Page 1

Hollywood Comes to Town GAME-CHANGER JULIE CALVERT TAKES ON CVB CEO ROLE

A Guide to the Best Drinks, Bars & Distilleries Around Town The Neurologist available at The Mercer OTR

Guide to Colleges & Universities


There is no routine breast cancer. Breast cancer is never logical or straightforward or routine. That’s why fighting breast cancer with routine treatment just isn’t enough. At The James at Ohio State, you get the expertise of a multidisciplinary team that specializes not just in cancer but breast cancer. They apply their collective thinking toward discovering the most effective therapies, and delivering them at exactly the right time, for you — which means you can count on comprehensive breast cancer care that’s far beyond routine. To learn more, visit cancer.osu.edu/breast.


Contents

The Magazine for Business Professionals

A p r i l/M ay 20 1 9

Drinks from Pontiac BBQ in OTR

Our guide to the Tristate’s growing bar and distillery scene. PAGE 41

BY THE EDITORS

View 4 Publisher’s BY ERIC HARMON 6 Contributors 7 Web Exclusives Cincy 8 Inside Ecuadorian butterflies,

22 A&E Calendar Traveler: 28 Midwestern Kentucky

38 Rivertown Brewery Turns 10

previewing Summerfair 2019 and a county-by-county breakdown of area employers.

12 Scene

After 10 years of operations, Rivertown Brewery’s owners are excited for what comes next. BY KEVIN MICHELL

CINCY LIVE

20 An Unlikely Pairing

The art of Nevada’s annual fringe festival, Burning Man, comes to the Cincinnati Art Museum. BY DAVID LYMAN 2

A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

There are more than just bourbon trails in Kentucky— the Bluegrass State features incredible culinary tours, too. BY CORINNE MINARD

40 Dining

Traveler: 37 Midwestern Gatlinburg

Springtime in Tennessee brings with it a host of Gatlinburg festivals and events. BY CORINNE MINARD

An Erlanger institution keeps making comfort food that garners national attention BY JULI HALE


COMMUNITY on Leadership 50 Reflections Looking back at 1920s Cincinnati

politics for lessons on rhetoric and symbolism. BY DAN HURLEY

View 52 Another Don Mooney looks to his young

father’s letters home during WWII for wisdom. BY DON MOONEY

54 Hollywood Loves Cincy

Educators 78 Outstanding Meet the 2019 Outstanding

110 Power 100 Re-Cap

Educators at area colleges and universities. BY THE EDITORS

Success 84 Driving One of Ohio’s oldest

trucking schools provides a path to a lucrative career. BY JANICE HISLE

86 DePaul Cristo Rey High School is Building Support

expanding to support students old and new. BY CHRISTIAN MEININGER

88

A Leap of Faith

Cincy Magazine’s annual gathering of impressive Cincinnatians featured an insightful panel discussion. BY CORINNE MINARD

in Business 112 Best Calendar & Directory

LIVE WELL

117 Guide to Back and Spine Film productions in Cincinnati bring stars, jobs, income and excitement to the city. BY PETER BRONSON

56

Cincy Motorsports Journal

Six new master’s-level certificates are being offered to seminarians and the public alike. BY ERIC SPANGLER

BUSINESS

90 The Destination Builder

Small, nagging pains could be a sign of bigger spinal problems to be aware of. BY DEBORAH RUTLEDGE

CINCY HOME

124 Back to Outdoor Living Car shows and racing events are happening in the area throughout the year. BY KURT NEIMEYER

to Colleges & 61 Guide Universities 2019

An anti-overdose device, a new NKU food pantry and more from local educators, plus listings. BY KEVIN MICHELL

The Convention and Visitors Bureau CEO has traveled a winding path to get there. BY DAVID HOLTHAUS

Meeting & Event 93 Tristate Planner Guide

Three venues for off-site business functions of different sizes, plus listings. BY KEVIN MICHELL

New trends in patio furniture to consider just in time for the warmer months. BY LAURA LEAVITT

128 Love Cincy

Cincy (ISSN-1934-8746) published in February/March; April/ May; June/July; August/September; October; November; December/January for a total of seven issues by Cincy, 30 Garfield Place, Cincinnati, OH 45202. Periodicals postage paid at Cincinnati, Ohio, and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Cincy, 30 Garfield Place, Suite 440, Cincinnati, OH 45202. w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9

3


Publisher’s View

Out in the Open W

h i le ser v i ng i n t he a r my, conversations about our Commander in Chief were always kept behind closed doors. I served under two, Clinton and Bush, each very different in their demeanor and in ways they approached working with the military. President Bill Clinton had a lot of things stacked against him amongst much of the officer corps, the first of which was the BRAC, or base closures, which to many were more important than what was being reported in the news about other transgressions. President George W. Bush overall was seen more favorably in terms of his support of the military, but the questions about Iraq and the need for war was the “scuttlebutt” of the time. While I am long gone from the military, I often wonder what the soldiers in the barracks think of news and events happening today—there are very strong restrictions about what opinions soldiers are allowed to share. In particular, I thought of this when President Trump recently made a comment regarding deceased American ex-prisoner Otto Warmbier and Kim Jong Un that I am sure lead to many private conversations, especially among those soldiers serving now in South Korea. President Trump stated that he takes Kim Jong Un at his word when he says had nothing to do with the treatment of Otto. This topic digs into a wound, never to be healed, for the Warmbier family and countless friends. Here in Cincinnati where Otto grew up, discussions obviously went beyond closed doors when we heard of the president’s words. The fact that many elected officials on both sides of the aisle were quick to denounce them gives credit

4

A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

Locally, veteran and family owned Editor & Publisher Eric Harmon Managing Editor Corinne Minard Associate Editors Kevin Michell, Eric Spangler Contributing Writers Amara Agomuo, Peter Bronson, Bill Ferguson Jr., Juli Hale, Janice Hisle, Dan Hurley, Laura Leavitt, David Lyman, Christian Meininger, Don Mooney, Kurt Niemeyer, Deborah Rutledge Creative Director Guy Kelly Art Director Katy Rucker Associate Publisher Rick Seeney Sales and Operations Manager Anthony Rhoades Custom Sales Manager Brad Hoicowitz Advertising Director Abbey Cummins Account Executives Susan Montgomery, Stephanie Simon Inside Sales Ian Altenau, Katelynn Webb

to our democracy, our media outlets and our ability to express our thoughts without restrictions. What President Trump believes about Otto’s treatment is his prerogative, however what he shared, for many officials, was illegitimate. As soldiers have rules for sharing opinion in public, I ask, should not the same standard apply to its leadership? Have no doubt that Cincinnati and our country will not forget Otto. Feeble, seemingly peacockish, attempts to negotiate with regimes of terror will not sequester Otto’s struggle and our soldiers serving now deserve better.

Advertising Manager Laura Federle Audience Development Coordinator Alexandra Stacey Events Director Hannah Jones Events Coordinator Alexandra Tepe Production Manager Keith Ohmer Work-study Students Esvin Bernardo Perez, Aliyah White Cincy on the web: www.cincymagazine.com Cincy Co. LLC Cincinnati Club Building 30 Garfield Place, Suite 440 Cincinnati, OH 45202 Contact Cincy: information@cincymagazine.com or call (513) 421-2533. Go to www.cincymagazine.com to get your complimentary subscription to Cincy.


The Official Health Insurer of Everything You Love

™

Insuring lifelong puddle splashers

Protecting and caring for your family is a full-time job. We know, because it’s ours. To learn more about our comprehensive health plans, visit MedMutual.com/Everything.


Contributors

A University of Cincinnati alum, Amara Agomuo’s work has been featured in MSNBC, NBC News and CNN. She currently produces and writes content for Kroger Co.

Cincy Magazine contributing editor Peter Bronson is an author, editor, publisher and owner of Chilidog Press LLC. He is a former reporter, columnist and editor at The Cincinnati Enquirer, The Tucson Citizen and other newspapers in Arizona and Michigan.

Bill Ferguson Jr. is a writer/editor/ communications consultant who has spent 40-plus years as an editor and reporter for six newspapers, beginning at age 14 as a sports reporter for his hometown daily.

Juli Hale is a marketing communications professional with a long history of writing about the people and places of Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky.

Janice (Morse) Hisle was a Cincinnati Enquirer reporter for 15 years, mostly covering suburban public safety, and has done freelance work for the Associated Press. She recently finished writing her first true-crime book.

David Holthaus is an award-winning journalist with more than 20 years experience in Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky covering business, public affairs and writing commentary.

Dan Hurley is a local historian and the president of Applied History Associates, which works with museums and historical societies throughout the Eastern U.S.

Laura Leavitt is a writer and editor living just north of Cincinnati in Hamilton. She specializes in writing about sustainable living, food/ drink, nonprofits and small businesses.

Christian Meininger is a native Cincinnatian and a follower of the Cincinnati arts scene. He occasionally indulges in the fact that he is a fan of the Reds and Bengals, but realizes that this can be a perilous choice.

Don Mooney is a Cincinnati attorney, a past member of the Cincinnati Planning Commission and active in local politics.

Kurt Niemeyer is a lifelong gearhead. A passionate racer, rallyist, preservationist, restorer and international Concours judge, Niemeyer contributes histories and technical articles to motoring enthusiast publications on a monthly basis.

Deborah Rutledge is a freelance feature writer, originally from Northern Ohio, who has lived and worked in Cincinnati for nearly 20 years.

Joe Simon is a Cincinnati native but travels back and forth from Cincinnati and Chicago. He’s a freelance photographer and been shooting since 1997. He’s been a regular contributor to Cincy Magazine and The Cincinnati Enquirer.

6

A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com


Web Exclusives INNOVATION & LEADERSHIP Batavia Goes Hollywood With WWII Plane

TOP 5 ONLINE STORIES 1 2019 Power 100 by David Holthaus & the Editors 2 Managing Your Wealth in 2019 by Greg Sharpless 3 Podcasts Come to Cincy by David Lyman 4 Is Cincinnati Innovative? by Liz Engel

2019’s Most Influential People

Black Leaders Sound Off PAGE 42

5 High-end Tastes: Orchids at Palm Court by Juli Hale PLUS:

LIVE

LEADING LAW YERS Spring is here and so are the events! Visit Cincy.Live to find fun events including the 2019 Night in White on April 12, Cincy Motorsports Spring Classic Driving Tour on April 27, Mimosas for Memories on April 27 and more.

DIALOGUE David Holthaus @dgholthaus I had fun working with @CincyMagazine to spot the ‘People to Watch’ in 2019. Including @TDennard, @pblackshaw, and @KimmLauterbach. Keep pushin’ the envelope! Josh Kauffman @MHS_Kauffman We are the @CincyMagazine Best of the East for School Spirit with the help of great partners like @Team_Fitz - thanks for helping make our tifo possible! #AllForTheM Brent Cooper @bcooperNKY Some great leaders are talking about the importance of innovation at Power 100 breakfast. @CincyMagazine @nkychamber @TiER1says @uofcincy @BeUptownCincy @Cincy_Tech

VIDEO Cincy Magazine has kept busy in 2019 with its many events. Not able to attend them? Visit YouTube.com/CincyCompany to see video re-caps of our Best of the East event and the Power 100 Leadership Forum.

Belterra Park @BelterraPark We’re proud to announce that our executive chef, Joshua Miragliotta, was named the Best Chef of the East by @CincyMagazine for 2019! Dine with us tonight to taste some of his award-winning flavors. #CincyEats w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9

7


InsideCincy

Taking Flight

THE BUTTERFLIES OF ECUADOR VISIT CINCINNATI THANKS TO A NEW EXHIBIT AT THE KROHN CONSERVATORY By Amara Agomuo

F

or 24 years, the Cincinnati Krohn Conservatory has put on a one-ofa-kind, annual butterfly exhibit that showcases different parts of the world through each region’s unique themes. This year, Ecuador will get the spotlight for 12 weeks in the Krohn Conservatory’s “The Butterflies of Ecuador.” This butterfly show will feature thousands of remarkably colored butterflies from all over the globe and from the surrounding Ecuadorian climate. Visitors will have the chance to get up close with butterflies like the big blue morpho—an eye-catching, luminous bright blue butterfly that hails from the tropical forest of Ecuador and South America. “It’s a cultural butterfly exhibit,” says Andrea Schepmann, director of Cincinnati’s Krohn Conservatory. Known as the “Martha Stewart” of butterflies, Schepmann says the butterfly show first began with the idea of bringing in nature to spruce up the entertainment scene in Cincinnati. Schepmann herself has always been a nature enthusiast. She received a degree 8

A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

in horticulture and has since presented at workshops and conferences on the latest trends in butterflies. So how exactly does one get thousands of butterflies into the Krohn Conservatory? Schepmann says the conservatory gets help from butterfly farmers. These butterfly farmers are scattered all across the world and raise butterflies in captivity and sell them to vendors for butterfly exhibits. And it almost takes a village to get all these alluring butterflies into Cincinnati for the show. For the exhibit, the conservatory can expect a weekly shipment of 1,200 butterflies from around the world—including this year’s batch from Ecuador. Then at 11 a.m. every day, a brand-new collection of butterflies is released into the flight room during the butterfly show. All this behindthe-scenes work is what makes it possible for attendees to see at least a thousand butterflies at any given time. And don’t worry, the journey the butterflies take to the Queen City is a safe one. One interesting thing about these butterflies is that they all arrive in chrysalis form. We may remember this as the cocoon stage; however, for butterflies, they actually dwell inside a shiny chrysalis. This form protects the butterflies from damaging their wings during transportation to the Krohn Conservatory. Once they’ve emerged from the chrysalis stage and are ready to fly, they are sent over to the but-

Krohn Conservatory’s annual butterfly show is Cincinnati’s opportunity to see about a thousand butterflies in person. terfly display. If you’ve never witnessed a chrysalis form in person, you can catch this transformation by walking by the nursery room at the butterfly event. Alongside the butterfly show, the Krohn Conservatory will also serve as a living museum with several other live attractions. While visiting “The Butterflies of Ecuador,” don’t forget to check out the orchid room featuring 300 orchids, the one-of-a-kind fern house with a chocolate tree and more. Close to 90,000 people from all over the world each year attend this annual event. This year’s show runs March 23 to June 16. For more events at the Krohn Conservatory, visit cincinnatiparks.com/krohn/. n


Q&A

4 Questions with Jayne Utter MANAGING DIRECTOR OF SUMMERFAIR CINCINNATI Jayne Utter

By Corinne Minard

S

ummerfair, the annual arts show that features more than 300 fine artists and craftspeople, returns for another year at Coney Island. We spoke with Jayne Utter, managing director of Summerfair Cincinnati, about the event and the impact of the organization on the community.

WHAT SHOULD PEOPLE KNOW ABOUT THIS YEAR’S EVENT? It’s May 31-June 2 this year at Coney Island. We’ll have over 300 juried artists. It’s our 52nd year. We are open Friday 2-8 p.m., Saturday from 10 a.m.-8 p.m. and Sunday 10 a.m.-5 p.m. It’s all outside, it’s rain or shine. It is a fine arts art show, but there’s a lot of stuff that’s affordable for anyone. There’s a lot of stuff that I wouldn’t touch with a 10-foot pole but I really like going and seeing it. We do have a $10 cover, but that money goes with any money we make from our merchandise to support Greater Cincinnati arts and artists.

HOW DID IT START? We got started in Mt. Adams. The people in Mt. Adams wanted to help support the opening of the Playhouse in the Park. They held this art fair on the streets of Mt. Adams and it ended up after a couple of years being named Summerfair. We went to Mirror Lake in Eden Park because it had gotten too big for the streets and [now] we’re at Coney. Coney’s the perfect place for us to be. 10

A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

This year’s Summerfair will be held May 31-June 2 at Coney Island.

AS A SMALL 501(C)3 NONPROFIT, HOW ARE YOU MAKING A DIFFERENCE IN THE ART WORLD IN GREATER CINCINNATI? We are a 501(c)3 nonprofit. Our mission statement is that we give back to the small arts and artists and arts organizations. We support the Overture Awards that Cincinnati Arts Association gives out, and that’s high school students. We support our college students, arts students, at our emerging artists exhibition. We have the AIA, Aid to Individual Artists—working artists here in Cincinnati. We choose four per year to give funds to and then every three years we bring those winners back to show how they’ve grown because of the money we gave them. The next one of those will be at the Weston Gallery in March of 2020. We also give to small arts organizations like music groups, men’s and women’s [art] courses, small theater groups [and] dance groups. We have $20,000 that we give out. We have our poster competition, which

has already been chosen for this year and the poster is the center of our advertising and merchandising for each year. We will be debuting that poster April 7 at Joseph Beth in Rookwood. Then we also try to choose something large to do and this year we chose the Art Academy of Cincinnati. It’s their 150th [anniversary]. [We supported] their Regional Scholastic Art and Writing Awards.

OTHER THAN BUYING PIECES AT SUMMERFAIR, WHAT OTHER WAYS CAN TRISTATE RESIDENTS SUPPORT LOCAL ARTISTS? We are a volunteer member group. I’m the only paid employee and everything else is done by volunteers. And we’re always looking for members. During the fair we call them outside volunteers. With that you get into the fair for free. We’re also taking applications for that. All this can be found on our website summerfair.org. n


By the Numbers

Doing Business in Greater Cincinnati The eight-county Greater Cincinnati region contains 44,688 employers with at least one paid employee and an additional 135,490 non-employer firms (businesses with no paid employees, such as independent contractors and sole proprietors), according to federal government statistics. Following are data drawn from the 44,688 employer-based businesses. (Research by Bill Ferguson Jr.)

$46.252 billion

Average number of employees for each business (region average is 20):

Boone: 26 Butler: 19 Campbell: 15 Clermont: 14 Dearborn: 14 Hamilton: 22 Kenton: 17 Warren: 19

Total annual payroll of businesses with at least one employee (ranging from $458.93 million in Dearborn County to $26.76 billion in Hamilton County)

908,600 Number of employees

$50,905

Number of residents for every business (region average is 46):

Boone: 41 Butler: 53 Campbell: 55 Clermont: 56 Dearborn: 54 Hamilton: 39 Kenton: 53 Warren: 53

Average annual pay of employees

SOURCES: 2012 THRU 2016 COUNTY AND ZIP CODE BUSINESS PATTERNS PROGR AMS, THE 2007 AND 2012 ECONOMIC CENSUS, AND THE 2012 CENSUS OF AGRICULTURE (EMPLOYER ESTIMATES) AND 2012 THRU 2016 NONEMPLOYER STATISTICS PROGR AMS AND THE 2007 AND 2012 ECONOMIC CENSUS (NONEMPLOYER ESTIMATES) w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9

11


SCENE

Scene

Power 100

On Feb. 21, Cincy Magazine hosted the eighth annual Power 100 Leadership Forum, a special leadership panel and networking event featuring discussions with some of the Tristate’s most influential leaders, at the Cincinnati Club. The event was sponsored by GBQ and the community partners were the University of Cincinnati Carl H. Lindner College of Business and Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber. The nonprofit beneficiary was DePaul Cristo Rey High School. 1 Neil Tilow, Talbert House, and Rich Mitchell, Ernst & Young 2 Greg Heimkreiter, GBQ; Jason Ware, CF Bank; and Tom Saelinger, Republic Bank 3 Kathleen Bodenlos, Cincinnati Museum Center; Jeremy Boerger, Boerger Consulting; Lisa Boerger, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital; and Peg Rusconi, CincyTech

1

3

International Women’s Day at 84.51° On March 8, 84.51° supported International Women’s Day by opening its doors to local female business owners and providing them a platform to further their business and mission. The businesses included Brewhaus Bakery Co., The Spicy Olive, Tablespoon Cooking Company, Grateful Grahams and Lauren Pax Yoga. 84.51° community partners, Girls With Pearls and Black Career Women’s Network, were also present during the celebration. In addition to the female-owned business expo, 84.51° celebrated the day with multiple interactive booths, all highlighting diversity and inclusion.  1 The 84.51° Women’s EDGE Group, an internal group that encourages associates to participate in thoughtful conversations about gender and diversity in the workplace 2 Lauren Pax Yoga leads a yoga class with 84.51° associates. 12

A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

1

2

2


Badin High School Hall of Honor Annual Dinner The Badin High School Hall of Honor inducted its fifth class at the annual dinner on Thursday, Sept. 27, at the Courtyard by Marriott in downtown Hamilton. The Badin Hall of Honor is dedicated to honoring the outstanding achievements of graduates, faculty, staff and members of the Badin community and its predecessor schools, Hamilton Catholic (all boys) and Notre Dame (all girls), which came together in the fall of 1966 to form Badin. 1 Principal Brian Pendergest ’90 2 Badin Chairman of the Board Ed Larkin ’88 3 2018 Hall of Honor inductees, from left: Robert Kirsch ’77, Kathleen Saurber DeRouen ’99, Ed Larkin ’58, Karen Larkin ’58, Michael Zettler ’66, Shirley Miller Rosmarin ’57, Father Gerald Haemmerle and Elizabeth Anne Tromans Ungerbuehler ’69 4 Ashley Mallory ’20 5 Emari Smiley ’20

1

2

3

4

5

w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9

13


Scene Cincinnati Home and Garden Show Logan A/C and Heat Services celebrated its 10th year of participation in the Cincinnati Home and Garden Show Feb. 23-24 and Feb. 28-March 3 at the Duke Energy Convention Center. This year, Logan A/C and Heat Services showcased both Trane and Mitsubishi Electric products. Each year, the team speaks with attendees, as many homeowners are looking to update their heating and cooling system. The show gives attendees the opportunity to take time talking to professionals to get informed about their upcoming project.

1

1 The Logan A/C and Heat Services team 2 The team brought both Trane and Mitsubishi Electric products. 3 Attendees were given the opportunity to ask questions.

2

3

a celebration OF SERVICE

Saint Ursula

Honoring Bob Castellini

Summer Academy

Enrichment Camps for girls entering grades 6, 7, and 8

June 17-21

Athletic Camps for girls grades 3-8 also available: Dates vary

For camp details and to register, visit https://www.saintursula.org/summercamps.aspx Camp fee assistance available for eligible students.

To schedule a tour or to learn more, contact: Michelle Dellecave, 513-961-3410 ext. 183 or mdellecave@saintursula.org www.saintursula.org SaintUrsulaAcademy SUA Bulldogs 14

A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

SUABULLDOGS

Join the celebration Thursday, May 9, 6 p.m. at Cintas Center Tickets at SVDPcincinnati.org/COS


Nicola’s Legendary Dinner On Thursday, Oct. 11, WordPlay Cincy hosted Nicola’s Legendary Dinner at Nicola’s Ristorante in historic Over-the-Rhine. Through ticket sales, a live auction and donations, attendees raised over $63,000 to help WordPlay expand mobile programming and reach more students. Now in its third year, Nicola’s Legendary Dinner supports WordPlay in creating communities where young people discover, honor and share their voices. More than 100 people attended this year’s dinner, and 100 percent of proceeds from the dinner were donated to WordPlay. 1 Nick Pietoso with Kitty Strauss-Rosenthal and Richard Rosenthal 2 WordPlay students walked onstage behind a cardboard van prop and performed “Oh the Places You’ll Go” to a captive audience. 3 WordPlay teens perform personal and compelling spoken word pieces during the event.

1

2

3

w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9

15


Scene March of Dimes Signature Chefs Auction The March of Dimes premier fundraiser, Signature Chefs Auction, was held Nov. 8 at the Hyatt Regency Cincinnati. The event celebrates culinary excellence with top chefs featuring tastings of their creations for March of Dimes supporters. 1 The Greater Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky March of Dimes Board members: Back row, from left: Karen Sparling, Kevin Mire, Ashley Brinegar, MacKenzie Curt, Daniel Staley and Chad Brizendine; front row, from left: Jessica Dipre, Dr. Emily DeFranco, Kate Finger, Essa Naser, Rebecca Riegelsberger, Richard Pinson, Aaron Foulk, Kimberly Baughman, Nina Tohill and Ruby Crawford-Hemphill 2 Jason

1

2

and Rebecca Riegelsberger, co-chairs, 2018 Signature Chefs Auction 3 Greater Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky March of Dimes Executive Director Tina Jackson awards Best Plate Presentation and Best Tasting Dish to winners Chef Jeff Moore and Sous Chef Christopher Biggers with Stone Creek Dining Company.

3

At the Art Academy of Cincinnati, we are the new generation of boundary-breakers. The imaginative radicals who are changing the face of art as we know it. The creative entrepreneurs who are redefining culture. The luminous visionaries who are creating a newer, brighter, more radiant world. Earning your BFA at the Art Academy of Cincinnati can help you make art, make a difference! The art of the future starts here. It starts with you.

MAJORS: CREATIVE WRITING, DESIGN, ILLUSTRATION, DRAWING & PAINTING, SCULPTURE, PRINT MEDIA, PHOTOGRAPHY MINORS: ART HISTORY FILM/VIDEO/AUDIO ASSOCIATE OF GRAPHIC DESIGN

16

A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com


Redwood Express Enters the Jungle On March 1, Redwood School and Rehabilitation Center held its largest fundraiser of the year at Paul Brown Stadium. The Redwood Express Enters the Jungle was a sell out with more than 600 supporters in attendance. The Naked Karate Girls performed for the enthusiastic crowd. Redwood has served children and adults with severe and multiple disabilities for more than 65 years. 1 Cheryl Wood, Redwood’s first client 2 Redwood Client Cheryl Haas with her brother John Haas 3 Redwood Staff Stacey and Taylor Hughes with their families

1

1

1

Seminary education stirs your imagination, launching you on a journey of transformation. In addition to the MDiv and MA, Bethany offers four specialized graduate certicates that will expand knowledge and provde theological application for any profession.

Intercultural Biblical Interpretation

Just Peace and Conict Transformation

Theopoetics and Theological Imagination

Theology and Science Many courses offered online

Let’s talk. bethanyseminary.edu Richmond, IN

765-983-1800

So that the world  w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9

17


HELP SOMEONE IN NEED CLEAN OUT YOUR CLOSET

Spring cleaning season is here! This is the perfect time to sort through new and gently-used clothing you may no longer want or need and donate it to Matthew 25: Ministries. Donations of new and gently-used clothes benefit those we serve here in the U.S. and around the world. Visit WWW.M25M.ORG for more information on clothing donations and other types of products we accept year-round.

CARING FOR A NEEDY WORLD WITH THE THINGS WE THROW AWAY 11060 KENWOOD ROAD, CINCINNATI, OH 45242

|

513.793.6256

|

M25M.ORG

|


LIVE!

CINCINNATI ART MUSEUM

page 20

A&E CALENDAR

page 22

TRAVEL KENTUCKY

page 28

GATLINBURG page 37

RIVERTOWN BREWERY

page 38

DINING

page 40

From“No Spectators”: HYBYCOZO, Deep Thought, 2018. Photo by Ron Blunt.

w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9

19


An Unlikely Pairing STARTING APRIL 26, VISITORS WILL FIND “NO SPECTATORS: THE ART OF BURNING MAN” AT THE CINCINNATI ART MUSEUM By David Lyman

20

A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

RON BLUNT

T

hey are the strangest of artistic bedfellows: the Cincinnati Art Museum and Burning Man, that annual rite of hedonism in the Nevada desert. Seriously, when I heard that the museum was soon to host a show called “No Spectators: The Art of Burning Man,” it was hard to know what to make of it. On the one hand, you have Burning Man, that colossal pop-up metropolis that reappears every year on Nevada’s Black Rock Desert. Billed as an “experiment in temporary community,” it has a reputation as a gathering of more than 70,000 pleasure-seeking, anti-consumer sybarites. Remember, when it comes to “the man,” this is a festival dedicated to burning him. On the other side of this partnership you have the Cincinnati Art Museum. It couldn’t be more different. We use words like “venerated” and “esteemed” to describe it. It’s an institution that was built with old money. Sitting on its Olympusstyle setting in Eden Park, it houses a vast permanent collection, much of it gifted by families who personify “the man.” The same “man” that Burning Man burns. How could they possibly find any common ground? Through art, it turns out. For all its radical trimmings, Burning Man is organized by a well-oiled nonprofit corporation. It engages in very little traditional fundraising, though it is rumored that some Silicon Valley money has crept into the funding mix in recent years. But those 70,000 people who show up to party and commune together? It turns out that they pay hefty entry fees. So while Burning Man may have its anarchic leanings, it manages to make a fair amount of money every year. And with that money, it offers economic support to an array of programs and individuals working in

TOP: Shrumen Lumen by FoldHaus, 2016. LEFT: Lead designers and builders for Shrumen Lumen. Front row, from left: Nathalie Collins, Annette Diefenthaler, and Kalan Kircher. Back row, from left: Bomani McClendon, Jesse Silver and Joerg Student.

everything from education and social enterprise to the arts. Especially the arts. If you should ever attend Burning Man, you’ll see the influence of the arts—particularly the visual arts—immediately. It is a manifestation of the creative juices that Burning Man hopes to unleash in everyone who visits. Visual artworks are central to creating Burning Man’s otherworldly desert atmosphere. Participants create the most remarkable “things” out there, from eye-popping steampunk-inspired vehicles to castle-like structures, from an enormous, multicolored jellyfish to a towering Afro pick rising out of the desert floor. Small wonder that some adventurous bricks-and-mortar arts institution might want to share that art with its patrons.

