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BRONSON EXCLUSIVE:

BEHIND THE SCENES—TRACIE HUNTER TRIAL

Your votes for the BEST on the West Side

495 82

Physicians in

Specialties PLUS:

TOP DENTISTS DECEMBER 2019/JANUARY 2020 VOLUME 16

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ISSUE 7

$3.99

magazine.com

Emmett C. Roper Jr., MD


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Best Doctors is now part of Teladoc Health, the global leader in virtual care. Best Doctors and the star-in-cross logo are trademarks of Teladoc Health, Inc., in the United States and in other countries, and are used under license. All rights reserved Š 2019. 404108346_10182019


Contents

The Magazine for Business Professionals

D e ce m b e r 20 1 9/J a n u a r y 2020

Meet the 2019 Best Doctors, as selected by their peers.

Page 44

By The Editors

Letter 6 Editor’s BY CORINNE MINARD 8 Contributors 9 Web Exclusives Cincy 10 Inside Meet Xavier men’s basketball

27 A&E Calendar 35 Midwestern Traveler

LIVE WELL Doctors 44 Best Meet the 2019 Best Doctors, as selected by their peers. BY THE EDITORS

63 Top Dentists

coach Travis Steele, inside the Winter Market at Fountain Square and behind the numbers of Cincinnati State.

13 Scene CINCY LIVE Cincinnati Become a 24 Can Hockey Town?

Ohio is home to almost every type of museum, from art and history to today’s veterans. BY CORINNE MINARD

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Cyclones’ head coach Matt Thomas is looking to do just that by creating a winning team. BY DAVID LYMAN 4

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Dining

Revel OTR offers an unpretentious and enjoyable wine-drinking experience. BY JESSICA BALTZERSEN

The 2019 Top Dentists list, created thanks to a survey of area dentists.

68 Guide to Retirement

Local retirement communities and organizations are working to keep seniors safe at home, plus listings. BY DEBORAH RUTLEDGE


COMMUNITY

80 History & Leadership

The 2020 Census has the power to reshape our story and how the region is perceived. BY DAN HURLEY

82

Another View

BUSINESS

118 A Homegrown Leader

St. Elizabeth Healthcare CEO Garren Colvin uses his local roots to grow Northern Kentucky’s largest health care system. BY DAVID HOLTHAUS

HOME

130 From Floor to Wall

The latest trend in flooring isn’t flooring at all. BY LIZ ENGEL

131 Opening the Gate

Green and Growing 120 AIndustry

An indoor/outdoor concert hall is at the center of the Tristate’s newest drama. BY DON MOONEY

At Large 84 Bronson Why Tracie Hunter had to be dragged out of a courtroom. BY PETER BRONSON

86 Best of the West

Area dispensaries and state departments work together in the first year of public access to legal medical marijuana. BY KEVIN MICHELL

Back to the City 122 Giving Gensuite fosters the next

generation of leaders in environmental science and technology. BY KEVIN MICHELL

The HGC Group of Companies aims to take the 160-year-old Stewart Iron Works to new heights. BY LIZ ENGEL

132 Love Cincy Special Insert

124 Providing More Than Rides

2020 AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY

Executive Transportation expands its service lines to help more people. BY KEVIN MICHELL

The Tristate’s guide to attacking cancer from every angle.

Celebrate the best food and more on the West Side. BY THE EDITORS

Blue Line 102 Long St. Xavier High School

offers a large network of alumni to help with a career. BY ERIC SPANGLER

First Step Toward Great 103 The Things St. John XXIII Catholic School helps students make an impact on the world. BY ERIC SPANGLER

in Business 126 Best Calendar & Directory

Starts after page 104, ACS105-ACS116

Cincy (ISSN-1934-8746) published in February/March; April/ May; June/July; August/September; October; November; December/January for a total of seven issues by Cincy, 30 Garfield Place, Cincinnati, OH 45202. Periodicals postage paid at Cincinnati, Ohio, and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Cincy, 30 Garfield Place, Suite 440, Cincinnati, OH 45202. w w w.

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Editor’s View

Only the Best T

his is t r u ly an issue of bests. Throughout this magazine, you will find many lists of the Tristate’s

finest. In Best Doctors, we list the region’s Best Doctors in America, the doctors other doctors recommend. In Top Dentists, we name the top pediatric dentists, general dentists, orthodontists, periodontists and more in the region as named by their peers. And in Best of the West, we feature the restaurants and companies that were voted the best in the region by the attendees of the 2019 Best of the West event. Together, these stories show there are many great things to celebrate about the Tristate. But there are also great things outside of these lists, too, that speak to the outstanding people and places in Greater Cincinnati. In our travel story, we look at some of the unique museums within the state. Writer David Lyman introduces us to Cyclones’ head coach Matt Thomas, who has worked to make the city’s hockey team into a winning one. And writer David Holthaus profiles St. Elizabeth Healthcare CEO Garren Colvin, detailing the growth he has helped spearhead and his hopes for the hospital system’s future. Hopefully, this issue helps you end the year on a high note. Read on to learn about more of the great things within the Tristate.

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Locally, veteran and family owned Editor & Publisher Eric Harmon Managing Editor Corinne Minard Associate Editors Kevin Michell, Eric Spangler Contributing Writers Jessica Baltzersen, Peter Bronson, Liz Engel, Bill Ferguson Jr., David Holthaus, Dan Hurley, Don Mooney, Deborah Rutledge Creative Director Guy Kelly Art Director Katy Rucker Digital Content Coordinator Danielle Cain Photographer Joe Simon Associate Publisher Rick Seeney Custom Sales Manager Brad Hoicowitz Advertising Director Abbey Cummins Operations & Finance Manager Tammie Collins Advertising & Circulation Manager Laura Federle Advertising Coordinator Katelynn Webb Audience Development Nakya Grisby Events Director Stephanie Simon Events Coordinator Amanda Watt Production Manager Keith Ohmer Work-Study Students Aixa Velazquez, Comar Watson Cincy on the web: www.cincymagazine.com Cincy Co. LLC Cincinnati Club Building 30 Garfield Place, Suite 440 Cincinnati, OH 45202 Contact Cincy: information@cincymagazine.com or call (513) 421-2533. Go to www.cincymagazine.com to get your complimentary subscription to Cincy.


Contributors

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Jessica Baltzersen holds an M.A. in English from Northern Kentucky University and works as a freelance writer and adjunct English instructor in the Greater Cincinnati area. Her background is in journalism, creative nonfiction and web content development.

Cincy Magazine contributing editor Peter Bronson is an author, editor, publisher and owner of Chilidog Press LLC. He is a former reporter, columnist and editor at The Cincinnati Enquirer, The Tucson Citizen and other newspapers in Arizona and Michigan.

Liz Engel is a business writer, runner and once-upon-a-time volleyballer who found her way back to the Queen City following stints in North Carolina and Tennessee. She’s spent more than a decade covering topics like health care, transit and entrepreneurship.

Bill Ferguson Jr. is a writer/editor/ communications consultant who has spent 40-plus years as an editor and reporter for six newspapers, beginning at age 14 as a sports reporter for his hometown daily.

David Holthaus is an award-winning journalist with more than 20 years experience in Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky covering business, public affairs and writing commentary.

Dan Hurley is a local historian and the president of Applied History Associates, which works with museums and historical societies throughout the Eastern U.S.

Don Mooney is a Cincinnati attorney, a past member of the Cincinnati Planning Commission and active in local politics.

Deborah Rutledge is a freelance feature writer, originally from Northern Ohio, who has lived and worked in Cincinnati for nearly 20 years.

Joe Simon is a Cincinnati native but travels back and forth from Cincinnati and Chicago. He’s a freelance photographer and been shooting since 1997. He’s been a regular contributor to Cincy Magazine and The Cincinnati Enquirer.

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Web Exclusives TOP 5 ONLINE STORIES 1 4 Sunday Things To Do That Aren’t Watching Football by Kevin Michell 2 Cincinnati’s Greatest Boondoggle by Don Mooney 3 Get Your Halloween Spooks In! by Kevin Michell 4 A City Lit Up Anew by Kevin Michell 5 FC Cincinnati vs. City Council by Peter Bronson

TOP TWEET

DIALOGUE CincyMuseum @CincyMuseum Thanks @CincyMagazine: cincymagazine.com/Main/Articles/…! Learn more about #DestinationMoon! #CMCmoon @sitesExhibits Christian Vlg Mason @MCV_OH Thank you to @CincyMagazine for hosting the annual #BestoftheNorth event, celebrating all the great organizations in our area. We appreciate everyone’s support of our communities! #retirement NELSON Worldwide @ NELSONworldwide @CincyMagazine shares more on our #hotel preservation with the historic Renaissance Hotel as #Cincinnati looks to grow and become a destination for conventions and more. #Hospitality Michael Shawn McCabe @shawnmccabe Happy #Birthday to the most prolific and influential publisher in our region, @HarmonEric. Eric’s @CincyMagazine is the single most valuable periodical that hits my mailbox. His specialty publictions are world-class and the events are driving so much commerce and connectivity.

LIVE

TOP INSTA POST “Have you been entranced by @ blinkcincinnati this weekend? It is inspiring to see our city aglow in honor of artistic expression! #CincyArts #LoveCincy”

As the weather begins to bring the frost, we have fun events to help warm things up! Check out Cincy.Live to find out what’s on the calendar!

Want to be featured in our Instagram stories? Follow us at @cincymagazine and use our hashtag #LoveCincy! Show us what makes you love this city! w w w.

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InsideCincy

Blue Skies Ahead XAVIER MEN’S BASKETBALL COACH TRAVIS STEELE PROVIDES INSIGHTS INTO THE HIGHLY ANTICIPATED SEASON AHEAD By Kevin Michell

Travis Steele

T

ravis Steele enters his second year as the head coach of Xavier University’s men’s basketball program with heightened expectations. The Musketeers showed up in the Associated Press preseason rankings as the 19th-best team in the country, raising Xavier fans’ hopes for a deep run in the 2020 NCAA Division I Men’s Basketball Tournament. Though still new to head coaching, Steele had already accrued 10 years of coaching experience at Xavier under Sean Miller and Chris Mack before ascending to the 10

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top job. That has helped him hit the ground running as a head coach in a way he may not have been able to at a different school. “I’m obviously going to be my own guy,” Steele says, “but having the relationships on campus and around campus and having a great understanding of what Xavier is, who we are—I don’t know if there’s anybody that has the perspective that I’ve had.” Year two in the head coach’s seat has also made this round of recruiting easier, especially by retaining the three assistant coaches whom he hired prior to last season. Steele has quite the class to show for it: four-star recruits KyKy Tandy and Dahmir Bishop and graduate transfers Jason Carter and Bryce Moore join an already potent core of returning scorers in Quentin Goodin, Paul Scruggs and Naji Marshall. “It’s been g reat to see some of our older guys really show a lot of leadership and help teach our system to the younger players,” Steele says. “That’s so powerful, when you have a player-led team. Tyreke and Quent in—t hose two specifically—have done a g r e at job of show ing [f resh men] Dieonte Miles, Zach Freemantle [and] KyKy Tandy the way.” More depth on the roster has made t he team much st ronger heading into regular season play while also stoking some competition among the players for important minutes. Steele points out that sacrifice will be a key trait if his team is going to be successful. That

will mean some players may have to accept fewer minutes or shots in a game for the greater good. But Steele sees the team gelling together well already, helped by a summer tour of games in Spain. “I love where our chemistry’s at at this point in the year,” Steele says. But with high expectations, Steele is emphasizing with his players the importance of working hard for the ultimate goal: playing meaningful tournament games deep into March. “We define our own expectations,” he explains. “That’s what I told our team when I saw the AP ranking. All of that stuff is great—I think it shows the respect that our program has, that our brand has throughout college basketball. But we have to earn that right every single day. You earn your wins in practice.” n Naji Marshall


Q&A

6 Questions with Christy Samad of 3CDC

SENIOR VP OF EVENT MANAGEMENT DISCUSSES NEWLY REBRANDED WINTER MARKET AT FOUNTAIN SQUARE AND MORE

By Eric Spangler

L

ooking for the perfect gift this holiday season? Look no further than downtown Cincinnati and Fountain Square, specifically. That’s because the Cincinnati Center City Development Corp., better known as 3CDC, has organized a Winter Market at Fountain Square featuring regional artisans and crafters. The Winter Market at Fountain Square will take place every Friday, Saturday and Sunday beginning Nov. 29 and running through Dec. 22. In addition, riding the streetcar will be free each Saturday from Thanksgiving to Christmas to enable visitors to check out other attractions downtown like Findlay Market and Washington Park. We asked Christy Samad, senior vice president of event management with 3CDC, six questions to learn more about the event.

last year we shared a few weekends with Cincideutsch Christkindlmarkt. They have decided not to return so we are extending our market and giving it a fresh new look with wooden huts rather than tents. We are kind of rebranding it and starting it fresh this year.

choir performances, petting zoos, cooking classes and more. The last day of the market we will be partnering with local organizations to showcase intercultural holiday celebrations featuring a menorah lighting, Hispanic Chamber Posada and a Kwanza celebration.

WHAT KINDS OF ITEMS WILL BE SOLD AT THE WINTER MARKET?

WHAT’S BEEN THE HARDEST PART ABOUT ORGANIZING THE WINTER MARKET AT FOUNTAIN SQUARE?

TELL US ABOUT THE WINTER MARKET AT FOUNTAIN SQUARE.

WHAT ELSE WILL YOU HAVE?

This is the second year we produced a Winter Market on Fountain Square. However,

As for vendors, they w ill range from holiday items, candles and soaps, jewelry, knitted accessories, pre-packaged sweets, fine art, home décor and, of course, food. Some vendors include Pot ters on t he Squa re, T he Nat ura l Wick, Libby Shop, Little Patch Alpacas, Sweet Jazz Treats and Three Arrows Farm Ripley.

We will complement the market with other various events that will include wreathmaking classes, wine tastings, karaoke,

Just getting the vendors to get in the holiday spirit.

IS IT TOUGH TO GET VENDORS BECAUSE OF THE MANY OTHER WINTER MARKETS AND FESTIVALS? Yes. We’re looking at what other [markets] exist and how we can complement each other. Because I think the more that is happening the more people that will come down. So it’s exciting to see everything come into play.

YOU CAN OFFER VENDORS A BIG CROWD AT FOUNTAIN SQUARE, RIGHT? Exactly. And that’s the great thing about Fountain Square is it’s just one of the attractions and so the market is not the only draw. So whether it’s the UC Health ice rink, you’re heading down for Macy’s Downtown Dazzle or Light Up the Square, the winter market, Santa Claus and his crew, there’s so much going on. We’re really trying to enhance all of the activities at Fountain Square to make it everyone’s downtown destination. n The Winter Market at Fountain Square w w w.

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By the Numbers

Cincinnati State turns 50 Cincinnati State Technical and Community College is marking its 50th anniversary this year with a number of events, including a 50th Anniversary Weekend May 15-16 and a 50th Anniversary Gala celebration to be scheduled in 2020. The Cincinnati Board of Education started the school in 1966 as the Cincinnati Cooperative School of Technology at the former Courter Tech High School. Three years later, Sept. 19, 1969, the Ohio Board of Regents chartered the school as the Cincinnati Technical Institute, with 650 students in technical-degree programs. It took on its current name in 1994 and now is composed of four campuses offering 130-plus degree and certificate programs to about 10,000 students a year. (Research by Bill Ferguson Jr.)

2,400

Co-op job placements each year at more than 600 business and industry partners, which the school says is one of the largest cooperative-education programs among U.S. two-year colleges

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Presidents through the years: Clifford House, Fredrick Schlimm, James Long, Ron Wright, O’dell Owens and Monica Posey (plus two interims, Jean Patrice Harrington and John Henderson)

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1,260

Students receiving associate degrees or certificates in 2018-19, including nine area high school students who earned associate degrees while still in high school through the College Credit Plus program

163.64 In-state tuition cost for one credit hour, in dollars ($327.28 out-of-state)

SOURCE: CINCINNATI STATE TECHNICAL AND COMMUNITY COLLEGE (CINCINNATISTATE.EDU) maga zine.com


SCENE

Home + Design Launch Party

Cincy, Dayton and NKY magazines celebrated their new brand, Home + Design, with a launch party Oct. 30 at People Working Cooperatively’s new Whole Home Innovation Center. Guests were invited to meet with the magazine’s editors and home and design professionals while enjoying complimentary beverages and light bites. The event was sponsored by Keidel and food was provided by Out of Thyme Kitchen Studio. 1 Janet Baltzersen, Jessica Baltzersen and Carol Venn 2 Michaela Smith, Lee Smith and Kim Janky 3 Deidre Sizer and Ellie Wells 4 Eva Alexander and Dan Alexander 5 The new Home + Design Magazine

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Scene Badin Hall of Honor The Badin High School Hall of Honor inducted its sixth class at its annual dinner Sept. 19 at the Courtyard by Marriott in downtown Hamilton. The Badin Hall of Honor is dedicated to honoring the outstanding achievements of graduates, faculty, staff and members of the Badin community and its predecessor schools, Hamilton Catholic and Notre Dame. 1 The Dr. Jim Zettler Family received the Stephen T. Badin Legacy Award. 2 Joe Hansbauer ’94, president and CEO of Findlay Market, was one of the recipients of the Distinguished Alumni Achievement Award. 3 Chemistry teacher Teresa Heinrich was the recipient of the Fr. Francis J. Miller Award for Distinguished Faculty/ Staff. 4 Dr. Stephanie Streit ’02, a major in the US Air Force, was the recipient of the Distinguished Young Alumni Achievement Award. 5 Father Tharp, pastor of Sacred Heart of Jesus and St. Ann, received the Carpenter’s Hand Award.

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BBB’s Spark Awards BBB’s inaugural Spark Awards launched during Startup Week (Oct. 7-11) in partnership with StartupCincy and Cintrifuse. The awards celebrate exceptional new businesses, startup founders and entrepreneurs. This year, three businesses were named winners: The Bagelry, Helium SEO and Whole House Counseling and Consultation. In addition, nine businesses were recognized as finalists: 1 Heart 2 Hands, Decades Rock N’ Pop Shop, Kentucky Botanical Co., Kyler-Moore Insurance Agency, Lean Effective Talent Strategies, New Seasons Estate Sales, Results Now, Southern Grace Cincy and StudioCincy.      1 Jocile Ehrlich, president of the Cincinnati BBB, presented the Spark Award to Colleen Hert of The Bagelry. 2 Cinnamon Reiheld, founder of Whole House Counseling and Consultation, accepted the award for her company. 3 Josh Brichacek of Helium SEO with his company’s Spark Award 4 The Spark Awards winners and finalists

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AHA CycleNation The American Heart Association/American Stroke Association held its fourth annual CycleNation event Oct. 3 on Fountain Square. Over 200 cyclists participated in teams in two outdoor spinning rides to raise funds and awareness about stroke. Throughout the events, stroke survivors shared their personal experiences to inspire the participants and keep the CycleNation mission in the forefront. CycleNation was chaired by Steve Davis of Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, presenting sponsor. CycleNation 2019 raised $210,000 (a 75% increase over last year) for the lifesaving work of the American Stroke Association. 1 More than 200 cyclists participated. 2 AHA supporters came out to the event to watch and ride. 3 Riders were sponsored by both teams and individuals. 4 The Cincinnati Stroke Support Group rode in honor of Terri Kersey. 5 Awards were given out to the top cyclists. 6 The 50 West team 7 Multiple teams participated in two outdoor spinning rides. 8 TriHealth had four teams participate in the event.

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Legendary Dinner for WordPlay More than 120 local professionals, philanthropists and community members gathered at Nicola’s Ristorante in Overthe-Rhine Sept. 12 for the fourth annual Legendary Dinner for WordPlay. Attendees raised over $100,000 for WordPlay’s capital campaign, “Unleash Curiosity; Ignite Community.” The evening’s presentation included a testimony from a young WordPlay student and a keynote speech by Aaron Parker, a teacher at Aiken High School and longtime WordPlay partner. Kathy DeLaura of Partners In Change led the live auction, which offered guests the chance to bid on items such as a restored vintage typewriter and tickets to the Ensemble Theatre’s holiday production of The Frog Princess. All of the proceeds from the event supported WordPlay Cincy’s capital campaign. 1 Nick Pietoso, owner of Nicola’s and WordPlay board member 2 WordPlay Community Engagement Coordinator Desirae Hosley with a guest 3 Guests enjoyed an authentic five-course Italian dinner with wine pairings for each course.

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Scene Children’s Home Anniversary Reception and Dedication The Children’s Home celebrated its 155th anniversary with a reception and dedication of the Heidt Center of Excellence and the Sheakley Day Treatment building on Oct. 29. The event was the culmination of a two-year capital expansion campaign, called Building Opportunit y, which expanded the amount of children and families the nonprofit agency will serve. More than 200 people attended the event, including Ohio State Treasurer Robert Sprague, Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley, The Children’s Home Board of Trustees Chair Joe Dominiak, immediate past board chair Larry Glassmann, other board members, state representatives, local judges and community leaders. 1 Board member Gail Kist-Kline (far left) and The Children’s Home Board of Trustees Chair Joe Dominiak (far right) with a guest 2 The Heidt Center of Excellence is specifically designed for children and young adults on the autism spectrum. 3 Mayor John Cranley, board member Dr. Robert Heidt and board emeritus Larry Glassmann 4 Board member Rhonda and Larry Sheakley 5 The Children’s Home of Cincinnati recently celebrated 155 years. 6 The ribbon cutting at the Sheakley Day Treatment building 7 Dr. Rob Heidt and Julia Scripps-Heidt at the ribbon cutting for The Heidt Center of Excellence 8 The Heidt Center of Excellence ribbon cutting

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Scene People Working Cooperatively’s Recognition Celebration On Oct. 8, People Working Cooperatively hosted its Recognition Celebration at Drees Pavilion to honor those who have impacted its mission. This year’s award recipients were ADEX International (Chairman’s Award), Colerain Township (Friends of PWC Award), Alan Hadley (Volunteer of the Year), David & Carol Legg (Dick Castellini Philanthropy Award) and Alex Webb (Employee of the Year). Fifteen volunteers were inducted into the Volunteer Hall of Fame. 1 PWC President Jock Pitts and keynote speaker Daniel Kalubi 2 Jock Pitts, Brian Thomas and Nina Creech with Cheryl Wood of ADEX International 3 Robert Wells, Russell Hairston, Q Smith Benedikt, Steve Rodenberg, Jean Swartley, Minerva Lawson, Debbie Colvin, Tom Colvin, Judy Ott, Steve Ott, Beverly Miller and Donna Jenkins

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Come see what makes

Bethany different!

Academic Excellence. Spiritual Growth.

OPEN HOUSE

January 26, 2020 2:00 - 4:00 pm

555 Albion Avenue | Glendale, Ohio 45246 www.bethanyschool.org 513.771.7462 20

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Wheat Ridge Olde Thyme Herb Fair & Farm Festival

1 Local Amish girls looked over the gourds. 2 A young girl found the perfect “just my size” mini-pumpkin at the event. 3 Guests could talk shop with the woodworking craftsmen at the Wheat Ridge Olde Thyme Herb Fair. 4 Artifacts and arrowheads were on display and for sale at the fair. 5 A craftsman showed off the intricate detailing that goes into a custom-made hiking staff.

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PHOTOS BY TOM CROSS

The 11th annual Wheat Ridge Olde Thyme Herb Fair & Farm Festival was held Oct. 11-13 just off Wheat Ridge Road in Adams County.

MOBILE VAN UNIT

Pregnancy, testing, health education, and health promotion All individuals who access the van are served. Services are confidential and no cost to you. No appointment is necessary, walk-ins welcome.

Healthy Moms & Babes is a Catholic-based organization that answers God’s call to serve

HOME VISITING SERVICES

at-risk women of childbearing age and their children so that they may survive and thrive.

(513) 591-5600 Healthymomsandbabes.org

Confidential home-based education and support at no cost to you

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LIVE!

CYCLONES COACH MATT THOMAS page 24

A&E CALENDAR

page 27

TRAVEL: MUSEUMS

page 35

DINING

page 40

Cyclones’ head coach Matt Thomas and assistant coach Jason Payne

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Can Cincinnati Become a

Hockey Town?

Head coach Matt Thomas

CYCLONES’ HEAD COACH MATT THOMAS IS LOOKING TO DO JUST THAT BY CREATING A WINNING TEAM By David Lyman

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tay focused,” reads the sign hanging above the entrance to the Cincinnati Cyclones’ dressing room. “Stay Positive,” reads the next. Pretty standard locker room messaging. But what is happening beyond that locker room is anything but standard. Out there on the ice, head coach Matt Thomas is leading a small revolution. A slightly quixotic one, in some people’s eyes; he’s trying to turn Cincinnati into a hockey town. Pretty cheeky, because Cincinnati is a baseball town, right? No matter how dreadful the Reds are, we still love them. 24

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Maybe “tolerate” is a better word. But the connection is there; “Cincinnati” and “the Reds” are almost synonymous. There are the Bengals, too. And now, FC Cincinnati. Mind you, it’s too early to tell if they’ll turn out to be the real thing or just another passing—and expensive—fad. But the question remains—hockey? To most Greater Cincinnatians, hockey still feels like some exotic import from the north. Most of us didn’t play hockey growing up. Our winters may be chilly, but they’re not long or bitter enough to freeze over every tiny pond in the neighborhood. Typically, that is where the love for hockey is born. None of that matters to the ever-optimistic Thomas. “When I got here, everyone had an expectation of success,” says Thomas. “Certainly the management and the players did. But so did the people who came to watch us. Them, most of all.”

And he delivered. Last season—Thomas’ first—the club won 51 games, tied for the second most in franchise history. They won the Brabham Cup, awarded to the ECHL team with the most regular season points. And Thomas copped the Brophy Award, honoring the coach who contributed the most to his team’s success. But they lost in the division finals. A great showing. But for Thomas, whose goal is always a championship, it wasn’t enough. “I know it’s a cliché, but we play to win— always,” says Thomas. “No one comes to the ice to lose. So yes, I was very proud of what we accomplished last season. But I want more this year.” Last season’s accomplishments are all the more surprising when you consider how little time he had to prepare. The Cyclones announced his hire on August 7, 2018, barely two months before the season’s first match. In an ideal world,


he would have been in place shortly after the previous season ended in early April. “We moved to Ohio two days after we accepted the job in Ohio,” recalls Thomas’ wife, Andrea. “It was crazy.” It was even more crazy when you realize that, besides coming up with a strategy for a team of hockey players he didn’t know, the Thomases had to find a house, settle in and locate schools for their two elementary school sons. “Hey, it’s always a new journey and a new group,” says Thomas, who has a reputation for staying positive, whether wooing the press, leading youth hockey camps or guiding his team through their grueling morning practices. “It’s not an act—he’s really, really good with people,” says Andrea. “He’s willing to listen to other people’s ideas and is as humble as he is confident. I think that’s why he’s always been so likeable in the community.” Clearly, Andrea is his biggest fan. But she is every bit as tough and competitive as he is. Raised in Sarnia, Ontario, at the southernmost tip of Lake Huron, she played high-level college soccer at Wilfrid Laurier University in Waterloo, just 40 or so miles west of Matt’s childhood home in Mississauga. “I knew what this life was going to entail before we got married and had children,” says Andrea. “We’ve been pretty fortunate.

It’s not always easy. But we’re behind him. And at this stage, we’ve lived a pretty amazing, interesting life.” At the moment, Matt’s life is largely defined by the endless hours on or near the ice of the newly renamed Heritage Bank Center—formerly U.S. Bank Arena. There’s not much more than 100 feet separating the ice from the crowded and unadorned office Thomas shares with assistant coach Jason Payne. There’s a bigscreen TV, a few white boards, a couple of chairs and little else. Here, it’s all about what takes place on the ice. No need for a fancy office. There’s no easing into practice here. Everything is done full-out. Speed, speed and more speed. All with a rock-hard puck rocketing along at 85-plus miles per hour. “This is all about building skills and stamina and an awareness of everything that is going on around them,” says Thomas. They’re working on three-on-one breakaways. The players hurtle down the ice, crisscrossing and gingerly passing the puck back and forth before unleashing full-speed slap shots at the goal. Quickly, another trio makes its way down the ice. And another and another. The drill moves with such feverish velocity that it makes an NBA breakaway look like a slow-motion exercise. Cody Sol, a towering 6’ 6” defenseman from Woodstock, Ontario, quickly skates

Assistant coach Jason Payne with head coach Matt Thomas

to the bench to grab a swig of water. He’s an intimidating presence on the ice, and one of the anchors of the Cyclones’ defense. As he pulls off his helmet, he grins as great clouds of steam emanate from his shaggy head of hair. “It’s cold out here, you know,” he says, nodding and quickly returning to the drill. Like the rest of these guys, he doesn’t want to miss a moment of practice time. This is, after all, what they have been working for since they were kids. Thomas is pushing them to work harder. “Don’t be so f------g careful,” he bellows at one of the players. “You’ve got to work here. Failure here will make it work tomorrow night.” And it does work. The following evening, they beat the Fort Wayne Komets 5-4. Hockey is a hungry sport that moves at a breakneck pace. Sit in on any NHL practice and you’ll see it. But these young players are even hungrier. Perhaps it’s because they still have so much to prove; to coaches, to scouts, to fans and, in many ways, to the communities and families who supported them so long to reach this level. Don’t misunderstand. These guys are not amateurs. This is, in every way, professional hockey. They’re paid. But, as Thomas points out “these guys aren’t playing to get rich. They’re playing because they love the game. And because they want to win.” And Thomas is good at helping them do just that. With a formidable mix of enthusiasm and know-how, he has proven to be a game-changing force, especially during his head coaching gigs with the Fresno Falcons and Stockton Thunder. Maybe it’s because he’s as hungry as his players are. He readily admits that he hates to lose. You can see it on the ice during practice. Sometimes it’s as if he is willing his players into action. He pushes and cajoles, he encourages and sometimes even demonstrates. But unlike coaches that we have all seen, he doesn’t embarrass players. Players are not the enemy. Underneath all the tough-talk ing, expletive-laced, spit-on-the-ice bravado, he is just a guy who wants everyone to love hockey as much as he does. “I grew up with this game,” he says. His dad, Art Thomas, Sr., played for several teams in the IHL, including the Dayton Gems. “I grew up the middle of three boys. How does that saying go? You learn how to be competitive when there’s three boys and one potato on the table. Let’s just say that I usually came up with the potato.” n w w w.

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DECEMBER

SUNDAY

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8 [12/8] Matthew 25: Ministries hosts the free Family Holiday Bash to support the nonprofit A Kid Again.

MONDAY 2

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TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

3 4 [12/3] Head to Music Hall for Happy Holidays with the Mighty Wurlitzer theater organ.

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12 [12/12] Join the Cincinnati Contemporary Jazz Orchestra for its holiday show, Have a Funky Christmas.

11 [12/10-11] Head to Memorial Hall for Jim Brickman: A Christmas Celebration.

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

[12/6-8] Enjoy carriage rides, carolers, holiday shopping and more during Christmas in the Village in Waynesville.

7 [12/7] The free Olde West Chester Christmas Walk Parade and Community Tree Lighting returns.

13 [12/13] The Ludlow Garage hosts Norman Brown’s Joyous Christmas.

14 [12/14] Mt. Adams will be filled with costumed dogs during the annual Reindog Parade.

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15 16 [12/15] The Musica Sacra Cincinnati Christmas Concert features sacred choral music in the Episcopal Church of the Redeemer. 22 23 [12/21-22] Mrs. Claus leads the way in the Children’s Theatre’s performance of Mrs. Claus Saves the Day.

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18 19 [12/18-20, 27] At least 10 trains will be operating and on display at the Heritage Village Museum during Train Days.

20 [12/20-23] More than 80 performers and original music bring the story of Awaited to life at the Aronoff.

21 [Through 1/5] Holiday Junction and the Duke Energy Holiday Trains return to their rightful home in Union Terminal.

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25 [12/25] Merry Christmas!

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29 [Through 12/31] Guests will be able to enjoy 20 rides, 16 shows and 15 holiday activities during King Island’s WinterFest.

31 [12/31] Enjoy the final hockey game of the year at the Cincinnati Cyclones NYE Fireworks event.

30 [Through 12/31] Light Up Middletown, Middletown’s drive-thru light display in Smyth Park, returns for another year.

26 [12/26] The Aronoff hosts a Mannheim Steamroller Christmas by Chip Davis.

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[Through 12/28] Take a train ride with Santa on the North Pole Express thanks to LM&M Railroad.

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Mannheim Steamroller Christmas by Chip Davis Mannheim Steamroller will play the Christmas album that made them a household name—Mannheim Steamroller Christmas—live at the Aronoff the day after Christmas. Dec. 26, 7 p.m. $38.75-$78.75. Aronoff Center, 650 Walnut St., Cincinnati. 513-621-2787, cincinnatiarts.org.

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MATT CHRISTINE PHOTOGR APHY

A&E Calendar


Every Christmas Story Ever Told (and then some!) A production of A Christmas Carol gets out of hand during Cincinnati Shakespeare’s Every Christmas Story Ever Told (and then some!). This irreverent play brings together pieces of It’s a Wonderful Life, Charlie Brown and more for a one-of-a-kind show. Dec. 13-29, times vary. $50-$60. Otto M. Budig Theater, 1195 Elm St., Cincinnati. 513-381-2273, cincyshakes.com.

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SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

1 2 [1/3-5] The Cincinnati Pops perform the film score of Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban at Music Hall.

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10 [1/10] Parents and children alike will love staying Overnight at the Museum at the Cincinnati Museum Center.

11 [1/10-11] Soprano Renee Fleming joins the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra for two evenings of shows.

17 [1/17] We Banjo 3 mixes bluegrass and Celtic music at Memorial Hall.

18 [1/18] Country star Morgan Wallen will play his hits, like “Whiskey Glasses,” at the Taft Theatre.

25 [1/25] The Kentucky Symphony Orchestra performs two powerful symphonies during Symphonic Fission.

12 13 [Through 2/17] See artifacts from the first moon landing during “Destination Moon” at the Cincinnati Museum Center.

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15

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19 [1/19] View and buy fine art and handmade goods from 70plus artisans at Art on Vine at Rhinegeist.

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21 [1/21] Yola plays songs from her newly released album Walk Through Fire at the Taft Theatre.

22 [1/22] Grace Potter brings songs from her seven studio albums, including her newest, Daylight, to the Taft.

23 [1/23-26] Cirque du Soleil Axel mixes highflying acrobatics and ice skating at the Heritage Bank Center.

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26 [1/26] Head to the UC CollegeConservatory of Music for Steel Drum Band: A Trip to Trinidad and Back.

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28 [1/28] Chamber Music Cincinnati presents the St. Lawrence String Quartet at Memorial Hall.

29 [1/29] Musicians, dancers and the audience share the stage during CSO Proof: Singulis Et Simul.

30 [Through 2/2] The Cincinnati Art Museum hosts the exhibition “The Levee: A Photographer in the American South.”

31 [1/31-2/2] The Cincinnati Pops are joined by pianist Marcus Roberts for Gershwin’s “Rhapsody in Blue.”

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MARIANNE MANGAN

9 ERIC LONG, NATIONAL AIR AND SPACE MUSEUM , SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION

8 [1/8-2/4] The Tony-winning musical The Lion King can’t wait to be king of the Aronoff Center.

MARCO BORGGREVE

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4 [1/4-5] The Boar’s Head & Yule Log Festival returns to the Christ Church Cathedral.

5 6 [Through 1/5] Coney Island will be filled with synchronized lights during Christmas Nights of Lights.

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SATURDAY

JOHN DOUGLAS

JANUARY


TONY ARR ASMITH/ARR ASMITH & ASSOCIATES

A&E Calendar Buddy: The Buddy Holiday Story Playhouse in the Park celebrates the 1950s rock ‘n’ roll icon with a show that tells his story and features the songs he made famous and influenced. Jan. 18-Feb. 16, times vary. Prices vary. Playhouse in the Park, 962 Mt. Adams Circle, Cincinnati. 513-421-3888, cincyplay.com.

At the Art Academy of Cincinnati, we are the new generation of boundary-breakers. The imaginative radicals who are changing the face of art as we know it. The creative entrepreneurs who are redefining culture. The luminous visionaries who are creating a newer, brighter, more radiant world. Earning your BFA at the Art Academy of Cincinnati can help you make art, make a difference! The art of the future starts here. It starts with you.

