Page 1

CELEBRATING MANUFACTURING

13th ANNUAL MANNY AWARDS NUXHALL MIRACLE LEAGUE DREAMS BIG BALLOON GLOW CELEBRATES 20 YEARS

TOP

COMMUNITIES PLUS: First-rate Schools Safest Neighborhoods Best Property Values

GREEN TOWNSHIP EMBRACES GROWTH METROPARKS OF BUTLER COUNTY SUMMER EVENTS


Drew Horter

Managing Expectations in an Overvalued Stock Market & Volatile Bond Market

The Bull Market Emotional Roller Coaster

Risk Scoring to Match Portfolio Design Most investors desire of low risk is diametrically opposed to what they actually own.

Tactical Wealth Management Utilizing third party portfolio managers who can go risk off to cash when necessary and potentially make money if the stock market goes up or down or possibly make money if interest rates go up or possibly down.

S& P 500

January 1, 2000 to March 31, 2018 Yahoo Finance

A Fee Based Fiduciary Firm Work with a firm with 35 + years’ experience that works in the clients best interest unlike some banks and wall street firms.

513-984-9933 horterinvestment.com support@him-ria.com Interest-Rate Cycles Tend to be Very Long

US 10-Year Yield (1945-2017) FRED - Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (US)

There is no guarantee that managers will be able to avoid future market losses by going risk off to cash. In addition, holding cash may carry the risk that a manager will not be invested during periods of positive market performance Past performance is no guarantee of future results. Investments are subject to risk, including market and interest rate fluctuations. Investors can and do lose money. Investment advisory services offered through Horter Investment Management, LLC, a SEC-Registered Investment Advisor. Horter Investment Management does not provide legal or tax advice. Investment Advisor Representatives of Horter Investment Management may only conduct business with residents of the states and jurisdictions in which they are properly registered or exempt from registration requirements. Insurance and annuity products are sold separately through Horter Financial Strategies, LLC. Securities transactions for Horter Investment Management clients are placed through E*TRADE Advisor Services, TD Ameritrade and Nationwide Advisory Solutions.


Contents

The Magazine for Business Professionals

J u n e/J u l y 20 1 9

The 13th annual list of the Tristate’s top suburban communities. BY BILL FERGUSON JR. PAGE 48

View 4 Editor’s BY CORINNE MINARD 6 Contributors 7 Web Exclusives Cincy 8 Inside Inside Social OTR, four

with the Glow of 34 Alive Summertime

Traveler: 39 Midwestern Indiana

Indiana destinations offer a mix of both new and classic attractions. BY CORINNE MINARD

Traveler: 46 Midwestern Paducah, Ky.

questions with Doug Bolton and by the numbers of Tristate household incomes.

13 Scene CINCY LIVE Piece of Shakespeare in 24 AIndiana Coney Island celebrates the 20th Balloon Glow, first responders and more. BY KEVIN MICHELL

36 The Great Outdoors

Richmond, Indiana, has created its own Shakespeare festival to celebrate theater and the Bard’s work, plus calendar and listings. BY DAVID LYMAN 2

J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

MetroParks of Butler County offers plenty of amenities and activities to have fun outside. BY ERIC SPANGLER

Paducah, Kentucky, is a chance to escape while being just a road trip away. BY CORINNE MINARD

47 Dining

Swampwater Grill in Mt. Lookout is serving up classic Cajun flavors. BY WILL JONES


COMMUNITY

72 Reflections on Leadership

Historians are using public institutions to better analyze the past and today. BY DAN HURLEY

BUSINESS

82 2019 MANNY Awards

Honoring the best in Tristate manufacturing. BY THE EDITORS

101 Redefining Membership

View 74 Another We are not “full” in Greater

LIVE WELL

111 Give Your Eyes a Break

Local experts recommend short breaks from the computer to prevent eyestrain and vision problems. BY DEBORAH RUTLEDGE

Update 117 Retirement Local retirement communities are

Cincinnati. BY DON MOONEY

continuing to expand and add new amenities. BY CORINNE MINARD

Column 75 Guest BY MONICA POSEY,

CINCINNATI STATE

76 Bronson-At-Large Will Nicholas Sandmann

HOME

be Clark Kent’s Kryptonite? BY PETER BRONSON

Tips for a Healthy Lawn 125 7This Summer

Third and 78 Rounding Heading for Home Members of the Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber are afforded many opportunities to shape the region’s future. BY KEVIN MICHELL

Complete Package 102 The Vista Packaging and Logistics has expanded to fit the many needs of its customers. BY KEVIN MICHELL

104 A Brighter Shade of Green

Come the Bugs 126 Here Thanks to a wet winter and

spring, the Tristate could see more insects than usual this summer. BY DAVID HOLTHAUS

128 Love Cincy

The Joe Nuxhall Miracle League dreams big with a new mini golf course. BY LIZ ENGEL

SPECIAL INSERT

Five Star Homes Pros

80 Best Schools

Marian University offers a comfortable, personal appeal for students. BY ERIC SPANGLER

BY DAVID HOLTHAUS

Green Township is growing steadily and the Nathanael Greene Lodge celebrates 20 years. BY KEVIN MICHELL

in Business 106 Best Calendar & Directory

Outstanding real estate agents, mortgage professional and home/auto insurance professionals in the area. FS1-7, starts after page 62

Cincy (ISSN-1934-8746) published in February/March; April/ May; June/July; August/September; October; November; December/January for a total of seven issues by Cincy, 30 Garfield Place, Cincinnati, OH 45202. Periodicals postage paid at Cincinnati, Ohio, and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Cincy, 30 Garfield Place, Suite 440, Cincinnati, OH 45202. w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9

3


Editor’s View Locally, veteran and family owned Editor & Publisher Eric Harmon

Best of the Best W

e do love to be the best here in the Tristate. We are forever arguing about which ice cream is better, the best high school, the best side of town and countless other things. Someone has to be the best and we love nothing better than when it’s us. I think that’s why people look forward to this annual Rating the Burbs issue so much. We all know we live in the best community and we want quantitative data to prove it. Many of us are focused on what community takes the top spot, but I like to look at the list as a whole. If you look at the numbers of our region’s suburbs, you start to see a trend—we live in a pretty great place. As a region, we’ve seen new communities spring up, older communities become revitalized and home values that have increased almost across the board. It’s fun to see if your suburb is named the best one in the Tristate, but I think it’s better to know that our region is improving year after year. After you delve into the data, there’s plenty of other stories to read in this issue. You can learn more about the Tristate’s manufacturing community with our annual MANNY Awards feature, learn about upcoming projects for the Nuxhall Miracle League, find things do this summer at the Metroparks of Butler County and more. In fact, much of this issue speaks to the great things here in the region.

4

J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

Managing Editor Corinne Minard Associate Editors Kevin Michell, Eric Spangler Contributing Writers Peter Bronson, Liz Engel, Bill Ferguson Jr., David Holthaus, Dan Hurley, Will Jones, David Lyman, Don Mooney, Monica Posey, Deborah Rutledge Editorial Intern Keely Brown Creative Director Guy Kelly Art Director Katy Rucker Digital Content Coordinator Danielle Cain Associate Publisher Rick Seeney Custom Sales Manager Brad Hoicowitz Advertising Director Abbey Cummins Account Executives Susan Montgomery, Anthony Rhoades, Inside Sales Katelynn Webb

So if your suburb isn’t No. 1, take heart and remember that there’s always next year. Hopefully you’ll join me in celebrating the accomplishments of all the communities in our region, even if they’re not always the community you call home.

Advertising & Circulation Manager Laura Federle Operations & Finance Manager Tammie Collins Events Director Stephanie Simon Events Coordinator Alexandra Tepe Production Manager Keith Ohmer Work-study Students Esvin Bernardo Perez, Aliyah White Cincy on the web: www.cincymagazine.com Cincy Co. LLC Cincinnati Club Building 30 Garfield Place, Suite 440 Cincinnati, OH 45202 Contact Cincy: information@cincymagazine.com or call (513) 421-2533. Go to www.cincymagazine.com to get your complimentary subscription to Cincy.


Contributors

Cincy Magazine contributing editor Peter Bronson is an author, editor, publisher and owner of Chilidog Press LLC. He is a former reporter, columnist and editor at The Cincinnati Enquirer, The Tucson Citizen and other newspapers in Arizona and Michigan.

Liz Engel is a business writer, runner and once-upon-a-time volleyballer who found her way back to the Queen City following stints in North Carolina and Tennessee. She’s spent more than a decade covering topics like health care, transit and entrepreneurship.

Bill Ferguson Jr. is a writer/editor/ communications consultant who has spent 40-plus years as an editor and reporter for six newspapers, beginning at age 14 as a sports reporter for his hometown daily.

David Holthaus is an award-winning journalist with more than 20 years experience in Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky covering business, public affairs and writing commentary.

Dan Hurley is a local historian and the president of Applied History Associates, which works with museums and historical societies throughout the Eastern U.S.

A marketing communications professional born and bred in Cincinnati, Will Jones enjoys telling the stories behind brands and making them appeal to any and everyone.

Don Mooney is a Cincinnati attorney, a past member of the Cincinnati Planning Commission and active in local politics.

6

J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

Deborah Rutledge is a freelance feature writer, originally from Northern Ohio, who has lived and worked in Cincinnati for nearly 20 years.


Web Exclusives TOP 5 ONLINE STORIES PHOTOS BY BRIAN DOUGLAS

1 Hollywood Loves Cincy by Peter Bronson 2 Worth the Trip: Colonial Cottage by Juli Hale

More movies are being filmed in the Tristate each year.

Hollywood

3 Reflections on Leadership: Potholes and Politics by Dan Hurley

LOV ES

Cincy THE QUEEN CITY HAS MADE ITS MARK ON PRODUCTION COMPANIES AND DIRECTOR S LOOKING FOR A PLACE TO FILM

By Peter Bronson

W

hen Charlton Heston parted the Red Sea in The Ten Commandments in 1956, movie posters promised “A Cast of Thousands.” Now movies are made with “A Cast of Dozens,” backed up by a flock of accountants, a swarm of assistants and a Texas herd of extras. And many are making an exodus

4 Publisher’s View: Out in the Open by Eric Harmon

54

A P R I L /M AY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

Mayor John Cranley gave Casey Affleck (left) and Robert Redford (center right) the key to the city while they were filming The Old Man & The Gun.

to the new filmmaking promised land… with gritty clips of Cincinnati in Asphalt Cincinnati. Jungle. Then came Rain Man in 1988, with Cincinnati? Swimmin’ pools and movie Tom Cruise and Dustin Hoffman countstars? Hollywood of the Heartland? ing toothpicks at Pompilio’s in Newport, As MGM’s Samuel Goldwyn said, “AbsoKentucky. In 2000, Michael Douglas fought lutely impossible, but it has possibilities.” the drug war in the shadows of Over-theBig possibilities. Rhine in Traffic. Our local film history begins in 1950, Big roles have been scarce.

But now Cincinnati is getting more mov- & The Gun—there’s also a local “cast of ie credits than Kevin Bacon. We have our thousands” who cater to the film business own stars on the sidewalk: Don Cheadle behind the screens. downtown in an old Jaguar, as Miles Davis Hollywood Meets Cincinnati is turning in Miles Ahead; Robert Redford, playing into a love story. a bank robber in his final movie, The Old Directors are attracted by the Ohio Man & The Gun; Anne Hathaway, in town Motion Picture tax credit that offers a 30 to film Dry Run; and Nicole Kidman, Bruce percent tax incentive. But they fall for the Willis, John Travolta, Emilio Estevez… city, Schlotman says. “We’re very busy,” says Kristen Schlot“One thing people don’t realize is that man, executive director of Film Cincinonce they choose Cincinnati, every single nati. “This was our biggest year. Last year director has come back again. They are all alone we generated $53 million of direct repeat customers. Todd Haynes, the direcimpact from film production for the local tor of Carol, is in town again (Dry Run, with economy.” Mark Ruffalo and Anne Hathaway, about That means big spending on “hotels, a lawyer who battles DuPont). It’s the fifth restaurants, catering, gas, construction, time he’s been back.” furniture, props and wardrobe,” SchlotFilm Cincinnati makes it easy, she says. man says. “TriHealth has taken over “We can help with every process—scou ting Emilio Estevez directed medical care [for filming] and Enterprise The Public, which locations, closing streets, police, whatever was filmed within the Cincinnati has even created its own movie division Public is needed. We’re a one-stop place for ev- Library. here for car rentals. It’s really exciting to erything they need.” see how far our reach is extending.” And Cincinnati, like a good character At Legacies Upscale Resale at Hyde Park actor, is the Swiss Army Knife of locations. Plaza, a nonprofit consignment shop that In Carol, it was the 1950s. In Miles Ahead, how much they love raised $240,000 last year for the the city,” says Meyers, Cancer the late 1960s. In The Old Man & The Gun, who is artistic Support Community, Business Manager director of the Ensemble the ‘70s. Traffic, the ‘90s. Cincinnati can Theater and a member of Lori Rochford says film crews like their the Casting mix play contemporary (Ides of March) or 1930s Society of America. “That of Victorian to mid-century modern provides great styles. (Seabiscuit). “The producers come to us to buy opportunities for our local pool of talented fur“It’s a great compliment to our city,” actors.” niture and props for their movies. They says D. Lynn Meyers, CSA, who has many might spend a couple of thousand A typical movie might require 50 dollars, credits as casting director local for Cincinnati actors in speaking which is a big sale for us. It’s fun to roles and a thousand be part films. “Our city has for generations been more in background of something artistic. People who work. “Casting calls” work dedicated to preservation, showing real for extras go out regularly. here watch the movie and say, ‘That’s the stewardship. Our architecture is really couch that was in our store,’” she “After the producer sends the script, says. I call diverse. Cincinnati can play a lot of cities.” people in for roles that are She thinks there might even be an age- and typeunFavored backdrops include Carew Tower tapped market for furniture that has appropriate,” Meyers says. “Background been and its arcade, the Queen City Club, the extras get at least used in a movie. “Maybe it will be minimum wage, and they worth Roebling Suspension Bridge, time-capsule might work 8 to 10 $100 more if we say Robert Redford hours, or sometimes 12 sat neighborhoo ds such as the West End, to 14 hours a day. For there,” she says. speaking roles, it’s the classic Hathaway’s lunch counter Along with familiar local faces in safe to say about $900 a day. That’s mov- and courtrooms at the Hamilton the County industry standard.” ies—such as PNC Bank President Kay Courthouse. Geiger as a bank manager in The Old Hundreds of local crewmembers Man also “Directors have been very vocal about work full time. “The directors find that we have built an industry,” Schlotman says. “We have full-time crews here, and local actors get roles they couldn’t get if they drove to Hollywood.” Meyers says friends she has worked with in Hollywood call and ask in disbelief, “What? You’re doing another movie in Cincinnati?” There’s no place like home, she tells them. “It’s a competitive market. Thousands of jobs come with every one of these films. We treat people really well and they want to come back. For us to be one of the top A Kind of Murder, starring Patrick film destinations right now really Wilson, was filmed in the area. speaks highly of our city.” n w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : A P R I L /M AY 2 0 19

55

5 The Destination Builder: Julie Calvert by David Holthaus

TOP INSTA POST

DIALOGUE Cathy Bishop-Clark @MURegDean Extremely proud of Jeff Kuznekoff, Associate Professor of Communication in the Department of @MiamiOH_ICS & Whitney Womack Smith, Chair of @MiamiOH_LLW for being named @CincyMagazine’s Outstanding Educators, your passion for the students is undeniable. Clermont Chamber @ClermontChamber Have you checked out “Explore the East Side” from @CincyMagazine? It features the Chamber’s membership directory and resource guide AND #BestoftheEast2019 winners! Get your copy today at the Clermont Chamber office and east side @kroger stores!

Want to be featured in our Instagram stories? Follow us at @cincymagazine

LIVE

and use our hashtag #LoveCincy! Show us what makes you love this city!

It’s time to get ready for the many summer events that make Cincy the place to be! Check out Cincy.Live to find out what’s on the calendar!

DePaul Cristo Rey @DePaulCristoRey Thanks @CincyMagazine for profiling how DPCR is building new facilities and future leaders! Jeff Wright @jwright45150 Congratulations to all of the businesses and schools that call @MiamiTwpOH home that won their categories in @CincyMagazine’s annual “Best of the East” competition. We appreciate them being in our community and encourage everyone to support them! #MiamiTownshipProud

w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9

7


InsideCincy

Locally Sourced, Socially Focused

SOCIAL OTR IS HELPING BUILD CINCINNATI’S CULINARY TALENT POOL AND THE COMMUNITY SURROUNDING IT By Kevin Michell

8

J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

ROSS VAN PELT PHOTOGR APHY

S

ocial OTR, run by the Corporation for Findlay Market (CFFM) in partnership with CityLink Center, is a nonprofit restaurant and bar connecting the area’s underemployed with local job opportunities in the food and beverage industry. But it’s not a simple placement service. Instead, it’s the site of 12 weeks of the Findlay Culinary Training Program, a 16week, no-cost training course that provides people the skills and experience needed to start a culinary career. The program is open to anyone 18 or older, including those with criminal convictions except arson and sexual offenses. “There’s opportunity here,” says Anthony Berin of CFFM and general manager of Social OTR. “It’s been a real goal of [Findlay] Market to keep the community here. We don’t want to push people out; we want to raise people up.” Such a model could have been done many different ways, but when CFFM and CityLink turned their attention to the local food and beverage labor gap, they focused on providing dignity alongside job opportunities and the necessary kitchen training. “Within our immediate community— the market district itself—and just outside of it,” Berin says, “we’ve got this whole group of folks who are underemployed and have high barriers to employment.” Those barriers can feel insurmountable to people who run up against them. Hence, the Findlay Culinary Training Program uses its first four weeks to refine students’ life skills—such as problem solving, conflict resolution and financial management—at CityLink Center before beginning the three-month paid internship in Social OTR’s kitchen. Berin describes the restaurant as a product of wanting people—especially potential employers—to respect what the program’s

ABOVE: The bar at Social OTR LEFT: Social OTR’s lounge area before the remodel

PROVIDED BY PLATTE ARCHITECTURE + DESIGN

students have gone through. “We don’t want to waste money and time by training too high and we don’t want to waste everyone’s time and experience by training too low,” he says. Social OTR was constructed to fit that end. The interior, designed by Platte Architecture and Design and adorned with art from local muralist Cody Gunningham, is vibrant and welcoming. The menu, featuring small plates of internationally inspired tapas, is refined and varied. The latter was built with the goal of giving students as wide a breadth of education in different cuisines, flavor profiles and cooking techniques as possible in 12 weeks’ time. “The style of dining, the concept of the menu,” Berin explains, “it lends itself so well to education in food.”

After learning various roles in the kitchen in four-week terms, groups of students progress and graduate together while new classes fill the positions vacated. Graduating students from the Findlay Culinary Training Program isn’t the end goal; providing them a meaningful career path is. Social OTR actively assists students in resume building, interview training and job placement. Berin foresees graduating 75 to 80 people in Social OTR’s first year of operations. More than anything, the mission is to give people who, for any reason, don’t feel worthy or capable of attaining sustainable job a means to achieve a career of gratifying work, meaningful benefits and lofty advancement. “In this industry, you can be the best in the entire world without education or money,” Berin says, “as long as you show up with a willingness to learn and a solid work ethic. That opportunity is there for our students.” n


Q&A

4 Questions with Doug Bolton CEO OF CINCINNATI CARES By Corinne Minard

D

oug Bolton knows Cincinnati. As the previous publisher of the Business Courier and market leader for Cushman & Wakefield, Bolton has spent much of his career gaining a deep knowledge of the Tristate. Now, he’s using that knowledge to help Cincinnati’s nonprofits as the new CEO of Cincinnati Cares. “While my work as a journalist and leader over more t han 30 years has given me a great view into the dynamics of Greater Cincinnati business, faith and government sectors, it has been my volunteer experiences with many organizations across our region and various sectors that link my past work to this new passion,” he says. We caught up with the busy Bolton to ask about his new career path and why volunteering is important to him and the region.

OVER THE PAST 20 YEARS, YOU’VE LED SEVERAL BUSINESSES AND WORKED IN MULTIPLE INDUSTRIES. WHY WAS NOW THE TIME TO JOIN CINCINNATI CARES? I only had a cursory knowledge of the work Craig Young and his team at Inspiring Service were embarking on as I wrapped up my leadership role at Cushman & Wakefield. But the more I learned when I joined Inspiring Service as a consultant in the summer of 2018, the more I realized what a great opportunity this is for me to make a big difference in Greater Cincinnati, and potentially beyond. Volunteering is at the core of our responsibility of being a human. Most people want to and need to volunteer, and the work of volunteers impacts hundreds of thousands of people in this region who are in need. After spending 25 years in the media business and seven years running the Cincinnati-Dayton region for one of the world’s biggest commercial real 10

J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

estate services firms, the idea of building a new organization, working with the Young family and improving one of our region’s most important sectors carries a lot of appeal.

COULD YOU INTRODUCE CINCINNATI CARES FOR OUR READERS? Craig Young founded Inspiring Service two years ago out of concern for the health of our region’s volunteer ecosystem. After significant research and testing, the first initiative was the creation of a free communitywide volunteer guide. It is now our region’s most popular way for volunteers to find their way to help. This service is free to volunteers and the more than 500 nonprofits whose volunteer opportunities are kept updated through technology that is frictionless, password free and mobile friendly. While the platform is building hand-on volunteering, we’ve expanded into helping one of our community’s most pressing needs—connecting volunteer leaders to nonprofit boards and committees. We will continue our innovation by connecting nonprofit leaders with prospective volunteers who want alternatives to board service—such as offering their skills, anything from web development to finance to legal—to nonprofits and the causes they care about. To take advantage of the success of the platform, the organization’s work in Cincinnati was rebranded as Cincinnati Cares, and this organization I now am CEO of will work on multiple initiatives aimed at increasing volunteerism here. Meanwhile, Inspiring Service will continue to serve as the parent organization.

WHAT ARE YOUR GOALS WITH THE ORGANIZATION? We want to inspire and empower people and organizations to engage in volunteering that improves and strengthens their community and themselves. In Cincinnati,

our volunteer ecosystem is unhealthy, and without our work as the only 100 percent volunteer-focused organization and attracting more investment into the volunteer ecosystem, it will only get worse. Volunteer rates in Cincinnati have declined at twice the national rate and we are lagging peer communities. We hope to reverse these trends by helping all willing individuals find their way to help, working with businesses to improve their community engagement and strengthening the nonprofit sector’s engagement of volunteers.

IF BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUALS WANT TO GET INVOLVED, WHAT ARE THEIR NEXT STEPS? Individuals can go to cincinnaticares.org, The site makes it easy to search by cause, by location, by type of volunteer work or some half-dozen other ways to help, giving the prospective volunteer an easy way to explore interests and the more than 1,200 volunteer opportunities showcased on the platform. The prospective volunteer can do further research on an organization from convenient links—or can express interest on the site, with a message sent to the nonprofit organization where the individual is seeking to connect. For businesses, we offer a suite of services, best viewed from in.cincinnaticares.org. Businesses can tap our expertise to accomplish more, better or reorganized community engagement across the entire nonprofit community. n


By the Numbers

Households in 20 Communities Bring in $90,000-plus Yearly With an expanding economy, 20 communities of 1,000 or more population in Greater Cincinnati saw median household incomes of $90,000 or more in 2017 (latest available), according to the U.S. Census Bureau. The Village of Indian Hill remained at the top of the list, but it was the only area among the top 20 that slipped in income from 2010 to 2017. (Research by Bill Ferguson Jr.)

Community

The Village of Indian Hill Terrace Park Amberley Village Wyoming Evendale Montgomery city Liberty Township (Butler) Union, Ky. Springboro Symmes Township (Hamilton) Clearcreek Township (Warren) Hidden Valley Lake, Ind. Glendale Mariemont Madeira Anderson Township (Hamilton) Edgewood, Ky. Mason Turtlecreek Township (Warren) Hamilton Township (Warren)

Estimated median household income (2017)

Estimated median household income (2010)

% change from 2010 to 2017

$215,679 $160,000 $124,750 $118,947 $115,882 $115,489 $115,371 $107,361 $104,063 $103,250 $103,053 $101,979 $101,359 $98,208 $97,292 $95,179 $93,958 $93,872 $93,426 $91,610

$220,433 $131,029 $120,921 $96,739 $101,071 $114,315 $96,943 $98,438 $92,889 $100,301 $95,165 $84,688 $74,815 $80,694 $81,905 $82,301 $85,398 $83,009 $70,377 $80,592

-2.16% 22.11% 3.17% 22.96% 14.65% 1.03% 19.01% 9.06% 12.03% 2.94% 8.29% 20.42% 35.48% 21.70% 18.79% 15.65% 10.02% 13.09% 32.75% 13.67%

SOURCE: U. S. CENSUS BUREAU’S AMERICAN COMMUNITY SURVEY FIVE-YEAR ESTIMATES PROGR AM

12

J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com


SCENE Mayfield Foundation’s Art & Science of Healing The Mayfield Education & Research Foundation’s The Art & Science of Healing, held April 6 at Fueled Collective, provided over 200 guests with an eclectic program that featured creative presentations, interactive exhibits and uplifting dance performances. Guests included Mayfield leadership, area hospital leaders, grateful patients and interested donors. Approximately $100,000 was raised to support the programs of the Mayfield Foundation. 1 Donna Anderle teaches guests the basics of ballet. 2 Alex Gil of NuVasive and Gene Tempel of the Lilly Family School of Philanthropy at Indiana University 3 Jennifer and Kip Heekin, Julie Back, Courtney Morriss and Stan Dohan 4 Pop up performance by Pones 5 Eddie Worrell

1

2

3

4

5 w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9

13


Scene GBQ Green Bagel Event For over 35 years, GBQ has been celebrating St. Patrick’s Day as only savvy accountants and consultants can do…with green bagels. As GBQ grows and expands geographically, so does its desire to continue this tradition and its enthusiasm for St. Patrick’s Day. In 2015, the company expanded its love for green to the Cincinnati office. This year’s event was held March 15. 1 Guests mingle at the annual GBQ Green Bagel client appreciation open house. 2 Six packs of green bagels “to go” are provided for guests to take enjoy at home. 3 GBQ associates Angie McLaughlin and Linda Bennett celebrate at the firm’s Cornerstone at Norwood location.

2

1

3

Annual St. Rita Golf Classic Friday, August 2, 2019 | 9:30am – 5:00pm Glenview Golf Course Tee Off at 11:00am

For more information on registration or sponsorship opportunities contact: Hap Durkin at hdurkin@srsdeaf.org 513-771-7600 | srsdeaf.org/golf.aspx 14

J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com


Wood Herron & Evans’ Made in USA event Wood Herron & Evans hosted a “Made in USA” client education event April 11 at the American Sign Museum, followed by a museum tour. Attorneys Lori Krafte and Glenn Bellamy gave a complimentary presentation on how and when it’s okay for clients to say “Made in USA” in their advertising material. 1 Lori Krafte and Glenn Bellamy, partners at Wood Herron & Evans, explain legal requirements for Made in America claims. 2 Tod Swormstedt, president and founder of the American Sign Museum, discusses how commercial signs chronicle the history of the U.S.