Most of today’s major art museums can no longer afford to be our grandmothers’ museums. For one thing, many are public institutions and are expected to serve a broader swath of the public than they did 50 years ago. Also, they’re looking to appeal to younger generations of arts patrons. And by “younger,” I mean everyone from Baby Boomers on down. “Visual arts” are no longer limited to dark and moody portraits by Dutch Masters. Or Impressionistic paintings awash in swirls of color. Today, art can be any thing from a dizzying light show—think “Blink”—to industrial design. It can be a hillside adorned with rocks arranged in geometric shapes. Or a fire-breathing vehicle with a dragonhead. To be fair, museums have dabbled in “new” art for many years. Remember Cincinnati Art Museum’s 2012 Nick Cave exhibit? Or Ryan McGinness’ blacklight installation in 2008? Or just last year, with William Kentridge’s massive “More Sweetly Play the Dance” installation?


LIBBY WEILER

Tin Pan Dragon by Duane Flatmo, 2006.

RON BLUNT

So as unlikely as it may be to find a bit of Burning Man in Eden Park, it really shouldn’t come as a shock. It’s a reflection of the many different directions that art is evolving into. In March of last year, the Renwick Gallery, now a part of the Smithsonian

Truth Is Beauty, Marco Cochrane, 2017.

American Art Museum, introduced “No Spectators.” The title, incidentally, is a reference to a deeply held Burning Man belief that people should not be bystanders. Life is not a spectator sport. Burning Man participants and, by extension, the rest of us should be involved in the world around us in every way we can. If you read through Burning Man’s 10 Principles, one deals with radical participation, another with radical inclusivity. With the Renwick having taken that first big step, it was easy for other museums to start to fall in line. The exhibition closed at the Renwick in late January and opens here on April 26. After Cincinnati, it will move on to the Oakland Museum of California (Oct.12, 2019–Feb. 16, 2020). “It is one of the most influential movements in contemporary American art and culture,” says CAM director Cameron Kitchin in a prepared statement. “The visual culture created in conjunction with the Burning Man gathering each year is a democratic and inclusive model of artistic expression. Working with the thinkers and artists who create the culture challenges the very notion of an art museum.” So what, exactly, will you see?

There are hundreds of objects, large and small. There’s Duane Flatmo’s “Tin Pan Dragon,” looking like a cross between a Viking ship and a creature out of a Harry Potter nightmare. There is “Shrumen Lumen,” a room filled with giant origami mushrooms with a constantly moving array of lights playing over them. And Marco Cochrane’s “Truth Is Beauty,” a shimmering 19-foot tall sculpture of singer/dancer Deja Solis. The original sculpture, created at Burning Man, was three times taller. There are dozens of other Burning Manrelated activities, from lectures and occasional tours given by “burners”—people who have attended Burning Man—to an enormous “temple” that is already being constructed by volunteers on the grassy hillside on the west side of the museum complex. Organizers hope to involve it in a Burning Man-type burn. But finding the right place to torch a sizeable structure is, as you might guess, proving complicated. In keeping with Burning Man’s philosophy that art is for everyone, admission to this special exhibition is free. Stay tuned. To keep yourself up to date on the museum’s Burning Man activities, visit cincinnatiartmuseum.org/burningman. n w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9

21


SUNDAY

APRIL

MONDAY 1 [4/1] Two local high school bands join the Fillmore Wind Band at Music Hall for Windfest.

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

[4/2] The Harry James Orchestra brings a big band revival to Music Hall’s ballroom.

3 [4/1-30] The Cincinnati Zoo celebrates springtime’s return with the monthlong Zoo Blooms.

4 [4/4] Pioneering transgender actress Laverne Cox speaks about her journey to womanhood at Miami University.

5 [4/5] Stand-up comedian Dane Cook stops at Taft Theatre on his first nationwide tour since 2013.

6 [4/6] Internet celebrity Tiffany Jenkins performs at The Taft on her “This Show is Awkward AF” tour.

2

7

8

9 [4/9] Bronson Arroyo and Kathy Wade help judge singing competition ArtsWave CincySings.

10

11 [4/11] Matthew 25: Ministries invites the public to bring their pups to volunteer for Paws for a Cause.

12 [4/12] Pink Floyd tribute band Brit Floyd performs a retrospective on The Wall at The Taft.

13 [4/13] The Pops celebrates the return of Reds baseball with Take Me Out to the Ballgame.

14 [4/12-14] Mozart’s final opera, La Clemenza di Tito, comes to the CCM’s Corbett Auditorium.

15

16 [4/16] Black Violin brings its “classical boom” fusion of hip-hop and classical music to Music Hall.

17 [4/17] Wilco frontman Jeff Tweedy stops at Music Hall on the tour supporting his new solo album Warm.

18 [4/18] Celtic Woman returns to The Taft while on its 2019 Ancient Land tour.

19 [4/19] Comedian, actor and craftsman Nick Offerman spends a night entertaining at The Taft.

20 [4/20] Springtime officially begins in Cincinnati with Kings Island’s Opening Day.

21 [4/30] Get ready for Ken Anderson Alliance’s Legends: Past and Present at Paul Brown Stadium, happening April 30.

22 [4/20-5/18] Join the Peanuts gang at Playhouse in the Park for You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown.

23 [4/23] Escher Quartet performs their mind-bendingly beautiful renditions at Memorial Hall.

24 25 [4/24] Cincinnati Go Red for Women has its Go Red Experience Luncheon at the Duke Energy Convention Center.

26 [4/26] Christian rock band MercyMe comes to U.S. Bank Arena on its Imagine Nation tour.

27 [4/27] Stand-up comedian and actor Patton Oswalt brings his insightful humor to Taft Theatre.

28

29

30

22

A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com


A&E Calendar Paying Tribute to Whitney Whitney Houston’s otherworldly voice left an indelible mark on the world of pop music forever. Join the Cincinnati Pops, vocalist Rashidra Scott and guest conductor Brent Havens on this tour of Whitney’s musical legacy, including hits such as “How Will I Know?” and “I Will Always Love You.” April 23. 7:30 p.m. $25-$115. Music Hall, 1241 Elm St., Overthe-Rhine. 513-381-3300, cincinnatisymphony.org.

Cincy 7.5x4.874_April_v1.pdf

1

2/28/19

11:49 AM

True Celtic Returns! July 26-28

Dayton’s First and Free Celtic Fest Returns.

C

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

FREE! • FOUR STAGES • FAMILY FRIENDLY • RAIN OR SHINE

Come celebrate the best of Celtic music, dance, art and culture at Dayton’s largest Downtown event. Visit DaytonCelticFestival.com for more information.

w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9

23


A&E Calendar Tangerine-colored Dream Mandolin Orange’s folk music runs between poles of emotion, at times achingly wistful, then radiating warmth moments later. The North Carolina duo brings their act to Taft Theatre for an evening in support of their latest album Tides of a Teardrop for an intimate and rich live music experience. April 16. 8 p.m. $22 in advance, $25 at the door. Taft Theatre, 317 E. Fifth St., Downtown. 513-232-6220, tafttheatre.org.

An event benefitting the Andy & JJ Dalton Fo u n d a t i o n a n d t h e K e n A n d e rs o n A l l i a n c e.

DAT E & T I M E

APRIL 30 6 : 3 0 PM

TH

LO C AT I O N PAU L B RO W N S TA D I U M

andydalton.org 24

A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

End the silence. Stop the stigma. 513.449.8415 ChallengeOfHope.org

maga zine.com LCOH-011_CIMA_April-2019_1/4Pg_Final.indd 1

3/1/19 3:50 PM


SUNDAY

MAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

1 [5/1] Indie pop quartet Lucius comes to Memorial Hall with Pure Bathing Culture.

2 [5/1-26] The Incline Theater starts May with the modern classic jukebox musical Mamma Mia!

3 [5/3] U.S. Bank Arena hosts an ‘80s throwback with The Mixtape Tour featuring New Kids on the Block.

4 [5/1-31] The Cincinnati Zoo’s Zoo Babies returns for a celebration of cute and cuddly newborn animals.

5 [5/5] Cincinnati’s Flying Pig Marathon gets the city on its feet and moving for its 21st year.

6 [5/6] Wrestling’s biggest weekly event returns to Cincinnati with WWE Monday Night Raw at U.S. Bank Arena.

7 [5/4-6/2] Cincy Playhouse puts on a production of Tiny Houses, a comedy about minimalism and growing up.

8 [5/8] Former Dancing with the Stars performer Derek Hough brings his first solo show to Taft Theatre.

10

11 [5/11] The Kentucky Symphony ends its 2018-19 season with Viva Vivaldi at St. Mary’s in Covington.

12

13

14 [5/10-18] Cincinnati Music Theatre presents The Hunchback of Notre Dame at the Aronoff.

15 [5/15] SCPA’s Corbett Mayerson Awards showcases juniors competing in a variety of artistic disciplines.

9 [5/9] Music Hall brings back Silent Movies Made Musical, pairing Charlie Chaplin movies with Wurlitzer organ music. 16 [5/16] Country music megastars Rascal Flatts come to Riverbend with Billy Currington and Jimmie Allen.

17 [5/17-18] West Chester’s Union Center hosts the Buckeye BBQ Fest for a weekend of food and fun.

19 20 [5/19] The Aronoff presents Darci Lynne & Friends featuring the 14-year-old singer/ ventriloquist.

21 [5/21] Veteran singersongwriter Josh Ritter and The Royal City Band comes to The Taft.

22 [5/17-6/2] Cincinnati Shakespeare Co. reimagines Feydeau’s 1907 farce A Flea in Her Ear.

18 [5/18-19] Sharonville’s Heritage Village Museum hosts Civil War Weekend featuring reenactments and more. 25 [5/25] The world’s largest recirculating pool reopens to the public on Coney Island’s Opening Day.

26 [5/25-27] Celebrate Memorial Day weekend with great food galore at the 41st Taste of Cincinnati.

28

29 30 [Through 8/18] Cincinnati Museum Center hosts the stunning historical exhibit “Egypt: The Time of Pharaohs.”

27

23 24 [5/23] Cello quartet Apocalyptica plays string versions of Metallica songs at Taft Theatre.

31

w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9

25


A&E Calendar

A Fitting Finale T h e C i n c i n n at i Sy m p h o ny Orchestra and Louis Langrée end the 2018-19 season in high style with a performance of Schubert’s Unfinished Symphony No. 8 and Mahler’s Symphony No. 5. May 10-11. F 11 a.m., Sa 8 p.m. $14-$120. Music Hall, 1241 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine. 513-381-3300, cincinnatisymphony.org.

April 23-27 Tune in for great deals. Bid, Buy and Support Your Local PBS station!

Mon-Fri. 5:30 -10:30pm Sat. 3 -11pm Watch on-air and online Over-the-air: 48.1 Spectrum: 1013 or 916 Fioptics: 13 Comcast: 7 or 1013

Connect with us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram for the latest updates. CETconnect #CETAuction

www.CETconnect.org/events

26

A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com


Little Boxes in the Playhouse Young writer and playwright Chelsea Marcantel penned Tiny Houses, a comedy of minimalism, millennials and maturation. Now, the production has it co-world premiere at Playhouse in the Park. May 4-June 2. Times vary, no shows on Mondays. $30-$86. Playhouse in the Park, 962 Mt. Adams Circle, Eden Park. 513-421-3888, cincyplay.com.

Don’t see your event? Visit cincymagazine.com to add it to our online calendar for free.

SensibleHelp@stresslessworkshops.com 513.382.4245 StressLessWorkshops.com

w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9

27


Midwestern Traveler

A Taste of the Bluegrass State FROM SWEET TO SAVORY, KENTUCKY OFFERS CULINARY TRAILS FOR ALL TASTES By Corinne Minard

S

avor ...

THE SIGHTS & SOUNDS OF GEORGETOWN.

PURE SMALL TOWN CHARM. – Family Activities – • International Kite & Cultural Fest - April • Horsey Hundred Bicycling Event - May

– Equine Activities – • Minutes from the Kentucky Horse Park

Kentucky Three-Day Event - April

• Old Friends Retired Thoroughbred Farm • Whispering Woods Riding Stables

– Picturesque Downtown – • Specialty Shops • Antiques • Scott County Arts and Cultural Center • Cafes and One-of-a-kind Restaurants • Georgetown and Scott County Museum

– Unbridled Fun – • Toyota Motor Manufacturing, KY, Inc. Tour • Country Boy Brewing • Bourbon 30 Spirits • Golf • Elkhorn Creek • Geocaching Trails • Yuko-en on the Elkhorn • Ward Hall • Close proximity to the Ark Encounter

INTERSTATE

64

INTERSTATE

75

www.GeorgetownKy.com • 888.863.8600 28

A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

Pivot Brewing is on the Brewgrass Trail


A

s the featured location of this year’s season of Top Chef (which has previously featured cities like New Orleans, Seattle and Miami and states like California) Kentucky is becoming a culinary destination for foodies throughout the country. For those who wish to taste the state’s cuisine there’s no better way to start than with a culinary trail. Kentucky is home to 11 unique trails that cover everything from craft beer to regional specialties like the Hot Brown.

HOT BROWN HOP The Hot Brown is one of those quintessential Kentucky dishes that you may have heard about but never tried. It’s an openfaced turkey sandwich served on toast with a Mornay sauce and bacon, and it was first created in Louisville in the 1920s. “It was actually created by a chef at the historic Brown Hotel, which is still in operation today,” says Stacey Yates, vice president of marketing communications for Louisville Tourism. At the time, locals would stay up late dancing at the hotel and

Try a delicious Hot Brown at one of about 40 restaurants on the Hot Brown Hop in Louisville.

w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9

29


Midwestern Traveler

LEFT: Hot Brown Pizza at Troll Pub ABOVE: Hot Brown Tots at the Kentucky State Fair would grab something there to eat before they headed home. “Often it was ham and cheese or something left over from that night’s buffet. The chef at the time, … we think that he took the leftover turkey, he was tired of making hot ham and cheese and used turkey, … and he put it over toast, covered in a Mornay sauce, added cheese and bacon and broiled it, and people loved it so much that they started asking for the hot turkey sandwich from the Brown. Over

30

A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com


VICTOR SIZEMORE, COURTESY OF VISITLEX

The Ethereal Brewing Co. is on the Brewgrass Trail.

time it became the Hot Brown.” Today, about 40 restaurants—including the Brown Hotel—serve a version of the Hot Brown in Louisville. While many are known for their classic take on the dish, others offer unique variations you can’t find anywhere else. For example, the Napa River Grille offers a brunch version with an egg on it, the Come Back Inn makes an Italian version on Ciabatta and Winston’s Restaurant has the Not-so Brown, which has fish instead of turkey. “It’s not a passport, you’re not collecting stamps and checking them all off and winning anything necessarily,” says Yates. “It is meant to be a sort of self-guided tour if you will, or guidebook, to one of Louisville’s most original dishes.” However, diners can tweet about the trail or tag images with #hotbrownhop. Lexington Tourism has given away shirts, and even free trips, to those who use the hashtag. gotolouisville.com

BREWGRASS TRAIL While the state is most known for its

w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9

31


VICTOR SIZEMORE, COURTESY OF VISITLEX

Midwestern Traveler

LEFT: Country Boy Brewing’s taproom in Georgetown ABOVE: Patio at the Distillery District, outside the Ethereal Brewing Co.

Civil War Museum of the Western Theatre In Historic Bardstown, Kentucky Bourbon Capital of the World

The finest collection of Western Theatre Civil War artifacts in the United States! Plus! • Women’s Civil War Museum • General Hal Moore Military Museum • Historic Colonial Village 32

A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

310 E. Broadway • Bardstown, KY (502) 349-0291 www.civil-war-museum.org Email: museumrow@bardstowncable.net


MARY JANE SPEER, COURTESY OF VISITLEX

Mirror Twin Brewing Co.’s Taproom

bourbon it has burgeoning craft beer scene as well. “We do say, ‘Respect bourbon but drink beer,’ when it comes to the Brewgrass Trail,” says Niki Heichelbech-Goldey, director of communications for VisitLEX in Lexington. “It’s kind of a nice alternative to folks that are out there doing the Kentucky Bourbon Trail.” At press time, 12 breweries with 14 locations were on the trail, though Heichelbech-Goldey says several more are being added this May. Participants can pick up a passport at any participating location and get started. To “conquer” the trail visitors need to visit all 12 breweries. You can then either mail the passport in or drop it off at the final brewery to claim a free T-shirt. Heichelbech-Goldey adds that the rules will change once the new breweries are added but are not finalized at this time. While bourbon may be on the brain of many visitors to Kentucky, HeichelbechGoldey says that the craft breweries in Lexington offer something you can’t find anywhere else.

w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9

33


Midwestern Traveler

A culinary trail now celebrates beer cheese, which was first made in Clark County, Kentucky.

LET YOUR NEXT ADVENTURE START IN GRANT COUNTY, KY

Home of the Ark Encounter, Brianza Gardens & Winery, Stage Right Musical Dinner Theatre, Lake Williamstown, specialty shops and restaurants 35 miles south of Cincinnati, just a short drive away 800-382-7117 • visitgrantky.com 34

A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com


Check out the Beer Cheese Festival in downtown Winchester.

“Our brewers here in the area have an added benefit in that they have personal relationships with the big distillers and are able to get some of those really fun used barrels, like Pappy [Van Winkle] barrels, and things that are harder to come by if you don’t have those relationships,” she says. “Country Boy and West Sixth both do really wonderful barrel programs. I think it just lends to a really great experience.” Also, Heichelbech-Goldey says, the trail has a lot of variety. For example, Blue Stallion specializes in German-style beers while Country Boy has a peanut butter stout and a jalapeno porter. Also on the trail is Pivot, the only cider brewer in the state that presses apples on site. “They started out making craft ciders—lots of different styles, it’s not just like your Woodchucks or things that people might know about on the mass production scale. There are some that taste to me kind of like a nice, dry champagne,” she says. visitlex.com

w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9

35


Midwestern Traveler BEER CHEESE TRAIL

Beer cheese complements a burger.

36

A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

Beer cheese is another dish that was created in the Bluegrass state. The spread was first made in Clark County, which now has a culinary trail to celebrate it. “No t wo recipes are alike. T hat’s t he t hing about beer cheese—ever yone has t heir own spin,” says Nancy Turner, executive director of tourism for the Winchester-Clark County Tourism Commission. “The main ingredients of all beer cheeses are typically a sharp cheddar cheese, a beer and cayenne pepper. And from there people might use Worcestershire or they might put in mustard or they might put in onion powder. So from the basic three ingredients people formulate their own recipes.” T he t r a i l, loc ated w it h i n Winchester, has nine different permanent stops that feature a variety of beer cheeses served in

many ways. “When I was growing up it was typically just a dip but so many people are coupling it with burgers, sandwiches, in chili, people do different things with it. One new restaurant that joined the beer cheese trail is a restaurant downtown and they have their ow n homemade beer cheese vinaigrette,” says Turner. To participate diners can pick up a Beer Cheese Log at any restaurant on the trail. After visiting at least five stops they’re eligible for a free T-shirt. For those who truly love beer cheese, make sure to stop by downtown Winchester on the second Saturday of June for the Beer Cheese Festival. “That’s the only place in the world that you can pay $5 and eat as much beer cheese as you can possibly consume,” says Turner. beercheesetrail.com. n


Midwestern Traveler

Spring in the Mountains GATLINBURG, TENNESSEE, CELEBRATES THE END OF WINTER WITH A SERIES OF SPECIAL EVENTS By Corinne Minard

W

hile Gatlinburg, Tennessee, is full of events all year long it’s particularly event-filled during the spring. “We’re known for the wildflowers that bloom in April and then also the mountains that turn that spring green,” says Marci Claude, public relations manager for the Gatlinburg Convention and Visitors Bureau. “Everything just comes alive and the baby bear cubs come out and the baby birds are everywhere and it’s just a wonderful time to be in the Smokies.” The spring festivities kick off April 12 with the Gatlinburg Smoky Mountain Wine Weekend. This two-day event features the Gatlinburg Wine Tour on Friday April 12, and continues with the all-day Gatlinburg Smoky Mountain Wine Fest on April 13 at the Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts. Twenty wineries will be at the event, and attendees will get to taste wines from them all while attending seminars and workshops. “New this year you can get a VIP ticket, which allows you to have access to a VIP room where you can go to take a respite from walking outside and there will be drinks there and snacks and things like that,” adds Claude.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: A Gatlinburg artist shows her marbling technique; the fountain at The Village; an artisan works on a piece of pottery; and a tour guide discusses the wildflowers. Another event happening that weekend is Hands On Gatlinburg. April 12-14, artists and crafters with the Great Smoky Arts & Crafts Community—the largest collection of working artists and craftsmen in the United States—will offer classes to those who wish to learn their craft. “We have this beautiful community [of] second- and third-generation artists and crafters who wanted to provide opportunities for visitors to get hands on and make their own marbled scarf or journal or paint their own landscape or paint a gourd or create a piece of turned wood or create a piece of pottery that they could take home for themselves,” says Claude. No skill or experience is required. Claude advises those who are interested in participating to register ahead of time as classes do fill up. The last event of the spring in Gatlinburg celebrates spring itself. The Spring Wildflower Pilgrimage, which is celebrating its 68th year, brings nature enthusiasts from around the world to view the region’s spectacular wildflowers. Held April 24-27, the event features more than 300 different

workshops and exhibitions on the flora and fauna of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Attendees can sign up for multiple days of the event or just one. Visit wildflowerpilgrimage.org to learn more. “It’s a wonderful opportunity to get out in the Smokies and learn something that you didn’t know,” adds Claude. n

The Village Shops The Village , an outdoor shopping location with a quant European village atmosphere, is celebrating 50 years in 2019. The Village is known for its many unique elements, such as handmade brick s , st ained-gla ss windows and gas-lighting fixtures, that have been collected from across the South. It’s currently home to 27 shops and will be celebrating its anniversary in June with a special event. Visit thevillageshops.com to learn more.

w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9

37


Dining & Drinks

Blast from the Past RIVERTOWN BREWERY CELEBRATES ITS 10TH ANNIVERSARY WITH NEW FOOD, CLASSIC BREWS AND GOATS Rivertown Brewery & Barrel House in Monroe is celebrating its 10th anniversary in 2019.

By Kevin Michell

T

en years ago Jason Roeper had a desire to make good beer locally and a budding reputation for crafting unique brews. The only problem was that the local landscape wasn’t quite ready for it. “When I started it was about fighting just

to get people to notice,” Roeper says. Strange though it may seem, brewpubs weren’t nearly as ubiquitous in the Tristate 10 years ago. In fact, before 2012 Ohio laws made it cost-prohibitive to open a taproom or self-distribute.

o education o experience o results 38

A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

Roeper and his young company ran into a lot of difficulty in being granted commercial space but in 2009 he found a location in Lockland with the right combination of industrial capability for production, proximity to the highway to keep distribution overhead low

greatoaks.com


and a consistent source of good, clean water with which to brew. Now, Rivertown Brewery is the secondlargest independent craft brewer in the city and its Monroe taproom and eatery is both a community fixture and a regional destination for quality food and drink. The local brewing operation started its 10th anniversary celebration a bit early as Rivertown began self-distributing its beer to Cincinnati bars, vendors and shops in October 2018. This new autonomy over distribution—in addition to owning the building in Monroe where their Barrel House is located—has been a welcome relief to Roeper and his wife and partner in running Rivertown, Lindsey. “It’s been really exciting to get that piece of our business back in our hands,” Lindsey Roeper says, “and to have control over the whole process from start to finish.” But 2019 will see many more celebratory events for Rivertown Brewery’s anniversary. First, May will bring the return of the wildly popular YoGoat event at the Barrel House. The combination of morning yoga and free-roaming baby goats in the taproom has quickly sold out its previous iterations

in December 2018 and this past February. Rivertown aims to offer the event quarterly for the foreseeable future. Also part of the 10th anniversary festivities is the return of a few old favorites from Rivertown’s large stable of beers. Its pumpkin ale will be reappearing late in the summer of 2019, as well as a few classic brews from earlier in Rivertown’s history—the specifics of which others will be re-released this year are being kept under wraps for now. Visitors to the Rivertown Brewery & Barrel House on Hamilton Lebanon Road in Monroe will notice an updated food menu. The emphasis is on Roeper’s other love—barbecue. The recipes and rubs are his own creation, with the execution of the menu aided by head chef Zac Payton’s sense of flavor and ability to run a busy kitchen. It will surely be an eventful year for Rivertown’s 10th anniversary of operations, but what the Roepers may celebrate most is just how far they’ve come in a decade. After overcoming uncertainty, Rivertown has found a lasting home in Monroe and a sustainable means of supplying its artful brews to the Cincinnati area. “There’s something really beautiful

about it,” Lindsey Roeper says. “Last year was a bit difficult, but out of it has come a real sense of ‘OK, this is who we are’. We’re in a really good place now.” The Monroe facility and taproom is a place the Roepers are pouring their hearts and souls into. Their focus is on maintaining their ingenuity for creating unique libations and being present with the community, making sure to ask their visitors what they’d like to see brewed up next. “With the landscape changing I think you’ll see people going back to the basics,” Roeper says. But that doesn’t mean Rivertown will completely revert to keeping it simple. Its sour beers and hard mineral waters are an excellent gateway for those who aren’t as wild about beer as others. “We have a pretty good rate of converting people who don’t normally like beer,” Lindsey Roeper says. More than anything the Roepers want Rivertown and its taproom to be a landmark long into the future. “We’re excited to continue offering a welcoming place that is truly for everyone,” says Lindsey Roeper. n

Find what’s possible for you at Gateway! gateway.kctcs.edu/possible 855-346-4282 w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9

39


Dining

Worth the Trip

COLONIAL COTTAGE IN ERLANGER, KENTUCKY, SPECIALIZES IN FOOD THAT TASTES LIKE HOME

By Juli Hale

Colonial Cottage is known for classics like its fried chicken.

N

estled among the fast food restaurants and retail stores, Colonial Cottage in Erlanger, Kentucky, offers a respite for those wanting to slow down and eat a home-cooked meal they don’t have to cook themselves. Its oil lamp-style lighting fixtures and folksy décor provide a backdrop for the slower pace one expects when they visit a cottage, but it is the food that makes visitors become regulars and compels Ohioans to cross the river to Kentucky. Unlike chain restaurants with a downhome, country theme, Colonial Cottage, which first opened in 1933, serves up the real thing. Most of the recipes are decades old, handed down from the restaurant’s two previous owners. Patrons can fill up on freshly made comfort food like goetta and eggs, breaded pork chops, country ham, catfish and the fried chicken, which is routinely ranked among the best in the state by food magazines and blogs. Not a small feat in the home of Colonel Sanders! “Simple home-cooked food is my signature. But you have to be attentive to other 40

A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

dining trends and habits,” says owner Matt Grimes who purchased the restaurant in 1999. “We keep the most popular dishes and give most popular dishes competition for menu space. Every year we create something noteworthy. I have to do something exemplary to capture the attention and keep myself fresh.” So, whi le pat rons ca n depend on the favorites to be on the menu season after season, Grimes reviews the menu quarterly and adds new items regularly including lighter fare and gluten-free options. He looks at trending food topics when deciding on which new meals to include but strives to stay true to the spirit of the menu. That can mean updating a classic—like adding inches of meringue to the already famous cream pies, which are available whole or by the slice—or developing a brand-new recipe. “I wanted our pies to have head-turning quotient, so we now have 6 inches of meringue. My chef thought I was crazy, but when our cream pies go through the room, you’re going to turn your head,” he says.

