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Y O UR C EN TE R F OR I NS P I RAT I ON Photo credit: Bruce Crippen

Get Inspired!

Bruce Metzger first brought his love for vintage shopping to the public in the mid 1980s, when he began producing a local, seasonal show of antiques and collectibles. But what started as a side business quickly became Metzger’s full-time career. Eventually, he inserted an “Art Deco” themed show into his annual schedule aptly entitled the 20th Century Review. The show was renamed 20th Century Cincinnati in 1998 and has been held at the Sharonville Convention Center since 2002. Today, vendors travel from all over the country to showcase their vintage art, architecture, furnishings, and fashion in the two-day event. “The mix of radical design and nostalgic pop culture memorabilia on display at 20th Century Cincinnati creates an energy that can barely be contained,” Metzger says. These types of 20th century modern design events are usually few and far between, with most national shows held on the East or West Coasts. But 20th Century Cincinnati allows those living in the Midwest to view and purchase vintage modern design directly from dealers, designers, and collectors. “One doesn’t even have to be involved with this tight knit community of collectors to appreciate their enthusiasm for the subject they love,” Metzger says. Sharonville Convention Center’s contemporary architecture provides a cohesive backdrop for the vintage modern materials sold at the show, and the environmental consciousness of vintage buyers aligns with the convention center’s LEED status and eco-friendly outlook. 20th Century Cincinnati holds their annual event every February at Sharonville Convention Center.

Contact Lisa Hodge to reserve your date 513.326.6465 • lhodge@cityofsharonville.com 11355 Chester Road • Cincinnati, OH 45246 www.sharonvilleconventioncenter.com Now Open!


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BREWERIES CLASS OF 2020 Our beer yearbook introduces you to 20 superlative purveyors of suds, highlights six folks who make the beer world go round, and quizzes you on what all those brewery buildings used to be. Bottoms up!

NO DOUBT

P. 66

With all the moves the Reds have made this offseason, there was some question whether Nick Senzel would ďŹ nd his place on the roster. But persuading people who underestimate or overlook him is something of a Senzel superpower.

FROM CHINA, WITH LOVE

P. 70

Adopting a child from another culture comes with challenges. But what happens when you take that child back to where it all began? It’s a humbling, overwhelming, unforgettable experience. BY ELLIOT GROSSMAN

BY CHAD DOTSON P H O T O G R A P H BY A A R O N M . CO N WAY

A P R I L 2 0 2 0 C I N C I N N AT I M A G A Z I N E . C O M 5


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12 / LETTER FROM THE EDITOR 14 / FEEDBACK

FRONTLINES 17 / DISPATCH

RADAR

30 / NECESSITIES Beer accessories

32 / STYLE COUNSEL Mia Carruthers’s comfortable, classic vibe

Cincinnati State adds bachelor’s degrees

18 / SPEAK EASY

38 / HOMEGROWN

18 / MUSIC

FOOD NEWS

36 / REAL ESTATE A gorgeous former carriage house in Hyde Park

Midwest Futures author Phil Christman

ON OUR SITE

Patrick Dewenter’s Shorthand Craftsman frames things up

The Who finally return

18 / ANTICIPATION METER How we feel about what’s next

20 / SPORTS Four kinds of Opening Day Reds fans

22 / POP LIFE Mural artist Tenzing

22 / BOOKS Intisar Khanani’s YA fantasy novel, Thorn

24 / DR. KNOW Your QC questions answered

An extra serving of our outstanding dining coverage.

COLUMNS

40 / LIVING IN CIN Why Teens for Decency had a rally BY J AY G I L B E R T

44 / PERSON OF INTEREST Donna Spiegel and the Conductive Learning Center

116 / HOT PLATE 20 Brix, Milford

116 / TABLESIDE WITH… Derrick Braziel, Pata Roja Taqueria Sitwell’s Act II, Clifton

118 / FIELD NOTES Fabulous Food Made Easy, by Gail Lennig

128 / CINCY OBSCURA

121 / DINING GUIDE

Repairing books at the Preservation Lab

Greater Cincinnati restaurants: A selective list

BY KATIE COBURN

DINE

ON THE COVER

Great Tang, West Chester

FOLLOW US

114 / TRADE SECRETS

Decoding our civic DNA, from history to politics to personalities.

118 / FINE DIVING

BY LISA MURTHA

112 / DINING OUT

CITY NEWS

HOME + LIFE

Tracking what’s new in local real estate, artisans, and storefronts.

photograph by AARON M. CONWAY

@CincinnatiMag

Restaurants using locally made ceramics

Cincinnati Magazine

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SPORTS

Insight and analysis on the Reds and FC Cincinnati.

Smoked pork katsu from The Littlefield, Northside

CINCINNATIMAGAZINE.COM PODCAST

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PAGE 97 SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

SENIOR LIV ING Staying Active While Giving Back Volunteering can provide a social outlet for seniors that’s beneficial both mentally and physically. —Kayla Gross

V

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OLUNTEERING AFTER retirement has proven to be mentally, and sometimes even physically, beneficial. Getting out and participating gives retirees a sense of purpose and the ability to give back to their communities in a meaningful way, says Gerontologist Suzanne Norman, PhD, of Geropsychology Consultants, Inc. “The social aspect of helping out in the community can decrease anxiety and depression,” says Norman, as well as introduce seniors to new social groups, all while making a positive contribution. Helping out within the community doesn’t have to be a grand act. Even small gestures such as helping schoolkids with homework or socializing kittens can make an impact. Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center is always looking for weekly volunteers to assist in easing the stress of patient children by playing or reading with them, helping them finish school assignments, or by bringing toys to outpatient clinics. Animal shelters, such as the Animal Adoption Fund in Hamilton, need volunteers to socialize cats, walk

dogs, or work the front desk, among other tasks. Working at events is a great way to stay physically active. The Cincinnati Reds offer volunteer opportunities selling raffle tickets at games for Split the Pot, during which volunteers are expected to work up until the seventh inning but are then dismissed to enjoy the game. If the arts are more your speed, Cincinnati Ballet and the Cincinnati Arts Association hire volunteers to usher and greet patrons at each performance. For the outdoorsy types, Gorman Heritage Farm offers an array of unique volunteer opportunities available to anyone willing: Tend to the farm’s bees as a beekeeper, share your knowledge as an educator with elementary-aged students visiting the grounds, or garden with other like-minded gardening buffs. Krohn Conservatory has opportunities allowing volunteers to monitor the

doors to the butterfl y garden (including catching butterflies when they escape). The vast number of volunteer opportunities in Cincinnati means it’s easy to accommodate seniors’ availability. Many organizations offer both full- and part-time positions, including the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County, which seeks both at almost every branch. Seniors can help with children’s events or work behind the scenes, placing returned books back on shelves and processing book returns and holds. Volunteering in retirement can be incredibly beneficial to a person’s mental and physical well-being. Becoming a retiree can be a difficult transition for some people, but volunteering can help ease that stress, Norman says. In the Cincinnati area alone, there are a wide variety of opportunities to meet anyone’s area of interest. So what are you waiting for? A P R I L 2 0 2 0 C I N C I N N AT I M A G A Z I N E . C O M 9 7

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CONTRIBUTORS

ELLIOT GROSSMAN

MY MOST MEMORABLE BEER EPIPHANY C AME IN 1989 IN A DUBLIN PUB , DURING my first visit to Ireland. Guinness stout was as synonymous with the country as leprechauns and “Danny Boy,” but I’d tried a glass once in Cincinnati and decided it was terrible. Near the end of the trip, I ordered a pint of Guinness in the town where it’s brewed just to check it off of my to-do list. I recall the sound of angels singing above me after a few sips, although it’s possible that didn’t really happen. The cool black beer was smoother and creamier than anything I’d ever had, and the bartender formed a small shamrock in the head with the final drips from the tap. I instantly connected with generations of Irish who had enjoyed Guinness in Dublin. I was home. I tried to replicate the experience later, of course, and Arnold’s was the only downtown bar I could find that consistently had Guinness stout on tap and knew how to pour a pint correctly. Arnold’s was always full of mystery and magic back then, especially when owner Jim Tarbell held court. An earlier beer epiphany came during college, when we’d often drive to nearby St. Louis for weekend fun. One of our favorite goofs was taking a free tour of the massive AnheuserBusch brewery complex south of downtown, which ended with 30 minutes of beer tasting, including exotic brands like Michelob and Bud Light. The city revolved around that company economically and culturally. Years later, probably at Arnold’s, I learned that Cincinnati had once surpassed St. Louis as a brewery town, but our brands never really recovered after Prohibition—while Budweiser became the “king of beers.” Fast forward several decades, though, and Cincinnati is again a brewery town. In fact, we have 53 craft breweries in the region now, with another opening soon—that’s according to this month’s cover story (see page 52). They’ve become economic development engines for their communities and neighborhoods in addition to great places to meet friends and feel at home. And occasionally, when you taste the perfect pint, hear angels sing.

J O H N F OX

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

1 2 C I N C I N N AT I M A G A Z I N E . C O M A P R I L 2 0 2 0

ILLUSTR ATIO N BY L A R S LEE TA RU

Former Cincinnati Enquirer reporter and editor Elliot Grossman shares the story of his daughter’s adoption in “From China, With Love” (page 70). He details the journey from his daughter’s adoption to their emotional return to China on a heritage tour. “I wrote the story to show that adoption can be a wonderful way to create a family,” he says. Grossman also wants to foster his daughter’s connection to her birth country. “As she’s learning, so are we.”

EMI VILLAVICENCIO Cincinnati’s dynamic evolution into a craft beer landmark, with breweries repurposing historic buildings, inspired Senior Art Director Emi Villavicencio’s vibrant collage illustration (page 58). “It’s been really fun to deep dive into something that I don’t have as much knowledge about,” says Villavicencio, who’s not a beer drinker herself. Villavicencio’s creative profession sets her apart in her family: her parents and sister work in the medical field.

RODNEY WILSON A freelancer and editor for Hobby Farms magazine, Rodney Wilson won’t turn down a meal—especially if he gets to write about it afterward. For every review, Wilson values a second opinion. So when he went to 20 Brix (“Sticking Around,” page 116), he took the opportunity to celebrate an anniversary. “It’s 100 percent always my wife,” he says. “I take her experience and balance it against mine when I’m putting it into words.”


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FEEDBACK BACHELOR’S DEGREES ASSOCIATE’S DEGREES CERTIFICATES SHORT-TERM CREDENTIALS Whether you want to be one of the first to receive a Cincinnati

Dr. Know is Jay Gilbert, weekday afternoon deejay on 92.5 FM The Fox. Submit your questions about the city’s peculiarities at drknow@cincinnati magazine.com

 DR. KNOW

the years but still with us. Next time, walk around to 632 Race St., look up, and you’ll see the concrete-embossed name of the Lyric Piano Company. Since that firm’s demise in 1937, several storefronts have come and gone, including Burger Chef. Now go back to the painted sign at the rear and notice that the doorway is only about four feet tall. Even the bricked-up windows are at knee level. How such low portals served Lyric Piano is a mystery, but any Burger Chef transactions there would have been suitable only for customers like Peter Dinklage. Unfortunately, answers about the sign’s provenance and persistence are lost to the mists and mayonnaise of time.

ON THE FLIP SIDE I read with a smile of interest your [March issue Dr. Know column] regarding the “Burger Chef” sign [on College Street, behind 632 Race St.].... I found your article amusing, but just a bit inaccurate. The building was built in 1919, and...the terra-cotta (not concrete) facade still displays [the Lyric Piano Company] name. You were correct that it remained in business until 1937 and since transitioned function and ownership to many retail companies. From our research, Burger Chef moved into the building in 1975. Before we bought it, the last occupant was Hardee’s, who [acquired the burger chain in the early ’80s].... The back door onto College [went] into the kitchen area— there was no service window! We bought it from them in 2008 [after being vacant for well over a decade] and renovated it for our house and office.

Q+ A

I’m worried about the controversy over renaming McMicken Avenue. I don’t defend Charles McMicken’s owning of slaves, but I fear how far these corrections might go. Is there an official list of Cincinnati streets that face historical cancellation? —WHERE THE STREETS HAVE BAD NAMES DEAR BAD:

Why is there a large “Burger Chef” sign in an alley behind Race Street? Was there some kind of rear walk-up window there? Was that kind of thinking an example of why the restaurant chain went bust long ago? Why is such a huge sign still there in that crummy little alley?