1

2

95 Glowing Since 19

OMPANY CANDLE C t 14 5

xi Travel I-70, e

Visit Us. .

Make a

dayof it

Outlet

We are a unique destination worth traveling for.

The Warm Glow outlet is a vast area of 22,000 sq.ft. and attached to one of the largest candles in the world. Warm Glow is a shopping mecca and a unique traveling destination. Warm Glow offers over 60 fragrances of candles, home decor, floral, chocolate, gourmet food, bath and body, Indiana wine and so much more. Visit our new Pour & Glow studio and create your very own candle. Shop our Artisans & Java Store for one of a kind gifts or a delicious cup of Boston Stoker coffee.

Open Daily 9am-7pm

Closed: Easter, Thanksgiving & Christmas Day

Handicap Accessible Bus & RV Parking Pet Friendly 2131 N. Centerville Rd., Centerville, Indiana 47330 | 765-855-2000 | warmglow.com

w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9

15


Trusted Family Advisors Taft’s Private Client Team: Planning for your family’s future through personalized, comprehensive counsel.

www.taftlaw.com


YMCA of Greater Cincinnati Healthy Kids Day The YMCA of Greater Cincinnati hosted the annual Healthy Kids Day April 27 at Parky’s Farm of Great Parks of Hamilton County. Over 6,000 children and families attended the event, which was the largest turnout for the event ever. The day featured the interactive music of Zak Morgan, climbing walls, bounce houses, face painting, a Bengals’ obstacle course, hula hooping and more. 1 Who Dey and friends enjoyed an afternoon of fun at Healthy Kids Day 2019. The Bengals sponsored an NFL Play60 zone where kids got to put on Bengal uniforms and run plays! 2 FC Cincinnati Mascot Gary learned some dance moves from a YMCA instructor at Healthy Kids Day 2019. 3 Baby animals, like this calf, were a popular attraction at Healthy Kids Day 2019. 4 Hooping it up at Healthy Kids Day 2019

1

2

3

4 w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9

17


Scene People Working Cooperatively ToolBelt Ball People Working Cooperatively hosted its third annual ToolBelt Ball on March 23 at JACK Cincinnati Casino. A record $100,000 was raised during the gala’s paddle raiser. All net proceeds are expected to be more than $200,000. Those funds will be used to support the nonprofit’s Modifications for Mobility program, which assists low-income, elderly homeowners and people with disabilities who have mobility limitations in the Tristate area. The black-tie event included a cocktail reception, three-course gourmet meal, raffles, a highend wine and bourbon pull, a silent auction, and a juried art exhibit. 1 PWC President and CEO Jock Pitts with PWC Board Chair Brian C. Thomas 2 Joi Thomas and Brian C. Thomas 3 WCPO’s Tanya O’Rourke and Craig McKee, 2019 ToolBelt Ball hosts 4 Al Loving III, Andrea Loving, Joi Thomas, and Donald and Liz Swain 5 PWC President and CEO Jock Pitts 6 Staci and Jay O’Leary, Aaron Grant, and Sue Renard 7 Mike and Mary Hall, Dave Foreman, Diana Bass, Teresa and Jim Huxel, and Julie Vorholt 1

& W NE BOURBON OF SERVICE

TASTING

Get into the spirit of helping others.

Join us for the third annual Wine & Bourbon Tasting. Monday, July 29, 5:00 p.m. Clovernook Country Club All proceeds benefit the St. Vincent de Paul Charitable Pharmacy.

CincyWineTasting.com

18

J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com


2

5

3

6

4

7

w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9

19


Scene ORV-WBC 10th Anniversary Catch the Wave Conference Ohio River Valley Women’s Business Council celebrated its 10-year anniversary with an event April 15-17 at the Sharonville Convention Center. The 2019 Catch the Wave Regional Conference provided networking, training and access to women business owners in Kentucky, Ohio and West Virginia, as well as ORV-WBC corporate members across the region. RiteMind Stress Less Workshops offered two morning yoga sessions on the final day of the conference. These sessions offered yoga moves that can be done at your desk in the office or at home.

1

1 Breakfast session on the last day 2 Group one gets a good stretch in. 3 Group two learns about yoga techniques.

2

3

Nathanael Greene Lodge is located fifteen minutes from downtown Cincinnati in the heart of Green Township. The parklike setting is perfect for an intimate ceremony under the new outdoor gazebo or to have a reception in the 50 foot cathedral ceiling Continental Ballroom, which can accommodate up to 200 guests. Nathanael Greene Lodge also has the perfect setting for a memorable birthday party, stress free rehearsal dinner, or enjoyable family gathering. The Mulberry Room has seating accommodations for up to 80 guests and has access to an outdoor patio. The West Point Room is ideal for 50 guests or less and is perfect for a corporate gathering. For business meetings or corporate outings, Nathanael Greene Lodge is ideal because of its close proximity to hotels and highways. The quiet setting, upgraded audiovisual systems, ample parking and various meetings rooms accommodate the needs of any size group from 12 or 200.

6394 Wesselman Road | Cincinnati, Ohio 45248 | 513-598-3100 | greentwp.org/departments/nathanael-greene-lodge 20

J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com


Council on Child Abuse’s Reach for the Stars The Council on Child Abuse (COCA) held its second annual Reach for the Stars event April 26 at The Summit, A Dolce Hotel. Nearly 150 guests enjoyed dinner by-the-bite, a silent auction, and games of chance while generously supporting COCA’s school-based personal safety program, which enables children to speak out safely and confidentially about mistreatment or abuse they may be experiencing. The second annual Reach for the Stars event raised close to $44,000, supporting COCA’s overall mission of preventing and stopping abuse and bullying where children live, learn and play.

1

2

3

4

1 COCA Executive Director Amy Orr, COCA 2019 Stars Kappa Delta Sorority area chapters and Mary Kay Calonge, COCA board president 2 Bill Kirkham, president of event sponsor The Dally Foundation, and Sandy Kirkham, COCA board member and development committee member 3 Kathy Bowman and Brandy Hurd from event

sponsor Humana 4 Alan Piker, Talbert House board member; Mary Katherine Hammett, COCA board member; and Sourushe Zandvakili, Talbert House board member 5 Felice Young, COCA prevention educator, and Sandy Rabe, COCA board member and development committee chair

5

w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9

21


YOU

BELONG HERE Forge a path to your future at NKU. For 50 years, our professors have provided students with a world-class education on a safe, supportive campus just minutes from downtown Cincinnati. nku.edu/apply


LIVE!

RICHMOND SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL

page 24

A&E CALENDAR

page 26

CONEY ISLAND page 34

METROPARKS OF BUTLER COUNTY page 36

TRAVEL INDIANA

page 39

PADUCAH

page 46

SWAMPWATER GRILL page 47

PATRICK FLICK

The cast of the 2018 Richmond Shakespeare Festival production of The Winter’s Tale.

w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9

23


PHOTOS: PATRICK FLICK

A Piece of

Sarah Summerwell as First Witch and Robyn Maitland as Second Witch in the 2018 Richmond Shakespeare Festival production of Macbeth.

Shakespeare RICHMOND, INDIANA, HAS CREATED ITS OWN SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL TO CELEBRATE THEATER AND THE BARD’S WORK

By David Lyman

L

orijo Metz was skeptical when she moved to Richmond, Indiana, from Chicago in 2013. It’s not that she thought Chicago was the center of the universe. But she and her husband liked good restaurants. And good theater. And being around smart people who were actively involved in the world around them. She wasn’t certain that she would find all of that in Richmond. But one Sunday afternoon soon after she got to town, she and her husband were looking for something to do and wandered into Richmond’s Two Sisters bookstore. 24

J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

in Indiana

They found a well-stocked independent bookshop, which was a plus. But they also found a group of people who had gathered to read a Shakespeare play. They decided to join them. “We were not Shakespeare people,” recalls Metz, an all-around computer whiz by trade. “But we had such a good time. And they were such nice people.” When Metz discovered that these nice people met every Sunday in an effort to read all of Shakespeare’s plays, she decided to return the next week. And the next. And the next. Little did she know, she had stepped into what would very soon morph into the

Richmond Shakespeare Festival. The group had been inspired by a Richmond Civic Theatre production of The Tempest to benefit its studio theater program. “In the process of doing that it became clear to us that people were genuinely interested in Shakespeare,” says Richmond businessman Ray Ontko. “And it became clear that it was possible to do a quality production with the resources we had available here in town.” So they started meeting at the bookstore to explore Shakespeare a little deeper. And when that was a success, they looked for a next step.


“We said, ‘That was fun, let’s do that again,’” says Ontko. “So we put together a board.” A year later, the Richmond Shakespeare Festival was born. They staged two plays that first season. Combined, Romeo and Juliet and Much Ado About Nothing attracted roughly 800 people. Not bad. So they did it again the following summer. A Midsummer Night’s Dream and Titus Andronicus drew 950. The festival has been growing ever since. This year’s festival kicks off June 21 with a production of The Tempest. The next night, Hamlet opens and the two run in repertory through July 6. “In some ways, things have changed radically since then,” says Patrick Flick, the festival’s producing artistic director. “But in other ways, we are still the same community-driven theater. The people of Richmond want this theater. And they support it, both as ticket buyers and volunteers. That depth of community involvement is why we exist.” When you stop and think about it, there is no better reason for any group to exist. People want it. People support it. People get involved with it. The result, for the RSF, is a theater that is far more robust that anyone had imagined back in 2013. Despite the success, they haven’t lost that community feel. Much of the board is made up of people who have been there since the beginning. And even though many of the actors in today’s productions are professionals, there are gifted non-professional actors who are part of

ABOVE: Patrick Flick LEFT: Tanner McCormick as Caithness, Jakob D. Winter as Menteith and Cody Alexander as Lennox in the 2018 Richmond Shakespeare Festival production of Macbeth. the mix as well. The theater draws much of its technical staff from nearby Earlham College, which also houses actors and provides rehearsal space. But what really sets the RSF experience apart is its theater. They probably could have finagled their way onto the stage of the beautifully restored 110-year-old Murray Theatre in downtown Richmond. But the extraordinarily active Richmond Civic Theatre keeps the building busy much of the year. Besides, the RSF wanted an identity all its own. They found it in the historic StarrGennett building, tucked away in the city’s Whitewater Valley Gorge Park. In the early part of last century, it was part of a complex of buildings that was home to the Starr Piano Company. Later, it also was home to a Starr subsidiary, Gennett Records, which specialized in recording early jazz stars like Duke Ellington, Jelly

Richmond’s Starr-Gennett Pavilion is a large, hulking space. Often it’s used for weddings or other social gatherings. But during the three weeks of the Richmond Shakespeare Festival, it is turned into a full Elizabethan stage.

Roll Morton, Hoagy Carmichael and Zack Whyte and his Chocolate Beau Brummels. But when the company folded, the complex fell into disuse. Most of the buildings were leveled. “Growing up, I remember the factory,” says Patricia “Patty” Glen, the co-owner of the Two Sisters bookstore and an RSF board member. “It was a ruins. Not a cool place to go. It was trashed. There was graffiti everywhere.” But the city decided to preserve this one remnant of the complex’s glory days. It would be a place that could host all manner of events, from weddings and large parties to, finally, the Richmond Shakespeare Festival. It has proven to be something of a blank slate for the theater’s designers to work with. It’s a rustic building, a massive open hall. There is a roof—a tin one, that can necessitate briefly pausing a show in the event of heavy rain. There are walls, too. But this is not a finely finished facility. The towering windows that once provided natural light for factory workers are devoid of glass now. So the theater has the feeling of being in the open air, a little like a Greek amphitheater, except that it’s covered. And it houses handsome, fully staged theater productions. “We knew that doing this was an audacious goal,” says Ontko. “But as we looked around, we realized that some of the bestknown Shakespeare festivals were in small towns like ours.” He’s done his homework and dutifully rattles off the name of several noted festivals, including the Stratford Shakespeare Festival in Stratford, Ontario, and the Oregon Shakespeare Festival in Ashland, Oregon. “They’re all off the beaten path,” says Ontko. “I thought, ‘Why not us? Why not Richmond?’” n w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9

25


SUNDAY

JUNE

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

1 [6/1-29] The Ensemble Theatre presents the regional premiere of The Wolves.

2 [5/31-6/2] View the work of more than 300 fine artists and craftspeople at Summerfair.

3 [6/3] Rob Thomas of Matchbox 20 fame brings songs from his fourth solo album to Riverbend.

4

5

6 [6/1-7/7] Dust off your best cowboy hat for a trip to the Old West Festival in Williamsburg.

7 [6/7] Hozier, known for his distinct bluestinged indie rock, makes a stop at the Taft Theatre.

8 [6/8] Country artists Lee Brice and Tyler Farr celebrate summer at SummitFest in Blue Ash.

9 [6/9] Car enthusiasts are invited to see mid-century modern vehicles in Ault Park during Concours d’Elegance.

10 [6/10] American folk band Hiss Golden Messenger, led by MC Taylor, plays the Taft Theatre.

11 [6/11-16] Jellicle songs aren’t just for jellicle cats when the national tour of Cats comes to the Aronoff.

12 13 [6/12] The sisters of electronic-soul band Ibeyi will play songs from their first album at the Taft.

14

15 [6/15] The fourth annual Tusculum Street Fest promises to be a day of live music and local food.

16 17 [6/16] Kenny Wayne Shepherd joins blues-rock guitarist Buddy Guy for a show at Riverbend.

18 19 [6/18] Young the Giant and Fitz and the Tantrums bring the party with a night of pop-rock at Riverbend.

20 [6/20] Head to Ault Park’s June Summer Music Festival for a night of free family fun.

21 [6/21-22] After 7 and Pieces of a Dream headline the 2019 A Celebration of Black Music.

22 [6/22] Paint the city in every color of the rainbow during the Cincinnati Pride Festival.

23/30 [6/23] Shop ‘til you drop at the 2019 Cincinnati Summer AvantGarde Art & Craft Show in Loveland.

25

27 [6/27, 29] Experience Romeo & Juliet’s tragic romance once again at this performance by the Cincinnati Opera.

28 [6/23] Shop ‘til you drop at the 2019 Cincinnati Summer AvantGarde Art & Craft Show in Loveland.

29

26

24

J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

26


A&E Calendar

It’s Festival Time

NEIL SHUMATE

In its eighth year, Bunbury Music Festival promises to be bigger and better than ever before. The three-day festival will have performances from artists like Fall Out Boy, Greta Van Fleet and The 1975; a craft beer village that will feature a new Braxton Brewery beer, created specifically for the event; and dozens of food stands boutiques and more. May 31-June 2. $79-$1,299. Price varies based on number of days and VIP level. Sawyer Point/Yeatman’s Cove, 705 E. Pete Rose Way, Cincinnati. 614-461-5483, bunburyfestival.com. .

Holidayinn.com/cvg-eastgate

HOLIDAY INN & SUITES CINCINNATI EASTGATE voted

Best of the East

by Cincy Magazine for weddings

one and two bedroom suites 15,000 square feet of event space

4501 Eastgate Boulevard

Cincinnati, OH

|

(513) 752-4400

indoor heated pool fitness center full service restaurant

28

J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com


Nature Takes Flight Krohn Conservatory’s annual butterfly show brings thousands of butterflies to the Tristate each year. The 2019 show, “Butterflies of Ecuador,” promises visitors an opportunity to see 12,000 butterflies in free flight. While viewing the butterflies, visitors will also get the chance to learn more about Ecuador and its four different climate zones: the Amazons, the Andes, the Coast and the Galapagos Islands. Through June 16. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Adults $10, youth 5-17 $7 and children 4 and under free. Krohn Conservatory, 1501 Eden Park Drive, Cincinnati. 513-421-4086, cincinnatiparks.com/krohn/.

When’s the last time you saw enough stars to make your own constellation? Your first time won’t be your last time. It’s the inspiring serenity that gives our town a certain something that other places just can’t quite capture. For enchanted evenings filled with bourbon, history, shopping and dining, go to visitlebanonky.com. 19LETO12665-1v1.indd 1

w w w.

2/28/19 1:48 PM m a g a z i n e . c o m : : J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9 2 9


SUNDAY

JULY WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

3 [7/3] Celebrate the 20th anniversary of the LaRosa’s Balloon Glow at Coney Island.

4 [7/4] Red, White and Blue Ash is a free celebration full of music, entertainment and fireworks.

5

6

9

10 [7/10] The Summit hotel serves classic picnic food and street fare during Summit Food Fest.

11

12 [7/12] Guitarist Peter Frampton says goodbye to touring when his final tour stops at Riverbend.

13 [7/13] Cincy Blues Fest has moved to the Schmidlapp Event Lawn at Smale Park for another year of music.

14 15 [7/11-14] Bacon, Bourbon and Brew Festival in Newport brings pork and brewing together for a weekend of fun.

16

17 [7/17] Pretend it’s the ’90s again at a Riverbend concert featuring Third Eye Blind and Jimmy Eat World.

18 [7/18] Parrotheads rejoice! Jimmy Buffet and the Coral Reefer Band return to Riverbend.

19 [7/19] The Grammywinning Tedeschi Trucks Band stops its Wheels of Soul tour in Cincinnati for the night.

20 [7/20] Try 42-plus beers and food from eight restaurants at the Crafted Local Food, Beer & Music Festival.

21

22

23 [7/23] Rock icon Alice Cooper will be joined by rock band Halestorm for a show at Riverbend.

24 [7/24] Train and The Goo Goo Dolls bring songs from their decadesspanning careers to Riverbend.

25 [7/25-27] Mary J. Blige and Maxwell headline the 2019 Cincinnati Music Festival at Paul Brown Stadium.

26 [7/26] The Righteous Brothers and The Temptations team up for a show at Riverbend.

27 [7/27] Heart returns to Riverbend for the first time in three years with their new Love Alive tour.

28 [7/28] Progressive rock band moe. and Blues Traveler stop at Riverbend for the night.

29

30

31 [7/31] John Bellion mixes pop, hip-hop, R&B and rock during a show at Riverbend.

MONDAY 1

TUESDAY 2

[7/2] Crash into a night of ‘90s music with Dave Matthews Band during a concert at Riverbend.

7

30

8

J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

FRIDAY

SATURDAY


A&E Calendar Keep on Truckin’

STUART LEVINE

Tedeschi Trucks Band, an American blues and blues rock group, makes a stop at Riverbend. The group, which is led by married couple Susan Tedeschi and Derek Trucks, is known its family-friendly and one-of-a-kind shows. Before the show, concertgoers can enjoy a Pre-Show Craft Beer Tasting. July 19. 7 p.m. $25.50-$149. Riverbend Music Center, 6295 Kellogg Ave., Cincinnati. 513-232-5882, riverbend.org.

television reached for the stars instead of ratings?

Support the one place that never stops asking “what if?” www.CETconnect.org

32

J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com


A Parrothead Party Riverbend’s top-selling artist, Jimmy Buffett, returns to the venue for another summer of island-inspired jams. Buffett will perform on stage with The Coral Reefer Band, playing hit songs like “Cheeseburger in Paradise,” “Margaritaville,” and “Changes in Latitudes, Changes in Attitudes.” July 18. 8 p.m. General admission $36, reserved seating $146. Riverbend Music Center, 6295 Kellogg Ave., Cincinnati. 513-232-5882, riverbend.org.

Don’t see your event? Visit cincymagazine.com to add it to our online calendar for free.

HOST YOUR EVENT WITH US! Teambuilding • Corporate Meetings Happy Hours • Holiday Parties Birthday Parties • Graduations • Rehearsal Dinners 16 State-of-the-Art Lanes - Full Bar & Menu - Private Rooms - Customizable A/V Systems Contact Group Sales to schedule: sales@axisalleylevee.com or call 859-652-7250 Newport on the Levee ~ 1 Levee Way, Suite 1112 ~ Newport, KY 41071 ~ AxisalleyLevee.com w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9

33


Alive with theGlow ofSummertime CONEY ISLAND CELEBRATES THE 20TH BALLOON GLOW, FIRST RESPONDERS AND MORE By Kevin Michell

F

or many eastern Cincinnatians, summertime is synonymous with Coney Island. Home to the Sunlite Pool, its surrounding waterslides and rides, and annual traditions like Summerfair, Coney is a seasonal gathering point that sees nearly half a million people visit it each year. The 2019 season holds many events in store, including the 20th annual LaRosa’s Balloon Glow. Featuring more than 15 grounded hot air balloons that light up the night on the park’s Moonlite Mall, Balloon Glow has been held every July 3 since 1999. Using the evening before the Fourth of July was unique when the annual event began and has allowed Coney Island’s celebration to stand out among the many others in the city. “It’s an iconic event for the whole area,” says Steve Edwards, the park’s director of operations. Balloon Glow has become Coney Island’s biggest annual event, with previous iterations bringing as many as 25,000 people to the park.

The Sunlite Pool 34

J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

The annual LaRosa’s Balloon Glow brings more than a dozen hot air balloons to Coney Island. For Tom Rhein, senior vice president at Coney Island and an employee of the park for 35 years, the event combined with the rides and attractions staying open well into the night creates a special feeling. “The park’s just humming,” Rhein says. “It’s just full of life, full of energy. To me, it’s why I do what I do—people come in for a few hours, they forget all their worries and just love being with each other.” Of course, it wouldn’t be the Balloon Glow without a Rozzi’s fireworks display lighting up the sky above Lake Como at 10 p.m. Prior to the balloons being lit up, Cincinnati Circus will bring its stunt show—complete with aerial acts, chair stacking, fire juggling and more—to the park with multiple performances during the day and on July 4 as well. “It’s a great full day of events,” says Edwards. Mid-June features six days honoring those who provide valuable service to the city and its communities. First Responders’ Free Days occurs June 9-14. Police personnel, state troopers, sheriffs, firefighters and emergency medical technicians get free admission to Coney Island, as well as discounted admission

for up to six of their guests and special deals on concessions. Rhein says it’s a unique opportunity for families to interact with first responders and learn about what their service means to the communities they aid, particularly during June 12’s Touch-a-Truck event featuring fire department and police vehicles. The week coincides with a special firefighter-themed dive show from Bill Brown Entertainment’s high diving daredevils, which will hold performances June 8-16. This show serves as a showcase for Coney Island’s new Cannonball Cove diving well, featuring three springboards perfect for swan dives and, of course, cannonballs. The dedicated diving pool opens on the park’s opening day, May 25. But, for Rhein, each summer at Coney is about more than the events or Sunlite Pool itself. The guests and the atmosphere they create when the park is full are the main attractions. “We can’t be what we are without guests and families and customers who are here to animate us into what we can become,” Rhein says. “The best amusement parks make time disappear. If you can do that then you’ve worked your magic.” n


The Great METROPARKS OF BUTLER COUNTY OFFERS PLENTY OF AMENITIES AND ACTIVITIES TO HAVE FUN OUTSIDE By Eric Spangler

Outdoors

Metroparks of Butler County consists of 11 parks that host events throughout the summer months.

T

here’s no better place to find a place or event to have fun this year than the MetroParks of Butler County. That’s because MetroParks has a great lineup of family friendly fun happenings occurring regularly over the summer such as the Hump Day Concerts every Wednesday night, Family Fun Fridays Series, Creeking in the Parks Series, twice weekly Fun on the Farm programs, Things that Flutter Series, Movies in the Parks, Photo Walks, Trail Yoga, Star Series, two Ultimate Adventure Camps, The Great America Campout and more, says Kelly 36

J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

J. Barkley, supervisor, Division of Community and Park Connections. But if your family is pressed for time here are the top five events that people don’t want to miss this year, she says.

HUMP DAY CONCERT Conducted 7-9 p.m. every Wednesday from May 29 through Aug. 14 at the Gazebo behind the Ronald Reagan Lodge in Voice of America MetroPark, 7850 VOA Park Drive, West Chester, this event offers plenty of powerful musical performances. In addition to music, there will be food

and beverages available for purchase (including beverages for adults), lake activities, bike and boat rentals, and a playground for the kids, says Barkley. Visit yourmetroparks.net for a listing of performances.

THE GREAT MIAMI FIRST PEOPLES CELEBRATION Set for 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, June 29, at Governor Bebb MetroPark, 1979 Bebb Park Lane, Okeana, this event celebrates the rich cultural history of Butler County, she says.


This will be the second year for this event and attendees can experience firsthand the vibrant culture of Native Americans while embracing the opportunity to honor their traditions, says Barkley. Activities will include drum circles, dancers dressed in regalia and intertribal traditional/contemporary song demonstrations. The Pioneer Village at Governor Bebb MetroPark will also be open with historical interpretation tours running throughout the day. Food, beverages, and Native American vendors will also be available for guests.

CRAZY CARDBOARD REGATTA Scheduled for 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, July 20, at Voice of America MetroPark, this event features individuals and groups building boats designed for speed or for show out of cardboard. Spectators can vote for their favorite boat, cheer them on in each heat and watch them advance to the final competition where the last boat floating wins the Soggy Bottom Battle. This is the 10th anniversary of the Crazy Cardboard Regatta and this year’s event will also feature music, food, beverages, kids activities, vendors, demonstrations and more, says Barkley. Spectators are free, but those who wish to participate in the regatta must register at eventbrite.com/e/10th-annual-crazycardboard-regatta-boat-registrationtickets-55407428109.

Visitors will also have the opportunity to pet and feed the animals, play on the nature playscape, take a wagon ride, taste samples of open-hearth cooking, stroll through the farmers market and tour the 1874 Amish-Mennonite Augspurger Home, says Barkley. “And, if the weather and bloom time cooperates, you can also enjoy having your photos taken in the beautiful sunflower fields,” she says.

MUD MANIA AND MUTT MANIA

WHAT’S NEW?

Get ready to get muddy at this event scheduled for 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Aug. 9, 10 and 11 at Rentschler Forest MetroPark, 5701 Reigart Road, Fairfield Township. Mud Mania features a variety of mud-themed events, including a slimy obstacle course, mud water slide, muddy pool, a little mudders area, mud volleyball games, vendors and more, says Barkley. Bring the dogs on a leash on Sunday, Aug. 11, when Mutt Mania arrives featuring doggy obstacles and muddy pools. Cost of the event is $5 per person on Friday and Saturday, with kids under 5 free, and $5 or a 3-pound bag of dog food on Sunday.

MetroParks added new amenities in 2018 that many people may not have had the chance to visit yet, Barkley says. “The Meadow Ridge Area of Elk Creek just opened in 2018 after nearly two years of extensive restoration work,” she says “In preparation of this opening numerous invasive species were removed, native prairies and grasses planted and acres of reforestation occurred.” Although work is continuing there are miles of trails to walk and nature to enjoy, she says. The Meadow Ridge Area of Elk Creek MetroPark is located at 5101 Circle Parkway, Middletown. Elk Creek MetroPark is the largest park in the park system with just under 800 acres. The River Center at Bicentennial Commons in Middletown opened in August of 2018, Barkley says. “The structure itself provides the perfect resting place along the Great Miami River Trail to use flush

FUN ON THE FARM Visit with the park district’s newest farm animals that will have just moved into the refurbished red band barn at this event from noon to 4 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 8, at Rentschler Forest MetroPark.