The latest to make the cut are goetta nachos, which were selected to represent Kentucky in The 50 States of Nachos by Food Network. (The Blue Cheese Potato Chip Nachos at Cap City Fine Diner and Bar earned the honor for Ohio.) This wasn’t the restaurant’s first taste of fame. The depression-era country kitchen earned national attention back in 2005 when it was featured on the Travel Channel’s Taste of America, which still brings in visitors from across the country. Additionally, the restaurant is featured in the book Counter Culture: The American Coffee Shop Waitress. Locally, it is featured in Behringer-Crawford Museum’s “Gourmet Dixie” exhibit. “We are real home-cooking replacement. We do very little that you can’t do for yourself at home. We’re nothing fancy but we convince people what real food is supposed to be,” says Grimes. “We’re not just about food. We are also about people. You have to pass a bunch of restaurants to get here. It’s my job to make sure you think it’s worth it to stop here.” n


Cincinnati has never had so many drink options. From new distilleries throughout the Tristate to bars specializing in craft cocktails on every corner downtown, any night can be a great night out in the Queen City. Ready to start exploring but don’t know where to start? Consider this your introductory guide. You’ll meet some of the region’s best bartenders, learn about the region’s distilleries

Signature Cocktails Mutiny on the Bay at Pontiac BBQ, OTR

and even learn how to make a cocktail yourself. So clear your schedule and get ready to try something new; we’re exploring Cincinnati’s ever-expanding

This refreshingly, fruity drink is

cocktail-and-spirits scene.

made with guava, rum, coconut and lime. w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9

41


Ask a Bartender MOLLY WELLMANN ANSWERS THE QUESTIONS WE’VE ALWAYS BEEN TOO EMBARRASSED TO ASK OUR BARTENDERS

By Corinne Minard Molly Wellmann knows a thing or two about making cocktails. Wellmann, the owner of Japp’s Since 1879 in Over-the Rhine, was recently named the country’s Best Bartender-Owner of the Year by Nightclub & Bar Media Group and has been serving drinks in Cincinnati since 2008. And there is nothing Wellmann loves more than sharing that knowledge with others. So we at Cincy Magazine came up with a list of cocktail questions we’ve always found too shameful to ask and challenged Wellmann to answer them. What we learned? Don’t ever be afraid to ask, especially when you’re asking someone as knowledgeable as Wellmann.

Q

: If someone doesn’t know what to order, what about their personal tastes should they tell the bartender to help them pick a drink?

A

Molly Wellman showed us the best way to mix our cocktails at Japp’s Since 1879.

42

A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

: It is helpful to know if you have tastes like not too sweet, we get that all the time. That is totally OK to ask and good to know. Because when you’re making a well-made crafted cocktail you have the ability to adjust sweetness. And the strength as well. “I love having a cocktail but I really don’t like tasting the liquor.” No problem, we can make that happen. Just be open with your tastes, I think that’s really important. Any good bartender will appreciate that and any good bartender … should have a whole Rolodex of different cocktails in


their head to be able to create something. That’s what a bartender does. It’s not just about, “What’ll you have?” That’s the old way of doing it. In today’s bars it should be, “Let me find out what you like because we can make it.”

Q

: If someone orders a drink, like a bourbon and soda, and is offered different brands of liquor, what should they ask to help them pick?

A

: What brand do you normally drink when you go to the bar? At this bar, I could tell you everything about bourbon, I drink enough of it to know every taste. I can introduce something new for you to try [based on your usual]. Any good bartender who does their research… here, that’s something that we do. I’m very particular about everybody knowing what’s on the back of the bar and how to sell it. Because at the end of the day we are all sales people, we sell liquor. We should know our product. It’s not just about putting a drink together and handing it to you. It’s about giving you choices and selling something new to you to try, to broaden your drinking horizons.

Q

: What terms should people know when they’re ordering a drink, such as a martini?

A

: Whenever anyone says, “I’d love a martini,” first question is, “Gin or vodka?” Dirty or clean? Dirty meaning there’s going to be some olive brine in it. Clean means there’s not going to be any brine in it and I’m probably going to express some lemon on top of it so it’s fresh and it’s bright. Everybody says I want extra dry. That doesn’t matter. I’m going to put vermouth in it one way or the other because it’s not a martini unless I put vermouth in it. It’s always stirred if it’s a martini. Now if you want something that’s shaken, you want it really cold, you want an ice rink on top of it, that’s fine but it’s no longer a martini. We can still do it. Big nerdy bartender thing—it’s called a Bradford then. Clean or dirty, some people like it extra dirty, some people like it just a tad dirty, slightly dirty, so we know how much brine to put it. And then whether you would like it up or on the rocks. Up means it’s being stirred and put into a martini glass with no ice and then on the rocks is on [ice]. I drink my martinis on the rocks, I like what the ice does.

Q A

: What questions have people asked you before?

Q

: What does lighting an element like orange zest add to a drink? Or is it just show?

A

: Both. It’s for show where everybody is looking at us definitely at the bar. Every movement counts behind the bar because everyone is facing you. Everyone is looking at you. So be a show. Lighting something on fire definitely gets people’s attention. Yes, it also does [add f lavor]. There’s oil in citrus, the orange has the most, that will ignite on fire and kind of give it almost like a toastiness rather than just expressing the fresh orange. It’s really dependent on the drink I’m making whether I’m lighting the orange or not. Sometimes I really like the fresh and not something that’s been ignited on fire.

Signature Cocktails

: People ask questions all the time. People ask what’s the difference between a bartender and a mixologist. The answer is I’m always a bartender. I’m always tending the bar first. That’s the most important job. [As] a mixologist you take it one step further, studying old drinks, studying spirits, studying where they come from, the history behind them, techniques, everything, from over 100 years ago. But I always say I’m a bartender and if you want just a Bud Light I really know how to serve that and I’m very happy to do so! n

Lemon Basil Martini at Padrino, Milford Padrino doesn’t have a regular cocktail menu, but ever since this drink was offered as a special it has become a secret menu item loved by frequent diners. It gained popularity purely through word-of-mouth and is one of the most popular cocktails at the restaurant.

FOOTLOOSE AND FANCY FREE You don’t always have to head out to a bar to have a quality drink. You can even make them in your own home. Molly Wellmann, owner of Japp’s Since 1879 in Over-the-Rhine, shared this recipe for a classic cocktail, the Fancy Free, so you can have a good drink wherever you are.

The Fancy Free 2 ounces of bourbon 0.5 ounces maraschino liquor 2 dashes angostura bitters 2 dashes orange bitters orange twist

Mix together in a mixing glass and pour in a glass over ice. Garnish with an orange peel. w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9

43


Molly Steele

Fiery Hen, Downtown

Rising Stars

THREE UP-AND-COMING CINCINNATI BARTENDERS TELL US ABOUT WHAT DRIVES THEIR PASSION FOR COCKTAILS

By Kevin Michell

Signature Cocktails The Liquid Knowledge at Coppins, Covington This variation of a Kentucky mule is served in a Rookwood Pottery mug. The name of this drink comes from the restaurant’s nameske, John Coppin, whose bet on a horse named Knowledge enabled him to open his department store.

44

A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

Molly Steele has seen a lot in her bartending career, including the transformation of the food and drink scene in Cincinnati. Fifteen years after first bartending shift at Dewey’s Pizza in Newport, she is one of the lead managers at Fiery Hen, a recent addition to the group of bars and restaurants on Court Street between Race and Vine. Steele tends bar there every Wednesday through Saturday. Slinging drinks is how she paid her way through college, where she gained associate degrees in applied science and cosmetology as well as a bachelor’s in entrepreneurship from Northern Kentucky University and Gateway Community and Technical College. But a continued education in wine and spirits, combined with the money to be made, created a compelling argument to stay in the bar industry. “I realized immediately that when I got out of school,” Steele says, “I wasn’t going to make as much money as I would bartending.” The craftsmanship of cocktailing is what Steele loves the most about working behind the bar, where she’ll gladly transport guests to New Orleans with her favorite drink to make—the classic Ramos gin fizz. “I feel like drinks are just like food,” Steele notes. “If you want to have a nice dinner, you have to have salt, you have to have acid, you have to have sweetness. It’s a built dish and drinks are very much the same.”


Scott Augsburger

Wiseguy Lounge, Over-the-Rhine & Covington

Like many bartenders in Cincinnati, the current resurgence of the bar scene is a case of “right place, right time” for Scott Augsburger. In 2015, Augsburger landed a job at the Wiseguy Lounge attached to Goodfellas Pizza in Over-the-Rhine. It was there that the appeal of working at a bar with a wide array of cocktailing possibilities hit him. “The reason why I got a job at Wiseguy was because I was a regular here,” Augsburger recalls. “I used to sit at a barstool right next to the window all the time. What caught my eye was how many people were interested in this craft. They made it look so cool.” Both Wiseguy locations are the sort of venues where inventive cocktails meld with detail-oriented mixology. That sort of showmanship and meticulousness draws the attention of everyone around the bar when a drink is being whipped up. “Sometimes you look like you’re working on a science experiment,” Augsburger observes with a smile. But it’s the spirits that have kept Augsburger honing his craft. Whether making a rum-based riff on a Manhattan cocktail called the El Presidente or introducing guests to the joys of Boulevardiers, Augsburger is focused on providing the full package to visitors to Wiseguy Lounge on Wednesdays and weekends.

Bennett Cooper

16-Bit Bar+Arcade, Over-the-Rhine

Though retro arcade cabinets and colorful drinks may be the main draw, Bennett Cooper is another compelling reason to visit 16-Bit Bar+Arcade. The seven-year veteran of bartending in the city has been familiar with spirits ever since growing up in a home with a full bar in the basement. Since cutting his teeth slinging drinks at Milton’s in Prospect Hill, Cooper’s helped open Taft’s Ale House and 16-Bit, finding a home at the latter ever since. “I’d been seeing things about it in Columbus,” Cooper says, “and I was like, ‘Videos games and alcohol together? I need to be there.’” He loves his job at one of the most popular bars in the city—where the large space often fills up quickly and stays that way until closing time—because of the variety each shift brings. “You’re going to have a different day every day,” Cooper observes. The back-to-back third-best bartender in CityBeat’s annual Best of the City and 2016 long pour champion at Video Archive’s bartender skill competition, Cooper will whip up a Carrie Fisher or Lisa Frank cocktail—two original favorites on 16-Bit’s drink list— with flair and a winning smile for guests when he’s working Fridays through Sundays. w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9

45


Spirits of the Tristate

LOCAL CRAFT DISTILLERIES EXTRACTING A TASTEFUL COMEBACK

By Eric Spangler

A

s the craft brewery business continues to boom across the Tristate, local craft distilleries are starting to enjoy resurgence as well.

Karrikin Spirits Co. Opened: 2018 Hours: 4-10 p.m. Monday-Thursday; 11 a.m.-12 a.m. Friday-Saturday; 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Sunday Address: 3717 Jonlen Drive, Fairfax Phone: 513-561-5000 Website: karrikinspirits.com

One of the newest distilleries is Karrikin Spirits Co., a grain-to-glass distillery and restaurant in Fairfax that opened its doors to the public in December, says Jessica Rilling. “We pride ourselves on house-made spirits and beverages including vodka, gin, agave spirit, rum and fruit brandies as well as hard sodas, non-alcoholic sodas and beers,” she says. “In addition to beverages, the restaurant offers a menu full of house-made dishes cooked on a wood-fired grill.” Founders of the distillery include Jeff Hunt, founder of MadTree Brewing; Mike Florea, former executive chef and operating partner at Maribelle’s Eat+Drink; Jeff 46

A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

Reichard, president of Holt & Reichard Inc.; Dan Hueber, owner of The V Collective; Mike Powell, former vice president of operations at Panera Bread; John Pattison, creative director at Unscripted Ideas; and Eric Baumann, former vice president of Moerlein.

New Riff Distilling Opened: 2014 Hours: 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday; 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Sunday  Address: 24 Distillery Way, Newport Phone: 859-261-7433 Website: newriffdistilling.com

One of the most well known distilleries in the area is New Riff Distilling in Newport, Kentucky. Founded in 2014 by Ken Lewis, a Kentucky liquor retailer and entrepreneur, New Riff is crafting a range of whiskeys—bourbon, rye and a host of specialty recipes—as well as Kentucky wild gin, says Zach MacMillian. New Riff Distilling’s mission is to someday be counted among the world’s great small distilleries. The company starts with water that is pumped from a private well 100 feet deep in an aquifer beneath New Riff Distilling’s land.

Karrikin Spirits Co. in Fairfax specializes in spirits like vodka, gin, rum and fruit brandies. That water contains as much as four times the amount of dissolved minerals that are found in the typical municipal water supplies because of the limestonepacked hills to the south of the distillery. And because yeast likes minerals, the water used in New Riff Distilling’s process is a great place to start the distilling process. Everything produced at New Riff Distilling, aside from its Single Barrel Program at barrel proof, is bottled in bond. Congress


passed the bottled-in-bond law in 1897 to ensure the product a consumer was buying was true whiskey, according to a standardized definition. That bottled-in-bond law requires the whiskey be the product of one distilling season from one distillery, aged in a federally bonded warehouse for at least four years and bottled at 100 proof. New Riff takes it a step further by bottling without chill filtration. It’s all part of New Riff Distilling’s mission to become one of the world’s great small distilleries.

OTHER LOCAL DISTILLERIES INCLUDE: Shumrick and Leys

Northside Distillery

Opened: April 2017 Hours: 4-10 p.m. Friday; 1-10 p.m. Saturday Address: 2810 Highland Ave., Norwood Phone: 513-429-5657 Website: shumrickleys.com 

Opened: 2015  Hours: 4-11 p.m. Thursday; 4 p.m.-midnight Friday; 1 p.m.-midnight Saturday. Also available for private events. Address: 922 Race St., Downtown Phone: 513-413-7477 Website: northsidedistilling.com

Second Sight Spirits Opened: February 2015  Hours: Tours available at 12:30, 2 and 4 p.m. Thursday; 12:30, 2, 4 and 6 p.m. Friday and Saturday  Address: 301 B Elm St., Ludlow Phone: 859-488-7866 Website: secondsightspirits.com

Boone County Distilling Co. Opened: Oct. 15, 2015 Hours: 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday; 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday  Address: 10601 Toebben Drive, Boone County  Phone: 859-282-6545 Website: boonedistilling.com

Boone County Distilling Co. resurrected one of the original distilleries in Kentucky—the Petersburg Distillery—that was founded in 1833, says Kurt Seipel. At the height of production in 1897 the Petersburg Distillery was producing 4 million gallons of whiskey, making it one of the largest distillers in the nation. The Boone County Distilling Co. today is crafting traditional bourbon whiskey and placing Boone County back in the historical conversations of Kentucky bourbon history.

Woodstone Creek Opened: 1999 Hours: 2-7 p.m. Saturday. No tours  Address: 4712 Vine St., St. Bernard  Phone: 513-569-0300 Website: woodstonecreek.com

Signature Cocktails Good Old Fashioned Bondage at The Mercer OTR From the cardamom bitters to the demerara simple syrup, every ingredient is unique in this bourbon-based drink. An ice cube made from Constant Comment tea makes the drink taste even better as it melts.

w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9

47


Community

REFLECTIONS ON LEADERSHIP

page 50

ANOTHER VIEW

page 52

HOLLYWOOD LOVES CINCY

page 54

CINCY MOTORSPORTS JOURNAL

page 56

GUIDE TO COLLEGES & UNIVERSITIES page 61

OUTSTANDING EDUCATORS

page 78

SOUTHERN STATE COMMUNITY COLLEGE page 84

DEPAUL CRISTO REY HIGH SCHOOL

page 86

BETHANY THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY

page 88

The Halloween movie Haunt was filmed in Covington in 2017. w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9

49


Reflections on Leadership By Dan Hurley

Potholes and Politics

A century ago, the lowly pothole provided the perfect symbol to revolutionize Cincinnati government.

TODAY’S POLITICIANS COULD LEARN SOMETHING ABOUT SYMBOLS FROM CINCINNATI CHARTERITES

C

onstructing an effective political rhetoric is challenging. Abstract political theory does not stir mass support. Politicians need symbols that are important, but not simply ends in themselves. When it comes to his rhetorical use of the border wall as a metaphor, President Trump could learn something from Cincinnati Charterites of a century ago. Each time the snow and ice melts after a winter storm, fresh potholes blossom in the streets of Cincinnati. Hated by drivers 50

A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

and despised by road crews, a century ago clever newspaper columnists and an inventive group of political leaders transformed the lowly pothole from a road hazard into a potent political weapon. For the first quarter of the 20th century, a political gang led by George Cox and his successor Rudolph Hynicka controlled Cincinnati. Lacking any vision beyond a desire to retain power, the gang was willing to risk nothing as the city fell into greater and greater inefficiency, wastefulness and corruption. Discouragingly, the vast majority of Cincinnatians accepted the situation as irreversible. The Cincinnati Post, an afternoon paper that served industrial workers whose shift ended at 3 p.m., emerged as the only con-

sistent public voice for political reform. The Post used its news pages for investigative reports and its editorial pages to skewer the foibles of the gang. The paper’s leading voice, Alfred Segal, launched his “Cincinnatus” column (which often ran on the front page) in 1920. In the hands of Post columnists and cartoonists, the pothole became the symbol for all that was wrong with Cincinnati government, and, according to historian William Baughin, was “the single most important factor” ultimately bringing down the Hynicka regime. Madison Road was compared to the ravaged battlefields of France after World War I. The lawyers representing a man charged with vehicular manslaughter for


killing two children argued their client was zigzagging to avoid the potholes in the street. The jury acquitted him. Ironically, one of his lawyers was the vice mayor, Froome Morris. Over five days at the beginning of June 1923, the Post ran a series of tongue-incheek articles describing the implications of an incident in which first a young woman, and then her fiancée, fell into a pothole on Linwood Avenue and ended up in Bombay, India. Worried that all of Cincinnati might fall through the hole, the citizens of Bombay threatened to launch a “Holey War” to protect their city. In the end, a contingent of Africans showed up in Cincinnati to teach the locals how to repair a pothole, staving off another world war. Murray Seasongood and the other leaders of the Charter Committee seized on the pothole as a key symbol that they could use to help people understand the problems Cincinnati faced and the alternative approach they offered. During the 1924 campaign for the proposed reform charter, and the 1925 campaign to elect the first council under the new charter, candidates hammered home the embarrassing and dangerous conditions of the streets.

They pointed out how few miles of city streets were repaved each year and railed against the gang’s preference for expensive granite paving stones purchased from private companies with close ties to the organization to less expensive asphalt from the city’s asphalt plant. Their favorite rhetorical example of corruption was a 1923 project to spend $300,000 for granite to improve just 4,000 feet of Kellogg Avenue running out to Coney Island. The Boss owned the amusement park. Once the Charterites gained power after the 1925 elections, they never tired of comparing their record in street repair with the gang’s. The new city manager hired a professional engineer to reorganize the street department (“no one knew his politics, no one cared”). The professionally run government adopted the best practices employed in other cities, especially the “superheater system” of street repair that welded the old surface to the new asphalt patch. Charterites were fond of saying, “There is no Republican or Democratic method to fix a pothole, only an efficient or inefficient method.” In the first five years in office, the reform government repaved twice as many lane

miles than the gang had done in the previous 10 years, all the time “hammering down prices and improving efficiency.” Between 1926 and 1940, the city manager and the Charter Committee filled their annual reports and campaign literature with before-and-after photos of city streets. The Charterites effectively wielded the pothole as a political symbol. Potholes were significant in themselves, but, even more importantly, as symbols, they stood for something larger, a new way of doing government. And in their simplicity, they helped citizens understand a new approach to urban government. The problem with President Trump’s rhetoric about the border wall is that the wall has become an end in itself. Immigration policy has been in crisis for decades. Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama, as well as dozens of congressional members, have tried to formulate a new policy for decades. President Trump has people’s attention, but has failed to understand the connection between political symbol, rhetoric and policy. n Dan Hurley is the president of Applied History Associates.

Unplug & Discover adamscountytravel.org w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9

51


Another View By Don Mooney

Lessons from My Teenaged Dad

DON MOONEY TAKES IN THE WISDOM OF THE LETTERS HIS FATHER WROTE DURING WWII

H

ad enough of the #COVCATHKIDS? Understandable. After that first wave of instant cyber vilification, the knee jerk counter-narrative has been equally insufferable. My quick take: Put aside knee-jerk conclusions based on MAGA headgear. The videos show an unruly teenaged gaggle. One student is stripped to the waist, others are tomahawk chopping and hopping with maniacal zeal. In my Catholic school days, such antics would have earned a black mark opposite the line labeled “fails to exercise self control.” Catholic school discipline may not be what it used to be. I’d rather write about another teenager, an Army private whose prolific letters home from 1945-46 recently showed up in a stuffed carton at my door. Dog-eared and fading, they bear the recognizable scrawl of my 19-year-old father on fragile, translucent pages. Some bear the stamp of U.S. Navy censors as my Dad crossed the Pacific in the summer of ’45, bound for a looming invasion of Japan. Others were postmarked from Fort Dix, New Jersey; Camp Blanding, Florida; Fort Ord, California; and, finally, “Tokio” (spelling was never his strong suit), where Dad served as an M.P. (military police) during the post-war occupation. Those letters to Ma and Pa provide a unique perspective on teen life in Dad’s day. January 25, 1945 - Ft. Dix - “I’m really doing fine. This life might make a man out of me yet. It’s going to be a lot harder at my next camp. But the hell. There’s only 10 million more like me.” Dad reported on the challenges of basic training, but also was frank about one timeless teen preoccupation: 52

A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

March 19, 1945 - Camp Blanding - “I got a pass, and got to town for a couple dances and to say the least the Army has landed and the situation is well in hand … I met a blonde young and cute schoolteacher. She teaches fourth grade. I took her out to the beach Sunday afternoon and really had a swell time.” Dad’s family was devoutly Catholic. His letters talk about serving mass, and his work with a Catholic chaplain in Japan to find Japanese nuns a fitting home. March 31, 1945: “Easter is a funny time, not so great a day in the eyes of children as Christmas but the greatest of days in the eyes of the Church. New clothes, flowers and spring. That’s Easter to a 120 million Americans … whether Catholic or Protestant, and that’s what this war is all about.” Of course, there were complaints about daily life, including slow mail delivery, spotty food and pricey Tokyo beers. Yet Dad took well to Army life. April 11, 1945: “The best thing about being in service is it teachers you not to … always think about yourself. No matter how sick or tired you get, you keep going.” But the letter that resonated most in light of the #COVCATH controversy contained a lesson about tolerance, with some words

that now might offend: August 7, 1945 - At Sea - “I was reading in the Reader’s Digest where a Jap[anese]American soldier, wearing the purple heart…. was thrown out of a barber shop in California because he was a Jap. From what I saw of the Jap[anese] soldiers in Florida, and have read about [the Japanese] regiment in Italy, they’ve certainly done alright for themselves and should be doing the kicking out. It’s the same way with negros (sic). There’s one sleeping right next to where I’m writing this, and we play cards with a couple in the afternoon. There’s going to be a lot less of this race hating, on the part of service men anyway, once the war is over. That’s one good thing anyway…” If only. Maybe my Dad’s generation was forced by war and depression to grow up too fast. Maybe it’s anachronistic to expect our schools to teach today’s teens discipline, sacrifice for the common good and tolerance of others. But at least teach them that whatever they do, someone may capture it all on video and post it on Twitter. n Don Mooney is an attorney, a past member of the Cincinnati Planning Commission and is active in local politics.


CELEBRATING MANUFACTURING

J U NE/J U LY 2 0 17

11th ANNUAL MANNY AWARDS WHAT’S NEXT FOR THE GOP?

THE MAGAZINE FOR BUSINESS PROFESSIONALS

ARTS • BUSINESS • CULTURE

TOP COMMUNITIES PLUS: First-rate Schools Safest Neighborhoods Best Property Values

VOLUME 14 I S S UE 4

COOL TECH AWARDS

AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2017

A Problem in our Parks?

BEST SCHOOLS 26

100+

THE MAGAZINE FOR BUSINESS PROFESSIONALS

Educators

Private School Guide

AWARDED

ISSUE 5

OHIO’S

BEST OF SHOW

2017

VOLUME 14

SOCIETY OF PROFESSIONAL JOURNALISTS

The Fiona Phenomenon

OCTOBER 2017 THE MAGAZINE FOR BUSINESS PROFESSIONALS

Mayor’s Race Gets Nitty-Gritty

Alfonso Cornejo, Hispanic Chamber, Cincinnati, USA

Molly Wellmann, Wellmann’s Brands

MOST

Courtis Fuller, WLWT

ARTS • BUSINESS • CULTURE

PEOPLE Bill Cunningham, WLW

Victoria Morgan, Cincinnati Ballet VOLUME 14

“Jungle” Jim Bonaminio, Jungle Jim’s

ISSUE 6

OHIO’S

BEST OF SHOW

2017

Visit us at WWW.CINCYMAGAZINE.COM for a complimentary subscription

A+

Schools Ranked

ARTS • BUSINESS • CULTURE

A magazine dedicated exclusively to Cincy: Its arts, businesses, communities, entertainment and most of all its people.


PHOTOS BY BRIAN DOUGLAS

More movies are being filmed in the Tristate each year.

Hollywood

LOVES

Cincy THE QUEEN CITY HAS MADE ITS MARK ON PRODUCTION COMPANIES AND DIRECTORS LOOKING FOR A PLACE TO FILM

Mayor John Cranley gave Casey Affleck (left) and Robert Redford (center right) the key to the city while they were filming The Old Man & The Gun.

By Peter Bronson

W

hen Charlton Heston parted the Red Sea in The Ten Commandments in 1956, movie posters promised “A Cast of Thousands.” Now movies are made with “A Cast of Dozens,” backed up by a flock of accountants, a swarm of assistants and a Texas herd of extras. And many are making an exodus 54

A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

to the new filmmaking promised land… Cincinnati. Cincinnati? Swimmin’ pools and movie stars? Hollywood of the Heartland? As MGM’s Samuel Goldwyn said, “Absolutely impossible, but it has possibilities.” Big possibilities. Our local film history begins in 1950,

with gritty clips of Cincinnati in Asphalt Jungle. Then came Rain Man in 1988, with Tom Cruise and Dustin Hoffman counting toothpicks at Pompilio’s in Newport, Kentucky. In 2000, Michael Douglas fought the drug war in the shadows of Over-theRhine in Traffic. Big roles have been scarce.


But now Cincinnati is getting more movie credits than Kevin Bacon. We have our own stars on the sidewalk: Don Cheadle downtown in an old Jaguar, as Miles Davis in Miles Ahead; Robert Redford, playing a bank robber in his final movie, The Old Man & The Gun; Anne Hathaway, in town to film Dry Run; and Nicole Kidman, Bruce Willis, John Travolta, Emilio Estevez… “We’re very busy,” says Kristen Schlotman, executive director of Film Cincinnati. “This was our biggest year. Last year alone we generated $53 million of direct impact from film production for the local economy.” That means big spending on “hotels, restaurants, catering, gas, construction, furniture, props and wardrobe,” Schlotman says. “TriHealth has taken over medical care [for filming] and Enterprise has even created its own movie division here for car rentals. It’s really exciting to see how far our reach is extending.” At Legacies Upscale Resale at Hyde Park Plaza, a nonprofit consignment shop that raised $240,000 last year for the Cancer Support Community, Business Manager Lori Rochford says film crews like their mix of Victorian to mid-century modern styles. “The producers come to us to buy furniture and props for their movies. They might spend a couple of thousand dollars, which is a big sale for us. It’s fun to be part of something artistic. People who work here watch the movie and say, ‘That’s the couch that was in our store,’” she says. She thinks there might even be an untapped market for furniture that has been used in a movie. “Maybe it will be worth $100 more if we say Robert Redford sat there,” she says. Along with familiar local faces in movies—such as PNC Bank President Kay Geiger as a bank manager in The Old Man

& The Gun—there’s also a local “cast of thousands” who cater to the film business behind the screens. Hollywood Meets Cincinnati is turning into a love story. Directors are attracted by the Ohio Motion Picture tax credit that offers a 30 percent tax incentive. But they fall for the city, Schlotman says. “One thing people don’t realize is that once they choose Cincinnati, every single director has come back again. They are all repeat customers. Todd Haynes, the director of Carol, is in town again (Dry Run, with Mark Ruffalo and Anne Hathaway, about a lawyer who battles DuPont). It’s the fifth time he’s been back.” Film Cincinnati makes it easy, she says. “We can help with every process—scouting locations, closing streets, police, whatever is needed. We’re a one-stop place for everything they need.” And Cincinnati, like a good character actor, is the Swiss Army Knife of locations. In Carol, it was the 1950s. In Miles Ahead, the late 1960s. In The Old Man & The Gun, the ‘70s. Traffic, the ‘90s. Cincinnati can play contemporary (Ides of March) or 1930s (Seabiscuit). “It’s a great compliment to our city,” says D. Lynn Meyers, CSA, who has many credits as casting director for Cincinnati films. “Our city has for generations been dedicated to preservation, showing real stewardship. Our architecture is really diverse. Cincinnati can play a lot of cities.” Favored backdrops include Carew Tower and its arcade, the Queen City Club, the Roebling Suspension Bridge, time-capsule neighborhoods such as the West End, the classic Hathaway’s lunch counter and courtrooms at the Hamilton County Courthouse. “Directors have been very vocal about

A Kind of Murder, starring Patrick Wilson, was filmed in the area.

