenging students to reach their full potential by providing academic excellence in a Christ-centered environment.

Ascension School

2001 Woodman Drive, Kettering 45420

937-254-5411

school.ascensionkettering.org

K-8

Catholic

Bishop Fenwick High School

4855 state Route 122, Franklin 45005

513-423-0723

fenwickfalcons.org

9-12

Catholic

Bishop Fenwick High School is a vibrant Catholic community of faith, learning and service at the heart of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati. It is devoted to developing moral character, self-discipline, perseverance and the foundation for a lifetime of learning. Bishop Fenwick is located a mile off Interstate 75 in Warren County. Bishop Leibold School

6666 Springboro Pike, Dayton 45449 and 24 S. Third St, Miamisburg 45342

937-434-9343 and 937-866-3021

bishopleiboldschool.com

PreK-8

Catholic

Carroll High School

4524 Linden Ave, Dayton 45432

937-253-8188

carrollhs.org

9-12

Catholic

Catholic Central School

1200 E. High St., Springfield 45505

937-325-9204

ccirish.org

PreK12

Catholic

Chaminade Julienne Catholic High School

505 S. Ludlow Drive, Dayton 45402

937-461-3740

cjeagles.org

9-12

Catholic

Founded in 1850, Chaminade Julienne Catholic High School provides an excellent Catholic educational experience that continues to seek and implement quality opportunities to meet the needs of today’s students. Students come to CJ from across the Greater Dayton region and from 46 ZIP codes and 79 schools, creating a community that is uniquely enriched. Holy Angels Elementary School

223 L St., Dayton 45409

937-229-5959

holyangelsdayton.com

PreK-8

Catholic

Bishop Fenwick High School WE’RE CLOSER THAN YOU THINK!

DAYTON

35

ST. ALBERT THE GREAT 20 MILES / 27 MINUTES

We welcome new parents to visit our campus during one of our Welcome Wednesdays!

Welcome

WEDNESDAYS

at to e pect

NO RSVP NECESSARY

v

MARCH 11 • APRIL 8 • MAY 13 8:15-11:am

8:15-11:am

8:15-11:am

v

uided sc ool tour v serve classes in real time v eceive admissions information pportunity to sc edule a follow up adow ay v s uestions get answers!

Check out these additional opportunities to visit Spring Valley Academy! MARCH 11 Open House 8:00am-3:00pm

MAY 13 Step-Up Day 1:00pm-3:00pm

• For all new students in Grades K-11 • Those attending receive Admission Discount Coupon (value up to $100) • Meet the SVA administration, teachers and staff • Join us and see SVA in action!

• For students currently in Grades K-7 • All current and prospective students will “step up” to their next grade level for an orientation with their next year’s teacher

MAY 13 • Academy Day 11:00am-9:30pm

• For all students ages 4-5 (rsvp requested) • Little Stallion kick-off begins in multi-purpose room with fun, kid-friendly activities • Parents will visit the classroom and be given an introduction to our Early Childhood Program at SVA • Ask questions, get answers!

• • • • • •

For SVA Grades 8 and all visiting students in Grade 8-11 Experience different classroom settings Academic scholarship testing Fun scavenger hunt after school Dayton Dragons game and dinner in luxury box 9:30 pm approximate return to SVA for parent pick-up

DAYTON MAGAZINE . August/September 2019

19.4 MILES / 23 MINUTES

OUR LADY OF GOOD HOPE 16.5 MILES / 22 MINUTES

13 MILES / 25 MINUTES

SPRINGBORO SCHOOLS 7 MILES / 10 MINUTES

CENTERVILLE

4

ST. MARY OF THE ASSUMPTION 9.8 MILES / 18 MINUTES

ST. AUGUSTINE - WAYNESVILLE

ST. JOHN XXII

14 MILES / 21 MINUTES

6 MILES / 9 MINUTES

SMALL CLASS SIZE & STUDENT—TEACHER RATIO 127 TRENTON

73

123

HOLY TRINITY CHURCH

Bishop Fenwick HIGH SCHOOL

6.5 MILES / 15 MINUTES

42

Est. 1952

122 LEBANON SCHOOLS 8 MILES / 12 MINUTES

ST. FRANCIS DE SALES 8 MILES / 12 MINUTES

MOTHER TERESA 11 MILES / 16 MINUTES

4

ST. SUSANNA

LEBANON

42

14 MILES / 16 MINUTES

ROYALMONT ACADEMY

PRINCETON

21 MILES / 23 MINUTES

17 MILES / 18 MINUTES

15 MILES / 17 MINUTES

ST. AUGUSTINE - GERMANTOWN

COEDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES

ST. GABRIEL CONSOLIDATED

INCARNATION

BISHOP LEIBOLD + ST. HENRY

1:1 TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM

4

BEAVERCREEK

ST CHARLES BORROMEO

13 MILES / 18 MINUTES

MASON

15 MILES / 18 MINUTES

MARCH 11 Kindergarten Round-up 2:00pm-3:30pm

35

KETTERING

LAKOTA SCHOOLS

Please RSVP if you are interested in attending: (937) 433-0750 • viswetnam@springvalleyacademy.org

62

66 ACRE STATE OF THE ART CAMPUS

ST. MICHAEL 19 MILES / 23 MINUTES

275

71

SOUTH LEBANON

MASON SCHOOLS 12 MILES / 16 MINUTES

75 42

ST. MARGARET OF YORK

ST. COLUMBAN 22 MILES / 35 MINUTES

17 MILES / 25 MINUTES

LOVELAND

TRANSFORMING STUDENT LIVES fenwickfalcons.org | 513.428.0525

4855 State Route 122, Franklin, OH 45005


SCHOOL

ADDRESS

PHONE

WEBSITE

GRADE

DENOMINATION

Immaculate Conception School

2268 S. Smithville Road, Dayton 45420

937-253-8831

icschooldayton.org

PreK-8

Catholic

Incarnation Catholic School

45 Williamsburg Lane, Centerville 45459

937-433-1051

incarnation-school.com

PreK-8

Catholic

Mother Brunner Catholic School

4870 Denlinger Road, Dayton 45426

937-277-2291

brunnercatholicschool.org

K-8

Catholic

Our Lady of the Rosary School

40 Notre Dame Ave., Dayton 45404

937-222-7231

olrschooldayton.com

K-8

Catholic

St. Albert the Great Catholic School

104 W. Dorthy Lane, Kettering 45429

937-293-9452

school.stalbertthegreat.net

PreK-8

Catholic

St. Anthony School

1824 St Charles Ave., Dayton 45410

937-253-6251

sites.google.com/a/stanthonydayton.org/thegiants/

K-8

Catholic

St. Benedict the Moor Catholic School

138 Gramont Ave., Dayton 45417

937-268-6391

stbenedictthemoorcatholicschool.org

K-8

Catholic

St. Brigid School

312 Fairground Road, Xenia 45385

937-372-3222

stbrigidxenia.com

PreK-8

Catholic

St. Charles Borromeo School

4600 Ackerman Blvd., Kettering 45429

937-434-4933

stcharles-kettering.org/school/

PreK-8

Catholic

St. Christopher Catholic School

405 E. National Road, Vandalia 45377

937-898-5104

school.stchristopheronline.com

K-8

Catholic

St. Helen Catholic School

5086 Burkhardt Road, Riverside 45431

937-256-1761

sthelenschl.org

PreK-8

Catholic

St. John XXIII Catholic Elementary School

3806 Manchester Road, Middletown 45042

513-424-1196

stjohn23school.org

K-8

Catholic

St. Luke Catholic School

1442 N. Fairfield Road, Beavercreek 45432

937-426-8551

saintlukeparishschool.org

K-8

Catholic

St. Patrick School

420 E. Water St, Troy 45373

937-339-3705

stpattroyschool.org

Prek-8

Catholic

St. Peter Elementary School

6185 Chambersburg Road, Huber Heights 45424

937-233-8710

saintpeterparish.org/school.html

K-8

Catholic

434 Wilson Park Drive, Dayton 45449

937-859-4713

bbcwc.com/school

K-12

Baptist

OTHER RELIGIOUS SCHOOLS Bethel Baptist School

?C<@hb,@RRI

Stay up to date on the

Arts, Entertainment & Culture in the Greater Cincy Area, visit: thedaytonmagazine.com

