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GREAT OAKS CELEBRATES 50 YEARS DAVID MANN FOR MAYOR?

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Great Escapes

CINCINNATI’S INNOVATION DISTRICT

Family-Friendly Outdoor Adventures

Just a Car Trip Away

Clifty Falls State Park, Madison, Indiana


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CWSP-0131 Cincy Ad-Apr 20.qxp_Layout 1 3/4/20 4:11 PM Page 1

DePaul Cristo Rey High School Salutes our Partners

Among those employing DPCR students this year are: Government City of Cincinnati Law Department Hamilton County Clerk of Courts Hamilton County Juvenile Court Hamilton County Prosecuting Attorney Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities

Insurance & Finance Ameritas Arthur J. Gallagher & Co. The Dental Care Plus Group F E G Investment Advisors

Kroger Personal Finance Social & Youth Services The Standard Children’s Home of Western & Southern Financial Group Northern Kentucky Manufacturing Cincinnati Association for the Blind and Visually Impaired AK Steel Corporation Cincinnati Union Bethel The David J. Joseph Company Community Matters Michelman Dress for Success Cincinnati Rotex Global Easter Seals Serving Shepherd Color Company Greater Cincinnati Marketing/Media Learning Grove Santa Maria Community Services 84.51 St. Francis Seraph Ministries Cincy Magazine ProFootball Focus The E.W. Scripps Company

St. Joseph Home St. Vincent de Paul YMCA of Greater Cincinnati

Suppliers Cintas Corporation The Home City Ice Company Saturday Knight Ltd.

Technology Cincinnati Bell LCS Quotient Technology Inc.

• •

www.depaulcristorey.org


Contents

Shawnee State Park

The Magazine for Business Professionals

A p r i l 2020

6

Great Escapes

4 5

Web Exclusives

INSIDE CINCY

6

Built to Last

By Corinne Minard PAGE 47

COLUMNS

Publisher’s View BY ERIC HARMON

Nearby outdoor adventures perfect for the whole family

FEATURES

14

History & Leadership

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The Right Mann for Mayor?

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Another View

59

Guide to Colleges & Universities

Patty Beggs and artful leadership. BY DAN HURLEY Ohio battles over school vouchers. BY DON MOONEY

CINCY LIVE

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Ballet Meets Business

Updates from local institutions, the 2020 outstanding educators, listings and more. BY THE EDITORS

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Exhibit to celebrate 200 years of Taft Museum of Art’s building. BY ERIC SPANGLER

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More Than Medicine

4 questions with Steve Edwards of Coney Island. BY KEVIN MICHELL

By the Numbers

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Growing in Every Way

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Former ballet star means business with fashion line. BY DAVID LYMAN

Time for Cincinnati to get Redshot. BY BILL FERGUSON JR. Great Oaks opens doors to greater success. BY KEVIN MICHELL YMCA encourages growth in children of all ages. BY KEVIN MICHELL

Scene

Local urology resources, plus behind the scenes of The Urology Group. BY KEVIN MICHELL

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Winning the War for Talent

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Right Idea, Right Time

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Meeting & Event Planner Guide

Q&A

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Cincy Live Well

BUSINESS

St. Vincent de Paul pharmacy prescribes more than medicine. BY CORINNE MINARD

Multiplying Potential

David Mann is again considering running for mayor. BY LIZ ENGEL

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Calendar Midwestern Traveler

Kentucky attractions get visitors close to horses. BY CORINNE MINARD

Nexigen grows by keeping up with tech trends. BY DAVID HOLTHAUS

Learn more about venues in the Tristate, plus listings. BY MENNA ELARMAN

110

Best in Business Calendar & Directory

112

Love Cincy

Dining

The Butcher and Barrel is a reason to dine. BY ERIC SPANGLER

The Cincinnati Innovation District will drive area’s economy. BY TERRY TROY

Cincy (ISSN-1934-8746) published in February/March; April/ May; June/July; August/September; October; November; December/January for a total of seven issues by Cincy, 30 Garfield Place, Cincinnati, OH 45202. Periodicals postage paid at Cincinnati, Ohio, and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Cincy, 30 Garfield Place, Suite 440, Cincinnati, OH 45202. 2

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Publisher’s View

A Voice For Community Progress I

n this time of dire need for our city and nation, I am pleased to announce t hat w it h t he Apr i l issue Cincy Magazine has become a founding partner of Voice For Community Progress. My apologies in advance—some of the content that you see here will be disrupted by the COVID-19 response—but we hope that this partnership will shine a light on the positive aspects of our region and the community at large. The 501(c)3 nonprofit was established in 2019 for the purpose of telling the stories of the individuals and organizations advancing Ohio and its communities economically, politically and socially. This mission of VCP Cincinnati was born out of the need that nonprofits and communities with important initiatives have today in telling their story to the people who can make all the difference in whether they succeed or fail. Cincy Magazine is beginning what we believe will be an exciting journey in making our city and region a better place to live and work. For example, the story of the Cincinnati Innovation District is a game-changing initiative that we will follow closely, as well as a number of others to be added. And as for nonprofits such as the YMCA and Great Oaks, we will be doubling our editorial coverage of nonprofits and their important mission. The most important part of our new adventure is not about us, but about you. Every mission needs a voice and it is now our mission to give voice to yours. Please contact me if we can help you tell your story to the region’s largest group of decision makers.

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Locally, veteran and family owned Editor & Publisher Eric Harmon Managing Editor Corinne Minard Associate Editors Kevin Michell, Eric Spangler Contributing Writers Peter Bronson, Liz Engel, Bill Ferguson Jr., David Holthaus, Dan Hurley, David Lyman, Don Mooney, Terry Troy Editorial Intern Menna Elarman Creative Director Guy Kelly Art Director Katy Rucker Digital Content Coordinator Danielle Cain Associate Publisher Rick Seeney Custom Sales Manager Brad Hoicowitz Advertising Director Abbey Cummins Sales Representatives Jon Castonguay, Kristine Granata, Dan Link, Donna Sobczak Operations & Finance Manager Tammie Collins Advertising & Circulation Manager Laura Federle Advertising Coordinator Katelynn Webb Audience Development Nakya Grisby Events Director Stephanie Simon Events Coordinator Amanda Watt Production Manager Keith Ohmer Work-Study Students Aixa Velazquez, Comar Watson Cincy on the web: www.cincymagazine.com Cincy Co. LLC Cincinnati Club Building 30 Garfield Place, Suite 440 Cincinnati, OH 45202 Contact Cincy: information@cincymagazine.comor call (513) 421-2533. Go to www.cincymagazine.com to get your complimentary subscription to Cincy.

Cincy Magazine is a founding partner of Voice For Community Progress, a 501(c)3 nonprofit center for research and communication whose mission is to tell the stories of the individuals and organizations advancing Ohio and its communities economically, politically and socially. VCP Cincinnati is an initiative-driven, community-based voice for educating and engaging citizens in the things that matter in achieving community progress and, just as importantly, personal growth.

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3/16/20 12:13 PM


Digital Exclusives

Pets and Vets

A Growing Demand

TOP 5 ONLINE STORIES 1 A Growing Demand by Eric Spangler 2 This is John Boehner on Pot by Peter Bronson 3 Spring into the Arts by Corinne Minard 4 Council-Approved Piracy by Don Mooney 5 Making Homes Healthier by Kevin Michell

PET OWNERS ARE SEEKING BETTER MEDICAL CARE, ADVANCED DIAGNOSTICS FOR THEIR PETS

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ne of only a couple facilities in the Greater Cincinnati area to offer 24-hour emergency veterinary care, MedVet is also is one of the leading specialty health care facilities for pets, says Dr. Jenny Wells, medical director. “We are a 24/7, 365-day-a-year practice as far as our emergency clinic goes and then the specialties group are available on a full-time basis as needed,” she says. MedVet, a veterinarian-led and -owned business with 24 locations throughout the country, has been in Cincinnati since 2010, says Wells. Located at 3964 Red Bank Road in Fairfax, MedVet offers specialty services by referral in 14 different specialties, including the area’s only board-certified anesthesiolog ists, radiation oncologist and radiologists, she says. MedVet Cincinnati’s Cancer Center is also home to an integrated team of oncology experts providing surgical, medical and radiation treatment options, says Wells. The facility is equipped with the most advanced diagnostic and treatment 52

TOP TWEET

Today’s pet owners expect their animal companions to be treated like family when they go to the vet.

By Eric Spangler

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technologies available to dog and cats, including CT scanner, linear accelerator and the only animal-dedicated MRI in the region. “I think as pets become a bigger part of our lives and our families people are expecting the same kind of care that they get for themselves for their pets and we’re here to deliver that,” she says. Because there is such a high demand for veterinary specialists MedVet, which also offers internships and residency programs to veterinarian s to further their knowledge and qualify them for board certification in a specific specialty, is continually seeking to recruit the best doctors, says Wells. “All the specialties are growing at a rapid rate and we’re doing our best to keep up with the demand,” she says. “People have higher demands, higher wants for their pets. They want those advanced diagnostics so they can give their pets the best life possible.” That’s especially true for the millennial population of pet owners, says Cidney

Fitzpatrick, MedVet regional marketing partner. “We’re seeing less and less millennials have children and they’re investing in their livelihood and their pets,” she says. Although no referrals are needed to bring a pet in for emergency care, MedVet works in partnership with general practitioners for specialty care needs, says Fitzpatrick. “Let’s say you take your cat to the vet and they’re listening with their stethoscope and they hear like a murmur,” she says. “They may refer you to a cardiologist which would be used to help detect where is the murmur coming from.” In fact, MedVet employs Dr. Kathy Wright, one of the leading veterinary cardiologists in the country. “Dr. Kathy Wright does cardiac ablation and she’s the only person in the country to do that,” Fitzpatrick says. Regardless of whether a pet is being seen for emergency or specialty health care they will never be alone at MedVet, says Wells. “We have 24-hour nursing, 24-hour doctor care,” she says. “There is always someone here.” n

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DIALOGUE PeopleWorkingCoop @ PWCCincy Interested in making your home more accessible? Our friends at Whole Home can help! Learn more about how PWC’s Whole Home Innovation Center is helping homeowners throughout the Tri-State live healthier lives — via @CincyMagazine CincyTech @Cincy_Tech Why #startup founders should swing hard. Thanks to @CincyMagazine + @_LizEngel for a great conversation with @mvenerable about investing locally + #momentum in the #CincinnatiRegion Judge Beridon @JudgeBeridon Good turnout tonight for @CincyMagazine #power100 reception. While it was wonderful to recognize the honorees, the real winner tonight was @CincinnatiWorks, the beneficiary of the nights proceeds. Christian Vlg Mason @ MCV_OH @CincyMagazine recently interviewed CEO Larry Monroe about our three new initiatives designed to bring the most modern touches to our Villages! Check out the great article. #retirement #RetirementPlanning Taft Law News @Taftlaw Hundreds of members of the Tristate legal community nominate colleagues for the honor of @CincyMagazine’s Leading Lawyer, and a jury of peers makes the final selections. Learn more about Taft Cincinnati’s 43 honorees.

LIVE

TOP INSTA POST

With the sun coming out and the days getting longer this spring, new and exciting events are popping up! Check out Cincy.Live to find out what’s on the calendar! w w w.

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View of the Taft’s residence showing the driveway and porte-cochere, during their lifetimes, 1913

Built to Last EXHIBIT TO CELEBRATE 200 YEARS OF THE TAFT MUSEUM OF ART’S ORIGINAL BUILDING By Eric Spangler

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isitors will be able to trace the story of downtown Cincinnati’s oldest surviving wooden residence still in its original location during an upcoming exhibit at the Baum-Longworth-SintonTaft house—better known as the Taft Museum of Art. The museum’s “Built to Last: The Taft Historic House at 200” exhibit will be open through Aug. 16, says Sarah Ditlinger, senior marketing manager. The exhibit includes historic objects on display in the museum’s Stinton Gallery, including a scale model of the BaumLongworth-Sinton-Taft Historic House, the possible front façade and floor plan of Martin Baum’s original house, glazed porcelain and marble bathroom tiles circa 1890, wallpaper fragments from the late 19th century, and bottles and teacup and saucer fragments discovered in 2002 while excavating the property behind the museum to build the parking garage, says Ditlinger. The exhibit also includes a self-guided tour of the original home, which was built 200 years ago in 1820 by merchant and 6

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entrepreneur Martin Baum, she says. “There’s a guided map that showcases what the rooms would have been used for back in the day,” Ditlinger says. The original house was called Belmont Square and included a 2,500-square-foot main floor—a perfect square—with a foyer and four grand rooms that were most likely used for entertaining. The bedrooms were most likely upstairs. Additions to the house were built over the years by other prominent Cincinnatians who owned the building, including attorney Nicholas Longworth, who added north and south wings to the original square house and an ornate portico to the front entrance with a triangular roof supported by stately columns. He also hired African American painter Robert S. Duncanson to paint landscape murals in the foyer, now considered to be one of the fi nest suites of domestic murals dating from before the Civil War. David Sinton, an iron industrialist and real estate investor, and his adult daughter, Anna, occupied the house beginning in 1871 and, in 1873, Anna married Charles Phelps Taft, a lawyer and Ohio state representative. Taft and Anna Sinton Taft remained in the house after David Sinton’s death in 1900 and assembled an exceptional collection of paintings and decorative arts that visitors to the exhibit will be able to view during the tour, says Ditlinger.

View of Tafts’ dining room, during their lifetimes, in what is now the Taft Museum of Art, about 1925 The Tafts donated the building, which is now a National Historic Landmark, and their incredible collection of artworks to the public for a museum. The transformation of the home into a public museum began after Anna Sinton Taft’s death in 1931. The “Built to Last: The Taft Historic House at 200” exhibit will be one of the last times the public will be able to tour the original part of the building until March 2021. Preservation work that includes repairs to the façade and exterior of the building will start in October. “Th is is a good last chance to see it up until they do the preservation efforts,” she says. So how is it that a house built 200 years ago in what is now downtown Cincinnati still standing? It’s simple. “People care about it,” says Ditlinger. ■

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More Than Medicine

ST. VINCENT DE PAUL PRESCRIBES MORE THAN MEDICATION WITH ITS CHARITABLE PHARMACY By Corinne Minard

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hen the Society of St. Vincent de Paul (SVDP) in Cincinnati opened its Charitable Pharmacy in 2006, its only purpose was to fill prescriptions for those with no health insurance. But over the years, that mission has changed and grown to do so much more. Today, the pharmacy also serves those described as underinsured—people who have insurance but, because of high copays (which can sometimes be 30-40 of the price of a medication), can’t afford their prescription—has moved to a new location with additional hours and opened a second location in Western Hills. SVDP has filled more than 500,000 free prescriptions, worth more than $65 million. But the Charitable Pharmacy has gone a step beyond that by becoming an outcomes-based pharmacy, too. “When you talk about pharmacy, you don’t normally talk about positive health outcomes, but through our clinical pharmacy program, we generate positive health outcomes for the patients that come in,” says Mike Espel, director of the Charitable Pharmacy. SVDP started its clinical program in 2008 to help its clients become healthier in addition to receiving prescriptions. All pharmacy clients receive a health screening and have their drug regimen reviewed. With this program in place, SVDP has seen a 49 reduction in hospitalizations,

The Charitable Pharmacy drop off area

ABOVE: The Charitable Pharmacy is now located in the Don and Phyllis Neyer Outreach Center LEFT: St. Vincent de Paul pharmacists

an average A1C reduction (the blood test used to test for blood sugar) of 1.3 in new patients with diabetes and an 81 medication adherence rate in its clients. The pharmacy has taken this a step further, though, with programs designed to educate and help clients lead healthier lives. Espel says that the pharmacy has found great success with its smoking cessation program. Those who join the program are given free nicotine replacement therapy, free once-a-month face-to-face counseling and weekly check-ins with pharmacy interns. At the start of the program, 37 of the pharmacy’s patients smoked, much higher than the national average of 14. Since the program was started in 2015, that percentage has decreased to 23. Another program that the pharmacy has found success with is its PHARMer’s Market. “We know that—and with diabetes in particular—food makes a big difference,” says Espel. “So we decided, what would it look like if we gave people food along with their prescriptions?”

Thanks to a grant from CVS, SVDP gave 50 patients in the pilot program healthy food and recipes once a week for three months. At the end of the program, 89 of patients saw a reduction in their A1C levels. To further add to the program, SVDP is planning on offering healthy cooking classes in the learning kitchen at the Don and Phyllis Neyer Outreach Center, which will be called the PHARMer’s Kitchen, to better assist people in learning healthy habits. “We feel like if we can get them to look at what healthy food looks like and then show them how to cook it, then hopefully those two things together could help us to maybe get grant funding to get some more healthy options for our pantry,” says Espel. Mike Dunn, executive director of SVDP in Cincinnati, sees the pharmacy and its programs as aligning perfectly with the mission of SVDP itself. “The quote for the society is no act of charity is foreign to the society. Essentially, as we’re looking at the whole being if you will, we found that this is a need that has largely gone unmet in this community,” he says. “There’s story after story after story that we truly are saving lives with the Charitable Pharmacy. It’s very much a resource that’s in line with what we do here at St. Vincent de Paul.” n w w w.

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Q&A

4 Questions with Steve Edwards VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS FOR CONEY ISLAND By Kevin Michell

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ast year, Coney Island made the decision to eliminate its amusement park rides in favor of focusing on the Sunlite Pool and the area surrounding it. This ushers in a transition period for the venerable attraction, opening up new possibilities for how the park will utilize the area between Lake Como and the river while looking ahead to Sunlite Pool’s centennial in 2025. Coney Island’s vice president of operations, Steve Edwards, talks about what visitors can expect this summer and in the future.

WHAT MOTIVATED MAKING SUNLITE POOL THE PRIMARY ATTRACTION? We made that determination by the fact that we feel our best ability to grow as a company is through the water park as our main entity. This allows us to have a focus on doing everything to the best level that we can in that area. It allows us to make sure that our cleanliness, our amenities, our structures, everything that the water park entails is the best. We’ve come to realize that our focus was a little bit everywhere and so now it’s more in one central location.

WHAT CHANGES WILL COME TO THE PARK OVER THE NEXT FIVE YEARS? What I can say is we’re looking to add more attractions, we’re looking to expand the water park. We’re going to be doing more research, talking more to our guests, talking to our season pass holders about what type of things they want us to add and, along the way, we’ll continue to research what are the best and brightest things we can add to the water park. 8

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As all decisions we’ve made the last few years have been, we don’t take this decision lightly either—we’ve made sure that we make the best decisions for our long-term success and we want everybody to know that Coney Island is a wonderful place to be and it’s going to be around for a long time and make that a long-term success.

HOW WILL THE AREA AROUND LAKE COMO CHANGE NOW THAT THE RIDES ARE GONE? What we’re hoping to have happen is to increase the events down here. We have our Balloon Glow, we’ll have our Fire Up the Night—which is actually moving dates to June 6 this year—we’ll also have our Summerfair, our Appalachian Festival. And I think that as people visit for those events, they’ll realize that Coney Island has a great space to have vendors and different areas and whatever you want your event to be, it can be here. I think what people will see is that the events that have been here in the past will change in a positive way. They’ll be more wide open, not as crowded to where you can’t get around.

WHAT CAN VISITORS TO CONEY ISLAND EXPECT TO ENJOY THIS YEAR? For the 2020 season I think what people will notice is a cleaner, more customer-

friendly, more welcoming environment. The amenities that we’re working on improving are the chairs—in the middle of the summer on a busy, hot day it can be difficult to find a chair, so we’re adding more chairs and lounge chairs and seating—we’re adding more shade structures over there, we’re improving our sound system. We strongly believe that we provide a great family atmosphere for our guests and I think people will realize in the summer that Coney Island is going to do what we’ve always done well even better. n

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By the Numbers

Time for Cincinnati To Get Reds-hot After several high-profi le offseason acquisitions, there’s much hope for the Reds as they begin their 2020 season. Last year, the team saw some strong pitching and some loyal prognosticators think that if the hitting improves this year the team could be a contender after six straight losing seasons. Some interesting Reds tidbits (research by Bill Ferguson Jr.):

6,571

46

First-inning home runs by Reds players in 2019, the most of any major league team in records dating to 1940; it’s also the number

Distance, in miles, from Cincinnati to the

of seasons that Marty

birthplace (Yokosuka, Kanagawa, Japan)

Brennaman broadcast Reds games before

of outfielder Shogo Akiyama, who signed

retiring last year

with the Reds in January

5 1,808,685 Reds World Series championships

(1919, 1940, 1975, 1976, 1990)

10.67

Pitcher Luis Castillo’s average strikeouts per nine innings in 2019, a Reds season record

Home attendance in 2019, the third-worst in majors

SOURCES: CINCINNATI REDS, REDS 2020 MEDIA GUIDE, MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL w w w.