Emilio Estevez directed The Public, which was filmed within the Cincinnati Public Library.

how much they love the city,” says Meyers, who is artistic director of the Ensemble Theater and a member of the Casting Society of America. “That provides great opportunities for our local pool of talented actors.” A typical movie might require 50 local actors in speaking roles and a thousand more in background work. “Casting calls” for extras go out regularly. “After the producer sends the script, I call people in for roles that are age- and typeappropriate,” Meyers says. “Background extras get at least minimum wage, and they might work 8 to 10 hours, or sometimes 12 to 14 hours a day. For speaking roles, it’s safe to say about $900 a day. That’s the industry standard.” Hundreds of local crewmembers also work full time. “The directors find that we have built an industry,” Schlotman says. “We have full-time crews here, and local actors get roles they couldn’t get if they drove to Hollywood.” Meyers says friends she has worked with in Hollywood call and ask in disbelief, “What? You’re doing another movie in Cincinnati?” There’s no place like home, she tells them. “It’s a competitive market. Thousands of jobs come with every one of these films. We treat people really well and they want to come back. For us to be one of the top film destinations right now really speaks highly of our city.” n w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9

55


CINCY MOTORSPORTS JOURNAL

W

elcome to the Cincy Motoring Enthusiast’s Guide for 2019. The Tristate area is packed with activities, clubs and organizations to feed your curiosity and fascination with vehicles of all sorts, be they automobiles, airplanes, boats or motorcycles. The prolific local scene outpaces many other venues around North America when it comes to accessing the vehicles and activities that capture your imagination. The following Schedule and Resource Guide scratch the surface of the available opportunities to enjoy motoring activities in your neighborhood. Find events, a club or organization that sparks your fancy and get involved; most groups welcome volunteers and participants with open arms. Participating gives one unprecedented access to the vehicles and events that educate and entertain the entire family. See you on the road, or at a show this summer. Kurt Niemeyer, editor

CINCY AREA MOTORING EVENTS April 27, Spring Classic Driving Tour VII, enter at cincy.live April 27, New Richmond Motor Show, 1-6 p.m., enter at cincy.live April 28, Sharonville Car Show, Sharonville

56

A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

April 28, Cincy SCCA Autocross Trader’s World West Parking Lot, Lebanon

May 5, third annual Cruise In to a Cure for ALS, Lawrenceburg, Indiana

May 4, OVR PCA Autocross, Kentucky Speedway, Sparta, Kentucky

May 10-12, Auburn Cord Duesenburg Regional Meet, Connersville, Indiana

May 4, Lynchburg Mafia Car & Bike Show, Lynchburg

maga zine.com

May 16-18, Southern Ohio Forest Rally, Chillicothe

May 18, Open House at Spade Kreations, Mt. Healthy May 18-19, Cincy Street Rods 49th annual Car Show & Swap Meet, Hamilton May 19, Lauren Hill’s Cruise for the Cure car show, Coney Island


May 19, Drei Staaten Gruppe Porsche 356 Bull Session & Picnic, Sharon Woods

June 15, Kenton County Library Motor Show for Summer Reading, Erlanger, Kentucky

May 19, Cincy SCCA Autocross Trader’s World West Parking Lot, Lebanon

June 15, Ohio Valley Austin Healey Club Driver Training Autocross, Live Oaks School, Milford

May 25, Cincy SCCA Road Rallye

June 15, Cincy SCCA Road Rallye

June 1, British Bash, Louisville British Sports Car Club, Louisville, Kentucky

June 20-23, SVRA Grand Prix At Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course Featuring Corvairs

June 1-2, OHMGTR Spring GOF, Fort Meigs

June 23, Glendale Car Show, Glendale

June 7-9, Cincinnati Concours d’Elegance, Ault Park, featuring 95 years of MG

June 23, Cincy SCCA Autocross Trader’s World West Parking Lot, Lebanon

June 9, Cincy SCCA Autocross Trader’s World West Parking Lot, Lebanon

June 29, Ohio Valley Austin Healey Club Driver Training Autocross, Live Oaks School, Milford

June 11-13, OVR PCA Driver Ed at Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course featuring vintage car sessions

June 25-29, GTO Association National Convention, Lawrenceburg, Indiana

June 30, Car Show for Kids, Joe Knuxhall Miracle Fields, Fairfield

July 21, Cincy SCCA Autocross Trader’s World West Parking Lot, 601 Union Road, Lebanon

July 5-7 Madison Regatta Hydroplane Races, Madison, Indiana

July 22, Judy Cowie Memorial ALS Fund Raiser, Quaker Steak & Lube, Milford, 5-8:30 p.m.

July 5-7, AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days, Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course, Lexington

July 27, OVR PCA Autocross, Kentucky Speedway, Sparta, Kentucky

July 7, Cincy SCCA Gears & Beers, Mad Tree Brewery & Taproom, Oakley

July 27, Heindl Ural Open House, Heindl Engineering, Eaton

July 12-14, P2O, Porsches to Ohio, Burr Oak State Park, Glouster

July 27, Cincy SCCA Road Rallye

July 13, Vettes4vets Car show, Gateway Community College, Ft. Wright, Kentucky

July 28, Tri-State Mustang/Ford Club Car Show, Eastgate Mall

July 14, British Car Day Cincinnati, Harbin Park, Fairfield

July 28, Rollin’ On The River Car Show, Fernbank Park For more events, visit facebook.com/ Cincy-MotorsportsJournal-106773406071724/.

July 20, Ohio Valley Austin Healey Club Driver Training Autocross, Live Oaks School, Milford

Sharefax Credit Union is your full service financial institution. Free Checking  Free Online Banking Free Bill Payer

1st & 2nd Mortgages Home Equity Lines       Small Business Services

Fee Free ATM Network Saturday Hours      Shared Branching

BATAVIA | EVENDALE | LEBANON | MASON | MILFORD w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9

57


CINCY MOTORSPORTS JOURNAL

RECURRING EVENTS; OVR Porsche Club meeting second Tuesday of the month, Fireside Grill, Blue Ash, 6 p.m. British Car Club meeting second Wednesday of the month, 6 p.m., check website or Facebook for location. Cincy SCCA meeting third Tuesday of the month, 6 p.m., check website or Facebook for location MG-T Owners gathering third Wednesday of the month, Uno’s West Chester, 6 p.m. Vettes4vets meetings, fourth Tuesday of every month, 5:30 p.m., check website for location Austin Healey Club meetings, check website for exact location

58

A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

Tristate Mustang/Ford Club meetings third Wednesday of the month Awakenings Coffee and Cars, Montgomery Road, Montgomery, Saturdays Crestview Hills Mall Coffee and Cars, Saturday mornings, MarchNovember Cincinnati Cars & Coffee at Liberty Center, third Saturday of the month starting May 18 Dayton Cars & Coffee, Austin Landing, alternating Saturdays starting April 13 Cars & Coffee West Chester, Buffalo Wings & Rings, South Liberty Drive, Saturdays May-October

maga zine.com

Quaker Steak & Lube Bike Nights and Cruise Ins, Florence Kentucky Car Show, Wednesdays AprilOctober Milford Mulberry Square Cruise In, Friday evenings May-October Lawrenceburg Speedway, Saturday April-October, lawrenceburgspeedway.com

Florence Speedway, Saturdays, March-October, florencespeedway. com Edgewater Sports Park, Drag Racing Friday-Sunday, April-October, edgewaterrace.com Thornhill Dragstrip, Drag Racing, Saturdays March-October


AREA RESOURCE GUIDE OF CLUBS AND ORGANIZATIONS CATERING TO ENTHUSIASTS Alfa Romeo Owner’s Club aroc-usa.org/oh-17-ovaroc Audi Club audiclubkentucky.org Austin Healey Club ohiovalleyahc.com Automotive Education podcasts learnfromothers.org Bob Colaizzi Auto/Aviation Artist colaizzidesign.com British Car Club bccgc.com Cincinnati Antique Boat Center antiqueboat.com Cincinnati Aviation Heritage Society Club cahslunken.org Champaign Aviation Museum Ohio champaignaviationmuseum.org Cincinnati Café Racers Group cincinnaticaferacer.com

Cincinnati Concours d’Elegance ohioconcours.com Cincinnati Sports Car Club cincyscca.com Cincinnati Supercars, Sales & Service of America cincinnatisupercars.com Cincy Motorsports Journal facebook.com/Cincy-MotorsportsJournal-106773406071724/ Classic British Motorcycle Club facebook.com/CincyBritBike/ Collector Car Insurance insurancediehl.com Concours News and Notes concours.news Corvette Restoration easterncorvettes.com Corvettes 4 Veterans Car Club vettes4vets.club Corvettes of Hamilton Car Club Corvette Restorers corvettesofhamilton.org Dayton Concours d’Elegance daytonconcours.com Ferrari Club - Ohio Chapter fca-ohio.org

Greater Cincinnati Miata Club Group cincimiata.com Jake Sweeney Alfa Romeo alfaromeousaofflorence.com Jeff Loewe Motorsports Photography Association jlofoto.net Keeneland Concours d’Elegance keenelandconcours.com Mercedes Benz Club - Cincinnati Section mbcacincinnati.org MG, Austin Healey Parts spridget.com Motorsports Country Club of Cincinnati mccofcincinnati.com Ohio Morgan Owner’s Group ohmog.org Ohio Valley GTO ovgto.com Ohio Valley Karting ovka.com OVR Porsche Club of America ovrpca.org Performance Automotive performanceautomotive.com

Piston Society Motorcycles & Gear pistonsociety.com Porsche 356 Club dreistaatengruppe.com Porsche Car Show in Oxford Ohio redbrickreunion.com Porsche Restorations metalkraftcoachwerkes.com Queen City National ncrs.org/qc Specialty Vehicle Insurance Section amig.com Specialty Vehicle Repair euroautospecialists.com Spring Classic Driving Tour springclassicdrivingtour.org Steve Petroskey, Artist Association driversroad.com Tri-State Mustang/Ford Club tristatemustang.com Tri-State Warbird Museum tri-statewarbirdmuseum.org Vintage Porsche Repair hhmotorcars.com Zakiras Garage, Restorations zakiras.com

To find your neighborhood First Watch, Please visit www.firstwatch.com

w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9

59


Guide to Colleges and Universities 2019

University of Cincinnati College of Design, Architecture, Art and Planning’s Claudia B. Rebola worked with graduate students to combat overdose deaths in the region.

Higher Learning on the Rise LOCAL SCHOOLS ARE GAINING RECOGNITION AND ADDING PROGRAMS By Kevin Michell

T

here are a bev y of colleges and universities in the Greater Cincinnati area and many of them are celebrating milestones, developing initiatives for community betterment and making improvements to their academic offerings. Here’s just a sampling of some of the notable news coming from our local higher learning facilities.

MOUNT ST. JOSEPH UNIVERSITY Two prestigious local grants have been awarded to Mount St. Joseph University

Mount St. Joseph University donates to nonprofits that students study in its Student Philanthropy Project. that will assist the school’s programs for art, philanthropy and community betterment. Cincinnati’s Cambridge Charitable Foundation announced in Januar y it would award two grants totaling $10,000 to The Mount. The new funds are to be

split between the university’s Student Philanthropy Project and its program to provide digital pianos for students. The money earmarked for philanthropy efforts will be used to fund courses involving the evaluation, research and running of nonprofit organizations in the Greater w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9

61


Guide to Colleges and Universities 2019

ABOVE and RIGHT: Northern Kentucky University’s FUEL NKU program provides free access to nutritional and non-perishable food to students. Cincinnati area. The program, which started in 2015, has involved nearly 300 Mount St. Joseph students so far. Keith Lanser, manager of Service Learning and Civic Engagement, is excited about leveraging the funds to drive student philanthropy towards socially conscious organizations that serve women, children, the environment, the impoverished and others in need. “One of the things we do a little differently here at The Mount is encourage our faculty to help students raise additional funds,” he says. Student philanthropy is closely tied to Mount St. Joseph’s core philosophy. “We give preference to classes around the core curriculum, [which is] the common good.” In the program, students get between $1,000 and $3,000 to eventually hand to a nonprofit organization after spending the semester becoming familiar with its operations, methodology and impact. The other portion will allow for the purchase of three new digital pianos for The Mount’s music department, which in turn will help accommodate expanded class sizes and greater availability of the equipment. 62

A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

Another grant Mount St. Joseph received came in February from the Greater Cincinnati Foundation. The $17,000 award will be used in creating a literacy program called Project Ready. This initiative’s purpose is to decrease the gap in early childhood literacy that is common between children of impoverished families and those of greater means in the area. Spearheaded by Amy Murdoch with assistance from assistant professor Elizabeth Corbo, Project Ready is gathering data for crafting a better early childhood literacy curriculum. Murdoch will spend the semester through mid-May at local area preschools and with families of students to identify ways to bridge the literacy gap and ensure equal quality of preschool education. The hope is that the resulting curriculum plan can be distributed to at-risk schools after the research is completed.

NORTHERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY Northern Kentucky University has partnered with Kroger to open a 2,300-squarefoot food pantry on the NKU campus. The FUEL NKU program has been around since 2013, providing students with free, easy ac-

cess to nutritional and non-perishable food items. As NKU’s student body has grown so has usage of the FUEL NKU program, necessitating an expanded facility made possible through The Kroger Company’s involvement. Initially located in a tiny former mailroom on campus inside the University Center building, the FUEL NKU pantry has moved into its new location in the A.D. Albright Health Center—which also contains the Campus Recreation Center— which is over seven times the size of the original pantry. The new space opened in February and already the positive results are apparent in the eyes of FUEL NKU director Jessica Averitt Taylor. “In the new space we’ve seen about 50 to 55 visits per day,” says Taylor, who is also an associate professor in the department


YOU

BELONG HERE Forge a path to your future at NKU. For 50 years, our professors have provided students with a world-class education on a safe, supportive campus just minutes from downtown Cincinnati. nku.edu/apply


Guide to Colleges and Universities 2019 of counseling, social work and leadership. “That’s up from around 25 per day in the old space.” FUEL NKU’s goal is to combat student hunger, provide additional essentials such as toiletries and eliminate food waste while maintaining a welcoming and nonjudgmental environment at the location. The zero waste goal is something Taylor hopes is assisted by enhanced recycling and composting efforts as the program grows into the new pantry. However, the priority now is more about keeping the shelves stocked than figuring out what to do with leftover items. “Our campus partners and community members help with donations,” she says, “but donations are always needed and all are appreciated.” Taylor points out that interested community members can visit nku.edu/fuelnku for details on a wide array of convenient donation options. Taylor is excited about what the future holds and the potential of the partnership with Kroger. Part of that is continuing collaboration with area food gardens, like the

one operated by fifth graders at Latonia Elementary, and integrating that into the social work program. “One thing we want to do is horticultural therapy and train students on how to use it for their clients,” Taylor mentions.

Beyond that, the hope is to expand this food pantry program and concept to other campuses in order to battle the hidden prevalence of student hunger, which Taylor points out is terribly common but rarely seen by the public. The AntiOD device is designed to allow anyone to dispense naloxone to someone experiencing an overdose.

SINCLAIR IN MASON With over 130 years of stability and experience, Sinclair plays an important role in the workforce and economic development initiatives in southwest Ohio. Students can complete associate degrees and certificates, or transfer credits to 4-year institutions. • Over 50 degree and certificate programs to complete close to home • Nationally recognized faculty • Fully Online and Hybrid programs • Credits that transfer easily to fouryear universities

WWW.SINCLAIR.EDU/MASON 64

A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com


UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI In the College of Design, Architecture, Art and Planning (DAAP), graduate studies coordinator Claudia B. Rebola and a team of graduate students have created a new tool for combatting overdose deaths in the current opioid epidemic. The AntiOD device—a publicly accessible cabinet containing single-use dispensers of naloxone, much like defibrillators placed in common spaces—is meant to help take some of the burden off first responders who often can’t arrive at the scene of overdoses soon enough. AntiOD’s packaging features easy instructions for administering the naloxone so the public can help save more lives. Rebola, who holds a doctorate in information design, had previously developed an iteration of this while she was a professor at the Rhode Island School of Design. There, working with the city of Providence and Geoffrey Capraro of Brown University, she deployed the predecessor to the AntiOD program—called NaloxBoxes—in 48 locations in Rhode Island. When she joined UC’s DAAP program in 2017 and was made aware of the area’s high rate of opioid overdoses, Rebola went back to work on a new version of the NaloxBox.

Rebola worked with UC graduate students on the design of AntiOD. “When I moved here to the University of Cincinnati,” she says, “I began to think about how we can use design to combat the opioid crisis.” The intersection of design and medicine has been something Rebola has been involved with through her career, though it

may not be an obvious connection to the general public. But it’s something that Rebola is passionate to educate the public about so as to further destigmatize the act of saving a stranger from succumbing to an opioid overdose. “[It’s about] changing the mindset,” she

CAREER FIELDS:

Healthcare/Medical • Advanced Manufacturing • Information Technology • Cosmetology • Firefighter/EMT • HVAC Welding • Heavy Equipment & Site Construction Electrical Power Line Mechanic • Dental Assisting

w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9

65


Guide to Colleges and Universities 2019 says. “It’s not someone else’s problem, it’s a shared problem.” Rebola recognizes that changing public mindsets requires a better approach to providing access. In fact, her proposal for grant funding was titled Designing Access. “It’s all about that access,” she points out. “Access to information, access to understanding of the stigma, access to naloxone.” Between working on deployment and scalability at UC’s 1819 Innovation Hub and coordinating an initial spring rollout with the city, the AntiOD program is gaining more supporters all the time. Rebola is encouraged by the reactions from the public, the city and various organizations as well as the potential to scale deployment up and save even more lives. “Downtown is just a starting point,” she notes in light of early successes in raising awareness and planning implementation. “I’m amazed by the support.”

MIAMI UNIVERSITY While varsity athletics generally conjure up images of the gridiron or a hardwood court, Miami University is leading the region when it comes to one of the newest collegiate sports options: esports, the term coined for organized competitions of multiplayer video gaming. Miami started a varsity esports team in 2016 that competes in collegiate tournaments involving video games such as Hearthstone and Rocket League. It’s a brave new world in college athletics and the Redhawks esports team has steadily gained more recognition and support, particularly after it won the 2017 National Association of Collegiate eSports (NACE) championship for the game Overwatch. “It’s an interesting time,” says Glenn Platt, director of Interactive Media Studies, Armstrong Chair in Interactive Media and co-director of the varsity esports program. “Kind of the Wild West. It’s a bit of a free-for-all.” Miami is one of the largest schools competing in the NACE and the school recognizes its standing as an early adopter. “We were the first Division I school to have varsity esports,” Platt notes. “So we’re taking on a leadership role with other universities.” But it’s not just about the competition. The university offers partial scholarships 66

A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

TOP: Gateway is offering potential students across the river in-state tuition. BELOW: Gateway’s new childcare program

for esports and Platt and the Armstrong Institute for Interactive Media Studies (AIMS) are integrating the gaming side of things with various educational tracks. Miami’s game design program was recently ranked third in the world among public universities by the Princeton Review and the school is one of the first to offer a graduate program in esports management, incorporating technology and entrepreneurial courses. One immediate application of the esports management program will be to help run Bill Donabedian’s upcoming PiviP video game festival at Kings Island in May. The rise of varsity esports has helped grow enrollment in the AIMS program— now up to 850 students—and has set Miami on a path to becoming one of the leading schools in the nation in both varsity esports and degrees related to the business and development of video games. There are plans to soon build two new esports arenas in or near the Armstrong Student Center on the Oxford campus.

GATEWAY COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE The three northern Kentucky campuses of Gateway Community and Technical College have provided a way to attain associate’s degrees and technical certifications for nearly 20 years. In 2019, the school is trying to make it easier for high school

graduates throughout the Tristate to attend through a new scholarship program. The Tri-State Scholars Program provides in-state tuition for non-Kentucky residents and is available to those hailing from Butler, Clermont, Hamilton or Warren counties in Ohio and Dearborn, Ripley, Switzerland or Ohio counties in Indiana. Qualified applicants must be recent high school graduates with a minimum 2.0 GPA and enrolled in six or more credit hours of classes at Gateway. The wider outreach this scholarship allows is made possible in part by partnerships among Cincinnati Public Schools, the Cincinnati Youth Collaborative, YMCA of Greater Cincinnati and Gateway. For parents attending classes at Gateway, a new childcare program is being offered on the Edgewood campus on evenings


EDUCATION PROFILE

ART ACADEMY OF CINCINNATI 1212 Jackson St. | Cincinnati, OH 45202 513-562-6262 | artacademy.edu Make Art, Make a Difference.

Y

our experience at the Art Academy of Cincinnati is all about discovering your brightest, most vibrant self. It’s about finding your artistic voice and making it resonate. As a part of our collective of rule-breaking makers, you’ll be challenged to take bold risks. To explore media you never dreamed of and invent art forms no one has yet imagined. In our active, hands-on classrooms, you’ll work side by side with faculty who are not only your mentors, but your peers, collaborators and greatest supporters. Our major-fluid programs give you the freedom to experiment and explore across disciplines and the power to customize your education so it fits your vision. Set in the historic district of Over-the-Rhine, the AAC is at the heart of an active and vibrant culture—one that drives curiosity and passion and is filled with inspiration and opportunity. Tap into the movement and experience everything our community has to offer aspiring artists, from the small, independent print shops, galleries and museums, to the dynamic design agencies and Fortune 500 companies.

The AAC gives students the opportunity to major in creative writing, design, painting and drawing, illustration, photography, print media and sculpture; minor in film, video and audio and art history; and earn and associate’s degree in graphic design.

EDUCATION PROFILE

Bethany Theological Seminary

615 National Road West | Richmond, IN 47374 765-983-1800 | bethanyseminary.edu

F

ounded in 1905 in Chicago, Bethany is the graduate school for the Church of the Brethren, a Historic Peace Church. Three principles in theological education that have remained constant are academic rigor, spiritual formation and the practice of ministry. In 1994 Bethany moved to Richmond, Indiana, to partner with the Earlham School of Religion (a Quaker institution), featuring a common campus and joint curriculum. Bethany is on the cutting edge of theopoetics, offering the only certificate and, in cooperation with Earlham School of Religion, the only master’s. Through synchronous video, students in different locations can take courses together in real time. Bethany is known for a strong MDiv Ministry Formation program and requires an intercultural experience of all students. In 2018 Bethany launched its first international partnership with Ekklesiyar Yan’uwa a Nigeria (Church of the Brethren in Nigeria), featuring synchronous video courses.

The school offers three graduate degrees (master of divinity, master of arts and master of arts: theopoetics and writing) and six graduate certificates (certificate of achievement in theological studies, specialized graduate certificates in biblical peacemaking, intercultural biblical interpretation, just peace and conflict transformation, theology and science, and theopoetics and theological imagination.

w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9

67


Guide to Colleges and Universities 2019 Monday through Thursday. Gateway students enrolled in a night class can utilize the program for free any time from 4:45 p.m. to 9:15 p.m.

ART ACADEMY OF CINCINNATI It may come as a surprise that Over-theRhine’s Art Academy of Cincinnati is one of the oldest institutions in the city. Founded in 1869, the Art Academy was closely tied to the Cincinnati Art Museum and spent much of its existence in Eden Park before securing a dedicated campus in Over-theRhine in 2005. The school is celebrating its 150 years of operation in 2019 with several events. A limited print, 144-page retrospective book on the Art Academy’s history and influence on the art world has been published to highlight the notable names and art to have come out of the institution over the last century and a half. An exhibition featuring work produced by alumni to commemorate the anniversary wrapped up at the academy’s Pearlman Gallery in March and a concurrent

The Art Academy of Cincinnati is celebrating its 150th anniversary. exhibit of art from notable alumni hosted at the Cincinnati Art Museum concludes on April 28. The evening of May 3 will feature a free,

public block party on Jackson Street in Over-the-Rhine where the Art Academy invites the neighborhood and all Cincinnatians to celebrate their anniversary

EDUCATION PROFILE

GATEWAY COMMUNITY & TECHNICAL COLLEGE 500 Technology Way | Florence KY 41042 (859) 441-4500 | (855) 346-4282 | gateway.kctcs.edu

G

ateway Community & Technical College offers highquality, targeted education to meet the personal and professional needs of the Tristate and contribute to the economic development of the region. With programs in a variety of subject areas leading to high-wage, high-demand jobs, Gateway gives you more than a diploma. Gateway prepares you for your career. Students have the opportunity to pursue associates degrees, certifications and diplomas. Degrees and credits earned at Gateway transfer to any public university in Kentucky and regionally accredited higher education institutions in the United States. Gateway’s Workforce Solutions provides assessments, training, and certifications that boost advancement in many careers paths. In addition, staff works with employers to develop strategies for

68

A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

employee recruitment, development, and retention. The Center for Advanced Manufacturing at Gateway’s Boone Campus in Florence, Kentucky, is home to the KYFAME apprenticeship and Enhanced Operator programs, which collaborate with advanced manufacturing industry partners. Gateway’s state-of-the-art Transportation Technology Center is home to the automotive technology, Ford Asset, and Commercial Driver’s License (CDL) programs, among others. For your convenience, Gateway offers daytime, evening and weekend classes at three campuses in Edgewood, Covington and Florence. High school students can earn college credit through the early college program. Gateway’s nationally recognized online courses make going to college even more accessible. Gateway is your first step to a better life!


The Art Academy created a timeline to show off the highlights of its 150-year history.

EDUCATION PROFILE

GREAT OAKS CAREER CAMPUSES 110 Great Oaks Drive | Cincinnati OH 45241 513-771-8840 | greatoaks.com

E

xperiential learning—the chance to put knowledge into action—is an important part of education. One way students gain this hands-on experience is through Great Oaks Career Campuses. There, students can learn aviation maintenance with real airplanes, study culinary arts in fully-equipped commercial kitchens, program manufacturing robots, use the latest software for cybersecurity or digital arts, work with horses and other animals, and more. Great Oaks is the public career-technical school district serving 36 southwest Ohio school districts. Students typically attend as juniors and seniors and can earn college credit and a professional credential in their career field. “Career-technical programs are super-electives for high schoolers,” says Jon Weidlich of Great Oaks. “Students meet the same academic requirements as their classmates, but have the chance to spend part Adult career training programs are also available. For more of their school career trying something new and different.” information, go to greatoaks.com.

w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9

69


EDUCATION PROFILE

Eastern Kentucky University

521 Lancaster Avenue | Richmond, KY 40475 859-622-1000 | eku.edu

EKU strikes cost, convenience balance

E

astern Kentucky University strikes the right balance for students and their families on many levels. For example, with about 16,000 students and small classes, EKU feels big, but not too big. And it’s an easy, 90-minute drive down Interstate 75 from Cincinnati, the ideal distance for students who want to earn independence but stay close enough for an occasional visit home. However, the cost value is where the balance truly felt. EKU has long been known for punching above its educational weight class, delivering the region’s most in-demand and unique programs for an affordable tuition. That affordability now extends to out-ofstate students thanks to the University’s Selective Merit Aid/Reduced Tuition (SMART) Program. The SMART Program provides near instate tuition to students from Ohio, Indiana and other surrounding states. At a flat, $10,000-per-year tuition, plus affordable housing and meal plans, SMART students are likely to find the cost of attending EKU less than or equal to schools in their home state. To qualify, students must have at least a 2.5 cumulative, unweighted GPA. Located in scenic Richmond, Kentucky, EKU offers nearly 100 degree programs at the associate, baccalaureate, master’s and doctoral levels, preparing students

for careers as pilots, nurses, psychologists, forensic scientists, firefighters, video game designers, entrepreneurs and much more. Students learn from accomplished professors in small class settings, allowing those professors to provide a high degree of mentorship and one-on-one engagement. EKU is also known for balancing classroom learning with hands-on, realworld experience. For example, aviation students earn flight hours in the cockpits of a fleet of Piper and Cessna aircraft. Nursing students practice lifesaving skills in simulation environments with some of the most advanced technology in the state. Additionally, nearly 6,000 employers have worked with EKU to place students in internships and coop positions in their fields.

student organizations, a fully equipped fitness center (complete with a popular indoor rock climbing wall) and frequent cultural events, live performances and social gatherings, so there’s plenty to do on campus outside the classroom. Students who live on campus have 12 residence halls with many different traditional-, suite- and apartment-style rooms to choose from. Other buildings opened within the last two years include the largest science building of its kind in Kentucky and brand-new dining hall.