—GRUBBY GRUB

DEAR GRUBBY:

Your four questions remind us of the season’s approaching Passover Seder and its traditional Four Questions. “Why is this alley different from all other alleys?” isn’t as erudite, but the Doctor shall proceed. You were not in an alley. You were on College Street, ravaged by

We are all flawed. Naming a street after any member of the human species will always invite danger. Lest we forget: Pete Rose Way. Also consider the wholesale cancellation—and later rehabilitation— of everything German during World War I. Which other Cincinnati street names could be targeted someday? The Doctor knows of no official list, but several candidates suggest themselves: Should Gest Street continue to honor the surveyor whose certified measurements of Cincinnati turned out to be wrong by almost five acres? Should Broadway forever share a name with New York’s most famous thoroughfare, nicknamed “The Great White Way?” St. Clair Avenue in Mt. Healthy salutes the general/governor who named our city, but this man also led a battle against American Indians that killed entire families while simultaneously suffering a humiliating defeat. We can’t even count the prominent

3 0 C I N C I N N AT I M A G A Z I N E . C O M M A R C H 2 0 2 0

State Bachelor’s degree, save on the first two years of a transfer degree, or start your career as soon as possible, Cincinnati State is a great fit for your future. Schedule your visit today!

ILLUSTR ATIO N S BY L A R S LEE TA RU

—DAVE COLLINS & SARAH RICE, VIA E-MAIL

WELL PRESERVED Our March issue On the Market (“Grande Dame”) about the recently listed former mansion of jeweler and clockmaker Frank Herschede in North Avondale grabbed the attention of readers with its jewelry box–like exterior and still-intact ornate interior details. But it was one of the building’s past business uses that really got people talking. “Think of the dance parties in the ballroom!” Nick Reader said on Facebook, tagging house-hunting friends. “Just have to deal with the ghost[s] from when it was a funeral home.” David Turner said, “I want no part of it. Even if it was rent-free, no thanks.” Lisa Jones clearly looks on the bright side of things: “It’s not like people died there. Probably barely haunted.” Where do we sign up?!

SHE’S ALL THAT

Cincinnatistate.edu (513) 861-7700 1 4 C I N C I N N AT I M A G A Z I N E . C O M A P R I L 2 0 2 0

Prior to the Democratic primary election for Ohio’s 1st Congressional District (this issue went to press before the March 17 vote), readers took to Facebook to voice their opinions about the viability of candidates Kate Schroder and Nikki Foster, the two Democratic women (profiled in March’s “Any Woman’s Race”) vying to challenge U.S. Representative Steve Chabot in November. Karen Lunn Kopack had a particularly impassioned message: “Let’s make it really hard for [Chabot] and vote for [Foster], an Air Force pilot vet with a stellar record of service to her nation.... One who relates to all working-class voters, because she grew up with hardworking, immigrant parents and went to public schools. She earned a scholarship to the Air Force Academy. She is the epitome of service to her country. She listens, learns, and will serve everyone in this district. My husband (a vet) and I are all in. We know she will beat him. [American flag emoji]”

ALL THE WORLD’S A STAGE Friends of Joe Rigotti, our March Style Counsel who always rocks his signature bright-colored, bold-patterned suits, rushed to share their love for the unapologetically fashionable fella. “[Joe] doesn’t ‘dress up,’” said Vicky Mary on Facebook. “He just dresses. I agree that it takes no more time to dress nicely than sloppily.” Tim Sweeney affirmed that Rigotti’s sense of style matches his personality, saying, “He has a good sense of humor.” Jeri Needleman wrote on our website, “Joe sets the bar high.... [He’s] Cincinnati’s answer to Gentlemen’s Quarterly.”

WHERE CREDIT’S DUE Architect Richard Butz wrote in to inform us of a glaring (albeit inadvertent) omission in February’s Architecture cover feature (“Our Buildings, Ourselves”): some of the architects responsible for Cincinnati’s most iconic buildings. In order of appearance: Taft Museum of Art, by Benjamin Henry Latrobe; The Carneal House, believed to be designed by its resident Thomas D. Carneal; Carew Tower, by W.W. Ahlschlager & Associates; Ingalls Building, by Elzner & Anderson; Cincinnati Times-Star Building, by Samuel Hannaford & Sons; Union Terminal, by Alfred Fellheimer and Stewart Wagner; Lincoln Road Mid-Century Modern, by Rudy Hermes; Bavarian Brewing Company’s contemporary addition by SFA Architects, Inc. (original architect unknown); Cincinnati Shakespeare Co., by GBBN Architects, Inc.; and Crosley Tower, by A.M. Kinney Associates.

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EXPLAINING THE MIDWEST P. 18

HEALING WITH THE WHO P. 18

BETTER BY DEGREES Cincinnati State expands its class offerings into new territory. A M Y B R O W N L E E

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F

SPOT THE REDS FAN P. 20

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OR MORE THAN 50 YEARS, CINCINNATI STATE TECHNICAL AND COMMUNITY COL-

lege has been a household name for local students seeking certifications and associate degrees in everything from nursing to welding. But the school is now offering its first-ever bachelor’s degrees, in land surveying and culinary and food science. The move is not simply a matter of paperwork: It marks an important shift in the college’s history and in Cincinnati’s landscape of higher education. Cincinnati State has been a place to skill up in a field, change careers, or ease the transition to a traditional university. And now it’s a place to get a four-year degree. “This is new for the state of Ohio, too,” explains Cincinnati State Provost Robbin Hoopes. “Ohio changed the law so that community colleges could have this opportunity.” That was back in 2017, when a state budget bill approved the process for community colleges to propose bachelor’s degree programs, which they were formerly prevented from doing. But the schools couldn’t just propose anything: The prospective programs needed to meet specific guidelines to help the state workforce expand in targeted ways that would keep it competitive and agile. The change is driven by some compelling labor data: The Ohio Department of Higher Education predicted that, by this year, 64 percent of the state’s available jobs will require some kind of post-secondary education. The state strictly limited the number of accreditations it granted to community colleges—Cincinnati State was among just a half-dozen or so—and there were specific limitations placed on which degrees could be CONTINUED ON P. 18 A P R I L 2 0 2 0 C I N C I N N AT I M A G A Z I N E . C O M 1 7


MUSIC

LOOK WHO’S BACK

DISPATCH

The Who return to help heal wounds from the 1979 Riverfront Coliseum tragedy. — J A S O N C O H E N DON’T THINK they’ll ever come back to Cincinnati.” That’s what Matt Wergers, who survived the crush of fans waiting outside The Who’s December 3, 1979, concert, told Tanya O’Rourke in her WCPO documentary, The Who: The Night That Changed Rock. Well, not exactly. The Who hasn’t played in Cincinnati in the 40 years since 11 fans died at Riverfront Coliseum, but right after the WCPO program aired they announced an April 23 concert at Northern Kentucky’s BB&T Arena. The show is a benefit for the P.E.M. Memorial Scholarship Fund, which honors three Finneytown High School students who were among the victims that night.

I

SPEAK EASY

MIDWEST, EXPLAINED X When Phil Christman moved back to Michigan, his Texas-born wife had some questions. “She pressed me into service as a local explainer,” Christman writes in Midwest Futures, his terrific new book out April 7 (Belt Publishing). Christman found himself struggling to explain his home’s customs and core identity. His book revisits those themes, bouncing between the region’s past, present, and future. Midwest Futures is smart, humble, and darkly funny, just like the region it describes.

Their friends and relatives helped make the concert happen, having first reached out to lead singer Roger Daltrey in 2017. “It’s a deeply poignant gesture,” says Elizabeth Nelson, whose song “A Goddamn Impossible Way of Life,” with her band The Paranoid Style, recounts the tragedy in mournful and impassioned detail. “I have no doubt that the horror of that night remains with [them] to this day.” A memorial plaque for the 11 victims was dedicated outside what is now Heritage Bank Arena in 2015, but the band returning there wasn’t in the cards. The Who’s longtime manager, Bill Curbishley, told WCPO, “I saw enough that night that I don’t want to revisit.”

IMAGES

So when your wife asks about the Midwest, do you have a better reply? I had to write 40,000 words to answer her! There are so many surprising ideas in your answer, including the Midwest’s role in the creation of America’s always-on military. In the 1780s, a lot of people didn’t CONTINUED ON P. 20

PHOTOGRAPH BY GETTY

offered. Starting in August, the school will be the only place in the region where you can earn land surveying and food science bachelor’s degrees, and that’s by design. “We had to show the state that there was a need for the people that we would produce,” says Doug Bowling, dean of Engineering and Information Technologies. Using labor market data and direct feedback from local industry partners, Cincinnati State was able to demonstrate exactly why they should expand programming and what effect it would have. And since 85 percent of Cincinnati State graduates stay in the area, there will be a direct and nearly immediate impact on the local workforce. “We’re a community technical college and we service the community,” Bowling says. “That’s part of our service: We keep people in the community. It’s part of our mission and our value.” Surveying and culinary arts are nothing new at Cincinnati State. “We already offer the two-year associate degree,” Bowling says, “and then we would send students off to the University of Cincinnati or Northern Kentucky University to get the coursework for a bachelor’s degree. But we thought We could offer all that, too, and we already do all the heavy lifting.” The school needed to demonstrate that it could expand some of its existing general education courses, like English composition, to achieve accreditation for the bachelor’s degree programs. And since none of the area colleges Registration begins currently offer surveying or culiApril 1 for Cincinnati nary and food science bachelor’s State Technical and degrees, Cincinnati State’s new Community College’s two new bachelor’s programs only add to the region’s degree programs. educational offerings. Still, Bowling anticipated pushback from traditional universities in the area, admitting that most of them don’t love the idea. But he stresses Cincinnati State’s commitment to a collaborative approach. “We don’t look at it as adversarial,” he says. “We’re looking to work with them. They’re our sister programs. We want our students to go to those four-year schools.” Local industry, however, is all in. “The flavoring and food science industry is very large in CONTINUED ON P. 20 ANTICIPATION METER +5 +4 +3 +2 +1 -1 -2 -3 -4 -5

Gone With the Goals FC Cincinnati hosts 2018 champs and 2020 favorites Atlanta United April 5 at Nippert Stadium. +1

Divergent Path Veronica Roth, author of the bestselling Divergent series, discusses her first adult novel April 15 at Joseph-Beth Booksellers. +1 Killing It Playhouse in the Park brings back the Agatha Christie thriller Murder on the Orient Express starting April 11. +1

1 8 C I N C I N N AT I M A G A Z I N E . C O M A P R I L 2 0 2 0

A Big Softie Iconic singer-songwriter Robyn Hitchcock celebrates his 40plus year career April 26 at the Southgate House Revival. +1

This Little Girl Precocious 5-year-old Matilda makes musical magic in the latest Children’s Theatre production at the Taft Theatre, opening April 25. +1

CURRENT OUTLOOK

+5

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this area,” Bowling says. “Perfetti Van Melle, Wild Flavors, Kroger. They need people with a bachelor’s degree who not only understand culinary— which we’re very good at with Midwest Culinary Institute—but who also understand the science.” As for surveying, candidates who seek to work as professionals in that field must possess bachelor’s degrees. Before Cincinnati State’s expansion, the closest school with that option was in Akron. The Department of Education initiated this process, but they’re cautious about expanding it. The hope is that once they see gains in the state’s workforce development, they’ll allow qualifying schools to propose more bachelor’s degree offerings, such as aviation maintenance, which Cincinnati State currently offers at the associate degree level and which would also complement existing industry here. Ultimately, Cincinnati State isn’t totally changing its stripes. “Our bread and butter is associate degrees,” says Bowling. “It’s what we do, what we were founded on. But we also try to adapt. What we are will always be whatever the city needs us to be.”

CORNER SHOT Over-the-Rhine still hosts a bevy of ghost ads for long-gone products, like this vodka brand once produced in Cleveland. Cheers to photographer Kevin Dugan, who explores Cincinnati on his Instagram @prblog.

