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PROST! IT’S OKTOBERFEST TIME

EXCLUSIVE: U.S. ATTORNEY BEN GLASSMAN SECOND CHANCE HIRING: NEHEMIAH MANUFACTURING

100+ Schools Ranked

PLUS:

AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2019 VOLUME 16

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ISSUE 4

$3.99

magazine.com

Private Schools Guide


Contents

The Magazine for Business Professionals

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Best Schools 2019 PAGE 38

View 4 Publisher’s BY ERIC HARMON 6 Contributors 7 Digital Exclusives Cincy 8 Inside A preview of the newly expanded

31 Guide to Gaming

Goettafest, inside the Western & Southern Open, and behind the numbers of Labor Day.

BEST SCHOOLS It’s time for our annual guide to the region’s education offerings. Read on for our ranked list, private school guide, educational programs, outstanding educators and profiles of several of the Tristate’s private schools.

38 Rankings 45 Programs 47 Outstanding Educators

11 Scene CINCY LIVE

22 Prost! It’s Oktoberfest Time!

A wealth of options showcases Ohio’s diverse casino scene. BY NOAH TONG

36 Dining

The Tristate celebrates its German heritage with many festivals throughout August, September and October. BY CORINNE MINARD

24 A&E Calendar 2

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Lobsta Bakes of Maine brings authentic New England flavors from over 1,000 miles away. BY KEVIN MICHELL

2019

51 Private School Guide 62 St. Gertrude School 64 Badin High School 65 McNicholas High School 66 Royalmont Academy


COMMUNIT Y

68 Reflections on Leadership

One local nonprofit is creating a middle class in Guatemala. BY DAN HURLEY

View 70 Another Is it time to re-brand the

Ronald Reagan Highway? BY DON MOONEY

71 Guest Column

Great Oaks adapts to better serve incoming generations and new businesses. BY HARRY SNYDER, PRESIDENT/CEO OF GREAT OAKS CAREER CAMPUSES

BUSINESS Chances Made 76 Second Possible

Nehemiah Manufacturing embraces second-chance hiring. BY KEVIN MICHELL

Lawyers for Local 78 Local Growth

LIVE WELL CINCY

90 Are the Kids Alright?

Mental health a top topic in pediatrics, but comprehensive care is the goal. BY LIZ ENGEL

and Fast 96 Convenience Service

The MidWest Eye Center now has nearly a dozen locations to serve patients quickly. BY ERIC SPANGLER

Wood Herron & Evans maintains its status as a prominent local IP firm without betraying its independence. BY KEVIN MICHELL

79 Guide to Team Building

HOME

100 Homes for Empty Nesters

72 License to Prosecute

U.S. Attorney Benjamin Glassman is the man behind “The Spy Who Paid Me” and other cases you might have missed in Cincinnati. BY PETER BRONSON

Ranch homes with no yard maintenance are popular with baby boomers. BY ERIC SPANGLER

Companies, corporations and businesses in the Greater Cincinnati area focus on team building to build engagement with employees. BY KEELY BROWN

in Business 86 Best Calendar & Directory

104 Love Cincy

Cincy (ISSN-1934-8746) published in February/March; April/May; June/July; August/September; October/November; December/January for a total of six issues by Cincy, 30 Garfield Place, Cincinnati, OH 45202. Periodicals postage paid at Cincinnati, Ohio, and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Cincy, 30 Garfield Place, Suite 440, Cincinnati, OH 45202. w w w.

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Publisher’s View

Lessons to Learn J

ust last month in reading the Cincinnati Enquirer I came to better appreciate the feeling of the “Ol Bait and Switch.” It was reported that the city was facing a budget shortfall of $1.2 million on the streetcar. What was proposed, and approved by city council was upping the already astronomical parking ticket fees to shore up the difference. As a local business owner in the city it’s always been a point of pride that we stay downtown. We continue to see positive things happening, from the general resurgence in Over-the-Rhine and the Banks to the soon-be-happening changes in Newport and new concert venues. Being downtown is also valuable when attracting creative talent since we’re so close to the action, the arts and the culture. It’s been my assumption that having a streetcar only adds to that value for the “creative class.” I hate to admit this, but I pay roughly $500 a year or more in parking ticket fees to the city because, well, I’m lazy. If I have any sliver of justification, it’s that I consider this the price of doing business downtown, going in and out of meetings daily with businesses. I am usually running just a little late making my stay longer than what I have paid for at the meter. Being a bit late can hurt quite a bit, though, for the folks who come from across the region to our company headquarters for committee meetings. It’s not uncommon to hear stories about being late by just 10 minutes and getting stuck with a $55 parking ticket from one of these non-city parking enforcement employees. I can only assume they are commission based or get bonuses for the numbers they pull in. I can’t blame them for being proactive—we all have to make a buck, right? Where I cry foul is this switch to the parking ticket additional fees to cover the streetcar. The streetcar obviously is not hitting its projected rider rate—anyone who drives downtown can attest to seeing many where the only rider is the driver upfront. This budget shortfall is to now fall on the backs of the businesses that were promised they would burgeon with this

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Locally, veteran and family owned Editor & Publisher Eric Harmon Managing Editor Corinne Minard Associate Editors Kevin Michell, Eric Spangler Contributing Writers Peter Bronson, Liz Engel, Bill Ferguson Jr., Dan Hurley, Don Mooney, Harry Snyder Editorial Interns Keely Brown, Noah Tong Creative Director Guy Kelly Art Director Katy Rucker Digital Content Coordinator Danielle Cain Photographer Joe Simon

new form of transportation. And with this being the Best Schools issue, I want to put this parking debacle in terms of how it affects our region’s educational institutions. Cincinnati Public Schools was the nation’s first large school district to offer lunches to students, starting in 1898. It serves 5.5 million lunches and 3 million breakfasts annually, including citywide summer programs. This program is award winning and serves the common good, more than I confidently can say the streetcar does. According to CPS, an elementary lunch costs $1.75. This $1.2 million shortfall amount could supply 685,714 lunches. To add insult to injury, the city’s reported backlog of unpaid parking tickets in the last five years is $10.3 million and there is little effort currently in place to win back these dollars. To recover this amount would cover CPS lunches for roughly a year. My father used to say that good decisions only get better. He also used to say that bad decisions only get worse. Maybe we as a city still have some lessons to learn.

Associate Publisher Rick Seeney Custom Sales Manager Brad Hoicowitz Advertising Director Abbey Cummins Account Executives Lori Gregorski, Anthony Rhoades Inside Sales Katelynn Webb Advertising & Circulation Manager Laura Federle Operations & Finance Manager Tammie Collins Events Director Stephanie Simon Events Coordinator Amanda Watt Production Manager Keith Ohmer Cincy on the web: www.cincymagazine.com Cincy Co. LLC Cincinnati Club Building 30 Garfield Place, Suite 440 Cincinnati, OH 45202 Contact Cincy: information@cincymagazine.com or call (513) 421-2533. Go to www.cincymagazine.com to get your complimentary subscription to Cincy.


Contributors

Cincy Magazine contributing editor Peter Bronson is an author, editor, publisher and owner of Chilidog Press LLC. He is a former reporter, columnist and editor at The Cincinnati Enquirer, The Tucson Citizen and other newspapers in Arizona and Michigan.

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Liz Engel is a business writer, runner and once-upon-a-time volleyballer who found her way back to the Queen City following stints in North Carolina and Tennessee. She’s spent more than a decade covering topics like health care, transit and entrepreneurship.

Bill Ferguson Jr. is a writer/editor/ communications consultant who has spent 40-plus years as an editor and reporter for six newspapers, beginning at age 14 as a sports reporter for his hometown daily.

Dan Hurley is a local historian and the president of Applied History Associates, which works with museums and historical societies throughout the Eastern U.S.

Don Mooney is a Cincinnati attorney, a past member of the Cincinnati Planning Commission and active in local politics.

Joe Simon is a Cincinnati native but travels back and forth from Cincinnati and Chicago. He’s a freelance photographer and been shooting since 1997. He’s been a regular contributor to Cincy Magazine and The Cincinnati Enquirer.

For more than two decades Harry Snyder, president and CEO (superintendent) of Great Oaks Career Campuses, has been committed to ensuring that youth and adults are prepared with the competitive skills necessary for economic growth. In 2014, the Great Oaks Board of Directors named Harry its fifth president and CEO. He is responsible for four campuses and career training for over 19,000 youth and 18,000 adults from 36 school districts.

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Web Exclusives TOP 5 ONLINE STORIES 1 2019 Rating the Burbs by Bill Ferguson Jr. 2 7 Tips for a Healthy Lawn This Summer by David Holthaus 3 Magical Michigan by Eric Spangler 4 River City Getaway by Corinne Minard 5 Will Nicholas Sandmann be Clark Kent’s Kryptonite? by Peter Bronson

TOP INSTA POST

DIALOGUE Liz Engel @_LizEngel Cincinnati’s Pride parade and festival is tomorrow. If you want to do some reading before the celebration, check out this custom pub from @CincyMagazine! VonLehman @VonLehman VonLehman is a proud sponsor of the @CincyMagazine #MANNYAwards. Our own Ryan Redleski was there last Thursday evening to announce the winners of New Product #Development & #Innovation. Congratulations to Xact Medical, Inc. and @MelinkCorp1! #VLCPA #Manufacturing #Distribution

Want to be featured in our Instagram stories? Follow us at @cincymagazine and

LIVE

use our hashtag #LoveCincy! Show us what makes you love this city!

It’s time to get ready for the many summer events that make Cincy the place to be! Check out Cincy. Live to find out what’s on the calendar!

Will Jones @Aryeznow We tried the oysters and the crawfish tails and maaaannnnn, it slapped fire, lol! Check out my write up on #swampwatergrill in @CincyMagazine Cincinnati Cares @CincinnatiCares What’s new at #CincinnatiCares? Doug Bolton, President and CEO, has the scoop. His recent features in @CincyMagazine will keep you up to date with our newest ventures!

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InsideCincy

Goetta Have It LOCAL FESTIVAL EXPANDS TO TWO WEEKENDS TO CELEBRATE ALL THINGS GOETTA By Keely Brown

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oetta—a German-inspired dish made of pork, beef, oats and seasonings—is a true Cincinnati classic and will be celebrated this summer in a big way. Glier’s Goettafest, an annual festival featuring the locally revered cuisine, is expanding into an eight-day event over two weekends. This year’s festival will take place at Newport’s Festival Park on the Levee July 25-28 and Aug. 1-4. The first Goettafest was originally a thank you party for customers, says Kerry Schall, marketing director and special events coordinator at Glier’s Meats, Inc. The small goetta gathering was a big hit and the event gradually evolved into what it is today. “We just couldn’t believe the support that the community had for this festival,” says Schall. “The next year, it became much more of a production and it has grown and grown ever since.” Almost 20 years later, Goettafest is no longer a small party for goetta fanatics— the event hosted over 200,000 people in 2018 and Schall estimates over 300,000 festivalgoers will attend the double-weekend celebration this year. Admission to Goettafest is free, and attendees can enjoy delicious food, live music, dancing and goetta-themed games. The festival features 10 vendors who are required to follow Goettafest’s strict food policy. These rules allow culinary artists three goetta items, two non-goetta items and one dessert. No duplicates are permit8

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ABOVE: Goettafest takes place on the Newport Riverfront. LEFT: Each of the 10 food vendors will be serving three specialty goetta items.

ted on individual menus, enabling chefs to demonstrate their creativity and showcase their specialties. Each vendor cooks up goetta recipes with a special twist for festivalgoers to sample. Every item has a max of $6 so attendees are able to sample everything at a reasonable price, says Schall. “There’s always something different for someone to try—with over 45 items, you can come all eight days and probably not eat everything,” says Schall. “There’s a lot of options to choose from.” If the food doesn’t convince you to head down to the Levee, the music will. Goettafest will host over 30 different country and rock artists. These bands—featuring local favorites Hi-Fi Honey, Swan and the Tyler Moore Band—will perform on two stages all weekend long. “A lot of the other festivals around don’t

have country music, so we bring that music for the big country crowd in Cincinnati,” says Schall. Goettafest is a family-friendly event with plenty of activities for kids including a goetta toss and history booth, bounce houses, hamster balls, balloon darts, face painting, dunk tanks and more. The festival also features the world’s only goetta vending machine. And that’s not all— Glier’s Meats gives back to the community as well. “All proceeds from these games go to charity,” says Schall. “We make those very reasonable. A kid can come in to play games for $1. It’s a lot of fun and it’s really a great atmosphere for families.” Although goetta may be an odd meat mixture for some, it’s a culinary creation that brings many local families and friends together. “I’ve actually had people cry and hug me because of how goetta has touched them in their lives,” says Schall. “It’s neat the way that Cincinnati just embraces this product, our festival and the things that we do.” n


Q&A

4 Questions with Western & Southern Open’s Andre Silva TOURNAMENT DIRECTOR AND CEO HOSTS TENNIS SUPERSTARS IN THE QUEEN CITY By Noah Tong

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or the last three years, Andre Silva has overseen the largest professional tennis competition in Cincinnati. Silva ensures the event’s vision aligns with customer expectations. This year’s event will take place from Saturday, Aug. 10, to Sunday, Aug. 18. We spoke with Silva to learn more.

DID YOU GROW UP AROUND TENNIS? WHAT SPARKED YOUR PASSION OF TENNIS, AND WHY DO YOU CHOOSE TO WORK IN THE TENNIS INDUSTRY? I started playing tennis when I was 9. I’m originally from Brazil. My father played, he’s the one who got the bug and gave it to my brother and I. Tennis has given me everything. It’s given me an education here in the U.S.—my brother and I played in college together. Tennis has been in our blood. I’ve been around the game for a while and I love it.

WHY DO YOU THINK W&S OPEN IS SUCH A SPECIAL EVENT FOR CINCINNATI? I think there are a couple things. We have gotten the support of the players that come in every year. Seeing the list of champions that come to play is quite amazing. That is not something everyone has in the world of tennis, or even in sports, where you can say the top of the top is coming to

play in your town. This event also has the feel of Cincinnati. We make sure to provide Midwest hospitality and that people feel comfortable here and feel safe. I think that’s a great combo.

WHAT’S THE ROLE INTERNS AND VOLUNTEERS PLAY WHEN PUTTING ON A HUGE EVENT LIKE THIS? We probably cou ld n’t be where we are today without the volunteers and the interns. We have a staff of 14 people, which as you can imagine at a tournament of this size, 14 people is not enough. So, they play a very important role. One thing that is unique from an intern perspective is we give them a lot of latitude to let them to make their own decisions. They know where we need to go, they know what we need to achieve, but the experience is not only to listen and absorb, but really do more than that and take a leadership role.

WHAT MIGHT YOU SAY TO THE INDIVIDUALS OR FAMILIES WHO MAY BE LOOKING FOR SOMETHING TO DO, BUT DON’T HAVE MUCH EXPOSURE TO TENNIS? There’s more than tennis. First of all, there’s entertainment throughout all the grounds. You have fans playing, different

[activities] from partners and you can see players practicing and having a great time. At the same time, even if you haven’t had exposure to the game of tennis live, tennis is one of those sports that once you see live you really appreciate. I challenge anyone who comes and watches superstars play to not say that what they do is impressive. Come and enjoy everything and give tennis a chance because you will leave impressed. n w w w.

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By the Numbers

Celebrating America’s Workers L

abor Day weekend is traditionally thought to be the end of summer break, with family gatherings, picnics and fireworks. The labor movement created the holiday to celebrate the social and economic achievements of American workers. The first governmental recognition of the holiday came through municipal ordinances in 1885 and 1886, then through states, with Oregon the first in 1887. Congress passed an act June 28, 1894, making the first Monday in September of each year a legal holiday nationally. (Research by Bill Ferguson Jr.)

1.07 MILLION

5 LARGEST GREATER

1882 The year, on Sept. 5, that the first “labor day” was celebrated, in New York City, in accordance with the plans of the Central Labor Union, featuring a parade of unions and a picnic that drew an estimated 25,000 union members and families.

MEMBERS O F CINCINNATI EMPLOYERS L A B O R (BY REGIONAL EMPLOYEES) UNIONS, IN 2018, IN OHIO 21,263 (639,000), KENTUCKY (161,000) AND INDIANA (269,000) 3 LARGEST INDUSTRIES**

15,429

GREATER CINCINNATI TRADE, TRANSPORTATION & UTILITIES

(221,100) (175,900) (172,700)

PROFESSIONAL & BUSINESS SERVICES

EDUCATION & HEALTH SERVICES

**NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES, AS OF MAY 10

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12,682 12,000

UNEMPLOYMENT RATES*

OHIO: 4.1% KENTUCKY: 4% INDIANA: 3.6% CINCINNATI: 2.9%

*as of May, except Cincinnati, as of April

11,241

10,835,200

Payroll employees in Ohio, Kentucky and Indiana, as of May

Sources: U.S. Department of Labor; U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics; REDI Cincinnati


SCENE

MANNY Awards

Cincy Magazine hosted the 13th annual MANNY Awards June 13 at JACK Casino downtown. The MANNY Awards recognize the manufacturing industry’s greatest accomplishments and, in doing so, honor local companies for their innovation and best practices. This year, the Lifetime Achievement Award was awarded posthumously to Gilbert Richards, founder of Richards Industries. The event was sponsored by VonLehman CPA & Advisory Firm, EGC Design/Build, Commerce Bank and Wood Herron & Evans. The community sponsors were Clermont County Department of Community and Economic Development, Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber and NKY Chamber of Commerce. 1 About 200 people attended the event. 2 Dan von Allmen, Andrew Cothrel, Robert Dunki-Jacobs, Emily von Allmen and John Hart 3 Kristin Leadingham and Janessa Huffman 4 Spencer Mapes 5 Michele Mischler and Chad Martin 6 Jodi Bertram and Dawn Juriga

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Scene Cedar Village Senior Living Book Creation Cedar Village Senior Living recently celebrated the culmination of work started in 2016 with the publication of its residentcreated book, Follow Me Beyond the Tree. Resident Life Coordinator Nancy Kirkham and art therapist Jessica Sebastian worked with residents to brainstorm, write and illustrate the story that takes inspiration from the community. The project was funded by the Harkavy Fund, which was created in 2005 in memory of Frank Harkavy to enrich the lives of the residents of Cedar Village Senior Living through special programs, classes and activities through art and music.

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1 The cover of Follow Me Beyond the Tree 2 Jessica Sebastian and Nancy Kirkham 3 Residents worked together to create the book’s artwork. 4 Jessica Sebastian reading the book with a resident. 3

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Stay up to date on the

Arts, Entertainment & Culture in the Greater Cincy Area, visit: cincymagazine.com

End the silence. Stop the stigma. 513.449.8415 ChallengeOfHope.org

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Patriot Cup The 2019 Patriot Cup, the fifth annual clay shooting event held May 17 by BBB’s Center for Ethics at the Sycamore Sportsman’s Club, had several individual attendees and registered squads put their sharpshooting skills to the test to help support the center’s programs. The center works to foster the future of the marketplace by providing scholarship opportunities for high school students, training initiatives for open-minded workers and acknowledgement for organizations with ethical operations.

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1 The team from Basement Doctor 2 Ken Anton, Valley Refrigeration, was the highest male shooter. 3 Shanon Hegarty, McCain and Associates, was the highest female shooter. 4 Lunch was included with the event. 5 Dino Costanzo and the Nationwide Insurance team were the winning team. 3

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Scene Cincinnati SneakerBall The second annual Cincinnati SneakerBall was held May 10 at the Cincinnati Museum Center at Union Terminal. Presented by Bigger Than Sneakers, Inc. (BTS) and powered by Corporate sneaker boutique, Cincinnati SneakerBall is a celebration of sneaker culture featuring art, live music, a silent auction and the opportunity to connect with top professionals, influencers and sports figures in the city. This year’s Cincinnati SneakerBall helped further BTS’ mission in the community by supporting the Children’s Hospital Charitable Care Fund. 1 Guests were asked to pair sneakers with their formal evening wear. 2 The event raised funds for the Children’s Hospital Charitable Care Fund. 3 The event is always held on the Friday before Mother’s Day. 4 The event celebrates sneaker culture for charity. 5 The event was held within Union Terminal. 6 The best attire and sneaker combinations received SneakerBall King and Queen trophies.

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Helping with challenges you didn’t even know you had. When you’re busy conducting business, it’s easy to get hung up on hidden obstacles that delay your growth. That’s why we offer solutions to help keep you successful, from streamlining your cash flow to financing options and beyond. We’re committed to handling every challenge that faces your business, and we’ll keep innovating so you can keep an eye on the big picture.

513.881.5571 commercebank.com © 2019 Commerce Bancshares, Inc.

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o education o experience o results

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Scene Ohio Manufacturing Summit On May 16, Ohio Business and Cincy magazines hosted the second annual Ohio Manufacturing Summit at Centre Park of West Chester. The event brought together a panel of the region’s most qualified thought leaders to share their insights into talent-related challenges. The event was moderated by Knox Machinery’s Greg Knox and the event panelists were Andreas Brockman, Festo Didatic; Dean Kales, Grob Machining Systems; Debby Combs, Partners for a Competitive Workforce; and Robin Rutschilling, Clippard Instrument Laboratory Inc. The event was sponsored by VonLehman CPA & Advisory Firm, EGC Design/Build, Commerce Bank and Great Oaks Career Campuses. The community partner was Tri-State Tooling & Manufacturing Association. 1 Moderator Greg Knox and panelists Andreas Brockman, Festo Didatic; Dean Kales, Grob Machining Systems; Debby Combs, Partners for a Competitive Workforce; and Robin Rutschilling, Clippard Instrument Laboratory Inc. 2 Randy Cloran, Joe Besl and Ken Baker 3 Traci Spencer, Paul Collura and Maura Korn 4 Laura Sage, Emily Larsh and Debby Combs 5 Michael Carr and Todd Marallen

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FAIR TRADE

RUG EVENT September 18–22

in The Shops at Harper’s Point

September 24–28 in O’Bryonville Classic to Contemporary

handknotted, heirloom-quality Tribal, Bokhara and Persian rugs From 2’x3’ to 10’x14’

Quality You Desire, Fairne ss Artisans Deserve Preview rugs and more info at: rugs.tenthousandvillages.com


Scene Great Oaks Signing Day This year Great Oaks Career Campuses and other area career-technical schools honored graduating students with Signing Days as they committed to employers and prepared to begin the career for which they’re certified. Signing Day took place in May at all four Great Oaks career campuses. Hundreds of parents, employers and students gathered as 273 seniors committed to area employers. From health care to automotive technology to veterinary assisting and more, students from 12 career programs stepped on stage to begin their journey.

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1 A Great Oaks student signed with Cooper Electric. 2 Signing Day at Laurel Oaks 3 Several Great Oaks Live students signed with a technology company. 4 Several students at Scarlet Oaks signed with Honda.

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SAVE THE DATE

10.17.19 Cincinnati Music Hall

at Grainworks Brewing Company

Vendor market. Upcycle design competition. Live art displays. Live music. FREE general admission.

Learn more at RetroFittings.org

Benefiting St. Vincent de Paul - Cincinnati

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VIP tickets & sponsorship opportunities starting at $50. oppo For more information, to RSVP, or to register as a vendor or crafter visit thank you to our habitatcincinnati.org/madeit media sponsor:


Cincinnati Royal Ball The first annual Cincinnati Royal Ball was held June 15-16 (Father’s Day Weekend) at The Friars Club. The event was designed to provide networking and charitable opportunities through competitive basketball. The Cincinnati Royal Ball also showcased basketball-related companies on the sidelines. Local vendors had the opportunity to share their products with over 700-plus spectators and this year’s event contributed over $10,000 to The Friars Club.

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1 Founder of the event, Professional Overseas player and Former Princeton Vikings Mark Dorris Jr. with the ball and Jordan Sibert #18 (Blue) Current Atlanta Hawks NBA Player. 2 This event featured 30-plus professional basketball players from the area. 3 The Friars Club was the featured charitable organization.

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Scene Art of Making Memories More than 500 guests crowded the pavilion level of JACK Cincinnati Casino, helping raise nearly $200,000 for the Alzheimer’s Association of Greater Cincinnati at the annual Art of Making Memories spring benefit on May 16. Guests enjoyed dinner, beer and wine, live entertainment and the opportunity to view and bid on Memories in the Making artwork and other auction items. Inspired by the Alzheimer’s Association’s Memories in the Making art program, the benefit featured the work of individuals in the early to middle stages of Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias through a special exhibit. Local12 anchor and health reporter Liz Bonis was program emcee. 1 1 Liz Bonis and Jim Scott 2 Mo the ALZephant with Jim and Donna Leer 3 Bengals mascot Who Dey stopped by to hangout with party guests. 4 Warm98.5’s Amanda Orlando and Jim Day were the celebrity auctioneers. 5 Alzheimer’s Association of Greater Cincinnati Executive Director Paula Kollstedt and Jeff Smith 6 Guests were invited to bid on Memories in the Making artwork and other auction items.

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OKTOBERFEST

LIVE!

page 22

A&E CALENDAR

page 24

GUIDE TO GAMING

page 31

DINING

page 36

The Ohio Renaissance Festival is Aug. 31-Oct. 27 this year.

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Prost!

It’s Oktoberfest Time!