:9l:hHCN03Nhq3Nn3.h/wjRN.hQ@CR sssY,aaRII@cYRa<hhhOkeYl9kY4S44 DAYTON MAGAZINE . August/September 2019

63


DAYTON â&#x20AC;şâ&#x20AC;ş PRIVATE SCHOOLS LISTINGS SCHOOL

ADDRESS

PHONE

WEBSITE

GRADE

DENOMINATION

Bethlehem Lutheran School

1240 S Maple Ave, Fairborn 45324

937-878-7050

mybethlehemschool.com

K-8

Lutheran-Missouri Synod

CHESS Christian School

208 Nutt Road, Centerville 45458

937-343-1130

chesschristian.com

PreK12

Interdenominational

Dayton Christian School

9391 Washington Church Road, Miamisburg 45342

937-291-7201

daytonchristian.com

PreK12

Interdenominational

Dayton Islamic School

3662 E. Patterson Road, Beavercreek 45430

937-429-9477

dis4u.org

PreK-8

Islamic

Dominion Academy of Dayton

925 N. Main St., Dayton 45405

937-224-8555

dominionacademy.org

1-12

Christian

East Dayton Christian School

999 Spinning Road, Dayton 45431

937-252-5400

eastdaytonchristian.org

K-12

Interdenominational

Emmanuel Christian Academy

2177 Emmanuel Way, Springfield 45502

937-390-3777

ecaoh.com

K-12

Interdenominational

Guiding Shepherd Christian School

220 S. Main St., New Carlisle 45344

937-845-3292

guidingshepherd.org

K-12

Interdenominational

Hillel Academy of Greater Dayton

305 Sugar Camp Circle, Dayton 45409

937-227-8966

daytonhillel.org

K-6

Jewish

Legacy Christian Academy

1101 Wesley Ave., Xenia 45385

937-352-1640

legacyknights.org

PreK12

Interdenominational

Middletown Christian School

3011 N. Union Road, Franklin 45005

513-423-4542

mcseagles.net

PreK12

Interdenominational

Salem Christian Academy

650 Southway Road, PO Box 309, Clayton 45315

937-836-9910

salemchristianacademy.com

K-6

Interdenominational

Spring Valley Academy

1461 E. Spring Valley Pike, Centerville 45458

937-433-0790

springvalleyacademy.org

K-12

Seventh-day Adventist

Spring Valley Academy is chartered by the state of Ohio and accredited by the Middle School Association of Colleges and Schools and the Board of Regents of the Seventh-day Adventist Church. SVA is dedicated to maximizing the development of the spiritual, mental, physical and social potential of each student. It believes that God is the source of all true knowledge. It seeks to provide a nurturing, Christ-centered environment where students can choose to grow into a meaningful relationship with Christ.

1

THE ALTER COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE: The only area Catholic school with a Conservatory of the Arts program & building

68

Individual and Team State Championships since 1962

10:1

4

Faculty/Student ratio that allows for individualized instruction

$

DAYTON MAGAZINE . August/September 2019

560,000

Financial aid and scholarships were awarded last year to one-third of families

alterhs.org 64

course levels are offered to students to allow them to succeed within their own abilities


SCHOOL

ADDRESS

PHONE

WEBSITE

GRADE

DENOMINATION

Springfield Christian Schools

311 W. High St., Springfield 45506

937-325-3113

springfieldchristian.com

PreK-8

Interdenominational

Temple Christian School

1617 Ohmer Ave., Dayton 45410

937-253-5288

templechristiandayton.com

PreK12

Interdenominational

Troy Christian Schools

700 S. Dorset Road, Troy 45373

937-339-5692

troychristianschools.org

PreK12

Interdenominational

Alexandria Montessori School

175 E. Franklin St., Centerville 45459

937-435-5392

alexandriamontessorischool.com

PreK-6

Nonsectarian

The Antioch School

1160 Corry St., Yellow Springs 45387

937-767-7642

antiochschool.org

PreK-6

Nonsectarian

The CinDay Academy

11 Sycamore Creek Drive, Springboro 45066

937-748-1991

academymustangs.com

PreK12

Nonsectarian

Dayton Montessori Society

5515 Brandt Pike, Huber Heights 45424

937-435-4572

daytonmontessori.org

PreK-6

Nonsectarian

Decolores Montessori

312 Central Ave., Greenville 45331 and 6104 Arcanum Bears Mill Road, Greenville 45331

937-547-1334 and 937-316-6104

decoloresmontessori.org

K-9

Nonsectarian

Gloria Dei Montessori School

615 Shiloh Drive, Dayton 45415

937-274-7195

gloriadeimontessori.org

PreK-8

Nonsectarian

Miami Montessori School

86 Troy Town Drive, Troy 45373

937-339-0025

miamimontessori.org

PreK-6

Nonsectarian

The Miami Valley School

5151 Denise Drive, Dayton 45429

937-434-4444

mvschool.com

PreK12

Nonsectarian

Montessori School of Dayton

2900 Acosta St., Dayton 45420

937-293-8986

montessoridayton.org

PreK-8

Nonsectarian

Nightingale Montessori

1106 E. High St., Springfield 45505

937-324-0336

nightingalemontessori.org

PreK12

Nonsectarian

PRIVATE NONSECTARIAN

Leading for For our students:

excellence

in Catholic education

t $JUZ$POOFDUT 4UVEFOUTVQQPSUTFSWJDFT t 3FWJUBMJ[FEUFBDIJOH MFBSOJOHTQBDFT t 4FOJPS$BQTUPOF1SPKFDU "QQMZJOHUIF$+$BUIPMJD FEVDBUJPOBMFYQFSJFODFJO TFSWJOHUIFDPNNVOJUZ t 4UBOEBSET#BTFE(SBEJOH &NQIBTJ[FTTUVEFOU NBTUFSZPG$+DVSSJDVMVN

Catholic Faith

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DAYTON MAGAZINE . August/September 2019

65


DAYTON ›› LEARNING

Making the Grade Spring Valley Academy enriches students academically and spiritually BY TIMOTHY WALKER

Spring Valley Academy, founded in 1968, is a Seventh-day Adventist private school for grades K-12.

W

hat do parents want? A little help around the house? Kids wiping their feet before they come in the door? Maybe washing their little hands before dinner? Sure, all of that goes without saying. But finding the right education for the kids… well, that tops the list of what most Dayton-area parents are really concerned about. And with the educational options in our area abounding Miami Valley parents who want their kids to be well-rounded individuals might find themselves a bit overwhelmed at the choices between public, charter, private and parochial schools. Dig deeper, however, and it’s easy to see why Spring Valley Academy in Centerville stands head and shoulders above the rest. For parents who want their children to have an education that’s as grounded in the spiritual as it is in the academic Spring Valley Academy offers Dayton families an obvious win/win situation. “When a child comes to ( Spring Valley Academy), our mission is to lead them to Jesus,” says Darren Wilkins, principal. Wilkins has a background of over 25 years in Seventh-day Adventist education and

66

DAYTON MAGAZINE . August/September 2019

has been principal at Spring Valley Academy for five years. The academy, also known as SVA, was founded in 1968 and is a Seventh-day Adventist private school that services grades K-12 located at 1461 E. Spring Valley Pike in Centerville. Over 400 students attend classes there. Spring Valley Academy offers four separate educational divisions: a home schooling division for those parents who desire an alternative educational program for their children; an elementary division for students in grades K-4; a middle school division for grades 5-8; and the high school division for the teenagers in grades 9-12. The high school program is a traditional college preparatory program, and the academy also offers a vocational education, available through the school’s affiliation with Montgomery, Green and Warren County’s Joint Vocational School programs. In 1990, Spring Valley Academy joined the auxiliary services program provided by the state of Ohio for parochial schools. This program provides remedial learning, speech, hearing, and occupational therapy and psychological services for students in

a portable classroom that sits adjacent to the school property. The program also allows the school to buy textbooks through the local public school district. Spring Valley Academy boasts a beautiful campus, which has recently been made even more attractive with the addition of a set of new sculptures. Thanks to a generous donation, Spring Valley redeveloped the center of its circle greenspace with a series of bronze sculptures that provides a visual representation of the school’s mission to anyone who drives onto the campus. A flagpole was relocated and in its place a beautiful plaza featuring Victor Issa’s work of art “Come Unto Me” was installed amid a serene reflection area complete with stone benches. Issa’s art conveys a message that is fundamental to everyone involved with Spring Valley Academy—that all children are welcome in Jesus’s arms. Spring Valley Academy is much more than just a school—it’s a place for children to grow, to learn, to deepen their spiritual connections and emerge as devout, well-rounded individuals ready to take on any of the challenges they’ll face in the adult world. n


Felix and Fiona

A musical experience for third-grade reading guarantee By Gwen Owen

H

ave you met Felix and Fiona? Your first-, second- or third-grader probably already has—or soon will!

