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What’s Next for Harry Black? FREEDOM CENTER’S NEW PRESIDENT

PERFECT Shopping in Indiana, Touring Distilleries in Kentucky, Hiking in Hocking Hills and More!

CINCY’S TOUGHEST COPS

OHIO’S

BEST OF SHOW

2017

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Make the SMART Choice

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At EKU you can:

• Receive personal guidance thanks • Choose from more than 100 into a 16-to-1 student-faculty ratio. demand degree programs. • Study with some of the industry’s • Live and study in modern, suitemost respected and accomplished style residence halls built in 2017. • Experience the most beautiful professors. college campus in the heart of • Live out of state but close to Kentucky. home. (EKU is just 90 minutes from Cincinnati.)

LEARN MORE at go.eku.edu/smarter

*To be eligible for SMART, students must live in Alabama, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, Mississippi, Michigan, Maryland, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia or West Virginia, or be attending a charter high school anywhere in the United States.


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Contents

Hocking Hills State Park

The Magazine for Business Professionals

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Whether you go north, south, east or west, you’re never far away from a perfect one-day trip.

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BY THE EDITORS

View 4 Editor’s BY CORINNE MINARD 6 Contributors 7 Web Exclusives Cincy 8 Inside Klosterman Bakery celebrates

24 Bringing an Army to Cincy

MIDWESTERN TR AVELER

40 Travel Kentucky

125 years, a Cincinnati artist’s new exhibit and behind the numbers of your yard.

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CINCY LIVE Small Stage, Big Time Talent “Terracotta Army: Legacy of the First Emperor of China” comes to the Cincinnati Art Museum. BY MADISON RODGERS

25 A&E Calendar First 32 Safety Bear Paddle Swim School

wants water safety to be on the mind of every parent. BY CORINNE MINARD

Local theater schools are producing top-notch plays and talented professionals. BY DAVID LYMAN 2

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34 Dining Zorbas Gyros Greek Restaurant

brings authentic Greek flavors to the Tristate. BY WILL JONES

The Bluegrass State is packed with outdoor activities ideal for all ages and skill levels. BY CORINNE MINARD

Great Outdoors 47 The Land Between the Lakes in

Golden Pond, Ky., offers a wide array of both outdoor and indoor options for anyone to experience this spring. BY HALEY JENA


COMMUNIT Y

50 Reflections on Leadership

to Colleges & 57 Guide Universities 2018

BUSINESS

Calm Before the Storm 86 The The city manager has gone to bat for Cincinnati, and courted controversy. BY LIZ ENGEL

Meeting & Event 89 Tristate Planner Guide 2018 Local educators are finding new ways to discuss race. BY DAN HURLEY

New college facilities and programs transform learning, plus listings. BY MIKE BOYER

View 52 Another What does Cincinnati need to

72 Meet the 2018 Outstanding

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78 A Guiding Hand

do to get Amazon or Apple? BY DON MOONEY

Q&A

Outstanding Educators

Local venues are making business events more fun and beneficial, plus listings. BY CAROLINE WIITA

108 Keep it Simple

Educators at area colleges and universities. BY THE EDITORS

Attorneys at Lyons & Lyons make estate planning easy and affordable. BY ERIC SPANGLER

100 Re-Cap 109 Power A panel of experts discussed

Four questions with the new president of the Underground Railroad Freedom Center. BY CORINNE MINARD

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The Children’s Home of Cincinnati provides mental-health services to kids. BY ERIC SPANGLER

80 DePaul Cristo Rey’s Secret

how to face Cincinnati’s poverty challenge. BY MIKE BOYER

in Business 112 Best Calendar & Directory

CINCY LIVE WELL

Back Pain 117 Tell-tale Specific symptoms can indicate

Cincy’s Toughest Cops

problems with the sacroiliac joint. BY DEBORAH RUTLEDGE

124 The school’s work-study program unlocks college success for low-income students. BY MIKE BOYER Peter Bronson dives into the history of the city’s law enforcement. BY PETER BRONSON

D.R.I.V.E. for Good 83 Students St. Ursula Academy’s new initiative encourages students to help those in need. BY JESSICA BALTZERSEN

CINCY HOME Updating the Outdoors

Outdoor spaces can be revitalized with help from local companies. BY CORINNE MINARD

128 Love Cincy

Cincy (ISSN-1934-8746) published in February/March; April/May; June/July; August/September; October/November; December/January for a total of six issues by Cincy, 30 Garfield Place, Cincinnati, OH 45202. Periodicals postage paid at Cincinnati, Ohio, and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Cincy, 30 Garfield Place, Suite 440, Cincinnati, OH 45202. w w w.

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Editor’s View Locally, veteran and family owned

Travel Time I

Managing Editor Corinne Minard Business Editor Mike Boyer Associate Editor Eric Spangler Contributing Writers Jessica Baltzersen, Peter Bronson, Leo DeLuca, Liz Engel, Bill Ferguson Jr., Dan Hurley, Haley Jena, Will Jones, Don Mooney, Deborah Rutledge, Caroline Wiita Creative Director Guy Kelly Art Director Katy Rucker Digital Content Editor Madison Rodgers Contributing Photographer Joe Simon Sales and Operations Manager Anthony Rhoades Custom Sales Manager Brad Hoicowitz Advertising Director Abbey Cummins Account Executive Tiffany Lacock Inside Sales Ian Altenau

Corinne Minard Managing Editor

Advertising Manager Laura Federle Audience Development Coordinator Alexandra Stacey Events Director Hannah Jones Production Manager Keith Ohmer Work-study Student Mykala Mahone Cincy on the web: www.cincymagazine.com Cincy Co. LLC Cincinnati Club Building 30 Garfield Place, Suite 440 Cincinnati, OH 45202 Contact Cincy: information@cincymagazine.com or call (513) 421-2533. Go to www.cincymagazine.com to get your complimentary subscription to Cincy.

OHIO’S

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BEST OF SHOW

2017

often referred to 2017 as my Year of Travel. Almost ever y month I was making a small trip somewhere. They weren’t long trips—I don’t think I ever took off more than two days in a row—but they were just long enough to explore a new place. While I was able to spread my trips over a couple days, sometimes you only have one. We didn’t realize until we started working on this issue’s cover feature that there were so many things to do just a short drive from the Tristate. A plethora of museums, parks, restaurants, tours and shopping destinations are within a twoto-three hour drive. Only having one day for a trip doesn’t sound that bad anymore. If you’re not full of wanderlust, though, this issue still has plenty to offer. Peter Bronson looks into Cincinnati’s law enforcement history with a feature on the city’s toughest cops. David Lyman dives into the world of college theater with his story on NKU and Xavier’s theater programs. And I was able to sit down with the new president of the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center. Whether your escape is a day away, or even just reading a magazine, we hope that this is the issue for you. Happy travels!

Editor & Publisher Eric Harmon


ADVERTISEMENT

Ge t I n s p i r e d

Mary Cook O w n e r o f A-Marika Dance Company

Ten years ago, Mary Cook, professional dance instructor and owner of A-Marika Dance Company, entered her six year old son, Mathew, in his first dance competition. However, there was not a category for him, as he has special needs. This inspired Mary to start free dance classes for individuals like Mathew, who have special needs and abilities. The first class had six students, who would not only learn how to dance, but also gain valuable social skills and appropriate behavior that extends well beyond a dance floor. Now the A-Marika Dance Company teaches over 60 students with special needs each year and gives them the confidence to show off their moves during the annual Special Ballroom Festival. The Special Ballroom Festival is a professionally organized ballroom dance competition for students with disabilities to compete in appropriate categories to show their abilities. The competition is judged by professional ballroom judges and with the help of sponsorship support, money is raised to provide contestants with attire for their specific dance. Dancers compete with qualified chaperones in several categories, including Foxtrot, Waltz, Tango, Rumba, Cha-cha, Salsa, and Swing. “One of the most amazing things is that we sometimes have more volunteers than students,” Mary says. The Special Ballroom Festival is held each year in October at Sharonville Convention Center with over 200 attendees. Mary chose to have the event at Sharonville Convention Center specifically because they are accommodating and accessible to the special needs of the dancers, volunteers and attendees. For more information on the A-Marika Dance Company or the Special Ballroom Festival, visit a-marika.com/specialballroomfestival.

Photo credit: Bruce Crippen

YOUR CENTER FOR INSPIRATION Contact Lisa Hodge to reserve your date 513.326.6465 • lhodge@cityofsharonville.com 11355 Chester Road • Cincinnati, OH 45246 www.sharonvilleconventioncenter.com Now Open!


Contributors

Jessica Baltzersen holds an M.A. in English from Northern Kentucky University and works as a freelance writer and adjunct English instructor in the Greater Cincinnati area. Her background is in journalism, creative nonfiction and web content development.

Cincy Magazine contributing editor Peter Bronson is an author, editor, publisher and owner of Chilidog Press LLC. He is a former reporter, columnist and editor at The Cincinnati Enquirer, The Tucson Citizen and other newspapers in Arizona and Michigan.

Leo DeLuca’s writing has been featured by Ohio Magazine, The A.V. Club, Aviation for Women, and more. He is currently working with American Heritage on its plans for a digital relaunch. The co-author of Dayton’s Spirit of Community Service and Leadership (Dayton History, 2016), DeLuca is a three-time All Ohio Excellence in Journalism award winner.

Liz Engel is a business writer, runner and once-upon-atime volleyballer who found her way back to the Queen City following stints in North Carolina and Tennessee. She’s spent more than a decade covering topics like health care, transit and entrepreneurship.

Bill Ferguson Jr. is a writer/ editor/communications consultant who has spent 40-plus years as an editor and reporter for six newspapers, beginning at age 14 as a sports reporter for his hometown daily.

Dan Hurley is a local historian and the president of Applied History Associates, which works with museums and historical societies throughout the Eastern U.S.

Haley Jena is a journalism student at Miami University. Besides writing for Cincy, she has had experience with several other print and digital publications.

A marketing communications professional born and bred in Cincinnati, Will Jones enjoys telling the stories behind brands and making them appeal to any and everyone.

Don Mooney is a Cincinnati attorney, a past member of the Cincinnati Planning Commission and active in local politics.

Deborah Rutledge is a freelance feature writer, originally from Northern Ohio, who has lived and worked in Cincinnati for nearly 20 years.

Joe Simon is a Cincinnati native but travels back and forth from Cincinnati and Chicago. He’s a freelance photographer and been shooting since 1997. He’s been a regular contributor to Cincy Magazine and The Cincinnati Enquirer.

Caroline Wiita is a Queen City native and Bobcat alumna. A writer and editor, she has covered topics ranging from education and engineering to home design and movie reviews.

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Web Exclusives TOP 5 ONLINE STORIES

1 Leading Lawyers 2018 by the Editors 2 The Race to Retirement: SmartAsset takes a deeper look into how long $1 million can last into retirement by Madison Rodgers

3 The Little Eyesore that Could: Inside the Kenwood Collection by Liz Engel 4 Cincinnati’s War on Poverty by Mike Boyer 5 Easy Way to Grow Wealth by Eric Spangler

DIALOGUE Joshua A. Smith @Joshua45011 @CincyMagazine #CincyPower100 breakfast this morning. A very engaged panel discussing childhood poverty and the downstream impact on our regional community. A common theme is we have many resources but need to deploy in a smarter fashion.

VIDEO The 2018 Power 100 breakfast forum brought leaders from throughout the region together to discuss one of the biggest problems facing the Tristate—child poverty. Not able to attend? Watch our re-cap video of the event at YouTube.com/CincyCompany.

ONLINE CONTENT Is Cincinnati a good place to retire? Digital Editor Madison Rodgers spoke with SmartAsset and what it takes for a city to be ideal for retirement and where Cincinnati stacks up when compared to other cities. Read this exclusive online story and more at CincyMagazine.com.

When inheriting an IRA, there’s a lot to consider. Bill Hesch, Esq., CPA, PFS, goes over the options for spouses and non-spouses in his latest blog posts at CincyMagazine.com/LiveWell. Follow the blog for more tips on how to have a well-balanced life. LiveWellCincy

@ LiveWell_Cincy

Judy Thompson @aafjudy Poor kids get a bad start from lead poisoning to roaches to less adult conversation. And trauma. Adverse childhood events make managing behavior difficult. Poverty’s impact. Milford Preschool @Milford_PS So honored that we were chosen as @CincyMagazine Best of the East for the Preschool category! We can’t thank the @Milford_Schools @milfordohio @MiamiTwpOH community enough for their support! #MilfordSoars Rob Fellows @FellowsEDU Great article in the latest @CincyMagazine issue on our own @CoachDeke!! She says, “Joy. Strength. Confidence. Gratitude. Pride...I hope to give to my kids...” You DEFINITELY do!!! 84.51° @8451group 84.51° CEO, Stuart Aitken has been featured in this year’s @CincyMagazine Power 100 issue recognizing important players in Cincinnati. buff. ly/2EkXWfM w w w.

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InsideCincy

Klosterman Bakery Turns 125 HOW KLOSTERMAN BAKERY HAS LEFT ITS MARK ON THE MIDWEST, AND HOW THE COMPANY PLANS ON CELEBRATING By Madison Rodgers

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he Klosterman Bakery has been a family-owned company for more than 100 years. “Certain baking secrets used in the modern kitchens of Klosterman Bread have been passed through generations of this family-owned company founded more than 100 years ago,” says Amy Schmitz, director of marketing for Klosterman Bread. The Klosterman family began many popular trends that expanded in the Cincinnati area over times. “The Klosterman

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Klosterman Bakery, known for its white bread and wheat half loaf, is celebrating being in business for 125 years.

family, trained and highly skilled in baking, arrived in Cincinnati more than a century ago, family recipes in hand,” Schmitz says. “To be most responsive to the changing need of its customers, Klosterman made many ‘firsts’ in the Cincinnati area, such as the first square loaf of bread, the first brown-and-serve rolls, the first hamburger bun and the first buns packaged in plastic wrap.” Klosterman Bakery has grown in its 125 years and now serves its products throughout the region. “We provide fresh hearth breads, rolls and a variety of other bakery items to more than 4,000 restaurants, groceries, hospitals and schools in Ohio, Kentucky and Indiana,” says Schmitz. “Under the leadership of Kim Klosterman, chairman and CEO, and Chip Klosterman, president, Klosterman Baking Company has grown to be one of the largest familyowned bakeries in the Midwest.” A lthough K losterman offers many options, there are customer favorites.

“Consumers continue to be taken by our Half Loaves, as well as our Honey Hamburger Buns and our Honey Hot Dog Buns,” says Schmitz. “We have been baking these classics in the heart of Cincinnati since 1982 and our authentic family recipes have been passed down for generations.” Klosterman has over 400 varieties of bread, buns, rolls, and flatbread options. Although Klosterman Bakery has been around for 125 years, the bakery still enjoys participating in different food holidays. On March 18, Klosterman Bakery celebrated Sloppy Joe Day. Klosterman Bakery has worked to include unusual food holidays into its calendar for years now. “By celebrating quirky food holidays like Sloppy Joe Day, we’re able to join in some of the conversations local foodies are already having and it also allows us to share our passion for bread while capitalizing on our favorite ways to use it in the kitchen and at home.” n


Not Your Normal Audio Tour

Q&A

A CONVERSATION WITH RISING CINCINNATI ARTIST BRITNI BICKNAVER, WHOSE LATEST WORK IS CHANGING THE WAY VISITORS VIEW THE CAC By Leo DeLuca

“Audio Tour” is the contemplative wonderland where artist Britni Bicknaver portrays the Contemporary Arts Center. Bicknaver, a seventh-generation Cincinnatian, has been frequenting the CAC since age 14, marveling at the work within its walls. For her University of Cincinnati MFA thesis she created an audible masterwork in homage to the space—one that the museum singled-out with high honor. “Audio Tour,” once a thesis, is now available at the CAC indefinitely. In covert, playful fashion, Bicknaver disguises her piece as a standard museum audio tour—visitors receive headphones, an information card and media player. But all convention ends there. The artist takes listeners on a 32-minute dreamlike ride through every nook and cranny of the CAC—zooming in and zooming out—meticulously uncovering the history of the museum, offering up philosophical musings and interpreting the story of Cincinnati itself. Bicknaver composed original music for each track, and sings in her entrancing alto voice. She gives special attention 10

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to world-renowned CAC architect Zaha Hadid, chanting her name, and weaving the designer’s involvement into her work of art.

HOW DID YOUR RELATIONSHIP WITH CINCINNATI SHAPE THE CONTENT FOR AUDIO TOUR? Cincinnati has always had this mythos for me. The Contemporary Arts center is unequivocally tied to the land on which it sits. I wanted to portray that in “Audio Tour.”

YOU HISTORICALLY WORKED IN OTHER MEDIUMS. HOW DID YOU BEGIN WORKING WITH SOUND? I entered grad school as a sculpture major, but my work felt empty. After watching Laurie Anderson perform, and encouraged by professors Mark Harris and Vickie Daiello, I knew I wanted to make music. I changed course. My dad is a musician, and he guided me.

ANY COLORFUL MOMENTS FROM CREATING “AUDIO TOUR?” For one of the tracks, I counted every

functional object at the CAC. I went into offices and counted trashcans, computers and staplers, standing over the staff as they worked. That was pretty funny. I’m also a stutterer, and sometimes recording, I just couldn’t get a specific word out, which made for a humorous editing process.

WHEN DID YOU GET THE IDEA FOR “AUDIO TOUR?” I was initially interested in writing a pop song for my thesis. Pop music is way more popular than visual art with the masses, and I liked the idea of a visual artist writing a pop song. I wanted to be a punk. But our thesis show was at the CAC, so I began thinking of how to incorporate sound in the museum. Similar to a pop song, a museum audio tour is a popular medium with the masses, but with it, I was additionally able to blur the line between utilitarianism and art.

WHAT’S NEXT? I’m still working in sound and thinking about video. I want to continue teaching. I really enjoy doing it. n


By the Numbers

Ahhh, that smell of fresh-cut grass is in the air Spring has sprung, and if you haven’t already pulled out your lawn mower, you will soon. Or you might hire someone to take care of your lawn for you. Following are some stats to keep your trivia thumb green (research by Bill Ferguson Jr.):

62 673

Number of landscaping services in Boone, Butler, Campbell, Clermont, Hamilton, Kenton and Warren counties, with 3,907 employees.

Percentage of Ohio homeowners in a survey who use lawn chemicals.

$35,071 Average annual pay for landscaping employees in Southwest Ohio and Northern Kentucky.

360 Gallons of water that a garden hose discharges in an hour, depending on water pressure and size and length of hose.

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Maximum height, in inches, that grass can grow before the City of Cincinnati will contact property owner after a complaint.

SOURCES: OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF FOOD, AGRICULTURAL, AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; OHIO AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CENTER; ODNR DIVISION OF SOIL AND WATER RESOURCES; UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI; CENSUS BUREAU; NOAA; CITY OF CINCINNATI. w w w.

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Power 100

Cincy Magazine held its annual Power 100 breakfast forum Feb. 21 at the Hilton Cincinnati Netherland Plaza Hotel. This year’s panelists were Karen Bankston, Child Poverty Collaborative; Rob Reifsnyder, United Way; O’dell Owens, Interact for Health; and Dave Herche, Enerfab, Inc. The event was sponsored by Taft Stettinius & Hollister, GBQ, TruePoint Wealth Counsel and University of Cincinnati Carl H. Lindner College of Business. The community partner was the Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber of Commerce. The nonprofit beneficiary was DePaul Cristo Rey High School.

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1 Jamie Jamison, First America Auto Brokers, and Alex Scharfetter, office of Congressman Brad Wenstrup 2 Rep. Brad Wenstrup and Laurie Althaus, Now and Next 3 From DePaul Cristo Rey High School: Maureen Babbit, Sparkle Worley and Margee Garbsch 4 From Catholic Charities of Southwestern Ohio: Dan Sarell and Ted Bergh 5 From Carl H. Lindner College of Business: Dan Gruber and Tiffany Cooper 6 Rev. George Sherrill and Sara South, Hilton Netherland Plaza

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Best of the East On Jan. 24, Cincy Magazine hosted the Best of the East celebration at the Holiday Inn Eastgate. The Best of the East is a celebration and competition among the top establishments east of Interstate 71. The event was sponsored by the Clermont Chamber of Commerce, Southern State Community College, Mercy Health Anderson and Clermont hospitals, and Great Oaks Career Campuses. The nonprofit beneficiary was KLiCWow. 1 Attendees could have unlimited food samples and two drink tickets. 2 Belterra Park Gaming was nominated in multiple categories. 3 The event was sold out. 4 Athlete Instincts owner Andrew Moreira with event attendees

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Scene Mayfield Brain & Spine Ribbon Cutting Physicians and leaders of Mayfield Brain & Spine celebrated their new West Chester office with an open house and ribbon cutting on Feb. 20. More than 70 guests attended, including representatives from The West Chester-Liberty Chamber Alliance and West Chester Township Board of Trustees. Fourteen clinicians will serve patients at the new Centre Pointe Drive location, which replaces Mayfield’s former offices in West Chester and Fairfield. 1 Mayfield’s Dr. Art Arand and Beth O’Connell hold oversized scissors for the official ribbon cutting. 2 From left: Lee Wong, West Chester Township Board of Trustees; Bill Powell, West Chester-Liberty Chamber Alliance; Dr. Art Arand, Mayfield; and Joe Hinson, West Chester-Liberty Chamber Alliance. 3 From left: Lee Wong; Yasmen Brown-Jones, West Chester Liberty Chamber Alliance; and Bill Powell

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a celebration OF SERVICE Tuesday, May 8, 2018 6 p.m. SVDPcincinnati.org/COS

Honoring Fr. Barry Windholtz 14

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HIGH SCHOOL


St. Ann Catholic School Family Service Day St. A n n Cat hol ic School pa r t nered with New Life Mission in Hamilton for its Family Service Day on Feb. 2. New Life Mission exists to alleviate physical, emotional and spiritual poverty in the community by transforming lives and restoring broken relationships through education, mentoring and love. The necessity bags consisted of hygiene items such as soap, shampoo, body wash, toothbrushes and toilet paper. The overall day was a great way for the St. Ann families to work together and give back to the people who need it most within their community.    1 Students and parents worked together to fill the necessity bags. 2 There were winter necessity bags as well with items such as socks, hats, gloves and chapstick. 3 St. Ann students and their families made 200-plus necessity bags. 4 All the items placed in the necessity bags were donated by St. Ann students and parents.

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Check out our June issue for outstanding real estate agents, mortgage professionals and home insurance professionals!

Tell us about your home professional today — they could win the Five Star award! Go to www.fivestarprofessional.com/homesurvey or call 651-259-1865. w w w.

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St. Gertrude School’s The Lion King Jr. The St. Gertrude Players performed Lion King Jr. for their families and community Feb. 17-18 at Madeira High School. St. Gertrude Players is an extracurricular group at St. Gertrude School open to students in fifth though eighth grade. They produce high-quality productions complete with lights, microphones, costumes, makeup and high-quality sets. Past productions include The Little Mermaid Jr., Seussical Jr., Alice in Wonderland Jr., Cinderella Jr., Beauty & the Beast Jr., Wizard of Oz Jr. and Annie Jr. 1 The St. Gertrude Players 2 Students dressed as giraffes and vultures for the production. 3 Students played characters, like Simba and Zazu, in Lion King Jr. 4 The play was professionally directed. 5 The students learned stage direction and terminology.

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2018 Cincinnati Chamber Annual Dinner The 2018 Great Living Cincinnatians were honored at the 2018 Cincinnati Chamber Annual Dinner at the Duke Energy Center Feb. 22. This year’s honorees were Robert J. Kohlhepp; Dr. Chester C. Pryor II; John F. Steele, Sr.; and Judith B. VanGinkel. 1 Aftab Pureval and Sean Rugless 2 Arlene Koth 3 Philip J. Castellini; Robert J. Kohlhepp; Dr. Chester C. Pryor II; Judith B. VanGinkel; John F. Steele, Sr.; and Jill Meyer 4 Dr. Chester Pryor 5 Fighter John Winfrey 6 Mahendra Vora and Jim Anderson

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Scene Valentine’s Day at Seasons Retirement Community Seasons Retirement Community was excited to host an internal month-long event with its residents to celebrate the Month of Love. Community members answered questions ranging from “Favorite Type of Valentine’s Day Candy?” to “How Did He Pop The Question?”  Photos provided by Elizabeth BangelStehlin, Senior Director of Sales and Marketing, Seasons Retirement Community

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1 Some residents dished on their celebrity crushes. 2 Friends and family came together to celebrate 3 Elizabeth BangelStehlin, senior director of sales and marketing, took a selfie with a resident. 4 Other residents were asked who or what owned their heart.

Who do you know who is suffering? Everyone knows someone who struggles with mental health. Common mental illnesses, including substance use disorders, can be successfully treated – if treatment is accessed. Lindner Center of HOPE was created to help individuals like you and me face the mental illness that is disrupting our quality of life. Take the next step, contact Lindner Center of HOPE at 513-536-HOPE.

lindnercenterofhope.org

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Dragonfly Foundation’s Grand Gala The Dragonfly Foundation held its annual Grand Gala Feb. 10 at the Renaissance Cincinnati in Burnham Hall. During the event, Marty Brennaman was given the 2018 Forty Four Award. The Forty Four Award was created to recognize unwavering commitment, passion and enthusiasm for supporting The Dragonfly Foundation and its mission. The event’s special guests were Reef and the Carneson Family. 1

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© 2018. Oswald Companies. All rights reserved. DS1614

1 Dragonfly Foundation co-founders, from left: Christine Neitzke and Ria Davidson 2 From left: Tony Huser, Marty Brennaman, Amanda Brennaman and Aymie Majerski 3 Burnham Hall at the Renaissance Cincinnati 4 The event honored the Carneson family: Ryan, Lydia, Reef (who has cancer), Payten and Kenzi

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Scene Ten Thousand Village Gala On Nov. 9, Ten Thousand Villages of Cincinnati held a Gala at the Freedom Center. “Part Of The Story: Celebrating 15 years of Fair Trade in Cincinnati” was an evening celebrating the 15th anniversary of the O’Bryonville store and the dedication of Karen and Ed Diller as the founders of the local nonprofit. 1 Musical group D-Fresh 2 Ed Diller 3 Ten Thousand Villages is known for selling fair trade items, including Bunyaad rugs. 4 The event celebrated 15 year of fair trade in Cincinnati. 5 The night included a Bollywood Beat performance

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LIVE!