THE TRISTATE CELEBRATES ITS GERMAN HERITAGE WITH MANY FESTIVALS THROUGHOUT AUGUST, SEPTEMBER AND OCTOBER By Corinne Minard

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all is Oktoberfest season in Cincinnati. When the end of August hits, locals pull out their lederhosen, find their favorite stein and get ready to take in their fill of bratwursts, pretzels and beer. And thanks to our region’s German heritage, you can partake in this festival on almost any weekend starting in August and through October. But which one is right for you? Our guide to this year’s festivals gives you a taste of the region’s many Oktoberfests so you don’t miss out on one of the Tristate’s favorite events.

‘n’ roll. 2 p.m.-12 a.m. Free. Nelson Sayler Memorial Park, 6600 Gracely Drive, Cincinnati. saylerpark.org/sayler-park-oktoberfest/.

OKTOBERFEST ZINZINNATI

The Germania Society of Cincinnati kicks off the season with its 49th annual Oktoberfest Aug. 23-25. According to the Germania Society, it is the most authentic Oktoberfest in the region, with live German music all weekend, imported German merchandise, German food and, of course, German beer. The festival is known for its classics like the sauerkraut balls and Oktoberfest chicken, but it’s also adding something new this year with the addition of carnival rides. F 6 p.m.12 a.m., Sa 2 p.m.-12 a.m., Su 12-8 p.m. $5, 12 and under free, parking free. Germania Park, 3529 W. Kemper Road, Cincinnati. germaniasociety.com/Oktoberfest.

The largest party of the season is, of course, the largest Oktoberfest in the country: Oktoberfest Zinzinnati. Held Sept. 20-22 this year, the event takes over Second and Third streets between Walnut and Elm streets downtown. This is the event where everything feels big—there are nine beirgartens featuring more than 100 beers after all. Oktoberfest Zinzinnati also hosts the world’s largest Chicken Dance; the Running of the Weiners, which has more than 100 dachshunds race each other; live entertainment on multiple stages; and plenty of food. Last year, 650,000 people attended the event. F 5-11 p.m., Sa 11 a.m.-11 p.m., Su 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Free. Downtown Cincinnati on Second and Third streets between Walnut and Elm streets. oktoberfestzinzinnati.com.

SAYLER PARK OKTOBERFEST

NEWPORT OKTOBERFEST

For a more intimate event that’s focused on music, head to Sayler Park Aug. 24 for the third annual Sayler Park Oktoberfest. Created by Howard Hughes, a member of local band Zinzinnati Beirband, the day features beer, sauerkraut, brats, metts, strudel, creampuffs and plenty of dancing in Sayler Park. The Zinzinnati Beirband will perform everything from traditional polka to rock

Those looking for a traditional feel should head to the southern side of the river Sept. 27-29 for Newport Oktoberfest. The entire event is held under a tent, just like the traditional Oktoberfest beer tents. In addition to the beer (which features varieties from local favorites like Moerlein and Braxton) and food, the day also includes stick horse racing, a beer stein holding competition and a log

GERMANIA SOCIETY OKTOBERFEST

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Oktoberfest Zinzinnati sawing competition. F 5-11 p.m., Sa noon-11 p.m., Su noon-9 p.m. Free. Newport Festival Park, Riverboat Row, Newport. cincinnatifestivalsandevents.com/newport-oktoberfest.

ST. AGNES OKTOBERFEST St. Agnes Parish in Fort Wright, Kentucky, celebrates Oktoberfest with a familyfriendly festival Sept. 27-29 on its parish grounds. Each day includes food and drinks, games suitable for attendees of all ages, festival rides and live music. This year’s bands include Doghouse, DV8 and the Derek Alan Band. F 6 p.m.-midnight, Sa 5 p.m.-midnight, Su 3-9 p.m. Free. St. Agnes Parish, 1680 Dixie Highway, Fort Wright, Kentucky. events.saintagnes.com.

DONAUSCHWABEN OKTOBERFEST The last Oktoberfest of the year happens in Colerain Township Oct. 4-6. The 27th annual Donauschwaben Oktoberfest will celebrate German culture with live entertainment from Europe, more than 25 imported and domestic beers on draft, homemade meals like pit-roasted Bavarian pig and stuffed cabbage, and more. The Cincinnati Donauschwaben Society itself was created to preserve and share its members’ German heritage. More information to come. Cincinnati Donauschwaben Society, 4290 Dry Ridge Road, Cincinnati. cincydonau.com. n


From dinosaurs and caves to spacecraft and steamships, there’s always something exciting. Visit today!

cincymuseum.org


AUGUST

SUNDAY

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MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

1 [8/1] Country act Florida Georgia Line is joined by Dan + Shay and Morgan Wallen for a show at Riverbend.

2 [8/2] Chart-topping alternative artists Beck and Cage the Elephant bring their national tour to Riverbend.

3 [8/3] Kayak, canoe or paddleboard your way down the Ohio River during the 2019 Paddlefest.

4 5 [8/1-4] Explore the tables of 100 vendors in MainStrasse Village during the 127 Yard Sale.

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7

8 [8/8] JJ Grey & Mofro, a Southern soul rock band from Florida, brings its distinctive sound to Riverbend.

9 [8/9] Country music singer-songwriter Thomas Rhett plays Riverbend for the evening.

10 [8/10] Santana celebrates the 20th anniversary of his album Supernatural with a tour stop at Riverbend.

11 12 [8/10-18] The world’s best tennis players head to Cincinnati for the Western & Southern Open.

13

[8/7] Multi-platinum rock band Breaking Benjamin will play songs from its newest album EMBER at Riverbend. 14

15 [8/15] Ault Park gets one more party in before school starts with its August Summer Music Festival.

16 [8/16-18] The empowering My Black Family Reunion brings together families and the community for three days of fun.

17 [8/17] American rapper Joey Bada$$ will be joined by Flatbush Zombies for a show at Riverbend.

18 19 [8/18] Get ready for a night of hard rock at Riverbend when KoRn and Alice in Chains come to town.

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22 23 [8/22] Special guests Kane Brown and Carly Pearce will join Jason Aldean for a show at Riverbend.

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25 26 [8/25] Pop sensation Why Don’t We stops by Riverbend with its latest hit “8 Letters.”

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28 [Through 9/2] The Burning Man art exhibit “No Spectators” celebrates creativity at the Cincinnati Art Museum.

29 30 [8/29] KISS brings its final tour, the End of the Road tour, to Riverbend for the night.

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A&E Calendar Paddle Away The nation’s largest paddling event, Ohio River Paddlefest, promises another day of fun on the river. More than 2,200 people participate in this annual event, traveling 9 miles of the river in canoe, kayak or other human-powered craft. Paddlelovers can participate in the Race to the Roebling, the Nati/ NKY Nine Mile or just paddle recreationally. Funds from the events help support outdoor recreation opportunities for 22 area high schools. Aug. 3. 6:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Price varies depending on activity. Put-in at Schmidt Recreation Complex, 2944 Humbert Ave., Cincinnati. 513-235-9700, ohioriverpaddlefest.org.

Shop to help save lives from cancer

Come shop the American Cancer Society Discovery Shop for upscale clothing, jewelry, household items, and more. What will you discover at 454 Ohio Pike Suite 70, Cincinnati, OH 45255? Find us on Facebook @ACSDiscoveryshopCincy

cancer.org/discovery | 1.800.227.2345 Š2019 American Cancer Society, Inc. No. 072170

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A&E Calendar Country Takeover Country music singer/songwriter Thomas Rhett is joined by fellow performers Dustin Lynch, Russell Dickerson and Rhett Atkins for a show at Riverbend. He’ll be playing songs from his four studio albums as well as his new single, “Remember You Young.” Aug. 9. 7 p.m. Tickets start at $89. Riverbend Music Center, 6295 Kellogg Ave., Cincinnati. 513-232-5882, riverbend.org.

A four-year college degree is not the only pathway to a successful career. Travel across Ohio to explore innovative programs linking education and the world of work.

September 5 | 8pm www.cincy-americangraduate.org

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An Island Escape The summer may be ending, but the party doesn’t have to stop. The Tony-winning musical Once On This Island is bringing its Calypso flair to Playhouse in the Park for the fall. Follow Ti Moune, a peasant girl who falls in love with a wealthy boy and must then go against the gods to win him back. Sept. 7-Oct. 6. Times vary. Prices vary. Playhouse i n t he Park , 962 Mt . Adam s Circle, Cincinnati. 513-421-3888, cincyplay.com.

Host Your Event* by September 30, 2019 & receive a

FREE Teambuilding Upgrade! Contact our Group Sales Department at 859-652-7250 or sales@axisalleylevee.com *Event must be booked through group sales. Event must take place by September 30, 2019.Must have a food and beverage package booked. Based upon availability.

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SEPTEMBER

SUNDAY

MONDAY

1 [9/1] Riverfest ends summer with a bang thanks to its Rozzi’s fireworks show.

2

8 [9/8] The Head and the Heart brings new and old songs, including new single “Mixed Connection,” to Riverbend.

9

15 [9/13-15] Hamilton’s Renee Elise Goldsberry joins the Cincinnati Pops for an evening of Broadway, pop and soul. 22 [9/22] Willie Nelson will be joined by Bonnie Raitt, Luke Combs and others for the Outlaw Music Festival at Riverbend.

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WEDNESDAY 4

THURSDAY 5

FRIDAY 6 [9/6] Singer-songwriter Amos Lee brings his newest album, My New Moon, to the Taft Theatre.

10

SATURDAY 7 [9/6-8] The Cincinnati Pops will take audiences to a galaxy far far away when it plays the score of Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back. 14 [8/31-10/27] The Ohio Renaissance Festival returns for its 30th season.

11 [9/11] English singer Adam Ant takes Cincinnati back to the ‘80s with a show at the Taft Theatre.

12 [9/12] Head to the Taft Theatre for an evening of indie folk music when Lord Huron comes to town.

13 [9/13] Gladys Knight, of “Midnight Train to Georgia” fame, stops by the Taft Theatre.

17 16 [9/16] The unlikely pairing of blink-182 and Lil Wayne puts on a one-of-a-kind show at Riverbend.

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19

20 [9/20-22] Oktoberfest Zinzinnati, America’s largest Oktoberfest, takes over downtown once again.

21 [9/21] Fire Up the Night at Coney Island brings international competitors together to create amazing fireworks displays.

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25

26 [9/26] Comedian Kathleen Madigan brings her newest set to the Taft Theatre.

27 [9/27] Australian guitarist and songwriter Tommy Emmanuel will play songs from his decades-spanning career at the Taft.

28 [9/27-29] A taste of Munich is just a river away during Newport Oktoberfest.

29 30 [9/28-29] Violinist AnneSophie Mutter Plays Beethoven with the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra at Music Hall. 28

TUESDAY

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A&E Calendar An Indie Evening American indie band Lord Huron, known for its folk-inspired sound, plays the Taft Theatre for the night. The band will be joined by Australian-American indie-pop musician Hazel English. Sept. 12. 7:30 p.m. $35-$65. Taft Theatre, 317 E. Fifth St., Cincinnati. 513-232-6220, tafttheatre.org.

Foundation

YEARS

Incorporated

CELEBRATE!

WATCH THE RIVERFEST FIREWORKS AT Great American Ball Park September 1 • 5 p.m.

Tours of the Ballpark • Full Beverage Service* • Dinner Private Fireworks Viewing • Reserved Parking Available Purchase Tickets or become a sponsor Now: gateway.kctcs.edu/riverblast19 Sponsored by:

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CINCINNATI’S PLACE TO PLAY Cincinnat’s only destination for new and exciting games, delicious dining, live music and thoroughbred racing. Experience Belterra Park Cincinnati, one amazing play to play.

A great variety of exciting games are waitng for you.

Make our Favorites, yours. Get reservations today on OpenTable.

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Gaming Guide 2019

A Unique Gamble A WEALTH OF OPTIONS AND ENTERTAINMENT SHOWCASE OHIO’S DIVERSE CASINO SCENE By Noah Tong

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he Buckeye state boasts a strong collection of casinos. Each one brings its own unique appeal to the table, but which one is right for you? To provide a glimpse into a few of the choices consumers have in the area we explored the features of each location and how casinos differentiate themselves from the competition—so you don’t have to.

HOLLYWOOD GAMING AT DAYTON RACEWAY A trip to Hollywood Gaming at Dayton Raceway guarantees a memorable experience for all guests.

“The excitement we create on the floor is what really keeps the energy high,” says Dan Kennedy, vice president and general manager of Hollywood Gaming at Dayton Raceway. “We have something exciting going on every day to keep our guests engaged and entertained. Whether it’s one of our many jackpots, someone winning a new car, getting a great meal or just enjoying the music with friends, there is always an opportunity to win big.” Located at 777 Hollywood Blvd., guests can expect a packed 2019 events lineup ranging from car shows to craft shows to comedy shows. Summertime concerts include performances from Lonestar, Cassadee Pope and Spin Doctors. Starting in September, live harness racing will occur five to six days a week while parimutuel betting is offered all year. Although Dayton Raceway offers these events plus more than 1,000 video lottery machines its approach to handling guests makes its officials most proud. “Our dedication to customer service is what sets us apart from the competition,” says Kennedy. “We pride ourselves in treating our guests like family and making sure

they feel at home when visiting us. We have great food options, exciting promotions and energetic entertainment to keep each day fresh and unique.”

JACK CINCINNATI CASINO JACK Cincinnati Casino is in possession of an intangible asset every successful business craves: a prime location. Positioned on the outskirts of downtown Cincinnati, JACK Cincinnati Casino is a walkable distance to major Queen City spots such as Paul Brown Stadium, Great American Ballpark and Over-the-Rhine. As if that w w w.

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Gaming Guide 2019 wasn’t enough, free complimentary parking provides the first impression to adults in search for a fun night out. Once inside “customers experience over 2,000 slot machines, 85 table games and 30 poker tables,” says Chad Barnhill, senior vice president of regional operations and general manager. Here gamblers can also choose among blackjack, craps, roulette or carnival games. The Synergy Table Game Experience, however, is unique when compared to its regional counterparts. “Synergy Table Game Experience has gained a lot of traction in the last 14 or 15 months,” says Barnhill. Characterized as dealer-assisted table action, this style of gaming requires just a $5 barrier to entry. The room is an altogether different environment for customers that may enjoy live DJs and the ability to watch sporting events while playing along. If gaming isn’t your thing, Barnhill says there’s still plenty of reasons to visit JACK Cincinnati Casino. “We’ve done much more for the guests concerning food offerings and now guests are considering us as

a standalone food option and entertainment option,” says Barnhill. “There’s food promotions offered almost every day of the week at one of our restaurants.”

HOLLYWOOD CASINO COLUMBUS As the self-proclaimed “Biggest & Best Casino in Ohio,” Hollywood Casino Columbus at 200 Georgesville Road insists on constantly improving the customer experience. “We are always evolving our offerings for our guests and listening to their feedback about what they want,” says Jason Birney, vice president and general manager of Hollywood Casino Columbus. “We have added

to the square footage of our gaming offering and continue to add the latest and greatest product to the floor as it debuts. We’ve also added an Asian noodle bar restaurant and a new daiquiri bar.” Additionally, the casino is introducing a new rewards program called Mychoice, allowing lucky guests to win trips to places such as Las Vegas and St. Kitts. “We are also the only central Ohio gaming facility to offer table games with selections ranging from blackjack to craps to exciting linkedprogressive games such as Mississippi Stud,” says Birney. “Recently, we’ve had to expand our table

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• Minutes from the Kentucky Horse Park • Old Friends Thoroughbred Retirement Farm • Equine Art Galleries • Whispering Woods Riding Stables • Nearby Keeneland Racetrack

– Unbridled Fun – • Toyota Motor Manufacturing KY, Inc. Tour • Country Boy Brewing • Bourbon 30 • Picturesque Downtown • Specialty Shops • Antiques • Cafes and One-of-a-kind Restaurants • Georgetown & Scott County Museum • Ward Hall • Golf • Elkhorn Creek • Yuko-en on the Elkhorn • Scott County Geocaching Trails • Nearby Wineries and Bourbon Distilleries • Close proximity to the Ark Encounter

15 hotels + over 80 Restaurants INTERSTATE

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games offering because our guests are telling us they want more,” says Birney. Ultimately, Birney believes the staff at Hollywood Casino Columbus is the secret to success. “Our team members are by far our best asset. They work hard every day to bring amazing experiences to our guests and we would not be where we are today without them.”

HOLLYWOOD GAMING AT MAHONING VALLEY RACE COURSE For customers interested in live racing and simulcast entertainment Hollywood Gaming at Mahoning Valley Race Course is

striving to be the casino, or racino, of choice. Guests can watch live races onsite and from around the world at a convenient location right off Interstate 80 and state Route 46. Large groups, subject to special accommodations, are made to feel right at home when hosting a special event. “We have a large banquet space downstairs that leads out to the race course, which is ideal for large parties, conferences and special events,” says Alex Rangel, director of marketing. “We also offer space for more intimate gatherings on our second story, which overlooks the race course or gaming floor.” Free play is offered to groups who

choose to have an event with Hollywood Gaming at Mahoning Valley. Guests looking for entertainment now have the option of attending free outdoor concerts featuring national acts such as Piff the Magic Dragon and Candlebox. There’s no limit in dining options either. Skybox Sports Bar offers a casual sit-down experience known for its burgers and steaks. At Take 2 Grill customers will find anything from wraps to mac and cheese in this food court. Finally, there is H Lounge Bar, which provides additional entertainment in the form of bands and Keno machines. Although certain to have a tremendous time while at the casino, guests can also leave the casino assured with the knowledge that Hollywood Gaming at Mahoning Valley benefits the local community. “We partner with our community and team members on a daily basis to benefit Mahoning Valley with efforts such as our toy drive, blood drive and food drive,” says Rangel. “We believe our dedication to serving the community sets us apart from our competitors.” n

SEPTEMBER 26-29, 2019 In Beautiful Downtown London, KY Experience all the egg-citement of four fun-filled days at one of Kentucky’s Largest Festivals!

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Gaming Guide 2019 TOLEDO 1) Miami Valley Gaming

6000 OH-63, Lebanon, OH 45036

CLEVELAND

2) Belterra Park Gaming + Entertainment 6301 Kellogg Rd, Cincinnati, OH 45230

3) Eldorado Gaming Scioto Downs 6000 S High St, Columbus, OH 43207

4) Hollywood Casino Columbus

200 Georgesville Rd, Columbus, OH 43228 in Franklin County

5) Northfield Park Live & Simulcast Racing 10777 Northfield Rd, Northfield, OH 44067

6) JACK Cleveland Casino

100 Public Square, Cleveland, OH 44113

7) Hollywood Gaming at Dayton Raceway 777 Hollywood Blvd, Dayton, OH 45414

OH I O COLUMBUS

8) Hollywood Casino Toledo

1968 Miami St, Toledo, OH 43605

DAYTON

9) Hollywood Gaming at Mahoning Valley Racecourse

655 N Canfield Niles Rd, Youngstown, OH 44515

10) JACK Cincinnati Casino

1000 Broadway St, Cincinnati, OH 45202

11) JACK Thistledown Racino

21501 Emery Rd, North Randall, OH 44128 in Cleveland

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CINCINNATI


GET READY TO GET LUCKY.

Just Off I–75 Exit 29

Over 1,900 GAMING MACHINES featuring

THE HOTTEST GAMES WITH THE BEST VARIETY! The excitement continues with 2 outdoor gaming patios, 4 restaurants, 2 bars, live entertainment every weekend, festivals, concerts and live harness racing in season.

miamivalleygaming.com Must be 21 or older to gamble. Problem Gambling? Ohio Problem Gambling Helpline (1-800-589-9966) or visit www.org.ohio.gov.


Dining

Coastal Flavor in a Landlocked Town LOBSTA BAKES OF MAINE BRINGS AUTHENTIC NEW ENGLAND FLAVORS FROM OVER 1,000 MILES AWAY By Kevin Michell

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estled in the heart of Newtown, near community fixtures like the Dairy Corner and Main Street Café, is an eatery that features something rare in a Midwestern town: fresh Maine lobsters. Truly fresh seafood can be a chore to find in Cincinnati, but Lobsta Bakes of Maine brings the flavors of the Northern Atlantic Ocean to those with a taste for the

east coast. It’s so authentic, the company switched out the “er” at the end of lobster for an “a,” just like real Mainers would say it. Lobsta Bakes of Maine is also a favorite of those locals who know about it as they’ve voted it as the top fresh catch in Cincy Magazine’s Best of the East twice. The seafood options are brought in daily and extend far beyond just live and prepared lobster; visitors can pick up many

types of ocean fish including swordfish and sushi-grade tuna, mussels from Prince Edward Island, middleneck clams and other seasonally available offerings. The Newtown seafood store is the creation of Maine transplant Kevin Smith. East Siders may remember his first venture from when he initially moved to Cincinnati, Anderson Township’s Bounty Seafood II, which was named after his family’s fishing business on Swan’s Island, Maine. Smith, his father and his three brothers all pitched in with the work at the original Bounty Seafood and cultivated a love for finding the best, freshest catch from the ocean. At Bounty Seafood II, Smith offered fresh seafood to Cincinnatians for over eight years. Smith sold the location in 2004 to focus on catering New England-style lobster bakes. But the storefront on Salem Road continued in much the same vein as he sold Bounty Seafood II to employee Tom Keegan, who turned it into his first Keegan’s Seafood store.

Find your new favorite restaurant at

cincymagazine.com

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Lobsta Bakes of Maine specializes in all the fixings of a New England bake.

In 2009, Smith opened up Lobsta Bakes of Maine on Church Street in Newtown to

serve as both a new fresh seafood store and a base of operations for his catering business. Smith’s traveling lobster bake operation has been a hit with private events and parties in the area or just those pining for the feeling of a summer evening in Maine. Dinners catered by Lobsta Bakes of Maine feature all the greatest hits of a New England bake—mussels, corn on the cob, redskin potatoes, cole slaw and bread—with entrée options ranging from a straight forward “lobsta dinner” where everyone gets a pound-and-quarter lobster of their own to multiple variations on surf and turf that can feature filet mignon, king crab or, of course, lobster. Chicken and vegan dinner packages are also available. The store itself has all the fixings to make a seafood dinner at home but also sells a wide array of prepared foods to carry out and enjoy at home. Lobster rolls, crab cakes, shrimp salad, lobster quiches, New England clam chowder, cioppino and even Maine blueberry pies are available to buy and enjoy as often as availability and the seasons allow. M-F 10 a.m.-6:30 p.m., Sa 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 3533 Church St., Newtown. 513-561-0444, lobstabakes.com. n

To find your neighborhood First Watch, Please visit www.firstwatch.com

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Best Schools 2019 For the sixth year in a row, we’re crunching the numbers and ranking Southwest Ohio and Northern Kentucky high schools to determine which are the best. Where did your school fall in our rankings?

I N SI DE:

38 Top Schools 40 School Rankings 44 Honorable Mentions 45 Special Programs 47 Outstanding Educators 51 Private School Guide 62 St. Gertrude School 64 Badin High School 65 McNicholas High School 66 Royalmont Academy

OHIO

Walnut Hills High School CINCINNATI PUBLIC SCHOOLS

After four years of being in the top five, Walnut Hills High School has taken the No. 1 spot in our rankings for the first time. Its overall excellence easily took it to the top—it’s ranked in the 99th percentile of high schools as ranked by the state, has the highest state performance index score in the region (106.129), has the area’s highest graduation rate (98.9%), great test scores and a high average ACT score (25.73). In fact, 17 students scored a perfect 36 on the test. But what pushed the school over the top was its end-of-course improvement indicator percentage. At Walnut Hills, 64.7% of students recorded higher scores on a retake of the same endof-course exam.

2 Indian Hill High School

INDIAN HILL EXEMPTED V ILLAGE SCHOOL DISTRICT

With its low student-to-teacher ratio (11.26), high percentage of teachers with master’s degrees and great end-of-course proficiency or better pass rates in English, biology, government and history, Indian Hill High School remains one the best high schools in the region. The community continues to invest in education, with the high school having the highest per pupil spending in the region with $15,142. Outside of academics, the school has excelled in athletics (its girls soccer team 38

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won the state’s Division II championship) and in mock trial (with its team going all the way to the state competition).

3 Madeira High School

MADEIR A CITY SCHOOLS DISTRICT

Madeira High School comes in at No. 3 this year thanks to its state score of 104.829, attendance rate of 95.5%, graduation rate of 98.1% and good end-of-course proficiency or better pass rates, including 100% in history. But Madeira students and teachers are using what they’re working on in class to have a positive impact on the community as well. Teacher Jenni-

fer Jordan recently received the Leavey Award for Excellence in Private Enterprise Education for the work she’s done in her entrepreneurship class. In the class, students create products and implement a business plan, with the profits from the products going to local charities. The class has donated to Cincinnati Children’s Hospital and the Reds Community Fund.

4 Wyoming High School

W YOMING CITY SCHOOL DISTRICT

Wyoming High School continues to be ranked highly in the state, with a state score of 104.617. The school has some of


the best academics in the region and has the Tristate’s highest average ACT score (26.03). Out of the classroom, the school has also excelled athletically, with its football team completing its perfect season at the state championship. The school is looking to keep winning next year, too—the school hired a new men’s soccer coach and brought back a previous basketball coach for the 2019-2020 season.

terests. For example, its marching band won the 2018 Bands of America Northwest Ohio Regional Championship and its theater program won four Cappies (theater awards presented to Tristate high schools) for its performance of Sweeney Todd. William Mason invests in academics as well, with 86% of its teachers having their master’s degrees and an average ACT score of 24.