Creative Writing Drawing & Painting Animation* Design Art History* Illustration Film, Video, Audio* Sculpture Print Media * Minor. Photography

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Schubert’s The Great

SIM CANETTY-CLARKE

Cellist Alban Gerhardt joins the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra and conductor Simone Young for a program featuring three symphonies, including Schubert’s Symphony in C Major, The Great. Jan. 24-25, F 11 a.m., Sa 8 p.m. $14-$130. Music Hall, 1241 Elm St., Cincinnati. 513-381-3300, cincinnatisymphony.org.

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PHOTO BY SCOTTSHAWPHOTOGR APHY

Midwestern Traveler

A Museum for Everyone OHIO IS HOME TO ALMOST EVERY TYPE OF MUSEUM, FROM ART AND HISTORY TO TODAY’S VETERANS By Corinne Minard

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o matter your interest, Ohio has a museum for that. From art to science to history, Ohio has museums covering almost any topic. While the state is filled with quality institutions, we’ve profiled three very different museums to give you a taste of what the state has to offer.

CARILLON HISTORICAL PARK What do the airplane, pop-top and cash register all have in common? They were all invented in Dayton, of course. To learn more about the city’s invention history—as well as more about Dayton itself—head to Carillon Historical Park just outside downtown Dayton. The 65-acre open-air museum is home to 35 historic buildings and structures, including the

The Cleveland Museum of Art collects art from all time periods and all cultures. Wright Brothers National Museum, Heritage Center of Dayton Manufacturing and Entrepreneurship, Carillon Brewing Co. and more. “What surprises people is how much is on this campus and how varied it is,” says Alex Heckman, vice president of museum operations. “It’s not as though we’re trying to tell the history of one house in 1870 or one battlefield from 1865 or something like that—we cover over two centuries worth of history.” Carillon Historical Park does this in two ways. First, it has many indoor exhibits featuring important artifacts from Dayton’s history. The Wright Brothers National Museum, for example, has more Wright brothers’ artifacts on display than any other museum in the world. Included in these w w w.

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Midwestern Traveler

Visitors to Carillon Historical Park in Dayton can see the world’s first practical airplane, the Wright Flyer III, along with nearly 200 National Cash Register registers.

artifacts is the Wright Flyer III, “which is considered the most original, consisting of the most original parts of any existing Wright brothers’ airplane and it’s the airplane that Orville Wright considered the world’s first practical airplane,” says Heckman.

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Other indoor exhibits and attractions include almost 200 National Cash Register registers, a hand-carved carousel that is Dayton themed, a Conestoga wagon, the oldest existing American-built locomotive and more.

Carillon Historical Park also explores the region’s history through interpreters and demonstrations in the open-air part of the park, which includes the Early Settlement Area and The Print Shop. At the William Morris House, visitors can


PHOTO BY NATIONAL VETER ANS MEMORIAL AND MUSEUM

learn how to dip candles or churn butter with the same types of tools early settlers would have used. The Carillon Brewing Co. brews beers the same way Daytonians did in the 1850s. And the Print Shop features the country’s only fully operational 1930s letterpress job shop. “They’re using the methods and the materials and the processes from the 1930s and that’s very eye-opening for folks,” says Heckman. “[In] the print shop you see printing equipment that can only handle one color of ink at a time and if you want to have a printed product that has four or five different colors on it that means you’re handling the paper four or fives times and cleaning up the printing press four or five times.” While touring the park, make sure to take in the 151-foot-tall Deeds Carillon as well. Built between 1940 and 1942, the carillon features 57 bells and is the largest carillon instrument in the state of Ohio. “It’s not just a big stone monument, it’s a living, breathing memorial to the

The National Veterans Memorial and Museum in Columbus introduces visitors to the stories of the country’s veterans. Deeds family,” says Heck man of the carillon honoring the couple that created the park.

NATIONAL VETERANS MEMORIAL AND MUSEUM The National Veterans Memorial and Museum in Columbus may have just celebrated its first year of being open to

the public, but it has already introduced thousands to the stories of the country’s veterans. “The National Veterans Memorial and Museum is the nation’s first and, we believe, only museum dedicated to all veterans, both war and peacetime service and all branches,” says Shelly Hoffman, associate director of external affairs for the museum.

WHO SAID PARADISE

Was someplace tropical.

Pl an your Winter Getaway at Gatlinburg.com

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PHOTO BY NATIONAL VETER ANS MEMORIAL AND MUSEUM

The National Veterans Memorial and Museum offers multimedia presentations and interactive pieces and artifacts to teach visitors about all facets of the veteran experience. Instead of displaying artifacts such as helicopters and tanks, the museum looks to honor veterans by telling their stories. Visitors follow the stories of veterans through 14 thematic alcoves. “[They] take you through the common steps a veteran takes from taking the oath of office and leaving home, basic training, deployment, combat experiences, coming home and then, equally

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PHOTO BY NATIONAL VETER ANS MEMORIAL AND MUSEUM

Midwestern Traveler

important, post-service, how they continue to contribute to their community and the country as a whole,” says Hoffman. “There are 25 veterans who were selected who provide the narration through these alcoves and they represent all different conflicts, World War II forward, and then also people who did service at peacetime. [They’re] from all parts of the country and

it’s their narrative that takes you through the museum,” adds Hoffman. Through multimedia presentations, interactive pieces and artifacts, visitors are able to learn about all facets of the veteran experience. The museum also invites visitors to discuss their own experiences with a Share Your Story booth. In addition the museum is looking to engage the community with its many events and programs. “We serve an important role as rally point and advocate for all veterans and continue to develop relevant programming to meet their needs as well as engage all Americans, and young people in particular, about the importance of doing something bigger than yourself,” says President and CEO Lt. General Michael Ferriter, who retired from the U.S. Army. These programs include Veteran Voices, which are panels that have previously featured veterans of D-Day and the Battle of Mogadishu; special Memorial Day and Veteran’s Day programs; community celebrations; and Rally Point, a free breakfast


and informal event that connects veterans to resources. Ultimately, the museum hopes to honor, connect, inspire and educate. “I think that being able to come through and hear the stories of veterans it demonstrates the power of people coming together for the good of our nation and I think it’s a reminder also that there’s so much that binds Americans than divides us and that’s a timely message now,” says Hoffman.

CLEVELAND MUSEUM OF ART

PHOTO BY SCOTTSHAWPHOTOGR APHY

The 103-year-old Cleveland Museum of Art is also looking to inspire its visitors. “We are an encyclopedic museum, meaning that we collect art from all time periods and all cultures, from the beginning of when art was produced in this world to the art of today. We like to think and hope that we have something for everyone. We have a wonderful permanent collection, the art that we have collected over our 103 years, and we also always have special exhibitions going on at any given time,” says Heather Lemonedes Brown, the museum’s chief curator and deputy director. The museum is home to many collections, from classic European art—such as the impressionists—to ancient art from the Bronze Age to modern, contemporary pieces. Brown recommends picking a gallery that aligns most with your interests, but there are several special pieces that are unique to the museum. For example, Stargazer is an abstract sculpture of a women looking up at the stars that dates back to 3,000 B.C. “It’s one of the oldest sculptures of the human figure in the museum,” says Brown. Another special piece is one of Claude Monet’s water lilies paintings that is featured in its impressionist room. “Water lilies are a product of his fascination with

The Cleveland Art Museum offers several programs for children and families to explore their inner artist.

The Cleveland Museum of Art is home to many famous pieces of art, including one of Claude Monet’s water lilies paintings. the shimmering surface of the pond and you see both the plants growing in the pond and you see the clouds overhead reflected in the surface of the pond. It’s as if the water, sky and land all come together in this one picture,” says Brown. And in the American collection, Brown recommends visitors make a point to see “Stag at Sharkey’s” by George Bellows. “It depicts a fight at Sharkey’s Athletic Club in New York City and what the artist does is he depicts the drama and energy of the struggle between the two boxers by blurring the scene’s details with rapid and very gestural brushwork. So the subject and the style merge together here,” adds Brown. Visitors in 2020 can also expect to see several temporary exhibitions at the Cleveland Museum of Art. “Proof: Photography in the Era of the Contact Sheet” is a Cleveland Museum of Art exclusive that will be open to the public from Feb. 7 to April 12. The exhibition features 150 contact, or proof, sheets that photographers used to select images in the era before digital photography. The collection features images of Marilyn Monroe, the Beatles and other celebrities. “Typically the contact sheet remained only a part of the working process and not in public view. So this exhibition will kind of pull back the

curtain on the [process] of a lot of photographers who were working in the second half of the 20th century,” says Brown. And in May, the exhibition “Picasso and Paper” will make its only U.S. stop at the museum. The exhibition features nearly 300 works by Pablo Picasso that showcase the many ways he used paper—“The way that he used prints and drawing but also the way that he used paper in collages, the way that he made sculpture out of the pieces of torn and even burned paper. We’ll see manipulated photographs on paper. And then we’ll also see the way he worked on paper to prepare himself for major paintings and sculpture,” adds Brown. One of the featured pieces of the exhibition is “Women at Their Toilette,” a more than 14-foot-long collage created from pieces of wallpaper. With the museum’s wide collection, Brown is confident visitors can find whatever experience they desire. “You can find what you’re looking for here, whether it’s quiet contemplation, relaxation—it’s a great place to come with family or friends. It can spark conversation. It can spark your own creativity. I think it can inspire you, but it’s everything from relaxing to energizing, just depending on what you’re in the mood for,” she says. n w w w.

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Dining

Off the Beaten Vineyard REVEL OTR OFFERS AN UNPRETENTIOUS AND ENJOYABLE WINE-DRINKING EXPERIENCE By Jessica Baltzersen

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evel; a verb, defined “to take great pleasure or delight in; riotous merry making.” Those who travel to Overthe-Rhine quickly realize the word “revel” and “wine” are synonymous, particularly at the three-year-old Revel OTR, a place to kick back with friends and sip specialty wine out of juice glasses. The owners, Anthony Maieron, Jodi Maieron, John Coleman (JC) and Amy Coleman, took the word, revel, and made it not only the name of their urban winery, but channeled the definition into the epitome of what the establishment stands for. Much like the black sheep eminent on the bar’s brick wall, they’re deviating from the norm and leaving wine snobbery at the door. If Revel OTR has proven anything, it’s that not all great wine comes from the majestic rolling hills of Napa Valley and that Cincinnati isn’t just for brewing beer. Combine the right conditions with the right knowledge and the best wine can be made beneath city streets. Many patrons are unaware that located just below their feet within the 1885 historic building are about 4,600 gallons of wine. From grape to bottle, the entire wine making process occurs onsite in their basement winery.

From left: John Coleman (JC), Amy Coleman, Anthony Maieron and Jodi Maieron 40

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Alex Sena, GM and master winemaker, prepares grapes for the crushing process. For Anthony, though, making wine in his basement is nothing new. Born of Italian immigrant parents, his father taught him how to make wine out of their garage at the age of 6. Later Anthony started making wine with JC in his own home basement and later moved the exploding hobby into the official Revel location on 12th Street. While they took the pretentiousness out of wine culture it doesn’t mean they’re not serious about making it. With each batch of wine, they aim to make the most unadulterated, pure product out there. “Our approach starts with sourcing the best fruit we can get so we don’t have to adjust the chemistry of the wine,” says Anthony. “Our philosophy is great grapes from great growers equals great wine. We also don’t rush our vintages by using additives and 100% of all of our reds are aged in oak.” Their grapes are sourced from popular wine regions, like California, Washington and Chile and are delivered right to the establishment’s vibrant, graffiti-covered alley. From there the building’s original freight elevator transports the produce to the basement winery where whole grape clusters are de-stemmed and crushed by Alex Sena, the head vintner. The grapes

then begin the fermentation process in the 58-degree environment, ideal for storing wine. Fancy stemware, top 40 hits and an uppity atmosphere are things you will not find at Revel. Instead, you’ll enter into a conversation-focused scene, with old-school hip-hop and a range of eclectic artists and events off the beaten path of traditional vineyard entertainment. “We wanted to embody an experience of friends over for wine passing around a playlist—that’s the heartbeat of Revel,” says Anthony. “We’re in our own swim lane and wanted to make the bar as approachable as possible.” Wine connoisseurs or those curious about the urban wine-making process can take a private, educational tour of their barrel room, where wines not yet on the menu, like their Barbera, Petite Sirah, Petit Verdot and Carménère are still being aged. For now, their immediate goal is getting their wine out into the world. “We want guests to bottle their experience at Revel and experience it in other locations,” adds Anthony. As of now, their bottles of wine can be found at city staples including Marty’s Hops and Vines, Prime Cincinnati, Salazar and a dozen more. n


dine with us

We invite you to experience our innovative menu, with chef-driven, modern Italian creations. Plan your event

Host your Holiday Party, business meeting or special occasion in one of our unique event spaces. 1420 Sycamore Street, Cincinnati, OH 45202 (513) 721-6200 • nicolasotr.com • events@nicolasotr.com


BEST DOCTORS

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TOP DENTISTS

page 63

RETIREMENT

page 68

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BY THE EDITORS Finding a new doctor can be daunting. Many of us count on recommendations from other doctors. Thankfully, we are able to provide a list of the doctors whom other doctors recommend in our 12th annual Best Doctors issue. Each physician on this list has received consensus of their peers as a physician to whom they would personally refer a loved one for care. Every physician must be nominated by a current Best Doctors physician, and then receive consensus during the voting phase of a biennial poll. Only those who receive consensus are a Best Doctor.

Physicians cannot apply or pay to become a Best Doctor Physician. By no means does this list encompass all of Greater Cincinnati’s excellent doctors. Omission from this database does not diminish or disparage the professional abilities and expertise of other local physicians. These lists are excerpted from The Best Doctors in America® 2019-2020 database, which includes close to 40,000 U.S. doctors in more than 450 medical specialty/subspecialty combinations. The Best Doctors in America® database is compiled and maintained by Best Doctors, Inc. For more information, visit www.bestdoctors.com or contact Best Doctors by telephone at 800-675-1199 or by email at research@bestdoctors.com. Please note that lists of doctors are not available on the Best Doctors website.

495 SPECIALISTS IN THE TRISTATE, SELECTED BY THEIR PEERS + LISTINGS BY SPECIALTY + BEST DOCTOR PROFILES + CONTACT INFORMATION ALLERGY AND IMMUNOLOGY David I. Bernstein Bernstein Allergy Group 8444 Winton Rd Cincinnati, OH 45231 513-931-0775 Jonathan A. Bernstein Bernstein Allergy Group 8444 Winton Rd Cincinnati, OH 45231 513-931-0775 Michelle B. Lierl Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Allergy Clinic Outpatient Services Bldg, 5th Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-2601 Steven A. Sutton Allergy & Asthma Associates 10597 Montgomery Rd, Ste 200 Cincinnati, OH 45242 513-793-6861 CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE Charles W. Abbottsmith The Christ Hospital Physicians Ohio Heart & Vascular The Christ Hospital Medical Office Bldg, Ste 136 2123 Auburn Ave Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-206-1060 Imran Arif UC Heart, Lung and Vascular Institute Medical Arts Bldg, Ste 6300 222 Piedmont Ave Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-8521

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Myron C. Gerson UC Heart, Lung and Vascular Institute Medical Arts Bldg, Ste 6300 222 Piedmont Ave Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-8521

Richard C. Becker UC Heart, Lung and Vascular Institute Medical Arts Bldg, Ste 6300 222 Piedmont Ave Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-8521 Thomas M. Broderick The Christ Hospital Physicians Ohio Heart & Vascular The Christ Hospital Medical Office Bldg, Ste 136 2123 Auburn Ave Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-206-1060 Joseph K. Choo The Christ Hospital Physicians Ohio Heart & Vascular 11140 Montgomery Rd, Ste 1300 Cincinnati, OH 45249 513-792-7800 Jennifer Lynn Cook UC Heart, Lung and Vascular Institute Hoxworth Center 3130 Highland Ave, 3rd Fl Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-584-7217 Mohamed A. Effat UC Heart, Lung and Vascular Institute Medical Arts Bldg, Ste 6300 222 Piedmont Ave Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-8521 David Seth Feldman UC Heart, Lung and Vascular Institute Hoxworth Center 3130 Highland Ave, 3rd Fl Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-8521

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Timothy D. Henry The Christ Hospital Physicians Ohio Heart & Vascular The Christ Hospital Medical Office Bldg, Ste 136 2123 Auburn Ave Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-206-1060 Richard W. Henthorn Mercy Health - The Heart Institute, West 3301 Mercy Health Blvd, Ste 125 Cincinnati, OH 45211 513-215-9200 Dean J. Kereiakes The Christ Hospital Physicians Ohio Heart & Vascular The Christ Hospital Medical Office Bldg, Ste 136 2123 Auburn Ave Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-206-1060 Robert E. O’Donnell UC Heart, Lung and Vascular Institute Medical Arts Bldg, Ste 6300 222 Piedmont Ave Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-8521 Jack Rubinstein UC Heart, Lung and Vascular Institute UC Health Physicians Office, Ste 4000 222 Piedmont Ave Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-8521 Ian Joseph Sarembock The Christ Hospital Physicians Ohio Heart & Vascular Center 11140 Montgomery Rd, Ste 1300 Cincinnati, OH 45249 513-792-7800

Edward J. Schloss The Christ Hospital Physicians Ohio Heart & Vascular The Christ Hospital Medical Office Bldg, Ste 137 2123 Auburn Ave Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-206-1060 John Frank Schneider The Christ Hospital Physicians Ohio Heart & Vascular 11140 Montgomery Rd, Ste 1300 Cincinnati, OH 45249 513-792-7800 Lynne E. Wagoner Mercy Health - The Heart Institute 3000 Mack Rd, Ste 100 Fairfield, OH 45014 513-751-4222 COLON AND RECTAL SURGERY Janice Rafferty UC Health Colon and Rectal Surgery 2123 Auburn Ave, Ste 524 Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-929-0104 CRITICAL CARE MEDICINE Andrew Darrow Friedrich University of Cincinnati Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 234 Goodman St Cincinnati, OH 45267 513-584-1000 Nishant Gupta UC Health Holmes Hospital Division of Pulmonary Medicine 200 Albert Sabin Way, 3rd Fl Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-8523 William Edward Hurford University of Cincinnati Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology 234 Goodman St Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-558-2402

Daniel S. Kanter UC Gardner Neuroscience Institute 3113 Bellevue Ave, Ste 3000 Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-8730 Francis McCormack, Jr. UC Health Holmes Hospital UC Heart, Lung and Vascular Institute 200 Eden Ave, 3rd Fl Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-8523 Timothy A. Pritts UC Health Surgery Medical Arts Bldg, Ste 7000 222 Piedmont Ave Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-8787 DERMATOLOGY Brian Adams UC Health Dermatology Medical Arts Bldg, Ste 5300 222 Piedmont Ave Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-7630 Debra L. Breneman UC Health Dermatology Medical Arts Bldg, Ste 5300 222 Piedmont Ave Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-7630 Brett M. Coldiron Skin Cancer Center 3024 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-221-2828 Drore Eisen Dermatologists of Southwest Ohio 10506 Montgomery Rd, Ste 402 Cincinnati, OH 45242 513-791-6161 Anne W. Lucky Dermatologists of Southwest Ohio 7691 5 Mile Rd, Ste 312 Cincinnati, OH 45230 513-232-3332


Diya F. Mutasim UC Health Dermatology Medical Arts Bldg, Ste 5300 222 Piedmont Ave Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-7630 Pranav B. Sheth Group Health TriHealth Physician Partners 379 Dixmyth Ave, 8th Fl Cincinnati, OH 45220 513-246-7000 James A. Zalla Dermatology Associates of Northern Kentucky 7766 Ewing Blvd, Ste 100 Florence, KY 41042 859-283-1033 Mark J. Zalla Dermatology Associates of Northern Kentucky 7766 Ewing Blvd, Ste 100 Florence, KY 41042 859-283-1033 EMERGENCY MEDICINE Stephen W. Dailey, Jr. UC Health Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine Medical Arts Bldg, Ste 2200 222 Piedmont Ave Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-8690 Arthur M. Pancioli University of Cincinnati Medical Center Department of Emergency Medicine 234 Goodman St Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-584-5700 Arthur A. Wall University of Cincinnati Medical Center Division of Emergency Medicine 234 Goodman St Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-558-5281 ENDOCRINOLOGY AND METABOLISM Jimmy D. Alele Group Health TriHealth Physician Partners 7991 Beechmont Ave, Ste C Cincinnati, OH 45255 513-246-7000 Mercedes Falciglia Cincinnati VA Medical Center Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism 3200 Vine St Cincinnati, OH 45220 513-861-3100 Nelson Barnett Watts Mercy Health - Kenwood Osteoporosis & Bone Health 4760 E Galbraith Rd, Ste 212 Cincinnati, OH 45236 513-686-2663 FAMILY MEDICINE Sandra Amoils Alliance Integrative Medicine 6400 E Galbraith Rd Cincinnati, OH 45236 513-791-5521 Steven L. Amoils Alliance Integrative Medicine 6400 E Galbraith Rd Cincinnati, OH 45236 513-791-5521

Orson Jude Austin UC Health Primary Care 11590 Century Blvd, Ste 102 Cincinnati, OH 45246 513-648-9077 Thaddeus M. Bort The Family Medical Group 6331 Glenway Ave Cincinnati, OH 45211 513-389-1400 Anna M. Daddabbo UC Health Primary Care 3120 Burnet Ave, Ste 406 Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-584-8600 Jon G. Divine UC Health Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine 68 Cavalier Blvd Florence, KY 41042 513-475-8690 Walter E. Donnelly, Jr. The Family Medical Group 6331 Glenway Ave Cincinnati, OH 45211 513-389-1400 Robert V. Ellis II UC Health Primary Care 175 W Galbraith Rd Cincinnati, OH 45216 513-821-0275 Andrew Thomas Filak, Jr. UC Health Primary Care 3120 Burnet Ave, Ste 406 Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-584-8600 Timothy Duane Freeman UC Health Primary Care 3120 Burnet Ave, Ste 406 Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-584-8600 Michael Holliday University of Cincinnati College of Medicine University Health Services Lindner Athletic Center 2751 O’Varsity Way, 3rd Fl Cincinnati, OH 45221 513-556-2564 Joseph Kiesler, Jr. Cincinnati Health Network McMicken Medical Clinic 40 E McMicken Ave Cincinnati, OH 45202 513-386-7899 Lisbeth M. Lazaron The Christ Hospital Physicians Primary Care The Christ Hospital Medical Office Bldg, Ste 235 2123 Auburn Ave Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-585-3238 Timothy McCarren The Family Medical Group 3260 Westbourne Dr Cincinnati, OH 45248 513-389-1400 Amy R. Mechley Integrative Family Care Edgecliff Bldg, Ste 603 2200 Victory Pkwy Cincinnati, OH 45206 513-457-4073 Douglas Moody TriHealth Montgomery Family Medicine 11029 Montgomery Rd Cincinnati, OH 45249 513-891-2211

Srilakshmi S. Murthy UC Health Primary Care UC Health Physicians Office South 7675 Wellness Way, Ste 105 West Chester, OH 45069 513-475-8264 Donald G. Nunlist-Young The Christ Hospital Physicians Primary Care 3805 Edwards Rd, Ste 360 Cincinnati, OH 45209 513-871-7848 Kathryn M. Peeden Alliance Integrative Medicine 6400 E Galbraith Rd Cincinnati, OH 45236 513-791-5521 Sarah R. Pickle UC Health Primary Care 175 W Galbraith Rd Cincinnati, OH 45216 513-821-0275 Douglas E. Puterbaugh TriHealth Health First Physicians Mariemont 6825 Wooster Pike Cincinnati, OH 45227 513-272-0250 David P. Rahner Cincinnati VA Medical Center Clermont Community Based Outpatient Clinic 4600 Beechwood Rd Cincinnati, OH 45244 513-943-3680 Ronald Reynolds The Christ Hospital Physicians Primary Care The Christ Hospital Outpatient Center - Anderson 7545 Beechmont Ave, Ste C Cincinnati, OH 45255 513-564-4026

Dr. Maria Britto

Montiel T. Rosenthal The Christ Hospital Physicians Primary Care The Christ Hospital Medical Office Bldg, Ste 235 2123 Auburn Ave Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-585-3238

As director of the Center for Innovation in Chronic Disease Care at Cincinnati Children’s, Dr. Maria Britto operates at the intersection of improving quality of care for children and adolescents who have chronic diseases and overseeing collaborative, multidisciplinary research on how to treat them. Care involves managing day-to-day aspects of living with chronic disease and aligning doctors’ goals—such as keeping blood sugar low in a child with diabetes—with those of the parents and child, who may just want to be able to do things like play sports or participate in other activities without worry. Communication can be a big hurdle for everyone involved, which is why Britto and her fellow doctors are integrating text messaging and phone apps into their efforts. “Any tools that we use and communication strategies that we have that help us and families have more honest, open, clear conversations,” Britto explains, “and, then, us directing the care we deliver to their goals in collaboration with them—we get to better places.” For Britto and her fellow doctors, the goal is to demonstrate evidence-based methods that can work for entire populations suffering from chronic disease by making sure that adolescent patients are receptive to and helped by them. “The health care system doesn’t work very well for teenagers,” Britto says. “It’s much more designed for younger kids and parents. We figured if we could make it work for teenagers it would probably work for parents and younger kids as well.”

Jeffrey D. Schlaudecker The Christ Hospital Physicians Primary Care The Christ Hospital Medical Office Bldg, Ste 340 2123 Auburn Ave Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-585-2000 Manoj Kumar Singh UC Health Primary Care UC Health Physicians Office South 7675 Wellness Way, Ste 105 West Chester, OH 45069 513-475-8264 Christopher David Sweeney Mercy Health - Kenwood Family Medicine 4750 E Galbraith Rd, Ste 210 Cincinnati, OH 45236 513-585-9600 Michael U. Todd Mercy Health - Be Well Within Center 1701 Mercy Health Place Cincinnati, OH 45237 513-952-5930 Richard Vonderbrink TriHealth Montgomery Family Medicine 11029 Montgomery Rd Cincinnati, OH 45249 513-891-2211

Pediatric Specialist/Adolescent and Young Adult Medicine Cincinnati Children’s Hospital and Medical Center

– Kevin Michell w w w.

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FAMILY MEDICINE (CONTINUED) Barry Webb Mercy Health - Springdale Family Medicine 212 W Sharon Rd Cincinnati, OH 45246 513-771-7213 Charles T. Webster Margaret Mary Community Hospital Division of Emergency Medicine 321 Mitchell Ave Batesville, IN 47006 812-933-5117 Elizabeth Ann Woolford Alliance Integrative Medicine 6400 E Galbraith Rd Cincinnati, OH 45236 513-791-5521 FAMILY MEDICINE/HOSPICE AND PALLIATIVE MEDICINE Douglas Smucker The Christ Hospital Division of Hospice and Palliative Medicine 2139 Auburn Ave Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-585-4157 FAMILY MEDICINE/ HOSPITAL MEDICINE Chris Bernheisel The Christ Hospital Physicians Primary Care The Christ Hospital Medical Office Bldg, Ste 340 2123 Auburn Ave Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-585-2000

Dr. Thomas Kiefhaber Hand Surgery

GASTROENTEROLOGY

TriHealth Hand Surgery Specialists It almost seems like Dr. Thomas Kiefhaber, an orthopedic surgeon specializing in hand surgery, was born to be a doctor. Kiefhaber says his father was an orthopedic surgeon in Middletown. “I got to see how a small-town doctor operated and got to see the joys that he experienced working with people and so I think I sort of fell into becoming an orthopedic surgeon naturally,” he says. Once he became a doctor he became inspired to specialize in hand surgery by one of his instructors during his residency, Dr. Peter J. Stern. “I very much enjoyed the intricacy of [hand surgery] and the microsurgery and also the ability to improve function for people,” Kiefhaber says. A lot has changed in the more than 30 years that Kiefhaber has been practicing, especially in the field of microsurgery, he says. Microsurgery has reached a point where doctors can now work on small arteries, veins and nerves allowing doctors to save fingers that have been injured or reattach fingers that have been cut off, Kiefhaber says. What else has changed in the years since Kiefhaber started practicing is his patients have aged along with him. “I take care of a lot of middle-age people who have arthritis in their fingers, who have carpal tunnel syndrome or trigger fingers or all the things we associate with being middle age,” he says. One thing will never change, however, and that is the joy Kiefhaber experiences interacting with his patients. “I think that everybody has something special about them,” says Kiefhaber. “It’s fun to learn that … and it’s fun to hear the unique and interesting stories that people have in their lives.”

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Michael Kreines Ohio Gastroenterology and Liver Institute 2925 Vernon Pl, Ste 100 Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-751-6667 Stephen P. Martin Ohio Gastroenterology and Liver Institute 2990 Mack Rd, Ste 107 Fairfield, OH 45014 513-860-4801 GERIATRIC MEDICINE Jeffrey D. Schlaudecker The Christ Hospital Physicians Primary Care The Christ Hospital Medical Office Bldg, Ste 340 2123 Auburn Ave Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-585-2000 HAND SURGERY Paul Fassler TriHealth Hand Surgery Specialists 10700 Montgomery Rd, Ste 150 Cincinnati, OH 45242 513-961-4263 Thomas R. Kiefhaber TriHealth Hand Surgery Specialists 10700 Montgomery Rd, Ste 150 Cincinnati, OH 45242 513-961-4263 Peter J. Stern UC Health Holmes Hospital Department of Orthopaedic Surgery 200 Albert Sabin Way, Ste 1007 Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-8690

John Dwight Wyrick UC Health Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine Medical Arts Bldg, Ste 2200 222 Piedmont Ave Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-8690 INFECTIOUS DISEASE George S. Deepe, Jr. University of Cincinnati Medical Center Division of Infectious Diseases 234 Goodman St Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-584-1000 Carl J. Fichtenbaum UC Health Holmes Hospital Division of Infectious Diseases 200 Albert Sabin Way, 1st Fl Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-584-6977 A. George Smulian UC Health Holmes Hospital Division of Infectious Diseases 200 Albert Sabin Way, 1st Fl Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-584-6977 INTERNAL MEDICINE Susan B. Abbott The Christ Hospital Physicians Primary Care The Christ Hospital Outpatient Center - Red Bank 4440 Redbank Expwy, Ste 200 Cincinnati, OH 45227 513-564-3822 Marc A. Alexander Western Hills Internal Medicine 6350 Glenway Ave, Ste 400 Cincinnati, OH 45211 513-481-3400 Barry Brook Mercy Health - Kenwood Internal Medicine 4750 E Galbraith Rd, Ste 111 Cincinnati, OH 45236 513-686-4840 Christine M. Burrows UC Health Internal Medicine & Pediatrics Hoxworth Center 3130 Highland Ave, 2nd Fl Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-584-7425 LeAnn Coberly UC Health Internal Medicine Faculty Practice Hoxworth Center 3130 Highland Ave, 2nd Fl Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-584-4503 Bruce C. Corser Your MD 8250 Kenwood Crossing Way, Ste 225 Cincinnati, OH 45236 513-721-9600 Tiffiny L. Diers UC Health Internal Medicine & Pediatrics Hoxworth Center 3130 Highland Ave, 2nd Fl Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-584-7425 Robert D. Finlay UC Health Primary Care 9275 Montgomery Rd, Ste 200 Cincinnati, OH 45242 513-936-4510

Matthew E. Hardin UC Health Primary Care UC Health Physicians Office North 7690 Discovery Dr, Ste 2700 West Chester, OH 45069 513-475-7425 Kay A. Johnson UC Health Primary Care 9275 Montgomery Rd, Ste 200 Cincinnati, OH 45242 513-936-4510 Lisa M. Joliat Mercy Health - Amberley Primary Care 8599 Ridge Rd Cincinnati, OH 45236 513-418-5700 Jeanne K. Kavinsky UC Health Primary Care Medical Arts Bldg, Ste 8000 222 Piedmont Ave Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-7880 Gregory D. Kennebeck UC Health Primary Care Medical Arts Bldg, Ste 8000 222 Piedmont Ave Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-7880 Katheryn Ellen Kermode Group Health TriHealth Physician Partners 379 Dixmyth Ave, 7th Fl Cincinnati, OH 45220 513-246-7000 Melissa Klein Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of General and Community Pediatrics 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-7722 Douglas A. Magenheim My Doctor 9050 Montgomery Rd, Ste B Cincinnati, OH 45242 513-631-6963 Vincent T. Martin UC Health Primary Care Medical Arts Bldg, Ste 8000 222 Piedmont Ave Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-7880 Bradley R. Mathis UC Health Primary Care Medical Arts Bldg, Ste 8000 222 Piedmont Ave Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-7880 Caroline Mueller UC Health Internal Medicine & Pediatrics Hoxworth Center 3130 Highland Ave, 2nd Fl Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-584-7425 Elizabeth J. Rabkin UC Health Primary Care Medical Arts Bldg, Ste 8000 222 Piedmont Ave Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-7880 Emmett C. Roper Mercy Health - Forest Park Internal Medicine and Pediatrics 11550 Winton Rd Cincinnati, OH 45240 513-924-8200


Gregory W. Rouan UC Health Primary Care Medical Arts Bldg, Ste 6000 222 Piedmont Ave Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-7880 Christopher J. Smith St. Elizabeth Physicians Crestview Hills Internal Medicine 334 Thomas More Pkwy, Ste 200 Crestview Hills, KY 41017 859-341-0288 Kellie Kay Smith My Doctor 9050 Montgomery Rd, Ste B Cincinnati, OH 45242 513-631-6963 Michael Sostok UC Health Primary Care Medical Arts Bldg, Ste 8000 222 Piedmont Ave Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-7880 Nita W. Walker UC Health Primary Care 9275 Montgomery Rd, Ste 200 Cincinnati, OH 45242 513-936-4510 Stephen E. Wilson Mercy Health - Forest Park Internal Medicine and Pediatrics 11550 Winton Rd Cincinnati, OH 45240 513-924-8200 Robert M. Wolterman UC Health Primary Care UC Health Physicians Office North 7690 Discovery Dr, Ste 2700 West Chester, OH 45069 513-475-7425 Sharice N. Wood UC Health Internal Medicine & Pediatrics Hoxworth Center 3130 Highland Ave, 2nd Fl Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-584-7425 Maria B. Wright Lisa Larkin MD & Associates 3908 Miami Rd Cincinnati, OH 45227 513-760-5511 Michael S. Yi The Christ Hospital Physicians Internal Medicine and Pediatrics The Christ Hospital Outpatient Center - Red Bank 4440 Red Bank Expy, Ste 200 Cincinnati, OH 45227 513-564-3822 INTERNAL MEDICINE/ HOSPITAL MEDICINE Justin D. Held University of Cincinnati Medical Center Department of Internal Medicine 234 Goodman St Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-558-7581 MEDICAL GENETICS Robert Hopkin Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Human Genetics Bldg C, 5th Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4760

Nancy D. Leslie Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Human Genetics Bldg C, 5th Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4760 MEDICAL ONCOLOGY AND HEMATOLOGY Philip D. Leming The Christ Hospital Physicians Hematology & Oncology The Christ Hospital Outpatient Center - Red Bank 4460 Red Bank Expy, Ste 200 Cincinnati, OH 45227 513-321-4333 Elyse Lower UC Health Barrett Cancer Center Breast Cancer Center 234 Goodman St, 3rd Fl Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-584-8480 Joseph E. Palascak UC Health Barrett Cancer Center Adult Hemophiliac Treatment Center 234 Goodman St, 2nd Fl Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-584-8500 NEPHROLOGY Suresh Kamath UC Health Nephrology UC Health Physicians Office South 7675 Wellness Way, Ste 211 West Chester, OH 45069 513-475-8525 Kotagal S. Kant UC Health Nephrology Medical Arts Bldg, Ste 6300 222 Piedmont Ave Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-8525 Manoocher Soleimani Dialysis Clinic 1075 Kemper Meadow Dr Cincinnati, OH 45240 513-558-5471 Charuhas V. Thakar University of Cincinnati Medical Center Kidney CARE Program 234 Goodman St Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-558-5471 NEUROLOGICAL SURGERY Joseph Shun-Che Cheng UC Health Barrett Cancer Center Department of Radiation Oncology 234 Goodman St, 3rd Fl Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-8990 George T. Mandybur Mayfield Brain & Spine 3825 Edwards Rd, Ste 300 Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-569-5222 Ronald E. Warnick Mayfield Brain & Spine 3825 Edwards Rd, Ste 300 Cincinnati, OH 45209 513-569-5222 Mario Zuccarello UC Gardner Neuroscience Institute 3113 Bellevue Ave Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-8990