Mud Mania, which features a variety of mud-themed events including a muddy pool, will be held Aug. 9-11 this year at Rentschler Forest Metropark in Fairfield. restrooms and get a cool drink from the drinking fountain when biking, running or hiking along the trail,” she says. To access this section of the trail visitors should park in the River Center lot located at 120 S. Carmody Blvd. in Middletown, says Barkley. Another new amenity recently completed were two new sections of trail at Rentschler Forest MetroPark, Barkley says. The Reigart Road area of the park and the Line Hill Mound area of the park now have been completed and connect to the Great Miami River Trail heading south toward the cities of Hamilton and Fairfield. A new 1.3-mile multipurpose paved path at Forest Run MetroPark was recently completed in the Timberman Ridge area, Barkley says. This path is accessible from lots on Timberman Road and Warvel Road. “It meanders along the ridge top of the park with stunning vistas, beautiful prairies, great birding, three catch-andrelease ponds and more,” she says. Visitors can access this property from 1976 Timberman Road or 1829 Warvel Road, Barkley says. MetroParks of Butler County consists of 11 parks and the park system owns and manages 4,332 acres of greenspace and 57 miles of trails. A motor vehicle permit is required to access MetroParks of Butler County, which is free to Butler County residents and $5/daily or $10/annually for nonresidents. n w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9

37


Midwestern Traveler

The New and the Classic INDIANA DESTINATIONS OFFER A MIX OF BOTH NEW AND CLASSIC ATTRACTIONS By Corinne Minard

W

ith Indiana right next door, many of us have taken advantage of the Hoosier State as a vacation destination. Those who haven’t visited in quite a while, though, may be surprised at all the new attractions in the state and by how fun the classic draws remain. Fort Wayne, Indianapolis and French Lick all have something new this summer to entertain adults, couples and the whole family.

FORT WAYNE Fort Wayne’s newest attraction is located right in the heart of its downtown. Opening June 21, the new Promenade Park creates

A rendering of Fort Wayne’s new Promenade Park

w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9

39


Midwestern Traveler a welcoming, communal environment on the riverfront surrounding its three rivers—the Maumee River, St. Marys River and St. Joseph River. The new area will feature a park, amphitheater, treetop canopy trail, restaurant, playground and more.

“[The rivers] have always been very natural, available for kayaking, canoeing, paddle boarding…but this development will make a real park and attraction right in the heart of downtown on the rivers,” says Kristen Guthrie, vice president of

The Crocodile Creek Adventure Ride at the Fort Wayne Children’s Zoo

40

J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

marketing and communications for Visit Fort Wayne. These new attractions will make it easier for visitors of all ages, skill levels and interests to enjoy the rivers. For example, the lawns are reinforced so that wheelchairs can use them. The new picnic areas will have entertainment like ping pong tables and cornhole for those not interested in the water. And the new Doermer Kids Canal gives kids the opportunity to play with water in a safe environment. “It’s kind of exciting to see how people will use it in different ways and enjoy it in different avenues,” says Jessa Campbell, marketing and communications coordinator for Visit Fort Wayne. The park will open with a bang, as the opening celebrations cover three days, June 21-23. Events are being added to the schedule regularly, but throughout the weekend visitors will be able to see fire dances, learn how to kayak and attend a live butterfly release. While the park brings something new to the region, families can also find fun at


the Fort Wayne Children’s Zoo. “Our No. 1 attraction is the Fort Wayne Children’s Zoo,” says Guthrie. “It’s just a really wonderful zoo and it is really built so that a child can enjoy it very easily. You don’t have to lift them out of the stroller, they can see everything, but yet it has all the animals and things you love.” The zoo has several sections—such as the Australian Adventure and African Journey—and each has its own ride and hands-on activity. “It’s lots to do but [with] a footprint that’s manageable for families,” adds Guthrie. The zoo first opened in the 1960s, but it has continued to add new attractions. New this year is the updated Monkey Island and a new river otter exhibit. “They do new things every summer to keep it contemporary but it is certainly a soft spot for people in the Midwest who know and love this zoo,” says Guthrie.

INDIANAPOLIS In Indianapolis, adults can mix old and new attractions for a fun weekend without the kids.

The Slippery Noodle Inn is the oldest bar in Indiana. On the classic end of the spectrum, visitors can stop by St. Elmo Steak House for high-quality steaks and fiery shrimp cocktail. First opened in 1902, the restaurant brings a touch of history to its high-end menu.

The Slippery Noodle Inn, the oldest bar in Indiana, mixes live music, food and drink with some history. The bar first opened in 1850 and was formerly a brothel. It was a way station on the Underground Railroad, has a pressed tin ceiling that was

w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9

41


Midwestern Traveler installed in 1890 and even has bullet holes from gangster John Dillinger. And don’t forget the duckpin bowling! At the Fountain Square Theatre Building, visitors can take part in this old-fashioned pastime after visiting the local vinyl shops, restaurants and cafes. The city has plenty of newer things to do as well. Bluebeard, named after Indianapolis native Kurt Vonnegut’s novel, uses books to inspire the restaurant’s theme—checks are given out in old library books. Andrew Luck of the Indianapolis Colts is known to frequent the restaurant. Another unique, new restaurant/bar is the Inferno Room. The Polynesian-themed bar features drinks like the Skull & Bones, Singapore Sling and The Fog of Thor and cuisine like fried plantains and Spam sliders. The bar also boasts more than 400 artifacts from Papa New Guinea, so there is always something to look at. Between meals, couples can take in the art at Newfields, the campus of the Indianapolis Museum of Art. Featured Fountain Square Theatre Building

AN INDY SUMMER TRADITION

27TH ANNUAL

INDIAN MARKET & FESTIVAL JUNE 22 & 23

One of the Midwest’s most unique and memorable cultural experiences is a short drive away. Experience Native cultures and shop for exquisite art from more than 100 Native artists. Enjoy performances, food, family activities and more at the Eiteljorg Museum, an Indianapolis treasure. Adult discount tickets at Eiteljorg.org (17 and under free June 22 and 23) SPONSORED BY:

#EJIndianMarket

42

J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

ENTERTAINMENT STAGE SPONSORED BY:

ADDITIONAL SUPPORT PROVIDED BY:

Christel DeHaan Family Foundation

The Mrs. Robert S. Eccles Fund


Bluebeard serves American plates and craft cocktails.

812-936-3418 • vflwb.com • #MyFrenchLick

w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9

43


Midwestern Traveler exhibits include the Robert Indiana LOVE sculpture, the Funky Bones sculpture and a pop-up teahouse near exhibits on Japanese culture.

FRENCH LICK The French Lick and West Baden area is known for its classic entertainment. The French Lick Resort’s two hotels were built in the early 1900s and retain much of their historic charm. The resort offers guided tours to hotel guests and visitors alike, and everyone can use the restored trolley to travel between the two. “Those two hotels are iconic—that’s why people come here,” says Kristal Painter, executive director of Visit French Lick West Baden. The resort is also known for many of its amenities. The resort offers carriage rides every evening, horseback riding and bike rentals and is home to three championship golf courses—the Pete Dye Course, Donald Ross Course and Sultan’s Run. One of Painter’s favorite features, though, is targeted at kids. “They offer

44

J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

Kids Fest activities, so those are themed activities throughout the year they offer the kids. Kiddos can stay and do those activities by themselves so mom and dad can sneak away and have some alone time or go to the casino, dinner, something like that, or parents can stay and participate

French Lick Resort offers carriage rides each evening.

in those activities as well,” says Painter. Outside the resort, families and couples can find many new things to do in the region. Adults can enjoy the French Lick Scenic Railway’s new dinner train service starting in August. The train also offers a bourbon-tasting trip in September and an


At Wilstem Ranch, guests can have up-close encounters with elephants, giraffes and kangaroos. adult chocolate tasting throughout the summer. Kids, on the other hand, can take the Dinosaur Adventure Train June 22-23 and 29-30, where they’ll meet live reptiles, dig for fossils, play in a bounce house and more. For something to do together, families can head to Wilstem Ranch. There, families can have up-close encounters with elephants,

giraffes and kangaroos. The 1,100-acre ranch’s newest attraction is the Grizzly Bear Encounter, where guests get to meet Jeff “The Bear Man” Watson, who’s been featured on shows like Animal Planet’s Project Grizzly and Discovery Channel’s Porter Ridge. “You get to interact with him, see him do some of his fun Jeff Watson bear stuff

and then you’re learning education stuff as well. Kind of like national park education and safety and things like that. So it’s a really cool once-in-a-lifetime kind of encounter where you’re going to learn about Bob and Screech, the two bears, [and] how to stay safe in bear country,” says Painter. n

Adventure Awaits! Explore the Midwest’s newest attractions in Fort Wayne, Indiana this summer! Make a splash at Riverfront Fort Wayne, have a wild time in the new central zoo at the Fort Wayne Children’s Zoo, and make memories they’ll treasure forever!

Find getaway ideas, overnight packages, & deals: VisitFortWayne.com • 1-800-767-7752 VFW_Summer19_CincyMag_7.5x4.875.indd 1

w w w.

4/15/19 12:25 PM m a g a z i n e . c o m : : J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9 45


Midwestern Traveler

River City Getaway Paducah stays busy all summer thanks to its many events, including its Riverfront Concert Series.

PADUCAH, KENTUCKY, OFFERS A CHANCE TO ESCAPE WHILE BEING JUST A ROAD TRIP AWAY By Corinne Minard

T

hanks to its many summer events, Laura Oswald, director of marketing for the Paducah Convention & Visitors Bureau, says Paducah is ideal for those looking for a quick weekend getaway. “One of our favorite summer events is our Riverfront Concert Series on our riverfront,” she says. “We are right here on the Ohio River where the Ohio and Mississippi come together. There’s a really beautiful setting on our riverfront for concerts.” Held June 6, June 22, July 4, July 20, Aug. 1 and Aug. 17, each evening features performances from two musical acts. Each concert is free and attendees are invited to bring their own chairs and dinner. While the concert series has proven to be popular, it’s not the only event this summer. “This year we are going to have a Shakespeare in the Park event at Bob Noble Park,” 46

J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

says Oswald. The Market House Theater, which is entering its 56th season and is considered to be one of the top community theaters in the country, will be performing Shakespeare’s As You Like It, a charming romantic comedy, July 12-14. “This will be a way to kind of celebrate theater and get outdoors and kind of switch up that venue and experience from what they do year round,” adds Oswald. Other events this summer include the Independence Day Celebration (which incorporates the Riverfront Concert Series), Paducah 48 Hour Film Project and Paducah Dragon Boat Festival. In between events, visitors can still find plenty to do in Paducah. Oswald recommends starting with the city’s Wall-to-Wall Murals. More than 50 murals are painted on Paducah’s floodwall, illustrating the city’s history and creativity. “That can be a jumping off point to going throughout the town and experiencing other attractions. There’s a Civil War Museum, the Hotel Metropolitan [and] the Coke Plant, which is a kind of new landmark that’s in restoration,” she says. “Just a couple of blocks up you have the National Quilt Museum, which is an international fiber art museum.”

Another way to explore the cit y is through its food scene. Sara Bradley, the runner up of the latest season of Top Chef, owns The Freight House, Paducah’s first farm-to-table restaurant. “That’s certainly a must experience and kind of a gateway to get people who are into food and foodie culinary experiences to see what Western Kentucky cuisine is all about,” says Oswald. Other standouts include JP’s Bar and Grill, a restaurant with a New Orleans vibe located on Market House Square, and Paducah Beer Werks, Paducah’s awardwinning brewery. n

Paducah’s historic Coke Plant


Dining

New Orleans Meets Cincy SWAMPWATER GRILL IN MT. LOOKOUT IS SERVING UP CLASSIC CAJUN FLAVORS By Will Jones

L

ocated at 3742 Kellogg Ave. in Mt Lookout, Swampwater Grill is cooking up authentic Cajun food you won’t find anywhere else in the city. When asked why he decided to start the restaurant, Cincinnati native and Swampwater Grill Operating Partner Chris Ornella says, “There’s a shortage of Cajun restaurants in Cincinnati. It’s a unique flavor. Everybody that goes to New Orleans loves the Cajun food so why not bring it to Cincinnati so the people can enjoy it here and not have to travel 900 miles to get it?” Ornella has worked in the restaurant and bar industry for nearly 30 years. He along with his business partner Kirk Prest (who is in Louisiana) opened the doors of Swampwater Grill in July 2013. They offer an eclectic variety of appetizers that includes smoked jalapeño poppers stuffed with chorizo sausage and cream cheese then wrapped with bacon; spicy crawfish tails, lightly fried; and their famous gator bites, which are tender, golden-fried gator served with crispy jalapeños and housemade remoulade. “We’ve got some of the best appetizers you can come up with,” Ornella says. Guests also have the option to order shucked oysters by the half dozen, or one

dozen on the half shell, fried or chargrilled. While classic Cajun options such as creamy cheddar shrimp n’ grits, chicken and andouille gumbo and jambalaya with smoked chicken are available, Swampwater Grill also offers smoker pit plates for those who have a taste for barbecue. Guests can enjoy a 12-ounce, bone-in Tomahawk pork chop, perfectly blackened and prepared in the restaurant’s newly renovated kitchen that is equipped with new cooktops and fryers. “It’s authentic Cajun food that’s as close to New Orleans as you’re going to get in Cincinnati,” Ornella says. Swampwater Grill has weekday lunch deals from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. starting at only

TOP: Crawfish Boil ABOVE: Swampwater Grill’s smoker

$10, as well as daily dinner specials after 5 p.m. It also has a full service bar with happy hour specials Wednesday through Friday, from 3-6 p.m. The bar features New Orleans-inspired drinks including hurricanes, mai tais and its signature “Swamp Juice” adult beverage. It also offers an extensive list of wines, seasonal rotating taps and local microbrews such as Rhinegeist, Madtree and 50 West. n w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9

47


INSIDE: 49 Top 10 Communities 51 Inside the Data 52 Top 50 Communities 58 Education Chart In our 13th annual Rating the Burbs feature, we look at our local communities to see how they stack up against each other. Where did your community fall in this year’s list?

Compiled by Bill Ferguson Jr.

Madeira

48

J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

60 Crime Chart 62 How We Did It


1 Madeira

After a year off, Madeira returns to the top spot in this year’s Rating the Burbs. The city of 9,149 has placed No. 1 or No. 2 among the Burbs since 2010, with the exception of one year. Madeira was strong across all categories, most notably an increase in the median home-sale price, which was up almost 60% to $340,000 from 2013 to 2018. Madeira City Schools are among the best in the state, and crime is relatively low, making this suburb an attractive place to live. Located next door to Kenwood Towne Centre, the 3.4-square-mile city is conveniently located off Interstate 71 about 12 miles from downtown Cincinnati. The Madeira Chamber of Commerce website lists 154 businesses, providing shopping, dining, doctors, dentists and other services for a population that lives in an area zoned above 90% residential. Incorporated in 1910, the 3.4-square-mile city was developed along the railroad line between Cincinnati and Parkersburg, West Virginia. For recreation, residents can enjoy three parks: Sellman Park (10 acres), McDonald Commons Park (17 acres), and Nelle V. Hosbrook Bird Sanctuary (2 acres).

Township 2 Union (Warren County)

Union Township is becoming a perennial top-five community, with eight straight years among the best of the best. Low crime, a strong housing market and good school systems all combine to make the township of more than 5,000 a magnet for residents. Union’s median home-sale price more than doubled between 2013 and 2018, to $422,855, the fourth-highest among Greater Cincinnati communities. The township, formed Jan. 3, 1815, from parts of Deerfield and Turtlecreek townships in the central part of Warren County, owns two parks—William H. Hackman Park and Willard E. Spicer Park—and is served by four school districts.

3

Morgan Township (Butler County)

While Morgan Township often appears in the list of top-50 communities, this is the first time since 2014 that it has made the top five. A high homeownership rate (93.1%), a good education system (Ross Local School District) and low crime moved the township from No. 21 last year to No. 3 this year. Named for Gen. Daniel Morgan, an American Revolutionary War officer, the township was formed March 4,

1811, when county commissioners divided it from Ross Township. In addition to 30 miles of roadways, the township maintains five cemeteries in the mostly rural area. Located in the southwestern corner of Butler County, the 36-square-mile township is on the state line with Indiana. The nonprofit Morgan Township Historical Society serves as a resource for the history of the township.

Township 4 Wayne (Warren County)

Similar to other Wayne townships in Ohio, the 46.3-square-mile township was named after Revolutionary War Gen. “Mad Anthony” Wayne. Wayne Township is one of the original townships in Warren County, created May 10, 1803, just nine days after the county began. The township, primarily served by the Wayne Local School District, has strong schools, good housing and relatively little crime. Residents have access to Caesar Creek State Park, which includes hiking, boating and camping. The Little Miami River flows through the township, and the Little Miami Scenic Trail passes through the township along the route of the now defunct Little Miami Railroad. Agricultural land makes up the largest portion of the land, with residential housing and parks making up much of the remainder. The 2018 median home-sales price of $239,000 was up 51.75% from 2013.

Township 5 Clearcreek (Warren County)

A regular top-20 community, Clearcreek Township continues to add residents, with a population of 32,849. Low crime, strong schools (Springboro, Lebanon and Wayne), and high homeownership keep attracting residents. At $358,500, it had the seventhhighest median home-sale price in the region in 2018. The township was established in October 1815, and by 1840, it was reported to have one of the best unpaved road systems in Ohio. Clearcreek Baptist Church, founded in 1797 in Ridgeville, is reported to be the first church in Warren County. The township operates several parks: Patricia Allyn Park (96.77 acres), The Hoffman Reserve (96.69 acres) and Diane’s Sycamore Reserve (6.796 acres), with plans for Harbaugh Park (142.2 acres).

6 Blue Ash

Blue Ash makes its second consecutive appearance in the top 10, experiencing a continued strong gain in the median sale price of its homes, along with a highly ranked education system (Sycamore Community School District). The city of 12,199 has invested heavily in its parks and recreation system, and hosts two premier summer events that draw people from throughout the region: SummitFest Country Music Festival in June (which began in 2018 after a 30-year run of Taste of Blue Ash ended in 2017) and Red, White & Blue Ash on July 4. Residents can find plenty of recreational and fitness opportunities in the more than 280 acres of parks and fields, including Blue Ash’s signature Summit Park, and a recreation center. Located 12 miles northeast of Cincinnati, the 7.7-square-mile city sees its population more than triple during the day because of its 2,300 businesses. Fifty Fortune 500 companies have some presence in Blue Ash, from manufacturing to offices to retail. Land use is divided almost equally, with residential at 35%, commercial at 35% and public use at 30%.

7 Montgomery

A strong school system (Sycamore Community School District), a high homeownership rate and a good housing market combined to keep last year’s No. 1 community in the top 10. The median home-sale w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9

49


The city has no stand-alone businesses and includes 75 miles of horse-riding trails and several parks and recreational areas.

Township 9 Milford (Butler County)

This Butler County Township is no stranger to the top-50 communities, but it’s the first time that it makes an appearance in the top 10. A high homeownership rate, good schools (primarily Talawanda City School District, with a portion in Edgewood City School District) and relatively low crime make this community of 3,714 an attractive place to live. The median home-sale price in 2018 climbed 46% to $203,000 from $139,000 five years earlier. Township trustees bought the former Marie Schmidt Elementary School (Collinsville School) for $1 from Talawanda and turned it into the Milford Township Community Center, with a playground and picnic shelter. In 2007, trustees bought 12 acres of adjoining land for expansion of the park or township administration uses.

Township 10 Hamilton (Warren County)

High homeownership, good schools and low crime keep Hamilton Township at No. 10 for the second year in a row. The township promotes itself as being a place for “the perfect blend of quiet, rural living and the conveniences of modern life.” It offers almost 600 acres of parks: Big Foot Run Dog Park, Marr Park, Mounts Park, Munitions Park and Testerman Park. A portion of the Little Miami Scenic Trail— the Loveland section—runs through the township. Little Miami Local Schools serves as the primary district, with Goshen Local, Kings Local and Loveland City making up the others. The median home-sale price jumped to $239,150 last year from $171,000 in 2013, a 40% move. The township of 25,996 population sits just east of Interstate 71 at the crossroads of US Route 22/ Ohio 3—also known as the “3C Highway” (Cincinnati-Columbus-Cleveland)—and Ohio Route 48.

Honorable Mentions ADA KUANG

ADA KUANG

price in Montgomery was $432,000 in 2018, up 31% from 2013. That price was the third highest in the region, behind The Village of Indian Hill and Terrace Park. Between 2001 and 2017, the city saw 258 teardowns, in which builders demolish smaller homes and typically build larger ones in place. The 5.3-square-mile city of 10,746 was settled in 1796, when six families moved from Orange County, New York, became a village in 1910 and incorporated as a city in 1971. Dulle Park, Johnson Nature Preserve, Montgomery Park, Pfeiffer Park, Pioneer Park, Swaim Park, Triangle Point Plaza and Weller Park provide 96-plus acres of protected green space, with playgrounds, baseball fields, soccer fields, tennis courts, basketball courts, sand volleyball, picnic shelters and a pool for residents’ recreation and relaxation. The parks are connected by more than 10 miles of sidewalks and bike paths.

8 The Village of Indian Hill

Settled as a farming community in 1795, The Village of Indian Hill became incorporated in 1941. While its population of 5,874 qualifies Indian Hill as a city, it still goes by the name “The Village of Indian Hill” on its website—a pitch for its rural feel and 100% residential makeup. Even the U.S. Census Bureau uses that as the official name. The almost-20-square-mile community ranks highly for homeownership, its education system and low crime. Indian Hill has Rating the Burbs’ No.1 public school system, the Indian Hill Exempted Village School District, which has ranked at the top for four consecutive years. Even though Indian Hill’s median home-sale price, $1.05 million, is by far the top price in the area, that amount was up a modest 8.8%. The Indian Hill Rangers, the police department that dates to 1903, help maintain a relatively low crime rate. 50

J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

Newtown Last year, we added the Honorable Mentions category to capture communities that did not place among the Top 50 Communities, but did place in the top 25 in at least two categories among the 138 communities of 1,000 or more population. This year, those communities are: Cold Spring, Ky.

Reily Township (Butler)

Evendale

St. Bernard

Franklin

Washington Township (Warren)

Highland Heights, Ky.

Wilder, Ky.

Newtown

Woodlawn

Oxford


Madeira Reclaims No. 1 as Housing Keeps Gaining By Bill Ferguson Jr.

M

is up 9% to 11% ($242-$246). Oxford, in Butler County, was the other double-digit increase, up 10%, adding about $130 a year. “If you look at the levies, there were some big ones on there,” Rhodes says. New fire/ EMS levies, school levies, etc., add to the cost of property taxes. P roper t y t a xes overa l l i n But ler, Clermont and Warren counties in Ohio; Boone, Campbell and Kenton counties in Kentucky; and Dearborn County, Ind., remained relatively stable or even fell a bit, depending on tax laws such as reduction factors and exemptions. An analysis of all data finds that Madeira returns to the top spot in Rating the Burbs, replacing 2018’s Montgomery. Madeira has been No. 1 or No. 2 in the ratings continuously. While the city performs well across almost all categories, its median home-sale price last year was a primary driver—up 59.62% to $340,000. Tom Moeller, who started as Madeira city manager in March 1989, says the city just completed its first comprehensive city plan, in which housing, community facilities/parks, the business district/economic development and transportation were the key topics. The community participation was strong, he says, and the plan is expected to be finalized this summer. In housing, the city is updating its zoning to allow a residential/commercial mix in which buildings can go to two or three stories, with retail or office on the first floor

and housing in the upper floors. As for the big gains in home prices in Madeira, Moeller says, “The majority of that increase is attributable to the in-fill building”—developers buy ing lessexpensive homes, tearing them down and then building homes that are much more expensive. “In the past nine years, we’ve done 200-plus of those. Then you couple that with a couple of new, small developments where the homes are in the seven, eight, $900,000 range, and it’s going to pull that average home sale up fairly dramatically.” The main drivers of housing are education—Madeira City Schools, which is one of the top-performing districts in Ohio—and the central location of Madeira. As in years past, several communities moved into or out of the top 50 (16 this year), and half of the top 10 has changed this year compared with 2018. n

HIGHEST-PRICED BURBS, 2018 n ia ed M ale S e- e c om ri H P 8 1

20

COMMUNITY

ld So es 18 om 20

H

ore than half of the 138 communities in Rating the Burbs experienced median homesale price gains of one-third or higher in 2018, compared with the five-year-earlier prices, and that factor helped Madeira return to the No. 1 spot among the Top 50 Communities. Woodlawn, site of the Home Builders Association of Greater Cincinnati’s 14th CiTiRAMA in October 2017, led the gains last year—skyrocketing 291% to a median sale price of $226,611 from $58,000 in 2013, data from local boards of Realtors and county auditors showed. The Woodlawn Meadows development featured 43 singlefamily lots with homes in the $200,000 to $375,000 price range. Three Clermont County areas—Batavia, Williamsburg and Washington Township—followed closely behind with gains of 287%, 256% and 215%, respectively. Although closings were down 1.6% last year, Michelle Billings, president of the Cincinnati Area Board of Realtors, said in a news release that “2018 home sales remained one of the top three strongest in over 10 years.” Prices continued up throughout the year. The Northern Kentucky Association of Realtors reported that sales were up 1.35% to 7,293 in 2018, a record, while median prices were up overall by 6.29%. Meanwhile, property taxes in Hamilton County also climbed overall. County Auditor Dusty Rhodes says that while many think that the 2018 full reappraisal of properties was behind the increases, that’s not true. “People are voting for levies,” Rhodes says. “That’s it.” Rhodes noted that the county must do a full appraisal every six years, with an update every three years in between, but the tax rates are rolled back to equal the money collected that was voted in the levy. New levies, however, add to the tax bill. The largest property tax increase occurred in Milford (Clermont and Hamilton counties), with gains of 17% to 23% in 2018 vs. 2017, depending on the tax district, adding $385 to $424 in costs for every $100,000 in value. Montgomery added 16% to 17.5% (an extra $325-$343), and Delhi Township

1

The Village of Indian Hill

121

$1,050,000

2

Terrace Park

44

$434,250

3

Montgomery

165

$432,000

4

Union Township (Warren)

35

$422,855

5

Mariemont

74

$414,000

6

Symmes Township (Hamilton)

167

$375,000

7

Clearcreek Township (Warren)

135

$358,500

8

Mason

421

$342,500

9

Madeira

187

$340,000

10

Wyoming

137

$330,000

Sources: Multiple Listing Service of Greater Cincinnati, Northern Kentucky Multiple Listing Service, Southeastern Indiana Board of Realtors w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9

51


52

J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

Madeira

Union Township (Warren)

Morgan Township (Butler)

Wayne Township (Warren)

Clearcreek Township (Warren)

Blue Ash

Montgomery

The Village of Indian Hill

Milford Township (Butler)

Hamilton Township (Warren)

Massie Township (Warren)

Fairfax

Springboro

Terrace Park

Hanover Township (Butler)

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

COMMUNITY

17

20 Sa fe ty

8,679

2,289

18,610

1,707

1,210

25,996

3,714

5,874

10,746

12,199

32,849

9,006

5,796

5,169

40

9

33

15

44

87

4

32

5

6

19

42

1

14

om

H

Talawanda (also Edgewood, Hamilton, Ross)