5 William Mason High School 6 Mariemont High School MASON CIT Y SCHOOLS

William Mason High School has the highest enrollment in the Tristate with 3,465 students, and it works hard to make sure those students have the opportunity to excel in activities that match their in-

MARIEMONT CITY SCHOOL DISTRICT

Mariemont High School remains in the top 10 thanks to its excellent end-ofcourse proficiency or better pass rates and high ACT score average. More than 80% of its teachers have master’s degrees and

its end-of-course improvement score is a high 44.7%. Students and parents aren’t the only ones who’ve noticed Mariemont’s excellent work—in January The Port voted to give the school up to $45 million to repair and update its school building.

7 Turpin High School

FOR EST H I L L S LOC A L SCHOOL DISTRICT

With its good end-of-course proficiency or higher rates and 23.66 ACT score, Turpin High School finishes out the top 7 in our Ohio list. The school is always looking to improve—Turpin added new security measures and a gym at the beginning of the school year and has also hired a new girls’ soccer coach for the coming year.

KENTUCKY

High School 1 Beechwood

BEECHWOOD INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT

Beechwood High School moves to the top spot in Kentucky this year, thanks in large part to having the highest average ACT score in Northern Kentucky (25.3). The school is in the 99th percentile in the state and has the highest end-ofcourse proficiency or better rate in NKY in math, science and reading. Outside of the classroom, the school won the state’s football championship and had its marching band perform at the National Memorial Day Parade.

2 Highlands High School

F OR T T HOM A S I N DE P E N DE N T SCHOOLS

While Highlands High School moved down a spot, the school continued to have a great year. The school has Northern Kentucky’s highest attendance rate and lowest chronic absenteeism rate, is in the 99th percentile in the state and offers the most AP classes in NKY. One student received a perfect 36 on the ACT

and the school’s boys’ soccer team went to the state soccer final.

A. Ryle High School 3 Larry BOONE COUNT Y SCHOOLS

For the first time since Cincy Magazine started ranking high schools, Larry A.

Ryle High School has entered the top 3 in Northern Kentucky. The school has the largest enrollment in Northern Kentucky with 1,866 students, but it also has an average ACT score of 21.9 and good proficiency or higher on its end-of-course exams. Two of its students were honored at the NKEC Excellence in Education Celebration, too.

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Best SCHOOLS

District

Per-Pupil Spending (District)

Number of State Standards Met

School Performance Index Score

State Performance Index Grade

State Percentile (Among High Schools)

WALNUT HILLS HIGH SCHOOL

Cincinnati City

2,905

$10,117

13 out of 14

106.139

B

99

95.1%

INDIAN HILL HIGH SCHOOL

Indian Hill Exempted Village

597

$15,142

7 out of 10

103.165

B

97

94.9%

Rank

Research by Bill Ferguson, Jr.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57

MADEIRA HIGH SCHOOL

Madeira City

428

$11,224

9 out of 10

104.829

B

98

95.5%

WYOMING HIGH SCHOOL

Wyoming City

635

$11,787

8 out of 10

104.617

B

98

93.8%

WILLIAM MASON HIGH SCHOOL

Mason City

3,465

$9,770

9 out of 10

102.59

B

97

96.4%

MARIEMONT HIGH SCHOOL

Mariemont City

491

$12,387

7 out of 10

102.111

B

96

94.3%

TURPIN HIGH SCHOOL

Forest Hills Local

1,103

$9,939

9 out of 10

101.86

B

96

95.4%

LOVELAND HIGH SCHOOL

Loveland City

1,400

$9,425

7 out of 10

96.572

B

90

94.6%

ROSS HIGH SCHOOL

Ross Local

728

$8,526

6 out of 10

96.978

B

90

94.7%

SYCAMORE HIGH SCHOOL

Sycamore Community City

1,623

$11,996

6 out of 10

97.044

B

91

94.8% 95.9%

BELLBROOK HIGH SCHOOL

Bellbrook-Sugarcreek Local

788

$10,150

7 out of 11

95.551

C

88

SPRINGBORO HIGH SCHOOL

Springboro Community City

1,843

$7,619

8 out of 11

99.497

B

93

97.1%

ANDERSON HIGH SCHOOL

Forest Hills Local

1,257

$9,939

7 out of 11

97.199

B

91

94.2%

LAKOTA EAST HIGH SCHOOL

Lakota Local

2,393

$9,803

7 out of 10

96.315

B

89

95.1%

WAYNESVILLE HIGH SCHOOL

Wayne Local

460

$8,661

6 out of 10

95.64

C

88

95.4%

LAKOTA WEST HIGH SCHOOL

Lakota Local

2,168

$9,803

7 out of 10

95.919

C

89

95.0%

KINGS HIGH SCHOOL

Kings Local

1,191

$9,253

6 out of 10

92.794

C

84

94.2%

CARLISLE HIGH SCHOOL

Carlisle Local

420

$9,813

6 out of 10

90.398

C

78

95.6%

LITTLE MIAMI HIGH SCHOOL

Little Miami Local

1,198

$8,805

6 out of 10

93.717

C

84

94.7%

MILFORD SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL

Milford Exempted Village

1,813

$9,078

5 out of 11

91.4

C

80

93.9%

MONROE HIGH SCHOOL

Monroe Local

673

$7,244

7 out of 10

90.589

C

78

94.6%

OAK HILLS HIGH SCHOOL

Oak Hills Local

2,227

$8,575

4 out of 10

88.414

C

72

92.4%

TALAWANDA HIGH SCHOOL

Talawanda City

826

$10,728

4 out of 10

88.079

C

71

94.5% 91.7%

GOSHEN HIGH SCHOOL

Goshen Local

702

$8,250

3 out of 10

88.46

C

72

EDGEWOOD HIGH SCHOOL

Edgewood City

975

$8,375

4 out of 10

87.679

C

70

92.1%

BLANCHESTER HIGH SCHOOL

Blanchester Local

418

$8,806

5 out of 10

86.216

C

65

94.1%

CLINTON-MASSIE HIGH SCHOOL

Clinton-Massie Local

549

$7,886

6 out of 10

86.961

C

68

95.0%

BETHEL-TATE HIGH SCHOOL

Bethel-Tate Local

417

$7,285

3 out of 10

85.956

C

64

94.0% 93.3%

DEER PARK JUNIOR/SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL

Deer Park Community City

532

$10,089

2 out of 15

84.461

C

60

NEW RICHMOND HIGH SCHOOL

New Richmond Exempted Village

648

$8,824

6 out of 10

85.514

C

62

93.4%

SCHOOL FOR CREATIVE & PERFORMING ARTS HIGH SCHOOL

Cincinnati City

1,356

$10,117

7 out of 23

82.509

D

53

94.5%

MADISON HIGH SCHOOL

Madison Local

381

$8,581

4 out of 10

82.15

D

52

93.9%

LEBANON HIGH SCHOOL

Lebanon City

1,594

$7,953

5 out of 11

84.979

C

61

95.8%

FRANKLIN HIGH SCHOOL

Franklin City

785

$8,700

3 out of 10

84.043

C

58

94.1%

WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL

Williamsburg Local

522

$7,640

2 out of 17

85.653

C

63

94.4%

READING COMMUNITY HIGH SCHOOL

Reading Community City

342

$8,603

3 out of 12

78.705

D

44

91.4%

TAYLOR HIGH SCHOOL

Three Rivers Local

911

$8,285

4 out of 15

85.383

C

62

93.6%

WILLIAM HENRY HARRISON HIGH SCHOOL

Southwest Local

897

$8,883

3 out of 10

82.503

D

53

91.6%

BATAVIA HIGH SCHOOL

Batavia Local

492

$6,747

3 out of 10

80.682

D

49

93.3%

WEST CLERMONT HIGH SCHOOL

West Clermont Local

2,280

$7,583

1 out of 10

80.14

D

47

91.5%

CLARK MONTESSORI HIGH SCHOOL

Cincinnati City

699

$10,117

4 out of 15

73.617

D

32

95.9%

FINNEYTOWN SECONDARY CAMPUS

Finneytown Local

750

$10,086

2 out of 17

74.686

D

34

93.8%

COLERAIN HIGH SCHOOL

Northwest Local

1,540

$8,416

2 out of 10

77.228

D

39

91.8%

NORWOOD HIGH SCHOOL

Norwood City

549

$10,662

2 out of 10

74.658

D

34

86.9%

WESTERN BROWN HIGH SCHOOL

Western Brown Local

842

$7,701

2 out of 9

75.333

D

35

95.9%

NORTHWEST HIGH SCHOOL

Northwest Local

684

$8,416

1 out of 10

75.676

D

36

90.4%

CLERMONT NORTHEASTERN HIGH SCHOOL

Clermont Northeastern Local

421

$9,291

2 out of 10

71.165

D

28

91.6%

JAMES N. GAMBLE MONTESSORI HIGH SCHOOL

Cincinnati City

499

$10,117

2 out of 13

63.329

D

19

94.3%

FAIRFIELD HIGH SCHOOL

Fairfield City

1,948

$7,769

2 out of 10

73.027

D

31

90.9%

HAMILTON HIGH SCHOOL

Hamilton City

1,742

$8,269

2 out of 10

71.468

D

28

88.5%

ST. BERNARD-ELMWOOD PLACE HIGH SCHOOL

St Bernard-Elmwood Place City

377

$9,270

0 out of 14

65.702

D

22

90.0%

FELICITY-FRANKLIN LOCAL HIGH SCHOOL

Felicity-Franklin Local

216

$9,019

0 out of 10

66.652

D

22

91.4%

PRINCETON HIGH SCHOOL

Princeton City

1,547

$10,223

0 out of 10

67.365

D

23

90.4%

MIDDLETOWN HIGH SCHOOL

Middletown City

1,289

$7,657

1 out of 10

65.788

D

22

90.5%

NEW MIAMI HIGH SCHOOL

New Miami Local

137

$9,824

0 out of 9

59.704

F

17

87.5%

WINTON WOODS HIGH SCHOOL

Winton Woods City

1,030

$10,080

1 out of 10

61.356

D

18

89.0%

SHRODER PAIDEIA HIGH SCHOOL

Cincinnati City

731

$10,117

2 out of 14

57.062

F

14

87.7%

*All school buildings are listed by the state as enrolling 12th-graders. These can be traditional 9-12 schools, such as regular public high schools, or K-12, many of which are community schools. NC — Not calculated or not reported (unranked schools had incomplete data) UR — Unranked

40

Attendance Rate

High School* (2017-18 data except where noted)

Enrollment

Southwest Ohio Public and Community Charter High Schools

A U G U S T/S E P T E M B E R 2 0 1 9 : : w w w.

maga zine.com


Teachers With at Least a Master's Degree

Average ACT Score**

High School English I EOC at or above Proficient

High School English II EOC at or above Proficient

High School Algebra I or Math I EOC at or above Proficient

High School Biology EOC at or above Proficient

High School Government EOC at or above Proficient

High School History EOC at or above Proficient

High School End-ofCourse Improvement Indicator

Number of Advanced Placement Classes***

% of Students Taking AP Test***

77.4%

25.73

97.7%

95.2%

88.4%

89.9%

93.5%

98.3%

97.2%

64.7%

48

94.2%

81.2%

11.26

90.6%

NC

96.5%

91.5%

57.1%

79.8%

94.7%

99.3%

95.9%

55.0%

34

79.6%

76.5%

% Scoring 3 or Higher on AP Test***

Student / Teacher Ratio 21.36

97.7%

High School Geometry or Math II EOC at or above Proficient

4-Year Graduation Rate (Class of 2017) 98.9% 98.1%

13.81

83.7%

24.50

92.4%

94.2%

86.2%

87.7%

96.5%

87.3%

100.0%

25.4%

21

80.6%

53.9%

98.2%

14.11

75.7%

26.03

92.8%

92.8%

65.9%

86.5%

89.9%

96.3%

94.8%

45.0%

34

88.9%

79.0%

96.4%

21.13

86.0%

24.40

91.4%

87.9%

85.3%

84.1%

95.8%

95.4%

96.3%

55.0%

44

75.3%

54.1%

94.9%

11.42

82.6%

24.03

95.4%

94.1%

51.4%

75.0%

89.3%

92.4%

94.7%

44.7%

18

66.9%

42.7%

96.5%

15.99

80.6%

23.66

91.2%

87.7%

83.3%

84.4%

88.2%

96.7%

90.3%

29.0%

27

66.7%

58.0%

97.4%

16.28

85.4%

22.72

88.9%

83.6%

78.7%

73.0%

95.3%

93.3%

88.0%

43.6%

25

43.3%

35.8%

96.6%

15.17

78.2%

19.38

85.1%

75.1%

87.4%

71.1%

91.1%

92.9%

91.7%

41.3%

12

26.6%

22.6%

94.3%

13.87

70.4%

24.11

87.6%

78.3%

79.9%

71.0%

87.1%

95.8%

88.4%

47.5%

36

60.9%

48.6%

96.4%

16.42

70.5%

22.50

83.8%

80.5%

76.2%

75.8%

92.4%

97.4%

92.7%

42.0%

14

29.8%

20.5%

96.3%

23.63

71.4%

23.25

91.4%

89.1%

87.5%

72.1%

90.1%

96.2%

94.1%

35.0%

22

36.4%

15.8%

93.9%

15.91

69.0%

22.43

90.7%

83.9%

75.6%

69.0%

85.7%

89.3%

92.8%

31.1%

25

56.5%

31.8%

94.5%

20.63

74.7%

21.44

88.6%

85.9%

68.8%

72.9%

91.4%

91.9%

92.4%

42.5%

25

43.6%

26.9%

98.6%

18.40

71.8%

21.48

84.5%

86.3%

78.8%

71.4%

90.4%

94.4%

95.0%

14.3%

12

16.4%

26.2%

94.7%

19.36

66.3%

21.29

87.6%

82.1%

73.7%

73.7%

84.8%

89.8%

90.7%

41.0%

25

38.8%

22.7%

95.2%

17.01

62.9%

22.40

86.5%

75.6%

74.9%

65.7%

92.5%

92.9%

88.2%

25.7%

23

12.8%

42.0%

97.6%

15.56

76.1%

18.49

83.8%

79.2%

70.1%

59.7%

81.0%

92.0%

92.4%

30.7%

3

8.3%

0.8%

97.4%

21.39

71.6%

20.96

81.3%

80.1%

77.0%

64.6%

87.0%

90.9%

88.1%

20.8%

10

32.0%

23.9%

95.3%

16.79

77.8%

21.30

85.8%

78.8%

64.3%

58.5%

88.4%

81.2%

84.3%

29.8%

41

54.1%

37.6%

97.2%

17.71

70.1%

19.11

89.2%

81.8%

62.7%

51.9%

83.0%

88.7%

85.3%

37.4%

3

42.4%

22.7%

94.6%

17.96

70.9%

19.70

70.0%

79.3%

66.4%

59.8%

87.4%

86.3%

92.6%

44.1%

39

52.8%

32.3%

93.8%

14.24

77.6%

20.20

74.5%

74.7%

71.5%

60.4%

85.1%

78.5%

82.8%

32.9%

8

29.5%

16.5%

95.5%

17.55

84.9%

19.52

73.2%

70.4%

56.6%

62.2%

84.9%

89.8%

85.1%

17.5%

8

26.3%

19.4%

90.2%

16.81

74.1%

18.44

79.8%

79.5%

61.9%

56.1%

82.3%

85.8%

84.0%

25.5%

9

35.7%

14.7%

90.2%

15.48

63.1%

18.62

73.8%

81.3%

64.6%

50.0%

75.5%

93.1%

91.3%

33.0%

5

0.0%

2.2%

94.4%

18.30

59.6%

20.27

81.2%

74.1%

57.8%

55.2%

84.1%

87.0%

86.6%

36.7%

0

0.7%

0.0%

97.4%

12.64

72.7%

19.38

79.4%

72.1%

49.0%

50.9%

75.0%

87.5%

71.8%

40.8%

2

8.9%

2.3%

95.2%

13.30

74.7%

17.36

79.3%

68.1%

60.8%

64.0%

58.9%

85.7%

77.9%

44.2%

9

33.7%

13.4%

96.2%

17.51

78.3%

19.65

81.3%

78.0%

49.7%

53.9%

83.8%

82.5%

87.0%

31.1%

6

18.9%

10.7%

99.2%

15.95

75.4%

20.44

83.8%

82.3%

38.3%

36.0%

83.2%

94.2%

89.2%

39.9%

10

47.2%

26.4%

94.5%

10.03

60.2%

18.15

68.9%

68.0%

56.6%

49.0%

88.4%

91.0%

86.1%

29.7%

2

11.4%

0.0%

98.4%

22.77

64.0%

20.54

75.5%

66.2%

60.7%

56.5%

81.2%

90.2%

85.1%

40.3%

18

44.2%

21.9%

94.6%

16.35

66.7%

17.81

75.1%

68.5%

54.6%

54.0%

75.5%

85.4%

88.5%

32.8%

3

22.0%

2.4%

90.0%

18.00

77.7%

18.87

76.7%

67.6%

60.3%

45.3%

72.8%

84.5%

77.5%

21.1%

5

16.2%

7.8%

91.5%

11.03

84.1%

17.91

65.6%

72.8%

48.1%

56.3%

84.6%

83.7%

83.5%

19.5%

7

14.8%

8.1%

94.5%

18.98

45.8%

20.24

71.3%

61.6%

55.7%

49.5%

77.3%

87.0%

82.5%

30.4%

13

20.4%

24.4%

89.2%

17.59

68.3%

18.68

80.2%

60.1%

47.8%

46.0%

78.2%

79.6%

80.1%

38.1%

18

46.5%

24.0%

92.6%

16.40

63.3%

19.28

70.0%

68.8%

58.2%

42.5%

70.9%

78.7%

80.3%

25.8%

4

15.1%

8.4%

91.2%

18.69

75.9%

18.59

70.7%

66.9%

52.6%

45.9%

73.5%

76.7%

82.8%

23.4%

10

31.2%

8.2%

93.4%

14.27

71.2%

21.83

66.9%

63.2%

44.1%

30.8%

75.2%

97.1%

59.8%

46.2%

2

43.8%

19.8%

94.4%

15.96

63.3%

18.01

60.7%

65.3%

46.7%

39.7%

88.9%

67.0%

63.3%

41.7%

11

42.7%

27.7%

88.2%

17.30

51.5%

17.70

63.3%

58.2%

73.6%

35.5%

68.7%

81.4%

74.6%

28.4%

15

24.7%

17.4%

85.6%

12.77

54.0%

17.25

69.8%

66.2%

36.7%

43.6%

75.9%

89.1%

70.8%

31.1%

5

22.8%

0.0%

95.3%

20.05

72.3%

17.47

69.7%

60.5%

36.6%

42.3%

64.5%

78.0%

76.8%

32.6%

0

0.2%

0.0%

89.7%

13.41

72.4%

16.69

58.9%

56.6%

51.7%

39.0%

71.5%

70.0%

66.5%

24.5%

14

29.5%

10.5%

94.3%

15.59

59.1%

17.40

57.5%

64.9%

26.0%

40.7%

75.2%

84.7%

75.4%

26.3%

1

16.0%

8.4%

87.5%

11.09

84.6%

NC

58.3%

68.9%

14.3%

25.0%

65.9%

NC

76.7%

34.6%

4

56.5%

11.8%

92.2%

18.73

69.1%

18.88

40.0%

67.0%

24.1%

29.4%

69.3%

88.7%

54.3%

26.3%

13

29.8%

11.2%

77.4%

16.28

46.9%

17.24

44.4%

66.8%

11.5%

36.6%

79.0%

85.5%

77.5%

27.5%

11

19.8%

10.3% 0.7%

82.9%

12.16

58.1%

16.11

57.6%

44.4%

42.0%

22.7%

73.4%

67.6%

77.4%

24.4%

1

13.1%

87.2%

13.50

68.2%

17.43

61.5%

52.1%

22.0%

16.4%

66.7%

78.3%

68.6%

18.2%

3

10.7%

1.3%

94.1%

16.82

67.5%

NC

56.6%

54.8%

31.8%

27.7%

71.5%

79.2%

35.0%

23.1%

14

30.2%

13.6%

85.4%

14.01

55.6%

16.39

53.9%

50.1%

26.3%

24.9%

62.9%

60.9%

52.6%

30.4%

5

18.8%

2.5%

82.5%

7.61

66.7%

15.13

46.3%

45.5%

25.0%

9.1%

55.1%

73.3%

45.5%

18.1%

0

0.9%

0.0%

86.9%

14.31

66.7%

15.75

42.7%

44.2%

15.6%

19.5%

51.6%

71.8%

57.6%

32.3%

10

26.3%

3.9%

91.8%

15.55

63.3%

15.39

59.4%

43.0%

23.4%

13.5%

31.6%

82.4%

75.2%

26.1%

10

61.7%

2.3%

**About ACT averages: Ohio did not report ACT scores for 2017-18 on the School Report Cards. Through a public-records request, Cincy obtained scores from the Ohio Department of Education; however, the department provided only scores it received from ACT. It said the scores were not for all students and should not be compared with previous years’ scores. Some schools’ scores were not provided. ***About Advanced Placement: Some schools have quit offering AP classes, replacing them with other dual-credit options. Data anomalies exist for some districts on Ohio report cards, and the Department of Education says there could be an issue with how the student data-reporting system is flowing the information onto the report cards. w w w.

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District

Number of State Standards Met

School Performance Index Score

State Performance Index Grade

LOCKLAND HIGH SCHOOL

Lockland Local

162

$9,743

1 out of 8

63.252

D

19

91.3%

NORTH COLLEGE HILL HIGH SCHOOL

North College Hill City

372

$7,228

1 out of 9

62.058

D

18

88.9%

CINCINNATI COLLEGE PREPARATORY ACADEMY

Cincinnati College Preparatory Academy

923

$7,076

2 out of 23

62.821

D

19

91.8%

SUMMIT ACADEMY SECONDARY SCHOOL-MIDDLETOWN

Summit Academy Secondary School - Middletown

138

$6,205

0 out of 14

52.889

F

10

88.2% 91.0%

58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 UR UR UR UR UR UR

Enrollment

Rank

(continued)

Research by Bill Ferguson, Jr.

Attendance Rate

High School* (2017-18 data except where noted)

Per-Pupil Spending (District)

Southwest Ohio Public and Community Charter High Schools

State Percentile (Among High Schools)

Best SCHOOLS

HUGHES STEM HIGH SCHOOL

Cincinnati City

897

$10,117

2 out of 14

51.625

F

9

GILBERT A. DATER HIGH SCHOOL

Cincinnati City

1,213

$10,117

1 out of 15

54.282

F

11

87.1%

MOUNT HEALTHY HIGH SCHOOL

Mount Healthy City

776

$8,806

1 out of 10

53.984

F

11

88.9% 90.2%

RIVERVIEW EAST ACADEMY

Cincinnati City

593

$10,117

1 out of 22

58.025

F

15

WITHROW UNIVERSITY HIGH SCHOOL

Cincinnati City

1,224

$10,117

1 out of 13

51.589

F

9

83.7%

OYLER SCHOOL

Cincinnati City

697

$10,117

0 out of 23

65.491

D

21

84.4%

AIKEN HIGH SCHOOL

Cincinnati City

690

$10,117

1 out of 13

51.256

F

8

86.7%

SUMMIT ACADEMY TRANSITION HIGH SCHOOL-CINCINNATI

Summit Academy Transition High School-Cincinnati

79

$6,430

1 out of 9

45.619

F

5

90.2% 82.9%

WESTERN HILLS UNIVERSITY HIGH SCHOOL

Cincinnati City

1,015

$10,117

1 out of 13

45.015

F

4

ROBERT A. TAFT INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY HIGH SCHOOL

Cincinnati City

593

$10,117

1 out of 13

44.32

F

3

79.6%

WOODWARD CAREER TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL

Cincinnati City

914

$10,117

0 out of 13

45.891

F

5

82.3%

CINCINNATI LEARNING SCHOOLS

Cincinnati Learning Schools

213

$10,100

1 out of 14

43.937

F

3

91.1%

VIRTUAL HIGH SCHOOL

Cincinnati City

544

$10,117

1 out of 11

51.443

F

8

80.8%

CINCINNATI TECHNOLOGY ACADEMY

Cincinnati Technology Academy

218

$6,248

2 out of 21

50.979

F

8

89.0%

MIAMI SCHOOL

Hamilton City

81

$8,269

0 out of 3

NC

NC

NC

84.0%

MOUNT AUBURN INTERNATIONAL ACADEMY

Mount Auburn International Academy

452

$8,103

1 out of 23

51.621

F

9

89.8%

PHOENIX COMMUNITY LEARNING CENTER

Phoenix Community Learning Center

469

$6,422

1 out of 23

54.694

F

12

88.0%

RIVERSIDE ACADEMY

Riverside Academy

261

$7,388

NC

N/A

F

9

82.9%

SPENCER ACADEMY

Cincinnati City

219

$10,117

13 out of 16

102.598

B

97

94.9%

Rank

High School (2017-18 data)

District

Enrollment

Per-Pupil Spending (District)

State Percentile (Among High Schools)

Attendance Rate

4-Year Graduation Rate (Class of 2018)

Student / Teacher Ratio

*All school buildings are listed by the state as enrolling 12th-graders. These can be traditional 9-12 schools, such as regular public high schools, or K-12, many of which are community schools. NC — Not calculated or not reported (unranked schools had incomplete data) UR — Unranked

1

BEECHWOOD HIGH SCHOOL

Beechwood Independent

646

$14,248

99

96.3%

96.4%

17.46

2

HIGHLANDS HIGH SCHOOL

Fort Thomas Independent

1,009

$14,327

99

96.9%

95.9%

17.70

3

LARRY A. RYLE HIGH SCHOOL

Boone County

1,866

$14,769

96

94.9%

93.6%

16.81

4

WALTON-VERONA HIGH SCHOOL

Walton-Verona Independent

539

$13,895

94

95.4%

99.2%

17.97

5

RANDALL K. COOPER HIGH SCHOOL

Boone County

1,332

$14,769

92

95.1%

97.3%

16.86

6

CONNER HIGH SCHOOL

Boone County

1,398

$14,769

88

94.8%

94.9%

15.36

7

CAMPBELL COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL

Campbell County

1,402

$14,140

91

94.9%

97.9%

17.53

8

SIMON KENTON HIGH SCHOOL

Kenton County

1,832

$13,901

87

95.2%

96.1%

20.36

9

DIXIE HEIGHTS HIGH SCHOOL

Kenton County

1,431

$13,901

86

94.3%

93.6%

20.15

10

LUDLOW HIGH SCHOOL

Ludlow Independent

365

$15,263

83

94.1%

94.8%

14.04

11

BELLEVUE HIGH SCHOOL

Bellevue Independent

356

$16,045

64

94.5%

100.0%

16.18

12

SCOTT HIGH SCHOOL

Kenton County

974

$13,901

66

94.2%

90.4%

20.72

13

BOONE COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL

Boone County

1,337

$14,769

54

94.3%

94.0%

14.53

14

DAYTON HIGH SCHOOL

Dayton Independent

360

$14,958

42

91.9%

81.7%

12.86

15

LLOYD HIGH SCHOOL

Erlanger-Elsmere Independent

610

$14,561

32

94.0%

96.5%

15.64

16

NEWPORT HIGH SCHOOL

Newport Independent

610

$19,522

8

92.8%

98.8%

11.09

17

HOLMES HIGH SCHOOL

Covington Independent

734

$18,034

6

93.9%

91.1%

11.65

UR

SILVER GROVE SCHOOL

Silver Grove Independent

163

$19,984

1

93.6%

71.4%

10.19

Kentucky Public High Schools Research by Bill Ferguson, Jr.