LOCAL THEATER PROGRAMS

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ART MUSEUM

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A&E CALENDAR

page 25

BEAR PADDLE page 32

DINING

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The cast of Northern Kentucky University’s 2016 production of August Wilson’s Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom. PHOTO: MIKKI SCHAFFNER w w w.

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Small Stage, BIG TIME LOCAL THEATER SCHOOLS ARE PRODUCING TOPNOTCH PLAYS AND TALENTED PROFESSIONALS By David Lyman

TALENT

The cast of Xavier University’s April 2016 production of Rent. Directed by Stephen Skiles, the show featured a set by Joe Leonard and costumes by Kathleen Hotmer.

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hey’re Greater Cincinnati’s other theater schools. You know—the ones that aren’t the College-Conservatory of Music. Some are small, like the one at Thomas More College. Others are large, but a little farther afield, like the one at Miami University. But the two most active and robust programs that are close to home are the ones at Xavier University and Northern Kentucky University. The two programs couldn’t be more different. NKU’s Department of Theatre and Dance is mammoth, with more than 250 majors. Its online faculty roster lists 19 people, though adjunct professors would expand that number greatly. Most impressive is that no matter where you wander in the Fine Arts Center, there seems to be some sort of production going on. There are mainstage productions and second-stage shows. The program has the biennial Y.E.S. Festival of new plays. And there always seems to be a performance taking place in one classroom or another. 22

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Xavier’s Theater major is tiny in comparison. It lists just two full-time faculty members, though the adjunct faculty is a veritable who’s who of Cincinnati theater, including the likes of Bruce Cromer, D. Lynn Meyers, Pamela Myers and Brian Isaac Phillips. There are just 62 majors. And that’s a leap of nearly 40 percent over what it had last year. But then, for a program that isn’t even four years old yet, it’s impressive. The one thing the two programs have is a certain scrappiness. Though they stage their share of mainstream shows, they’re constantly sticking out their creative necks. They’re hungry. They’re ambitious. And they tend to graduate students with similar traits. After Griff Bludworth graduated from Xavier in 2016, he stepped into a one-year apprenticeship at Ensemble Theatre Cincinnati. He understudied roles in nearly every production. He performed in a worldpremiere ETC holiday show. But all the while, he was crafting a decidedly out-of-the-ordinary play for the apprentice company to perform. It was

called Antigone (born against.) and was a modern-day adaptation of Sophocles’ 2,500-year-old play about gender inequality, courage and the love of family. Not only did Bludworth write the script, but he starred as King Creon. And, to top it all off, the script was based on his own translation of the original play from the ancient Greek. Sound like an exercise in over-achievement? You bet. But then, Bludworth graduated with not only a degree in theater, but also another in classical studies. Today, he’s still at ETC, but now as an assistant director. “That’s typical,” says Stephen Skiles, the head of XU’s theater program. “Maybe not the classical studies part. But I really encourage our theater majors to be double majors. If you can add a business or engineering or marketing degree on top of the theater degree, why not? Let’s continue educating ourselves.” That’s a rarity in any degree program. Why encourage students to engage in other fields of study that may diminish their fo-


PHOTOS BY MIKKI SCHAFFNER

McKenzie Reese and Sam Johnson starred in Northern Kentucky University’s wellreceived 2017 production of Beauty and the Beast.

cus? Or, in the case of theater, cause them to miss the occasional rehearsal? Usually, that sort of thing is unthinkable. “College is one of the rare times in life where people are encouraged to pour all their efforts into learning,” says Skiles. “So why not learn even more than you thought you might be able to? Why not immerse yourself in other things that interest you? In the end, all of that will make you a better actor or director or designer or whatever you decide to be in life.” Xavier has a great tradition of student theater. But until Skiles pressed the issue with the university administration, Xavier had not offered a theater major. Once he got the go-ahead, Skiles has been aggressive in his recruiting and in his willingness to put edgy plays onto the stage. He regularly attends high school productions and corresponds with students who show an interest in the program. Skiles is every bit as aggressive in bringing outside professionals to the campus. When playwright Trey Tatum and director Bridget Leak presented a show called Slut Shaming at the 2014 Cincinnati Fringe Festival, Skiles saw a play that he thought would hold enormous relevance for XU students, especially for those at the beginning of their college careers. Within months, Tatum and Leak were workshopping the show at Xavier, refining and tightening the play with a cast of XU students. In August 2016, the play was performed several times for incoming freshman. It was sobering and impactful theater and regarded as so important that it won an Ignatian Medal for Outstanding Commitment to Diversity and Social Justice from the Jesuit Association of Student Personnel Administrators. “But remember, we also did Legally Blonde and The Music Man,” laughs Skiles. “I guess what I’m trying to say is that all of

it is important. I know I said it before, but it bears saying again—we want to develop well-rounded people and well-rounded theater professionals.” It’s much the same attitude over at NKU, says department chair Mike King. But the route they take is vastly different. As a large state school, NKU has the advantage of in-state tuition of residents of Kentucky. There is also a tuition incentive program that offers a tuition reduction of at least $5,200 to residents of 30 Ohio counties and three in Indiana. Like Skiles at Xavier, King believes that nurturing and encouraging students is an essential part of what they do. “That’s especially true in the early part of a student’s career,” says King. “That adjustment from high school to college can be very difficult. The expectations are different. And the responsibilities, too.” At many colleges, first-year students aren’t allowed to participate in productions. That can be incredibly disheartening for a young person who has presumably had some great success on the stage in high school. “We don’t do that here,” says King. “Students want to get onstage and perform. That’s why they’ve come here. To learn and to perform. So one thing we do every year is our first-year show.” Typically, it takes place within the first three months of the school year. So even as they are adjusting to all the things that are different about university life, the students are able to throw themselves into one thing that is familiar—rehearsals. “It gives them a chance to see what life is like at NKU,” says King. “And even more important, it gives them a chance to make connections to other students. We’ve found that this production has been an important element in retaining students and helping them make the adjustment to college.” Erin Ward was typical of those students. When she arrived at NKU in the fall of 2010, she was like many college students—she didn’t really know what she wanted to do. She had attended an Educational Theatre Association conference at NKU a couple of years earlier and had heard then-department head Ken Jones speak. She was intrigued enough to audition for NKU’s musical theater program. “But I didn’t get in,” she says. She decided

to go to NKU anyway. “Because I lived in Morehead, it was affordable for me. And it was little distance from home, which I wanted, too. Mostly, I think I wanted a city experience. I’m from the woods, so this would be new for me.” By her own admission, she was confused about what she wanted out of college, even after deciding to become a theater major during her sophomore year. “But I had faculty members who were patient with me and took me under their wings,” says Ward. “I remember Mike King showing me how I was more skilled in acting than in music. I mean, I’m a folk singer, not your usual musical comedy performer.” Most importantly, though, she was encouraged to experiment, to get in front of audiences, no matter how small, to take chances and to try all manner of performing. During her final months at NKU, she took a leap and auditioned for a Fringe production called Hot Damn! It’s the Loveland Frog. The show was a hit. And it linked her with two of Greater Cincinnati’s best-connected actors and writers, Michael Douglas Hall and Joshua Steele. Suddenly, Ward seemed to be on stage all the time. She was on stage at the Carnegie. And in the Know Theatre’s “Serials” series. And in a production of Tom Sawyer for Queen City Flash. Before long, she signed on to spend the 2015-2016 season as an apprentice at the Playhouse in the Park. Today, Ward is still in town. And she is still performing. She’s an active member of OTR Improv and performs in plays as often as she can. She co-starred in the Know Theatre’s world premiere production of The Arsonists in September. And she’s currently acting in an indie film. And she is still thankful for the decision that took her to NKU. “At NKU, you have to make your own career,” says Ward. “You can’t just sit and wait for someone to bring things to you. You have to make things happen for yourself. If you don’t get cast in a show, you have to find the drive to make other ways to get yourself and your art seen. That’s how it is now that I’m out of school, too. I learned how to find those avenues for myself. I don’t think I could have done that without NKU and Mike King.” n w w w.

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BRINGING AN ARMY TO CINCY “TERRACOTTA ARMY: LEGACY OF THE FIRST EMPEROR OF CHINA” COMES TO THE CINCINNATI ART MUSEUM By Madison Rodgers

Middle-Ranking Officer, Qin dynasty (221–206 BC), earthenware, Excavated from Pit 1, Qin Shihuang’s Mausoleum, 1976, Emperor Qin Shihuang’s Mausoleum Site Museum

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or the first time, Cincinnatians will be able to see an important part of China’s history. The pieces from the “Terracotta Army: Legacy of the First Emperor of China” exhibit will premiere April 20 at the Cincinnati Art Museum. The collection is currently at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts and is drawing in large crowds. So, what’s so special about the Terracotta Army? “Bringing this exhibit here has been several years in the making,” says Jill Dunne, director of marketing and communications at the Cincinnati Art Museum. “This is the greatest archeological discovery in the 20th century.” The Terracotta Army’s story begins with Ying Zheng, who was the first emperor of China in 221 B.C. His army defeated other regional states and unified the country. He implemented fundamental cultural, political and economic reforms and established the core territory of China. In 1974 a farmer was digging a well outside of the city of Xi’an when he struck some24

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thing that turned out to be very important to Chinese history. He discovered pottery shards and bronze arrows near the mausoleum of Ying Zheng. As people continued to investigate, it was discovered that there were 8,000 Terracotta warriors buried in the ground. The emperor created these warriors, starting in the Pre-Qin period (770-221 BC) to the Qin dynasty (221-206 BC). He built these warriors in preparation for his death. “He knew that he needed them for the afterlife,” says Dunne. A few Cincinnatians took a trip to China at the beginning of January to see firsthand where these warriors were found. “We were able to meet with experts that work on the site they were found,” says Dunne. “We were really immersed in the history.” The exhibit will show more than just a few warriors. It will also include 120 individual objects, which include terracotta figures of warriors, arms and armor, ritual bronze vessels, works in gold and silver, jade orna-

ments, precious jewelry, and ceramics. The exhibit will also include a cavalry horse. These objects were all drawn from the collections of art museums and archaeological institutes in Shaanxi province, China. The exhibit also considers works of art from the Qin’s neighboring states that tell the story of the nomadic peoples of northwestern China. “We do have to use timed ticketing to ensure that people get the time they need to look at the full exhibit,” says Dunne. “We are also offering a special tour during Saturday and Sunday hours.” This exhibit includes an interactive activity and family and gallery guides that will be held within the museum throughout the spring and summer. Events associated with the exhibit include Art After Dark on Friday, April 27, 5-7 p.m.; Family First Saturday: Explore China on May 2, 2017, 12-4 p.m.; and the Fourth Annual Cincinnati Asian Art Society Lecture. This specific lecture will focus on the Terracotta Army on May 6, 2018 at 2 p.m. n


SUNDAY

1 [4/1] Celebrate Easter by watching the Reds take on the Washington Nationals at Great American Ball Park.

8 [4/8] Adult contemporary pop’s Five for Fighting joins the Cincinnati Pops for a piano-filled evening.

MONDAY

APRIL

TUESDAY

2 [4/2] The Findlay Market Opening Day Parade returns for its 99th year.

WEDNESDAY

3 [4/3] The CollegeConservatory of Music’s Percussion Ensemble will perform pieces by Herbert Brun and others. 9 10 [4/9] [4/10] The CCM Brass Student composers Choir will perform will show their classical, folk and stuff during CCM popular music at a Presents A View free show at UC. from the Edge.

[4/11] Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee Buddy Guy stops by the Taft Theatre.

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

4 [4/4] Alternative band Dashboard Confessional plays Bogart’s for the night.

5

6

7 [4/7] Brian McKnight, known for the ‘90s hit “Back at One,” comes to the Lawrenceburg Event Center.

11

12 [4/12] Head to the Woodward Theater to see indie folk rock band The Mountain Goats.

13 [4/13-14] The Aronoff Center presents Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus Live.

14 [4/14] Seven local celebrities try to wow the crowd (for a good cause) at the Dancing for the Stars fundraiser.

15 [Through 4/15] The Color Purple ends its run at La Comedia Dinner Theatre.

16

17 [4/17] They Might Be Giants brings its new album, I Like Fun, to the Madison Theater.

18 [4/18] Rhode Island altrock band Deer Tick stops by the 20th Century Theater.

19 [4/19] Whose Live Anyway, with cast members from Whose Line is it Anyway? promises a night of improv at the Taft Theatre.

20 [4/20] The Indigo Girls take over the Madison Theater for an evening of folk music.

21 [4/21] The Tristate celebrates Earth Day at the Greater Cincinnati Earth Day Celebration in Blue Ash.

22 [4/22] The Power of Music at Memorial Hall benefits the UC Health Barrett Cancer Center with featured artist Zac Greenberg.

23 [4/23] CCM honors a professor as he retires during the Randy Gardner Legacy Concert.

24 [4/24] Memorial Hall welcomes the Victor Wooten Band as part of its American Roots series.

25 [4/25] The University of Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra holds a free concert for the community.

26 [4/26] The eight-piece country and western band Asleep at the Wheel stops by the Taft Theatre.

27 [4/27] The Piano Guys blend classical and pop music at the Taft Theatre.

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29 30 [4/29] Rick Astley, of “Never Gonna Give You Up” fame, comes to the Taft Theatre.

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A&E Calendar Opening Day Findlay Market Parade The parade may not fall on the same day as the Red’s first game this year, but it still promises to be a great time. Held April 2, the parade will travel its familiar route through downtown. In honor of the parade’s 99th year, former Reds players Danny Graves and Sam LeCure will be the grand marshals. April 2. Begins at noon. Downtown Cincinnati. 513-5007554, findlaymarketparade.com.

Zoo Blooms Throughout the month of April, the Cincinnati Zoo celebrates spring as its garden comes back to life. The zoo has one of the largest tulip displays in the Midwest, with more than 100,000 tulips total. In addition, 1 million flowers (including daffodils and hyacinths) will show off their colors. And the fun doesn’t end with the flowers—every Thursday in April the zoo will host free concerts in the garden from 6-8:30 p.m. April 1-30. Zoo open 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Prices vary. Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden, 3400 Vine St., Cincinnati. 513-281-4700, cincinnatizoo.org.

April 24 - April 28 Support Your Local PBS Station & Get a Great Deal! Watch On-Air and Online

Over-the-air 48.1; Spectrum 1013; Spectrum NKY 916; Fioptics 13

events.cetconnect.org Connect with us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram for the latest updates! @CETconnect #CETAuction

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Homecoming Festival Indie band The National, which first formed in Cincinnati in 1999, teams up with the annual MusicNOW Festival to celebrate art and music in the Queen City April 28-29. The National, which will perform both days, will be joined by musical acts like Father John Misty, Feist, Future Islands and The Breeders in Smale Park. While the music plays, other cultural events will happen throughout the city including a photography exhibit by Graham MacIndoe and a premiere by the Cincinnati Ballet. April 28-29. Smale Riverfront Park, West Mehring, Downtown. ntlhomecoming.com.

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SUNDAY

MAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY 1

[5/1-31] It’s the cutest time of the year when Zoo Babies returns to the Cincinnati Zoo.

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

2 [5/2] Seattle indie-rock band Minus the Bear plays Bogart’s for the night.

3 [5/3] Raise funds for those affected by Alzheimer’s disease at The Art of Making Memories.

4 [5/4] Halestorm kicks off the Riverbend season with a show at the venue.

5 [5/5] Jimmy Eat World and The Struts take over Bogart’s for the night.

6 [5/6] Pull out your running shoes for the 20th annual Flying Pig Marathon.

7

8

9 [5/9] Ashley Judd is the keynote speaker for the 2018 YWCA Women of Achievement Luncheon.

10 [5/10] Todd Rundgren’s Utopia brings its first tour in 32 years to the Taft Theatre.

11 [5/11] Country bands Alabama and Montgomery Gentry stop by BB&T Arena.

12 [5/11-12] The CSO and violinist James Ehnes end the season with Brahms + Beethoven.

13 [5/13] The eclectic group Tune-Yards brings its latest album to the Taft Theatre.

14 [5/3-6/24] Head to La Comedia Theatre for a show filled with alien plants and R&B during Little Shop of Horrors.

15 [5/5-6/10] Playhouse in the Park presents the zany two-person play Murder for Two.

16 [5/16] Animals and music come together for Opera at the Zoo.

17 [Through 6/8] The Butterflies of Madagascar are calling Krohn Conservatory home for this special event.

18 [5/18] Get your party on while raising funds for animals at Zoo La La.

19 [5/19] NKY HeartChase participants explore the community and raise funds for the American Heart Association.

20 [5/20] Singer-songwriter Rhiannon Giddens brings her Freedom Highway tour to Memorial Hall.

21

22

23

24 [5/24] Thee Phantom and The Illharmonic Orchestra mix hip-hop and classical music at Memorial Hall.

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26 [5/26] Maria Bamford, start of Netflix’s Lady Dynamite, stops by the Taft Theatre.

27 [5/27] Laugh out loud with beloved comedians Steve Martin and Martin Short at Riverbend.

28 [5/26-28] The 40th annual Taste of Cincinnati promises three days of food and fun.

29 [5/29-6/8] Disney’s Aladdin comes to life during the liveaction musical at the Aronoff.

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31 [Throughout 2018]

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Creatures of the deep, like jellyfish and the octopus, are on display in Newport Aquarium’s Ring of Fire.


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A&E Calendar Cirque du Soleil: Corteo In Cirque du Soleil’s Corteo, a clown’s imagination comes alive as he dreams of a celebration in honor of his life. The show features 51 acrobats, musicians, singers and actors from around the world. Corteo will call U.S. Bank Arena home May 3-6. May 3-6. Th-F 7:30 p.m., Sa 3:30 p.m. & 7:30 p.m., Su 1 p.m. & 5 p.m. U.S. Bank Arena, 100 Broadway, Downtown. 513-421-4111, usbankarena.com.

OHIO STAR

Saint Ursula Summer Academy

RETREAT CENTER

Enrichment Camps for girls entering grades 6, 7, and 8

June 18-22

Athletic Camps for girls grades 3-8 also available: Dates vary

For camp details and to register, visit www.saintursulaevents.com/SummerCamps

937-217-9248

To schedule a tour or to learn more, contact: Michelle Dellecave, 513-961-3410 ext. 183 or mdellecave@saintursula.org www.saintursula.org

232 Old Cincinnati Pike West Union, OH 45693

SaintUrsulaAcademy SUA Bulldogs 30

A Quilt Retreat, Experience in a Country Setting while you work on those projects

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SUABULLDOGS

ohiostarrc@gmail.com www.ohiostarrc.com


Taste of Cincinnati The 40th annual Taste of Cincinnati promises a weekend filled with food and fun. Held each year over Memorial Day weekend, the event features more than 30 local restaurants, 45 live musical performances across five stages, food trucks and more. May 26-28. Fifth Street, Downtown. tasteofcincinnati.com.

Ring of Fire Newport Aquarium’s newest exhibit, Ring of Fire, opened in March to give animal lovers the opportunity to see the animals of volcanic underwater habitats up close. Featured species include the giant Pacific octopus, moon jellyfish and Japanese spider crab. Adults $24.99, children 2-12 $17.99. Newport Aquarium, 1 Aquarium Way, Newport, Ky. 800-406-3474, newportaquarium.com.

Don’t see your event? Visit cincymagazine.com to add it to our online calendar for free.

8,208

What does serving over children and families, annually, look like?

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We are the lead partner for emotional and behavioral health counselling in 55 Greater Cincinnati schools.

Autism Services has a 100% retention rate. Expanding access to quality pre-school. In the last year, The Children’s Home has been able to double the amount of seats in our 5-star pre-school program.

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With your help, we can serve more children and families:

MAKE A TAX-DEDUCTIBLE GIFT TO THE CHILDREN’S HOME OF CINCINNATI 2017 - 2018

Your investment of $50, $100, $250, $500 or any other meaningful amount will help us continue our progress. Mail your gift today in the reply envelope enclosed or donate online at:

ANNUAL FUND

www.thechildrenshomecinti.org/Giving

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SAFETY

FIRST

BEAR PADDLE SWIM SCHOOL WANTS WATER SAFETY TO BE ON THE MIND OF EVERY PARENT By Corinne Minard

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ummer, swimming and fun go together perfectly, but parents should still make sure they’re prepared before they head to the pool or ocean, says Bear Paddle Swim School co-owner Spencer Rice. “Kids will see others swimming and they’re not able to process that they can’t do it on their own,” he says. “So we have to educate them as much as possible and as early as possible that this is a dangerous situation.” Bear Paddle Swim School, which has locations in Oakley (3099 Disney St.), Mason (9376 Mason Montgomery Road) and Florence, Kentucky (4012 Seligman Drive), teaches children as young as six months old how to survive if they should fall into water. It starts with what Rice calls a Humpty Dumpty—in a controlled environment, kids “fall” from the pool wall and learn a reflex that has them turn and swim to the wall. “They can do that with less ability and skill than it takes to be able to flip over on your back and sustain yourself,” says Rice. By the third level, children are taught how to flip and float on their backs. Class sizes

are small, with a maximum of three students per class in level one and a maximum of four students for level two and above. Rice says that water safety is part of Bear Paddle Swim School’s mission, which is why the school offers free presentations on the subject to preschools and other childfocused facilities. The school’s mascot, Paddle the Bear, and a friend teach kids about water safety around almost any body of water, from a pool or ocean to the bathtub. “A lot of the education is directed at the parents, too,” adds Rice. In addition to teaching water safety and survival techniques, Bear Paddle Swim School also teaches the fundamentals of swimming. “[Levels] four through seven really focus on stroke development for swimmers to be able to have a skill that will last them a lifetime and also provide that foundation should they ever want to be on a swim team or swim competitively,” says Rice. While traditional swim classes are often purchased in sessions, Rice says that Bear Paddle offers month-to-month classes so that parents can determine how quickly they would like their children to learn.

Students can graduate to the next level at any time. Families can bring their children for a lesson a week, or even every day if they wish. Bear Paddle also offers what it calls “family swim” for families who would like some more practice. “We look at that as a chance for the families to really get in and practice the skills,” says Rice. “The volume of time in the water is a major factor [in learning to swim well].” During the summer, kids can get more scheduled time in the pool thanks to Bear Paddle’s swim camps. Not a traditional camp, the swim camps are instead two weeks of swim lessons, with four lessons each week. “For the families that are really thinking, ‘OK, we’ve got [vacation] coming up and we want to get this done and we want to get this child to the next level of swimming, camps are a great way to do that,” says Rice. Whatever a parent chooses to do, Rice just wants families to be safe when it comes to the water. “As a child, you can fall down in the water and it doesn’t hurt. It’s sunshine. It’s outside. We’re with our friends. However, there’s a lot of dangers.” n

Bear Paddle Swim School teaches children how to swim and about water safety.

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Dining

A Taste of Greece ZORBAS GYROS GREEK RESTAURANT BRINGS AUTHENTIC GREEK FLAVORS TO THE TRISTATE By Will Jones

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ong t ime f r iends a nd business partners Kosta Papathanasiou and Dean Vasiliou have always dreamed of operating their own Greek restaurant. Learning homemade recipes and cooking techniques from their parents and grandmothers, their goal was to show customers there’s more to Greek food than just gyros. Hailing from the small village of Variko, Florinas, which is in the northern part of Greece, Kosta and Dean have brought what they call a “real” Greek taste to Cincinnati as well as southeast Indiana. With Dean arriving in the states in 2000, Kosta followed in 2008 searching for greater opportunities. “When I came to America I couldn’t speak English and I had no money—I started from the bottom up,” Kosta says. Residing in Lawrenceburg, Indiana, they saw there were no places in the area to enjoy Greek food. Shortly after, they opened Zorbas Gyros Greek Restaurant. Relying heavily on word-of-mouth, they brought their food to customers in festivals and saw how quickly people fell in love with the experience of enjoying Greek meals. “Everything we have is made from scratch including our recipes, our sauces and our spice mixes,” Kosta says. Zorbas offers a variety of traditional lamb, chicken and veggie gyros. What makes Zorbas special is that they also offer other menu items that they encourage guests to try such as their signature soups and chili (which takes 15 hours to cook). I tried the potato soup that Kosta highly suggested and was impressed by the texture and taste of the massive chunks of potatoes. He later revealed they make the broth from the same ingredients used in their soups. For example, they make tomato broth for their tomato soup instead of using canned chicken broth. For dinner they recommended the Pas34

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Zorba’s stuffed peppers with a Greek salad tichio, which is a Greek lasagna consisting of ground beef and penne pasta topped with feta cheese and baked in a homemade cream sauce. They also recommend the Grape Leaves Dinner, which are three stuffed grape leaves served with gyro meat and come with a Greek salad and pita bread. Guests have the option of visiting one of two locations—1093 W. Eads Parkway in Lawrenceburg, Indiana, or 6520 Glenway Ave. in Western Hills. Guests will also be excited to know both locations offer dif-

ferent specials every week. Jennifer Powell says she’s been a customer since they opened the Glenway location in 2016. “I always get the Zorbas salad. That comes with gyro meat on top, and I get the chili. You should definitely try it,” she says. “We want them to get satisfaction,” Kosta says when asked what kind of impression they want to leave with their guests. Zorbas is surely serving up satisfaction to the Westside’s craving for the Greek dining experience. n


PERFEC T

Day Trips By the Editors

Upper Falls at Old Man’s Cave

Sometimes you just need to get away. Fortunately, Cincinnati’s location makes it so that you’re never far from your next adventure or escape. No matter the direction—north, south, east or west—there’s something to help your family leave their worries behind. What’s your favorite one-day trip? Let us know by tweeting at us with the hashtag #CincyOneDayTrips.