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MULTIPLYING POTENTIAL

GREAT OAKS’ PROGRAMS FOR BOTH ADULT LEARNERS AND HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS OPEN UP DOORS TO GREATER SUCCESS By Kevin Michell

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arry Snyder, president and CEO of Great Oaks Career Campuses, recalls meeting with a local rotary club recently where 10 of the 25 visiting members were surprised by what the career and technical education institution was doing. Despite knowing of its existence, they were unaware of how Great Oaks is guiding career development in both teenagers and adults through programs and certifications in an array of industries. “We’ve been at that forefront for 50 years,” Snyder says with a laugh. It’s true—Great Oaks was founded in 1970 when 22 school districts partnered to become the Hamilton County Joint Vocational School District and, ever since, the organization has provided educational tracks designed to prepare the workforce of the future. 10

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Today, the school has four main campuses for adult and high school learners, partnerships with 36 school districts and career exploration programs in which around 18,000 high school and middle school students participate. One of the great drivers of Great Oaks’ success is the speed with which it embraces the emerging technology and skills that employers will need from workers. In the early 1980s, Great Oaks purchased 100 personal computers directly from IBM, which led to the computer manufacturer’s leadership visiting Cincinnati because a school making such a purchase was relatively unheard of at the time. Great Oaks split those computers among four large Airstream vans and shuttled the computers around to its satellite schools, parking them for students to learn how to use. Today, that integration of new technology in Great Oaks’ classrooms and workshops takes many forms, from utilizing drones in its Fire and Emergency Medical Rescue Academy to the use of robotics in its CNC manufacturing program. “It’s interesting to look over our 50-year history and see the program changes and/

or how they have adapted,” says Snyder. “Precision machining’s a good example— we still use the same milling machines, but the information is put in differently. It’s now using a computer numerical control (CNC) system. [The work] evolved and we’ve had to evolve our machinery to do likewise.” Creating a workforce development curriculum that always has one eye on the future has allowed Great Oaks Career Campuses to persist, grow and evolve over its 50 years while also solidifying its importance to local and regional industries, as well as the economy on the whole. A couple of years ago the school system faced a series of crucial moments. In fall 2017, the University of Cincinnati Economics Center released its study on the wider economic impact of a Great Oaks education, both in terms of a student’s return on investment and the local economies that graduates left Great Oaks to work in. Among its findings were that adult learners who earned a certification through Great Oaks earned between $8,000 and $27,000 more than workers with only a high school diploma or equivalent experience

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ABOVE: Students at Great Oaks learn by using the same technology that’s being used in their chosen profession. RIGHT: Students can learn skills in a variety of areas, including the digital arts. LEFT: The academic tracks available at Great Oaks cover a wide range of industries, including aviation. in just their first year after leaving Great Oaks, a positive return for their tuition expenses that compounded further five to 20 years down the road. The study also found that Great Oaks operations alone resulted in nearly $115 million in local economic impact, not counting the wider effect that its students and their enhanced incomes had on their respective municipalities. Snyder says this study, which used adult student information and data from the Ohio Department of Job and Family services to track the career paths and earnings of those who earned certification through Great Oaks, really answered the question of what impact the school was making. “That data then showed us that we’re not just making this up,” he says. “These are our students, this is what’s happening with people who have taken our HVAC program, our police academy program, our part-time programs.” Having this concrete data to show helped the school pass its levy renewal in November 2018 and continue to forge partnerships with businesses and municipalities—and the leaders steering them. “It helped us have that conversation,” says Snyder, “helping them understand that we’re not just a place where kids are sent to learn skills, but we also contribute back to those communities that we serve and there’s an economic impact on that.” And while having industry-specific advisers and partners for Great Oaks’ programs goes a long way to helping the school adapt its offerings for the workforce of the next decade or two, the focus is still and always on the students who utilize its classes and the successes they achieve.

While many of the adult and high school learners who enroll in Great Oaks go on to have great careers because of the education they receive at its campuses, around 30 of the high school students that take Great Oaks courses continue on to traditional four-year college. In February, MacKenzie Kay of McClain High School in Greenfield, who has taken medical assistant classes at Laurel Oaks, was awarded the Wilfred R. Konneker Cutler Scholarship, a full fouryear free ride to Ohio University. In that way, Great Oaks holds a special appeal to middle school and high school students, as well as their parents. Taking courses at one of its campuses allows students to explore multiple potential career paths through exposure to different career skills before they have left secondary edu-

cation. As Snyder says, taking classes at Great Oaks multiplies a student’s potential pathways and lets them learn not only career-relevant skills but also applications for their passions they might not have known of beforehand. “I always like to say that our high school students are risk-takers,” he adds, “and that they step away from the comforts of their home school to try something that’s different, that fits their excitement and their dreams and then they pursue them.” And with the support of Cincinnati’s communities and industries, Great Oaks will continue to reward the risk-takers— both those still in high school and the adults who come to Great Oaks campuses for career advancement—by offering many paths to fulfilling their potential. n

Great Oaks provides classes for high school students and adult learners. w w w.

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Growing in Every Way PROGRAMS AT THE YMCA OF GREATER CINCINNATI ENCOURAGE PHYSICAL, MENTAL AND INTELLECTUAL GROWTH IN CHILDREN OF ALL AGES By Kevin Michell

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he arrival of spring promises many days ahead for families to get outside and enjoy the warmer months. But as Jorge Perez, president and CEO of the YMCA of Greater Cincinnati, points out, it’s a crucial time for children and teens to continue their growth, even outside of their classrooms. It’s important for them to avoid the “summer slide,” he says, which is how some students lose the knowledge they’ve gained from the previous school year during summer break. Based on how they spend the months in between academic years, some kids can lose ground—as much as

three or four months’ worth of learning—if they aren’t getting opportunities to apply what they’ve learned in the summertime. “The research is real clear when it comes to outdoor space and youth development,” says Perez, who mentions a speaker he recently saw giving a talk on promoting good mental health in children. At the top of the list of best things to encourage a child’s mental growth: be outside. Perez has a personal example that immediately made that point resonate with him. “I remember going waterskiing during a summer camp and being on those skis, wondering what was keeping me up,” he recalls. “Why was I, when I’m not moving, falling into the water but when I am moving with the right gear, I can be on top of the water—and wondering whether friction had something to do with it. “Well that wouldn’t have happened if I wasn’t on those skis, if I hadn’t had those adventures, if I just spent all my time watching old episodes of I Love Lucy,” Perez adds with a laugh.

That room to dream, imagine and explore is necessary to supplementing the academic development that takes place in the classroom and gets to the heart of the YMCA of Greater Cincinnati’s summer and year-round programming. While the focus of summer is often on sports, swimming classes and camps that encourage healthy activity and physical well-being, there are several great YMCA programs focused on other aspects of youth development that are every bit as important. Perez likens the holistic view of youth development to something a lot of us experienced in early elementary school: receiving a bean in a cup in order to have it sprout when given the crucial ingredients of sunlight, water and soil. He says it’s much the same for human beings—give kids opportunities of social/emotional, cognitive and physical development and they have the right ingredients for growing into healthy adults. The programs of the YMCA of Greater Cincinnati serve to add any of those factors that are lacking in a child or teen’s life.

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“We also learn in that lesson that you can’t skimp on any of the ingredients,” Perez explains. “Again, human beings are the same way: You can’t have a great academic experience and great physical support—great food and exercise—but not teach these young people how to develop positive relationships and expect that ‘bean’ not to struggle.” One of the programs that helps fill in the gaps is the YMCA Achievers program, which is for teenagers who will be the first in their families to attend college. YMCA Achievers offers college and career preparation to make that opportunity count and help them avoid being one of the 35-40 of students who drop out during or after the first semester at college. The program received recognition from Hello Insight late last year through its HI Impact Award, which was given to only 17 youth development organizations around the country for demonstrating strong programs and opportunities for young people. The YMCA Achievers program runs parallel to the school year, starting in September and running through April, with several college campus visits and career opportunity sessions with area companies happening monthly in between. The YMCA also offers a unique program for teens interested in participating in government or thinking about running for office someday. The Youth and Government program serves as an introduction to government involvement at various levels, where participants work with local teachers to form clubs that meet after school. Those clubs hold mock committee meetings to draft, debate and vote on bills, meet with elected leaders and convene with groups from other states or regions to caucus together. Teens involved with the program also hold office in their respective chapters and states, having positions like mayor of their local delegation or being a part of the congressional body in their state’s youth assembly. The YMCA Youth and Government program serves equally as career exploration and social development, helping teens grow into active, thoughtful citizens. “We love to say in youth development work that we want to help kids achieve, relate and belong,” says Perez. “The achievement part of it might be academic, but it also may be helping young people develop a voice that they can use.” With the array of programs that the YMCA offers young people, there is always

Local organizations, including area sports teams like the Reds, Bengals and FC Cincinnati, participate in some of the YMCA’s summer programming to promote childhood health and safety. a need for adult mentors and leaders to help organize events and clubs. Perez says that it’s not necessarily about having special skills or professional qualifications—all an adult mentor needs is to love kids and want to support the next generation by applying their own passions to the YMCA’s programming. That can take the form of coaching a sports team, reading to very young children or helping to lead one of the development programs like those described above. The YMCA’s adult mentors help children of all ages by meeting them

where they are and providing development opportunities that will stay with them for life. “That’s what we try to concentrate on: creating environments,” Perez explains, “whether it’s after school or summer camps or youth sports or swim lessons—where we’re at least asking ourselves, ‘Are we creating, for that child, an environment that is supportive?’ For kids that live in low-income communities, we’re going one step further and saying, ‘How do we help them even in spaces that are not ours?’” n w w w.

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History & Leadership By Dan Hurley

Artful Leadership PATTY BEGGS AND HER IMPACT ON THE CINCINNATI OPERA

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he Cincinnati Opera will celebrate its 100th anniversary this summer. When the season hits its centennial crescendo in August, Patty Beggs, who has been with the opera for more than a third of its history and spent 23 of those years as the managing director, will retire. It is one thing for someone who works for a large, complex company like P&G or Fifth Third to move to a new job every few years inside the company, learn new technical and leadership skills, and get rejuvenated. But how does a person grow and stay fresh over four decades in a smaller organization?

When Patty joined the opera in September 1984 as the director of marketing, she had a passion for the art form that she had discovered in college. “What engaged me in opera was the relevance of it,” says Beggs. But what she found in 1984 was an organization that tried to convince people to buy tickets because it is “good for you,” which she found “demeaning.” Plus, it wasn’t working. Attendance was down and when she offered her friends a free ticket, the “excuses were lame, like ‘I have to clean out my drawers.’” “I didn’t see anybody talking about the emotional, visceral response that

Patty Beggs accompanied Louise Dieterle Nippert to visit bass-baritone Erwin Schrott’s Green Room after a performance of Carmen. 14

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Patty Beggs with the promotional artwork for Cincinnati Opera’s production of Tosca, painted by Rafal Olbinski the combination of the stories and the music and the grandeur of being in a performance hall [offered],” she says. She set out to make attending an opera a complete experience that starts with street activities outside Music Hall and carries through with decorations in the foyer and the hall. Her approach meant making the relevance of individual operas visual by drawing on contemporary references with bold, sensual images that drew connections, like the connections between Carmen and Pretty Woman. Patty pushed those images and references not just to traditional opera patrons, but in print ads, radio ads on stations like WLW and WEBN, and on street banners. Certain opera writers “abhorred what I was doing. That I had desecrated the art form by pandering to the lowest common denominator of the mass public,” she says. Although Beggs didn’t know it, she successfully implemented something the opera had unsuccessfully tried 40 years earlier. In the late 1940s the opera hired Harry McWilliams out of Hollywood. McWilliams advertised Carmen in newspaper ads as “an opera of torrid passions where love is dear and life is cheap,” and Samson and Delilah as an opportunity to see “passionate women lure a man to destruction with false love.” The reaction was swift. One patron, Mary Jane Phillips of Lebanon, charged in a 1947

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Letter to the Editor in the Cincinnati Post that McWilliams was prostituting the fi ne arts just “to fi ll seats,” and that an ad for La boheme read like a “an advertisement for an Adults Only motion picture at a burlesque house.” McWilliams didn’t last and the buzz saw of opposition he ran into had been long forgotten by the time Patty Beggs arrived. Sometimes it may be good to not know history. When she was named managing director in 1997, Beggs led the company in another new direction. That journey began in 2000 when Beggs took a group of board members to San Francisco to see Dead Man Walking, the story of Sr. Helen Prejean’s effort to make Americans face the reality of the death penalty. After attending the opera, “the group decided in the van on the way back from the theater that we had to do it.” That was the beginning. In the intervening years, the opera has commissioned several new works, including Margaret Garner, the locally based story of the Underground Railroad with a libretto by Toni Morrison. So far, the Cincinnati Opera has workshopped 12 new works, some of which

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the company has performed and some that have been produced by other companies. “We have immersed ourselves in creating product for the art form as well as presenting it. It has energized the company and the community and it certainly has put us on the map,” she says. Creating new operas has been the company’s doorway into not only expanding the audience but diversifying it. “If there is one thing I have learned,”Beggs says about committing to greater diversity, “[it’s that] authenticity and trust don’t happen overnight. It has to be built. I think our organization has been smart and persevering in recognizing that inclusion is essential for survival.” T h roug hout her g rou ndbrea k i ng career, the leadership principles upon which everything else stands are trust and collaboration with her board. Having board members from P&G, the most aggressive marketing and branding firm in the world, and the collaboration of great leaders like Don Hoffman is fundamental. Learning to collaborate with board members—not manipulate and manage them—is the most important

skill for a not-for-profit leader who wants a long-term career. After 35 years, Patty Beggs says that she can let go “completely at peace” knowing that the board has selected Christopher Milligan, her longtime colleague, as the new managing director. ■ Dan Hurley is the president of Applied History Associates.

Patty Beggs with Evans Mirageas, the Harry T. Wilks artistic director of Cincinnati Opera, at the company’s “Back to the Zoo” event

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Another View By Don Mooney

Ohio Battles Over School Vouchers A

bout 90 of Ohio’s kids attend public schools. America’s public schools sustain the world’s oldest active democracy and dominant economy. Ohio’s constitution tells the Ohio General Assembly that it must provide for the “thorough and efficient system of common schools”, i.e. public schools, that has educated generations of Ohioans. But if you follow the antics in Columbus, you’d never guess that public education was a real priority. For weeks, state legislators have been mired in a nasty conflict on how much money should be diverted from public schools to mostly religious private schools through the EdChoice voucher program. Vouchers worth up to $6,000 per child can go to families based on whether their local public school is underperforming. That desultory status is determined by state report cards of questionable reliability linked to the endless standardized tests that parents and kids have come to loathe. This year, the list of allegedly underperforming schools whose students were eligible for vouchers was about 500. But changes set to take effect next school year would expand that list to more than 1,200 schools, covering 70 of Ohio’s school districts. Local districts on the new voucher eligible list would include schools in highly rated suburban districts like Indian Hill and Wyoming. The new law would also allow kids who have never attended public schools to get one of those $6,000 vouchers. One study in northeast Ohio showed that more than 60 of voucher users never attended public schools, and never would. Further, unlike public schools, private schools can cherry pick students, and often reject kids with disabilities. 16

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One bone of contention: The approximately $149 million spent to send about 30,000 Ohio kids to mostly religious private schools this school year actually comes from local school districts. The legislature has failed to fully fund public schools with state dollars, so Ohio districts must repeatedly beg voters to increase real estate taxes. Big urban districts like Cincinnati have long been picking up the voucher tab, which will cost the district about $28 million this year. But when many suburban districts discovered their tight budgets would now be tapped to pay for vouchers—with a projected cost exceeding $300 million annually—a high stakes political battle broke out in Columbus. In marathon legislative hearings, school board members, teachers’ unions and public school parents made the case against raiding their budgets to pay for private, religious education. In response, Catholic and other religious school advocates made the “school choice” case—why should their kids be forced to attend a public school? The big hole in the school choice argument is that Ohio’s private religious schools are not held to the same controversial standards used to smear some public schools as failing, which triggers voucher eligibility. Ohio does not publish report cards for private schools. As recently reported by the Cleveland Plain Dealer, “Ohio’s private schools are not measured in several other ways public schools are,” including a performance index that is a composite of all tests for all grades, a value added calculation of yearly student progress and ratings of how younger students learn to read. The few apples-to-apples comparisons available actually show that private schools typically perform no better—and often

worse—than their local public school. The Plain Dealer’s study of math and English proficiency test scores reported for private schools receiving vouchers found that “for K-8 schools, just under 3 of [private] schools met that standard for math and less than 8 for English.” Question: Why should Ohio taxpayers pay to send kids to private schools that appear to be underperforming even worse than their local public schools? Here are ideas for Ohio lawmakers debating whether to pay for private religious schools: 1 If the state really wants to pay for private schools, pay them from the state budget, not from school district funds. 2 hold private schools receiving public funds to exactly the same standards applied to public schools, including report cards, so parents can make an informed choice. 3 require private schools to admit any voucher-eligible child, including those with disabilities. n Don Mooney is an attorney, a past member of the Cincinnati Planning Commission and is active in local politics.

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Power 100

Cincy Magazine hosted the first-ever Power 100 Reception Feb. 20 at The Backstage Event Center. The special cocktail event featured networking with some of the Tristate’s most influential leaders and celebrated the release of Cincy Magazine’s list of the 100 most influential business, political and community leaders in the Tristate. The event was sponsored by the African American Chamber of Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky and Western & Southern Financial Group. Those who attended the event were invited to donate to the evening’s nonprofit partner, Cincinnati Works. 1 Judge Kim Burke, Hamilton County Court of Common Pleas; Kevin Dinkelacker, Hamilton County Sheriff’s Office; and Steve Lawson, Hamilton County Sheriff ’s Office 2 U.S. Rep. Brad Wenstrup 3 Gerron McKnight, The Christ Hospital Health Network and Cincinnati Works 4 Elisia Triggs, owner of The One Group, was one of the evening’s raffle winners. 5 Steve Eroskey, CMIT Solutions; Diana Lara, Jack Cincinnati Casino; Jorge Perez, YMCA of Greater Cincinnati; and Barbara Perez, YWCA Greater Cincinnati 6 Kellie Sheets, Oak Hills Local School District, and Erich Michael, Western & Southern Life

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Best of the East Cincy Magazine hosted the 2020 Best of the East Celebration Jan. 23 at the Holiday Inn & Suites Cincinnati-Eastgate. Southern State Community College, Renewal by Anderson, Cincinnati Bell and Walton Creek Boutique sponsored the event. The community partner was the Clermont Chamber of Commerce. This year’s nonprofit partner was KLiCWow, a community project aligned with Connect Clermont that works to distribute free tablets to all Clermont County children ages 3 and 4 to prepare them for grades K-12. 1 Oliver’s Desserts was nominated for both Best Bakery and Best Dessert. 2 Several hundred people attended the Best of the East. 3 Attendees could explore the products offered by several local shops. 4 Cincinnati Bell sponsored the event. 5 Those who attended the event could also get their caricature done.

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Scene Gensuite Volunteer Efforts Since 2015, Gensuite has been committed to increasing access to education and continued learning opportunities for its employees and local communities, as well as communities around the globe. Gensuite has worked with several nonprofits addressing this issue. 1 Gensuite employees with the Silverton Paideia Academy class that the company adopted. 2 In 2018, Gensuite team members Jessica Button and Yanshie Bahuguna traveled to help build a school with buildOn in Malawi, Africa. 3 Gensuite employees created an assembly line to make pencil kits for the kids of Infi nite Chance.

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Lindner Center of HOPE’s Touchdown for HOPE Lindner Center of HOPE’s 11th annual Touchdown for HOPE Super Bowl Sunday event at the Great American Ballpark Champions Club raised $195,000 for patient assistance. Approximately 250 people attended the event. Th is year, Jim Breech, former Bengals star kicker, and his wife, Denise, were honorary hosts. Proceeds from Touchdown for HOPE sponsorships and ticket sales will be used to fund a mental health services financial assistance program at Lindner Center of HOPE, benefitting the community’s first responders.

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1 Mary Alexander, Lindner  Center of HOPE; Jim Breech, former Bengals kicker; Dr. Paul Keck, Lindner Center of HOPE; and Dr. Tracey Skale, Greater Cincinnati Behavioral Health Services 2 Jack and Kay Geiger 3 Jean and Dr. Alvin Crawford 2

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Scene DePaul Cristo Rey High School’s Corporate Partner Leadership Breakfast DePaul Cristo Rey recognized Corporex and its chairman, Bill Butler, as its Corporate Partner of the Year in its Corporate Work Study Program (CWSP) during the school’s annual Corporate Partner Leadership Breakfast Feb. 25 at The View in Mt. Adams. Corporex has employed DePaul Cristo Rey students through the CWSP since 2011, the first year the school opened. During the event the school also honored nine companies who have been a part of the program for five years. 1 Nine companies and organizations were honored as five-year corporate partners. 2 DPCR President S. Jeanne Bessette presents the Corporate Partner of the Year Award to Dan Sink, CEO of Corporex Companies. 3 Dr. H. James Williams, president of Mount St. Joseph University, is pictured with DPCR’s Director of Admissions Yasmeen Khan and Mount CFO Jeff Briggs. The Mount is a DPCR Corporate Partner 4 Eli Lilly & Company biologist Montanea Daniels (center) gave closing remarks. She’s a graduate and board member of the Indianapolis Cristo Rey School. She’s pictured with DPCR seniors Haxell and Victoria. 5 DPCR Board of Directors members Andre Williams of BOLD Change and Bart Kohler of TAKKT America Holding 6 Keynote speaker Robert Bilott of Taft, Stettinius & Hollister with DPCR President S. Jeanne Bessette (left) and Corporate Work Study Executive Director Abby Held (right) 7 DPCR Board member Nick Reilly (far right) is shown with Malinda Eisenmann and Robert Hodgkins of Corporate Partner The Dental Care Plus Croup.

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Cincy Chic’s Lady in Red Cincy Chic hosted the Lady in Red event, a fundraiser for the American Heart Association, Feb. 7 at the Macy’s in Tri-County Mall. Those who came to the event were able to enjoy storewide discounts, a fashion show, pop-up shops and more. 1 Guests of Cincy Chic’s Lady in Red wearing their red for National Wear Red Day. 2 Cincy Chic and Cincy Magazine Events Director Stephanie Simon with family and enjoying a girls’ night out for a great cause. 3 Alice Lin, independent Stella & Dot stylist, mingling with event guests. 4 Heart disease survivor Nancy Wilkins walking the red carpet. 5 Heart disease survivor Lynn Maatman rocking the runway. 6 Cincy Chic’s Lady in Red heart disease survivors and Heyman Talent models showcasing their looks provided by Macy’s.

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Scene Thrivent Financial Ribbon-cutting Th rivent Financial marked the opening of its new Sharonville location Nov. 12 with a ribbon-cutting ceremony. Financial professionals Susan Bennett and Dawn Napier, as well as representatives from the Mason Deerfield Chamber, were on hand to perform the ceremonial cutting of the ribbon in the presence of clients, local business leaders and nonprofit leaders. 1 Front row, from left: Nancy Seiller, president of Shelf Express; Susan Bennett, fi nancial consultant with Th rivent Financial; and Dawn Napier, financial associate with Th rivent Financial. Back row, from left: Keith Kline, executive director of Grant Us Hope; John Bennett, office professional with Th rivent Financial; and Shelby Calvin, community engagement leader with Th rivent Financial. 1

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I AM ME Youth Conference On Feb. 8, Guiding Light Mentoring hosted its third annual I AM ME Youth Conference at the Duke Energy Convention Center. Guiding Light Mentoring founder and CEO Latisha Owens says that 258 participants came to the event. The conference consisted of youth breakout sessions, parent workshops, a resource and job fair, and a panel discussion. 1 WLWT Reporter Alexis Rogers emceed the conference. 2 Guiding Light Mentoring CEO Latisha Owens (right) with parent workshop facilitator Susan Bennett 3 McKenzie Kirwen, a senior HR business partner at Paycor, facilitated a workshop on creating your fi rst resume. 4 Between workshops, attendees could visit the resource and job fair.