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FAN SCENES

You never know how a Cincinnati Reds home game will turn out, but you’ll always run into certain fan types. Play ballpark bingo and see how quickly you spot these folks on your next visit. You’ll have plenty of opportunities, with 15 games this month at Great American Ball Park. — K E V I N S C H U LT Z

And today that army consists of a lot of working-class Midwesterners. Yep. The Midwest has become a staging ground for the post–“making things” economy, and in that economy the military is a way people can find a living wage and a feeling that they’re contributing. So what do you want a Midwesterner to take from your book? The idea that, over the next century or so, people and capital are both going to look at the Midwest very carefully. People will want to live here because our ruinous way of life is going to create a lot of refugees. At the same time, capital will want to profit off this huge stretch of land that’s relatively insulated from climate change. I think we need to prioritize the first set of claims. What do you hope a non-Midwesterner takes from it? Well, all of the above. But also a sense that we’re not boring, we’re not Clark Kent, we’re not raw material that needs to be sent out East to be developed into something useful. —CRAIG FEHRMAN

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want to ratify the Constitution because it had a provision for a standing army. That always struck me—what a different world. What conquered this opposition was a lot of people who had a lot of money tied up in land claims out West, in what we now call Ohio. They needed those claims to mean something, which meant kicking out the people who rightfully lived there. That’s where a new army could help.


Unearth a world of innovators and gods

MAYA

March 14 – September 7 #MAYAatCMC Audio guides (English and Spanish) included free Member children are free with adult ticket


BOOKS

POP LIFE

OFF THE WALL

One of our city’s youngest muralists prepares to grow up and branch out. — C H R I S

PASION

LATELY, LOCAL ARTIST TENZING HAS BEEN CONSUMED BY TWO THINGS: HIS FIRST-EVER SOLO ART EXHIBITION AND

graduating from high school. Tenzing, whose name is Owen Gunderman, is an 18-year-old artist who gained attention for his contributions to 2019’s BLINK Cincinnati light and art festival. His highcontrast work contains bold lines, expansive landscapes, and enigmatic characters that seem to come to life off the brick walls he paints. He pulls influence from skateboard graphics and Pop Art to create pieces that have the undeniable Tenzing stamp. His style is a result of countless hours spent filling up sketchbooks, which makes sense for an artist who compares his practice to that of a bodybuilder. “You have to work on it every day,” he says, “or else you start to lose it pretty quickly.” His art show will take place at Over-the-Rhine’s AGAR on April 24 and 25, featuring a mix of refined older projects as well as 12 new paintings—all before he even leaves high school. 2 2 C I N C I N N AT I M A G A Z I N E . C O M A P R I L 2 0 2 0

“Writing mighty girls and diverse worlds.” That’s how Intisar Khanani explains herself and her work, and it’s the spirit that runs through her latest novel, Thorn (HarperCollins). Thorn is also Khanani’s oldest book: It’s the first one she ever attempted, and that was 18 years (and many drafts) ago. Khanani, who lives in Cincinnati with her husband and two daughters, selfpublished the book back in 2012, and HarperCollins republished and released it on March 24. The fantasy novel, aimed at a young adult audience, centers on Princess Alyrra as she is betrothed to a powerful prince and the subsequent journey that unfolds. It is loosely based on the Brothers Grimm’s “The Goose Girl,” a story about stolen identity, adversity, and inheritance. “One of the things I love about speculative fiction is that you’re creating a framework outside of this world,” says Khanani. “You can question authority and power dynamics very deeply. And people will come along for the ride.” —AMY BROWNLEE

IM AG E S BY (IL LU S T R ATI O N) T ENZIN G / (HE A D SH OT ) CO U R T E S Y IN T IS A R K H A N A N I

CONFRONTING POWER WITH COMPASSION


School is out. Camps are in.


Dr. Know is Jay Gilbert, weekday afternoon deejay on 92.5 FM The Fox. Submit your questions about the city’s peculiarities at drknow@cincinnati magazine.com

 DR. KNOW

Jacobs Mechanical in Camp Washington had no moving sign, just an imposing metallic figure standing out front. He looked like the love child of the movie creature you cited and Robby the Robot from Forbidden Planet (it’s science fiction, OK?). The unnamed robot (which they call a tin man; tomato, tomahto) tagged along when the company moved to Mitchell Avenue, but did not resume his Walmartgreeter role. He is currently laying on his back in a shop corner, his fate uncertain. Considering how many roadside behemoths like him have been junked in recent years, let us be grateful. While we’re on the subject: The Young & Bertke walking man also survives, inside the company’s present-day location on Spring Grove Avenue. He’s been cleaned up and painted, but unfortunately, he no longer moves. If you get close enough, perhaps you’ll hear him whispering, “Oil can!”

Q+ A

What happened to the giant robot that used to stand in front of Jacobs Mechanical in Camp Washington? It always reminded me of the metallic creature from that sci-fi movie, The Day the Earth Stood Still. Please tell me the robot wasn’t destroyed! —WE’RE DONE FOR, WE’RE DONE FOR

DEAR DONE:

The Doctor shares your concern. Cincinnati childhoods once thrilled to gigantic, garish signs, some of which gave live performances. The “Big Indian Sign” in Carthage used to wave its arm (safety now requires it to stay still). And You-Bert, the sheet-metal mascot of the Young & Bertke Company near Crosley Field, once walked in place atop its facility.

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On Channel 12 each night, just as Stephen Colbert’s first commercial break ends, I see the final second of a totally different commercial. It’s some guy saying, “Don’t forget who you are.” Sometimes we see just the last two words. It’s an obvious screwup, and it’s every night. Do they go home early at Channel 12? —WONDER WHO’S WATCHING DEAR WONDER:

The engineers at WKRC-TV apologize, but they plead not guilty. You are witnessing the standard “network cover,” explained thusly: Mr. Colbert’s commercial break varies, but it usually contains a few national spots, followed by 60 seconds of local ads for obnoxious car dealers and poorly dressed injury attorneys (feel free to trade those adjectives). But underneath those ads, the network is still sending PSAs—public service announcements—just in case a local station fails to sell that time. Locally-made commercials might not have a network’s atomic-clock timing, so if that segment ends a little early, the final moment of the ILLUSTR ATIO N S BY L A R S LEE TA RU


hidden PSA pops out. The Doctor was unable to identify that bald gentleman who appears so briefly, but he seems sincere, doesn’t he? Spring has barely arrived, and yet we are tempted to award you the Dr. Know Least Consequential Question of 2020, a contest that came into existence upon the arrival of your inquiry.

Journey to the past.

My father says that along with well-known Cincinnati nicknames like “Porkopolis” and “the Queen City,” it used to be common for people to call us “Solid Cincinnati.” He says it wasn’t just local; people everywhere called us that. I almost never see it. Was it ever a thing? —SQUISHY ABOUT SOLID DEAR SQUISHY:

Behold the power of alliteration, word groups that start with the same sounds (e.g. Freaky Friday, Dunkin’ Donuts, Great Green Gobs of Greasy Grimy Gopher Guts). Note how easily we call ourselves “Sin City” when the opportunity arises. It’s no surprise, then, that we find widespread evidence of “Solid Cincinnati” going back to at least the 1870s. After all, it’s not only alliterative but complimentary, suggesting fortitude and steadiness. It was often used to cheer our city’s resilience during times of turbulent trouble. (See what the Doctor did there?) That being said, the term falls far short of being universally ubiquitous (last time, promise). “Solid Cincinnati” doesn’t appear nearly as often as the other common nicknames you mention, except for one time period: In 1951, the Cincinnati Enquirer began a big national advertising campaign for itself, using the slogan Solid Cincinnati Reads the Cincinnati Enquirer. (Our column from June 2018 has more about that.) We see “Solid Cincinnati” appearing more frequently during the campaign, and that’s probably when your dad saw and heard it a lot. But its usage declined not long after the Enquirer’s ads ended in 1963. Now, it’s become just another negligible, niche nickname (sorry).

May 12 - 24, 2020

June 9 - 21, 2020 ARONOFF CENTER CincinnatiArts.org A P R I L 2 0 2 0 C I N C I N N AT I M A G A Z I N E . C O M 2 5


TURKEY RUN STATE PARK

LESS SCREEN TIME. MORE SCENE TIME. There’s no filter required when you’re witnessing nature in person, especially when you’re visiting our Indiana State Parks. Whether you’re hiking the forests and canyons, mountain biking the challenging trails, making waves on a popular lake or simply roasting marshmallows over your campfire, you’ll be glad you’re living in the moment. And enjoying your getaway worth sharing.

VisitIndiana.com/StateParks Share your moments. #VisitIndiana


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Scenic Southern Indiana Visit Southern Indiana’s home for natural excursions for awe-inspiring natural caverns; outdoor fun including canoeing and ziplining; nature trails for mountain biking, horseback riding, and hiking; a charming downtown; wineries; and a luxury casino.

ThisIsIndiana.org

Experience Madison, Indiana Known for the largest contiguous National Historic District in the United States with 133 blocks downtown. You’ll enjoy historic buildings, rich history, unique businesses and shops, and its beautiful scenery, parks, and recreational activities.

VisitMadison.org

Visit Lafayette - West Lafayette! Life is about stories. Add to yours here. Vibrant downtown, winery, breweries, art galleries, art trail, golf packages including courses by Pete Dye & Hale Irwin, trails, Purdue University, Wolf Park, Prophetstown State Park, The Farm at Prophetstown.

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Discover Native and Migratory Birds Jackson County, Indiana is home to a 7,724-acre refuge for migratory birds. Muscatatuck National Wildlife Refuge hosts Wings Over Muscatatuck in May to celebrate migratory birds, as well as other events. Visitors enjoy hiking, photography and fishing.

JacksonCountyIN.com


Win this House Built by Fischer Homes in the Tuscany by Fischer Homes subdivision, Covington, KY. Estimated value $430,000.

Giveaway Date: June 12

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Get your ticket by April 17 for a chance to win 2 night stay at Graduate Cincinnati plus a watch party for a 2020 UC Football Game, courtesy of Graduate Cincinnati.

Get Tickets dreamhome.org | 800-537-1735 National Sponsors Local Sponsors

Giveaway is conducted by and benefits ALSAC/St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital®. ©2020 ALSAC/St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. (DMH-75)


BEER NECESSITIES P. 30

A STYLISH SINGER-SONGWRITER P. 32

A HILLTOP HOME FOR SALE P. 36

SHORTHAND CRAFTSMAN P. 38

OH, BABY! You can bring your babes to Rhinegeist and now you can dress them in brewery apparel, too. Plus, during April, 15 percent of all Babygeist onesie sales beneďŹ t March of Dimes. $15, rhinegeist.com

P H O T O G R A P H BY A A R O N M . CO N WAY

A P R I L 2 0 2 0 C I N C I N N AT I M A G A Z I N E . C O M 2 9


NECESSITIES

FOR THE LIGHT BEER LOVERS 1 If you’re going to drink light beer, it might as well be one that’s brewed in the Queen City. And to further cement your support for Hudy Delight, sport this rad Tshirt from Cincy Shirts. $25, cincyshirts.com

DO IT YOURSELF Read up on all 2 things beer at Joseph-Beth Booksellers and then buy this Craft Beer Kit to try brewing your own suds at home. $45.95, josephbeth.com

THE BEER NECESSITIES

FORGET ABOUT YOUR WORRIES AND YOUR STRIFE AND ENJOY THESE LOCAL BEER ACCESSORIES.