NEUROLOGY Joseph P. Broderick UC Gardner Neuroscience Institute 3113 Bellevue Ave, Ste 3000 Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-8730 Jennifer Cavitt UC Health Neurology UC Health Physicians Office North 7690 Discovery Dr, Ste 3500 West Chester, OH 45069 513-475-8730 Richard Curry III Group Health TriHealth Physician Partners 6949 Good Samaritan Dr, Ste 200 Cincinnati, OH 45247 513-246-7000 Alberto J. Espay UC Gardner Neuroscience Institute 3113 Bellevue Ave, Ste 3000 Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-8730 David M. Ficker UC Gardner Neuroscience Institute 3113 Bellevue Ave, Ste 3000 Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-8730 Matthew L. Flaherty UC Gardner Neuroscience Institute 3113 Bellevue Ave, Ste 3000 Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-8730 Daniel S. Kanter UC Gardner Neuroscience Institute 3113 Bellevue Ave, Ste 3000 Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-8730 Pooja Khatri University of Cincinnati Medical Center Department of Neurology 234 Goodman St Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-558-2968 Brett Kissela Daniel Drake Center for Post-Acute Care UC Health Neurology 151 W Galbraith Rd Cincinnati, OH 45216 513-475-8730 Dawn Olson Kleindorfer UC Gardner Neuroscience Institute 3113 Bellevue Ave, Ste 3000 Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-8730 Andrew Massey UC Gardner Neuroscience Institute 3113 Bellevue Ave, Ste 3000 Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-8730 Robert Walton Neel UC Gardner Neuroscience Institute 3113 Bellevue Ave, Ste 3000 Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-8730 Michael D. Privitera UC Gardner Neuroscience Institute 3113 Bellevue Ave, Ste 3000 Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-8730 John G. Quinlan UC Gardner Neuroscience Institute 3113 Bellevue Ave, Ste 3000 Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-8730 Alok Sahay UC Gardner Neuroscience Institute 3113 Bellevue Ave, Ste 3000 Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-8730

Laura A. Sams UC Gardner Neuroscience Institute 3113 Bellevue Ave, Ste 3000 Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-8730 Rhonna S. Shatz UC Health Neurology UC Health Physicians Office North 7690 Discovery Dr, Ste 3500 West Chester, OH 45069 513-475-8730 Daniel Woo UC Gardner Neuroscience Institute 3113 Bellevue Ave, Ste 3000 Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-8730 NUCLEAR MEDICINE Michael J. Gelfand Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging Bldg B, Level 1 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4251

Mickey M. Karram The Christ Hospital Physicians Urogynecology The Christ Hospital Medical Office Bldg, Ste 720 2123 Auburn Ave Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-463-2500 Elizabeth Anne Kelly City of Cincinnati Primary Care Bobbie Sterne Health Center 1525 Elm St Cincinnati, OH 45202 513-357-7320 Megan Lee Kessler For Women 3219 Clifton Ave, Ste 125 Cincinnati, OH 45220 513-751-1919 Steven Douglas Kleeman Cincinnati Urogynecology Associates 7798 Discovery Dr, Ste A West Chester, OH 45069 513-463-4300

Sherif G. Awadalla Institute for Reproductive Health 3805 Edwards Rd, Ste 450 Cincinnati, OH 45209 513-924-5550

Donna S. Lambers TriHealth Good Samaritan Hospital Tri-State Maternal-Fetal Medicine Associates Seton Center for Advanced Obstetrics 375 Dixmyth Ave, 8th Fl Cincinnati, OH 45220 513-862-6200

Jack B. Basil TriHealth Women’s Services Tristate Gynecologic Oncology 3219 Clifton Ave, Ste 100 Cincinnati, OH 45220 513-862-1888

Mamata Narendran Obstetrics & Gynecology Associates 3050 Mack Rd, Ste 375 Fairfield, OH 45014 513-221-3800

Lesley L. Breech Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Young Women’s Center for Reproductive Health and Development 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-9400

James Pavelka TriHealth Women’s Services Tristate Gynecologic Oncology 3219 Clifton Ave, Ste 100 Cincinnati, OH 45220 513-862-1888

OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY

Elizabeth Ann Clark For Women 3219 Clifton Ave, Ste 125 Cincinnati, OH 45220 513-751-1919 Emily A. DeFranco UC Health Women’s Center Division of Maternal and Fetal Medicine Hoxworth Center 3130 Highland Ave, 1st Fl Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-584-5239 Arthur T. Evans III UC Health Midtown Office 3590 Lucille Dr Cincinnati, OH 45213 513-475-8588 Kevin R. Fitzgerald Mt. Auburn Obstetrics & Gynecologic Associates The Christ Hospital Medical Office Bldg, Ste 724 2123 Auburn Ave Cincinnati, OH 45220 513-241-4774 Thomas J. Herzog UC Health Barrett Cancer Center Gynecologic Oncology Center 234 Goodman St, 3rd Fl Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-584-6373

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Gerard Reilly Seven Hills Women’s Health Centers 10506 Montgomery Rd, Ste 504 Cincinnati, OH 45242 513-922-0009 Michael D. Scheiber Institute for Reproductive Health 3805 Edwards Rd, Ste 450 Cincinnati, OH 45209 513-924-5550 Aparna D. Shah The Christ Hospital Physicians Urogynecology 7335 Yankee Rd, Ste201 Liberty Township, OH 45044 513-463-2500 Graig W. Smith TriHealth Samaritan ObGyn 3219 Clifton Ave, Ste 230 Cincinnati, OH 45220 513-559-9411 Candice C. Snyder UC Health Women’s Center Division of Maternal and Fetal Medicine Hoxworth Center 3130 Highland Ave, 1st Fl Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-584-5239 Eric F. Stamler The Christ Hospital Physicians Obstetrics and Gynecology The Christ Hospital Outpatient Center - Green Township 5885 Harrison Ave, Ste 3100 Cincinnati, OH 45248 513-564-1600

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OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY (CONTINUED) Michael A. Thomas UC Health Center for Reproductive Health UC Health Physicians Office South 7675 Wellness Way, Ste 315 West Chester, OH 45069 513-475-7600 Carri Warshak UC Health Women’s Center Division of Maternal and Fetal Medicine Hoxworth Center 3130 Highland Ave, 1st Fl Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-584-5239 James Wendel Mt. Auburn Obstetrics & Gynecologic Associates The Christ Hospital Medical Office Bldg, Ste 724 2123 Auburn Ave Cincinnati, OH 45220 513-241-4774 OCCUPATIONAL MEDICINE David I. Bernstein Bernstein Allergy Group 8444 Winton Rd Cincinnati, OH 45231 513-931-0775

Dr. Susan McElroy

Jonathan A. Bernstein Bernstein Allergy Group 8444 Winton Rd Cincinnati, OH 45231 513-931-0775

Psychiatry

Lindner Center for HOPE The world can thank the kindness of Dr. Susan McElroy’s family doctor as a child for launching her on a journey to discover the holy grail of psychiatry. That discovery—a blood test or other type of biological test to diagnose whether someone has a mental illness—has so far proven elusive. However, McElroy and her team at the Lindner Center for HOPE, in conjunction with the Mayo Clinic, are working hard to discover that test. That discovery would change the way patients with mental illnesses are treated, she says. Because if doctors learned through a biologic test that someone has a high chance of developing a mental illness then that patient could be monitored and if symptoms occur treatment could begin immediately, says McElroy. “We can be much more proactive than we are now,” she says. “Psychiatry’s very reactive. People don’t tend to get psychiatric help until they’ve been sick for quite a while.” The process to find that discovery started when McElroy was young. “I was very sick as a child,” says McElroy. “I had a lot of respiratory problems and my family doctor … was an incredibly kind man.” She figured since he helped her get better that she’d also like to help other people get better as well. And her mother’s best friend’s son, who was severely autistic, helped to steer her focus in medicine toward helping those with illnesses that come from the brain. Today, McElroy oversees a team of researchers conducting five to seven studies at a time focused primarily on mood disorders such as bipolar disorder, major depression and eating disorders, she says. “We’re working very hard to uncover new knowledge because we can really help a lot of people, but we still have a long way to go before we can help everybody,” McElroy says. “So we have to uncover new knowledge.”

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OPHTHALMOLOGY Hisham Arar Cincinnati Eye Institute 4760 Red Bank Expy, Ste 108 Cincinnati, OH 45227 513-531-2020 James J. Augsburger UC Health Barrett Cancer Center Ocular Oncology and Diagnostic Ultrasonography Service 234 Goodman St, Ste C Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-7300 Thomas G. Burch Cincinnati Eye Institute 3310 Mercy Health Blvd, Ste 220 Cincinnati, OH 45211 513-984-5133 John S. Cohen Cincinnati Eye Institute 1945 CEI Dr Cincinnati, OH 45242 513-984-5133 Robert E. Foster Cincinnati Eye Institute 1945 CEI Dr Cincinnati, OH 45242 513-984-5133 Karl C. Golnik Cincinnati Eye Institute 1945 CEI Dr Cincinnati, OH 45242 513-984-5133 Mark Gooch Tri-State Centers for Sight 2135 Dana Ave, Ste 310 Cincinnati, OH 45207 513-221-7788 Linda Joy Greff Cincinnati Eye Institute 1945 CEI Dr Cincinnati, OH 45242 513-984-5133

Jenny Hamilton Cincinnati Eye Institute 601 Ivy Gateway, Ste 301 Cincinnati, OH 45245 513-984-5133 Michael A. Hater Cincinnati Eye Institute 1945 CEI Dr Cincinnati, OH 45242 513-984-5133 Edward J. Holland Cincinnati Eye Institute 1945 CEI Dr Cincinnati, OH 45242 513-984-5133 Robert K. Hutchins Cincinnati Eye Institute Medical Arts Bldg, Ste 4000 222 Piedmont Ave Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-984-5133 Adam H. Kaufman Cincinnati Eye Institute Medical Arts Bldg, Ste 4000 222 Piedmont Ave Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-569-3007

Michael Joseph Prokopius UC Health West Chester Hospital Department of Ophthalmology UC Health Physicians Office South 7675 Wellness Way, Ste 308 West Chester, OH 45069 513-475-8152 Christopher D. Riemann Cincinnati Eye Institute 1945 CEI Dr Cincinnati, OH 45242 513-984-5133 Robert A. Sisk Cincinnati Eye Institute 1945 CEI Dr Cincinnati, OH 45242 513-984-5133 Michael E. Snyder Cincinnati Eye Institute 1945 CEI Dr Cincinnati, OH 45242 513-984-5133 Gary A. Varley Cincinnati Eye Institute 1945 CEI Dr Cincinnati, OH 45242 513-984-5133

Anup K. Khatana Cincinnati Eye Institute 1945 CEI Dr Cincinnati, OH 45242 513-984-5133

Robert B. Werner Tri-State Centers for Sight 2135 Dana Ave, Ste 310 Cincinnati, OH 45207 513-221-7788

Ramesh Kode Cincinnati Eye Institute 1945 CEI Dr Cincinnati, OH 45242 513-984-5133

Alan H. Zalta Cincinnati Eye Institute Medical Arts Bldg, Ste 4000 222 Piedmont Ave Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-569-3008

Stephen Kondash Tri-State Centers for Sight 6909 Good Samaritan Dr, Ste B Cincinnati, OH 45247 513-389-9911 Dwight R. Kulwin Cincinnati Eye Institute 3219 Clifton Ave, Ste 110 Cincinnati, OH 45220 513-618-3300 Daniel C. Love Tri-State Centers for Sight 1017 Main St Hamilton, OH 45013 513-868-2181 Daniel M. Miller Cincinnati Eye Institute 1945 CEI Dr Cincinnati, OH 45242 513-984-5133 Jeffrey A. Nerad Cincinnati Eye Institute 1945 CEI Dr Cincinnati, OH 45242 513-984-5133 Michael L. Nordlund Cincinnati Eye Institute 1945 CEI Dr Cincinnati, OH 45242 513-984-5133 James M. Osher Cincinnati Eye Institute 1945 CEI Dr Cincinnati, OH 45242 513-984-5133 Robert H. Osher Cincinnati Eye Institute 1945 CEI Dr Cincinnati, OH 45242 513-984-5133

Jeffrey M. Zink Cincinnati Eye Institute 1945 CEI Dr Cincinnati, OH 45242 513-984-5133 ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY Michael T. Archdeacon UC Health Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine Medical Arts Bldg, Ste 2200 222 Piedmont Ave Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-8690 Marc T. Galloway Cincinnati Sports Medicine & Orthopaedic Center 5236 Socialville-Foster Rd Mason, OH 45040 513-347-9999 Samer S. Hasan Cincinnati Sports Medicine & Orthopaedic Center 10663 Montgomery Rd, 3rd Fl Cincinnati, OH 45242 513-347-9999 Patrick G. Kirk The Christ Hospital Physicians Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine The Christ Hospital Outpatient Center - Red Bank 4460 Red Bank Expy, Ste 110 Cincinnati, OH 45227 513-791-5200 Richard T. Laughlin UC Health Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine Medical Arts Bldg, Ste 2200 222 Piedmont Ave Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-8690


A magazine dedicated exclusively to Cincy: Its arts, businesses, communities, entertainment and most of all its people. Visit us at WWW.CINCYMAGAZINE.COM for a complimentary subscription


ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY (CONTINUED) Thomas N. Lindenfeld Cincinnati Sports Medicine & Orthopaedic Center 3050 Mack Rd, Ste 200 Cincinnati, OH 45014 513-347-9999 Frank R. Noyes Cincinnati Sports Medicine & Orthopaedic Center 10663 Montgomery Rd, 3rd Fl Cincinnati, OH 45242 513-347-9999 Peter F. Sturm Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Orthopaedics Bldg A, 1st Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4785 Eric Wall Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Orthopaedics Bldg A, 1st Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4785 OTOLARYNGOLOGY Daniel E. Cajacob Group Health TriHealth Physician Partners 379 Dixmyth Ave, 8th Fl Cincinnati, OH 45220 513-246-7000

Rebecca J. Howell UC Health Ear, Nose & Throat UC Gardner Neuroscience Institute 3113 Bellevue Ave, Ste 4400 Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-8400

Myles L. Pensak UC Health Ear, Nose & Throat UC Gardner Neuroscience Institute 3113 Bellevue Ave, Ste 4400 Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-8400

Keith M. Wilson Group Health TriHealth Physician Partners 8240 Northcreek Dr, Ste 2000 Cincinnati, OH 45236 513-246-7000

Stacey Ishman Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Pediatric Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery Bldg C, 2nd Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4355

Ravi N. Samy UC Health Ear, Nose & Throat UC Gardner Neuroscience Institute 3113 Bellevue Ave, Ste 4400 Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-8400

Chad Zender UC Health Ear, Nose & Throat UC Gardner Neuroscience Institute 3113 Bellevue Ave, Ste 4400 Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-8400

Allen M. Seiden UC Health Ear, Nose & Throat Medical Arts Bldg, Ste 5200 222 Piedmont Ave Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-8400

PATHOLOGY

Thomas James Kereiakes The Christ Hospital Physicians - Ear, Nose & Throat The Christ Hospital Medical Office Bldg, Ste 209 2123 Auburn Ave Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-421-5558 Siddarth M. Khosla UC Health Ear, Nose & Throat Medical Arts Bldg, Ste 5200 222 Piedmont Ave Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-8400 Yash J. Patil UC Health Ear, Nose & Throat UC Health Physicians Office North 7690 Discovery Dr, Ste 3900 West Chester, OH 45069 513-475-8400

Kevin A. Shumrick Group Health TriHealth Physician Partners 379 Dixmyth Ave, 8th Fl Cincinnati, OH 45220 513-246-7000 David L. Steward UC Health Ear, Nose & Throat UC Gardner Neuroscience Institute 3113 Bellevue Ave, Ste 4400 Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-8400 Thomas A. Tami Group Health TriHealth Physician Partners 379 Dixmyth Ave, 8th Fl Cincinnati, OH 45220 513-246-7010

Diya F. Mutasim UC Health Dermatology Medical Arts Bldg, Ste 5300 222 Piedmont Ave Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-7630 James A. Zalla Dermatology Associates of Northern Kentucky 7766 Ewing Blvd, Ste 100 Florence, KY 41042 859-283-1033 PEDIATRIC ALLERGY AND IMMUNOLOGY Amal H. Assa’ad Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Allergy Clinic Outpatient Services Bldg, 5th Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-2601

Sheharyar “Sandy” R. Durrani Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Department of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology 3333 Burnett Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-2400 Gurjit K. Khurana Hershey Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Allergy Clinic Outpatient Services Bldg, 5th Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-2601 Michelle B. Lierl Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Allergy Clinic Outpatient Services Bldg, 5th Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-2601 Kimberly A. Risma Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Allergy Clinic Outpatient Services Bldg, 5th Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-6771 Marc E. Rothenberg Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Cincinnati Center for Eosinophilic Disorders 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-7402

DR. STEPHEN WAYNE DAILEY, M.D. Dr. Dailey is the director of sports medicine at Miami University, and the fellowship director for the University of Cincinnati Emergency Medicine/ Primary Care Sports Medicine fellowship. A graduate of Miami University and The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Dr. Dailey has practiced primary care sports medicine in the Greater Cincinnati area for the past 24 years. He is also very active in treating high school athletes and has worked closely with area high schools for over 20-plus years. He is assistant professor in the department of orthopedics and sports medicine and sees patients of all ages in his White Oak, Ross and West Chester locations. Mental illness is our nation’s #1 health problem. Let’s make it part of the conversation.

UC Health Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine 5575 Cheviot Road Cincinnati OH 45239 513-475-8690

End the silence. Stop the stigma.

LindnerCenterOfHope.org

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PEDIATRIC AND ADOLESCENT GYNECOLOGY Lesley L. Breech Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Young Women’s Center for Reproductive Health and Development 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-9400 PEDIATRIC ANESTHESIOLOGY Elena Adler Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Department of Anesthesia Bldg E, 3rd Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4408 John B. Rose Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Inpatient Pain Rehabilitation Program 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-7768 Paul Samuels Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Department of Anesthesia Bldg E, 3rd Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4408

James P. Spaeth Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Department of Anesthesia Bldg E, 3rd Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4408

James F. Cnota Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center The Heart Institute Bldg C, 4th Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4200

Arnold W. Strauss Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center The Heart Institute Bldg C, 4th Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-803-7329

PEDIATRIC CARDIAC SURGERY

Russel Hirsch Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center The Heart Institute Bldg C, 4th Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4200

Michael David Taylor Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center The Heart Institute Bldg C, 4th Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4200

Timothy K. Knilans Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center The Heart Institute Bldg C, 4th Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4432

PEDIATRIC CARDIOVASCULAR ANESTHESIA

James Tweddell Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center The Heart Institute Bldg C, 4th Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-803-8824 PEDIATRIC CARDIOLOGY Jeffrey B. Anderson Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center The Heart Institute Bldg C, 4th Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4200 Clifford Chin Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center The Heart Institute Bldg C, 4th Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4200

Angela Lorts Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center The Heart Institute Bldg C, 4th Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-803-1746 Andrew Redington Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center The Heart Institute Bldg C, 4th Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4432

Laura K. Diaz Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Department of Anesthesia Bldg E, 3rd Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4408 James P. Spaeth Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Department of Anesthesia Bldg E, 3rd Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4408

PEDIATRIC CRITICAL CARE Jeffrey A. Alten Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Cardiac Intensive Care Unit Bldg C, 4th Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4200 Ranjit S. Chima Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Pediatric Intensive Care Unit 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4259 David Seth Cooper Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center The Heart Institute Bldg C, 4th Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4200 Lesley Doughty Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Pediatric Intensive Care Unit 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4259 Jennifer M. Kaplan Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Pediatric Intensive Care Unit 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4259

DR. PHILLIP LICHTENSTEIN, Associate Medical Director

D

r. Phillip K. Lichtenstein, a board certified pediatrician, joined The Children’s Home in 2011 with years of experience in treating medical and mental health needs of patients. In his career, he has held multiple positions in Kentucky and Ohio while also maintaining a private practice for nearly 30 years. The scope of his work over the years has expanded well beyond that of pediatrics and included serving children with behavioral health problems. Lichtenstein formerly developed training programs for primary care physicians at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center to help them treat the most common childhood mental health issue, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, also known as ADHD. In 2016, he received the Comprehensive Healthcare Leadership Award from Venue and LEAD magazines. In 2003, the Children’s Hospital Medical staff presented him its Unsung Heroes Award. In 1997, St. Luke Hospital recognized him with its Distinguished Physicians Award. Lichtenstein also has been instrumental in identifying, preventing and responding to child sexual abuse in Northern Kentucky. He has served as the medical director and forensic evaluator at the Community Pediatric Clinic for Child Sexual Abuse Evaluation at the Northern Kentucky Children’s Advocacy Center. Whether in a hospital setting, a medical office, a school or a community mental health organization, Lichtenstein puts his clients first. He has a particular passion for working with youth who have difficult family situ-

ations, challenging diagnoses and tough experiences. Lichtenstein is a valued member of the leadership staff at The Children’s Home, and is fondly known by clients and around campus as “Dr. Phil.” At the Children’s Home, he held the position of medical director until 2019 and now serves in the role of associate medical director.

Practice The Children’s Home 5050 Madison Rd • Cincinnati, OH 45227

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PEDIATRIC CRITICAL CARE (CONTINUED) Erika L. Stalets Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Department of Pediatric Critical Care 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 43229 513-636-4259 Kenneth B. Tegtmeyer Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Pediatric Intensive Care Unit 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4259 Derek Wheeler Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Pediatric Intensive Care Unit 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4259 Hector R. Wong Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Pediatric Intensive Care Unit 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4259 PEDIATRIC DERMATOLOGY Anne W. Lucky Dermatologists of Southwest Ohio 7691 5 Mile Rd, Ste 312 Cincinnati, OH 45230 513-232-3332 PEDIATRIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE

Dr. Daniel Woo Neurology

University of Cincinnati Gardner Neuroscience Institute Working with neurology patients, especially those who have suffered a stroke, is something that has been immensely gratifying to Dr. Daniel Woo of UC Health. “Neuroscience affects people in the most personal way possible,” he says. “It affects who you are, how you think, it affects your ability to function and interact with the world.” For Woo, this field of medicine really clicked the first time he was able to help someone who was unable to speak or move the right half of their body. Since then, he’s developed many lifelong relationships with patients he’s helped. One woman who Woo treated for a tear in one of her carotid arteries sent him a photo of her teenaged children years later when they graduated high school to thank him. Another time, Woo cured Santa Claus when he collapsed while on a treadmill. That one got him on the news and particularly impressed his young niece and nephew. Being a part of the Gardner Neuroscience Institute has afforded him new opportunities to research strokes and ways to prevent them. His research is the foundation for two major grants through the National Institute of Health, one of which focuses on cholesterol’s protective utility against brain hemorrhages. “Stroke used to be the third-leading cause of death; it’s now the fifth-leading cause of death,” explains Woo. “A lot [of that] comes from the treatments and interventions and, of course, the participation of patients in the research that helps us identify those benefits that can expand across the whole of society.”

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Lynn Babcock Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Department of Emergency Medicine 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4200 Gary Geis Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Department of Emergency Medicine 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4200 Srikant B. Iyer Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Department of Emergency Medicine 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4416 Richard M. Ruddy Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Department of Emergency Medicine 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4200 David Schnadower Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Department of Emergency Medicine 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-803-5348

PEDIATRIC ENDOCRINOLOGY Philippe F. Backeljauw Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Endocrinology Bldg E, 2nd Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4744 Sarah D. Corathers Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Endocrinology Bldg E, 2nd Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4744 Lawrence M. Dolan Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Endocrinology Bldg E, 2nd Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4744 Louis J. Muglia Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Endocrinology Bldg E, 2nd Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4744 Meilan Rutter Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Endocrinology Bldg E, 2nd Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4744 Amy S. Shah Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Adolescent Type 2 Diabetes Program 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-3200 PEDIATRIC GASTROENTEROLOGY Jorge A. Bezerra Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition Bldg C, 2nd Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4415 Kathleen Campbell Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition Bldg C, 2nd Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4415 Lee Denson Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition Bldg C, 2nd Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4415

Michael Kevin Farrell Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition Bldg C, 2nd Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4415 James E. Heubi Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition Bldg C, 2nd Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4415 Ajay Kaul Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition Bldg C, 2nd Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4415 Samuel A. Kocoshis Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition Bldg C, 2nd Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4415 Philip E. Putnam Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition Bldg C, 2nd Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4415 Stavra Xanthakos Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition Bldg C, 2nd Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4415 PEDIATRIC GENERAL HEPATOLOGY William Francis Balistreri Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition Bldg T, 9th Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-803-1664 Jorge A. Bezerra Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition Bldg C, 2nd Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4415 James E. Heubi Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition Bldg C, 2nd Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4415


PEDIATRIC HEMATOLOGYONCOLOGY Stella Davies Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Cancer and Blood Diseases Institute Bldg A, 1st Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-1371 Peter de Blank Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Cancer and Blood Diseases Institute Bldg A, 1st Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-517-2234 Ashish R. Kumar Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Cancer and Blood Diseases Institute Bldg A, 1st Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4266 Lori Luchtman-Jones Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Cancer and Blood Diseases Institute Bldg A, 1st Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 800-344-2462

Joseph Palumbo Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Cancer and Blood Diseases Institute Bldg A, 1st Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4266 John P. Perentesis Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Cancer and Blood Diseases Institute Bldg A, 1st Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-8790 Charles T. Quinn Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Cancer and Blood Diseases Institute Bldg A, 1st Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4266 Cristina Tarango Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Cancer and Blood Diseases Institute Bldg A, 1st Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4266 Russell E. Ware Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Cancer and Blood Diseases Institute Bldg A, 1st Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4266

PEDIATRIC INFECTIOUS DISEASE Rebecca C. Brady Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Infectious Diseases Bldg C, 2nd Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-7499 Lara Danziger-Isakov Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Infectious Diseases Bldg C, 2nd Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4578 Robert Frenck, Jr. Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Infectious Diseases Bldg C, 2nd Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-7499 Grant C. Paulsen Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Infectious Diseases Bldg C, 2nd Fl 3333 Burnett Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4578

Paul W. Spearman Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Infectious Diseases Bldg C, 2nd Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4578 Mary A. Staat Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center International Adoption Center Division of Infectious Diseases 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-6754 PEDIATRIC NEPHROLOGY Prasad Devarajan Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Nephrology and Hypertension Bldg A, 1st Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4531 Stuart Goldstein Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Nephrology and Hypertension Bldg A, 1st Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4200

David Hooper Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Nephrology and Hypertension Bldg A, 1st Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4200 Mark M. Mitsnefes Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Nephrology and Hypertension Bldg A, 1st Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4531 PEDIATRIC NUCLEAR MEDICINE Michael J. Gelfand Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging Bldg B, Level 1 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4251 PEDIATRIC NUTRITION Michael Kevin Farrell Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition Bldg C, 2nd Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4415

Ian Sarembock, MD Dr. Sarembock, an interventional cardiologist, brings an international outlook and expertise to Cincinnati. He was born and raised in South Africa and received his medical degree and doctorate at the University of Cape Town. Dr. Sarembock spent two years at Yale University as Research Associate in the Cardiovascular Division, then moved on to the University of Virginia (UVA), where he did translational and clinical research, taught and practiced medicine. He was Director of the Coronary Care Unit, as well as the Harrison Distinguished Teaching Professor of Internal Medicine and Director of the Center for Interventional Cardiology. He helped create and maintain an extraordinary translational and clinical trials research program at UVA, which included original hypothesis-based research as well as being a leading participant nationally in NIH and industry-supported clinical trials. In 2007, he joined the Ohio Heart and Vascular Center. He is also the Co-Director of The Heart and Vascular Center at The Christ Hospital and Executive Medical Director of the Heart and Vascular Service Line. Among his numerous awards and accolades are the J. Edwin Wood Jr. Cardiovascular Division Attending Teaching Award and the Clinical Excellence Award. He has been regularly included in the Best Doctors in America®, Best Doctors in Cincinnati, and Marquis Who’s Who in Medicine and Healthcare. Dr. Sarembock’s research career has spanned everything from basic science to clinical trials. He has authored a wide range of publications in the research and treatment of heart disease. Based on his research, he has consistently published in high-impact journals and has contributed more than 250 peer-reviewed articles, abstracts, book chapters, and invited publications in cardiology. In addition, he is a peer reviewer for many of the leading journals in both clinical and investigational cardiovascular medicine.

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James E. Heubi Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition Bldg C, 2nd Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4415 Nancy D. Leslie Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Human Genetics Bldg C, 5th Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4760

Terry L. Schwartz Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Ophthalmology Bldg E, 4th Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4751

Eric Wall Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Orthopaedics Bldg A, 1st Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4785

Robert A. Sisk Cincinnati Eye Institute 1945 CEI Dr Cincinnati, OH 45242 513-984-5133 PEDIATRIC ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY

Miles J. Burke 10475 Montgomery Rd, Ste 4-F Cincinnati, OH 45242 513-984-4949

Alvin H. Crawford UC Health Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine Medical Arts Bldg, Ste 2200 222 Piedmont Ave Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-8690

Michael E. Gray Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Ophthalmology Bldg E, 4th Fl 3333 Burnett Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4751

James McCarthy Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Orthopaedics Bldg A, 1st Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4454

Virginia A. Miraldi Utz Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Ophthalmology Bldg E, 4th Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4751

Peter F. Sturm Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Orthopaedics Bldg A, 1st Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4785

PEDIATRIC OPHTHALMOLOGY

PEDIATRIC OTOLARYNGOLOGY

Catherine K. Hart Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Pediatric Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery Bldg C, 2nd Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4355

Michael J. Rutter Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Pediatric Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery Bldg C, 2nd Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4355

Daniel I. Choo Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Pediatric Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery Bldg C, 2nd Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4355

Stacey Ishman Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Pediatric Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery Bldg C, 2nd Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4355

Ravi N. Samy UC Health Ear, Nose & Throat UC Gardner Neuroscience Institute 3113 Bellevue Ave, Ste 4400 Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-8400

Alessandro de Alarcon Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Pediatric Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery Bldg C, 2nd Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4355

Charles M. Myer III Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Pediatric Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery Bldg C, 2nd Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4355

John H. Greinwald, Jr. Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Pediatric Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery Bldg C, 2nd Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4355

Charles M. Myer IV Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Pediatric Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery Bldg C, 2nd Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4355

Sally R. Shott Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Pediatric Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery Bldg C, 2nd Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4355 Jay Paul Willging Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Pediatric Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery Bldg C, 2nd Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4355

TRACEY GOODMAN SKALE, MD Tracey Goodman Skale, MD, is the Chief Medical Officer of Greater Cincinnati Behavioral Health Services (GCBHS), whose mission is to ensure people with mental illness, addiction and related challenges lead healthy and productive lives. GCBHS is the largest behavioral healthcare provider in the Greater Cincinnati region, serving 30,000 people with a staff of more than 700. Dr. Skale has been with GCBHS for over 26 years and is actively involved with the mental health community as a consulting psychiatrist and advocate. She is the lead physician for the GCBHS Homeless, Assertive Community Treatment and First Break Psychosis Teams. Her focus is on neurobiological illnesses with an expertise in bipolar disorder, depression and schizophrenia. Dr. Skale has degrees in Neuroscience and Psychology from Amherst College. She completed her medical degree and residency in Psychiatry at the University of Cincinnati’s College of Medicine, and continues to serve on the volunteer faculty.

Practice Greater Cincinnati Behavioral Health Services 1501 Madison Road • Cincinnati, OH 45206

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PEDIATRIC PAIN MANAGEMENT John B. Rose Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Inpatient Pain Rehabilitation Program 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-7768 PEDIATRIC PHYSICAL MEDICINE AND REHAB Mary Anne McMahon Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Rehabilitation Medicine Bldg E, 2nd Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-7480 David W. Pruitt Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Rehabilitation Medicine Bldg E, 2nd Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-7480 Jilda N. Vargus-Adams Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Rehabilitation Medicine Bldg E, 2nd Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-7480 PEDIATRIC PULMONOLOGY Raouf S. Amin Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Pulmonary Medicine Bldg C, 5th Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-6771 Dan T. Benscoter III Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Pulmonary Medicine Bldg C, 5th Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-6771 Barbara A. Chini Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Pulmonary Medicine Bldg C, 5th Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-6771 John Paul Clancy Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Pulmonary Medicine Bldg C, 5th Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-6771 Theresa W. Guilbert Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Asthma Center Outpatient Services Bldg, 5th Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-3200 Patricia M. Joseph UC Health Holmes Hospital UC Heart, Lung and Vascular Institute 200 Eden Ave, 3rd Fl Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-8523

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Carolyn M. Kercsmar Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Pulmonary Medicine Bldg C, 5th Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-6771 Michelle B. Lierl Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Allergy Clinic Outpatient Services Bldg, 5th Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-2601 Hemant Sawnani Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Pulmonary and Sleep Medicine Bldg C, 5th Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-6771 Marc Gregory Schecter Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Pulmonary Medicine Bldg C, 5th Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-6771 Narong Simakajornboon Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Sleep Disorders Center Outpatient Services Bldg, 5th Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-2601 Cherie A. Torres-Silva Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Pulmonary Medicine Bldg C, 5th Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-6771 Robert E. Wood Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Pulmonary Medicine Bldg C, 5th Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-6771 PEDIATRIC RADIATION ONCOLOGY John C. Breneman UC Health Barrett Cancer Center Department of Radiation Oncology 234 Goodman St, 3rd Fl Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-517-0300 Luke E. Pater UC Neuroscience Institute 234 Goodman St, 2nd Fl, Ste D Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-584-5668 PEDIATRIC RADIOLOGY Alan S. Brody Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging Bldg B, Level 1 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-7535

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Brian D. Coley Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging Bldg B, Level 1 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-8703 Jonathan R. Dillman Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging Bldg B, Level 1 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-8557 Bernadette L. Koch Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging Bldg B, Level 1 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4200 Alexander J. Towbin Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging Bldg B, Level 1 3333 Burnett Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4251 Andrew T. Trout Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging Bldg B, Level 1 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4200 PEDIATRIC RHEUMATOLOGY Michael Henrickson Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Rheumatology Bldg E, 2nd Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4676 Daniel J. Lovell Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Rheumatology Bldg E, 2nd Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4676 PEDIATRIC SLEEP MEDICINE Raouf S. Amin Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Pulmonary Medicine Bldg C, 5th Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-6771 Hemant Sawnani Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Pulmonary and Sleep Medicine Bldg C, 5th Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-6771

Narong Simakajornboon Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Sleep Disorders Center Outpatient Services Bldg, 5th Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-2601 PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST/ ABUSED CHILDREN Kathi L. Makoroff Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Child Abuse Team Mayerson Center for Safe and Healthy Children 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-7233 Robert A. Shapiro Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Child Abuse Team Mayerson Center for Safe and Healthy Children 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-7233 PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST/ ADOLESCENT AND YOUNG ADULT MEDICINE Frank M. Biro Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Adolescent and Transition Medicine Bldg C, 2nd Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4200 Maria T. Britto Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Adolescent and Transition Medicine Bldg C, 2nd Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4681 Jessica A. Kahn Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Adolescent and Transition Medicine Bldg C, 2nd Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4200 Corinne E. Lehmann Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Adolescent and Transition Medicine Bldg C, 2nd Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4681 PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST/CHILD AND ADOLESCENT PSYCHIATRY Leah S. Casuto Lindner Center of HOPE 4075 Old Western Row Rd Mason, OH 45040 513-536-0600 Charles William Collins UC Health Psychiatry Stetson Bldg, Ste 3200 260 Stetson St Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-558-7700

Melissa DelBello UC Health Psychiatry Stetson Bldg, Ste 3200 260 Stetson St Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-558-2989 Carol B. Engel Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience Bldg E, 2nd Fl 3333 Burnet Ave. Cincinnati, OH 513-636-4788 Michael J. Maloney Cincinnati Center For Psychotherapy & Psychoanalysis 3001 Highland Ave Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-961-7799 Michael Sorter Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4124 PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST/ NEONATAL-PERINATAL MEDICINE Vivek Narendran Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Neonatology 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-803-0961 Amy T. Nathan Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Neonatology 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-803-0961 PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST/ NEUROLOGY, EPILEPSY Tracy A. Glauser Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Neurology Bldg A, 8th Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4222 Hansel Greiner Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Neurology Bldg A, 8th Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4222 PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST/ NEUROLOGY, GENERAL David Neal Franz Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Neurology Bldg A, 8th Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4222 Mary Elizabeth Sutton Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Neurology Bldg A, 8th Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4222


PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST/ NEUROLOGY, NEURO-ONCOLOGY Maryam Fouladi Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Cancer and Blood Diseases Institute Bldg A, 1st Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-8790 Mary Elizabeth Sutton Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Neurology Bldg A, 8th Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4222 PEDIATRIC SPECIALIST/ PEDIATRIC METABOLIC DISEASES Nancy D. Leslie Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Human Genetics Bldg C, 5th Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4760 PEDIATRIC SURGERY Maria H. Alonso Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Pediatric General and Thoracic Surgery Bldg C, 2nd Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4371 Rebeccah L. Brown Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Pediatric General and Thoracic Surgery Bldg C, 2nd Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4371

Jaimie D. Nathan Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Pediatric General and Thoracic Surgery Bldg C, 2nd Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4371 Gregory Ming Tiao Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Pediatric General and Thoracic Surgery Bldg C, 2nd Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4371 Daniel von Allmen Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Pediatric General and Thoracic Surgery Bldg C, 2nd Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4371 PEDIATRIC THORACIC SURGERY Daniel von Allmen Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Pediatric General and Thoracic Surgery Bldg C, 2nd Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4371 PEDIATRIC TRANSPLANT HEPATOLOGY William Francis Balistreri Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition Bldg T, 9th Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-803-1664

Jason S. Frischer Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Colorectal Center for Children 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-3240

Samuel A. Kocoshis Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition Bldg C, 2nd Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4415

Victor F. Garcia Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Pediatric General and Thoracic Surgery Bldg C, 2nd Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4371

Gregory Ming Tiao Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Pediatric General and Thoracic Surgery Bldg C, 2nd Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4371

Michael Helmrath Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Pediatric General and Thoracic Surgery Bldg C, 2nd Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4371 Foong-Yen Lim Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Pediatric General and Thoracic Surgery Bldg C, 2nd Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4371

PEDIATRIC UROLOGY Eugene A. Minevich Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Urology Bldg A, 1st Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4975 Pramod P. Reddy Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Pediatric Urology Bldg A, 1st Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4975

PEDIATRICS/GENERAL Christopher S. Adley Pediatric Care of Kentucky 20 Medical Village Dr, Ste 102 Edgewood, KY 41017 859-341-1011 Joseph M. Bailey Queen City Physicians Glenway Pediatrics 6350 Glenway Ave, Ste 300 Cincinnati, OH 45211 513-481-9700 Christopher F. Bolling Pediatric Associates 2865 Chancellor Dr, Ste 225 Crestview Hills, KY 41017 859-341-5400 Eric Bosley Pediatric Associates 2865 Chancellor Dr, Ste 225 Crestview Hills, KY 41017 859-341-5400 Barry A. Brokaw Pediatric Associates 2865 Chancellor Dr, Ste 225 Crestview Hills, KY 41017 859-341-5400 Christine M. Burrows UC Health Internal Medicine & Pediatrics Hoxworth Center 3130 Highland Ave, 2nd Fl Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-584-7425 Charles Cavallo Pediatric Associates 2865 Chancellor Dr, Ste 225 Crestview Hills, KY 41017 859-341-5400 Christopher Cunha Pediatric Associates 2865 Chancellor Dr, Ste 225 Crestview Hills, KY 41017 859-341-5400 James Brian Davis Oxford Pediatrics and Adolescents 5141 Morning Sun Rd Oxford, OH 45056 513-523-2156 William deBuys Pediatric Associates 2865 Chancellor Dr, Ste 225 Crestview Hills, KY 41017 859-341-5400 Mark Deis Pediatric Associates 2865 Chancellor Dr, Ste 225 Crestview Hills, KY 41017 859-341-5400 James DePiore Anderson Hills Pediatrics 7400 Jager Ct Cincinnati, OH 45230 513-232-8100 Tiffiny L. Diers UC Health Internal Medicine & Pediatrics Hoxworth Center 3130 Highland Ave, 2nd Fl Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-584-7425 Jeffrey A. Drasnin ESD Pediatric Group 905 Main St Milford, OH 45150 513-248-1210 Robert Engelhardt, Jr. Queen City Physicians Glenway Pediatrics 6350 Glenway Ave, Ste 300 Cincinnati, OH 45211 513-481-9700

Dr. Aparna Shah Obstetrics and Gynecology

The Christ Hospital Physicians – Urogynecology Pelvic floor disorders—which occur when the group of muscles, ligaments and connective tissue that form the bowl at the bottom of the pelvis are damaged or weaken— can greatly affect women’s day-to-day lives. They may experience symptoms like urinary or stool incontinence or even suffer pelvic organ prolapse. But while some women may think that these symptoms are a normal part of aging, Dr. Aparna Shah, a urogynecologist with The Christ Hospital Network, wants women to know that they’re not and that they can find relief and treatment. “Yes, aging is one risk factor, but so is pregnancy, so is childbirth, so are genetics. There are multiple things that are risk factors and I don’t want anyone to feel like this is a normal part of aging,” she says. “There are so many options for treatments.” Treatments range from the very conservative, such as changing a patient’s diet or physical therapy, to office procedures like Botox injections to major surgery. Shah says that she works with patients to determine the best treatment for them and together they decide what works best for a woman’s disorder and lifestyle. By providing treatment in this way, Shah has seen major changes in the quality of life for her patients. “It is really great to have these relationships with my patients and to see them go from these patients who are really kind of suffering in silence and maybe have done so for years to really getting back out there,” she says.