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1 Anthony Munoz signed memorabilia for fans who attended the event. 2 Ken Anderson 3 Twelve bands performed at Austim Rocks. 4 Former Reds pitcher Bronson Arroyo with a Ken Anderson Alliance participant 5 Ken Anderson Alliance particpant with Sean Casey of Future Great Wrestling

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Ballet Meets BUSINESS CINCINNATI BALLET DANCER HAS TURNED HIS PASSION FOR DANCE INTO FASHION

Samantha Griffin is a member of the corps de ballet of Cincinnati Ballet. She also models for a dancewear company co-founded by one of her colleagues in the company. Here, she is seen wearing the Aditi leotard.

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PHOTOS BY A ARON M . CONWAY

By David Lyman

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hey thought he was just a ballet dancer. And it’s true that Cuban-born Rodrigo Almarales was an excellent and dashing performer. But what Cincinnati Ballet’s audiences didn’t realize when Almarales was hired in 2011 as a 22-year old soloist is that tucked away inside all that onstage bravado was an entrepreneur with an unquenchable drive for more. All the while he was dancing roles in King Arthur’s Camelot and The Prodigal Son, he was wheeling and dealing, inventing a handful of dance-related products and preparing to launch a dancewear company with his wife, Cincinnati Ballet principal dancer Sirui Liu. “Rodrigo always has something going on,” Cincinnati Ballet artistic director Victoria Morgan said in 2016, when Almarales staged a groundbreaking dance gala called Ballet Royalty Gala in the Gran Teatro de la Habana. It was an understatement. You’ve got to go back to 2012 to fully grasp what Almarales and Liu have accomplished. Almarales had just snagged the silver medal at the Helsinki International Ballet competition and had been promoted to a senior soloist position in Cincinnati. He was on top of the world. But for Almarales, enough was never enough. Even as he settled into his position in Cincinnati—he soon became a principal dancer—he seemed restless. Of course, he was like that before Cincinnati, moving from a company in Germany to one in Boston, stopping over in Italy long enough to be a top-ranked finalist on a network TV show. But he was already at work on the product that would spring him from the limits of a dance studio. During his spare time in Helsinki, his mind hadn’t been on the next ballet he might learn. It was on a product that didn’t yet exist. Almarales had always had trouble with his feet. That’s a huge problem for a ballet dancer. His dream was to find a device that could help him stretch his feet and make them stronger without injuring them. When he learned there were no workable products on the market, he set out to invent one. Two years later, Almarales and Liu launched Improvedance. Their f irst product was called THE-footstretcher. Manufactured in Liu’s native China, it was immediately successful. On weekends

Rodrigo Almarales, a former principal dancer with Cincinnati Ballet and now co-founder of Royale LLC and Improvedance LLC, companies that design, manufacture and distribute a variety of dance-related products

when they weren’t performing they would travel to dance conventions and competitions, set up a booth and go to work. They promoted their growing product line through studios and teachers and dance publications. “It’s stressful and exhausting,” says Liu, who learned and performed the leading roles in Swan Lake at the same time that the company was launching its newest and potentially most profitable product line—leotards.

The line is called Dancewear Royale. And, in many ways, the line looks to be a game-changer in the American dancewear market. Now, if you’ve never shopped for leotards—and you probably haven’t—there are a few things you need to know. For many decades, the dancewear market was a pretty drab one. Most ballet studios demanded that students wear black leotards and pink tights. Even when things began to change in the 1970s, it was hard w w w.

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Cincinnati Ballet dancer Samantha Griffin is seen modeling a Yemaya leotard, a part of the product line of Cincinnati-based Royale LLC.

to find anything much beyond dark blue or brown or white. Now, there are lines with color. But Dancewear Royale has upped the ante considerably. Take a look at the website—improvedance.com—if you need convincing. They offer a kaleidoscopic array of colors. Some have mesh panels and varying sleeve lengths. Some even come with detachable hoods and multi30

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colored patterns that could pass as high fashion. Most radical of all is that nearly all of them are customizable. You want a different color or have some mesh in a different place? You just re-design it online. “All of the designs are so different and contemporary compared to other leotards that are out there,” says Samantha Griffin, a Cincinnati Ballet corps de ballet member and an occasional model for Dancewear

Royale. “I’m a taller dancer, so it’s usually very hard for me to find a leotard that fits me. But every style I’ve tried with these has been extremely flattering.” And Griffin isn’t alone in that assessment. Dancewear stores all along the eastern seaboard and into the Midwest are snatching up the leotards as quickly as Improvedance’s wholly owned Miami factory can create them. “I love the designs they have,” says Kat Wolf, owner of NKY Dancewear in Cold Spring, Kentucky. “Some of them are very bold, which is very popular with many dancers. But then they have some designs that feel more traditional but use unusual colors. They have such a good balance of bold and elegant. And the cuts are flattering, too. For me, that’s a trifecta: bold, elegant and flattering.” As this story goes to press, Almarales and Liu are, like so many other companies around the world, navigating the uncertainties of a China-based supply chain in the age of the COVID-19. Currently, all of the leotard fabrics come from China, as do the other product lines. But they have several months’ supply of fabrics in-hand in Miami. And, in the meantime, they are driving traffic to their website with streaming dance and Pilates classes given by notable teachers. They recognize the complications. But they’re not panicked. “I think that has to do with where we come from,” says Liu. “It’s exciting to do business in this country. It’s what you’re supposed to do here. We have the freedom to do what we want to do. It would have been impossible to do this if we were still in China or Cuba.” “This is the best country to have a business,” agrees Almarales. “As long as you make money and pay your taxes, the government doesn’t really care too much about what you do. At first, we looked at Europe, but no—this is much, much better.” n

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A&E Calendar Actually Playhouse in the Park’s Actually addresses gender, race and consent t hrough a s tor y of t wo college students. Through April 26. Playhouse in the Park, 962 Mt. Adams Circle, Cincinnati. cincyplay.com.

TONY ARR ASMITH

At the time this publication went to press, many organizations were considering whether or not to cancel or postpone their events because of the spread of COVID-19. Our calendar may no longer be accurate. Please visit cincymagazine.com for more up-to-date listings.

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Murder on the Orient Express

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Agatha Christie’s classic mystery comes to life at Playhouse in the Park. Through May 9. Playhouse in the Park, 962 Mt. Adams Circle, Cincinnati. cincyplay.com.

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MONDAY

TUESDAY

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THURSDAY

MARK BOWEN

10 [5/9-10] Try food from all over Asia during Asian Food Fest at The Banks.

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24/31

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5 6 [5/4-5] A comedy legend will be answering audience questions during Carol Burnett: An Evening of Laughter & Reflection. 12 13 [5/13] Christian hip-hop artist TobyMac stops by the Taft for the evening.

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SHANE MCCAULEY

4 [5/1-16] The Falcon Theatre tells the true story of 19th century astronomer Henrietta Leavitt in the play Silent Sky.

DANA TRIPPE

3 [5/3] The 22nd annual Flying Pig Marathon flies through downtown Cincinnati.

14 [5/12-24] The Broadway musical Anastasia, which was inspired by the 1997 animated film, comes to the Aronoff.

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

1 {Through September] Head to the Cincinnati Museum Center to see “Maya: .The Exhibition.”

2 [5/2] Paul Thorn brings his unique roots music to Memorial Hall.

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9 [5/8-10] The 51st annual Appalachian Festival brings crafters, musicians and more to Coney Island.

[5/8-9] The National, Patti Smith and Her Band, and others will play the Homecoming Festival.

15 [5/15] Whose Live Anyway? brings the unpredictable fun of Whose Line Is It Anyway? to the Taft.

16 [5/16] Michael Bublé will perform his jazz-inspired hits at the Heritage Bank Center.

20 21 [5/20] [5/19] AJR, a pop trio Kesha brings composed of songs from her newest album, High brothers Adam, Road, to Riverbend. Jack and Ryan Met, plays Riverbend.

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26 [5/21-31] The May Festival will fill the region with music as the group performs in venues throughout the Tristate.

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27 28 [5/1-31] Cute animals take over the Cincinnati Zoo during the annual Zoo Babies event.

EVA AN KHER A

SUNDAY

MAY

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Opera singer Pene Pati returns to Cincinnati for another show at Memorial Hall. May 3, 7 p.m. $24-$30. Memorial Hall, 1225 Elm St., Cincinnati. memorialhallotr.com.

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TERESA WOOD

Becoming Dr. Ruth Playhouse in the Park’s one-woman show, Becoming Dr. Ruth, tells the story behind the radio and TV personality. May 9-June 21. Playhouse in the Park, 962 Mt. Adams Circle, Cincinnati. cincyplay.com.

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Midwestern Traveler

A Trip to the World’s Horse Capital

Visitors can tour stud farms, nursery farms, a sport horse farm, two equine clinics and more through Horse Country.

KENTUCKY ATTRACTIONS GET VISITORS CLOSE TO HORSES

By Corinne Minard

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Midwestern Traveler

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here’s a reason Kentucky is known for horses. The state is packed with hundreds of horse farms; is home to Keeneland, the world’s largest thoroughbred auction house; and hosts the first leg of the American Triple Crown, the Kentucky Derby, at Louisville’s Churchill Downs. With much of the state being connected to horses it’s no wonder that so many of its attractions are connected to them, too. Have a horse enthusiast in the family? A trip down to Kentucky can help them get closer to what they love while entertaining the rest of the family as well.

KENTUCKY DERBY MUSEUM The race known as “The Fastest Two Minutes in Sports” is May 2 this year, but every day is Derby Day at the Kentucky Derby Museum in Louisville. “We celebrate Derby Day every day so if you come here you should be able to get a good taste of what the derby is like,” says Rachel Collier, director of communications for the museum.

The Kentucky Derby Museum in Louisville offers two floors of exhibits and is the exclusive tour provider for Churchill Downs.

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LEFT: The Kentucky Derby Museum in Louisville offers many different exhibits, artifacts and films for horse lovers. ABOVE: The Kentucky Derby Museum film, The Greatest Race, is shown in a 360-degree theater.

The museum itself offers two floors of exhibits. Visitors can learn more about trainer D. Wayne Lukas, who has won four Kentucky Derbies, and Bill Shoemaker, who is considered the greatest jockey of all time; see memorabilia from famous Kentucky Derby winners like Secretariat

and American Pharoah; and view the museum’s newest exhibit, “Right to Ride,” which opens April 19 and tells the stories of the derby’s female jockeys. According to Collier, one of the museum’s must-see attractions is its 18-minute film, The Greatest Race. The film is shown on an

oval-shaped screen and envelopes the audience in the sights and sounds of the derby. “It tells the story of Derby Day, from how a foal gets to the derby, it starts out with that, and then it goes through the day of the derby, the sights, the sounds, the streets outside of Churchill Downs where you

CORBIN, KENTUCKY WHERE ADVENTURE, HISTORY AND HOSPITALITY AWAIT!

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Midwestern Traveler have street cart vendors who are cooking barbecue and to inside the track where you’re seeing all the preparations that go into the big day—it’s really powerful,” she says. “A lot of people watch that movie and it makes them want to come to the derby if they haven’t been.” In addition to viewing the exhibits visitors can also tour the museum’s next-door neighbor Churchill Downs. “Our museum is the exclusive tour provider for Churchill Downs,” adds Collier. Included with admission to the museum is a 30-minute tour of the park, which includes the grandstands, track and famous twin spires. But for those looking to explore more of Churchill Downs, the Kentucky Derby Museum offers several other tours. The Behind the Scenes Walking Tour, for example, takes visitors into non-public areas such as the exclusive Millionaires Row, members-only Turf Club and the Jockey’s Quarters. The Barn and Backside Tour explores the village behind Churchill Downs that features 1,400 stalls, the dormitories and

Visitors can climb abord a replica horse inside the starting gate at the Kentucky Derby Museum.

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living quarters of those who care for the horses, the community’s church and more. And the museum’s newest tour, Bourbon and Bridles, looks at the history of bourbon and horse racing. At the end of the tour, visitors also get to enjoy a bourbon tasting and learn how to make their own Mint Julep. “We’ve found that when people come to Kentucky they want to learn about the Kentucky Derby, of course, but they also want to experience bourbon,” says Collier. “We wanted to have something to offer guests who kind of want both.” While the museum offers many different attractions for horse lovers visitors should also make sure to stop by one of the museum’s free diversions. “Even if you do come in the winter months… our stable always has a thoroughbred and pony,” says Collier. “You can walk in our museum anytime and say, ‘I just want to go look at your horse.’”

HORSE FARM AND OTHER TOURS Those looking to get closer to the horses themselves may want to look into taking a

Visitors who take the Bourbon and Bridles tour at the Kentucky Derby Museum end their tour with a bourbon tasting. tour of a horse farm or other facility. Horse Country, a nonprofit membership organization, assists local farms by handling, booking, marketing and coordinating all touring experiences at its member farms. With prestigious farms like Claiborne

Farm (where Secretariat is buried), Horse Country helps visitors fi nd the tours that best match their interests. With 40 members, Horse Country has access to about any experience a horse lover could ask for. Visitors can book tours with

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Midwestern Traveler

Horse Country helps visitors find and book tours with 40 horse farms, adoptions centers and more. stud farms, nursery farms, a sport horse farm, two equine clinics, a training track, three accredited after-care facilities (which serve as adoption agencies for horses looking for new homes after the racetrack) and a feed mill. “So really at any point in the life cycle of the horse, literally from what they eat at the feed mill, to foaling at the nurseries, training at the tracks, stud career after they race, to after care, … you’re seeing really behind the scenes of the

most premier facilities that you can,” says Stephanie Arnold, marketing and members services director for Horse Country. Because so many tours are available Arnold suggests narrowing your options by date and location first. “If you know there is a particular horse that you want to see that’s obviously a leading kind of criteria, but if you are just looking for a great horse experience, honestly, I would point people toward their itinerary and what fits into it,” she says. If you plan on taking multiple tours, Arnold suggests picking up a free Horse Country passport. They can be found at any touring Horse Country member location, the Lexington Visitor Center and several other sites. If you complete one of the two experience categories, you can earn a commemorative gift. “[People] may not know just how interconnected it all is. So hopefully the passport rings some bells for people and they can see that it’s all connected,” adds Arnold.

KENTUCKY HORSE PARK There are many more horse attractions beyond the Kentucky Derby Museum and farm

tours, though. The Kentucky Horse Park in Lexington is itself home to many attractions. The International Museum of the Horse, an affiliate of the Smithsonian Institution, is considered to be the largest horse museum in the world with more than 60,000 square feet of exhibits. Featured exhibits include “All the Queen’s Horses: The Role of the Horse in British History” and “A Gift from the Desert: the Art, Culture and History of the Arabian Horse.” Its new permanent exhibit, “Black Horsemen of the Kentucky Turf,” features reproductions by artist Edward Troye and looks at the legacy of legendary jockeys like Oliver Lewis and Isaac Murphy. Other museums at the park include the American Saddlebred Museum, the Al-Marah Arabian Horse Galleries and Wheeler Museum. After viewing the museums, visitors can also take a tour of the Big Barn, which houses the park’s draft horses, or Mounted Police Barn; view park memorials for several famous horses, including Man o’War; meet famous horses in the Hall of Champions; take a horseback or pony ride; and more. n

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Horse Country tours enable visitors to see the entire lifecycle of a horse, from foaling at the nurseries to aftercare.

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Dining

The Butcher and Barrel’s Feast for Two option features a 22-ounce porterhouse steak, a shared salad and two shareable sides.

A Reason to Dine THE BUTCHER AND BARREL RESTAURANT IS OFFERING SPECIAL DEALS DURING THE WEEK By Eric Spangler

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here’s now a reason to dine every day at The Butcher and Barrel restaurant at 700 Race St. in downtown Cincinnati—great deals on delicious meals. The Butcher and Barrel is offering special deals nearly every day of the week during its “A Reason to Gather Every Day” promotion to entice customers to come in and try its mouthwatering entrees, says Lisa K. Colina, director of communications and events for Ignite Entertainment Cincinnati. The Butcher and Barrel promotion is taking some of the items it feels most passionately about—the dishes and drinks it puts the most work into—and showcasing them for customers, she says. Those items include homemade pastas, signature burgers, wine, steak and Milanesa, says Colina. On Tuesdays, the upscale Argentine steakhouse offers its handmade pastas at 46

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half the normal price, she says. “We make all of our pasta fresh every day in house,” Colina says. Some of the pasta-making tools that were used by one of the owner’s grandparents, whose grandmother taught him how to make pasta in Argentina, are the same tools The Butcher and Barrel uses today to make its pastas, she says. “The difference between a fresh-made pasta versus a boxed pasta is unparalleled. You can get these $25 pasta dishes for $12.50, so it’s pretty crazy,” she says. On Wednesdays, the restaurant is offering its signature burgers for $8. The burgers are incredibly juicy because The Butcher and Barrel grinds its own ground beef blend, and they go great with a side of handmade steak fries made with Kennebec potatoes, says Colina. “They are phenomenal,” she adds. Thursdays offer half-price wine by the bottle, says Colina. “Wine pairs really well with grilled meat,” she says. “And our servers are incredibly knowledgeable and can sell you a wonderful bottle of wine that would serve perfectly with your dinner.”

The Butcher and Barrel offers a $75 feast for two on Fridays, featuring a 22-ounce porterhouse steak, a shared salad and two shareable sides. “That’s $75 for two folks and you will not leave hungry,” says Colina. The steak is topped with the restaurant’s famous chimichurri sauce. “It’s incredibly authentic, super fresh, really bright and it really adds a lot to every dish,” says Colina. The shareable side dishes are large portions of everything, from gnocchi with a cream truff le sauce to creamy mashed potatoes to caramelized Brussels sprouts with garlic butter, bacon, truffle and white wine. On Sundays, The Butcher and Barrel offers Milanesa dishes at half-price. Milanesa is an Italian tradition in which chicken is butterfl ied, pounded very thin and then lightly breaded and fried. Milanesa dishes can be topped with mozzarella cheese, two fried eggs or prosciutto, mozzarella cheese and tomato sauce, says Colina. “That’s also served with our hand-cut Kennebec steak fries.” The Butcher and Barrel is open Tuesday through Sunday at 3:30 p.m. for happy hour and dinner service starts at 5 p.m. ■

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6

Great Escapes

Nearby outdoor adventures perfect for the whole family By Corinne Minard

Sometimes we just need to get out of the house, especially as we finally enter spring. It feels like you and your family have been stuck inside for the last couple months and you’re ready to breathe in some fresh air, unplug your devices and explore someplace new. Our suggestion? Visit one of our region’s great parks! The following seven parks are all within two hours of Cincinnati and promise both outdoor recreation and lots of nature. Are you ready for an escape?

Hueston Woods State Park • Ohio Located near the Indiana border, Hueston Woods State Park is a good park for families looking to explore the outdoors together. It’s home to the 625-acre Acton Lake and its 12 hiking trails are all considered to be of moderate difficulty. One of the highlights of the park is its state nature preserve, which has the largest old-growth forest in southwest Ohio as well as one of the largest nature centers in the state. WHAT TO DO: “Hueston is one of those places where I say no matter who you bring

along with you in the family, there’s something [they’ll like],” says Heidi Hetzel-Evans, communications manager for the Ohio Department of Parks and Watercraft. The park is great for outdoor recreation thanks to its many hiking trails and a mountain biking trail. Those who own horses can bring them to the park to ride on one of its many bridle trails. There are also indoor and outdoor pools, an archery range, a lake for boating and fishing, an 18-hole golf course and the aforementioned nature center. Fossil hunting is also a popular activity thanks to the limestone and shale bedrock of the area. WHERE TO STAY: Hueston Woods State Park is one of nine Ohio state parks with a lodge on the park grounds. Visitors have the option of staying in one of the lodge’s 92 rooms or in one of the park’s many cabins. Looking to stay someplace unique? The park also rents out a yurt, a round tent with modern amenities. WHAT’S NEARBY: If the family needs a break from the outdoors, the town of Oxford is

just a quick 10-minute drive away. There, you can visit several historic attractions and the Miami University Art Museum or sit down for a meal in one of the town’s local cafés. LOCATION: College Corner PARK SIZE: About 3,000 acres TRAILS: 12 hiking trails, 1 mountain biking trail and various bridle trails w w w.

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6 Great Escapes

Shawnee State Park • Ohio Shawnee State Park is part of the former hunting grounds of the Shawnee Indians and looks much the same as it did when they hunted there. The park is located within the 63,000-acre Shawnee State Forest, making Shawnee a much more rugged and natural park than Hueston Woods. In addition to the forest, visitors will also fi nd two lakes and a nature center. WHAT TO DO: Boating and fishing are popular activities thanks to the park’s two

lakes. Both lakes have public beaches for swimming. The park is also great for those who enjoy long-distance hiking—the Shawnee Backpacking Trail covers about 40 miles. Hetzel-Evans adds that the park is home to many wildflowers. “Shawnee is an absolutely gorgeous place for spring wildflowers,” she says. WHERE TO STAY: While Shawnee State Park is known for its outdoor activities, it does

have more modern lodging for those who desire it. Visitors can stay in the park’s 50room lodge, in one of the park’s 25 cabins or at one of the 108 campsites, 94 of which have electrical hookups. WHAT’S NEARBY: Because of the Shawnee State Forest, there’s not too much near the park. But a half-hour drive east will take you to Amish Country in Adams County. LOCATION: West Portsmouth PARK SIZE: 1,095 acres within the 63,000-acre Shawnee State Forest TRAILS: 9 hiking trails, 2 bridle trails and 1 backpacking trail 48

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Caesar Shawnee Creek State State Park Park • Ohio • Ohio The 2,830-acre lake may be the star of Caesar Creek State Park. The lake allows the use of boats of all speeds, but there are still swim and paddling areas for those looking to slow down. Right next door to the park is the 484-acre Caesar Creek Gorge State Nature Reserve and a 135-acre Scenic River land. WHAT TO DO: Boating and fishing are both very popular at Caesar Creek,

but that’s not all there is to do. The park has many hiking, mountain biking and bridle trails that cover the grounds. Most of the trails are rated moderate to difficult, and some of them include scenic waterfalls and views of the lake. While high-speed boats often use the lake, paddling is also popular, with the park’s naturalist regularly leading a sunset paddling trip. WHERE TO STAY: Caesar Creek State Park offers a variety of campsites

for those looking to stay in the park. It has 269 electric sites, 18 full hookup sites and even an equestrian camp with 30 non-electric sites. WHAT’S NEARBY: Lots of family attractions are close to the park,

including Fort Ancient Earthworks & Nature Preserve, a Pioneer Village and Kings Island. LOCATION: Wilmington PARK SIZE: 3,741 acres TRAILS: 14 hiking trails, 4 bridle trails and 2 mountain biking trails w w w.