NC — NOT CALCULATED UR — UNR ANKED

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High School Algebra I or Math I EOC at or above Proficient

High School Biology EOC at or above Proficient

High School Government EOC at or above Proficient

57.4%

44.4%

18.2%

17.1%

50.0%

63.2%

NC

29.9%

0

0.0%

0.0%

15.37

52.0%

36.8%

20.6%

20.3%

44.6%

65.3%

42.4%

29.0%

0

0.0%

0.0%

% of Students Taking AP Test***

High School End-ofCourse Improvement Indicator

% Scoring 3 or Higher on AP Test***

High School English II EOC at or above Proficient

15.40

66.9%

Number of Advanced Placement Classes***

Average ACT Score**

68.8%

15.50

High School History EOC at or above Proficient

Teachers With at Least a Master's Degree

16.20

High School Geometry or Math II EOC at or above Proficient

Student / Teacher Ratio

High School English I EOC at or above Proficient

4-Year Graduation Rate (Class of 2017) 79.5% 76.7% 93.2%

20.51

13.3%

14.72

53.8%

32.2%

14.0%

11.8%

75.9%

83.3%

53.8%

30.7%

0

0.0%

0.0%

80.0%

6.90

25.0%

16.47

25.0%

50.0%

4.0%

28.6%

63.2%

46.7%

73.7%

22.0%

0

0.0%

0.0%

78.6%

13.00

63.5%

15.64

31.9%

39.6%

15.4%

10.8%

26.8%

81.3%

63.9%

32.8%

4

24.1%

0.4%

80.1%

16.85

63.9%

17.19

40.5%

30.9%

30.3%

9.3%

42.9%

69.7%

51.7%

23.4%

6

28.2%

8.6%

79.6%

15.52

51.1%

15.35

28.8%

24.6%

17.8%

15.5%

42.1%

73.3%

52.0%

26.0%

3

5.7%

0.0%

60.0%

15.21

64.9%

14.91

47.8%

45.0%

17.4%

7.4%

39.2%

42.9%

50.0%

27.4%

5

23.6%

0.0%

76.2%

15.49

74.7%

14.55

25.3%

28.8%

17.7%

10.6%

31.5%

69.9%

37.2%

29.2%

4

7.5%

0.0%

57.9%

15.84

61.4%

14.71

23.1%

22.2%

29.2%

11.4%

33.3%

47.4%

41.0%

16.3%

4

28.7%

0.8%

67.6%

13.53

62.5%

14.77

26.2%

22.3%

22.2%

4.4%

21.8%

69.9%

39.6%

26.9%

7

40.0%

1.7%

82.6%

7.90

31.6%

14.06

30.4%

33.3%

0.0%

15.4%

31.0%

42.1%

51.9%

12.0%

0

0.0%

0.0%

69.9%

13.36

59.2%

14.61

21.8%

23.3%

6.0%

7.9%

28.3%

58.0%

40.7%

26.4%

5

17.0%

1.7%

68.4%

12.89

54.3%

14.71

18.5%

26.7%

10.2%

6.0%

33.6%

42.7%

38.9%

27.1%

5

25.0%

0.9%

60.9%

13.06

61.4%

15.12

18.6%

24.1%

8.6%

9.8%

30.4%

37.0%

42.9%

19.4%

4

13.4%

1.2%

63.6%

16.38

38.5%

13.96

23.8%

8.7%

9.1%

2.2%

12.9%

25.0%

13.8%

22.2%

0

0.0%

0.0%

20.2%

34.00

100.0%

17.11

29.4%

23.3%

23.9%

4.3%

21.3%

19.5%

25.5%

26.2%

0

2.9%

1.1%

N/A

31.14

28.6%

16.08

9.1%

20.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

NC

NC

32.5%

0

6.3%

0.0%

N/A

20.25

25.0%

15.07

NC

NC

NC

NC

NC

27.3%

NC

24.2%

0

NC

NC

N/A

15.59

24.6%

14.00

40.0%

26.1%

26.9%

33.3%

39.1%

60.0%

48.3%

31.1%

0

0.0%

0.0% NC

N/A

39.08

8.3%

NC

40.0%

35.7%

16.7%

14.3%

64.3%

73.3%

48.0%

73.0%

0

NC

N/A

14.50

44.4%

NC

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

NC

NC

N/A

15.64

48.1%

NC

NC

NC

80.0%

NC

NC

NC

NC

NC

0

NC

NC

Student / Teacher Ratio

Teachers With at Least a Master's

Average ACT Score

Chronic Absenteeism Rate

End-of-Course Math % Proficient or Better (Grades 9-12)

End-of-Course Reading % Proficient or Better (Grades 9-12)

End-of-Course Science % Proficient or Better (Grades 9-12)

End-of-Course Writing % Proficient or Better (Grades 9-12)

Number of Advanced Placement Classes

Advanced Placement Test Takers

% of AP Exams With a Score of 3 or Above

**About ACT averages: Ohio did not report ACT scores for 2017-18 on the School Report Cards. Through a public-records request, Cincy obtained scores from the Ohio Department of Education; however, the department provided only scores it received from ACT. It said the scores were not for all students and should not be compared with previous years’ scores. Some schools’ scores were not provided. ***About Advanced Placement: Some schools have quit offering AP classes, replacing them with other dual-credit options. Data anomalies exist for some districts on Ohio report cards, and the Department of Education says there could be an issue with how the student data-reporting system is flowing the information onto the report cards.

17.46

56.4%

25.3

7.4%

87.3%

79.4%

68.6%

73.3%

22

386

58.5%

17.70

50.7%

24.1

6.3%

72.2%

77.3%

62.4%

84.3%

40

966

62.7%

16.81

56.1%

21.9

15.2%

61.4%

63.3%

52.0%

76.0%

27

855

60.2%

17.97

60.0%

21.8

12.0%

56.6%

64.5%

52.0%

66.9%

2

8

25.0%

16.86

55.4%

20.8

13.9%

56.8%

58.5%

43.8%

70.4%

2

513

55.9%

15.36

60.4%

20.9

16.5%

54.9%

58.0%

41.0%

62.5%

20

454

60.4%

17.53

51.1%

20.7

15.6%

55.1%

57.8%

40.4%

66.7%

24

959

57.7%

20.36

57.0%

20.9

14.0%

54.3%

56.6%

42.0%

57.3%

14

351

69.5%

20.15

60.9%

20.7

20.9%

55.6%

55.1%

39.1%

59.2%

17

515

73.0%

14.04

39.3%

19.8

20.9%

35.7%

53.6%

30.4%

83.9%

1

0

NC

16.18

48.0%

18.6

18.3%

40.0%

43.1%

22.0%

65.3%

0

0

NC

20.72

46.3%

19.5

19.4%

40.4%

44.3%

27.6%

62.7%

9

92

52.2%

14.53

60.9%

18.8

18.4%

42.8%

42.2%

27.5%

48.6%

9

155

61.3%

12.86

39.3%

19

27.7%

37.5%

44.6%

27.3%

38.6%

0

0

NC

15.64

52.1%

18.6

23.1%

28.8%

43.0%

25.6%

43.6%

6

99

27.3%

11.09

52.7%

17.3

28.9%

25.8%

30.4%

13.8%

31.5%

0

0

NC

11.65

47.5%

16.6

24.2%

18.8%

28.2%

8.8%

35.0%

4

94

5.3%

10.19

26.3%

NC

25.0%

0

NC

NC

0.0%

0

0

NC

w w w.

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43


Best SCHOOLS

Honorable Mentions Enrollment School

We’ve named the overall top seven in Ohio and top three in Kentucky, but that doesn’t mean other local schools aren’t great as well. That’s why we’ve compiled the top lists—from both Ohio and Kentucky—in four other categories: Student/Teacher Ratio, Four-Year Graduation Rate, Attendance Rate and Enrollment. While schools that did well in the following categories tended to do well overall, these top lists also contain plenty of surprises. Bill Ferguson Jr., who also puts together our Rating the Burbs project annually, collected and analyzed the data for this feature.

Enrollment

Attendance rate School

Rate

1 William Mason High School

3,465

1 Springboro High School

97.1%

2 Walnut Hills High School

2,905

2 Highlands High School

96.9%

3 Lakota East High School

2,393

3 William Mason High School

96.4%

4 West Clermont High School

2,280

4 Beechwood High School

96.3%

5 Oak Hills High School

2,227

5 Bellbrook High School

95.9%

6 Lakota West High School

2,168

5 Clark Montessori High School

95.9%

7 Fairfield High School

1,948

5 Western Brown High School

95.9%

8 Larry A. Ryle High School

1,866

8 Lebanon High School

95.8%

9 Springboro High School

1,843

9 Carlisle High School

95.6%

10 Simon Kenton High School

1,832

10 Madeira High School

95.5%

4-year graduation rate School

1 Bellevue High School

Rate

Student/teacher ratio School

Ratio

1 Summit Academy Secondary School-Middletown

6.90

2 School For Creative & Performing Arts High School 99.2%

2 New Miami High School

7.61

2 Walton-Verona High School

99.2%

3 Summit Academy Transition High School-Cincinnati 7.90

4 Walnut Hills High School

98.9%

4 Madison High School

10.03

5 Newport High School

98.8%

5 Silver Grove School

10.19

6 Waynesville High School

98.6%

6 Reading Community High School

11.03

7 Lebanon High School

98.4%

7 James N. Gamble Montessori High School

11.09

8 Wyoming High School

98.2%

7 Newport High School

11.09

9 Madeira High School

97.1%

9 Indian Hill High School

11.26

10 Campbell County High School

97.9%

10 Mariemont High School

11.42

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maga zine.com


Programming the

Future

HAMILTON HIGH SCHOOL Hamilton Hamilton High School is continuing to develop a sanctuary for special needs students to express themselves by embracing gardenbased learning that promotes collaboration and inclusiveness across the student body. “We wanted to create a learning environment where students can be outside, get messy, use their energy, but still make ties to content,” says Amy Michael, special education teacher and one of the project’s pioneers. The accessible sensory garden, producing everything from eggplants to herbs, is designed with the student’s needs in mind. The beautiful outdoor space, situated just outside the main hallway, consists of two traditional beds and two raised wheelchair beds to accommodate both adult and youthsized wheelchairs, although there are plans to construct a fully operational tiered bed and washing station in the future. Other students utilize adaptive tools allowing them to be involved like any other student. Hamilton’s garden impacts 60 students directly, though the project has drawn interest across various academic departments. In the future, the garden will continue to be used for hands-on science activities, while a new art mural elective plans on creating its first masterpiece on a wall facing the garden. “The unsung hero of this project is the carpentry department and Tim Carpenter,

While our school list gives you great information on the raw numbers of local schools, sometimes greatness can’t be measured. That’s why we looked at four programs offered by schools to find out what they’re doing to help students be prepared for future learning and careers. Read on to learn about what local schools are doing that may not be reflected in test scores, but will certainly help students later in life.

ironically the carpenter teacher, has been a vital member of the team,” says Michael, as she motions toward the tables, specifically designed by students with wheelchair accessibility in mind. “His students build what we need, which is great since we wouldn’t have been able to afford everything.” Jacqueline Nicholson, a special education teacher specializing in sensory learning, believes the garden creates a special environment in which students work together. “This space is accessible for everyone and we all work together as a team,” she says. - Noah Tong

HUGHES STEM HIGH SCHOOL Cincinnati

The Cincinnati Zoo Academy is the only college preparatory program in the U.S. to offer students hands-on work experience with zookeepers and the animals for which they care. Students at Hughes STEM High School take classes that prepare them for leadership roles in conversation and environmental science, as well as plant and animal care. Program participants also have the opportunity to meet on zoo grounds every day to work directly with zookeepers at the Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden. “We’re here to teach them a lot about the natural world, as well as expose them to careers that deal primarily with conservation of animal and plant species,” says Chris Edelen, Zoo Academy pathway instructor. The Zoo Academy has been a part of the Cincinnati public school system for over 40 years. The program accepts 50 students every year—25 juniors and 25 seniors—who hope to gain experience for a job in conservation. The program gives students unique experiences they would never have anywhere else. From bathing elephants to holding baby penguins or swimming with manatees, students gain valuable skills to use in their future professions. “You get to see a lot of really incredible things,” says Edelen. “These experiences when we encounter nature—up close and personal and in our face—stay with us for the rest of our lives.” – Keely Brown w w w.

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45


Best SCHOOLS

ROGER BACON HIGH SCHOOL Cincinnati

CINCINNATI PUBLIC SCHOOLS Cincinnati The Cincinnati Public Schools program Men, Organized, Respectful and Educated (M.O.R.E.) is changing lives. African-American males throughout the U.S. historically underperform academically at troubling rates, according to the Council of the Great City Schools. M.O.R.E. was created in 2011 as a districtwide initiative to support Cincinnati’s minority male students and works to improve the lives of these young men through academic achievement and social and community responsibility. The program works with African-American and other at-risk young men in grades four through 12. Each of the 26 M.O.R.E clubs includes after-school programs and enrichment opportunities to help students achieve their dreams. “The M.O.R.E. Program provides a space where its members can be vulnerable and develop into a strong, educated and respectful man,” says William Johnson, the program’s district coordinator and community partnership specialist for CPS. “M.O.R.E. impacts its members in school and throughout the community.” M.O.R.E. strives to save the lives and expand the minds of young men both mentally and socially to become an example for generations to follow. The program achieves this through school-based advi46

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sors—each club’s advisor facilitates club meetings and serves as an ambassador of the M.O.R.E. program at their schools and across the district. “M.O.R.E. advisors are the driving force of the program—they conduct the day to day operation of the program. They have the direct contact and influence of the young men that are in the program,” says Johnson. “Without the advisor the program would fail; the M.O.R.E. advisor is an essential part of the impact that the M.O.R.E. program has created.” – Keely Brown

Home to the country’s only high school underwater hockey team, Roger Bacon High School is teaching students to pursue their passions, even when they derive from the most unexpected sources. Paul Wittekind, social studies department chair and the team’s head coach since 1997, knows even the name is instinctively confusing to those unaware of the sport’s existence. “There’s a certain quirkiness to it,” says Wittekind. “People sometimes roll their eyes at the store when they see my underwater hockey shirt and ask, ‘Is that a real sport?’ but it comes with the territory.” Games begin as six players per team race to the center of the pool to gain possession of a three-pound lead puck before scoring in their opponent’s goal. Athletes wear masks, snorkels and fins and are equipped with a wooden or plastic stick with a banana curve that push the puck in front of them. Players are underwater for 30 seconds at a time on average, ultimately coming to the surface to temporarily watch play unfold at the bottom of the pool through their snorkels, says Wittekind. His teams, usually co-ed, are accustomed to success at a high level. Roger Bacon has won its division at nationals—this year taking place in Orlando, Florida—for four separate years, playing an assortment of college and adult teams. Roger Bacon students have even been chosen to represent Team USA at the youth level, as well as Wittekind himself from a coaching perspective. “I love watching kids grow up,” remarks Wittekind. “It’s rewarding to see kids grow up, graduate, go to their weddings and see them start families to have kids of their own. We, as a Catholic institution, want to educate the mind and body of our students.” - Noah Tong


The Best of the Best THIS YEAR’S OUTSTANDING EDUCATORS ARE JUST A SAMPLING OF OUR REGION’S GREAT TEACHERS

T

his year’s winners of our eighth annual K-12 Outstanding Educator Recognition Program are from public and private schools in both Ohio and Kentucky. Our committee picked teachers who went above and beyond expectations, and we’re honored to list these exemplary educators as well as tell one of their stories.

2019

AND THE WINNERS ARE Kathy Backherms Music Saint Ursula Academy CINCINNATI, OHIO

Erin Bannon

Sixth Grade Science Colerain Middle School CINCINNATI, OHIO

Erin Bole

Lisa Earnest

English DePaul Cristo Rey High School CINCINNATI, OHIO

Science Middletown Christian Schools FRANKLIN, OHIO

Melinda Boyd

Librarian Bethany School GLENDALE, OHIO

Kelly Flick

Seventh Grade Science Madiera Middle School CINCINNATI, OHIO

Learn More About Nativity Come see for yourself just how special Nativity could be for your family! Information Session Thursday, November 7, 2019 at 7:00 pm Coffee with the Principal Wednesday, December 4, 2019 at 9:00 am

www.whynativity.org (513) 458-6767

A Catholic K-8 Elementary School 5936 Ridge Avenue Cincinnati Ohio 45213 w w w.

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Kate Gandenberger

Pat Hemingway

Fifth Grade Math & Science St. James School CINCINNATI, OHIO

Katie Keuffer

Fourth Grade St. Veronica Parish School CINCINNATI, OHIO

Art St. Veronica Parish School CINCINNATI, OHIO

Jan Herrmann Adam Gardner

Music and Drama St. Veronica Parish School CINCINNATI, OHIO

Art Villa Madonna Academy High School/ Jr. High VILLA HILLS, KENTUCKY

Jane Kyle

Dan Greene

Molly Hoctor

Leann Lewis

Elementary St. Gertrude School

Second Grade St. James School CINCINNATI, OHIO

MADEIRA, OHIO Michelle Hofmann

Second Grade Our Lady of Victory CINCINNATI, OHIO

Karina Gross

Music Cincinnati Christian Schools FAIRFIELD, OHIO

Kim Icsman

French, World Languages Saint Ursula Academy CINCINNATI, OHIO

Saloni Hemani

Your first step to a

Curriculum & Instruction Coordinator DePaul Cristo Rey High School CINCINNATI, OHIO

better life.

Your first step to a better life.

Learn more at gateway.kctcs.edu/better-life NEVER UNDERESTIMATE YOU. 48

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Special Education Piner Elementary School MORNING VIEW, KENTUCKY

English Simon Kenton High School INDEPENDENCE, KENTUCKY

Jessica Long

Biology Mariemont High School CINCINNATI, OHIO

Carol Lumpkin

Fourth Grade Fort Wright Elementary School FORT WRIGHT, KENTUCKY


ERICKA SIMMONS Principal, Mariemont Elementary School

When she’s not getting hugs and high fives from students, Ericka Simmons guides Mariemont to unrivalled levels of success. Under her direction, the school was honored as one of 349 National Blue Ribbon Schools, receiving the status of “Exemplary High Performing School.” Mariemont also earned the Momentum Award from the State Board of Education of Ohio for the third straight year, formally signifying consistent academic growth.

Kelli Nitardy

Kathy Lynn

Special Education Fort Wright Elementary School FORT WRIGHT, KENTUCKY

Music Our Lady of Victory CINCINNATI, OHIO

Jordan Paquet

Heather Mastin

Second Grade St. James School CINCINNATI, OHIO

English Simon Kenton High School INDEPENDENCE, KENTUCKY

Despite the recognition, Simmons, in her sixth year, believes there is still room for improvement. “We never arrive at this place of excellence,” she says. “It’s really a journey. Every year our students challenge us and push us towards implementing best practices in the classroom.” “She is a constant source of support for her staff members, both professionally and personally,” says Alex Lange, director of communications, “and will stop at nothing to make sure her students know they are cared for and loved at Mariemont Elementary.” – Noah Tong

Gina Smearsoll

Biology Cincinnati Christian Schools FAIRFIELD, OHIO

Kristin Smith

Intervention Specialist Taylor Elementary School CINCINNATI, OHIO

Erin McGhee

Lori Payne

Heather Talbert

English and Language Arts Taylor Elementary School CINCINNATI, OHIO

Math Bishop Fenwick High School FRANKLIN, OHIO

Ashley Milar

Cheryl Petry

Second Grade Middletown Christian Schools FRANKLIN, OHIO

Molly Walter

Fifth Grade Fort Wright Elementary School FORT WRIGHT, KENTUCKY

Molly Moehring

Vilma Salaverria

Spanish Middletown Christian Schools FRANKLIN, OHIO

Kindergarten Our Lady of Victory CINCINNATI, OHIO

Lynne Morris

Don Shields

Athletic Director/Physical Education DePaul Cristo Rey High School CINCINNATI, OHIO

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Math Villa Madonna Academy High School/Jr. High VILLA HILLS, KENTUCKY

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Special Education Beechgrove Elementary School INDEPENDENCE, KENTUCKY

Fourth Grade River Ridge Elementary School VILLA HILLS, KENTUCKY

Angela Young

Fourth Grade Math Madiera Elementary School CINCINNATI, OHIO


Best SCHOOLS — GUIDE TO PRIVATE SCHOOLS 2019-2020

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he following chart lists private schools in southern Ohio, southeast Indiana and Northern Kentucky. All schools listed have 30 or more students and are not charter schools. Catholic, nonsectarian and other religious schools are all represented on the list. All information listed is based on the most recent data. This information may be subject to change.

School

Address

Zip

Phone

Website

Affiliation

Grades

OHIO CATHOLIC-ARCHDIOCESE OF CINCINNATI

All Saints School Annunciation Catholic School Archbishop Alter High School Archbishop McNicholas High School

8939 Montgomery Road, Cincinnati 45236 513-792-4732

allsaints.cc/school

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

K-8

3545 Clifton Ave., Cincinnati

45220 513-221-1230

school.annunciationbvmparish.org

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

PK-8

940 E. David Road, Kettering

45429 937-434-4434

alterhs.org

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

9-12

6536 Beechmont Ave., Cincinnati

45230 513-231-3500

mcnhs.org

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

9-12

The mission of McNicholas High School is “To inspire young men and women through faith formation and academic excellence to become compassionate leaders and grow toward full stature in Christ.” Archbishop Moeller High School

9001 Montgomery Road, Cincinnati 45242 513-791-1680

moeller.org

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

9-12

Ascension School

2001 Woodman Drive, Kettering

45420 937-254-5411

school.ascensionkettering.org

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

K-8

4855 State Route 122, Franklin

45005 513-423-0723

fenwickfalcons.org

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

9-12

Bishop Fenwick High School

Since 1952, Bishop Fenwick High School has been dedicated to promoting lifelong learning and Christian formation through spiritual, academic, service and extracurricular opportunities in a strong Catholic educational community. Students who walk through the doors of BFHS experience rigorous academic curriculum, highly engaged faculty and daily applications of our talons: faith, integrity, compassion and service. Cardinal Pacelli School Corryville Catholic Elementary School DePaul Cristo Rey High School Elder High School

927 Ellison Ave., Cincinnati

45226 513-321-1048

cardinalpacelli.org/cardinal-pacelli/

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

PK-8

108 Calhoun St., Cincinnati

45219 513-281-4856

corryvillecatholic.org

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

PK-8

1133 Clifton Hills Ave., Cincinnati

45220 513-861-0600

depaulcristorey.org

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

9-12

3900 Vincent Ave., Cincinnati

45205 513-921-3744

elderhs.org

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

9-12

Guardian Angels School

6539 Beechmont Ave., Cincinnati

45230 513-624-3141

gaschool.org

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

PK-8

Immaculate Heart of Mary School

7800 Beechmont Ave., Cincinnati

45255 513-388-4086

ihomschool.org

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

PK-8

John Paul II Catholic School

9375 Winton Road, Cincinnati

45231 513-521-0860

jpiics.org

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

PK-8

La Salle High School

3091 N. Bend Road, Cincinnati

45239 513-741-3000

lasallehs.net

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

9-12

Mercy McAuley High School

6000 Oakwood Ave., Cincinnati

45224 513-681-1800

mercymcauley.org

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

9-12

Mercy Montessori School

2335 Grandview Ave., Cincinnati

45206 513-475-6700

mercymontessori.org

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

PK-8

mtces.org

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

K-8

mndhs.org

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

9-12

Mother Teresa Catholic Elementary School Mount Notre Dame High School

7197 Mother Teresa Lane, Liberty 45044 513-779-6585 Township 711 E. Columbia Ave., Cincinnati

45215 513-821-3044

Mount Notre Dame is a Catholic, college preparatory high school for female students featuring over 150 academic course offerings, including 25 Honors classes, 20 AP Courses and multiple CCP opportunities. MND students are challenged to achieve more and graduate as empowered young women inspired to transform the world! Nativity School

5936 Ridge Ave., Cincinnati

45213 513-458-6767

nativity-cincinnati.org/school/

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

K-8

For over 90 years Nativity School has offered an education second to none to our students. We are proud of our tradition of academic excellence, with a global perspective all rooted in the Gospel of Jesus Christ. Discover more about Nativity School, the community that supports it and the opportunities available to your family.