Felix and Fiona are the stars of a new, multifaceted project led by Dayton Metro Library to support students in the Third Grade Reading Guarantee. They are the main characters in a brand new, original book, Felix and Fiona: The Big Stink and Other Adventures—along with an original musical composition and theatrical production too! “Kids will be able to read the book, watch a live production, listen to the score or experience any blend of the three,” says Diane Farrell, director of External Relations and Development. “All kids can discover their favorite way to experience the story and be encouraged in both reading and creativity.”

is the single greatest indicator in determining high school graduation success. The Third Grade Reading Guarantee is an Ohio Department of Education effort to keep students on track.

Why is there a musical element? Comprehension increases when an auditory component is coupled with print. In fact, students comprehend content at two grade levels higher when they not only read it, but hear it as well. Dayton Metro Library is collaborating with partners at Sinclair College, Muse Machine, Austin Jaquith and Montgomery County Educational Services to compose music and create the accompanying theatrical production.

Why do these characters look familiar?

The new chapter book features best friends Felix and Fiona getting ready for a talent This is Dayton Metro Library’s third origishow, cheering up a classmate with new nal book featuring Felix and Fiona. In braces and trying to figure out the source 2015, Dayton Metro Library launched of a mysterious odor that’s disrupting the First Club, a campaign to ensure that whole school. The book, written first-graders receive library and illustrated by a local team of cards. A key element of First Children’s Librarians, educators Club is daytonmetrolibrary. and an outside creative firm, is org/polaris/search/title. designed to delight third-gradaspx?ctx=1.1033.0.0.6&pos=4” ers while meeting educational The Awesome, Amazing, Wonstandards to blend into the third derful Book of First Grade grade curriculum. As third-gradFirsts, a picture book starring ers themselves, Felix and Fiona Felix and Fiona as first-graders interact with friends, deal with gaining responsibilities and inmisunderstandings and have a dependence, and getting their Diane Farrell lot of silly fun too. first library cards. Each fall, Children’s Librarians share the book and Why third grade? activities in first-grade classrooms across Research shows that from birth through Montgomery County. To date, nearly third grade children focus on “learning to 11,300 first-graders have received their read.” From fourth grade onward children own library cards through First Club. “read to learn.” This shift in education Getting a library card is only the first step. means that reading proficiency by the end Felix and Fiona also appear in a follow up of third grade is vital. In fact, studies have book called The Awesome, Amazing, Wonshown that third-grade reading proficiency derful First Trip to the Library, so that all

those new library cardholders would know what to expect—and what wonders they can find—at their Library.

What’s next for the project? The production debuted this summer at the library’s annual Party in the Park followed by performances at all Dayton Metro Library Branches. The book will be available for checkout and the music can be downloaded from the library’s digital collection. Ultimately, Dayton Metro Library will gift the production and accompanying curriculum to Muse Machine for future use. “Muse Machine is an incredible asset to our community and well versed in educational arts outreach,” says Farrell. “We’re very pleased and fortunate to partner with them.” The project is made possible with the support of a federal Institute of Museum and Library Services LSTA grant awarded by the State Library of Ohio, the Ohio Arts Council, The Frank M. Tait Foundation and the Dayton Metro Library Foundation. “Sponsor organizations, as well as individual donors who believe in the magic of blending literacy with arts, have stepped up to help make this program a reality,” says Farrell. “It’s truly a collaborative effort. We’re excited to play our role as a valued literacy partner for schools and a collaborator with the quality arts and educational organizations in our region.”

PARTNER PROFILE


DAYTON ›› 2019 GUIDE TO COLLEGES & UNIVERSITIES

Antioch College

Back to School Guide

Colleges and universities in the Greater Dayton area continue to invest in programs for the benefit of their students BY KEELY BROWN AND NOAH TONG

START AT SINCLAIR, GO ANYWHERE! With flexible class schedules, over 260 academic programs, and regional locations throughout Southwest Ohio and online, Sinclair is ready to help you reach your goals.

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WWW.SINCLAIR.EDU/REGISTER 68

DAYTON MAGAZINE . August/September 2019


AIR FORCE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY The Air Force Institute of Technology, a graduate school and continuing education provider for the United States Armed Forces, celebrates its 100th anniversary this year. This past year Air Force Institute of Technology held an event, STEM 3.14 Fest, at the Youth Center at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. The event celebrated Pi Day and Albert Einstein’s birthday by teaching students from the Prairies School Age Program and Prairies Youth Center about science, technology, engineering and math. “Kids go through their school years and may not think about their futures,” says Esther Jones, a Youth Program assistant at the Prairies Youth Center, in a recent news release. “Whether they go into a STEM career or not we want them to be exposed to a variety of STEM possibilities. Students participated in a multitude of events, including launching go-karts and catapults, discovering visible DNA, building structures, 3D printing, manipulating

drones and working with coding programs. Bennie Luck, Youth Programs coordinator, says an important part of the event is creating opportunities for children to see people in STEM careers who look like them. Air Force Institute of Technology will continue to celebrate its centennial through community outreach programs such as STEM 3.14 Fest.

ANTIOCH COLLEGE Antioch College, a private liberal arts institution, continues to renovate its campus after receiving a $500,000 grant from the Yellow Springs Community Foundation. The college plans to restore heat and air circulation in Antioch Hall, more commonly known as Main Building, to ensure the structure is stable and functional. “We really see Main Building as being a place that we can use not only for the college, but also as a hub for the community,” says James Lippincott, university spokesman. “We’re doing quite a bit of work in there at the moment to get that building back into full year-round use.”

Antioch College, a staunch advocate for environmental stability, has four LEED certified buildings on its campus, as well as a central geothermal plant and solar farm. Although Main Building is not LEED certified, the college demonstrates its dedication to sustainability through the renovation. Renovation is a sustainable practice, says Lippincott. Rather than tear down and rebuild existing structures, Antioch College focuses on reusing and upgrading its buildings instead.

Antioch College

DAYTON MAGAZINE . August/September 2019

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DAYTON ›› 2019 GUIDE TO COLLEGES & UNIVERSITIES Antioch College was recognized as a top performer in 2018 by the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education, achieving a secondplace rating in grounds management as well as achieving a seventh-place rating as a top performing institution for food and dining. “Sustainability is one of the core commitments of the college and one of the things that we really feel strongly about as an institution,” says Lippincott. “We’ve wanted to try and demonstrate how can we, as a college and as a community, exemplify ways of living and learning that are sustainable and that are looking to the future.”

ANTIOCH UNIVERSITY MIDWEST Antioch University Midwest’s McGregor Library was awarded a Celebrating Ohio Book Awards & Authors grant by the State Library of Ohio, financed with federal funds from the Institute of Museum and Library Services. The university, which requested $750 in funds, bought 45 books for student use.

different titles and you experience different cultures, voices and perspectives, literature has this kind of great power to create empathy and understanding,” says Knott. “When [students] leave Antioch, we hope that they can take this knowledge and help others.”