Mariemont (also Indian Hill)

Springboro (also Franklin)

Mariemont (also Cincinnati)

Clinton-Massie (also Wayne)

Little Miami (also Goshen, Kings, Loveland)

22

3

11

3

26

18

22

1

Indian Hill (also Cincinnati, Madeira, Mariemont, Sycamore) Talawanda (also Edgewood)

7

Sycamore

7

11

6

Wayne (also Clinton-Massie, Lebanon, Bellbrook-Sugarcreek, Xenia) Springboro (also Lebanon, Wayne)

14

22

2

Ross (also Southwest)

Kings, Lebanon (also Little Miami, Mason)

Sycamore (also Princeton)

HOUSING

OTHER

86

44

121

28

11

514

33

121

165

161

135

69

37

35

187

ed

M

$173,075

$434,250

$285,000

$162,825

$147,200

$239,150

$203,000

$1,050,000

$432,000

$275,000

$358,500

$239,000

$271,000

$422,855

$340,000

M

$121,250

$410,000

$225,000

$85,000

$68,000

$171,000

$139,000

$965,000

$329,900

$176,000

$278,000

$157,500

$184,325

$193,000

$213,000

42.74%

5.91%

26.67%

91.56%

116.47%

39.85%

46.04%

8.81%

30.95%

56.25%

28.96%

51.75%

47.02%

119.10%

59.62%

90.08%

93.18%

84.30%

76.85%

79.41%

91.55%

88.43%

96.62%

88.38%

73.50%

90.00%

80.29%

93.15%

80.27%

86.84%

26.70 31.94 29.97 21.49 22.99 25.04 28.42

$1,441$1,679 $1,382$1,936 $1,127$1,672 $2,610$2,992 $1,439$1,641 $1,751$3,000 $1,357$1,668

22.67

$2,181$2,457

22.59

19.61

$1,830$1,864

$1,382$2,614

24.58

$1,525$1,797

30.85

$1,368$1,422

25.81

25.28

$1,670$1,969

$1,163$1,795

20.00

$1,580$2,455

20 Av 18 W era 5 e i O uc or g n -y di pe Pr w ia a M ea es k eC at ne 20 r op (in o ed r Pr n H Pr n H io So $ r 1 e S % n ia 10 rt ic om ic om 7 O a m mm ld R e e cc H le n C y in u an 0 e e H ha 20 20 20 T o u P ut te , a 00 x pi m ki ric om ng es t 18 Sal 13 Sal 18 ng e e e 0 d e e s e e e s ) o

Ed

Madeira (also Cincinnati, Indian Hill)

Pr im D ar is y tr S ic ch t( o s) ol

EDUCATION

135

ng

ki

an

R

9,149

n

tio

ul a

Po p

SAFETY

THE TOP 50 COMMUNITIES


Ross Township (Butler) Liberty Township (Butler) Fort Thomas, Ky. Lakeside Park, Ky. Mariemont Crosby Township (Hamilton) Salem Township (Warren) Madison Township (Butler) Wyoming Anderson Township (Hamilton) Edgewood, Ky. Mason Greendale, Ind. Oxford Township (Butler) Carlisle Ohio Township (Clermont) St. Clair Township (Butler) Harlan Township (Warren) Goshen Township (Clermont) Delhi Township (Hamilton) Alexandria, Ky. Amberley Village Fort Mitchell, Ky. Southgate, Ky. Williamsburg Township (Clermont) Union, Ky. Waynesville Deer Park Washington Township (Clermont) Hidden Valley Lake, Ind. Greenhills Villa Hills, Ky. Harrison Monroe Township (Clermont) Maineville

16 (tie) 16 (tie) 18 19 20 (tie) 20 (tie) 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 (tie) 37 (tie) 39 40 41 42 43 (tie) 43 (tie) 45 46 47 48 49 50

1,070

8,137

11,300

7,437

3,597

5,344

2,357

5,679

3,081

5,895

5,907

3,892

8,248

3,778

9,438

29,686

16,095

5,153

7,254

5,370

5,336

25,254

4,417

33,235

8,720

43,969

8,536

8,871

4,819

2,808

3,433

2,745

16,263

39,333

8,821

3

92

66

12

29

10

94

28

37

13

52

24

55

7

71

63

46

50

72

51

23

2

26

22

21

53

30

77

62

73

31

27

17

34

65

Little Miami

New Richmond (also West Clermont)

Southwest

Kenton County

Winton Woods

Sunman-Dearborn (also Lawrenceburg)

Felicity-Franklin (also Bethel-Tate, New Richmond)

Deer Park

Wayne

Boone County

Williamsburg (also Batavia)

Campbell County/Southgate Independent

Beechwood Independent (also Kenton County)

Cincinnati

Campbell County

Oak Hills (also Cincinnati)

18

28

35

32

62

29

47

36

6

30

39

48

10

61

25

17

24

18

Little Miami (also Blanchester, Clinton-Massie, Goshen) Goshen (also Little Miami, Loveland)

33

28

23

22

41

Edgewood (also New Miami, Ross)

New Richmond (also West Clermont)

Carlisle (also Franklin)

Talawanda (also College Corner)

Lawrenceburg

5

32

Kenton County (also Erlanger-Elsmere Independent) Mason (also Kings, Lebanon)

9

4

Wyoming (also Cincinnati, Finneytown, Winton Woods) Forest Hills (also Cincinnati)

38

18

35

3

32

15

16

14

Madison (also Edgewood)

Little Miami (also Lebanon)

Southwest

Mariemont (also Cincinnati)

Kenton County (also Beechwood Independent)

Fort Thomas Independent

Lakota

Ross

25

77

169

118

69

105

24

123

54

548

36

67

85

74

319

402

214

68

50

22

58

34

65

421

115

675

137

82

44

48

74

39

227

681

72

$182,000

$151,500

$199,900

$227,500

$126,000

$206,900

$143,539

$151,000

$177,000

$285,922

$139,950

$102,000

$260,000

$326,550

$218,000

$135,000

$166,700

$219,250

$86,000

$268,000

$151,950

$210,000

$149,900

$342,500

$222,000

$250,000

$330,000

$182,500

$245,000

$318,443

$414,000

$221,000

$223,500

$299,000

$288,000

$145,000

$89,000

$123,950

$190,000

$84,000

$162,000

$45,500

$115,000

$135,000

$237,750

$65,000

$66,800

$184,900

$253,800

$150,000

$99,750

$120,000

$146,500

$35,001

$145,500

$112,900

$156,000

$103,000

$288,500

$180,000

$191,750

$305,000

$87,000

$153,400

$202,500

$304,000

$157,000

$175,250

$225,000

$185,000

25.52%

70.22%

61.27%

19.74%

50.00%

27.72%

215.47%

31.30%

31.11%

20.26%

115.31%

52.69%

40.62%

28.66%

45.33%

35.34%

38.92%

49.66%

145.71%

84.19%

34.59%

34.62%

45.53%

18.72%

23.33%

30.38%

8.20%

109.77%

59.71%

57.26%

36.18%

40.76%

27.53%

32.89%

55.68%

78.01%

83.66%

72.26%

85.51%

72.20%

89.76%

88.37%

64.60%

58.71%

94.06%

67.45%

59.96%

50.39%

93.64%

83.32%

80.94%

85.52%

83.22%

71.75%

72.62%

73.48%

36.96%

78.24%

81.21%

89.19%

85.56%

84.59%

86.00%

76.83%

90.42%

62.16%

66.06%

68.98%

89.93%

87.47%

26.62

$1,141$1,357

34.29

$1,408$1,754

28.60

26.79

$1,883$2,027

$1,774.41

23.82

$1,409

21.64

31.58

$1,473$1,816 $3,271

43.47

20.03 $1,140$1,406

$2,842

22.83

28.08

$1,412$1,765

$1,918

20.47

20.43

22.31

25.87

$2,139

$1,249$1,453

$2,640

$1,434

25.39

$2,522$3,000

26.89

$1,358$1,669

28.52

29.13

$1,240$1,586

$1,656$2,196

24.46

$1,599$1,645

37.00

15.66

$1,361$1,467

$1,159$1,796

24.54

23.75

$1,521$2,108 $3,000

21.27

$1,364$1,688

25.70

$2,309$2,692

28.02

$1,570$1,644

21.34

27.75

$1,713$2,001

$2,507$3,424

26.86

$1,775

23.84

19.50

$1,426$1,630 $2,451$2,832

19.45

26.91

29.99

$1,857

$1,919

$1,472


This is the inside Template is 6.5” x 11.125” Including the Bleed (In Red) Finished size is 16.25” x 10.875” (In Blue) Live Area is 15.25” x 9.875” (In Yellow) Pretrim the 1.25” Face before binding in Cincy Magazine

Pretrim .125” Face Before Binding into Cincy Magazine

8.25”

8.”

Fold


EDUCATION

PUBLIC SCHOOL SYSTEMS pi

l/

lS

R

ng

g in at

i nd pe

e at St

pi s ol ho Sc

1

ed ag nt va ad is D r he ac y te r e ala ag s er Av ith w rs ve he bo ac A Te or r’s io te at R as r M he ac Te

Pu

Pu rPe

(Top 35 of 70) (2017-18 data)

t en llm ro En

DISTRICT Indian Hill

1,977

4

$15,142

2

Madeira

1,449

3

$11,224

A (Performance Index)

15.75

78.7%

$78,079

7.5%

3

Mariemont

1,621

4

$12,387

B (Performance Index)

13.18

82.5%

$70,173

9.8%

4

Wyoming

1,926

5

$11,787

B (Performance Index)

14.59

75.1%

$76,930

6.5%

5

Mason

10,257

5

$9,770

B (Performance Index)

19.17

82.7%

$77,667

8.6%

6

Wayne

1,393

3

$8,661

B (Performance Index)

17.63

72.0%

$61,643

16.7%

7

Sycamore

5,334

7

$11,996

B (Performance Index)

14.73

69.8%

$71,577

14.7%

8

Loveland

4,462

6

$9,425

B (Performance Index)

17.57

84.9%

$75,224

14.0%

9

Forest Hills

7,318

9

$9,939

B (Performance Index)

16.52

74.6%

$70,299

8.6%

10

Beechwood Independent, Ky.

1,377

3

$14,248

N/A

16.49

56.3%

$54,359

19.3%

11

Springboro Community City

5,853

6

$7,619

B (Performance Index)

19.71

68.6%

$60,007

7.1%

12

Bellbrook-Sugarcreek

2,508

4

$10,150

B (Performance Index)

16.83

74.5%

$69,089

14.0%

13

Kings

4,534

6

$9,253

B (Performance Index)

17.11

64.9%

$68,804

16.8%

14

Ross

2,658

4

$8,526

B (Performance Index)

17.15

70.7%

$60,423

24.4%

15

Fort Thomas Independent, Ky.

3,082

5

$14,327

N/A

17.32

50.0%

$61,160

11.2%

16

Lakota

14,954

20

$9,803

B (Performance Index)

19.73

72.9%

$70,238

19.6%

17

Oak Hills

7,409

9

$8,575

B (Performance Index)

16.95

63.0%

$68,514

21.0%

18

Little Miami

4,492

5

$8,805

C (Performance Index)

17.41

64.2%

$56,851

18.0%

19

Milford

6,345

8

$9,078

B (Performance Index)

17.58

76.4%

$67,647

20.0%

20

Walton-Verona, Ky.

1,663

3

$13,895

N/A

16.15

58.0%

$51,196

38.8%

21

Monroe

2,691

4

$7,244

B (Performance Index)

17.94

56.6%

$55,247

30.0%

22

Talawanda

2,828

5

$10,728

C (Performance Index)

14.88

64.9%

$65,764

32.0%

23

Carlisle

1,533

4

$9,813

C (Performance Index)

16.31

70.2%

$60,652

31.2%

24

Goshen

2,759

4

$8,250

C (Performance Index)

17.35

73.0%

$62,171

51.4%

25

Campbell County, Ky.

4,793

8

$14,140

N/A

15.98

55.6%

$52,177

47.5%

26

Clinton-Massie

1,749

3

$7,886

C (Performance Index)

18.61

54.4%

$54,451

21.6%

27

Bethel-Tate

1,528

4

$7,285

C (Performance Index)

15.43

74.7%

$54,997

37.2%

28

New Richmond Exempted Village

2,361

5

$8,824

C (Performance Index)

16.06

73.3%

$62,056

41.4%

29

Sunman-Dearborn, Ind.

3,803

5

$11,306

B

19.50

56.4%

$52,453

23.7%

30

Boone County, Ky.

20,133

26

$14,769

N/A

15.34

60.1%

$53,681

39.3%

31

Lebanon

5,311

5

$7,953

C (Performance Index)

19.97

60.6%

$61,661

21.6%

32

Kenton County, Ky.

14,622

19

$13,901

N/A

18.20

57.6%

$54,693

43.6%

33

Edgewood

3,510

5

$8,375

C (Performance Index)

16.64

69.7%

$60,237

36.4%

34

Blanchester

1,555

4

$8,806

C (Performance Index)

15.71

64.8%

$52,899

45.3%

35

Southwest

3,581

6

$8,883

C (Performance Index)

18.18

64.7%

$69,071

43.1%

A (Performance Index)

12.36

91.4%

$77,872

5.1%

N/A — Not available or not calculated. *About academic ratings: Ohio and Indiana use an index to rank their schools, but the indexes are weighted differently, so the states’ scores do not compare directly. Indiana uses 100 as a top score; Ohio uses 120. Kentucky is revamping its overall scoring system and did not report overall index scores for 2017-18. **About ACT and SAT averages: Ohio did not report ACT or SAT scores for 2017-18 on the School Report Cards. Through a publicrecords request, Cincy obtained scores from the Ohio Department of Education; however, the department provided only scores it received from ACT and the College Board (SAT). It said the scores were not for all students and should not be compared with previous years’ scores. SAT scores, but not ACT scores, were provided for Indian Hill and Princeton. Kentucky students take the ACT; some take the SAT, and the state does not report SAT scores.

58

J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com


2018 BLUE RIBBON SCHOOLS The National Blue Ribbon Schools Program, which started in 1982, honors public and private elementary, middle and high schools throughout the U.S. Recognition is based on schools’ overall academic excellence or progress in closing achievement gaps among student subgroups. Schools are honored in one of two categories—Exemplary High Performing Schools or Exemplary Achievement Gap Closing Schools, each of which include several criteria. A total of 300 public and 49 private schools nationwide were honored in 2018. Each school was recognized at a November ceremony in Washington, D.C., and received a plaque and flag signifying their status. The schools serve as models of achievement for schools throughout the U.S. Locally, seven schools were selected: • Bishop Brossart High School, 4 Grove St., Alexandria, Kentucky • Immaculate Heart of Mary School, 5876 Veterans Way, Burlington, Kentucky • John Foster Dulles Elementary School (Oak Hills), 6481 Bridgetown Road, Cincinnati, Ohio • Mariemont Elementary School, 6750 Wooster Pike, Cincinnati, Ohio • St. Andrew-St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Catholic School, 5900 Buckwheat Road, Milford, Ohio • St. Cecilia Elementary School, 5313 Madison Pike, Independence, Kentucky • St. Joseph School, 4011 Alexandria Pike, Cold Spring, Kentucky Source: U.S. Department of Education

Information for the education chart was collected primarily from the 2017-18 Ohio School Report Cards, 2017-18 Kentucky School Report Cards, Indiana’s school-data reporting system and data available from the state departments of education websites or public-records requests. N/A means the data were not available, not calculated, not reported or not applicable. For academic ratings, Ohio uses 120 as a top score and Indiana uses 100. Kentucky is currently revamping its data reporting and did not issue academic ratings for 2017-18.

d ca

ic em

da an St rd s et M

ed ift G

rs ke Ta * st ** Te ve o P A ab r % or be 3 um g N ting in or a or s cip * te rti ** Sc ua Pa st ad s Te Gr nt P e A s of ud n t a se % S n i as of Cl ** P * A 8) of 7-1 # 01 (2 * e* or Sc CT A e ag * er e* Av or Sc T SA e ag ) er (% Av e at R n io at du ra ) G (% e at R e nc ol da ho en sc ndtt A gh e hi ng lish of si g s n % pa E e ol ts rs ho en ou sc ndud f-c st o gh e hi ng ath of ssi M % pa se r ts ou en -c f ud o g* st in at R

A

e at St 49.8%

24 out of 24

108.85

89.4%

91.5%

95.9%

97.7%

1190

N/A

34

79.6%

76.5%

43.2%

23 out of 24

108.432

90.8%

94.2%

96.3%

98.1%

N/A

24.50

21

80.6%

53.9%

24.6%

22 out of 24

107.265

86.2%

94.1%

95.2%

94.9%

N/A

24.03

18

66.9%

42.7%

42.9%

23 out of 24

107.292

91.2%

92.8%

95.6%

98.2%

N/A

26.03

34

88.9%

79.0%

36.0%

23 out of 24

105.273

90.9%

87.9%

96.5%

96.4%

N/A

24.40

44

75.3%

54.1%

29.8%

22 out of 24

104.639

86.0%

86.3%

96.0%

98.6%

N/A

21.48

12

16.4%

26.2%

39.5%

20 out of 24

103.694

86.4%

78.3%

95.9%

94.3%

N/A

24.11

36

60.9%

48.6%

31.6%

19 out of 24

99.452

86.3%

83.6%

95.5%

97.4%

N/A

22.72

25

43.2%

35.8%

27.3%

16 out of 25

100.231

85.6%

85.4%

95.7%

95.2%

N/A

23.01

52

61.8%

45.3%

20.4%

N/A

N/A

87.3%

79.4%

96.8%

96.4%

N/A

25.30

22

386

58.5%

38.2%

21 out of 25

101.373

91.2%

89.1%

96.8%

96.3%

N/A

23.25

22

36.4%

15.8%

29.7%

21 out of 25

101.971

82.8%

80.7%

96.2%

96.4%

N/A

22.50

14

29.6%

20.4%

21.8%

16 out of 24

99.757

84.9%

75.6%

95.3%

95.2%

N/A

22.40

23

12.8%

42.0%

21.4%

17 out of 24

98.563

87.4%

75.1%

95.7%

96.6%

N/A

19.38

12

26.6%

22.6%

16.4%

N/A

N/A

72.2%

77.3%

97.3%

95.9%

N/A

24.10

40

966

62.7%

39.4%

18 out of 24

98.586

80.5%

84.0%

96.1%

94.4%

N/A

21.37

50

41.2%

24.9%

19.1%

13 out of 24

96.997

78.5%

79.3%

94.2%

94.6%

N/A

19.70

39

52.8%

32.3%

22.7%

12 out of 24

95.778

81.4%

80.1%

95.6%

97.4%

N/A

20.96

10

32.0%

23.9%

25.6%

15 out of 25

98.09

64.3%

78.8%

95.5%

95.3%

N/A

21.30

41

54.1%

37.6%

13.2%

N/A

N/A

56.6%

64.5%

96.1%

99.2%

N/A

21.80

2

8

25.0%

15.8%

16 out of 24

96.912

69.9%

81.8%

95.3%

97.2%

N/A

19.11

3

42.4%

22.7%

23.8%

8 out of 24

93.015

80.0%

74.7%

95.1%

93.8%

N/A

20.20

8

29.5%

16.5%

15.6%

6 out of 24

90.618

76.9%

79.2%

95.4%

97.6%

N/A

18.49

3

8.3%

0.8%

21.3%

7 out of 24

92.45

75.9%

70.4%

93.6%

95.5%

N/A

19.52

8

26.3%

19.4%

15.6%

N/A

N/A

54.6%

57.3%

95.6%

97.2%

N/A

20.60

24

959

57.7%

24.5%

12 out of 24

93.495

72.5%

74.1%

95.4%

94.4%

N/A

20.27

0

0.7%

0.0%

17.8%

4 out of 24

90.769

59.8%

72.1%

94.8%

97.4%

N/A

19.38

2

8.9%

2.3%

16.1%

8 out of 24

90.588

58.7%

78.0%

94.5%

96.2%

N/A

19.65

6

18.9%

10.7%

12.8%

N/A

89.5

50.8%

70.4%

95.6%

96.3%

1109

23.30

13

25.4%

16.1%

12.3%

N/A

N/A

53.6%

55.2%

95.7%

94.0%

N/A

20.70

58

1,977

59.2%

21.4%

10 out of 25

92.247

71.8%

66.2%

96.1%

98.4%

N/A

20.54

18

44.2%

21.9%

22.1%

N/A

N/A

51.6%

53.3%

95.8%

93.9%

N/A

20.5

40

958

69.7%

10.4%

5 out of 24

88.899

73.3%

79.5%

93.6%

90.2%

N/A

18.44

9

35.7%

14.7%

10.0%

6 out of 24

88.567

70.7%

81.4%

94.8%

90.2%

N/A

18.62

5

0

2.2%

16.4%

9 out of 24

92.907

69.3%

60.1%

93.9%

89.2%

N/A

18.68

18

46.5%

24.0%

***About Advanced Placement: Some schools have quit offering AP classes, replacing them with other dual-credit options. Kentucky provides numbers of students taking AP courses, not percentages of graduates. Data anomalies exist for some districts on Ohio report cards, and the Department of Education says there could be an issue with how the student data-reporting system is flowing the information onto the report cards. The number of AP classes are collected from test provider College Board. w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9

59


ed at sa t

y

e

ul

ap

r be ob

as

R

R

on rs

e/ im cr p t po en 0 ol 0 Vi 10

v ra gg

t en lig r eg te nn gh no lau & ns a r e/ de m im cr op ty p er 00 op 10

Pr A

t ef th

ft he /t

ry

n tio

a gl

la

ur

e cl hi ve

y en rc

B

pu Po

(2017 statistics)

or ot M

La

17 20

COMMUNITY

A

ur M

CRIME SAFEST COMMUNITIES 1

Terrace Park

2,289

0

2

0

0

0.874

0

0

0

0

0.000

2

Oxford Township (Butler)

25,254

4

16

5

0

0.990

0

0

0

2

0.079

3

Maineville

1,070

1

1

0

0

1.869

0

0

0

0

0.000

4

Clearcreek Township (Warren)

32,849

8

63

3

0

2.253

1

2

0

8

0.335

5

Morgan Township (Butler)

5,796

4

26

0

0

5.176

0

0

0

1

0.173

6

Union Township (Warren)

5,169

1

14

1

1

3.289

0

0

0

6

1.161

7

Amberley Village

3,778

1

28

0

0

7.676

0

0

0

0

0.000

8

Harrison Township (Hamilton)

15,547

16

31

8

1

3.602

0

2

0

3

0.322

9

Hamilton Township (Warren)

25,996

9

36

0

0

1.731

0

21

0

3

0.923

10

Hidden Valley Lake, Ind.

5,344

2

20

2

0

4.491

0

2

0

0

0.374

11

Miami Township (Hamilton)

16,040

16

45

5

0

4.115

0

2

1

5

0.499

12

Villa Hills, Ky.

7,437

7

30

2

1

5.379

0

1

0

1

0.269

13

Union, Ky.

5,895

6

29

1

0

6.107

0

1

0

1

0.339

14

Springboro

18,610

15

105

2

0

6.556

0

5

0

5

0.537

15

The Village of Indian Hill

5,874

5

35

3

0

7.320

0

2

0

0

0.340

16

Newtown

2,662

5

16

0

0

7.889

0

0

0

1

0.376

17

Fort Thomas, Ky.

16,263

17

88

11

1

7.194

0

2

4

2

0.492

18

Franklin Township (Warren)

31,811

36

135

9

1

5.690

1

2

4

36

1.352

19

Madeira

9,149

9

68

6

0

9.072

0

0

1

2

0.328

20

Independence, Ky.

27,634

33

102

14

0

5.392

0

11

8

6

0.905

21

Edgewood, Ky.

8,720

10

61

9

0

9.174

0

0

0

1

0.115

22

Mason

33,235

31

321

5

0

10.742

0

5

3

4

0.361

23

Carlisle

5,336

11

33

0

0

8.246

0

1

0

2

0.562

60

J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com


A ed at lt

y

e

r be ob

u sa as

R ap

e/ im cr p t po en 0 ol 0 Vi 10

v ra gg

R

t en lig r eg te nn gh no lau & ns a r e/ de m im ur cr op M ty p er 00 op 0 Pr 1 on rs

A

t ef th

ft he /t

ry

n tio

a gl

la

ur

e cl hi ve

y en rc

B

pu Po

(2017 statistics)

or ot M

La

17 20

COMMUNITY 24

Southgate, Ky.

3,892

3

15

7

0

6.423

0

0

2

1

0.771

25

Lemon Township (Butler)

15,136

20

126

6

0

10.042

0

1

2

2

0.330

26

Greendale, Ind.

4,417

5

12

3

3

5.207

0

1

3

0

0.906

27

Lakeside Park, Ky.

2,745

5

19

1

0

9.107

0

0

1

0

0.364

28

Deer Park

5,679

4

44

3

0

8.980

0

1

0

5

1.057

29

Greenhills

3,597

4

38

1

0

11.954

0

0

0

1

0.278

30

Wyoming

8,536

15

68

2

0

9.958

0

0

3

0

0.351

31

Mariemont

3,433

5

34

2

0

11.943

0

0

0

0

0.000

32

Wayne Township (Warren)

9,006

11

34

6

0

5.663

0

0

0

20

2.221

33

Milford Township (Butler)

3,714

3

48

1

0

14.001

0

0

0

0

0.000

34

Liberty Township (Butler)

39,333

32

433

8

1

12.051

0

6

4

6

0.407

35

Amelia

4,970

2

58

3

0

12.676

0

0

0

3

0.604

36

Highland Heights, Ky.

7,100

7

45

6

0

8.169

0

1

5

1

0.986

37

Waynesville

3,081

5

28

3

0

11.685

0

0

0

0

0.000

38

Pierce Township (Clermont)

14,863

28

118

5

3

10.361

0

2

1

2

0.336

39

Washington Township (Warren)

2,984

4

13

2

0

6.367

0

0

1

5

2.011

40

Massie Township (Warren)

1,210

2

6

2

0

8.264

0

0

0

1

0.826

41

Reily Township (Butler)

2,746

6

20

1

0

9.832

0

1

0

0

0.364

42

Hanover Township (Butler)

8,679

13

77

5

0

10.946

0

3

0

1

0.461

43

Trenton

12,912

18

94

5

0

9.061

0

8

2

2

0.929

44

Montgomery

10,746

8

139

5

0

14.145

0

2

1

1

0.372

45

Loveland

12,770

25

79

7

1

8.771

0

6

1

5

0.940

46

Goshen Township (Clermont)

16,095

32

118

15

1

10.314

0

5

1

1

0.435

47

Wilder, Ky.

3,064

2

32

2

0

11.749

0

1

1

1

0.979

48

Deerfield Township (Warren)

39,728

24

390

22

1

11.000

0

6

2

63

1.787

49

Taylor Mill, Ky.

6,765

13

46

10

0

10.200

0

2

0

1

0.443

50

Harlan Township (Warren)

5,153

9

28

7

0

8.539

0

2

0

4

1.164

w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9

61


Deep Dive Into Data Finds Best of the ’Burbs By Bill Ferguson Jr.