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NORTH

National Aviation Heritage Area

Here’s a one-day trip that will seem to fly by. That’s because most of the sites and attractions available to visitors in the National Aviation Heritage Area, an eight-county area in the Dayton region, are aviation related. Dayton, of course, is where Orville and Wilbur Wright lived and also where they invented and perfected the airplane. Visitors can tour two renovated buildings that were used by the Wright brothers for their printing and bicycle shops at the Wright-Dunbar Interpretive Center and Aviation Trail Visitor Center, 16 S. Williams St., Dayton. Next, visitors can tour the field where between 1904 and 1905 the Wrights developed the first dependable, fully controllable airplane at the Huffman Prairie Flying Field on Pylon Road at the WrightPatterson Air Force Base. To see the original first dependable, fully controllable airplane— the 1905 Wright Flyer III—head over to the John W. Berry Sr. Wright Brothers Aviation Center at Carillon Historical Park. Of course any trip to the National Aviation Heritage Area wouldn’t be complete without a visit to the National Museum of the United States Air Force. The museum, located at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, is the world’s largest and oldest military aviation museum with more than 360 aerospace vehicles on display. - Eric Spangler 36

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ABOVE: National Museum of the United States Air Force BELOW: Aviation Trail Visitor Center


ABOVE: Woodford Reserve distillery BELOW: Bourbon samples are provided at the end of the tours.

SOUTH

Kentucky Bourbon Trail Tour

If you’re interested in sampling the history, the industry and the culture of Kentucky, the Kentucky Bourbon Trail tour is your roadmap. The Kentucky Distillers’ Association formed the Kentucky Bourbon Trail® tour in 1999 to offer a firsthand look at the art and science of crafting bourbon, its more than 200-year-old history and the tradition of the commonwealth’s signature spirit. Bourbon tourism has been growing in popularity. More than 2.5 million visitors have made stops on the Kentucky Bourbon Trail tour over the last five years, the distillers’ association says. The 10 distilleries on the Kentucky Bourbon Trail tour are scattered from Lexington to Louisville. Visitors can start and stop their distillery tour wherever they like, but figure on at least three days to visit all 10 distilleries. All the distilleries charge a fee for their tours that can last an hour or more and offer samples at the end for those 21 or older. Most offer non-alcoholic beverages as well. Those who do visit all 10 and get their official Kentucky Bourbon Trail passport stamped at each stop can collect a free T-shirt. If that doesn’t quench your thirst, the Kentucky Bourbon Trail Craft tour, also through the Distillers’ Association, offers a look at another 13 small, up-and-coming distilleries from Newport to Bowling Green. – Mike Boyer w w w.

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EAST

Hocking Hills

When you hear the call of the wild, head east for Hocking Hills. Hocking Hills State Park has five separate sections that feature everything from cliffs and waterfalls to gorges. One of the park’s most popular sites is Old Man’s Cave. Named after a settler that lived in the caves after the Revolutionary War, the site is home to many waterfalls, the Devil’s Bathtub (a churning tub of water that spills into the creek below) and the Sphinx Head (a rock formation that looks like a Sphinx). The hiking trail is approximately a mile long and takes an hour to hike. Other sections to explore include Cedar Falls (with waterfalls that plunge 50 feet), Ash Cave (the largest recess cave east of the Mississippi), Cantwell Cliffs (a remote area ideal for hiking) and Rock House (the only true cave in the park). For those looking for some guidance, you can take tours by horseback, by air or even by Segway. Zip-lining and canopy tours are also offered. - Corinne Minard

Ash Cave

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WEST

Nashville, Indiana

There’s a reason the village of Nashville, Indiana, is referred to the as the Arts Village. A number of artists, including painter T.C. Steele, settled in the area in the early 19th century and formed the Brown County Art Colony. Today, the county has more than 250 specialty shops and in 2012, Indiana designated the county an Indiana Cultural District. Art lovers of all ages will find something to enjoy in the village. From sculptures (like the wooden Abe Martin on Franklin Street) to the Hamilton Fine Art Gallery and Studio (where visitors can watch artist Stan Hamilton paint in the shop), the town is packed with opportunities to view or buy art. Don’t know where to start? The Brown County Craft Gallery, where local artisans bring their pottery, jewelry and baskets to sell, and the Nashville House, the town’s original general store, are ideal places to start your shopping adventure. - Corinne Minard

Nashville, Indiana, features art and fantastic views in a small-town setting.

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Midwestern Traveler

A Kentucky Adventure THE BLUEGRASS STATE IS PACKED WITH OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES IDEAL FOR ALL AGES AND SKILLS LEVELS By Corinne Minard

WINTER

S

avor ...

THE SIGHTS & SOUNDS OF GEORGETOWN.

PURE SMALL TOWN CHARM. – Family Fun – • International Kite & Cultural Fest - April • Horsey Hundred Bicycling Event - May

– Equine Activities –

a SPRING a SUMMER a FALL

365

Always in season

No matter the time of year, there is always something for you on Lake Cumberland in Somerset-Pulaski County. Watersports, fishing, car shows, music, arts, history, local foods and nightlife — you name it! Come have fun with us in and out of the water.

• Minutes from the Kentucky Horse Park -

Land Rover Kentucky Three-Day Event - April • Old Friends Retired Thoroughbred Farm • Whispering Woods Riding Stables

– Picturesque Downtown – • Specialty Shops • Antiques • Scott County Arts and Cultural Center • Cafes and One-of-a-kind Restaurants • Georgetown and Scott County Museum

– Unbridled Fun – • Toyota Motor Manufacturing, KY, Inc. Tour • Country Boy Brewing • Bourbon 30 Spirits • Golf • Elkhorn Creek • Geocaching Trails • Three Horses Winery • Ward Hall

Socialize with us all year!

#LC365

• Close proximity to the Ark Encounter INTERSTATE

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SOMERSET-PULASKI COUNTY CVB LAKE CUMBERLAND TOURISM

www.GeorgetownKy.com • 888.863.8600 40

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utdoor adventures, from hiking and camping to rock climbing and kayaking, are a great way to celebrate spring. Luckily, you can find these types of activities and more throughout the state of Kentucky. “We’ve got 50 tremendous state parks with some of the neatest natural features of anywhere in the country,” says Seth Wheat, director of tourism development for the Kentucky Department of Tourism. For those looking for time on the water Lake Cumberland, a 100-square-mile reservoir, is open all year. “It is a year-round playground,” says Carolyn Mounce, executive director of Lake Cumberland Tourism. In the summer she says many people visit the lake for house and speed boating. In the fall she says more pontoon boats and kayaks can be found on the lake because people are taking in the fall colors. And no matter what the season people can be found fishing on the lake. “It would be easy to say that at any given time there’s probably a fishing tournament out on our lake,” says Mounce. “Our lake is a deep, beautiful, clear lake that has all

Fishing is a popular activity at Lake Cumberland. kinds of fish for people to fish for.” Lake Cumberland also has the only state park that is a true island. General Burnside

Island State Park features a Brian Aultdesigned golf course and a campground with 94 campsites.

Willett Distillery

Historic Distilleries. Legendary Bourbons.

ENDLESS SOUTHERN CHARM. Spring is the perfect season to raise a glass in the Bourbon Capital of the World®. Shop, dine, relax and tour ten world-renowned distilleries in Bardstown, KY— just a two-hour, scenic drive from the Ohio/Kentucky state line. 18BART10528-1v8_7.5x4.875.indd 1

www.visitbardstown.com 800.638.4877 w w w.

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Midwestern Traveler

Mammoth Cave is the world’s longest known cave system.

EXPERIENCE THE BOURBON CAPITAL’S

OLDEST OPERATING

DISTILLERY A day along the bourbon trail isn’t complete without a visit to Bardstown’s only downtown distillery, established in 1879.

Complimentary Distillery Tours Monday - Saturday Explore pristine grounds, featuring 29 warehouses, a towering column still, and the legendary Tom Moore Spring Receive a complimentary tasting of our famous 1792 Small Batch Bourbon Convenient location in the heart of “The Bourbon Capital of the World” @Barton1792 Barton 1792 Distillery @barton1792

300 Barton Road, Bardstown, KY 40004 (866) 239-4690

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Spots like Red River Gorge continue to be great places for rock climbers. “Anybody that climbs in this part of the world has more than likely been to the Red at some point,” says Wheat. However, Red River Gorge has been developing more activities to make the park even more of a mustvisit destination. “There’s an effort there under way to build a new mountain bike trail, which will complement the climbing routes,” he says.

Zip lines have been added to the area and one of the newest attractions involves kayaking and paddle boarding in an old rock quarry. “You go underground to these caverns while you’re floating on the water. It’s a really unique experience,” says Wheat. For those who love both horses and nature horseback riding is available throughout Kentucky. Whispering Woods Riding Stables in Georgetown offers rides through the woods with several different trails that

Kayaking is becoming increasingly popular at Lake Cumberland. range from 50 minutes to 2 hours. “You’re getting to see Kentucky in its most natural form when you go and do that,” says Bailey Gilkerson, marketing director for Georgtown/Scott County Tourism. Georgetown is also great when you’re looking for a different type of ride. The Horsey Hundred, set for May 25-27 this year, invites cyclists from all over the

Civil War Museum of the Western Theatre In Historic Bardstown, Kentucky

The finest collection of Western Theatre Civil War artifacts in the United States! Plus! • Women’s Civil War Museum • General Hal Moore Military Museum • Historic Pioneer Village

310 E. Broadway • Bardstown, KY (502) 349-0291 www.civil-war-museum.org Email: museumrow@bardstowncable.net w w w.

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Midwestern Traveler

Crappie are a popular fish to pursue at Lake Cumberland.

country to explore Kentucky. The 100-mile Saturday route will showcase historic sites, beautiful scenery and even bourbon distilleries. There are also shorter routes for those looking for a less intense experience. “Right now we have about 2,500 cyclists that come in and they ride the country scenic roads,” says Gilkerson. Lovers of caves can also find plenty to do in Kentucky. Mammoth Cave is the world’s longest known cave system, with more than 400 miles of it explored. Visitors can take several different tours of the cave system, covering different regions of the cave; take guided hikes of the land above the caves; canoe or kayak on nearby rivers; and more. “The paddling around Mammoth Cave is neat because you can kind of sneak back into some of the caves at certain times of the year if the water is right,” says Wheat. If you’re looking for a location more off the beaten path Wheat suggests visiting the far east or far west corners of the state. “In western Kentucky it’s a completely

Come Back To The Sandlot Dust off your PF Flyers and return to the game, where the boys of summer are still running bases! Our new mini-exhibit, “Legends Never Die!” The Sandlot Celebrates 25 Years, features original props from the beloved film, including that sacred Babe Ruth ball, behind-the-scenes images, and more. Then watch wood chips fly as we create bats for baseball’s best, and take home your own souvenir mini-bat for free.

Plan Your Visit | sluggermuseum.com © 1993 Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation. All Rights Reserved. © 2018 Twentieth Century Fox Home Entertainment LLC. All Rights Reserved.

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The Red River Gorge is a great place to go for a hike.

The natural sandstone arch known as Sky Bridge is located in the Red River Gorge.

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Midwestern Traveler

Cumberland Falls offers visitors beautiful views from land and from the water. says the area is ideal for water adventures or explorations. Wheat says that two of the best fishing lakes in the country, Kentucky Lake and Lake Barkley, are in the area. “And right in between those two is 170,000 acres of

different landscape,” says Wheat. “We have these Mississippi River swamps and oxbows and this world that looks like you’re down in the middle of Louisiana or Mississippi or somewhere that’s totally foreign to the rest of the country, but it’s here.” He

recreation in Land Between the Lakes,” he says. “You can hunt there, you can camp, and there’s a 60-some odd mile backpacking trail that cuts through the middle of it. ATVs, horseback riding, you can see bison and elk and there’s literally something for everyone there.” On the eastern side of the state Wheat suggests making a visit to Breaks Interstate Park, one of two shared state parks in the country. “It’s earned the nickname of the Grand Canyon of the South because the river cuts this very deep winding gorge through the state line there. It’s got some of the best white water anywhere in the Southeast,” he says. Depending on the season, visitors can find white water runs that range from Class 2 to Class 5. Rock climbing has recently been added to the park. There are also about 20 miles of hiking trails and 10 miles of mountain biking trails. “It’s just such a scenic place that I think the views there rival any anywhere in the country,” says Wheat. n

Berea Craft Festival, July 13-15 • Festival of Learnshops, July 13-29

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Discove

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Mus

Discover Sho

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Berea, KY

Folk Arts

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The Great Outdoors LAND BETWEEN THE LAKES IN GOLDEN POND, KY., OFFERS A WIDE ARRAY OF BOTH OUTDOOR AND INDOOR OPTIONS FOR ANYONE TO EXPERIENCE THIS SPRING By Haley Jena

T

he beginning of the spring season awakens a lifest yle previously buried by the winter in all of us. We pack up our snow boots and don our favorite warm-weather apparel. We cheer on the Reds as baseball season officially

begins. And this spring, we can plan a getaway to Land Between the Lakes. Land Between the Lakes is a familyfriendly national recreation area consisting of over 170,000 acres of forests, wetlands, hiking trails and more in Golden Pond, Ky. Since 1963, Land Between the Lakes has offered one of the largest blocks of undeveloped forest in the eastern United States. “We have all the outdoor activities folks can do,” says Emily Cleaver, the communications resource assistant at Land Between the Lakes. “Hiking, biking, horseback riding, canoeing, kayaking, boating—all those good things.” In addition to plenty of lively nature activities, Land Between the Lakes also enjoys plenty of indoor activities and

Land Between the Lakes offers plenty of outdoor activities, such as camping. programs, like its Woodlands Nature Station, Elk and Bison Prairie, Homeplace 1850s Working Farm and Golden Pond Planetarium and Observatory. “The nature center and the homeplace and the planetarium are all really easy for places to go for families,” Cleaver says.

USAT Sanctioned Triathlo

Sprint: swim 750 Olympic: swim 150

Triathlon & Kids Duathlo

Inaugural event - Soon to be a premier regional event in N. Ky. & Cincy area

Grant County is:

• 35 min. south of Cincinnati • Home of the Ark Encounter, Lake Williamstown, winery, specialty & antique shops, splash park, dinner theatre, rolling hills and friendly people!

www.visitgrantky.com Make Grant County your next weekend getaway!

located on I-75, 35 miles sou Beautiful lake with bike and

www.stelizabethtriathlon.com

USAT Sanctioned Triathlon - July 21, 2018 Sprint: swim 500m/bikeFriday kicks off with an Exp 20k/run 5k Duathlon, and a party in do Olympic: swim 1500m/bike 40k/run 10

More info:

re Expo - July 20 - Downtown Williamstown Triathlon & Kids Duathlon - July 21 followed by Finish Line Festival on Main Street with food, vendors and live music w w w.

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Land Between the Lakes gets 1.5 million visitors each year. “You’re not really getting off road; you’re going to get to visit and have a good time…We see a lot of families getting out and enjoying the area and recreation.” For those who can’t make it down to Kentucky this spring for a day or week trip, Cleaver says the area is a pleasant travel destination year-round, especially for its

many special programs. “We have a lot of special events throughout the year,” Cleaver says. “There’s a children’s day, a free astronomy day, Cool Critters Day in the nature center, the Hummingbird Fest in August when hundreds of hummingbirds come [through] while they’re migrating back…There’s a lot of things to do.”

With 1.5 million visitors each year—including at least one person visiting from each of the 50 states and at least one person visiting from 50 different countries last year alone—Land Between the Lakes continues to draw people to the area. “We get a lot of return visitors,” Cleaver says. “Some folks come back and bring their families every single year. They enjoy their experience, and they return to come back and visit us.” While Land Between the Lakes indeed enjoys hundreds of miles of hiking and mountain biking trails, plenty of quintessential boating lakes and picnic spots, 1,400 campsites, four surrounding state parks and cities, and more, perhaps what keeps visitors coming back is its genuinely friendly atmosphere. “It’s very welcoming... We try to keep things safe for everyone and make sure everyone has a good time,” Cleaver says. “We have something for everyone. From one extreme to the next, there’s a little bit of something for everyone to do here.” n

Inspiration. Creativity. Heritage. Paducah inspires creativity as a UNESCO Creative City. Home of the National Quilt Museum, Paducah’s rich American heritage and engaging attractions create the foundation for authentic cultural experiences. Travel to Paducah and find your inspiration!

Plan your next getaway at Paducah.travel—and be creative! 1-800-PADUCAH

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Community REFLECTIONS ON LEADERSHIP

page 50

ANOTHER VIEW

page 52

FREEDOM CENTER

page 53

CINCY’S TOUGHEST COPS

page 54

GUIDE TO COLLEGES & UNIVERSITIES

page 57

OUTSTANDING EDUCATORS page 72

CHILDREN’S HOME

page 78

DEPAUL CRISTO REY page 80

ST. URSULA ACADEMY

page 83

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Reflections on Leadership By Dan Hurley

Striving to Become Color Brave LOCAL EDUCATORS ARE FINDING NEW WAYS TO DISCUSS RACE

This image by NKU Visual Design major Carly Strohmaier of mothers and children is a powerful statement about the need to break racial categories to allow true human connection.

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he early weeks of 2018 in greater Cincinnati have been discouraging for those who believed that the United States has made progress in recent decades with inclusion and tolerance. Incidents involving students and the adults around them reminded everyone that intolerance is rampant. It is impossible to believe that the recreational basketball team for high school-aged boys in the Kings Local School District who put derogatory names on their jerseys or that the Holmes High School teacher using the term “porch monkey,” were acting out of blatant and conscious racism. A teacher in Mason City Schools threatened an African American student with lynching if he did not obey. Though this word probably lurked in the teacher’s subconscious and came out in a moment of 50

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stress, the incident is a reminder that each of us carry unconscious biases that when spoken aloud are grounded in centuries of discrimination and brutality. At a basketball game between St. Xavier High School in The Pit, Elder students repeatedly chanted belittling cheers at two St. X students, one of Asian American and one of African American descent. As in Kings, adults who were present were slow to react and shut down the offensive cheers. Commentators expressed shock and community members demanded action that sent school leaders scrambling. The traditional response is to employ diversity and inclusion training to help students, faculty and administrators recognize their biases and begin to address them. Having started my career as a high school teacher, I know this sort of experience can be very impactful for young people who are work-

ing out their personal value systems. And under the pressure of a crisis, some adults are willing to reevaluate their stances. But this is what we as a society have been trying for five decades; why do we find ourselves stuck here? At least on the issue of race, what if the way we think about what divides us, the paradigm of white and black, is fundamentally flawed? If it is, then traditional responses are flawed. The good news is that a concrete effort to rethink the traditional paradigm is being pushed forward by Professor Joan Ferrante at Northern Kentucky University. For over 20 years, she and Prince Brown (now retired) taught a course entitled “The Social Construction of Race in the United States.” Their argument rests on several points. First, race is not a biological reality. Despite


centuries of arguments, the origin and In a new initiative, “Mourning the significance of differences has nothing Creation of Racial Categories,” Professor to do with biology. Second, the creation Ferrante gathered 15 NKU students— of white and black “races” is rooted in the majors in dance, music, theater, visual contact experience between Europeans design and literature. For 10 months they and sub Saharan Africans in the 15th struggled with creating a new vocabuand 16th centuries, which triggered deep lary and a new set of attitudes—a new cultural responses. As Winthrop Jordan paradigm—for speaking about identities wrote in his groundbreaking work White that had traditionally been lumped unOver Black (1968), in English liturgical, der race. They had to learn to be “Color literary and popular language, no two Brave.” In the end, they created visual colors were so fraught with meaning and images, original music, dance, theater so utterly opposed. “White and black and literature that expressed ways to connoted purity and filthiness, virginity mourn the creation of race categories. and sin, virtue and baseness, beauty and Their work is captured in a 60-minute documentary. ugliness, beneficence and evil.” Third, in the rough and tumble caulIndia Hackle, an international studies/ dron of early American society, groups of theater major, summed up the imporimmigrants who hated each other in Eu- tance of this experience by noting that rope—French and Germans, English and without learning a new way of thinking Irish, Protestants and Catholics—found and speaking, “I would have passed on common cause in “becoming white” and the same lack of understanding that was targeting a single group to oppress, people passed on to me.” of African descent. This sociological proBreaking the old paradigm has practical cess of manufacturing two supposedly implications. After more than a century distinct “races,” one white, one black, is of thinking of sickle cell anemia as a explored by Noel Ignatiev in How the Irish “black disease,” medical researchers now Cincy 7.5x4.874_April_v1.pdf 1 3/15/18 11:42 AM that this genetic adaptation is Became White. recognize

related to exposure to the malaria belt, and places that Americans think of as “white,” like certain villages in Greece, carry the gene in much higher proportions than Africans. Leading researchers like Professor Michael Yudell of Drexel University argue that scientists need to push past the race concept. Adherence to racial categories hinders researchers’ ability to recognize that evidence demonstrates that many health discrepancies are best explained by social factors. Put simply, zip codes better explain life expectancy than genetic codes. Locally, a 2015 Hamilton County Public Health Department study found variations as wide as 17 years in the county. The good news is that Ferrante is expanding and deepening her work to develop ways for more of us to be color brave, shift our paradigms and break the chains of racial categories that have trapped Americans for centuries. n

Dan Hurley is a local historian and president of Applied History Associates, which works with museums in the Eastern U.S.

July 27, 28 & 29 Dayton’s First and Free Celtic Fest Returns.

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FREE! • FOUR STAGES • FAMILY FRIENDLY • RAIN OR SHINE

Come celebrate the best of Celtic music, dance, art and culture at Dayton’s largest Downtown festival. Visit DaytonCelticFestival.com for more information.

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Another View By Don Mooney

Pass The Secret Sauce WHAT DOES CINCINNATI NEED TO DO TO GET AMAZON OR APPLE?

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018 began with a vengeance for Cincinnati. First downtown’s Macy’s and then Tiffany’s announced they were shuttering downtown, apparent victims of the relentless growth of cybershopping. Then, one of the prime online culprits delivered le coup de grace: we did not make the cut for Amazon’s HQ2 and its 50,000 new jobs. It shouldn’t have been a surprise. Could we really compete with big hitters like Denver, with its nearby ski slopes and legal pot? Surely we couldn’t offer $7 billion in incentives, like Newark, New Jersey; or $5 billion like Bethesda, Maryland. Amazon said that public transportation would be a big factor in its choice. So it was hard to see us stacking up well against transit friendly cities like Boston, Philadelphia or Chicago. Our downtown streetcar goes comatose in cold weather. But what really stuck in our civic craw? Four of our regional “peers”—Nashville, Indy, Columbus and Pittsburgh—remain in the Amazon hunt. Cincinnatians have a certain stubborn pride. Our town is an overlooked gem. Beautiful vistas. Sophisticated arts scene. Major league and college sports. Two great 52

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universities. And now a re-polished urban core acting as a millenial magnet. Something went terribly wrong. How did the city and REDI mess up our Amazon application? We may never know. REDI’s Ed Loyd explained to the Enquirer that our rejected application contained the recipe for a “secret sauce” that would be of incalculable value to competitors if it sees the light of day. That left me wondering about his sauce’s secret ingredients. Here is my highly speculative list: - Renaming the Bengals the Amazons, with new uniforms channeling Wonder Woman’s red, blue and gold costume? - Pete Rose as the new voice for Alexa? - Extend streetcar to Amazon’s Whole Foods location in Hyde Park? - In addition to the typical tax breaks, all local residents obligated to sign up for Amazon Prime? - Mayor Cranley will personally pick up Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos’ dry cleaning for drop off at Widmer’s? - Taxpayers will cover Jean Robert’s salary to toil in Amazon’s executive dining room? - Rather than improve our transit system,

the city will pay for door-to-door Uber service for all Amazon employees? - Cincinnati’s baseball team will change its iconic team colors to Amazon orange? - As a sign of solidarity, P&G will be renamed Procter & Bezos? - An actual secret sauce recipe: the formula for Gold Star Chili, courtesy of the mayor’s in-laws? So, with goodies like that on the table, how could Cincinnati not make Amazon’s top 20? Here’s my theory: Curious about that chili recipe, Mr. Bezos sent it for vetting to the Whole Foods test kitchen. Spooned over some hand-rolled gluten-free pasta, topped with a dollop of finely grated aged pecorino cheese, and paired with a vintage Willamette Valley Pinot Noir, the result was . . . heart burn. But hope springs eternal. REDI is already back in its test kitchen whipping up a new batch of compote de pommes for that mega Apple call center still in search of a location. Bon Appetit, Siri! n Don Mooney is an attorney, a past member of the Cincinnati Planning Commission and is active in local politics.


Q&A

Four Questions with Dion Brown NEW PRESIDENT OF THE NATIONAL UNDERGROUND RAILROAD FREEDOM CENTER By Corinne Minard

D

ion Brown, the new president of the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center who started on Feb. 26, is no stranger to museums. He got his start at the Exploration Place in Kansas, where he initially began as HR director after spending 21 years in the military. “The president came in about six months later after I started and said, ‘I like what you do and I’m going to show how to become a president,’” Brown says. He would later become the founding executive director of the National Blues Museum in St. Louis and executive director of the BB King Museum in Mississippi. Brown’s background is in operations and he is looking to bring that approach to the Freedom Center with the goal of increasing its visibility in the community and beyond.

WHY DID YOU DECIDE TAKE THIS POSITION? I know about as much about the Underground Railroad as I do about the blues, which is nothing. But I know how to do operations and it’s a continuous learning process. I like to learn [and] I’d like to go get another degree. This came up and this is a perfect living history here [that] I can do. I can learn about the past, I can learn about the present, plus make an impact in the community.

WHAT DO YOU SEE AS THE ROLE OF THE FREEDOM CENTER IN THE COMMUNITY? I think we’re already a central point [my role is] just to highlight even more the

Dion Brown

message that we put out about freedom for all. If we activate some of the other spaces through music on the outside like the plaza, that gets people excited about coming down to the Freedom Center. You hook them that way, then they see us. So they say, “What are you guys doing there?” And that’s how you pull them in. And music brings everybody together. That’s what I’ve used at every museum I’ve worked at, especially in the blues business, is use the music to hook people in because it brings everybody together to have hard conversations that you may not feel comfortable having.