CEDARVILLE UNIVERSITY Antioch University Midwest Titles purchased include those nominated or awarded the Dayton Literary Peace Prize, Ohioana Book Awards and the Anisfield-Wolf Award. Antioch University Midwest’s mission relates to social and environmental justice and the purchased books support these values, says Dana Knott, director of Library Services. The university hopes to empower students to make the world a better place through literature. “One thing that I love about these grants as a librarian, and as a big reader and instructor, is that when you read these

Cedarville University, a private Baptist academic institution, recently announced the development of a new Master of Science program in physician assistant studies set to begin in May of 2022. The university, which also has one of the leading nursing schools and pharmacy schools in Ohio, hopes the new program will complement the school’s strong presence in health care. Jason Grahame, a Cedarville alumnus and experienced physician assistant professional, will return to the school to serve as the founding program director. Grahame says he is looking forward to training and mentoring Cedarville’s physician assistant students to ensure they will meet the physical and spiritual needs of their patients.

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DAYTON ›› 2019 GUIDE TO COLLEGES & UNIVERSITIES to develop professionals who are serious about their faith and are going to integrate it into the work that they do,” says Supplee.

Cedarville University

CLARK STATE COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Cedarville University’s program will become the 13th in Ohio and third in the Miami Valley. The new 24- or 27-month graduate program will be cohort-based, with the last 12 months spent in clinical rotations. Janice Supplee, dean of Cedarville’s graduate school and vice president of mar-

keting and communications, is helping to develop the innovative program that will address today’s health-care needs. She hopes the graduates of the program will be outstanding medical professionals who are also able to minister to their patients. “Cedarville isn’t just trying to equip excellent professionals, we’re also trying

Clark State Community College has partnered with Mercy Health to build a new health clinic, dubbed Mercy Primary Care, on Clark State’s Springfield campus. The 1,750-square-foot facility opened in late May and serves both the college and its surrounding community. Mercy Health owns and operates the clinic and is staffed by Leatha Ross, the on-site nurse practitioner and a medical assistant. The practice provides free nursing care, basic health and wellness screenings and also coordinates free health services throughout the academic year. “The clinic helps build and strengthen the workforce for the surrounding community,” says Ross. “I see it as a wonderful opportunity—not only for our students, but for the community as a whole.” Mercy Primary Care and Clark State partnered with the hope of providing students with easy access to reliable

A funded internship or research experience for every student. DAYTON MAGAZINE . August/September 2019

73


DAYTON ›› 2019 GUIDE TO COLLEGES & UNIVERSITIES health care, as well as supporting them in their academic endeavors. The health clinic offers internships for Clark State students enrolled in academic health care programs. Nichole Clark, the director of Primary Care Services at Mercy Health, says the clinic hopes to encourage Clark State students as they further their careers in health, health care administration or health care services. She is confident the Mercy Primary Care will be a positive addition to Clark State’s campus. “We’re excited to be part of a collaboration with Clark State and we’re hopeful that the students and the surrounding community are excited about us being here as well,” says Clark. “We look forward to being able to serve them with the highest quality healthcare.”

INDIANA WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY Indiana Wesleyan University, a private evangelical Christian liberal arts university, offers more than 123 different degree programs. This year the university added a new theater education major to its available

Indiana Wesleyan University recently added a theater education major to its academic programs, making the degree one of only eight available in the state of Indiana. academic programs, making the degree one of only eight available in the state. “We discovered as we applied for state

certification that the state of Indiana recently lost two university theater education programs at other universities in

CAREER FIELDS:

Healthcare/Medical • Advanced Manufacturing • Information Technology • Cosmetology • Firefighter/EMT • HVAC Welding • Heavy Equipment & Site Construction Electrical Power Line Mechanic • Dental Assisting

DAYTON MAGAZINE . August/September 2019

75


DAYTON ›› 2019 GUIDE TO COLLEGES & UNIVERSITIES the state,” says Greg Fiebig, professor of communication and theater chairman at IWU. “We found out serendipitously we filled a void.” The program is designed to prepare students to teach theater in the public schools in Indiana and other articulating states, Fiebig explains. Students will double major in secondary education and

theater to teach elementary, middle school and high school theater and dramatic arts programs. Katie Wampler, the artistic director and associate professor of the theater program at IWU, says she’s excited to teach students who share her passion for theater and education. “We bring what we’re learning in the

classroom into our performances and our rehearsal space, and what we’re learning in our rehearsal space back into the classroom,” says Wampler. “That’s something that we offer in terms of our overall program, and I’m excited to continue to do this in terms of theater education.” Fiebig hopes the theater education major will create interest in the program and inspire prospective students to attend IWU. “We believe it will bring new students to the university,” says Fiebig. “In the past, students looking for a theater education major would have to request special consideration, but now they will be able to major from the beginning.”

KETTERING COLLEGE Kettering College, a private Adventist college founded in 1967, makes the health of its students, faculty and staff a top priority. The school hosted its 11th annual Spring into Health 5K to promote healthy habits and raise money for Dayton’s Good Neighbor House and the college’s Physician Assistant Student Professional Development Fund.

Kettering College’s Spring into Health 5K promotes healthy habits.

Master of Arts: Theopoetics and Writing

COME VISIT KETTERING’S

N AT I O N A L LY R E C O G N I Z E D D E S I G N C O L L E G E Selected as one of the Top Design Schools in the country for 8 consecutive years.*

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Schedule a visit at themodern.edu

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DAYTON MAGAZINE . August/September 2019

1725 East David Road, Kettering, Ohio 45440 // 937-294-0592 @themodernedu

@themodern.edu

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*As published in Graphic Design USA’s annual list of top design institutions.

For more information about our graduation rates, the median debt of students who completed the program, and other important information, please visit our website at www.themodern.edu/gainful-employment-disclosure/. The Modern College of Design is accredited by the ACCSC and registered with the State Board of Career Colleges and Schools [Registration #85-03-0958T]. Financial aid is available to those who qualify.


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EDUCATION PROFILE

Butler Tech 3603 Hamilton Middletown Rd. Fairfield Township, OH 45011 513-645-8200 butlertech.org/adult-education

All programs are focused on student success:

B

utler Tech Adult Education offers more than 40 careerfocused programs designed to prepare individuals for employment and to begin a successful career or advance in their current career in 11 months or less. Butler Tech’s adult education programming offers handson career training to meet the ever-changing skills demanded of 21st century industry. From health care and public safety to manufacturing and commercial driver training Butler Tech provides a purpose for every passion.

Two dedicated adult education campuses located about 30 minutes north of downtown Cincinnati and south of downtown Dayton.

All programs offer credentials and certifications that are state and/or nationally recognized.

Liberty Township Public Safety Education Complex houses multimedia classrooms, an indoor 20-lane firing range, computerized firearms, driving simulators and physical fitness facilities for students. Also houses a fleet of 53-foot and 45-foot trailers and box trucks on a 5.5-acre driving course for CDL A and B training.

Partnerships with area businesses and organizations to help individuals find the employment they are looking for when they graduate.

LeSourdsville Campus houses state-of-the-art health care and manufacturing labs, and welding and HVAC/R training high-bay labs and training equipment.

Clark State Community College P.O. Box 570 Springfield, OH 45501-0570 937-328-6028 (Springfield) 937-429-8819 (Beavercreek) 937-431-7171 (Xenia) clarkstate.edu

78

94% overall completion rate across health care programs; with a 96% NCLEX pass rate for the LPN program.

DAYTON MAGAZINE . August/September 2019

EDUCATION PROFILE

C

lark State Community College is a public higher education institution located in Springfield, Ohio, with additional campuses in Beavercreek, Xenia and Bellefontaine. Clark State offers associate degrees and certificates in over 125 academic areas and, starting this fall, the college will offer a bachelor’s degree in Manufacturing Technology Management. Clark State offers online programs and courses to meet the needs of today’s busy students.


DAYTON ›› 2019 GUIDE TO COLLEGES & UNIVERSITIES

Kettering College’s Spring into Health 5K Members of the community also attend the event and enjoy different activities to learn about the importance of an active lifestyle before settling down to watch the marathon. The race, which had over 300 attendees this year, is organized by students of the college and has raised almost $60,000 in donations since it began. “The physician assistant students work very hard—they are the ones who plan and coordinate [the event],” said Lona

Blake, clinical coordinator of the physician assistant program. “This is their main fundraiser for the entire year.” 75 of proceeds from the event benefit Dayton’s Good Neighbor House, a nonprofit organization that provides food pantry services, clothing and household items to under-served individuals and families in the Greater Dayton Region. The remaining 25 of proceeds goes to the Physician Assistant Student Professional Development Fund, which finances educational opportunities for students in the program. Kettering College’s 12th annual Spring into Health 5K will take place on Sunday, April 5, 2020.