Cincy’s 13th annual “Rating the Burbs” project examined hundreds of spreadsheets and websites in gathering the thousands of data points to determine the Top 50 Communities, 35 Top Public School Systems and 50 Safest Neighborhoods in the eight-county Greater Cincinnati region. We began with the most recent available data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey and Population Estimates Program, which update the 2010 decennial census annually in several categories. Most data were updated through 2017 for this year’s survey. We sift through data on more than 270 villages, cities, townships, Census County Divisions and Census Designated Places

in Boone, Butler, Campbell, Clermont, Dearborn, Hamilton, Kenton and Warren counties, leaving almost 140 jurisdictions of 1,000 or more population. The Multiple Listing Service of Greater Cincinnati, the Northern Kentucky Association of Realtors and the Southeastern Indiana Board of Realtors provide median home-sale prices. For communities unavailable through those three organizations, sales are gathered from county auditors. Crime statistics are based on the FBI’s Uniform Crime Reporting Program. The FBI lists four categories of property crime and four categories of violent crime, with the breakdown of the latest community

numbers coming from 2018. For areas not reporting to the FBI (reporting is voluntary), we check community and state websites, and contact our county sheriffs’ offices and township, city and village police departments. County auditors, treasurers and property valuation administrators supply propertytax data used to compare taxes in each area for a $100,000 house. Seventy school districts serve students in the eight-county area, and we scoured state report cards, state education department websites and school district websites for data, and we also made public-records requests to the state departments of education themselves. n

City Home Prices Continue to Soar Over Past 5 Years By Bill Ferguson Jr. ge an Ch e % om ar n H ice Ye ia Pr 5- ed le M Sa in

le Sa e 3 om 1 H 20 n e ia ic ed Pr

M

18

20

AREA

le Sa e 8 om 1 H 20 n e ia ic ed Pr

M

ld

So

maga zine.com

es

J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

om

62

H

Evanston again tops the list of city neighborhoods with the largest gains in median home-sale prices—for the third year in a row—during a period in which home prices in city neighborhoods continued big gains. Evanston’s 2018 median price skyrocketed more than eight times the 2013 median price, to $102,450 from $12,000. Twelve city neighborhoods experienced at least a doubling of prices from 2013 through last year. In addition to Evanston, four neighborhoods—Spring Grove, Avondale, Price Hill and Hartwell—all tripled or more in median prices. Each year, the Multiple Listing Service of Greater Cincinnati (MLS) provides home sales for the City of Cincinnati for our “Rating the Burbs” cover story/project. Most statistics that we use to evaluate the suburbs—all areas outside the city limits—are not readily available on the micro level for the 52 city neighborhoods. The MLS breakdown consists of 38 areas, which do not correspond exactly to the 52 neighborhoods, but some areas are true neighborhoods. To the right are the 15 city areas with 20 or more sales that experienced the largest price gains from 2013 to 2018:

Evanston

58

$102,450

$12,000

753.75%

Spring Grove

24

$114,000

$26,600

328.57%

Avondale

74

$153,000

$44,750

241.90%

Price Hill

172

$62,000

$18,500

235.14%

Hartwell

36

$105,500

$34,125

209.16%

Madisonville

160

$139,250

$50,750

174.38%

Bond Hill

67

$76,000

$28,000

171.43%

Roselawn

43

$102,500

$38,500

166.23%

Fairmount

23

$24,000

$10,000

140.00%

Sayler Park

55

$109,000

$50,000

118.00%

Westwood

283

$100,000

$46,100

116.92%

City

50

$329,500

$160,000

105.94%

Kennedy Heights

62

$148,950

$78,000

90.96%

College Hill

133

$122,900

$64,500

90.54%

Northside

163

$181,000

$99,500

81.91%

(Downtown / OTR / Pendleton / Queensgate / West End)

Source: Multiple Listing Service of Greater Cincinnati


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

2019 CINCINNATI

FIVE STAR AWARD WINNERS Five Star Professional par tnered with Cincy Magazine to identify real estate, mortgage and insurance professionals in the Cinncinati area who deliver outstanding service and client satisfaction. The Five Star Professional research team surveyed homebuyers, home sellers, and industry peers, and analyzed online consumer evaluations. Survey respondents rated their service professional on criteria such as overall satisfaction and whether they would recommend the provider to a friend. The research methodology allows no more than 7 percent of professionals in each category to receive the award.

Rising Star Award Winners

Meet the next wave of outstanding real estate agents in the Cincinnati area! Five Star Professional’s research team contacted branch managers, established real estate veterans and consumers to identify up-and-coming real estate agents in the industry. Rising Star award winners are held in high regard by their peers and mentors and have received a qualifying nomination for the award. Evaluators were asked to identify an agent who has been in the industry for five years or less and embodies professional excellence, exhibits superior customer service and shows great potential to excel in their profession. All Rising Star award winners must be actively licensed, satisfy minimum production criteria and have a favorable regulatory history to be eligible for award consideration.

Recognizing Outstanding Real Estate Agents, Mortgage Professionals and Home/Auto Insurance Professionals

Research — How Our Winners Are Chosen • The 2019 Five Star Real Estate Agents, Mortgage Professionals and Home/Auto Insurance Professionals do not pay a fee to be included in the research or the final lists. • Each professional is screened against state governing bodies to verify that licenses are current and no disciplinary actions are pending. • The inclusion of a real estate agent, mortgage professional or insurance professional on the final list should not be construed as an endorsement by Five Star Professional or Cincy Magazine.

Determination of Award Winners Professionals who satisfied each of the following objective criteria were named a 2019 Cincinnati Five Star Real Estate Agent, Five Star Mortgage Professional or Five Star Home/Auto Insurance Professional: 3. Favorable regulatory and complaint Evaluation Criteria: history review 1. Qualifying rating 4. Satisfies minimum production on a Eligibility Criteria: one-year and three-year basis 2. Holds an active license and employed in 5. Successful completion of a Blue Ribbon their field for a minimum of three years Panel review

FIVE STAR PROFESSIONAL Proprietary Research Process Nomination of Candidates The Five Star Professional research team surveyed homebuyers, home sellers and industry peers, and analyzed online consumer evaluations to identify professionals that excel in key attributes of customer service.

Evaluation Score Using our scoring algorithm, each nominee is given an evaluation score based on surveys in our database. High scorers are named candidates.

Candidate Submission of Business Information Candidates must complete either an online or over-the-phone interview.

Eligibility Criteria Candidates must be in the industry for at least five years, have a favorable regulatory history and meet minimum production thresholds.

Blue Ribbon Panel A Blue Ribbon panel of industry experts reviews the final list of candidates.

Final Selection Less than 7% of professionals in the market are selected.

Real estate agents, mortgage professionals and home/auto insurance professionals are pooled only with other candidates from their profession. The final list of 2019 Cincinnati Five Star award winners is a select group, representing approximately 1 percent of real estate agents, 1 percent of mortgage professionals and 1 percent of home/auto insurance professionals in the area. To see the full list of winners, visit www.fivestarprofessional.com.

FS • 1


LOOKING FOR A FUN SUMMER ACTIVITY? Come volunteer at Matthew 25: Ministries! Volunteering is a fun, educational experience for the whole family, and a great team-building exercise for businesses and other groups. Volunteering at Matthew 25 also offers a sense of deep satisfaction and accomplishment when finished. Donating just one hour of your time helps approximately 150 people in desperate need here in the U.S. and around the world!

VISIT M25M.ORG/VOLUNTEER TO LEARN HOW YOU CAN GET INVOLVED. 11060 KENWOOD ROAD, CINCINNATI, OH 45242

|

513.793.6256

|

M25M.ORG

|


Community REFLECTIONS ON LEADERSHIP page 72

ANOTHER VIEW page 74

GUEST COLUMN page 75

BRONSON-AT-LARGE page 76

NUXHALL MIRACLE LEAGUE page 78

MARIAN UNIVERSITY page 80

The Nuxhall Miracle League in Fairfield

w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9

71


Reflections on Leadership By Dan Hurley

Confronting Racism and Slavery

HISTORIANS ARE USING PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS TO BETTER ANALYZE THE PAST AND TODAY

R

acism is America’s original sin. It made hypocrites of the founders who proclaimed, “all men are created equal” while enslaving men and women themselves. It infected the U.S. Constitution by counting any enslaved man or woman as only three fifths of a person, and laid the groundwork for the Supreme Court ruling in the 1857 Dred Scott case that a person of African descent could never be a citizen of the United States. In 2019, race remains the most divisive fault line in American life. After every racially fueled tragedy, whether in Cincinnati in 2001 or Charlottesville in 2017, religious and civic leaders urge Americans to reach across divides to talk deeply about the way race conditions our experiences and divides us. Those efforts rarely draw true cross-sections of participants or endure very long. It is against that backdrop that I was pleasantly surprised on a recent trip to Virginia to visit the historic homes of Thomas Jefferson and James Madison. As a graduate student in American history at the College of William and Mary in the early 1970s, everyone made a trip to Jefferson’s Monticello, primarily to torture the tour guides. At the time, the guides refused to use the word “slave,” insisting that the people who worked in the fields and the house were “servants.” And nothing was more fun than waiting until the tour reached Jefferson’s bedroom and watching the apoplectic reaction to the question, “Did Sally Hemings sleep here every night?” To the credit of the Thomas Jefferson Foundation, 45 years later the interpretation now experienced by visitors reflects the effective integration of nearly a half72

J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

A group of visitors to Monticello confront the reality of American slavery along Mulberry Row on the plantation of the man who asserted “all men are created equal.” century of scholarship by the public historians responsible for designing the tours and exhibits at the site. The basic house tour still recognizes the influence of Jefferson as an architect, natural scientist, political theorist and practical politician. But now the tour also focuses on the men and women who actually ran the house on a day-by-day basis, including James Hemings, who had mastered the art of French cookery while living in France with Jefferson, as well as hundreds of others, many of whom are known only by a first name and worked in the fields. The garden tour credits Jefferson for introducing non-native plants, including delicate striped tulips, imported fruit trees and vegetables. But the landscape

of Monticello no longer springs magically from Jefferson’s imagination, but from the sweat of enslaved men and women who actually created and tended the gardens. The walking tour of Mulberry Row where many enslaved people lived is now a bold and challenging hour-long discussion of American slavery and racism. The public historian who led our tour never blinked or avoided hard realities and worked to get the visitors from seven states and two countries to engage with each other and the issues that were different 250 years ago, but still relevant today. Most dramatically, the existence of Sally Hemings and her long, complex relationship with Thomas Jefferson is now prominently on display. An exhibit focused on


A shadow exhibit tells the heartrending story of the way enslaved families and friends were torn apart to pay off debts on the death of James Madison. Sally Hemings draws on the memories of their son, Madison Hemings. Guides help visitors grapple with questions like: Can such a relationship only be understood as rape? Was real affection possible between a white owner and an enslaved woman? The image of James Madison is not as crisp as Jefferson’s for most Americans, but his role as the principal author of the

Constitution and of many of the Federalist Papers makes a visit to Montpilier, just 30 miles from Monticello, a must. Here, too, the public historians responsible for the restoration and interpretation of the site have made the story of those enslaved by James and Dolley Madison central to the experience. Archeological digs have informed the

reconstruction of some slave quarters as well as an exhibit in the basement of the main house. The exhibit draws its inspiration and title from Madison’s observation during the Constitutional Convention in 1787 that the “mere distinction of colour made in the most enlightened period of time, a ground of the most oppressive dominion ever exercised by man over man.” The exhibit explores the lives and fate of the 300-plus men and women enslaved by the Madisons. The public historians at Monticello and Montpilier have two goals. First, they have tried to recognize the humanity of the enslaved, using their names and telling their stories. Second, they want to provide visitors who thought they were coming just to learn about some famous presidents the opportunity to talk with each other about fundamental issues that echo through the centuries. In the process, they have created examples of the sort of tools that we need to create to stimulate meaningful reflection and discussion about the issues we have inherited from the founders. n Dan Hurley is the president of Applied History Associates.

w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9

73


Another View By Don Mooney

We Are Not ‘Full’ in Greater Cincinnati D

ear President Trump: You recently told a cheering audience in Las Vegas that we could take no more Central American immigrants because “we’re full.” Do you really think we’re full? Take a drive, as my wife and I did recently, over the mountains of northern New Mexico and Southwest Colorado, over the prairies of Kansas, across Missouri, southern Illinois and central Indiana. You’ll find wide-open and lonely spaces, dotted with fading towns. Stop by Costilla, New Mexico; Las Animas, Colorado; Abilene, Kansas; or Blackwater, Missouri—you’ll discover shuttered store fronts, abandoned homes and empty schools. In some towns, the only sign of new life are freshly painted burrito joints. Immigrants, the folks you want to turn away, have come to work the malodorous cattle feed lots, factory farms and a sprawling Tyson chicken plant outside Holcomb, Kansas. They’re filling jobs that need doing, but that Americans are too busy, or picky, to fill. You’ve come to Cincinnati seeking votes and campaign cash time and again. Look around the next time you pass through. We have plenty of room. In 1960 we were home to more than 500,000. We now number only 300,000. That’s down 40%. We have wide boulevards, ample parkland and some neighborhoods with fading homes that sure could use some new residents and elbow grease. We would welcome some new, younger families to work hard, fill vacant jobs, open businesses, fill classrooms, cheer on local teams and develop a taste for Skyline. Newcomers would also pay taxes to help us pay for local services, including the underfunded pensions of our city’s police, fire and other public workers. You won the presidency with Ohio and 74

J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

“Population growth is at its lowest since 1937. As the population ages, and our kids head to regions that are hipper and hotter economically, too many Ohio and Kentucky communities are left to struggle. Fewer workers are available to fill jobs, buy homes, and pay for local services. It’s a downward spiral.” Kentucky’s electoral votes. Look beyond your adoring base the next time you pass through. Ohio has plenty of room. Ohio’s population has grown at a paltry 1% in recent years. In 1960, Ohioans amounted for nearly 6% of the U.S. population. Now we are less than 4%. We once had 24 members of Congress. Now just 16. Not many decades ago we had more folks than California and Texas. No longer. Georgia and North Carolina will pass us in population in the next 10 years. Kentucky is in the same sinking boat, with an aging population that’s grown only 3% since 1980. We may have more elbowroom these days, but the aging of those of us still hanging on in the “flyover” states goes to the heart of our economic viability. The New York Times recently printed a color-coded map of the U.S. It shows that in 80% of U.S. counties the number of people in the prime working age population (2554) declined over the last decade. A purple swath representing a 10% or more decline in working age population extends from rural New England, across upstate New York, and through the “heartland”—Western Pennsylvania, Ohio, Kentucky, Indiana, Michigan and beyond. The only places where the nation’s work-

ing age population has risen are in urban areas in Florida, Texas and along the East and West coasts. What’s the problem? Our declining birth rate. Population growth is at its lowest since 1937. As the population ages, and our kids head to regions that are hipper and hotter economically, too many Ohio and Kentucky communities are left to struggle. Fewer workers are available to fill jobs, buy homes, and pay for local services. It’s a downward spiral. With fewer workers, the U.S economy will grow more slowly than the 4% you promised. It’s no coincidence that the folks at Social Security say that by 2034 there will not be enough workers paying into the system to cover benefits for those who are retired. Your anti-immigrant rhetoric may thrill your devoted base, but America needs immigrant families more than ever to grow and prosper. Don’t lock them in cages or tent cities. Don’t force them back to countries where they face violence, death, poverty or persecution. Send some our way. We have plenty of room. n Don Mooney is an attorney, a past member of the Cincinnati Planning Commission and is active in local politics.


Guest Column

By Dr. Monica Posey, president of Cincinnati State Technical and Community College

Cincinnati Proud CINCINNATI STATE HAS BEEN ABLE TO MAKE AN IMPACT THANKS TO ITS RELATIONSHIPS FORGED THROUGHOUT THE REGION

P

eople often ask me what I am most proud of when it comes to Cincinnati State. I am most proud of the collaborative spirit that has been achieved across the college among our wonderful faculty, staff and students, and with employers and our partners in education, economic development and communities. These relationships are key to our ability as an institution, in a quickly changing world, to address a wide range of needs and challenges. At a recent luncheon that included local government officials, employers and economic development officials, it was made very clear how important Cincinnati State is when it comes to attracting and retaining employers in Greater Cincinnati. Cincinnati State has the unique ability to quickly develop targeted training that results in a highly competitive workforce. We are especially proud that 85 percent of our graduates stay and work in Greater Cincinnati. Our FAA-certified aviation maintenance program at our Harrison campus is a prime example. It is playing a key role in the redevelopment of our Greater Cincinnati Northern Kentucky International Airport. The giant hub that Amazon Prime Air is creating at CVG is expected to result in 2,900 jobs. But it would not be possible without the skilled aviation maintenance technicians that Cincinnati State produces who keep the planes safely flying. Cincinnati State provides highly skilled personnel in many local industries, including health care, manufacturing, energy,

“A couple of years ago, a few employees noted that some students at Cincinnati State, like more and more college students across the country, were facing food shortages. The employees suggested we start a food pantry that is now fully operational because employees and students have volunteered their time.” culinary, construction, and others. Just recently, Cincinnati State’s Landscape Horticulture students came in fourth place in national competition, beating out some of the best university programs in the country. This happened because our diverse team of students not only had great skills but also displayed the grit and determination so common among community college students. Cincinnati State is also collaborating with local high schools to help families throughout the region save thousands of dollars on college expenses through the College Credit Plus program. The students complete courses such as English Composition, College Algebra and History, fulfilling high school and college requirements at the same time. More than 2,300 area high school students participated in the program this year through Cincinnati State. Nine of these students earned enough credits to be awarded an associate’s degree along with their high school diploma. While Cincinnati State focuses on education, it also helps students and others in

the community meet basic needs such as a lack of food. A couple of years ago, a few employees noted that some students at Cincinnati State, like more and more college students across the country, were facing food shortages. The employees suggested we start a food pantry that is now fully operational because employees and students have volunteered their time. And earlier this year, our Midwest Culinary Institute worked with chefs from throughout the region to provide meals for hundreds of furloughed federal workers, many who were struggling to make ends meet. These are just a few of many examples. We are so pleased to be a part of this wonderful community that is Greater Cincinnati and look forward to continuing to advance the educational, economic and social value of our region and state. n Dr. Posey is the president of Cincinnati State Technical and Community College. You can email her directly at monica. posey@cincinnatistate.edu or connect with her on Twitter at @madamprezposey.

w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9

75


Bronson-At-Large By Peter Bronson

Will Nicholas Sandmann be Clark Kent’s Kryptonite? T

he greatest superhero in the universe is: A.) Superman; B.) Clark Kent; or C.) a 16-year-old student at Covington Catholic? The answer, for now, is B.—the mildmannered reporter, Clark Kent. Superman is allergic to kryptonite, but reporters are invulnerable. The Supreme Court’s Times vs. Sullivan decision of 1964 is an invisible force field that lets almost anyone who claims to be a journalist—virtually anyone who can type or tweet—get away with reckless, damaging, false and malicious libel. But C., the 115-pound teenager Nicholas Sandmann, may have a chance to take down the media’s magic shield, which could make him the most powerful superhero. In case anyone missed it, on Jan. 18, a mob of racist boys from Covington Catholic High School, wearing hateful Make America Great Again hats, surrounded and smirked at a Native American elder and Vietnam veteran who was peacefully banging his drum and chanting a tribal song at the Lincoln Monument... Wait. Stop the presses. That’s not what happened at all. In fact, video showed and an independent investigation confirmed that the boys did nothing wrong. They were minding their own business when the drum-banging activist, Nathan Phillips, pushed into their crowd and shoved his drum into the face of Sandmann. He claimed the students yelled “build that wall” and blocked his path. All untrue, but amplified by the media megaphone. The story was based on a misleading 59-second video posted on social media that did not show what Phillips did, and 76

J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

also failed to show the true racists, a crowd of Black Hebrew Israelites who hurled profane and vicious insults at the students. Yet for three days, The Washington Post and other social and mainstream media continued to smear Sandmann and the other students with false stories that could have easily been corrected by checking more complete videos of the incident that were available online. Sandmann’s $250 million lawsuit says that The Washington Post led “a mainstream and social media mob of bullies which attacked, vilified and threatened Nicholas Sandmann, an innocent secondary school child.” Sandmann was targeted because he was white and wearing a MAGA hat he bought as a souvenir on his first trip to Washington. The Post ignored basic standards of journalism “to advance its well-known and easily documented, biased agenda against President Donald J. Trump by impugning individuals perceived to be supporters of the president.” Sandmann was subjected to “public hatred, contempt, scorn obloquy and shame,” “severe emotional distress,” “permanent harm to his reputation” and a lifetime of “constant concern over his safety and the safety of his family.” He and other Covington Catholic students, including some who were not even on the trip, were threatened and slandered. A legal team led by L. Lin Wood of Atlanta has also sued CNN for $275 million, and many more lawsuits may follow, including newspapers “farther down the food chain,” such as The Cincinnati Enquirer. The law-

suit against The Post seeks $50 million in compensatory damages and $200 million in punitive damages. And that’s a problem, according to some legal analysts. “The conventional wisdom is that no plaintiff can win a defamation case in any matter that is of public interest,” writes John Hinderaker of the Power Line blog—who supports Sandmann. Times vs. Sullivan declared open season on public figures by requiring them to prove “actual malice” by the press, meaning “knowledge that it was false or with reckless disregard of whether it was false or not.” And courts have expanded public figures to include anyone the press drags into their spotlight. It’s a Catch 22—Sandmann could be defined as an “involuntary public figure” because the media made him one. Just like Richard Jewell, the client who propelled Wood to national stature on media libel. The security guard at the 1996 Atlanta Olympics found a backpack of pipe bombs, alerted police and helped evacuate the area, saving many lives. But reckless and false media reports painted him as “the Olympic bomber.” His life and reputation were ruined. He won settlements from NBC and CNN, but his libel suit against the Atlanta JournalConstitution was blocked because the courts said he became a “limited purpose public figure” by talking to the press. That definition of public figures means almost every libeled victim has to prove “actual malice,” which is almost impossible. But Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas recently said Times vs. Sullivan was an unconstitutional distortion of the


First Amendment. Justice Brett Kavanaugh might agree. If so, Sandmann vs. Post might be the case to curb libel laws that have become an unrestricted hunting license to destroy nearly anyone. Wood says, “Justice Thomas’ keen observations could not be more timely. The mainstream media’s 24-hour news cycle depends on the actual malice standard to dodge responsibility, and the actual malice standard permits corporate media to rush out sensational, false stories to generate profits and consolidate media influence and power. Both the victims of the false stories and society at large suffer as we are now inundated with false, poorly investigated and questionably sourced information.” Other businesses are held accountable by product liability lawsuits. Why should the media have immunity for exploding Pinto stories? In an era of click-bait sensationalism, lynch-mob social media and vanishing standards of editing, libel laws from 1964 look as archaic as dial phones and telegrams. The press is now controlled mostly by an oligopoly of corporations—Amazon, TimeWarner, AT&T, Disney, Microsoft, Google, Facebook—often recycling counterfeit “breaking news” from Twitter, blogs and political activists, as they did in this case. Wood says, “Since the Supreme Court’s ill-fated [Times vs. Sullivan] decision, the press has splintered into a series of echo chambers, and the public’s righteous distrust of the press has spiraled to unprecedented levels. The press will again thrive, and public trust will be restored, if and when the Supreme Court limits or abolishes the ‘actual malice’ era.” Can Nicholas Sandmann win? Cleveland media lawyer David Marburger has won “a slew of these cases,” including a successful U.S. Supreme Court defense of the Cleveland Plain Dealer. He calls the Sandmann libel suit “ridiculous.” “It all boils down to one question: Did you fail to exercise reasonable care to determine the truth?” He says the answer is yes. “The media have a right to make

“Other businesses are held accountable by product liability lawsuits. Why should the media have immunity for exploding Pinto stories? In an era of click-bait sensationalism, lynch-mob social media and vanishing standards of editing, libel laws from 1964 look as archaic as dial phones and telegrams.” mistakes. They are not under any duty to shut up until they find a better video.” He believes Sandmann can be defined as a public figure who will have to prove actual malice, because “he plainly chose to behave in a way that was controversial.” Even compensatory damages are doubtful, he says. “I’m very skeptical that anything the institutional press said would cause all that grief he experienced. I don’t doubt that he has had all sorts of problems, but that’s just the way people are today on social media.” But a jury of angry parents in Covington’s U.S. District Court might see it differently. Sandmann’s Kentucky lawyer, Todd McMurtry of Fort Mitchell, says all but one of 500 comments have been positive. The more complete video supports the lawsuit argument that “Nicholas was startled and confused” when Phillips accosted him, and “was concerned that turning away from Phillips might be considered a sign of disrespect.” Where the press cried “smirk,” others see an awkward, frozen smile on a scared kid. And if discovery shows that reporters and editors did know or suspect that their story was false, “actual malice” could be proved. Even without punitive damages, he could win $50 million from The Post, and more like it from other newspapers, net-

works and social media. His lawsuit checks the boxes for media malpractice: reckless disregard, biased reporting, refusal to correct or apologize, false and defamatory accusations, negligence, permanent damage… The media think they are above the law, Wood says. “If they can do this to a 16-yearold, we’re all at risk.” In a backward way, Sandmann vs. Washington Post might even save the media from itself. It’s no coincidence that as accountability has evaporated, trust in the press has cratered. If the courts don’t do something, the government might restrict freedom of the press, as some Republicans and Democrats have proposed with growing public approval. Accountability could restore public trust. As for claims that the lawsuit chills freedom of the press: When a kid gets death threats for wearing a MAGA hat because the media falsely labels him as a racist, that chills free speech for everyone. Nicholas Sandmann will be a superhero if he restores one simple truth from Justice Potter Stewart in 1966: “The right of a man to the protection of his own reputation from unjustified invasion and wrongful hurt reflects no more than our basic concept of the essential dignity and worth of every human being—a concept at the root of any decent system of ordered liberty.” n w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9

77


Rounding Third and THE JOE NUXHALL MIRACLE LEAGUE DREAMS BIG WITH

Heading for

A NEW MINI GOLF COURSE

By Liz Engel

I

Home

t’s a phrase forever etched in baseball greatness. In lights, literally, along the side of Great American Ball Park, home of the Cincinnati Reds, is the signature signoff of legendary radio broadcaster and pitcher Joe Nuxhall: “Rounding third and heading for home.” In Fairfield, those words live on, too, at the namesake Joe Nuxhall Miracle League fields. And when the League debuts its latest project this summer—a first of its kind for kids with special needs—it will be the resonating theme. The Joe Nuxhall Miracle League is expanding once more, this time with a new, fully accessible 18-hole miniature golf course. And volunteers are also setting their sights on the next big dream. “That’s what we do. That’s the mindset for all of us. What can we continually do to make this a better place for everyone here, for the families, for the kids?” says Kim Nuxhall, chairman of the Nuxhall Miracle League board of directors and Joe Nuxhall’s son. The Joe Nuxhall Miracle League debuted in 2012, but it came into vision years before that. Today, there are more than 240 Miracle League organizations across the country; around 2001, the Nuxhalls saw an opportunity to add one here.