WHAT WOULD YOU LIKE TO SEE HAPPEN WITH THE MUSEUM IN THE NEXT COUPLE YEARS? I’m big on earned income. Between the talent we have here, the talent that is at the Cincinnati Museum Center and their

artifacts, I think if we use that partnership correctly we can put together two to three [traveling] exhibits over the next five years and put them on the road. Because once you have the exhibit on the road, if it’s a good exhibit, … every 90 days there’s a check for you. Our attendance numbers are up this year, our membership numbers are up, and that’s great but I want to grow even more because this is Cincinnati’s museum. If you’re proud of it, when guests come to town to visit you you’re going to want to show this off to them. They’re going to go home and say you’ve got to go. And that’s going to continue to build the brand.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE THING IN TOWN SO FAR? My favorite place so far to eat is Knockback Nat’s. That place right there has the best wings I have ever had. n w w w.

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CI NC Y’S

Toughest

Cops

PETER BRONSON DIVES INTO THE HISTORY OF THE CITY’S LAW ENFORCEMENT

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Lawrence Hazen

awrence Hazen was an Irish bull of a man, thick as a beer barrel, with a neck like a tree trunk and a bushy handlebar mustache. His left arm was stabbed and crippled during an arrest, but his right arm of the law was enough to throttle crime in the Queen City. He looked like a streetcar conductor in his pillbox hat, bowtie and brass-buttoned coat, but Cincinnati’s chief of detectives in the 1850s was as tough as a hobnailed boot. When a convict swore he would kill Hazen when he got out of prison, the detective took a train to Columbus and waited for 54

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him at the prison gates. As the man stepped out, Hazen said, “I heard you want to kill me. I thought I would save you the trouble of coming to Cincinnati to try.” Cincinnati Police Museum Curator Dic Gross, a retired CPD detective, shakes his head. “That guy wanted no part of Hazen,” he says. “He decided to go straight and move to Indiana.” When another local thug threatened him, Hazen sent word that he would meet him for a showdown at the Burnett House hotel. Gross says, “The guy showed up. They pulled their guns. Hazen shot him.” As a private detective, he was first to track down Jesse James. During his police career he was shot, stabbed and fought hand-to-hand. “And he did all that with one arm,” says Gross. L.M. Hazen served Cincinnati from 1856 to 1901. He’s No. 5 among Cincinnati’s toughest cops. No. 4. Stanley Schrotel was clean-cut and handsome, with gray hair before he was 40. As Cincinnati’s youngest police captain he scored 99.3 on the chief’s exam in 1952 and skipped all the rungs to become the youngest chief, at 37. He immediately fired 35 cops who were caught taking kickbacks in the 1951 “Wrecker Scandal.” Schrotel was a high school dropout but earned a law degree and became “the most

educated police chief in America.” In 1958, Life Magazine put him on the cover saying, “Almost all of the nation’s cities can learn from Cincinnati” and Chief Schrotel. FBI boss J. Edgar Hoover called him for advice. He modernized records, raised the bar for education and training, scrubbed away corruption and kept his beat cops biting their nails with random walkarounds. “He was the father of modern law enforcement nationwide,” says Police Museum Director Stephen Kramer. Cities from Chicago to Denver tried to hire him. Chiefs from London and Paris came to learn from him.

Stanley Shrotel


He retired from the Police Division in 1966 to be head of security for Kroger. His honesty and courage made policing a profession. No. 3. John Poppe earned America’s highest award for bravery at the Battle of Milk Creek in northwest Colorado in 1879, just three years after Little Bighorn. Attacked by hundreds of Utes, Sgt. Poppe’s Fifth Cavalry patrol circled its wagons and held out for a week. Poppe earned the Medal of Honor for “Gallantry in Action.” Five years later, the horse soldier with a “giant, rugged frame and enormous strength” showed that medal to the Cincinnati Police and asked for a job. He was hired. Stabbed and shot at many times, he became a “model patrolman” and rose to chief of detectives. He showed gallantry in action again on Jan. 30, 1909, as his morning streetcar ride suddenly lurched into a heart-stopping emergency. On a steep hill down Clifton Avenue, the trolley’s ice-jammed brakes failed and it hurtled out of control. Lt. Poppe fought his way through panicked passengers to the front of the car, where he grabbed a handbrake to help the motorman. The trolley flew off its tracks on a curve and shot toward a 150-foot drop to the city below. It snapped an iron trolley pole like a toothpick and finally stopped in mud, two feet from the fatal drop. Many of the 20 passengers were injured, but only the motorman was killed. Poppe, found lying in blood-stained snow, told rescuers, “I think I’m pretty badly done for. The motorman is hurt worse. Look after him.” With crushed ribs, a punctured lung and a mangled leg, he was given no chance to live. As he prepared to die, he wanted the police to know: “Tell the boys down there I was right in front, and I want them to know I was trying to do my duty.” Prayers and cards flooded in and Lt. Poppe survived. A special city ordinance for his heroism allowed him to return to active police duty on an artificial leg until 1913. No. 2. When the mob infested Newport, Cincinnati stayed as clean as Kansas. One of the reasons was the dapper detective Robert “Machine Gun” Meldon. As a young bailiff in 1930, he tackled a burglar who tried to leap from a courthouse window, then rescued two boys and a girl from drowning in the Ohio River. “Saves Four Lives in One Week,” the headline said.

John Poppe A 1949 Picture of the Year from the Cincinnati Post showed Meldon straddling a curb in trench coat and fedora, blasting his Thompson submachine gun into a basement through clouds of gun smoke.

Robert “Machine Gun” Meldon

“These are photos of the SWAT team sent to Sixth and John Street where a suspect was in an old coal cellar, shooting up at the police,” he wrote years later. Meldon and his partner Det. Bill Wood believed the .45 cal. “Tommy Gun,” invented by Brig. Gen. John T. Thompson of Newport, Ky., was very effective for removing barricaded gunmen, dead or alive. He was in more than a dozen gun battles: three killed, six wounded. In 1957, police were tipped that burglars were going to rob a safe at a Beechmont Avenue Thriftway. Meldon and his crew smuggled weapons into the supermarket in fruit crates and set up an ambush. As the “yeggmen” (safecrackers) arrived, w w w.

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Meldon cut the Thompson loose, riddling one burglar with more than 20 bullets. Another burglar shot back and was machine-gunned. A third was captured alive, huddled behind a bullet-holed meat counter. When a mobster threatened to get even by killing Meldon, the detective made a date to meet him on a street corner in mob-city Newport with his Thompson. The hitman did not show up. Headlines called “Machine Gun” Meldon the “Mob Menace” when he retired in 1963. The wise guys agreed and left Cincinnati alone. No. 1. If Superman pretended to be a polite patrolman instead of a mild-mannered reporter, he could be William C. Boers. Born in Cincinnati in 1872, Boers grew up as a strongman and trapeze artist in the Boers Brothers Circus Act. Looking for a more death-defying challenge, he joined the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Police and singlehandedly, while unarmed, arrested a trio of armed bank robbers in downtown Cincinnati. The mayor hired him on the spot as a Cincinnati policeman in 1896. On July 6, 1900, he stepped into the path of a runaway mule, wrestled it to the ground and saved three boys in the mule cart. In 1903 he ran with a ladder to the Millcreek Distilling Co. fire and rescued a man from the third floor. Two months later he grabbed a team of runaway horses and pulled them down on himself to save a crowd of shoppers. Still recovering from his injuries a few weeks later, he ran in front of a streetcar

William C. Boers and saved a 4-year-old girl. A year later he jumped out of a moving streetcar on Gest Street and ran alongside

The Murder Case The Greater Cincinnati Police Museum at 308 Reading Road downtown has blackjacks, machine guns, nightsticks, dozens of detectives’ snub-nosed revolvers, ancient radios and callboxes and an amazing archive of records and photos. One of the most interesting exhibits might be called “The Murder Case.” Over 50 years, celebrated defense attorney William “Foss” Hopkins handled hundreds of sensational murder trials—and collected key pieces of evidence along the way. Only half of the murder weapons he collected are guns. The rest testify to the ingenuity of human hate: a hammer, a jagged broken coke bottle, jackknives, weights for drowning, a small bottle of phenobarbital, even a stone axe that could have been used when Cain killed Abel. The police museum is open Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays from 10 to 4. Parking and admission are free. Donations welcome. 56

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to pull a 3-year-old girl from its path. Both were run over but Boers shielded the girl, and neither was seriously hurt. He was cut while breaking up a knife fight, saved a woman from the second floor of a burning building and wrestled a gun away from a man he arrested for domestic violence. On April 16, 1917, he was off duty but responded to a domestic incident on Fourth Street, where he was shot and killed by a wife-beating husband. His last words to his wife were: “Ma, I tried it once too often. This time they got me.” Kramer says, “Boers was absolutely fearless. Undoubtedly the toughest guy to ever wear a badge for the Cincinnati Police.” That badge, No. 394, is on the wall at the Cincinnati Police Museum, near a medal that shows Boers diving under a streetcar. His picture hangs among 100 officers killed in the line of duty while serving the City of Cincinnati. n


Guide to Colleges and Universities 2018

Mount St. Joesph University has launched a new physician assistant program.

An Innovative Education NEW COLLEGE FACILITIES AND PROGRAMS TRANSFORM LEARNING By Mike Boyer

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rom new programs to serve the needs of their students and their communities, to new facilities to transform learning, area colleges and universities are constantly evolving. Here’s a look at what a cross-section of area institutions are doing this year.

MOUNT ST. JOSEPH UNIVERSITY Mount St. Joseph University has launched

the first class of its new Physician Assistant program, the only provisionally accredited PA program in the area. In January the first class of 32 st udents began t he 27-mont h graduate program designed to help fill the growing need for clinicians to deliver quality health care, the Delhi Township school says. “PAs are vital to improving the overall health care of our region,” The physician assistant programs has both says Patrick Caffert y, program lectures and simulations. director. “The Mount’s rigorous education program will enable these other members of the health care team. clinicians to diagnose, treat and pre- They will be trained as generalists with a scribe medicine in collaboration with strong foundation in primary care, makw w w.

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Guide to Colleges and Universities 2018 ing them adaptable to the needs of this community.” The United States faces a shortage of up to 105,000 physicians by 2030, according to the Association of American Medical Colleges. In addition to 12 months of class work in topics such as anatomy, physiology, pharmacology, clinical medicine, genetics, diagnostic lab, EKG, physical exam and clinical skills, the program includes clinical rotations in family medicine, internal medicine, general surger y, women’s health, pediatrics, emergency medicine, orthopedics and behavioral health, along with two student-selected elective rotations. The program has a simulation lab and advanced anatomy lab that includes Anatomage, a virtual anatomy program to supplement cadaver specimens. Graduates earn a master’s degree in Physician Assistant Studies and are eligible to take the PA National Certification Exam. Information can be found at msj.edu/

NKU continues to add new buildings.

EDUCATION PROFILE

BLUFFTON UNIVERSITY 1 University Drive | Bluffton OH 45817 419-358-3257 | bluffton.edu

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n a world that changes rapidly, Bluffton University prepares students to lead in their communities and in the world. Founded in 1899, Bluffton is built on a 117-year legacy rooted in the four enduring values of discovery, community, respect and service. For 20 consecutive years, these distinguishing aspects of a Bluffton education have been recognized by U.S. News With more than 90 programs for undergraduate students, adult degree-completion programs and master’s degrees and World Report in its Best Colleges Guidebook. “At Bluffton, we focus on preparing students for com- in business and education, Bluffton provides a variety of pelling careers,” said Erin Ostling Burkholder, director choices to prospective students. of admissions. “New opportunities include pre-physical Bluffton alumni are in demand. Ninety-nine percent of therapy, pre-engineering, nursing, and speech-language Bluffton graduates are employed or engaged in advanced study or long-term service within six months of graduation. pathology and audiology.”

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academics/graduate-programs/physicianassistant-program.

NORTHERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY This fall Northern Kentucky University will open its $97 million Health Innovation Center, a new facility to support an integrated portfolio of programs to prepare health care professionals and provide solutions to the health and wellness challenges the region faces. The new training programs reflect the transformational changes taking place in the health care industry. To ensure the Center’s success, NKU has designed three main types of spaces in the facility: space for learning, space for collaboration and space for practice. The spaces for learning are designed for 21st century active learning with movable tables and chairs to work alone or in teams. The idea behind the learning spaces is to disrupt traditional lecture style classes. Students can listen to on-

Northern Kentucky University is opening a new Health Innovation Center.

line lectures at home and then spend class working together to solve problems. The spaces for learning include

state-of-the-art monitors and projection equipment to provide a top-tier learning environment.

Lead Differently AT HOME, AT WORK AND IN YOUR COMMUNITY At Bluffton, we believe advanced education makes a difference in the lives of our graduates, in the management of their organizations and in the well-being of their communities.

Adult and graduate studies programs provide: • Flexible one-night-a-week or blended-online professional programs • Experiential learning over lectures • Small group-based classes • Professors who are professionals and academics

1 University Drive, Bluffton, Ohio 45817

419-358-3257

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Guide to Colleges and Universities 2018 ing projection surfaces on multiple walls for small group work, access to flat-panel screens and wireless collaboration software, and rectangular tables that allow for easy collaboration. - “Egg” classrooms, two 35-person oval configured classrooms enclosed in glass, which will be a prominent feature of the third and fourth floors.

CINCINNATI STATE TECHNICAL AND COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Students in Cincinnati State’s Aviation Maintenance program get hands-on training in the jet engine laboratory at the college’s Harrison Campus.

Some examples of the new learning spaces: - A learning studio, a space consisting

of two adjacent 60-person classrooms that can become one room. - A single, 66-person classroom featur-

Cincinnati State Technical and Community College, which offers more than 130 associate degree and certificate programs, is constantly adding and updating its certificate and degree programs. For example, to keep up with Greater Cincinnati’s fast-growing craft beer industry, the college recently launched a new brewing science degree and brewing sales and marketing certificate. The college also recently launched an Associate of Applied Business – Paralegal program that’s being offered at both the Clifton and Middletown campuses to ad-

EDUCATION PROFILE

GREAT OAKS CAREER CAMPUSES 110 Great Oaks Drive | Cincinnati OH 45241 513-771-8840 | greatoaks.com

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reat Oaks Career Campuses prepares high school students and adults for success in careers and college. Great Oaks is one of the largest career-technical school districts in the country, including 2,200 square miles in 12 southwestern Ohio counties. A recognized leader and innovator, Great Oaks provides quality programming to

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more than 14,000 youth and 40,000 adults each year. Programs range from aviation mechanics to cosmetology, from robotics to nursing to computer technology. Students learn on the same state-of-the-art equipment they’ll use in their careers. Great Oaks is a public school system, providing career-technical programs for 36 school districts. Great Oaks programs lead to industry certification and employment. Campuses include Diamond Oaks (Dent), Laurel Oaks (Wilmington), Live Oaks (Milford) and Scarlet Oaks (Sharonville). Career planning and placement services and partnerships with area businesses help ensure that Great Oaks graduates begin working right away in their career field.


dress the needs of the legal field. Cincinnati State is also adding new courses and scholarship opportunities for students in its aviation maintenance and avionics programs at its Harrison campus to meet demand from expanding regional airfreight carriers and the increased use of commercial drones.

WARREN COUNTY CAREER CENTER After five years of study and planning and months of construction, the Warren County Career Center Fire Training Center, a countywide Fire/Rescue and Technical Rescue Training Facility and Class A Burn Building, opened last fall on the Career Center campus. Hundreds of WCCC adult and high school students in firefighter and EMT classes and all county fire departments now use the center for essential, handson training and continuing education for certification. This is the first such facility in Warren County. WCCC firefighter students and all county fire departments no

WCCC’s new Fire Training Center

Learning works! For business Great Oaks offers customized training and assessment to help local business and industry maintain their competitive edge.

For you Full-time and part-time career programs and individual professional development, computer training, and personal interest classes help you enhance career skills or pursue new interests.

www.greatoaks.com

For the community More than 40,000 adults each year turn to Great Oaks for education and training.

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Guide to Colleges and Universities 2018

Thomas More College’s new Work Ready Incubator helps students receive real-world experiences.

longer have to travel out of the county to rent facilities for required fire and rescue training, which cost more time and travel expense. The closer proximity of the training center also may have an impact on insurance ratings, possibly reducing rates for businesses and homeowners, the career center says. A 2012 feasibility study showed that the facility would pay for itself within just a few years, due to the lack of any fire training facilities in the county and the great need of the 14 area fire departments. Â

THOMAS MORE COLLEGE

The Thomas More College Work Ready Incubator is a groundbreaking program that will benefit students in their quest for realworld experiences, as well as businesses in their search for high-quality talent by connecting to the Thomas More College student population and alumni network. A recent ribbon-cutting ceremony, at Gravity Diagnostics, a biotech firm in 62

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Covington’s bioLOGIC incubator, marked the start of the pilot program. Conceptually, the Thomas More Work Ready Incubator is a talent pipeline that allows an employer to directly recruit Thomas More College students and alumni to fill a variety of workforce needs across multiple disciplines, including internships and co-ops as well as part-time and full-time jobs. They will be housed in a dedicated workspace within the company

where they will work to meet both emerging and immediate needs, to enhance their skillsets, and to learn corporate culture. A Thomas More faculty mentor who will act as a liaison between the employer and any students will monitor the process. The faculty member, together with a Thomas More alumnus and a representative from the broader business community, will mentor and support the student through the initial work experience.


EDUCATION PROFILE

THE CHRIST COLLEGE OF NURSING & HEALTH SCIENCES 2139 Auburn Ave. | Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-585-2401 | thechristcollege.edu

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he Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences, affiliated with The Christ Hospital Health Network for over a century, was ranked the No. 1 College in the Region for Post-Graduate Salaries by the Cincinnati Business Courier for two consecutive years. The Christ College offers a bachelor of science in nursing degree, accelerated BSN for second degree seekers, and an online RN to BSN completion program. A bachelor of science in health care administration degree is also offered online with learning opportunities in partnership with The Christ Hospital. Located on The Christ Hospital’s main campus, the college provides a fully immersed health care education with connections to first-hand career experiences and industry professionals, a non-competitive nursing clinical guarantee, and opportunities for specialty electives, residencies and internships all at the region’s most preferred hospital.

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Guide to Colleges and Universities 2018 Thomas More is the only college in Kentucky that requires its students to have one credit hour of experiential learning in order to graduate, and the incubator program advances that mandate, college officials say.

SOUTHERN STATE COMMUNITY COLLEGE A spring groundbreaking is planned for Southern State Community College’s new Adams County campus. Located on 15 acres east of the Adams County Career and Technical Center on Lloyds Road, the new campus will have enough space for future expansion, college officials say. It will be the fifth in Southern State’s network including Brown, Clinton, Fayette and Highland counties. BHDP Architects has been selected to design the new facility, which will borrow design from Southern State’s recently completed Brown County campus. Primarily because of supportive state funding, the college can construct the fa-

cility without incurring additional debt. In all, the state’s capital fund provided $4.25 million to the project, in addition to approximately $750,000 in proceeds from the sale of its former South Campus. Dr. Kevin Boys, Southern State president, says, “The construction phase could take about 12 months, which could position us to open the Adams County Campus to students for fall semester 2019.”

A rendering of Southern State Community College’s new Adams County campus

UNION INSTITUTE & UNIVERSITY Union Institute & University’s online bachelor degree program has been ranked on the list of best online degree programs for 2018 by U.S. News and World Report. “Ranked among the best in the nation is an honor,” says Ashley S. Finkes, director of marketing. “UI&U is distinguished as a pioneer in adult education.” Union Institute & University is a private, nonprofit university that specializes in distance education nationwide with bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degree offerings. It has locations in five states including at 440 East McMillan St., Cincinnati. n

EDUCATION PROFILE

SINCLAIR COLLEGE MASON CAMPUS 5386 Courseview Drive | Mason OH 45040 800-315-3000 | sinclair.edu/mason

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pened in 2007, the Sinclair College Campus in Mason continues Sinclair’s mission of providing accessible, affordable, flexible education to meet the needs of the community. Conveniently located, the campus is easily accessible from I-71, central to Warren County. Stu-

dents come from throughout the Warren, Butler, Clinton and Northern Hamilton County areas. Sinclair offers more than 50 degree and certificate programs, including university transfer, business, IT, computer information and healthcare options. Partnerships with other schools provide access to advanced degrees. Top three awards/recognitions - 2013 U.S. Professor of the Year: Bob Chaney (CASE and Carnegie Mellon Foundation) - 2013 Automotive School of the Year (Tomorrow’s Tech magazine) - Largest regional provider of online education with more than 200 different courses and 27 online degree programs

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With over 130 years of stability and experience, Sinclair plays an important role in the workforce and economic development initiatives in southwest Ohio. Students can complete associate degrees and certificates, or transfer credits to 4-year institutions.

Sinclair in Mason offers: • Over 50 degree and certificate programs to complete close to home

• Nationally recognized faculty • Fully Online and Hybrid programs

• Credits that transfer easily to four-year universities

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EDUCATION PROFILE

GATEWAY COMMUNITY & TECHNICAL COLLEGE 500 Technology Way | Florence KY 41042 (859) 441-4500 | (855) 346-4282 | gateway.kctcs.edu

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ateway Community & Technical College offers high-quality, targeted education to meet the personal and professional needs of the Tristate and contribute to the economic development of the region. With programs in a variety of subject areas leading to high-wage, high-demand jobs, Gateway gives you more than a diploma, Gateway prepares you for your career. Students have the opportunity to pursue associates degrees, certifications and diplomas. Degrees and credits earned at Gateway transfer to any public university in Kentucky and regionally accredited higher education institutions in the United States. Gateway’s Workforce Solutions provides assessments, training and certifications that boost advancement in many careers paths. In addition, staff works with employers to develop strategies for employee recruitment, development and retention.

Find what’s possible for you at Gateway! gateway.kctcs.edu/possible 855-346-4282 66

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The Center for Advanced Manufacturing at Gateway’s Boone Campus in Florence, Kntucky, is home to the KYFAME apprenticeship and Enhanced Operator programs, which collaborate with advanced manufacturing industry partners. Gateway’s stateof-the-art Transportation Technology Center is home to the automotive technology, Ford Asset and Commercial Driver’s License (CDL) programs, among others. For your convenience, Gateway offers daytime, evening and weekend classes at three campuses in Edgewood, Covington and Florence. High school students can earn college credit through the early college program. Gateway’s nationally recognized online courses make going to college even more accessible. Find what’s possible for you at Gateway!


Guide to Colleges and Universities 2018 The Tristate benefits from one of the most diverse educational portfolios around. With more than 20 colleges and universities in the area, residents have the opportunities to add job skills and certifications, keep up with continuing education needs, and earn various undergraduate and graduate degrees. Did we miss your school? Please email us at publisher@cincymagazine. com so we can make sure to include it next year. Art Academy of Cincinnati 1212 Jackson St., Cincinnati 45202 513-562-6262 artacademy.edu Four-year college that focuses on art and design. Majors include design, illustration, print media and photography.

Chatfield College 1544 Central Parkway, Cincinnati 45202 513-921-9856 chatfield.edu An open enrollment college offering the associate of arts degree plus a third year towards a bachelor’s degree.

The Art Institute of Cincinnati: College of Design 1171 E. Kemper Road, Cincinnati 45246 513-751-1206 aic-arts.edu Graphic design college. Offers focused three-year degree.

The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences 2139 Auburn Ave., Cincinnati 45219 513-585-2401 thechristcollege.edu Bachelor’s and associate’s degrees in nursing. Also offers LPN-RN pathway and RN-BSN completion.

Athenaeum of Ohio 6616 Beechmont Ave., Cincinnati 45230 513-231-2223 athenaeum.edu Third oldest Roman Catholic seminary in the United States.

Cincinnati Christian University 2700 Glenway Ave., Cincinnati 45204 800-949-4228 ccuniversity.edu Christian university that offers programs in biblical/ cultural studies, deaf studies, business management, music and worship, psychology, ministry, education and arts and sciences.

Bluffton University 1 University Drive, Bluffton 45817 419-358-3000 bluffton.edu More than 90 programs for undergraduate students, adult degree-completion programs and master’s degrees in business and education.

Cincinnati College of Mortuary Science 645 W. North Bend Road, Cincinnati 45224 513-761-2020 ccms.edu Offers associate’s degrees and bachelor’s degrees in mortuary science. Specializes in clinical services and funeral directing.

Cincinnati State Technical & Community College 3520 Central Parkway, Cincinnati 45223 513-569-1500 cincinnatistate.edu Offers 75 associate’s degrees and 40 certificate programs in business technologies, health and public safety, engineering technologies, humanities and sciences and information technologies Eastern Kentucky University 521 Lancaster Ave., Richmond KY 40475 859-622-1000 eku.edu Offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees as well as doctorates in five academic colleges. Fortis College 11499 Chester Road, Suite 200, Cincinnati 45246 513-771-2795 fortis.edu Programs include nursing, dental assisting, HVAC, medical assisting, practical nursing and welding technology. Galen College of Nursing 100 E. Business Way, Suite 200, Cincinnati 45241 513-475-3636 galencollege.edu Offers dual track BSN, LPN to BSN, and online RN to BSN. Gateway Community and Technical College 500 Technology Way, Florence KY 41042 859-441-4500 gateway.kctcs.edu Two-year associate’s degree in business administration, criminal justice and others. Also offers certificates.

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Guide to Colleges and Universities 2018 God’s Bible School & College 1810 Young St., Cincinnati 45202 513-721-7944 gbs.edu Non-denominational Christian school. Associate’s and bachelor’s degrees available in education, professional studies, ministerial, intercultural studies and music.

Indiana Wesleyan University 4201 S. Washington St., Marion IN 46953 866-468-6498 indwes.edu Evangelical Christian university with focus on liberal arts. Known for its master’s and adult education programs.