- Corinne Minard w w w.

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PEDIATRICS/GENERAL (CONTINUED) Teresa M. Esterle Alliance Integrative Medicine 6400 E Galbraith Rd Cincinnati, OH 45236 513-791-5521 Joseph Gerard Gibbons West Side Pediatrics 663 Anderson Ferry Rd Cincinnati, OH 45238 513-922-8200

Dr. Emmett C. Roper Internal Medicine

Mercy Health – Forest Park Internal Medicine and Pediatrics Dr. Emmett Roper, an internal medicine physician with Mercy Health, knows he wouldn’t be where he is today without a little help. Roper first told his high school football team’s doctor that he wanted to be a physician when we he was 16 years old. And instead of laughing off the suggestion, the doctor did everything he could to help. “He encouraged me the whole time, whenever I needed him he was always there … all the way down to monetary support,” he says. That doctor’s assistance was something Roper never forgot and Roper pays that forward by mentoring young people who are also considering a career in medicine. As an internal medicine doctor, Roper gets to bring that same level of generosity and kindness to his patients. He assists patients with both simple and complex medical problems, and then helps them connect to specialists when additional care is needed. “We are the window, the gate,” he says of primary care physicians. “Our job is to coordinate people’s care.” Roper, who has been practicing for 25 years, says that he enjoys the impact this type of care has on patients but is quick to pass on any praise to his team and support network. “My accomplishments are not without support from many, many people. That goes from the past all the way to now, all the way from my parents to the nurses and folks that are in support of my practice today,” he says.

– Corinne Minard 58

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Anjali D. Pearce UC Health Internal Medicine & Pediatrics Hoxworth Center 3130 Highland Ave, 2nd Fl Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-584-7425 Radhika Ramesh Pediatric Care of Kentucky 20 Medical Village Dr, Ste 102 Edgewood, KY 41017 859-341-1011

Matthew E. Hardin UC Health Primary Care UC Health Physicians Office North 7690 Discovery Dr, Ste 2700 West Chester, OH 45069 513-475-7425

Kevin Reidy Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Pediatric Services 5642 Hamilton Ave Cincinnati, OH 45224 513-803-0814

Sharon L. Harp Queen City Physicians Glenway Pediatrics 6350 Glenway Ave, Ste 300 Cincinnati, OH 45211 513-481-9700

Ronna Y. Schneider Suburban Pediatric Associates Bldg D, Ste100 9600 Children’s Dr Mason, OH 45040 513-336-6700

Charles J. Kelly Pediatric Care of Kentucky 20 Medical Village Dr, Ste 102 Edgewood, KY 41017 859-341-1011

Cynthia Spicker Pediatric Associates 2865 Chancellor Dr, Ste 225 Crestview Hills, KY 41017 859-341-5400

Kevin Joseph Kelly Pediatric Care of Kentucky 20 Medical Village Dr, Ste 102 Edgewood, KY 41017 859-341-1011

Robert J. Tagher Pediatrics of Florence 7409 US Hwy 42 Florence, KY 41042 859-525-8181

Katheryn Ellen Kermode Group Health TriHealth Physician Partners 379 Dixmyth Ave, 7th Fl Cincinnati, OH 45220 513-246-7000

Shelly F. Voet Pediatric Associates 2865 Chancellor Dr, Ste 225 Crestview Hills, KY 41017 859-341-5400

Robert Krzeski Group Health TriHealth Physician Partners 6010 Mason-Montgomery Rd Mason, OH 45040 513-246-7000 Kathleen J. Lamping-Arar Pediatricians of Hyde Park 3666 Paxton Ave Cincinnati, OH 45208 513-871-0684 Corinne E. Lehmann Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Adolescent and Transition Medicine Bldg C, 2nd Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4681 Philip K. Lichtenstein The Children’s Home of Cincinnati 5051 Duck Creek Rd Cincinnati, OH 45206 513-272-2800 Mona E. Mansour Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Fairfield Primary Care Clinic 3050 Mack Rd Fairfield, OH 45014 513-636-8259 Caroline Mueller UC Health Internal Medicine & Pediatrics Hoxworth Center 3130 Highland Ave, 2nd Fl Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-584-7425

Stephen E. Wilson Mercy Health - Forest Park Internal Medicine and Pediatrics 11550 Winton Rd Cincinnati, OH 45240 513-924-8200 Robert M. Wolterman UC Health Primary Care UC Health Physicians Office North 7690 Discovery Dr, Ste 2700 West Chester, OH 45069 513-475-7425 Sharice N. Wood UC Health Internal Medicine & Pediatrics Hoxworth Center 3130 Highland Ave, 2nd Fl Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-584-7425 Michael S. Yi The Christ Hospital Physicians Internal Medicine and Pediatrics The Christ Hospital Outpatient Center - Red Bank 4440 Red Bank Expy, Ste 200 Cincinnati, OH 45227 513-564-3822 PEDIATRICS/HOSPITAL MEDICINE Jeffrey M. Simmons Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Hospital Medicine 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-1945

PHYSICAL MEDICINE AND REHABILITATION Mark Goddard Daniel Drake Center for Post-Acute Care UC Health Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation 151 W Galbraith Rd Cincinnati, OH 45216 513-418-2707 David J. Kissel TriHealth Hand Surgery Specialists 538 Oak St, Ste 200 Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-961-4263 PLASTIC SURGERY Kevin A. Shumrick Group Health TriHealth Physician Partners 379 Dixmyth Ave, 8th Fl Cincinnati, OH 45220 513-246-7000 PSYCHIATRY Caleb M. Adler UC Health Psychiatry Stetson Bldg, Ste 3200 260 Stetson St Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-558-7700 Lesley M. Arnold UC Health Psychiatry Stetson Bldg, Ste 3200 260 Stetson St Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-558-7700 Jacqueline Collins UC Health Psychiatry Stetson Bldg, Ste 3200 260 Stetson St Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-558-7700 Melissa DelBello UC Health Psychiatry Stetson Bldg, Ste 3200 260 Stetson St Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-558-2989 Brian P. Dowling Lindner Center of HOPE 4075 Old Western Row Rd Mason, OH 45040 513-536-0600 Thomas Geracioti, Jr. 2631 Erie Ave, Ste 3 Cincinnati, OH 45208 513-748-9825 John M. Hawkins Good Samaritan Hospital Department of Psychiatry 375 Dixmyth Ave, 10th Fl Cincinnati, OH 45220 513-862-2692 Julie Hyman Lindner Center of HOPE 4075 Old Western Row Rd Mason, OH 45040 513-536-0600 Paul E. Keck, Jr. Lindner Center of HOPE 4075 Old Western Row Rd Mason, OH 45040 513-536-0311 Michael A. Keys UC Health Psychiatry Stetson Bldg, Ste 3200 260 Stetson St Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-558-7700


PSYCHIATRY (CONTINUED)

RADIATION ONCOLOGY

Christopher J. Lockey Mercy Health - Clermont Hospital Department of Psychiatry 3000 Hospital Dr Batavia, OH 45103 513-732-8629

William Barrett UC Health Barrett Cancer Center Department of Radiation Oncology 234 Goodman St, 3rd Fl Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-584-8957

Susan McElroy Lindner Center of HOPE 4075 Old Western Row Rd Mason, OH 45040 513-536-0600

John C. Breneman UC Health Barrett Cancer Center Department of Radiation Oncology 234 Goodman St, 3rd Fl Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-517-0300

Henry A. Nasrallah UC Health Psychiatry Stetson Bldg, Ste 3200 260 Stetson St Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-558-7700 Erik B. Nelson UC Health Psychiatry Stetson Bldg, Ste 3200 260 Stetson St Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-558-7700 Marie E. Rueve Lindner Center of HOPE 4075 Old Western Row Rd Mason, OH 45040 513-536-0400 Tracey G. Skale Greater Cincinnati Behavioral Health Services 1501 Madison Rd Cincinnati, OH 45206 513-354-5200 PULMONARY MEDICINE Robert P. Baughman UC Health Pulmonary Medicine Medical Arts Bldg, Ste 6000 222 Piedmont Ave Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-584-5225 Jean M. Elwing UC Health Holmes Hospital UC Heart, Lung and Vascular Institute 200 Eden Ave, 3rd Fl Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-8523 Patricia M. Joseph UC Health Holmes Hospital UC Heart, Lung and Vascular Institute 200 Eden Ave, 3rd Fl Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-8523 Francis McCormack, Jr. UC Health Holmes Hospital UC Heart, Lung and Vascular Institute 200 Eden Ave, 3rd Fl Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-8523 Ralph Joseph Panos Cincinnati VA Medical Center Division of Pulmonary, Sleep and Critical Care Medicine 3200 Vine St Cincinnati, OH 45220 513-861-3100

Jordan R. Kharofa UC Health Proton Center 7777 Yankee Rd, Ste 1000 Liberty Township, OH 45044 513-584-2326 Kevin P. Redmond University of Cincinnati Medical Center Department of Radiation Oncology 234 Goodman St Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-584-4775 RADIOLOGY Rebecca Sue Cornelius University of Cincinnati Medical Center Section of Neuroradiology 234 Goodman St Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-558-2043 James Leach Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging Bldg B, Level 1 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-4251 Mary Mahoney UC Health Barrett Cancer Center Section of Breast Imaging 234 Goodman St, 3rd Fl Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-584-4396 Thomas A. Tomsick University of Cincinnati Medical Center Section of Neuroradiology 234 Goodman St Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-558-2043 RHEUMATOLOGY Christopher Lee Colglazier Tristate Arthritis & Rheumatology 2616 Legends Way Crestview Hills, KY 41017 859-331-3100 John B. Harley Cincinnati VA Medical Center Division of Rheumatology 3200 Vine St Cincinnati, OH 45220 513-861-3100 SLEEP MEDICINE

Mitchell Carl Rashkin UC Health Holmes Hospital UC Heart, Lung and Vascular Institute 200 Eden Ave, 3rd Fl Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-8523

Raouf S. Amin Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Division of Pulmonary Medicine Bldg C, 5th Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-6771

David Wiltse Group Health TriHealth Physician Partners 2001 Anderson Ferry Rd Cincinnati, OH 45238 513-793-2654

Bruce C. Corser Your MD 8250 Kenwood Crossing Way, Ste 225 Cincinnati, OH 45236 513-721-9600

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Shahrokh Javaheri TriHealth Sleep Medicine 10535 Montgomery Rd, Ste 200 Cincinnati, OH 45242 513-865-9500 Ann M. Romaker UC Health Holmes Hospital Sleep Medicine Center 200 Eden Ave, 3rd Fl Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-584-1238 Narong Simakajornboon Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Sleep Disorders Center Outpatient Services Bldg, 5th Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-636-2601 Virgil Wooten Cincinnati VA Medical Center Sleep Disorders Center 3200 Vine St Cincinnati, OH 45220 513-861-3100 SURGERY David R. Fischer The Christ Hospital Physicians General Surgery The Christ Hospital Medical Office Bldg, Ste 308 2123 Auburn Ave Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-585-2062 Jay Johannigman UC Health Surgery Medical Arts Bldg, Ste 7000 222 Piedmont Ave Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-8787

Shimul A. Shah UC Health Transplant Surgery Medical Arts Bldg, Ste 7000 222 Piedmont Ave Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-8787

Jeffrey J. Sussman UC Health Barrett Cancer Center Division of Surgical Oncology 234 Goodman St, 2nd Fl Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-584-8900

David L. Steward UC Health Ear, Nose & Throat UC Gardner Neuroscience Institute 3113 Bellevue Ave, Ste 4400 Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-8400

THORACIC SURGERY

Chad Zender UC Health Ear, Nose & Throat UC Gardner Neuroscience Institute 3113 Bellevue Ave, Ste 4400 Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-8400 SURGICAL ONCOLOGY Syed Arif Ahmad UC Health Barrett Cancer Center Division of Surgical Oncology 234 Goodman St, 3rd Fl Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-584-8900 J. Michael Guenther, Jr. St. Elizabeth Physicians Edgewood Medical Village 20 Medical Village Dr, Ste 254 Edgewood, KY 41017 859-344-1600 Jaime Lewis UC Health Women’s Center 7675 Wellness Way, Ste 440 West Chester, OH 45069 513-584-8900

James Tweddell Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center The Heart Institute Bldg C, 4th Fl 3333 Burnet Ave Cincinnati, OH 45229 513-803-8824 UROLOGY James F. Donovan, Jr. UC Health Surgery Medical Arts Bldg, Ste 7000 222 Piedmont Ave Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-8787 VASCULAR SURGERY Joseph Giglia UC Health Vascular Surgery Medical Arts Bldg, Ste 7000 222 Piedmont Ave Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-558-3700 George H. Meier III UC Health Vascular Surgery Medical Arts Bldg, Ste 7000 222 Piedmont Ave Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-558-3700

Elizabeth A. Shaughnessy UC Health Barrett Cancer Center Division of Surgical Oncology 234 Goodman St, 3rd Fl Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-584-8900

Founded in 1989 by Harvard Medical School physicians, Best Doctors is a global benefits provider and medial information services company that connects individuals facing difficult medical treatment decisions with the best doctors, selected by impartial peer review in over 450 medical specialty/subspecialty combinations, to review their diagnosis and treatment plans. Best Doctors’ team of researchers conducts a biennial poll using the methodology that mimics the informal peerto-peer process doctors themselves use to identify the right specialists for their patients. Using a polling method and proprietary balloting software, they gather the insight and experience of tens of thousands of leading specialists all over the country, while confirming their credentials and specific areas of expertise. The result is the Best Doctors in America® list, which includes the nation’s most respected specialists and outstanding primary care physicians in the nation. These are the doctors that other doctors recognize as the best in their fields. They cannot pay a fee and are not paid to be listed and cannot nominate or vote for themselves. It is a list which is truly unbiased and respected by the medical profession and patients alike as the source of top quality medical information. Best Doctors is a part of Teladoc Health, Inc., the global leader in virtual care successfully transforming how people access and experience healthcare. Teladoc Health partners with the world’s leading employers, health plans, and health systems to offer patients across the globe access to care for a broad spectrum of needs. As part of Teladoc Health, Best Doctors focuses on improving health outcomes for the most complex, critical and costly medical issues. More than a traditional second opinion, Best Doctors delivers a comprehensive evaluation of a patient’s medical condition—providing value to both patients and treating physicians. By utilizing Best Doctors, members have access to the brightest minds in medicine to ensure the right diagnosis and treatment plan. Through its global network of Best Doctors and other critical services, Teladoc Health is expanding access to high quality healthcare, lowering costs and improving outcomes around the world. The company’s award winning services are inclusive of telehealth services, expert medical services, mental health services, integrated clinical solutions, and platform and program services. Best Doctors, Inc., has used its best efforts in assembling material for this list, but does not warrant that the information contained herein is complete or accurate, and does not assume, and hereby disclaims, any liability to any person or other party for any loss or damage caused by errors or omissions herein, whether such errors or omissions result from negligence, accident or any other cause. Copyright 2019, Best Doctors, Inc. Used under license, all rights reserved. The list, or any parts thereof, must not be reproduced in any form without written permission from Best Doctors, Inc. No commercial use of the information in this list may be made without the permission of Best Doctors, Inc. No fees may be charged, directly or indirectly, for the use of the information in this list without permission. Best Doctors, Inc. is the only authorized source of the official Best Doctors in America® plaque and other recognition items. Best Doctors does not authorize, contract with or license any organization to sell recognition items for Best Doctors, Inc. Please contact Best Doctors at plaques@bestdoctors.com with any questions. For more information or to order visit usplaques.bestdoctors.com or call 617-963-1167. BEST DOCTORS, THE BEST DOCTORS IN AMERICA and the Star-in-Cross Logo are trademarks of Best Doctors, Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries, and are under license.


We know heart surgery —by heart. When it comes to your heart, an experienced team matters. We perform Cincinnati’s widest range of cardiac procedures and nearly twice as many heart surgeries than any other health system in the region. And with Cincinnati’s most experienced robotics team, we bring you the latest advances in minimally invasive cardiac care. It’s a partnership that promotes a quicker recovery with less pain so you can get back to your normal life sooner. Put your heart at ease. Make an appointment with the experts at TriHealth.

To learn more, go to TriHealth.com/heart To find a doctor call 513 865 2222


TOP DENTISTS

This list is excerpted from the 2019 topDentists™ list, a database which includes listings for more than 200 dentists and specialists in The Cincinnati Metro Area. The Cincy list is based on thousands of detailed evaluations of dentists and professionals by their peers. The complete database is available at usatopdentists.com. For more information call 706-364-0853; write PO Box 970, Augusta, GA 30903; email info@ usatopdentists.com or visitusatopdentists.com. This list only names dentists who practice in Ohio. For this year’s Top Dentists in Northern Kentucky, please visit bestofnky.com.

SELECTION PROCESS

”If you had a patient in need of a dentist, which dentist would you refer them to?” This is the question we’ve asked thousands of dentists to help us determine who the topDentists should be. Dentists and specialists are asked to take into consideration years of experience, continuing education, manner with patients, use of new techniques and technologies and of course physical results. The nomination pool of dentists consists of dentists listed online with the American Dental Association as well as all dentists listed online with their local/regional dental societies, thus allowing virtually every dentist the opportunity to ENDODONTICS VAISHALI AGARWALA Yonchak & Agarwala 5180 Winton Road Fairfield, OH 45014 513-829-1935 ERIC M. BRAMY 6900 Tylersville Road, Suite C Mason, OH 45040 513-754-0900 ERIC BROWN 810 Plum Street Cincinnati, OH 45202 513-322-2462 ericbrownendo.com DONALD B. DAVIES Davies Endodontics 10751 Montgomery Road, Suite 1 Cincinnati, OH 45242 513-469-1121 daviesendodontics.com CAREY M. HEIN 4030 Smith Road, Suite 450 Cincinnati, OH 45209 513-321-5353 ZACHARY IMPERIAL Imperial Endodontics 10597 Montgomery Road, Suite 100 Cincinnati, OH 45242 513-583-5700 TIMOTHY J. KREIMER 3560 Blue Rock Road Cincinnati, OH 45247 513-385-9888 timkreimerendo.com

participate. Dentists are also given the opportunity to nominate other dentists that they feel should be included in our list. Respondents are asked to put aside any personal bias or political motivations and to use only their knowledge of their peer’s work when evaluating the other nominees. Voters are asked to individually evaluate the practitioners on their ballot whose work they are familiar with. Once the balloting is completed, the scores are compiled and then averaged. The numerical average required for inclusion varies depending on the average for all the nominees within the specialty and the geographic area. Borderline cases are given careful consideration by the editors. Voting characteristics and comments are taken into consideration while making decisions. Past awards a dentist has received and status in various dental academies can play a factor in our decision. Once the decisions have been finalized, the included dentists are checked against state dental boards for disciplinary actions to make sure they have an active license and are in good standing with the board. Then letters of congratulations are sent to all the listed dentists. Of course there are many fine dentists who are not included in this representative list. It is intended as a sampling of the great body of talent in the field of dentistry within Ohio. A dentist’s inclusion on our list is based on the subjective judgments of his

G. ROBERT LAWLEY Lawley Endodontics 748 State Route 28, Suite C Milford, OH 45150 513-456-4144 lawleyendo.com DAVE A. LEACH 7533 State Road Cincinnati, OH 45255 513-232-6660 PAUL F. SIEGEL, JR. 9403 Kenwood Road, Suite B-205 Cincinnati, OH 45242 513-821-2668 THOMAS YONCHAK Yonchak & Agarwala 5180 Winton Road Fairfield, OH 45014 513-829-1935 GENERAL DENTISTRY CHRISTOPHER A. BALSLY Trailside Dental Care 5382 Cox-Smith Road Mason, OH 45040 513-229-7711 trailsidedental.com ANNE G. BANTA 5680 Bridgetown Road, Suite B Cincinnati, OH 45248 513-574-2444 annebantadds.com

RICHARD T. BAUDENDISTEL 3860 Race Road, Suite 101 Cincinnati, OH 45211 513-661-8509 mybrightsmile.org CHARLES W. BELL* Bell Dental Group 2767 Erie Avenue Cincinnati, OH 45208 513-449-6068 belldentalgroup.com DAVID C. BELL, JR.* Bell Dental Group 2767 Erie Avenue Cincinnati, OH 45208 513-449-6068 belldentalgroup.com JOHN B. BENNET, JR. Bennet Family Dental 5606 Bridgetown Road Cincinnati, OH 45248 513-662-2000 bennetfamilydental.com EMILY BOEHM Wyoming Family Dentistry 411 Wyoming Avenue Wyoming, OH 45215 513-821-0659 wyomingfamilydentistry.com JEREMY BORSKY Borsky Dental Group 7521 State Road Cincinnati, OH 45255 513-232-6560 drborsky.com

By the Editors or her fellow dentists. While it is true that the lists may at times disproportionately reward visibility or popularity, we remain confident that our polling methodology largely corrects for any biases and that these lists continue to represent the most reliable, accurate, and useful list of dentists available anywhere.

DISCLAIMER

This list is excerpted from the 2019 topDentists™ list, which includes listings for over 200 dentists and specialists in the Cincinnati Metro Area. For more information call 706-364-0853 or email (info@ usatopdentists.com) or visit www.usatopdentists. com. topDentists has used its best efforts in assembling material for this list but does not warrant that the information contained herein is complete or accurate, and does not assume, and hereby disclaims, any liability to any person for any loss or damage caused by errors or omissions herein whether such errors or omissions result from negligence, accident or any other cause. Copyright 2010-2019 by topDentists, Augusta, GA. All rights reserved. This list, or parts thereof, must not be reproduced in any form without permission. No commercial use of the information in this list may be made without permission of topDentists. No fees may be charged, directly or indirectly, for the use of the information in this list without permission.

ANGELA BURLESON-OTT Cornerstone Dental Group 4030 Smith Road, Suite 110 Cincinnati, OH 45209 513-631-8920 cornerstonedentist.com ROBERT A. CAPOZZA Gates Family Dentistry 3249 West United States 22 & 3 Loveland, OH 45140 513-683-3838 gatesfamilydentistry.com CHRIS D. CARRICO Park Dental Care 345 Park Avenue Hamilton, OH 45013 513-896-7979 parkdentaloh.com

THOMAS M. COX Cox and Manegold Dentistry 9215 Cincinnati Columbus Road, Suite C West Chester, OH 45069 513-777-5513 coxandmanegolddental.com DAVID N. CROOP Mount Lookout Dentistry 3197 Linwood Avenue Cincinnati, OH 45208 513-871-2852 mtlookoutdentistry.com SARA E. CROUCH-YOCHUM* 423 Worthington Avenue Cincinnati, OH 45215 513-761-1900

JOHN A. CLEMENTS* Clements Family Dentistry 25 North F Street, Suite 2 Hamilton, OH 45013 513-887-7027 clementsfamilydentistry.com JONATHAN D. CONOVER Conover Family Dental 8005 Plainfield Road, Suite 31 Cincinnati, OH 45236 513-791-8937 conoverfamilydental.com HEWITT J. COOPER 1305 William Howard Taft Road Cincinnati, OH 45206 513-751-3384

SHAWN A. DORNHECKER Patel & Dornhecker Dentistry 5520 Harrison Avenue, Suite A Cincinnati, OH 45248 513-815-3188 pateldornheckerdds.com ANDREW J. DORR 3473 North Bend Road Cincinnati, OH 45239 513-661-6800 andrewdorrdds.com CHRISTINE L. ELFERS 2758 Erie Avenue Cincinnati, OH 45208 513-321-7076 hydeparkdentist.com

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T OP DEN T IS T S GENERAL DENTISTRY (CONTINUED) M. ELEANOR ENDRES Endres Gateway Dentistry 9380 Montgomery Road, Suite 204 Cincinnati, OH 45242 513-438-0236 endresdentistry.com JOEL J. ESSELMAN 3012 Glenmore Avenue, Suite 301 Cincinnati, OH 45238 513-661-1227 joelesselmandds.com PATRICK FLANNERY* 8250 Beckett Park Drive, Suite A West Chester, OH 45069 513-715-0101 patrickflannerydds.com ANTHONY E. FORTE 3475 North Bend Road, Suite 1 Cincinnati, OH 45201 513-661-5700 fortedentistry.com DAVID J. FRANZ 8333 Montgomery Road Cincinnati, OH 45236 513-771-2230 cincinnatismiles.com GREGORY C. FRESE III Family Cosmetic & Implant Dentistry 1149 Fehl Lane Cincinnati, OH 45230 513-231-9300 familyimplantdentistry.com THOMAS J. FRIETCH Frietch & Anderson 9017 Colerain Avenue Cincinnati, OH 45251 513-385-7771 frietchdds.com JERRY P. GAO Montgomery Family Dental 8271 Cornell Road, Suite 710 Cincinnati, OH 45249 513-791-0030 familydentalmontgomery.com WARREN R. GASE* 9294 Winton Road Cincinnati, OH 45231 513-931-3001 gasedds.com GREGORY P. GATES Gates Family Dentistry 3249 West United States 22 & 3 Loveland, OH 45140 513-683-3838 gatesfamilydentistry.com CONNIE G. GAWRYCH Cincinnati Dental Services 121 East McMillan Street Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-721-8888 cincinnatidentalservices.com WALTER E. GAY, JR.* 602 Main Street, Suite 315 Cincinnati, OH 45202 513-381-7900 confidentsmile.com MARK E. GEROME Gerome Family Dentistry 6378 Branch Hill Guinea Pike Loveland, OH 45140 513-677-1349 geromefamilydentistry.com

BARRY P. GIBBERMAN* Montgomery Dentistry 9157 Montgomery Road, Suite 105 Cincinnati, OH 45242 513-793-2611 montgomerydentistryohio.com BENJAMIN T. GOSNELL Mount Lookout Dentistry 3197 Linwood Avenue Cincinnati, OH 45208 513-871-2852 mtlookoutdentistry.com RONALD J. GRYCKO* Grycko Dentistry of Blue Ash 9050 Plainfield Road, Suite 1 Blue Ash, OH 45236 513-791-3138 gryckodentistryofblueash.com LAWRENCE W. HAGEN II Hagen Dental Practice 4998 Glenway Avenue Cincinnati, OH 45238 513-251-5500 hagendds.com TARA N. HARDIN* Hardin Advanced Dentistry 5350 Socialville-Foster Road Mason, OH 45040 513-813-2716 hardindental.com ANDREW J. HARRIS Fountain Square Cosmetic Dental Group 525 Vine Street, Suite 1020 Cincinnati, OH 45202 513-621-2483 cincinnatismiledesign.com DANIEL P. HEFFERNAN 6040 Harrison Avenue Cincinnati, OH 45248 513-574-7503 PATRICK J. HOBAN Hoban Dentistry 5184 Winton Road Fairfield, OH 45014 513-858-1600 hobandentistry.com SCOTT J. HUDEPOHL Hudepohl Family Dentistry 5954 Cheviot Road Cincinnati, OH 45247 513-385-5607 hudepohldentistry.com MICHAEL W. HULL Montgomery Dentistry 9157 Montgomery Road, Suite 105 Cincinnati, OH 45242 513-793-2611 montgomerydentistryohio.com JOSEPH W. JACKSON* Jackson Family Dental Wellness Center 322 North Elm Street Oxford, OH 45056 513-523-6267 jacksonfamilydentalwellnesscenter. com KEITH D. JACKSON* Madeira Dentistry 7113 Miami Avenue Madeira, OH 45243 513-561-5318 madeiradentistry.com

* Provides cosmetic dentistry.