I’D TAP THAT Spruce up your 6 kegerator with this super shiny ceramic Cheetah tap handle from Rhinegeist Brewery. $40, rhinegeist.com

BOTTOMS UP 4 Feel cool and look even cooler while drinking from this ceramic Woodburn Brewery chalice. $20, facebook.com/ thewoodburnbrewery

OPEN SESAME Stop trying to open 3 beer bottles with your teeth and use this classy opener instead. You and your dentist can thank us later. $20, elmandiron.com

HATS OFF What better way to show your 5 appreciation for Cincinnati’s third-largest brewery than with this MadTree trucker hat? $25, madtree brewing.com

3 0 C I N C I N N AT I M A G A Z I N E . C O M A P R I L 2 0 2 0

PPHHOOTTOOGGRRAAPPHHSS BBYY AJAORNOANT HMA. NC OWNI LWLAI YS


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T H A N K S TO O U R S P O N S O RS


STYLE COUNSEL

Mia Carruthers OCCUPATION: Singer, songwriter, and producer, Gwynne Sound STYLE: Comfortable yet classic

How do you dress for work? Working in a creative field, it’s really up to me how I want to dress. With certain artists I’ll dress for the project, so I’ll think about the tone of what I’m producing and try to bring that vibe into the studio with me. Whose style inspires you? I love classic and vintage pieces. I take a lot of inspiration from classic films, especially the styling, like Audrey Hepburn in Roman Holiday. Music is also a huge influence, and I love menswear for women. Artists like Janelle Monáe and Phoebe Bridgers are always crushing it. How does that translate into your personal style? I never see anything and want to exactly copy it. I think, Oh, that’s an interesting way to do that, and interpret it my own way. Where do you find one-of-kind items? My friend Matt Joy has an amazing collection; his apartment is basically a museum of apparel. He’s a garment historian and always knows the story behind a garment. Also, Hi-Bred; I’d work there basically for trade. Do you prefer to shop in-store or online? Shopping online is a great way to be exposed to brands we don’t have locally. I’m also an artist on a budget, so when I can find something at a vintage shop and it’s affordable and I’m giving that item another life, that’s very special to me. What are some items that you feel particularly connected to? I have this Scottish wool Harris Tweed coat that I got from my friend. One night at Neon’s, back in the day, it got singed when I got too close to a fire. I was heartbroken. Then my fiancé, who’s a painter, did these paint splatters all over it for me. It’s something I thought was going to be ruined, and now it’s one of my forever pieces that I will treasure even more. — S T U A R T L I N D L E

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ON THE MARKET

ADDRESS: 2680 GRANDIN PLACE, HYDE PARK LISTING PRICE: $1.297 MILLION

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YOU CAN’T TOUR THIS HILLTOP HOME WITHOUT LEARNING A GOOD BIT

about the March family. Maybe that’s because nearly every wall is currently draped with large-scale modern art tapestries woven by Maud Rydin March, the Sweden-born matriarch of the family and an extraordinary artist whose works have been exhibited at the Cincinnati Art Museum. Maybe it’s because the home is filled with family furniture, photos, and antiques and, for all its beauty, doesn’t seem like a place that has been staged for resale. But it’s mostly because the real estate agent, Perrin March IV, grew up here. “This was my room,” he says, as we climb to the top floor of the converted carriage house. The room is scaled like a bachelor apartment with three distinct living spaces and a fireplace; it will be the ideal master suite for a future buyer. When you see the room where March’s parents slept, though, you’ll understand their preference: The suite features a balcony overlooking Mt. Lookout and ColumbiaTusculum. In the 1950s the original owner 3 6 C I N C I N N AT I M A G A Z I N E . C O M A P R I L 2 0 2 0

converted the building into a more than 5,000-square-foot single-family home with four bedrooms, and added some Space Age amenities like intercoms and a built-in under-the-counter coffee maker (sadly, neither is still operable). The kitchen and the bathrooms are trapped in mid-century amber, and the rest of the home feels like classic early-20th-century Hyde Park. But its history is unique; you will never meet its equal. Perrin March III, an engineer who ran the machine tool manufacturing company Cincinnati, Inc., for 70 years, loved pointing out the reminders of the building’s life as a former stable, like the timber frame ceiling in the grand family room. “Everybody loved being here,” March remembers, and he admits that a challenge with showing the home is helping prospective buyers imagine how they could make the place—still so full of his vibrant family—their own. But that might just be the secret to success with this listing: The buyer for this home will surely do so because it is steeped in history, and one of a kind.

PHOTOGR APHS COURTESY CHRIS FARR, THE FIRST SHOWING , LLC

THIS GRANDIN PLACE HOUSE IS ON THE MARKET FOR THE FIRST TIME IN A GENERATION. — A M Y B R O W N L E E


HOMEGROWN

FRAME OF MIND WOODWORKING COMPANY SHORTHAND CRAFTSMAN IS LOOKING AT THE BIG PICTURE.

P

—AMY BROWNLEE

PATRICK DEWENTER THINKS A LOT ABOUT WHY HE CREATES THINGS.

When he builds a desk, for instance, he’s creating a functional object, but he’s also intentionally celebrating nature. “You can probably tell in a lot of my work,” he says, “that I have such a deep admiration and love for nature and what it offers, from resources to just natural beauty, that led me toward the products I make.” After design school at Sinclair Community College and Northern Kentucky University, an internship at a design agency in Asheville, North Carolina, and stints at local creative firms 3 8 C I N C I N N AT I M A G A Z I N E . C O M A P R I L 2 0 2 0

like LPK, where he cut his teeth in the world of package design, the Dayton native was looking to diversify. Dewenter is a graphic designer, screen printer, woodworker, welder, and all-around “student for life” always in search of the next creative experience, so he channeled his pursuit of knowledge and skill into Shorthand Craftsman. The shop is a one-man studio out of Dewenter’s Camp

Springs, Kentucky, garage, where he turns out geometric brass key rings, bottle openers, leather wallets, and myriad other useful things. He’ll also create a custom table or light fixture. But his current focus is on made-to-order frames. “I embrace a level of simplicity in the framing that I do,” Dewenter says. “I could make fancy frames, but I like to use really beautiful quality wood like hickory, walnut, cherry, sometimes really high-quality pine, and I let the wood’s beauty sing.” The frames are indeed lovely, demonstrating that embellishment doesn’t always equal beauty—and that good quality doesn’t have to be prohibitively expensive. “Framing stands out as one of those things that’s fun, people love it, and it still feels so good to do that work from a craftsman standpoint,” he says. Despite the assortment of product categories, every item in Dewenter’s shop has one thing in common: It’s wellmade, on purpose. “I just love when you take the time to address the detail, because those things add up to something that’s just really well thought out and beautiful,” he says. “Having the eye of a designer, and someone who is thinking about the nuances and the details, definitely trickles into the things that I build, because I’m always trying to do things at a finer level.” shorthandcraftsman. com

SHOP TALK

CRAFTED WITH CARE

This custom cast iron light fixture holds a glass jar and Edison bulb and turns on and off with the faucet knob (naturally). 1

This custom Mid-Century– inspired accent table has hairpin legs and a solid wood top. 2

Dewenter lets the wood’s beauty shine in his custom frames. 3

A repurposed tree slice makes a unique and beautiful desk clock. 4

PH OTO G R A PHS BY (LEF T ) D U STIN S PA R K S/ (RI G HT ) CO U R TE S Y PATRI C K D E W EN TER


MORE CARDIO. MORE SWEAT. MORE WAYS TO TRANSFORM YOUR BODY. TRY PURE EMPOWER TODAY PureBarre.com


LIVING IN CIN

How Very Decent of Us CINCINNATI HAD A TEENS FOR DECENCY RALLY IN APRIL 1969. IT MADE A BIG DIFFERENCE. OR NOT.

THIS IS THE STORY OF TWO PENISES, SEPARATED BY 20 YEARS AND 1,000 MILES. ONE WAS in Miami in 1969, and belonged to Jim Morrison of The Doors. The other was in Ohio in 1989, and caused the downfall of a popular politician. Between these two bookends—I feel more comfortable calling them bookends—rests the tale of two public events that happened in Cincinnati on the same day in 1969. Each, amusingly, was dedicated to condemning the other. Humor me for a moment and take this little test: Simply note whether you involuntarily smile upon seeing the name Congressman Donald “Buz” Lukens. Did you snort, even a little? OK, Boomer, you’ve betrayed your age. You can skip the following paragraph while our younger readers catch up. 4 0 C I N C I N N AT I M A G A Z I N E . C O M A P R I L 2 0 2 0

Between 1966 and 1990, Buz Lukens represented areas north of Cincinnati (Hamilton, Middletown, Fairfield, West Chester, etc.) in Columbus and Washington, D.C. He was very popular. Unfortunately, he got convicted of having sex with an underage girl, which is a deal-breaker even today. Lukens arranged to meet with the girl’s mother at a McDonald’s to negotiate a cover-up, but sadly for him that conversation was videotaped. He went to jail twice—the second time for a Congressional bribe. The guy just had no decency. Decency had once been what Buz Lukens was all about. He was among several politicians and celebrities who attended Cincinnati’s Teens for Decency rally, the first of our pair of opposed public events. About 10,000 people packed the Cincinnati Gardens, where Ohio’s and Kentucky’s P H O T O G R A P H BY A A R O N M . CO N WAY

( S K Y ) E L E N A M I V/ S H U T T E R S T O C K . C O M

BY JAY GILBERT


PROMOTION

15 MINUTES

PHOTOGRAPHS BY CATHERINE GRACE PHOTOGRAPHY

BEST RESTAURANTS TASTING EVENT

CINCINNATI MAGAZINE CELEBRATED THE CITY’S TOP 10 RESTAURANTS LAST MONTH AT BRAXTON BREWING COMPANY. Cincinnati Magazine readers and local foodies gathered to honor some of the city’s top restaurants and chefs last month at the eighth annual Best Restaurants Tasting Event. Guests sampled incredible dishes from coveted menus, ranging from Nicola’s pickled beet salad to Phoenician Taverna’s Mediterranean treats. With Braxton’s on-tap favorite beers and seltzers, guests were able to enjoy a full night of eating and drinking at this sold-out event. To view our full Best Restaurants list and event photos, visit cincinnatimagazine. com/best-restaurants-event-2020/ THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS: Braxton Brewing Company, Chef’s Cut, Brummel & Brown, Westrock Coffee


governors and Cincinnati’s mayor welcomed them. There was also an appearance by America’s poster child for teenage innocence, Dick Clark—the guy who’s still bringing us New Year’s Eve from the grave. Local TV host Bob Braun emceed. It was an afternoon of inspirational speeches, patriotic demonstrations, and lots of what we today call virtue signaling.

CINCINNATI WAS QUICK TO JOIN THE decency bandwagon rolling across the nation. After all, along with Ivory Soap and Mr. Clean, overreacting to sexual controversy is our most cherished brand. First, an upcoming Doors concert here was abruptly canceled. Then, Cincinnati Enquirer columnist Frank Weikel proposed having our own Teens for Decency rally, which got imme-

WHEN THE DAY WAS OVER, BOTH SIDES FELT THEY’D WON, SECURE IN WHO THEY WERE, HOW THEY LIVED, AND WHERE THEIR LIVES WOULD LEAD. WHO TURNED OUT TO BE RIGHT? Full credit for this event must go to Jim Morrison’s penis. The rock star had been arrested the previous month for exposing himself at a Doors concert in Miami, setting off explosions of national rage against filthy, longhaired hippies like him. Something had to be done to stop the vulgarity ruining America’s youth! Only two weeks after Morrison’s arrest, the first Teens for Decency rally was held in Miami’s Orange Bowl, near the scene of his crime.

diate enthusiastic responses from every predictable direction. Braun invited Clark, who agreed to cover his own expenses. The American Legion supplied thousands of small American flags, Hennegan Printing donated 25,000 Teens for Decency car decals, and Cincinnati police officers volunteered their services. Additional support came from the Boy Scouts, Cincinnati Fire Department, Kiwanis, Shriners, and others. Tickets, which were free but required

PRESS THE FLESH FRED WYMORE, CHAIRMAN OF TEENS FOR DECENCY, WELCOMES VOLUNTEERS TO THE CAMPAIGN ON MARCH 29, 1969.