EKU graduates have distinguished themselves in almost every conceivable career, from teachers, police and social workers to business owners, corporate executives and NASA engineers. With a degree from EKU, students join more than 135,000 successful, living alumni Outside of academics, student life is at worldwide who are proud to call themthe forefront at EKU. The University is selves an Eastern Kentucky Colonel. home to 15 NCAA athletic teams, 230


Guide to Colleges and Universities 2019

ABOVE: Cincinnati State’s Advanced Technology and Learning Center BELOW: Cincinnati State and Wilmington College

Jackson streets, which formerly housed the BarrelHouse Brewery, the $5 million project—named Future House—coincides with the academy’s increasing emphasis on video production, animation and other emergent fields of visual art. Construction and renovations are slated to begin in early 2020. with the school. That will be followed in November by the return of the Beaux Arts Ball, a formal costumed event that has been a semiannual fixture of the academy for the last 100 years. Most notable, though, is the Art Academy’s announcement of a planned expansion to its Over-the-Rhine campus. Utilizing the unused space at 12th and

CINCINNATI STATE TECHNICAL AND COMMUNITY COLLEGE January at Cincinnati State Technical and Community College saw the opening of its remodeled Advanced Technology and Learning Center (ATLC). The $2.2 million remodel of the ATLC includes many amenities for students and faculty, including a welcome center, career center and transfer

center. The building is also home to an auditorium, bookstore, cafeteria, lounge and multiple mixed-use spaces, as well as offices for career and educational guidance. Cincinnati State’s partnership with Wilmington College was extended late in 2018, solidifying the program that allows adult students to more easily achieve bachelor’s degrees. The 15-year collaboration thus far between the schools allows adult undergraduates to attain an associate degree from Cincinnati State and a bachelor’s from Wilmington while only having to attend the Cincinnati State campus. Eighty-two percent of associate degree recipients have gone on to successfully receive their bachelor’s over the history of the program. n w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9

71


Guide to Colleges and Universities 2019 The Tristate benefits from one of the most diverse educational portfolios around. With more than 20 colleges and universities in the area, residents have the opportunities to add job skills and certifications, keep up with continuing education needs, and earn various undergraduate and graduate degrees. Those not in the region are supporters of this publication. Did we miss your school? Please email us at publisher@cincymagazine.com so we can make sure to include it next year. Art Academy of Cincinnati 1212 Jackson St., Cincinnati 45202 513-562-6262 artacademy.edu Four-year college that focuses on art and design. Majors include design, illustration, print media and photography. The Art Institute of Cincinnati: College of Design 1171 E. Kemper Road, Cincinnati 45246 513-751-1206 aic-arts.edu Graphic design college. Offers focused three-year degree.

Athenaeum of Ohio 6616 Beechmont Ave., Cincinnati 45230 513-231-2223 athenaeum.edu Third oldest Roman Catholic seminary in the United States. Bluffton University 1 University Drive, Bluffton 45817 419-358-3000 bluffton.edu More than 90 programs for undergraduate students, adult degree-completion programs and master’s degrees in business and education.

Chatfield College 1544 Central Parkway, Cincinnati 45202 513-921-9856 chatfield.edu An open enrollment college offering the associate of arts degree plus a third year towards a bachelor’s degree. The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences 2139 Auburn Ave., Cincinnati 45219 513-585-2401 thechristcollege.edu Bachelor’s and associate’s degrees in nursing. Also offers LPN-RN pathway and RN-BSN completion. Cincinnati Christian University 2700 Glenway Ave., Cincinnati 45204 800-949-4228 ccuniversity.edu Christian university that offers programs in biblical/ cultural studies, deaf studies, business management, music and worship, psychology, ministry, education and arts and sciences.

EDUCATION PROFILE

INDIANA TECH - Northern Kentucky Campus

809 Wright Summit Parkway, Suite 310 | Fort Wright, KY 41011 859-916-5884 | indianatech.edu/cps

I

ndiana Tech educates students beyond its home base in Fort Wayne, Indiana, with regional campuses throughout the Midwest, as well as online programs that meet the needs of students worldwide. The private, not-for-profit university offers career-oriented degree programs at the associate, bachelor’s, master’s and Ph.D. levels, as well as graduate certificates. Each program aligns with an in-demand career, including project management, engineering, business, cybersecurity, accounting, information technology, computer science, health care administration, criminal justice and more. Busy working adults find Indiana Tech an ideal fit, with class schedules that allow students to take one class at a time and still make rapid progress toward a degree. Many classes start every six weeks, so students can begin their education at any time of year. The university is accredited through the Higher Learning Commission (HLC). For more information or to enroll today, contact the Northern Kentucky admissions team at 859-916-5884.

72

A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com


EDUCATION PROFILE

SINCLAIR COLLEGE MASON CAMPUS 5386 Courseview Drive | Mason OH 45040 513-339-1212 | sinclair.edu/mason

O

pened in 2007, the Sinclair College Campus in Mason continues Sinclair’s mission of providing accessible, affordable, flexible education to meet the needs of the community. Conveniently located, the campus is easily accessible from Intersate 71, central to Warren County. Students come from throughout the Warren, Butler, Clinton and Northern Hamilton County areas.

Sinclair offers more than 50 degree and certificate programs, including university transfer, business, IT, computer information and health care options. Partnerships with other schools provide access to advanced degrees. Awards and Recognitions • 2013 U.S. Professor of the Year: Bob Chaney (CASE and Carnegie Mellon Foundation) • 2013 Automotive School of the Year (Tomorrow’s Tech magazine) • Largest regional provider of online education with more than 200 different courses and 27 online degree programs

EDUCATION PROFILE

THE CHRIST COLLEGE OF NURSING & HEALTH SCIENCES 2139 Auburn Ave. | Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-585-2401 | thechristcollege.edu

T

he Christ College, located on The Christ Hospital campus for over 116 years, provides a fully-immersed health care education. A clinical partnership with the region’s most preferred hospital ensures students receive a guaranteed clinical seat, connections to first hand career experiences, and up-close study alongside the best health care professionals. The college offers a traditional 4-year Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN), an Accellerated BSN (ABSN) for second degree seekers, and on online RN to BSN completion program for nurses wishing to advance their education. An online Bachelor of Science in Health Care Administration (HCA) and Associate of Science in Medical Assisting (MA) are also offered with learing opportunities in partnership with The Christ Hospital. Ranked 1st in the region for post-graduate salaries by The Cincinnati Busines Courier (2017) and 1st in the region/12th in the nation by Payscale (2018) for producing the highest paid graduates entering the wrokforce, The Christ College was once again listed by The Cinncinnati Courier as graduating students best positioned to pay down college debt (Nov 2018). Visit us @ TheChristCollege.edu

w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9

73


EDUCATION PROFILE

Miami University Regionals Middletown Campus 4200 N. University Blvd. Middletown, OH 45042

Hamilton Campus 1601 University Blvd. Hamilton, OH 45011

513-785-3111 | miamioh.edu/regionals iami University Regionals serves our region with open access to a Miami University degree at three campuses and online, offering one of the lowest tuition rates for four-year public institutions in Ohio.

M

option allows students to begin one of over 100 majors on the regional campuses and relocate to the main campus in Oxford. Regardless of which campus you start at or finish at, as One Miami, you would join the Miami Family and earn a Miami University degree.

you through your education. Ninety-six percent of our recent alum are employed or furthering their graduation. Our Career Services and Professional Development Office support students from start to finish and beyond!

Miami University Regionals offers a nationally ranked education close to you at one of our three locations—Hamilton, Middletown and West Chester. And, for students looking to fit college into their busy lives, Miami University Regionals E-Campus delivers high quality online courses and 100 percent online degree options.

Our Miami Tuition Promise allows families to plan the cost of their four-year college education without surprises, and with one of the lowest tuition rates for four-year public institutions in Ohio, a bachelor’s degree can be affordable at Miami University Regionals.

Our regional campuses offer a vibrant student life with championship athletics, more than 50 student organizations, community service learning opportunities, arts programming and performances, and more! With nearly 5,000 students attending classes on our beautiful campuses or online, you will have an incredible experience as a Miami University Regionals student!

As the regional system of Miami University, Miami Regionals offers 18 bachelor’s degrees and 13 associate degrees entirely at its regional campuses. Our One Miami relocation

Your success matters. Our outstanding faculty and staff provide personalized attention and consider your success as our highest priority. We offer free tutoring, disability services, student employment opportunities and professional advising to support

See for Yourself! Schedule your visit today! MiamiOH.edu/Regionals/YouChoose


Guide to Colleges and Universities 2019 Cincinnati College of Mortuary Science 645 W. North Bend Road, Cincinnati 45224 513-761-2020 ccms.edu Offers associate’s degrees and bachelor’s degrees in mortuary science. Specializes in clinical services and funeral directing.

Fortis College 11499 Chester Road, Suite 200, Cincinnati 45246 513-771-2795 fortis.edu Programs include nursing, dental assisting, HVAC, medical assisting, practical nursing and welding technology.

Cincinnati State Technical & Community College 3520 Central Parkway, Cincinnati 45223 513-569-1500 cincinnatistate.edu Offers 75 associate’s degrees and 40 certificate programs in business technologies, health and public safety, engineering technologies, humanities and sciences and information technologies

Galen College of Nursing 100 E. Business Way, Suite 200, Cincinnati 45241 513-475-3636 galencollege.edu Offers dual track BSN, LPN to BSN, and online RN to BSN.

Eastern Kentucky University 521 Lancaster Ave., Richmond KY 40475 859-622-1000 eku.edu Offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees as well as doctorates in five academic colleges.

Gateway Community and Technical College 500 Technology Way, Florence KY 41042 859-441-4500 gateway.kctcs.edu Two-year associate’s degree in business administration, criminal justice and others. Also offers certificates.

God’s Bible School & College 1810 Young St., Cincinnati 45202 513-721-7944 gbs.edu Non-denominational Christian school. Associate’s and bachelor’s degrees available in education, professional studies, ministerial, intercultural studies and music. Good Samaritan College of Nursing and Health Science 375 Dixmyth Ave., Cincinnati 45220 513-862-2631 gscollege.edu Nonprofit nursing program. Subsidiary of Good Samaritan Hospital, a partner of TriHealth. Great Oaks Career Campuses 110 Great Oaks Drive, Cincinnati 45241 513-771-8840 greatoaks.com One of the largest career and technical districts in the US. Offers career, workforce and economic development.

To keep up to date on the Arts, Entertainment & Culture in the Greater Cincy Area, visit: cincymagazine.com

w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9

75


Guide to Colleges and Universities 2019 Indiana Wesleyan University 4201 S. Washington St., Marion IN 46953 866-468-6498 indwes.edu Evangelical Christian university with focus on liberal arts. Known for its master’s and adult education programs. John Carroll University 1 Jon Carroll Blvd., University Heights 44118 888-388-2971 sites.jcu.edu Offers 70 majors in areas including accountancy, biology, business, communications, data science, exercise science, pre-health professions, sports studies and many more. Marian University 3200 Cold Spring Road, Indianapolis IN 46222 317-955-6000 marian.edu The university’s focus areas include arts and sciences, business, education, engineering, nursing and ministry. Miami University 501 E. High St., Oxford 45056 513-529-2531 miamioh.edu Public liberal arts school that has bachelor’s degrees in more than 120 areas of study, more than 60 master’s degree programs and 12 doctoral degree programs. Also has regional programs in Hamilton, Middletown and West Chester. Mount Saint Joseph University 5701 Delhi Road, Cincinnati 45233 800-654-9314 msj.edu Liberal arts institution focused on experiential and cooperative learning. Northern Kentucky University Nunn Drive, Highland Heights KY 41099 859-572-5100 nku.edu One of the fatest growing universities in Kentucky. Recently renovated its College of Informatics, student union and BB&T Arena. Ohio Dominican University 1216 Sunbury Road, Columbus 43219 614-251-4500 ohiodominican.edu ODU offers nearly 50 bachelor’s and master’s degrees that will prepare you for an exciting career in a high-demand field.

76

A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

Sinclair Community College 5386 Courseview Drive, Mason 45040 513-339-1212 sinclair.edu Associate’s degrees in arts and science at a convenient location. Also offers certificates. Southern State Community College 100 Hobart Drive, Hillsboro 45133 937-393-3431 sscc.edu Academic programs as well as technical and transfer ones. Locations in Mt. Orab, Hillsboro, Wilmington and Washington Court House. Sullivan University 3101 Bardstown Road, Louisville KY 40205 502-456-6505 sullivan.edu Focused on practical degrees in areas ike accounting, business administration, information and computer technology, legal studies, early childhood education, nursing and more. Thomas More College 333 Thomas More Parkway, Crestview Hills KY 41017 859-341-5800 thomasmore.edu Small Catholic liberal arts college that offers 40 bachelor’s degree programs, 29 associate programs and several graduate degrees.

Union Institute & University 440 E. McMillan St., Cincinnati 45206 800-861-6400 myunion.edu Specializes in helping working adults achieve their dreams of obtaining an undergraduate, master’s or doctoral degree so they can change the world. Offers online and low residency learning. University of Cincinnati 2600 Clifton Ave., Cincinnati 45221 513-556-0000 uc.edu Hottest College in America. Public research institute. Features College-Conservatory of Music; Design, Architecture, Art and Planning (DAAP); Lindner College of Business; and College of Nursing. Warren County Career Center 3525 N. State Route 48, Lebanon 45036 513-932-8145 mywccc.org Career development and enhancement classes and training. Xavier University 3800 Victory Parkway, Cincinnati 45207 513-745-3000 xavier.edu Jesuit Catholic university. Focus on community service, sustainability and religious inclusion. Recently renovated Alter Hall.


EDUCATION PROFILE

Northern Kentucky University Nunn Drive | Highland Heights, KY 41099 859-572-5100 | nku.edu

N

KU is a growing metropolitan university of more than 14,000 students served by more than 2,000 faculty and staff on a thriving suburban campus near Cincinnati. Located in the quiet suburb of Highland Heights, Kentucky, we have become a leader in Greater Cincinnati and Kentucky by providing a private school education for a fraction of the cost. While we are one of the fastest growing universities in Kentucky, our professors still know our students’ names. From accounting to visual communication and much more, we can help you find and develop your passion. Ignite your spirit with 17 division one sports teams and blaze new trails through study abroad in over 40 countries. With inviting and state-of-the-art facilities including Griffin Hall and the Health Innovation Center, NKU is empowering a new generation of professionals for the region’s information and health economies. Visit campus today and learn more about NKU.


The Tristate’s A+ Professors 2019

THIS YEAR’S BEST COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY EDUCATORS, AS NOMINATED BY THEIR PEERS AND STUDENTS, SHOW THE BREADTH OF TALENT AT OUR LOCAL INSTITUTIONS By the Editors

Cincy Magazine’s Outstanding Educators Class of 2019 features exceptional professors who were among the many nominations we received from colleagues. The winners were singled out for a variety of traits that ranged from scholarship and spending extra time with students to innovation in the classroom and research.

MICHAEL BINDIS Adolescent/Young Adult and Middle Childhood Education Mount St. Joseph University “His research interests include the perceptions of high school female students toward science and science careers, and the use of pedagogical content knowledge by pre-service and early career science teachers. He has presented his research at local and national conferences.” - Kathleen Cardwell, Mount St. Joseph University

EDUCATION PROFILE

UNION INSTITUTE & UNIVERSITY 440 East McMillan St. | Cincinnati OH, 45206 myunion.edu | 800-861-6400

U

nion Institute & University is a nonprofit, regionally accredited university specializing in providing quality higher education degrees for adults nationwide. Founded in 1964, Union’s academic programs and services are the result of more than five decades of identifying and refining ways to structure and deliver education to meet the needs of adults. Distinguished as the pioneer in adult education, Union perfected the concepts now common in higher education such as the hybrid model, a blend of online and traditional classroom instruction, interdisciplinary studies, and student centered education with socially relevant and applicable learning outcomes in its undergraduate, master’s and doctoral degree programs. The university is guided by its core mission to educate highly motivated adults who seek academic programs to engage, enlighten, and empower them to pursue professional goals and a lifetime of learning, service, and social responsibility.

78

A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

Union is a national university with academic centers located in Ohio, Florida and California. For more information about Union Institute & University, visit myunion.edu or call 1- 800-861-6400.


J.W. CARTER, II

ASHLEY HINCK

JEFFREY KUZNEKOFF

CECILE MARCZINSKI

Criminology & Criminal Justice Mount St. Joseph University “Dr. Carter and two of his colleagues have trained over 600 members of the Mount community to survive an active shooter situation. Dr. Carter’s current research focuses on developing innovative pedagogical approaches to criminal justice and criminology.” - Kathleen Cardwell, Mount St. Joseph University

Digital Media/Communications Xavier University “Since 2015 she has immersed her students in courses that use technology and media to understand the impact of technology and media on ourselves and society. Her innovative teaching and infectious enthusiasm have helped to build a strong cohort of majors.” - Gary Lewandowski, Xavier University

Interdisciplinary & Communication Studies Miami University Regionals “Kuznekoff is a highly successful instructor who has his students working with cutting-edge social media technology. His teaching is influenced by his research focused on examining how mobile phone usage and social media can affect student learning in the higher education classroom.” - Moira Casey, Miami University Regionals

Psychological Science Northern Kentucky University “Students are captivated by her ability to blend her research on cognition and psychopharmacology into her lectures and learning material and demonstrate a deeper appreciation of key concepts and ideas as a consequence.” - Jason Vest, Northern Kentucky University

RISING STARS

Indiana Tech will help you go further with 40-plus quality degree programs. Our class schedules allow you to make rapid progress toward an affordable degree, taking one class at a time—either online or at one of our regional campuses. • Degrees at the associate, bachelor’s, master’s and Ph.D. levels. • Graduate certificates that will expand your skills and advance your career. • Dedicated staff and resources that will support you throughout your education.

READY TO TAKE THE NEXT STEP? CONTACT OUR NORTHERN KENTUCKY ADMISSIONS TEAM. 859.916.5884 | 809 WRIGHT SUMMIT PKWY, SUITE 310

INDIANATECH.EDU/GOFORIT w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9

79


LIKE US ON FACEBOOK AND FOLLOW US ON TWITTER! Join our online community and stay in the know! Stay updated on upcoming events and giveaways.


GEMA NAVARROBAHNS Strategic Management University of Cincinnati “Since joining the faculty she has been highly involved in our college community, serving on a search committee, a diversity and inclusion task force and on the Teaching Excellence Committee.” - Elaine Hollensbe, University of Cincinnati

DAVID RAPIEN

HOLLY RIFFE

JENNIFER RODE

Information Systems/OBAIS University of Cincinnati “David is truly inspiring in his commitment to education in the larger Cincinnati community. He advises and takes students to case study competitions several times a year, something most faculty do not do.” - Craig Froehle, University of Cincinnati

Counseling, Social Work & Leadership Northern Kentucky University “Holly has expertly and creatively integrated her teaching with service and scholarship. Holly delivers quality instruction to her students through meaningful assignments with current community relevancy.” - Jason Vest, Northern Kentucky University

Nursing Miami University Regionals “Her willingness to bring different points of view to the table—in a constantly improving and competitive program— makes her an invaluable asset to the leadership of Miami’s Department of Nursing housed at Miami Regionals.” - Bob Davis, Miami University Regionals

www.myunion.edu YOU can work and go back to school! Whether you’re completing an unfinished degree, seeking an advanced degree to further your professional development, or fulfilling a lifetime goal, we have the academic program to match your needs. With online and low-residency degree options, as well as a liberal transfer policy, Union Institute & University makes earning your degree accessible and affordable. Keep your job, your income, and your commitments while you study.

Your education pathway starts at Union.

www.myunion.edu admissions@myunion.edu | 800.861.6400

w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9

81


DAVID SINGLETON

JANE SOJKA

CINDY VERALDO

Law Northern Kentucky University “The Constitutional Litigation Clinic exists because of Professor Singleton; in effect, he is the program. The quality of this program and the benefits of this program cannot be overstated.” - Jason Vest, Northern Kentucky University

Business/Marketing University of Cincinnati “She is truly student-focused, more so than any other faculty member I have met. Indeed, she won our Grilliot Award for the faculty member who does the most in advancing studentfaculty relations.” - Karen Machleit, University of Cincinnati

Sports Management Mount St. Joseph University “Dr. Veraldo’s research agenda includes investigating the underrepresentation of women in intercolleg iate at hlet ic leadership and the experience of women in the sport management major. Dr. Veraldo also brings professional experience in the sport industry to the sport management classroom.” – Kathleen Cardwell, Mount St. Joseph University

WHITNEY WOMACK SMITH Languages, Literature & Writing Miami University Regionals “Womack Smith has played a key role in the success of Miami Regionals’ new English Studies bachelor’s degree program by promoting it and devoting substantial time to advising majors and prospective majors.” - Moira Casey, Miami University Regionals

See all that Cincy has to offer in the Arts, Business and Culture. Visit cincymagazine.com for a FREE subscription to Cincy Magazine

82

A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com


DePaul Cristo Rey students start their climb up the corporate ladder in high school.

Join 100+ local companies to partner with our Corporate Work Study Program. Call to learn more.

513.861.0600 • www.depaulcristorey.org


Best Schools

Driving Success SOUTHERN STATE COMMUNITY COLLEGE STEERS STUDENTS INTO GREAT-PAYING JOBS

By Janice Hisle

All aboard! This big rig—a 35,000-pound, 18-wheeler with a 53-foot-long trailer—provides real-life driving experience on a closed course for aspiring truck drivers.

A

fter a four-week training program that cost about $5,000 to complete, a smart, hard-working young lady left a minimum-wage job—and landed one that paid $60,000 the first year. By her second year, she was earning upwards of $100,000. “There are so many success stories like that one,” says J.T. Smith, director and training manager for the Truck Driving Academy at Southern State Community College. “Everyone who completes the program and gets a commercial driver license can get a job right away if they want one; they can start out in a $50,000-a-year job in the blink of an eye. I don’t think there are many other types of work that can do that for you.” People who once wouldn’t have even considered truck driving as a career might now give it a second look, Smith says, considering the opportunities now available. Upwards of 50,000 trucking jobs need to 84

A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

“Everyone who completes the program and gets a commercial driver license can get a job right away if they want one; they can start out in a $50,000-a-year job in the blink of an eye. I don’t think there are many other types of work that can do that for you.” —J.T. Smith, director and training manager for the Truck Driving Academy at Southern State Community College be filled nationally—a shortfall expected to increase as older truckers continue to reach retirement age. The trucking industry needs 890,000 new drivers to keep pace with demand during the next 10 years, the American Trucking Associations reported, and employers are luring new drivers with pumped-up pay and fringe benefits. Programs such as the one offered by Southern State—at locations in Clinton, Gallia, Jackson, Lawrence and Pike counties—are helping to fill the gap. Among about 40 Ohio truck-driving

programs, Southern State’s academy is one of the state’s longest running and most reputable, Smith says. In operation nearly two decades, the Southern State program has trained about 6,500 students. A distinguishing feature of Southern State’s program: People who complete it may return at any time for a “refresher” course, free of charge, Smith says. Southern State’s program also provides personal attention; for each four students, there’s one instructor. That’s one way Southern State ensures


Instructor J.T. Smith, second from left, works with two students on a truck-driving simulator at Southern State Community College’s Wilmington campus.

its trucking graduates are well prepared for new careers behind the wheel. Some schools promising quick completion of state-required exams offer mostly classroom time and little behind-the-wheel training, Smith says. At Southern State, students spend the bulk of their time learning to drive via computer simulators and in an actual 18-wheeler. Training for passenger-bus drivers is less extensive; tuition and fees for that two-week program runs $900. Training for truck-driving tops out at $5,300 for a four-week program; shorter, lower-cost programs are offered for licenses that limit the types of vehicles a student is authorized to drive. Smith says most people would be hard-pressed

to name another type of training that can launch a new career at a lower cost in such a short time. Smith, who has four decades of experience in trucking, says the industry has been gaining respect but remains misunderstood somewhat. Driving a truck is more complicated than most people imagine, he says. For example, pre-trip inspections require students to have knowledge of 90 different items. Another misconception: truck drivers don’t always spend long periods away from their families; there are many different types of trucking jobs, including ones limited to local routes. Because of the opportunities and ben-

efits available, trucking is attracting a wide array of people, such as retired airline pilots, nurses and people whose jobs were eliminated because of technological advances in their fields, Smith says. Southern State has trained students ages 18 to 70. In a testimonial posted on the program’s website, alumna Cierra Walker said she obtained two jobs in trucking—one fulltime and one part-time, after completing the program. She recommends Southern State’s program because: “The teachers are there to help you when you need it, both in class and on the road … The door is always open for you there.” For more information, visit sscc.edu/ truckdriving. n w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9

85


Best Schools

Building Support

DePaul Cristo Rey High School is a Catholic high school that serves families who want a college-preparatory education for their children but may not be able to afford it without financial assistance.

DEPAUL CRISTO REY HIGH SCHOOL STAYS FOCUSED ON ITS STUDENTS, BOTH BEFORE AND AFTER GRADUATION By Christian Meininger

D

ePaul Cristo Rey High School, a Catholic high school that serves families who want a private, college-preparatory education for their children but may not be able to afford it without financial assistance, is expanding less than eight years after it first opened to better serve its students. “We’re building a permanent campus here in Clifton,” says Sister Jeanne Bessette, president of DePaul Cristo Rey High School. The high school began a capital campaign in 2017 for what it has termed its “campus enhancement.” The school has raised $20.8 million and has exceeded its fundraising goal. Bessette says that the school started 86

A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

fundraising with its friend base—those who already work with and support the school—which led to them asking their friends. Connections were built from friend connections, says Bessette, so in the end “very few people that [supported us] were complete strangers.” As Bessette spoke during a February interview, a jackhammer could be heard not far away. “We are under construction, literally,” jokes Margee Garbsch, director of communications and marketing. “We were scrappy to begin with, but we just ran out of space. We knew it was time to build,” Bessette says. After originally opening in 2011 with six classrooms and five teachers, Bessette, says that the school

began to ask itself, “What’s the 50-year plan?” DePaul Cristo Rey’s campus enhancements include adding a gym, cafeteria, theater and a three-story academic building that will house 22 classrooms. The school believes that its new facilities will be state-of-the-art, helping the school keep up with an ever-changing world. Bessette says that DePaul Cristo Rey will be “the newest high school in Cincinnati. “We wanted to give the kids a ‘big kid school,’” she says. “This will be a real high school campus.” The new facility will be able to accommodate 425 students, an increase from the current number of 325. The school will also be adding a laundry


facility and food pantry. All students who attend DePaul Cristo Rey High School complete a financial aid assessment prior to enrollment. Each student must qualify for admission. DePaul Cristo Rey invests in its students “to and through college”—a model that has been established in the DePaul Cristo Rey model. The national DePaul Cristo Rey network is made up of 35 Catholic workstudy schools. The goal of each school is to prepare students from low-income families to achieve a college degree. One day per week, students do not attend school—instead, they head to work to gain experience for college and the work world beyond. This program also helps to pay for the education. Garbsch says that the school now has relationships with more than 100 businesses in the Greater Cincinnati area. Garbsch says that students are required to attend a two-week training course, which prepares the students for the corporate work-study program. In this training program, students study skills such as answering the phone in a corporate environment, greeting people professionally and dressing for success. DePaul Cristo Rey High School has a 100 percent college acceptance rate and has seen 160 of its students graduate from the school. After graduation, the school continues to stay in touch, supporting them with not only encouragement, but also with minor expenses while they are in college. Garbsch calls these expenses “gaps in financial aid”—for example, the cost of books or transportation. The school is currently raising funds for this endowment. Bessette, who worked with other high schools before DePaul Cristo Rey, says that there is a noted contrast between what happens after graduation at those schools and what happens at DePaul Cristo Rey. The difference: At other schools, graduation might be the last time where students and faculty interact while at DePaul Cristo Rey the support system extends beyond graduation. One particularly significant DePaul Cristo Rey success story is that of a student named Theresa. This student became pregnant while she was attending DePaul Cristo Rey and she considered dropping out. Bessette advised her to stay in school, and the support system at the school carried her on, helping her to not only graduate from high school, but she is also set to graduate from Berea College in Kentucky as well. Berea College has a work-study program,

TOP: A rendering of DePaul Cristo Rey’s new campus BELOW: The campus is currently under construction. too, and if students participate they are able to gain their degree without debt. Theresa was able to participate in this program and bring her child with her when she attended college. The school has a unique set-up, and a “special dorm,” Bessette says, where students can stay with their children. They gain support and find commonalities with other students who have brought their children with them. Theresa is on track to graduate on time, in four years, and has received several job offers. Many graduates of DePaul Cristo Rey High School have attended the University of Cincinnati. Others attend Mount St. Joseph University, Xavier University, Northern Kentucky University, Ohio State University and Loyola University. Two graduates are currently attending the University of Chicago, a competitive school with a low admission rate. Of these students, Bessette says, “These young women are rock stars, they set their sights high.” Current senior Daniel Gilliland says that the newest graduating class is applying to schools across the map—a development

that he thinks is different from past years. Gilliland says that he has applied to 16 schools—his top choices are Georgetown, Princeton and Villanova. “This is the school,” current senior Kayla Thomas Lainez says about DePaul Cristo Rey. She says that after school, teachers and students “are more like family” than teachers and students. Lainez has been accepted to Ohio State University. While she has not decided where she will attend, she plans to study biology. Along with supporting students in the college journey, DePaul Cristo Rey aims to educate the families of students. Bessette says that the college admission process can be overwhelming and complicated, particularly for family members who many not have attended college. She says the families of some of the students must be educated on the process, which is constantly evolving. Financial aid applications alone can be a minefield. Bessette says that this detail is only a small part of the school’s mission to “assist families to the level that they deserve and that they need.” n w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9

87


Best Schools

A Leap of Faith BETHANY THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY NOW OFFERS SIX MASTER’S-LEVEL CERTIFICATES By Eric Spangler

F

or anyone wanting to see how their faith matters in real life Bethany Theological Seminary now has six master’s-level certificates that are a great way to start, says Steve Schweitzer, academic dean and professor. The six certificates include Biblical Peacemak ing, Intercultural Biblical Interpretation, Just Peace and Conflict Transformation, Theology and Science, Theopoetics and Theological Imagination, and Theological Studies, he says. “The courses that go along with this are meant to connect people and their interests to real-world concerns,” says Schweitzer. The courses are a great way for individuals to get a taste of thinking theologically, he says. The courses are also a great way for anyone to learn a new skill or learn about how theology and ethics can influence the way people conduct business, says Schweitzer. 88

A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

“Something like the Just Peace and Conflict Transformation [certificate] might be helpful,” he says. “It’s also for folks who are wanting to think theologically about the larger aspects of our culture and life.” Although about half of the students taking the certificate courses are in the ministry, other professionals like writers, college professors and community organizers are just some of the business professions who are represented in the classes, says Schweitzer. “We’ve had a number of students who have taken these as personal enrichment so they are really concerned and care deeply about these issues,” he says. “They want to … dive deeper into these areas and they believe it will make them a better person.” Bethany Theological Seminary, one of eight institutions of higher education related to the Church of the Brethren, is the only school in the country that offers the Theopoetics and Theological Imagination certificate, Schweitzer says. Theopoetics is “seeing theology in the world around us—particularly through poetry and the arts—and thinking creatively about how we think about God,” he says.