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RICHARD L. JACKSON 3650 Erie Avenue Cincinnati, OH 45208 513-321-3037 GREGORY J. JAUN 9157 Montgomery Road, Suite 204 Cincinnati, OH 45242 513-793-4235 RICHARD E. JOHNSON Fairfield Family Dentistry 1140 Hicks Boulevard Fairfield, OH 45014 513-829-8822 fairfieldfamilydental.com DANIEL J. KELLEY Eastgate Dental Excellence 3241 Mount Carmel Road Cincinnati, OH 45244 513-443-8561 eastgatedentalexcellence.com RUCHIKA KHETARPAL Cincinnati Area Dentist 7074 Harrison Avenue Cincinnati, OH 45247 513-923-1215 cincinnatiareadentist.com JULIA R. KINLAW Wyoming Family Dentistry 411 Wyoming Avenue, Suite 3 Cincinnati, OH 45215 513-821-0659 wyomingfamilydentistry.com MICHAEL D. KINSER 4102 Roosevelt Boulevard Middletown, OH 45044 513-422-0179 JOEL R. KOCH 9655 Cincinnati Columbus Road, Suite 1 Cincinnati, OH 45241 513-779-2200 joelrkochdds.com DERRICK KRUGER Drs. Sirkin, Kruger and Associates 4157 Hunt Road Cincinnati, OH 45236 513-426-7088 blueashdentist.com STEPHEN P. KUENNEMEIER Eastgate Dental Excellence 3241 Mount Carmel Road Cincinnati, OH 45244 513-443-8561 eastgatedentalexcellence.com STEVEN A. LANG* Great Miami Dental Associates 130 North Breiel Boulevard Middletown, OH 45042 513-434-8239 greatmiamidental.com ERICH D. LENZ 6431 Bridgetown Road, Suite 1 Cincinnati, OH 45248 513-574-1477 STUART J. LEVY* Merit Dental 9608 Kenwood Road Blue Ash, OH 45242 513-791-2009 meritdental.com/locations/ohiodental-centers/blue-ash-oh/

DAVID S. LIPPS Wyoming Smile Center 423 Worthington Avenue Cincinnati, OH 45215 513-761-1900 bestdentistcincinnati.com

STEVEN R. MOORE, SR.* Lakota Dental 6962 Tylersville Road West Chester, OH 45069 513-779-9800 lakotadentalgroup.com

MARK A. LOGEMAN 2761 Erie Avenue Cincinnati, OH 45208 513-321-0886 drlogeman.com

DENNIS M. MURPHY Clifton Family Dentistry 310 Terrace Avenue, Suite 102 Cincinnati, OH 45220 513-221-1550 cliftondds.com

TERRY K. LOWITZ Lowitz & Meier 8712 Winton Road Cincinnati, OH 45231 513-521-8900 cincinnatidentists.com JOHN G. LUBER 11867 Mason-Montgomery Road, Suite B Cincinnati, OH 45249 513-677-0383 luberdds.com CHRISTOPHER J. MADDOX Bridgetown Dentistry 5630 Bridgetown Road, Suite 3 Cincinnati, OH 45248 513-574-7511 bridgetowndentist.com DAVID J. MANEGOLD Cox and Manegold Dentistry 9215 Cincinnati Columbus Road, Suite C West Chester, OH 45069 513-777-5513 coxandmanegolddental.com ANDREW J. MARCK 6911 Main Street Newtown, OH 45244 513-272-2792 drmarck.com JANE R. MAYS 2631 Erie Avenue Cincinnati, OH 45208 513-321-1102 janemaysdmd.com JEROME E. MCMAHON University of Cincinnati Dental Center 234 Goodman Street Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-584-6650 uchealth.com

M. ROBERT ONADY 333 West Kemper Road Cincinnati, OH 45246 513-771-5084 ELIZABETH L. OSTERDAY Osterday Family Detistry 7655 Five Mile Road, Suite 121 Cincinnati, OH 45230 513-233-0001 osterdayfamilydentistry.com SUNNY PAHOUJA Lifetime Smiles 5205 North Bend Road Cincinnati, OH 45247 513-661-8586 lifetimesmilescincinnati.com JESAL A. PATEL Patel & Dornhecker Dentistry 3500 Siaron Way Fairfield Township, OH 45011 513-815-3166 pateldornheckerdds.com JERRY M. PAUL Southwood, Paul & Pope Family Dentistry 5601 Cheviot Road Cincinnati, OH 45247 513-741-0900 southwoodsmiles.com PAUL M. PAVLOFF Bridgewater Family Dental 6518 Winford Avenue Hamilton, OH 45011 513-712-9642 bridgewaterfamilydental.com FRED H. PECK* 8251 Cornell Road, Suite 130 Cincinnati, OH 45249 513-621-7666 peckdds.com

CHRISTEN G. MCVEY* 797 Compton Road Cincinnati, OH 45231 513-522-8660 drchrismcvey.com

THOMAS J. PERRINO Perrino Family Dentistry 7565 Kenwood Road, Suite 201 Cincinnati, OH 45236 513-791-9092 perrinofamilydentistry.com

MELISSA S. MEIER Lowitz & Meier 8712 Winton Road Cincinnati, OH 45231 513-521-8900 cincinnatidentists.com

RICHARD PLOTNICK Drs. Franklin, Plotnick & Carl 6204 Ridge Avenue Cincinnati, OH 45213 513-731-1106 franklinplotnickcarl.com

PATRICK D. MICHEL Laub & Michel 1100 Bonnell Avenue Cincinnati, OH 45215 513-563-6936

TIMOTHY L. POHLMAN 2761 Erie Avenue Cincinnati, OH 45208 513-871-2989 timothypohlmandds.com

LAIRY W. MILLER First Impressions Dentistry 315 West Kemper Road Springdale, OH 45246 513-772-8840 firstimpressionsdentistry.com


BRIAN J. POPE Southwood, Paul & Pope Family Dentistry 5601 Cheviot Road Cincinnati, OH 45247 513-741-0900 southwoodsmiles.com NATHAN POWERS Powers Family Dental Care 6839 Wooster Pike Mariemont, OH 45227 513-271-6322 powersfamilydentalcare.com ERWIN J. REWWER 6700 Ruwes Oak Drive Cincinnati, OH 45248 513-923-3847 DAVID M. ROBINSON* Kenwood Cosmetic Dentistry 7615 Kenwood Road Cincinnati, OH 45236 513-791-6262 kenwoodcosmeticdentistry.com MICHAEL D. ROLFES 7729 Montgomery Road, Suite A Cincinnati, OH 45236 513-793-1241 cincinnatidentalgroup.com JERRY J. ROTELLA 8974 Columbia Road Loveland, OH 45140 513-683-5405 MICHAEL T. SCHAEFFER 522 Batavia Pike Cincinnati, OH 45244 513-528-2363 ANDREA R. SCHMERLER Beckham Square Family Dental 12500 Reed Hartman Highway, Suite 110 Cincinnati, OH 45241 513-489-7800 smilingfamilies.com JAMES SEIBERT Family Cosmetic & Implant Dentistry 1149 Fehl Lane Cincinnati, OH 45230 513-231-9300 familyimplantdentistry.com AARON SHAFTEL Vita Dental 5841 Snider Road Mason, OH 45040 513-777-9117 vitadental.com MARC H. SIRKIN Drs. Sirkin, Kruger and Associates 4157 Hunt Road Cincinnati, OH 45236 513-426-7088 blueashdentist.com ERIK SNELL Liberty Center Dental Care 7570 Bales Street, Suite 370 Liberty Township, OH 45069 513-759-7635 libertycenterdentalcare.com STEVEN L. SNOW 931 State Route 28, Suite 305 Milford, OH 45150 513-831-8394 stevenlsnowdds.com

RONALD J. SOLOMON Cornerstone Dental Group 4030 Smith Road, Suite 110 Cincinnati, OH 45209 513-631-8920 cornerstonedentist.com STEVEN M. SOUTHWOOD Southwood, Paul & Pope Family Dentistry 5601 Cheviot Road Cincinnati, OH 45247 513-741-0900 southwoodsmiles.com JULIANNE M. SWAYNE* 410 West Loveland Avenue, Suite C Loveland, OH 45140 513-683-4500 swaynedds.com RYAN S. SWISHER 736 Columbus Avenue, Suite B Lebanon, OH 45036 513-932-1370 ALEC R. TACKETT Ivy Dental 7201 Main Street Cincinnati, OH 45244 513-231-3990 ivydentistry.net JAN H. TEPE Tepe Family Dentistry 3427 Glenmore Avenue Cincinnati, OH 45211 513-662-4555 tepefamilydentistry.com LAWRENCE J. TEPE Tepe Family Dentistry 3427 Glenmore Avenue Cincinnati, OH 45211 513-662-4555 tepefamilydentistry.com RACHEL L. TEPE Tepe Family Dentistry 3507 Glenmore Avenue Cincinnati, OH 45211 513-481-5885 tepefamilydentistry.com COLLEEN TEPE-HOFSTETTER Tepe Family Dentistry 3507 Glenmore Avenue Cincinnati, OH 45211 513-481-5885 tepefamilydentistry.com GREGG L. TESTERMAN* Testerman Dental 767 Columbus Avenue Lebanon, OH 45036 513-932-4806 testermandental.com WAYNE R. WAULIGMAN Wauligman Dentistry 16 East Main Street Addyston, OH 45001 513-662-4242 wauligmandds.com WHITNEY R. WAULIGMAN Wauligman Dentistry 16 East Main Street Addyston, OH 45001 513-662-4242 wauligmandds.com ALAN R. WEINSTEIN* 7835 Remington Road, Suite 1 Cincinnati, OH 45242 513-793-1977 wdbdentalhealth.com

TODD E. WILLIAMS 11325 Springfield Pike Cincinnati, OH 45246 513-772-9100 toddwilliamsdds.com GREGORY A. WNEK Caring Family Dentistry 11497 Springfield Pike, Suite 3 Cincinnati, OH 45246 513-771-0844 drwnek.com EDWARD N. WOLF* Wolf + Adler Family Dentistry 10475 Reading Road, Suite 408 Cincinnati, OH 45241 513-563-8188 wolfadler.com THOMAS F. YASH* 1056 Delta Avenue Cincinnati, OH 45208 513-321-6044 drthomasyash.com

RICHARD E. LAMPING Cincinnati Oral Surgeons, Inc 11438 Lebanon Road, Suite F Cincinnati, OH 45241 513-769-5545 drslampingandlucas.com MICHAEL B. LEE Cincinnati Center for Corrective Jaw Surgery 7523 State Road Cincinnati, OH 45255 513-232-8989 cincinnatijawsurgery.com ROBERT W. LUCAS Cincinnati Oral Surgeons, Inc 11438 Lebanon Road, Suite F Cincinnati, OH 45241 513-769-5545 cincinnatioralsurgeons.com

ORAL AND MAXILLOFACIAL SURGERY

J. DAVID MORRISON, JR. Oral & Facial Surgery Associates 10506 Montgomery Road, Suite 203 Cincinnati, OH 45242 513-791-0550 omscincinnati.com

V. RUSSELL BOUDREAU, JR. Thatcher & Boudreau 11323 Springfield Pike Cincinnati, OH 45246 513-771-4080 cincinnati-oralsurgeons.com

DENNIS A. PERRY, SR. Oral & Facial Surgery Associates 10506 Montgomery Road, Suite 203 Cincinnati, OH 45242 513-791-0550 omscincinnati.com

JAMES P. CASSIDY Cincinnati Oral, Maxillofacial & Dental Implant Surgery 7140 Miami Avenue, Suite 202 Cincinnati, OH 45243 513-271-5900 cincinnatioralsurgery.com

STEVEN P. PIEPER Cincinnati Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery Associates 7611 Cheviot Road Cincinnati, OH 45247 513-385-8600 cincinnatioralsurgery.com

TIMOTHY W. CONLEY Affiliates in Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery 5188 Winton Road Fairfield, OH 45014 513-829-8080 aomsohio.com

GARY G. PIES 3020 Banning Road, Suite 1 Cincinnati, OH 45239 513-923-1500 drgarypies.com

BABAK EMAMI Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery of Ohio 7462 Jager Court Cincinnati, OH 45230 513-232-4600 omsohio.com MICHAEL J. GRAU 3805 Edwards Road, Suite 160 Cincinnati, OH 45209 513-321-9627 drmjgrau.com JIMMIE L. HARPER, JR. Cincinnati Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery 2852 Boudinot Avenue, Suite 2 Cincinnati, OH 45238 513-451-7300 cincinnatioms.com DEEPAK G. KRISHNAN University of Cincinnati Medical Center 222 Piedmont Avenue, Suite 7300 Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-8783 surgery.uc.edu/Divisions/Oral/ OMS_Faculty_Krishnan.html

MICHAEL J. POLLOCK 3721 Roosevelt Boulevard Middletown, OH 45044 513-423-9471 JOHN L. PRATHER Prather Oral Facial Surgery 7268 Liberty Way West Chester, OH 45069 513-777-9555 pratheroralfacialsurgery.com STEVEN J. REUBEL 7729 Montgomery Road, Suite B Cincinnati, OH 45236 513-891-2992 drreubel.com TIMOTHY W. SCHILLER Crocker & Schiller Inc. 7462 Jager Court Cincinnati, OH 45238 513-661-7410 ohio-oms.com JAMES M. SCHIRMER The Center for Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery at Countryside 1726 Deerfield Road Lebanon, OH 45036 513-932-9991 schirmeroralsurgery.com

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RANDALL D. STASTNY Blue Ash Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery 4350 Malsbary Road, Suite 201 Cincinnati, OH 45242 513-984-2100 blueashoms.com SCOTT L. THATCHER Thatcher & Boudreau 800 Compton Road, Suite 20 Cincinnati, OH 45231 513-521-0110 cincinnati-oralsurgeons.com DOUGLAS W. WALLACE Affiliates in Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery 5188 Winton Road Fairfield, OH 45014 513-829-8080 aomsohio.com GLENN S. WATERS Oral & Facial Surgery Associates 10506 Montgomery Road, Suite 203 Cincinnati, OH 45242 513-791-0550 omscincinnati.com GARY H. WILCOX, JR. Cincinnati Oral, Maxillofacial & Dental Implant Surgery 7140 Miami Avenue, Suite 202 Cincinnati, OH 45243 513-271-5900 cincinnatioralsurgery.com ORTHODONTICS MICHAEL K. AGENTER Agenter Orthodontics 5964 South State Route 48 Maineville, OH 45039 513-239-8104 agenterortho.com EDGAR L. BERRE, JR. 7655 Five Mile Road, Suite 220 Cincinnati, OH 45230 513-232-6050 edgarberrejr.com J. SPENCER BOLEY Boley Braces 5530 Muddy Creek Road Cincinnati, OH 45238 513-347-9222 boleybraces.com DARCIE R. BRADLEY 5947 Cheviot Road Cincinnati, OH 45247 513-385-2161 drbradleyortho.com ALEXANDER G. CASSINELLI Cassinelli & Shanker Orthodontics 4881 Cooper Road Cincinnati, OH 45245 513-821-1625 westchesterorthodontics.com BARTON J. GIRDWOOD Girdwood Orthodontics 600 Columbus Avenue, Suite 1 Lebanon, OH 45036 513-932-7675 girdwoodortho.com ERIC W. HICKMAN Hickman Orthodontics 3116-L Montgomery Road Maineville, OH 45039 513-697-9772 hickmanortho.com

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T OP DEN T IS T S ORTHODONTICS (CONTINUED) LAMONT B. “MONTY” JACOBS Lamont Jacobs Orthodontics 1242 Nilles Road, Suite D Fairfield, OH 45014 513-829-7045 teethstr8.com D. WILLIAM (BILL) LANGE Lange Orthodontics 9157 Montgomery Road Cincinnati, OH 45242 513-791-0777 teamlange.com JAMES W. LOGEMAN 5240 East Galbraith Road Cincinnati, OH 45236 513-791-0260 orthodude.com CHARLES A. MANILLA Manilla Orthodontics 347 Park Avenue Hamilton, OH 45013 513-434-8301 manillaorthodontics.com FERNANDO L. MARTINEZ Martinez Orthodontics 6381 Bridgetown Road Cincinnati, OH 45248 513-598-9800 martinezortho.com

KENT R. MORRIS 9573 Montgomery Road Cincinnati, OH 45242 513-683-3900 kentmorrisorthodontics.com DONALD R. MURDOCK Murdock Orthodontics 5420 North Bend Road, Suite 1 Cincinnati, OH 45247 513-662-2100 murdockorthodontics.com TIMOTHY M. REDDY Reddy & Haverkos Orthodontics 5754 Bridgetown Road Cincinnati, OH 45248 513-481-8000 reddyorthodontics.com ANTHONY L. RINALDI Rinaldi Orthodontics 5987 Meijer Drive Milford, OH 45150 513-831-6160 rinaldiorthodontics.com MONA RINALDI Rinaldi Orthodontics 6406 Thornberry Court, Suite 210 Mason, OH 45040 513-234-7890 rinaldiorthodontics.com BRIAN W. ROMICK 7655 Five Mile Road, Suite 207 Cincinnati, OH 45230 513-232-4110 drromick.com

* Provides cosmetic dentistry.

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SHIV SHANKER Cassinelli & Shanker 7242 Tylers Corner Drive West Chester, OH 45069 513-777-7060 westchesterorthodontics.com

EDWARD J. WNEK Wnek Orthodontics 2712 Erie Avenue Cincinnati, OH 45208 513-871-0324 wnekorthodontics.com

MURRAY DOCK Montgomery Pediatric Dentistry 4881 Cooper Road Blue Ash, OH 45242 513-891-0660 montgomerypediatricdentistry.com

PETER M. SUFFIELD Precision Orthodontics 8154 Montgomery Road, Suite 102 Cincinnati, OH 45236 513-891-4324 preciseorthocincy.com

JAMES J. ZETTLER Zettler Orthodontics 417 Park Avenue Hamilton, OH 45013 513-863-1984 zettlerorthodontics.com

JOHN A. GENNANTONIO Sea of Smiles Pediatric Dentistry 1319 Nagel Road Anderson, OH 45255 513-474-6777 seaofsmilesdds.com

JAMES N. THACKER Thacker Orthodontics 1057 Nimitzview Drive Cincinnati, OH 45230 513-802-9360 thackerortho.com

JAMES R. ZETTLER, JR. Zettler Orthodontics 417 Park Avenue Hamilton, OH 45013 513-863-1984 zettlerorthodontics.com

SARAH L. HUSTED Sea of Smiles Pediatric Dentistry 1319 Nagel Road Cincinnati, OH 45255 513-474-6777 seaofsmilesdds.com

SHELLEY A. TRETTER 11831 Mason Montgomery Road, Suite A Cincinnati, OH 45249 513-697-9999 tretterortho.com ALAN R. WEBER Northeast Orthodontic Specialists 9380 Kenwood Road Cincinnati, OH 45242 513-793-4770 cincinnatismilefixer.com BRYAN WIRTZ 11329 Springfield Pike Cincinnati, OH 45246 513-772-1671 bryanwirtzorthodontics.com

PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY DOUGLAS J. BROCKMAN Noonan, Brockman, & Pollock 210 South Breiel Boulevard Middletown, OH 45044 513-423-9239 noonanbrockman.com MARIE R. CALLEN Marie Callen Dentistry for Kids 11306 Montgomery Road Cincinnati, OH 45249 513-376-8200 mariecallen.com

RICHARD W. KENNEDY Chew Chew Junction 1246 Nilles Road, Suite 3 Fairfield, OH 45014 513-858-6575 chewchewjunction.com TRISHA MCNAMARA The Pediatric Dentist 5177 North Bend Road Cincinnati, OH 45211 513-662- 5203 thepediatricdentist.com ELIZABETH S. MUELLER 9200 Montgomery Road, Suite 4-B Cincinnati, OH 45242 513-791-3660 outstandingdentalteam.com


MATTHEW P. POLLOCK Noonan, Brockman & Pollock 210 South Breiel Boulevard Middletown, OH 45044 513-423-9239 noonanbrockman.com

KATHRYN L. STEWART Sea of Smiles Pediatric Dentistry 1319 Nagel Road Cincinnati, OH 45255 513-474-6777 seaofsmilesdds.com

CINDY R. PONG Smiles 4 Kids Pediatric Dentistry 11350 Springfield Pike Cincinnati, OH 45246 513-771-5231 smiles4kids.net

DAVID M. SULLIVAN The Pediatric Dentist 5177 North Bend Road Cincinnati, OH 45211 513-662-5203 thepediatricdentist.com

RONALD L. POULOS Pediatric Dentistry of Anderson 7655 Five Mile Road, Suite 214 Cincinnati, OH 45230 513-232-0550 drronskidsteeth.com

ADEL M. TAWADROS 420 Ray Norrish Drive Cincinnati, OH 45246 513-671-1666 wilmingtonchildrensdentist.com

LISA M. RUDOLPH Montgomery Pediatric Dentistry 4881 Cooper Road Blue Ash, OH 45242 513-891-0660 montgomerypediatricdentistry.com NANNETTE R. SHERMAN 7908 Cincinnati-Dayton Road, Suite R West Chester, OH 45069 513-755-7220 westchesterchildrensdentist.com

CHRIS W. BECKNER 5850 Boymel Drive, Unit 2 Fairfield, OH 45014 513-856-8253 becknerperiodontics.com STACEY M. BLUME 4030 Smith Road, Suite 225 Cincinnati, OH 45209 513-871-8488 topgums.net RAYMOND A. BONOMO Bonomo Periodontics 6208 Muhlhauser Road West Chester, OH 45069 513-671-0222 bonomoperiodontics.net

JODY L. WRIGHT Wright Smiles Pediatric Dentistry 50 Remick Boulevard Springboro, OH 45066 937-885-2222 wrightsmilespediatricdentistry.com PERIODONTICS ANDREW BAKER Shapiro and Baker Periodontics & Dental Implants 7665 Monarch Court West Chester, OH 45069 513-563-6611 greatercincinnatiperio.com

MARY HANLON 7074 Harrison Avenue Cincinnati, OH 45247 513-662-4867 cinciperio.com RYAN G. HARRIS Harris Periodontics & Implant Dentistry 5138 Cedar Village Drive Mason, OH 45040 513-336-8100 harrisperio.com TIFFANY A. HARRIS Harris Periodontics & Implant Dentistry 5138 Cedar Village Drive Mason, OH 45040 513-336-8100 harrisperio.com

NEAL E. LEMMERMAN Lemmerman Periodontics 6950 East Kemper Road Cincinnati, OH 45249 513-851-9292 lemmermanperiodontics.com LARRY S. MARTIN Martin Periodontics 1211 Nilles Road Fairfield, OH 45014 513-829-8999 martinperio.com

SCOTT I. SILVERSTEIN Ohio Valley Center for Periodontics & Implants 748 State Route 28, Suite A Milford, OH 45150 513-248-2626 milfordperio.com MICHAEL C. TOMS 5532 Muddy Creek Road Cincinnati, OH 45238 513-922-7300 yourhealthygums.com

MATTHEW M. PARKER Parker Periodontics and Implant Dentistry 8000 Five Mile Road, Suite 350 Cincinnati, OH 45230 513-474-4486 parkerperio.com VLADIMIR M. SHAPIRO Shapiro and Baker Periodontics & Dental Implants 8350 East Kemper Road, Unit C Cincinnati, OH 45249 513-984-4867 greatercincinnatiperio.com MARK J. SILVERS 7710 Shawnee Run Road, Suite G-1 Cincinnati, OH 45243 513-271-1101 marksilversdds.com

PROSTHODONTICS DAVID D. CARRIER 121 William Howard Taft Road Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-961-8113 dcarrierdds.com MANISH CHOPRA Center for Dental Health 2752 Erie Avenue, Suite 1 Cincinnati, OH 45208 513-871-4411 chopras.com ROBERT F. FAULKNER 6355 East Kemper Road, Suite 150 Cincinnati, OH 45241 513-489-8070 faulknerdentistry.com GORDON P. HUNTRESS 222 Piedmont Avenue, Suite 8300 Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-475-7991 gordonhuntress.com

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Guide to Retirement

Staying Safe at Home LOCAL NONPROFITS AND SENIOR LIVING COMMUNITIES OFFER TIPS TO HELP SENIORS LIVE SAFELY By Deborah Rutledge

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A

nyone who has baby- or toddlerproofed a home can imagine what it would take to senior-proof one. Of course, there are differences. Notably, while toddler-proofing allows for the inevitable spills that unsteady toddlers take, senior-proofing is more about preventing spills altogether. “Our focus is generally on fall prevention when we’re visiting clients in their homes,” says Paula Smith, communications manager for The Council on Aging of Southwestern Ohio. Falls are the leading cause of injuries that bring Ohioans 65 and older to the ER, or result in hospital stays and even death. Despite the commonality, COA maintains falling is actually not a natural part of aging and most falls are preventable. A good first step is to clear anything on the floor that could cause tripping. The COA recommends securing loose rugs with double-sided tape, tacks or slip-resistant backing, and on stairs repairing loose carpeting or wooden boards. Clutter is one of t he biggest  challenges  seniors face, echoes Elizabeth Bangel-Stehlin, senior director of sales and marketing for Seasons Retirement community.  “After a lifetime of collecting furniture, mementos from travel and simply accumulating through life in general, many homes are beyond capacity for safety,” she says. Although parting with belongings can be difficult, it is worth it to clear paper piles and excess furniture so seniors can negotiate rooms without tripping. “One bad fall can take a senior adult from their home into a care community,” says Bangel-Stehlin. “By proactively investing in the skills of a downsizing specialist, a home can quickly be made much safer and reduce the likelihood of a life-altering fall.” As part of its Own Your Future workshops for aging in place, the COA offers a home safety checklist that thoroughly covers all there is to consider, throughout all areas of the home, like whether sink basin and tub faucets, shower control and drain plugs are manageable, hot water pipes are covered and mirror heights are appropriate for sitting and standing.  If a senior has been living for decades in their homes, they may also be dealing with older home construction, says Bangel-Stehlin. Bathrooms, often the most hazardous room in the home, should be outfitted with such features as professionally

mounted grab bars, cut-out tubs (or conversions to showers), built-in or added shower seats, and various nonskid strips in the shower and under rugs to help maintain safety.  Older homes are also more likely to have cement steps leading inside without the benefit of handrails, Bangel-Stehlin notes, adding that keeping the outdoor steps clear of moss and adding railings will significantly decrease the likelihood of slips and falls.  “Loss of independence is a slow shift, oftentimes created through an unsafe living environment most individuals aren’t

even aware is happening,” Bangel-Stehlin says. “Should the time come to consider a move to a senior living community, many of these items will be tied into the apartment.”  She recommends looking for the following safety measures when shopping for an independent or assisted living apartment:  - grab bars in bathroom,  - easily accessible kitchen,  - ADA height-compliant commode, - nonskid strips in shower and bathroom,  - emergency response pendant/system,  - housekeeping,  - and maintenance. n

Senior Safety First Since the topic of senior safety at home has the attention of so many resources such as AARP, People Working Cooperatively, and the Ohio Department of Aging, which operates the STEADY U statewide campaign for fall preventions, there is no shortage of tips for anyone attempting to senior-proof their home or that of a loved one.  Cincy culled the following tips from those resources:  • Use the brightest wattage of bulbs safe for light fixtures such as nightlights and lamps. • Install a nightlight to illuminate the path between the bedroom and bathroom. • Refrain from storing things in stairwells or hanging items on hand rails. • Arrange furniture so there is a clear pathway between rooms. • Keep electric, appliance and telephone cords out of walkways, and do not put cords under a rug.  • Place a lamp, telephone or flashlight near the bed. • Keep eyeglasses close by when napping. • Use slip-resistant rugs in the bathroom, especially next to the tub or shower. • Consider a bath bench in the tub or shower. • Clean up spills when they happen. • Always wear a LifeLine or other emergency monitoring system if you own one. • Consider a cordless phone or answering machine to avoid having to rush to the phone. • Consider purchasing a sturdy step stool with side rails. • Add extensions to pull cords on lights and ceiling fans for easy reach. • Wear supportive rubber-soled, low-heeled shoes. • Stay active, with simple exercises to help build muscle and bone strength and improve balance.  • Review medications with the doctor or pharmacist annually to understand any side effects that may increase the risk of falling—especially if you are taking four or more medications.  • Check vision and hearing annually and update your eyeglasses. • Go slowly, especially when getting out of bed or standing up. • Stay hydrated to prevent low blood pressure, fatigue and confusion. Drink six to eight glasses of non-alcoholic liquids each day. • Eat a well-balanced diet with a variety of vegetables and calcium-rich foods like yogurt, cheese, milk, orange juice, tofu and calcium-fortified cereals to promote health. Some safety modifications, special equipment or additional services and therapies could reduce the risk of falling and may be covered by Medicare and/or Medicaid. Contact the Council on Aging for more information. Check out STEADY U, the campaign the Council on Aging participates in, for more information at aging.ohio.gov/steadyu/.

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Retirement Resource Directory Finding the right retirement living arrangement can be daunting, but this sampling of options is a good starting point. Visit cincymagazine.com for a more complete listing. ASSISTED LIVING ALOIS ALZHEIMER CENTER

70 Damon Rd, Cincinnati, OH 45218

513-605-1000

alois.com

ANTHOLOGY OF ANDERSON TOWNSHIP

9849 Beechmont Ave, Cincinnati, OH 45230

513-909-3189

anthologyseniorliving.com

ARDEN COURTS OF ANDERSON TOWNSHIP*

6870 Clough Pike, Cincinnati, OH 45244

513-233-0831

arden-courts.com

ARDEN COURTS OF KENWOOD*

4580 E Galbraith Rd, Cincinnati, OH 45236

513-745-9600

arden-courts.com

ARTIS SENIOR LIVING OF BRIDGETOWN

5799 Bridgetown Rd, Cincinnati, OH 45248

513-666-2548

artisseniorliving.com

ARTIS SENIOR LIVING OF MASON*

6200 Snider Rd, Mason, OH 45040

513-445-8646

artisseniorliving.com

ATRIA HIGHLAND CROSSING

400 Farrell Dr, Ft Wright, KY 41011

859-654-0433

atriaseniorliving.com

ATRIA SUMMIT HILLS

2625 Legends Way, Crestview Hills, KY 41017

859-757-4951

atriaseniorliving.com

BAPTIST LIFE COMMUNITIES THE SEASONS AT ALEXANDRIA*

7341 E Alexandria Pike, Alexandria, KY 41001

859-694-4450

blcnky.com

BAPTIST LIFE COMMUNITIES THE VILLAGE AT ERLANGER*

3000 Riggs Ave, Erlanger, KY 41018

859-727-9330

blcnky.com

BARRINGTON OF FORT THOMAS

940 Highland Ave, Ft Thomas, KY 41075

859-609-3307

carespring.com

BARRINGTON OF OAKLEY

4855 Babson Pl, Cincinnati, OH 45227

513-561-9100

seniorlifestyle.com

BARRINGTON OF WEST CHESTER

7222 Heritagespring Dr, West Chester, OH 45069

513-777-4457

seniorlifestyle.com

BAYLEY*

990 Bayley Dr, Cincinnati, OH 45233

513-347-5500

bayleylife.org

BICKFORD OF MIDDLETOWN

4375 Union Rd, Middletown, OH 45005

937-679-4149

bickfordseniorliving.com

BIRCHWOOD CARE CENTER*

4070 Hamilton-Mason Rd, Fairfield, OH 45011

513-777-1400

hillandale.com

BRADFORD PLACE*

1302 Millville Ave, Hamilton, OH 45013

513-867-4100

dvcr.com

BRIDGE POINT CENTER*

7300 Woodspoint Dr, Florence, KY 41042

859-371-5731

genesishcc.com

BRIDGEWAY POINTE

165 W Galbraith Road, Cincinnati, OH 45216

513-418-4370

bridgewaypointe.com

BROOKDALE FINNEYTOWN

9101 Winton Rd, Cincinnati, OH 45231

513-273-7047

brookdale.com

BROOKDALE KENWOOD

9090 Montgomery Rd, Cincinnati, OH 45242

513-273-7045

brookdale.com

BROOKDALE SPRINGDALE

11320 Springfield Pike, Springdale, OH 45246

513-273-7042

brookdale.com

BROOKWOOD RETIREMENT COMMUNITY*

12100 Reed Hartman Hwy, Cincinnati, OH 45241

513-605-2000

brookwoodretirementcommunity.com

BURLINGTON HOUSE REHAB & ALZHEIMER'S CENTER*

2222 Springdale Rd, Cincinnati, OH 45231

513-851-7888

communicarehealth.com

CARMEL MANOR*

100 Carmel Manor Rd, Ft Thomas, KY 41075

859-781-5111

carmelmanor.com

CARRIAGE COURT OF KENWOOD

4650 E Galbraith Rd, Cincinnati, OH 45236

513-792-9697

seniorlifestyle.com

CEDAR VILLAGE CARE & COMMUNITY* 5467 Cedar Village Drive, Mason, OH 45040 • 513-754-3100 • cardon.us At Cedar Village, you’ll find highly trained professionals and an unmistakable feeling of home. Designed to engage and encourage residents in all areas of life, we’re building a legacy of consistent care and commitment. We work with residents and loved ones to enrich each day and maximize independence. CHARTER SENIOR LIVING OF EDGEWOOD

2950 Turkeyfoot Rd, Edgewood, KY 41017

859-359-7498

charterseniorliving.com

CHESTERWOOD VILLAGE*

8073 Tylersville Rd, West Chester, OH 45069

513-777-1400

hillandale.com

COLONIAL HEIGHTS & GARDENS

6900 Hopeful Rd, Florence, KY 41042

859-525-6900

colonialhg.org

COTTINGHAM RETIREMENT COMMUNITY*

3995 Cottingham Dr, Cincinnati, OH 45241

513-563-3600

cottinghamretirementcommunity.com

COVINGTON LADIES HOME

702 Garrard St, Covington, KY 41011

859-431-6913

covingtonladieshome.org

DEUPREE HOUSE*

3939 Erie Ave, Cincinnati, OH 45208

513-561-6363

episcopalretirement.com

DOVERWOOD VILLAGE*

4195 Hamilton-Mason Rd, Fairfield, OH 45011

513-777-1400

hillandale.com

ELMCROFT OF DEER PARK

3801 E Galbraith Rd, Cincinnati, OH 45236

513-427-0435

elmcroft.com

ELMCROFT OF FLORENCE

212 Main St., Florence, KY 41042

859-212-6603

elmcroft.com

EMERALD TRACE* 3802 Turkeyfoot Rd, Elsmere KY 41018 • 859-342-0200 x303 • emeraldtrace.org Emerald Trace on Turkeyfoot, Senior Care by Rosedale Green offers short-term rehabilitation in a dedicated building with all private suites. Get well and get home after rehabilitating in our state of the art gym! Offering memory, rehabilitation and long-term skilled nursing care in our unique households. Call today for more information. EVERGREEN RETIREMENT COMMUNITY & WELLSPRING HEALTH CARE CENTER*

230 W Galbraith Rd, Cincinnati, OH 45215 • 513-948-2308 • seniorlifestyle.com Evergreen is a continuing care community with a reputation for excellence in senior independent living, assisted living, award-winning memory care, and skilled nursing and rehabilitation. If you or your spouse’s needs change, our commitment to your well-being won’t. Pets are welcome, too. No buy-in is required—only a monthly lease. FAIRFIELD PAVILION

5251 Dixie Hwy, Fairfield, OH 45014

513-699-4600

fairfieldpavilion.com

FAIRFIELD PLACE ASSISTED LIVING COMMUNITY

2357 Mack Rd, Fairfield, OH 45014

513-434-3077

enlivant.com

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Retirement Resource Directory FLORENCE PARK NURSING & REHAB CENTER*

6975 Burlington Pike, Florence, KY 41042

513-605-5000

florenceparkcarecenter.com

FOREST HILLS CARE CENTER*

8700 Moran Rd, Cincinnati, OH 45244

513-578-6200

premierhcm.com

GRANT CENTER*

201 Kimberly Ln, Williamstown, KY 41097

859-824-7803

genesishcc.com

HARRISON PAVILION REHABILITATION & NURSING CARE*

2171 Harrison Ave, Cincinnati, OH 45211

513-662-5800

harrisonpavilionhc.com

HAWTHORN GLEN CAMPUS*

5414 Hankins Rd, Middletown, OH 45044

513-863-7775

hawthornglennc.com

HYDE PARK HEALTH CENTER*

4001 Rosslyn Dr, Cincinnati, OH 45209

513-272-0600

hydeparkhealthcenter.com

INDIANSPRING OF OAKLEY*

4900 Babson Place, Cincinnati, OH 45227

513-561-2600

carespring.com

IVY KNOLL CARING SENIOR COMMUNITY

800 Highland Ave, Covington, KY 41011

859-491-3800

ivyknoll.com

LIBERTY NURSING CENTER OF COLERAIN*

8440 Livingston Road, Cincinnati, OH 45247

513-245-2100

libertynursingcenters.com

LODGE NURSING & REHAB CENTER*

9370 Union Cemetary Rd, Loveland, OH 45140

513-677-4900

caringplacehcg.com

LODGE RETIREMENT COMMUNITY

12050 Montgomery Rd, Cincinnati, OH 45249

513-683-9966

caringplacehcg.com

MALLARD COVE SENIOR LIVING

1410 Mallard Cove Dr, Sharonville, OH 45246

513-772-6655

mallardcoveseniorliving.com

MAPLE KNOLL VILLAGE*

11100 Springfield Pike, Cincinnati, OH 45246

513-782-2717

mapleknoll.org

MARJORIE P. LEE*

3550 Shaw Ave, Cincinnati, OH 45208

513-871-2090

episcopalretirement.com

MERCY HEALTH - WEST PARK*

2950 West Park Dr, Cincinnati, OH 45238

513-451-8900

mercy.com

MT. WASHINGTON CARE CENTER*

6900 Beechmont Ave, Cincinnati, OH 45230

513-231-4561

mtwcc.com

NORTHGATE PARK

9191 Round Top Rd, Cincinnati, OH 45251

513-268-5944

northgateparkseniorliving.com

OHIO LIVING CAPE MAY*

175 Cape May Dr, Wilmington, OH 45177

937-382-2995

ohioliving.org

OHIO LIVING LLANFAIR*

1701 Llanfair Ave, Cincinnati, OH 45224

513-681-4230

ohioliving.org

OHIO LIVING MOUNT PLEASANT*

225 Britton Ln, Monroe, OH 45050

513-539-7391

ohioliving.org

OHIO LIVING QUAKER HEIGHTS*

514 High St, Waynesville, OH 45068

513-897-6050

ohioliving.org

OTTERBEIN SENIORLIFE*

Lebanon campus: 585 N state Route 741, Lebanon, OH 45036 • 513-932-2020 • otterbein.org Otterbein Senior Lifestyle Choices is a health and human health services ministry that has been serving southwestern Ohio for 104 years. Otterbein seeks to enhance the quality of life and holistic growth of older persons. They operate five continuing care senior lifestyle communities, nine skilled nursing and rehabilitative neighborhoods, a home health and hospice agency. Locations include Loveland, Maineville, Middletown, Springboro and Union Township. *These facilities also offer skilled nursing care.

248-0126

248-1140

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474-5827

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PINEBROOK

5877 Wolfpen Pleasant Hill Rd, Milford, OH 45150

513-831-5222

pinebrook.watermarkcommunities.com

RIDGEWOOD HEALTH CAMPUS*

181 Campus Dr, Lawrenceburg, IN 47025

812-260-1019

trilogyhs.com

ROSEDALE GREEN* 4250 Glenn Ave., Covington, KY 41015 • 859-431-2244 • rosedalegreen.org Rosedale Green has built a reputation for our steadfast commitment to quality and compassion. Rosedale’s skilled nursing and rehabilitation care is now delivered in a 21st century household setting after undergoing an extensive renovation. Our households are designed to duplicate the essence and environment of home. Call today for more information regarding our beautiful community 859-431-2244. SCARLET OAKS COMMUNITY*

440 Lafayette Ave, Cincinnati, OH 45220

513-861-0400

scarletoakshc.com

SEASONS RETIREMENT COMMUNITY*

7300 Dearwester Dr, Cincinnati, OH 45236

513-984-9400

seniorlifestyle.com

SEM HAVEN*

225 Cleveland Ave, Milford, OH 45150

513-248-1270

semhaven.org

SPRING HILLS MIDDLETOWN/FRANKLIN

3851 Towne Blvd, Franklin, OH 45005

513-433-3461

spring-hills.com

ST. CHARLES COMMUNITY

600 Farrell Dr, Covington, KY 41011

859-331-3224

stcharlescommunity.org

ST. MARGARET HALL*

1960 Madison Rd, Cincinnati, OH 45206

513-751-5880

stmargarethall.com

ST. THERESA*

7010 Rowan Hill Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45227

513-271-7010

dvcr.com

THE ASHFORD OF MT. WASHINGTON

1131 Deliquia Dr, Cincinnati, OH 45230

513-438-8752

theashford.com

THE BEECHWOOD HOME*

2140 Pogue Ave, Cincinnati, OH 45208

513-321-9294

beechwoodhome.com

THE CHRISTIAN VILLAGE AT MASON* 411 Western Row Road, Mason, OH 45040 • 513-398-1486 • christianvillages.org Our staff is dedicated to helping residents enjoy a fulfilling, joyful lifestyle, in a relaxed, faith-filled community. Our approach to care is grounded in compassionate service, and built upon a multi-dimensional approach; we call it Service From the Heart. Call today to learn more about our life plan community!