4 2 C I N C I N N AT I M A G A Z I N E . C O M A P R I L 2 0 2 0

pre-order by phone or mail, were gone within a week. This thing was going to be big. Early promotions suggested there would be music performances from James Brown, the Bee Gees, the Association, and more. Actual performances were from the Fun Explosions, the Mystics, the Heywoods, and less. There’s nothing better for bringing people together than a common enemy. Students from area high schools and colleges flocked to volunteer for this massive orgy of wholesomeness. As teens began handling preparations themselves, the rally’s official student leader emerged, and he couldn’t have been more perfect: Fred Wymore, a clean-cut, 19-year-old, churchgoing, varsity-football-playing student council president from North College Hill. The UC freshman showed a knack for organization and leadership, and the media couldn’t praise him enough. Wymore later became a local and national Emmy-winning TV sportscaster, and then...well, we’ll get back to where his life eventually went. Meanwhile, Newton’s Law about everything having an opposite reaction proved itself: Sales of Doors albums skyrocketed at local record stores, and another rally was hastily organized for the same day as Teens for Decency, purely for the purpose of mocking it. This one was instigated by Jerry Rubin, a Cincinnati native who’d become world-famous as a troublemaker. Anyone familiar with 1960s radicalism and protest knows about him. Alongside revolutionary buddies like Abbie Hoffman, Rubin helped invent ultraextreme political theater. Imagine Michael Moore weighing half as much but being twice as disruptive— that was Jerry. Never one to pass up an opportunity for grandstanding, he decided

P H OTO G R A P H C O U R T E SY T H E C I N C I N N AT I E N Q U I R E R / R A N C O C H R A N

LIVING IN CIN


P H OTO G R A P H C O U R T E SY T H E C I N C I N N AT I E N Q U I R E R / M A R K T R E I T E L

CAPED CRUSADER YIPPIE LEADER JERRY RUBIN LED A COUNTER-RALLY AT SEASONGOOD PAVILION IN EDEN PARK, APRIL 20, 1969.

to come home and headline an anti-rally at Eden Park. On April 20, 1969, both events started at roughly the same time. The crowd at the Gardens, of course, had the vastly larger and louder turnout. No surprise, really. Teens for Decency had been proposed by an Enquirer writer, so his newspaper lavished it with front-page exposure and cheerleading, with other local media joining in. By every standard—except for the direction American culture continued to drift—the rally was a big success. The headline in the The Cincinnati Post, unmindful of how the country’s vocabulary was changing, called it a “gay event.” Allegiance was pledged, flags were waved, and a parade of political leaders sang the praises of morality. Braun read a telegram of support from President Richard Nixon, that exemplar of virtue. A “What Decency Means to Me” essay contest was promoted, with entrants to receive a book by J. Edgar Hoover, that exemplar of fashion. Wymore delivered a rousing speech, and Cincinnati Mayor Eugene Ruehlmann managed to get the biggest laugh. He claimed he’d entered the arena through a window, because “I don’t believe in doors.” Over at Eden Park, Rubin had no bands

or politicians, but his audience was just as enthusiastic. His rant called for total revolution against a society that had become like Pavlovian dogs. Under local law, he could easily have been arrested for his numerous F-bombs, but the cops had been instructed to get involved only if actual mayhem broke out. Rubin said he would run for Cincinnati Mayor (he didn’t), get Fidel Castro admitted to the Chicago Bar (didn’t), and get the voting age lowered to 14 (nope). Back at the Gardens, as things were wrapping up, Wymore suddenly announced he was resigning. He had skipped countless classes at UC in order to work on the rally, and in desperately trying to drop a course before flunking it he got caught forging a professor’s signature and was expelled. Braun, though, exhorted the crowd to forgive Fred and keep him on. They did, via long applause. WHEN THE DAY WAS OVER, BOTH SIDES of the debate felt they’d won, secure in who they were, how they lived, and where their lives would lead. So who, from today’s perspective, turned out to be right? Don’t bother looking to either rally’s leader for the answer, because within 15 years, Jerry

Rubin and Fred Wymore became the very people that each had warned their audiences about. Rubin ditched his hippie hair and bandana for short hair and a tailored suit, while Wymore ditched his short hair and tailored suit for hippie hair and a bandana. Rubin embraced the American Dream he’d rejected, becoming a Wall Street entrepreneur with a focused vision. And Wymore did the exact opposite, becoming a solo backpacker who traveled the world with no fixed agenda. He now lives on an island in the Gulf of Thailand. Rubin died in 1994. Was any lasting difference made on April 20, 1969? Yes and no. The culture wars born in that decade are now middle-aged, and even grumpier. Some people have switched sides, but the shrillness of their certainty doesn’t seem to have diminished. “Teens for Decency” has been the name of a Canadian alt-rock band as well as a brief Cincinnati one, and The Simpsons creator Matt Groening used it as his political party’s name when he ran for high school class president. (He won.) Our local Teens for Decency organization did continue for a while, helping with initiatives like sending letters of encouragement to soldiers in Vietnam, fund-raising for a Lincoln Heights community center, and collecting donations to help create today’s Lighthouse Youth Services in Walnut Hills. Maybe Cincinnati’s Decency rally sparked some teens into a lifelong habit of generosity. And maybe the young people at the opposing rally were sparked into a lifelong habit of skepticism. Both are commendable. Life lessons, good and bad, come from unexpected places. Might you have been part of Teens for Decency’s fundraising effort to help starving refugees in Biafra? The chairman of that relief program probably was delighted to hear from any and all idealistic teenagers. His name was Congressman Donald “Buz” Lukens. A P R I L 2 0 2 0 C I N C I N N AT I M A G A Z I N E . C O M 4 3


T H E O B SOF E RINTEREST VER PERSON BB YY BL OI SB A WMOUORDTI HW AI S S

The Slyest Fox

D

DONNA SPIEGEL FINDS JOY IN HELPING KIDS. DONNA SPIEGEL SITS ON A WOODEN CHAIR IN A COVINGTON CLASSROOM CHATTING WITH 9- and 10-year-olds Lourdes and Addy about schoolwork, holiday parties, and boyfriends. Roman, who’s 13, is home sick today, but Amelia, 4 years old and a first-time visitor, perches on a teacher’s lap munching goldfish crackers on this chilly Monday morning. Just behind her, 17-year-old Dayton sits upright at a desk alongside an aide, ready for the day’s activities. Scattered throughout the room are bins of learning aids (paper snowflakes, small musical instruments, and more); shelves of books; a set of parallel bars; wooden climbing ladders; and padded floor mats in front of a mirrored wall. It’s an interesting place, to be sure, but nothing about this scene seems miraculous. And yet everything about it is. All of the kids who spend time in this small center have neurological or mobility 4 4 C I N C I N N AT I M A G A Z I N E . C O M A P R I L 2 0 2 0

disorders from spina bifida, genetic mutations, or cerebral palsy. In fact, doctors said many of them might never be able to move or communicate, let alone walk or talk. Yet here they all are. Lourdes and Addy have each just walked to the fridge and back, and eaten their snacks without help. Amelia’s fighting off sleep after a morning of rigorous activity, but still keeping a tight grip on a special handlebar designed to help her learn to sit upright. And Dayton, though nonverbal, is engaging playfully with his aide and Spiegel; a tweak of the nose means he’s happy. A bent arm over his eyes means he’s feeling shy. The teacher, or Conductor, in this particular classroom is Judit Tirkalane, a gentle but encouraging native of Hungary. She’s devoted her life’s work to helping these kids achieve the seemingly impossiP H O T O G R A P H BY A A R O N M . CO N WAY


2005, for reasons she keeps private. When Spiegel realized Dayton spent most days sitting in a pumpkin seat, staring at a ceiling fan instead of toddling around like a typical 2-year-old, she immediately began working to ďŹ gure out why. One pediatrician told her “he just needs to be held and rocked and loved,â€? says Spiegel. “So I rocked, I held, I sang—I did everything.â€? But none of it worked. Dayton fell further behind. When he was diagnosed with cerebral palsy (later, doctors would realize he had a rare genetic mutation instead), Spiegel was told Dayton would likely never walk or talk. But call it strong will, a grandmother’s intuition, or a little of both, she refused to accept that Dayton would only ever stare at the ceiling. Instead, she tried every kind of therapy with him she could— physical, occupational, even speech. Again, none of it worked. This is not going to change. This is what he’s been dealt, Spiegel found herself thinking. But “one night, I was watching 60 Min-

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CALLING SPIEGEL A MASTER PROBLEMsolver is probably an understatement; she started the ďŹ rst Snooty Fox shop, in Terrace Park, because she’d moved back here from Virginia and couldn’t ďŹ nd a good place to consign her old maternity clothes. Now, 40 years later, she oversees 10 Fox locations, from Erlanger to West Chester, and is one of Cincinnati’s more successful and recognizable—thanks to the television and print ads she’s been appearing in for decades— small business owners. She was just opening a new Fox location, in fact, when 2-year-old Dayton came to live with her and her husband, Dennis, in

utes,â€? she says, “and a segment came on about a mother [and] her son with cerebral palsy, and how this special therapy in Hungary made such a difference.â€? Developed in the 1940s, the therapy was called Conductive Education, and it focused on helping retrain the brains of kids with neurological and mobility issues by using intentional and highly repetitive movement. The idea, said anchor Scott Pelley, was, “If the brain is forced to try, it will learn to connect mind and muscle.â€? Spiegel watched specially trained teachers, called Conductors, help previously immobile kids learn to sit up on their own and roll over using simple wooden tools like ladderback chairs and tables called plinths ďŹ tted with grab bars, much of it purposely uncomfortable to motivate the kids to actively use muscles or move. She heard them singing songs and saw them working in groups, so the kids could motivate and encourage one another. And she watched kids like Dayton do all the things she’d been told

AU

ble. But the real reason any of them are here is Donna Spiegel. If that name seems familiar, it probably is—Spiegel is the founder of Greater Cincinnati’s chain of Snooty Fox consignment shops. But here, at the Conductive Learning Center of Greater Cincinnati (CLC), she’s known as both Dayton’s grandma and the school’s founder.

A P R I L 2 0 2 0 C I N C I N N AT I M A G A Z I N E . C O M 4 5


PERSON OF INTEREST he’d never do, like holding their heads up, sitting independently, even walking. Some kids were struggling—the process is physically taxing and takes both stamina and patience—but many were smiling, looking like they’d achieved a sense of purpose and

gan; Dayton was accepted. Four weeks into the classes, the gamble paid off. Dayton did something Spiegel thought she’d never see: He rolled over. Four weeks after that, he sat up without help. After a year traveling back and forth,

BUT CALL IT STRONG WILL, A GRANDMOTHER’S INTUITION, OR A LITTLE OF BOTH, SHE REFUSED TO ACCEPT THAT DAYTON WOULD ONLY EVER STARE AT THE CEILING. independence. And their parents seemed to have something Spiegel desperately needed: a vibrant sense of hope. When the segment was over, she says, “I thought, Oh my gosh, I’m going to have to take this child to Hungary.” A quick internet search showed a trip overseas wasn’t necessary; there were already Conductive Education schools in the U.S. Spiegel applied to one in Michi-

Spiegel was torn. “I thought, I can’t take Dayton out of this program, and I can’t live in Michigan forever in a Holiday Inn. I had my business and my husband.” So, master problem solver that she is, “I talked that school into helping me open a school here.” She and Dennis bought the Covington building from St. Elizabeth Healthcare. They had the space renovated, and volun-

teers painted it bright, cheerful colors. The Conductors began offering free assessments to find kids to come to the school. Most were accepted, says Spiegel, noting, “we’ve had children blind, deaf, whatever.” The only major criteria for qualifying, she adds, is “you have to be motivated.” In 2006, with six students, Cincinnati’s Conductive Learning Center opened. That, says Spiegel, is when “we just started seeing miracles happen: kids sit up for the first time, put weight on their feet for the first time, maybe take steps with the ladder back chair, as I had seen in Michigan.” Lourdes, who wasn’t supposed to be able to walk or talk, was soon ambling unaided up the school’s accessible ramp; now, she talks so much “we can’t stop her,” says her dad, Steve Kayser. When Dayton unexpectedly took off walking up the aisle at church one summer, people dubbed it “The Miracle of Vacation Bible School.” Spiegel—every bit the beaming grandmother—says she’s all for divine

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intervention, but by that point, she notes, Dayton had been painstakingly learning how to walk at the CLC for years and had even taken a few steps. If the incentive of seeing his pastor and the other kid campers finally made it all click, so be it. The bottom line, she says, is that the boy who doctors once thought would never move a muscle now had the capacity to walk. THE PROBLEM WITH CONDUCTIVE EDUcation, Spiegel discovered, is that it’s not medically recognized here in the U.S. A Cleveland-based pediatrician in the 60 Minutes segment noted it hasn’t been studied long-term and said it almost sounds too good to be true. Medical insurance won’t pay for it. Pair that with the fact that student-to-teacher ratios at the CLC need to be very small, and you have a pretty expensive proposition. This is especially burdensome for parents of kids with mobility issues, who are already grappling with significant medical and therapy bills.