Bethany Theological Seminary offers degrees for those in the ministry and those in other careers.

And, starting next fall, students will be able to earn a master’s degree in theopoetics, says Schweitzer. “You can start with a certificate and move to a [master’s degree program] or you can start right away with the [master’s degree program],” he says. In fact, all of the courses in the certificate programs are fully transferable to a master’s degree program, says Schweitzer, and all the certificates can be completed in one or two years. “It’s designed to work either as a standalone specialty focus or as complementary work towards a master’s degree,” he says. The certificates are a great deal financially, Schweitzer says. “The financial aid around these things is simply amazing,” he says. “You could get through the coursework and you could get a master’s certificate for only $2,200 if you did it all in one year.” Located in Richmond, Indiana, Bethany Theological Seminary’s six master’s-level certificate programs can be taken either at the school or online, says Schweitzer. The courses fit anyone’s schedule, with either weekly classes, one weekend a month for three months or every weekday for two weeks, he says. n


Business Julie Calvert, CEO of the Cincinnati USA Convention and Visitors Bureau

JULIE CALVERT page 90

MEETING & EVENT PLANNER GUIDE page 93

POWER 100 RE-CAP

page 110

BUSINESS CALENDAR

page 112

JOE SIMON

BEST IN BUSINESS DIRECTORY

page 114

w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9

89


The Destination Builder WITH A CONVENTION CENTER, HOTEL AND EVENT ARENA WOEFULLY IN NEED OF UPDATES, NEW CVB CEO JULIE CALVERT IS TASKED WITH BRINGING CONVENTIONS BACK TO CINCINNATI By David Holthaus

T

he year was 2001, certainly not the best year Cincinnati ever had. Or the country for that matter. And it certainly wasn’t the best time to start a new job whose focus was selling the city as a destination for business travelers. The police shooting of an unarmed man in April had sparked three days of rioting in the city’s Over-the-Rhine neighborhood. Despite efforts by city leaders and others to portray the events as “civil unrest,” three days of disorder left the city shaken and brought it the most unwanted kind of 90

A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

national attention. It was just a few months afterward that Julie Calvert began a job pitching Cincinnati to outsiders for the Cincinnati Convention and Visitors Bureau. Dave Anderson, a Delta Air Lines executive and then chairman of the CVB, reached out to Calvert with a vision for a convention agency that was more strategically focused on communicating Cincinnati’s strengths to the convention trade. Despite the obvious challenges, “I enthusiastically raised my hand,” Calvert says.

Enthusiasm is a strong suit of Calvert’s and she needed it in buckets three weeks after she started at the bureau, when the worst terror attack in U.S. history struck on Sept. 11, 2001. The attack chilled travel around the country and caused all kinds of economic uncertainty. But her enthusiasm never waned and she eventually became vice president of communications and strategic development for the Cincinnati USA CVB, driving its national marketing and communications and working to build the region’s


PHOTOS BY JOE SIMON

reputation. The work paid off with years of growth in conventions and high-profile events such as the 2016 national NAACP convention. Calvert left the bureau in 2014, but she came back in June, this time as its president and chief executive officer. “I’m incredibly honored to lead this organization at this important time,” she says. Since the dark days of 2001, the progress has been remarkable: Over-the-Rhine developed into a destination for dining and entertainment; The Banks and adjacent developments sprouted out of the ground and are still growing; Downtown came alive; and investment spread to neighborhoods like Northside and Walnut Hills. The Convention and Visitors Bureau helps drive that growth, Calvert says. “The role the CVB plays in furthering that momentum is critical in terms of bringing in visitors,” Calvert says. “That brings tax dollars into the region from the tax on hotel rooms and sales tax. All that feeds the general fund that allows that development to happen. “We’re about bringing in new dollars to the region,” she adds. The challenges she faces as CEO, fortunately, aren’t on the same earth-shattering level as a Sept. 11, but they are critical to keeping the convention business growing in the midst of growing competition from other cities. “It’s well documented that Cincinnati is falling behind our peer cities in terms of conventions, mostly because of our headquarters hotel issue,” she said. The Millennium Hotel, the city’s largest hotel and the only one physically connected to the Duke Energy Convention Center, has needed renovating for some time and is not operating at its 870-room capacity. Meanwhile, the peer cities that Cincinnati competes with for convention business—such as Columbus, Indianapolis, Louisville and Nashville—all enjoy up-todate headquarters hotels, in some cases more than one, that offer conventioneers easy, comfortable access to their convention halls. The issues go beyond the hotel, Calvert says. The Duke Center needs to be expanded and the city is losing convention traffic because it’s no longer large enough to get the biggest meetings. “Our convention center has not been expanded in 12 years,” she says. An up-to-date headquarters hotel and a bigger convention center are just part

Julie Calvert sits in her office on Vine Street of what Calvert sees as a total package that can attract big out-of-town meetings. “Getting a contemporary, competitive convention package is really our priority,” she says. “That’s where our growth is going to come.” The package should include an update to the cit y’s indoor arena. U.S. Bank Arena is also overdue for a makeover and high-profile sporting events and concerts have bypassed Cincinnati in favor of the competitors in Columbus, Indianapolis and Louisville. Add to that the general lack of development in downtown’s southwest quadrant, where the Duke Center is located, and you have a plate full of heavy lifting for the new CEO and her team. “As we look for growth and look to the future, it really is that southwest corner that can be a game changer for downtown and I mean for our restaurants, our retailers, our hotels, small businesses, minority-owned business,” she says. “All those interests grow when you have a very healthy convention industry.” Before jumping headlong into those big projects, Calvert devoted her first three months to a strategic review of the CVB. “We looked at our financials and at the people who were organized to do the work,” she says. “As a result, we made some organizational changes.” In March, after a national search, Andy Conklin started as executive vice president for sales and marketing. He was previously vice president of sales responsible for owned and managed Trump Hotel

properties. He also has held senior sales positions with Starwood, W, Sheraton and Hyatt Hotels. Also in March, the CVB announced the promotion of Jason Dunn to group vice president of diversity sales and inclusion to lead a new department that consolidates several CVB initiatives. In 2014, Calvert left the CVB and started Source Cincinnati, connecting the region with national media and elevating the “Cincinnati Story” into the global spotlight. That’s resulted in favorable stories in national outlets such as the New York Times, USA Today, The Atlantic and Black Enterprise. “Five years ago, it was Julie who had the vision to create an initiative dedicated to telling our story in a game-changing way,” says Scott Robertson, Source Cincinnati’s board chair. “Now she takes that experience, passion and vision to the CVB, and our destination couldn’t be in better hands.” Calvert comes by her enthusiasm for the region as a native Cincinnatian, a graduate of Finneytown High School and Miami University. She worked in journalism in Boston and Cleveland after college before boomeranging back to her hometown to work in public relations before she got the call from the CVB. After a national search, the bureau’s board last May chose one they knew well for its next leader. With her husband, Chris, two sons and a home in Anderson Township, she’ll be working as she has for years to make Greater Cincinnati even greater. n w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9

91


Tristate Meeting and Event Planner Guide 2019

Meeting in the Middle OFF-SITE MEETING SPACES CAN CATER TO EVENTS OF ANY SIZE By Kevin Michell

C

incinnati businesses continue to experience growth and, because of that, external resources are in higher demand. As such, the meeting and event space business is adapting to a variety of business needs. The following three venues each fill a niche for off-site corporate gatherings of varied sizes.

SMALL GROUP HUDDLES Coworking spaces have become popular with the rise of startups and the gig economy, but they’re not just for independent workers untethered to a desk or office. Facilities like CovWorx in Covington, Kentucky, are flexible and spacious enough for getting a small group together out of the office to work on a project or brainstorm as a team. Started in 2016 in a building on Madison one block west from The Carnegie, which previously housed Senior Services of Northern Kentucky, CovWorx boasts 20,000 square feet of huddle rooms, networking space and more for entrepreneurs and teams alike. CovWorx operates largely on monthly memberships but is flexible to business needs, with custom plans for use of the building’s amenities available. Standard options range from floating desk rental to securing a dedicated large room. All membership tiers include locker space, 24-hour keycards for building access, free parking, wireless internet access, coffee, monthly conference room allotment and discounted access to in-house design and technology assistance. 1032 Madison Ave., Covington, 513-205-8022, covworx.com.

MEDIUM DEPARTMENT OR STAFF MEETINGS One of the newest hotels in the city, The Summit—a Dolce hotel, part of Wyndham’s fleet of modernist resorts around the world—was designed to be easy on the eyes for all visitors, whether they’re staying

The Manor House in Mason can accomodate groups as large as 2,000. on-site for their family getaway or visiting the building for a few hours on business. This venue prides itself on adaptability as much as aesthetics. Containing 19 indoor rooms—ranging from 400-square-foot meeting areas to 2,000-square-foot ballrooms—spread among three floors of the building, The Summit is big on modern flair and capability while also providing a welcoming and energetic atmosphere. The Summit also features many additional amenities. Two rooftop terraces are available for rental, art and modern décor line the halls, the Overlook Kitchen + Bar offers a refined menu to visitors, and the hotel is in close proximity to many Oakley and Hyde Park hot spots. Whether a business function needs an afternoon or the whole weekend, the Summit is a hotel and venue designed to fit the bill. 5345 Medpace Way, Madisonville, 513-527-9900, thesummithotel.com.

LARGE COMPANY-WIDE EVENTS Long a premier wedding destination in northern Cincinnati, Mason’s Manor House covers 18 acres and can host groups as large as 2,000 people. The property is adaptable for corporate events of any format with a set of ballrooms in the main

building and several ancillary areas. The Georgian room can be used as the largest space at the Manor House or broken down into two smaller but ample rooms and is a popular choice for large organizational gatherings. The Carriage House, opened in 2012, is a unique venue for corporate retreats. It was styled to be an upscale, comfortable lodge that boasts both a rustic aesthetic and modern amenities. “It’s a more exclusive option available that’s still on our property that just sits back a little further, that their company alone can host holiday parties at,” says Events and Sales Manager Morgan Orlando. “They really like that it’s different from the ballroom style [rental spaces].” As a premier event space, the Manor House has a full array of amenities to pair with the rentable areas. Chief among them is the in-house food program, run by executive chef Kevin Lamb—who has been a part of the Manor House for almost 20 years—and his full kitchen staff. “We make it so easy to customize a package with great food that some restaurants and other banquet centers can’t do,” notes Orlando. 7440 Mason Montgomery Road, Mason, 513-459-0177, manorhouseohio.com. n w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9

93


Tristate Meeting and Event Planner Guide 2019 Number of Number of Rooms/ Meeting Suites Rooms

Hotels

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

Theater Capacity

Classroom Capacity

Banquet Capacity

Maximum Reception Number of Capacity Booths

Features

AIRPORT HOTELS Cincinnati Airport Marriott • 2395 Progress Dr • Hebron, KY 41048 • 859586-0166 • cincinnatiairportmarriott.com

294/8

11

7,480

750

400

550

750

220

Executive fitness center with indoor lap pool, concierge level with morning breakfast, evening reception, business center, work station, high-speed Internet access.

Hilton Cincinnati Airport • 7373 Turfway Rd • Florence, KY 41042 • 859-371-4400 • cincinnatiairport.hilton.com

314/10

11

3,940

400

200

250

300

20

High-speed Internet, exercise room, indoor pool, airport shuttle.

Holiday Inn Cincinnati Airport • 1717 Airport Exchange Blvd • Erlanger, KY 41018 • 859-371-2233 • holidayinn.com/ cvg-airport

278/5

18

6,612

700

400

500

130

40

Exercise facilities, indoor pool, whirlpool, sauna, free wireless Internet, complimentary airport transportation.

DoubleTree by Hilton Cincinnati Airport • 2826 Terminal Dr • Hebron, KY 41048 • 859371-6166 • cincinnatiairport.doubletree.com

177/1

10

5,400

525

300

420

600

40

The only hotel on proper t y at the Cincinnati/NK Y International Airport. Private business center with 24-hour access, complimentary airport shuttle and hotel parking.

21c Museum Hotel • 609 Walnut St • Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513-578-6612 • 21cmuseumhotels.com

156/20

7

1,900

140

72

120

200

14

21c has more than 8,000 square feet of art-filled space in the heart of downtown’s arts and entertainment district for board retreats, executive meetings, cocktail gatherings, weddings, reception dinners or any kind of event.

The Cincinnatian Hotel, Curio Collection by Hilton • 601 Vine St • Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513-381-3000 • cincinnatianhotel.com

148/2

6

1,144

80

60

72

100

Hilton Cincinnati Netherland Plaza 35 W 5th St • Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513-421-9100 • cincinnatinetherlandplaza.hilton.com

561/73

31

11,343

1,000

500

730

1,000

45

A A A four-diamond hotel and restaurant. National Historic Landmark, art deco styling. Business center, executive lounge, high-speed Wi-Fi Internet, fine dining, bar, health club.

Hyatt Regency Cincinnati • 151 W 5th St • Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513-579-1234 • hyatt.com

491/14

18

14,219

1,650

750

1,200

2,000

86

Across from the Duke Energy Convention Center. Concierge, health club, indoor pool, high-speed Internet and complimentary Wi-Fi. Guest rooms, meeting space and restaurants.

Millennium Hotel Cincinnati • 150 W 5th St • Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513-352-2100 • millenniumhotels.com/cincinnati

828/44

30

10,527

1,200

520

900

1,300

DOWNTOWN

Renaissance Cincinnati Downtown Hotel 36 E, Fourth St., Cincinnati, OH 45202 513-333-0000 Fax: 513-455-6450 marriott.com/cvgbr

Brick and Mortar upscale gastropub restauarant, casual dining Hannaford Market, business center, fitness center, concierge service, AAA four-diamond.

Located in the heart of downtown, events will be close to shops, museums, restaurants and entertainment venues. Pool, business center, fitness center.

Find a mix of modernity and history in our storied event spaces, which offer capacity for up to 700 guests and eight upscale meeting spaces.

Number of Rooms/Suites

Number of Meeting Rooms

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

Theater Capacity

Classroom Capacity

Banquet Capacity

Reception Capacity

Maximum Number of Booths

283/40

8

6,800

600

300

380

700

100

SpringHill Suites Cincinnati Midtown • 610 Eden Park Dr • Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513381-8300 • marriott.com/cvgdt

122 suites

1

464

12

8

n/a

n/a

n/a

Proximity to Eden Park, Mt. Adams and downtown. Lounge/ bar serving beer, wine and cocktails, fitness center, indoor pool, complimentary breakfast, free high-speed Internet.

The Westin Cincinnati • 21 E 5th St • Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513-621-7700 • westincincinnati.com

420/36

14

8,880

1,000

500

700

1,000

59

Overlooking historic Fountain Square. McCormick & Schmick’s Seafood Restaurant and Ingredients (gourmet grab-and-go). WestinWORKOUT®. AAA four-diamond.

198/8

23

5,355

630

330

350

500

UPTOWN Kingsgate Hotel and Conference Center • 151 Goodman Dr • Cincinnati, OH 45219 • 513-487-3800 • kingsgatehotel.com

Fitness center, complimentary high-speed Internet, restaurant, lounge, covered parking garage, business center, gift shop. Located near the University of Cincinnati.

NORTH/NORTHWEST C in cin n a t i M ar r io t t N o r t h a t U nio n Centre • 6189 Muhlhauser Rd • West Chester, OH 45069 • 513-874-7335 • cincinnatimarriottnorth.com

298/4

15

7,480

960

480

500

960

60

Two concierge levels, 24-hour executive facility and business communication center, high-speed Internet, indoor pool, on-site restaurant, fitness center.

D o u b l eTr e e S u i t e s b y H il t o n H o t e l Cincinnati-Blue Ash • 6300 E Kemper Rd • Sharonville, OH 45241 • 513-489-3636 • cincinnatiblueashsuites.doubletree.com

152 suites

15

2,100

200

140

160

200

20

All-suites Hilton hotel. Conveniently located to the business districts of Blue Ash, Sharonville, Mason and West Chester. Fitness room, business center, outdoor pool and awardwinning restaurant.

Embassy Suites by Hilton Cincinnati Northeast Blue Ash • 4554 Lake Forest Dr • Blue Ash, OH 45242 • 513-733-8900 • embassysuitesblueash.com

238 suites

8

4,828

450

250

375

500

Meeting Facilities begin on pg. 99. Hotels and Facilities sorted by area. 94

A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

Business center, fitness center, pool, restaurant.


LIVE CincyLive is the home of all Cincy and NKY Magazine events, as well as our partners. From food and community events to professional and nonprofit ones, all can be found on CincyLive.

2019 Night in White

New Richmond Motor Show

A fashionable fundraiser for the Eight Days & One Hour Foundation’s Stephen Morsch Nursing Scholarship. Enjoy: Shopping, sipping, light bites, silent auction, photo booth, runway fashion show, and fun fundraising activities.

Motor Show featuring classic, custom and collector cars and motorcycles to benefit a variety of charities. Supported by numerous regional car, truck and bike clubs each benefitting a charity of their choosing. The final stop on the Spring Classic Driving Tour.

Apr. 12th, Backstage Event Center

Spring Classic Driving Tour VII

Apr. 27th, Spring Classic Driving Tour VII

Apr. 27th, New Richmond’s Historic Waterfront

2019 Cincy Chic Women’s Health Expo

Scenic Driving Tour featuring the most picturesque roads in Southern Ohio, visit an Amish Market, historical points, and more as we tour Clermont, Brown and Adams Counties. The drive Benefits a number of charities, support the cause that speaks to you. Open to all roadworthy, licensed and insured vehicles; drive your “everyday car” with the Classic, Collector and Specialty vehicles

May 18th, The Phoenix

Mimosas for Memories 2019

2019 Best of NKY

A brunch time event with FREE mimosa bar, light bites from local eateries, music, a photo booth, silent auction, GELATO tastin and MORE in the beautiful Greenwich House Gallery in historic O’bryonville in Cincinnati, OH. All proceeds to benefit Alzheimer’s in Cincinnati

The Best of the NKY is a celebration and competition between the top establishments from Northern Kentucky. The event will feature booths hosted by participating NKY finalists from categories including food, retail, and service organizations.

Apr. 27th, The Greenwich House Gallery

Ladies! Join us for a FREE, fun and informative event that’s all about helping you live your best life! Enjoy complimentary swag bags, healthy treats, interactive demos and workouts, screenings, fun photobooth, and 40+ pop-up shops, local health experts and services!

May 30th, Newport Syndicate

Are you a nonprofit looking for a no upfront cost promotion for an upcoming event?

Contact: Eric Harmon, President & Publisher • eharmon@cincymagazine.com • 513-297-6205


Tristate Meeting and Event Planner Guide 2019 Number of Number of Rooms/ Meeting Suites Rooms

Hotels

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

Theater Capacity

Classroom Capacity

Banquet Capacity

Maximum Reception Number of Capacity Booths

Features

Located in state park, complimentary Wi-Fi, exercise area, indoor and outdoor pools, 37 equipped cottages, golf course, marina, dining room, lounge, tennis, basketball, disc golf, sand volleyball.

Hueston Woods Lodge & Conference Center 5201 Lodge Rd • College Corner, OH 45003 • 513-664-3500 • huestonwoodslodge.com

92/37 cabins

6

3,404

375

150

250

240

Ramada Plaza by Wyndham Cincinnati Sharonville 11320 Chester Rd • Cincinnati, OH 45246 • 513-771-2080 • ramadaplazacincy. com

237 including suites

8

8,304

800

346

800

800

Best Western Premier Mariemont Inn 6880 Wooster Pike • Cincinnati, OH 45227 • 513438-8633 • mariemontinn.com

45/1

3

2,500

100

170

170

170

Clarion Hotel Cincinnati North 3855 Hauck Rd • Cincinnati, OH 45241 • 513-563-8330 • choicehotels.com

273/1

9

6,000

632

414

500

667

36

Indoor pool, business center, fitness center, complimentary high-speed Internet.

Great Wolf Lodge 2501 Great Wolf Dr • Mason, OH 45040 • 513-229-5817 • greatwolf.com/mason

401 suites

15

9,847

1,036

432

660

1,094

56

Great Wolf Lodge - Cincinnati/Mason offers configurable meeting rooms, culinary quality and a team of experience meeting professionals.

Hilton Garden Inn Cincinnati Blue Ash 5300 Cornell Rd • Blue Ash, OH 45242 • 513-4696900 • cincinnatiblueash.hgi.com

122

5

2,220

200

100

150

220

Holiday Inn & Suites Cincinnati-Eastgate 4501 Eastgate Blvd • Cincinnati, OH 45245 • 513-752-4400 • holidayinn.com

212/31

52

AV equipment, fitness center, gift shop, office rental, restaurant.

EAST/NORTHEAST

Quality Hotel Conference Center Cincinnati Blue Ash 5901 Pfeiffer Rd • Cincinnati, OH 45242 • 513-793-4500 • choicehotels.com

175/25

14

6,750

11

5,100

800

537

510

520

352

On National Register of Historic Places. Restaurant on site, fitness center, business center.

Site includes a beautifully appointed 2,220-square-foot ballroom and state-of-the-art meeting spaces for groups from 10 to 220. The culinary staff prepares fresh dishes to accompany any gathering. AV equipment, business services, indoor pool and whirlpool, cocktail lounge, fitness center, on-site restaurant.

1,000

425

567

30

Business center, high-speed wireless Internet, on-site restaurant, lounge, indoor pool, fitness center.

You’re a professional. Your ride should be, too.

RESERVE A RIDE | 859.261.8841 |

www.executivetransportation.org w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9

97


Tristate Meeting and Event Planner Guide 2019 Number of Number of Rooms/ Meeting Suites Rooms

Hotels

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

Theater Capacity

Classroom Capacity

Banquet Capacity

The Summit, a Dolce Hotel 5345 Medpace Way, Cincinnati, OH 45227 513-527-9900 thesummithotel.com

Maximum Reception Number of Capacity Booths

Features

The Summit offers 32,600 square feet of meeting space, rooftop gardens, Nourishment Anytime, Anywhere™, a well-stocked library, art gallery and fitness center with yoga studio.

Number of Rooms/Suites

Number of Meeting Rooms

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

Theater Capacity

Classroom Capacity

Banquet Capacity

Reception Capacity

Maximum Number of Booths

239

19

5,743

320

250

330

380

38

NORTHERN KENTUCKY Cincinnati Marriott at RiverCenter • 10 W RiverCenter Blvd • Covington, KY 41011 • 859-261-2900 • marriott.com

317/4

30

46,200

5,000

1,900

2,650

5,000

Embassy Suites by Hilton Cincinnati RiverCenter • 10 E RiverCenter Blvd • Covington, KY 41011 • 859-261-8400 • embassysuitesrivercenter.com

227 suites

9

3,800

300

150

230

300

Business center, high-speed Internet, banquet room with view of city.

Radisson Hotel Cincinnati Riverfront • 668 W 5th St • Covington, KY 41011 • 859-491-1200 • radisson.com/covingtonky

216/4

12

6,000

500

300

400

400

Indoor pool, workout room, guest laundry, complimentary high-speed wireless Internet, revolving restaurant.

90

Restaurant, concierge lounge, fitness center, business center, indoor pool, high-speed wireless Internet. Connected to Northern Kentucky Convention Center.

INDIANA Belterra Casino Resort • 777 Belterra Dr • Florence, IN 47020 • 812-427-7777 • belterracasino.com

565/45

11

12,831

1,538

460

720

1,100

83

With more than 50,000 square feet of flexible meeting space, including everything from grand ballrooms to smaller breakout rooms, Belterra is the region’s premier event facility. Our meeting rooms feature on-site state-of-the-art sound and video equipment to handle executive functions and business meetings alike.

Hollywood Casino & Hotel • 777 Hollywood Blvd • Lawrenceburg, IN 47025 • 888-2746797 • hollywoodindiana.com

295/5

3

10,000

700

375

400

500

90

F ive res t aur ant s, high -speed wireless Inter net , complimentary coffee station.

the art of inspiration

98

A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com


Number of Number of Rooms/ Meeting Suites Rooms

Hotels

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

Theater Capacity

Classroom Capacity

Banquet Capacity

Maximum Reception Number of Capacity Booths

Features

Indoor pool, jacuzzi and sauna, fitness center, Scottish Link-style golf course, Big Vic’s Pub and Grub restaurant, fine dining at Wellington's Steakhouse, Riverview Buffet, Starbucks Queen City Market featuring Skyline and Graeter's, Internet access.

294 including suites

6

12,000

1,140

350

Number of Meeting Rooms

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

Theater Capacity

Classroom Capacity

Banquet Capacity

American Sign Museum • 1330 Monmouth Ave • Cincinnati, OH 45225 • 513-5416366 • americansignmuseum.org

3

20,000

175

90

175

350

30

Cincinnati's unique venue, home of the history of American signage from 1870-1970. Perfect for weddings, corporate events, holiday and private parties.

Anderson Center • 7850 Five Mile Rd • Anderson Twp, OH 45230 • 513-688-8444 • andersoncenterevents.org

6

3,000

223

150

170

170

30

Theater, banquet room, conference room, community room, atrium and outdoor plaza.

Ault Park Pavilion • 5090 Observatory Ave • Cincinnati, OH 45208 • 513-221-2610 • premierparkevents.com

1

600

200

600

600

Rising Star Casino Resort • 777 Rising Star Dr • Rising Sun, IN 47040 • 800-472-6311 x4 • risingstarcasino.com

Meeting Facilities

750

650

Maximum Reception Number of Capacity Booths Features

OHIO

The Backroom at The Butcher and Barrel 700 Race St., Cincinnati, OH 45202 513-954-8974 thebutcherbarrel.com

Features gardens, overlooks, isolated coves and a cascading waterfall.