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6 Great Escapes

John Bryan State Park • Ohio The scenic John Bryan State Park separates itself from the region’s other parks thanks to its main feature—a limestone gorge formed by the Little Miami River. Visitors can easily see the layers of limestone and shale in addition to unique rock formations. The park is also home to many types of flora and fauna—it boasts 100 different types of trees and shrubs, more than 340 kinds of wildflowers and more than 90 different varieties of birds. WHAT TO DO: While no power boating is allowed, the Little Miami River is ideal for canoeing and fishing. The park has 9.7 miles of interconnected mountain biking trails and 10 hiking trails. Visitors can also rock climb or rappel at designated locations, though they must bring their own equipment. The Clifton Gorge State Nature Preserve is also nearby. Hetzel-Evans says that the preserve’s wildflower display is stunning and worth a trip on its own. WHERE TO STAY: Hetzel-Evans says that John Bryan has more primitive campsites than many other Ohio state parks, but its beauty makes up for it. The park has nine electric sites and 52 non-electric sites. WHAT’S NEARBY: To see history in action, campers can visit the Clifton Mill, one of the largest water-powered gristmills still in existence. Nearby Yellow Springs, on the other hand, is home to many unique shops as well as Young’s Jersey Dairy farm. LOCATION: Yellow Springs PARK SIZE: 752 acres TRAILS: 10 hiking trails and 6 mountain biking trails 50

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East Fork State Park • Ohio One of Ohio’s largest state parks, East Fork State Park features a large lake, hills and rivers. The park is known for its diverse landscapes, including floodplains, grasslands and forests. Because of this, the park is home to a variety of plants and animals. WHAT TO DO: East Fork has seven boat ramps to give boaters access to the 2,160-acre

Harsha Lake. While boating remains a favorite activity, Hetzel-Evans says that paddling is on the rise. “Paddling has really increased, and most folks might be surprised to hear that it’s really popular for rowing teams. [The park] actually hosts several regional and national junior rowing [events]. It’s because of the lake and the amount of flat water—it’s perfect for rowing competitions and rowing practices,” she says. The park also has a 1,200-foot swimming beach with a beach house, 46 miles of back country trail, a 16-mile backpacking trail and 32-mile perimeter trail. WHERE TO STAY: All campers at East Fork State Park must reserve a campsite ahead

of time. Campers can choose from 376 electric sites, 23 full hookup sites and 17 horsefriendly sites. WHAT’S NEARBY: A bit of history can be found in the region around the park. The birthplace of Ulysses S. Grant—Point Pleasant—and the one-room cottage in which he was born are within a half-hour drive from the park. Even closer is the town of New Richmond, which has the Ross-Gowdy House Museum and the World’s Only Cardboard Boat Museum. LOCATION: Batavia PARK SIZE: 4,870 acres TRAILS: 8 hiking trails, 3 bridle trails and 1 mountain biking trail w w w.

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6 Great Escapes Clifty Falls State Park • Indiana The four waterfalls at Clifty Falls State Park make the park a scenic place to enjoy the outdoors. Many of the park’s trails pass by the falls, but visitors can also explore Clifty Canyon. Those who hike the canyon will be able to see many rock formations in addition to fossils. WHAT TO DO: The park’s Four Falls Challenge encourages visitors to see all four of the Clifty Falls’ waterfalls, with those who complete the challenge earning a commemorative sticker. The park has 10 hiking trails, rated from easy to rugged; a nature center; tennis courts; and a swimming pool. WHERE TO STAY: For those looking to camp, Clifty Falls State Park has 106 electric sites and 63 non-electric ones. But for a hotel experience, visitors can stay at the Clifty Inn, which offers a variety of room types as well as a restaurant.

PHOTO BY DANIELLE CAIN

WHAT’S NEARBY: Located within the city of Madison, the park is just a quick drive away from many attractions. Visitors to Madison can go antiquing, stop by Mad Paddle Brewery, see several historic sites or sample the wines of Madison’s three award-winning wineries. LOCATION: Madison PARK SIZE: 1,519 acres TRAILS: 10 hiking trails

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MORE ESCAPES Looking for more ways to get outside? Hocking Hills State Park in southeastern Ohio is home to cliffs, waterfalls and gorges that are perfect for hikers who want to explore. Natural Bridge State Resort Park in Kentucky has a sky lift and a 78-foothigh, 65-foot-long natural sandstone arch. And the Starve-Hollow Recreation Area, located within the 18,000-acre JacksonWashington State Forest, is considered to be one of the best places to camp in southern Indiana.

Hocking Hills State Park

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The Right

Mann for Mayor? WITH DECADES OF EXPERIENCE IN POLITICS, DAVID MANN FINDS HIMSELF AGAIN CONSIDERING RUNNING FOR MAYOR By Liz Engel

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n some ways, David Mann can attribute the beginnings of his political career to Jerry Springer and the former TV talk show host’s “moment of disgrace.” It was 1974, and Mann had lost his inaugural bid for Cincinnati City Council a couple years prior, his first attempted foray into public office. But when Springer, a political star on the rise, resigned his post amid scandal, Mann took his place. He’s now served, on and off, for a total of 26 years. And there could be more to come. At age 81, and term limited, he’s “very seriously” considering a run for mayor in 2021. There’s been no announcement yet—and no timetable for one—but by late February, Mann had already drafted a fundraising ask—a letter he’ll send to contributors to test the waters. In it, he says he’s humbled by the “many voices urging” him to become a candidate. He quotes Howard Wilkinson, a political analyst for WVXU, who, in a recent column, calls Mann “a person of substance” with “more energy than many men half his age.” Jason Williams, a Cincinnati Enquirer 54

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columnist, says Mann will be an instant contender if he joins the race. For what it’s worth, Mann agrees. “I’m not going to run for Congress. I don’t have aspirations to be governor. Maybe once in my career I did, but not now, and I think there’s the operating assumption I care about public service—which is true,” Mann says. “We’ll see how it goes and make a final decision. I mean, the primary isn’t until next May. We’ve got to elect a president before that.” Over the last half century, Mann has been among council’s most steady Eddies.

He’s levelheaded, a voice of reason—a slogan he used in his last campaign—a constant. Mann, a lawyer by day, also legislates much like he practices law. Mann went to Harvard and practiced at firms like Dinsmore & Shohl, Taliaferro & Mann and Thompson Hine before starting his own outfit in 1997 with oldest son, Michael. Mann & Mann generalizes in employment discrimination, civil litigation, personal injury, probate administration and more. “In the local bar, there’s an emphasis on civility. Just because you’re on opposite

David Mann meeting with constituents.

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Davind Mann in his downtown law office

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David Mann has 26 years of experience in public service. sides of the case doesn’t mean you have license to be nasty—and experienced lawyers know you don’t win by being unpleasant to your opponent,” he says. “It’s not that different from what I do when visiting a community council or some constituents—show respect, show interest and show authenticity.” Mann, a Northern Kentucky native, didn’t originally aspire to be a lawyer—or a politician. He majored in biochemistry as an undergrad with the goal of becoming a doctor. But he admired John F. Kennedy, the very first president for which he was able to vote, and was moved by his inauguration speech—“Ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country”—and changed course after a four-year stint in the Navy. He made hints at a possible political career while at sea. And military service laid the proper foundation. “Those four years were very important to me, in developing a confidence in myself,” Mann says. “In a lot of ways, the challenges have been the same challenges in politics.” He married his wife, Betsy, halfway through his commission; this October, the couple will celebrate their 57th wedding anniversary. They decided to return to the Tristate—Betsy is from Northern Kentucky, too—because they wanted to be closer to family, turning down an opportunity in San Francisco post-law school. Once here, Mann cut his political teeth putting up campaign signs for Jack Gil56

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ligan during his Senate run in 1968, going on to help Tom Luken during his run for Cincinnati City Council a few years later. Mann made his first attempt for that same office in 1973, finishing 13th—only the top nine vote-getters are elected. But in 1974, Springer resigned—after the whole paying a prostitute with a check debacle— and Mann was in. Mann had to run again the following year, in 1975, and narrowly took that last spot by a mere 430 votes. But it was all the stronghold he needed. He would remain on council until 1992 when he was elected to Congress, representing Ohio’s First District. He lost his re-bid for the House two years later to Steve Chabot in a wave election. It would be two decades before he’d opt to return to public office. He was elected to city council again in 2013. There’s definitely memorable moments from each stint. Mann calls “Stress Day” the “most anxious day” he’s ever experienced. Following a surge in police officer deaths, Cincinnati cops lined Plum Street with cruisers, and, with lights flashing, marched up to city hall, demanding reforms. Tensions ran high. There was also the time he was summoned to the Oval Office to be lobbied for NAFTA. A Democrat, Mann voted for the pact, which angered a lot of his labor friends. There’s been no shortage of controversy this term. From the long, drawn-out and public scuff le between current Mayor John Cranley and former City Manager

Harry Black—who eventually resigned— to the federal probe into councilwoman Tamaya Dennard on allegations of wire fraud, bribery and attempted extortion, Mann’s been frustrated by the distractions. Perhaps it’s one of the reasons behind his possible mayoral bid. Overall, it’s been an “unhappy time,” he says, but there have been positives, too. “During the [last] six years, we’ve dramatically increased the amount of funds we devote to human services. I take pride in that,” Mann says. “And I’ve been able to bring a lot of attention to affordable housing needs. We now have an affordable housing trust fund, with the revenues from the tax on Airbnbs. I hope we can do more.” Come 2021, Mann won’t be the only council member term limited—there will be at least six new members, he says, after next year’s election. And, at least in his fundraising letter, he’s looking to position himself as the kind of mayor who could serve as their mentor. It’s one of many campaign platforms that could work for him, some more light-hearted than others (his last batch of political ads, for example, poked fun at his signature shockingly white hair). But he says the city deserves a “serious option” when it comes to mayor. “I hope I’ve provided some stability [on council]. I’ve sort of seen everything. I’ve lived long enough,” Mann says. “Working to make the city better is important. And I still think I have something to offer.” n

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David Mann outside his law offices in downtown Cincinnati

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Guide to Colleges and Universities 2020

God’s Bible School and College

New and Improved LOCAL COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES ARE TAKING HUGE STEPS TOWARDS CREATING A BETTER WORLD

Here’s a glimpse of some of the milestones and new programs that Tristate colleges and universities are celebrating.

By Menna Elarman & the Editors

Sinclair Community College has recently expanded its Registered Apprenticeship program thanks to a $140,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Labor. With the grant, Sinclair students are learning and developing many trade skills in a professional environment. The Registered Apprenticeship program is a training and developing initiative that

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here are many colleges and universities in the Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky areas, so it can be difficult to keep up with all their achievements, environmental initiatives and new academic opportunities they offer to both local and international students.

SINCLAIR COMMUNITY COLLEGE

first launched in spring 2018, thanks to an earlier grant from the U.S. Department of Labor through ApprenticeOhio. Sinclair Community College was one of 10 Ohio community colleges to be awarded this grant. With this program, Sinclair is able to help companies develop and train students while they’re getting introduced to the work inherent to their fields. “The ultimate goal of our work-based learning office is to help assist students to be able to connect their skills and abilities to the world of work,” says Chad Bridgman, director of the Office of Workw w w.

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Guide to Colleges and Universities 2020 based Learning at Sinclair Community College. According to Bridgman, the Registered Apprenticeship program is also a great opportunity for students who need financial aid as it allows them to “earn and learn”—they can work while they’re learning and then apply what they learn in the classroom in the field. “[This] puts us right in the middle to help really guide intensively a student and making sure that they really are taking the right classes at the right time and also measuring their progress at a company,” he says. “We are seeing companies wanting to adapt and evolve and change their recruiting practices and what we already watched with our Registered Apprenticeship is that the retention continues to grow.” Bridgman is hoping to see more companies get involved with the program to help students move forward in their professional careers. “A company wants someone to move forward in their professional career and get really good at their job, so if we can

The library of God’s Bible School and College blend both of these services together then collectively we’re helping to lift the student up and then, more importantly, help fill the skills gap,” he adds.

GOD’S BIBLE SCHOOL AND COLLEGE God’s Bible School and College, which first opened in 1900, offers both bachelor’s

and master’s degrees in fields ranging from biblical studies to music education. The school is regionally accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and is nationally accredited by the Association of Biblical Higher Education. Located in the Mt. Auburn neighborhood of Cincinnati near downtown, GBSC offers online and in-person courses for students

EDUCATION PROFILE

GATEWAY COMMUNITY & TECHNICAL COLLEGE 500 Technology Way | Florence, KY 41042 859-441-4500 OR 855-346-4282 | gateway.kctcs.edu With programs in a variety of subject areas leading to highwage, high-demand jobs, students can pursue associate degrees, certifications and diplomas. Also, all Gateway credits transfer to any public university in Kentucky and regionally accredited higher education institutions in the U.S. Gateway’s Workforce Solutions serves local area employers and community members by providing training programs and testing services to strengthen the workforce. Gateway has three convenient campuses in Covington, Edgewood and Florence, and offers daytime, evening, weekend and online classes. High school students can earn college credit through the dual credit program. Gateway’s Boone Campus is home to the KYFAME apprenticeship program, Enhanced Operator program, the new line worker training program and others, which all collaborate with advanced manufacturing industry partners.

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Gateway’s state-of-the-art Transportation Technology Center is home to the automotive technology, Ford Asset, and Commercial Driver’s License (CDL) programs, among others.

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to earn two-year associate degrees, fouryear bachelor’s degrees and two-year master’s degrees. Famous for its ministry education and training, GBSC has partnered up with several different Christian schools as well as churches in the Cincinnati area—such as the Church on Fire in Harrison—so that future ministers can start their professional journeys while at the same time pursuing their academic careers through taking accredited classes at God’s Bible School and College.

“Our bottom line is preparing people for ministry and preparing them to be out there and to be trained,” says Matt Hallam, vice president for advancement at GBSC. “We are finding the education really has changed. It is not so much bringing people to our school and teaching them all the things they need to know and then sending them out to the workforce but actually going out to the community and finding out [what] people are doing with their education and that is what we are trying to do.”

God’s Bible School and College also offers a dual-degree option for students, which Hallam calls the school’s “buy one get one” program, as students pay the cost of pursuing one degree but receive two when they graduate. The school partnered up with Indiana Wesleyan University to implement the program for its students, who must earn 70-80 credits at GBSC and another 40-60 credit hours at IWU to receive the dual diploma. The school hopes that the program will motivate and help students to accomplish their dream of becoming a minister while still having a professional career in a field like health care or business administration, for example. GBSC says that it should take students four to five years to complete the program and earn both degrees.

NORTHERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY

Northern Kentucky Univesity

Northern Kentucky University was founded in 1968 and has 14,795 students enrolled across its eight colleges. The College of Informatics at NKU—which focuses on

COLLEGE FOR THE REAL WORLD.

NEVER UNDERESTIMATE YOU GATEWAY.KCTCS.EDU/YOU

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Guide to Colleges and Universities 2020 information processing and systems and their intersections and applications with a wide range of disciplines in business, science, technology and communication—is one of only a few such programs in the country. Founded in 2005, the College of Informatics offers 12 unique majors,

several master’s degrees and a few doctoral degrees. The school specializes in information-related fields like journalism and software engineering. The College of Informatics launched its newest program, Informatics+, in November 2019, which connects students of the

NKU’s College of Informatics

College of Informatics looking for possible future employers to companies throughout the community that seek skilled students to eventually hire. “NKU has a new strategic framework that our new president launched and a lot of that is about career and community engagement,” says Kevin Kirby, dean of the College of Informatics at NKU. “One of the main ways the College of Informatics does that is through Informatics+,” Kirby says, and that the Informatics+ initiative is giving corporations a chance to interact and connect with more of NKU’s students through events, which is creating better co-op and internship opportunities for students. “The one thing we wanted to do is connect our students to the outside world more, just get them outside of the classroom on real world projects,” he adds. In addition, Kirby says that the school is using the Informatics+ program to “connect lots of different students in different disciplines together and get them out into the region to help out.” The program involves students from all majors in the

EDUCATION PROFILE

THE CHRIST COLLEGE OF NURSING & HEALTH SCIENCES 2139 Auburn Ave. | Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-585-2401 | TheChristCollege.edu The Christ College, located on The Christ Hospital main campus for over 119 years, provides a fully-immersed healthcare education. A clinical partnership with the region’s most preferred hospital ensures students receive a guaranteed clinical seat, connections to first-hand career experiences, and up-close study alongside the best healthcare professionals. The college offers a traditional 4-year Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN), an Accelerated BSN (ABSN) for second degree seekers, and an online RN to BSN completion program for nurses

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wishing to advance their education. An online Bachelor of Science in Healthcare Administration (HCA) and Associate of Science in Medical Assisting (MA) are also offered with learning opportunities in partnership with The Christ Hospital. The Christ College was ranked 1st in the region for post-graduate salaries by The Cincinnati Business Courier (2017), 1st in the region/12th in the nation by Payscale (2018) for producing the highest paid graduates entering the workforce, and named 4th Best Online College in Ohio by BestColleges.com.

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school. One example of the program in action is the Jacob Spears Trail project, which is on on the Licking River. For this project, students had to develop an app that allowed kayakers to track their progress. Students from different majors, such as computer science, public history and biology, had to work together to create this app.

MIAMI UNIVERSITY Miami University plans to have a new Honors College by fall 2021 that will be an intensive research-focused program guided by the university’s qualified professors. The Honors College will only be offered to high-achieving students to give them an experience similar to attending an Ivy League institution—fitting for a university that was one of the original eight “Public Ivy” schools identified by Richard Moll in 1985. Therefore, students will have to complete assessments, including a leadership project, to show the talents they can offer to the community. Students will also have to come up with a thesis before they graduate.

Miami University The Honors College will be accepting about 400 students, including students that receive full-ride scholarships, making it the largest one in the nation. Miami University

will also be offering activities and campus events for students to experience and enjoy college life with other honor students. “The Honors College will be an incubator where undergraduates create now, not waiting until after graduation,” says Gregory Crawford, president of Miami University. “Miami’s students will be architects of their future.” The Honors College offers a residential college environment, where students will be living with other students in resident halls and engage in campus events like student and community competitions, intramural sports teams and more. According to Crawford, the Honors College’s faculty will motivate students to pursue their unique dreams and help them build their futures. “Our faculty will empower our students with mentorship support and freedom to write their first novel, construct their first invention, conduct their first orchestra, write their first play, or start their first company, all while they complete their degree,” says Crawford.

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Guide to Colleges and Universities 2020

Miami University According to Zeb Baker, the director of the University Honors Program, the college’s goal is to provide unique learning opportunities to Miami’s top students so they can discover their scholarly talents to prepare them professionally and enrich them personally. “We want to produce thinkers, servants and leaders whose courageous inquiry and innovative spirit will positively transform their chosen fields and communities,” he adds. Miami University is also offering the Prodesse Scholars Program—originally called The University Academic Scholars program—to high-performing students. The Prodesse Scholars Program helps students explore the real world by connecting them with known corporations at which students can train and learn more 64

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about their field in a one-year cohort-based experience. Students who share a passion for more than one major will receive career counseling and be able to participate in a class with first-year students. In that class, students will work on a project that helps them explore their passions by engaging in different co-curricular activities. Students can choose from 10 to 12 different themes to partner up with a related institution. Possible themes include data and analysis, health and medicine, natural systems and more. Enrolling in the Prodesse Scholars Program also gives students access to the University Honors program courses. Students who have previously participated in the program interned at well-known

institutions such as The Cleveland Clinic in the Center for Human Nutrition, NASA and Procter & Gamble.

THE OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY The Ohio State University has 15 colleges offering hundreds of different majors. The university introduced its Buckeye Opportunit y Program in 2017 for the Columbus campus, but extended it to all other campuses in spring 2019. The Buckeye Opportunity Program covers tuition and any mandatory fees for students who require financial aid and qualify for federal Pell Grants. The program has helped 4,000 students complete their education without any cost. The Buckeye Opportunity Program is just one facet of a concerted effort by the

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Guide to Colleges and Universities 2020

The Ohio State University Campus

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university to make attaining a degree from OSU more feasible for students coming from low- to moderate-income families, first-generation college attendees, students paying their own way through school and many more. The President’s Affordability Grant is given to nearly 15,000 students each year who receive up to $2,250 in aid. In addition, the Land Grant Opportunity Scholarships are awarded to Ohio residents with the goal of giving them out to two students in each county in the state, totaling 176 annual scholarships. Furthermore, another program recognizing instructors is resulting in knock-on savings for students of their classes. The Affordable Learning Exchange (ALX) gives grants to teachers who plan their course curriculum around utilizing affordable materials, such as opting for digital textbooks or free software. Instructors submit their proposals to the ALX committee, which awards grants to those who demonstrate a forwardthinking approach to their classes that

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The Ohio State University Campus

MARIAN UNIVERSITY Indianapolis

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Apply and gain admittance by October 15 to be considered for full- and half-tuition scholarships. WHAT ARE YOU

MADE OF?

marian.edu Marian University is sponsored by the Sisters of St. Francis, Oldenburg, Indiana.

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Guide to Colleges and Universities 2020

University of Cincinnati Campus also lessens the financial burden on the students who take them. The most recent cohort was selected at the beginning of the year and recognized 32 teachers leading 35 classes across all of Ohio State University’s campuses. In the end, these efforts make attending the university more attainable to a much wider swath of students in Ohio—talented students who deserve a chance to attend a prestigious school no matter their family’s income or background. According to Benjamin Johnson, director of media relations at OSU, the university’s latest class at the Columbus campus was “the best prepared and most diverse in history with an average ACT score that increased to 29.5.”

UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI Having celebrated its bicentennial in January 2019, the University of Cincinnati is implementing a new initiative called Next Lives Here. The initiative’s goal is to focus on trying new approaches in hopes to lead the university into a new era of innovation. 68

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The initiative will focus on three areas: academic excellence, urban impact and innovation agenda. With the first, the university is pledging to its students and staff that it will make forward-thinking improvements to the school’s curriculum and quality of life on campus while investing more in its faculty. The focal point of urban University of Cincinnati impact entails heightened visibility in and involvement with the cutting-edge research and learning hapurban communit y surrounding UC’s pening at UC through enabling greater main campus, both nearby in Clifton access to emerging technologies and fosand downtown as well as throughout the tering easier connections among students, city proper. To that end, the university instructors and professionals of diverse is forging partnerships with entities backgrounds. in all facets of city life, from economic Through this initiative, the University of development and education to civ ic Cincinnati looks to challenge itself to make organizations and the arts. tremendous strides in the coming years The innovation agenda is perhaps the and, by doing so, challenge students and broadest and most future-minded facet the community to help make the world a of Next Lives Here, aiming to elevate the better place. n

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Advanced Degrees = Advancing Careers Looking to build your career or take it in a new direction? EKU is here to help you get ahead. Choose from: 30+ masters degrees 4 doctoral degrees And 1 specialist program

Browse EKU Graduate Programs GO.EKU.EDU/GRADUATE ON CAMPUS | ONLINE | ACCREDITED

EASTERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY Eastern Kentucky University is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer and Educational Institution.

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Guide to Colleges and Universities 2020

Eye on the Future MARIAN UNIVERSITY FOCUSES ON NURSING PROGRAM AS DEMAND GROWS By David Holthaus

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arian University in Indianapolis is a small, liberal arts college with a difference. The university has offered a highly ranked nursing program for more than 40 years and, thanks largely to partnerships with hospital systems in the region, had placed 96 of its latest nursing graduates within six months of graduating. Marian maintains a close relationship with Ascension St. Vincent Hospital, a Catholic health care provider in Indianapolis that operated its own nursing program before linking up with Marian’s program. It also has forged a strong relationship with the Franciscan Health system of hospitals, says Mark Apple, Marian’s vice president for marketing communications. “Being a Catholic university gives us an advantage in that we have strong relationships with Catholic health care providers in the area,” he says. “They are hungry to hire our graduates.” Marian supplies other health care systems with its nursing graduates, Apple says, 70

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including Community Health Network and Hendricks Regional Health. “We’ve been able to strengthen those partnerships since 2010 since we opened a medical school here,” Apple says. That year, Marian opened a school of osteopathic medicine, the first such school to open at a Roman Catholic university. The two programs complement each other and have made Marian a key provider of skilled talent for health care organizations in Indiana and beyond. “We’ve got strong partnerships with local hospitals to get our medical school students placed in residencies throughout the state,” Apple says. “That’s only increased our exposure as a university to those health care providers and opened up additional opportunities for our nursing students,” Apple says. Nursing is the largest program at Marian, a school of about 3,600 students that touts its small class sizes. A chronic shortage of nurses has allowed its graduates to readily find jobs after passing the required state nursing examination. “We look to the community to help us identify what the needs are going to be in terms of jobs for the next 10 to 20 years out,” Apple says. “We’ll only see the nursing shortage increase in coming years as baby boomers retire. They will be retiring from nursing,

Marian University has a high placement rate of its graduates from the school’s nursing program.

but they will also require more health care. There’s going to be a greater need for nurses and there will be jobs opening up.” Marian also offers students who already have bachelor’s degrees from regionally accredited institutions the option of earning a Bachelor of Science in nursing through its accelerated program. Accelerated students can complete the nursing portion of the program in 16 months through a balance of coursework and hands-on experience in the university’s labs and onsite at clinical agencies. Marian also offers a registered nurse to Bachelor of Science in nursing completion program that enables registered nurses who have associate’s degrees or diplomas from an accredited program the opportunity to earn bachelor’s degrees and grow professionally. Marian also offers graduate programs in nursing, including a Master of Science in nursing education that prepares graduates to assume nurse educator roles in schools of nursing, health care facilities and in the community. It a lso of fers a Doctor of Nu rsing practice program to prepare registered nurses for advanced clinical practice and leadership roles. The program offers a family nurse practitioner track and a nurse anesthesia track. n

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THE STUDY OF GOD BETHANY THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY OFFERS A NEW MASTER’S DEGREE IN THEOPOETICS By Eric Spangler

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new master’s degree in theopoetics and writing—the only master’s degree of its kind anywhere—is now available at Bethany Theological Seminary. The advanced degree in theopoetics and writing was initiated this year because student interest was so high in its previous theopoetics and theological imagination certificate program, says Scott Holland, the co-director of the master’s degree program in theopoetics and writing. “Many students said, ‘Why can’t we make this a full master’s degree?’” says Holland. So, he and Ben Brazil at the Earlham School of Religion—Bethany’s partner graduate school in Richmond, Indiana—jointly created the new program. Theopoetics, he says, emphasizes the poetics of theology—the study of God and religion. “Theopoetics would suggest that theology is a kind of writing, a kind of creative and constructive writing that intersects with human experience, with a multitude of conversations, stories, possibilities for the way we name God, the way we name ourselves, the way we name others, the way we name our world,” says Holland. To earn the master’s degree in theopoetics and writing students must earn two years worth of credits, he says. But those classes and credits can be earned in several convenient ways. Classes can be taken the traditional way, in the Richmond, Indiana, classroom at

ABOVE: Bethany Theological Seminary allows students to take classes in many different ways, including a traditional classroom format. LEFT: Bethany Theological Serminary teaches students expecting to enter the ministry and those who have chosen other professions.

Bethany Theological Seminary, but those same classes can be attended remotely from anywhere in the world via the Zoom video communication app. The semesterlong course can also be taken during three weekend on-campus intensives or during two-week intensives in January, May and August. The classes can be taken online as well, Holland says. “We have a very flexible, nimble educational model for delivery at our school,” he says. The master’s degree in theopoetics and writing is not only flexible in its method of attendance it’s also flexible in terms of what classes students can take to earn the advanced degree. “The program is flexible enough to be student centered and we really want it to be that way so students are not locked into a program where there’s not the ability to choose a number of electives that would address their needs, perhaps their vocational interest and future plans,” Holland says.

Some of the students in the Master of Arts theopoetics and writing degree program are in or are anticipating a ministryrelated vocation, including but not limited to pastoral ministry, he says. Many of the students, from recent college-graduates to older or nontraditional students, are exploring a variety of vocations, including nonpastoral ministry. Some students are already in professional vocations, ranging from nonprofits and social action organizations to high school and university teaching, theater direction and business. “I think there’s hospitable space for persons from many different theological, spiritual perspectives and journeys to enter in together and to study and have lively conversation,” he says. Besides, both Bethany Theological Seminary and Earlham School of Religion have always emphasized that ministry isn’t just pastoral ministry, says Holland. “Any vocation that is pitched in the direction of serving humanity is a form of ministry,” he says. ■ w w w.

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Guide to Colleges and Universities 2020

God’s Bible School and College

The Tristate benefits from one of the most diverse educational portfolios around. With more than 20 colleges and universities in the area, residents have the opportunities to add job skills and certifications, keep up with continuing education needs, and earn various undergraduate and graduate degrees. Those not in the region are supporters of this publication. Did we miss your school? Please email us at publisher@cincymagazine.com so we can make sure to include it next year.

Art Academy of Cincinnati 1212 Jackson St., Cincinnati 45202 513-562-6262 artacademy.edu Four-year college that focuses on art and design. Majors include design, illustration, print media and photography. Mount St. Mary’s Seminary & School of Theology 6616 Beechmont Ave., Cincinnati 45230 513-231-2223 athenaeum.edu Prepares students for ordination to the priesthood and offers master’s degrees in biblical studies, Catholic studies, theology and pastoral ministry. 72

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Chatfield College 1544 Central Parkway, Cincinnati 45202 513-921-9856 chatfield.edu An open enrollment college offering the associate of arts degree. The Christ College of Nursing & Health Sciences 2139 Auburn Ave., Cincinnati 45219 513-585-2401 thechristcollege.edu Bachelor’s and associate degrees in nursing. Also offers RN-BSN degree completion.

Cincinnati College of Mortuary Science 645 W. North Bend Road, Cincinnati 45224 513-761-2020 ccms.edu Offers associate degrees in applied science and bachelor’s degrees in mortuary science. Cincinnati State Technical & Community College 3520 Central Parkway, Cincinnati 45223 513-569-1500 cincinnatistate.edu Offers more than 100 associate degrees and certificate programs in business technologies, health and public safety, engineering and information technologies, and humanities and sciences. Eastern Kentucky University 521 Lancaster Ave., Richmond KY 40475 859-622-1000 eku.edu Offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees as well as doctorates in six academic colleges. Fortis College 11499 Chester Road, Suite 200, Cincinnati 45246 513-771-2795 fortis.edu Programs include nursing, dental assisting, HVAC, medical assisting and welding technology.

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EDUCATION PROFILE

Miami University Regionals Middletown Campus 4200 N. University Blvd. | Middletown, OH 45042

Hamilton Campus 1601 University Blvd. | Hamilton, OH 45011

513-785-3111 | miamioh.edu/regionals

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iami University Regionals provides open access to a Miami University degree at a price you

can afford. Miami University Regionals offers a nationally ranked education close to you at one of our three locations—Hamilton, Middletown and West Chester. And, for students looking to fit college into their busy lives, Miami University Regionals E-Campus delivers high-quality online courses and 100 percent online degree options. As the regional system of Miami University, Miami University Regionals offers bachelor’s and associate degrees entirely at its regional campuses. Our One Miami relocation option allows students to begin one of over 100 majors on the regional campuses

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and relocate to the main campus in Oxford. Regardless of which campus you start at or finish at, as One Miami, you would join the Miami Family and earn a Miami University degree. Our Miami Tuition Promise allows families to plan the cost of their four-year college education without surprises, and with one of the lowest tuition rates for four-year public institutions in Ohio, a bachelor’s degree can be affordable at Miami University Regionals. Your success matters. Our outstanding faculty and staff provide personalized attention and consider your success as our highest priority. We offer free tutoring, disability services, student employment opportunities and professional advising to

support you through your education. Ninety-six percent of our recent alum are employed or furthering their graduation. Our Career Services and Professional Development Office support students from start to finish and beyond! Our regional campuses offer a vibrant student life with championship athletics, more than 50 student organizations, community service learning opportunities, arts programming and performances, and more! With nearly 5,000 students attending classes on our beautiful campuses or online, you will have an incredible experience as a Miami University Regionals student! Local. Affordable. Respected. MiamiOH.edu/Regionals

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Guide to Colleges and Universities 2020 Galen College of Nursing 100 E. Business Way, Suite 200, Cincinnati 45241 513-475-3636 galencollege.edu Offers three-year BSN, an associate degree in nursing and advanced standing LPN to ADN.

Good Samaritan College of Nursing & Health Science 375 Dixmyth Ave., Cincinnati 45220 513-862-2631 gscollege.edu Nonprofit nursing program. Subsidiary of Good Samaritan Hospital, a partner of TriHealth.

Gateway Community & Technical College 500 Technology Way, Florence KY 41042 859-441-4500 gateway.kctcs.edu Two-year associate’s degree in business administration, criminal justice and others. Also offers certificates.

Great Oaks Career Campuses 110 Great Oaks Drive, Cincinnati 45241 513-771-8840 greatoaks.com One of the largest career and technical districts in the US. Offers career, workforce and economic development.

God’s Bible School & College 1810 Young St., Cincinnati 45202 513-721-7944 gbs.edu Non-denominational Christian school. Associate’s and bachelor’s degrees available in education, professional studies, ministerial, intercultural studies and music.

Indiana Tech 809 Wright Summit Parkway, Suite 310, Fort Wright KY 41011 859-916-5884 indianatech.edu Associate, bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in business, engineering, arts, computer sciences and criminal justice.

Indiana Wesleyan University 4201 S. Washington St., Marion IN 46953 866-468-6498 indwes.edu Evangelical Christian university with focus on liberal arts. Known for its master’s and adult education programs. Marian University 3200 Cold Spring Road, Indianapolis IN 46222 317-955-6000 marian.edu Private Catholic university offering undergraduate and graduate degrees. Miami University 501 E. High St., Oxford 45056 513-529-2531 miamioh.edu Public liberal arts school that has bachelor’s degrees in more than 120 areas of study, more than 60 master’s degree programs and 13 doctoral degree programs. Also has regional programs in Hamilton, Middletown and West Chester.

EDUCATION PROFILE

INDIANA TECH • NORTHERN KENTUCKY CAMPUS 809 Wright Summit Parkway, Suite 310 | Fort Wright, KY 41011 859-916-5884 | IndianaTech.edu/GOFORIT Indiana Tech educates students beyond its home base in Fort Wayne, Indiana, with regional campuses throughout the Midwest, as well as online programs that meet the needs of students worldwide. The private, not-for-profit university offers career-oriented degree programs at the associate, bachelor’s, master’s and Ph.D. levels, as well as professional certificate programs. Each program aligns with an in-demand career, including project management, engineering, business, cybersecurity, accounting, information technology, computer science, health care administration, criminal justice and more. Busy working adults find Indiana Tech an ideal fit, with class schedules that allow students to take one class at a time and still make rapid progress toward a degree. Many classes start every six weeks, so students can begin their education at any time of year. The university is accredited through the Higher Learning Commission (HLC). For more information or to enroll today, contact the Northern Kentucky admissions team at 859-916-5884.

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EDUCATION PROFILE

GREAT OAKS CAREER CAMPUSES 110 Great Oaks Drive | Cincinnati OH 45241 513-771-8840 | greatoaks.com Experiential learning—the chance to put knowledge into action—is an important part of education. One way students gain this hands-on experience is through Great Oaks Career Campuses. There, students can learn aviation maintenance with real airplanes, study culinary arts in fully equipped commercial kitchens, program manufacturing robots, use the latest software for cybersecurity or digital arts, work with horses and other animals, and more. Great Oaks is the public career-technical school district serving 36 southwest Ohio school districts. Students typically attend as juniors and seniors and can earn college credit and a professional credential in their career field. have the chance to spend part of their school career trying “Career-technical programs are super-electives for high something new and different.” schoolers,” says Jon Weidlich of Great Oaks. “Students meet Adult career training programs are also available. For more the same academic requirements as their classmates, but information, go to greatoaks.com.

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Guide to Colleges and Universities 2020 Mount St. Joseph University 5701 Delhi Road, Cincinnati 45233 800-654-9314 msj.edu Liberal arts institution focused on experiential and cooperative learning. Northern Kentucky University Nunn Drive, Highland Heights KY 41099 859-572-5100 nku.edu One of the fastest growing universities in Kentucky. Home to the College of Informatics, Health Innovation Center and BB&T Arena. Sinclair Community College 5386 Courseview Drive, Mason 45040 513-339-1212 sinclair.edu Associate degrees in arts and science at a convenient location. Also offers certificates.

Southern State Community College 100 Hobart Drive, Hillsboro 45133 937-393-3431 sscc.edu Academic programs as well as technical and transfer ones. Locations in Mt. Orab, Hillsboro, Wilmington and Washington Court House. Thomas More University 333 Thomas More Parkway, Crestview Hills KY 41017 859-341-5800 thomasmore.edu Small Catholic liberal arts university that offers 43 bachelor’s degree programs and five graduate programs. Union Institute & University 440 E. McMillan St., Cincinnati 45206 800-861-6400 myunion.edu Doctoral, master’s and bachelor’s degrees in various majors. Focus on social implications of studies.

University of Cincinnati 2600 Clifton Ave., Cincinnati 45221 513-556-0000 uc.edu Public research university. Features CollegeConservatory of Music; Design, Architecture, Art and Planning (DAAP); Carl H. Lindner College of Business; and College of Nursing. Warren County Career Center 3525 N. state Route 48, Lebanon 45036 513-932-8145 mywccc.org Career development and enhancement classes and training. Xavier University 3800 Victory Parkway, Cincinnati 45207 513-745-3000 xavier.edu Jesuit Catholic university. Focus on the development of the whole person and a strong system of personal moral values.

EDUCATION PROFILE

MARIAN UNIVERSITY 3200 Cold Spring Road | Indianapolis, Indiana 46222-1997 317-955-6300 or 800-772-6264 | marian.edu Marian University is the only Catholic university in Indianapolis. In 2018, it served over 3,500 undergraduate and graduate students. Its high-impact, experiential curriculum provides hands-on learning for students from 45 states and 23 nations. In U.S. News & World Report’s 2019 Midwestern rankings Marian was named No. 10 Most Innovative Regional University, No. 24 Best Value University, and No. 38 Best Regional University. We also offer national championship NAIA athletic programs. Marian University opened its College of Osteopathic Medicine in 2013, making it the first new school of medicine in the state of Indiana in over 110 years. Several new facilities have opened at Marian recently: Evans Center for Health Sciences (housing the Leighton School of Nursing and College of Osteopathic Medicine), Norman Center (home of the Byrum School of Business) and a new dining commons, student fitness center and indoor arena/convocation center.

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EDUCATION PROFILE

SINCLAIR COLLEGE • MASON CAMPUS 5386 Courseview Drive | Mason, OH 45040 513-339-1212 | sinclair.edu/mason Opened in 2007, the Sinclair College Campus in Mason continues Sinclair’s mission of providing accessible, affordable, flexible education to meet the needs of the community. Conveniently located, the campus is easily accessible from Interstate 71, central to Warren County. Students come from throughout the Warren, Butler, Clinton and Northern Hamilton County areas. Sinclair in Mason offers more than 20 degree and certificate programs, including university transfer, business, IT, computer information and health care options with access to over 300 programs online or on the Dayton campus. Partnerships with other schools provide access to advanced degrees.

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The Tristate’s A+ Professors THIS YEAR’S BEST COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY EDUCATORS, AS NOMINATED BY THEIR PEERS AND STUDENTS, SHOW THE BREADTH OF TALENT AT OUR LOCAL INSTITUTIONS By the Editors

Cincy Magazine’s Outstanding Educators Class of 2020 features exceptional professors selected from the many nominations we received from their colleagues. The winners were singled out for a variety of traits that ranged from scholarship and spending extra

2020

time with students to innovation in the classroom and research. Read on to learn more about this year’s winners from those who nominated them.

HASSANA ALIDOU Social Justice Union Institute & University “As an educator and diplomat, Dr. Alidou brings a wealth of world-class expertise and knowledge in equality and social justice coupled with her outstanding global experience. She is widely known for her work in helping community-based organizations, national governments and international institutions work together to achieve educational equality, literacy, gender equality and economic development.” – Teresa Wilkins, Union Institute & University

ROSALYN BROWN BEATTY STACEY LOWERY BRETZ Chemistry & Biochemistry Miami University “Dr. Lowery Bretz advances student learning using studentcentered teaching methods and innovative assessments to help students build lasting conceptual understanding over rote memorization. Scores demonstrating student learning, students’ perceptions of learning and students’ ratings of her teaching … meet the highest standards of classroom teaching and significantly distinguish Dr. Lowery Bretz from her colleagues.” – Carolyn Haynes, Miami University

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Clinical Mental Health Counseling Union Institute & University “As a professor for the last 12 years in the substance abuse and mental health counseling fields, she strives to make a personal connection with students and humanize the experience between teacher and student. Dr. Brown Beatty reminds students that there must be a work-life balance in the counseling profession, and she urges students to practice self-care.” – Teresa Wilkins, Union Institute & University

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EDUCATION PROFILE

EASTERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY 521 Lancaster Ave. | Richmond, KY 40475 859-622-1000 | eku.edu

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oday’s workforce is more educated than ever—nearly 15% of American workers have an advanced degree. That number is steadily rising, which means that the job market is more competitive than ever. Graduate degrees can help young professionals build meaningful careers, and, at Eastern Kentucky University, they can earn one on their own terms. EKU offers more than 30 master’s, four doctoral and one specialist degree programs in critical fields such as education, business, health care, social work, computer science and criminal justice. Many of those accredited programs are nationally recognized for their excellence and value. EKU’s master’s and doctoral programs in occupational therapy and nursing are consistently ranked among the nation’s best, and the nursing programs have earned international awards. Quality programs start with quality faculty. EKU graduate faculty are evaluated regularly and demonstrate a commitment to scholarship and student success. Over 90% of faculty have a terminal degree, ensuring that they are experts in their field. Some graduate classes take place on our main campus in Richmond, Kentucky, less than two hours from Cincinnati. A perfect mix of lovely wooded areas, historic buildings and modern amenities, there’s a reason it’s called the Campus Beautiful. Alternatively, students in need of more flexible options

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can choose from more than 15 online master’s and two online doctoral programs. Many working professionals choose EKU for that very reason.

Nationally recognized degree programs, flexible options and committed faculty are just a few of the great reasons to earn a graduate degree at EKU.

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DEE KINNEY

KIM LASALA

Kinesiology and Health Miami University Regionals “Dr. Kinney believes that effective teaching goes beyond creative and engaging techniques. She likes to paraphrase Theodore Roosevelt: ‘Students don’t care how much you know until they know how much you care.’ Her students have no doubt about how much she cares.” – Moira Casey, Miami University Regionals

Chemistry Sinclair Community College “[As co-chair of the WiSTEM camp, Kim] brought her industry experience ... to develop hands-on activities with ‘real world’ female scientists. STEM fields are still male-dominated, and the value of the young women students being able to see themselves in mentors cannot be stressed enough.” – Chris Hubbard, Sinclair Community College

CHRISTOPHER LORENTZ

THEMBINKOSI “PETER” MKHATSHWA

Biology Thomas More University “Ch r is is a ver y t horoug h teacher, continually assesses and modifies his teaching techniques, and has been critical to the successful preparation of the majority of our students over the last 20-plus years.” – Maria C. Garriga, Thomas More University

Mathematics Miami University Regionals “Sstudents who are seeking mentorship and assistance in difficult subjects quickly recognize him for his open and friendly personality. [He] is willing to use his expertise and outstanding work ethic to find ways to benefit all STEM students.” – Robert B. Davis, Miami University Regionals

EDUCATION PROFILE

XAVIER UNIVERSITY WILLIAMS COLLEGE OF BUSINESS 3800 Victory Parkway | Cincinnati, OH 45207 513-745-3527 | xavier.edu/mba At the Xavier University Williams College of Business, students will find a focus on experiential education across all programs. Our classrooms are “business laboratories” where leaders are developed. Students learn to be resourceful problem solvers with a grounding in ethical business practices—thus making a difference in their organizations and the world. Our programs fit the lifestyle of the working professional with the unprecedented flexibility to take advantage of the breadth of course offerings. We invite you to learn more about the Williams College of Business’s MBA programs, where we are Learning, Serving and Achieving…Together.