Noodling over this subject in the shower one day, it came to Spiegel: Why not use Snooty Fox to help fund the school? And just like that, the consummate problemsolver made it happen. Today, proceeds from the chain’s Platinum Card (a special discount card shoppers can purchase) and December charter bus tours, plus the Angel Fox discount section of every store, help fund the school. The only thing parents pay to send their kids to the CLC is $10 an hour. “You can be a great business person, which [Donna] is, but changing all these kids’ lives? It’s priceless,” says Kayser, who notes that Lourdes’s life will be longer and more fulfilling because of all the CLC has helped her learn to do. “To have run this and run her stores at the same time, it’s pretty amazing.” Spiegel accepts the praise with an embarrassed smile, then laughs and calls herself “nuts” to have taken on so much. (At press time, she and Executive Director Kelli Flanigan were searching for a new Ohio lo-

cation so that they will be able to accept the state-based Jon Peterson Special Needs Scholarship.) In the end, though, Spiegel is adamant about one thing. “Dayton was the inspiration,” she says. “He’s got the legacy. Without Dayton, [the school] wouldn’t be here. There was a reason for it all to happen.” Back in the classroom, Tirkalane is presenting a lesson about winter. As Dayton sifts his hands through a bowl of artificial snow, helping develop his sense of touch, Tirkalane asks Addy and Lourdes questions, helping them work on their verbal and speech skills. When asked what month it is, Addy stumbles; she clearly knows it’s January, but can’t quite get the word out right. Without hesitation, Lourdes reaches over and puts her arm around her friend’s shoulder in support. Soon enough, they both laugh and say the word together. And just like that, the world becomes more about what they can do, together, than what they can’t. Which is just what Spiegel wanted all along.

2020 FIVE STAR WEALTH MANAGERS Who will be named? Find out in a special section inside the October issue of Cincinnati magazine Go to fivestarprofessional.com/wmconsumerfeedback to share your opinion

A P R I L 2 0 2 0 C I N C I N N AT I M A G A Z I N E . C O M 4 7


ONE D EXPER

PRESENTED BY

SPONSORS


DELICIOUS RIENCE.

summer series 2020

five nights. ten chefs.

ONE DELICIOUS EXPERIENCE.

Our lavish, five-night dinner series returns to Pinecroft, the historic Powel Crosley Jr. estate in Mt. Airy. Be sure to #savorthedate for our summer dinner series and experience a one-of-a-kind meal in a one-of-a-kind setting. CINCINNATIMAGAZINE.COM/OUREVENTS

save the date

JULY 27–31 Pinecroft at Crosley Estate


The Sound of Hope. Today, one of your neighbors is ringing the bell at a TriHealth Cancer Institute location. It signals a milestone in cancer treatment. It’s the sound of hope for everyone still going through it. When you see our bell around town, ring it to send a message of support to TriHealth Cancer Institute patients and cancer patients everywhere. Let them know, they may have cancer, but they also have us.


Learn how to #RingYourSupport Starting March 26 and running through April, we’ll be at various locations around the city. Visit TriHealth.com/Hope to find the location closest to you.

“When someone rings that bell it is emotional. “I’ve felt 100% supported by my team here… I

We take care of these folks for months. You cry.

look forward to coming and that’s the truth.”

You get goose bumps. They’re our friends and family and we love them.”

– Francis, TriHealth Patient

– Olivia, TriHealth Nurse

Visit TriHealth.com/Hope to find the location closest to you.


CINCINN AT I’S BR E W ERY SCENE H A S E X PL ODED DURING T HE L A S T DEC A DE. W E S T UDIED UP ON T HE REGION’S 53 CR AF T BR E W ERIE S, PL US T HE INDUS T RY L E A DERS W HO M A K E T HE M AGIC H A PPEN, T O PR E SEN T YOU T HIS Y E A R BOOK HIGHL IGH T ING T HE BE S T SUDS A ND BR E W M A S T ERS ON BO T H SIDE S OF T HE R I V ER .

APRIL 2020

P H OTO G R A P H B Y A A R O N M . C O N WAY


B Y K AT I E C O B U R N , J O H N F O X , K A R A HAGERMAN, KAILEIGH PEYTON, KEVIN S C H U LT Z , A N D A M A N D A B O Y D WA LT E R S ICONS BY LAUREN MEILSTRUP

APRIL 2020


1. ALEXANDRIA BREWING COMPANY Alexandria, KY 2. BAD TOM SMITH BREWING East End, OH

17. FIGLEAF BREWING CO. Middletown, OH

3. BIG ASH BREWING Turpin Hills, OH

18. FRETBOARD BREWING COMPANY Blue Ash, OH

4. BIRCUS BREWING COMPANY Ludlow, KY 5. BRAXTON BREWING COMPANY Covington, KY 6. BRAXTON LABS Bellevue, KY

34

16. FIFTY WEST BREWING COMPANY PRODUCTION WORKS Mariemont, OH

19. GRAINWORKS BREWING COMPANY West Chester, OH 20. GREAT CRESCENT BREWERY Aurora, IN 21. HIGHGRAIN BREWING COMPANY Silverton, OH

7. BRINK BREWING CO. College Hill, OH 8. CELLAR DWELLER BREWERY Morrow, OH 9. CHRISTIAN MOERLEIN MALT HOUSE OTR, OH

22. HOFBRÄUHAUS NEWPORT Newport, KY 54 23. HUMBLE MONK BREWING CO. Northside, OH

51

24. KARRIKIN SPIRITS COMPANY Fairfax, OH

10. THE COMMON BEER COMPANY Mason, OH

11. DARKNESS BREWING Bellevue, KY

25. LISTERMANN BREWING COMPANY Evanston, OH 26. LITTLE MIAMI BREWING COMPANY Milford, OH

12. DEAD LOW BREWING California, OH 13. DOGBERRY BREWING West Chester, OH

20

27. LOCOBA BY PLATFORM BEER CO. OTR, OH 30 28. MADTREE BREWING Oakley, OH

14. FIBONACCI BREWING COMPANY Mt. Healthy, OH 15. FIFTY WEST BREWING COMPANY BREWPUB Mariemont, OH

29. MARCH FIRST BREWING AND DISTILLING Blue Ash, OH 30. MASH CULT Florence, KY

APRIL 2020

31. MOERLEIN LAGER HOUSE Downtown, OH

33. MT. CARMEL BREWING COMPANY Mt. Carmel, OH

35. NARROW PATH BREWING CO. Loveland, OH

37. NORTHERN ROW BREWERY & DISTILLERY OTR, OH

32. MPH BREWING Montgomery, OH

34. MUNICIPAL BREW WORKS Hamilton, OH

36. NINE GIANT BREWING Pleasant Ridge, OH

38. PARADISE BREWING Anderson Twp., OH


19

42 40 17

48

10

8

44

45

13

29 35 18

14

BEER IS ONE OF THE FOUR BASIC FOOD groups in Cincinnati, along with chili, steaks, and ice cream. The early German immigrants’ skill at brewing and consuming beer was one of their lasting legacies, not only in Over-the-Rhine but across the region. An explosion in craft beer startups has made Cincinnati a brewery town once again—the No. 1 beer city in the U.S., according to a 2019 study. To our Craft Class of 2020, more than 50 strong, we say, Prost!

32

7

21 36

53 23

49

26

55

2 28

25

37 9 39 50 43 52 27 41

24

56

5

22 57

38

12

47. STREETSIDE BREWERY Columbia-Tusculum, OH 48. SWINE CITY BREWING Fairfield, OH 46 49. TAFT’S BREWPOURIUM Spring Grove Village, OH 50. TAFT’S ALE HOUSE OTR, OH 1

40. RIVERTOWN BREWERY & BARREL HOUSE Middletown, OH

41. ROCK BOTTOM RESTAURANT & BREWERY Downtown, OH 42. ROLLING MILL BREWING COMPANY Middletown, OH

PARKING

SERVES OTHER ALCOHOL

RIVER

33

6

39. RHINEGEIST BREWERY OTR, OH

DOG FRIENDLY

OUTDOOR AREA

3

11

4

BREWERY

HIGHWAY

47

31

16

SELLS FOOD

15

43. SAMUEL ADAMS BREWERY OTR, OH 44. 16 LOTS BREWING COMPANY Mason, OH

45. SONDER BREWING Mason, OH 46. SONS OF TOIL BREWING Mt. Orab, OH

51. 13 BELOW BREWERY Sayler Park/ Addyston, OH 52. 3 POINTS URBAN BREWERY OTR, OH

53. URBAN ARTIFACT Northside, OH 54. WEST SIDE BREWING Westwood, OH 55. WIEDEMANN’S FINE BEER St. Bernard, OH 56. THE WOODBURN BREWERY Walnut Hills, OH 57. WOODEN CASK BREWING COMPANY Newport, KY

APRIL 2020


56

APRIL 2020


CLASS CLOWN

M O S T E C O - F R I E N D LY

Bircus Brewing Company

F

F O U N D E D B Y PA U L M I L L E R , A N H O N E S T-T O - G O D R I N G L I N G B R O S .

clown, Bircus (pronounced beer-cuss) opened in 2018 to help support Circus Mojo, a troupe of performers who make good use of the taproom’s location in the historic Ludlow Theatre. Miller and his investors have plans to expand: The group purchased a former propane plant with Ohio River views and intends to convert it into a beercentric event center (and a canning line for the brewery). Who’s the clown now? BEST BREW: Lud-Lite, American Lager

HighGrain Brewing Co.

Sustainability was top priority when the owners of HighGrain revitalized Silverton’s former town hall into a brewery and restaurant. It’s still a main focus: They purchase electricity from an Ohio wind farm, donate spent grain to farmers, and source ingredients locally. Most recently, brewer Matthew Utter released Lil’ Joey Pale Ale, a beer to benefit victims of the Australia wildfires, inviting other breweries to serve it up and contribute to this worthy cause. BEST BREW: Drava, European Pale Ale 6860 PLAINFIELD RD., SILVERTON, (513) 7917000, HIGHGRAINBREWING.COM

322 ELM ST., LUDLOW, (800) 381-8232, BIRCUS.COM

BIGGEST OVER-ACHIEVER

Fibonacci Brewing Company Before long, “sourced locally” at Fibonacci will also mean right outside. The brewery has an on-site urban farm with an apiary, goats, chickens, and fruits and berries they plan to source for their beers, among them Pride of the Valley, a wheat ale with locally foraged paw paw fruit, and Mulberry Grove, a sour ale made with mulberries collected in a Fibonacci-run competition. There’s more to the story: Fibonacci also operates an Airbnb, so you can drink some beer, meet goats Fiddlehead and Honey, then cozy up in an old farmhouse for the night. BEST BREW: Pride of the Valley, Wheat Ale 1445 COMPTON RD., MT. HEALTHY, (513) 8321422, FIBBREW.COM

M O S T L I K E LY T O B E P R E S I D E N T

JOINT EFFORT

Rhinegeist Brewery

Since its birth in 2013 in the old Christian Moerlein bottling plant, Rhinegeist has gone from producing 2,000 barrels to 106,000 barrels in 2019. That makes it the second largest brewery in Cincinnati—and Ohio—by sales volume. All that growth also increases opportunities to give back. Local nonprofits can benefit from weekly charitable suds nights, and the annual MOVE event, when aerialists take over the taproom, supports Mission2Move, a group teaching mindful movement classes in an effort to prevent chronic stress. Great beer and giving back? That’s a platform we can get behind. BEST BREW: Truth, IPA 1910 ELM ST., OVER-THE-RHINE, (513) 381-1367, RHINEGEIST.COM

MOST GOTH

Arnold’s Bathtub Sangria Beer by Fifty West This juicy limited-release ale, inspired by Arnold’s rave-worthy sangria, is a tribute to the bar’s retired former owner Ronda Breeden and her 35 years (20 at the helm) at the historic establishment. Aptly dubbed A Long Strange Journey, it features notes of peach, strawberry, blueberry, and merlot grapes.

PHOTOGRAPHS BY LANCE ADKINS

Darkness Brewing

Those who embrace the dark side of the beer spectrum will find a home in this former garage in Northern Kentucky. Since Eric Bosler and Ron Sanders opened Darkness in 2016, it’s quickly become a neighborhood staple. A few lighter styles pop up among the stouts, porters, and brown ales on the menu, and there’s always a cider available. A permanent food truck, Darkness Diner, claims space in the courtyard, and you can turn your Sunday into Funday with the weekly brunch. BEST BREW: Man on the Moo, Milk Stout 224 FAIRFIELD AVE., BELLEVUE, (859) 8158375, DARKNESSBREWING.BEER

APRIL 2020

57


POP QUIZ

Past Lives The beers may be new, but the buildings occupied by many of your favorite breweries are not. Can you suss out each structure’s original use? — A M A N D A B O Y D W A L T E R S

Brewery

Once was

Alexandria Brewing Company

1

A

Imwalle Memorial Funeral Home

Bad Tom Smith Brewing

2

B

Dead Low Brewing

Procter & Gamble Mitchell Lab, a laboratory and testing facility

3

HighGrain Brewing Co.