Good Samaritan College of Nursing and Health Science 375 Dixmyth Ave., Cincinnati 45220 513-862-2631 gscollege.edu Nonprofit nursing program. Subsidiary of Good Samaritan Hospital, a partner of TriHealth.

John Carroll University 1 Jon Carroll Blvd., University Heights 44118 216-397-4294 sites.jcu.edu Offesr 70 majors in areas including accountancy, biology, business, communications, data science, exercise science, pre-health professions, sports studies and many more.

Great Oaks Career Campuses 110 Great Oaks Drive, Cincinnati 45241 513-771-8840 greatoaks.com One of the largest career and technical districts in the US. Offers career, workforce and economic development.

Marian University 3200 Cold Spring Road, Indianapolis IN 46222 317-955-6000 marian.edu The university’s focus areas include arts and sciences, business, education, engineering, nursing and ministry.

Miami University 501 E. High St., Oxford 45056 513-529-2531 miamioh.edu Public liberal arts school that has bachelor’s degrees in more than 120 areas of study, more than 60 master’s degree programs and 12 doctoral degree programs. Also has regional programs in Hamilton, Middletown and West Chester. Mount Saint Joseph University 5701 Delhi Road, Cincinnati 45233 800-654-9314 msj.edu Liberal arts institution focused on experiential and cooperative learning. Northern Kentucky University Nunn Drive, Highland Heights KY 41099 859-572-5100 nku.edu One of the fatest growing universities in Kentucky. Recently renovated its College of Informatics, student union and BB&T Arena.

Ohio Dominican University 1216 Sunbury Road, Columbus 43219 614-251-4500 ohiodominican.edu ODU offers nearly 50 bachelor’s and master’s degrees that will prepare you for an exciting career in a high-demand field. Sinclair Community College 5386 Courseview Drive, Mason 45040 513-339-1212 sinclair.edu Associate’s degrees in arts and science at a convenient location. Also offers certificates. Southern State Community College 100 Hobart Drive, Hillsboro 45133 937-393-3431 sscc.edu Academic programs as well as technical and transfer ones. Locations in Mt. Orab, Hillsboro, Wilmington and Washington Court House.

Everything you’re looking for in a college – and more • Minutes from downtown Columbus • Honors program and study abroad opportunities • Generous financial aid • Early admission into med and grad school • Comfortable suite-style residence halls • NCAA Division II athletics • Columbus’ only Catholic university

Schedule a visit – you’ll love it here.

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EDUCATION PROFILE

UNION INSTITUTE & UNIVERSITY 440 East McMillan St. | Cincinnati OH, 45206 myunion.edu | 800-861-6400

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nion Institute & University is a nonprofit, regionally accredited university specializing in providing quality higher education degrees for adults nationwide. Founded in 1964, Union’s academic programs and services are the result of more than five decades of identifying and refining ways to structure and deliver education to meet the needs of adults. Distinguished as the pioneer in adult education, Union perfected the concepts now common in higher education such as the hybrid model, a blend of online and traditional classroom instruction, interdisciplinary studies, and student centered education with socially relevant and applicable learning outcomes in its undergraduate, master’s and doctoral degree programs. The university is guided by its core mission to educate highly motivated adults who seek academic programs to engage, enlighten, and empower them to pursue professional goals and a lifetime of learning, service, and social responsibility.

Union is a national university with academic centers located in Ohio, Florida and California. For more information about Union Institute & University, visit myunion.edu or call 1- 800-861-6400.

www.myunion.edu YOU can work and go back to school! Whether you’re completing an unfinished degree, seeking an advanced degree to further your professional development, or fulfilling a lifetime goal, we have the academic program to match your needs. With online and low-residency degree options, as well as a liberal transfer policy, Union Institute & University makes earning your degree accessible and affordable. Keep your job, your income, and your commitments while you study.

Your education pathway starts at Union.

www.myunion.edu admissions@myunion.edu | 800.861.6400

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Guide to Colleges and Universities 2018 Sullivan University 3101 Bardstown Road, Louisville KY 40205 502-456-6505 sullivan.edu Focused on practical degrees in areas ike accounting, business administration, information and computer technology, legal studies, early childhood education, nursing and more. Thomas More College 333 Thomas More Parkway, Crestview Hills KY 41017 859-341-5800 thomasmore.edu Small Catholic liberal arts college that offers 40 bachelor’s degree programs, 29 associate programs and several graduate degrees. Union Institute & University 440 E. McMillan St., Cincinnati 45206 800-861-6400 myunion.edu Master’s and bachelor’s degrees in various majors. Focus on social implications of studies.

University of Cincinnati 2600 Clifton Ave., Cincinnati 45221 513-556-0000 uc.edu Hottest College in America. Public research institute. Features CollegeConservatory of Music; Design, Architecture, Art and Planning (DAAP); Lindner College of Business; and College of Nursing. Warren County Career Center 3525 N. State Route 48, Lebanon 45036 513-932-8145 mywccc.org Career development and enhancement classes and training. Xavier University 3800 Victory Parkway, Cincinnati 45207 513-745-3000 xavier.edu Jesuit Catholic university. Focus on community service, sustainability and religious inclusion. Recently renovated Alter Hall.

EDUCATION PROFILE

OHIO DOMINICAN UNIVERSITY 1216 Sunbury Road | Columbus OH 43219 614-251-4500 | ohiodominican.edu

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onnect your passion with a purpose at Ohio Dominican University. ODU offers nearly 50 bachelor’s and master’s degrees that will prepare you for an exciting career in a high-demand field. ODU’s most popular majors include business administration, biology, exercise science and early childhood education. Ohio Dominican offers a variety of pre-professional programs and early acceptance opportunities, including into its physician assistant master’s program and the Ohio University Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine. ODU’s Honors Program is perfect for students who want to deepen their understanding of important issues. ODU has 1,700 students and is located just minutes from downtown Columbus—the nation’s 14th largest city. Approximately 99 percent of undergraduate students receive some form of financial assistance.

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Ohio Dominican is Central Ohio’s only NCAA Division II athletics program and offers 16 varsity sports. ODU was founded in 1911 by the Dominican Sisters of Peace. Schedule your visit today at ohiodominican.edu.


EDUCATION PROFILE

MARIAN UNIVERSITY 3200 Cold Spring Road | Indianapolis, IN 46222 317-955-6300 | 800-772-6264 | marian.edu learning in the Franciscan and liberal arts traditions. The wooded campus is located 10 minutes west of downtown Indianapolis, home to many of the nation’s top employers and a hub for the life sciences and technology industries. The university is experiencing tremendous growth in enrollment, facilities and academic programs, and expects to double its number of annual graduates by 2025. At Marian University, students learn by doing. We’ve replaced the traditional lecture/textbook/exam model with hands-on, experiential learning opportunities. Students engage with local businesses and other community partners arian University, founded in Indianapolis in in a variety of ways that better prepare them for their careers 1937, is the premier Catholic university in cen- and life after graduation. tral Indiana. It serves a student body of more The university’s focus areas include arts and sciences, busithan 4,000 through dedication to excellent teaching and ness, education, engineering, nursing and ministry.

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MARIAN UNIVERSITY Indianapolis

®

WHAT ARE YOU

MADE OF?

It’s a pivotal question that will shape your life. At Marian University, we’ll challenge you to think about who you want to become. You’ll work hard, but you won’t be alone— professors will teach and mentor you. You’ll learn to find your voice, speak out, and step up. We’ll inspire you with our faith and Franciscan values. When you graduate, you’ll be prepared to lead and to serve. So, ask yourself: What are you made of? Then come and find out. We’re just a short two-hour drive from Cincinnati.

marian.edu Marian University is sponsored by the Sisters of St. Francis, Oldenburg, Indiana.

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The Tristate’s A+ Professors THIS YEAR’S BEST COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY EDUCATORS, AS NOMINATED BY THEIR PEERS AND STUDENTS, SHOW THE BREADTH OF TALENT AT OUR LOCAL INSTITUTIONS

2018

By the Editors

EDUCATION PROFILE

JOHN CARROLL UNIVERSITY 1 John Carroll Blvd. | University Heights, OH 44118 216-397-4248 | go.jcu.edu/cincy

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t John Carroll University, we focus on the whole person—mind, body, and spirit. Through our four learning goals, we strive to develop intellect, character, leadership and service in all that we do. We offer 70 majors in areas including accountancy, biology, business, communications, data science, exercise science, pre-health professions, sports studies and many more. Created exclusively for students in the John M. and Mary Jo Boler School of Business, the seven-semester Professional Development Program helps students build and polish a portfolio of skills by providing the following: skillbuilding workshops, career events, and networking and mentoring opportunities with alumni and recruiters. Our Pre-Health Professions Program includes a full-time director and a phy-

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sician-in-residence. They’ll help students map out a plan to navigate course selections, understand career paths, gain relevant experience, and build relationships with and apply to medical, dental, pharmacy, physician assistant and other health-related programs. We also provide personalized application and interview preparation through our Health Professions Advisory Committee (HPAC). An entire team of faculty and staff help students evaluate their skills, create a compelling application, and stand out during the program interview. When students are deciding where to spend their next four years, most colleges and universities will say that they will know students by name. The John Carroll University experience is more personal than that. We want to know what drives our students. Each student’s pathway through JCU will be distinctly their own. We’re focused on providing students with the experiences—both in and out of the classroom—that position them for a successful career and, more importantly, a life well lived. This starts in the classroom, where we help students develop the skills that employers and graduate schools demand. John Carroll students learn to communicate effectively, understand and interpret data, solve complex problems in diverse settings and work collaboratively with others.


Cincy Magazine’s Outstanding Educators Class of 2018 features exceptional professors who were among the many nominations

MOLLY MOORHEAD Education Leadership Miami University Dr. Moorhead is one of the best when it comes to learning and

we received from students and colleagues.

instruction. She takes an approach to learning that applies mul-

The winners were singled out for a variety

speakers. This is an extremely effective way to learn firsthand

of traits that ranged from scholarship and

entail. She is also compassionate, funny and knowledgeable about

spending extra time with students to

the profession of education and continues to do so. She would

tiple current readings with discussion and LIVE in the profession what the job of being a principal or an assistant principal would the profession. Dr. Moorhead has made many contributions to be an asset to any institution, but I am glad Miami University

innovation in the classroom and research.

has her as a professor. - Mary Villarreal, Seventh Grade Language Arts, Creekside Middle School

It’s about YOU Your passion, your path.

NATIONALLY FOR CAREER READINESS Bloomberg Businessweek The journey to fulfilling your purpose starts at go.JCU.edu/cincy

You are a leader called to engage the world. At John Carroll, we are committed to supporting you as you chart your own path. We will challenge you to integrate your thinking and provide the experiences that prepare you for a constantly changing world.

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EDUCATION PROFILE

Eastern Kentucky University 521 Lancaster Avenue | Richmond, KY 40475 859-622-1000 | eku.edu

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astern Kentucky University’s Selective Merit Aid/Reduced Tuition (SMART) Program provides reduced tuition to residents of Ohio, Indiana and several other states. At a flat $10,000-per-year tuition, SMART students are likely to find the cost of attending EKU less than many in-state schools. This student-centered university offers more than 100 in-demand degree programs at the associate, baccalaureate, master’s and doctoral levels, preparing students for careers as pilots, nurses, forensic scientists, accountants, video game designers, entrepreneurs, brewers and much more. EKU Online also offers more than 30 online undergraduate and

graduate degree options in a wide variety of fields. In recent years, under the leadership of President Michael T. Benson, EKU has built many new structures and refurbished old ones in the most comprehensive campus revitalization since the 1960s. Several brand-new buildings have been opened in the last year alone, including two suite-style residence halls, the largest science building of its kind in Kentucky, an open-concept, modern dining hall and the university’s first parking garage. The university is home to 15 NCAA athletic teams, 230 student organizations, a fully equipped fitness center (complete

with a popular indoor rock climbing wall) and frequent festivals, live performances and social gatherings, so there’s plenty to do on campus outside of academic pursuits. Students who live on campus reside in one of 12 residence halls with traditional rooms, suites and apartments. EKU graduates have distinguished themselves in almost every conceivable career, from teachers, police and social workers to business owners, corporate executives and NASA engineers. With a degree from EKU, you will join more than 135,000 successful, living alumni worldwide who are proud to call themselves an Eastern Kentucky Colonel.


CRAIG LLOYD

JAMIE TITUS

Fine Arts

Chemistry

Mount St. Joseph University

Mount St. Joseph University

Professor Lloyd’s work has been exhibited in over 160 group,

As a professor of chemistry, Professor Titus strives to inspire

solo and juried exhibitions both regionally and nationally. He

students to appreciate science and the pursuit of knowledge

is a recipient of a City of Cincinnati Individual Artists Grant,

through careful testing of new ideas and the far-reaching effects

a Summerfair Foundation Individual Artists Grant and has

of science in their daily lives.

taught drawing at Huron University in London as a summer

- Kathleen Cardwell

exchange professor. He has also had essays published in two

Communications Manager, Mount St. Joseph University

library reference texts and, in 2017, was honored with the MSJU Distinguished Scholar Award. - Kathleen Cardwell Communications Manager, Mount St. Joseph University

Visit cincymagazine.com to find your favorite new restaurant and sign up for your complimentary subscription.

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ROSALYN BROWN BEATTY

JENNIFER HOILMAN

Clinical Mental Health

Nursing

Union Institute & University

Fortis College

Dr. Brown Beatty is a consummate professor who is always

Dr. Hoilman’s facilitation style develops problem solving and

interested in her students inside and outside of the classroom.

critical thinking skills in her students. Her research on the

She is available to offer advice and resources in the evenings and

impacts of social media on undergraduate nursing students as

on weekends. After graduation, she offers students her personal

well as her recommendations on leveraging social media have

phone number so that students may stay in touch after graduation.

changed the way many colleges view social media. Her involve-

- Teresa Wilkins

ment in student activities from an Easter Egg Hunt to serving the

Marketing & Communications, Union Institute & University

poor in Greater Cincinnati has made her a well-known educator. - Teri Brossea, Dean, Fortis College

CAREER FIELDS:

Healthcare/Medical • Advanced Manufacturing • Information Technology • Cosmetology • Firefighter/EMT • HVAC Welding • Heavy Equipment & Site Construction Electrical Power Line Mechanic • Dental Assisting

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EDUCATION PROFILE

Miami University Regionals now a four-year destination

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iami University Regionals, with campuses in Hamilton and Middletown, offers smart, flexible and affordable options for area citizens to earn a Miami bachelor’s degree close to home. Miami Regionals also includes the Voice of American Learning Center in West Chester and Greentree Health Sciences Academy in Middletown. While Miami Hamilton and Miami Middletown continue to offer the initial years of many of the Oxford campus majors, more four-year degree programs are being offered that students can complete entirely on the regional campuses—at a regional campus price. “Start here and finish here, or start here and finish in Oxford. Both paths lead to a diploma from Miami University,” says Perry Richardson, senior director of Marketing and Public Relations for Miami University Regionals. Many students earn their bachelor’s degrees taking classes entirely at the regional campuses. Others begin on the regional campuses and complete their degree on the Oxford campus. Miami University Regionals maintains an open admission policy, which means first-time college students are automatically accepted with a high school diploma or GED, at any age. Miami’s regional locations are all ideally located near Interstate 75. The Hamilton campus is easily accessible from State Route 129, the Middletown campus is minutes from I-75, Greentree Health Science Academy is located on the Atrium Hospital campus in Middletown, and the Voice of America Learning Center is just off the interstate in West Chester. As Miami University’s regional campuses become more of a four-year destination, the campuses in Hamilton and Middletown are serving an even greater range of students. In 2015, Miami Univer-

sity Regionals became the area’s first Purple Heart Institution for its commitment to supporting active military, veteran and dependent students. Miami Hamilton and Miami Middletown offer quality faculty instruction, small class sizes, free academic tutoring and advising, flexible class schedules, free career services and professional development, on-site childcare, and plenty of nearby, free parking. Miami Hamilton and Miami Middletown offer all of the above, plus vibrant student life, men’s and women’s athletics, opportunities for service learning, and cultural programs. Some bachelor’s degrees are available completely online, including the new bachelor of science in commerce (available online or face-to-face), the RN to BSN completion program in nursing, and the new master of science in criminal justice. Check out all that Miami University Regionals has to offer! Visit us today at miamioh.edu/regionals.


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THE CHILDREN’S HOME OF CINCINNATI PROVIDES MENTALHEALTH SERVICES TO KIDS By Eric Spangler

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hat started as an organization focused on saving children from neglect, abuse and poverty has evolved into a group that also provides mental-health services in partnership with neighborhood schools. The Children’s Home of Cincinnati— a private, nonprofit organization and a leading provider of education and mental health treatment for children facing significant social, behavioral and learning challenges—is now the mental health lead agency for 56 different school buildings, says Debbie Gingrich, senior director of community behavioral health. Founded in 1864, The Children’s Home of Cincinnati offers 20-plus services to its clients, including education at its nonpublic, private schools; early childhood and school-aged programs, adult and child mental health treatment and therapy. All of its programs focus on children’s behavioral health and therapy. The shift from on-site delivery of mentalhealth care to school-based care started between 15 and 20 years ago, says Gingrich. That’s because agency officials realized it was difficult for families to disrupt the parents’ workday by taking children out of school regularly for appointments. “So we started partnering with local schools, neighborhood schools, and offering services as part of the school’s community center,” she says. Schools provided a natural fit for The Children’s Home of Cincinnati, says Gingrich, because already children were able to get dental care, vision care, after-school yoga classes, etc. in the buildings. “School is first and foremost this academic institution, but it’s also a resource for the neighborhood,” she says. The Children’s Home of Cincinnati now has a team of 150 professionals, including thera78

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pists, care coordinators and doctors, that are in the schools all day. The schools provide an office space, mail slot and designated phone extension for members of The Children’s Home of Cincinnati team, Gingrich says. “They’re part of the school team and they function just like a staff person at the school—only their role is the mental health professional,” she says. Some teams The Children’s Home of Cincinnati has in schools consist of just one person, a therapist, and other teams are larger with a care manager and psychiatrist, says Gingrich. The therapist working at the school partners with the school principal, school psychologist, teachers and the parentteacher organizations, she says. That way the therapist is able to respond to any child in the school who might have a mental health need, says Gingrich. Referrals can come from anyone at the school, including teachers, school staff, parents and even the students themselves, she says. “They could just say, ‘I’m concerned about this student,’ and then our therapists work with the parent and the child,” says Gingrich. “We would schedule a meeting with the parent and the child and begin an assessment process.” The assessment process would include a thorough exam to determine if there’s a mental-health condition and then deciding the treatment options such as therapy, a medical evaluation or case management, she says. “We go through that process with the child and family identifying what their goals are or what their kind of identified needs and supports are and then we go from there,” says Gingrich. Although every situation is different, she says the school-based mental health teams at The Children’s Home of Cincinnati’s typically see kids that have disruptive behavioral issues. “You see their emotions through their behaviors so maybe they’re really volatile, really edgy, really touchy, easily irritated and you see that,” she says. The cause could be depression, anxiety, a history of trauma, experiencing a significant loss, a history of abuse, domestic violence or seeing neighborhood violence, says Gingrich. “Sometimes those things come out

Sarah Scovell, a behavioral health counselor for The Children’s Home of Cincinnati, leads a daily therapy group at Three Rivers Elementary School in Cleves.

and sometimes it might be like [attention deficit hyperactivity disorder] or autism or a learning challenge so just a variety of different presentations,” she says. The Children’s Home of Cincinnati works with children of all ages. It has an early childhood specialty team that works with children under the age of 8, says Gingrich. It also works with children in elementary, middle and high school. “We have a team that works with the kids that have mental health and substance use disorders,” she says. “So if a youth is maybe abusing alcohol or marijuana and also has depression or anxiety we can work with them and treat both conditions at the same time.” But children aren’t the only ones The Children’s Home of Cincinnati treats. The organization also offers a counseling for caregivers program for caregivers of any of the children it is working with, says Gingrich. “Sometimes the adults and the family need their own care and support,” she says. The Children’s Home of Cincinnati also offers training for other professionals, such as teachers, says Gingrich. “Education is not what it was. Things have really evolved and teachers are responding to kids that have experienced trauma or have depression, considering suicide, you know all these kind of things that teachers now have to respond to. Teachers aren’t trained in mental health so they need some additional guidance.” n


Azaria Pittman-Carter is a freshman at the University of Cincinnati. She graduated from Aiken High School after receiving services from the School-Based Mental Health program.

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Best Schools

DePaul Cristo Rey’s Secret THE SCHOOL’S WORK-STUDY PROGRAM UNLOCKS COLLEGE SUCCESS FOR LOW-INCOME STUDENTS By Mike Boyer

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ne of Cincinnati’s best-kept secrets in education is bursting at the seams. DePaul Cristo Rey High School, which helps low-income students prepare for and earn college degrees, will break ground this spring on the first phase of a $19.5 million expansion at its Clifton campus. The grades 9-12 college prep school has 325 students enrolled this year from 37 area communities from Butler County to Northern Kentucky. “Our school has been too small since we reached 280 students,” says Sr. Jeanne Bes-

sette, president and CEO. “One of the first places you see it is in the cafeteria [which was designed for 60 students]. Expansion will give us the capacity to handle 400 to 425 students.” T he Cincinnat i Sisters of Cha r it y launched the school named for St. Vincent de Paul seven years ago in Cincinnati. It is part of the national Cristo Rey network of high schools that now number more than 30 across the country. The school’s two-year building plan calls for adding a new gym and larger cafeteria in the parking lot of the former Concordia Lutheran Church and elementary school. Once that’s completed, a new three-story academic wing will be added and temporary classroom buildings will be removed to restore parking on the 10-acre site. What makes DePaul Cristo Rey’s college prep program unique is its work-study

program that allows students to earn about half their high school tuition. Four days a week, the students attend classes like other high school students, but one day a week they’re out in the community working at one of more than 125 corporate partners ranging from accounting firms to health care and social service providers. The money they earn is considered scholarship money by the U.S. Department of Labor and paid to the school to underwrite their tuition. The work-study program is DePaul Cristo Rey’s “secret sauce,” says John Moster, shareholder-in-charge at the accounting firm Clark Schaefer Hackett, which has employed DePaul Cristo Rey students for the last five years. Sakura Perry, a 17-year-old College Hill junior, is now in her second year working at Clark Schaefer. She says she works a lot with Microsoft Excel software, does filing,

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Sakura Perry, 17, works at the accounting firm Clark Schaefer Hackett for her work-study program. She has enjoyed it so much that she is looking to double majoy in it and law.

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Best Schools families who’ve navigated col lege,” says Besset te “We thought, ‘What could we do prevent kids from dropping out of college if we only knew there was an issue earlier?’ Sometimes we don’t find out until it’s too late.” La r isa Wr ig ht, who’s worked in college access programs at Mt. St. Joseph and Miami universities, is director of the College Success Program. “I’m a t raveling academic support,” she says, v isiting the 27 colleges where DePaul Cristo Rey st udent s a re en rol led, offering advice, fielding financial aid questions and helping them connect with resources. All DePaul Cristo Rey students in the school’s first three graduating classes were accepted at a “It’s really about being four-year college. proactive to solve issues that could take them out of college,” she says. and works on invoices and putting projects perform at a high level and add value. They As part of its fundraising for the expantogether for the firm. actually do,” says Moster, who now serves sion, DePaul Cristo Rey is also raising “You’d think doing paperwork all day on DePaul Cristo Rey’s board. money to create an endowment fund to would be boring but it’s not,” she says. “And there’s more to it than that,” he provide small grants to graduates who Sakura, whose older brother and sister says. “We feel like we’re doing something need financial help while in college. “We’re not naïve, poverty doesn’t go away also attended DePaul Cristo Rey, already to help change the community. We’re also helping change a child’s life as well and when our kids go to college,” says Margee has college goals. Garbsch, school spokeswoman. “I want to double major in law and ac- that’s incredibly rewarding.” counting,” she says. “I’ve learned to like One measure of DePaul Cristo Rey’s “One example was a student last semesaccounting.” success is that all the students in its first ter whose father died. She was planning to After this year’s work-study program three graduating classes were accepted at drop out of college and earn some money ends, Clark Schaefer has hired Perry to a four-year college. for his burial,” says Bessette. “But if she work for them this summer. “A four-year college acceptance is impor- left college the odds aren’t good that she’d “These students are the best selling point tant to us,” says Bessette. “We’re learning return. So we figured out the cremation this school has,” Moster says. “They are across the Cristo Rey network that our cost and she paid half and we paid half unbelievable.” kids have much better odds of finishing and we kept her in college.” Moster says when he was first ap- college if they start and finish at a fourThe school has paid other non-education proached about becoming a corporate year college.” expenses for graduates. partner he declined. None of DePaul Cristo Rey’s graduates “We’ve paid for a bus ride to and from “I wasn’t convinced there was a return have been in college long enough to gradu- school, bought students food and found on investment,” he says. It costs a corporate ate. But nationally Cristo Rey graduates an apartment one summer for young man partner $29,000 this year to hire a team of are 2.5 times more likely to finish college who was homeless,” says Bessette. “It’s not four students. only tuition, a lot of people don’t get that.” than other low-income students, it says. But after participating in the CincinTo make sure its graduates finish college, This year DePaul Cristo Rey will add nati USA Regional Chamber’s Leadership DePaul Cristo Rey has launched a College another 65 students to the 120 graduates Cincinnati Class 36 in 2012-13 studying the Success Program to help them cope with it has in college. city’s poverty issues and becoming friends the college challenges they face. The College Success Program, Bessette with Bessette he changed his mind. “One of our kids’ handicaps is that for the says, “is a program we’re going to need “We expect these students to work and most part they don’t have people in their to grow.” n 82

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Best Schools

Students D.R.I.V.E. for Good ST. URSULA ACADEMY’S NEW INITIATIVE ENCOURAGES STUDENTS TO HELP THOSE IN NEED By Jessica Baltzersen

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mbedded in its mission to educate and empower students to build a better world, Saint Ursula Academy provides families of Cincinnati basic necessities through its 2018 Community Food D.R.I.V.E initiative. According to Feeding America, in Ohio alone one in six people struggles with hunger and one in five children struggles with hunger. In response to the city’s high poverty and child hunger rates, St. Ursula is working towards being part of the solution by combining direct and indirect service opportunities for its students. D.R.I.V.E.—Donate, Respond, Invest, Value and Educate—aligns with SUA’s teaching strategy to educate students about developing broader community views, building relationships and meeting the needs of their neighbors. “We wanted to focus on educating our school community and make it more individualized and personal. We are all connected and one person’s needs affect all of us,” says Rachel Kemper, service learning director. For three weeks in February, students in each homeroom paired with different households to gather non-perishable food, hygiene products, grocery gift cards, cleaning supplies, blankets and other personal care items. This year, instead of taking place before Christmas, the outreach occurred after the holiday season when financial assistance is needed the most. Instead of blindly collecting items to stock shelves at a pantry, SUA collaborated with local nonprofits in the area—Center for Respite Care, St. Vincent de Paul, Episcopal Retirement Services, Mercy Neighborhood Ministries and Roll Hill Community Cen-

St. Ursula Academy students worked together to collect supplies and good for area nonprofits as part of its Community Food D.R.I.V.E. initiative. ter—to provide requested items tailored specifically to each family’s needs. Different from food drives in the past, senior students, faculty and staff delivered the items personally to different agencies and households. “This way we really saw the impact we were making!” says Eva Caudill, D.R.I.V.E. student organizer. Prior to delivery day, the students exchanged postcards with the various households connected to the different partner agencies in an effort to share information and get to know one another before meeting on March 2 (the scheduled day of delivery). “We are attempting to make it more of an opportunity for personal connection and getting to know others in our local community who we may not otherwise get to meet,” adds Kemper. In addition to the collection of nutritious, shelf-stable food and hygiene products, the SUA community collected monetary donations that will assist local families with

the purchase of fresh food items. “The most monumental impact of D.R.I.V.E. was 100 percent participation,” says Caudill. “We made it mandatory to donate money or actual items towards the family. This makes our community stronger and our mission statement stay true to what we believe.” “We are very lucky to have great partnerships and working relationships with local nonprofits that help us provide educational experiences about issues of justice, as well as opportunities for our students to contribute to the greater good locally,” says Kemper. n w w w.