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KARSTEN PIEP

JACLYN TYLER

Interdisciplinary Studies Union Institute & University “Dr. Piep spends many hours with his adult students via Adobe Connect, phone calls, and email exchanges because, in his words, ‘Our students’ personal interests and scholarly pursuits are widely divergent. I have to be continually on my feet.’” – Teresa Wilkins, Union Institute & University

Psychology Sinclair Community College “Jaclyn began teaching at the Mason campus in 2014, and in that time the enrollment in the psychology program has nearly doubled. I believe this is directly related to her ability to connect with and encourage her students. She is dynamic even in her online classes.” – Chris Hubbard, Sinclair Community College

CARI GIGLIOTTI

RAYMOND HEBERT

Chemistry Sinclair Community College “In 2019, and again for 2020, Cari and co-nominee Kim Lasala expanded the WiSTEM camp to include more outings to local businesses and organizations such as Procter & Gamble, Ethicon and the Cincinnati Zoo. Through hands-on activities, participating young women have been able to experience how STEM is applied in the real world, and have seen how their own academic and professional careers could blossom in a STEM-related field.” – Chris Hubbard, Sinclair Community College

History Thomas More University “Dr. Raymond Hebert started at Thomas More in 1975 as a faculty member for one semester. Since then, Hebert has been chairperson of both history and the expanded history program, international studies, the political science departments, interim dean of student affairs, vice president of academic affairs/dean of the college, director of the James Graham Brown Honors Program, director of the Gemini Dual Credit Program, and coordinator of study abroad programs.” – Rebecca Stratton, Thomas More University

QUALITY ASSURANCE The quality of your education directly impacts the quality of your life. Xavier University has been providing the highest quality business education since 1831. We offer several pathways to a MBA that will fit with your lifestyle. The value of the curriculum, faculty, students, and alumni provides a return on your educational investment that is unmatched in the region. We are positive the experience will enhance your life and career for the better. CHOOSE FROM: • Executive MBA • Full-time MBA • Online MBA • Part-time MBA

READY TO MAKE THE MOVE? Let us improve your quality of life.

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Urology

No Shame in Seeking Help DOCTORS STRESS THE NEED FOR BEING OPEN ABOUT UROLOGIC CONDITIONS AND PURSUING TREATMENT SOONER RATHER THAN LATER By Kevin Michell

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rologic concerns can be no small source of embarrassment for sufferers of incontinence, urinary tract infections and other issues. But overcoming that shame to talk to a physician is the first step to improving quality of life and, in some cases, catching a more serious concern before it’s too late. Dr. Brooke Edwards, chief medical officer for The Urology Group, sees part of her role as helping to remove some of the embarrassment of seeking treatment. “How I look at it with medicine and specifically with urology,” she says, “it’s very much a privilege to take care of patients and for them to open up and talk about problems that they have that they are completely embarrassed to talk about and even embarrassed to talk to a family doctor about. I think when they come into a urology office, they understand this is why [they’re] here. It’s a subspecialty, it’s safe to talk about.” Once patients are open to talking to a specialist about urologic issues, organizations like The Urology Group are able to offer treatments that many haven’t even

Dr. Eric Kuhn of The Urology Group talks with a patient about kidney stones. considered. A common barrier at this point is resignation—many men and women who notice problems with urination or sexual function often chalk it up to simply getting older. A good example is benign prostatic hyperplasia, commonly known as BPH, which is when a man’s prostate enlarges and causes discomfort during urination and frequent nighttime urination. It is indeed a common issue in men—around 70 of men in their 60s and over 40 million men in the United States experience BPH. But that’s not to say that men should only treat it with a stiff upper lip. “I think it’s common to say, ‘Well this is just something that happens. Dad had it, he dealt with it when he was older, [so] I’m

“It’s very much a privilege to take care of patients and for them to open up and talk about problems that they have that they are completely embarrassed to talk about and even embarrassed to talk to a family doctor about.” —Dr. Brooke Edwards, chief medical officer for The Urology Group 82

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going to deal with it. It’s not a big deal,’” says Edwards. BPH tends to first occur in a man’s 40s and worsens over time, which can lead to knock-on issues like a urinary tract infection (UTI) or, worse, bladder and kidney damage if left untreated. Treating BPH at 40 or 50 years old instead of later on in life—particularly for those who have suffered from it for years but haven’t addressed it with their doctor—not only lessens the symptoms to improve quality of life, it can prevent serious issues that result from untreated BPH, which range from necessitating catheter use to potential kidney failure. Thus, Edwards stresses the importance of catching it earlier, which is helped by men being open and communicative with their doctors about their urination, particularly after they turn 40. “As they ignore those symptoms, they’re doing something to their body that I can’t fix,” she says. “I can’t reverse the damage that they’re doing to their bladder.” The same goes for frequently recurring UTIs in women, which can often be dismissed as an annoyance that is just part of life. But it could be a red flag for hidden kidney issues or other underlying problems. And, just as men are with BPH, women are more susceptible to very serious issues the older they get and the longer they avoid more intentional treatment.

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Edwards says that anything that affects quality of life should be checked out by a specialist if the patient is willing. It may seem routine, but treatment options for mitigating common urologic conditions are more numerous and effective than ever. And getting a more in-depth examination can lead to catching the more serious problems—including cancer—earlier and thus widening the window of treatability. One major issue is that UTIs share a lot of symptoms with the warning signs of kidney or bladder cancer. It’s normal for a UTI to result in blood in one’s urine but if there are no other symptoms of a UTI—a frequent need to urinate that often releases only small amounts of urine each time, burning or pain during urination or lower abdominal pain—it’s crucial that further testing takes place. “One of the things about bladder and kidney cancer is that the blood in the urine—if you see it—is painless,” explains Dr. Gary Kirsh, president of The Urology Group. “So, if there are no symptoms of an infection and there’s blood in the urine, that should raise the radar that it may be something more dangerous than a simple urinary infection.”

But even if the worst-case scenario should arise and some form of cancer is spotted, the options for treatment are more targeted and effective than ever. In cases of prostate cancer, for example, The Urology Group utilizes what’s called somatic testing, which analyzes the genome of cancer cells when they are found. “That’s looking at the DNA characteristics of how that cancer’s going to behave,” says Kirsh. After an initial examination under a microscope that results in a Gleason Score—a 1 to 5 scale of how aggressive the cancer appears—tumor tissue is sent off to an external lab. A DNA profile of the cancer is returned that provides a recommendation of starting treatment or, in cases of slow-growing, low-risk prostate cancer, safely continuing to monitor the patient. It may be a surprise to many that one of the improvements to addressing prostate cancer is knowing when treatment isn’t necessary. For a long time, finding cancer cells in a man’s prostate meant immediate treatment, leading to the many side effects that diminish quality of life and invasive procedures. “We now know that it is safe to watch— meaning surveil, which isn’t the same as

Dr. Justin Cox, a urologist with The Christ Hospital ignore—men who have a smaller amount of nonaggressive cancer as viewed under the microscope,” Kirsh explains. For those who do have an aggressive cancer or one that has spread into other areas of the body—at that point referred to as metastatic prostate cancer—specialists like The Urology Group and those at The Christ Hospital Health Network have the tools and techniques to improve survivability. Dr. Justin Cox, a urologist with The Christ Hospital, says that robotic-assisted surgery and more targeted radiation therapy

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Urology extend the lifespan of men with prostate cancer while also helping to reduce the negative aspects of getting treatment. Side effects cannot be fully eliminated, but they can be lessened. “The challenge for us has been trying to figure out from a surgery standpoint how can we minimize the injury to the bladder control muscles and be able to preserve those nerves and blood vessels for sexual function,” says Cox, adding that surgery and radiation options have become better at only targeting the problem areas without impacting nearby organs, nerves and muscles. But beyond improved mechanisms for treatment, equally important are the improvements to how patients receive care from their physicians and specialists. That is why The Christ Hospital Health Network developed its Urologic Cancer Collaborative, a team of physicians meant to provide one resource for all of a patient’s concerns and questions. “What’s nice about the collaborative is it’s an avenue for patients who have any

The recovery room at The Urology Group form of prostate cancer, be it newly diagnosed [or] guys who have very complicated cases. We see a lot of second opinions,” explains Cox. “But what’s nice is that it is a combination of a urologist, a radiation oncologist and a medical oncologist that all sit down as one with the patient. They can see all three specialties that they would potentially be involved with in their care.” Together they can explore the patient’s options and determine what approach they

are most comfortable with. Everything can be discussed together in one setting, helping patients feel more confident about the care they’re getting and reassured about the road ahead. Between the advancements in identification and treatment of urologic cancers and how specialists in the field can communicate options to patients, prostate cancer and similar problems can be less of a death sentence and more of a chronic condition. ■

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Unparalleled Care

THE UROLOGY GROUP BRINGS WORLD-CLASS CARE AND TREATMENT OPTIONS TO CINCINNATI THAT ARE RARELY FOUND ELSEWHERE By Kevin Michell

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ince 1996, The Urology Group has operated as a collective of physicians focused on one of the narrowest specialties in the medical world. Urology accounts for 2 of all medicine practiced, but its role in treating common issues like benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and urinary tract infections (UTIs), as well as cancers involving the kidneys, prostate and bladder, make it a vital discipline. By being an organization that solely focuses on urology across its 11 Greater Cincinnati locations, The Urology Group offers best-in-class care for the whole spectrum of urologic ailments, from improving quality of life for sufferers of issues like incontinence to extending survivability for cancer patients. “The Urology Group, fortunately, is very all-encompassing urology care,” says Dr. Brooke Edwards, The Urology Group’s chief medical officer, adding that its dedicated focus is what sets it apart from hospital systems and other, larger multispecialty groups. The president of The Urology Group, Dr. Gary Kirsh, adds that having dozens of urologists under the group’s umbrella allows for an ability to scale that couldn’t be possible with the same specialists split into twos and threes among other care providers. That enables collaboration among the doctors who have their own lanes of expertise, such as research, surgery and oncology.

“We use that scale to deliver upon the promise of creating a center of excellence,” says Kirsh. “And when we do deliver on that—and I really mean this from the bottom of my heart—we become a community asset, a community resource.” Delivering on that promise comes both from the quality of physicians and the access to technology that is on par with or better than much larger cities than Cincinnati. The Urology Group is the only provider in the region to use CyberKnife radiation therapy exclusively for prostate cancer and has the only facility in the city that offers a DNA analysis of the cells shed during urination—called fluorescence in situ hybridization—that can determine how aggressively to look for recurrence of cancer cells in patients with a history of bladder cancer. The Urology Group also has its own pathology laboratory with a permanent uropathologist, a level of specialized expertise that has resulted in other care providers and organizations sending samples to The Urology Group for analysis. Furthermore, it also is home to the largest independently owned and operated ambulatory urology surgery center in the country. But beyond the access to world-class technology and methods, The Urology Group offers uniquely collaborative care that serves as a further benefit to its current and prospective patients. Nurse navigators provide

TOP: The Urology Group’s Norwood Surgery Center ABOVE: Dr. Gary Kirsch, president of The Urology Group an extra set of eyes on patients’ developments and can suggest treatment options that may have been initially overlooked. And the group’s own clinical research department allows patients access to research trials if standard therapy isn’t working. In building a practice upon urology and its subspecialties, The Urology Group is able to be competitive in attracting physicians with top talent in their field, bringing in the best and brightest of a medical concentration that only sees 290 graduates enter practice in the U.S. each year. And while urology may not be the most well-known and appreciated medical specialty, having the world-class care that The Urology Group can offer makes Cincinnati a more attractive and healthy place to live by elevating the quality of urologic care well beyond that of most other cities the same size or larger. “Our group is widely recognized in the country as being one of the leading examples of what can be done with a urology company,” Kirsh says. “And we’re very proud of that.” ■ w w w.

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Winning the War

FOR TALENT CINCINNATI INNOVATION DISTRICT WILL DRIVE AREA’S ECONOMY

The 1819 Innovation Hub in Uptown is looking to have an impact on the community at large.

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UC CREATIVE SERVICES

BY TERRY TROY

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hat’s the difference between an Innovation Hub and an Innovation District? How about $2 billion in research and real estate development, 20,000 new jobs and up to $3 billion in annual economic impact—and that’s just for starters. Clearly recognizing the work of the University of Cincinnati’s 1819 Innovation Hub, JobsOhio is investing up to $100 million to create something called the Cincinnati Innovation District. Over the next 10 years the project aims to foster talent development, including more than 15,000 STEM graduates, while dramatically accelerating research and innovation initiatives at the University of Cincinnati and Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. “To compete and win, we must invest in research and talent while establishing vibrant, amenity-rich communities to realize our long-term vision of making Ohio the best place in the country for tech and life science jobs,” says J.P. Nauseef, JobsOhio’s president and chief investment officer. “We applaud UC, Cincinnati Children’s and the many partners who have stepped up and made significant new investments to drive these outcomes.” “It is great to see our ‘Next Lives Here’ vision truly resonating with thought leaders across Ohio,” says UC President Neville Pinto. “Th is historic investment in

our academic mission only reaffi rms the world-class talent and immense promise of our faculty, staff and students. I want to extend a special thanks to my leadership team for partnering with JobsOhio to see this endeavor to success.” The massive investment places Cincinnati and the whole Tristate area in a leadership position in terms of innovation, attracting talent and corporations, and ultimately building the city’s population. It will also serve as a blueprint for future economic development across the state, according to JobsOhio officials. When JobsOhio announced the new partnership among government, academia and business creating the Cincinnati Innovation District, the event attracted notable government dignitaries such as Gov. Mike DeWine, Lt. Gov. Jon Husted and, of course, Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley. “The Cincinnati Innovation District is the next big thing for Cincinnati’s growth,” says Cranley. “This partnership among the state, JobsOhio, the city, the University of Cincinnati and Cincinnati Children’s Hospital will pay dividends for decades to come.” “In partnering with the University of Cincinnati and Cincinnati Children’s to create this Innovation District, we are investing in opportunities for students and incumbent workers to build a suc-

cessful career in Ohio, while unleashing the research and innovation happening on our university campuses and hospitals to help drive job creation,” says DeWine. “The three most important elements to developing a vibrant, modern economy are innovation, talent and investment,” adds Husted. “[The] announcement represents an aggressive effort to build our capacity and align these resources to create a worldclass innovation district in Cincinnati. Great ideas must fi nd a way from the lab to the marketplace if they are to improve the quality of life for the public and create jobs and economic opportunity. Th is innovation district will make this process faster and more effective.” Future investments from JobsOhio will go toward placemaking initiatives within the Cincinnati Innovation District, which encompasses the innovation assets of UC, Cincinnati Children’s and neighboring research-focused institutions. JobsOhio projects its investments, alongside those made by UC and Cincinnati Children’s, will result in the creation or attraction of 20,000 high-skilled jobs to Cincinnati and an annual economic impact of between $2 billion and $3 billion. “Our leaders in Columbus have been watching closely as we’ve implemented the university’s innovation agenda,” says David J. Adams, chief innovation officer at

“Our efforts will help make Cincinnati—and ultimately all of Ohio—the Midwest’s premier destination for skilled talent and investment.”

UC CREATIVE SERVICES

— David Adams

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UC. “It reinforces what we already knew: Our approach to innovation works. They recognize that UC has drawn up the blueprint for establishing nationally competitive innovation districts. Our efforts will help make Cincinnati—and ultimately all of Ohio—the Midwest’s premier destination for skilled talent and investment.” The University of Cincinnati developed an innovation district blueprint through the creation of the 1819 Innovation Hub and the developing Digital Futures complex. These sites have already attracted Fortune 500 companies, mid-sized companies and generated significant start-ups. In only its second year, the Innovation Hub’s Venture Lab accelerator is on pace to grow its startup dramatically. Clearly, the UC 1819 Innovation Hub has become an economic engine that strengthens the entire Ohio economy. The storied history of UC’s innovation expertise is long-standing, making the vision of attracting even more businesses and the talent to serve them a reality. A significant part of the initiative announced in March is the acceleration of the number of STEM graduates, which is also very important to organizations looking for new locations, says Adams. “The No. 1 issue we hear from companies looking for locations is access to talent,” says Adams. “We live in an environment today where talent is drawn to innovation and that companies are drawn to locations that have talent. So the 1819 Innovation Hub was our first start into the development of an innovation district, which we had in our vision for some time.” While it’s clearly serving the Greater Cincinnati area, it’s a district that is as

“It really is important to be seen on campus, to be seen as an innovative company and as a place that is technology enabled.” — Stephanie Ferris

much about mindset as it is about firm geographic borders, adds Adams. “We will curate this project over time to define how this will look,” he says. “That’s why we are not looking at firm boundaries. We are keeping this loosely defined because it will continue to evolve. Instead of constraining it, we are looking at this to be unconstrained and evolving as we move forward.” That includes the constraining definition many people place on the concept of innovation itself. While the 1819 Innovation Hub has done a lot to create startups, it’s also helped numerous mid-market companies, as well as Fortune 500 companies such as Kroger and Procter & Gamble. You can add Fifth Third Bank to that list, and others are sure to follow.

“In partnering with the University of Cincinnati and Cincinnati Children’s to create this Innovation District, we are investing in opportunities for students and incumbent workers to build a successful career in Ohio, while unleashing the research and innovation happening on our university campuses and hospitals to help drive job creation.” — Governor DeWine 88

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“Whether it’s a startup, mid-sized or a Fortune 500 company, all companies today are facing similar problems,” says Adams. “Innovation is not just limited to startups.” If you think about the pace of change of today’s business environment, Fortune 500 companies must redefine their organizations to be more entrepreneurial in order to solve problems, says Adams, “which is no different than someone trying to start a business. “By creating spaces for them to interact, it also creates new opportunities for organizations that might not even talk to one another.” A leading provider of technology solutions for merchants, banks and capital market firms globally, FIS announced earlier this year that the company plans to solidif y its presence in Cincinnati as a Strategic Technology and Innovation Campus at the former corporate headquarters of Worldpay, which was acquired by FIS more than a year ago. It also recently opened a space at the 1819 Innovation Hub. As chief operating officer, Stephanie Ferris leads a global team that drives FIS corporate strategy, marketing, communications and mergers and acquisitions, as well as portfolio analytics optimization. With a career that spans more than 20 years, Ferris is a transformative business leader who knows the importance of the Innovation District in terms of attracting and retaining talent, as well as creating synergies with other companies located within the Innovation District.

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UC CREATIVE SERVICES

The 1819 Innovation Hub was designed to have spaces specificallyfor collaboration and innovation.

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“We’re pretty excited about it,” says Ferris of the company’s new space at the Innovation Hub. “It’s a new, current and an innovative space right on the UC campus that gives us the opportunity to actively bring in students to work with our teams on developing new products or working on processes.” So how is that different than bringing students out to the Mason area where the company is headquartered? “They see us every day,” answers Ferris. “It really is important to be seen on campus, to be seen as an innovative company and as a place that is technology enabled.” That’s not only true for global companies such as FIS, but other major organizations such as Kroger, P&G, Cincinnati Bell and Cincinnati Financial, she adds. “The space also gives us the opportunity to network with those companies, to potentially co-develop some things together,” Ferris says. “We haven’t gotten there yet because our space is so new. But we are very excited about the opportunities moving forward.” Being a part of the Innovation Hub has also changed the way the company works because of the way its space is configured. “It’s the way people are working today: in very small teams developing things in very

agile short sprint manner versus having a long product development cycle. It enables collaboration,” Ferris says. Clearly, the 1819 Innovation Hub is not only a place for aggressive innovation, but also an economic engine that will drive the entire economy of Cincinnati and the Tristate. “The future is now and many companies are well into their future building,” says Jill P. Meyer, president and chief executive officer of the Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber. “What 1819 provides is both the push for some to enter that phase, but also a place to foster additional, faster innovation for those who are pursuing it. “Place matters; before 1819 we were missing it. That Cincinnati now has this focused Innovation District tells the rest of the world that this is a strong place to build your future—whether you are a student, a researcher, a scientist or business leader. 1819 has created that initial, critical convergence where a major urban Research-1 university, medical community and businesses all come together by design to create that which none could create on their own.” The Innovation District has been a missing piece of Cincinnati’s business landscape, adds Meyer. That the area now

has this kind of investment and energy happening at the core of the Cincinnati MSA serves as a strong signal that the area is building its future economy in a strong sustainable way that will enable continuous growth. “It’s the new economy springing to life in a visible way for all not only to see, but join,” Meyer adds. “It’s an enviable asset that not all communities enjoy. It is a differentiator.” This opinion is shared by the city’s economic development team as well. “The Innovation Hub was the first major new investment within the corridor and is like a spark that is creating a buzz and interest from other employers looking to locate in the surrounding development opportunities now beginning to come out of the ground,” says Markiea Carter, interim director of the Department of Community and Economic Development for the city of Cincinnati. “The 1819 Innovation Hub allows Cincinnati and our region to have a true and viable place for individuals and companies wanting to share their ideas and develop cutting-edge technologies that will keep us competitive against other competing regions within the Midwest.” As well as the rest of the world. n

“The 1819 Innovation Hub allows Cincinnati and our region to have a true and viable place for individuals and companies wanting to share their ideas and develop cutting-edge technologies that will keep us competitive against other competing regions within the Midwest.” — Markiea Carter

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Nexigen is considered to be a cybersecurity resource in the community. Above, a senior security engineer at Nexigen is being interviewed about a security incident in Kenton County.