C 4

Kern Bros. Bowling Alley, Newport Yellow Cab Co., punk hangout The Jockey Club

Nine Giant Brewing

5

D

A film warehouse for the motion picture industry

Samuel Adams Cincinnati Tap Room

6

E

The Myrtle theater, florist shop, bank branch, dry cleaner

Taft’s Brewpourium Cincinnati

7

F

Jeff Wyler auto dealership

Wiedemann’s Fine Beer

8

G

Silverton Municipal Building

Woodburn Brewery

9

H

Fifth Third Bank branch

Wooden Cask Brewing Company

10

I

A variety of retail tenants; most recently, The Earth Collectible Toy Mall

J

Rivergalley, Shanty’s Steak & Fish, A Touch of Elegance event center

JOINT EFFORT

Answers

1. F, 2. H, 3. J, 4. G, 5. I, 6. D 7. B, 8. A, 9. E, 10. C

APRIL 2020

I L LU S T R AT I O N BY E M I V I L L AV I C E N C I O

Bootsy Brewski by Fretboard Brewing A funked-up brut IPA with bright citrus notes and a dry, crisp finish, it can turn even the squarest among us into certified Funkateers (sick bass-slapping skills not included). Some of the proceeds benefit the Bootsy Collins Foundation, supporting youth music education.


CLASS SOURPUSS

Urban Artifact

A

AT F I R S T G L A N C E , I T M I G H T S E E M L I K E U R B A N A R T I FA C T I S H AV I N G

a bit of an identity crisis: It looks like a place of worship, sounds like a nightclub, smells like a restaurant, and ships away load after load of its canned beer. But the brewery, operating out of historic St. Patrick’s Church in Northside, has an identity that is so much more than its stellar fruit-forward sour beers. There’s its restaurant, Wildfire Pizza Kitchen; its radio station, Radio Artifact; its taproom (that’s become a local-music mecca); its private event and outdoor spaces; and of course its brewery, which despite all the multitasking doesn’t sacrifice an ounce of quality in its on-site and wholesale offerings. BEST BREW: The Gadget, Midwest Fruit Tart 1660 BLUE ROCK ST., NORTHSIDE, (513) 542-4222, ARTIFACTBEER.COM

PHOTOGRAPH BY LANCE ADKINS

M O S T AT H L E T I C

Fifty West Brewing Company

Lots of breweries host on-site workout classes, but Fifty West takes “exercising while drinking” to the next level with sand volleyball, running, cycling, and canoeing and kayaking programming at its Production Works location along the Little Miami Scenic Trail and Little Miami River. It also hosts Punch Out, an annual “brewery-on-brewery” boxing tournament, and plans to debut a fast-casual restaurant with a beer garden and futsal court in the former Pizelii space next month. To fuel its patrons’ active lifestyles, it serves Quencher, a 100-calorie activated ale with electrolytes and reduced gluten. Plus, a seasonal menu at its Brewpub is inspired by its Flying Pig Marathon training programs. BEST BREW: Doom Pedal, White Ale 7668 U.S. ROUTE 50, COLUMBIA TWP., (513) 834-8789, FIFTYWESTBREW.COM

APRIL 2020

59


BY THE NUMBERS M O S T L I K E LY T O W I N O LY M P I C G O L D

99 Bottles of Beer on the Wall But who’s counting? We are!

25

LOCAL

Brink Brewing Co.

—JOHN FOX

Local breweries sold 109 different beers March 6 & 7 at the Duke Energy Convention Center.

BREWERIES AT WINTER BEERFEST

5905 HAMILTON AVE., COLLEGE HILL, (513) 882-3334, BRINKBREWING.COM

CLASS MUSICIAN

Fretboard Brewing Company

1

43%

#

GROWTH IN

CRAFT BEER PRODUCTION

25

# BEST CITIES

MOST BREWERIES

FOR BEER

PER CAPITA

DRINKERS

Cincinnati has six breweries per 50,000 residents, a stat that skews toward smaller towns like Portland, Maine (#1), and Ashville, North Carolina (#2). Cincinnati was one of just four major cities on the list.

Cincinnati topped this annual ranking of U.S. cities, based on breweries per 100,000 residents, beer choices per brewery, and average price of a pint.

Kentucky tied with New Jersey for the highest output growth among U.S. states between 2015 and 2018.

“Relative affordability and variety make the city a savory option for even the choosiest of beer lovers.” TOTAL BREWERIES

53

These pages feature breweries in eight counties in Ohio, Kentucky, and Indiana. (See map on page 54.) Not counted: Esoteric, opening in May in Walnut Hills.

ANNUAL BEER PRODUCTION

900,000 barrels

Hudepohl Brewing production peaked in 1946, after the U.S. government contracted with the company to supply beer to troops during World War II. The largest local brewery today, Rhinegeist, produced 106,000 barrels last year.

BEER OBSESSION

40 gallons per person

In Cincinnati, per capita consumption of beer—counting every man, woman, and child—was 40 gallons in 1893. The national average was 16 gallons. APRIL 2020

This place hits all the right notes with an emphasis on live music three nights a week, plus open mic nights and flights delivered on a modified guitar neck. A second brewpub in downtown Hamilton offers full lunch and dinner menus and a rooftop patio overlooking the Great Miami River. Fretboard also uploads regular Spotify playlists created with customer input, from East Coast Hip-Hop to ’80s One-Hit Wonders. BEST BREW: Reba, Strawberry Blonde Ale TAPROOM: 5800 CREED RD., BLUE ASH, (513) 914-4677, FRETBOARDBREWING.COM PUBLIC HOUSE: 103 MAIN ST., HAMILTON, (513) 737-1111, FBPUBLICHOUSE.COM

B E S T I M A G I N AT I O N March First Brewing and Distilling

When this brewery registered with the state, it didn’t have a name, so as a placeholder, the owners used the date, March First. Once they discovered that Ohio became a state on that day in 1803, the name clicked. They’ve displayed a pioneering approach ever since, venturing into spirits, cider, and hard seltzer in addition to a full menu of craft beers. The large taproom features a pizza and sandwich kitchen, an outdoor patio, and specialty cocktails made with its own Cooper Island Rum, Sycamore Whiskey, and Voltage Vodka brands. You won’t run out of options here. BEST BREW: Irish Red, Red Ale 7885 E. KEMPER RD., SYCAMORE TWP., (513) 718-9173, MARCHFIRSTBREWING.COM

MOST LAID BACK THE TRUTH

60

Would you expect to find the country’s Very Small Brewing Company of the Year in College Hill? How about the back-to-back champion? That would be Brink, which took Great American Beer Festival medals in the Sweet/Cream Stout and English-Style Mild Ale categories for the second year in a row in 2019. The cozy, welcoming neighborhood brewpub is unassuming otherwise, with gleaming tanks in full view and old-fashioned board games in the bookcase. BEST BREW: Hold the Reins, English Ale

ABOUT BREWING

$35/person American Legacy Tours hosts a monthly walk through Overthe-Rhine’s brewing past and present, climbing down into old lagering tunnels and watching the current brewing process (with samples, of course). The next tour is April 19.

West Side Brewing

It’s all the best parts of the west side under one roof, from a “come as you are” attitude to a nononsense beer menu of Amber Ale, Common Ale, Hefeweizen, Double IPA, and Session IPA. Nothing too cute. You’ll find yourself among running clubs warming up and/or cooling down, friends studying up for trivia night, and families fresh from the new Westwood Town Hall playground across the street. West is best, hun. BEST BREW: Schwarzbier, Dark Lager 3044 HARRISON AVE., WESTWOOD, (513) 661-2337, WESTSIDEBREWING.COM


JOINT EFFORT

Kris & Remus by Listermann Brewing Listermann has partnered with the Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden to celebrate its ridiculously cute ambassador cheetah cub Kris and her equally adorable companion pup Remus with a canned caramel stout brewed with vanilla. Proceeds benefit the zoo.

C L A S S H E A LT H N U T

Rolling Mill Brewing Company

A

A CELIAC DISEASE DIAGNOSIS LEFT JOSH LAUBACH UNABLE TO CON-

sume gluten, a protein found in wheat. That meant no more bread, pastries—or beer. But Josh and wife Megan jumped into action and, over time, learned the art of brewing beer, minus the gluten. In 2016 they turned that skill into Rolling Mill Brewing Company, a fully gluten-free brewery in the heart of Middletown. Unlike most GF beers, Rolling Mill’s IPAs, lagers, stouts, and other brews are made with grains that don’t contain gluten (rather than simply removing the gluten after brewing), meaning they’re safe for those avoiding gluten and those with celiac alike. BEST BREW: Two Goldens, American Lager 916 FIRST AVE., MIDDLETOWN, (513) 217-4444, ROLLINGMILLBC.COM

MOST CHANGED SINCE FRESHMAN YEAR

M O S T L I K E LY T O B E A M A D S C I E N T I S T

C L A S S I N N O VAT O R

MadTree Brewing

Listermann Brewing Company

Braxton Brewing Company

If you’ve been a fan of MadTree since 2013, you remember its original Kennedy Avenue taproom, located about a mile from the much larger Madison Road facility it debuted in 2017. Now a community gathering spot and home to Oakley’s monthly flea market and Catch-A-Fire Pizza, MadTree continues to grow as Cincinnati’s third-largest brewery. It recently redesigned its cans and website and joined 1% For the Planet, an international organization whose members donate 1 percent of annual sales to nonprofits focused on environmental sustainability. BEST BREW: Happy Amber, Amber Ale

Dan Listermann moved his home brewing supply shop to Dana Avenue in 1995, catering to weekend mash masters—at that point, a very niche audience. In 2008, he decided to start producing suds for the general public, eventually adding a small tasting space next to the shop. Slowly, the taproom footprint has grown, and the beer lineup has evolved from the early days, when dark beers dominated (hello, Chickow), to experimental New England IPAs (hello, Team Fiona). Still, Listermann serves hobby brewers, selling kits that let you cook up your own version of its recipes. BEST BREW: Nutcase, Peanut Butter Porter

You could say Braxton Brewing Company likes to break the mold. It crowd-funded $71,885 to construct its taproom, created the area’s first barrelaging brewery and taproom, and built a $5 million rooftop space nearly five years after first opening. It also gets creative. Beyond staple offerings like Garage Beer lager, Revamp IPA, and Storm golden cream ale, Braxton also partners with companies to create new brews, such as Graeter’s Black Raspberry Chocolate Chip Stout and Buzz, the official beer of the Bunbury Music Festival. BEST BREW: Storm, Golden Cream Ale

3301 MADISON RD., OAKLEY, (513) 836-8733, MADTREEBREWING.COM

PHOTOGRAPH BY LANCE ADKINS

1621 DANA AVE., EVANSTON, (513) 731-1130, LISTERMANNBREWING.COM

27 W. SEVENTH ST., COVINGTON, (859) 2615600, BRAXTONBREWING.COM

APRIL 2020

61


T O P O F TH E CLASS

” IS AFT BREWERY THE TERM “CR renovated ware-

us with “a p ctically synonymo pr pra s make llennial white dude mi house where bearded inle op pe ly usly not the on beer.” They’re obvio sure ey th t bu , try us wing ind volved in the craft bre lat pu ion. cant portion of its po do make up a signifi ld, mo who don’t fit this We scouted six folks what d hin be n r to the perso from a female brewe wery, bre d ne ow yrit first mino will be Cincinnati’s try us they got into this ind and asked them how One are moving forward. and what their plans ng beer ari sh joy They each find thing’s for certain: rs. tte ma lly rea at at’s all th with others, and th

nging Six industry leaders challe the status quo.

Mike Dewey, y 47, and Kathleen Dewey, 48 BREWERY

MT. CARMEL BREWING COMPANY FAVORITE LOCAL BEER

“MY FAVORITE GO-TO BEER IS THE ONE IN FRONT OF ME.” —MIKE

When they th founded Cincinnati’s oldest microbrewery in 2005, Mike and Kathleen een Dew Dewey became industry pioneers—“perhaps more appropriately defined as guinea pigs,” Mike says. “There was no one to borrow a pitch of yeast from, or a few pounds of hops.” He started brewing beer 19 years ago while working in commercial development (how he met Kathleen), honing his craft in the family’s cellar, but it was Kathleen’s idea to launch Mt. Carmel. As president, she controls all the finances and, “most importantly, Mike’s spending,” she says, jokingly. The husband-and-wife duo spent years focused on distribution, getting their beer on local store shelves and paving the way for breweries that followed in their footsteps. “Charting new territory was the driving force. It was motivating and rewarding to Kathleen and me to forge that history,” Mike says. Clearly their game is still strong: Last year Mt. Carmel experienced a 400 percent revenue leap. “The growth is quite competitive,” he says. “Like most industries, you need to adapt and navigate. We believe we have a course set for the next 15 years together.”