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Best SCHOOLS — GUIDE TO PRIVATE SCHOOLS 2019-2020 School

Address

Our Lady of Grace Catholic School Our Lady of Lourdes School Our Lady of the Visitation School

Zip

Phone

2940 W. Galbraith Road, Cincinnati 45239 513-931-3070

Website

Affiliation

Grades

olgcs.org

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

K-8

5835 Glenway Ave., Cincinnati

45238 513-347-2660

school.lourdes.org

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

K-8

3180 South Road, Cincinnati

45248 513-347-2222

olvisitation.org/school

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

K-8

Our Lady of Victory School

808 Neeb Road, Cincinnati

45233 513-347-2072

olv.org

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

PK-8

Purcell Marian High School

2935 Hackberry St., Cincinnati

45206 513-751-1230

purcellmarian.org

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

9-12

Queen of Peace Catholic School

2550 Millville Ave., Hamilton

45013 513-863-8705

queenofpeacehamilton.org

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

PK-8

Resurrection School

1740 Iliff Ave., Cincinnati

45205 513-471-6600

resurrectionschool.org

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

K-8

Roger Bacon High School

4320 Vine St., Cincinnati

45217 513-641-1300

rogerbacon.org

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

9-12

200 Northcrest Drive, Mason

45040 513-754-0555

royalmontacademy.org

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

PK-12

Royalmont Academy

Royalmont Academy Catholic School, founded in 1996, serves preschool through high school students. Full- and half-day preschool and full-day kindergarten are offered. Royalmont offers an authentic Catholic education with pride in academic excellence, spiritual formation, leadership development, small class sizes and no-cut athletics. Sacred Heart of Jesus School

400 Nilles Road, Fairfield

45014 513-858-4215

shjs.org

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

K-8

3901 Glenway Ave., Cincinnati

45205 513-471-2600

setoncincinnati.org

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

9-12

St. Albert the Great School

104 W Dorothy Lane, Kettering

45429 937-293-9452

school.stalbertthegreat.net

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

PK-8

St. Aloysius Gonzaga School

4390 Bridgetown Road, Cincinnati

45211 513-574-4035

saintals.org

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

PK-8

Seton High School

Come and see what makes

Bethany different!

- Full Day Kindergarten - 8th Grade -15 to 1 Student to Teacher Ratio -On Site Before/After School Care & Activities

-Academic Excellence. Spiritual Growth.

OPEN HOUSES

October 6, 2019 January 26, 2020 2:00 - 4:00 pm

555 Albion Ave. - Glendale, Ohio 45246 513.771.7462 - www.bethanyschool.org

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School

Address

St. Andrew Campus

Zip

555 Main St., Milford

Phone

45150 513-831-5277

Website

Affiliation

Grades

saseasschool.org

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

6-8

St. Andrew - St. Elizabeth Ann Seton (SASEAS) is a National Blue Ribbon school offering exceptional academics with proven results, a Catholic curriculum steeped with values and a small environment which allows for an extraordinary, individualized, educational experience. Extraordinary Lives Begin Here! St. Ann Catholic School

3064 Pleasant Ave., Hamilton

45015 513-863-0604

saintanncs.com

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

PK-8

St. Ann Catholic School is committed to the spiritual, intellectual, physical and social growth of each student. Our school strives for academic excellence in an environment interwoven with the Gospel values of the Catholic faith. Each student is prepared to meet future challenges and to practice Christian service to the Church and the community. St. Antoninus School

5425 Julmar Drive, Cincinnati

45238 513-922-2500

saintantoninus.org/school

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

K-8

St. Bernadette School

1453 Locust Lake Road, Amelia

45102 513-753-4744

stbameliaschool.org

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

PK-8

St. Bernard School

7115 Springdale Road, Cincinnati

45247 513-353-4224

stbernardtc.org

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

K-8

4305 Pitts Ave., Cincinnati

45223 513-541-5122

stbonifaceschool.net

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

K-8

3324 Wunder Ave., Cincinnati

45211 513-481-7683

stcathos.org/school

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

K-8

St. Boniface School St. Catharine of Siena Catholic School St. Cecilia School St. Charles Borromeo School St. Clement School

4115 Taylor Ave., Cincinnati

45209 513-533-6060

school.stceciliacincinnati.org

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

PK-8

4600 Ackerman Blvd., Kettering

45429 937-434-4933

stcharles-kettering.org/school

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

PK-8

4534 Vine St., St. Bernard

45217 513-641-2137

stcschool.org

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

PK-8

Notre Dame Academy,

preparing graduates to be outstanding female leaders

serving the world.

BY THE NUMBERS

10,000

Alumnae nationwide, making a difference in every state and 9 countries

$16.8 million

in scholarships offered to NDA’s Class of 2019

43%

of NDA’s Class of 2019 received offers of half tuition or more to college

99-100%

of seniors accepted into college each year

15:1

Student-to-faculty ratio

$865,000

in financial assistance given in 2018-19

Learn more about Notre Dame Academy at our

OPEN HOUSE

November 3, 2019 1-3 p.m.

1699 Hilton Drive, Park Hills, KY 41011 | 859.292.1829 | www.ndapandas.org w w w.

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Best SCHOOLS — GUIDE TO PRIVATE SCHOOLS 2019-2020 School

Address

Zip

Phone

Website

Affiliation

Grades

St. Columban School

896 Oakland Road, Loveland

45140 513-683-7903

saintcolumbanschool.org

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

PK-8

St. Dominic School

371 Pedretti Road, Cincinnati

45238 513-251-1276

stdominic-k-8.org

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

PK-8

1602 Madison Road, Cincinnati

45206 513-961-1953

desalescincy.org

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

PK-8

St. Francis de Sales School - Lebanon

20 DeSales Ave., Lebanon

45036 513-932-6501

stfrancisdesales-lebanon.com

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

K-8

St. Francis Seraph School

14 E. Liberty St., Cincinnati

45202 513-721-7778

sfsschool.com

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

PK-8

18 W. Sharon Road, Glendale

45246 513-771-5220

stgabeschool.org

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

K-8

6543 Miami Ave., Maderia

45243 513-561-8020

stgertrudesch.org

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

K-8

5222 North Bend Road, Cincinnati 45247 513-389-3242

sainti.org/school

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

PK-8

St. Francis de Sales School

St. Gabriel Consolidated School St. Gertrude School St. Ignatius of Loyola School St. James School St. John the Baptist School St. John the Baptist School - Harrison St. John XXIII Catholic School St. Joseph Consolidated School St. Jude School St. Lawrence School

6111 Cheviot Road, Cincinnati

45247 513-741-5333

stjameswo.org

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

K-8

5375 Dry Ridge Road, Cincinnati

45252 513-385-7970

stjohnsdrschool.org

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

PK-8

508 Park Ave., Harrison

45030 513-367-6826

3806 Manchester Road, Middletown 45042 513-424-1196 925 S. Second St., Hamilton

45011 513-863-8758

5940 Bridgetown Road, Cincinnati 45248 513-598-2100 1020 Carson Ave., Cincinnati

sjbharrison.org

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

PK-8

stjohn23school.org

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

PK-8

sjcshamilton.org

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

PK-8

stjudecincy.org

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

K-8

45205 513-921-4996

stlawrenceparish.org/school

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

PK-8

St. Louis School

250 Broadway St., Owensville

45160 513-732-0636

stlparish.org/school

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

PK-8

St. Margaret of York School

9495 Columbia Road, Loveland

45140 513-697-3100

smoy.org/school

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

K-8

3729 Harding Ave., Cheviot

45211 513-661-7609

saintmartin.org/schools

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

K-8

St. Martin of Tours School

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School

Address

Zip

Phone

Website

Affiliation

Grades

St. Mary Hyde Park School

2845 Erie Ave., Cincinnati

45208 513-321-0703

smshp.com

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

K-8

St. Michael School

11136 Oak St., Sharonville

45241 513-554-3555

stmichaelsharonville.org

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

K-8

170 Siebenthaler Ave., Reading

45215 513-686-2727

stnacademy.org

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

PK-8

St. Nicholas Academy St. Peter in Chains School St. Rita School for the Deaf St. Susanna School St. Teresa of Avila School St. Thomas More School

451 Ridgelawn Ave., Hamilton

45013 513-863-0685

stpeterinchains.org/our-school

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

PK-8

1720 G lendale M ilford Road , Cincinnati

45215 513-771-7600

srsdeaf.org

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

PK-12

500 Reading Road, Mason

45040 513-398-3821

stsusannaschool.org

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

K-8

1194 Rulison Ave., Cincinnati

45238 513-471-4530

stteresa.net

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

K-8

788 Ohio Pike, Cincinnati

45245 513-753-2540

sttmschool.org

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

PK-8

school.stveronica.org

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

PK-8

St. Veronica School

4475 Mt. Carmel Tobasco Road, 45244 513-528-0442 Cincinnati

St. Vincent Ferrer Catholic School

7754 Montgomery Road, Cincinnati 45236 513-791-6320

svf-school.org

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

K-8

885 Denier Place, Cincinnati

45224 513-522-6858

mystvivian.org

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

PK-8

St. William School

4125 St. William Ave., Cincinnati

45205 513-471-2989

swscincinnati.com

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

PK-8

Stephen T. Badin High School

571 New London Road, Hamilton

45013 513-863-3993

badinhs.org

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

9-12

St. Vivian School

At Badin, students are more than just a test score. We welcome all students because we know that who they are now is just a glimmer of who they will become through the welcoming Badin environment. In a co-ed Catholic environment, students will have big opportunities in a small school setting. The Sky’s the Limit and we are excited to watch our students Think, Achieve, Serve and Lead! The Class of 2019, 130 strong, achieved over $17.5 million in academic college scholarships. #BadinProud #theskysthelimit

Royalmont Academy A Pre K - Grade 12 Catholic School

• Preschool - 12th grade • Full and 1/2 Day Preschool

OPEN HOUSE

• Full Day Kindergarten • Academic Excellence

Sunday, October 27 1:00 – 3:30 p.m.

• Small class sizes

COME AND EXPERIENCE THE WELCOMING, FAMILY ATMOSPHERE. TOUR OUR BEAUTIFUL CAMPUS, including our new Theater, and Art/Design Wing. Plus, see how students are learning through advanced technology like 3-D Printing, Robotics, and our unique one-to-one Tablet PC Program. Learn why Saint Ursula is the expert in All-Girls Education, empowering every student to achieve great Success in high school, college and beyond.

Saint Ursula Academy Admissions Office: 1339 East McMillan St., Cincinnati, OH 45206 www.saintursula.org | Contact Michelle Dellecave, (513) 961-3410 ext. 183 or mdellecave@saintursula.org

Follow Us! SUABulldogs SaintUrsulaAcademy

Bringing Souls to Christ by Forming Christian Leaders

OPEN HOUSE

November 10th, 2:00 - 4:00 pm January 26th, 2:00 - 4:00 pm

Come see the Royalmont Difference! 200 Northcrest Drive • Mason, Ohio 45040 513-754-0555 • www.royalmont.org w w w.

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Best SCHOOLS — GUIDE TO PRIVATE SCHOOLS 2019-2020 School

Sts. Peter and Paul Academy

Address

Zip

Phone

Website

Affiliation

Grades

231 Clark Road, Reading

45215 513-761-7772

sppacademy.org

Catholic-Archdiocese of Cincinnati

K-8

4460 Berwick St., Cincinnati

45227 513-271-4171

gscmontessori.org

Catholic-Independent

PK-8

1339 E. McMillan St., Cincinnati

45206 513-961-3410

saintursula.org

Catholic-Independent

9-12

CATHOLIC-INDEPENDENT (OH)

Good Shepherd Catholic Montessori Saint Ursula Academy

Saint Ursula Academy transforms young women into confident difference-makers. Students learn to be committed to building a better world through strong academics, a dynamic, welcoming and nurturing environment, and endless opportunities to develop their unique interests through service, athletics, leadership and co-curricular opportunities. Choosing Saint Ursula is a wise investment in your future. The Class of 2019 earned more than $25 million in scholarship offers. St. Edmund Campion Academy

4100 Watterson St., Cincinnati

45227 513-871-0331

stedmundcampion.info

Catholic-Independent

1-12

St. Gertrude the Great School

4900 Rialto Road, West Chester

45069 513-645-4216

sgg.org

Catholic-Independent

K-12

St. Ursula Villa School

3660 Vineyard Place, Cincinnati

45226 513-871-7218

stursulavilla.org

Catholic-Independent

PK-8

St. Xavier High School

stxavier.org

Catholic-Independent

9-12

The Summit Country Day School

600 W. North Bend Road, Cincinnati 45224 513-761-7600 2161 Grandin Road, Cincinnati

45208 513-871-4700

summitcds.org

Catholic-Independent

PK-12

Ursuline Academy

5535 Pfeiffer Road, Cincinnati

45242 513-791-5791

ursulineacademy.org

Catholic-Independent

9-12

1810 Young St., Cincinnati

45202 513-763-6655

aldersgatechristian.com

Christian

K-12

OTHER RELIGIOUS SCHOOLS (OH)

Aldersgate Christian Academy

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School

Beautiful Savior Lutheran School Bethany School

Address

Zip

Phone

Website

Affiliation

Grades

11981 Pippin Road, Cincinnati

45231 513-825-2290

beautifulsaviorschool.com

Lutheran

PK-8

555 Albion Ave., Glendale

45246 513-771-7462

bethanyschool.org

Episcopal

K-8

The mission of Bethany School is to be a community where all members can thrive as learners, growing and developing academically, socially, physically, emotionally and spiritually; where students experience and learn respect, responsibility and an appreciation for diversity; and where academic excellence is valued. Central Baptist Academy

7645 Winton Road, Cincinnati

45224 513-521-5481

centralbaptistacademy.org

Baptist

K-8

Cincinnati Christian Schools Elementary Campus

7350 Dixie Highway, Fairfield

45014 513-874-8500

cincinnatichristian.org

Christian

PK-6

Cincinnati Christian Schools, partnering with Christian families, provides a Bible-centered, 21st century, quality educational program to equip, train and disciple students to follow Christ and impact culture. Cincinnati Christian Schools Junior/Senior High Campus

7474 Morris Road, Fairfield

45011 513-892-8500

cincinnatichristian.org

Christian

7-12

2222 Losantiville Road, Cincinnati

45237 513-351-7777

chdsonline.org

Jewish

PK-8

Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy Edyth B. Lindner Elementary

11312 Snider Road, Cincinnati

45249 513-247-0900

chca-oh.org

Christian

PK-3

Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy Martha S. Lindner High School

11525 Snider Road, Cincinnati

45249 513-247-0900

chca-oh.org

Christian

9-12

Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy Founders Middle School

11300 Snider Road, Cincinnati

45249 513-247-0900

chca-oh.org

Christian

4-8

Cincinnati Hebrew Day School

w w w.

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Best SCHOOLS — GUIDE TO PRIVATE SCHOOLS 2019-2020 School

Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy Otto Armleder Memorial Education Center Clifton Christian Academy El-Sewedy International Academy of Cincinnati

Address

Zip

Phone

Website

Affiliation

Grades

140 W. Ninth St., Cincinnati

45202 513-721-2422

chca-oh.org

Christian

PK-6

3798 Clifton Ave., Cincinnati

45220 513-751-1255

cliftonchristianacademy.org

Seventh-Day Adventist

PK-8

intlacademy.org

Islamic

PK-8

8094 Plantation Drive, West 45069 513-755-0169 Chester

Immanuel Lutheran School

1285 Main St., Hamilton

45013 513-895-9212

immanuelhamilton.com

Lutheran-Missouri Synod

PK-8

Lebanon Christian Academy

130 Cook Road, Lebanon

45036 513-228-0677

lebanonchristianschool.org

Christian

PK

1436 Deerfield Road, Lebanon

45036 513-932-5590

lebanonchristianschool.org

Christian

K-5

2634 Drake Road, Lebanon

45036 513-932-5590

lebanonchristianschool.org

Christian

6-12

libertybibleacademy.org

Christian

PK-12

marshill.edu

Classical Christian

K-12

Lebanon Christian Elementary School Lebanon Christian Middle & High School Liberty Bible Academy Mars Hill Academy Miami Valley Christian Academy Milford Christian Academy Rockwern Academy

4900 Old Irwin Simpson Road, 45040 513-754-1234 Mason 4230 Aero Drive, Mason

45040 513-770-3223

6830 School St., Cincinnati

45244 513-272-6822

mvca-oh.com

Christian

PK-12

1365 Woodville Pike, Milford

45150 513-575-1708

mcabulldogs.org

Christian

PK-12

rockwernacademy.org

Jewish

PK-8

8401 Montgomery Road, Cincinnati 45236 513-984-3770

St. Mark's Lutheran School

5849 Buckwheat Road, Milford

45150 513-575-3354

stmarksmilford.org

Lutheran

PK-8

Zion Temple Christian Academy

3771 Reading Road, Cincinnati

45229 513-861-5551

ztca.org

Christian

PK-6

Central Montessori Academy

1904 Springdale Road, Cincinnati

45231 513-742-5800

centralmontessoriacademy.com

Nonsectarian

PK-6

Children's Meeting House Montessori School

927 O'Bannonville Road, Loveland 45140 513-683-4757

cmhschool.com

Nonsectarian

PK-6 PK-12

PRIVATE NONSECTARIAN (OH)

Cincinnati Country Day School

6905 Given Road, Cincinnati

45243 513-561-7298

countryday.net

Nonsectarian

Cincinnati Waldorf High School

6703 Madison Road, Cincinnati

45227 513-386-7974

cincinnatiwaldorfschool.org

Nonsectarian

9-12

6743 Chestnut St., Cincinnati

45227 513-541-0220

cincinnatiwaldorfschool.org

Nonsectarian

PK-8

Cincinnati Waldorf School Linden Grove School

4122 Mrytle Ave., Cincinnati

45236 513-984-2215

lindengroveschool.org

Special Needs

K-8

McGuffey Montessori School

5128 Westgate Drive, Oxford

45056 513-523-7742

mcguffeymontessori.com

Nonsectarian

PK-9

8293 Duke Blvd., Mason

45040 513-398-7773

montacademy.org

Nonsectarian

PK-8

Montessori Academy of Cincinnati Seven Hills School

5400 Red Bank Road, Cincinnati

45227 513-728-2400

7hills.org

Nonsectarian

PK-12

Springer School and Center

2121 Madison Road, Cincinnati

45208 513-871-6080

springer-ld.org

Learning Disabilities

1-8

The New School Montessori

3 Burton Woods Lane, Cincinnati

45229 513-281-7999

newschoolmontessori.com

Nonsectarian

PK-6

8100 Cornell Road, Cincinnati

45249 513-489-8940

schillingschool.org

Gifted Children

K-12

1 Twister Circle, Oldenburg

47036 812-934-4440

oldenburgacademy.org

Catholic-Independent

9-12

The Schilling School for Gifted Children INDIANA

Oldenburg Academy of the Immaculate Conception St. John Lutheran School

222 Mechanic St., Aurora

47001 812-926-2656

stjohnlcms.com

Lutheran-Missouri Synod

PK-8

St. Lawrence School

524 Walnut St. Lawrenceburg

47025 812-537-3690

stlschool.com

Catholic-Independent

PK-8

St. Louis Catholic School

17 E. St. Louis Place, Batesville

47006 812-934-3310

st.louisschool.org

Catholic-Independent

PK-8

stnicholas-sunman.org

Catholic-Independent

K-8

St. Nicholas Catholic School

6459 E. St. Nicholas Drive, Sunman 47041 812-623-2348

KENTUCKY CATHOLIC-DIOCESE OF COVINGTON

Bishop Brossart High School

4 Grove St., Alexandria

41001 859-635-2108

bishopbrossart.org

Catholic-Diocese of Covington

9-12

2407 Dixie Highway, Ft. Mitchell

41017 859-331-3062

school.bssky.org

Catholic-Diocese of Covington

K-8

1600 Dixie Highway, Park Hills

41011 859-491-2247

covcath.org

Catholic-Diocese of Covington

9-12

21 E. 11th St., Covington

41011 859-291-7044

covingtonlatin.org

Catholic-Diocese of Covington

7-12

Holy Cross District High School

3617 Church St., Covington

41015 859-431-1335

hchscov.com

Catholic-Diocese of Covington

9-12

Holy Cross Elementary School

3615 Church St., Latonia

41015 859-581-6599

holycrosselem.com

Catholic-Diocese of Covington

K-8

Holy Family Catholic School

338 E. 16th St., Covington

41014 859-581-0290

stbenedictcovington.com

Catholic-Diocese of Covington

K-8

Holy Trinity School

235 Division St., Bellevue

41073 859-291-6937

holytrinity-school.org

Catholic-Diocese of Covington

K-5

Blessed Sacrament School Covington Catholic High School Covington Latin School

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The Most Accessible Orthopaedic & Sports Medicine Care in the Tri-State. 24/7 SCHEDULING & WALK-IN APPOINTMENTS, A ONE-STOP SHOP PATIENT EXPERIENCE Beacon Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine has eight locations in the Cincinnati Tri-State area that offer comprehensive musculoskeletal care for patients of all ages. Get your diagnosis, imaging and treatment completed all under one roof. View Orthopaedic Urgent Care Hours or Schedule an Appointment 24/7 Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine

513.530.3322 • www.BeaconOrtho.com


Best SCHOOLS — GUIDE TO PRIVATE SCHOOLS 2019-2020 School

Address

Zip

Phone

Website

Affiliation

Grades

Immaculate Heart of Mary School

5876 Veterans Way, Burlington

41005 859-689-5010

ihm-ky.org/school

Catholic-Diocese of Covington

PK-8

Mary, Queen of Heaven School

1130 Donaldson Road, Erlanger

41018 859-371-8100

mqhschool.com

Catholic-Diocese of Covington

K-8

Newport Central Catholic High School

13 Carothers Road, Newport

41071 859-292-0001

ncchs.com

Catholic-Diocese of Covington

9-12

Notre Dame Academy

1699 Hilton Drive, Park Hills

41011 859-261-4300

ndapandas.org

Catholic-Diocese of Covington

9-12

Notre Dame Academy is NKY’s ONLY Catholic college-preparatory high school exclusively for young women. Sponsored by the Sisters of Notre, NDA provides a premier education empowering young women to become intelligent and compassionate leaders who strive to make a difference in the world. NDA graduates are poised, confident, loving and intellectually competent young women prepared for a life of service to others. Prince of Peace Montessori School St. Agnes School

625 Pike St., Covington

41011 859-431-5153

popcov.com

Catholic-Diocese of Covington

PK-8

1322 Sleepy Hollow Road, Ft. Wright

41011 859-261-0543

school.saintagnes.com

Catholic-Diocese of Covington

K-8

St. Anthony School

485 Grand Ave., Taylor Mill

41015 859-431-5987

saintanthonytaylormill.org/school

Catholic-Diocese of Covington

K-8

St. Augustine School

1840 Jefferson Ave., Covington

41014 859-261-5564

staugustines.net

Catholic-Diocese of Covington

K-8

St. Catherine of Siena School

1803 N. Ft. Thomas Ave., Ft. Thomas

41075 859-572-2680

stcatherineofsiena.org

Catholic-Diocese of Covington

K-8

St. Cecilia Catholic School

5313 Madison Pike, Independence

41051 859-363-4314

saintceciliaschool.net

Catholic-Diocese of Covington

PK-8

St. Henry Catholic School

3825 Dixie Highway, Elsmere

41018 859-342-2551

sthenryschool.net

Catholic-Diocese of Covington

PK-8

St. Henry District High School

3755 Scheben Drive, Erlanger

41018 859-525-0255

shdhs.org

Catholic-Diocese of Covington

9-12

4011 Alexandria Pike, Cold Spring

41076 859-441-2025

stjosephcoldspring.com

Catholic-Diocese of Covington

PK-8

St. Joseph - Cold Spring

L E A R N • L I V E • L E A D • S E RV E

Bishop Fenwick High School WE’RE CLOSER THAN YOU THINK!

DAYTON

35

20 MILES / 27 MINUTES

66 ACRE STATE OF THE ART CAMPUS

19.4 MILES / 23 MINUTES

OUR LADY OF GOOD HOPE 16.5 MILES / 22 MINUTES

13 MILES / 25 MINUTES

SPRINGBORO SCHOOLS

ST. MARY OF THE ASSUMPTION 9.8 MILES / 18 MINUTES

ST. AUGUSTINE - WAYNESVILLE

ST. JOHN XXII

14 MILES / 21 MINUTES

6 MILES / 9 MINUTES

11 MILES / 16 MINUTES

73

123

HOLY TRINITY CHURCH

Bishop Fenwick HIGH SCHOOL

6.5 MILES / 15 MINUTES

42 122 LEBANON SCHOOLS

Est. 1952

8 MILES / 12 MINUTES

ST. FRANCIS DE SALES 8 MILES / 12 MINUTES

4

ST. SUSANNA

LEBANON

42

14 MILES / 16 MINUTES

ROYALMONT ACADEMY

PRINCETON

13 MILES / 18 MINUTES

MASON

LAKOTA SCHOOLS 15 MILES / 18 MINUTES

ST. GABRIEL CONSOLIDATED

7 MILES / 10 MINUTES

CENTERVILLE

4

MOTHER TERESA

21 MILES / 23 MINUTES

INCARNATION

17 MILES / 18 MINUTES

15 MILES / 17 MINUTES

ST. AUGUSTINE - GERMANTOWN

SMALL CLASS SIZE & STUDENT—TEACHER RATIO 127 TRENTON

4

BEAVERCREEK

ST CHARLES BORROMEO BISHOP LEIBOLD + ST. HENRY

COEDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES

to transform the world.