All facilities are built to be accessible. 78

J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

The Nuxhall Miracle League baseball diamond is rubberized for easier movement. Baseball diamonds, by design, restrict play for people with physical and mental challenges. Miracle League fields are rubberized for easier movement, with extra electrical outlets to power wheelchairs and large, open dugouts and concourses. Besides its two accessible fields, the Joe Nuxhall Miracle League has also grown to include a pair of playgrounds and a bocce court, which serves as the host site for state Special Olympics bocce tournaments. There’s a wheelchair-accessible glider and a wheelchair-accessible merry-go-round, all on 11 acres in Fairfield down Groh Lane. The new mini golf course, under construction now, will sit behind the LCPL Taylor Prazynski Memorial Field. Thanks to corporate and community support and various in-kind donations, the League

recently expanded the design from nine holes to 18. Skidmore Sales is the course sponsor; Kim Nuxhall says the company wanted to honor employees whose kids have special needs. Other businesses like Ernst Concrete and Apex Construction have also stepped in. The course will likely open to the public on the weekends—visitors can choose to make a monetary contribution—but each Miracle League athlete, kids and adults alike, will get a putter and a ball. Kim Nuxhall says an organization called May We Help is working to develop an automatic putting device for those who may not be able to hold a club themselves. The course will be accessed using a special code so they can play any time they want.


“It’s like their own special club,” Kim Nuxhall says. The overall concept is possibly a first of its kind. While some mini-golf courses may be accessible to a degree, Kim Nuxhall says this is likely the first course in the country specifically designed with those for special needs. That means extra width at each hole, plenty of wide-open space for a wheelchair to maneuver. Kim Nuxhall has no formal renderings; the course is mostly a vision in his head, but the obstacles will be “cool.” There’s a huge Frisch’s Big Boy, a 22-foot giraffe from Trader’s World and a dinosaur, frog and hippo, too, relics from the former Joe Nuxhall Golf Center that once operated nearby. But Kim Nuxhall’s favorite hole will be No. 18. That’s where kids can putt through a life-sized bobblehead of his dad, a rendering from age 15 when he became the youngest player in Major League history. The theme on the final green, of course, is “Rounding third and heading for home.” “It’s just going to be really neat,” Kim Nuxhall says. “That, I think, is going to be fun.”

Kim Nuxhall says it will cost roughly $5 million to make that dream a reality; that includes funds for an endowment for future maintenance and repairs. Once the golf course is complete, finding those funds—whether it be via a corporate donor, private individual, or both—will be the next point of focus. It may also be Kim Nuxhall’s last go round. Once the g ym is complete, “it might be time to sit back a little bit,” he says. The League relies entirely on volunteer help, but when the gym comes online, it might be time to hire a director, he says, someone to take over the day-to-day with his support. But for now, the course is taking shape. The goal is to debut it in time for this year’s Nuxy Bash, the League’s anniversary celebration, on July 28. And there’s plenty of excitement about that. “The kids, they can’t wait,” Kim Nuxhall says. “They’re always asking, ‘When’s it going to open? When’s it going to open?’ It’s going to be a real special day when that happens, and we give them that opportunity. That’s kind of been our ongoing mantra here, to keep dreaming for our kids. Because if we don’t, who’s going to?” n

BRUCE CRIPPEN

Kim Nuxhall with some of the children that use the facility

away in 2007—but his presence is everywhere here. Kim Nuxhall says he’d be “blown away” by what the community has done thus far. The League just kicked off its seventh season—April 13 marked the “second biggest opening day in the city” for 100 youth players, ages 5-16. An adult league similarly plays on Friday nights. The next “big, big dream,” Kim Nuxhall says, is a full-size gymnasium. While it’s been talked about for years, it’s closer than ever to reality. At roughly 18,000 square feet, it will serve as a year-round facility and house Butler County Special Olympics, a place for athletes to play wheelchair rugby, wheelchair basketball and more. He envisions a multi-purpose room with specialized equipment. Maybe another merry-go-round. A climbing wall. “An experience that these kids may not get anywhere else,” he says. And, upstairs, a mini-museum of sorts, filled with his dad’s various memorabilia. Part historical, but equally inspiring. “We want it to tell the story of dad, but beyond baseball, what really was important to him was giving back to the community,” Kim Nuxhall says.

KEEP DREAMING Joe Nuxhall didn’t live long enough to see his Miracle League’s debut—he passed

The diamond also has electrical outlets for wheelchairs. w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9

79


Best Schools

The Right Fit

MARIAN UNIVERSITY OFFERS A COMFORTABLE, PERSONAL APPEAL FOR STUDENTS

By Eric Spangler

F

or high school students in southwest Ohio looking for a college with a community feel and one-on-one personal attention from faculty and staff then Marian University near Indianapolis, Indiana, might be the best choice. “We are going to be the right fit for a lot of students that are looking for that type of school,” says Mark Apple, vice president for marketing communications at Marian University. Marian University is a private, nonprofit Roman Catholic university founded in 1851 by the Sisters of St. Francis, Oldenburg, Indiana. It serves 2,431 undergraduate students, 1,164 graduate students and 650 medical students with a student-faculty ratio of 14:1. Apple says there is a large Catholic high school base in southwest Ohio and Xavier University and the University of Dayton aren’t always the right fit for everyone who wants to continue Catholic higher education. Plus, more students want to go out of state for college, he says. And Indianapolis— about a two-hour drive from Cincinnati—is very similar to The Queen City in size, culture and its strong downtown, says Apple. In addition, more students want to go to college in a city rather than a small college Marian University’s student center

80

J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

town because they can get connected to large employers for internships and jobs, he says. “The students feel comfortable here,” he says. “Also, we’ve already got a good base of students from Cincinnati on campus so odds are the incoming freshman are going to know people from their high school or from the athletic programs that they participate in here at Marian.” Although Marian University is a private school, Apple says the school offers multiple scholarships, grants and other types of financial aid that can reduce the cost of tuition significantly. He says 99% of Marian University students receive some sort of institutional grants or scholarships. “A lot of people assume that a private school is going to be more expensive than going to a public school, but the reality is it can be as affordable as going to a state school in Indiana,” says Apple. The No. 1 most popular degree Marian University offers is nursing, followed by biology, business and management, and marketing, he says. The university also has a growing school of education—Klipsch Educators College, says Apple. Students who want to teach spend five years at the school, but the fifth year they

Marian University’s St. Vincent Field

are student teaching and getting paid, he says. In addition, once they’ve successfully completed the fifth year students earn both a bachelor’s and a master’s degree, says Apple. “It’s a pretty attractive option for people who want to be teachers.” Marian University also has a medical school, which opened in 2013. The school gives preference to its undergraduate students and guarantees them an interview for the medical school if they graduate with a 3.5 grade point average or higher, he says. “A lot of students see that as a good pipeline into medical school,” says Apple. n


Business

MANNY AWARDS

page 82

CINCINNATI USA REGIONAL CHAMBER

page 101

VISTA PACKAGING page 102

NATHANAEL GREEN LODGE page 104

BEST IN BUSINESS CALENDAR page 106

BEST IN BUSINESS DIRECTORY

page 107

w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9

81


Celebrating

MANUFACTURING

Excellence By The Editors

LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

Gilbert Richards, Jr., the founder of perennial MANNY winner Richards Industries, is the 2019 awardee of the MANNY Lifetime Achievement Award. Gilbert Richards, Jr. began his career on Wall Street. He worked for a leveraged buyout firm, which sent him to Cincinnati to gain practical experience with a new manufacturer the firm had acquired. Richards quickly realized the work setting—where nozzles, valves, fittings and couplings for the petroleum industry were produced—was a challenge he enjoyed far more than sitting behind a Wall Street desk. So he stayed and bought the company in 1961. Over the next 46 years, Richards grew the firm from six employees to an enterprise with nearly 200 workers. Under R icha rds’ leadersh ip, t he compa ny created a distribution organization, expanded the product line, acquired related companies and successfully entered the global market.

Gilbert Richards, Jr. • Founder, Richards Industries • Posthumous Award

82

J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

In the early years, when the company was small, Richards would go into the back door of industrial plants and sell directly to the maintenance people, selling one or two valves at a time. Over time, the company’s methods became more sophisticated, but Richards never lost his affinity for the personal touch. Richards’ commitment to his employees was demonstrated when, upon retirement, he sold the company to his employees. The move, not without risk, had been a longtime goal of Richards’ and it gave him great satisfaction. Richards supported organizations and events such as the Cincinnati Country Day School, Au lt Pa rk a nd t he May Festival. He was married to wife Mary for 49 years. Those who knew Richards well described him as a “no-nonsense” man. Yet a personal goal of Richards, who died in April 2017, was to live his life by making at least one person happy every day.


BEST NEW PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT/INNOVATION

Xact Medical, Inc.

Location: Springboro Ownership: Private Founded: 2016 Employees: 6 CEO: Andrew Cothrel Website: xactmedical.com Business: Medical device development

Springboro medical device developer Xact Medical was founded in 2016 to bring to life a revolutionary advancement. Its Fast Intelligent Needle Delivery (FIND) device is a hand-held ultrasound-guided probe that uses intelligent technology to allow any clinician, regardless of experience, to perform injections on a patient’s body.

“The device combines advanced imaging with the precision of robotics to place needles exactly where you want them to go,” describes Dr. Dan von Allmen, cofounder of Xact and surgeon-in-chief at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. The goal for FIND is beyond simple injections; Xact wants to expand the utility of the device’s ability to make difficult procedures safer and more reliable through robotics. “It’s really a platform,” says von Allmen, describing how FIND’s smart robotic delivery system can be adapted for nerve blocks, biopsies and other procedures. “[And] that system can be brought to the bedside as opposed to taking a patient to a very big, very expensive unit. Bring the treatment to the patient, not the patient to the treatment.” – Kevin Michell

From left: Alissa Dickerson, Dan von Allmen, John Hart and Robert Dunki-Jacobs BEST NEW PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT/INNOVATION

Melink Corporation

Location: Milford Ownership: Private Founded: 1987 Employees: 100 CEO & Chairman: Steve Melink Website: melinkcorp.com Business: Provider of energy efficiency and renewable energy solutions for commercial buildings

Alex Falck, product engineer for Melink Corporation’s new product, PositiV, says the building system is almost like a FitBit for buildings. “Not everyone needs or wants a FitBit but it gives users the information they need to kind of improve their overall health. Similarly, PositiV will give building owners and facility managers the

information they need to improve their buildings.” PositiV, which just launched last year, monitors and tracks building health metrics like CO2, temperature relative to humidity and building pressure. “We took market feedback from our other business units and then implemented this product, which will be used in retail, restaurant facilities…it can be used in hospitals, things like that, where building pressure and building health is pretty important to maintain,” says Falck. Melink is working to spread the word among retail and restaurant facilities, but Falck says the company would like to expand to larger buildings—such as manufacturing facilities—in the future. - Corinne Minard

Alex Falck

w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9

83


NEW JOB CREATION

Mesa Industries, Inc.

Location: East End Ownership: Private Founded: 1967 Employees: 70 President: Brian Karns Website: mesa-intl.com Business: Engineer and manufacturer of products, such as emission controls and industrial water drains for oil companies

Mesa Industries, located in the East End, has been in business for over 50 years, but the best may yet to come. The company created 16 new positions in 2018, representing a 25 percent growth in its full-time workforce. Its mid-2017 acquisition of WG Seals brought a complimentary product line and a process Mesa previously had to outsource under its roof, but it also led

to more jobs at the company. “We hired front-line managers, supervisors, production leads,” says Heather Britton, Human Resources manager. “By doing that we were able to provide our employees a direct succession path so they can see what their future would look like—not just adding those positions but being able to show them that we’re committed to their future.” Mesa added press brake operations to its facility for the first time and new positions in super v ision and sk illed operation. Britton believes this should encourage continued growth that will in turn make Mesa an employer of choice in the region. – KM

From left: Heather Britton and Traci Thomas

PUSH YOURSELF I PULL OTHERS A M O R N I N G O F D E V E LO P M E N T P R E S E N T E D BY C I N TA S

FRIDAY, AUGUST 2ND

CINTAS CENTER AT XAVIER UNIVERSITY

1624 Herald Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45207

Join us to discover how building your brand will accentuate your professional journey. To learn more and register for the event visit cintas.com/pushpull2019.

84

J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com


NEW JOB CREATION

Clippard Instrument Laboratory Location: Colerain Township Ownership: Private Founded: 1941 Employees: 215 President: William A. Clippard Website: clippard.com Business: Manufacturer of pneumatic and electronic miniature control solutions

Clippard Instrument Laboratory, Inc.— which manufactures products that run the gamut of industrial needs—has seen its focus on the growing medical/life sciences market pay off in job creation. “We’ve been adding quite a few positions around the company because our strategy this year has really been to focus on the medical/life sciences market,” says William A. Clippard, president. The company

recently added 10 new positions to support that strategy, bringing its total workforce to 220 employees, he says. Clippard Instrument Laboratory was also the recipient of the recent Hamilton County Southwest Ohio Region Workforce Investment Board’s Super Award for its efforts in creating jobs and partnering with Ohio Means Jobs for training employees new skills. The company has been promoting a strategy to achieve 10% annual growth. That strategy helped the company achieve a new sales record of $30 million in 2018. The company achieved this record by keeping its employees focused on the strategy, measuring progress toward goals each month and making adjustments to maximize manufacturing capacity. In addition, the company became customer focused and prioritized delivering meaningful products that were customized to fit its customers’ needs. – Eric Spangler

From left: Rob Clippard, Ernie Doering, Bill Clippard and Jennifer Caunin

Lakota Local Schools is proud to be a leader in redefining the K-12 educational experience. Everything WE do is designed to provide a future ready, studentcentered learning experience for every single child.

www.LakotaOnline.com         (513) 874-5505          lakota@lakotaonline.com w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9

85


BEST PLACE TO WORK

KDM POP Solutions Group Location: Evendale Ownership: Private Founded: 1970 Employees: 308 President: Bob Kissel Website: kdmpop.com Business: Point of purchase solutions provider

KDM Pop Solutions Group, a 2015 and 2017 MANNY Best Place to Work winner, has been named a Best Place to Work yet again thanks to the innovative ways it engages with its employees. “[President Bob Kissel] believes in engaging from the top down all throughout the organization. And that translates into

programming and benefits that we’re able to offer to our employees—the Dreammakers program, the wellness program, our training, the work we do within the community [and] partnering with our local school districts to identify talent and bring it into the company,” says Cara Shelton, Dreammakers and wellness program manager. The Dreammakers program, for example, provides employees with coaches (and even financial support) to help them fulfill their dreams. The company has also taken that helpful attitude and applied it to the local community. KDM Pop Solutions Group has partnered with Princeton School District to help kids learn skills they need if they’re seeking employment straight out of high school. - CM

From left: Thomas Rinner and Cara Shelton

BEST PLACE TO WORK

Richards Industries

Location: Hyde Park Ownership: Private Founded: 1947 Employees: 145 President: Bruce Broxterman Website: richardsind.com Business: Industrial valve manufacturer

This year marks the 11th time Richards Industries has been named a Best Place to Work in Cincy Magazine’s MANNY Awards. “We consistently put a strong focus on the culture at Richards,” says Cheryl Koopman, vice president of human resources at Richards. “Our employees are our most important asset. We believe in

From left: Bob Brumberg and Chase Collier

86

J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

working hard and playing hard. Having a good culture makes it so much easier to recruit and retain. Because continuous improvement is important to us, we believe it applies to company culture as well. So we are always looking for ways to make Richards Industries an even better place.” The company has sat with employees going through chemotherapy, mock interviewed children of employees, helped employees looking to lose weight, held an annual recognition dinner and even given out Dairy Queen ice cream when it was hot outside. “We’re also very proud of our employee recognition program,” says Koopman. “We like to celebrate wins and everyday things when we can.” - CM


BEST PLACE TO WORK

Monti Inc.

Metal fabricator Monti’s Cincinnati headquarters is full of stories of employee longevity and advancement, created by its willingness to promote from within and create educational opportunities. For example, the company’s production manager started as a college student working CNC machines during the summer,

Location: Norwood Ownership: Private Founded: 1971 Employees: 264 President & CEO: Gavin Narburgh Website: monti-inc.com Business: Manufacturer and fabricator

From left: Chris Narburgh, Molly Fender, Gordon Narburg and Jay Bender

your choices, our advice. Respected for our expertise, common sense approach, and vision, VonLehman's Manufacturing & Distribution Service Group assists 250 best-in-class companies. From strategic business insights that drive meaningful change, to process improvement, and everything in between, regional manufacturing and distribution firms know that VonLehman is the team to trust. After all,your future is our top priority.

CONTACT US TODAY! vlcpa.com • 800.887.0437 • info@vlcpa.com

88

J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

working his way up to his current title in a little under 10 years. He is currently pursing a master’s degree as well. Many other employees are working toward college degrees of their own to continue their advancement in the company. Monti long offered tuition reimbursement but it was underutilized, says Molly Fender, vice president of human resources. Leadership began paying for classes upfront in order to spur greater involvement. “Since we’ve done that, we’ve had a ton of people use the benefit,” Fender notes. Members of the leadership team are continuing their educations, too. Three are in the process of gaining their master’s in business administration, Fender included. Supporting employees’ professional growth has built a positive workplace culture at Monti, strengthened by exceptional retention. – KM


BEST PLACE TO WORK

United Performance Metals

Location: Hamilton Ownership: Private Founded: 2008 Employees: 244 President: Tom Kennard Website: upmet.com Business: Distributor of high-performance specialty metals

Hamilton’s United Performance Metals has been active in engaging with its employees, building a workplace offering competitive benefits, f lexibility and a positive culture. Employee Tim Moore has seen it first hand throughout his 25 years with the company. Moore started as a machin-

ist but didn’t feel perfectly comfortable with adjusting to the office atmosphere of management. So United Performance Metals created a position for him to stay on the shop floor but also function as a team leader. “They knew I was an energy kind of guy on the floor,” Moore describes. “I want to work with my hands, I want to produce stuff. Being there as long as I have, I’ve learned a lot and that has given me the ability to help people who are struggling in other areas.” The company started small and its workforce has grown together over the years, fostering open communication and promotion from within. “I think they genuinely care about the employees,” says Moore. “It kind of became a big family.” – KM

From left: David Smith, Kim Skelton, Tim Moore, Kyle Lunsford, Danielle Reinert and Scott Fasse

w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9

89


BEST PLACE TO WORK

Perfetti van Melle USA

Location: Erlanger, Ky. Ownership: Private Founded: 1970 Employees: 360 President & CEO: Sylvia Buxton Website: perfettivanmelleus.com Business: Confectionery manufacturer and marketer

Not only does Perfetti van Melle USA manufacture Airheads candy and Mentos Gum it also makes life sweeter for its employees. By treating its employees fairly; valuing different styles, skills, experiences and backgrounds; and acknowledging that these differences result in greater creativity and better insights, the company based in Erlanger, Kentucky, has gained the respect

From left: Stephanie Creech and Sylvia Buxton

Mindfulness-Based Stress Intelligence™ Training. Let's Talk!

SensibleHelp@stresslessworkshops.com 513.382.4245 StressLessWorkshops.com

90

J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

of its workforce and the award for Best Place to Work. “It’s more than a company,” says President and CEO Sylvia Buxton. “It’s family.” Perfetti van Melle USA provides a number of employee events and activities to ensure its employees feel a sense of family, including a holiday party; company picnic; Halloween party; monthly and holiday candy allotments; team-building activities at fun, off-site locations such as Keeneland, Art of Entertaining and Main Event; employee anniversary celebrations; and birthday celebrations. That approach to building a family atmosphere has paid off for the bottom line as Perfetti Van Melle USA grew its business by 6.3% in 2018, nearly eight times more than the rest of the non-chocolate/mints/ gum category. – ES


TOP GROWTH

Deceuninck North America

Location: Monroe Ownership: Public Founded: Founded in 1969, purchased by Deceuninck in 1995 Employees: 536 President & CEO: Filip Geeraert Website: deceuninckna.com Business: Design, compounding, tolling, lamination and PVC extrusion company that produces energyefficient PVC window and door systems

Though somewhat hard to pronounce— just think of someone named Nick who works at the Dairy Queen (dee-CUEnink)—Monroe’s Deceuninck has experienced nearly 200% growth in the PVC extrusion industry over the last six years. That g row t h has been spurred by solidifying customer relations, maintaining product quality and keeping an eye on potential avenues for innovative expansion.

“We’re always looking for new opportunities to serve existing markets and geographies,” says Phil Morton, Deceuninck’s director of business development and innovation, “but also looking at new, adjacent markets.” Adding valuable new technologies to Deceuninck’s product line has helped, as has the installation of additional high-speed production and extrusion lines. Morton acknowledges this growth— and the recognition of it—provides the company with more credibility in the marketplace and encouragement to keep going. “This MANNY award is part of that affirmation that we’re doing some of these things right,” Morton says. – KM

Phil Morton

w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9

91


TOP GROWTH

Cold Jet

Location: Miami Township, Clermont County Ownership: Private Founded: 1986 Employees: 124 CEO: Gene Cook III Website: coldjet.com Business: Manufacturer of dry ice cleaning and production equipment

It’s no wonder that Cold Jet earned Cincy Magazine’s MANNY Award for top growth. It’s one of the company’s key priorities. “Everything we do is designed to the grow th of the company,” says Tyson Marlowe, director of global business development strategy, food & beverage at Cold Jet. “It doesn’t matter if you’re in product

development, marketing, human resources—it’s part of who we are,” he says. “And we’re good at it.” Cold Jet’s revenue has grown more than 87% in the last five years. Gross revenue for 2018 was $81 million. “I’ve been with the company since 2003 and we’ve grown every single year,” says Marlowe. That growth in revenue has translated to an exponential growth in Cold Jet’s workforce. Nine jobs were created in 2018 and 101 jobs have been created in the last five years. That growth in jobs is expected to continue in 2019. “One of the reasons we have achieved growth year after year is we have a diversified customer base,” says Marlowe. – ES

With a growth rate of 208% over the last five years, it’s no wonder Elite Biomedical Solutions is a winner in this year’s Top Growth category. “We’ve built a reputation of quality, so our customers know that they are going to receive safe, accurate, reliable products on time, any time, and because of that reputation, our sales have grown consistently and

significantly upward in the double digits since the company’s inception [in] 2012,” says Susan McClure, controller and director of human resources for the distributor and manufacturer of medical device parts. During the past five years, the company has increased its gross revenue by $9.5 million and created 33 new jobs. However, the company has no plans to slow down. “We plan on continuing to release quality products. We’re also looking into going into different sectors where maybe we’ll provide engineering or provide manufacturing services to third parties,” adds McClure. - CM

Tyson Marlowe

TOP GROWTH

Elite Biomedical Solutions LLC Location: Eastgate Ownership: Private Founded: 2012 Employees: 42 President: Jeff Smith Website: elitebiomedicalsolutions.com Business: Manufacturer and distributor of parts for medical devices

From left: Jeff Smith, Susan McClure and Madison Smith

92

J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com


BIGGEST BREAKTHROUGH

Batesville Products Inc.

Location: Lawrenceburg, Ind. Ownership: Private Founded: 1965 Employees: 85 President & COO: Len Weber Website: batesvilleproducts.com Business: Aluminum foundry and machine shop

The biggest breakthrough for Batesville Products Inc. started in 2017 when the company began working with Purdue University’s manufacturing extension service to create a new scheduling software algorithm. That software allowed the company to dramatically increase its productivity, including an increase in the amount of metal poured per hour from 27 pounds to 36

pounds, reducing scrap percentages from about 14 percent to an almost unheard of 5 percent and improving on-time delivery from about 80 percent to 100 percent. But another breakthrough in improving the production of its employees began recently when the company hired a dedicated life coach, through Workforce Connection, who works one on one with employees to help them reach their goals, says Tim Weber, vice president of sales. The company also works closely with employee hiring through second chance initiatives such as Beacon of Hope, Cincinnati Works and Dearborn County Community Court Service, he says. The combination of a life coach and the support of second chance initiative organizations helps Batesville Products Inc. give its employees a second chance at becoming successful, contributing members of society, says Weber. – ES

Tim Weber

OUR COMMITMENT

IS REAL.

Middletown is open for business and ready to welcome you home!

OUR SUPPORT

IS SINCERE.

OUR SERVICE

IS SUPERIOR!

cityofmiddletown.org

2018 BEST WORKPLACES IN

OHIO

94

J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com


BIGGEST BREAKTHROUGH

Advanced Manufacturing Industry Partnership Ownership: Nonprofit Founded: 2008 Members: 298 President: Amy Meyer, vice president of corporate development at Rhinestahl Business: Collaborative group of manufacturing employers, educators and community agencies working together to address workforce pipeline issues

The Advanced Manufacturing Industry Partnership’s breakthrough this past year wasn’t technological—instead, it’s focused on people. The partnership, which is funded and led by Partners for a Competitive Workforce, was created to help local manufacturers

address the skills gap, particularly with the next generation of workers. Last year during October, the partnership reached out to current students with its “What’s So Cool Abut Manufacturing?” video contest—it reached 7,500 students, parents and teachers in the Tristate. Teams of middle school students were encouraged to create videos about manufacturing that were then voted on and viewed by other students. In addition, more than 50 manufacturers hosted over 4,500 students during that month, giving them an exposure to manufacturing. According to the nomination form, these initiatives collectively impacted 11,500 parents, teachers and students in the region. – CM

Standing from left: Dave Fleischer, Will Healy, Pete Borden and Chris Leedy Seated from left: Emily Larsh, Amy Meyer and Debby Combs

Learning works! For business Great Oaks offers customized training and assessment to help local business and industry maintain their competitive edge.

For you Full-time and part-time career programs and individual professional development, computer training, and personal interest classes help you enhance career skills or pursue new interests.

www.greatoaks.com

For the community More than 40,000 adults each year turn to Great Oaks for education and training.

513.771.8881 w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9

95


EVENT EMCEE

Tom McKee Veteran broadcast journalist Tom McKee worked for WCPO-TV for 40 years before retiring at the end of 2018. In his career, McKee was a reporter, producer, assignment manager and multimedia journalist covering stories in Greater Cincinnati and around the country. The biggest challenge came in 1980, when he and eight co-workers were taken hostage at the station by a man who later took his own life. All nine were released unharmed. Honors for McKee include a 2013 Walter Cronkite Award for Civic Engagement in election coverage, the L.J. Hortin Distinguished Alumni Award from the Scripps School of Journalism at his alma mater, Ohio University, and induction into the Hall of Fame of the Ohio Associated Press Managing Editors. McKee and his wife, Claudia, have three grown sons and seven grandchildren.

United Performance Metals is honored to be selected as a winner in Cincy Magazine’s 13th annual Manny Awards in the Best Place to Work category. We believe that a culture of safety, respect, collaboration, continuous improvement, and most importantly, a positive attitude creates a thriving work environment for our team members. Our employees are the key to our growth and success.

1.888.282.3292 • upmet.com 96

J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

MANNY Winners Honored Manufacturers from across the Tristate will be honored at the 13th annual MANNY Awards, presented by Cincy Magazine, for achievements in five categories: Best Place to Work, New Product Development/Innovation, Job Creation, Biggest Breakthrough and Top Growth. The 15 winners will be celebrated at a dinner June 13 at JACK Casino from 5:30-8 p.m. To make a reservation, contact Events Coordinator Alexandra Tepe at atepe@ cincymagazine.com or go to cincy.live.