MIAMI UNIVERSITY With an eye towards the future, Miami University invested in new academic programs designed to better prepare its st udents for t he work place af ter graduation. Underclassmen now have two new options when choosing a major: Data analytics and organizational leadership.

These Bachelor of Arts degrees will be implemented following approval from the Ohio Department of Education. “The new degrees in organizational leadership and data analytics are designed to leverage core liberal arts knowledge and skills to prepare students for successful careers and fulfilling lives,” says Carolyn Haynes, associate provost of undergraduate education. “The Ohio Department of Jobs and Family Services reports that the most job openings in Ohio require strong analytical and leadership skills.” Interactive Media Studies—no longer considered an academic program—is now recognized as an academic department in the College of Creative Arts. This department accounts for over 900 students. In the past year, Miami students and faculty may have noticed changes across Oxford as well. Pearson Hall, Miami’s biological science building, was renovated to create more classrooms and labs. Two residence halls, Scott and Minnich, were upgraded, while Miami also unveiled Withrow and Presidents hall for the first time.

BE BOLD. BE YOU. FIND SUCCESS.

ENROLL NOW!

The career you want. The degree you need.

Springfield | Beavercreek | Bellefontaine | Xenia | Online

DAYTON MAGAZINE . August/September 2019

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DAYTON ›› 2019 GUIDE TO COLLEGES & UNIVERSITIES SINCLAIR COMMUNITY COLLEGE Sinclair, a premier destination for community college students in the region, launched its Registered Apprenticeship Program in spring 2018. The program’s goal is to provide training areas such as electrical maintenance and mechanical maintenance, while Sinclair is one of 10 colleges in the nation to be awarded this apprenticeship grant. “It is critical that we prepare our students for the workforce,” says Chad Bridgman, internship coordinator at Sinclair College. “Sinclair works towards this by not only providing workforce aligned academic programs but also creating opportunities for students to get hands-on training.” Among other grants, Sinclair received money to participate in the Community College Accelerated CyberCorp Pilot Program. This should increase the number of qualified cybersecurity professionals that graduate from Sinclair College. Although primarily a school comprised of local students, Sinclair joined the U.S. Japan Collaborative Online International Learning Initiative. This provides an op-

portunity for students to learn about other cultures through online teaching and collaboration.

THE MODERN COLLEGE OF DESIGN The Modern College of Design, formerly the School of Advertising Art, is a baccalaureate institution for the first time. Starting in fall 2019, students have the option of enrolling in the Design Leadership Bachelor’s Program or opting for the associate degree. The curriculum directly suits individuals interested in graphic design and web design. This intensive program will add faculty and staff jobs to the local community, and the Modern intends on constructing additional on-campus housing. A new Student Success Center provides a workspace for various clubs and programs. President Jessica Barry says, “After three years of development we are thrilled to release a program that not only strengthens students’ design skills but also increases their knowledge of entrepreneurship, leadership and strategy. Graduates from this program will strengthen the Dayton

Earlham College

Students in The Modern College of Design now have the option of enrolling in the Design Leadership Bachelor’s Program. creative community and the national design industry for generations to come.” Students who choose the bachelor’s degree route must complete one year of the associate degree.

UNIVERSITY OF DAYTON Founded in 1850, The University of Dayton has offered multidisciplined undergraduate and graduate programs for generations. This past year is no different as Dayton launched numerous academic degrees for all types of students.

EDUCATION PROFILE

801 National Road West Richmond, IN 47374 765-983-1200 earlham.edu

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ith a distinctive focus on collaboration and hands-on learning—including the offer of funded internships or research opportunities for every student—Earlham College prepares graduates for lives of purpose and accomplishment. What brings students to Earlham? For starters, a world-class faculty. Earlham is known for its unusually strong commitment tao undergraduate teaching. Students and professors work side-by-side everywhere from classrooms and labs to rain forests and glaciers. A large percentage of Earlham professors include students in their research on some of the important challenges facing the world today, often leading to co-authored publications.

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DAYTON MAGAZINE . August/September 2019

Located in Richmond, Indiana—an hour’s drive west of Dayton on Interstate 70—graduates from the past five years have earned such prestigious awards as the Rhodes Scholarship, Fulbright Scholarship, the Watson Fellowship, the National Science Foundation PreDoctoral Fellowship, the Samuel Huntington Public Service Award and a Fellowship at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.


EDUCATION PROFILE

Eastern Kentucky University 521 Lancaster Ave. • Richmond, Ky. 40475 (859) 622-1000 • eku.edu

EKU STRIKES COST,

Kentucky. Forensic science students investigate complex staged crime scenes, gather evidence and test it in the lab.

CONVENIENCE BALANCE

Additionally, nearly 6,000 employers have worked with EKU to place students in internships and co-op positions in their fields.

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Outside of academics, student life is at the forefront at EKU. The University is home to 16 NCAA athletic teams, 230 student organizations, a brand new fitness center coming in fall 2019 (complete with a popular indoor rock climbing wall and indoor pool) and frequent cultural events, live performances and social gatherings.

astern Kentucky University strikes the right balance for Ohio students and their families on many levels.

For example, EKU feels big, but not too big. More than 15,000 students go to school there, but classes are small. Students will be challenged, yet they will find welcoming, encouraging professors to help them overcome those challenges. EKU prides itself on helping students find their place and their group, and you will, too. And it’s an easy, 2-hour drive down Interstate 75 from Cincinnati, the ideal distance for students who want to earn independence, but stay close enough for an occasional visit home. But the cost value is where the balance is truly felt. EKU has long been known for punching above its educational weight class, delivering the region’s most in-demand and unique programs for an affordable price. That affordability now extends to out-ofstate students thanks to the University’s Selective Merit Aid/Reduced Tuition (SMART) Program. The SMART Program provides students with near in-state tuition to students from Ohio, Indiana and 15 other states. At $10,300-per-

year in tuition, plus affordable housing and meal plans, SMART students are likely to find the cost of attending EKU less than or equal to schools in their home state. To qualify, students must have at least a 2.5 cumulative, unweighted GPA. Located in scenic Richmond, Ky., EKU offers nearly 100 degree programs at the associate, baccalaureate, master’s and doctoral levels, including more than 40 online degree programs (although online-only students don’t qualify for SMART). Whether they study on campus or online, students are prepared for careers as pilots, nurses, psychologists, forensic scientists, firefighters, video game designers, entrepreneurs and much more. Students learn from accomplished professors focused on student support, allowing those professors to provide a high degree of mentorship and one-on-one engagement. EKU is also known for balancing classroom learning with hands-on, real-world experience. For example, aviation students earn flight hours in a fleet of Piper and Cessna aircraft. Nursing students practice lifesaving skills in simulation environments with some of the most advanced technology in

Students who live on campus have 12 residence halls with many different types of living arrangements to choose from. There are traditional residence halls, suites and apartments right on campus. Half a dozen structures are brand new, opening in the last three years. EKU graduates have distinguished themselves in almost every conceivable career, from teachers, police and social workers to business owners, corporate executives and NASA engineers. With a degree from EKU, students join more than 135,000 successful, living alumni worldwide who are proud to call themselves an Eastern Kentucky Colonel.