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Retirement Resource Directory THE CHRISTIAN VILLAGE AT MT. HEALTHY* 8097 Hamilton Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45231 • 513-931-5000 • christianvillages.org Our life plan community provides exceptional integrated health services for older adults and offers a full range of social, cultural, spiritual and creative opportunities. Our approach to care is grounded in compassionate service, and built upon a multi-dimensional approach; we call it Service From the Heart. Call today to learn more! THE GLEN*

4300 Glen Este-Withamsville Rd, Cincinnati, OH 45245

513-909-3342

trilogyhs.com

THE KENWOOD BY SENIOR STAR*

5435 Kenwood Rd, Cincinnati, OH 45227

513-666-5099

seniorstar.com

THE KNOLLS OF OXFORD*

6727 Contreras Rd, Oxford, OH 45056

513-524-7990

knollsofoxford.org

THE LANDING OF LONG COVE

5535 Irwin Simpson Rd, Mason, OH 45040

513-229-3155

thelandingoflongcove.com

THE LEGACY AT LIBERTY RIDGE

7200 Heritagespring Dr, West Chester, OH 45069

513-342-1587

trilogyhs.com

THE OAKS AT GARDEN MANOR*

6898 Hamilton Middletown Rd, Middletown, OH 45044

513-217-6257

theoaksatgardenmanor.com

THE SHERIDAN AT MASON

5373 Merten Dr, Mason, OH 45040

513-466-8400

seniorlifestyle.com

THE WELLINGTON AT NORTH BEND CROSSING

5165 North Bend Crossing, Cincinnati, OH 45247

513-661-4100

capitalsenior.com

TRADITIONS AT DEERFIELD

3455 Nantucket Cir, Loveland, OH 45140

513-583-5170

traditionsofdeerfield.com

TRADITIONS AT NORTH BEND

4916 North Bend Rd, Cincinnati, OH 45211

513-693-1885

northbendseniorliving.com

TRIPLE CREEK RETIREMENT COMMUNITY*

11230 Pippin Rd, Cincinnati, OH 45231

513-666-2523

trilogyhs.com

TWIN LAKES*

9840 Montgomery Rd, Montgomery, OH 45242

513-247-1300

lec.org

TWIN TOWERS*

5343 Hamilton Ave, Cincinnati, OH 45224

513-853-2000

lec.org

VILLAGE AT EASTGATE

776 Cincinnati-Batavia Pike, Cincinnati, OH 45245

513-753-4400

villageateastgate.com

WESTERN HILLS RETIREMENT VILLAGE*

6210 Cleves Warsaw Pike, Cincinnati, OH 45233

513-941-0099

caringplacehcg.com

WESTOVER RETIREMENT COMMUNITY*

855 Stahlheber Rd, Hamilton, OH 45013

513-844-8004

community-first.org

WEXFORD CARE CENTER*

3875 E. Galbraith Rd, Cincinnati, OH 45236

513-793-5222

premierhcm.com

ATRIA HIGHLAND CROSSING

400 Farrell Dr, Ft Wright, KY 41011

859-654-0433

atriaseniorliving.com

ATRIA SUMMIT HILLS

2625 Legends Way, Crestview Hills, KY 41017

859-757-4951

atriaseniorliving.com

BAPTIST LIFE COMMUNITIES THE VILLAGE AT ERLANGER*

3000 Riggs Ave, Erlanger, KY 41018

859-727-9330

blcnky.com

BARRINGTON OF FORT THOMAS

940 Highland Ave, Ft Thomas, KY 41075

859-609-3307

carespring.com

BAYLEY*

990 Bayley Dr, Cincinnati, OH 45233

513-347-5500

bayleylife.org

BERKELEY SQUARE*

100 Berkeley Dr, Hamilton, OH 45013

513-896-8080

community-first.org

BROOKWOOD RETIREMENT COMMUNITY*

12100 Reed Hartman Hwy, Cincinnati, OH 45241

513-605-2000

brookwoodretirementcommunity.com

CEDAR VILLAGE SENIOR LIVING COMMUNITY*

5467 Cedar Village Dr, Mason, OH 45040

513-754-3100

cardon.us

CHESTERWOOD VILLAGE*

8073 Tylersville Rd, West Chester, OH 45069

513-777-1400

hillandale.com

COLONIAL HEIGHTS & GARDENS

6900 Hopeful Rd, Florence, KY 41042

859-525-6900

colonialhg.org

COTTINGHAM RETIREMENT COMMUNITY*

3995 Cottingham Dr, Cincinnati, OH 45241

513-563-3600

cottinghamretirementcommunity.com

DEUPREE HOUSE*

3939 Erie Ave, Cincinnati, OH 45208

513-561-6363

episcopalretirement.com

EVERGREEN RETIREMENT COMMUNITY & WELLSPRING HEALTH CARE CENTER*

230 W Galbraith Rd, Cincinnati, OH 45215

513-948-2308

seniorlifestyle.com

FAIRFIELD PAVILION

5251 Dixie Hwy, Fairfield, OH 45014

513-699-4600

fairfieldpavilion.com

IVY KNOLL CARING SENIOR COMMUNITY

800 Highland Ave, Covington, KY 41011

859-491-3800

ivyknoll.com

LODGE RETIREMENT COMMUNITY

12050 Montgomery Rd, Cincinnati, OH 45249

513-683-9966

caringplacehcg.com

MALLARD COVE SENIOR LIVING

1410 Mallard Cove Dr, Sharonville, OH 45246

513-772-6655

mallardcoveseniorliving.com

MAPLE KNOLL VILLAGE*

11100 Springfield Pike, Cincinnati, OH 45246

513-782-2717

mapleknoll.org

MARJORIE P. LEE*

3550 Shaw Ave, Cincinnati, OH 45208

513-871-2090

episcopalretirement.com

MERCY HEALTH - WEST PARK*

2950 West Park Dr, Cincinnati, OH 45238

513-451-8900

mercy.com

OHIO LIVING CAPE MAY*

175 Cape May Dr, Wilmington, OH 45177

937-382-2995

ohioliving.org

OHIO LIVING LLANFAIR*

1701 Llanfair Ave, Cincinnati, OH 45224

513-681-4230

ohioliving.org

OHIO LIVING MOUNT PLEASANT*

225 Britton Ln, Monroe, OH 45050

513-539-7391

ohioliving.org

OTTERBEIN SENIORLIFE LEBANON*

585 N state Route 741, Lebanon, OH 45036

513-932-2020

otterbein.org

PINEBROOK

5877 Wolfpen Pleasant Hill Rd, Milford, OH 45150

513-831-5222

pinebrook.watermarkcommunities.com

SCARLET OAKS COMMUNITY*

440 Lafayette Ave, Cincinnati, OH 45220

513-861-0400

scarletoakshc.com

SEASONS RETIREMENT COMMUNITY*

7300 Dearwester Dr, Cincinnati, OH 45236

513-984-9400

seniorlifestyle.com

ST. CHARLES COMMUNITY

600 Farrell Dr, Covington, KY 41011

859-331-3224

stcharlescommunity.org

THE CHRISTIAN VILLAGE AT MASON*

411 Western Row Rd, Mason, OH 45040

513-398-1486

christianvillages.org

THE CHRISTIAN VILLAGE AT MT. HEALTHY*

8097 Hamilton Ave, Cincinnati, OH 45231

513-931-5000

christianvillages.org

THE GLEN*

4300 Glen Este-Withamsville Rd, Cincinnati, OH 45245

513-909-3342

trilogyhs.com

THE KENWOOD BY SENIOR STAR*

5435 Kenwood Rd, Cincinnati, OH 45227

513-666-5099

seniorstar.com

THE KNOLLS OF OXFORD*

6727 Contreras Rd, Oxford, OH 45056

513-524-7990

knollsofoxford.org

THE OAKS AT GARDEN MANOR*

6898 Hamilton Middletown Rd, Middletown, OH 45044

513-217-6257

theoaksatgardenmanor.com

THE WELLINGTON AT NORTH BEND CROSSING

5165 North Bend Crossing, Cincinnati, OH 45247

513-661-4100

capitalsenior.com

TRADITIONS AT DEERFIELD

3455 Nantucket Cir, Loveland, OH 45140

513-583-5170

traditionsofdeerfield.com

TRADITIONS AT NORTH BEND

4916 North Bend Rd, Cincinnati, OH 45211

513-693-1885

northbendseniorliving.com

CONTINUING CARE

*These facilities also offer skilled nursing care. 74

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TRIPLE CREEK RETIREMENT COMMUNITY*

11230 Pippin Rd, Cincinnati, OH 45231

513-666-2523

trilogyhs.com

TWIN LAKES*

9840 Montgomery Rd, Montgomery, OH 45242

513-247-1300

lec.org

TWIN TOWERS*

5343 Hamilton Ave, Cincinnati, OH 45224

513-853-2000

lec.org

VILLAGE AT EASTGATE

776 Cincinnati-Batavia Pike, Cincinnati, OH 45245

513-753-4400

villageateastgate.com

WESTERN HILLS RETIREMENT VILLAGE*

6210 Cleves Warsaw Pike, Cincinnati, OH 45233

513-941-0099

caringplacehcg.com

WESTOVER RETIREMENT COMMUNITY*

855 Stahlheber Rd, Hamilton, OH 45013

513-844-8004

community-first.org

ALEXANDRA RETIREMENT COMMUNITY

921 William Hoard Taft Rd, Cincinnati, OH 45206

513-961-5700

yournextplacetolive.com

AMANDA ACRES APARTMENTS

11 Cecelia Dr, Amelia, OH 45102

513-753-4334

premiermgtohio.com

ASBURY WOODS SENIOR APARTMENTS

1149 Asbury Rd, Anderson Township, OH 45255

513-231-1446

asburywoodsseniorapartments.com

ATRIA HIGHLAND CROSSING

400 Farrell Dr, Ft Wright, KY 41011

859-654-0433

atriaseniorliving.com

ATRIA SUMMIT HILLS

2625 Legends Way, Crestview Hills, KY 41017

859-757-4951

atriaseniorliving.com

BAPTIST LIFE COMMUNITIES THE VILLAGE AT ERLANGER*

3000 Riggs Ave, Erlanger, KY 41018

859-727-9330

blcnky.com

BARRINGTON OF FORT THOMAS

940 Highland Ave, Ft Thomas, KY 41075

859-609-3307

carespring.com

BAYLEY*

990 Bayley Dr, Cincinnati, OH 45233

513-347-5500

bayleylife.org

BERKELEY SQUARE*

100 Berkeley Dr, Hamilton, OH 45013

513-896-8080

community-first.org

BROOKWOOD RETIREMENT COMMUNITY*

12100 Reed Hartman Hwy, Cincinnati, OH 45241

513-605-2000

brookwoodretirementcommunity.com

CEDAR VILLAGE SENIOR LIVING COMMUNITY*

5467 Cedar Village Dr, Mason, OH 45040

513-754-3100

cardon.us

CHESTERWOOD VILLAGE*

8073 Tylersville Rd, West Chester, OH 45069

513-777-1400

hillandale.com

COLONIAL HEIGHTS & GARDENS

6900 Hopeful Rd, Florence, KY 41042

859-525-6900

colonialhg.org

CORBLY TRACE

6416 Corbly Rd, Cincinnati, OH 45230

513-624-7183

mkcseniorhousing.org

COTTINGHAM RETIREMENT COMMUNITY*

3995 Cottingham Dr, Cincinnati, OH 45241

513-563-3600

cottinghamretirementcommunity.com

DEERFIELD SPRINGS RETIREMENT RESORT

3664 W US 22, Loveland, OH 45140

513-818-4257

rlcommunities.com

DEUPREE HOUSE*

3939 Erie Ave, Cincinnati, OH 45208

513-561-6363

episcopalretirement.com

DUBLIN HOUSE

1425 Central Ave, Middletown, OH 45044

513-424-4828

nationalchurchresidences.org

EVERGREEN RETIREMENT COMMUNITY & WELLSPRING HEALTH CARE CENTER*

230 W Galbraith Rd, Cincinnati, OH 45215

513-948-2308

seniorlifestyle.com

FAIRFIELD PAVILION

5251 Dixie Hwy, Fairfield, OH 45014

513-699-4600

fairfieldpavilion.com

FOREST SQUARE APARTMENTS

3511 Harvey Ave, Cincinnati, OH 45229

513-222-2825

episcopalretirement.com

HILLCREST ELDERLY

1821 Losantiville Rd, Cincinnati, OH 45237

513-731-6012

benchmarkgrp.com

IVY KNOLL CARING SENIOR COMMUNITY

800 Highland Ave, Covington, KY 41011

859-491-3800

ivyknoll.com

JERUSALEM JUDSON MEADOWS

4855 Ridge Ave, Cincinnati, OH 45209

513-841-0881

wallickcommunities.com

LODGE RETIREMENT COMMUNITY

12050 Montgomery Rd, Cincinnati, OH 45249

513-683-9966

caringplacehcg.com

MADISON VILLA

5615 Madison Rd, Cincinnati, OH 45227

513-561-5997

episcopalretirement.com

MALLARD COVE SENIOR LIVING

1410 Mallard Cove Dr, Sharonville, OH 45246

513-772-6655

mallardcoveseniorliving.com

MAPLE KNOLL VILLAGE*

11100 Springfield Pike, Cincinnati, OH 45246

513-782-2717

mapleknoll.org

MARJORIE P. LEE*

3550 Shaw Ave, Cincinnati, OH 45208

513-871-2090

episcopalretirement.com

MAYFIELD VILLAGE

2030 Aaron Dr, Middletown, OH 45044

513-422-2855

nationalchurchresidences.org

McHENRY HOUSE

3600 McHenry Ave, Cincinnati, OH 45225

513-541-5006

nationalchurchresidences.org

MERCY HEALTH - WEST PARK*

2950 West Park Dr, Cincinnati, OH 45238

513-451-8900

mercy.com

MT. VIEW TERRACE

650 E Benson St, Cincinnati, OH 45215

513-821-3357

mkcseniorhousing.org

NEW ENGLAND CLUB

8135 Beechmont Ave, Cincinnati, OH 45255

513-729-9361

holidaytouch.com

OHIO LIVING CAPE MAY*

175 Cape May Dr, Wilmington, OH 45177

937-382-2995

ohioliving.org

OHIO LIVING LLANFAIR*

1701 Llanfair Ave, Cincinnati, OH 45224

513-681-4230

ohioliving.org

OHIO LIVING MOUNT PLEASANT*

225 Britton Ln, Monroe, OH 45050

513-539-7391

ohioliving.org

OTTERBEIN SENIORLIFE LEBANON*

585 N state Route 741, Lebanon, OH 45036

513-932-2020

otterbein.org

PINEBROOK

5877 Wolfpen Pleasant Hill Rd, Milford, OH 45150

513-831-5222

pinebrook.watermarkcommunities.com

SCARLET OAKS COMMUNITY*

440 Lafayette Ave, Cincinnati, OH 45220

513-861-0400

scarletoakshc.com

SEASONS RETIREMENT COMMUNITY*

7300 Dearwester Dr, Cincinnati, OH 45236

513-984-9400

seniorlifestyle.com

INDEPENDENT LIVING

SEM COMMUNITIES

201 Mound Ave, Milford 45150 • 513-831-3262 • semcommunities.org Located on 55 beautiful acres in historic Milford and Anderson Township, SEM Retirement Communities is a nonprofit community offering senior living with a continuum of care. Enjoy apartment living at the Laurels or Manor. We offer retirement living with meals at the Terrace or Villa. SEM Haven offers assisted living, nursing home, memory care or short-term rehab. Each facility has many amenities and activities for our resident’s convenience and enjoyment. SEM LAURELS

203 Mound Ave, Milford, OH 45150

513-248-0126

semlaurels.org

SEM MANOR

1348 Pebble Ct, Cincinnati, OH 45255

513-474-5827

semmanor.org

SEM TERRACE

5371 S Milford Rd, Milford, OH 45150

513-248-1140

semterrace.org

SEM VILLA

201 Mound St, Milford, OH 45150

513-831-3262

semvilla.org

SHERMAN GLEN APARTMENTS

301 Sherman Dr, Franklin, OH 45005

937-746-0934

wccsi.org

SPRING HILL VILLAGE

700 Taylor Spring Ct, Taylor Mill, KY 41015

859-581-1544

masonichomesky.com

SPRINGBORO COMMONS APARTMENTS

20 N Pioneer Blvd, Springboro, OH 45066

937-746-0996

wccsi.org

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Retirement Resource Directory ST. CHARLES COMMUNITY

600 Farrell Dr, Covington, KY 41011

859-331-3224

stcharlescommunity.org

ST. PAUL VILLAGE

5515 Madison Rd, Cincinnati, OH 45227

513-272-1118

episcopalretirement.com

ST. PIUS PLACE

3715 Borden St, Cincinnati, OH 45223

513-222-2825

episcopalretirement.com

STANLEY ROWE TOWERS

1609 Linn St, Cincinnati, OH 45214

513-721-4580

cintimha.com

STATION HILL APARTMENTS

114 Dave Ave, Lebanon, OH 45036

513-932-6940

wccsi.org

STONEBRIDGE AT WINTON WOODS

10290 Mill Rd, Cincinnati, OH 45231

513-834-7000

stonebridgeatwintonwoods.com

STORYPOINT FAIRFIELD

7129 Gilmore Rd, Fairfield, OH 45011

513-438-8753

storypoint.com

STORYPOINT UNION

9255 US 42, Union, KY 41091

859-305-3995

storypoint.com

THE CHRISTIAN VILLAGE AT MASON*

411 Western Row Rd, Mason, OH 45040

513-398-1486

christianvillages.org

THE CHRISTIAN VILLAGE AT MT. HEALTHY*

8097 Hamilton Ave, Cincinnati, OH 45231

513-931-5000

christianvillages.org

THE ELBERON

3414 E Eighth St, Cincinnati, OH 45205

513-222-2825

episcopalretirement.com

THE GLEN*

4300 Glen Este-Withamsville Rd, Cincinnati, OH 45245

513-909-3342

trilogyhs.com

THE KENWOOD BY SENIOR STAR*

5435 Kenwood Rd, Cincinnati, OH 45227

513-666-5099

seniorstar.com

THE KNOLLS OF OXFORD*

6727 Contreras Rd, Oxford, OH 45056

513-524-7990

knollsofoxford.org

THE OAKS AT GARDEN MANOR*

6898 Hamilton Middletown Rd, Middletown, OH 45044

513-217-6257

theoaksatgardenmanor.com

THE WELLINGTON AT NORTH BEND CROSSING

5165 North Bend Crossing, Cincinnati, OH 45247

513-661-4100

capitalsenior.com

TRADITIONS AT DEERFIELD

3455 Nantucket Cir, Loveland, OH 45140

513-583-5170

traditionsofdeerfield.com

TRADITIONS AT NORTH BEND

4916 North Bend Rd, Cincinnati, OH 45211

513-693-1885

northbendseniorliving.com

TRINITY MANOR

301 Clark St, Middletown, OH 45042

513-423-7862

nationalchurchresidences.org

TRIPLE CREEK RETIREMENT COMMUNITY*

11230 Pippin Rd, Cincinnati, OH 45231

513-666-2523

trilogyhs.com

TWIN LAKES*

9840 Montgomery Rd, Montgomery, OH 45242

513-247-1300

lec.org

TWIN TOWERS*

5343 Hamilton Ave, Cincinnati, OH 45224

513-853-2000

lec.org

VALLEY CREEK

10620 Montgomery Rd, Cincinnati, OH 45242

513-337-9758

yournextplacetolive.com

VILLAGE AT EASTGATE

776 Cincinnati-Batavia Pike, Cincinnati, OH 45245

513-753-4400

villageateastgate.com

WALNUT COURT

1020 Chapel St, Cincinnati, OH 45206

513-222-2825

episcopalretirement.com

WATERFORD AT FAIRFIELD

1460 Corydale Dr, Fairfield, OH 45014

866-912-4779

capitalsenior.com

WESTERN HILLS RETIREMENT VILLAGE*

6210 Cleves Warsaw Pike, Cincinnati, OH 45233

513-941-0099

caringplacehcg.com

WESTOVER RETIREMENT COMMUNITY*

855 Stahlheber Rd, Hamilton, OH 45013

513-844-8004

community-first.org

*These facilities also offer skilled nursing care.

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Community HISTORY & LEADERSHIP

page 80

ANOTHER VIEW

page 82

BRONSON-AT-LARGE

page 84

BEST OF THE WEST

page 86

ST X

page 102

ST JOHN XXIII

page 103

Wicked Good Pub & Grill in White Oak

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History & Leadership By Dan Hurley

The Power Behind the Census THE 2020 CENSUS HAS THE POWER TO RESHAPE OUR STORY AND HOW THE REGION IS PERCEIVED

I

n 2020 the United States, at the direction of the Constitution, will conduct the nation’s 24th census. The results of decennial enumeration of people living in the country will guide the reapportionment of representation and federal funding for states and localities beyond 2022. But the significance of the census goes far beyond those two mundane functions. Today, data determines what companies choose to produce, what projects banks and venture capitalists will fund and what posts we see on our social media accounts. In 2020, data (even more than cash) is king. That concept was only primitively understood in 1789, but the inclusion of a command to systematically collect critical data marks the Constitution as one of the first modern documents. The census has always done more than shape representation. It has also shaped the way communities think about their prospects. That has certainly been the case for Cincinnati. The 1830 census counted 24,831 people living in Cincinnati. Fueled by a flood of immigrants after 1835, the city claimed 115,435 (over 48% foreign born) by 1850, and by 1860 to 161,044. In that 25-year period Cincinnati became America’s fastest growing and sixth largest city. Charles Cist, who oversaw the census locally, used the data he gathered about population, businesses and manufacturing to publish data-laden promotional descriptions of the city in 1841, 1851 and 1859. Cincinnati’s tremendous growth fueled wild speculation about the city’s 80

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Each census determines the demographic mean center of the country—the spot at which 50% of the population lives north and 50% lives south; 50% of the population lives east and west. In 1880 the demographic mean center of the country, was at 39.06889 N 84.66111 W, 8 miles southwest of Cincinnati in Boone County, Kentucky, on the property of the modern CVG. prospects. “Within one hundred years from this time,” Jacob Scott predicted in 1841, “Cincinnati will be the greatest city in America; and by the year of our Lord two thousand, the greatest city in the world.” Others speculated that Cincinnati’s prominence and central location would spark relocating the nation’s capital to Fourth and Vine. When census results in 1870, 1880 and beyond revealed that Cincinnati’s earlier exponential growth had slowed and that places like Chicago and Kansas City were growing faster, Cincinnatians faced a psychological dilemma. If the city was no longer on track to become the nation’s greatest (measured by population size), what was its destiny?

The answer was that promoters in the 1870s and ‘80s shifted from focusing on the size of the city to stressing the quality of life. Cincinnatians began beautifying the city by creating Fountain Square (1871) and Music Hall (1878) and forming cultural organizations like the May Festival (1873), the Cincinnati Zoo (1875), the Cincinnati Art Museum (1886) and the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra (1895). If Cincinnati could not be America’s biggest city, it sought to become its cultural capital, the “Paris of America.” To this day, promoters emphasize our cultural infrastructure. And when the 1900, 1910 and 1920 census results revealed that immigrants no longer saw Cincinnati as an optimum place to settle, locals turned long-standing praise of


The census has always done more than shape representation. It has also shaped the way communities think about their prospects. That has certainly been the case for Cincinnati. immigration on its head. Suddenly, the lack of immigration and growing demographic homogeneity became a value. In 1921 a Cincinnati Times-Star editorial proudly referred to Cincinnati as the “most American city in the North,� not corrupted by troublesome Italian, Greek and Polish immigrants who were fueling the steel-based economies of Cleveland, Detroit and Milwaukee, but also challenging the political and social stability of those booming cities. With the suburbanization of American cities after 1880, the traditional focus on city population became increasingly inadequate as an indicator of community dynamics. The political boundaries of the City of Cincinnati long since ceased to describe the actual economic and social

dynamics of place. The center city population peaked in 1950 (503,998) and steadily contracted until 2010 (296,943). To compensate for the changing reality of suburban sprawl, the Bureau of the Budget proposed what would become Metropolitan Statistical Areas in 1949 and formed the Cincinnati MSA in 1950 including Hamilton, Kenton and Campbell counties. Today, the Cincinnati-Middletown OH-KY-IN MSA has expanded to include 15 counties and 2,114,580 people and is ranked 29th largest in the country. In many ways, we are still psychologically trapped in the sense that as a place, we peaked long ago and have been fighting to stem decline ever since. That worry has been of special concern to the last

two Cincinnati mayors, Mark Mallory and John Cranley, who grasp at any hint that population contraction inside the city proper has bottomed out and begun to turn around. But the real issue is the slow growth character of the MSA, the functional community in which we live. As data from the 2020 census is reported, pay attention to the population trends for the MSA. How much slower is our growth rate compared to the national average? Is our ranking as a MSA (currently 29th) rising or falling? How do we rank against other midwestern MSAs? And most importantly, the Census Bureau may announce the combination of the Cincinnati and Dayton MSAs. That possibility has been anticipated for several census cycles. If such a move occurs, will we recognize it as an opportunity to think bigger, outside our current box? Or will we see it as an affront and close our eyes to the challenge and opportunity? n Dan Hurley is the president of Applied History Associates.

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Another View By Don Mooney

Riverview vs. Ovation AN INDOOR/OUTDOOR CONCERT HALL IS AT THE CENTER OF THE TRISTATE’S NEWEST DRAMA

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MEMI/GBBN/MESSER

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onfused by t he kerfuff le over whether a new music venue will come to Cincinnati’s riverfront? Join the crowd. In true Cincinnati tradition, what seemed to be a no-brainer has turned into a communit y cleav ing political brawl, rivaling past controversies like the streetcar, locating a new Reds’ stadium or fluoridating our drinking water, a seminal 1960s Cincy culture war. How did we get here? The original idea: an indoor/outdoor concert hall, built next to Paul Brown Stadium on top of parking garages to serve nearby stadiums, apartments, offices and restaurants. Tentatively called Riverview, the venue’s dramatic design, accommodating 4,500 indoors and 8,000 outdoors, would become a jewel in the Queen City’s Crown. More than 150 nights each year concertgoers would be drawn downtown, patronizing The Banks’ bars and restaurants when the stadiums are dark. The proposed development would also expand Smale Park, and spur the relocation of the concrete plant that creates an ugly western edge to our stunning riverfront park. In its place would be more green space, used for Bengals’ parking on game days, and open to the public the remaining 355 days of the year. Bonus: The new venue might also set the stage to a final sayonara to that crumbling concrete bunker now called the Heritage Bank Center. Win-Win-Win. Or so it seemed. The spat broke out over who would run the new venue. Some, including Mayor Cranley, backed Columbus based PromoWest. But local poobahs picked MEMI, a Cincinnati Symphony affiliate that programs Riverbend and the Taft Theatre.

Rendering of the proposed music venue at The Banks, called Riverview

Turf wars promptly broke out. The mayor, Cincinnati City Council and the Hamilton County Commission, who share responsibility for The Banks’ decision making, began an ugly feud over the project. Despite the city’s repeated attempts to sabotage Riverview, in October the county cut deals with the Bengals (who could have vetoed the plan) and that concrete company, pronouncing full speed ahead with the music venue. Meanwhile, PromoWest took its dollars across the River to Newport where construction is already underway for a competing 2,700 indoor/7,000 outdoor capacity venue called Ovation. PromoWest’s die-hard fans at City Hall argue that there is no way the Cincinnatibased music venue can or should compete with Ovation in Newport.

My view: consumers—in this case, concertgoers—benefit from competition, with more choices and maybe even lower ticket prices. All things being equal, a majority of the region’s population lives in Ohio, and would prefer the new venue in Cincinnati over the Newport option. But why choose? There is no reason to think both venues can’t prosper in a growing region. So, City Hall, get over it! Hamilton County Commissioners, stick to your plans and finally finish the Banks with Riverview! Then, let’s talk about demolishing that ugly, star-crossed Coliseum. Or should we revisit fluoridation? n Don Mooney is an attorney, a past member of the Cincinnati Planning Commission and is active in local politics.


Bronson-At-Large By Peter Bronson

Contentious and Inflammatory P

at Mahaney’s name is rarely spoken by the defenders of Tracie Hunter. One August day in 2012, as he walked home from a store in his North College Hill neighborhood, he was brutally beaten by six juveniles. The teens sucker-punched him to the ground, savagely kicked and slugged him and threw a full can of beer into his head. The police report says, “They stated that they were just bored and were looking for something to do.” National headlines called it the “Bored Beating.” As he recovered from severe head and internal injuries, Mahaney’s life was a quiet torture of pain and anxiety. He refused to leave his home and drank himself to an early grave at age 46. He died of liver failure, 11 months after the beating. As the press moved on, Mahaney remained locked in his prison of fear, waiting for justice to worm its way through the courthouse compost. Juvenile Court Judge Tracie Hunter stalled, delayed and blocked the case for two years. She put some of the teens on house arrest and ordered them to do community service and book reports. Prosecutors objected. She stalled some more. The case was finally resolved when the Ohio Supreme Court suspended Hunter in 2014. Appeals Court Judge Sylvia Hendon finally sentenced the teens. She called the beating “horrible, brutal, hideous,” and said the situation was “a disgrace and a grave injustice.” Pat Mahaney’s brother Michael told the press, “Judge Hunter wanted to protect [the juveniles]. I think we need to be protected.” Mahaney was white. The teens who beat the life out of him were all black. It was not a “hate crime” in the press, but it was tangled in race because Judge Hunter’s view of justice lifted the blindfold to look everywhere for racial victims and motives. 84

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She saw the biggest victim in the mirror. “Many of you expressed and understood that Hamilton County Juvenile Court was not ready for its first American-American and Democrat judge,” she wrote in a an email to Hamilton County Juvenile Court staff when she was suspended. Prosecutor Joe Deters said she needed professional help. Instead, she had a small posse of enablers—amplified by the press—who painted her as a victim of racism. But the two respected Cincinnati defense lawyers who investigated and prosecuted her draw a different picture. Scott Croswell and Merlyn Shiverdecker were appointed as special prosecutors because Hamilton County Prosecutor Joe Deters was the target of numerous grievances by Hunter. The prosecutors had “no comment” while Hunter’s supporters shaped the headlines. Now they are setting the record straight. “We gave her ever y opportunit y to exit this whole thing without criminal charges,” Croswell says. “We made it clear to her that if she would resign we would have no objection to her running again, to let the citizens speak. But she chose to litigate and was found guilty. There was no great joy in this.” During Hunter’s five-week trial Croswell says, “She chose the scorched-earth approach with virtually everyone in her 16 months as judge. “Judge Hunter, just like a child, cannot be told no.” Right on cue, when she was sent to jail on July 22, she went limp and dragged her heels as a deputy carried her out by the arms and her supporters yelled racism. Her attorney, Clyde Bennett, argued that she was the victim of a conspiracy, “Hamilton County political warfare” and “incestuous politics.”

WHY TRACIE HUNTER HAD TO BE DRAGGED OUT OF A COURTROOM That backfired in U.S. District Court, where Hunter’s claim of 51 misconduct charges against Shiverdecker and Croswell was rejected because their statements were “invited” by Bennett’s “hyperbolic arguments.” In court, Shiverdecker pointed out that Hamilton County has had many black judges, including several women. The “conspiracy” against her had to include the local press, the prosecutor’s office, courthouse officials, the Ohio Supreme Court and Court of Appeals, two federal courts, several teams of lawyers she hired and fired, and the public defender’s office. “Looking back, it’s a shame the whole thing occurred,” says Croswell. “She had an opportunity to make a positive impact on the juvenile court. Given the demographics of most of the people in court, she could have been a wonderful role model. She tried to make positive changes, but she chose to go about it the wrong way and the illegal way.” She made many enemies. But her worst enemy was Tracie Hunter. She ran for Juvenile Court in 2010, but lost by 23 votes. She sued to count more ballots and won more than a year later, taking the office that she said was promised by God. But by then her opponent, Republican John Williams, had been appointed to a vacancy, making him the senior judge in Juvenile Court. Hunter refused to speak to Williams and issued an order declaring that she was the boss. The Ohio Supreme Court replied: No, you are not. So she redoubled her efforts. Judge Hunter blocked the press from the “Bored Beating” hearings, was sued by the Cincinnati Enquirer and other local media, and then hired lawyers to defend herself. Ordered by a federal court to let


it “contentious and inflammatory.” Hunter and her lawyer could not dispute the evidence. So they blamed conspiracies, attacked the prosecutors, played the God card and the race card, and said she did it for the children. But as her cases stacked up like rushhour traffic behind a car-wreck, how many children suffered abuse, neglect and delayed adoptions? Still, Tracie Hunter got a lot of breaks. Social justice groups rushed to offer free legal defense, as her appeals dragged through state and federal courts for five years. The man at the top of her enemies list, Prosecutor Deters, asked the governor to release her from jail if she would only admit her guilt. She refused. Sheriff Jim Neil released her after 75 days—less than half of her sentence. She emerged defiant, calling on God to punish her enemies for injustice.

By the time it was all over, Croswell was not entirely surprised at the bizarre scene of a judge being dragged out of a courtroom. “It was staged to make her look like a civil rights martyr. She had given a speech comparing herself to Fred Shuttlesworth, Martin Luther King and Rosa Parks. She truly fashioned herself a martyr. I think she believes it.” But it fizzled like a wet match. No black judges and few civil rights leaders or city officials went to war for Hunter. “The silence speaks volumes,” Croswell says. Maybe it says that Cincinnati has finally left behind the chronic, inflammatory race conflicts of the past. Would Pat Mahaney be glad she went to jail? Or would he forgive the judge who delayed and denied justice while she punished his attackers with book reports? He can’t say. He did not live long enough to see Tracie Hunter’s version of justice. n JOE SIMON

the press back in, she refused and was held in contempt. The Ohio Court of Appeals said her legal team was illegal. Only a county prosecutor can defend such lawsuits, to protect the interests of the public. But she refused to cooperate and decided to defend herself, paying the $1,100 filing fee with a county credit card intended only for official travel. Meanwhile, prosecutors suspected that she had deliberately stalled cases to run out the clock on their appeals. An investigation confirmed that cases were falsely backdated with her signature. She was indicted on nine criminal counts. The jury found her guilty on one: Unlawful interference. When she found out her brother was being fired from Juvenile Court Youth Center for striking a child in detention, she demanded confidential documents, delivered them to him and “used the power and influence of her office” to save his job. Along the way, she filed complaints of unethical conduct against Prosecutor Joe Deters and his team; personally attacked trial judge Patrick Dinkelacker; tried to get reporters arrested, investigated or thrown out of court; and caused so many delays in court cases that Public Defender Ray Faller finally filed a lawsuit against her. In her defense, Bennett said, “She would not submit to arbitrary political authority.” But the trial transcripts show a judge— sworn to uphold integrity and avoid impropriety—who made her own rules and would not submit to any authority. The trial was “chirpy,” says Shiverdecker. Tempers flared and Judge Norbert Nadel scolded both sides. A federal judge called

Similar Case, Different Result In 2002, Cincinnati was still healing from riots when race conflict was inflamed again; Assistant Police Chief Ron Twitty was indicted on four criminal charges for damaging his police car and covering it up with a false “hit-skip” police report. A former federal judge and former U.S. attorney defended him and insisted he was an innocent victim of racism. But the evidence was indisputable. After weeks of protests, drama and conflict, Twitty cut a deal and pleaded no contest to one count of obstruction. He was fined one dollar and agreed to retire.