Right Idea, Right Time NEXIGEN GROWS BY KEEPING UP WITH TECH TRENDS By David Holthaus

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on Salisbury and J.J. Schaffer met nearly two decades ago when they were both working at the Best Buy in Florence, Kentucky, on the electronics retailer’s tech bench. They became friends by way of their IT engineering backgrounds, sharing ideas about computing, especially about something known at the time as “utility computing.” Today, that’s called “cloud computing,” the idea of having access to computing resources, storage and power without having to directly manage it. With a good idea and their entrepreneurial bent, they started a company called Nexigen in 2003. “It was a great idea that turned into a fantastic industry,” says Chris West, Nexigen’s director of sales and marketing. However, in 2003, they were a bit ahead of their time on the cloud computing idea, so they began offering managed services to businesses, providing information 92

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technology services for companies on a contract basis, saving those businesses the expense and time of hiring their own full-time IT staffs. Today, Nexigen has grown to 55 employees, 45 of whom work in tech roles. From its base in Newport, Kentucky, Nexigen offers IT services—including managed services and cloud computing—to companies around the Greater Cincinnati region and beyond. Nexigen is a full-service shop, offering everything from everyday IT support to a full cybersecurity suite. In the last couple of years, its cybersecurity services have become an important center of growth, West says. “In the last 12 to 24 months, across all industry segments, information security has become more and more prevalent,” West says. High-profile data breaches at companies like Equifax, Marriott International and Target exposed the data of tens of millions of their customers and highlighted the risks and liabilities of weak cybersecurity. “The internet has enabled many more people to reach out and interact with other organizations’ infrastructures,” West says.

“So businesses are putting more and more attention on this particular aspect of their business.” The negative publicity has awakened businesses and other organizations to the need for strong cyber security. “A lot of organizations don’t realize they have compliance exposures or security issues,” he says. Protecting IT systems from intrusions and hacking demands constant attention and vigilance. “You need to build robust applications and robust authentication processes,” West says. It’s not something all companies want to staff up for by using their own workforce. Then there’s the cost of hiring IT staff. “Small businesses often don’t believe they have the budget,” he says. “But we can help them prioritize where to put their resources and it becomes much more manageable.” The company provides services largely in the health care, manufacturing, retail and financial verticals and has grown largely through word-of-mouth and a referral network, West says. “We’re basically a customer service company that happens to be good at IT,” he says. n

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36 East Fourth St., Cincinnati, OH 45202

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Tristate Meeting and Event Planner Guide 2020

No Lack of Choices UNIQUE MEETING AND EVENT VENUES GIVE EVENTS PLANNERS PLENTY OF OPTIONS By Menna Elarman

BOOST has a rooftop deck that can be used during events.

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lanning an event can be stressful, but it doesn’t have to be. Whether you’re on a budget or not, or choosing between a typical or an outside-thebox venue, the Tristate has the meeting or event space that will work best for you.

BRAINSTORM If you’re looking for a venue to host a corporate offsite business meeting, BrainStorm at 815 Main St., may be a place worth considering. According to Hazel Bloomfield, owner of BrainStorm, what makes the venue unique is its quality customer service and attention to details. “We take care of everything else for you so it’s seamless and easy,” she says. BrainStorm also has a unique location— it is located in a 120-year-old building. “We have the original hardwood floor, exposed

BrainStorm gives groups access to an HD projector and screen. w w w.

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Tristate Meeting and Event Planner Guide 2020

BOOST (above and left) creates a welcoming environment to encourage collaboration and productivity.

brick, we kind of combine the old with the new so it’s a clean modern feel with the original architecture and the old floors and exposed brick wall,” says Bloomfield. As a boutique venue, BrainStorm can host up to 100 people at a time. It also offers multiple amenities such as a house sound system, whiteboards, teleconferencing, flip charts, Wi-Fi, breakout rooms and more. Since it first opened in 2014, BrainStorm has hosted about 20 events a month and has opened a second location in Mason at the end of 2018. 96

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According to Bloomfield, the company’s goal is “to not meet our clients’ expectations, but to exceed them. “We have done things like order a birthday cake to be delivered if we hear there is a birthday at a meeting or get medicine for a sick client.”

BOOST Known for its natural light atmosphere, exposed bricks and hardwood f loors, BOOST is located on 538 Reading Road in Over-the-Rhine. BOOST only hosts

corporate meetings for a maximum of 80 people. “I started it for a couple of reasons but the main reason is to provide a meeting space that really fostered collaboration and productivity,” says Jenny White, owner of BOOST. BOOST is known for its privacy and hospitality as it’s only rented to one group at a time to eliminate distraction. “It is almost like you are coming to my house, I’m having you to my house for you to have your meeting so it’s private,” says White. “There is a hospitality provider on-site with the group all day long.” Those who choose BOOST have access to the main meeting room, a separate dining area, a conference room and a rooftop deck, as well as amenities like a webcam, color laser printer and more. “You’re not just stuck in a room with four walls, you get an entire space all to yourself,” adds White.

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Tristate Meeting and Event Planner Guide 2020 BOOST host 15 events a month, and White credits the business’ success to its clients. “They know our environment is going to put their attendees in the positive mindset that they need to be in order to have a productive meeting,” says White.

BB RIVERBOATS Since 1979, BB Riverboats has been hosting all types of events, including corporate gatherings. “Our location offers an experience and scenery that is unmatched by anyone in BB Riverboats allows companies to host events on the water.

the city,” says Captain Ben Bernstein, chief fi nancial officer for BB Riverboats. “We offer an unrivaled setting that overlooks the beautiful Cincinnati skyline on the Ohio River.” BB Riverboats is a family-owned business that has over 40 years of experience. The family opened the Mike Fink Restaurant in 1977, a floating fi ne-dining restaurant. “After opening the restaurant, we had many customers come down and inquire about when the next cruise was leaving the dock,” says Bernstein. “We decided the natural thing was to buy a riverboat.” After celebrating its 40th anniversary last year, BB Riverboats is still going strong and is able to host up to 1,000 passengers. “We have a world-class executive chef, Jesus Picazo, who leads the charge on approximately 1,500 events between the riverboats and catering,” Bernstein says. “We have something for every event,” he adds. “We offer exquisite cuisine, exceptional service and we can handle any detail to make your event special.” ■

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Hotels

Number of Number of Rooms/ Meeting Suites Rooms

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

Theater Capacity

Classroom Capacity

Banquet Capacity

Maximum Reception Number of Capacity Booths

Features

AIRPORT HOTELS Cincinnati Airport Marriott 2395 Progress Dr • Hebron, KY 41048 • 859-586-0166 • cincinnatiairportmarriott.com

294/8

11

7,480

750

400

550

750

220

Executive fitness center with indoor lap pool, concierge level with morning breakfast, high-speed Internet access.

Hilton Cincinnati Airport 7373 Turfway Rd • Florence, KY 41042 • 859-371-4400 • cincinnatiairport.hilton.com

314/10

11

3,940

400

200

280

300

20

High-speed internet, exercise room, indoor pool, airport shuttle.

Holiday Inn Cincinnati Airport 1717 Airport Exchange Blvd • Erlanger, KY 41018 • 859-371-2233 • holidayinn.com/cvg-airport

278/5

20

6,612

550

300

450

130

40

Exercise facilities, indoor pool, whirlpool, sauna, free wireless internet, complimentary airport transportation.

DoubleTree by Hilton Cincinnati Airport 2826 Terminal Dr • Hebron, KY 41048 • 859-3716166 • cincinnatiairport.doubletree.com

177/62

10

5,400

525

300

420

600

40

Only hotel on property at the Cincinnati/NKY International Airport. Business center, complimentary airport shuttle and hotel parking.

DOWNTOWN 21c Museum Hotel Cincinnati 609 Walnut St., Cincinnati, OH 45202 513-578-6600 Fax: 513-578-6601 21cmuseumhotels.com/cincinnati/

The Cincinnatian Hotel, Curio Collection by Hilton 601 Vine St • Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513-381-3000 • cincinnatianhotel.com

In the heart of the Queen City, 21c Museum Hotel is a multi-venue contemporary art museum and an award-winning 156-room boutique hotel featuring Metropole restaurant and a spa.

Number of Rooms/Suites

Number of Meeting Rooms

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

Theater Capacity

Classroom Capacity

Banquet Capacity

Reception Capacity

Maximum Number of Booths

143

7

1,900

250

75

120

200

12

148/2

4

1,144

80

60

72

100

Brick and Mortar upscale gastropub restauarant, casual dining Hannaford Market, fitness center, concierge service.

Meeting Facilities begin on pg. 102. Hotels and Facilities sorted by area.

Roll with Rotolo for Your Next Event Team Building Corporate Events Rehearsal Dinners Happy Hours

Holiday Parties Birthday Parties Product Launches Fundraisers

Newport on the Levee • 1 Levee Way • Newport, KY 41071 • 859.652.7250 • rotolobowling.com w w w.

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Tristate Meeting and Event Planner Guide 2020 Number of Number of Rooms/ Meeting Suites Rooms

Hotels

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

Theater Capacity

Classroom Capacity

Banquet Capacity

Maximum Reception Number of Capacity Booths

Features

Hilton Cincinnati Netherland Plaza 35 W 5th St • Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513-421-9100 • cincinnatinetherlandplaza.hilton.com

561/73

31

11,343

1,000

450

734

1,000

45

National Historic Landmark, art deco styling. Business center, executive lounge, high-speed Wi-Fi internet.

Hyatt Regency Cincinnati 151 W 5th St • Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513-579-1234 • hyatt.com

491/14

18

14,219

1,650

750

1,200

2,000

86

Across from the Duke Energy Convention Center. Concierge, health club, indoor pool, high-speed internet and Wi-Fi.

Renaissance Cincinnati Downtown Hotel 36 E, Fourth St., Cincinnati, OH 45202 513-333-0000 Fax: 513-455-6450 marriott.com/cvgbr

Find a mix of modernity and history in our storied event spaces, which offer capacity for up to 700 guests and eight upscale meeting spaces.

Number of Rooms/Suites

Number of Meeting Rooms

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

Theater Capacity

Classroom Capacity

Banquet Capacity

Reception Capacity

Maximum Number of Booths

283/40

8

6,800

600

300

380

700

100

SpringHill Suites Cincinnati Midtown 610 Eden Park Dr • Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513381-8300 • marriott.com/cvgdt

122 suites

1

464

12

8

T he Westin Cincinnati 21 E 5th St • Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513-621-7700 • westincincinnati.com

456/6

14

8,880

1,000

500

800

1,000

198/8

23

5,355

630

330

350

500

Lounge/bar, fitness center, indoor pool, complimentary breakfast, free high-speed internet. 59

Overlooking historic Fountain Square. McCormick & Schmick’s Seafood Restaurant and Ingredients (graband-go).

UPTOWN Kingsgate Hotel and Conference Center 151 Goodman Dr • Cincinnati, OH 45219 • 513487-3800 • kingsgatehotel.com

Fitness center, complimentary high-speed internet, restaurant,business center. Located near the University of Cincinnati.

Formerly Wunderland, was fully renovated in early 2019. Complete with a fresh, contemporary look, plenty of space and an ample parking lot, Willow is the perfect place for your event! In addition to our amazing indoor space, we also offer a deck with a gazebo that is just right for outdoor ceremonies up to 135 guests or a fun cocktail hour under the stars. Our scenic grounds surrounding the deck offer great photo opportunities with a double pond and large trees as a backdrop. These factors come together to make Willow Event Center elegant, affordable and the perfect venue for your next event!

(513) 931-2261 • willoweventcenter.com • info@willoweventcenter.com

7881 Colerain Ave. • Cincinnati, OH 45239 Check us out on FB: willoweventcenter

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Hotels

Number of Number of Rooms/ Meeting Suites Rooms

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

Theater Capacity

Classroom Capacity

Banquet Capacity

Maximum Reception Number of Capacity Booths

Features

NORTH/NORTHWEST C in cin n a t i M ar r io t t N o r t h a t U nio n C entre 618 9 Muhlhauser Rd • West Chester, OH 45069 • 513-874-7335 • cincinnatimarriottnorth.com

298/4

15

7,480

960

480

500

960

60

Two concierge levels, 24-hour executive facility and business center, high-speed internet,on-site restaurant, fitness center.

D o u b l eTr e e S u i t e s b y H il t o n H o t e l Cincinnati-Blue Ash 6300 E Kemper Rd • Sharonville, OH 45241 • 513-489-3636 • cincinnatiblueashsuites.doubletree.com

152 suites

12

2,100

200

200

160

200

20

All-suites Hilton hotel. Fitness room, business center, outdoor pool and award-winning restaurant.

Embassy Suites by Hilton Cincinnati Northeast Blue Ash 4554 Lake Forest Dr • Blue Ash, OH 45242 • 513-733-8900 • embassysuitesblueash.com

238 suites

6

3,800

450

250

400

500

Business center, fitness center, pool, restaurant.

Hueston Woods Lodge & Conference Center 5201 Lodge Rd • College Corner, OH 45003 • 513-664-3500 • huestonwoodslodge.com

92/37 cabins

6

3,404

375

150

250

240

Located in state park, complimentary Wi-Fi, exercise area, indoor and outdoor pools, 37 equipped cottages.

Best Western Premier Mariemont Inn 6880 Wooster Pike • Cincinnati, OH 45227 • 513-438-8633 • mariemontinn.com

45/1

2

2,500

100

200

175

200

On National Register of Historic Places. Restaurant on site, fitness center, business center.

Clarion Hotel Cincinnati North 3855 Hauck Rd • Cincinnati, OH 45241 • 513-563-8330 • choicehotels.com

273/1

9

6,000

632

250

500

667

36

Indoor pool, business center, fitness center, complimentary high-speed Internet.

Great Wolf Lodge 2501 Great Wolf Dr • Mason, OH 45040 • 513-229-5817 • greatwolf.com/mason

401 suites

15

9,847

1,036

450

600

1,094

56

Configurable meeting rooms, culinary quality and a team of experienced meeting professionals.

EAST/NORTHEAST

It’s not easy to narrow down a beautiful wedding venue that you can easily personalize. Luckily, we have these stunning Cincinnati locations to provide a customizable backdrop that matches your unique love story and wows your guests.

mchalescatering.com (859) 442-7776

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Tristate Meeting and Event Planner Guide 2020 Number of Number of Rooms/ Meeting Suites Rooms

Hotels

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

Theater Capacity

Classroom Capacity

Banquet Capacity

Maximum Reception Number of Capacity Booths

Hilton Garden Inn Cincinnati Blue Ash 5300 Cornell Rd • Blue Ash, OH 45242 • 513-4696900 • cincinnatiblueash.hgi.com

122

10

2,220

200

103

150

220

Quality Hotel Conference Center Cincinnati Blue Ash 5901 Pfeiffer Rd • Cincinnati, OH 45242 • 513-793-4500 • choicehotels.com

175/25

11

5,100

537

300

425

567

Holiday Inn & Suites Cincinnati-Eastgate 4501 Eastgate Blvd • Cincinnati, OH 45245 • 513-752-4400 • holidayinn.com

212/31

16

6,750

800

510

600

1,000

The Summit, a Dolce Hotel 5345 Medpace Way, Cincinnati, OH 45227 513-527-9900 thesummithotel.com

Features

2,220-square-foot ballroom and state-of-the-art meeting spaces for groups from 10 to 220. Business center, high-speed wireless Internet, on-site restaurant, lounge, indoor pool, fitness center.

30

AV equipment, business services, indoor pool and whirlpool, cocktail lounge, fitness center, on-site restaurant.

The Summit offers 32,600 square feet of meeting space, rooftop gardens, Nourishment Anytime, Anywhere™, a well-stocked library, art gallery and fitness center with yoga studio.

Number of Rooms/Suites

Number of Meeting Rooms

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

Theater Capacity

Classroom Capacity

Banquet Capacity

Reception Capacity

Maximum Number of Booths

239

19

5,743

320

250

330

380

38

NORTHERN KENTUCKY Cincinnati Marriott at RiverCenter 10 W RiverCenter Blvd • Covington, KY 41011 • 859-261-2900 • marriott.com

317/4

30

46,200

3,900

1,200

2,650

5,000

Restaurant, business center, indoor pool, high-speed wireless internet. Connected to Northern Kentucky Convention Center.

Embassy Suites by Hilton Cincinnati River Center 10 E River Center Blvd • Covington, KY 41011 • 859-261-8400 • embassysuitesrivercenter.com

227 suites

15

3,800

300

150

250

300

Business center, high-speed internet, banquet room with view of city.

Radisson Hotel Cincinnati Riverfront 668 W 5th St • Covington, KY 41011 • 859-491-1200 • radisson.com/covingtonky

216/4

7

6,000

500

300

400

400

Indoor pool, workout room, guest laundry, complimentary high-speed wireless internet, revolving restaurant.

Belterra Casino Resort 777 Belterra Dr • Florence, IN 47020 • 812-427-7777 • belterracasino.com

565/45

11

12,831

1,538

460

800

1,100

83

State-of-the-art sound and video equipment to handle executive functions and business meetings alike.

Hollywood Casino & Hotel 777 Hollywood Blvd • Lawrenceburg, IN 47025 • 888-2746797 • hollywoodindiana.com

295/5

3

10,000

700

375

400

500

90

F ive res t aur ant s, high -speed wireless Inter net , complimentary coffee station.

Rising Star Casino Resort 777 Rising Star Dr • Rising Sun, IN 47040 • 800-472-6311 x4 • risingstarcasino.com

294 including suites

6

12,000

1,140

350

750

650

Number of Meeting Rooms

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

Theater Capacity

Classroom Capacity

Banquet Capacity

American Sign Museum 1330 Monmouth Ave • Cincinnati, OH 45225 • 513-5416366 • americansignmuseum.org

3

20,000

175

90

175

350

30

Cincinnati's unique venue, home of the history of American signage from 1870-1970.

Anderson Center 7850 Five Mile Rd • Anderson Twp, OH 45230 • 513-688-8444 • andersoncenterevents.org

6

3,000

223

150

170

170

30

Theater, banquet room, conference room, community room, atrium and outdoor plaza.

Ault Park Pavilion • 5090 Observatory Ave • Cincinnati, OH 45208 • 513-221-2610 • premierparkevents.com

1

600

200

600

600

90

INDIANA

Meeting Facilities

Indoor pool, jacuzzi and sauna, fitness center, internet access.

Maximum Reception Number of Capacity Booths Features

OHIO

Backstage Event Center 625 Walnut St., Cincinnati, OH 45202 513-564-9111 backstagecincinnati.com Number Meeting Rooms

3 Bell Event Centre 4 4 4 Reading Rd • Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513-852-2787 • belleventcentre.com

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Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

Features gardens, overlooks, isolated coves and a cascading waterfall.

The Backstage Event Center is a unique loft style venue that features a front terrace overlooking downtown and a back patio with a marble fountain.

Theater Capacity

Classroom Capacity

Banquet Capacity

Reception Capacity

130

50

300

300

300

Maximum Number of Booths

Vaulted ceilings, stained glass windows, hand-painted murals, marble and terrazzo flooring.

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Holidayinn.com/cvg-eastgate

HOLIDAY INN & SUITES CINCINNATI EASTGATE voted

Best of the East

by Cincy Magazine for weddings

one and two bedroom suites 15,000 square feet of event space

4501 Eastgate Boulevard

Cincinnati, OH

|

(513) 752-4400

indoor heated pool fitness center full service restaurant

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Tristate Meeting and Event Planner Guide 2020 Number of Meeting Rooms

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

Theater Capacity

Classroom Capacity

Banquet Capacity

Belterra Park 6301 Kellogg Ave • Cincinnati, OH 45230 • 513-232-8000 • belterrapark. com

7

15,000

300

250

300

Blue Ocean Facilities 10250 Alliance Rd, Suite 226 • Cincinnati, OH 45242 • 513-842-6323 • blueoceanfacilities.com

4

1,600

70

50

BOOST 538 Reading Rd • Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513-621-8222 • boostmeeting.com

1

4,600

80

45

Brainstorm Creative Meeting and Event Space 815 Main St • Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513-421-0318 • brainstormevents.com

1

4,000

100

Butcher & Barrel 700 Race St. • Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513-954-8974 • thebutcherbarrel.com

1

1,500

Carlo & Johnny 9769 Montgomery Rd • Montgomery, OH 45242 • 513-936-8600 • jeffruby.com/carlo-johnny

5

The Center 115 E 5th St • Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513-824-7274 • thecentercincinnati. com

1

Cincinnati Art Museum 953 Eden Park Dr • Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513-639-2347 • cincinnatiartmuseum.org

Meeting Facilities

Maximum Reception Number of Capacity Booths Features

300

25

On the banks of the Ohio River, live racing Thursday through Sunday, 1,300 video lottery terminals.

70

Off-site meeting spaces created with collaboration and creativity in mind.

70

150

Tradtional and non-traditional furnishings, outdoor space, meeting supplies, AV, snacks and beverages.

24

72

130

4,000-square-foot open loft area, a private conference room, a full kitchen, a lounge area, and break-out rooms.

50

50

50

100

Varies

40

24

65

75

8

15,000

500

200

300

300

20 ot 30

9

7,783

324

324

160

350

Can host wedding ceremonies, receptions, rehearsal dinners, luncheons, parties, meetings, retreats and corporate events.

Cincinnati Club Building 30 Garfield Place, Suite 10 • Cincinnati, OH 45202 •513-2413464 • mchalescatering.com

4

4,100

500

300

300

300

Newly restored. Private club feel but membership not required.

Cincinnati Music Hall 1241 Elm St • Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513-744-3241 • cincinnatiarts.org

7

17,033

2,500

400

800

1,200

110

A national landmark. Ballroom features barrel-vaulted ceiling, hardwood floor, elegant bar and decorative mirrors.

Cincinnati State Technical & Community College 3520 Central Parkway • Cincinnati, OH 45223 • 513-569-4123 • cincinnatistate. edu

9

5,000

400

100

224

224

54

Features Wi-Fi, multimedia and computer presentation equipment. Catering through the Midwest Culinary Institute.

Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden 3400 Vine St • Cincinnati, OH 45220 • 513-4873481 • cincinnatizoo.org

6

4,500

400

150

330

400

40

AV capabilities in addition to multiple outdoor venues, including animal exhibits. Special animal visits available.

Cintas Center 1624 Herald Ave • Cincinnati, OH 45207 • 513-745-3428 • cintascenter. com

5

11,760

770

450

650

770

90

On-site catering, state-of-the-art technical capabilities and free parking. Llocated at Xavier University.

The Conference Center at the Daniel Drake Center 151 W. Galbraith Rd West Pavilion • Cincinnati, OH 45216 • 513-418-2596 • Fax: 513-418-3959 • uchealth.com/ danieldrakecenter/conference/

11

3,049

234

144

250

200

40

Catering, audiovisual support and exceptional customer service. Competitive rates.