The Butcher and Barrel is downtown’s premier private event space that boasts exquisite dining options, eclectic décor, a private bar and a variety of room arrangements for the perfect celebration.

Number Meeting Rooms

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

Theater Capacity

Classroom Capacity

Banquet Capacity

Reception Capacity

Maximum Number of Booths

1

1,500

50

50

50

100

Varies

SIMPLE. SPIKED. SPARKLING. CINCINNATI.

5% ALC/VOL • 100 CALORIES • GLUTEN FREE • 2g CARBS

w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9

99


Tristate Meeting and Event Planner Guide 2019 Meeting Facilities

Number of Meeting Rooms

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

Theater Capacity

Classroom Capacity

Bell Event Centre • 444 Reading Rd • Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513-852-2787 • belleventcentre.com

1

B elter r a Par k • 6 3 01 Kellogg Ave • Cincinnati, OH 45230 • 513-232-8000 • belterrapark.com

7

7,500

300

200

Blue Ocean Facilities • 10250 Alliance Rd, Suite 226 • Cincinnati, OH 45242 • 513-8426323 • blueoceanfacilities.com

4

1,600

70

50

Boi Na Braza • 441 Vine St • Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513-421-7111 • boinabraza.com

2

BOOST • 538 Reading Rd • Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513-621-8222 • boostmeeting.com

1

4,600

80

Brainstorm Creative Meeting and Event Space • 815 Main St • Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513-421-0318 • brainstormevents.com

1

4,000

Carlo & Johnny • 9769 Montgomery Rd • Montgomery, OH 45242 • 513-936-8600 • jeffruby.com/carlo-johnny

5

The Center • 115 E 5th St • Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513-824-7274 • thecentercincinnati. com

1

Cincinnati Art Museum • 953 Eden Park Dr • Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513-639-2347 • cincinnatiartmuseum.org

9

Banquet Capacity

Maximum Reception Number of Capacity Booths Features

The former St. Paul Church features vaulted ceilings, stained glass windows, hand-painted murals, marble and terrazzo flooring.

300

300

350

25

Located on the banks of the Ohio River, Belterra Park offers live racing Thursday through Sunday in addtion to 1,200 video lottery terminals. They have five different restaurants offering everything from fine dining to bars and grills.

70

Off-site meeting spaces created with collaboration and creativity in mind.

70

440

An authentic Brazilian churrascaria with a variety of menu items and the largest and only salad bar in Downtown Cincinnati. The front dining room features a superb view of Fountain Square. AV equipment is also available.

45

70

150

Functional and playful meeting spaces bursting with natural sunlight, tradtional and non-traditional furnishings, outdoor space, meeting supplies, AV, snacks and beverages included with rental. Easy planning process with single point of contact.

100

24

72

130

Located is an intimate urban loft located in the heart of downtown Cincinnati. TOur unique space includes 4,000 sq. ft. open loft area, a private conference room, a full kitchen, a lounge area, and break-out rooms.

40

24

65

75

Offers a complete, turn-key private event planning experience. This includes access to an array of audio/video and floral options

15,000

Downtown location central to hotels and parking, contemporary architecture with nearly 15,000 square feet of customizable space. Spacious ballroom with hardwood floors, direct view of Fountain Square and elegant reception area under lit dome.

300

324

180

400

Cincinnati Club Building 30 Garfield Place, Suite 10, Cincinnati, OH 45202 513-241-3464 mchalescatering.com

Newly restored. Private club feel but membership not required.

Number Meeting Rooms

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

Theater Capacity

Classroom Capacity

Banquet Capacity

Reception Capacity

Maximum Number of Booths

4

4,100

500

300

300

300

Varies

Cincinnati Museum Center’s Union Terminal 1301 Western Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45203 513-621-3326 cincymuseum.org/private-events/

Union Terminal is a beautifully restored National Historic Landmark. Groups of 20 or 2,000 can be accommodated with our on-site events professionals and catering service.

Number Meeting Rooms

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

Theater Capacity

Classroom Capacity

10+

24,000

300

100

Banquet Capacity

Reception Capacity

800-1,200

6,500

Maximum Number of Booths

A national landmark offering a variety of spaces available from the world-renowned auditorium to the dramatic ballroom. Ballroom features barrel-vaulted ceiling, hardwood floor, elegant bar and decorative mirrors. To be closed from June 2016 to September 2017 for renovations.

Cincinnati Music Hall • 1241 Elm St • Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513-744-3242 • cincinnatiarts.org

5

Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame & Museum 100 Joe Nuxhall Way • Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513-765-7923 • cincinnati.reds. mlb.com/cin/hof/

3

90

300

Showcasing the world’s largest collection of Reds memorabilia.

Cincinnati State Workforce Development Center • 10100 Reading Road • Cincinnati, OH 45241 • 513-569-1643 • cincinnatistate. edu

12

100

125

State-of-the-art classrooms and training labs.

Cincinnati State Technical & Community C olle g e • 3 5 2 0 C e n t r al P a r k w a y • Cincinnati, OH 45223 • 513-569-4123 • cincinnatistate.edu

9

5,093

300

150

224

250

54

Features Wi-Fi, multimedia and computer presentation equipment. Catering through the Midwest Culinary Institute.

Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden • 3400 Vine St • Cincinnati, OH 45220 • 513-4873481 • cincinnatizoo.org

4

4,500

400

150

330

400

40

Four Zoo-nique indoor venues with AV capabilities in addition to multiple outdoor venues, including animal exhibits, are available for meetings, dinners, receptions or picnic outings. There are four outdoor picnic shelters available. Special animal visits create an even more memorable event!

100

A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

17,033

2,500

400

800

1,200

110


dine with us

We invite you to experience our innovative menu, with chef-driven, modern Italian creations. Plan your event

Host your Holiday Party, business meeting or special occasion in one of our unique event spaces. 1420 Sycamore Street, Cincinnati, OH 45202 (513) 721-6200 • nicolasotr.com • events@nicolasotr.com


Tristate Meeting and Event Planner Guide 2019 Meeting Facilities Cin t as C en t er • 16 24 H er ald Av e • Cincinnati, OH 45207 • 513-745-3428 • cintascenter.com

Number of Meeting Rooms

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

Theater Capacity

Classroom Capacity

Banquet Capacity

5

11,760

770

450

650

Coney Island’s Moonlite Pavilion 6201 Kellogg Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45230 513-232-6701 Fax: 513-231-1191 coneyislandpark.com

Maximum Reception Number of Capacity Booths Features

770

Number Meeting Rooms

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

Theater Capacity

Classroom Capacity

Banquet Capacity

Reception Capacity

Maximum Number of Booths

1

15,070

2,000

800

1,000

1,500

90

11

3,049

234

144

250

200

Contemporary Arts Center • 44 E 6th St • Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513-345-8415 • contemporaryartscenter.org

6

3,500

210

65

210

350

Cooper Creek Event Center • 4040 Cooper Rd • Blue Ash, OH 45241 • 513-745-8596 • coopercreekblueash.com

5

6,960

500

261

360

320

Dave & Buster’s • 11775 Commons Dr • Springdale, OH 45246 • 513-671-5501 • daveandbusters.com

8

Duke Energy Convention Center • 525 Elm St • Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513-419-7300 • Fax: 513-419-7327 • duke-energycenter.com

39

A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

This 300,000-square-foot center is three facilities in one – arena, conference center and banquet center. Features on-site catering, stateof-the-art technical capabilities and free parking. Centrally located in the Tristate on the beautiful campus of Xavier University.

This open-air pavilion is in a beautiful setting in the heart of historic Coney Island and is perfect for picnics, dinners, dances and trade shows.

The Conference Center at the Daniel Drake Center • 151 W. Galbraith Rd West Pavilion • Cincinnati, OH 45216 • 513-418-2596 • Fax: 513-418-3959 • uchealth.com/ danieldrakecenter/conference/

1 02

90

maga zine.com

195,320

40

We are dedicated to serving businesses, state agencies, associations and the Cincinnati community. Excellent facilities, catering, audiovisual support and exceptional customer service. Competitive rates. Our staff is committed to exceeding your expectations. Downtown accessibility. Galleries for touring, including the Unmuseum.

34

Cooper Creek Event Center is an inviting, upscale destination overlooking the scenic Blue Ash Golf Course specializing in social and corporate events.

200

120

200

250

25

65,000 square feet of food, fun and games. From the Grand Dining Room, Million Dollar Midway, multi-level Viewpoint Areas and private rooms such as the Function Room 1 to the fully stocked bars, D&B has an event area for every occasion. The entire facility can be rented for an exclusive close-out event.

11,700

12,550

12,550

12,550

964

The largest grand ballroom in Cincinnati with more than 39,500 square feet. The 195,000-square-foot Exhibit hall can be split into three rooms.


Number of Meeting Rooms

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

Theater Capacity

Classroom Capacity

Banquet Capacity

Elements at Delta Hotels • 11320 Chester Rd • Cincinnati, OH 45246 • 513-552-6369 • elementsatdeltahotels.com

3

16,000

700

320

550

1,000

75

Space is customizable to your needs.

EnterTRAINment Junction • 7379 Squire Court • West Chester, OH 45069 • 513898-8000 • entertrainmentjunction.com

7

4,000

300

105

200

300

50

Whether it’s a sales meeting, a product launch, team-building exercises, lunch, dinner or holiday party, let us help you set the stage for fun, creativity and innovative thinking.

The Farm • 239 Anderson Ferr y Rd • Cincinnati, OH 45238 • 513-922-7020 • theplacetohaveaparty.com

3

9,000

200

400

600

550

Meeting Facilities

Full Throttle Indoor Karting – Tri-County 11725 Commons Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45246 513-341-5278 gofullthrottle.com Number Meeting Rooms

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

3

1,600

Game On! Sports Complex • 6630 Hamilton Ave • Cincinnati, OH 45244 • 513-432-5100 • gameoncinci.com

3

25,200

Great American Ball Park • 100 Joe Nuxhall Way • Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513-765-7237 • reds.com

16

10,500

Jack C asino • 10 0 0 Br o ad w ay S t • Cincinnati, Ohio 45202 •513-252-0777 • jackentertainment.com

13

19,000

500

1,946

Maximum Reception Number of Capacity Booths Features

Three rooms with large dance floors. Excellent catering prepared on site. Popular Tuesday and Thursdays evening dinner buffet.

Cincinnati’s premier high-speed indoor karting and axe-throwing venue. We offer unique corporate and team building events that will bring a gold metal mentality back to the office.

Theater Capacity

Classroom Capacity

200+

40

1,000

1,000

250

325

550

1,188

1,200

1,900

Booths could be set up on turf/ courts

Banquet Capacity

Reception Capacity

200+

200+

Maximum Number of Booths

With over 75,000 square feet, Game On! Sports Complex is the perfect place for a party, no matter what the size! From birthday parties for the little ones and big receptions to everything in between, we can accommodate all of your party needs. Choose the space or spaces you will need and we will assist you with food, decor, and more! Unique meeting space inside home of the Cincinnati Reds.

120

Situated just off the Ohio River at the Broadway Commons site in the heart of Downtown. A first-class property with nearly 33,000 square feet of flexible meeting and event space. With two large, configurable venues divisible into as many as 11 rooms, including an 19,000-squarefoot ballroom. The property also features a usable outdoor event space. Perfect for nearly any meeting or event for up to 1,560 attendees.

HOST YOUR EVENT WITH US! Teambuilding • Corporate Meetings Happy Hours • Holiday Parties Birthday Parties • Graduations • Rehearsal Dinners 16 State-of-the-Art Lanes - Full Bar & Menu - Private Rooms - Customizable A/V Systems Contact Group Sales to schedule: sales@axisalleylevee.com or call 859-652-7250 Newport on the Levee ~ 1 Levee Way, Suite 1112 ~ Newport, KY 41071 ~ AxisalleyLevee.com w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9

103


Tristate Meeting and Event Planner Guide 2019 Meeting Facilities

Number of Meeting Rooms

Jeff Ruby's Steakhouse • 700 Walnut St • Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513-784-1200 • jeffruby.com/cincinnati

2

Lazer Kraze • 7082 Columbia Road • Maineville, OH 45039 • 513-339-1030 • lazerkraze.com

4

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

Theater Capacity

Classroom Capacity

54

Banquet Capacity

Maximum Reception Number of Capacity Booths Features

50

A favorite of celebrities, athletes, politicians and special-occasion diners, Jeff Ruby's Steakhouse delivers award-winning steaks, seafood and service. Combined with live nightly entertainment and impeccable attention to detail, this is the perfect backdrop for an extraordinary evening.

54

Schedule your next corporate team-building event with us. Five different size rooms that can accommodate 16-54 people with tables and chairs for meetings or parties. Living Room does two things really well: creative meeting spaces and market research services, both designed for those with an insatiable desire for better. With this in mind, we've created an experience that provides you with creative meeting spaces for team-building activities, creative workshops, training, ideation sessions, team celebrations and more.

Living Room • 236 8 Nor wood Ave • Cincinnati, OH 45212 • 513-531-5030 • hellolivingroom.com

4

1,078

50

35

35

50

Manor House Banquet & Conference Center • 7440 Mason-Montgomery Rd • Mason, OH 45040 • 513-459-0177 • manorhouseohio.com

15

8,905

1250

700

650

1,000

Meier's Wine Cellars • 6955 Plainfield Rd • Cincinnati, OH 45236 • 513-794-4388 • meierswinecellars.com

2

Miami Valley Gaming • 600 state Route 63 • Lebanon, OH 45036 • 513-934-7670 • miamivalleygaming.com

3

Nathanael Greene Lodge • 6394 Wesselman Rd • Cincinnati, OH 45248 • 513-598-3100

3

3,408

200

National Underground Railroad Freedom Center • 50 E Freedom Way • Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513-621-3326 • freedomcenter.org

10

24,000

300

70

60

120

60

Varies

Planning assistance provided. Multiple room sizes and breakout options. Outdoor spaces. In-house chef and experienced management team. Complimentary parking. Hotels nearby.

149

Located in the community of Silverton, Meier’s Wine Cellars is 1.5 miles south of the Kenwood Town Center. With a tasting room, event space, garden and retail store, Meier’s hosts special events, welcoming wine novices and wine enthusiasts for a taste of something new as well as a return for favorite wine varietals.

1,000

Offer 3 different venues to accommodate events up to 1000 guests. Will customize room configurations, menus and services to build your special event. Extensive and flexible catering capabilities

100

200

800

1,200

The Possibilities Are Endless, for Every Occasion

60

Only 15 minutes from downtown Cincinnati. Outdoor patio,50-foot cathedral windows and warm stone fireplace. It is one of Cincinnati’s most spectacular venues for wedding receptions, meetings or events of any kind. It features two floors of premier spaces with private terraces that overlook the Ohio River.

Newly Restored, Private Club Feel, Membership Not Required

Cincinnati Club, Garfield Place, 513-241-3464

Cincinnati Club, Oak Room

McHalesCatering.com One Website, Eighteen Reception Venues

Pinnacle Ballroom, Covington

The Grand Ballroom, Covington

PRIVATE EVENTS | MEETINGS | WEDDING RECEPTIONS & REHEARSAL| DI NNERS | HAPPY HOURS | CELEBRATIONS | GROUP GATHERINGS | FULL SERVICE BAR | PERFORMANCES | NETWORKING EVENTS | ANNIVERSARIES | CONFERENCES | ENGAGEMENT PATIES PERFORMANCES AND LIVE MUSIC | COMEDY | TRADE EXPOS | BIRTHDAY PA CELEBRATIONS | FEASTS | SPEAKING ENGAGEMENTS | BUFFET-STYLE DINING | SCREENINGS | SPECIAL EVENTS | CORPORATE EVENTS | PANELS | SOCIAL EVENTS | BAR Award Winning Cuisine • Exceptional Service

TheButcherBarrel.com 104

A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

McHalesCatering.com • 859-442-7776


Meeting Facilities

Number of Meeting Rooms

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

Theater Capacity

Classroom Capacity

Banquet Capacity

Nicola’s Ristorante 1420 Sycamore St., Cincinnati OH 45202 513-721 - 6200 Fax: 513-721 - 1777 nicolasotr.com

Oasis Golf Club & Conference Center 9 0 2 • Loveland-Miamiville Rd • Loveland, OH 45140 • 513-583-8383 • oasisconferencecenter.com

Number of Meeting Rooms

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

5 spaces

800

9

20,000

2,000

1,700

Maximum Reception Number of Capacity Booths Features

Experience elegant dining and professional service for your meeting or reception in one of our five unique spaces. We also offer private and semi-private options.

Theater Capacity

1,350

Classroom Capacity

2,500

Banquet Capacity

Reception Capacity

Maximum Number of Booths

135

135

5

125

Located in Northeast Cincinnati, Oasis Conference Center is known for its flexible meeting space, service and cuisine. The Oasis offers free parking, professional event planning, free wireless internet and festive menus and décor. Event space varies from a dining room setting to ballrooms, with room for up to 2,000 guests.

The Oscar Event Center • 5440 E Dixie Hwy • Fairfield, OH 45014 • 513-674-6055 • junglejims.com/the-oscar-event-center

5

10,500

750

300

525

750

80

Located at Jungle Jim’s International Market “Food Lover’s Paradise,” the full-service venue provides ceremonies and receptions, an in-house bakery, international menus, a unique atmosphere with flexible floor plans, inviting décor, free parking and an experienced, hands-on, service-oriented team.

Paul Brown Stadium • 1 Paul Brown Stadium • Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513-455-4830 • bengals.com

14

35,000

600

300

800

1,000

60

Non-game day events in sleek NFL stadium. ARAMARK catering.

The Phoenix • 812 Race St • Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513-721-8901 • thephx.com

7

4,752

575

250

396

500

30

The Phoenix banquet rooms combine a traditional feel of warmth and comfort along with stunning grandeur. The experienced staff will assist with planning your special corporate meeting, event or party.

The Precinct • 311 Delta Ave • Cincinnati, OH 45226 • 513-321-5454 • jeffruby.com/ precinct

3

70

40

85

85

For Jeff Ruby, this is the steakhouse that started it all. Recently named one of America's Top 10 Steakhouses by USA Today and Gayot.com, The Precinct is frequently recognized as having Cincinnati’s best steaks, seafood and service. This consistent high level of quality and overall guest experience over three decades has endeared Precinct to celebrities, business people, families and loyal diners alike.

w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9

105


Tristate Meeting and Event Planner Guide 2019 Number of Meeting Rooms

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

Theater Capacity

Classroom Capacity

Banquet Capacity

The Rober ts Centre • 123 Gano Rd • Wilmington, OH 45177 • 800-654-7036 • robertscentre.com

12

60,002

4,600

2,200

4,600

2,200

350

Home to Holiday Inn, Max & Erma’s restaurant and the Roberts Conference Centre, which has more than 80,000 square feet of unobstructed meeting space, wireless internet and an outdoor patio. Free parking.

The Ronald Reagan Lodge Banquet & Conference Center at Voice of America MetroPark • 7850 VOA Park Dr • West Chester, OH 45069 • 513-867-5835 • yourmetroparks.net

6

3,700

250

125

250

260

20

Multi-room facility with gazebo that looks overlooks 35-acre lake. Beautiful park setting. Cater-only facility. Fireplace, projector and dance floor. Great for all occasions big and small.

Savannah Center • 5533 Chappell Crossing Blvd • West Chester, OH 45069 • 513-8604142 • savannahcenter.com

11

16,000

1,200

850

900

930

84

Savannah Center offers the most advanced technology and audio and visual equipment. The Center is heated and cooled by geothermal technology. Situated on 12 acres with a 5-acre lake, the 44,000-squarefoot facility can accommodate any sized business function. It boasts an award-winning culinary staff offering customized catering.

144

The region's only LEED-certified sustainable event facility. Conveniently located at I-75 and I-275 in Northern Cincinnati. Newest and most contemporary facility in Greater Cincinnati. Free Wi-Fi. Four ballrooms. Northern Lights Ballroom seats up to 1,000 guests. Recognized for food and beverage excellence. 1,100 on-site free parking spaces.

Meeting Facilities

Maximum Reception Number of Capacity Booths Features

Sharonville Convention Center • 11355 Chester Rd • Sharonville, OH 45246 • 513-771-774 4 • Fax: 513-772-574 5 • sharonvilleconventioncenter.com

21

20,455

2,395

1,437

1,408

2,650

Stir • 7813 Ted Gregory Lane • Cincinnati, OH 45242 • 513-833-4485 • stircincy.com

1

3,000

55

55

55

125

Taf t Museum of A r t • 316 Pike St • Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513-684-4523 • Fax: 241-7762 • taftmuseum.org

3

2,700

200

200

200

200

20

The Taft offers elegance, convenience and a masterpiece just around the corner. Available for meeting, private board dinners, team-building events and cocktail receptions.

TriHealth Fitness and Health Pavilion • 6200 Pfeiffer Rd • Montgomery, OH 45242 • 513246-2609 • trihealthpavilion.com

3

375

120

65

70

3,120

16

Meeting rooms include conference speaker phone, LCD overhead projector, DVD and CD/CVS player, wireless lavalier and on-site catering.

Vinoklet Winery & Restaurant • 11069 Colerain Ave • Cincinnati, OH 45252 • 513385-9309 • vinokletwines.com

3

2,400

60

60

155

155

The WEB Extreme Entertainment • 7172 Cincinnati-Dayton Rd • West Chester, OH 45069 • 513-860-2882 • funattheweb.com

8

2,000

350

150

350

600

Dinner parties, celebrations, interactive cooking classes, presentations, corporate team building and other entertaining events. Premium amenities include comfortable, casual seating inside, outdoor patio, ample parking and media system. Located in Old Montgomery.

Vinoklet also offers banquet and dinner packages for private parties, corporate events and wedding receptions.

30

The Web is the one place in the Tristate where you can meet, eat and play as a group. Your choice for fun includes electric go-karts, laser tag, bowling and glow golf. We feature a delicious catering menu to complete your event.

KENTUCKY Axis Alley 1 Levee Way, Suite 1112 • Newport, KY 41071 859-652-7250 • Fax: 859-652-7269 axisalleylevee.com Number of Meeting Rooms

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

Axis Alley is 25,000 square feet of high energy, interactive fun. We offer private rooms, sophisticated menus, full-service bars, and state-of-the-art audio-visual systems. We have event packages that include food, beverage and team building!

Theater Capacity

4 Baker-Bird Winery • 4465 Augusta Chatham Rd • Augusta KY 41002 • 859-620-4965 • bakerbirdwinery.com

4

200

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

2

2,824

Banquet Capacity

Reception Capacity

Maximum Number of Booths

75

800

800

Call Venue

15

Historic grounds that are part of the Civil War heritage trail and on the national historic registry. From Civil War Balls to wedding ceremonies, this is the perfect venue for all of your events.

Braxton Brewing Company contains two unique spaces suitable for a variety of events. The Loft Event Space has room for 150 seating, 300 standing. It is located on the second floor of our Covington Taproom location. Guests experience a completely private venue with a rustic industrial atmosphere, full bar and service staff and A/V system. The Garage Meeting/ Event Space’s capacity is 50 seated, 65 standing. Our “Garage” is in the main taproom, overlooking the brewery, making it perfect for meetings and medium-size events. Keep The Garage door open to share the taproom atmosphere or closed for a more private venue.

Braxton Brewing Company 27 W. Seventh St., Covington, KY 41011 859-669-6631 braxtonbrewing.com Number of Meeting Rooms

200

Classroom Capacity

Theater Capacity

Classroom Capacity

Banquet Capacity

Reception Capacity

150

1300

Maximum Number of Booths

Carnegie Visual & Performing Arts Center • 1028 Scott Blvd • Covington, KY 41011 • 859-491-2030 • thecarnegie.com

1

1,500

447

200

150

500

15

Five galleries and a newly renovated turn-of-the-century theater that is fully equipped with lights, sound and projection.

Celebrations Riverboats • 848 Elm St • Ludlow, KY 41016 • 859-581-2600 • celebrationriverboats.com

1

4,000

380

380

380

380

22

Private riverboat available for company outings, meetings, weddings and seminars.

Drees Pavilion at Devou Park • 790 Park Lane • Covington, KY 41011 • 859-431-2577 • dreespavilion.com

3

5,940

300

225

300

300

106

A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

Nestled in tranquil park setting overlooking Cincinnati skyline.


Tristate Meeting and Event Planner Guide 2019 Number of Meeting Rooms

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

GameWorks • 1 Levee Way, Suite 2130 • Newport, KY 41071 • 859-392-2373 • gameworks.com

3

975

Gardens of Park Hills • 1622 Dixie Hwy • Park Hills, KY 41011 • 859-442-7776 • mchalescatering.com

2

6,500

500

The Grand and Pinnacle Ballrooms • 6 E. Fifth St. • Covington, KY 41011 • 859-442-7776 • mchalescatering.com

2

6,500

400

Hofbrauhaus • 200 E 3rd St • Newport, K Y 41071 • 859-491-7200 • hofbrauhausnewport.com

2

100

Lazer Kraze • 1335 Donaldson Hw y • Erlanger, K Y 41018 • 859-371-5729 • lazerkraze.com

5

29

Madison Event Center • 700 Madison Ave • Covington, KY 41011 • 859-261-1117 • Fax: 859-655-7855 • thecovingtonmadison.com

6

6,850

400

152

400

350

30

We customize your event by offering an inviting, casual, stress-free environment with a modern touch. That’s the Madison approach.

Metropolitan Club • 50 E Rivercenter Blvd • Covington, KY 41011 • 859-491-2400 • metropolitanclub.net

9

3,800

300

80

220

500

40

The Metropolitan Club has a variety of rooms for sit-down dinners or cocktail receptions. The Club offers flexible pricing, in-house catering, free Wi-Fi and covered parking.

Newport Aquarium • 1 Aquarium Way • Newport, KY 41071 • 859-815-1466 • newportaquarium.com

3

6,000

250

130

340

300

75

The Riverside Room is the perfect venue for your perfect day. Enjoy spectacular views of the Cincinnati skyline and Ohio River in a unique, contemporary and elegant setting against a backdrop of exotic fish.

Newport on the Levee Community Center • 1 Levee Way • Newport, KY 41071 • 859-815-1384 • newportonthelevee.com

2

2,000

Meeting Facilities

Theater Capacity

Classroom Capacity

300

50

Banquet Capacity

Maximum Reception Number of Capacity Booths Features

130

130

call for info

Located at Newport on the Levee, GameWorks offers a fun and casual environment for all groups. Our Banquet Room can accommodate intimate gatherings of 10 people or grand gatherings of as many as 600.

300

500

45

Beautiful Banquet Rooms with complete packages that make for stress free planning. Craft beer bar and late night snacks of flatbreads included.

360

360

40

Ballroom with 24-foor ceilings with a mezzanine level for cocktail hour

230

230

n/a

Large facility with brewery, beer hall and beer garden. Schedule your next corporate team-building event with us. Five different size rooms that can accommodate 16-54 people with tables and chairs for meetings or parties.

29

32/73

75

The Levee’s community center can host meetings, association functions, training seminars or client presentations. Carpeted; rooms with tables, chairs and A/V capabilities. Private restrooms.

Visit cincymagazine.com and plan your night out on the town.

108

A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com


Meeting Facilities

Number of Meeting Rooms

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

Theater Capacity

Classroom Capacity

Banquet Capacity

Newport Syndicate 18 East Fifth St. • Newport KY 41073 859-491-8000 Fax: 859-655-3315 newportsyndicate.com

Pompilios Restaurant • 600 Washington Ave • Newport, KY 41071 • 859-581-3065 • pompilios.com

Maximum Reception Number of Capacity Booths Features

Our Grand Ballroom with a large stage, three drop screens and built-in projection make it perfect for a presentation. After the meeting we can prepare lunch, dinner or a cocktail reception.

Number of Meeting Rooms

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

Theater Capacity

Classroom Capacity

Banquet Capacity

Reception Capacity

Maximum Number of Booths

6

8,000

600

500

450

700

50+

2

An authentic Italian restaurant with over 80 years of experience. Indoor eating space as well as an outdoor area complete with a bar and activities like bocce ball, cornhole can be made available. Capable of doing everything from wedding receptions to corporate happy hours.

45

100

350

375

375

800

150

150

450

400

30

Full kitchen and bar, 1,000 parking spaces, dance floor, fountain, waterfall, outdoor gazebo, ceremony and picnic space.

550

550

n/a

All food for the on-site restaurant comes directly from the farm itself, or from local vendors. The restaurant features a unique rustic atmosphere and is perfect for everything from Sunday brunch to wedding rehearsals. There is live music on the weekends and a patio that is open seasonally.