35

KETTERING

1:1 TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM

Empowered

ST. ALBERT THE GREAT

ST. MICHAEL

19 MILES / 23 MINUTES

275

71

MASON SCHOOLS

SOUTH LEBANON

12 MILES / 16 MINUTES

75 42

ST. MARGARET OF YORK

ST. COLUMBAN

22 MILES / 35 MINUTES

17 MILES / 25 MINUTES

LOVELAND

TRANSFORMING STUDENT LIVES 711 E. Columbia Avenue • Cincinnati, OH 45215 60

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fenwickfalcons.org | 513.428.0525

4855 State Route 122, Franklin, OH 45005


School

Address

St. Joseph - Crescent Springs St. Joseph Academy

2474 Lorraine Ave., Crescent Springs 48 Needmore St., Walton

Zip

Phone

Website

Affiliation

Grades

41017 859-578-2742

sjscrescent.net

Catholic-Diocese of Covington

PK-8

41094 859-485-6444

sjawalton.com

Catholic-Diocese of Covington

PK-8

St. Mary School

9 S. Jefferson St., Alexandria

41001 859-635-9539

saintmaryparish.com/school

Catholic-Diocese of Covington

PK-8

St. Paul School

7303 Dixie Highway, FlorenceÂ

41042 859-647-4070

stpaulnky.org/school/

Catholic-Diocese of Covington

PK-8

St. Philip School

1 4 0 0 M a r y I n g l e s H i g h w ay, Melbourne

41059 859-441-3423

stphilipky.org

Catholic-Diocese of Covington

K-8

348 Dudley Road, Edgewood

41017 859-341-4900

school.stpiusx.com

Catholic-Diocese of Covington

K-8

St. Pius X Catholic School St. Therese Catholic School

2516 Alexandria Pike, Southgate

41071 859-441-0449

school.sainttherese.ws

Catholic-Diocese of Covington

K-8

St. Thomas School

428 S. Ft. Thomas Ave., Ft. Thomas

41075 859-572-4641

sttschool.org

Catholic-Diocese of Covington

PK-8

Sts. Peter and Paul School

21 6 0 C a l i fo r n i a C ro s s ro ad s , 41007 859-635-4382 California

stspp.com

Catholic-Diocese of Covington

PK-8

Villa Madonna Academy

2500 Amsterdam Road, Villa Hills

41017 859-331-6333

villamadonna.org

Catholic-Diocese of Covington

K-12

5955 Taylor Mill Road, Covington

41015 859-356-9201

ccsky.org

Baptist

PK-12

11875 Taylor Mill Road, Independence

41051 859-356-7990

ccaky.org

Pentecostal

PK-12

10310 Dixie Highway, Florence

41042 859-371-9008

zionchristianacademy.com

Christian

K-8

2625 Anderson Road, Crescent Springs

41017 859-331-3725

nkmacademy.org

Nonsectarian

PK-6

OTHER RELIGIOUS SCHOOLS (KY)

Calvary Christian School Community Christian Academy Zion Christian Academy PRIVATE NONSECTARIAN (KY)

Northern Kentucky Montessori Academy

Experience the CCS Difference!

INRI

Schools

Cincinnat

hristian iC

Est. 1971

C I N C I N N AT I CHRISTIAN SCHOOLS

Admissions Office 513.892.8500 www.cincinnatichristian.org

Junior/Senior High Campus 7474 Morris Road, Fairfield, OH

Elementary Campus 7350 Dixie Hwy. Fairfield, OH w w w.

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Best SCHOOLS

Developing the Whole Child ST. GERTRUDE FOSTERS ITS STUDENTS ACADEMICALLY AND SPIRITUALLY By Corinne Minard

W

hile many of us think purely of academics when we think of school, St. Gertude School in Madeira is focused on developing the whole child. “[When you talk about the whole child], typically you talk about the social, emotional, spiritual, academic, just the whole picture of what it means to be human,” says Sister Maria Christi, O.P., principal of the preschool-through-eighth grade Catholic school. The school fosters students’ academic and artistic sides with features like its active theater program, Latin classes and outdoor classroom, but St. Gertrude also works to develop students’ spirituality, even with students as young as age 3.

CATECHESIS OF THE GOOD SHEPHERD St. Gertrude School is the only school in the Tristate that uses the Catechesis of the Good Shepherd method. Developed by Sophia Cavalletti and Gianna Gobbi in Rome in the 1950s, the Catechesis of the Good Shepherd uses Montessori principles to assist children in understanding Catholic teachings and developing a relationship with God. St. Gertrude first developed its atrium (a dedicated space specifically designed for this type of learning) five years ago and has seen the program grow since then. Students ages 3 through 9 participate and the program even has its own staff. “We’re really trying to continue to build this and make it an important part of their week while they’re here,” says Cindy Wurzelbacher, director of the Catechesis of the Good Shepherd at St. Gertrude. When students are in the atrium, they are presented “works”—interactive fig62

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ures or displays that showcase biblical, liturgical or historical concepts. Students are presented the work as a group and shown how to interact with the figures. Wurzelbacher uses the Annunciation as an example. “That’s the story of when the angel Gabriel came to visit Mary and invited her to be Jesus’ mother. So there’s a house and there’s a little Mary and there’s a little Gabriel peg doll—although we don’t play in the atrium, we pray, so when I use the word doll let me be clear we are not playing. And then we have a Holy Spirit dove that’s part of it. We read directly from the scripture, even to our youngest friends. And then as we read it … we will move Gabriel over to Mary and then they will talk. And then you will ask pondering questions. I wonder how Mary felt. I wonder did Mary question whether she should say yes or not. You just ask a lot of pondering questions,” she says. Once a student has received a presentation, they are able to interact with that work during their time in the atrium. And as a student gets older, they will be brought back to previous works and asked more complex questions to help them further build their understanding. However, much of each student’s time is spent interacting with these works by themselves or with a partner. “It’s all work, whether you’re 3 or whether you’re in the fourth grade. This is your work time. And they treat it as such. And they’re quiet and they’re prayerful, for the most part. It’s about learning grace and courtesy. It’s about learning that my friends are also praying right now, so I need to be respectful of that,” says Wurzelbacher. ““It’s really a quiet, contemplative meditative environment where [we’re] asking pondering questions, trying to create wonder and awe in the child to slow them down and to ultimately build a personal relationship with Christ.”

A young St. Gertrude School student works with a map of Israel.

VIRTUE PROGRAM Another way St. Gertrude is looking to develop the whole child is with its Virtue program. Assistant Principal Travis Johnson says that the program was first created by the sisters at the school and was developed to help students learn to be virtuous people. “There are three theological virtues: faith, hope and charity, or love. We focus on one of those every three years,” he says. “What we do is we have these subvirtues, nine of them, that follow under that theological virtue, faith, hope and love, and then every month we’re focusing on a different virtue, whether it’s patience, whether it’s temperance, whether it’s zeal, whether it’s justice, prudence, forgiveness, responsibility, and we highlight each one of those every month and the teachers talk about it in the classrooms, they integrate them into their curriculum and their lessons. “The emphasis is on them becoming virtuous and therefore being happy, but being happy in a virtuous way.” The virtues are also integrated into activities, mentioned during announcements and connected back to saints on


their feast days. “It’s actually putting into the concrete, putting the virtue into a concrete person, which when you’re trying to inspire children to be virtuous people, holy people, good people, you can talk about it all you want, but in the end we need an example,” says Johnson. Second graders even put on a Gallery of Saints each year where they dress up as different saints, line up in the halls and give presentations of the saints to those who walk by. “I think by doing the virtues program, it creates an awareness of not just the rules of not doing the wrong thing but really trying to strive to be the best person we can and the best response to the truth of who we are,” says Christi.

YOUTH MINISTRY St. Gertrude’s active youth ministry keeps students actively involved in their faith as they get older. The school and parish offer both a junior high and high school youth ministry, keeping kids connected even after they leave school. “The youth ministry has been a paid position here since 1999—the parish has seen that the ministry is an important part of parish life,” says Kristen Eggers, Office of Youth Evangelization assistant. She says that Brian Wells, who leads

the junior high youth ministry, actively works to get students excited about their faith with activities like group hikes or get-togethers like the morning event Jesus and Doughnuts. “Brian’s a lot of fun. He stands outside at dismissal and not only greets the junior high kids but everyone who walks by, you know high fives, handshakes. Just to have a relationship with them. And then through that he can help lead them and guide them in prayer,” says Eggers. Wurzelbacher, who is also a parent at the school, says she appreciates how involved

St. Gertrude students spend their time in the atrium with “works,” which are displays or figures that help them learn about biblical or spiritual concepts.

the youth ministry is. “It’s not just a junior high youth ministry thing that’s done over [on the side]. It is an active and visible part of our school campus,” she says. And it’s just one more way that St. Gertrude looks to develop the whole child within its students. n w w w.

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Best SCHOOLS

Always Improving

To stay competitive and ahead of the game, Badin High School is always looking for ways to improve.

think is important and that you can get accomplished. This is a great summer for progress. Certainly the safety of our students is a priority and [these updates] will help us enhance that,” says Allen. These changes come at a time of great growth for the school. Enrollment has continued to increase—from 450 students in 2010 to 620 in the upcoming school year—with students in the 2018-2019 school year alone hailing from 46 different junior high schools and 29 zip codes. Allen credits much of the growth of the school to its passionate families. “The word in the community about Badin is very positive, which I certainly attribute to our continuous improvement. It’s a winning cycle. Students and families speak well of the Badin experience and what we like to call the Badin Family. Being the admissions director is my job, and it’s easy to encourage people to come to Badin. But when your students and families are talking you up, that’s what really resonates,” he says. And continuous improvements—to both the curriculum and the school facility— make a big difference. The school has a 1:1 iPad program, a yearlong Integrated Tech

class for freshmen, four years of engineering classes through Project Lead the Way, Advanced Placement and College Credit Plus classes, and even an Economics/ Personal Finance class. The additions to the academic curriculum have paid off for the students. The 20182019 class earned a total of $17.5 million in academic scholarships, with 59 of the 130 students each earning more than $100,000. The summer may almost be over, but Badin isn’t finished improving its campus this year. The schools expects to break ground on a new $2 million Student Development Center before the summer ends. The new facility will connect the Pfirman Family Activity Center with the main building, add a student commons area, relocate several offices and allow the school to have more classroom space in the main building. It’s just one more update that shows Badin’s commitment to continuous improvement. “It’s interesting to me that students and parents do notice everything we do. Even if it’s just painting a hallway, they will see it and appreciate it. They know that you’re working to improve the facility and the experience,” says Allen. n

BADIN HIGH SCHOOL COMMITS TO CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENTS WITH A SERIES OF PROJECTS THIS SUMMER By Corinne Minard

B

adin High School doesn’t take the summer off. While students may be out of classes, Badin is working to improve itself with a series of updates. “We’re always working to get better. If you’re not getting better, if you’re staying the same, then you’re losing ground, because other schools are going past you,” says Dirk Q. Allen, director of admissions and media relations for the school. Those updates include: - installing air conditioning in the gym, a $175,000 project that will bring air conditioning to the gymnasium for the first time, - adding more space for the music department with the addition of a new piano loft in the Pfirman Family Activity Center, - swapping out the doors in the lower classrooms with new security-enhanced doors and creating a new guest entrance. “Each summer you prioritize what you 64

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Best SCHOOLS

Rocketing Ahead ARCHBISHOP MCNICHOLAS HIGH SCHOOL EMBRACES NEW PROGRAMS UNDER THE LEADERSHIP OF PRINCIPAL DAVID MUELLER By Kevin Michell

D

avid Mueller joined Archbishop McNicholas High School as principal in 2018 after over 40 years as a Catholic school educator. It took just one Friday night football game for him to grasp what makes Mt. Washington’s coed Catholic high school and the community that surrounds it special. “I knew I had wandered into a place that really had a tradition,” Mueller says, “a really strong historical legacy that people were proud of and a consciousness that there’s a gift of good relationships and community here.” In his first year as principal, the quality of everyone in the McNicholas family—from the faculty and staff to the students and alumni—inspired him. Now, in his second year, he and the school are creating new ways to enlighten students and better prepare them for their eventual careers. McNicholas’ commitment to STEAM— which stands for Science, Technology, Engineering, the Arts and Mathematics—education encourages its teachers to engage students through projects that combine aspects of the five disciplines. One application of this is the school’s involvement with the INTERalliance of Greater Cincinnati, which promotes IT careers among high school students through camps, competitions, internships and events like its annual TechOlympics. This past year, McNicholas placed second out of 50 area schools for winning the most INTERalliance competitions. This coming school year will feature a scheduling tweak that spreads one day’s worth of classes across Thursday and Friday of each week. The time not allotted to traditional classes will be used for things like “explore” periods, where students and teachers will join in different combinations

to learn about life skills, public speaking, service opportunities and other topics. “It gives an opportunity for teachers who have special interests to put those interests out there and try to match those up with students who would be interested in that,” explains Mueller. He hopes the potential of linking the explore periods with other classwork will lead to unique educational experiences for the students. A hallmark of Catholic schools is the intersection of academics and service. McNicholas stays true to that tradition through programs for its own students and others in Greater Cincinnati. The high school’s SAIL (Support and Accommodations for Identified Learners) program brings in intervention specialists who assist McNicholas students with special learning needs through attentive tutoring and assistive technology. “This has become, I think, a real calling card for McNick,” Mueller says. “We’re finding more and more people are coming to the school because of the success rate of our intervention specialists.” As for serving the Cincinnati community, McNicholas is now an EdChoice school, which is a state program that provides

TOP: Archbishop McNicholas students work on a coding project in the library. BELOW: A McNicholas student explains a proposal for architectural improvements to the school. scholarships to esteemed private schools for low-income students at underperforming public schools. That’s another way McNicholas leads by example, something Mueller sees reflected in his students throughout the school year when they run religious retreats for their peers and summer day camps for younger, underprivileged children. It goes to show the traditions Mueller observed during that Friday night football game run deep and represent a rich culture that will continue to inspire him as principal. n w w w.

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Best SCHOOLS

A Personal Touch ROYALMONT ACADEMY IN MASON USES ITS SMALL SIZE TO GIVE STUDENTS PERSONALIZED ATTENTION By Corinne Minard

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t Royalmont Academy, a preschoolthrough-12th grade college preparatory Catholic school in Mason, everything has a personal touch. “Royalmont Academy is dedicated to forming the whole child by providing the highest level of academics, by building character, by developing a strong personal Catholic faith and by teaching how to put faith in to action,” says Karen Kinross, admissions and marketing director. One way the school does this is through small class sizes. “Small class sizes are important at Royalmont as this ensures each student is well known by classmates, the teacher and the entire staff. Our aim is to work with each child and help him or her grow into the person each is meant to be,” says Head of School Veronica Murphy. “Because we care about growing as a human, we greet each student at the door every day, we help our students work with others in apostolic endeavors, we also help them create weekly goals to grow in virtue and much more.” While the school teaches students in preschool through 12th grade, there are only about 200 students in the school, guaranteeing that each student has personal guidance when they need it most. Class sizes range from eight to 18 students. Small class sizes also allow the school to develop students through the integral formation of four areas: intellectual, spiritual, human and apostolic. “Our method of formation seeks to build up every student with the attitudes, practices and skills to succeed in our world and more importantly become a Christian leader,” says Murphy. Royalmont’s personal touch allows these areas to be integrated throughout the curriculum. Faith is woven into each class, but students also attend mass at least once a week in addition to retreats, holy hours and prayer services. “We show them that our faith permeates 66

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TOP: Small classes sizes ensure that every student receives personal attention. BELOW: Faith is integrated into all classes. our lives and calls us to live a life of virtue,” adds Murphy. Royalmont’s caring and personal attitude also allows students to excel in their extracurricular activities. The school offers cross country, volleyball, basketball and track for both boys and girls, with its boys cross country team placing first overall in the Ohio Valley Christian Conference this

year. Students are also able to participate in the second and seventh grade science fair, theater programs like Narnia, and the junior high and high school Latin teams. “Royalmont prides itself on graduating students with beautiful knowledge of their Catholic faith and a servant’s heart,” says Kinross. “Our approach is direct, intentional and personal for every student.” n


Community

REFLECTIONS ON LEADERSHIP - DAN HURLEY page 68

ANOTHER VIEW - DON MOONEY page 70

GUEST COLUMN - HARRY SNYDER page 71

BEN GLASSMAN

Silvia, a student in CoEd’s Computer Program, showing off one of her school’s new laptops

page 72

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Reflections on Leadership By Dan Hurley

Quintessentially American ONE LOCAL NONPROFIT IS CREATING A MIDDLE CLASS IN GUATEMALA

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henever someone asked Dr. O’dell Owens what the faculty and staff did at Cincinnati State Technical and Community College during the years he served as president, his answer was direct and inspiring: “This is where we create the middle class.” That’s the same answer you get when you ask Joe Berninger, the co-founder and executive director of Cooperative for Education (CoEd), only he’s talking about creating a middle class in the rural highlands of Guatemala. CoEd’s work may seem far away and marginal, but given the looming role immigration plays in contemporary United States politics and the fact that migrants from the Northern Triangle—Guatemala, El Salvador and Honduras—make up the main source of refugees seeking a new life in the United States, CoEd’s work is immediate and central. CoEd began simply enough in 1993 when Joe Berninger’s brother Jeff volunteered to teach English in a high school in the rural highlands of Guatemala. Jeff discovered the first day that “there were no books in the school, no books in the region, no books in the country. Ninety percent of the schools in Guatemala had no books of any kind,” remembers Joe. Jeff, who had worked as an analyst for P&G, wanted to do more than give books to one group of students for one year. He created a self-sustaining book cooperative model that still drives almost half of CoEd’s programs. The model raises the initial funds to buy paperback textbooks for every student in math, science, Spanish language and social studies. The school rents the books to the students for a modest amount (as little as $1.50/year) with the idea that the rental fees will generate funds to buy new paperbacks to replace 68

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Joe Berninger, one of CoEd’s founders, reading with a student in the Spark Reading Program worn out books every five years. Guatemalan school officials were skeptical, but parents made the commitment and 94% came back that first year. The next year four more schools joined the effort and, with Joe working in Cincinnati and Jeff in Guatemala, they formally incorporated the Cooperative for Education in 1997. The real magic of the self-sustaining book cooperative model was not only that it worked for students in Guatemala, but that it also appealed to business-minded investors in the U.S. and Canada. When Joe was on an early trip to deliver books, the school threw a party that was so raucous that an American dentist on a medical mission trip working nearby came over to find out why people were so excited. He saw the potential in the model and invited Joe to visit his Rotary Club in Lander, Wyoming, when they both got back to the U.S. Joe drove to Lander and the club donated $5,000, which was matched by the state

and national organizations. (Gifts from Canadian clubs are now also matched by the Canadian government’s “magnifying good” smart foreign aid program.) Over the last 20 years, over 620 different clubs have contributed and over 1,000 Rotarians have visited CoEd schools in Guatemala. Like many startups, Joe remembers, “Our first five years was five years of one-year plans.” Beyond that point, they began to do more serious planning, setting measurable goals, hiring staff and building capacity. CoEd’s programs have expanded over time. They have pushed book distribution down to lower grades with their Spark Reading Program, recognizing that a student needs to learn to read by the third grade so that they can then read to learn. Working with Professor Ben Kelcey at the University of Cincinnati and Guatemalan partners, CoEd has demonstrated that groups using their methodolog y progressed twice as fast as a control group.


Ancelma, a Rise Youth Development Program graduate, with her mother and grandmother CoEd has pioneered mentoring programs in middle schools, built computer labs in schools using the same cooperative sustainable financial model as with books and introduced the Rise Youth Development program to teach soft skills to high school students to ease the transition to the workforce.

CoEd serves the very poor in the agricultural highlands. Most adults make $4 a day and speak one of 21 Mayan languages as their first language and Spanish as their second language. Given that, CoEd has been careful to keep fees low for books and computers. Joe knows that, “all the research shows that if you graduate from high school in Guatemala, you’re out of poverty.” Given all that Cooperative for Educa-

tion has accomplished, why the uptick in migration to the north? Berninger cites government corruption and ineffectiveness as a leading push factor. He also notes that half the population is under 15 and increasingly unwilling to accept that they have no realistic prospect for a better life. He also points to the impact of a current drought and the increasing concern that climate change is driving climate migration. The Trump Administration has suspended all USAID projects. “In my view,” Berninger says, “they need to being doing exactly the opposite of that. That is counterproductive… We need to create opportunities in home countries so people don’t have to migrate.” The Guatemalan government has created a program called “Stay Here,” targeted at teenagers who are temped to leave. Joe argues the U.S. should support that along with encouraging private investment that can provide opportunities for an increasingly educated workforce. Whatever limits one modest Cincinnatibased nonprofit may have on an international challenge, CoEd’s trust that education is critical to creating opportunity is quintessentially American. n

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Another View By Don Mooney

Time to Re-Brand the Ronald Reagan Highway? I

s there trouble brewing amongst our Hamilton County commissioners? It’s been less than a year since the 2018 election produced the first all-Democratic commission in the county’s history. But storm clouds have gathered to rain on Democrats’ victory lap; only months after she took office, Commissioner Stephanie Dumas’s chief of staff, Dr. Paul Sohi, filed discrimination claims against the other commissioners. Hard to imagine that happened without her approval. Dumas raised more eyebrows by blocking the relocation of a commission meeting to accommodate Todd Portune’s temporary hospitalization. Here’s how all three Democrats can find some common ground: rename the Ronald Reagan (aka cross-county) Highway. The 16-mile highway was built from 1958 to 1997, allowing an expedited path from Interstate 275 in the west to Montgomery Road in the east. In 1993, an all-Republican commission voted to name the Cross County Highway for the former president. Then Commissioner John Dowlin cited Reagan’s electoral success in the county during the 1980 and 1984 election as grounds for the honor. 70

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That 1993 commission vote set a precedent: to the victors belong the spoils, including the right to rename public highways. In that tradition, the three Democratic commissioners should come together to rename the highway after another former president who won two consecutive elections in Hamilton County: Barack H. Obama. Of course, it can be a mistake to name public stuff (roads, bridges, schools, etc.) after the living. Think Pete Rose Way. On the other hand, former President Reagan was still clearing brush on his California ranch when he received the county’s 1993 honor. And who’s going to complain? The GOP has squandered its Hamilton County foothold, and local Trumpublicans seem to have no love lost for the “Gipper’s” brand of politics. Ronald Reagan practiced what he called the “golden rule”—never speak ill of another Republican. But Donald Trump relishes making up disparaging nick names for GOP rivals, like “Lyin’ Ted Cruz.” Reagan spoke of our nation as a welcoming “shining city on a hill.” In a 1986 speech at the Statue of Liberty, Reagan signed immigration legislation that gave legal status to millions of immigrants who

he invited to step out of the shadows and “into the sunlight,” with an opportunity for citizenship. Trumpublicans would denounce such legislation as “amnesty.” The current GOP president shifts money from the defense budget to build border walls. But in what may have been his most famous speech, the former president called on the Russian president to tear down walls. In a June tweet, WCPO cartoonist Kevin Necessary suggested that the Reagan Highway be re-named for Neil Armstrong, the Ohio native who placed that first human footprint on the moon 50 years ago. Armstrong spent his later years on the University of Cincinnati faculty. A good choice, no doubt. But I’m sticking with Barack Obama, the nation’s first black president, who won election twice with the strong support of Hamilton County voters. Such a “re-branding” of a highway that connects our west to our east would acknowledge the important role our African American citizens and communities have played in building a prosperous and diverse county that is no longer the domain of Ronald Reagan’s (or Donald Trump’s) GOP. n


Guest Column

By Harry Snyder, President/CEO of Great Oaks Career Campuses

Teaching the Future GREAT OAKS ADAPTS TO BETTER SERVE INCOMING GENERATIONS AND NEW BUSINESSES

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or nearly 50 years, Great Oaks has been preparing young men and women for careers. And just as careers have changed in the past five decades, each generation of students has differing needs, wants and motivations in the workplace. Forbes Magazine tells us that Generation Z, the latest entrants into the workforce, have learned from their predecessors. They saw their parents hit by the Great Recession, and so they are likely to want more security in their lives. They may be more competitive and independent than millennials. Feedback is important. It should be frequent, brief and face-to-face. They want to understand the reasons for the work they do; because of that, author Mark Perna calls them the “Why Generation.” Research says that Gen Z has an 8-second attention span, down from the 12-second attention span of millennials. They assume that technology is a part of all aspects of daily life, and embrace it in the workplace. Why is this important to know? For employers, this helps in recruiting, managing and motivating the generation now coming of age. For us at Great Oaks, understanding our students affects what we teach, how we teach it and what additional skills our students might need to be successful in their careers. For instance, automotive technology students must be able to use and repair the dozens of computers in each 21st-century automobile. We must equip career labs with the technology that they’ll see in the workplace. And we need to be sure our students have workplace skills that employers require. Administrators and instructors at our Laurel Oaks campus understand that students will be working with a variety of co-workers and employers. The Laurel

Great Oaks works with employers to make sure students are being trained for the jobs of today and tomorrow. Oaks staff developed a system of measuring, promoting and teaching so-called “soft skills” and providing each student with a quarterly Professional Skills Report. This quarterly report motivates students to think about the skills and habits that aren’t always on the job description—attendance, behavior incidents, timeliness, ability to work with others and more. Of course, we must also be able to understand and meet local employers’ needs. One way we do so is through Business and Industry Advisory Committees. Every career program at every Great Oaks Career Campus has such a committee, made up of six to eight employers, and they provide a valuable connection between education and the workplace. At least three times a year, the 1,400 business leaders on these committees meet to review curriculum and equipment, visit the career labs and discuss the future of their career fields. Our students can be sure that they are learning appropriate skills with up-todate equipment because of these business partners.