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Business

HARRY BLACK

page 86

MEETING & EVENT PLANNER

page 91

LYONS & LYONS

page 108

POWER 100 RE-CAP

page 109

BUSINESS CALENDAR

page 112

BEST IN BUSINESS DIRECTORY

page 113

The Power 100 panel, from left: Karen Bankston, Dave Herche, O’dell Owens and Rob Reifsnyder with moderator Eric Harmon

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The Calm Before the Storm

THE CITY MANAGER HAS GONE TO BAT FOR CINCINNATI, AND COURTED CONTROVERSY By Liz Engel

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He seems to have hit his stride. There’s plans to up the ante on innovation, to literally pave more roads and make city government more efficient. It’s highly unclear whether he’ll be here to see those through.

THE ROAD TO THE QUEEN CITY Black didn’t always pine for a career in government. Initially, he wanted to be a physician. When he graduated from east Baltimore’s Dunbar High School in 1981, he left as a certified lab tech. “But when I got to college as a pre-med student,” he says, “it became very clear that wasn’t going to work,” he says with a laugh. So he switched tracks to political science before landing—for good—in public administration. It was “something a little more practical,” he admits. But it clicked. “I think it was always in me,” Black says. “I think public service was just part of my DNA.” Black started his career in New York, worked in Washington, D.C., and spent three years in Richmond, Virginia, as the city’s deputy chief administrative officer.

Harry Black

PHOTO BY JOE SIMON

Editor’s Note: When this issue went to print March 16, the controversy surrounding Harry Black had reached new heights. Mayor John Cranley had asked for Black’s resignation, Black had refused and a war of words began in the local press. The Calm Before the Storm reflects the position of the city and Black when we went to press t’s a Thursday afternoon in mid-February, and Cincinnati City Manager Harry Black is calm. Relaxed, even. Of course, there’s no way he could ever predict the drama that’s yet to come. Enter March, and there’s a call for his resignation. Accusations of retaliatory behavior. Claims he’s been less than transparent. But Black stands firm. Sitting in his Plum Street office—in his last sit-down interview before that call to resign—he talks purposefully, brushing past personal questions but lingering longer on those that allow him to talk more about Cincinnati: its unique qualities, its people and the 52 neighborhoods that make up its bounds. He says he’s been the city’s biggest cheerleader. He loves it here. He has big goals for year four on the job.


He was in Baltimore in 2014 working as the city’s finance director when he got a call from a recruiter about the job here. He earned Mayor John Cranley’s nod for the position—and city council’s unanimous support. He started in September of that same year. Cranley called it “an exciting time” for Cincinnati. Exactly three and a half years later, Cranley makes a complete about-face. “It was the most strenuous recruitment process I’ve ever experienced,” Black recalls. “I was literally interviewed by at least 160 people—there were series of one-on-ones, one-on-threes, one-on-fives [etc.]. But it was a tremendous development opportunity. I’ve always wanted to be a city manager. It’s the pinnacle of the profession.” His marquee accomplishment, no question, has been the Office of Performance and Data Analytics (OPDA), a department Black created from scratch. The idea is to collect and analyze city data for efficiency, transparency and to improve customer service. The department “has had tremendous success,” Black says.  Rocky Merz, communications director for the city, calls it the “hallmark of his tenure to date.” But Black is quick to point out others, like the city’s capital acceleration plan, or CAP, in which Cincinnati has improved its pavement condition index, a rating for roads, from “fair” to “good.” The city has nearly tripled the number of lane miles resurfaced or rehabbed.  Cincinnati, too, has made major strides in economic inclusion. In 2013, the city spent less than $4 million a year on contracts with minority- and women-owned businesses. In 2016, that number hit $27.9 million.  And Black plans to roll out a few new “Smart City” initiatives in 2018—installation has already started on a “fiber ring” in the Central Business District, which will improve traffic signalization and pave the way for free Wi-Fi downtown. “The goal is to make Cincinnati the best it can be,” Black says. “We want Cincinnatians to be proud of their government. We’ve accomplished so much, but we’ve done it as a team. The mayor has a role to play. Council has a role to play. Administration has a role to play. I think our unprecedented success has been the result of all entities working together.”

Willie Halsell speaks in support of City Manager Harry Black at a City Council meeting on March 14, 2018.

THE ROADBLOCKS But there’s also been controversy—and not just lately. In 2015, Black fired Cincinnati Police Chief Jeffrey Blackwell, a decision that angered many who criticized the process behind the decision. In 2017, Black was named in at least three separate federal lawsuits claiming abuse of power, including one from Cincinnati Police Captain Jeffrey Butler, who said he was denied a promotion after complaining about possible misuse of funds. Earlier this year, a former city employee said Black shouted threats when she complained about mismanagement at the city’s 911 call center. And in March, a stalemate with Cranley. Black, after complaining about a “rogue element” within the police department, forced out Assistant Police Chief Dave Bailey, the department’s second in command, in a buyout that will cost taxpayers roughly $400,000. Hours later, there was a meeting between Black and Cranley, in which the mayor asked Black to resign. Cranley, during a March 14 press conference, said his push to part ways with Black is not about the Bailey incident, despite the timing, but rather a pattern of behavior that threatens the “morale” and “productivity” of the city’s 6,300 employees. He says there’s proof. Black responded publically that there’s efforts to smear him. “It’s a sad day for Cincinnati,” Cranley said. “I brought Harry here, and we did some great things together, but there are behaviors I’ve asked him to address that continue to repeat themselves. I believe in second chances, third chances, fourth chances…but the behaviors [don’t change].” Black, however, seems steadfast; he says he’s here to stay—as long as mayor and city council will have him. It takes five votes

to fire a city manager, and it’s unclear if Cranley has that level of support. “The key for the city manager is to not be political, but the city manager must be politically astute,” Black says weeks before. “The key is to play straight down the middle, and to always maintain absolute professionalism.” As for the life expectancy of a cit y manager—here, or anywhere else, for that matter—longevity is rare. Turnover, in this profession, is high. In Cincinnati, on average, a city manager lasts less than six years. A recent national survey shows the average tenure is less than seven. Milton Dohoney, Black’s predecessor, served that long (2006-2013). Valerie Lemmie (2002-2005) and John Shirey (1995-2001) were on the job for three and six years, respectively.  The average stint of a Major League Baseball manager, for comparison—a line of work maybe only slightly more volatile than this—is 3.7 seasons. Black has almost made that mark. Longer than Cincinnati Reds heads Lou Piniella, Bob Boone and Jerry Narron, at least.  “The last three and a half years, unequivocally, have been the most productive of my entire career,” he says. “If people view me as a change agent, that’s good. If people view me as a coach/ quarterback leader, that’s desirable. If people view me as not being afraid to get my hands dirty and work, that’s flattering. If people view me as a tough task master, but fair, that’s a compliment.  “Hopefully whenever my run concludes—whenever that might be—people will say, ‘he made a difference,’” he adds. “Hopefully they’ll say, ‘He came to Cincinnati and gave everything he had back to the people.’” n w w w.

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dine with us

Chef Aaron Owen invites you to experience our seasonal, chef-driven, modern Italian creations.

Plan your event

Host your business meeting or special occasion in one of our unique event spaces. 1420 Sycamore Street, Cincinnati, OH 45202 (513) 721-6200 • contact@nicolasotr.com • events@nicolasotr.com


Tristate Meeting and Event Planner Guide 2018

More Than a Meeting LOCAL VENUES ARE MAKING BUSINESS EVENTS MORE FUN AND BENEFICIAL By Caroline Wiita

W

ith the revitalization of Cincinnati’s downtown neighborhoods, it’s no surprise that local businesses are ditching the conventional conference. While the traditional meeting location still exists, companies are now looking at venues that can host any group outing in an upbeat environment.

THE CARNEGIE HALL AT NEWPORT Best known as a historic landmark and a former Carnegie library, the Carnegie Hall at Newport takes guests back to the turn of the 20th century in the middle of northern Kentucky’s cityscape. Inside the limestone building, guests are greeted by Italian Renaissance architecture, including marble columns and ornate chandeliers. The styling behind this former library is idyllic for weddings and receptions, but the venue can hold any event. Every event at the Carnegie Hall includes exclusive use of the 10,000-square-foot building, says Pegg y Sparks, general manager of the facility. This includes all three floors of the building, as well as the outdoor garden terrace. In addition to the whole venue, groups have the ability to bring in the caterer of their choice. “We believe each group has their own preferred taste in food and beverage,” Sparks says. “So we allow the client to select the caterer that best fits their taste and budget.” The Carnegie Hall also has breakout rooms, an integrated sound system, complimentary Wi-Fi, a large stage for keynote speakers or performances, and even a pool table for more relaxed functions.

BOOST BOOST is a site the solely holds corporate events. BOOST hosts corporate groups for a variety of functions: retreats, team

The Carnegie in Newport

building, brainstorming sessions, strategy meetings, workshops, training sessions, consumer research and more, says owner Jenny White. Meetings are its function, but as BOOST’s slogan says, it’s “not your typical meeting space.” With other venues, there may be multiple groups having events on the same day. BOOST only hosts one group per day. With a Nintendo Wii, a Karaoke machine, swing chairs, cornhole and more, BOOST incorporates fun elements into the environment. “A great deal of effort goes into planning a meeting before it happens, and every meeting has objectives it sets out to meet or exceed,” says White. “It’s our goal to immerse attendees in a space that doesn’t feel like a workspace, but where the work gets done.” Located in the heart of Over-the-Rhine, BOOST’s design is the antithesis of a corporate office. For example, the 4,600-squarefoot loft has natural sunlight, hardwood floors, a spiral staircase and decorated metalwork. BOOST is also home to a rooftop deck that dons an excellent view of downtown Cincinnati.

IMPROV CINCINNATI Sometimes, instead of a group meeting,

companies are looking for team building activities. Improv Cincinnati helps groups learn—and to laugh along the way. Improv Cincinnati can serve the precise needs of any group—that’s what makes improv so versatile. “If a team just wants t wo hours of fun and laughter, we can provide that service,” says Improv Cincinnati executive director Jon Ulrich. “If they’d like to cultivate practicing specific skills—executive presence, speaking with passion, active listening, building trust, etc.—we can do that, too.” One of the things that makes an improv workshop different than other team building outings is the connections the team makes. “Participants were noticeably applying the concepts in the following days [after the workshop]. Partnering with clients enables us to provide … practical and relevant business skill training,” Ulrich says. Taking an Improv Cincinnati workshop cultivates trust, creativ it y and communication, among other skills, says Ulrich. “Plus, improv workshops provide the rare opportunity for adults to play and laugh together—always a good thing.” n w w w.

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the art of inspiration

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Tristate Meeting and Event Planner Guide 2018 Hotels

Number of Number of Rooms/ Meeting Suites Rooms

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

Theater Capacity

Classroom Capacity

Banquet Capacity

Maximum Reception Number of Capacity Booths

Features

AIRPORT HOTELS Cincinnati Airport Marriott • 2395 Progress Dr • Hebron, KY 41048 • 859586-0166 • cincinnatiairportmarriott.com

294/8

11

7,480

750

400

550

750

220

Executive fitness center with indoor lap pool, concierge level with morning breakfast, evening reception, business center, work station, high-speed Internet access.

Hilton Cincinnati Airport • 7373 Turfway Rd • Florence, KY 41042 • 859-371-4400 cincinnatiairport.hilton.com

300/10

15

3,940

400

200

280

300

20

High-speed Internet, exercise room, indoor pool, airport shuttle.

Holiday Inn Cincinnati Airport • 1717 Airport Exchange Blvd • Erlanger, KY 41018 • 859-371-2233 • holidayinn.com/ cvg-airport

287/5

18

6,612

700

400

500

130

28

Exercise facilities, indoor pool, jacuzzi, sauna, free wireless Internet, complimentary airport transportation.

176/1

17

5,400

525

300

420

600

35

The only hotel at the Cincinnati/NKY International Airport. Private business center with 24-hour access, complimentary airport shuttle and hotel parking, complimentary wireless Internet access in public areas, private club, more than Bistro Danielle, bar, indoor pool, fitness center.

21c Museum Hotel • 6 0 9 Walnut St Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513-578-6600 21cmuseumhotels.com

136/20

7

1,900

140

72

120

200

14

21c has more than 8,000 square feet of art-filled space in the heart of downtown’s arts and entertainment district for board retreats, executive meetings, cocktail gatherings, weddings, reception dinners or any kind of event.

The Cincinnatian Hotel • 601 Vine St Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513-381-3000 cincinnatianhotel.com

144/2

6

1,144

120

60

90

125

Hilton Cincinnati Netherland Plaza • 35 W 5th St • Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513-4219100 • cincinnatinetherlandplaza.hilton.com

488/73

39

11,343

1,000

500

730

1,000

45

Four-diamond hotel and restaurant. National Historic Landmark, art deco styling. Business center, executive lounge, high-speed Wi-Fi Internet, fine dining, bar, health club.

Hyatt Regency Cincinnati • 151 W 5th St Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513-579-1234 cincinnati.hyatt.com

477/14

18

14,219

1,650

750

1,200

2,000

86

Across from the Duke Energy Convention Center. Concierge, health club, indoor pool, high-speed Internet and complimentary Wi-Fi. Guest rooms, meeting space and restaurants.

DoubleTree by Hilton Cincinnati Airport 2826 Terminal Dr • Hebron, KY 41048 859-371-6166 • cincinnatiairport. doubletree.com

DOWNTOWN

Millennium Hotel Cincinnati • 150 W 5th St Cincinnati, OH 45212 • 513-352-2100 millenniumhotels.com/cincinnati

828/44

30

10,527

1,200

520

1,500

Renaissance Cincinnati Downtown Hotel 36 E, Fourth St., Cincinnati, OH 45202 513-333-0000 Fax: 513-455-6450 marriott.com Number of Rooms/Suites

Palace Restaurant, Cricket Lounge, business center, fitness center, concierge service, free Wi-Fi, AAA four-diamond.

Located in the hear t of downtown, events will be close to hundreds of shops, museums, restaurants and entertainment venues. The highly trained, multilingual staff full-service banquet and catering staff stands ready with a “make it happen” attitude” and a friendly smile.

1,500

Constructed by the famed Chicago architect Daniel Burnham in 1901, the hotel was once Ohio’s tallest skyscraper. Today, it’s an inimitable destination for a meeting or event in the heart of downtown Cincinnati. The conference room spaces exude classic sophistication while providing the latest in meeting and events technology.

Number of Meeting Rooms

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

Theater Capacity

Classroom Capacity

Banquet Capacity

Reception Capacity

Maximum Number of Booths

8

6,800

600

200

450

400

100

SpringHill Suites Cincinnati Midtown • 610 Eden Park Dr • Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513381-8300 • marriott.com/cvgdt

122 suites

1

464

12

8

n/a

n/a

n/a

Proximity to Eden Park, Mt. Adams and downtown. Lounge/ bar serving beer, wine and cocktails, fitness center, indoor pool, complimentary breakfast, free high-speed Internet.

The Westin Cincinnati • 21 E 5th St Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513-621-7700 westincincinnati.com

450/6

17

8,880

1,000

500

700

1,000

59

Overlooking historic Fountain Square. McCormick & Schmick’s Seafood Restaurant and Ingredients (gourmet grab-and-go). WestinWORKOUT®. AAA four-diamond.

198/8

23

5,355

630

330

350

500

Fitness center, complimentary high-speed Internet, restaurant, lounge, covered parking garage, business center, gift shop, valet parking available. Located near the University of Cincinnati.

Two concierge levels, 24-hour executive facility and business communication center, high-speed Internet, indoor pool, on-site restaurant, fitness center.

UPTOWN Marriott Kingsgate Conference Center Hotel 151 Goodman Dr • Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-487-3800 • kingsgatemarriott.com

NORTH/NORTHWEST Cin cin n a t i M ar r io t t N o r t h a t U nio n Centre • 6189 Muhlhauser Rd • West Ch e s t er, O H 4 5 0 6 9 • 513 - 8 74 -73 3 5 cincinnatimarriottnorth.com

298/4

15

7,480

960

480

500

960

DoubleTree Suites by Hilton CincinnatiBlue Ash • 6300 E Kemper Rd Sharonville, OH 45241 • 513-489-3636 cincinnatiblueashsuites.doubletree.com

152 suites

15

2,100

200

140

160

200

20

All-suites, award-winning Hilton hotel. Conveniently located to the business districts of Blue Ash, Sharonville, Mason and West Chester. Fitness room, business center, outdoor pool and award-winning restaurant.

Meeting Facilities begin on pg. 96. Hotels and Facilities sorted by area. w w w.

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Executive Transportation

When Getting You There Means Business Family Owned since 1961

100 diversified vehicles Sedans, SUV’s, Shuttle Vans, Executive Vans, Motor Coaches and Mini-coaches.

- Hotel - Business - Home - Private Service -

1810 Monmouth Street • Newport, KY 41071 859-261-8841 • executivetransportation.org


Tristate Meeting and Event Planner Guide 2018 Number of Number of Rooms/ Meeting Suites Rooms

Hotels

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

Theater Capacity

Classroom Capacity

Banquet Capacity

Embassy Suites Blue Ash Business • 4554 Lake Forest Dr • Blue Ash, OH 45242 513-733-8900 • embassysuitesblueash.com

238 suites

8

4,828

450

250

375

Hueston Woods Lodge & Conference Center 5201 Lodge Rd • College Corner, OH 45003 513-664-3500 • huestonwoodslodge.com

92/2

6

3,404

375

150

250

Maximum Reception Number of Capacity Booths

500

Features

Business center, fitness center, pool, restaurant. Located in state park, complimentary Wi-Fi, exercise area, indoor and outdoor pools, 37 equipped cottages, golf course, marina, dining room, lounge, tennis, basketball, disc golf, sand volleyball.

Exclusive presidential and executive suites. Free wireless high-speed Internet access. 24-hour fitness center and access to Queen City Racquet Club. Over 25,000 square feet of functional and flexible banquet space. Complimentary on-site parking. Full-service business center. Heated indoor pool. On-site restaurant and bar. Attached to 50,000-square-foot indoor water park Splash Cincinnati.

Ramada Plaza Cincinnati North 11320 Chester Road • Sharonville, OH 45246 513-771-2080 Fax: 513-771-2312 ramadaplazacincy.com Number of Rooms/Suites

Number of Meeting Rooms

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

Theater Capacity

Classroom Capacity

Banquet Capacity

Reception Capacity

Maximum Number of Booths

237

13

8,400

900

400

500

1,100

50

EAST/NORTHEAST Best Western Premier Mariemont Inn • 6880 Wooster Pike • Cincinnati, OH 45227 • 513271-2100 • mariemontinn.com

45/1

3

2,500

100

170

170

170

Crowne Plaza Cincinnati Blue Ash • 5901 Pfeiffer Rd • Cincinnati, OH 45242 • 513793-4500 • cpcincinnati.com

175/25

11

5,100

500

300

400

400

30

Business center, high-speed wireless Internet, on-site restaurant, lounge, indoor pool, fitness center.

16

7,183

800

510

600

1,000

35

The only full-service hotel in the Eastgate area. Flexible meeting space, comfortable guest rooms, and outstanding service await you. Awarded “Best Place to Host a Wedding” in 2018.

Holiday Inn & Suites Cincinnati Eastgate 4501 Eastgate Blvd. • Cincinnati, OH 45245 513-752-4400 • Fax: 513-943-5820 holidayinn.com/cvg-eastgate

On National Register of Historic Places. Restaurant on site, fitness center, business center.

HOST YOUR EVENT WITH US! Teambuilding - Corporate Meetings Happy Hours - Holiday Parties Birthday Parties - Graduations Rehearsal Dinners

16 State-of-the-Art Lanes - Full Bar & Menu Private Rooms - Customizable A/V Systems Contact Group Sales to schedule: sales@axisalleylevee.com or call 859-652-7250 Newport on the Levee ~ 1 Levee Way, Suite 1112 ~ Newport, KY 41071 ~ AxisalleyLevee.com w w w.

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Tristate Meeting and Event Planner Guide 2018 Number of Number of Rooms/ Meeting Suites Rooms

Hotels

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

Theater Capacity

Classroom Capacity

Banquet Capacity

The Summit, a Dolce Hotel 5345 Medpace Way, Cincinnati, OH 45227 513-527-9900 thesummithotel.com Number of Rooms/Suites

Clarion Hotel Cincinnati North • 3855 Hauck Rd • Cincinnati, OH 45241 • 513-563-8330 choicehotels.com

273/1

9

Number of Meeting Rooms

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

Theater Capacity

Classroom Capacity

Banquet Capacity

Reception Capacity

19

4,750

320

250

320

320

6,000

632

414

500

667

36

Maximum Number of Booths

Indoor pool, business center, fitness center, complimentary high-speed Internet.

Great Wolf Lodge Cincinnati/Mason offers configurable meeting rooms, uncompromised culinary quality and a team of experienced meeting professionals committed to your success.

Number of Rooms/Suites

Number of Meeting Rooms

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

Theater Capacity

Classroom Capacity

401 suites

15

9,847

1,036

432

122

Features

The Summit offers 32,600 square feet of meeting space, rooftop gardens, Nourishment Anytime, Anywhere™, a well-stocked library, art gallery and fitness center with yoga studio.

Great Wolf Lodge Cincinnati/Mason 2501 Great Wolf Drive, Mason, OH 45040 513-229-5817 Fax: 513-228-5809 greatwolf.com/meetings

Hilton Garden Inn Cincinnati Blue Ash 5300 Cornell Rd • Cincinnati, OH 45242 513-469-6900 • cincinnatiblueash.hgi.com

Maximum Reception Number of Capacity Booths

Banquet Capacity

Reception Capacity

Maximum Number of Booths

660

1,094

56

5

2,220

246

150

184

222

40

Site includes a beautifully appointed 2,220-square-foot ballroom and state-of-the-art meeting spaces for groups from 10 to 245. The culinary staff prepares fresh dishes to accompany any gathering.

8

5,096

600

460

320

900

45

Restaurant, concierge lounge, fitness center, business center, indoor pool, high-speed wireless Internet.

NORTHERN KENTUCKY Cincinnati Marriott at RiverCenter • 10 W RiverCenter Blvd • Covington, KY 41011 859-261-2900 • marriott.com/cvgdr

321/4

Oldest and largest wine producer in Ohio

No matter the occasion, book your private event with Meier’s! 6955 Plainfield Rd. | Silverton Ohio (513) 891-2900 | drinkmeiers.com 94

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4 VENUES to accommodate 25–1000 guests with room configurations and services customized to meet your needs A SPECIAL EVENTS TEAM dedicated to delivering your event just the way you want it

Customized CATERING to fit your budget Conveniently located between Cincinnati and Dayton – JUST OFF I-75 AT EXIT 29 with lots of FREE parking

Over 1800 GAMING MACHINES for you and your guests to enjoy after the event FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO BOOK YOUR GROUP PLEASE

EMAIL: MVGEVENT@MVGRLLC.COM

Just off I-75 Exit 29

OR

CALL: 513-934-7755

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Tristate Meeting and Event Planner Guide 2018 Number of Number of Rooms/ Meeting Suites Rooms

Hotels

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

Theater Capacity

Classroom Capacity

Banquet Capacity

Maximum Reception Number of Capacity Booths

Embassy Suites by Hilton Cincinnati RiverCenter • 10 E RiverCenter Blvd Covington, K Y 41011 • 859 -261-8400 embassysuitesrivercenter.com

227 suites

9

3,800

300

150

230

300

Radisson Hotel Cincinnati Riverfront • 668 W 5th St • Covington, KY 41011 • 859-4911200 radisson.com/covingtonky

216/4

6

6,000

400

250

450

350

Features

Business center, part-time pizza and frozen yogurt restaurant, high-speed Internet, banquet room with view of city. 25

Indoor pool with retractable roof, workout room, guest laundry, complimentary high-speed wireless Internet, revolving restaurant.