Contemporary Arts Center 44 E 6th St • Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513-345-8415 • contemporaryartscenter.org

6

3,500

210

65

210

350

Cooper Creek Event Center 4040 Cooper Rd • Blue Ash, OH 45241 • 513-745-8596 • coopercreekblueash.com

5

7,000

500

261

350

320

34

Overlooks the scenic Blue Ash Golf Course, specializes in social and corporate events.

Dave & Buster’s 11775 Commons Dr • Springdale, OH 45246 • 513-671-5501 • daveandbusters.com

8

200

120

200

250

25

The entire facility can be rented for an exclusive close-out event. Private rooms also available.

Duke Energy Convention Center 525 Elm St • Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513-419-7300 • Fax: 513-419-7327 • duke-energycenter.com

39

195,320

11,700

12,550

12,550

12,550

964

The largest grand ballroom in Cincinnati with more than 39,500 square feet. Exhibit hall can be split into three rooms.

EnterTRAINment Junction 7379 Squire Court • West Chester, OH 45069 • 513-898-8000 • entertrainmentjunction.com

3

4,000

300

105

200

300

50

Access to train displays and escape room. AV capabilities and free parking.

T h e F ar m 2 3 9 A n d er s o n F er r y R d • Cincinnati, OH 45238 • 513-922-7020 • theplacetohaveaparty.com

3

9,000

200

400

600

550

15

Three rooms with large dance floors. Popular Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday evening dinner buffet.

Full Throttle Adrenaline Park & Event Center • 11725 Commons Drive • Cincinnati, OH 45246 • 513-341-5278 • gofullthrottle.com

3

1,600

200+

200+

200+

Great American Ball Park 100 Joe Nuxhall Way • Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513-765-7237 • reds.com

16

10,500

250

325

550

104

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500

Unique décor, AV capabilities, private bar, stage and many set-up possibilities. Access to an array of audio/video and floral options Downtown location, spacious ballroom with hardwood floors, direct view of Fountain Square.

Downtown accessibility. Galleries for touring, including the Unmuseum.

Team building opportunities with race track and private rooms for meetings. 70

Unique meeting space inside home of the Cincinnati Reds.

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GATHER WITH ART From board retreats and executive meetings to cocktail parties and bridal brunches – our experienced events team can handle it. With art-filled spaces to accommodate groups of 12 to 200 and catering provided by award-winning Metropole, let 21c provide an inspiring backdrop for your next gathering. > For more information, visit 21cCincinnati.com

609 Walnut Street, Cincinnati, Ohio 513.578.6600 | 21cCincinnati.com

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Tristate Meeting and Event Planner Guide 2020 Number of Meeting Rooms

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

Theater Capacity

Classroom Capacity

Banquet Capacity

J a c k C a s i n o 10 0 0 B r o a d w a y S t • Cincinnati, Ohio 45202 •513-252-0777 • jackentertainment.com

13

19,000

1,946

1,188

1,200

Jeff Ruby's Steakhouse 700 Walnut St • Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513-784-1200 • jeffruby.com/cincinnati

2

Living Room 2368 Norwood Ave • Cincinnati, OH 45212 • 513-531-5030 • hellolivingroom. com

4

1,078

100

35

35

50

Meeting spaces for team-building activities, creative workshops, training, ideation sessions, team celebrations and more.

Manor House Banquet & Conference Center 7440 Mason-Montgomery Rd • Mason, OH 45040 • 513-459-0177 • manorhouseohio. com

15

8,900

1,000

700

650

1,000

Multiple room sizes and breakout options. Outdoor spaces. In-house chef. Complimentary parking. Hotels nearby.

Meier's Wine Cellars 6955 Plainfield Rd • Cincinnati, OH 45236 • 513-794-4388 • meierswinecellars.com

2

1,200

60

60

60

60

Miami Valley Gaming 6000 state Route 63 • Lebanon, OH 45036 • 513-934-7670 • miamivalleygaming.com

4

12,270

1,008

550

440

1,500

Nathanael Greene Lodge 6394 Wesselman Rd • Cincinnati, OH 45248 • 513-598-3100

3

3,408

200

120

100

200

Fifteen minutes from downtown Cincinnai and in a serene wooded setting, 50-foot cathedral windows and stone fireplace.

National Underground Railroad Freedom Center 50 E Freedom Way • Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513-333-7739 • freedomcenter.org

4

300

120

250

250

Two floors of spaces with private terraces that overlook the Ohio River.

Nicola's 1420 Sycamore St • Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513-721-6200 • nicolasotr.com

5

75

75

12

135

5

Award-winning food, wine, private and public spaces, professional service.

Oasis Golf Club & Conference Center 902 Loveland-Miamiville Rd • Loveland, OH 45140 • 513-583-8383 • oasisconferencecenter.com

9

2,000

1,700

1,350

2,500

125

Free parking, professional event planning, free wireless internet and festive menus and décor.

Meeting Facilities

Maximum Reception Number of Capacity Booths Features

1,900

120

50

20,000

Two large, configurable venues divisible into as many as 11 rooms. Also features a usable outdoor event space. Live nightly entertainment and impeccable attention to detail.

Tasting room, event space, garden and retail store. Four spaces with different amenities. Options include private bars, AV packages and a dance floor.

50

T H E

Backstage E V E N T

C E N T E R

Unique, rustic-modern decor with city views & outdoor terrace seating Downtown Cincinnati 625 Walnut Street backstagecincinnati.com Katie Swantko

Sales & Events Manager email kswantko@dinetrg.com cell 513.633.0559 106

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Number of Meeting Rooms

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

Theater Capacity

Classroom Capacity

Banquet Capacity

The Oscar Event Center 5440 E Dixie Hwy • Fairfi eld, OH 45014 • 513-674-6055 • junglejims.com/the-oscar-event-center

3

10,000

750

300

525

750

80

Full-service venue, an in-house bakery, international menus, flexible floor plans, free parking and an experienced team.

Paul Brown Stadium 1 Paul Brown Stadium • Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513-455-4830 • bengals.com

14

35,000

600

300

700

1,000

60

Non-game day events in sleek NFL stadium. ARAMARK catering.

The Phoenix 812 Race St • Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513-721-8901 • thephx.com

7

4,752

575

250

400

500

30

Experienced staff will assist with planning your special corporate meeting, event or party.

The Precinct 311 Delta Ave • Cincinnati, OH 45226 • 513-321-5454 • jeffruby. com/precinct

3

70

40

85

85

T h e R o b er t s C e n t r e 12 3 G an o R d • Wilmington, OH 45177 • 800-654-7036 • robertscentre.com

12

60,000

4,600

2,200

4,600

2,200

350

Max & Erma’s restaurant, wireless internet and an outdoor patio. Free parking.

The Ronald Reagan Lodge Banquet & Conference Center at Voice of America MetroPark 7850 VOA Park Dr • West Chester, OH 45069 • 513-867-5835 • yourmetroparks.net

6

3,700

250

125

250

260

20

Multi-room facility with gazebo that looks overlooks 35-acre lake. Beautiful park setting. Cater-only facility.

Savannah Center 5533 Chappell Crossing Blvd • West Chester, OH 45069 • 513-8604142 • savannahcenter.com

11

16,328

1,200

850

900

1,200

84

Advanced technology and audio and visual equipment. Heated and cooled by geothermal technology.

Sharonville Convention Center 11355 Chester Rd • Sharonville, OH 45246 • 513-771-774 4 • Fax: 513-772-574 5 • sharonvilleconventioncenter.com

19

20,000

2,395

1,437

1,408

2,650

144

Located at I-75 and I-275 in northern Cincinnati. Free Wi-Fi. Four ballrooms. 1,100 on-site free parking spaces.

Stir 7813 Ted Gregory Lane • Cincinnati, OH 45242 • 513-833-4485 • stircincy.com

1

3,000

55

55

55

125

Meeting Facilities

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Maximum Reception Number of Capacity Booths Features

Frequently recognized as having Cincinnati’s best steaks, seafood and service.

Comfortable, casual seating inside, outdoor patio, ample parking and media system. Located in Old Montgomery.

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Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

Theater Capacity

Classroom Capacity

Banquet Capacity

Taft Museum of Art 316 Pike St • Cincinnati, OH 45202 • 513-241-0343 • Fax: 241-7762 • taftmuseum.org

3

2,700

200

200

200

200

20-30

Available for meeting, private board dinners, team-building events and cocktail receptions.

TriHealth Fitness and Health Pavilion 6200 Pfeiffer Rd • Montgomery, OH 45242 • 513985-0900 • trihealthpavilion.com

3

1,375

100

65

70

3,120

16

Meeting rooms include conference speaker phone, LCD overhead projector, DVD and CD/CVS player, on-site catering.

Vinoklet Winery & Restaurant 11069 Colerain Ave • Cincinnati, OH 45252 • 513-385-9309 • vinokletwines.com

3

2,400

75

75

750

750

The WEB Extreme Entertainment 7172 Cincinnati-Dayton Rd • West Chester, OH 45069 • 513-860-2882 • funattheweb.com

8

2,000

350

150

350

600

Meeting Facilities

Maximum Reception Number of Capacity Booths Features

Banquet and dinner packages for private parties, corporate events and wedding receptions. 30

Electric go-karts, laser tag, bowling and glow golf.

Formerly Wunderland Banquet Hall, Willow Event Center was completely renovated in 2019 under new ownership, and is the perfect spot for everything from corporate seminars to wedding ceremonies & receptions. The venue holds just under 300 guests and offers an outdoor deck with gazebo as well as a few private suites for clients.

Willow Event Center 7881 Colerain Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45239 513-931-2261 willoweventcenter.com Number Meeting Rooms

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

Theater Capacity

Classroom Capacity

Banquet Capacity

Reception Capacity

Maximum Number of Booths

1

5,000

350

250

300

370

25

KENTUCKY Baker-Bird Winery 4465 Augusta Chatham Rd • Augusta KY 41002 • 859-620-4965 • bakerbirdwinery.com

4

Braxton Brewer y 27 W. Seventh St. • Covington, KY 41011 • braxtonbrewing.com

2

2,824

200

200

150

1,300

15

Historic grounds that are part of the Civil War heritage trail and on the national historic registry. AV equipment, full bar, multiple room configurations.

An amazing even vent t begins with a spectacular view iew w... ...

and ends as a truly memorable experienc xperience e.

Private Dining with a View! • Corporate Meetings • Fundraisers • Wedding Receptions Rehearsal Dinners • Holiday Parties • Birthday & Anniversary Celebrations • And More! Mention this ad and we’ll waive your room rental fee! Contact The Metropolitan Club for information: Melanie Sandy, Director of Catering: 859-392-2462 or msandy@metropolitanclub.net Sydney Meyer, Catering Sales Manager: 859-392-2466 or smeyer@metropolitanclub.net

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Number of Meeting Rooms

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

Theater Capacity

Classroom Capacity

Banquet Capacity

The Carnegie 1028 Scott Blvd • Covington, KY 41011 • 859-491-2030 • thecarnegie.com

4

2,400

447

200

150

500

Drees Pavilion at Devou Park 790 Park Lane • Covington, KY 41011 • 859-431-2577 • dreespavilion.com

3

5,940

300

225

300

300

Nestled in tranquil park setting overlooking Cincinnati skyline.

GameWorks 1 Levee Way, Suite 2130 • Newport, K Y 41071 • 859-392-2373 • gameworks.com

3

975

120

120

120

Located at Newport on the Levee, GameWorks offers a fun and casual environment for all groups.

Gardens of Park Hills 1622 Dixie Hwy • Park Hills, KY 41011 • 859-392-8268 • mchalescatering.com

2

6,500

500

300

320

500

45

Banquet rooms with complete packages. Craft beer bar and late night snacks of flatbreads included.

The Grand and Pinnacle Ballrooms 6 E. Fifth St. • Covington, KY 41011 • 859-442-7776 • mchalescatering.com

2

6,500

400

160

350

350

40

Ballroom with 24-foor ceilings with a mezzanine level for cocktail hour

Hofbrauhaus 200 E Third St • Newport, K Y 41071 • 859-491-7200 • hofbrauhausnewport.com

2

350

50

750

1,120

6

Large facility with brewery, beer hall and beer garden.

The Madison Event Center 700 Madison Ave • Covington, KY 41011 • 859-261-1117 • Fax: 859-655-7855 • thecovingtonmadison.com

6

400

152

375

375

30

Customizable events with inviting, casual, stress-free environment.

Meeting Facilities

6,850

The Metropolitan Club 50 E. RiverCenter Blvd, Suite 1900, Covington, KY 41011 859-491-2400 Fax: 859-491-5423 metropolitanclub.net

15

Five galleries and a newly renovated turn-of-the-century theater that is fully equipped with lights, sound and projection.

Metropolitan Club is a full-service venue with a spectacular view of Downtown Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky and a variety of menus to fit your needs.

Number Meeting Rooms

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

Theater Capacity

Classroom Capacity

Banquet Capacity

Reception Capacity

Maximum Number of Booths

9

3,300

300

140

220

500

22

Newport Aquarium 1 Aquarium Way • Newport, K Y 41071 • 859-815-1466 • newportaquarium.com

3

6,000

Newport on the Levee Community Center 1 Levee Way • Newport, KY 41071 • 859-8151384 • newportonthelevee.com

2

2,000

250

130

340

300

32/73

75

Views of the Cincinnati and Ohio River in a unique, contemporary and elegant setting against a backdrop of exotic fish. Carpeted; rooms with tables, chairs and A/V capabilities. Private restrooms.

75

Newport Syndicate 18 E Fifth St, Newport, KY 41073 859-491-8000 Fax: 859-655-3315 newportsyndicate.com

Pompilios Restaurant 600 Washington Ave • Newport, KY 41071 • 859-581-3065 • pompilios.com

Maximum Reception Number of Capacity Booths Features

Grand ballroom with a large stage, three drop screens, and built-in projection make it perfect for a presentation. After the meeting we can prepare lunch, dinner or a cockail reception.

Number Meeting Rooms

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

Theater Capacity

Classroom Capacity

Banquet Capacity

Reception Capacity

Maximum Number of Booths

6

8,00

600

500

450

700

50+

2

40

Rotolo 1 Levee Way, Suite 1112, Newport, KY 41071 859-652-7250 Fax: 859-652-7269 rotolobowling.com Number Meeting Rooms

Largest Meeting Room Sq. Ft.

Indoor eating space as well as an outdoor area complete with a bar and activities like bocce ball, cornhole can be made available.

100

Rotolo features 12 main lanes, four private lanes and an indoor bocce court, along with two large patios and two bars. We also offer full AV capabilities for events and meetings.

Theater Capacity

3

Classroom Capacity

Banquet Capacity

Reception Capacity

Maximum Number of Booths

75

800

800

Varies

INDIANA Chateau Pomije 25043 Jacobs Rd • Guilford, IN 47022 • 812-623-8004 • cpwinery.com

2

5,000

350

350

375

350

25

Working winery with 70-acre vineyard. On-site food preparation.

Lawrenceburg Event Center 91 Walnut St • Lawrenceburg, IN 47025 • 812-539-8888 • thelawrenceburgeventcenter.com

17

18,000

1,300

1080

800

800

88

Can host a wedding, business meeting, reunion or any special occasion.

Starlight Reception Hall 10265 U.S. 50 • Aurora, IN 47001 • 812-926-7600 • starlightreception.com

1

6,000

600

500

450

400

30

Full kitchen and bar, 1,000 parking spaces, dance floor, fountain, waterfall, outdoor gazebo, ceremony and picnic space.

Walhill Farm 857 Six Pine Ranch Rd • Batesville, IN 47006 • 812-934-2600 • walhillfarm.com

4

12,000

550

300

550

550

40

250-acre farm with 26 acres of forest, 10 acres of gardens, three large fish ponds and 190 acres of pasture.

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Business Calendar

APRIL 2020 Economic Forecast Breakfast with Brian Beaulieu Clermont Chamber of Commerce

April 9

Brian Beaulieu, executive director of the Institute for Trend Research, will speak on what he sees happening in the coming economic year. 7:30-10 a.m. Members $75, non-members $95. Crossroads East Side, 4450 Eastgate S. Drive, Cincinnati. 513-576-5002, clermontchamber.com.

Law Enforcement Appreciation Banquet Clermont Chamber of Commerce

2020 Legislative Appreciation Breakfast Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce

The Clermont Chamber of Commerce honors the county’s police with this annual dinner. The event raises thousands of dollars each year for the law enforcement scholarship at the University of Cincinnati Clermont College. 5:30-8:30 p.m. $75. Oasis Conference Center, 902 Loveland-Miamiville Road, Loveland. 513-576-5002, clermontchamber.com.

Meet with the Northern Kentucky Legislative Caucus and celebrate its successes during the annual Legislative Appreciation Breakfast. 7:15-9 a.m. Members $35, non-members $40. Hilton Cincinnati Airport, 7373 Turfway Road, Florence, Ky. nkychamber.com.

May 20

May 22

Don’t see your event? Visit cincymagazine.com to add it to our online calendar for free.

Eggs ‘N Issues: Turfway Redevelopment Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce

April 21

Kevin Flanery, president of Churchill Downs Racetrack, will discuss the planned redevelopment of Turfway Park and its impact on the region during this special breakfast. 7:30-9 a.m. Members $30, nonmembers $50. Receptions Banquet & Conference Center – South, 1379 Donaldson Road, Erlanger, Ky. nkychamber.com.

MAY 2020 Leadercast Cincinnati East Clermont Chamber of Commerce

May 7

The Clermont Chamber of Commerce invites area professionals to work on their leadership skills during this live simulcast of the world’s largest one-day leadership conference. This year’s theme is Positive Disruption. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. $99. Crossroads East Side, 4450 Eastgate S. Drive, Cincinnati. 513576-5002, clermontchamber.com. The Everest Award West Chester Liberty Chamber Alliance

May 7

The annual Everest Award honors area leaders who have made an impact on the Interstate 75 corridor. This year’s honorees are Jeff Beckham, Kingsgate Logistics; Jim Bonaminio, Jungle Jim’s International Market; and Bill Schaefer, Clark Schaefer Hackett. 6 p.m. Ticket prices TBA. Cincinnati Marriott North, 6189 Muhlhauser Road, West Chester. thechamberalliance.com.

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Best in Business Directory

T

hose who run or manage businesses know that sometimes you need some help. As the Tristate’s magazine for business professionals, we are in a unique position that enables us to meet and interact with some of the best business service providers in the region. This list gives you a taste of the region’s best business services, and serves as a resource for those looking for assistance. Make sure to visit CincyMagazine.com to see exclusive online Best in Business content.

Accounting GBQ 513-871-3033 gbq.com VonLehman 800-887-0437 vlcpa.com

Chambers/Economic development African American Chamber of Greater Cincinnati & Northern Kentucky 513-751-9900 african-americanchamber.com Blue Ash Business Association babusiness.org The Chamber of Commerce Serving Middletown, Monroe & Trenton 513-422-4551 thechamberofcommerce.org Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber 513-579-3100 cincinnatichamber.com Clermont Chamber of Commerce 513-576-5000 clermontchamber.com

Air Travel

Clermont Department of Economic Development 513-732-7825 clermontcountyohio.biz

CVG 859-767-3151 cvgairport.com

Hispanic Chamber Cincinnati USA 513-979-6999 hispanicchambercincinnati.com

Audio Visual

Lebanon Chamber of Commerce 513-932-1100 lebanonchamber.org

ITA Audio Visual Solutions 800-899-8877 ita.com SpotOn Productions 513-779-4223 spoton.productions

Mason Deerfield Chamber 513-336-0125 madechamber.org

BAnking

Milford Miami Township Chamber 513-831-2411 milfordmiamitownship.com

Commerce Bank 800-453-2265 commercebank.com

Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce 859-578-8800 nkychamber.com

Commonwealth Bank 859-746-9000 cbandt.com

West Chester Liberty Chamber Alliance 513-777-3600 thechamberalliance.com

BUsiness Law

Western Economic Council westerneconomiccouncil.com

William E. Hesch Law Firm 513-731-6601 heschlaw.com Business Resources Cincinnati Better Business Bureau 513-421-3015 bbb.org/cincinnati/

PNC Financial Advisors/W Mgmt. 513-651-8714 pnc.com Western & Southern 866-832-7719 westernsouthern.com Health Superior Dental 937-438-0283 superiordental.com IT Services CMIT Solutions 800-399-2648 cmitsolutions.com Law firms Calfee, Halter & Griswold LLP 513-693-4880 calfee.com Lyons & Lyons 513-777-2222 lyonsandlyonslaw.com Taft Stettinius & Hollister 513-381-2838 taftlaw.com Wood Herron & Evans 513-241-2324 whe-law.com Professional development Gateway Community & Technical College 859-441-4500 gateway.kctcs.edu Great Oaks Campuses 513-771-8840 greatoaks.com The Haile/US Bank College of Business at Northern Kentucky University 859-572-5165 nku.edu/academics/cob

Construction

Indiana Wesleyan University 866-468-6498 indwes.edu

EGC Construction 859-442-6500 egcconst.com

Sinclair Community College - Mason 513-339-1212 sinclair.edu

Financial Management

Union Institute & University 800-861-6400 myunion.edu

Charles Schwab Fort Mitchell 859-308-1425 schwab.com/fortmitchell

Interested in having your company included? Please contact Publisher Eric Harmon at publisher@cincymagazine.com or 513-297-6205. w w w.

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Love Cincy

Jon Reynolds, Photographer

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HEALTHY KIDS DAY Saturday, April 25 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. Families spend time together to prepare for an active healthy summer. Free to the Community: Includes climbing wall, bounce houses, obstacle course, fitness classes, face painting, visits with farm animals, wagon rides and more!

Presenting Sponsors:

Parky’s Farm 10073 Daly Road Cincinnati, OH 45231

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Welcome to the Preferred Life

Where meetings and events are a work of art The Summit Hotel offers an inspirational environment to bring people together for unparalleled meetings and events. The Summit features over 20,000 ft² among 19 indoor flexible meeting and banquet rooms, located on multiple floors with convenient access. Meeting facilities will exceed planner and attendee expectations with built-in audio-visual components and insightful design. Madisonville Ballroom, complemented by 11,600 ft² rooftop garden and terrace space, is the perfect setting for large meetings and social events. The Summit’s inspiring meeting and event space provides a blank canvas open to infinite possibilities to plan celebrations and unforgettable meetings.

5345 MEDPACE WAY, CINCINNATI, OH 45227 P: (513) 527-9900 · WWW.THESUMMITHOTEL.COM summit_RDP.indd 1

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