DAYTON ›› 2019 GUIDE TO COLLEGES & UNIVERSITIES

The University of Dayton now has Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees in sustainability. Beginning operation in August 2019, UD introduced Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees in sustainability. Housed in the College of Arts and Sciences,

the Bachelor of Science degree focuses on energy and sustainable watersheds, while the Bachelor of Arts degree centers around food studies and urban sustainability. “We are placing vocation and community-based, hands-on learning at the center of the curriculum,” said Rebecca Potter, director of the sustainability program. “These programs will provide students a foundation for using sustainability to serve others regardless of their career paths.” Earning a sustainability degree will require students to take courses in many different disciplines that may include biology, economics, statistics and ecology to name a few. Dayton is also offering a nursing degree in partnership with Sinclair Community College. Students are required to take courses and complete clinical rotations at both institutions over a four-year period. Graduate students can now earn a master’s degree in dietetics and nutrition after concluding an internship with Premier Health. This program qualifies students to work in places such as hospitals, schools and sports medicine, says Jennifer Dal-

Indiana Tech Main Campus 1600 E. Washington Blvd. Fort Wayne, IN 46803 Northern Kentucky Campus 809 Wright Summit Parkway, Ste. 310 Fort Wright, KY 41011 888.832.4742 IndianaTech.edu/cps

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ndiana Tech educates students beyond its home base in Fort Wayne, Indiana, with regional campuses throughout the Midwest, as well as online programs that meet the needs of students worldwide. The private, not-for-profit university offers career-oriented degree programs at the associate, bachelor’s, master’s and Ph.D. levels, as well as graduate certificates. Each program aligns with an in-demand career, including project management, engineering, business, cybersecurity, accounting, information technology, computer science, health care administration, crimi-

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ton, director of the didactic program in dietetics. Finally, the UD School of Law started an online Master of Laws program, including an optional U.S. legal practice certificate, in January 2019.

WILMINGTON COLLEGE Originally established by Quakers in 1870, Wilmington College is a private, liberal arts school known for its strong agriculture and athletic training majors. Starting in 2022, however, undergraduate athletic training programs will no longer exist at accredited schools. Therefore, the athletic training program is transitioning from a bachelor’s degree to a master’s degree. “These are exciting times and we’re at the forefront,” says Dr. J. Brett Massie, program director and associate professor of athletic training. “I like where we’re sitting right now. We’re well ahead of the mandate.” Wilmington College’s partnership with Cincinnati State Technical and Community College is continuing to thrive. Students receiving associate degrees from Cincinnati State can apply credits towards

EDUCATION PROFILE nal justice and more. Busy working adults find Indiana Tech an ideal fit, with class schedules that allow students to take one class at a time and still make rapid progress toward a degree. Classes start throughout the year, so students can begin their education at any time. The university is accredited through the Higher Learning Commission. For more information or to enroll today, contact the Northern Kentucky admissions team at 859-916-5884.


a bachelor’s degree from Wilmington College. These students may work toward a Wilmington College diploma at Cincinnati State’s campus, an idea designed to benefit the working adult populations on both campuses. Adults, beginning in fall 2019, may enroll in Wilmington Institute for Lifelong Learning courses. Topics such as gardening, history, art, literature and many more are offered for six-week periods.

WRIGHT STATE UNIVERSITY Wright State University is a public research university that sits on a 557-acre campus in Fairborn, Ohio. Its mission to, “build a strong foundation for student success at all levels through high-quality, innovative programs,” was strengthened this past year when it announced a new Division of Student Success. Four separate divisions—Enrollment Management, the University Center for International Education, the University Registrar and the University College—will function and work together. This administrative shift is designed to provide more

Wright State University has revamped its career services in preparation for life after graduation. opportunities and improve the student experience. Wright State also revamped its career services in preparation for life after graduation. Early intervention services will offer pre-professional development guidance

Indiana Wesleyan University 2912 Springboro West Road, Dayton, OH 45439 937-298-4430 indwes.edu

EDUCATION PROFILE

We’re passionate about breaking down barriers to provide opportunities for people to develop in character, scholarship and leadership, and we believe education can change the world. Our students believe it, too. In fact, 23% of our alumni return to us to further their education. Why? Because at IWU, we’re shining brighter.

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ndiana Wesleyan University is a Christian university focused on the liberal arts and professional education. IWU has been a brick-and-mortar institution since 1920, but we implemented an innovative learning format in 1985 that focused on the unique needs of adult learners with busy schedules. IWU has over 30 years of experience in flexible learning formats and over 20 years of experience in online education. We’re recognized for our high-quality, affordable online programs, programs that can even fit the lives of military students and their families.

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DAYTON ›› 2019 GUIDE TO COLLEGES & UNIVERSITIES for both first-year students and upperclassmen alike in the Wright State Career Center. These career services will be a new addition to the Division of Student Success. “For students who are exploring and not firmly set in their career plans we want to have the services they need to help them achieve their career decisions,” says Cheryl Stuart, director of the Career Center. To provide additional guidance to the student body student tutors in the Academic Success Centers will now adhere to national training standards when assisting their peers. Tutors earned the International Tutor Training Program Certification from the College Reading and Learning Association.

WITTENBERG UNIVERSITY

Wittenberg University is a Lutheran-affiliated liberal arts college.

Kettering College 3737 Southern Blvd. Kettering, OH 45429 937-395-8601 kc.edu

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s the education institution of Kettering Health Network, we offer graduate and undergraduate degrees specializing in health sciences. We nurture the highest possible academic standards to prepare our graduates to be the best in their chosen profession. You can choose from eight areas of study, each with streamlined coursework and early hands-on practical experience. Kettering College has developed its curriculum to match the needs of today’s healthcare environment. Kettering College has been the leader in simulations in the Dayton area for several years. Inter-professional training and education at Kettering College continue to grow each year as it partners with departments in Kettering Health Network to bring these specific learning techniques for Kettering College students, medical residency students and other nursing departments.

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Established in 1845, Wittenberg University is a Lutheran-affiliated liberal arts college that enrolls over 1,700 undergraduate students. Wittenberg students have the advantage of using the recently overhauled School of Graduate and Professional Studies. Formerly the School of Community Education, Graduate and Professional

EDUCATION PROFILE


Studies benefits sectors such as graduate programs, the Center for Musical Development and the College Credit Plus Program. Graduate and Professional Studies also offers master’s degrees in analytics, coaching, and education, as well as an undergraduate degree in organizational leadership. “My goal is to bring us together as a team to grow our current three fantastic programs to their fullest potential, and work has already begun along these lines,” says Barbara Randazzo, executive director of Graduate and Professional Studies. “I would also like to see new programs developed.” “I want ( Graduate and Professional Studies) to be a place within the university where innovative programs are launched and effectively administered for the overall benefit of students and the institution,” says Randazzo. Sociology majors, as of fall 2019, also have the option of selecting a cultural anthropology concentration. Students must create a senior thesis to earn this designation. n

Marian University

Blair Hall at Wittenberg University

EDUCATION PROFILE

3200 Cold Spring Road Indianapolis, Indiana 46222-1997 317-955-6300 or 800-772-6264 marian.edu

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arian University is the only Catholic university in Indianapolis. In 2018, it served over 3,500 undergraduate and graduate students. Its high-impact, experiential curriculum provides hands-on learning for students from 45 states and 23 nations. In U.S. News & World Report’s 2019 Midwestern rankings Marian was named No. 10 Most Innovative Regional University, No. 24 Best Value University, and No. 38 Best Regional University. We also offer national championship NAIA athletic programs. Marian University opened its College of Osteopathic Medicine in 2013, making it the first new school of medicine in the state of Indiana in over 110 years. Several new facilities have opened at Marian recently: Evans Center for Health Sciences (housing the Leighton School of

Nursing and College of Osteopathic Medicine), Norman Center (home of the Byrum School of Business) and a new dining commons, student fitness center and indoor arena/convocation center.

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EDUCATION PROFILE

Miami University Regionals Middletown Campus 4200 N. University Blvd. Middletown, OH 45042

Hamilton Campus 1601 University Blvd. Hamilton, OH 45011

513-785-3111 | miamioh.edu/regionals iami University Regionals serves our region with open access to a Miami University degree at three campuses and online, offering one of the lowest tuition rates for four-year public institutions in Ohio.

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option allows students to begin one of over 100 majors on the regional campuses and relocate to the main campus in Oxford. Regardless of which campus you start at or finish at, as One Miami, you would join the Miami Family and earn a Miami University degree.

you through your education. Ninety-six percent of our recent alum are employed or furthering their graduation. Our Career Services and Professional Development Office support students from start to finish and beyond!

Miami University Regionals offers a nationally ranked education close to you at one of our three locations—Hamilton, Middletown and West Chester. And, for students looking to fit college into their busy lives, Miami University Regionals E-Campus delivers high quality online courses and 100 percent online degree options.

Our Miami Tuition Promise allows families to plan the cost of their four-year college education without surprises, and with one of the lowest tuition rates for four-year public institutions in Ohio, a bachelor’s degree can be affordable at Miami University Regionals.