350

With more than 50,000 square feet of flexible meeting space, including everything from grand ballrooms to smaller breakout rooms, Belterra is the region’s premier event facility. Our meeting rooms feature on-site state-of-the-art sound and video equipment to handle executive functions and business meetings alike.

INDIANA Belterra Casino and Hotel • 777 Belterra Dr • Florence, IN 47020 • 812-427-7777 888-BELTERRA • belterracasino.com

608/15

Hollywood Casino & Hotel • 777 Hollywood Blvd • Lawrenceburg, IN 47025 • 888-2746797 • hollywoodindiana.com

295/5

Rising Star Casino Resort • 777 Rising Star Dr • Rising Sun, IN 47040 • 800-472-6311 risingstarcasino.com

294 including suites

6

12,000

720

460

Number of Meeting Rooms

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

Theater Capacity

Classroom Capacity

Banquet Capacity

American Sign Museum • 1330 Monmouth Ave • Cincinnati, OH 45225 • 513-5416366 • americansignmuseum.org

1

20,000

190

175

175

175 seated, 700 cocktail/ standing

50

Cincinnati's unique venue, home of the history of American signage from 1870-1970, perfect for weddings, corporate events, holiday and private parties.

Anderson Center • 7850 Five Mile Rd Cincinnati, OH 45230 • 513-688-8400 andersoncenterevents.org

3

3,000

223

150

200

200

30

Theater, banquet room, conference room, community room, atrium and outdoor plaza.

Meeting Facilities

9

10,000

900+

480

720

10,000

720

900+

600

Five res t aur ant s, high-speed wireless Inter net, complimentary coffee station.

720

Indoor pool, jacuzzi and sauna, fitness center, Scottish Link-style golf course, Big Vic’s Pub and Grub restaurant, fine dining at Wellington's Steakhouse, Riverview Buffet, Starbucks Queen City Market featuring Skyline and Graeter's, Internet access.

Maximum Reception Number of Capacity Booths Features

OHIO

600

Providing picnic facilities, nature trails, and children's play areas, Ault Park adds to its attractions with a splendid pavilion and lookout point and beautiful gardens. Ault is one of Southwest Ohio's premier parks and hosts events such as the Concours d' Elegance Car Show, as well as summer dances and a community July 4th celebration. Its beautiful backdrop and pavilion make it popular for weddings and private parties.

300

The former St. Paul Church features vaulted ceilings, stained glass windows, hand-painted murals, marble and terrazzo flooring.

300

Located on the banks of the Ohio River, Belterra Park offers live racing Thursday through Sunday in addtion to 1,200 video lottery terminals. They have six different restaurants offering everything from fine dining to bars and grills.

100

Blue Ocean Facilities has creative meeting rooms that are adaptable for creative activities such as ideation, strategic planning and customer/ consumer groups. Full and ½ day meeting space available.

230

An authentic Brazilian churrascaria with a variety of menu items and the largest and only salad bar in Downtown Cincinnati. The front dining room features a superb view of Fountain Square. AV equipment is also available.

Ault Park • 3600 Observatory Ave Cincinnati, OH 45208 • 513-221-2610 premierparkevents.com

1

Bell Event Centre • 444 Reading Road Cincinnati, OH 45202• 513-852-2787 belleventcentre.com

1

Belterra Park • 6301 Kellogg Ave Cincinnati, OH 45230 • 513-232-8000 belterrapark.com

1

7,500

300

150

Blue Ocean Facilities • 10250 Alliance Road, Suite 226 • Blue Ash, OH 45242• 513-842 6323 • blueoceanfacilities.com

3

1,700

30

30

Boi Na Braza • 441 Vine St • Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513-421-7111 • boinabraza. com

3

50

50

BOOST ... for meetings sake • 538 Reading Rd • Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513621-8222 • boostmeeting.com

1

80

44

Functional and playful meeting spaces bursting with natural sunlight, tradtional and non-traditional furnishings, outdoor space, meeting supplies, AV, snacks and beverages included with rental. Easy planning process with single point of contact.

24

BrainStorm is an intimate urban loft located in the heart of downtown Cincinnati. This creative meeting space is perfect for your next business meeting or social event. The 100-year-old building has been renovated to meet our modern needs while keeping the character of the original structure. Our unique space includes 4,000 sq. ft. open loft area, a private conference room, a full kitchen, a lounge area, and break-out rooms.

Brainstorm Creative Meeting and Event Space • 815 Main St Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513-421-0318 brainstormevents.com

96

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maga zine.com

3,000

4,600

4,000

600

100

200

600

250

50

72

130


The Grand Ballroom


Tristate Meeting and Event Planner Guide 2018 Meeting Facilities

Number of Meeting Rooms

Carlo & Johnny • 9769 Montgomery Rd Montgomery, OH 45242 • 513-936-8600 jeffruby.com/carlojohnny

5

The Center • 115 E 5th St Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513-824-7274 thecentercincinnati.com

6

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

4,251

Theater Capacity

Classroom Capacity

Banquet Capacity

Maximum Reception Number of Capacity Booths Features

40

24

65

75

400

400

350

350

Zagat rates Carlo & Johnny higher than any steakhouse in either Chicago or New York City, America's quintessential steakhouse towns. We feature more than 14 U.S.D.A. Prime steaks--more than anyone in Cincinnati. Known also for incredible live entertainment and a vibrant bar scene as well as a seemingly endless raw bar offering 10 varieties of oysters, king crab and lobster, Carlo & Johnny delivers the Jeff Ruby Experience with effortless charm and hospitality. 20

Downtown location central to hotels and parking, contemporary architecture with nearly 15,000 square feet of customizable space. Spacious ballroom with hardwood floors, direct view of Fountain Square and elegant reception area under lit dome.

The classic elegance of the museum is a most memorable location for receptions, luncheons, parties, meetings, retreats and corporate events. Our executive chef can help you create a perfect culinary experience and our sophisticated service staff will execute service with precision.

Cincinnati Art Museum 953 Eden Park Drive, Cincinnati OH 45202 513-721-ARTS (2787) cincinnatiartmuseum.org Number Meeting Rooms

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

Theater Capacity

Classroom Capacity

Banquet Capacity

Reception Capacity

Maximum Number of Booths

6

1,842

300

60

300

170

16

Cincinnati Club Building • 30 Garfield Place, Suite 10 • Cincinnati, OH 45202 859-392-8261 • mchalescatering.com

5

Cincinnati Music Hall • 1241 Elm St Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513-744-3242 cincinnatiarts.org

6

Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame & Museum 100 Joe Nuxhall Way • Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513-765-7923 • cincinnati.reds. mlb.com/cin/hof/

1

4,134

500

300

300

300

2,500

400

800

1,300

150

Elegant European-style rooms, historic building built in 1925 as a grand hotel, Attached to parking. Home to offices of Cincy Magazine. 100

A national landmark offering a variety of spaces available from the worldrenowned auditorium to the dramatic ballroom. Ballroom features barrelvaulted ceiling, hardwood floor, elegant bar and decorative mirrors.. Showcasing the world’s largest collection of Reds memorabilia.

Nathanael Greene Lodge is located fifteen minutes from downtown Cincinnati in the heart of Green Township. The parklike setting is perfect for an intimate ceremony under the new outdoor gazebo or to have a reception in the 50 foot cathedral ceiling Continental Ballroom, which can accommodate up to 200 guests. Nathanael Greene Lodge also has the perfect setting for a memorable birthday party, stress free rehearsal dinner, or enjoyable family gathering. The Mulberry Room has seating accommodations for up to 80 guests and has access to an outdoor patio. The West Point Room is ideal for 50 guests or less and is perfect for a corporate gathering. For business meetings or corporate outings, Nathanael Greene Lodge is ideal because of its close proximity to hotels and highways. The quiet setting, upgraded audiovisual systems, ample parking and various meetings rooms accommodate the needs of any size group from 12 or 200.

6394 Wesselman Road | Cincinnati, Ohio 45248 | 513-598-3100 | greentwp.org/departments/nathanael-greene-lodge 98

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Number of Meeting Rooms

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

Theater Capacity

Classroom Capacity

Banquet Capacity

Cincinnati State Technical & Community College • 3520 Central Parkway Cincinnati, OH 45223 • 513-569-4123 cincinnatistate.edu

1

5,000

400

100

224

Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden 3400 Vine St • Cincinnati, OH 45220 513-487-3481 • cincinnatizoo.org

4

4,500

400

150

330

400

40

Four Zoo-nique indoor venues with AV capabilities in addition to multiple outdoor venues, including animal exhibits, are available for meetings, dinners, receptions or picnic outings. There are four outdoor picnic shelters available. Special animal visits create an even more memorable event!

Cintas Center • 1624 Herald Ave Cincinnati, OH 45207 • 513-745-3428 cintascenter.com

7

12,000

770

450

650

770

90

This 300,000-square-foot center is three facilities in one – arena, conference center and banquet center. Features on-site catering, stateof-the-art technical capabilities and free parking. Centrally located in the Tristate on the beautiful campus of Xavier University.

Contemporary Arts Center • 44 E 6th St Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513-345-8415 contemporaryartscenter.org

4

3,500

150

210

250

350

Cooper Creek Event Center • 4040 Cooper Rd • Blue Ash, OH 45241 • 513-745-8596 coopercreekblueash.com

3

6,960

500

261

360

400

Meeting Facilities

Dave & Buster’s • 11775 Commons Dr Springdale, OH 45246 • 513-671-5501 daveandbusters.com

4

Duke Energy Convention Center • 525 Elm St Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513-419-7300 Fax: 513-419-7327 • duke-energycenter.com

30

Eddie Merlot’s • 10808 Montgomery Road Cincinnati, Ohio 45242 • (513)489-1212 eddiemerlots.com/locations/cincinnati/

4

Features Wi-Fi, multimedia and computer presentation equipment. Catering through the Midwest Culinary Institute.

200

250

200

200,000

11,700

2,400

12,550

1,050

200

70

82

18_3763_CAM_CincyMag_TerracottaArmyMarch_E02_v04sarah.pdf

1

Maximum Reception Number of Capacity Booths Features

Downtown accessibility. Galleries for touring, including the Unmuseum.

34

65,000 square feet of food, fun and games. From the Grand Dining Room, Million Dollar Midway, multi-level Viewpoint Areas and private rooms such as the Function Room 1 to the fully stocked bars, D&B has an event area for every occasion. The entire facility can be rented for an exclusive close-out event.

250

964

The largest grand ballroom in Cincinnati with more than 39,500 square feet. The 195,000-square-foot Exhibit hall can be split into three rooms.. Eddie Merlot’s offers several private and semi-private dining areas, giving you a variety of choices to meet your needs, with accommodations available for as few as 10 guests to as many as 300. In addition, our entire restaurant is also available for large corporate or charitable functions..

100

2/15/18

Cooper Creek Event Center is an inviting, upscale destination overlooking the scenic Blue Ash Golf Course specializing in social and corporate events.

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Tristate Meeting and Event Planner Guide 2018 Number of Meeting Rooms

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

Theater Capacity

Classroom Capacity

Banquet Capacity

EnterTRAINment Junction • 7379 Squire Court • West Chester, OH 45069 • 513898-8000 • entertrainmentjunction.com

8

25,000

250

60

250

500

55

Whether it’s a sales meeting, a product launch, team-building exercises, lunch, dinner or holiday party, let us help you set the stage for fun, creativity and innovative thinking.

The Farm • 239 Anderson Ferry Rd Cincinnati, OH 45238 • 513-922-7020 theplacetohaveaparty.com

3

9,000

100

300

600

600

25

Three rooms with large dance floors. Excellent catering prepared on site. Popular Tuesday and Thursdays evening dinner buffet. With over 75,000 square feet, Game On! Sports Complex is the perfect place for a party, no matter what the size! From birthday parties for the little ones and big receptions to everything in between, we can accommodate all of your party needs. Choose the space or spaces you will need and we will assist you with food, decor, and more!

Meeting Facilities

Game On! Sports Complex • 6630 Hamilton Ave • Cincinnati, OH 45244 513-432-5100 • gameoncinci.com

3

25,200

Great American Ball Park • 100 Joe Nuxhall Way • Cincinnati, OH 45202 513-765-7237 • reds.com

18

10,500

Jack Casino • 1000 Broadway St Cincinnati, Ohio 45202 jackentertainment.com

13

Jeff Ruby's Steakhouse • 700 Walnut St Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513-784-1200 jeffruby.com/cincinnati

2

Lazer Kraze • 7082 Columbia Road Maineville, OH 45039 • 513-339-1030 lazerkraze.com

6

19,000

500

1,900

1,000

Maximum Reception Number of Capacity Booths Features

40

1,000

1,000

Booths could be set up on turf/ courts

250

350

550

70

1,200

54

1,200

Unique meeting space inside home of the Cincinnati Reds.

1,900

Situated just off the Ohio River at the Broadway Commons site in the heart of Downtown. A first-class property with nearly 33,000 square feet of flexible meeting and event space. With two large, configurable venues divisible into as many as 11 rooms, including an 19,000-squarefoot ballroom. The property also features a usable outdoor event space. Perfect for nearly any meeting or event for up to 1,900 attendees.

50

A favorite of celebrities, athletes, politicians and special-occasion diners, Jeff Ruby's Steakhouse delivers award-winning steaks, seafood and service. Combined with live nightly entertainment and impeccable attention to detail, this is the perfect backdrop for an extraordinary evening.

54

8

ARTS

Schedule your next corporate team-building event with us. Five different size rooms that can accommodate 16-54 people with tables and chairs for meetings or parties.

BUSINESS

CULTURE

STUFFY MEETINGS? NEVER. We offer fun, unique and on-trend upgrades that will make your event the one guests talk about for years to come. •

Convenient to Downtown Cincinnati

Complimentary Parking

Stress Free Room Rental

Flexible Pricing & Custom Packages

700 Madison Avenue, Covington, KY 41011 info@thecovingtonmadison.com • 859.261.1117

100

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Like us on facebook and stay updated on upcoming events and giveaways.


Meeting Facilities

Number of Meeting Rooms

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

Theater Capacity

Classroom Capacity

Banquet Capacity

Maximum Reception Number of Capacity Booths Features

Living Room • 2369 Norwood Ave Cincinnati, OH 45212 • 513-531-5030 hellolivingroom.com

3

1,078

60

45

50

60

Manor House Banquet & Conference Center • 7440 Mason-Montgomery Rd Mason, OH 45040 • 513-459-0177 manorhouseohio.com

10+

8,900

1250

700

650+

1,000

Meier’s Wine Cellars 6955 Plainfield Rd • Cincinnati, OH 45236 513-794-4388 • Fax: 513-891-6370 drinkmeiers.com Number of Meeting Rooms

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

Varies

Planning assistance provided. Multiple room sizes and breakout options. Outdoor spaces. In-house chef and experienced management team. Complimentary parking. Hotels nearby.

We can host any type of private event, from bridal and baby showers to birthday and anniversary parties.

Theater Capacity

3 Nathanael Greene Lodge 6394 Wesselman Road, Cincinnati OH 45248 513-598-3100 Fax: 513-598-3103 greentwp.org

Living Room does two things really well: creative meeting spaces and market research services, both designed for those with an insatiable desire for better. With this in mind, we've created an experience that provides you with creative meeting spaces for team-building activities, creative workshops, training, ideation sessions, team celebrations and more.

Classroom Capacity

Banquet Capacity

Reception Capacity

15

100

100

Maximum Number of Booths

With its ability to host a wide array of community, civic, and private events, the Lodge is sure to meet your needs. For corporate meetings, Nathanael Greene Lodge has several rooms to accommodate groups from 12 to 200. Amenities include setup, cleanup, up-to-date audio-visual equipment in every room, and flexible spaces. The Lodge’s meeting rooms also have access to our outdoor patio space.

Number of Meeting Rooms

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

Theater Capacity

Classroom Capacity

Banquet Capacity

Reception Capacity

3

3,408

200

120

120

200

Maximum Number of Booths

START THE CONVERSATION 513.229.5817 masonsales@greatwolf.com 2501 Great Wolf Drive • Mason, OH 45040 greatwolf.com/meetings

GROUPS & MEETINGS

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Tristate Meeting and Event Planner Guide 2018 Meeting Facilities National Underground Railroad Freedom Center • 50 E Freedom Way Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513-621-3326 freedomcenter.org

Number of Meeting Rooms

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

Theater Capacity

Classroom Capacity

Banquet Capacity

5

8,490

300

50

400

Nicola’s Restaurant 1420 Sycamore St., Cincinnati OH 45202 513-721 - 6200 Fax: 513-721 - 1777 nicolasotr.com

Oasis Golf Club & Conference Center 902 Loveland-Miamiville Rd Loveland, OH 45140 • 513-583-8383 oasisconferencecenter.com

Number of Meeting Rooms

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

5 spaces

800

10

20,000

2,000

1,700

Maximum Reception Number of Capacity Booths Features

It is one of Cincinnati’s most spectacular venues for wedding receptions, meetings or events of any kind. It features two floors of premier spaces with private terraces that overlook the Ohio River.

1,500

Experience elegant dining and professional service for your meeting or reception in one of our five unique spaces. We also offer private and semi-private options.

Theater Capacity

1,350

Classroom Capacity

2,500

125

Banquet Capacity

Reception Capacity

Maximum Number of Booths

135

135

5

Located in Northeast Cincinnati, Oasis Conference Center is known for its flexible meeting space, service and cuisine. The Oasis offers free parking, professional event planning, free wireless internet and festive menus and décor. Event space varies from a dining room setting to ballrooms, with room for up to 2,000 guests. Located at Jungle Jim’s International Market “Food Lover’s Paradise,” the full-service venue provides ceremonies and receptions, an in-house bakery, international menus, a unique atmosphere with flexible floor plans, inviting décor, free parking and an experienced, hands-on, service-oriented team.

The Oscar Event Center • 5440 E Dixie Hwy • Fairfield, OH 45014 • 513-6746055 • junglejims.com/oscareventcenter

3

10,500

500

200

250

1,000

Paul Brown Stadium • 1 Paul Brown Stadium • Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513455-4830 • bengals.com

14

35,000

600

300

800

1,000

60

Non-game day events in sleek NFL stadium. ARAMARK catering.

The Phoenix • 812 Race St • Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513-721-8901 • thephx.com

7

4,752

546

400

400

450

39

The Phoenix is a boutique, full-service event center and catering company. Our dynamic and experienced culinary team and event coordinators will work with you to artfully create the menu tailored to suit your needs. We are inspired by fresh, seasonal ingredients provided by local farms and creameries.

The Precinct 3 • 11 Delta Ave • Cincinnati, OH 45226 • 513-321-5454 • jeffruby. com/precinct

3

The Roberts Centre • 123 Gano Rd Wilmington, OH 45177 • 800-654-7036 robertscentre.com

12

The Ronald Reagan Lodge Banquet & Conference Center at Voice of America MetroPark • 7850 VOA Park Dr • West Chester, OH 45069 • 513-867-5835 yourmetroparks.net

3

For Jeff Ruby, this is the steakhouse that started it all. Recently named one of America's Top 10 Steakhouses by USA Today and Gayot.com, The Precinct is frequently recognized as having Cincinnati’s best steaks, seafood and service. This consistent high level of quality and overall guest experience over three decades has endeared Precinct to celebrities, business people, families and loyal diners alike.

70

40

85

85

60,000

4,600

2,200

4,600

2,000

800

Home to Holiday Inn, Max & Erma’s restaurant and the Roberts Conference Centre, which has more than 80,000 square feet of unobstructed meeting space, wireless internet and an outdoor patio. Free parking.

3,700

250

125

250

250

20

Multi-room facility with gazebo that looks overlooks 35-acre lake. Beautiful park setting. Cater-only facility. Fireplace, projector and dance floor. Great for all occasions big and small.

Savannah Center • 5533 Chappell Crossing Blvd • West Chester, OH 45069 513-860-4142 • savannahcenter.com

11

12,000

1,200

850

900

1,200

84

Savannah Center offers the most advanced technology and audio and visual equipment. The Center is heated and cooled by geothermal technology. Situated on 12 acres with a 5-acre lake, the 44,000-squarefoot facility can accommodate any sized business function. It boasts an award-winning culinary staff offering customized catering.

Sharonville Convention Center • 11355 Chester Rd • Sharonville, OH 45246 513-771-7744 • Fax: 513-772-5745 sharonvilleconventioncenter.com

19

20,455

1,648

1,119

1,408

2,650

144

Located near I-75, 15 miles north of downtown Cincinnati and only 25 miles south of Dayton, the Sharonville Convention Center is easily accessible from any direction. Modern, contemporary, and stylish.

Stir • 7813 Ted Gregory Lane • Cincinnati, OH 45242 • 513-833-4485 • stircincy.com

1

3,000

55

55

55

125

Dinner parties, celebrations, interactive cooking classes, presentations, corporate team building and other entertaining events. Premium amenities include comfortable, casual seating inside, outdoor patio, ample parking and media system. Located in Old Montgomery.

Taft Museum of Art • 316 Pike St Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513-684-4523 Fax: 241-7762 • taftmuseum.org

1

1,200

112

112

75

112

The Taft offers elegance, convenience and a masterpiece just around the corner. Available for meeting, private board dinners, team-building events and cocktail receptions.

TriHealth Fitness and Health Pavilion 6200 Pfeiffer Rd • Montgomery, OH 45242 • 513-246-2609 • trihealthpavilion. com

3

375

120

65

70

3,120

Vinoklet Winery & Restaurant • 11069 Colerain Ave • Cincinnati, OH 45252 513-385-9309 • vinokletwines.com

3

2,400

155

155

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Liven up your ordinary meeting with spa services, corporate sports challenges, employee appreciation, pool party or workouts before or after your business function. Meeting rooms include conference speaker phone, LCD overhead projector, DVD and CD/CVS player, wireless lavalier and on-site catering. With a three-room space, including the Private Veritas room, the Cincinnatus Party Room and the Solarium (weather permitting), Vinoklet also offers banquet and dinner packages for private parties, corporate events and wedding receptions.


Meetings

When you want the best in food, wine, and service for your meeting, you can expect the best from us. At Eddie Merlot’s, every detail is given our most careful attention. That’s why we offer special touches that turn every occasion into an Exceptional Experience. Eddie Merlot’s offers several private and semi-private dining areas with accommodations available for as few as ten guests or as many as 300. Whether it’s your a large business meeting, a presentation, or a small group function let us customize all of the details so you can focus on the rest. Eddie Merlot’s is committed to serving as your partner and helping make your private party a success.

513.489.1212 | 10808 Montgomery Road at I-275 | www.eddiemerlots.com


Tristate Meeting and Event Planner Guide 2018 Meeting Facilities The WEB Extreme Entertainment • 7172 Cincinnati-Dayton Rd • West Chester, OH 45069 • 513-860-2882 • funattheweb.com

Number of Meeting Rooms

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

Theater Capacity

Classroom Capacity

Banquet Capacity

8

2,000

350

200

350

Maximum Reception Number of Capacity Booths Features

The Web is the one place in the Tristate where you can meet, eat and play as a group. Your choice for fun includes electric go-karts, laser tag, bowling and glow golf. We feature a delicious catering menu to complete your event.

600

KENTUCKY Axis Alley 1 Levee Way, Suite 1112 • Newport, KY 41071 859-652-7250 • Fax: 859-652-7269 axisalleylevee.com Number of Meeting Rooms

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

Axis Alley is 25,000 square feet of high-energy, interactive fun. We offer party spaces, sophisticated menus, full-service bars and state-of-the-art audio visual systems. We have event packages that include food, beverage, and team building!

Theater Capacity

4 Baker-Bird Winery • 4465 Augusta Chatham Rd • Augusta KY 41002 • 859620-4965 • bakerbirdwinery.com

4

Carnegie Visual & Performing Arts Center 1028 Scott Blvd • Covington, KY 41011 859-491-2030 • thecarnegie.com

1

1,500

447

Celebrations Riverboats • 848 Elm St Ludlow, KY 41016 • 859-581-2600 celebrationriverboats.com

1

4,000

Drees Pavilion at Devou Park • 790 Park Lane • Covington, KY 41011 • 859-4312577 • dreespavilion.com

3

5,940

GameWorks • 1 Levee Way, Suite 2130 Newport, KY 41071 • 859-392-2373 gameworks.com

3

975

Gardens of Park Hills • 1622 Dixie Hwy Park Hills, KY 41011 • 859-392-8267 mchalescatering.com

2

6,500

350

The Grand and Pinnacle Ballrooms • 6 E. Fifth St. • Covington, KY 41011 • 859392-8263 • mchalescatering.com

2

4,500

400

Hofbrauhaus • 200 E 3rd St Newport, KY 41071 • 859-491-7200 hofbrauhausnewport.com

2

110

Lazer Kraze • 1335 Donaldson Hwy Erlanger, KY 41018 • 859-371-5729 lazerkraze.com

5

400

Reception Capacity

75

800

800

Maximum Number of Booths

200

15

Historic grounds that are part of the Civil War heritage trail and on the national historic registry. From Civil War Balls to wedding ceremonies, this is the perfect venue for all of your events.

200

150

500

15

Five galleries and a newly renovated turn-of-the-century theater that is fully equipped with lights, sound and projection.

380

380

380

380

22

Private riverboat available for company outings, meetings, weddings and seminars.

300

225

300

300

Nestled in tranquil park setting overlooking Cincinnati skyline.

130

130

Located at Newport on the Levee, GameWorks offers a fun and casual environment for all groups. Our Banquet Room can accommodate intimate gatherings of 10 people or grand gatherings of as many as 600.

380

500

360

360

Ballroom with 24-foor ceilings with a mezzanine level for cocktail hour

325

325

Large facility with brewery, beer hall and beer garden.

35

Schedule your next corporate team-building event with us. Five different size rooms that can accommodate 16-54 people with tables and chairs for meetings or parties.

300

110

45

Beautiful Banquet Rooms with complete packages that make for stress free planning. Craft beer bar and late night snacks of flatbreads included.

Perfection is in our details. Whether it’s a team meeting, corporate event or celebration, we will deliver an exceptional and memorable experience paired with stress-free planning.