Defense lawyers Scott Croswell (left) and Merlyn Shiverdecker prosecuted Tracie Hunter. w w w.

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BY THE EDITORS What are the best businesses on the West Side? On Aug. 22, more than 40 businesses from the West Side gathered in Green Township’s Nathanael Greene Lodge & Reception Hall to answer just that question at Cincy Magazine’s third annual Best of the West event. About 400 people attended the party to sample the fare and interact with businesses before casting their vote for the best in 62 categories. We tallied those votes and are now proud to present this year’s winners. The Nathanael Greene Lodge & Reception Hall and Sunrise Treatment sponsored this year’s Best of the West event and the community partner was Green Township. Healthy Moms & Babes was the event’s nonprofit partner.

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FOOD BEST BAKERY

BEST BUTCHER

Bridgetown Finer Meats

Cake & Pastries by George

6135 Bridgetown Road, Cincinnati 513-574-3100, bridgetownfinermeats.com

3674 Muddy Creek Road, Cincinnati 513-451-0700

BEST CATERING

BEST BBQ

Velvet Smoke BBQ Multiple locations including Harrison (10515 New Haven Road, 513-367-5227). velvetsmokebbq.com

Vonderhaar’s Catering 19 W. Pleasant St., Reading 513-554-1969, vonderhaars.com

BEST CHEF

Vitor Abreu, Vitor’s Bistro & Sushi Bar 1932 Jamison Road, West Harrison, IN 812-637-3663, vitorsbistro.net

BEST FAST CASUAL BEST CHINESE CUISINE

Skyline Chili

5818 Cheviot Road, Cincinnati 513-245-0888, goldendragonwoc.com

Multiple locations including Delhi (5137 Delhi Pike, 513-451-7000). skylinechili.com

First Watch

BEST FAMILY DINING

BEST FRIED CHICKEN

Multiple locations including Harrison Green (5655 Harrison Ave., 513-574-7500). firstwatch.com

3853 Race Road, Cincinnati 513-574-0222, ronsroost.net

5102 Crookshank Road, Cincinnati 513-451-3000, fngoodechicken.com

Golden Dragon BEST BREAKFAST

Ron’s Roost Restaurant & Bar

F&N Goode Chick’n Tenders

BEST FOOD TRUCK

Mexi-Q

513-310-6378, mexican-bbq.com Check website for location schedule Laura Ramirez has a lengthy background in the food and hospitality industries, at various times working for Chipotle and Cincinnati’s Big Dogg’s BBQ. It makes perfect sense then that she started a food truck in 2018 that blends Mexican staples like tacos, burritos and nachos with barbecued meats like brisket and pulled pork. “My menu was really small when I started, I had like five menu items,” Ramirez says. By adding new ingredients and incorporating mac and cheese, she’s built out a wide array of Mexicanbarbecue fusion offerings. Mexi-Q has thrived on word-of-mouth referrals and being able to show up anywhere in the Tristate. In 2019, the truck had a very successful year, branching out to new opportunities like participating in Kings Island’s Halloween Haunt. “Over the past year, I’ve been more involved in festivals and more actual events versus just focusing on breweries and lunches,” says Ramirez. She’s also catered weddings from her food truck and trailer. After Mexi-Q’s banner 2019, Booth can be more selective in where she and the truck will show up in 2020. But she stays busy year-round, staying true to the values of always showing up and being prepared for anything. – Kevin Michell

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BEST RESTAURANT & BEST BURGER

Wicked Good Pub & Grill 6032 Cheviot Road, White Oak 513-741-4663, wickedgoodpub.com

When asked to describe Wicked Good Pub & Grill, owner Kim Nichols points to the restaurant’s name. “It’s just a perfect description of the experience you’re going to have there,” she says. Nichols, who has 25 years of restaurant experience and was previously owner of the now closed Thelma’s Diner, says that the handcrafted food, quality service and engaged customers combine to create a special experience. The restaurant’s repeat customers have become friends during the two years the restaurant has been open, and Nichols says she know the first names of 50% of the people who eat there. It’s easy to see why so many people return again and again. Wicked Good is known for its hot bacon slaw, Greek salads and chocolate éclairs, but it’s the burgers that really shine. Nichols says she uses fresh ground Angus chuck that is never frozen and then hand patties them herself. The restaurant serves up a variety of creative burgers, such as the brat burger (which is topped with a brat and beer cheese) and the Greek burger (which features Feta cheese and Greek seasoning), but Nichols says the most popular burger by far is Wicked Good’s goetta burger. “If you’re German, you’ve grown up with goetta and you love it,” she says. All burgers are served on the restaurant’s special pretzel buns, which Nichols says are “darn tasty.” For those who prefer something other than a burger, the menu is also packed with many other items, such as the honey-glazed salmon, and features new specials every night, such as the popular barbecued ribs and Greek chicken pasta. - Corinne Minard

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BEST GREEK CUISINE

Zorbas Greek Restaurant Multiple locations including Cincinnati (6520 Glenway Ave., 513-574-2111). zorbasgreekgyro.com

BEST ICE CREAM/ FROZEN YOGURT

Zip Dip

4050 Drew Ave., Cincinnati 513-574-6252, zip-dip.com

BEST INDEPENDENT COFFEEHOUSE

White Oak Coffee House

BEST STEAK

Maury’s Tiny Cove

5935 Cheviot Road, Cincinnati 513-808-2893, whiteoakcoffeehouse.com

3908 Harrison Ave., Cincinnati 513-662-2683, maurys-steakhouse.com

BEST ITALIAN CUISINE

Giovanni’s Family Italian Restaurant

BEST SUSHI

4050 N. Bend Road, Cincinnati 513-389-9777

Multiple locations including Cincinnati (5510 Rybolt Road, 513-574-9666). sakuracincy.com

Sakura Steakhouse & Sushi

BEST MEXICAN CUISINE

Cancun Mexican Restaurant Multiple locations including Cincinnati (6385 Glenway Ave., 513-574-1639). cancunmexicanrestaurantes.com

BEST VIEW FROM A RESTAURANT BEST SANDWICH SHOP

J&J Restaurant

6159 Glenway Ave., Cincinnati 513-661-2260

BEST PIZZA

Cabana on the River

7445 Forbes Road, Cincinnati 513-941-7442, cabanaontheriver.com

BEST WINGS

Dewey’s Pizza

BEST SOF T SERVE

Wild Mikes

Multiple locations including Harrison Greene (5649 Harrison Ave., 513-574-5744). deweyspizza.com

2673 Putz Place, Cincinnati 513-681-8668, putzscreamywhip.com

Multiple locations including Miami Heights (7587 Bridgetown Road, 513-467-9464). wildmikeswings.com

Putz Creamy Whip

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ENTERTAINMENT BEST B OWLING ALLEY

Western Bowl Strike & Spare 6383 Glenway Ave., Cincinnati 513-574-2222 westernbowl.strikeandspare.com

BEST HAPPY HOUR/ BEST SPORTS BAR

Bucketheads

6507 Harrison Ave., Cincinnati 513-574-5600

BEST LIVE MUSIC/ BEST PATIO DINING

Cabana on the River

7445 Forbes Road, Cincinnati 513-941-7442, cabanaontheriver.com

BEST WINE STORE/TASTING

Vinoklet Winery

11069 Colerain Ave., Cincinnati 513-385-9309, vinokletwines.com

Voted Best Happy Hour & Sports Bar on the West Side Happy Hour Daily 2p-7p Breakfast Every Sunday $5.9 9 Lunch Specials Daily Daily Drink Specials Featured Craft B eer Weekly

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BEST BEER SELECTION

White Oak Marathon

6050 Cheviot Road, Cincinnati 513-245-2717, twitter.com/cheviotmarathon

Most gas stations have three grades of gasoline: unleaded, plus and premium. Few gas stations, however, have 20 different beers on tap. White Oak Marathon is one of the few gas stations that can boast a huge selection of beer on tap and in packages as well. Exactly how big is that beer selection? “We carry roughly 550 different package beer for take home,” says Paul Gonzalez, beer buyer for White Oak Marathon. “On the outside we look like your typical gas station but once you walk inside then it’s a whole different story,” says Gonzalez. “We have a patio out back that sits 40 to 49 people with an always rotating selection of draft beer.” The store started carrying different craft beer packages about four years ago and its bar opened three years ago, he says. The patio has been open more than a year. “The unique experience that we offer I believe is what separates [us] from other stores,” says Gonzalez. “Not only do we host exciting events such as Live Art that takes place on our back patio, but not too often can you say you grabbed a pint at your local gas station.” – Eric Spangler

3660 Werk Road, Cincinnati, OH 45248

Gymnastics

Birthday Parties

Ninja Training Fun Fridays

We are proud to be a part of the Westside Community THANK YOU for your support and voting us Best of the West!

thegymnasticscenter.com • 513-922-3433 w w w.

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BEST GYMNASTIC S CENTER

TGC - The Gymnastics Center 3660 Werk Road, Cincinnati 513-922-3433, thegymnasticscenter.com

Michelle Booth has had a long relationship with TGC The Gymnastics Center, even before she was its owner. She has been a lifelong gymnast and worked at TGC as an instructor starting when she was 15 years old. Booth ended up buying the center from her former boss and for a period of time, Booth ran TGC while teaching first grade. She left teaching in 2013 to focus entirely on the growth of TGC, during which time the center moved to its current 11,000-square-foot facility. Over these years, classes have grown and Booth has expanded the range of programs for children ranging from toddlers to teens. “Our team has grown tremendously,” Booth adds. Early 2020 will see further expansion, as she has purchased a 25,000-square-foot facility just a little over a mile from the current location. Sometime next year TGC will have space for additional equipment and more space for a new kids’ play area and programs. - Kevin Michell

LIFE IN EVERY MOMENT! Bayley Living Options • Independent Living in The Village • Assisted Living • Nursing Care • Memory Support Bayley Community Services • Fitness Club • Adult Day Program • Home Services • Outpatient Therapy

990 Bayley Drive Cincinnati, OH 45233 513-347-5500 • bayleylife.org 92

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CHILDREN BEST BIRTHDAY LOCATION

Sky Zone Trampoline Park

Multiple location including Springdale (11745 Commons Drive, 513-671-1333). skyzone.com

BEST DANCE/THEATER INSTRUCTION

Head to Toe Dance Studio 5960 Harrison Ave., Cincinnati 513-520-3993, headtotoe.dance

BEST MUSIC INSTRUCTION

Western Hills Music

4310 Harrison Ave., Cincinnati 513-598-9000, westernhills-music.com

BEST PARK

BEST PRESCHOOL

BEST SCHOOL SPIRIT (K-12)

4764 West Fork Road, Cincinnati 513-574-4848, greentwp.org

4418 Bridgetown Road, Cincinnati 513-574-9047, pilgrimpreschool.com

3200 Ebenezer Road, Cincinnati 513-922-2300, ohlsd.us

West Fork Park

Pilgrim Preschool

Oak Hills High School

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BEST FITNES S CLUB

The Western Tennis & Fitness Club 5490 Muddy Creek Road, Cincinnati 513-451-4233, westerntfc.com

The Western Tennis & Fitness Club was voted best fitness center because it offers so many different ways for a person to work out, says Angela Farley Wilson, general manager. The family-owned and operated tennis, fitness and outdoor pool family club offers multiple programs that can help people young and old live a healthy lifestyle, she says. In addition to a tennis program, Western Tennis & Fitness Club offers more than 40 fitness classes for the hardcore fitness junkies like spinning to more relaxed clasess like yoga.

When her parents bought the facility, formerly known as the Western Racquet Club, in 2004, the decision was made to invest more in the fitness aspect of the club, she says. The racquetball courts were renovated into a two-level fitness center, tripling the fitness space. “We did all this while still investing in tennis—resurfacing the courts, new lights and installing a new fabric and insulation around all nine courts,” she says. “Tennis is big—it’s the majority of our space—but we want all members to feel encouraged.” The club is about 80,000 square feet and includes nine indoor tennis courts, fitness center, two fitness classrooms, lobby area and party room, locker rooms, wellness/massage room and dance studio. The club also has an outdoor pool with pool house, snack shack, outdoor volleyball and picnic area. - Eric Spangler

BEST PERSONAL TRAINER

HEALTH

Barbara Wenning, Gymbo’s Personal Training and Fitness Center

BEST FITNES S CLAS S INSTRUCTOR

BEST FLORIST

Lutz Flowers

5110 Crookshank Road, Cincinnati 513-921-0561, lutzflowerhaus.com

6037 Harrison Ave., Cincinnati 513-922-4967, gymbos.training

BEST JEWELER

6355 Harrison Ave., Cincinnati 513-832-7034, purebarre.com

SHOPPING

6355 Harrison Ave., Cincinnati 513-598-4653, dfsjewelers.com

BEST FITNES S TRAIL

BEST B OOK STORE

BEST PLACE TO BUY FITNESS GEAR

9001 Mt. Hope Road, Harrison 513-367-4774, greatparks.org

Multiple locations including Northgate (9720 Colerain Ave., 513-385-4100). hpb.com

Multiple locations including White Oak (5819 Cheviot Road, 513-918-4845). queencityrunning.com

Lindsey Wilson, Pure Barre Cincinnati West

Miami Whitewater Forest

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Half Price Books

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Dave Faigle & Son Jewelers

Queen City Running


SERVICE

BEST ELECTRIC

BEST HOME REMODELER

Serves Ohio, Kentucky and Indiana. 513-738-3401, kistelectric.com

6571 Glenway Ave., Cincinnati 513-922-8989, murphyhomeimprovements.com

Kist Electric

BEST HOME HEALTH CARE

BEST LANDSCAPE

Multiple locations including Colerain (9019 Colerain Ave., 877-618-4748). visitingangels.com

889 Anderson Ferry Road, Cincinnati 513-922-1313, allisonlandscapingandwatergardens.com

Visiting Angels

BEST AC/HEATING

EW Heating & Cooling 5945 Cottontail Court, Cincinnati 513-316-6422

BEST CAR WASH

LA Express Car Wash Multiple locations including Harrison (6527 Harrison Ave., 513-574-7072). laexpresswash.com

513-520-3993 Tap, Ballet, Jazz, Contemporary, Acting, Vocals, Music Theatre www.headtotoe.dance 96

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Allison Landscaping


BEST PLACE TO HAVE A WEDDING

Nathanael Greene Lodge & Reception Hall 6394 Wesselman Road, Cincinnati. 513-598-3100, greentwp.org

According to Cindy Tabler, Nathanael Greene Lodge manager, the reason the lodge and reception hall was selected as this year’s best place to have a wedding on the West Side is the location. “It is a community center owned by Green Township located approximately 10 minutes off [Interstate] 74, nestled in a park-like setting off Wesselman Road,” she says. “It’s literally surrounded by woods.” The lodge has three rooms that can accommodate guests from 12 to 200, and offers event coordination, set up and tear down and access to its preferred caterer, Vonderhaar’s Catering. While the venue is known for hosting weddings, it can also host other events. “We also host birthday parties, Christmas parties, anniversaries, after life celebrations, community meetings, condo associations, business meetings… it goes on and on” she adds. But Tabler says the venue’s biggest plus is its view. “[We have] 50-foot cathedral ceilings in the ballroom that has a large viewing window out the west side of the building,” she says. “The sunset is right in the window.” - Corinne Minard

Vitor’s Bistro & Sushi Bar 1932 Jamison Rd. West Harrison, IN 47060 (812) 637-3663 • vitorsbistro.net

A dining experience like no other

Vitor’s Bistro & Sushi Bar is located in the heart of Bright, Indiana at 1932 Jamison Rd. We are a family owned and operated upscale casual Bistro. We feature New American, Sushi, and International Infusion Style cuisines. Full bar with craft beer, boutique wine, and expansive bourbon selections. We offer daily specials, and our Special Features Menu rotates approximately every 4-5 weeks to allow our dish selections to be new and fresh for our guests. Chef Vitor Abreu

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SERVICE

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BEST MANICURE/PEDICURE/ BEST MASTER STYLIST

Beauty Blush Bar & Spa and Stylist Kristy Ward

7569 Bridgetown Road, North Bend 513-742-5111, blushbeautybarandspa.net

BEST PHOTOGRAPHER

Cindy Dover Photography Serves Cincinnati, Northern Kentucky, Lexington and surrounding areas. 513-276-8203, cindydoverphotography.com

BEST PLACE FOR A SPA DAY/ BEST B OUTIQUE

A Touch of Heaven and Heavenly Boutique

6766 Hamilton Cleves Pike Road, Miamitown 513-353-2500, atouchofheaven.info

BEST PLACE TO PAMPER YOUR PET

Dog Gone Beautiful

6127 Bridgetown Road, Cincinnati 513-574-4444

BEST RETIREMENT COMMUNITY

Bayley

990 Bayley Drive, Cincinnati 513-347-5500, bayleylife.org

BEST TAILOR

Peppe Ramundo 5229 Glenway Ave., Cincinnati 513-921-2400, pepperamundo.com

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Restaurant

FINALISTS The Best of the West is a celebration and competition among the top establishments on the West Side. Finalists were determined by nominations cast by the general public and the readers of Cincy Magazine. Below are the finalists as well as the winners in each category. FOOD Bakery n Cake & Pastries by George ■ Regina Bakery ■ Servatii’s Pastry Shop & Deli

BBQ ■ Big Art’s BBQ n Velvet Smoke BBQ

Breakfast n First Watch ■ Price Hill Chili ■ TAG’s Cafe

Burger ■ Chandler’s Burger Bistro ■ Tavern on the Bend n Wicked Good Pub & Grill

Butcher n Bridgetown Finer Meats ■ Humbert Meats ■ Langen Meats

Catering ■ R&R Catering ■ Taste of Class Catering n Vonderhaar’s Catering

Chef n Vitor Abreu (Vitor’s Bistro & Sushi Bar) ■ Rick Kennings (Kennings Circle K) ■ Kim Nichols (Wicked Good Pub & Grill)

Chinese Cuisine ■ Bamboo House n Golden Dragon ■ Thai Taste

Family Dining ■ Christine’s Casual Dining ■ Price Hill Chili n Ron’s Roost Restaurant & Bar

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Fast Casual ■ Christine’s Casual Dining n Skyline Chili ■ Price Hill Chili

Food Truck ■ Chicken Mac Truck n Mexi-Q ■ Urban Vistro

Fried Chicken n F&N Goode Chick’n Tenders ■ Ron’s Roost Restaurant & Bar ■ Sullivan’s Family Foods

Greek Cuisine ■ Santorini ■ Sebastian’s n Zorbas Greek Restaurant

Ice Cream/ Frozen Yogurt ■ Graeter’s Ice Cream ■ Putz’s Creamy Whip n Zip Dip

Independent Coffeehouse ■ Aroma’s Java and Gelato ■ College Hill Coffee Co. n White Oak Coffee House

Italian Cuisine n Giovanni’s ■ LaRosa’s Pizzeria ■ Primavista

Mexican Cuisine n Cancun Mexican Restaurant ■ El Ranchero Grande ■ Vèracruz

Pizza n Dewey’s Pizza ■ LaRosa’s Pizzeria ■ Trotta’s Pizza

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■ Chandler’s Burgers & Bistro ■ Primavista n Wicked Good Pub & Grill

Sandwich Shop n J&J Restaurant ■ Jersey Mike’s Subs ■ TAG’s Cafe

Soft Serve ■ The Goody Shop n Putz’s Creamy Whip ■ Zip Dip

Steak n Maury’s Tiny Cove ■ Longhorn Steakhouse ■ Sakura Steakhouse & Sushi

Sushi ■ Bamboo House n Sakura Steakhouse & Sushi ■ Thai Taste

View from a Restaurant n Cabana On the River ■ Incline Public House ■ Primavista

Wings ■ Chandler’s Burger Bistro ■ Crossroads Sports Bar & Grill n Wild Mike’s

SERVICE AC/Heating ■ Anderson Automatic n EW Heating & Cooling ■ Schibi Heating & Cooling

Car Wash n LA Express Car Wash ■ Mike’s Car Wash ■ Royal Car Wash

Electric ■ EW Heating and Cooling n Kist Electric ■ TMI Electrical

Home/Health Care ■ Home Instead Senior Care ■ Village Home Health & Hospice n Visiting Angels


Home Remodeler

Boutique

n Murphy Home Inprovement ■ OnSight Construction ■ Sullivan Custom Builders

n Heavenly Boutique ■ Lou Lou’s ■ Metallic Giraffe

Landscaper

Florist

n Allison Landscaping ■ Bob Meyer Landscaping ■ Ohio Landscaping

■ At All About Flowers n Lutz Flowers ■ Piepmeier the Florist

Manicure/Pedicure

Jeweler

n Beauty Blush Bar & Spa ■ Paragon Salon ■ US Nails

n Dave Faigle & Son Jewelers ■ Robin James Jewelers ■ Steve Faigle Legacy Jeweler’s

Master Stylist

Place to Buy Fitness Gear

■ Kim Sims (J McQueen Salon) n Kristy Ward (Blush Beauty Bar & Spa) ■ Nicole Stenger (Studio Lush)

■ Dick’s Sporting Goods n Queen City Running

Photographer ■ Anthony Antal Photography n Cindy Dover Photography ■ Sara Simonson Photography

Place for a Spa Day n A Touch of Heaven ■ Blush Beauty Bar & Spa ■ Paragon Salon

Place to Have a Wedding n Nathanael Greene Lodge ■ The Event Center at Pebble Creek ■ Receptions - Western Hills

Place to Pamper Your Pet n Dog Gone Beautiful ■ Pampered Paws & Claws ■ Wildflower Dog Spa

Retirement

n Western Tennis & Fitness Club ■ Mercy Healthplex ■ Planet Fitness ■ Pure Barre Cincinnati West

Fitness Class Instructor ■ Barb Wenning (Gymbos) n Lindsey Wilson (Pure Barre Cincinnati West) ■ Sarah Celek (Pure Barre Cincinnati West)

Fitness Trail ■ Fernbank Park n Miami Whitewater Forest ■ Veterans Park

Personal Trainer n Barbara Wenning (Gymbos) ■ Dave Tennant (Gymbos) ■ Jeff Robison (Club MMA)

Beer Selection ■ BIERmarket ■ West Side Brewery n White Oak Marathon

CHILDREN Birthday Party Location

Bowling Alley

■ Rockin’ Jump Trampoline Park n Sky Zone Trampoline Park ■ The Dent Schoolhouse

■ Heid’s Lanes ■ Stumps Lanes n Western Bowl Strike & Spare

Dance/Theatre Instruction

Happy Hour

n Head to Toe Dance Studio ■ Technical Dance Center ■ Turning Pointe Dance Academy

n Bucketheads ■ Jtaps Sports Bar & Grill ■ Marty’s Hops & Vines

Gymnastics Center

Live Music

■ Cincinnati Gymnastics n TGC - The Gymnastics Center ■ Westside Academy of Gymnastics (WAG)

n Cabana On the River ■ Club Trio ■ Knotty Pine Rock Club & Tiki Bar

Patio Dining

Tailor

Sports Bar

■ Bianco Custom Tailors ■ Lisa Rose Alterations n Peppe Ramundo

n Bucketheads ■ Chandler’s Burger Bistro ■ Jtaps Sports Bar & Grill

SHOPPING

Wine Store/Tasting

■ The Friends’ Used Book Store at the Warehouse n Half Price Books ■ Inner Blessings Christian Books & Gifts

Fitness Center

ENTERTAINMENT

■ Artis Senior Living of Bridgetown n Bayley ■ Hillebrand Nursing & Rehabilitation Center ■ Ohio Living Llanfair

Book Store

HEALTH

Music Instruction ■ The Music Shoppe Sales & Learning Center n Western Hills Music ■ Wyoming Fine Arts Center

n Cabana On the River ■ Incline Public House ■ Wicked Good Pub & Grill

Park ■ Miami Whitewater Forest ■ Verterans Park n West Fork Park

Preschool ■ A Child’s Garden Preschool ■ The Children’s House n Pilgrim Preschool

■ Bridgetown Finer Meats ■ Marty’s Hop & Vines n Vinoklet Winery

School Spirit (K-12) n Oak Hills High School ■ Our Lady of the Visitation School ■ St. James School

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Best Schools

Long Blue Line ST. XAVIER HIGH SCHOOL OFFERS A LARGE NETWORK OF ALUMNI TO HELP WITH A CAREER By Eric Spangler

T

here are plenty of advantages to attending St. Xavier High School, including a long list of alumni who will most likely be there at every step in a career. It’s called the “long blue line,” says Becky Schulte, director of communications and marketing for St. Xavier High School. “We have probably about 40,000 alumni,” she says. “Probably about 20,000 of them are living and they’re all over the world. One of the things that we say is it’s kind of an advantage that you’ve got this big alumni network.” Schulte knows firsthand. Her husband is an alumnus of St. Xavier High School, an all-male private school in Springfield Township. “My husband’s a grad, too, and every interview he’s ever had a St X. person has been in there and given him a shot because he was a grad,” she says. 1 02

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Not only is the extensive alumni network an advantage, but the opportunity to develop into a good, young man through a network of caring and nurturing teachers and administrators is another asset, says Mike Dehring, assistant vice president for enrollment services at St. Xavier High School. Not that attending St. Xavier is going to be cheap. It costs the parents of the 1,440 students currently attending the school $15,650 a year for tuition, he says. But it’s money well spent, says Dehring. “St. X is a great return on your investment,” he says. “It’s not inexpensive. I wouldn’t pretend that it’s not. But I think the long-term benefits, whether it’s the scholarships that students get to college or the connections that are made through the St. X or Jesuit network are invaluable.” More importantly is the development of young men’s characters, he says. “I think we produce, generally, really good kids who turn into really good young men and men,” says Dehring. “So I think it’s the best investment a parent could make in their son.” He says 99% of St. Xavier High School’s graduates go to a four-year college or uni-

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St. Xavier High School enourages students to follow their interests outside the classroom.

versity. “Our goal is to get students ready for college, but frankly we’re also trying to get them ready for their life beyond that,” says Dehring. That means encouraging students to connect with fellow students who have similar interests outside the classroom, he says. “We have over 100 clubs and athletic opportunities for kids to begin to discover who they are,” says Dehring. “We’re small enough where kids are known and cared for and at the same time we’re big enough so that they can find a wealth of opportunities and find peers who are like them,” he says. And it’s just one of the many advantages of attending St. Xavier High School. n


The First Step Toward Great Things ST. JOHN XXIII CATHOLIC SCHOOL PROVIDES TRADITIONAL VALUES AND AN EXCEPTIONAL EDUCATION TO HELP STUDENTS MAKE AN IMPACT ON THE WORLD By Eric Spangler

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t. John XXIII Catholic School provides traditional values and an exceptional education, says Dawn Pickerill, principal. “Obviously academics are very important,” she says, “but also to produce responsible members of society.” The preschool through eighth grade school in Middletown currently is teaching those important academic and societal lessons to about 425 students, says Pickerill. St. John XXIII Catholic School is the beneficiary school of the Holy Family Parish, which consists of the combined members of Holy Trinity Church and St. John Church in Middletown. The school is located at 3806 Manchester Road in the former Fenwick High School building. Because it is a former high school, the 17-acre campus has a high school regulation baseball field, football field and gym, Pickerill says. That allows the private school to offer students some of the best facilities for athletic extracurricular activities, she says. St. John XXIII Catholic School offers cheerleading, football, soccer, golf, basketball, volleyball, track and field and lacrosse. In addition, the full-size stage in the gym has stage lights for the performing arts productions, including this year’s Wizard of Oz play, says Pickerill. Some of the other after-school activities include art club, builders club, student council and the Power of the Pen writing team. The school’s academic offerings feature a rigorous high school preparatory curriculum that emphasizes Catholic values, character development and leadership, says Pickerill. St. John XXIII Catholic School also offers classes in Spanish, fine arts, physical education and technology.

Technology is incorporated throughout the curriculum, as each student in the third grade through the eighth grade is provided with a laptop computer. Students can take notes in class by writing on the laptop with a stylus and answer assignment questions pushed out by teachers by writing with the stylus instead of typing, Pickerill says. The school is offering parents of prospective students a great opportunity to see the educational facility up close and personal when it conducts an open house Jan. 26 from noon to 3 p.m., says Pickerill. “It’s for any prospective parents to come and get a tour and they’ll be able to meet teachers, administration and get any questions answered,” she says. The open house is a great way to learn more about the school and a personal, private tour can also be arranged, says Pickerill. Parents will learn that teachers and administrators at St. John XXIII Catholic

All students third through eighth grade are provided with a laptop for school.

School care deeply about their students, she says. “It is truly is a family atmosphere,” says Pickerill. “And we look out for each other. We do really look to grow the whole child.” That growth means that students can graduate and make a difference. “We also want each child to know that they are loved and they are cared about and that they can go out and do great things in this world,” she says. “And that’s what expected of them.” n

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2020 Edition

Attacking Cancer from Every Angle • Area men fight breast cancer through Real Men Wear Pink • Helping patients get to treatment through Road To Recovery • American Cancer Society’s 2020 events

SUPPLEMENT TO


HOW WE HELP

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hile most people know us for our research, the American Cancer Society does so much more. We attack cancer from every angle, promote healthy lifestyles, work towards better treatments, fight for lifesaving policy changes and provide everything from emotional support to the latest cancer information. We do this all 24 hours a day, seven days a week. We couldn’t do what we do without our volunteers and donors who participate in events, serve on boards and planning committees, provide peer support to other survivors and give their time to drive cancer patients to treatment. Together, we’re making a difference and you can help us save lives by becoming a volunteer, making a donation or participating in a fundraising event.

American Cancer Society Leadership

Meredith Niemeyer, American Cancer Society Executive Director

Missy Duggan, Delta Air Lines, American Cancer Society Board Chair

TABLE OF CONTENTS MORE THAN 26,766

EVENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

ANSWERED CALLS AND CHATS FROM OHIO RESIDENTS Information, answers and hope are available every minute of every day.

REAL MEN WEAR PINK . . . . . . . 7 MORE THAN 10,060 NIGHTS OF FREE OR REDUCED-COST LODGING Provided to Ohio cancer patients through our Hope Lodge® communities or Hotel Partners Program, saving patients nearly $1.5 million in lodging costs.

NEARLY 11,996 RIDES FOR PATIENTS IN OHIO TO AND FROM CANCER-RELATED TREATMENTS Through the Road to Recovery® program, saving patients more than $450,000 in transportation costs.

NEARLY 1,047 PATIENTS AND CAREGIVERS IN OHIO RECEIVED PERSONAL GUIDANCE Including help with insurance problems, referrals to local services and more.

REAL MEN WEAR PINK LIST . . . 8 ROAD TO RECOVERY . . . . . . . 10 Published in Partnership with

Locally, Veteran & Family Owned Publisher & President: Eric Harmon Custom Editor: Kevin Michell Designer: Keith Ohmer Advertising Administrator: Laura Federle Sales Executives: Brad Hoicowitz, Abbey Cummins, Rick Seeney

WWW.CANCER.ORG

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2020 EVENTS ResearcHERS: Women Fighting Cancer acsresearchers.org/ohio Women in cancer research are making a difference with their incredible discoveries and breakthroughs. This springtime fundraising initiative gathers donations to support their work while empowering women leaders to help the Society’s national research program.

from Cleveland to Cincinnati over the course of a four-day scenic tour while raising thousands of dollars to fight cancer. Golf Classic cincinnatigolfclassic.org Enjoy this charitable golf experience for players of any skill level on August 24 at the Kenwood Country Club. This year’s Classic will take place at the Kenwood Country Club and features putting and chipping contests and a silent auction before the golf begins in earnest at noon. A cocktail reception and dinner follow in the evening.

Relay For Life Movement relayforlife.org Relay For Life is more than a series of fundraisers for fighting cancer; it’s about community-based events that celebrate and honor survivors, caregivers and those we’ve lost through moving and inspirational ceremonies. Head to the website for information about how to start or join a Relay team, volunteer or attend a Relay For Life in your community. Pan Ohio Hope Ride panohiohoperide.org This four-day, 328-mile bicycle tour across

Ohio takes place every July to raises awareness and funds for lifesaving research, programs and services. Bicyclists will ride

Making Strides Against Breast Cancer makingstridewalk.org Join many others downtown in October for a walk with a bittersweet mix of purpose—celebrate survivorship, pay meaningful tributes to loved ones lost and unite to fight for a world without breast cancer. Lead a team or join one and walk three miles with your family, friends and neighbors for the cause.

Stay up to date on the

Arts, Entertainment & Culture in the Greater Cincy Area, visit: cincymagazine.com

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Striders’ Ball stridersball.org This November horse-themed gala is unique to our region. Enjoy food, drinks, live music, a live auction and silent auction and much more while contributing to the fight against cancer. Discovery Shop 454 Ohio Pike Cincinnati, OH 45255 513-891-8343 Donate, volunteer and shop for high- quality, gently used clothing, accessories and household items- all to benefit the ACS. Open Monday through Friday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Real Men Wear Pink realmenwearpinkacs.org This fundraising campaign happens through the month of October and brings together male community leaders to help

our mission to eliminate breast cancer. Real Men Wear Pink participants pledge to wear pink throughout the month to raise awareness and raise funds through peer donations and fundraising events.

www.cancer.org/ohio Find us on: Facebook @ACSOhio Twitter @ACS_Ohio Instagram @ACSOhio

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There is no routine lung cancer. A revolution in lung cancer treatment is happening at The James at Ohio State. Our research is proving that cancers are not defined solely by their locations and stages, but also by individual molecules and genes that drive each patient’s unique cancer. To deliver the most effective ways to treat lung cancers, we work to understand each cancer at a genetic level, then pinpoint what makes it grow. Our teams of world-renowned scientists, oncologists and other specialists use their collective knowledge and expertise to deliver treatments that target one particular lung cancer‌yours. To learn more visit cancer.osu.edu/lung.


REAL MEN WEAR PINK

Continuing the Fight By Kevin Michell

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019 marked the fourth year of the American Cancer Society’s Real Men Wear Pink (RMWP) fundraising campaign and the Cincinnati chapter was proud to have 31 local men work towards the goal of raising $289,356.14 to combat breast cancer. Every October, Real Men Wear Pink brings together men throughout the region whose lives have been touched by breast cancer. Together, they work to not only raise money but also awareness of the ongoing battle against this disease. John Fay, whom many know as one of the most prominent area sportswriters covering the Cincinnati Reds, has been a participant of RMWP since its inception and returned to participate for a fourth year in a row. His wife Laura was diagnosed with breast cancer over eight years ago, eventually reaching stage four. But throughout her battle, Laura’s attitude has never wavered. “She’s never let this get her down,” Fay says. “If you didn’t know she was suffering from this disease you would have no idea… It’s never dimmed her smile or broke her spirit. That’s been an inspiration to me.” Laura and John go in for her treatments at Mercy Health three times a month, where they see so many others there going through the same fight. “If I can share her story and then at some point down the line if what we do helps so other people don’t have to go through this,” says Fay, who himself is a survivor of Hodgkin’s lymphoma, “that would be the most rewarding thing ever for me.” Fay was the top Cincinnati fundraiser during 2018’s campaign, during which the Cincinnati chapter raised the most funds—over $267,000—in the country. “The work is not done,” Fay says of the impression he wants his Real Men Wear Pink campaign to leave on people,

Chief Elliot Isaac of the Cincinnati Police, pictured with his wife Kimberly, raised over $21,000 as part of 2019’s Real Men Wear Pink campaign. whether they’ve donated to his efforts or not. “There’s just so much more to be done and I think the American Cancer Society does a great job to help people.” Cincinnati Police Department’s chief, Elliot Isaac, participated in Real Men Wear Pink for the first time in 2019 and the city’s officers joined in raising awareness through October. It’s an effort that hits close to home for both Chief Isaac and the entire police force—they’ve had many officers lose their battles with cancer, including Captain Kimberly Williams in 2018 with whom Chief Isaac was close and attended the academy. “We lost her last year to breast cancer,” Chief Isaac says. “It was less than a year from her diagnosis that she was taken by this horrible disease. So, when they asked me this year if I would consider being one of the ambassadors for the Real Men Wear Pink campaign, I was more than happy to do it.” Chief Isaac wanted Cincinnati’s Finest to use their visibility to raise awareness through pink badges, uniform patches, hats and even pink collars on police dogs, showing those dealing with breast cancer that they’re not alone in the fight.