Our regional campuses offer a vibrant student life with championship athletics, more than 50 student organizations, community service learning opportunities, arts programming and performances, and more! With nearly 5,000 students attending classes on our beautiful campuses or online, you will have an incredible experience as a Miami University Regionals student!

As the regional system of Miami University, Miami Regionals offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and 13 associate degrees entirely at its regional campuses. Our One Miami relocation

Your success matters. Our outstanding faculty and staff provide personalized attention and consider your success as our highest priority. We offer free tutoring, disability services, student employment opportunities and professional advising to support

See for Yourself! Schedule your visit today! MiamiOH.edu/Regionals/YouChoose


DAYTON ›› 2019 GUIDE TO COLLEGES & UNIVERSITIES

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ayton benefits from one of the most diverse and broadest higher educational portfolios around. With more than 20 colleges and universities in the area, residents have the opportunity to add job skills and certifications, keep up continuing education needs and earn various undergraduate

and graduate degrees, all while staying within a 60-minute drive of downtown. With the help of the Southwest Ohio Council on Higher Education and the Ohio Board of Regents, we compiled a list of area colleges to help you find the best one for you and your family.

Institution

Address

Phone

Website

Info

Air Force Institute of Technology

2950 Hobson Way, WPAFB 45433

937-255-6565

afit.edu

U.S. Air Force's graduate school of engineering and management as well as its institution for technical professional continuing education

American National University

1837 Woodman Center Drive, Kettering 45420

937-299-9450

an.edu/locations/dayton-oh

Branch of ANU offering associate, bachelor and master degree and diploma programs

Antioch College

1 Morgan Place, Yellow Springs 45387

937-767-1286

antiochcollege.edu

A private, independent, nonprofit liberal arts college that requires a cooperative education work program for all its students

Antioch University Midwest

900 Dayton St., Yellow Springs 45387

937-769-1814

antioch.edu/midwest

A private institution serving adult students that offers bachelor's degrees, a number of master's degrees, certificates and educational endorsements

Cedarville University

251 N. Main St., Cedarville 45314

937-766-7700

cedarville.edu

An independent Baptist school known for its adherence to the Christian tradition that offers bachelor's and graduate-level degree programs

Central Michigan University

2130 Fifth St., Building 50, Area B, WPAFB 45433

937-252-5600

cmich.edu

A branch campus of CMU located at WPAFB offering graduate certificate programs and a master of science in administration degree

Central State University

1400 Brush Row Road, Wilberforce, 45384

937-376-6011

centralstate.edu

A historically black university conferring bachelor through doctorate degrees with a second location in downtown Dayton

Clark State Community College

100 S. Limestone St., Springfield, 45502

937-325-0691

clarkstate.edu

A community college serving Clark, Greene and Montgomery counties with locations in Springfield, Beavercreek and Bellefountaine

Sinclair Community College

EDUCATION PROFILE

444 West Third St. Dayton, Ohio 45402-1460 937-512-3000 sinclair.edu

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inclair is on the move with new construction. Building 10 will be reopening this summer as the new Student Services Center. The building redesign and renovation project supports a holistic, integrated service model that meets the various needs of Sinclair’s new and continuing students in a centralized location. Founded in 1887, Sinclair is a public, nonprofit, comprehensive, non-residential community college based in downtown Dayton. Sinclair provides higher education opportunities for citizens of Montgomery County, Warren County and the surrounding Miami Valley region of southwest Ohio. Sinclair works to meet the needs of employers and focuses on helping area residents achieve their dreams through post-secondary education. Whether your goal is to earn a degree or quickly acquire a new skill, Sinclair’s flexible programs will make you job ready. Sinclair is

building the region’s workforce through quality education programs in growing, high-demand career fields, workforce development initiatives and by providing personal attention and support to students. Sinclair is a recognized national leader in delivering high quality and affordable higher education. Known as one of the top community colleges in the nation, Sinclair is home to national-award-winning faculty and staff who serve more than 32,000 students each year. With locations in Dayton, Centerville, Englewood, Huber Heights, Mason and online, Sinclair offers more than 250 degree and certificate programs and has awarded more credentials than any other community college in the state of Ohio over the last five years.

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DAYTON ›› 2019 GUIDE TO COLLEGES & UNIVERSITIES School

Address

Phone

Affiliation

Edison Community College

1973 Edison Drive, Piqua, 45356

937-778-8600

edisonohio.edu

A community college with a second location in Darke County offering associate and degree programs

Fortis

555 E. Alex Bell Road, Centerville, 45429

937-433-3410

ignite.fortis.edu

Career school offering associate degree and certificate programs in several career fields

Kettering College

3737 Southern Blvd., Kettering, 45429

937-395-8601

kc.edu

A coeducational college owned by the Kettering Medical Center and chartered by the Seventh-day Adventist Church with degrees in health care programs

Miami University

501 E. High St., Oxford, 45056

513-529-1809

miamioh.edu

A public university with locations in Hamilton, Middletown, West Chester and Luxembourg, offering associate through doctorate degrees

School of Advertising Art

1725 E. David Road, Kettering, 45440

937-294-0592

saa.edu

A private institution offering an associate of applied business in advertising art

Sinclair Community College

444 W. Third St., Dayton, 45402

800-315-3000

sinclair.edu

A community college offering various associate degree and certificate programs

United Theological Seminary

450 Denlinger Road, Dayton, 45426

937-529-2201

united.edu

A Christian seminary affiliated with The United Methodist Church offering graduate-level programs

University of Dayton

300 College Park, Dayton, 45469

937-229-1000

udayton.edu

A Catholic university with offerings from the undergraduate to the doctoral levels

Urbana University

579 College Way, Urbana, 43078

937-772-9200

urbana.edu

An independent liberal arts institution offering associate, bachelor's and graduate degree programs

Wilberforce University

1055 N. Bickett Road, Wilberforce, 45384

937-376-2911

wilberforce.edu

Nation's oldest private, historically black university offering undergraduate and graduate programs

Wilmington College

1870 Quaker Way, Wilmington, 45177

800-341-9318

wilmington.edu

An independent, co-educational liberal arts college offering bachelor and graduate-level programs

Wright State University

3640 Colonel Glenn Hwy, Dayton, 45435

937-775-1000

wright.edu

A public four-year university offering associate, bachelor's and graduate-level programs

Wittenberg University

200 West Ward Street, Springfield, 45501

800-677-7558

wittenberg.edu

A Lutheran-affiliated liberal arts college offering programs in humanties, arts and sciences plus business and teaching education

University of Dayton 300 College Park Dayton, OH 45469 937-229-1000 udayton.edu

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t the University of Dayton, a top-tier Catholic research university, we bring the issues of today into focus and generate innovative ideas that solve the challenges of tomorrow. With $150 million in annual sponsored research, UD is the No. 1 university in the nation for materials R&D—and the No. 1 Catholic university for engineering R&D. The university is also home to one of the nation’s top programs in entrepreneurship, one of the nation’s first undergraduate programs in human rights studies and Ohio’s first master’s program in clean and renewable energy. We are builders of community—inviting people with diverse talents, interests and backgrounds to enrich and advance our common mission. Together, we’re passionately striving to create a brighter tomorrow!

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DAYTON MAGAZINE . August/September 2019

EDUCATION PROFILE


EDUCATION PROFILE

Otterbein University 1 S. Grove St. • Westerville, OH 43081 614-823-1500 • otterbein.edu Otterbein University is re-defining 21st century liberal arts education in an affordable way.