Number of Meeting Rooms

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

Theater Capacity

Classroom Capacity

Banquet Capacity

Reception Capacity

Maximum Number of Booths

6

6,000

400

200

400

400

40

Metropolitan Club • 50 E Rivercenter Blvd Covington, KY 41011 • 859-491-2400 metropolitanclub.net

10

2,550

200

20-60

200

200

Newport Aquarium • 1 Aquarium Way Newport, KY 41071 • 859-815-1427 newportaquarium.com

3

6,000

250

130

340

300

Newport on the Levee Community Center 1 Levee Way • Newport, KY 41071 859-815-1384 • Fax: 859-291-7020 newportonthelevee.com

2

2,000

The Metropolitan Club has a variety of rooms for sit-down dinners or cocktail receptions. The Club offers flexible pricing, in-house catering, free Wi-Fi and covered parking. 75

The Riverside Room is the perfect venue for your perfect day. Enjoy spectacular views of the Cincinnati skyline and Ohio River in a unique, contemporary and elegant setting against a backdrop of exotic fish. The Levee’s community center can host meetings, association functions, training seminars or client presentations. Carpeted; rooms with tables, chairs and A/V capabilities. Private restrooms.

32/73

Newport Syndicate 18 East Fifth St. • Newport KY 41073 859-491-8000 Fax: 859-655-3315 newportsyndicate.com

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Banquet Capacity

200

The Madison Event Center 700 Madison Avenue • Covington, KY 41011 859-261-1117 thecovingtonmadison.com

104

Classroom Capacity

Our Grand Ballroom with a large stage, three drop screens and built-in projection make it perfect for a presentation. After the meeting we can prepare lunch, dinner or a cocktail reception.

Number of Meeting Rooms

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

Theater Capacity

Classroom Capacity

Banquet Capacity

Reception Capacity

Maximum Number of Booths

6

8,000

600

500

450

700

50+

maga zine.com


Holidayinn.com/cvg-eastgate

HOLIDAY INN & SUITES CINCINNATI EASTGATE voted

Best of the East

by Cincy Magazine for weddings

one and two bedroom suites 15,000 square feet of event space

4501 Eastgate Boulevard

Cincinnati, OH

|

(513) 752-4400

indoor heated pool fitness center full service restaurant


Tristate Meeting and Event Planner Guide 2018 Meeting Facilities Pompilios Restaurant • 600 Washington Ave • Newport, KY 41071 • 859-581-3065 pompilios.com

Number of Meeting Rooms

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

Theater Capacity

Classroom Capacity

2

Banquet Capacity

Maximum Reception Number of Capacity Booths Features

40

100

350

375

An authentic Italian restaurant with over 80 years of experience. Indoor eating space as well as an outdoor area complete with a bar and activities like bocce ball, cornhole can be made available. Capable of doing everything from wedding receptions to corporate happy hours.

INDIANA Chateau Pomije • 25043 Jacobs Rd Guilford, IN 47022 • 812-623-8004 cpwinery.com

4

5,000

Lawrenceburg Event Center • 91 Walnut St • Lawrenceburg, IN 47025 • 888-2746797 • hollywoodindiana.com Starlight Reception Hall • 10265 U.S. 50 Aurora, IN 47001 • 812-926-7600 • starlightreception.com

350

70

18,000

2

50,000

30

Welcome to the Lawrenceburg Event Center, the place to see Lawrenceburg’s hottest acts or to host a wedding, business meeting, reunion or any special occasion.

150

700

150

Walhill Farm 857 Six Pine Ranch Road, Batesville IN 47006 812-934-2600 walhillfarm.com Number of Meeting Rooms

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

6

12,000

Working winery with 70-acre vineyard. On-site food preparation.

450

500

600

Full kitchen and bar, 1,000 parking spaces, dance floor, fountain, waterfall, outdoor gazebo, ceremony and picnic space.

Walhill Farm’s exceptional artisanal location boasts a beautiful country setting for a unique event experience. Our 250-acre farm produces innovative, delicious cuisine.

Theater Capacity

Classroom Capacity

Banquet Capacity

Reception Capacity

150

600

600

Maximum Number of Booths

T:7.5 in

DON’T HOLD MEETINGS, SET THEM FREE.

T:4.875 in

Turn your business trip into an opportunity for new, interesting and shareable experiences at Renaissance Cincinnati Downtown Hotel. Close to popular restaurants and enticing attractions, including Paul Brown Stadium and Horseshoe Casino, our hotel coaxes you to discover the world outside the boardroom. Our upscale amenities include eight chic meeting spaces, totaling more than 12,000 square feet, with experienced planning and catering teams on hand. With stylish rooms including plush bedding, HDTV and spacious work desk, you’ll be ready to enjoy all that Cincinnati has to offer. Book your next meeting today. To learn more, email events@renaissancecincinnati.com or call 513.333.0000. RENAISSANCE CINCINNATI DOWNTOWN HOTEL

36 East Four th Street, Cincinnati, OH 45202 T 513.333.0000 www.marriott.com/CVGBR

© 2018 Renaissance Holdings, Inc.

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Law

Father-daughter team Robert H. and Kara Lyons

Keep it Simple ATTORNEYS AT LYONS & LYONS MAKE ESTATE PLANNING EASY AND AFFORDABLE By Eric Spangler

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obert H. Lyons and his daughter Kara Lyons have seen it before. Someone comes in to their law office at Lyons & Lyons in West Chester toting a 50- to 100-page estate-planning document and they have no idea what it all means. “Some of these documents are just so ridiculously overwhelming that people are afraid to go and review them because they have no idea what they signed years ago,” says Robert. That’s why the fatherdaughter team has made it a mission to simplify the estate-planning process. “Just because something is 100 pages long does not mean that it’s any better than a document that’s eight pages long,” says Robert. “Most of it is just boiler-plate information that’s printed out to justify the high cost of the document.” The problem starts when people go to presentations where they end up buying 108

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high-priced estate-planning documents, he says. “That’s been our mission to expose these oversold documents from the past,” says Robert. The goal at Lyons & Lyons is to create estate-planning documents that the client can read and understand at a fair value. A simple will for one person, for example, costs $150 at Lyons & Lyons, says Kara. “It’s not going to break the bank and it’s something you can rely on,” she says. In addition to a simple will, Kara recommends her clients also have health-care power of attorney, living will and durable general power of attorney documents created. “That package for the four of them is $450. So for husband and wife for all eight documents between the two of them would just be $900.” Those four estate-planning documents for each person are usually all anyone needs, she says. Creating a trust is more

complicated and is tailored to fit each client’s individual needs, says Kara. “A lot of times people will have trusts that are entirely too complicated for their situation and a lot of times people have no business needing a trust,” she says. People can create wills using documents on the internet, but Robert says to beware. “Chances are real good it will not be done in compliance with Ohio law and oftentimes you will spend money for an ineffective document,” he says. “We keep our prices very reasonable so it does not make sense to economize by going to the internet or pick up a law package at the drug store,” says Robert. “When you are dealing with something as important as your estate plan and what to do with your finances and what to do with your children and what to do with you if you become disabled that’s not really a time for do-it-yourself [documents]” he says. n


Power 100 Re-Cap

From left: Karen Bankston, Dave Herche, O’dell Owens, Rob Reifsnyder and moderator Eric Harmon

Facing Cincinnati’s Poverty Challenge POWER 100 PANEL SEES MULTIPLE FACTORS REQUIRING VARIED SOLUTIONS By Mike Boyer

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inning Cincinnati’s War on Poverty won’t be as simple as passing a law, launching a program or finding jobs for the poor. That was made clear by the panel at Cincy Magazine’s seventh annual Power 100 Leadership Forum in February. The year’s breakfast forum, presented with the Carl H. Lindner College of Business at the University of Cincinnati and held at the Hilton Netherland Plaza, examined what Cincinnati needs to do to solve one of its most pressing issues: child poverty. “In 1970 the number of children in the city below [the federal] poverty level was 20 percent. Today it’s 50 percent,” says Dave Herche, chairman of Enerfab Inc., and one of the panelists. “In 1970 in the

region, that number was 18 percent, today it’s 70 percent. The trend is not good. We have to deal with it.“ Panelist O’dell Owens, president and CEO of Interact for Health who has worn many different hats from Hamilton County coroner to president of Cincinnati State Technical & Community College, offered another measurement. “The life expectancy of someone living in South Fairmount [one of the city’s poorest neighborhoods] is 20 years less than someone living in Mt. Lookout, one of the city’s richest. It’s all about economics,” he says. Karen Bankston, recently named executive director of the Cincinnati Child Poverty Collaborative, a coalition of business and community leaders who’ve focused on reducing child poverty, says finding jobs for those in poverty is only part of the solution. “How do the structural systems that are in place add to the state of the condition?” she asked. “Housing, transportation, justice, the socio-economic environment all of those things add to this condition we call poverty.”

The fourth panelist, Rob Reifsnyder, president and CEO of the United Way of Greater Cincinnati, says the agency has made dealing with the issues around poverty a priority. “Our focus is on helping 10,000 families move out of poverty over the next four years,” he told the audience. “It’s a very ambitious goal.” One of the programs the United Way is supporting is the Cincinnati Preschool Promise, funded through a 2016 voterapproved tax levy, to expand access to preschool for children in poverty. He says about 46 percent of low-income children in Cincinnati are ready to learn when they come to school, versus 89 percent of higher income children. “That has to change,” he says. One of the major strategies of the Child Poverty Collaborative was the creation of an employer’s roundtable of local companies, which meets regularly to share ideas about how to help their low-income employees become self-sufficient. For example, Reifsnyder says Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, w w w.

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Power 100 Re-Cap SPONSORS The Carl H. Lindner College of Business, a leader in research and teaching exCarl H. Lindner College of Business cellence, has earned national acclaim in several academic areas across its undergraduate, graduate and online programs. In 2019, the college will move into a new stateof-the-art $120 million building, which will serve as a 21st century hub for students, faculty and the Greater Cincinnati business community and provide a collaborative space for education, research and innovation to thrive. business.uc.edu

a member of the roundtable, determined that about 4,000 of its more than 15,000 employees had incomes below 200 percent of the federal poverty level for a family of four. One area the hospital looked at was educational reimbursement for employees. Many employees couldn’t take advantage of the program because it reimbursed after they completed a program and many can’t afford the upfront costs of education. By changing the reimbursement program, he says, “They opened that up for certificate programs and for upfront payment of education costs. They made it possible by paying upfront for many more of their employees to get further education and move to the next level.” Herche serves as chairman of Cincinnati Works, a nonprofit that’s helped put hundreds of unemployed people into jobs that have lifted them out of poverty. “We find them a job and a coach, who helps them deal with issues like transportation, child care, legal issues, health issues and housing,” he says. “Seventy percent of those people who come to us and make it through a year… are able to move up to the next step on the ladder.” Herche and the other panelists challenged those attending the forum to do more. “This is not about talk, this is about action,” he says. “We have to get the business community to step up. Frankly, human capital is the biggest concern every business has in this room.” n 110

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A Columbu s-ba sed accounting firm and consultancy with more than 165 associates in five offices in four states, GBQ expanded its presence in Cincinnati two years ago when it acquired the firm of Ernst & Rabe, one of the city’s top 25 accounting firms. GBQ says its size allows it to serve the most complex organizations while its independence allows it to keep decision making in one place. gbq.com The law firm of Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP has a rich history dating to 1885. Its partners have included former U.S. Senator Robert A. Taft and former Cincinnati Mayor Charles Taft II, both sons of former President William Howard Taft. Through a series of successful mergers, Taft has become a premier regional firm with more than 400 attorneys in eight Midwestern cities and Phoenix, Ariz. taftlaw.com

Truepoint Wealth Counsel offers integrated wealth management services that deliver clarity and confidence to its clients. In-house teams dedicated to the financial disciplines of investment management, financial planning, tax management, estate planning and risk management work together to deliver unbiased advice and customized service. Founded in 1990 as one of the first fee-only advisory firms in the greater Cincinnati area, Truepoint is 100 percent employee-owned. truepointwealth.com Located in the heart of downtown Cincinnati, the Hilton Netherland Plaza is a National Historic Landmark and one of the finest examples of French Art Deco. It offers more than 40,000 square feet of meeting and event space including three ballrooms and 28 flexible rooms. Orchids at Palm Court is the hotel’s AAA Four-Diamond and Forbes Four Star fine dining restaurant. cincinnatihilton.com

Since 1982, ITA Audio Visual Solutions has been providing best-inclass audio-visual services and integrated technology to Fortune 1000 companies, universities, health care institutions, small businesses, hotels and meeting facilities. ita.com

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One of the nation’s largest chambers of commerce, the Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber provides services to members across 15 Tristate counties. The chamber serves its members and the community through leadership and professional development programs, government advocacy, festivals and events, regional vision and collaboration, money-saving benefit programs, networking opportunities and educational programs. cincinnatichamber.com

DePaul Cristo Rey High School in Clifton is part of the national Cristo Rey Network that provides quality Catholic, college-preparatory education to young people who live in urban communities with limited educational options. All Cristo Rey Network schools use a rigorous academic model supported by effective instruction to prepare students with a broad range of academic abilities for college. depaulcristorey.org


Best in Business

BUSINESS CALENDAR WE Lead Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber

April 11

This information session will offer an overview of WE Lead, a 10-month executive leadership development experience for high potential, goal-oriented women preparing for the next level of their career. Through a combination of professional development and executive coaching, WE Lead prepares, positions and empowers talented women to move into higher leadership roles. 4:30-6 p.m. Seasons 52, 3819 Edwards Road, Cincinnati. cincinnatichamber.com. Eggs ‘N Issues: NKY is Embracing Automation Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce

April 17

Panelists John Baines of HAHN Automation and James Biro from Perfetti VanMelle will discuss the state of industry automation at this networking breakfast. 7:30-9 a.m. Members $25, nonmembers $50. Receptions Banquet and Conference Center – South, 1379 Donaldson Road, Erlanger, Ky. nkychamber.com. WE Speak: Powerhouses in Education Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber

April 18

NKY Business Hall of Fame cultural and civic endeavors. This year’s honorees include Candace McGraw, CEO of the Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport. 5-7:30 p.m. $79. Metropolitan Club, 50 E. Rivercenter Blvd., 19th floor, Covington, Ky. cincy.live.

Hear from Laura Mitchell, superintendent of Cincinnati Public Schools, and Dr. Monica Posey, president of Cincinnati State Technical and Community College, as they share their perspectives on the state of education in our city, how their organizations are preparing students for the future, and their personal stories of success and passion around children and education. 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Members $35, nonmembers $60. Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber, 3 E. Fourth St., Downtown. cincinnatichamber.com.

Outstanding Women of Northern Kentucky Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce

NKY Business Hall of Fame NKY Magazine

For over 30 years the Chamber has partnered with law enforcement agencies to present the Clermont County Law Enforcement Appreciation Banquet as a thank you for the good acts performed by police and citizens that are not always publicized. 5:30-8 p.m. $75. Holiday Inn & Suites Cincinnati East, 4501 Eastgate Blvd., Eastgate. clermontchamber.com.

April 26

NKY Magazine, in partnership with the Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce, presents the fourth annual Northern Kentucky Business Hall of Fame, honoring men and women who have made a lasting contribution to the community in economic, 112

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May 1

This annual event will honor the 2018 honorees of the Outstanding Women of Northern Kentucky Awards. 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. $40. St. Elizabeth Training and Education Center, 3861 Olympic Blvd., Erlanger, Ky. nkychamber.com. Law Enforcement Appreciation Banquet Clermont County Chamber of Commerce

May 16

Ohio Manufacturing Summit Cincy Magazine

May 10

This breakfast networking event will feature discussions with some of the Tristate’s leading manufacturing leaders followed by a question and answer session. 7:15-9:30 a.m. Cost TBA. Centre Park of West Chester Event & Banquet Center (Holiday Inn), 5800 Muhlhauser Road, West Chester Township. cincy.live. Eggs ‘N Issues Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce

May 15

Start your day at this high-energy networking breakfast, featuring expert speakers on topics that affect you and your business. Topic and speakers to be announced. 7:30-9 a.m. Members $25, nonmembers $50. Receptions Banquet and Conference Center – South, 1379 Donaldson Road, Erlanger, Ky. nkychamber.com.

Don’t see your event? Visit cincymagazine.com to add it to our online calendar for free.


Best in Business Directory

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hose who run or manage businesses know that sometimes you need some help. As the Tristate’s magazine for business professionals, we are in a unique position that enables us to meet and interact with some of the best business service providers in the region. This list gives you a taste of the region’s best business services, and serves as a resource for those looking for assistance. Make sure to visit CincyMagazine.com to see exclusive online Best in Business content.

ACCOUNTING GBQ 513-871-3033 gbq.com VonLehman 800-887-0437 vlcpa.com AIR TRAVEL CVG 859-767-3151 cvgairport.com Executive Jet Management 800-451-2822 executivejetmanagement.com AUDIO VISUAL ITA Audio Visual Solutions 800-899-8877 ita.com SpotOn Productions 513-779-4223 spoton.productions BANKING Commerce Bank 800-453-2265 commercebank.com Commonwealth Bank 859-746-9000 cbandt.com BUSINESS LAW William E. Hesch Law Firm 513-731-6601 heschlaw.com BUSINESS RESOURCES Cincinnati Better Business Bureau 513-421-3015 bbb.org/cincinnati/

P&G Alumni Network pgalums.com TechSolve 513-948-2000 techsolve.org CHAMBERS Blue Ash Business Association babusiness.org Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber 513-579-3100 cincinnatichamber.com Clermont Chamber of Commerce 513-576-5000 clermontchamber.com

LAW FIRMS Calfee, Halter & Griswold 513-693-4880 calfee.com Lyons & Lyons 513-777-2222 lyonsandlyonslaw.com Taft Stettinius & Hollister 513-381-2838 taftlaw.com Wood Herron & Evans 513-241-2324 whe-law.com PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Lebanon Chamber of Commerce 513-932-1100 lebanonchamber.org

Gateway Community & Technical College 859-441-4500 gateway.kctcs.edu

Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce 859-578-8800 nkychamber.com

Great Oaks Campuses 513-771-8840 greatoaks.com

COMMERICAL REALTY

Union Institute & University 800-861-6400 myunion.edu

Keller Williams 513-766-9200 kwcincinnati.com CONSTRUCTION EGC Construction 859-442-6500 egcconst.com FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT PNC Financial Advisors/W Mgmt. 513-651-8714 pnc.com Raymond James 513-287-6777 raymondjames.com HEALTH Anthem BlueCross BlueShield anthem.com

REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT Corporex 859-292-5500 corporex.com TELECOMMUNICATIONS AT&T att.com ATC 513-234-4778 4atc.com TRANSPORTATION Executive Transportation 859-261-8841 executivetransportation.org WEALTH MANAGEMENT

Medical Mutual 800-382-5729 medmutual.com

Horter Investment Management 513-984-9933 horterinvestment.com

Superior Dental 937-438-0283 superiordental.com

Truepoint Wealth Counsel 513-792-6648 truepointwealth.com

INSURANCE BROKERAGE

Oswald Companies 513-725-0306 oswaldcompanies.com Interested in having your company included? Please contact Publisher Eric Harmon at publisher@cincymagazine.com or 513-297-6205. w w w.

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BACKAND SPINE page 117

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Live Well Cincy

Tell-tale Back Pain SPECIFIC SYMPTOMS CAN INDICATE PROBLEMS WITH THE SACROILIAC JOINT By Deborah Rutledge w w w.

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Live Well Cincy

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ack pain will strike about 80 percent of people in their lifetime, but when one cause mimics many others, the diagnosis can prove frustratingly elusive. But then, the sacroiliac joint does have its giveaways. There’s the sufferer who has trouble standing or walking for very long, or—as Dr. Arthur Arand notices when he walks into an exam room—who can’t sit on the painful side so they lean to the other. Of course, Arand, a neurosurgeon with Mayfield Brain & Spine, applies more tests to determine whether the SI joint is the culprit, perhaps starting with an X-ray, CT scan or MRI to rule out a fracture or tumor. SI joint pain accounts for 15 to 25 percent of all back pain, says Dr. Jonathan Grainger, anesthesiology and pain management specialist at the St Elizabeth Spine Center. The symptoms of SI pain start in the lower back and bottom, where patients often point when asked where it hurts, Arand notes.

The very broad SI joints, which connect the spine to the hips and are key in providing support and stability, are marked on the surface by the dimpled spots on the lower back. The SI joints are supported themselves by strong ligaments, which cause SI joint pain when they become too tight or too loose, such as in pregnancy, Arand says. Age-related degeneration, falls or injuries, disparate leg length or past surgery also can cause the SI joint trouble. Often, patients who have had lumbar fusion, total hip or knee replacement surgeries will show up two or three years later with SI joint pain because of their slightly altered gait, he adds. The pain sometimes radiates to the lower hip, groin or upper thigh and can cause a numbness, tingling or weak feeling in the leg. Treatment for SI joint pain varies, according to the severity of the condition, with

“Probably 80 percent [of SI joint afflictions] can be fixed without an operation.” – Dr. Arthur Arand

TOP CHIROPRACTOR FOREST PARK CHIROPRACTIC AND ACUPUNCTURE

Forest Park Chiropractic and Acupuncture Dr. Reed Moeller, DC, FIAMA, Dipl. AC 1250 W. Kemper Road Cincinnati, OH 45240 513-742-0880 drreedmoeller.com

We believe in the holistic approach to health. Treating the cause of your problem and improving your overall well-being is our No. 1 priority. This year we have celebrated 28 years in practice. What separates us from other chiropractic offices is we offer a variety of additional treatment options. There is acupuncture, which channels energy to the root of the problem. We use physiotherapy and rehab exercise. We have therapist Kim Issac who does FASTR, which stands for Fusion Assisted Soft Tissue Release. PEMF and Shock Wave, which are two of the latest technologies for muscle and joint repair.

We use spinal decompression to treat degenerative and herniated discs. And finally, we use mindfit, which calms the stressed-out mind to a wavelength for healing of the mind and body. Why have back surgery and live on medication when you don’t have to? Here you will be welcomed with open arms to a friendly staff, who have your best interests in mind. We accept all patients and work with you to make the treatment affordable. We’re open Monday through Saturday and we take walkins, so come in today and let us take care of you like you’re family.

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Live Well Cincy surgery always a last resort. “Probably 80 percent [of SI joint afflictions] can be fixed without an operation,” Arand says, adding non-surgical options for treatment include chiropractic manipulation, stretching, oral anti-inflammatory medications or topical patches, creams, salves or mechanical bracing. Non-chronic SI joint flare-ups, which can occur suddenly, may be treated by rest, physical therapy, nsaids, ice and heat and perhaps steroid injections, which reduce the swelling and inflammation of nerves, says Grainger. He adds that maintaining a healthy weight, regular exercise and avoidance of trauma or repetitive activities are recommended for pre-empting SI point problems. Treatment of chronic issues with the SI joint, lasting 10 weeks or more, may involve procedures like nerve ablations, which uses an electrical current to destroy the nerve fibers that send pain signals in the joint. The downside is that the nerves can grow

back, making the procedure necessary in another five years or so. When all else has lost effectiveness and the pain level has become intolerable, corrective action may be recommended through a minimally invasive SI joint fusion surgery, Arand says. Through a small incision, titanium implants are inserted to stabilize the joint and promote bone growth. The surgery takes about 45 minutes to an hour, but the results are dramatic in post-operative visits three or so weeks later, Arand says. Following some post-operative soreness at the site, “the patient literally wakes up” without the once-nagging pain, he says. But patients can spend time researching the cause of their pain. Other back or spine maladies that can be mistaken for SI joint pain include spondyloarthropathies, facet joint disease, hip dysfunction, lumbar disc herniation, spinal stenosis and piriformis syndrome. n

Live Well Cincy brings you balanced, health-related editorial content to help you discover wellness in multiple aspects of life.

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Home

Outdoor lighting is just one way to update the exterior of your home.

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Cincy Home

Updating the Outdoors OUTDOOR SPACES CAN BE REVITALIZED WITH HELP FROM LOCAL COMPANIES By Corinne Minard As the snow melts away, it’s easy to get excited about being outside again. We also start to wonder if our outdoor spaces are ready for us to use them. If you find your patio or yard to be outdated or underused, there are many landscaping companies in the region that can help with that. Ft. Thomas, Kentucky-based Stegman Landscape & Tree is known for its allinclusive landscaping and tree services. According to owner Brian Stegman, making seemingly small updates or changes can make all the difference.

Hills can often be difficult spaces to use. Cutting the hill with a wall and landscaping the area can make what wasn’t usable space into a decorative feature. Stegman did that at this property, and also added the large wall in the back.

Where will your next vacation be? midwesterntraveler.com

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To make the patio area larger, land can be built up near the house to create more usable space. For this property, Stegman built the wall to hold up the patio and the porch, and installed the paver patio and the porch covering.

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Bring the family to enjoy the country ambience of our 14-acre garden center just minutes from your home.

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Cincy Home

A new paver patio and landscaping were able to update this yard. Stegman also reset the covered porch, giving the yard a more current look.

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Replacing walkways and adding features can also make a difference. The owners of this house wanted a courtyard feel, so Stegman gave them a slate walkway and patio along with stone sitting walls.

For some houses, replacing what was there before can made a yard feel like a new space. “We tore out an old stone wall and an old paver patio,” says Stegman. “Then we built the new wall and put down this nice looking paver patio.”

Raising garden beds can also give a home a special touch. For this house, Stegman added the retaining wall in addition to the landscape design and installation.

8267 Licking Pike Alexandria Kentucky 41001 859-781-1562 stegmanlandscape.com BEFORE

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Making the World More Beautiful, One Yard at a Time Landscape Design, Installation, Maintenance • Retaining Walls, Paver Patios, Flagstone Patios, Fire Pits, (Outdoor Living Environments) • Tree Services • Lawn & Landscape Maintenance packages for homeowners • Decks, Pergolas, Trellises

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Love Cincy

Dave Schmidt, photographer Downtown Cincinnati during the 2018 flood

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Cincy Magazine April/May 2018  
Cincy Magazine April/May 2018  
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