INDIANA Chateau Pomije • 25043 Jacobs Rd • Guilford, IN 47022 • 812-623-8004 • cpwinery.com

3

Lawrenceburg Event Center • 91 Walnut St • Lawrenceburg, IN 47025 • 812-539-8888 • thelawrenceburgeventcenter.com

5,000

375

18,000

Starlight Reception Hall • 10265 U.S. 50 • Aurora, IN 47001 • 812-926-7600 • starlightreception.com

1

6,000

700

Walhill Farm • 857 Six Pine Ranch Rd • Batesville, IN 47006 • 812-934-2600 • walhillfarm.com

4

12,000

550

15

Working winery with 70-acre vineyard. On-site food preparation. Welcome to the Lawrenceburg Event Center, the place to see Lawrenceburg’s hottest acts or to host a wedding, business meeting, reunion or any special occasion.

TRANSFORM THE MEETING EXPERIENCE Turn your business trip into an opportunity for new, interesting and shareable experiences at Renaissance Cincinnati Downtown Hotel. Close to popular restaurants and enticing attractions, including Paul Brown Stadium and Horseshoe Casino, our hotel coaxes you to discover the world outside the boardroom. Our upscale amenities include eight chic meeting spaces, totaling more than 12,000 square feet, with experienced planning and catering teams on hand. With stylish rooms, including plush bedding, HDTV and a spacious work desk, you’ll be ready to enjoy all that Cincinnati has to offer. Book your next meeting today. To learn more, email events@renaissancecincinnati.com or call 513.333.0000. RENAISSANCE CINCINNATI DOWNTOWN HOTEL

36 East Four th Street, Cincinnati, OH 45202 T 513.333.0000 Marriott.com/CVGBR ©2019 Marriott International, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9

109


Power 100 Re-Cap

An Innovative Future

ABOVE and RIGHT: From left: David J. Adams, Normand Desmarais, Beth Robinson, Mike Venerable and Daniel Gruber

REGIONAL EXPERTS WEIGHED IN ON HOW TO MAKE CINCINNATI MORE INNOVATIVE DURING THE 2019 POWER 100 BREAKFAST FORUM By Corinne Minard

T

he panelists of this year’s Power 100 Leadership Forum all agree that innovation and leadership are key to making Cincinnati a destination for top talent. However, the city still has a way to go before it can compete on an even playing field with tech hubs like Boston and Austin. “We’ve visited several areas that are creating innovation districts but we need a development with walkability, green space, connectivity, places where it’s pleasant to work at and you can live there, too,” said panelist Beth Robinson, president and CEO of Uptown Consortium, Inc. An innovation district—in which an 110

A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

under-performing neighborhood is regenerated into a desirable location for innovative companies and people—is already in the works in uptown at the University of Cincinnati. UC is looking to make its new 1819 Innovation Hub the center of this district. “In creating 1819, we’re truly creating the front door for the University of Cincinnati and the community, but we’re also creating the anchor within Cincinnati’s developing innovation district,” said panelist David J. Adams, chief innovation officer of UC’s Office of Innovation. Across the river, panelist Normand Desmarais, chairman, employee owner and founding partner of TiER1 Performance Solutions, said Northern Kentucky is also looking to drive innovation and entrepreneurship. Desmarais, who is on Northern Kentucky University’s Board of Regents and is chairman of the Northern Kentucky Entrepreneurship Council, said that the state is looking to focus on the sectors in which the region already excels—health care, logistics and informatics.

“You’re going to see a lot of activity in the Northern Kentucky region in and around clustering in those areas and driving innovation in those spaces,” he said. “We really look forward to driving opportunity to all of us in the region, not just in Northern Kentucky.” While cities like Austin became technology hubs almost by accident, panelist Mike Venerable, CEO of CincyTech, said that is no longer the case. “Cities are way more intentional. The thing about intentionality is we have to work hard to create these new companies. But we can’t really predict which ones will be transformational. That’s why pipeline is so important, importation of capital is so important. We have to do these things,” he said. Ultimately, Cincinnati needs to become a destination location to attract and retain the people it needs to grow, said the panel. “I think as a community we need to embrace diversit y and differences. I think that’s what young talent is seeking and I think they’ll leave if they don’t feel


that we’re doing a good job with that. I was struck when we took the trip with the chamber to Toronto how welcoming they were to immigrants and to other people coming into the community,” said Robinson. Adams, who also visited Toronto, said that Toronto’s strategy is working. “People who graduate from colleges in Toronto stay in Toronto. In fact what we’re starting to see is people from the United States moving to Toronto as a destination location,” he said. For the attendees of the event, a major concern going forward was including existing communities and not leaving them behind. Robinson said that was a major concern of the Uptown Consortium as well. “I can’t say we have it all figured out but we’re learning a lot as we’re going and I think the biggest thing from our point of view is that we’re being very intentional about it,” she said. Those steps have included inviting community leaders to attend development coordination meetings and contracting area business for projects.

While much work still needs to be done, Desmarais said that some work needs to be done within ourselves. “What we need here in this region, in the Midwest, is a bit more confidence in cultural change,” he said. “We’ve got to drive into the future of this region. We’ve got to have the confidence to say, ‘I can create a company, I can do something, I can fail and it’s going to be OK.’” Held Feb. 21 at the Cincinnati Club, the annual Power 100 brings together leaders to discuss the region’s challenges and successes. This year’s panel was moderated by Daniel Gruber, associate dean of innovation and new ventures, professoreducator of management, at the University of Cincinnati Carl H. Lindner College of Business. The event was sponsored by GBQ and the community partners were the University of Cincinnati Carl H. Lindner College of Business and Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber of Commerce. The nonprofit beneficiary was DePaul Cristo Rey High School. n

SPONSOR

COMMUNITY PARTNERS

NONPROFIT BENEFICIARY

w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9

111


Business Calendar Stir! Multicultural Networking Reception Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber

April 3

Seven regional chambers—the African American Chamber of Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky, Cincinnati USA Hispanic Chamber, Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber, Greater Cincinnati Chinese Chamber of Commerce, European American Chamber of Commerce of Greater Cincinnati, Indian American Chamber of Commerce of Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky, and Japan America Society of Greater Cincinnati—have joined together for a night of networking across cultures and communities. 5:30-7:30 p.m. $25. Cincinnati Art Museum, 953 Eden Park Drive, Mt. Adams. cincinnatichamber.com. Stir! Multicultural Networking Reception WE Lead Information Session Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber

April 4

Learn about the Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber’s WE Lead program, a 10-month development experience that aims to equip women professionals in the area with the information, education and resources they need to pursue executive leadership opportunities. Hear from recent WE Lead graduates and area businesswomen while enjoying appetizers and drinks. 4:30-6 p.m. Free with registration. Seasons 52, 3819 Edwards Road, Hyde Park. cincinnatichamber.com. African American Chamber Day at City Hall Greater Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky African American Chamber

April 10

Cincinnati City Hall hosts members of the African American Chamber of Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky. Attendees will hear presentations from City Manager Patrick Duhaney and Mayor John Cranley, have a Q&A with all nine Cincinnati City Council members and can stay after the event to sit in on the weekly City Council meeting at 3 p.m. Catered food will be provided. 10:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Free with registration. Cincinnati City Hall, Room 115, 801 Plum St., Downtown. african-americanchamber.com. Eggs ‘N Issues Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce

April 16, May 14

The Northern Kentucky Chamber’s monthly breakfast series continues in April and May 112

A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

with panelists from UpTech, The Salyers Group, Madison Design Group and more. Join for forward-thinking discussions and presentations on the future of business in Northern Kentucky. Pre-event registration is required. 7:30-9 a.m. Chamber members $25, nonmembers $50. Receptions Banquet & Conference Center, 1379 Donaldson Road, Erlanger. nkychamber.com. Salute to Leaders Clermont Chamber of Commerce Foundation

April 23

Clermont County’s 31st annual Salute to Leaders event celebrates the individuals and organizations driving growth in the county. Examples of excellence in community service, education, health care, public works and many other fields will be recognized for their impact on Clermont County. Registration closes on day of event. 5:30-8 p.m. Event ticket $30, sponsorships from $700. Oasis Conference Center, 902 LovelandMiamiville Road, Loveland. clermontchamber.com. 2019 Outstanding Women of NKY Luncheon Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce

May 15

Recognizing women making significant contributions to the community, the Outstanding Women of Northern Kentucky Awards will be given at a May luncheon to the winners selected in March. Awards include the Helen Carroll Champion of Education Award and the Henrietta Cleveland Inspiring Women Award, among

others. 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Chamber members $40, nonmembers $50, table sponsorship $650. St. Elizabeth Training and Education Center, 3861 Olympic Blvd., Erlanger. nkychamber.com. Hamilton Red Carpet Luncheon Greater Hamilton Chamber of Commerce

May 16

The Greater Hamilton Chamber of Commerce holds its Red Carpet Luncheons to showcase innovation and sustainable growth in and around the city. The 28th Leadership Hamilton graduating class will be acknowledged and includes members of Miami University Regionals, First Financial Bank, Fort Hamilton Hospital and other regional organizations. 11:45 a.m.-1 p.m. Chamber members $25, nonmembers $30. Courtyard by Marriott Hamilton, 1 Riverfront Plaza, Hamilton. hamilton-ohio.com. 2019 MADE Annual Lunch Mason Deerfield Chamber

May 21

The annual lunch held by the Mason Deerfield Chamber features networking opportunities, compelling presentations, leadership insights and highlights from brands based in the area. 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Chamber members $45, nonmembers $60, sponsorships from $750. Manor House, 7440 Mason Montgomery Road, Mason. madechamber.org.

Don’t see your event? Visit cincymagazine.com to add it to our online calendar for free.


CSS professionals work with businesses to augment Corporate Communications teams for critical/crisis issues and to add strategic resources to get an essential initiative over the finish line. With extensive experience in aviation, transportation, logistics, food safety, government affairs, and media relations, our professionals have decades of experience supporting executive teams in: • “Bet-the-company” issues, including C-suite and executive communications • Sensitive/confidential/crisis communications • Labor and employee relations • Workforce and economic development initiatives Contact Meghan Glynn • Media relations and training for more information. • Project management • Lobbying 513.693.4885 mglynn@calfeesolutions.com • External/shareholder communications Disclaimer: Calfee Strategic Solutions, LLC (CSS) is a wholly owned subsidiary of the law firm of Calfee, Halter & Griswold LLP. CSS is not a law firm and is not authorized to engage in the practice of law.

©2019 Calfee Strategic Solutions, LLC. All Rights Reserved. 2800 First Financial Center, 255 East Fifth Street, Cincinnati, OH 45202

Calfee Strategic Solutions Helps Companies Bridge Gaps by Navigating Complex Issues and Meeting Business Goals in the Tri-State Region


Best in Business Directory

T

hose who run or manage businesses know that sometimes you need some help. As the Tristate’s magazine for business professionals, we are in a unique position that enables us to meet and interact with some of the best business service providers in the region. This list gives you a taste of the region’s best business services, and serves as a resource for those looking for assistance. Make sure to visit CincyMagazine.com to see exclusive online Best in Business content.

CHAMBERS

INSURANCE/INSURANCE BROKERAGE

African American Chamber of Greater Cincinnati & Northern Kentucky 513-751-9900 african-americanchamber.com

Medical Mutual 800-382-5729 medmutual.com

ACCOUNTING

Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber 513-579-3100 cincinnatichamber.com

GBQ 513-871-3033 gbq.com

Blue Ash Business Association babusiness.org The Chamber of Commerce Serving Middletown, Monroe & Trenton 513-422-4551 thechamberofcommerce.org

Clermont Chamber of Commerce 513-576-5000 clermontchamber.com

VonLehman 800-887-0437 vlcpa.com AIR TRAVEL

Lebanon Chamber of Commerce 513-932-1100 lebanonchamber.org

CVG 859-767-3151 cvgairport.com

Milford Miami Township Chamber 513-831-2411 milfordmiamitownship.com

AUDIO VISUAL

Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce 859-578-8800 nkychamber.com

ITA Audio Visual Solutions 800-899-8877 ita.com

CONSTRUCTION

Oswald Companies 513-725-0306 oswaldcompanies.com LAW FIRMS Calfee, Halter & Griswold LLP 513-693-4880 calfee.com Lyons & Lyons 513-777-2222 lyonsandlyonslaw.com Taft Stettinius & Hollister 513-381-2838 taftlaw.com Wood Herron & Evans 513-241-2324 whe-law.com PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT Gateway Community & Technical College 859-441-4500 gateway.kctcs.edu Great Oaks Campuses 513-771-8840 greatoaks.com

SpotOn Productions 513-779-4223 spoton.productions

EGC Construction 859-442-6500 egcconst.com

BANKING

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

The Haile/US Bank College of Business at Northern Kentucky University 859-572-5165 nku.edu/academics/cob

Commerce Bank 800-453-2265 commercebank.com

Charles Schwab Fort Mitchell 859-308-1425 schwab.com/fortmitchell

Indiana Wesleyan University 866-468-6498 indwes.edu

Commonwealth Bank 859-746-9000 cbandt.com

Horter Investment Management, LLC 513-984-9933 horterinvestment.com

Union Institute & University 800-861-6400 myunion.edu

BUSINESS LAW

PNC Financial Advisors/W Mgmt. 513-651-8714 pnc.com

REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT

William E. Hesch Law Firm 513-731-6601 heschlaw.com BUSINESS RESOURCES Cincinnati Better Business Bureau 513-421-3015 bbb.org/cincinnati/

Raymond James 513-287-6777 raymondjames.com Western & Southern 866-832-7719 westernsouthern.com HEALTH Superior Dental 937-438-0283 superiordental.com

Corporex 859-292-5500 corporex.com TELECOMMUNICATIONS AT&T att.com ATC 513-234-4778 4atc.com

Interested in having your company included? Please contact Publisher Eric Harmon at publisher@cincymagazine.com or 513-297-6205. 114

A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com


BACK AND SPINE page 117

w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9

115


Cincy Live Well

Not a Regular Ache THE CAUSE OF PAIN OR NUMBNESS IN YOUR LEGS MAY NOT JUST BE SYMPTOM OF GETTING OLDER; THERE COULD BE A PROBLEM IN YOUR SPINE By Deborah Rutledge

w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9

117


Live Well Cincy brings you balanced, health-related editorial content to help you discover wellness in multiple aspects of life.

CincyMagazine.com/LiveWellCincy

LiveWellCincy

@ LiveWell_Cincy


Cincy Live Well

T

hat shooting pain down the leg and limited walking tolerance might not be simple aches and pains; it may signal a shift in the vertebrae, a condition called spondylolisthesis. Its Greek name means sliding spine, and more than 3 million people in the U.S. are diagnosed with it each year. Typically occurring where the spine curves and bears the most weight, around L4 and L5, the vertebral bone on top is sliding forward onto the one beneath it, says Dr. Ryan Seal of the Christ Hospital Health Network. Dr. Tann Nichols of the Mayfield Brain and Spine Clinic likens it to a shifted tower of blocks. “If you push it, you offset those in front,� Nichols says. The most common cause is degeneration, where the joint that holds the vertebrae in proper alignment wears out, Seal says. Aging brings about wear and tear on the spine, causing changes such as the drying out and weakening of intervertebral disks. Disk degeneration leads to arthritis and

A diagram showing spondylolisthesis

degenerative spondylolisthesis, a condition more common in African Americans, people with Diabetes and women over 40, Seal says. When arthritis develops, it weakens the joints and ligaments that hold the vertebrae in the proper position and the resulting slippage can narrow the spinal canal, putting pressure on the spinal cord.

This applies increasing strain to the back, and though the condition develops over time, the body naturally tries to overcompensate, which can lead to bone spurs and enlarged ligaments, Seal says. A related condition, spondylolysis, can be a precursor but is not always. It refers to a defect, or break, in the pars interarticularis, the narrow bridge between the upper

w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9

119


Cincy Live Well and lower facet joints of the vertebrae. Some athletes, like gymnasts and weight lifters, develop a pars fracture through hyperextension or repetitive micro trauma, Seal says. Others simply have genetically weaker pars that can more easily lead to fractures. Mild degrees of spondylolisthesis could remain undiagnosed if the person has no pain. In that case, it might be discovered by an X-ray for something else. But with greater vertebral slippage, the pain may reach the leg, buttocks, hamstring and foot. Higher-grade slippage can cause spondylolisthesis patients to have tingling, numbness, or weakness in one or both legs. The slippage puts pressure on the spinal nerve root, which causes the symptoms. The discomfort tends to be worse when upright and active, but improves upon sitting. Even leaning forward, such as pushing a grocery cart, can bring about some relief, since it opens up space in the spinal canal. The slippage can cause further degeneration, or arthritis, in the joint, pinching

Tips for a Healthy Spine The risk of developing spondylolisthesis increases as we get older, but there are steps people can take at any age to improve the health of their spine. • Follow your doctor’s treatment plan, par ticularly if you were in physical therapy. • Sit and stand properly—don’t hunch. • Lift with your legs, not your back. • Exercise regularly. • Avoid lifting heavy objects or excessive bending or twisting. • Attain and maintain a health body weight. • Eat healthy. • Don’t smoke. • Avoid excessive drinking of wine, beer or other alcoholic beverages. • Get plenty of rest. SOURCE: VERTICAL HEALTH’S SPINEUNIVERSE.COM

nerves in the neural canal. Spondylolisthesis can be detected on X-ray, CT scans and MRIs, which show the nerves, Nichols says.

Once detected, the sequence for treatment starts with conservative therapies, like physical therapy, perhaps chiropractic manipulation, and exercises to strengthen the core muscles. Non-opiate pain medications, oral steroids and muscle relaxers may be used to calm pain and nerves. The next level of therapy might include epidural injections at the nerve root, but in the most advanced cases surgery could be a resort, except for a patient who is too old or frail, Nichols says. Lumbar fusion surger y, which can be ac c ompl i shed by ac c essi ng t he spine from the front, side, back or perirectally, aims to both decompress the affected nerves and stabilize the joint, he adds. The procedure is a standard one, similar to a joint replacement, with about 80 percent recovery typical after three months. “We’ve seen more and more of it as time has gone on,” Nichols says of patients’ willingness to pursue this corrective surgery. “There are more people who want to stay active and want to get [this] fixed.” n

CINCY MAGAZINE CUSTOM Innovative Publications that Build Brands and Increase Business 2018 Bengals Team Guide & Season Preview

MOTHER. SISTER. FRIEND.

PLAYER SPOTLIGHTS

2019 EDITION

SUPPORTERS GROUPS

SUPPLEMENT TO PERIODICAL PUBLICATION

COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT SCHEDULE AND TICKET INFORMATION

Go Red for Women is nationally sponsored by

Let us show you how we can give you your very own publication.

1 20

A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

Schedule, Tickets & More

A.J. Green and the Bengals are Ready to Rumble in the Jungle

Locally sponsored by

SUPPLEMENT TO PERIODICAL PUBLICATION

513.421.2533

2018 Draft Class Homegrown Talent

The Magazine for Business Professionals

OFFICIAL HEALTH INSURER OF FC CINCINNATI

New Coaches

SPECIAL EDITION


LIVE WELL PROFILE

Mayfield Brain & Spine 3825 Edwards Road, Suite 300 • Cincinnati, OH 45209 513-221-1100 • mayfieldclinic.com

A

s a trusted independent physician group, Mayfield treats 25,000 patients from more than 30 states each year. With more than 20 physician specialists in neurosurgery, interventional neuroradiology, physical medicine and rehabilitation, and pain management, Mayfield treats patients with back and neck pain, sciatica, Parkinson’s disease, essential tremor, NPH, brain and spinal tumors, stroke, moyamoya, brain aneurysms, Chiari malformation, scoliosis, kyphosis, facial pain, facial twitch, trauma, concussion, spinal cord injury and carpal tunnel. Mayfield is proud of its expansion at premier regional health care systems, including Mercy Health, St. Elizabeth Healthcare and TriHealth. These health systems are ramping up their neurosurgical capabilities in multiple ways, including upgraded operating suites and enhancements in neurocritical care. When people think of Mayfield Brain & Spine, the first word that comes to mind is likely to be neurosurgery. Indeed, Mayfield is known throughout the world for its neurosurgical expertise. It may come as a surprise, then, to learn that 80 percent of Mayfield’s spine patients get better without surgery. That’s because Mayfield specialists never operate unless it is absolutely necessary. They take a conservative approach, doing everything possible to help their patients heal without surgery. Mayfield accomplishes this by providing a continuum of care, from PM&R to physical therapy. A patient who comes to Mayfield with non-emergency back pain may begin their journey by seeing a PM&R physician, nurse practitioner or physician’s assistant. If conservative care does not solve

the problem, Mayfield surgeons employ minimally invasive procedures whenever possible. Minimally invasive surgery, performed through small incisions, promotes faster recoveries for patients. Mayfield’s spine patients have access to a complete continuum of care throughout the Tristate. They can see a PM&R physician at the Mayfield Brain & Spine offices at Rookwood Exchange in Norwood or at Mayfield’s West Chester and Northern Kentucky offices. They can undergo physical therapy at Rookwood Exchange, West Chester and Green Township. PM&R specialists at the Spine Surgery Center, located on Smith Road off Interstate 71, provide minimally invasive injections for pain, which can cut inflammation, allow

the spine to recover and enable patients to start physical therapy. Steroid injections are used to treat pain in the neck, arm, low back or leg. Mayfield’s PM&R specialists also perform electromyography (EMG), facet joint injections, nerve blocks, sacroiliac joint injections, radiofrequency ablation and spinal cord stimulator trials. In addition to reducing pain, treatments by PM&R specialists can help determine which part of a patient’s spine is producing pain.


EARTHSTOCK | EARTHDAY DAYFESTIVAL FESTIVAL EARTHSTOCK | EARTH

Earthstock | Earth Day Festival

Earthstock | Earth Day Sunday, April 28, 2019 Festival WHEN 12:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

WHEN

WHERE

WHERE

PRICE

Sunday, April 28, 2019 Voice of –America MetroPark 12:00 p.m. 5:00 p.m. 7850 VOA Park Dr., West Chester OH 45069

Voice of America MetroPark 7850 VOA Park Dr., FREE West Chester OH 45069

REGISTERFREE PRICE Reduce-Reuse-Recycle art competition, YourMetroParks.net

REGISTER

Vendor, & Sponsorship information under About, Special Event Forms

YourMetroParks.net Reduce-Reuse-Recycle art competition, Vendor, & Sponsorship information About, Special Event Forms 513.867.5835 |under YourMetroParks.net

ABOUT NEW! Celebrate Earth Day and get closer to nature at Earthstock | Earth Day Festival! Guests will have the chance to experience lecturesEarth and demonstrations NEW! Celebrate Day and get closer on a variety of environmental topics, try to nature at Earthstock | Earth Day out variousGuests recreation and to Festival! will equipment have the chance activities, viewlectures natural artwork in the experience and demonstrations Reduce-Reuse-Recycle art competition, on a variety of environmental topics, try check out all the Earth-friendly vendors out various recreation equipment and and opportunities for service around activities, view MetroParks... plusnatural MORE! artwork in the

ABOUT

Reduce-Reuse-Recycle art competition,

Want to out enter check allthe theReduce-Reuse-Recycle Earth-friendly vendors art competition? Just head to Special and opportunities for service around Event Forms at www.YourMetroParks.net MetroParks... plus MORE! for rules and registration.

Want to enter the Reduce-Reuse-Recycle art competition? Just head to Special Event Forms at www.YourMetroParks.net for rules and registration.

Motor Vehicle Permit Required. FREE to Butler County Residents. Non-Residents $5/daily or $10/annually. sjb 190111 approved

513.867.5835 | YourMetroParks.net

Motor Vehicle Permit Required. FREE to Butler County Residents. Non-Residents $5/daily or $10/annually. sjb 190111 approved


Home

OUTDOOR FURNITURE

page 124

TELESCOPE CASUAL FURNITURE

Experts are recommending seating areas for those looking to use their outdoor spaces more.

w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9

123


Cincy Home

SEASIDE CASUAL FURNITURE

Back to Outdoor Living

EXPERTS SAY IT’S EASY TO ENJOY TIME OUTSIDE WITH NEW PATIO FURNITURE OPTIONS The Daphne deep-seating set

By Laura Leavitt

A

s Cincinnati approaches spring, thoughts turn to relaxation and recreation outdoors. Local pool and patio furniture purveyors are seeing people start to eye the new patio furniture with excitement. With more options for condominium and apartment living around Cincinnati, a new height of patio furniture is becoming 1 24

A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

popular, meeting demand for comfortable seating on balconies. “Balcony height is between dining table chairs and bar stools,” says Doug Bosse, general manager of SunSpot Pool and Patio. “A lot of people like that since they like that they aren’t sitting so low, but you don’t have to step up; these chairs are easy to get into and out of. You can see over a

balcony railing this way.” Even when strapped for space, Cincinnatians will be able to enjoy whatever outdoor spaces they have available. “People want more and more out of their patio furniture,” says Watson’s Vice President of Purchasing Ken Tedrick, who oversees one of the largest outdoor furniture selections in the nation. “Some


William E. Hesch Law Firm, LLC

Personalized • Experienced • Service-oriented

Update Your Estate Plan NOW! Your Family Is Depending On YOU! Call Bill on his cell phone

today at (513) 509-7829 to receive legal, tax, business or financial advice from a:

BABY BOOMERS NEED HELP Baby Boomers need help getting answers to their complicated tax, estate and retirement planning questions.

• Attorney • CPA • Personal Financial Specialist (PFS) • Former CFO of a $70 million privately owned company • Former Deloitte TAX Partner

William E. Hesch Law Firm, LLC

As an Attorney, CPA and Personal Financial Specialist, Bill is uniquely qualified to advise Baby Boomers on their complicated tax, estate and retirement planning matters. Get your second opinion now by calling Bill at 513-509-7829 PEACE OF MIND IS ONLY A PHONE CALL AWAY

Cincy Magazine’s

Leading Lawyer in the Trust and Estate Area for

15 consecutive years

Check out our website at www.heschlaw.com to see the videos which identify the Top 10 Mistakes Business Owners Make in Tax, Succession and Estate Planning.

Contact Bill to get a second opinion and see what he can do for you. 3047 Madison Road, Suite 205, Cincinnati, OH 45209 | 513-731-6601 | www.heschlaw.com This is an advertisement. Legal work may be performed by others within the firm


shoppers don’t have space for both a dining set and a sofa group, but a chat set could be the perfect solution to get the best of both worlds.” Chat sets provide the comfort of soft deep seating in an arrangement that works for dining as well. Until every remnant of chilly air leaves the area, there are still cozy options for getting outside. “We see more and more people who set up a fire pit and then surround it with deep seating chairs and a sofa. So you can eat or drink in comfort and then just sink back into the cushions and relax in the warmth,” Tedrick says. If you are looking for a comfortable set of pool deck furniture but don’t want to pull the cushions in before every April shower, consider Sunbrella fabric upholstery, say experts. “When you aren’t on an enclosed porch but want cushions, you can choose this rain fabric; it’s a solution-dyed acrylic,” explains Bosse. “They seal it on the underside, so the outside is soft. It can rain,

SEASIDE CASUAL FURNITURE

Cincy Home

The Roma outdoor sofa set with the Majorca dining set and half an hour later, you can sit on your completely dry furniture. You also don’t have to worry about the cushion prematurely aging with mildew.” As people look to reduce single-use plastics in their lives, a polymer made of recycled milk jugs has become a popular material for durable, beautiful porch furniture. It doesn’t fade in the sun or degrade

like some other furniture materials over time, and the stainless steel hardware stays gleaming for years. “The polymer furniture used to be just a few bright colors, but now they have a color that looks like teak,” says Bosse. “Now they are making a weathered wood look, which can be in shades of gray or brown. It looks real, but its polymer so it will last forever.” n

Find your new favorite restaurant at

cincymagazine.com

MAY 17TH, 2019

PRESENTING SPONSORS:

ARTS

126

BUSINESS

CULTURE

www.cincymagazine.com

A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com


TELESCOPE CASUAL FURNITURE

Telescope sofa set

w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9

127


Love Cincy Todd Shumard, photographer First Lutheran Church in OTR

128

A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com


So close, you can feel the heat. Buy your ticket today.

Robert D. Lindner Family OMNIMAX Theater ®

cincymuseum.org

An

DIGITAL CROSSING Release

FILMS


Profile for Cincy Magazine

Cincy Magazine - April/May 2019  

Cincy Magazine - April/May 2019  

Profile for cincyflip
Advertisement