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ith a scenic campus in Westerville, Ohio, minutes away from downtown Columbus, Otterbein University is nationally recognized for its innovation, student success, community service and commitment to affordability. Those seeking a first-class education can afford it at Otterbein. Inclusive. Since 1847, the university has believed that the strength of any community is dependent on its diversity. Learning from others of different backgrounds and their experiences can open students’ eyes to new ideas and realities. That’s why the institution is introducing the Opportunity Scholarship for all Pell-eligible students across Ohio and households with an annual income less than $60,000. Plus, the university is committing to total tuition transparency for all students. Innovative. At Otterbein, students can have four years of professional experience as part of their curriculum. They have access to start-up companies or to a top 12 Fortune 500 company, JPMorgan Chase. Currently, students are working on research and development on the ATM machine of the future, as JPMorgan Chase has an R&D office on campus. Students conduct research alongside professors from their first semester and benefit from established partnerships with businesses, corporations and industries. Their resumes are full of relevant work experience by the time they graduate.

fields. The school supports its students with student success programs to clear roadblocks to graduation. And while other schools are creating new integrative studIntentional. Otterbein is keeping up with ies programs we’ve been doing it for 49 market trends and has created new pro- years. And we’ve been nationally recoggrams to provide professionals in growing nized as a result. Otterbein’s 21st century

liberal arts program teaches its students the skills employers want. Only Otterbein is leading the way into the future of higher education. Learn more at otterbein.edu.


DAYTON ›› HIGHER EDUCATION

Meeting the Needs of Students T

he times, as the old song goes, are indeed a-changin,’ and the way that modern universities nurture, motivate and educate their students has changed as well. Indiana Wesleyan University is now celebrating its 100th year as one of the lowestpriced—yet highest-quality—Christian universities in the country and the school has certainly seen its own share of changes since its earliest days as the brick-andmortar Marion University, which began way back in 1920 in Marion, Indiana. Now, IWU boasts 15 onsite locations in Indiana, Kentucky and Ohio, with the Dayton campus, which opened in November 2005, going strong for 14 years now. The Buckeye state also boasts IWU campuses in Cleveland, Cincinnati and Columbus. Cynthia Sizemore is Indiana Wesleyan University’s regional dean for all of its campuses in the state of Ohio and as such she is no doubt a very busy person. She’s been with the university since 2011 but she says she’s never too busy to make herself available to help one of her many students.

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“I live in the Cincinnati area with my husband,” Sizemore says. “And on my business card for the students I put my cell phone number because I try to be available as people might need me. And that’s really important to me.” “So I make myself available,” she says. “And accessible and one of the ways I do that is that if students need to reach out to me, whether it’s a student that might have concerns over a weekend, or needs help with finding a resource, I’m available—I guess my biggest thing is that I don’t want my students to be concerned. I want to be a resource that’s available whenever they need me.” Indiana Wesleyan University itself is an evangelical Christian comprehensive university of the Wesleyan Church and is committed to global liberal arts and professional higher education. The university’s system includes IWU Marion, located midway between Indianapolis and Fort Wayne along Interstate 69, where over 3,000 students are enrolled in traditional programs on the 350-acre main campus.

Indiana Wesleyan University celebrates 100 years of higher education BY TIMOTHY WALKER

Indiana Wesleyan is also the single largest member of the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities, the largest private college in Indiana, based on enrollment, and one of the largest employers in Grant County, Indiana. Indiana Wesleyan offers its students more than 80 undergraduate degrees, with 38 graduate degrees and five doctorate degrees as well. Indiana Wesleyan students represent more than 80 Christian denominations and 10 foreign countries from around the world and the school has received national commendations for its innovative adult education program, which began in 1985. Over 10,000 adult learners attend classes through Indiana Wesleyan, either online at the university’s 15 various education centers in Indiana, Kentucky and Ohio. But what does Indiana Wesleyan University have to offer Dayton-area students that other local universities don’t? “We’ve been here since 2005,” says Sizemore. “And we’re proud to offer a wide variety of online and classroom options. We’re


Indiana Wesleyan University began offering adult-friendly programs of study in 1985 and has been offering students online program options since 1998. More than 80 undergraduate degrees, 38 graduate degrees and five doctorate degrees are available through the university.

friendly to the working adult, to the nontraditional student—for example, we offer classes where the student only has to be on-site one night per week, usually in the evening from 7 p.m. until 10 p.m. or so. When it comes to our nursing programs we have an articulation agreement with Miami Valley Hospital and Premier Health for the RN/BSN program on-site here in Dayton, which has the potential to help fill the currently high demand for RN’s in southwest Ohio.” Never one to shy away from educational innovation, Indiana Wesleyan first began offering such adult-friendly programs of study in 1985 and it has also been offering students online program options since 1998. “I feel like we offer not just the classroom settings and online options,” she says, “But we really try to work with our students. We have great library resources. We have academic advising. We reach out to them to meet every area of their needs and we try to work with them if we see them struggling in a particular area. We always try to do what we can to match our resources to them, in many different areas.” Indiana Wesleyan University has the largest adult education program on any school in the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities. In 2008, the council selected Indiana Wesleyan to establish The Research Center in Adult Learning, a joint project. US News and World Report magazine has named the university as “One of the Top Universities in the Midwest” and the Young America’s Foundation has named Indiana Wesleyan one of the Top Ten Conservative Colleges in the United States for five years in a row.

Indiana Wesleyan also created the Society of World Changers in 2003. Designed to recognize nationally renowned figures who exemplif y the concept of “world changers”—those who impact their secular sphere of influence for Christianity—and whose lives can serve as an inspiration to future generations, those chosen to receive the honor are notable and often well-known. Each year a World Changers Convocation is conducted on Indiana Wesleyan’s Marion campus to induct a new member into the society and celebrate his or her career and list of accomplishments. A life-size bronze bust of each inductee is placed on permanent display in the Society of World Changers Hall of Honor located in the rotunda of the Jackson Library in Marion. Past honorees include such figures

as Elizabeth Dole, actor Kirk Cameron, presidential candidate Ben Carson and Christian author Frank Peretti. Religion and faith definitely make up a large part of the educational env ironment at Indiana Wesleyan, but providing a number of opportunities for students to achieve success in their chosen field of study is always the final goal. “Besides being Christ-centered, we offer a vast array of opportunities to lead students toward degree completion,” says Sizemore. “We care about our students, and we want to make sure whatever resources they need are made available to them.” With goals like that, it’s a solid bet that Indiana Wesleyan University will be serving and educating students for another 100 years to come. n DAYTON MAGAZINE . August/September 2019

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Warren County Career Center

EDUCATION PROFILE

3525 N. state Route 48 Lebanon, Ohio 45036 513-932-5677 mywccc.org

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reparing high school and adult students for careers and further education in a variety of fields, including advanced manufacturing, automotive, aviation, construction, cosmetology, culinary, digital/graphic arts, health care, information technology and public safety services. Above 90 percent placement rate for successful completers, and students earn industry certifications, college credit and are eligible for scholarships. Five Star Step Up To Quality Learning Lab Preschool fully licensed and offering two sessions per day, four days per week. K-12 Career Development resources for partner school districts Franklin, Kings, Lebanon, Little Miami, Springboro and Waynesville.

Xavier University Executive MBA Program

EDUCATION PROFILE

3800 Victory Parkway Cincinnati, OH 45207 513-745-2993 xavier.edu/emba

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he Executive MBA at Xavier University is a nationally ranked, transformational program designed specifically for experienced professionals who want to earn their degree among similarly situated and motivated peers. Candidates come from a multitude of industry and job types but at their core have an innate desire to learn, combined with an interest in moving their career to the next level. This could mean undertaking a more significant leadership position, transitioning into the C-Suite, assuming leadership in a family business or even shifting to a second career. The requirement of significant career, leadership, and management experience means the class—which is cohort based—is different than a traditional online or on campus MBA class. The discussion is on a higher level, the coursework is an integrated

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combination of theoretical and experiential, international immersion is required and the cohort structure ensures a supportive and collaborative learning experience. Executive MBA courses are restricted to only cohort members and faculty are asked to teach in the program, not assigned. Professors intentionally hail from both academia and industry. The Executive MBA is a campus-based, concierge-level program that meets two weekends a month for 16 months (essentially every other weekend)—Fridays and Saturdays from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. The format and brevity of the program allows for a very fast return on investment for both you and your company. It has remained the only program of its kind in the Greater Cincinnati area for over 40 years. You don’t have to go far to get the very best.

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Dayton's Best Schools 2019  

Dayton Magazine's Best Schools special section includes Outstanding Educators, unique school programs, private school listings, Guide to Col...

Dayton's Best Schools 2019  

Dayton Magazine's Best Schools special section includes Outstanding Educators, unique school programs, private school listings, Guide to Col...

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