The business connection has other important benefits. Students can meet and talk with experienced professionals in their future field. They can network, and they can often begin internships or job placements that grow into permanent employment after graduation. And the relationship is mutually beneficial; annual surveys of employers show that 95% would hire Great Oaks graduates again. To remain relevant for the next 50 years, we must understand both our students and area employers. That’s our role in the success of the regional economy. n For more than two decades Harry Snyder, president and CEO (superintendent) of Great Oaks Career Campuses, has been committed to ensuring that youth and adults are prepared with the competitive skills necessary for economic growth. In 2014, the Great Oaks Board of Directors named Harry its fifth president and CEO. He is responsible for four campuses and career training for over 19,000 youth and 18,000 adults from 36 school districts. w w w.

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LICENSE TO PROSECUTE U.S. ATTORNEY BENJAMIN GLASSMAN IS THE MAN BEHIND ‘THE SPY WHO PAID ME’ AND OTHER CASES YOU MIGHT HAVE MISSED IN CINCINNATI By Peter Bronson

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he movies have it all wrong. The real James Bond doesn’t live in London and drive an Aston Martin with pop-up machineguns. He lives in Cincinnati and probably drives a minivan with pop-up cup holders to keep his kids hydrated after soccer practice. His boss is not the mysterious “M” of the Ian Fleming novels. He is a boyish-looking 44-year-old graduate of Seven Hills (class of 72

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Ben Glassman, U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Ohio 1993) and Harvard Law (magna cum laude) who plays racquetball and keeps pictures of his wife, two children and mixed-breed dog in a downtown Cincinnati office that has room for two Aston Martins, but no inventory of spy-camera cufflinks or 9 mm semi-automatic pencils. His mission, however, would stir Bond

like a bespoke martini. “We have an expectation that we are the best U.S. Attorney’s office in the world, with more impact than ever before,” says Benjamin Glassman, U.S. attorney for the Southern District of Ohio. “As long as some aspect of a crime touches anything in our territory, we can prosecute it.”


That prosecutor’s version of Bond’s “license to kill” was demonstrated on April Fool’s Day last year, when the long arm of the law reached 4,150 miles across the Atlantic—from federal offices in the Atrium Two tower in downtown Cincinnati to Brussels, Belgium—and tapped a Chinese secret agent on the shoulder with a pair of handcuffs. Federal court records say that Yanjun Xu, also known as “Zang Hui” and other aliases, was a deputy director of China’s espionage and security version of “KGB,” the MSS. He was waiting in Brussels to meet an engineer from GE Aircraft in Cincinnati, who promised to hand over a flash drive of secrets for better jet-engine performance. But FBI agents had already caught the GE engineer stealing industrial secrets for China in return for travel and “stipends” from Xu. Using the cover of a Chinese university that works directly with China’s aviation industry, Xu had recruited the engineer through social media and flattered him with invitations to “exchange ideas.” Court records show that in 2017, Xu paid the GE engineer $3,500 for a one-hour speech in China to buy research that had cost GE billions of dollars and years to develop. In coded emails, Xu boasted about his success and sent the engineer a shopping list for GE computer files. But by then, the FBI had confronted the engineer. The files that he delivered to agent Xu were edited to protect GE’s secrets, and the leaker was now bait in a trap. Xu was lured to Belgium, busted and extradited to the U.S. It was the first time a Chinese agent was caught and prosecuted on U.S. soil. The investigation uncovered at least two other American aviation companies that were being robbed by China, whose thefts cost the U.S. hundreds of billions each year. Xu was held in a Michigan federal prison to await trial in federal court in Cincinnati. The engineer was fired, but not prosecuted. A Bond movie might call it The Spy Who Paid Me. But in Cincinnati, it’s called What? Spies and Secret Agents Here? That’s because cases handled by the U.S. Attorney’s office that covers 48 counties encompassing Cincinnati, Columbus and Dayton get less attention than agents 001 through 006. Glassman, who became U.S. Attorney three years ago, wants to change that. “The purpose of prosecution is to achieve justice, but also to deter people, so we want them to know we have a hammer to use, with fair but tough sentencing.” As the Sopranos would say, “Don’t make

Glassman in his Cincinnati office a federal case out of it.” Federal prosecutors have time and resources and they don’t cut deals. “We don’t have parole,” Glassman says, “so 85 percent of a sentence is served.” Working with local and federal law enforcement in a scrabble of acronyms— CPD, DEA, ATF, FBI, IRS, HCSO—and his prosecutors target the small crowd of gangs and criminals who cause most crime and violence. His message: “We know who you are, so get out while you can.” One of the hammers they swing is a 20year sentence for anyone who distributes a drug that causes a death. With overdose deaths in record numbers, that one nails a lot of drug dealers. Glassman says, “We’re trying to inform the public more about what we’re doing.” And they’re doing a lot. A typical list of recent cases includes public corruption, child exploitation and pornography, gun violations, fraud schemes, civil rights violations, welfare fraud, police corruption, national security and terrorism, organized crime, espionage and drugs, drugs, drugs. Ohio is in the top five states for opioid overdoses. And drug cartels that are “as big as Procter & Gamble and Kroger” are always offering new and improved products, Glassman says. As the pill-mills were shut down to fight the opioid epidemic, demand shifted to heroin and then fentanyl, a deadly animal tranquilizer. Now demand and supply are shifting again to stimulants—cocaine, meth and prescription drugs such as Adderall and Ritalin, Glassman says. “We’re seeing carfentanyl [an elephant

anesthetic] that is a hundred times stronger and more deadly. As we see some progress against the opioid epidemic, we don’t want to replace that with cocaine and meth laced with fentanyl,” he says. Meanwhile, they also are battling MS-13, the Central American gang with the motto, “Kill, rape, control.” “They are quite different,” Glassman says. “Their main purpose is not drugs, but violence and control. They’re not in it to get rich. They don’t live lavish lifestyles. Many have day jobs as roofers or carpet-layers and are diligent workers. A lot of what they make gets sent to El Salvador. They do some drug trafficking, but mainly extortion of vulnerable undocumented immigrants.” His office indicted and broke up an MS-13 gang in Columbus in 2017. “I’m pretty proud of that case. We completely dismantled the MS-13 clique in Columbus.” Glassman gives all the credit to his team of prosecutors and FBI agents, such as Cincinnati Special Agent Bradley Hull, who caught Yanjun Xu. U.S. Attorneys come and go at the whim of the White House. As a Democrat serving a Republican president, he could be replaced at any time. And he knows most people can probably name the flavor of the month at UDF before they can name a U.S. Attorney. (Best name ever: Flamen Ball, the U.S. attorney for the Southern District of Ohio appointed by President Lincoln.) But as Bond’s boss “M” might say, sometimes it’s better to work on the quiet side of the street. n w w w.

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Business

NEHEMIAH MANUFACTURING

page 76

WOOD HERRON EVANS

page 78

TEAM BUILDING

page 79

BUSINESS CALENDAR page 86

BEST IN BUSINESS DIRECTORY

page 87

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Second Chances Made Possible NEHEMIAH MANUFACTURING EMBRACES SECOND-CHANCE HIRING AND PROVIDES AN EXAMPLE FOR OTHER COMPANIES TO DO THE SAME By Kevin Michell

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n the Bible, Nehemiah rebuilt the walls of Jerusalem after the city had been laid to ruin. Its residents felt defeated and despondent as their city’s fortifications, gate and temple had been destroyed. Nehemiah organized and led the work of building a new wall and, through it, renewed the dignity of the people of Jerusalem and the city itself. It makes sense then that Lower Price Hill’s Nehemiah Manufacturing would use the Old Testament figure as its namesake. Founded in 2009 by former Procter & Gamble employees Dan Meyer and Richard Palmer, Nehemiah started as an idea for establishing a light manufacturing plant close to downtown that could create jobs for those who had trouble finding employment. “In my previous company, we were donating about 10% of our earnings each year to inner city ministries,” says Meyer. “In the next venture, I wanted to be able to give back in a bigger way—time, talent and treasure.” Palmer met Meyer through a mutual 76

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friend a little over a year before Nehemiah was founded. As they were swapping stories, they discovered that their post-P&G business interests neatly aligned, as did their desire to make a difference. “We found that we shared a passion for using our God-given talents to help people and to really use a business as a way to give back in a broader way to the community,” describes Palmer. Initially, the plan was to bring manufacturing jobs to those around downtown who lacked reliable transportation to reach similar jobs in other parts of the city. Meyer and Palmer had the experience and know-how to create a consumer packaged goods-focused manufacturer that would bring jobs back to the center of the city. But a little over a year into Nehemiah’s existence, a different way to help the area’s underemployed emerged. “We got introduced to these additional challenges that people with criminal backgrounds have in finding meaningful

Nehemiah Manufacturing leadership cuts the ribbon on the Lower Price Hill facility at its 2018 opening. employment,” recalls Palmer. “We recognized that that’s a unique population and a unique area of the ecosystem where we could focus and make a difference. And we still see that today.” Through working with social service organizations like Cincinnati Works, City Gospel Mission’s JobsPlus program, CityLink Center and St. Vincent de Paul, Palmer and Meyer learned how hard it was for the formerly incarcerated to find normalcy through regular, meaningful employment. Many companies would dismiss applicants with criminal backgrounds out of hand, making it hard on the social workers who provide life skills training to also find employment opportunities for people who had been incarcerated. One of Nehemiah’s social service partners approached the company about hiring someone with a felony on their record. Palmer describes recognizing the opportunity as consistent with Nehemiah’s mission but also being understandably cautious. Meyer adds that there was no playbook for regularly hiring people who came out of the prison system and, thus,


Dan Meyer (FAR RIGHT) and Nehemiah staff prepare and serve a potluck for employees. there was a lot of uncertainty on how to do so properly. So Nehemiah Manufacturing hired one person with a felony on their record to test this opportunity out. The results quickly spoke for themselves. “It didn’t take too long for us to realize that when somebody came in and we gave them a second chance, they quickly were our most loyal, most productive employees,” Palmer says. “It really flipped the paradigm for us in terms of opening up that door.” It was then that second-chance hiring became a pillar of Nehemiah’s mission to help the community in and around downtown Cincinnati. But there was a lot of work to do in order to make sure second-chance hires had the support they needed to demonstrate that loyalty and productivity at work. With barriers like unreliable transportation or uncertain housing situations and needs like child care, legal guidance or general counseling, there needed to be a support system in place. “Hiring a seasoned social worker that would sit down with each potential employee to understand their individual needs [and] barriers upfront enabled us to not only provide the sustainable employment but to also work with each individual to eliminate the barriers that prevent them

from being productive,” explains Meyer. Once Meyer and Palmer knew they could provide the environment and access to social service support, they committed fully to bringing quality applicants with criminal backgrounds on board. Today, 90% of Nehemiah’s manufacturing and warehouse employees are working again in spite of a felony on their record and 120 employees of the company are secondchance hires. Many have worked their way up to supervisory positions within the company. Meyer and Palmer both recognize this as a real way their company has been able to change lives for the better and not just those whom they’ve hired. “This not only impacts those individuals, but it also has a positive impact on the family and others… which is another 10-12 individuals,” observes Meyer. “So with that, we have provided a positive impact on over 1,000 people.” But the company hasn’t stopped at that. Palmer and Meyer saw an opportunity to educate other businesses about the mutual benefits of second-chance hiring. Not only could companies change people’s lives for the better by giving them real work opportunities, but the loyalty and hard work these second-chance hires demonstrated at Nehemiah had led to incredible employee retention rates, which in turn increased the company’s overall profitability.

TOP: Nehemiah Manufacturing employee Kevin Brown BELOW: Nehemiah Manufacturing employee Keisha Sterling To that end, they spearheaded the Beacon of Hope Business Alliance, which allowed Nehemiah and other companies to share their successes with second-chance hiring and providing opportunity to the underemployed while learning from one another and connecting with social service organizations. There are now 77 companies involved with Beacon of Hope that have employed over 500 second-chance hires to date. With perceptions changing about hiring people working their way back from incarceration, Meyer and Palmer hope their company becomes just one example of many. All the while, Nehemiah Manufacturing remains focused on not just hiring people with criminal backgrounds who have difficulty finding work but offering a path to lift people up to better futures through support, encouragement and stable employment. As Meyer puts it, Nehemiah’s culture is continually nurtured by relentlessly helping others transform their lives and realize their dreams. Like the Nehemiah of the Bible, all it takes is one figure willing to show others how to rebuild themselves, their neighbors and the place where they live all at once. n w w w.

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Local Lawyers for

Local Growth

WOOD HERRON & EVANS MAINTAINS ITS STATUS AS A PROMINENT LOCAL IP FIRM WITHOUT BETRAYING ITS INDEPENDENCE By Kevin Michell

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owntown’s Wood Herron & Evans has been practicing intellectual property (IP) law in Cincinnati for 151 years, with over 80 of those based on the 27th floor of Carew Tower. With many Cincinnati industries on the upswing and innovation being stoked by the local entrepreneurial ecosystem, Wood Herron & Evans is enjoying a period when its IP expertise is as needed and desired as ever. “It’s exciting for us,” says Kate Smith, a partner at Wood Herron & Evans specializing in trademarks. She adds that it presents an opportunity to show how the long-tenured firm is capable of excelling in a field of law that requires being on the cutting edge. “Having entrepreneurs and startup businesses here is really an opportunity to partner with those that need some guidance and strong footing.” The team of 45 patent, copyright and trademark lawyers is a bit of an anomaly—in an era when law firms acquiring or buying out other firms is increasingly common, Wood Herron & Evans has remained fiercely independent. It’s commit78

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ted to being a boutique—that is, focused exclusively on one area of practice—IP firm that resists the overtures of others trying to absorb it. “I think the model that was developed has sustained the firm and the partnership and we’re not backing down,” says Smith. “That’s really been a valuable lesson—just to identify what our strengths are and to continue doing that.” The firm’s staying power hasn’t come without making adjustments. Five years ago, Wood Herron & Evans broke its firm down into practice groups centered on the technological expertise its attorneys have, such as electrical or chemical engineering. “It’s helped us align our focuses in how we practice and how we help develop client portfolios,” Smith points out. Having those specializations in house allows Wood Herron & Evans to provide a lot of expertise to its clients. The firm has also forged new partnerships in light of the entrepreneurial and small business upswing in Cincinnati. One such relationship is with HCDC, the city’s oldest

Wood Herron & Evans’ Colleen Jackson, Sean Owens and Randy Jackson

business incubator, with which Wood Herron & Evans sponsored April’s Innovation & Technology Awards. The firm and HCDC will put on additional events through the year for networking with businesses that need guidance from an IP law firm. Smith says the value goes both ways in that the firm can get in early with a potential long-term client while providing a level of support and expertise that early-stage businesses may have trouble finding. Internal growth is also happening at Wood Herron & Evans. The firm has four summer clerks—each in law school with different engineering specialties—and will also welcome a new associate to the firm who had previously been a clerk there. Continued growth entails finding IP lawyers willing to roll up their sleeves and provide clarity amid the uncertainty common to acquiring and defending patents, trademarks and copyrights. “It is hard-working attorneys that have maintained this firm and continued the success of the firm,” says Smith about how Wood Herron & Evans stays small but also focused on its client relationships. “That, I think, is what our hallmark is.” n


Team Building

Something for Everyone COMPANIES, CORPORATIONS AND BUSINESSES IN THE GREATER CINCINNATI AREA FOCUS ON TEAM BUILDING TO BUILD ENGAGEMENT WITH EMPLOYEES By Keely Brown

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TEAM BUILDING PROFILE

Newport Syndicate 18 East 5th Street • Newport KY 41071 859-491-8000 • newportsyndicate.com

People who play together stay together. That’s how the old saying goes. Want something new?

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ring your team to the Newport Syndicate, where our 24 years of experience will help create new and exciting ways to team build. Explore the history of a local institution with our Behind-the-Scenes Scavenger Hunt, where teams hunt for the forgotten escape routes of long-gone gangsters and gamblers. Enjoy a stroll through history with the Gangsters Walking Tour, which includes a history presentation and casual walking tour of the gangster history of Newport. Put your team to the test with our interactive Murder Mystery Dinner, based upon our award-winning wedding receptions! Savor a classic SyndicateStyle wedding reception while looking for clues. Can your team solve the crime? Or, unwind with one of our Wine & Canvas events. This easy-going experience comes with its own handmade souvenir! Looking to make the event your own? The Newport Syndicate prides itself on flexible packaging. Add breakfast, lunch, or dinner to round out your event. Then, appreciate our Prohibition-era origins with a bourbon or wine tasting!

The Oak Room, which holds 25-50 guests. With seven separate spaces for anywhere from 25-500 guests, our own inhouse catering and bar services, as well as dedicated event coordinators, the Newport Syndicate has everything you need to take your team-building to the next level!

Call 859-491-8000 today to schedule your next event that guests won’t stop talking about.


Team Building

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uaranteeing that the members of a business work together as a unit is vital for company success. However, each and every office is filled with employees who have different work and communication styles. In order to ensure personnel are effective at completing tasks, it’s important to build relationships through teamwork. Engaging in team-building exercises helps to build trust between coworkers and ensures a unified and organized work environment. There are many different local team-building programs in the Greater Cincinnati area from which to choose, so we picked a few for you to check out so you can see what best fits your company.

ARCHERY ARENA When thinking of team building, archery doesn’t usually come to mind. However, Archery Arena at 4950 Provident Drive in Cincinnati utilizes the concept of strategy to bring coworkers together. This program lets colleagues battle it out with bows and arrows in private group

sessions. Don’t worry—arrows are foamtipped for safety and leave no bruises or marks. Archery Arena rotates through different mixes of game modes that encourage groups to strategize together to lead their team to victory. “It’s so unique—being able to shoot a bow and arrow at people is new and not really anywhere else,” says Noah Hameaught, a manager at Archery Arena. Sessions range from $395-$850 depending on the size of the company’s group and team-building packages are personalized

for clients, explains Haught. “We’re extremely customizable. For anyone that wants to do something, we try and make it work as best we can,” he says. “Whatever their dream goal is—we shoot for that.” Archery Arena puts the emphasis on fun in the workplace, Haught says. “We want people to come out and have a great time and not feel pressured to have to be good at it. It’s very easy to learn,” he says. “You just come out, you have fun, goof off with your coworkers and just let go.”

STATE-of-the-art

TEAM BUILDING

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Try our popular TEAM BUILDING games with your TEAM! INTERACTIVE OLYMPICS SCAVENGER HUNT TICKET EXTRAVAGANZA

1 Levee Way #2130 • Newport, KY 41071 • 859.581.7529

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Team Building CINCINNATI ART MUSEUM The Cincinnati Art Museum’s corporate team-building program, ART, Inc., uses artwork to create a positive environment where employees can share their perspectives to make people more aware that everyone contributes valid and innovative ideas to the workplace. ART, Inc. leads employees through an interactive gallery experience at the Cincinnati Art Museum, located on 953 Eden Park Drive. The program uses artwork as a focal point to boost morale and engage in creative thinking solutions, says Manager of Accessibility and Gallery Programs Sara Birkofer. “We really want [participants] to understand that everybody can be creative in the right environment and with the right kind of encouragement,” says Birkofer. “We’re really trying to get people in that mindset of coming up with something new and different and pushing themselves outside of their comfort zone.” ART, Inc. team-building programs are $200 for groups of 20 people or less. For groups over 20, the museum charges $100 TEAM BUILDING PROFILE

Archery Arena

4950 Provident Drive • West Chester Township, OH 45246 513-860-0874 • archery-arena.com

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our co-workers will battle it out with bows and arrows in a private group session in the Midwest’s only dedicated archery dodgeball area. Our arrows are foam-tipped for safety and leave no bruises or marks. (don’t worry, they’ll still have you dodging, ducking, and dipping!) We’ll rotate through a mix of game modes that will have your group strategizing together to lead their team to victory! Our arena holds 24 players and we host larger groups by rotating teams. Some groups even as large as 70! Feel free to bring your own food and drink or ask us for catering recommendations. Bookings can be made online or feel free to shoot us a call / email! We’re looking forward to hosting an event your team will be talking about long after it’s over!

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per each set of 10 attendees. The program offers three different activities to inspire creativity and unity between coworkers. “Each activity is designed to help the corporate team get to know each other a little bit better, work together in a creative environment to get them to solve problems and improve their critical thinking skills through activities,” says Birkofer.

GAMEWORKS GameWorks, located at Newport on the Levee in Kentucky, specializes in helping corporate events planners, office managers and team leaders who are looking for a team-building activity that everyone in the office will enjoy. The franchise offers a gaming experience accompanied with food and fun by providing a variety of games and the option of esports to promote team bonding. GameWorks is able to customize team-building packages and provides options for groups of all sizes. GameWorks’ Newport location offers three different team-building activities for groups of 10 or more, says Director of Sales

Amiee Countz. “Each activity can be done separately if the group just wants to come in and do a team-building activity, or they can be added to one of our buffet packages that we offer as well,” she says. The franchise began offering teambuilding activities after finding that companies were looking for interactive events. GameWorks boasts full banquet rooms, full banquet-style menus, bar menus and games, and uses these features to its benefit. Now, GameWorks offers team-building events for groups to build their team and inspire co-workers to get to know each other a little bit better, explains Countz. “We hope they just go around and have fun, learn who their coworkers are and hopefully work together better as a team once they go back into the office,” says Countz.

PINOT’S PALETTE WEST CHESTER Pinto’s Palette at 7334 Tylers Corners Drive brings creativity, teamwork and fun to the West Chester community through its team-building events. This program focuses on team bonding through several differ-

ent painting and drinking activities that jumpstart creative thinking and problemsolving abilities. The program is f lexible and detailoriented with a wide variety of options. Pinto’s Palette offers custom paintings, jigsaw painting, classic paint sip, mystery, collaborative, self-guided and musical chair team-building activities. Every activity can be adapted to fit a client’s needs. Although painting may be intimidating for the artistically challenged, the program caters to all participants regardless of talent. Many participants, particularly Type A individuals, may walk into Pinto’s Palette stressed about the activity, says Emily Davis, the franchise owner of the West Chester Pinot’s Palette. However, these participants relax after exercising a different part of their brain— they employ different skills they don’t usually use on the job, explains Davis. “Painting is great to blow some stress off—it’s good for camaraderie and creative thinking,” she says. “It’s a fun way to get a group come out and do something different.” n

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TEAM BUILDING PROFILE

Full Throttle Indoor Karting

11725 Commons Drive, Cincinnati • 24 Spiral Drive, Florence 833-351-5278 x106 • gofullthrottle.com

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reater Cincinnati’s premier indoor high-speed karting and axe throwing venue with locations in both Springdale, Ohio, and Florence, Kentucky. Our karts reach speeds of 40 mph on our professionally built tracks. Both locations are equipped with axe throwing lanes and expert coaches to help every step of the way. The facilities include conference rooms with Wi-Fi and AV support. We are a unique teambuilding experience that you will not find anywhere else. From celebrations to promoting teamwork and comradery, we are your team to make that happen.

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TEAM BUILDING PROFILE

GameWorks

1 Levee Way, Suite 2130 • Newport, KY 41071 859-581-7529 • gameworks.com

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ameWorks is located at Newport on the Levee and boasts 25,000 square feet of fun. It hosts private events from 10 to 600, that can range from a kid’s birthday party, youth groups and family event to corporate, team building, social and holiday parties. GameWorks has over 130 video games, a state-of-the-art esports lounge that boasts 20 computers and consoles, full-service restaurant and bar, and private event rooms.

TEAM BUILDING PROFILE

Pinot’s Palette West Chester

7334 Tyler’s Corner, Suite 800 • West Chester, OH 45069 513-342-1927 • pinotspalette.com/west-chester

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inot’s Palette organizes upscale team building events and corporate celebrations. Our paint and sip events encourage creativity, teamwork and fun—no art experience required! An energetic atmosphere is fueled by music, laughter and an instructor who’s both artist and entertainer. Top-tier service includes a variety of turnkey options, with every detail tailored to your organization. Planning and setup is flexible and hassle-free, making Pinot’s Palette an easy and memorable choice—perfect for team building activities, client appreciation, fundraising events and holiday parties. Event options include jigsaw painting, classic paint and sip, mystery, collaborative, self-guided and musical chairs. Use promo code Cincy10 to receive 10% off reservations to our public classes.