Honoring the previous winners of the MANNY Awards since 2007 Able Tool Corp. 2013

D & E Machine 2011

Intelligent Green Products 2014

Mubea 2014, 2015, 2017

Advanced Manufacturing Industry Partnership 2019

Deceuninck North America 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019

Intelligrated 2007, 2010, 2013, 2015, 2016

Multi-Color Corp. 2008

Eagle Specialty Vehicles 2011, 2013

Interplex Medical 2011

Nilpeter USA, Inc. 2011

Elite Biomedical Solutions LLC 2017, 2018, 2019

It’s a Wrap Ideas LLC 2009

Nolte Precise Manufacturing 2008

Enerfab 2008, 2009, 2010, 2014

JTM Food Group 2017

Odom Industries 2007

Emerson Industrial Automation 2012

Kaivac, Inc. 2007

Perfetti Van Melle USA 2017, 2018, 2019

Emery Oleochemicals LLC 2012, 2013

KDM POP Solutions Group 2015, 2017, 2019

Polycraft Products Inc. 2014, 2018

Eurostampa North America 2013, 2015

Kingdom Productions, Inc. 2016

Polymet Corp. 2015, 2016

Fecon Inc. 2008, 2014, 2015, 2016

Kroger Co. 2017

Pro Mach, Inc. 2010

Festo Didactic 2017

L’Oreal USA 2013

Flottman Company 2013

Lafarge Gypsum 2007, 2009

Ransohoff-Cleaning Technologies Group LLC 2012

Formica Corporation 2011

LOC Enterprises LLC 2017

Foster Transformer Co. 2015, 2016

Long-Stanton Manufacturing Co. 2014, 2015

Freeman Shwabe Machinery LLC 2009

LSI Industries 2010, 2013

AK Steel 2008 Altimet-Global Scrap Management 2012 Amano Cincinnati 2009, 2011 American Fan 2011 American Micro Products 2007 Ampac 2013 Amylin Pharmaceuticals 2012 AquiSense Technologies 2018 Arnold Guage Co., Inc. 2015, 2018 BAE Systems 2009 Batesville Casket Co. 2008 Batesvile Products Inc. 2017, 2018, 2019 Beam Global Spirits & Wine, Inc. 2007 B.I.C. Precision Machine Co., Inc. 2012 Bonfiglioli USA 2013, 2014 Brighton Tru-Edge Heads Inc. 2012 Champion Window Manufacturing 2009 Cincinnati Gearing Systems 2015, 2017 Cincinnati Inc. 2016, 2018

Cleaning Technologies Group LLC 2014, 2016, 2018 Clippard Instrument Lab, Inc. 2009, 2019 Cold Jet 2008, 2017, 2018, 2019 Comfort Care Foods 2009 CONTECH Engineered Solutions 2010, 2013 Coolant Control Inc. 2009 J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

GeckoTek 3D 2015 General Data Co. 2007, 2012, 2014 General Tool 2008 Ghent Manufacturing 2010 Glasshand LLC 2011 Gold Medal Products Co 2011, 2012, 2017 Graeter’s Manufacturing Co. 2010

CKS Solution, Inc. 2009

98

Gallatin Steel Company 2007, 2008

maga zine.com

MAG 2011 Makino 2012 Mazak 2011, 2014 Melink Corp 2008, 2010, 2011, 2019 Meridian Bioscience Inc. 2012 Mesa Industries, Inc. 2010, 2017, 2018, 2019 The Metal Working Group 2008, 2012, 2013, 2018 Michelman Inc. 2014, 2018

Greg G. Wright & Sons 2008

Micropyretics Heaters International, Inc. 2007

Hamilton Caster & Mfg. Co. 2007

Middletown Tubeworks 2009

Hamilton Sorter 2016

Milacron Inc. 2016

Hill-Rom/Hillenbrand Industries 2007

Mil Air 2010

Huhtamaki Inc. 2014

MillerCoors Brewery 2012

Indelac Controls Inc. 2018

Monti Inc. 2019

Innovative Labeling Solutions 2011

MN8 LumAware Safety 2017

Richards Industries 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019 Rite Track 2007 Rotek, Inc. 2009 Rumpke Waste & Recycling 2010, 2014 Salamander Sinkers 2013 Servatii 2010 Sharonville Transmission Plant/ Ford Motor Co. 2009 Sims-Lohman Inc. 2014, 2015 Star Manufacturing 2011, 2012, 2013 Storopack Inc. 2007 StratusGroup, Inc. 2010 Sugar Creek Packing Co. 2015, 2016 Sweco 2007 The Hillman Group 2010 TSS Technologies 2008 United Performance Metals 2019 Victory Industrial Products 2008 ZF Steering Systems 2011


SPONSORS

COMMUNI T Y PA R T NERS

100

J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com


Redefining Membership MEMBERS OF THE CINCINNATI USA REGIONAL CHAMBER ARE AFFORDED MANY OPPORTUNITIES TO SHAPE THE REGION’S FUTURE

By Kevin Michell

S

everal new initiatives offered by the Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber showcase the collaborative opportunities that come through membership. Momentum Investor membership—a new tier of chamber membership introduced last year—allows businesses to become more active participants in shaping the Cincinnati area’s growth. Momentum Investor members receive exclusive or discounted access to events and opportunities to interact directly with chamber leadership. Chamber President and CEO Jill Meyer delivers a regional strategy update to Momentum Investor members at an annual event. Members also are able to meet individually with the chamber’s senior leadership to have a detailed, in-person discussion of their goals and ideal involvement as members. “It grew beyond our expectations the first year,” says Beth McNeill, senior director of Sales and Engagement at the chamber, “and we’re really excited for how it continues to grow in its second.” Chamber members of any level can utilize an array of regional events for networking and collaboration. The Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber operates in 16 Ohio, Kentucky and Indiana counties and has joint partnerships with seven other area chambers. These partnerships set the collaborative tone of events happening through the year. Regular meetups like Member Benefits 101 and the Converge Networking series offer a chance for members to learn from one another and forge new partnerships. The annual Manufacturing Exchange provides an opportunity to experience the industry in cities outside of the Ohio Valley and bring new insights home. Outside of those events, the chamber is always willing to facilitate connections between members. “We guarantee that, if you ask, we will connect you with who

The 16 counties with which the Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber actively partners

you’re looking to meet,” says McNeill. The chamber also offers a fleet of programs for members and non-members alike to engage with the region’s economic development and public sector. Vox Futura is a way for young professionals to intimately collaborate with the Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber’s leadership team to identify focal points and goals for the area’s economic future. Membership consists of up to 15 emerging leaders from throughout the region selected after a springtime application period. “Vox Futura is going to strategically help us define the work of the chamber,” says Brendon Cull, the chamber’s senior vice president and chief operating officer. “It’s been a theme here, recognizing that we’re building a chamber that’s going to be around for the next 180 years. To do that, we’ve got to have a constant influx of new voices and new perspectives at the table.” In a similar way, the chamber’s Influence Cincinnati program is providing a leg up to anyone interested in shaping public policy through collaboration with municipal and government leaders. Influence Cincinnati

Beth McNeill, senior director of Sales and Engagement for the chamber

members will meet regularly to engage with policy makers and develop their influence to stoke civic engagement in their own communities. “What we want is to make sure a wider array of people in this community have an opportunity to weigh in on policy and community initiatives,” Cull says. Influence Cincinnati serves as a great entry point for people who encounter policy and want to affect it but don’t know how best to be heard. “What my hope is that it makes being engaged in policy and politics more relevant to even more people,” says Cull. “I’m so excited about what this program is going to look like over the next few years.” n w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9

101


The COMPLETE Package By Kevin Michell

A

fter starting in Jay and Martha Cahall’s family home in Columbus, Vista Packaging and Logistics now has four facilities spread among Columbus, Cincinnati and Hebron, Kentucky. That’s just one signifier of the family-owned company’s growth since its founding in 1985. Vista began by offering packaging solutions for area manufacturers and has now expanded its service offerings to include everything packaging related—from kitting and assembly to shrink sleeving and wrapping—as well as custom in-house design, warehousing and logistics for customer shipments. In its first decade of operations, Vista grew to a workforce of 25 employees; now, the company has over 200 in permanent positions and nearly as many more temporary workers to assist during busy seasons or as needed. Greater people power is an asset that puts Vista’s customers at ease, explains Jim Stein, who oversees quality and inventory control as well as ISO standards, IT and human resources. “Part of what we do for our customers that they appreciate is that we take the hassle and challenges of responding to that labor market fluctuation,” Stein says. That eliminates client stress and allows them to simply request what they need and let Vista handle the execution. That customer confidence is bolstered by the Columbus facility’s ISO 9001 certification, which it renewed to meet 2015 standards last summer. The globally recognized ISO standard for quality management signifies to potential and existing clients that day-to-day operations are well under control and outcomes are reliably delivered. “It also means as you go to expand and grow your business,” Stein points out, “you have a methodology of how you do that, and how you set up new facilities so that you’re ready to go when you turn the lights on.” That has been crucial to Vista’s continued regional expansion. “That also opens the door for us to work with larger, more complicated organizations because they know we’re ready to handle that,” says Stein. With the multiyear process of renewing Columbus’ ISO certification accomplished, Stein and Vista now look to do the same for the Hebron facility. 1 02

J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

ABOVE: One of Vista’s autobagging machines used for commercial packaging RIGHT: Vista Packaging & Logistics’ leadership team, including President and CEO Martha Cahall (center, holding award) BOTTOM RIGHT: Warehousing space at Vista Packaging & Logistics The Hebron location is Vista’s newest addition, something Stein oversaw when he started with the company about five years ago. Customer demand for a presence on the south side of the Ohio River led to the company purchasing a building with over 200,000 square feet of warehousing and production space. Combined with the Cincinnati facility and two Columbus locations, Vista owns nearly 1 million square feet of space for its business needs. But in the midst of this growth, it can be easy to overlook how carefully Vista has expanded its operations. The company has taken time to identify good opportunities in offerings adjacent to its core services and adapts quickly when customers request something. Whether it’s temporary mass warehousing for a client undergoing renovations or adding the capability to handle electronic data interchange transactions, Vista Packaging and Logistics continues to demonstrate adaptability and develop multiyear relationships with customers that set both up for a profitable future. n

VISTA PACKAGING AND LOGISTICS HAS EXPANDED TO FIT THE MANY NEEDS OF ITS CUSTOMERS


William E. Hesch Law Firm, LLC

Personalized • Experienced • Service-oriented

Update Your Estate Plan NOW! Your Family Is Depending On YOU! Call Bill on his cell phone

today at (513) 509-7829 to receive legal, tax, business or financial advice from a:

• Attorney

BABY BOOMERS NEED HELP Baby Boomers need help getting answers to their complicated tax, estate and retirement planning questions.

• CPA • Personal Financial Specialist (PFS) • Former CFO of a $70 million privately owned company • Former Deloitte TAX Partner

William E. Hesch Law Firm, LLC

As an Attorney, CPA and Personal Financial Specialist, Bill is uniquely qualified to advise Baby Boomers on their complicated tax, estate and retirement planning matters. Get your second opinion now by calling Bill at 513-509-7829 PEACE OF MIND IS ONLY A PHONE CALL AWAY

Cincy Magazine’s

Leading Lawyer in the Trust and Estate Area for

15 consecutive years

Check out our website at www.heschlaw.com to see the videos which identify the Top 10 Mistakes Business Owners Make in Tax, Succession and Estate Planning.

Contact Bill to get a second opinion and see what he can do for you. 3047 Madison Road, Suite 205, Cincinnati, OH 45209 | 513-731-6601 | www.heschlaw.com This is an advertisement. Legal work may be performed by others within the firm


The gazebo at Nathanael Greene Lodge

A Brighter Shade of Green

GREEN TOWNSHIP IS GROWING STEADILY AND THE NATHANAEL GREENE LODGE CELEBRATES 20 YEARS

By Kevin Michell

G

reen Township, one of the two largest townships in Hamilton County alongside Colerain, has been on the upswing over the last decade and it doesn’t show any signs of slowing down. It’s been spurred in part by major development projects such as the arrivals of TriHealth’s Good Samaritan Western Ridge hospital in 2010, Mercy West Hospital in 2013 and the Greenshire Commons residential area three years ago. One million square feet of medical facility and office space has been constructed over the last nine years, including an 88,000-square-foot expansion to the Good Samaritan building set to be completed 104

J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

early next year. “There’s been tremendous growth,” says Frank Birkenhauer, the township’s administrator. As a result, Green Township’s daytime population has ballooned, requiring more housing for the many professionals who want to live closer to where they work. “The last five years,” Birkenhauer says, “Green Township has put in more singlefamily building permits than any other community in Hamilton County but for the city of Cincinnati.” Part of that home building spree was Greenshire Commons in northwestern Green Township. The 235-home community was a joint development project

among the township, Rakesh Ram of Coldwell Banker and four major Cincinnati builders: Drees Homes, Inverness Homes, M/I Homes and Dennis Ott Builders. The houses sold quickly, indicative of the residential boom happening in Green Township. The nearly $1 billion in commercial development and corresponding increase in homes being built and sold has retailers flocking to the area to seize the opportunity. The Harrison Greene retail development opened in 2015 to anchor a bona fide entertainment district on Harrison Avenue. Its tenants include Graeter’s Ice Cream and the west side’s only Dewey’s Pizza—both


The playground at West Fork Park of which are among the top performing locations for their respective brands—as well as First Watch and Keystone’s Mac Shack. When the property sold in February for almost $6 million, it was an indication of how desirable of a commercial space it has already become—the sale price per square foot of the center equated to $342. But Green Township officials know there is more to be done to support the growing community. “It’s been very successful, but it’s not enough,” Birkenhauer points out. “People are still asking for more choices in terms of lunch and dinner options on the west side. We’ve got a lot of interest in different types of restaurants that want to move into this area.” It’s a matter of playing catch up with the demand residents new and old are creating for additional dining options and amenities. The latter is something the township is actively improving upon. A new playground tailored to younger children and those with sensory disabilities and autism opened in West Fork Park in October 2017. Full of unique and inclusive features like a colorful maze and a turf-covered climbing hill, the park has been a huge success in its first few months. “The biggest complaint is that we need more parking,” says Birkenhauer. The township also purchased 5 acres of land adjacent to Kuliga Park for expanded development. The park hosts many events during the year, including the township’s signature Independence Day Celebration Concert and Fireworks event held every July 3. The 2019 edition will feature Reds Hall of Famer Ron Oester and music from Saffire Express Band and up-and-coming local outfit The Midwestern in addition to, of course, fireworks.

Also in October of last year, Green Township opened up its bike and walk trail, which Birkenhauer considers a hidden gem of the area. “It was an old rail line that was made into a bike trail,” he says. “That’s something that has really taken off.” The trail runs 2 miles between Oakdale Elementary and a trailhead with parking off Hutchinson Road while passing behind Harrison Greene. Plans are in place to eventually extend the trail north to Veterans Park, near one of Green Township’s local landmarks. Nathanael Greene Lodge has stood just south of Veterans Park since 1999. In its 20 years of operations, the lodge has evolved from a place for holding civic and municipal meetings to an event space integral to the community. Nestled in the heart of the township,

Nathanael Greene Lodge is the primary gathering space in the community for social functions, fundraisers, organizational events and meetings, says assistant lodge manager Cindy Tabler. Complete with three rooms that can adapt to any layout needs and food service offered by Vonderhaar’s Catering, the lodge is perfect for departmental meetings, offsite business functions and holiday parties. Because of its central location and quiet setting, it has also become a popular destination for wedding receptions and family gatherings, especially on the weekends. The lodge is where Cincy Magazine’s annual Best of the West event got its start in 2017 and has hosted many receptions and community functions over the two decades. Its signature event is December’s Winterfest. “A lot of the community participates in [Winterfest] because it gives back to the children,” Tabler says. The event brings together Green Township residents, members of the local Veterans of Foreign Wars to play Santa Claus and organizations like Cincinnati Children’s Hospital and area churches to benefit young ones in need. Hundreds show up for the four-hour fundraiser every year, Tabler estimates. Nathanael Greene Lodge continues to be a community fixture and will remain an invaluable resource as Green Township continues to grow. It’s an exciting time for this west side community and its residents with even more growth sure to come. n

The lodge has both indoor and outdoor spaces.

w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9

105


Business Calendar

JUNE

Eggs ‘N Issues: Cybersecurity Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce

Greater Hamilton Chamber’s Golf Classic XXXVI Greater Hamilton Chamber of Commerce

June 3

It’s time to dust off your clubs for the Greater Hamilton Chamber of Commerce’s 36th golf classic. Participants will begin the day with a game of golf and end it with dinner and prize drawings. Registration and lunch 11 a.m., shotgun start 12:30 p.m., dinner immediately following golf. $135 per golfer, just dinner $35. Twin Run Golf Course, 2305 Eaton Road, Hamilton. hamilton-ohio.com.

June 11

Local experts will discuss cybersecurity and what local businesses can do to protect themselves during the June Eggs ‘N Issues. The event panelists include Dennis Kennedy, Dressman Benzinger LaVelle PSC; Brian Ruschman, C-Forward; and Tom Scarborough, Fifth Third Bank. 7:30-9 a.m. Members $25, non-members $50. Receptions Banquet & Conference Center – South, 1379 Donaldson Road, Erlanger. nkychamber.com. 2019 Women’s Business Awards Clermont Chamber of Commerce

June 11

The Clermont Chamber of Commerce honors the county’s women professionals and women-owned businesses with a special luncheon. Awards will be given out in the categories of Woman-Owned Business of the Year, Business Woman of the Year and Young Professional of the Year. The event’s keynote is Anne Tabor, public speaker, author and owner of Shine by Design. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Members $50, nonmembers $75. Oasis Golf Club & Conference Center, 902 Loveland Miamiville Road, Loveland. clermontchamber.com. Women’s Initiative Annual Golf Outing & Clinic Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce

June 18

Molly North WE Speak: Leaning In & Rising Up Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber of Commerce

June 6

Teresa Tanner, executive vice president and chief administrative officer of Fifth Third Bank, and Molly North, president and CEO of Al. Neyer, will speak about their experiences leaning in and rising to the top during this luncheon. 11:45 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Members $35, non-members $65. Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber, 3 E. Fourth St., Suite 200, Cincinnati. 513-579-3111, cincinnatichamber.com. 106

J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

Enjoy a game of golf with other professional women or learn to play golf for the first time at the Northern Kentucky Chamber’s Women’s Initiative Golf Outing. Afterwards, enjoy appetizers, drinks and shopping opportunities at the 19th Hole Social. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Individual $95, foursome $380, golf clinic $95, 19th hole social only $30. Summit Hills Country Club, 236 Dudley Road, Crestview Hills. nkychamber.com. Stir! Multicultural Networking Reception Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber of Commerce

June 27

Seven regional chambers—the African American Chamber of Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky, Cincinnati USA Hispanic Chamber, Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber, Greater Cincinnati Chinese Chamber of Commerce, European American Chamber of Commerce of Greater

Cincinnati, Indian American Chamber of Commerce of Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky, and Japan America Society of Greater Cincinnati—have joined together for a night of networking across cultures and communities. 5:30-7:30 p.m. $25. Hotel Covington, 638 Madison Ave., Covington. cincinnatichamber.com.

JULY 2019 NKY United Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce

July 19

Join Kentucky legislators for an all-day event celebrating the success of the region. The day begins with free Joint Committee Meetings held across the region from 1-3 p.m. At 4 p.m., attendees can head to the Hofbrauhaus for a reception with state legislators. The day ends in the Center Field Pavilion at Great American Ball Park to watch the Reds play the Cardinals. 1-10:30 p.m. Prices vary depending on membership and events. nkychamber.com. NKY International Trade & Affairs: Utilizing This Region’s International Students Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce

July 25

Sherry Neal, an immigration attorney with Hammond Law Group, and Francois Le Roy, Northern Kentucky University’s director of the office of education abroad and executive director of the International Education Center, will discuss the rewards of increasing and diversifying your international employee population and how to go about doing so. 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Members $35, non-members $55. Northern Kentucky University, Nunn Drive, Highland Heights. nkychamber.com.

Don’t see your event? Visit cincymagazine.com to add it to our online calendar for free.


Best in Business Directory

T

hose who run or manage businesses know that sometimes you need some help. As the Tristate’s magazine for business professionals, we are in a unique position that enables us to meet and interact with some of the best business service providers in the region. This list gives you a taste of the region’s best business services, and serves as a resource for those looking for assistance. Make sure to visit CincyMagazine.com to see exclusive online Best in Business content.

CHAMBERS

INSURANCE/INSURANCE BROKERAGE

African American Chamber of Greater Cincinnati & Northern Kentucky 513-751-9900 african-americanchamber.com

Medical Mutual 800-382-5729 medmutual.com

ACCOUNTING

Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber 513-579-3100 cincinnatichamber.com

GBQ 513-871-3033 gbq.com VonLehman 800-887-0437 vlcpa.com

Blue Ash Business Association babusiness.org The Chamber of Commerce Serving Middletown, Monroe & Trenton 513-422-4551 thechamberofcommerce.org

Clermont Chamber of Commerce 513-576-5000 clermontchamber.com

AIR TRAVEL

Lebanon Chamber of Commerce 513-932-1100 lebanonchamber.org

CVG 859-767-3151 cvgairport.com

Milford Miami Township Chamber 513-831-2411 milfordmiamitownship.com

AUDIO VISUAL

Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce 859-578-8800 nkychamber.com

ITA Audio Visual Solutions 800-899-8877 ita.com

CONSTRUCTION

Oswald Companies 513-725-0306 oswaldcompanies.com LAW FIRMS Calfee, Halter & Griswold LLP 513-693-4880 calfee.com Lyons & Lyons 513-777-2222 lyonsandlyonslaw.com Taft Stettinius & Hollister 513-381-2838 taftlaw.com Wood Herron & Evans 513-241-2324 whe-law.com PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT Gateway Community & Technical College 859-441-4500 gateway.kctcs.edu Great Oaks Campuses 513-771-8840 greatoaks.com

SpotOn Productions 513-779-4223 spoton.productions

EGC Construction 859-442-6500 egcconst.com

BANKING

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

The Haile/US Bank College of Business at Northern Kentucky University 859-572-5165 nku.edu/academics/cob

Commerce Bank 800-453-2265 commercebank.com

Charles Schwab Fort Mitchell 859-308-1425 schwab.com/fortmitchell

Indiana Wesleyan University 866-468-6498 indwes.edu

Commonwealth Bank 859-746-9000 cbandt.com

Horter Investment Management, LLC 513-984-9933 horterinvestment.com

Union Institute & University 800-861-6400 myunion.edu

BUSINESS LAW

PNC Financial Advisors/W Mgmt. 513-651-8714 pnc.com

REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT

William E. Hesch Law Firm 513-731-6601 heschlaw.com BUSINESS RESOURCES Cincinnati Better Business Bureau 513-421-3015 bbb.org/cincinnati/

Raymond James 513-287-6777 raymondjames.com Western & Southern 866-832-7719 westernsouthern.com HEALTH Superior Dental 937-438-0283 superiordental.com

Corporex 859-292-5500 corporex.com TELECOMMUNICATIONS AT&T att.com ATC 513-234-4778 4atc.com

Interested in having your company included? Please contact Publisher Eric Harmon at publisher@cincymagazine.com or 513-297-6205. w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9

1 07


Saif Jaweed, M.D., Director

Laser-Assisted Cataract Surgery, Lifestyle Lens Implants, LASIK Surgery Currently Sees Patients at: Thomas More Parkway Eastgate - Kenwood Colerain - West Chester

Maryam Ahmed-Naqvi, M.D.

Comprehensive Ophthalmology Pediatric and Adult Strabismus, & Cataract Surgery Currently Sees Patients at: Eastgate - Kenwood - Delhi Blue Ash (Susan Szmyd M.D.)

Gary G. Carothers, M.D.

Comprehensive Medical Ophthalmology, special interest in Double Vision, Prism Measurements & Diabetic Eye Care Currently Sees Patients at: Kenwood

Mark A. Cepela, M.D.

Oculoplastic Surgery & Reconstruction

Currently Sees Patients at: Kenwood - Crestview Hills Springdale - Western Hills

Michael E. Daun, M.D.

Vitreo-Retinal Disease & Surgery Currently Sees Patients at: Downtown - Anderson Crestview Hills - Delhi

Christopher J. Devine, M.D., F.A.C.S.

Vitreo-Retinal Disease & Surgery

Currently Sees Patients at: Downtown - Anderson - Springdale Crestview Hills

Matthew Dykhuizen, M.D.

Vitreo-Retinal Disease & Surgery Currently Sees Patients at: Downtown - Crestview Hills Eastgate - Colerain

Michael S. Halpin, M.D.

Comprehensive Medical Ophthalmology, Glaucoma & Diabetic Eye Care Currently Sees Patients at: Thomas More Parkway

Faiz Khaja, M.D.

Medical Retina & Cataract Surgery

Currently Sees Patients at: Eastgate - Downtown - Colerain Crestview Hills - Springdale

Joseph T. Mando, M.D.

Cornea, Cataract & LASIK Surgery, Lifestyle Lens Implants

Currently Sees Patients at: Crestview Hills - Eastgate Kenwood - West Chester Thomas More Parkway- Delhi

Jean M. Noll, M.D.

Laser-Assisted Cataract Surgery, Lifestyle Lens Implants

Currently Sees Patients at: Thomas More Parkway Florence - Kenwood

Rawzi A. Baik, O.D.

The diagnosis and medical management of Ocular Disease: Glaucoma, Diabetes, ARMD, Dry Eyes & Refractive Care Currently Sees Patients at: Delhi

Katie J. Holnbeck, O.D.

The diagnosis and medical management of Ocular Disease: Glaucoma, Diabetes, ARMD, Dry Eyes & Refractive Care Currently Sees Patients at: Colerain - Thomas More Parkway Eastgate - Florence

Philip G. Kies, O.D.

The diagnosis and medical management of Ocular Disease: Glaucoma, Diabetes, ARMD, Dry Eyes & Refractive Care

Currently Sees Patients at: Colerain - Eastgate - West Chester

Erin E. Mosellen, O.D., F.A.A.O.

The diagnosis and medical management of Ocular Disease: Glaucoma, Diabetes, ARMD, Dry Eyes & Refractive Care Currently Sees Patients at: Eastgate - Florence - Kenwood West Chester

Chris D. Thon, O.D.