“Even though we’ve lost [people to cancer], we also wanted to equally celebrate the survivors of it,” says Chief Isaac. “We have a number of officers who have been diagnosed with this, but they’re surviving it and doing well.” Chief Isaac ended his first stint with RMWP as the city’s top fundraiser, gathering over $21,000 in donations, and also organized a fashion show fundraiser that took place on October 5 at the Montgomery Inn Boathouse. The Fashion for a Cure event raised another $20,000 to fight breast cancer and featured guests such as Vice Mayor Christopher Smitherman and WKRC’s Angela Ingram. “Even though October is the month that we recognize this,” Chief Isaac adds, “we want to make sure this is remembered and thought about year-round. It’s about saving lives.” ■ The American Cancer Society’s Real Men Wear Pink campaign in Cincinnati is presented by TriHealth and chaired by Jeanette Altenau. Meet and support all of the men involved at realmenwearpinkacs.org. WWW.CANCER.ORG

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2019 RMWP PARTICIPANTS

Congratulations to Cincinnati’s top fundraisers!

Carmon DeLeone, Cincinnati Ballet

Eddie Tyner, Enquirer Media

Todd Duesing, Cincinnati Arts Association

Kent Wellington, Graydon, Head & Ritchey

Devyn Dugger, Ohio Eagle Distributing

Walter Whitley, Fox National

Chief Elliot Isaac, Cincinnati Police Department: $21,853

John Fay, Cincinnati Enquirer Jeff Gaylor, American Heart Association

Thank you to our other 2019 participants from Dayton:

Walt Kelsey, Kelsey Chevrolet: $18,434

Daniel Ginsberg

Eric Bugger, Wright-Patt Credit Union

William Tobler, TriHealth: $16,001

Tim Godfrey, Macy’s

John Clark, eXp Realty

Brad Hansman, Medpace

Sean Clark, Rusty Wood Renovations

O’Dell Owens, Interact for Health: $15,835

Gregg Harris, Trustaff

Wayne Davis, City of Centerville

Nicholas Hodge, Kroger

John Eckelberry, Premier Health

Thank you to our other 2019 participants from Cincinnati:

Joseph Jones, Crossroads Church

Jeremy Johnson, eXp Realty

Roderick Justice, The Children’s Theatre of Cincinnati

Mike Monjot, Dayton Children’s Hospital

Matt Kittell, The Warehouse

Chris Reid, Premier Health

Bill Klee, Kleemax Properties

Jeff Sergent, Dayton Physician’s Network

Marvin Butts, The Butts Family Foundation

Jay Koch, Snapbac

Jack Sowers

Dave Lapham, Cincinnati Bengals

Dave Collins, Cincinnati Reds

Michael Millay, Rooted Media House

Toby Spencer, Darke County Sheriff’s Department

David Fulcher, Cincinnati Bengals: $25,477

Yousuf Ahmad, AssureCare Marc Bellisario, Primary Health Solutions

Brian Nelson, Fifth Third Bank

See all that Cincy has to offer in the Arts, Business and Culture. Visit cincymagazine.com for a FREE subscription to Cincy Magazine

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ROAD TO RECOVERY

When a Ride Delivers More Than Transportation

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or Jan Hollon, a close friend’s cancer diagnosis led to a new volunteer opportunity. “Star was like a sister I didn’t have,” Hollon says of her friend. “We got through a lot of hard things together.” As a retiree, Hollon was able to travel to Star’s home in another city, become a caretaker and drive her to doctors’ appointments and treatments, easing the family’s responsibilities. “She had been sick for so long and her family was trying to have a normal life themselves,” says Hollon. “We spent some precious moments together.” When Star passed, Hollon turned her experience into a positive one by volunteering to drive cancer patients to appointments through the American Cancer Society’s Road To Recovery program. Last year, the Society provided more than 340,000 rides to treatment and medical appointments for cancer patients across the country. Hollon especially likes the flexibility that the program provides. She can find her community’s needs online and at her convenience, seeing ride details such as the distance to the medical center, the length of the appointment and how many days per week or month a ride is needed. “College kids, moms whose kids are in school could easily fit a ride into their schedules,” Hollon points out. In volunteering for Road To Recovery, Jan says she’s been rewarded beyond what she anticipated. In some ways, she notes, it is easier for patients to talk to a stranger, someone who isn’t a family member or a doctor. “I wasn’t expecting to have these folks I am meeting to have such a great

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“Am I helping them or are they helping me?”


impact on me,” she says. “The people I’ve met have been unbelievably warm, generous, friendly and grateful. They lift my spirits and amaze me by their strength. I shake my head after each new patient I meet and ask myself, ‘Am I helping them, or are they helping me?’” “Everyone is so giving and loving and genuine. It has been a heartfelt experience for me,” Hollon adds. One patient came to tears when Jan told her the service is free. “Hopefully, I put a smile on their face—I know they’ve put one on mine.” ■

Volunteer now to give patients a muchneeded lift—you might be surprised by the pick-me-up you get in return. For more information, visit cancer.org/drive or 1-800-227-2345

Jan Hollon has been driving cancer patients to treatments and appointments ever since her close friend Star succumbed to cancer.

WWW.CANCER.ORG

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Treating

Cancer more than

You are more than your diagnosis. That’s why at Kettering Cancer Care, we reach beyond treatment to provide healing for the whole person—mind, body, and spirit. No one wants a cancer diagnosis, but if it happens, you want to know that you’ll receive the best care. Our experts use cutting-edge treatment combined with compassionate care and supportive services tailored to meet your needs. Trust Kettering Cancer Care to guide you and your loved ones through the healing process.

ketteringhealth.org/cancercare

KETT E R I N G

H E A LT H

NETWORK


Business GARREN COLVIN page 118

MEDICAL MARIJUANA page 120

GENSUITE page 122

EXECUTIVE TRANSPORTATION page 124

BEST IN BUSINESS CALENDAR & DIRECTORY page 126

St. Elizabeth Healthcare CEO Garren Covin

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A Homegrown

LEADER

ST. ELIZABETH HEALTHCARE CEO GARREN COLVIN USES HIS LOCAL ROOTS TO GROW NORTHERN KENTUCKY’S LARGEST HEALTH CARE SYSTEM By David Holthaus

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hen the board of St. Elizabeth Healthcare selected Garren Colvin as the organization’s chief executive officer in 2015, they chose a hometown boy whose association with St. E went way back. In fact, Colvin’s links to Northern Kentucky’s largest health care organization go all the way back to Oct. 21, 1964, the day he was born in what was then St. E’s maternity ward. Since that day, Colvin has been a lifelong resident of Northern Kentucky, growing up in Ludlow, and attending Ludlow High School and Thomas More College. He’s been a St. E employee for 36 years (minus one short stint outside the organization), beginning in 1983 with an entry-level job as an accounting clerk. That turned into a co-op job while he was an accounting and business administration double major at Thomas More. At the time, his career goals fell far short of commanding one of the region’s leading health care organizations. “My goal was to get a job,” Colvin says. “Thomas More had a 100% job placement in accounting. I was motivated not to be the first accounting student not to get a job.” Consider that goal accomplished. In 2010, St. E’s CEO Joe Gross retired after 25 years and chief operating officer John Dubis was promoted to the top job, with Colvin being elevated to the COO role. But in 2015, Dubis retired due to health concerns and Colvin was appointed interim CEO. A few months later, after a national search, the board anointed him CEO. “That was not even on the radar, to be honest with you,” Colvin says. But Colvin was well prepared for the job, having worked his way up on the finance side of the enterprise and then moving into operations as COO. In 2008, as chief financial officer, he was instrumental in consummating the merger of St. Luke’s with St. Elizabeth, combining the region’s two major health care groups in what was, at the time, a controversial move. The merger was completed after St. Luke decided to leave what was then the Health Alliance of Greater Cincinnati, a consolidation that was eventually dissolved. The merger brought together two institutions that had traditionally been regional rivals in the lucrative world of health care. “You had two systems that were very fierce competitors,” Colvin says. “They lived and breathed to compete with each other, but had similar cultures and the same desire to take care of the patients.

When that came together, it was almost as if we never competed with each other. From day one we said how can make this merger the best for all 400,000 people living in Northern Kentucky.” The tie-up created an organization that today has more than 6,000 employees, more than 500 licensed beds, a medical staff of 1,300 physicians and net patient revenue of $760 million, making it the largest not-forprofit organization in Northern Kentucky. The organization has continued to grow under Colvin’s leadership. In June, it announced the opening of a 15,000-square-foot Women’s Health Center on its Edgewood campus. The center offers screening mammography, bone density scans, physical therapy and other services in a comfortable environment. In August 2018, construction began on a five-story comprehensive cancer care center that, when finished, is expected to be the largest such facility in Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky. Situated on 4 acres at St. Elizabeth’s campus in Edgewood, the center is the largest and most expensive project undertaken by St. E. It will accommodate 650 workers, including hundreds of new positions. The goal is to expand cancer prevention, genetic screening, clinical research and treatment options in Northern Kentucky. “What St. E wants to do is build a program that takes care of the whole patient,” Colvin says. “A one-stop shop where the clinician and the physician actually come to the patient as opposed to the patient traveling to several different locations.” Services will include radiation and medical oncology, an infusion floor, radiation imaging, women’s wellness diagnostic services and a gynecological oncology clinic. Colvin sees the role of St. Elizabeth going beyond providing health care services. “One of the things that is important to me, as the largest nonprofit in Northern Kentucky, we feel we have a responsibility to partner with this community to make this community the best it can possibly be,” Colvin says. Indeed, as CEO, Colvin has pursued partnerships with other organizations to complement and expand on what St. E does. Most recently, the organization entered into a collaboration with the University of Kentucky College of Medicine and Northern Kentucky University to create the Northern Kentucky Campus of the UK College of Medicine. In August, the new site welcomed an inaugural class of 35

Garren Colvin, John Calipari and Trey Greyson medical students to address a physician shortage in the state and the region. In August, St. Elizabeth announced it was expanding its clinical partnership with Mayfield Brain & Spine, the region’s largest independent neurosurgical physician group. The agreement will allow St. Elizabeth to provide more complex interventional stroke and brain tumor services in Northern Kentucky. “Every partnership we have is trying to help this community to not only be the healthiest community, but to be as economically healthy as possible,” Colvin says. “We want to help the community attract business and attract people.” Colvin’s leadership skills developed during his years as a standout high school and college athlete. Although he downplays those days (“My high school career improves every year,” he jokes), Colvin did excel and has been inducted into both the Northern Kentucky Sports Hall of Fame and the Thomas More Athletic Hall of Fame. He was a three-year starter in three sports—baseball, basketball and football—at Ludlow High School, and received a baseball scholarship to Thomas More. In college, he was a pitcher and outfielder all four years and, as a pitcher, did not lose a game until his junior season. He was named captain of several of his teams. “I learned a lot playing team sports,” he says. “You learn a lot winning; you learn a lot losing. It prepares young men and women for this type of job later in life.” Now in the health care world, Colvin is prepared to continue to lead his organization and his community. “Our long-term goal is to lead Northern Kentucky to become one of the healthiest regions in the country,” he says. “Success for us is a growing economy in this community, a healthier workforce, a healthier community. That’s where we’re focusing.” n

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A GREEN AND GROWING INDUSTRY AREA DISPENSARIES AND STATE DEPARTMENTS WORK TOGETHER IN THE FIRST YEAR OF PUBLIC ACCESS TO LEGAL MEDICAL MARIJUANA By Kevin Michell

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edical marijuana has been legalized in the state of Ohio for over three years but only this year have residents begun seeing dispensaries open up for business across the state. The first ones opened in mid-January, a little over four months after state regulators had planned for medical marijuana sales to begin. That delay was largely the cause of delays in the approval of state cultivators to start growing marijuana plants for sale in dispensaries as flower or for sending to processors to create other forms such a edibles and tinctures. 1 20

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But despite some hiccups and growing pains both the State of Ohio Board of Pharmacy—which oversees the regulation of and approval of medical marijuana dispensaries, as well as the registration of patients and forms of marijuana that can be sold—and the open dispensaries in southwest Ohio are generally pleased with the rollout and optimistic for the program’s future. “I think that we could say that we’re exceeding expectations with the number of registered patients,” says Ali Simon, public and policy affairs liaison for the State of Ohio Board of Pharmacy. Though there were no concrete benchmarks for how many patients would register for the Ohio Medical Marijuana Control Program the nearly 64,000 that have reg-

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One of the major uncertainties for Verilife and other medical marijuana dispensaries has been setting projections for their business.

istered through the end of September 2019 is well above initial hopes. The Board of Pharmacy initially approved a total of 60 potential dispensary licenses—from almost 380 applications— to award across 31 districts based on the size of counties in each region of the state and creating ease of access for patients. Some districts were allotted a higher maximum of approved dispensaries— Hamilton County and Montgomery County, which were each given their own districts, were each approved for three—while regions without a major metropolitan center were mostly grouped into districts comprising three or four counties with one or two dispensaries approved for the entire district. The program was always meant to be f lexible, starting with a conservative number of dispensary approvals and then growing as need and patient registrations dictate in the near future. “We are going to start examining the number of patients and looking at opportunities for potential additional dispensaries,” says Simon, noting that there’s


QUICK FACTS: Medical marijuana was legalized in Ohio with the passage of House Bill 523 on Sept. 8, 2016. The Ohio Medical Marijuana Control Program is overseen by three state departments:

Unlike many other dispensaries in the state, Pure Ohio Wellness grows a large amount of its flower product at its own cultivation center. still some time to go before a new round of applications is opened. For those dispensaries that have opened they’ve gone through a prolonged and new process for opening their businesses. Larry Pegram, owner of Pure Ohio Wellness, runs two dispensaries—one in Springfield and another newly opened in northern Dayton—as well as his company’s own cultivation facility. Working with the Ohio Board of Pharmacy agent helped the run-up to opening, with the attendant inspections for regulatory compliance, be a rather smooth ordeal. “It was pretty simple, really. It was just a time-consuming process,” Pegram says, describing that the Springfield building for his first dispensary required a great deal of construction and rehabilitation. One of the unique aspects of Pure Ohio Wellness compared to other dispensaries in the state is that a large amount of its flower product—as opposed to other preparations of marijuana like oils, edibles and transdermal patches—is grown at its own cultivation center. Additionally, Pure Ohio Wellness is one of only a couple dispensaries in southwest Ohio fully owned by someone from the area where it is selling. “I’ve been born and raised in Ohio my whole life and my whole family has, so all the people that work for us are local here in the Springfield-Dayton area,” says Pegram. “It’s a neat feeling to know that we’re making medicine for our own community.” Education was a big part of Pure Ohio Wellness’ first year of operations, both in terms of explaining to first-time patients the benefits, experience and process of using medical marijuana and for marketing to potential customers in the area.

• The State of Ohio Board of Pharmacy oversees dispensaries, patient registration and approving forms of marijuana to be sold. • The Ohio Department of Commerce oversees marijuana cultivators (facilities that grow the marijuana flower), processors (facilities that extract THC from the flower for use in tinctures, edibles and other approved non-flower forms) and testing labs. • The State of Ohio Medical Board certifies state physicians to recommend marijuana to their patients.

In Cincinnati, Chaz Mize is the general manager of Verilife in Pleasant Ridge. He’s noticed the same need for educating residents, though he’s been impressed by the overall knowledge and maturity of the Ohio Medical Marijuana Control Program. “They’re a knowledgeable base of patients,” he says. “We see processed goods selling at a higher clip than most young markets. It’s actually been a really challenging but really fun experience.” But one of the major uncertainties for Verilife, Pure Ohio Wellness and all other dispensaries has been setting projections for their businesses. Mize notes that Verilife has already adjusted the proportions of marijuana forms and strains it carries in response to customer activity over the first two months of operation. Pegram has made a point for Pure Ohio Wellness to always carry a couple of less potent but more affordable strains of flower for patients. He’s also been a bit surprised by the fact that the majority of his dispensary’s customer base has been aged 55 or older. But both men have been impressed by the assistance of the Board of Pharmacy, the quality of product being cultivated in the state and the overall patient response during this first year of operation. Approaching the end of the year, the Ohio Board of Pharmacy will be keeping an eye on registered patient renewals—the first of which will be happening in December—and the state medical board has begun accepting petitions for new qualifying conditions. On the ground level, the dispensaries will continue to refine their offerings and service to help out those who can use this new form of medicine. For Pegram in particular, success lies in keeping the focus on helping friends and neighbors understand and comfortably utilize the program. “We’re local people and we’re just trying to help out,” he says. n

As of November 2019, 45 dispensaries have been approved to open and operate in Ohio, with 11 more holding provisional licenses awaiting a Certificate of Operation. There are currently 10 dispensaries operating in southwest Ohio between the Cincinnati and Dayton regions. As of the end of September 2019, over 40,000 individual patients have purchased medical marijuana from Ohio dispensaries. 266 Ohio physicians have received certificates to recommend medical marijuana to their patients. 32 cultivators and 39 processors in the state have received provisional licenses to grow and prepare marijuana for sale, with 18 cultivators and 10 processors receiving approval to operate as of November 2019. Medical conditions that currently qualify for medical marijuana use include AIDS, positive HIV status, ALS, Alzheimer’s, cancer, CTE, Crohn’s and inflammatory bowel disease, PTSD, epilepsy and other seizure disorders, glaucoma, fibromyalgia, Parkinson’s, MS, hepatitis C, sickle cell anemia, Tourette’s syndrome, ulcerative colitis, traumatic brain or spinal disease or injury and chronic pain. w w w.

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Yanshie Bahuguna (left) and Jessica Button went to Malawi this year as part of Gensuite’s involvement in building a school in the African country.

Giving Back to the City THE EMPLOYEES OF GENSUITE’S CINCINNATI HEADQUARTERS FOSTER THE NEXT GENERATION OF LEADERS IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY By Kevin Michell

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ason’s Gensuite has grown into a powerhouse compa ny by providing a software platform that helps companies all around the globe maintain environmental, health and safety (EHS) compliance. But Gensuite’s incredible growth hasn’t precluded the company from fruitful philanthropic efforts in the Cincinnati area and abroad. One of its more recent initiatives is participating in Cincinnati’s Adopt A Class program this year. Thirty Gensuite employees from different departments have visited Katie Sanford’s first-grade class at Silverton Paideia Academy to mentor students, lead educational activities, show the children what a career in environmental science and technology can look like and take them on field trips to the zoo and museums. It’s an example of how the cloud-based EHS management company has expanded its philanthropic efforts since Brittany 122

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for the recipient to learn more about what a career at the intersection of technology and environmental studies looks like. Often, Gensuite is misunderstood as purely a tech company, but O’Bryan points out that the technology enables better stewardship of the environment and, thus, provides a great potential workplace for graduates who have a passion for that. “These companies [that use the Gensuite platform] are staying compliant and they are tracking these things going into the air and the water and things like that because of our software,” she says. This year, the Cincinnati office also sent an employee—Jessica Button, who was joined by Yanshie Bahuguna from Gensuite’s Toronto office—to Malawi as part of Gensuite’s partnership with buildOn, which helped build a school in the African country. Also, in 2017, the Cincinnati office spent part of Veteran’s Day weekend repainting an elderly veteran’s house in Covington. All of these initiatives to help children, students and the less fortunate fit philosophically with Gensuite’s product goal of responsible business operations that reduce harm on the environment. It all demonstrates that this growing company is using its stature to help ensure a bright future for children around the world. n

O’Bryan, senior leader of Gensuite Corporate, joined the company in 2015. “We believe in investing in the future,” O’Bryan says, “and education is just such a core part of that. I think everybody on the team is so passionate about it that it’s just taken off. It’s been something that’s been so easy for us to do because we don’t have to force people to participate—they want to.” The Silverton students enjoy it, too, particularly the pen pal relationships they build with Gensuite employees and the occasional pizza party that they get out of it. “It’s just cool to see how excited they get about it,” adds O’Bryan. Meanwhile, Gensuite is in the process of awarding its third scholarship to a University of Cincinnati student of environmental sciences as part of a five-year commitment to the college. Students who receive the scholarship not only get help with their tuition, they forge a connection with the company. Gensuite’s marketing department helps them publish their written work online and the company hosts a lunch with a top company executive Employees with students at Silverton Paideia Academy

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Executive Transporation’s Express Mobile Transport service takes seniors to and from check-ups and care visits.

Providing More

Than Rides

EXECUTIVE TRANSPORTATION EXPANDS ITS SERVICE LINES TO HELP PEOPLE OF ALL TYPES IN THE CINCINNATI AREA By Kevin Michell

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hen Tammy Bravo, president of Newport, Kentucky-based Executive Transportation, had both of her in-laws fall ill three years ago, she felt the pressure of having to leave work to take them to and from their many doctor’s appointments. Both she and her husband work at the company full-time and she wondered how others dealt with this who didn’t have the same freedom to leave work as needed as she did. “As I was sitting around, I thought, ‘If I could just find a way to get them there 1 24

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and meet them at the doctor’s appointment, my life would be so much easier,’” Bravo recalls. “And then it was a light bulb moment.” This was the genesis for one of her company’s newest service lines, Express Mobile Transportation, which takes mobilitychallenged people and seniors to and from check-ups and care visits anywhere around Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky. It’s a solution to a growing need as more Baby Boomers enter their 70s. Executive Transportation bought two vans dedicated to this service in January and will have added a sixth to its fleet of Express Mobile Transportation vehicles before the year’s end. The service is growing through partnerships with assisted living centers and health care providers

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like St. Elizabeth, TriHealth and The Christ Hospital. A major aspect of the service, beyond the convenience given to working adults whose parents need regular health care visits, is the peace of mind Express Mobile Transportation provides. “We take a great deal of care in training the drivers,” says Bravo. “The drivers go through first-aid training, they go through the proper etiquette of picking up and loading the passenger and customer service. A lot of times, the only time this passenger gets out for the month is for this doctor’s appointment.” It creates a real connection between the driver and the passenger and helps make regular trips to the doctor a more pleasant experience for seniors. Drivers wear a shirt


and tie every ride and make conversation with their passengers in order to brighten their day a bit. As Bravo says, they treat every passenger like their own parents. Meanwhile, Executive Transportation has seen growing demand for its employee shuttle service. That can entail national or international organizations that have out-of-town employees visiting a Cincinnati office, transporting workers to a new office location or from a more remote parking lot when construction or remodeling is ongoing, and any other need that organizations may have to move people around easily and conveniently. “That’s another niche that has developed that we’re very proud of,” says Bravo. A lot of clients have found Executive Transportation through word-of-mouth referrals. While that has been encouraging, Bravo wants clients and potential customers to know that Executive Transportation is eminently adaptable to any shuttling or mobility needs through its fleet of vehicles that ranges from sedans to charter buses. She recalls recently being approached by some of the organizations at the Cincinnati/ Northern Kentucky International Airport

about an easier way to get job applicants from job fairs in places like downtown to interviews at the airport itself. Beyond that, she says the company is open to other opportunities to help facilitate transportation around the city and fill in the gaps that other forms of transit can’t fulfill. And there looks to be plenty of possibilities for that in the future as Cincinnati works toward becoming more of a convention destination. These newer and emerging service lines add to an impressive array of existing offerings, from simple executive ride services to group events like weddings. Executive Transportation also offers small group rentals for brewer y and bourbon tours or trips down to Keeneland to name a few examples. Bravo just wants the company to provide any form of transportation service that the Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky communities might need. The company’s service and communityminded philosophy extends to initiatives outside of its business efforts. This month featured Executive Transportation’s second annual Holiday Hope Charity Drive on Dec. 7.

The event is hosted at Superior Prosthetic Solutions in Newport, with the companies coming together to gather winter clothes, blankets and other useful items for the Henry Hosea House. Bravo recalls how the inaugural charity drive struck a chord with one of her employees. “It was really heartwarming—one of my employees approached me last year and she said to me, ‘You know, my mom raised four of us on our own and we never had much of a Christmas. But every year she would look for something like this to take my siblings and I to and it meant a lot to us… What you’re doing here is pretty special.’” As Executive Transportation has grown to over 200 employees, giving back to the area has become an increasingly more important part of the company’s philosophy. As Bravo puts it, the employees are a big part of the company’s growth and “without them, we have nothing.” Bravo wants to keep expanding their community efforts through continuing the holiday charity drive and adding new initiatives. “Hopefully our employees will guide me in that and what we need to do,” she says. n

With its new service lines, Executive Transportation does more than pick people up from the airport. w w w.

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Business Calendar

DECEMBER 2019 Manufacturing Summit: Cyber Security Risks & Solutions Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber

Dec. 3

Learn more about cyber security risks and solutions during this event targeted specifically at manufacturers. The day will feature a keynote from Julio Guzman of The Ackerman Group, tours of TechSolve’s High Bay and RBI Solar, and a panel discussion. 8 a.m.-noon. Members $75, nonmembers $150. TechSolve, 6705 Steger Drive, Cincinnati. 513-579-3111, cincinnatichamber.com. Cincinnati & Northern Kentucky Area Total Internship/Co-op Management Workshop Northern Kentucky University

Dec. 5

Companies can learn how to create an internship/co-op program that attracts students and also builds a pipeline of possible future employees. Robert Shindell, who has 20 years of experiencing working in higher education, will facilitate the event. 8:15 a.m.-3:30 p.m. For profit company $299, nonprofit/government/start-up $249. Northern Kentucky University, Nunn Drive, Highland Heights, Ky. internbridge.com/northern-ky/. Connections MADE: Jingle Mingle Mason Deerfield Chamber

Kentucky state Sen. Chris McDaniel, Rep. Sal Santoro and Rep. Buddy Wheatley Blue Ash Holiday Social Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber

JANUARY

The Blue Ash Advisory Committee and the Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber invite business professionals to network for a good cause. In addition to coming out for a good time, attendees are asked to donate gift cards to Operation Give Back. 4:30-6:30 p.m. Members $25, non-members $50. Graphic Village, 4440 Creek Road, Blue Ash. 513-5793111, cincinnatichamber.com.

2020 Women’s Initiative Annual Breakfast Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce

Dec. 10

Hispanic Chamber Posada Cincinnati USA Hispanic Chamber

Dec. 14

The sixth annual Jingle Mingle is a chance for members of the Mason Deerfield Chamber to network before the holidays. 4-6:30 p.m. Free. Mason Deerfield Chamber office, 316 W. Main St., Mason. 513-336-0125, madechamber.org.

The Cincinnati USA Hispanic Chamber’s 12th annual Posada, or Christmas Party, invites chamber members and non-members alike to enjoy Hispanic holiday traditions such as piñatas, carols and holiday food. 5:30-8:30 p.m. Members and their families free, non-members $10 donation. UC Blue Ash College, Muntz Hall, 9555 Plainfield Road, Blue Ash. 513979-6999, hispanicchambercincinnati.com.

Eggs ‘N Issues: Riverfront Development Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce

Where We Stand 2020 Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce

Tom Banta, Corporex Companies; Jack Moreland, Southbank Partners; and Jeanne Schroer, The Catalytic Fund, will discuss what is currently happening on the Northern Kentucky riverfront and plans for its future during this morning panel. 7:30-9 a.m. Members $30, non-members $50. Receptions Banquet & Conference Center – South, 1379 Donaldson Road, Erlanger, Ky. nkychamber.com.

As the year comes to a close, Kentucky House Speaker David Osborne and Kentucky Senate Majority Leader Damon Thayer will make a stop in Northern Kentucky to discuss the legislative agenda for the upcoming year. 4:30-6:30 p.m. Members $30, non-members $40. Triple Crown Country Club, 1 Triple Crown Blvd., Union, Ky. nkychamber.com.

Dec. 6

Dec. 10

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Dec. 17

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Jan. 14

The Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce’s 11th annual Women’s Initiative Breakfast will feature a keynote speech by Kristi Nelson of the Multi-Color Corporation on the topic Mindshift: Finding the Power Within. 7-9:30 a.m. Members $60, non-members $70. Northern Kentucky Convention Center, 1 W. Rivercenter Blvd., Covington, Ky. nkychamber.com. Eggs ‘N Issues: General Assembly Preview Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce

Jan. 21

Local Kentucky legislators—including state Sen. Chris McDaniel, state Rep. Sal Santoro and state Rep. Buddy Wheatley—will give a preview of the 2020 General Assembly agenda. 7:30-9:15 a.m. Members $30, nonmembers $50. Receptions Banquet & Conference Center – South, 1379 Donaldson Road, Erlanger, Ky. nkychamber.com.

Don’t see your event? Visit cincymagazine.com to add it to our online calendar for free.


Best in Business Directory

T

hose who run or manage businesses know that sometimes you need some help. As the Tristate’s magazine for business professionals, we are in a unique position that enables us to meet and interact with some of the best business service providers in the region. This list gives you a taste of the region’s best business services, and serves as a resource for those looking for assistance. Make sure to visit CincyMagazine.com to see exclusive online Best in Business content.

Blue Ash Business Association babusiness.org

GBQ 513-871-3033 gbq.com

Hispanic Chamber Cincinnati USA 513-979-6999 hispanicchambercincinnati.com

VonLehman 800-887-0437 vlcpa.com

Lebanon Chamber of Commerce 513-932-1100 lebanonchamber.org

AIR TRAVEL

Milford Miami Township Chamber 513-831-2411 milfordmiamitownship.com

ITA Audio Visual Solutions 800-899-8877 ita.com SpotOn Productions 513-779-4223 spoton.productions BANKING Commerce Bank 800-453-2265 commercebank.com Commonwealth Bank 859-746-9000 cbandt.com

Lyons & Lyons 513-777-2222 lyonsandlyonslaw.com Taft Stettinius & Hollister 513-381-2838 taftlaw.com Wood Herron & Evans 513-241-2324 whe-law.com PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT Gateway Community & Technical College 859-441-4500 gateway.kctcs.edu Great Oaks Campuses 513-771-8840 greatoaks.com

EGC Construction 859-442-6500 egcconst.com

The Haile/US Bank College of Business at Northern Kentucky University 859-572-5165 nku.edu/academics/cob

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT Charles Schwab Fort Mitchell 859-308-1425 schwab.com/fortmitchell

Indiana Wesleyan University 866-468-6498 indwes.edu

Horter Investment Management, LLC 513-984-9933 horterinvestment.com

William E. Hesch Law Firm 513-731-6601 heschlaw.com

Raymond James 513-287-6777 raymondjames.com

BUSINESS RESOURCES

Western & Southern 866-832-7719 westernsouthern.com

African American Chamber of Greater Cincinnati & Northern Kentucky 513-751-9900 african-americanchamber.com

Calfee, Halter & Griswold LLP 513-693-4880 calfee.com

CONSTRUCTION

BUSINESS LAW

CHAMBERS

LAW FIRMS

Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce 859-578-8800 nkychamber.com

PNC Financial Advisors/W Mgmt. 513-651-8714 pnc.com

Cincinnati Better Business Bureau 513-421-3015 bbb.org/cincinnati/

Oswald Companies 513-725-0306 oswaldcompanies.com

Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber 513-579-3100 cincinnatichamber.com

ACCOUNTING

AUDIO VISUAL

Medical Mutual 800-382-5729 medmutual.com

The Chamber of Commerce Serving Middletown, Monroe & Trenton 513-422-4551 thechamberofcommerce.org

Clermont Chamber of Commerce 513-576-5000 clermontchamber.com

CVG 859-767-3151 cvgairport.com

INSURANCE/INSURANCE BROKERAGE

Union Institute & University 800-861-6400 myunion.edu REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT Corporex 859-292-5500 corporex.com TELECOMMUNICATIONS AT&T att.com

HEALTH

ATC 513-234-4778 4atc.com

Superior Dental 937-438-0283 superiordental.com

Interested in having your company included? Please contact Publisher Eric Harmon at publisher@cincymagazine.com or 513-297-6205. w w w.

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Home FLOORING page 130

IRON WORKS page 131

New flooring products are being used for both floors and walls.

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Cincy Home

From Floor to Wall THE LATEST TREND IN FLOORING ISN’T FLOORING AT ALL By Liz Engel

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or 50 years, McSwain has been a go-to outfit in the Tristate for flooring and carpet needs. But one of the trendiest products it carries these days isn’t really even flooring at all. Three-dimensional wood wall panels, made from real wood and laid out in cool geometrical patterns, are proving popular with customers. And it’s nothing like the wood paneling of old. “If you’re looking to make a statement in your home, on an accent wall or in small area, it’s a real fashion type of thing,” says Dean Wright, vice president, retail/ wholesale sales at McSwain Carpets & Floors. “It adds a lot of texture. I don’t even want to call it wood paneling because it’s so modern.” The company liked it so much it installed it in the lobby of its corporate office in Sharonville during a recent remodel. Not your style? Don’t worry. McSwain is still committed to its roots; carpet makes up about two-thirds of the business, while luxury vinyl is quickly becoming a key seller. Luxury vinyl can mimic hardwood and porcelain tile—and quite well. “It’s so realistic, that it’s hard to tell it’s not real,” Wright says. “It’s easy maintenance, easier installation. Most are waterproof. Customers, obviously, they see the advantages of that.” n 130

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Wood paneling is making a comeback thanks to new flooring products.

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Sticking with Traditional Hardwood? Here’s some tips to keep your floors looking top notch DO consider a welcome mat to protect floors from mulch, rocks, outside brush and even salt . DO keep the dog’s nails trimmed. DO leave shoes, especially high heels, at the door. The exposed metal post of any high heel will exert between 2,000-8,000 pounds per square inch, which can definitely damage a flooring surface. (SOURCE: A STEP ABOVE FLOORING)


Stewart Iron Works is based out of Erlanger, Kentucky, and makes iron products like gates.

Opening the Gate THE HGC GROUP OF COMPANIES AIMS TO TAKE THE 157-YEAR-OLD STEWART IRON WORKS TO NEW HEIGHTS By Liz Engel

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Stewart Iron Works is 160 years old.

t’s hard to fly under the radar for almost 160 years. While Stewart Iron Works has a legacy that rivals that of Graeter’s and the Cincinnati Reds, it’s not exactly a household name. The team at the HGC Group of Companies aims to change that. It acquired Stewart this summer and looks to scale the Northern Kentucky-based maker of ornamental fences and gates. “It feels a Verdin bell kind of company or Ivory soup. It’s part of that fabric of Cincinnati,” says President Mike Huseman. “We want to revitalize it and make our city proud.”

HGC, prior to the deal, had considered forming its own in-house iron works company and Huseman had first-hand knowledge working with Stewart during his project manager days, so the transaction was smooth. Stewart is a “tiny” outfit right now, but with the backing of HGC, and its 350 employees, he says that will change. “We want to take [Stewart] down the national path,” Huseman says. “HGC, we have a lot of respect for a brand. Whether it’s [using our] purchasing, subcontracting relationships or bonding capabilities, we are going to grow it.” After all, there’s a legacy to protect. Walk any length of MainStrasse or Hyde Park or Downtown, and you’ll see the Stewart shield. The company created jail cells for Alcatraz and supplied the entrance gates to the White House. At one point, you could order Stewart wrought iron via the Sears Roebuck catalog. “For us to be stewards of that brand, that’s the kind of stuff that gets us out of bed in the morning,” says Paul Moran, vice president of marketing and communications. “We love it. And frankly we love the opportunity.” n

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Love Cincy

Katy Rucker Art Director and Photographer

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Pioneering Integrative Medicine in Cincinnati for 20 Years Since 1999, Alliance Integrative Medicine has been providing patients with care that transforms their health and lives, using a combined approach of conventional, functional, and integrative medicine. Recognized as a leader in the integrative medicine field, AIM was founded by Drs. Sandi and Steve Amoils. The practice focuses on creating personalized, preventative wellness plans based on the principles of combining the best practices of conventional and alternative medicine to achieve the most meaningful outcomes. Today, Alliance Integrative Medicine is still providing the best possible care for every patient who walks through our doors. The AIM team — medical doctors, chiropractors, energy healers, massage and Rolfing® therapists, and staff — is passionate and focused on creating personalized care for all. AIM Fellowship Program Recognized by the ABOIM


Profile for Cincy Magazine

Cincy Magazine December 2019/January 2020  

Best Doctors, Top Dentists, Best of the West 2019, and More!

Cincy Magazine December 2019/January 2020  

Best Doctors, Top Dentists, Best of the West 2019, and More!

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