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Business Calendar

AUGUST Annual Chamber Golf Outing Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce

Aug. 13

Meet with possible clients and business professionals during this annual golf outing. The day features both morning and afternoon flights and ends with a social (featuring appetizers, a silent auction and awards) at 5:30 p.m. 7:30 a.m.-7:30 p.m. Individual $160, foursome $640, social only $25. Summit Hills Country Club, Dudley Road, Crestview Hills, Ky. nkychamber.com.

successful women leaders as they discuss their personal experiences and lessons learned. August’s speakers are Chief Maris Herold, the first woman to serve as police chief for the University of Cincinnati police division, and Dr. Lakshmi Sammarco, first female elected official and first female coroner of Hamilton County. 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Members $35, non-members $60. Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber, 3 E. Fourth St., Suite 200, Cincinnati. 513-579-3111, cincinnatichamber.com.

10:30 a.m. Members $20, non-members $30. Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce, 300 Buttermilk Pike, Suite 330, Ft. Mitchell, Ky. nkychamber.com. Partnership Celebration Clermont Chamber of Commerce

Sept. 18

The Clermont Chamber of Commerce Foundation will honor the partnerships forged by businesses, organizations and individuals with school districts, administrators and teachers during this premier event. 5-8:30 p.m. $45. 902 Loveland Miamiville Road, Loveland. clermontchamber.com.

Bold Fusion Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber

Aug. 15

The Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber’s annual young professional summit returns for its 15th year. The keynote speaker will be Pamela Abalu, a workplace architect most known for her transformation of MetLife’s global work culture through the use of human-centered spaces. She’ll be discussing her journey and how young professionals can use love to change their work environment. 1-5 p.m. Members $80, non-members $100. JACK Cincinnati Casino, 1000 Broadway St., Cincinnati. 513-579-3111, cincinnatichamber.com. Eggs ‘N Issues: Lee Crume, Northern Kentucky Tri-ED Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce

Aug. 20

Pamela Abalu is the keynote speaker of this year’s Bold Fusion.

Lee Crume, the new president and CEO of Northern Kentucky Tri-ED, will discuss his vision for the organization and the region during this monthly breakfast event. 7:30-9 a.m. Members $25, non-members $50. Receptions Banquet & Conference Center – South, 1379 Donaldson Road, Erlanger, Ky. nkychamber.com. WE Speak with Chief Maris Herold and Dr. Lakshmi Sammarco Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber

Aug. 28

The WE Speak luncheons provide local professionals the opportunity to hear from 86

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SEPTEMBER Trademark Basics: What Your Small Business Should Know Now, Not Later Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce

Sept. 17

Craig Morris, who works within the Office of the Commissioner for Trademarks in the United States Patent and Trademark Office, will go into detail about trademarks, copyrights, patents and more during this informational session. 8:30-

Don’t see your event? Visit cincymagazine.com to add it to our online calendar for free.


Best in Business Directory

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hose who run or manage businesses know that sometimes you need some help. As the Tristate’s magazine for business professionals, we are in a unique position that enables us to meet and interact with some of the best business service providers in the region. This list gives you a taste of the region’s best business services, and serves as a resource for those looking for assistance. Make sure to visit CincyMagazine.com to see exclusive online Best in Business content.

CHAMBERS

INSURANCE/INSURANCE BROKERAGE

African American Chamber of Greater Cincinnati & Northern Kentucky 513-751-9900 african-americanchamber.com

Medical Mutual 800-382-5729 medmutual.com

ACCOUNTING

Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber 513-579-3100 cincinnatichamber.com

GBQ 513-871-3033 gbq.com VonLehman 800-887-0437 vlcpa.com

Blue Ash Business Association babusiness.org The Chamber of Commerce Serving Middletown, Monroe & Trenton 513-422-4551 thechamberofcommerce.org

Clermont Chamber of Commerce 513-576-5000 clermontchamber.com

AIR TRAVEL

Lebanon Chamber of Commerce 513-932-1100 lebanonchamber.org

CVG 859-767-3151 cvgairport.com

Milford Miami Township Chamber 513-831-2411 milfordmiamitownship.com

AUDIO VISUAL

Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce 859-578-8800 nkychamber.com

ITA Audio Visual Solutions 800-899-8877 ita.com

CONSTRUCTION

Oswald Companies 513-725-0306 oswaldcompanies.com LAW FIRMS Calfee, Halter & Griswold LLP 513-693-4880 calfee.com Lyons & Lyons 513-777-2222 lyonsandlyonslaw.com Taft Stettinius & Hollister 513-381-2838 taftlaw.com Wood Herron & Evans 513-241-2324 whe-law.com PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT Gateway Community & Technical College 859-441-4500 gateway.kctcs.edu Great Oaks Campuses 513-771-8840 greatoaks.com

SpotOn Productions 513-779-4223 spoton.productions

EGC Construction 859-442-6500 egcconst.com

BANKING

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

The Haile/US Bank College of Business at Northern Kentucky University 859-572-5165 nku.edu/academics/cob

Commerce Bank 800-453-2265 commercebank.com

Charles Schwab Fort Mitchell 859-308-1425 schwab.com/fortmitchell

Indiana Wesleyan University 866-468-6498 indwes.edu

Commonwealth Bank 859-746-9000 cbandt.com

Horter Investment Management, LLC 513-984-9933 horterinvestment.com

Union Institute & University 800-861-6400 myunion.edu

BUSINESS LAW

PNC Financial Advisors/W Mgmt. 513-651-8714 pnc.com

REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT

William E. Hesch Law Firm 513-731-6601 heschlaw.com BUSINESS RESOURCES Cincinnati Better Business Bureau 513-421-3015 bbb.org/cincinnati/

Raymond James 513-287-6777 raymondjames.com Western & Southern 866-832-7719 westernsouthern.com HEALTH Superior Dental 937-438-0283 superiordental.com

Corporex 859-292-5500 corporex.com TELECOMMUNICATIONS AT&T att.com ATC 513-234-4778 4atc.com

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Dr. Maryam Ahmed-Naqvi, M.D. Dr. Naqvi graduated from Wofford College with a Bachelor’s Summa Cum Laude degree. She received her Medical Degree from The University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, and completed her Residency at U.C. Medical Center. Dr. Naqvi completed her Ophthalmology Pediatric Fellowship at the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. She specializes in Comprehensive Ophthalmology, Cataract Surgery, Pediatric Ophthalmology, and Adult Strabismus.

IMPORTANCE OF AN EYE EXAM

Connections between the eye and the brain are made in childhood. Anything that comes between that, such as a need for glasses, lazy eye, or an injury could prevent the vision pathways from fully developing; putting a child at risk of permanent vision loss. WHY DR. NAQVI IS YOUR BEST CHOICE FOR YOUR CHILDS EYE CARE. Children cannot voice vision problems like adults can. Therefore, it is important to seek a professional eye care specialist, such as Dr. Naqvi, who knows how to determine their visual acuity and potential. While primary care doctors are very skillful with a vast amount of knowledge, most never learn the skills needed to evaluate ocular health and vision correction the way an eye care provider does. PLEASE CONTACT DR. NAQVI IF YOUR CHILD HAS ANY OF THESE SYMPTOMS. Eye movement deviation (either inward or outward), persistent eye rubbing, squinting, not making eye contact, persistent unexplained redness, or light sensitivity.

Dr. Naqvi will care for your kids like they’re her own.

800-385-EYES (3937) 859-341-4525

midwesteyecenter.com CLINIC LOCATIONS

“Ocular health is vital to a child’s development, not only physically, but also socially and emotionally. It is important to give them every opportunity to develop their vision, so they may see the world as perfectly as possible.” Dr. Maryam Ahmed-Naqvi, M.D.

Blue Ash (Susan Szmyd, M.D.) 9302 Towne Square Ave. Cincinnati, OH 45242

Delhi 5340 Rapid Run Road, Suite 2 Cincinnati, OH 45238

Eastgate 4452 Eastgate Blvd., Suite 305 Cincinnati, OH 45245

Kenwood South 7730 Montgomery Rd., Ste 120 Cincinnati, OH 45236


Page Tag

PEDIATRICS page 90

MIDWEST EYE CENTER page 96

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Live Well Cincy

Are the Kids Alright?

MENTAL HEALTH A TOP TOPIC IN PEDIATRICS, BUT COMPREHENSIVE CARE IS THE GOAL By Liz Engel

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r. Chris Bolling started to notice it about 10 years ago. An uptick in mental illness in his patients. All kids. And it’s still a major concern in pediatrics today. But, in this specialty, it’s never about just one thing. “Pediatrics is hard to pin down as one challenge,” Bolling, a physician at Pediatric Associates of Northern Kentucky, says. “There’s just a lot of issues that children face.” So it’s no surprise that many local offices are adding “extra” services as more kids battle issues like anxiety, depression and obesity. Pediatric Associates, for example, is at 90

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the tail end of a three-year grant from bi3, a Bethesda Inc. initiative, that’s outfitted its practice, and a few others in Greater Cincinnati, with a parenting expert—a person who can provide guidance and advice when it comes to navigating these challenges. There’s a dietician available now, and, most recently, Pediatric Associates has added a psychologist to its staff as well. A little farther north, at Suburban Pediatric Associates, which has offices in Liberty, Mason and Springdale, there’s definitely a strong focus on mental health, but also on complete, comprehensive care, says Dr. Ronna Schneider, a pediatrician at the practice. That’s why they offer lactation services in office. There’s a doctor trained specifically to treat adolescents. Another who deals with chronic illnesses. “I think everybody’s sort of moving toward that [adding more services],” Bolling

says. He co-founded Pediatric Associates along with Chris Cunha in 1992, and it has three locations: Crestview Hills, Florence and Cold Springs. “We want patients to see us a safe place.” If anything, the parent coaching may be unique, Bolling says. The program, called Parent Connext, is offered through Beech Acres Parenting Center, in partnership with TriHeath Pediatrics and Cincinnati Children’s Mayerson Center for Safe and Healthy Children. It’s free for patients. And access is easy; the parenting expert is on site. The goal is to provide support, whether in overcoming an adverse childhood experience, which is a huge health determinant, or more routine behavior issues, like toilet training and picky eating, that can cause stress for families. Bolling is on the board at Beech Acres and, when the program was proposed, he


Your priority. Our specialty. Your child is your number one priority. We understand. Your child is important to us too. In fact, this isn’t our job, it’s our calling. From urgent care, to cancer care, Cincinnati Children’s is changing the outcome for patients and families.

If illness or injury impacts your child, turn to us. At Cincinnati Children’s, your child is our specialty.


LIVE WELL PROFILE

Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Your priority is our specialty.

We offer 11 neighborhood locations to serve you where you are, in addition to our main hospital on Burnet Avenue. Our neighborhood locations offer you all the expertise and pediatric focus of a world-class children’s hospital—closer to where you live.

There’s nothing more important to you than your child. We understand, because your children are important to us, too. Our physicians, specialists, nurses and therapists are all pediatrics professionals trained specifically to work with children. Most have devoted their entire careers to caring for kids. So when illness or injury happens to your child—from urgent care to cancer care—turn to us. To let you know a little bit more about us, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center has served the medical needs of infants, children and teens in greater Cincinnati and beyond for more than 135 years.

One of the most highly respected pediatric hospitals in the U.S., we have been repeatedly recognized for excellent specialty care: • Rank third in the nation among Honor Roll hospitals in US News & World Report’s 2019-20 Best Children’s Hospitals, and top 10 in all 10 subspecialties ranked by that website • Achieved Magnet recognition for nursing excellence • Among the very top ranked cancer care centers year after year As a national and international referral center for complex care, we care for children with the most difficult-to-treat diseases and conditions and provide the most advanced care, leading to better outcomes. In fact, families from all 50 states and 100-plus countries trust us to care for their children. But we’re not just for children with chronic or serious illness.

We believe every Tristate family should have easy access to expert pediatric care, so you’ll find a neighborhood location that works for you, including: Anderson, Eastgate, Fairfield, Green Township, northern Kentucky in Crestview Hills and Mason, and a second full-service hospital in Liberty Township, to provide easier access for our northern Cincinnati and southern Dayton families. The services we offer vary by location (see our website cincinnatichildrens.org for details): • Urgent care • Emergency care • Laboratory services • X-rays, radiology and diagnostic imaging, including ultrasound, MRI, and CT scans • Physical therapy and occupational therapy • Sports medicine and orthopaedics • Sports physical therapy • A variety of pediatric medical and surgical specialty clinics at each location


Live Well Cincy

Dr. Ronna Schneider, Suburban Pediatric Associates jumped at the opportunity to help pilot. “Our families love it. Just having one more person they can sit down with [is huge],” Bolling says. “You can read about this stuff in a book, but it’s nice to troubleshoot with somebody who’s an expert. Someone with real-world experience. And it helps the pro-

viders. Rather than having a 15-20 minute well[ness] visit, you can do a deep dive into some of the bigger challenges of parenting. It’s become a vital part of what we do.” Childhood obesity is another area of focus. In the U.S., about 13.7 million children and adolescents, aged 2-19 years, are obese. And “what’s really distressing,” Bolling says, “is that severe obesity is on the uptick.” Children with obesity are more likely to have high blood pressure and high cholesterol, which are risk factors for cardiovascular disease, and breathing problems, such as asthma and sleep apnea. Childhood obesity is related to psychological problems like anxiety and depression, low self-esteem and lower self-reported quality of life. All providers at Pediatric Associates— there are 14 doctors, Bolling says, and four nurse practitioners—are versed in obesity prevention and treatment, but having a dietician adds another layer. That person can also aid with food allergies, sports nutrition, eating disorders and more. Pediatric Associates added that service in 2017. But it’s only in the last year that it’s

offered psychology services, too. Bolling says those offerings will only continue to expand. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, nearly 1 in 5 children have a diagnosable mental health illness. Most, about 80 percent, are not identified, and therefore, not treated. “It’s something we know is not going away,” Bolling says. “Kids live under different stressors. Social media and the screen stuff has a big impact. Before, I think kids could kind of leave school behind, and now they’re so tethered. There’s no escape. It can be a great source of connectedness in some ways, and we try to have families create a media use plan, but for kids, it’s about keeping them non-exposed as long as possible.” The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends only two hours a day for TV/ electronics, Schneider says. But an hour, at most, is plenty, she says. Mental health is at the forefront at Suburban these days, too, and pediatricians seem to bear more responsibility. “Pediatricians are at the forefront, because we see these patients at least

MOBILE VAN UNIT

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Healthy Moms & Babes is a Catholic-based organization that answers God’s call to serve

HOME VISITING SERVICES

at-risk women of childbearing age and their children so that they may survive and thrive.

(513) 591-5600 Healthymomsandbabes.org

Confidential home-based education and support at no cost to you

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Live Well Cincy once a year,” Schneider says. “There’s an overwhelming need for help with mental health. Counseling. Even recognition of symptoms. And mental health resources in Cincinnati—for pediatrics—are not abundant. So we’re very proactive.” Warning signs could include a change in behavior, erratic behavior or a drop in grades. Adolescents should be afforded some privacy, but Schneider says they “should be eating meals with their parents… or having some social interaction.” And early detection is huge. At age 12, patients at Suburban undergo a depression screen—which they complete in the office by themselves, without their parents. The practice is working with Cincinnati Children’s and Dayton Children’s on putting psychologists and social workers in private practices on a trial basis. And currently, Suburban is compiling a database of mental health resources in Cincinnati to further aid in access of care. Schneider hopes that information will be available on Suburban’s website by the end of summer. No matter the issue—whether it’s behav-

ioral health, breastfeeding assistance or even international adoption aid, which Suburban also offers—continuity is important. “If you start as a newborn in our practice, and you go to age 23—and we treat patients up to age 23. That’s amazing continuity of care,” she says. “Every issue you’ve ever had, we have on file, and we’ve gotten you through it. And it helps families. You’re not having to go to this specialist, or that specialist; that’s time consuming, and it’s disruptive for school and academics.” As for its part with Beech Acres, Bolling says he hopes the service can continue,

even after the grant expires. “We really want to figure out how to continue it,” he says. “It’s been a really, really great experience.” And another tool that could prove useful when it comes a child’s health. “I think a lot of parents think, ‘OK, I was raised by an alcoholic. Why would I tell my [kid’s] pediatrician?’ But by asking questions, sometimes we’re able to elicit that information from families and help them. We’re not pointing fingers. We’re just trying to identify things that might impact your health and your child’s health. And we can we address those.” n

Mental health and substance use challenges don’t take a break. Neither does Changes® at Beckett Springs. If you are concerned about your child’s mental health, mood or behavior, there is help. Changes Partial Hospitalization and Intensive Outpatient groups can provide immediate assessment and treatment for children and adolescents, ages 5–18.

Call 24/7 to schedule an assessment

513.942.9500

CHANGES® 7909 Schatz Pointe Dr. Dayton, OH 45459

BECKETT SPRINGS 8614 Shepherd Farm Dr. West Chester, OH 45069

BECKETTSPRINGS.COM/CHANGES

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- benefitting -

Sunday, September 1, 2019 5 pm to 11 pm

Carol Ann’s Carousel in Smale Park in Downtown Cincinnati “Rockin’ at Riverfest isnt’ your typical fundraiser. Its a party with unbelievable networking while also having the ability to do good.” - Mike Prescott, Market President, US Bank

Tickets $100 Rockin2019.gesture.com

Live DJ, Bar, Premiere Fireworks Seating


Live Well Cincy

Convenience and Fast Service THE MIDWEST EYE CENTER NOW HAS NEARLY A DOZEN LOCATIONS TO SERVE PATIENTS QUICKLY By Eric Spangler

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t’s easy to see how the MidWest Eye Center, with 10 locations in southwest Ohio and Northern Kentucky, could be your neighborhood eye doctor. The MidWest Eye Center, a division of Tri-State Centers for Sight, is the second largest ophthalmology group in the Greater Cincinnati area, says Joe Sgro, administrator 96

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for Tristate Centers for Sight Inc. “No matter where you’re located there’s going to be a MidWest Eye Care Center nearby,” he says. MidWest Eye Center has facilities in West Chester, Union Township in Clermont County near Eastgate Mall, Colerain Township, Kenwood, downtown Cincinnati, Springdale and Delhi Township in Ohio and two facilities in Crestview Hills and one in Florence, Kentucky. What sets MidWest Eye Center apart from other eye care facilities is its one-stop shop convenience and quick customer service, says Sgro. No matter what a patient’s eye care needs are they can be taken care

Midwest Eye Center retina specialist Dr. Faiz Khaja treats patients with retina conditions associated with diabetes, macular degeneration, accidents and injury, cataracts and other vision-threatening conditions related to the retina. of at any of the MidWest Eye Center’s locations, he says. And those eye care needs can be taken care of quickly. “I think the other thing that really sets us apart is how quickly we are seeing a patient because we don’t have one huge location,” says Sgro. Doctors at the MidWest Eye Center travel from location to location, enabling patients to have their eye care needs taken care of quickly as opposed to one huge location where patients have to wait to have their eye care needs completed. “There’s not a lot of wait time,” says Sgro. “I think that’s huge compared to our competitors where people may be spending a half a day at the eye doctor.” In addition to the convenience of multiple locations and quick service for a


patient’s eye care needs the MidWest Eye Center is also able to serve multiple age groups. “Whether you’re young and you’re having eye care issues all the way up to your eyes are aging … we have specialists who are able to care for you no matter what age group you fall in,” he says. The MidWest Eye Center has a complete roster of board-certified ophthalmologists, retina specialists and optometrists, offering diagnosis and surgical and nonsurgical treatment for eye diseases such as cataracts, glaucoma, dry eyes, blepharitis, floaters and flashes, diabetic retinopathy, macular degeneration and others. Sgro says the MidWest Eye Center employs 11 ophthalmologists and five optometrists who treat common eye conditions such as blepharitis, cataracts, chalazion, corneal erosions, dry eyes, glaucoma and herpes zoster, also known as shingles. The doctors at MidWest Eye Center can perform a wide range of procedures, from LASIK vision correction to laser-assisted cataract surgery to oculoplastic cosmetic reconstruction, he says. Many of today’s procedures at the MidWest Eye Center take advantage of the use of lasers, rather than the traditional scalpel. The LASIK vision correction is one of the most widely known procedures and uses a laser to reshape the cornea to correct the imperfections that cause nearsightedness, farsightedness and astigmatism. Lasers are also being used to conduct cataract surgery, allowing doctors at the MidWest Eye Center to make precise incisions in less time than traditional cataract surgery. The cataract laser surgery also allows for an easier procedure by eliminating some of the steps that are required under traditional cataract surgery, says Sgro. “There is less likelihood of complications, it’s safer and usually results in a quicker recovery,” he says. The cataract laser surgery is used for patients who upgrade to premium lenses, says Sgro. The doctors at the MidWest Eye Center are also using lasers to treat a retinal tear or break to prevent the retina from detaching from the back of the eye. “You look back 20 plus years ago when LASIK [surgery] just kind of first became available to everyone and where we’ve gone from corrective laser surgery or what they call refractive laser surgery to where we’re at today,” says Sgro. The MidWest Eye Center is continually seeking to improve eye care procedures. “We are constantly moving in that direction where the surgeries are becoming less

invasive, recovery is quicker and better after effects of the surgery in terms of the vision, whether it’s restoring vision or preventing vision loss,” he says. In addition to its use of lasers in surgeries, the MidWest Eye Center is the only group that is using the KAMRA inlay treatment, says Sgro. The KAMRA inlay treatment is “an eye procedure that restores near vision and frees you from the constant frustrations of reading glasses,” he says. The KAMRA inlay, a mini-ring with an opening—or pinhole—in the center, is smaller and thinner than a contact lens. The inlay uses this pinhole to focus light coming into the eye. “This restores near vision while maintaining distance vision,” says Sgro. Dr. David Schneider originally independently owned Midwest Eye Center, he says. It was acquired by the Tristate Centers for Sight Inc. in 2015 and Midwest Eye Center

Dr. Saif Jaweed, the director of the MidWest Eye Center, practices comprehensive ophthalmology as well as refractive surgery. then became a division of the Tristate Centers for Sight Inc., he says. The Midwest Eye Center has two surgery centers, one in Kenwood and the other in the Eastgate area, says Sgro. The Eastgate location was recently renovated, he says. “We’re actually looking to do more in Eastgate so some of the changes that we did were from the current space, but we are looking at possibly expanding our footprint in Eastgate.” The Midwest Eye Center is also in the process of renovating the Kenwood location, he says. The Kenwood renovation is expected to be completed in September. For more information visit midwesteyecenter.com. n w w w.

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PATIO HOMES page 100

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Cincy Home

Homes for Empty Nesters RANCH HOMES WITH NO YARD MAINTENANCE ARE POPULAR WITH BABY BOOMERS By Eric Spangler

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atio-style homes, or ranch homes that have yards maintained by a homeowners association, are becoming more popular as baby boomers retire and downsize from their larger home. Randy Terry, owner/manager of Liberty Land Co., developer of the 450-acre Carriage Hill community in Liberty Township, says patio-style homes are one of the hottest sellers in his development. 100

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And the trend in popularity of patio-style homes continues to rise. “We certainly see the demographics moving in that direction,” he says. The demographics driving the market for patio-style homes are people in their 50s to those well into their 80s, says Terry. The typical buyer of a patio-style home is a couple whose children are grown and living on their own, also known as empty

Many empty nesters are turning to patio homes, like the ones in the Carriage Hill community.

nesters. Many are retired, but others are still working, he says. The attraction to a patio-style home for baby boomers is that most of the living space is located on the first floor and someone else handles all the yard work, Terry says. “We certainly have some homeowners who love doing their gardening and some of that type of thing, but we do have a first-class lawn care company to maintain the landscape beds, plants, lawns and in the winter time issues of snow and ice removal.” The homeowners association fees pay for that yard maintenance, he says. “I think that a lot of the aging population is coming out of older homes, which are high cost and maintenance, and the challenges of dealing with larger properties and homes are too large for what their


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Cincy Home needs are today,” he says. The opportunity to buy a new home with all of the new amenities combined with no steps and no yard maintenance at a comparable price to their current home is driving many of today’s buyers into patiostyle homes, says Terry. The Carriage Hill community caters to those empty nesters with a clubhouse and pool that is designated for adults and community activities and events that are geared toward the older age group, he says. Three types of patio-style homes are offered in the Carriage Hill community, says Terry. One style includes a master bedroom and a second bedroom on the first floor along with a full lower level for entertainment or additional bedroom space, he says. A second style offered at Carriage Hill is called a courtyard home and it consists of a garage entry that faces the front door of the home instead of the street, creating a courtyard driveway effect. It also has a full lower level, Terry says. One of its newest home styles is located in The Retreat section of the Carriage Hill

The Carriage Hill Community pool

development that will include smaller units, usually without lower levels. Each unit will be separate but will include a common driveway for four units. Each unit will have a two-car garage and a third dedicated parking space, he says. “Some of them have very similar upscale features and home design along with the

maintenance-free aspects,” Terry says. The Carriage Hill development, site of the Homearama showcase in 2013 and 2014, is conducive to extended families, he says. The development includes singlefamily homes with large lots for younger families along with the patio-style homes for parents or grandparents, says Terry.

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“We see a huge mix of that,” he says. “We see a lot of grandparents. I think they tend to follow their grandkids rather than their children, and then we also certainly see the children following their parents as

their parents age.” Homes in the Carriage Hill development range from the smaller patio homes in the 2,000-square-foot range up to grand estates on larger lots that are approaching

the $2 million price point, he says. The Carriage Hill development, which is about 80 percent completed, now has about 100 empty-nester type homes. Once completed the development will have an equal mix of empty-nester homes and single-family homes—about 225 units each, Terry says. n

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Love Cincy Stephen T. Shumard, Photographer

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Cincy Magazine - August/September 2019  

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