The diagnosis and medical management of Ocular Disease: Glaucoma, Diabetes, ARMD, Dry Eyes & Refractive Care Currently Sees Patients at: Thomas More Parkway - Florence

800-385-EYES (3937) 859-341-4525 midwesteyecenter.com Clinic Locations Blue Ash (Susan Szmyd, M.D.) 9302 Towne Square Ave. Cincinnati, OH 45242 Colerain 6779 Colerain Ave. Cincinnati, OH 45239 Crestview Hills Mark Cepela, M.D. 2865 Chancellor Dr., Suite 210 Crestview Hills, KY 41017 859.331.6616 Crestview Hills 2865 Chancellor Dr., Suite 215 Crestview Hills, KY 41017 Delhi 5340 Rapid Run Road, Suite 2 Cincinnati, OH 45238 Downtown Retina Office 2055 Reading Rd., Suite 330 Cincinnati, OH 45202 Eastgate 4452 Eastgate Blvd., Suite 305 Cincinnati, OH 45245 Florence 7510 U.S. Route 42 Florence, KY 41042 Kenwood South 7730 Montgomery Rd., Ste 120 Cincinnati, OH 45236 Springdale Retina Office 12124 Sheraton Ln. Springdale, OH 45246 Thomas More Parkway 500 Thomas More Pkwy. Crestview Hills, KY 41017 West Chester 8760 Union Centre Blvd. West Chester, OH 45069

Ambulatory Surgery Centers Eastgate 4452 Eastgate Blvd., Suite 305 Cincinnati, OH 45245 Kenwood 8044 Montgomery Rd., Suite 155 Cincinnati, OH 45236

Refractive Surgery Center West Chester 8760 Union Centre Blvd. West Chester, OH 45069


OPHTHALMALOGY page 111

RETIREMENT UPDATE page 117

w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9

109


LIVE WELL PROFILE

Helping Artist-Athletes Get Back in Action

Performing arts medicine provides specialized care to artist-athletes

I

f you’ve ever been to a ballet, watched a comedian do a pratfall or seen a stuntman dive through a plate glass window in your favorite western, what you may not realize is that you were looking at highly skilled, performing athletes. Dancers and other performing artists can experience the same kinds of physical injury as a linebacker, golfer, basketball forward or hockey player. Sometimes physicians and physical therapists may not understand the nature of this kind of work and the physical stress put on the body in its practice. But one program at Kettering Health Network can provide treatment especially suited to these patients, who have different therapeutic needs and unique range-of-motion requirements to be able to return to daily activity. Carol Fisher is the coordinator of the Performing Arts Medicine program. When starting the program, Fisher set out to see that these “artist-athletes” have access to high-quality physical therapy and injury care. “They really are athletes,” she said. “They have the same types of physical risk of injury that any other athlete might experience.”

As a gymnast and dancer, Fisher experienced her first injury while in high school and ended up seeing many physical therapists. While this was in the late 1970s and early 80s, she said that, even today, health care providers rarely understand what dancers, gymnasts and performing artists really do. Fisher saw an entire group of patients that was either being overlooked or underserved because of a lack of knowledge, so she set out to change that. Targeted Physical Therapy Options Fisher recognized that it was imperative for the physicians and therapists who treated these patients to have a clear understanding of the types of movements involved in dance and other physical performing arts. “Biomechanically, once you see movement of the dancing, you can help them,” she said. “We create programs that simulate what their needs would be.” The Performing Arts Medicine Program has therapists trained in arts-specific equipment for the rehabilitation and performance enhancement of the patient. The program is

available to any dancer, gymnast, cheerleader and other performing artist with an injury that requires treatment. Specialized care can make the difference between resuming their craft or ending it. Patients come from all over the region, including Dayton Ballet, Wright State University dancers and students from many of the dance studios around the Dayton area. The program has even treated older patients, into their 70s, like ballroom dancers. In addition to traditional methods, therapists in the program also utilize other approaches including Pilates and gyrotonic expansion, which is a multidirectional, spiraling machine used to simulate the movements of a dancer. Fisher said the one-of-a-kind program is expanding, now available at several clinics within Kettering Health Network. For more information about this program, visit ketteringhealth.org/sports-medicine/programs/therapy.cfm or call (937) 395-3910 to make an appointment.


Cincy Live Well

Give Your Eyes a Break LOCAL EXPERTS RECOMMEND SHORT BREAKS FROM THE COMPUTER TO PREVENT EYESTRAIN AND VISION PROBLEMS By Deborah Rutledge

E

ver wonder whether staring at your computer for the bulk of your workday is hurting your vision, or if the blue light emanating from the screen is any cause for concern? Actually, although eyes might start to feel scratchy or blurry after prolonged exposure to screens, it “has zero bearing on glasses prescriptions,” says Dr. Edward Meier, from Apex Eye.  Vision blurs anytime we stare at one thing, but the effects are usually not per-

manent for adults, says Dr. Kevin Corcoran, director of optometric services at Cincinnati Eye Institute and private practitioner at Innovative Vision in Montgomery. There is concern for the risk of near-sightedness for children who are involved in prolonged near-focus tasks. Corcoran tells his patients to take breaks every half hour to defocus and give their eyes a chance to relax.  Those uncomfortable symptoms—including eyestrain, headaches and neck and shoulder pain—may indicate Computer Vision Syndrome, also called Digital Eye Strain. Much of the eye discomfort comes from not blinking, which deprives the cornea of the nutrients and oxygen it needs, Meier says.  One solution is following a 20-20-20 plan, meaning every 20 minutes taking a 20-second break to look at something 20

feet away, he says, adding that the strategy is a good one for reading books, too. Dr. Alex Gibberman, an optometrist at Harper’s Point Eye Care, adds, “Screens, phones and books alike all increase our use of our accommodative muscles, which in turn can lead to headaches, fatigue and eventually mild shifts in our vision in the near-sighted direction. “There are easy direct correlations here but I will be interested to see what larger and more long-term studies find with blue light going forward,” Gibberman says. “I would argue that the main issue with screen use is the increase in dry eye symptoms—among other things, we blink a whole lot less while staring at screens; blink rates are essentially chopped in half.”  And, unlike looking down to read paper text with the eyelid partially closed, the w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9

111


LIVE WELL PROFILE

MidWest Eye Center 4452 Eastgate Blvd., Ste. 305 • Cincinnati, OH 45245

1-800-385-EYES • midwesteyecenter.com

T

he MidWest EyeCenter’s Surgery Center exclusively offers laser eye surgery in West Chester, Ohio. MidWest EyeCenter’s laser eye surgery treatment and diagnostic facility also houses the most comprehensive technology available. We invest in the most cuttingedge laser eye surgery and pre-op testing equipment available on the market today. For the treatment of nearsightedness, farsightedness and astigmatism, our team has been directly involved in the testing and development of many proven laser eye surgery techniques and technologies. We have not only contributed to laser eye surgery in Cincinnati, Ohio, but also to the advancement of laser eye surgery procedures used around the world. Our team of surgeons has performed more than 60,000 vision correction procedures. MidWest has offices in 10 convenient locations in Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky including two ambulatory surgical centers. MidWest Eye Center is the only ophthalmology group in Cincinnati to offer laser cataract surgery.

Faiz Khaja, M.D.

Saif Jaweed, M.D., Director


Cincy Live Well eyelid is open when looking at an eye-level computer screen, which adds to the dry eye effect, Meier says. When it comes to blue light’s effects on vision, the jury is still out. “My thoughts are that blue light may indeed play a role in affecting vision but likely not much in the short term,” Gibberman says. “It will be awhile before the long-term effects of blue light are known, mainly because there are so many other things affecting our eyesight.”  Blue light is a high energy, short wavelength light compared with red, orange or yellow. The biggest source of blue light is the sun, but while harmful effects of over-exposure to the ultraviolet light from the sun are known to increase the risk of certain eye diseases, less is known about blue light.  Thirty-five percent of sunlight is blue light, Corcoran says. It is also found in LED screens, fluorescent lights, tablets, phones and monitors. “There have been various small and short-term studies showing the differ-

P E D I A T R I C OPHTHALMOLOGY AND ADULT EYE MUSCLE DISORDERS

MILES J. BURKE, M.D.

10475 Montgomery Rd. Cincinnati, Ohio 45242 513-984-4949 drmilesburke.com

“It will be awhile before the long-term effects of blue light are known, mainly because there are so many other things affecting our eyesight.” — Dr. Alex Gibberman, Harper’s Point Eye Care ent potential effects of blue light, and not all are bad,” Gibberman says. “Blue light increases alertness and is important for eye development in childhood, although over-exposure in childhood has been linked to increased amounts of nearsightedness.”  Blue light has also been used to treat some skin conditions such as psoriasis and acne, Corcoran says. But more widely known findings have suggested circadian rhythms are negatively affected by blue light at bedtime,

suppressing the normal release of melatonin that is important for sleep. In one study, people using tablets with LED screens at bedtime took longer to fall asleep than those who read text on paper, Gibberman says. “These are some of the potential issues,” including the idea that blue light may be involved in the cell death of the macula, which is the part of the retina responsible for central and detailed vision, Gibberman says. “However all studies mentioned are either retrospective or short-term; it

Dr. Burke is Cincinnati’s most experienced children’s eye care professional and was the Tri-State’s first full-time Pediatric Ophthalmologist. He has cared for and treated tens of thousands of patients over the last 3 decades. Cincinnati physicians and national colleagues have recognized Dr. Burke as one of Cincinnati’s Best Doctors, Top Doctors, and Top Ophthalmologists. Dr. Burke believes that infants, children, and teenagers benefit from serial eye and vision screenings by their primary medical care provider to detect poor vision (amblyopia and refractive errors), eye misalignment problems (strabismus), and potentially vision and life-threatening medical conditions.

Dr. Miles J. Burke, M.D. Pediatric Ophthalmologist

Dr. Burke is Cincinnati’s most trusted resource concerning children’s eye care.

If you have concerns about your child’s eyes, go see Dr. Miles J. Burke. Your child will be seen in a warm, childfriendly environment where Dr. Burke cares for them personally and treats each one as if they were his own. Call now to make an appointment.

w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9

113


Cincy Live Well will be many years before the long-term effects are truly understood.” When it comes to eye health, other factors play a part, such as smoking, which increases the risk of damaging the macula and developing macular degeneration, Corcoran says. “It’s a  fascinating, complex area of study,” he says, adding that researchers can do large epidemiologic studies of the effects of blue light on the body as a whole, paving the way for protective recommendations.  Among those recommendations are eating well and getting enough leafy greens and antioxidants to quell inflammation, which can cause a host of systemic problems, Corcoran says. “There are an immense number of variables when it comes to environmental factors contributing to changes in vision,” Gibberman says. “It will be many years before we truly understand the sole effects of blue light but I think it’s fair to say that at the very least, it plays a role. “How big a role is yet to be determined.” n

Struggling with vision loss? We can help! Cincinnati Association for the Blind & Visually Impaired

114

J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

Call today for information on low vision services and other rehabilitation services to help you live more successfully with vision loss. 513-221-8558 www.cincyblind.org


LIVE WELL PROFILE

When is it Time to Start Considering Your Medicare Options? If you’re turning 65 within the next year, now is the time to start planning for Medicare. Understanding your coverage options and enrollment deadlines will help you select a plan best suited for you. Medicare Explained Medicare has different parts, plus additional plan options to help you get the best coverage for your needs. Medicare Part A and Part B together are referred to as Original Medicare. Original Medicare is managed by the federal government. The program helps cover the cost of health care, but it does not cover all medical expenses or prescription drug coverage. Medicare Part A, also known as hospital insurance, covers hospital stays, skilled nursing, hospice care and home health. “If you or your spouse paid Medicare taxes while working for at least 10 years, you will likely not have to pay a monthly premium for this coverage,” says Lynn Specht, licensed sales and service representative for Medical Mutual. Medicare Part B, also known as medical insurance, covers physician office visits, medical supplies and preventive care services. You will pay a premium each month for Part B. While it’s important to know what Original Medicare covers, it may be more important to know what it doesn’t. Original Medicare does not cover every medical expense, such as routine services for vision, hearing and dental care. Original Medicare also does not cover prescription drugs. Other Parts of Medicare Medicare Part C plans, also known as Medicare Advantage, are sold by private insurance companies and help pay some of the health care costs not covered by Original Medicare. “These plans are offered by Medical Mutual and other private insurance companies and replace Original Medicare as your primary insurance,” says Specht. Medicare Part D prescription drug plans are also offered by private insurers and generally

cover generic and brand name prescription drugs. If you don’t enroll when you are first eligible for Medicare, you may be subject to a late enrollment penalty. When a Medicare Advantage plan includes a Medicare Part D prescription drug plan, it is referred to as a Medicare Advantage with Prescription Drugs (MAPD) plan. An MAPD plans offers the benefits of Original Medicare together with Part D prescription coverage. Most Medicare Advantage and MAPD plans also include extra benefits like vision, hearing, dental and/or health and wellness programs. Medicare Supplement Plans Explained Medicare Supplement insurance plans, also known as MedSupp or Medigap, also help pay some of the health care costs not covered by Original Medicare. You must have Medicare Part A and Part B to purchase a Medicare Supplement plan. These plans are not part of the federal Medicare program. Plans offered in Ohio are standardized and are identified by letters, such as Plan F or Plan G. This means that no matter which company is selling the plan, all plans identified with the same letter have identical coverage. Enrollment Periods You can enroll in Medicare for the first time during the Initial Enrollment Period (IEP). The IEP runs three months before the month of your 65th birthday through three months after. If you are still working and covered by your (or your spouse’s) employer’s group insurance when you turn 65, you will be eligible to enroll later when you retire. You have eight months to enroll in Medicare after your employment ends or after your group coverage ends, whichever comes first. If you miss your IEP window, you can enroll in Original Medicare during the next General Enrollment Period, which occurs Jan. 1 through March 31 each year. If you are enrolled in any type of Medicare plan, you can change or add plans, such as Medicare Part D, during the Annual Enrollment Period (AEP), Oct. 15 through Dec. 7, each year.

Lynn Specht, Licensed Sales and Service Representative, Medical Mutual Choosing a Plan “Once you understand your Medicare options, it is important to do a personal needs assessment to help you choose the plan that’s right for you,” Specht says. “Answering the following questions can help.” - What is your budget? Costs may include premiums for Medicare Part B medical insurance and premiums insurance companies charge for Part D prescription drug coverage. Plan premiums will vary by level of coverage and insurance provider. When considering total out-of-pocket costs, generally, the higher your monthly premiums, the lower your copays and deductibles will be. - Do you need prescription drug coverage? If you take prescription medications, then you will likely want to look at Part D prescription drug coverage. Original Medicare and Medicare Supplement plans do not include prescription drug coverage. Part D coverage is included with most Medicare Advantage plans or you can purchase a standalone Part D plan. - Which plans cover your doctors? Original Medicare and Medicare Supplement plans allow you to go to any doctor or hospital that accepts Medicare. Medicare Advantage plans have networks of providers, and some networks are broader than others. Check the network associated with each plan to make sure your physician or specialist is included. Additional Guidance For more information and answers to your Medicare questions, contact the official U.S. government website for Medicare (medicare. gov). You can also review the Social Security website (ssa.gov) or speak with a licensed Medical Mutual Medicare insurance professional at 1-866-406-8777 (TTY 711) Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.


Retirement Update 2019

Bigger and Better

LOCAL RETIREMENT COMMUNITIES ARE CONTINUING TO EXPAND AND ADD NEW AMENITIES By Corinne Minard

Rosedale Green in Covington, Kentucky, recently won a Business IMPACT Award from the Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce.

R

etirement living in the Tristate has continued to grow and expand throughout 2019. Many communities are adding new technology, expanding to new buildings and locations, or winning awards. Below is just a taste of what local facilities have been up to over the last couple months.

dents can take a class, try out a new piece of technology and ask questions. In addition, RoundTower has assisted in created a “smart apartment” for residents. Using the Internet of Things, things like automatic lights and wearable healthtracking devices can be set up to help residents live safer, healthier lives.

MAPLE KNOLL VILLAGE

MARJORIE P. LEE RETIREMENT COMMUNITY

Maple Knoll Village in Springdale is offering its residents technology classes so that they can learn how to use Amazon’s Alexa or an Apple Watch. The retirement facility has teamed up with RoundTower Technologies to provide this service. Called the Knowledge Bar and ServUS Lab, resi-

Marjorie P. Lee Retirement Community, which is located in Hyde Park and is part of Episcopal Retirement Services, is renovating its 55-year-old building. With the renovations, the community is reinvesting in memory support, short-term reha-

bilitation, long-term nursing care and new technology. The community raised $4.25 million towards the renovations, with contributions from 90 individuals, foundations and faith-based organizations.

CHESTERWOOD VILLAGE Chesterwood Village’s Advanced Therapy Center opened in April, offering residents use of the Motek Rysen System (which assists patients with balance, gait and mobility), cyber cycles, Hydroworx Therapy Pool and other new therapy treatments. In addition, the new center has an internet café and 24-hour restaurant-style dining. The $22 million facility has 75 rehabilitation suites and 50 long-term nursing suites. w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9

117


Retirement Update 2019 LANDING OF LONG COVE Brookdale Long Cove Pointe in Deerfield Township was acquired by Bridge Investment Group in September last year and has

been reamed the Landing of Long Cove. In addition to the new name, the retirement community has been renovated. Both the common areas and individual rooms were

2019 Senior Housing Trends According to The Senior List, a senior lifestyle website, there are nine trends we can expect to see in assisted living through the rest of the year. - More and more people will decide to age in place. Facilities that allow people to access the entire continuum of care will continue to be popular. - Memory care will step back in time. Facilities will use the sights, sounds and smells of the past to immerse residents as part of their therapy. - Residents will have more access to technology. - Expect to see automation in more residences. This includes administrative functions as well as tracking clinical data. - Co-housing will gain more traction. Co-housing offers seniors communal living while giving them individual spaces. - Facilities will go green. This will become more popular because it helps the environment and often reduces costs. - More social activities will be offered. Expect to see everything from group outings to museums to book clubs. - The demand for qualified health professionals will increase. - Living spaces will gain more amenities. More apartments will have features like walk-in closets and full kitchenettes.

updated. The facility has 46 assisted living studios, 15 one-bedroom apartments and 22 memory care rooms.

TRADITIONS AT NORTH BEND A new retirement community is expected to open on the west side later this summer. Called Traditions at North Bend, the 117unit community is neighbors with Mercy Health – West Hospital. The 96,000-squarefoot property will offer memory services, independent living and assisted living.

ROSEDALE GREEN Rosedale Green, located in Covington, won a Business IMPACT Award from the Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce this March. The awards are given out to companies who have made an impact on the Northern Kentucky community—Rosedale Green was honored for its innovation over the past year.

EPISCOPAL RETIREMENT SERVICES Episcopal Retirement Services, which owns Deupree House and Marjorie P. Lee,

Come visit a luxurious community with all the comforts of home. DISCOVER a senior living community

513-580-7442

you’ll love today and all your tomorrows.

118

J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

Independent Living | Assisted Living Skilled Nursing & Rehabilitation | AL #1888R 7300 Dearwester Dr. | Cincinnati, OH 45236 WWW.SENIORLIFESTYLE.COM


announced in March that it is planning to build a $9.1 million facility in Florence, its first development in Northern Kentucky. The community will offer 48 homes for low-income seniors and is expected to open in 2021.

RESOURCE DIRECTORY

OTTERBEIN SENIORLIFE The rebranded Otterbein SeniorLife (previously Otterbein Senior Lifestyle) continues to add new Neighborhoods in the area. The Neighborhoods offer skilled nursing care and long-term care in a home-like environment—residents have private suites in a small facility that also has communal spaces, like a kitchen, dining room and living room. Otterbein now has Neighborhoods in Loveland, Maineville, Middletown, Springboro and Union Township. In addition, Otterbein is in the midst of creating a master plan for the 1,200 acres surrounding its Lebanon campus. It’s looking at creating an intergenerational, mixed-use area, a new concept that mixes seniorswith other residents of all ages. n

Cedar Village Senior Living Community cedarvillage.org • 513-754-31003

You’re unique with a history worth celebrating. That’s why you need a senior living community that’s not like the rest. Welcome to Cedar Village, a full-service community close to home and family. We offer independent and assisted living, short-term rehabilitation, skilled nursing and memory care. Our caring staff at Cedar Village is always here to help. Continue to enhance your life, improve your health and engage your mind at Cedar Village!

The Christian Village at Mason christianvillages.org • 513-398-1486

Our staff is dedicated to helping residents enjoy a fulfilling, joyful lifestyle in a faith-filled community. Our 85-acre lakeside campus offers a full continuum of care: independent living Garden Homes, assisted living apartments, memory support and private short-term rehabilitation suites. While our campus provides a beautiful setting, we believe it’s our staff and our residents that truly make living here special. Call today to learn more!

INTRODUCING

Emerald Trace ON TURKEYFOOT

Come see Rosedale Green’s completed Household renovation!

Senior Care by Rosedale Green, trusted Skilled Nursing, Rehabilitation, and Memory Care in NKY. Offering two beautiful, innovative, forward Emerald Trace 859-342-0200 Rosedale Green 859-431-2244

thinking “household”

Emerald Trace breakthrough A NEW APPROACH TOaSENIOR CARE.

concept campuses!

design concept! w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9

119


Retirement Update 2019 RESOURCE DIRECTORY

The Christian Village at Mt. Healthy christianvillages.org • 513-931-5000

Our nonprofit, faith-based community provides exceptional integrated health services for older adults. Our approach to care is grounded in compassionate service and built upon a multidimensional approach; we call it Service From the Heart. Call today to learn more about our assisted living apartments, private short-term rehabilitation suites and our brand new Guardian Center for Memory Support opening soon!

Emerald Trace

Otterbein SeniorLife

Emerald Trace on Turkeyfoot, Senior Care by Rosedale Green offers short-term rehabilitation in a dedicated building with all private suites. With memory care and long-term skilled nursing care designed to duplicate the essence and environment of home, our Household design puts people first! Call today for more information.

Otterbein Senior Lifestyle Choices is a health and human health services ministry that has been serving southwestern Ohio for 104 years. In keeping with our United Methodist tradition, Otterbein seeks to enhance the quality of life and holistic growth of older persons. We believe as children of God, every individual has the right to a lifestyle of their own choosing no matter what type of care and support is needed.

emeraldtrace.org • 859-342-0200 x503

Otterbein Whether it's short-term rehabilitation from surgery, illness, or injury—or more long-term care solutions, Otterbein has the right plans and programs to meet your needs.

otterbein.org • 513-932-1054

The care you deserve, on your terms.

n Skilled Nursing Care n Physical Therapy n Memory Care

n Occupational Therapy n Rehabilitative Care n Speech Therapy n Long term Care

Visit Otterbein.org to contact the Otterbein near you! Union Township • Maineville • Loveland Springboro • Middletown • Lebanon 1 20

J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w. Clermont Ad.indd 1

maga zine.com

4/12/19 3:59 PM


Retirement Update 2019 RESOURCE DIRECTORY

Rosedale Green

Seasons

Rosedale Green has built a reputation for our steadfast commitment to quality and compassion. Rosedale’s skilled nursing and rehabilitation care is now delivered in a 21st century household setting after undergoing an extensive renovation. Our households are designed to duplicate the essence and environment of home. Call today for more information regarding our beautiful community 859-431-2244.

Nestled into 19 wooded acres in Kenwood, Seasons Retirement Community has been providing exceptional care to Cincinnati seniors since 1987. Whether enjoying an independent lifestyle, gaining the advantages of care in assisted living or rehabbing in our five-star skilled nursing unit, we have something for everyone. With a great dining plan overseen by our executive chef, a wide variety of entertainment and programs, and staff that feels like family, we look forward to welcoming you!

rosedalegreen.org • 859-431-2244

seniorlifestyle.com • 513-846-9524

Well-being is not just one thing,

IT’S EVERYTHING. Make your next move, your best move.

513-952-9963 Independent Living | Assisted Living Memory Care | Skilled Nursing & Rehabilitation AL License #1883 R 230 West Galbraith Road | Cincinnati, OH 45215 W W W. S E N I O R L I F E S T Y L E . C O M

122

J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com


Home

LAWN CARE

page 125

PEST CONTROL

page 126

w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9

123


Cincy Home

7 Tips for a Healthy Lawn This Summer By David Holthaus

A

thick, healthy lawn means fewer weeds and disease problems. No lawn is ever weed and disease free, but they can be minimized through proper practices. These tips are recommended by Natorp’s Nursery: • Mow higher rather than lower: Your lawn will be happier if you raise your mowing height. Lower mowing puts the lawn under constant stress. Maintaining lawn between 2 1/2 and 3 1/2 inches is recommended for most cool season grasses. • Never remove more than a third of the grass blades each time you mow and throw those clippings back into the turf: Grass blades are mostly water and about 10 to 15 percent nitrogen, so they break down quickly and return nitrogen back to the soil. • Sharpen the mower blade: Do this on a regular basis, as often as every 12 to 15 hours of use—or at least two or three times during the season. A sharp blade makes a clean cut rather than shredding or tearing the grass blades, which can make the lawn look yellow or brown, as well as susceptible to diseases. • Change directions each time you mow: Mow north to south one time, then east to west the next. It keeps your grass blades standing upright, rather than laying in one direction. • Core aerate the lawn: Pulling plugs out of the soil helps to open compacted soils and allow better air flow, water flow and nutrient flow to the roots. • Water as needed, and do it thoroughly: Most lawns would like one inch of rainfall every 10 days or so. If you need to supplement that inch, do it all at one time with a deep and thorough watering. • Feed the lawn as needed: Two feedings in the fall are the most important feedings for all cool season grasses. Spring or early summer feedings may be needed depending on the type of grass, as well as weather and soil conditions. n

w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9

125


Cincy Home

Here Come the Bugs THANKS TO A WET WINTER AND SPRING, THE TRISTATE COULD SEE MORE INSECTS THAN USUAL THIS SUMMER By David Holthaus

A

wet winter and spring could mean we’ll see more bugs around the home this summer. In late March, the National Pest Management Association released its bi-annual Bug Barometer, a seasonal forecast of pest activity expected in the regions of the country based on weather patterns and long-term predictions. According to the group’s team of entomologists, residual winter moisture

126

J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com

A mosquito bite


coupled with wet forecasts ahead will cause pest populations to spike early in much of the U.S. “While regions across the country were either unseasonably cold or warm this past winter, there’s one factor that almost all of them had in common—excessive moisture,” says Jim Fredericks, chief entomologist for the NPMA. In the Ohio Valley and Great Lakes, snowmelt due to warm spring conditions could cause flooding, leading to an increase in pest populations, says Michael Bentley, director of education and training for the National Pest Management Association. Excess moisture buildup can lead to standing water, which creates ideal breeding sites for mosquitoes, Bentley says. Additionally, dry summer conditions expected in the Great Lakes region could force earwigs and springtails indoors in search of water. He recommends reducing moisture to prevent pest infestations. He also recommends making sure basements and attics

are well-ventilated, and repairing any leaking faucets, water pipes and air conditioning units. Also, diverting water away from the property with properly functioning downspouts, gutters and splash blocks is important. To keep the property tick-free, he suggests keeping grass cut low, eliminating overgrown vegetation or brush, especially

along wooded property lines, and removing woodpiles and debris that can attract and shelter pests. Additionally, homeowners should be sure to inspect the outside of the home for potential entry points, especially around areas where utility pipes enter the home. Use an appropriate sealant to address any cracks, crevices or gaps. n

w w w.

m a g a z i n e . c o m : : J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9

127


Love Cincy

Katy Rucker Art Director and Photographer

128

J U N E /J U LY 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com


Profile for Cincy Magazine

Cincy Magazine: June/July 2019  

Cincy Magazine: June/July 2019  

Profile for cincyflip
Advertisement