QUOTE “I do work for beer!” —Mike

Brian Jackson, 34 BREWERY

ESOTERIC BREWING COMPANY FAVORITE LOCAL BEER

“OBVIOUSLY I’M PARTIAL TO MADTREE, SO IDENTITY CRISIS HAS ALWAYS BEEN MY FAVORITE.”

There’s been plenty of buzz surrounding Esoteric Brewing, slated to open in May in Walnut W Hills’s historic Paramount building. Amid an already-packed craft beer scene, Esoteric will stand out as the first minority-owned brewery in Cincinnati. To founder and brewer Brian Jackson, who currently works at MadTree, that status is about much more than beer. “We want to promote and champion diversity in a way that is representative of our culture as a whole,” says Jackson, who joined the MORTAR business accelerator and connected with co-owner Marvin Abrinica. Together, they raised almost $800,000 through crowdfunding to revitalize the 1930s Art Deco building, part of a redevelopment project in the neighborhood’s emerging business district. Esoteric will look different than typical taprooms—for example, you won’t find any TVs, a choice designed to “put more emphasis on the experience our customers have with our beer, rather than the beer itself,” he says. As for the beer: Jackson loves to keep things traditional, so the lineup will feature simple styles focusing on the recipes’ main raw ingredients.

QUOTE “Brewing for me is a personal passion. But the main reason for getting into the

industry is so that I can utilize my position to elevate those around me and bring positive change in the communities we serve.” APRIL 2020

I L LU S T R AT I O N S BY C O N R A D G A R N E R


Natalie Blair, 36 BREWERY

RHINEGEIST BREWERY FAVORITE LOCAL BEER

GADGET BY URBAN ARTIFACT OR HOLD THE REINS BY BRINK BREWING

Brewing wasn’t Natalie Blair’s first career choice, but it’s one she’s grateful too have found. Before joining Rhinegeist in 2015, Blair taught architecture at Miam Miami University. Her husband had been working as a driver for the brewery when she was jokingly offered a role as a tour guide. “I was fascinated by the combination of science, art, and will [involved in brewing],” she says. After moving on to a role on the packaging team, where she spent a year and a half, she was promoted to brewer and has been waking up at 3:15 a.m. to churn out some of the city’s most popular suds for the past three years. Her architecture background comes in handy, she says, in understanding the mechanics of the complex process and finding creative solutions to “random, really strange little problems.” Most people would be surprised at how physically demanding the job is, she explains, requiring carrying 50- and 100-pound bags of grains up two flights of stairs to the brew deck. Between the hauling and thorough cleanings, she says “it’s like working out eight hours a day.”

QUOTE “It is definitely a male-dominated industry all across the board. But I do find that

women really are making forays and showing how valuable [we] can be to a team—in any industry.”

Paul Kemp, 27 BREWERY

HUMBLE MONK BREWING FAVORITE LOCAL BEER

RHINEGEIST’S GOBI BRUT IPA

Paul Kemp’s Ke foray into craft brewing started with a joke. His dad had been home-brewing ome-b for more than 35 years before the duo decided to create Humble Monk Brewing in Northside. A business owner his whole life, Paul’s Humb dad’s most recent venture had been manufacturing biodiesel, which left him with a couple of food grade tanks that the pair jokingly admitted would make great fermentation tanks. “But one day,” Kemp says, “he actually came up to me and said, ‘How about you just write a business plan and we’ll see where it goes?’ ” Kemp, fresh off studying entrepreneurship at Northern Kentucky University, got to work, and “the rest,” he says, “is history.” Today, Kemp runs the day-to-day operations of the business while his father serves as brewmaster to a roster of beers that’s heavy on Belgian varieties. Kemp’s wife and mother help bartend on the weekends, his younger brother helps cellar, and his sisterin-law handles event planning and social media (with an assist from his sister). “It’s definitely a family affair,” he says.

QUOTE “Dad’s always loved brewing. He gets less joy out of drinking it and more out of

sharing it with others. That’s the mantra for how we craft our recipes. Our goal is to bring the joy of craft beer to everyone.”

Jessica Green, 34 BREWERY

SONDER BREWING

FAVORITE LOCAL BEER

KING CAKE FROM BRINK BREWING

Five yea years ago, Jessica Green was running an in-home daycare and waitressing ng at th the Hyde Park Keystone Bar & Grill (now closed) when her passion for craft beer was tapped. “It was really neat to see how much of a culture there was behind it,” she says. Her involvement in Cincinnati’s chapter of Girls Pint Out, a national nonprofit that connects women interested in craft beer, led to a bartending opportunity at Brink Brewing Company in 2018. The following September, she joined Sonder, where she worked as a bartender and taproom manager before stepping into her current role as Director of Beer Education last July. As a liaison between the production team and all other employees, she’s tasked with making sure everyone’s “speaking the same language” when it comes to Sonder beer. She does so by organizing regular tastings and classes about Sonder’s history, brewing process, and ingredients. Not only does this benefit the staff, it benefits the customers, too. “Enthusiasts want to talk about the beer when they sit down at the bar,” she says. Green makes sure that’s possible.

QUOTE “I don’t have a giant résumé full of [craft beer experience] and I’m not very well-

versed in the scientific side of it, but I think if you’re passionate about this industry, there are doors open all over the place.”

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Starting

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We scouted the best beers in the area to draft this first-string six-pack (including one hard seltzer) that should be on the top shelf of your fridge all summer long. LAGER, 1 BLUEBERRY RIVERTOWN BREWING

COMPANY A fruit-forward American Lager, 4% ABV

2 SUMMER, WEST SIDE BREWING A citrusy English-Style Summer Ale, 4.8% ABV

REAL, 3 HELLES GRAINWORKS BREWING

OF BENGAL, 4 BAY CHRISTIAN MOERLEIN

BLOW, 5 DEAD BRAXTON BREWING CO.

6 MARCH FIRST BREWING

COMPANY A smooth Helles-Style Lager, 4.7% ABV

BREWING CO. A double IPA with aggressive hops, 7.6% ABV ASTRA SATURN PEACH,

A hard seltzer with a balanced sweet and tart finish, 5% ABV

A rich and roasty tropical stout, 7.2% ABV

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2

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BEST DRESSED

Taft’s Ale House

T

T H E R E ’ S S O M E T H I N G S P E C I A L A B O U T B E I N G I N TA F T ’ S A L E H O U S E .

Though the site has no direct ties to its namesake William H. Taft and there’s no evidence he ever stepped foot in the building, it’s steeped in history. Constructed in 1850 as St. Paul’s Evangelical Church—said to be the oldest Protestant church building in the city—it held congregations of Northern German immigrants until the church merged with a Westwood congregation in 1948. Following decades of abandoned renovation attempts, the brewery opened in 2015 after an exhaustive $9.6 million restoration. The drama of the space’s gothic arched windows, soaring tray ceilings, and overlooking mezzanine are unmatched. While three small tanks are visible where the altar once stood, almost all of the beer is brewed at its 50,000-square-foot “brewpourium” on Spring Grove Avenue. BEST BREW: Verdict No. 6, India Pale Lager 1429 RACE ST., OVER-THE-RHINE, (513) 334-1393, TAFTSBEER.COM

M O S T L I K E LY T O A C E T H E G R O U P P R O J E C T

Big Ash Brewing Nine years ago, Dave Emery and 25 of his “beerminded buddies” invested $5,200 in brewing equipment and started making beer in the basement of his Anderson Township home. In September, after renovating a Mexican restaurant into a taproom and brewery and growing to almost 100 partners, the group unveiled Big Ash Brewing. The coolest part? A 28-tap self-serve tap wall with Big Ash beers, guest brews, and wine lets customers sample all they want (employees start pouring after 32 ounces) without bothering a bartender or holding up the line. BEST BREW: Vanilla Cream, Cream Ale 5230 BEECHMONT AVE., MT. WASHINGTON, (513) 401-6868, BIGASHBREWING.COM

MOST OUTDOORSY

Little Miami Brewing Company Perched on the edge of the Little Miami River and Little Miami Scenic Trail in downtown Milford, this brewery screams outdoorsy. The river views from its patio and rooftop bar are unbeatable, and most of its beers are named after animals or things found in nature—like Junkyard Dog, its global IPA, and Bike Path, its Bohemian Pilsner. And the brewery is just as fun to visit during the winter months. On a chilly Monday evening in February, the taproom was packed with families playing cards, groups prepping for trivia, and friends enjoying fresh made-in-house brick oven pizza. BEST BREW: Pterodactyl, Hefeweizen 208 MILL ST., MILFORD, (513) 713-1121, LITTLE MIAMIBREWING.COM

BIGGEST HEARTTHROB

JOINT EFFORT

Streetside Brewery

This cozy neighborhood joint is an under-the-radar fan favorite. Last fall it took top prize in Cincinnati Magazine’s Battle of the Breweries bracket. It’s easy to see why: The lineup is diverse with IPAs, wheats, lagers, and fruity varieties, so there’s something for everybody, and it’s damn good. If the stellar suds and charming vibe aren’t enough to get you in the door, the activities schedule will. About once a week, mosey over for beer pairings, crafting sessions, and trivia nights. BEST BREW: Suh, Brah?, New England IPA 4003 EASTERN AVE., COLUMBIA-TUSCULUM, (513) 615-5877, STREETSIDEBREWERY.COM

MOST ARTISTIC

Jeff Ruby’s Smoked Amber Ale by Taft’s Brewing The restaurateur and brewery convened to concoct a signature ale to mark the 20th anniversary of Ruby’s downtown steakhouse. The result is slightly smoky with cherry wood notes, pairing well with red meat. The Jeff Ruby Foundation gets a cut of the sales.

PHOTOGRAPHS BY LANCE ADKINS

3 Points Urban Brewery

Opened in 2018 by Hickory Wald, 3 Points is about more than just beer. Its founders wanted to create an outlet for local artists to showcase their work. And you can’t help but feel a creative spark here: Each beer on the rotating tap list is paired with original artwork that serves as a visual representation of the beer’s tasting notes—and of course, you’re surrounded by all those murals. Get in good with the eclectic neighborhood folk and join the Wednesday Mug Club, where beer refills are $2 all day with purchase of a 3 Points mug. BEST BREW: Albatross, American Lager 331 E. 13TH ST., PENDLETON, (513) 918-4804, 3POINTSBEER.COM

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n e e b s ha l e z n rs e e S t k b c u i N do e h t g e provin g his entir ll wron areer. Wi lc l a b eds e R i t bas a inn c e n i k C a e m h s t an f r i e ? h and t me mistake the sa

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W W H E N N I C K S E N Z E L A R R I V E D AT G R E AT American Ball Park last spring, he was one of the top-ranked prospects in baseball, more highly touted than all but one Reds farmhand in the last 30 years. At every level of the minor leagues, he had blown scouts away with his preternatural talent and maturity, both at the plate and in the field. Before that, he’d been a college star, rising to the top of his draft class after three standout seasons at the University of Tennessee. It’s easy to draw the conclusion that Senzel was born to be a star, lifted to the bright lights of baseball’s big stage by natural talent and athleticism. He was the No. 2 overall pick in Major League Baseball’s 2016 draft, after all, and the Reds’ starting center fielder at age 23. As it turns out, nothing could be further from the truth. “Growing up, I was a late bloomer,” he says. “Always small, and especially smaller than a lot of my teammates.” More than a decade ago, as Senzel entered Farragut High School, near Knoxville, Tennessee, he encountered the first instance of being told he wasn’t quite talented enough. He loved baseball and was eager to try out for Farragut’s nationally ranked powerhouse team, which has won nine state championships since 2003. Seven Farragut grads are currently playing professional baseball, including Patrick Raby, a right-handed pitcher the Reds drafted last summer out of Vanderbilt University.

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G A M E P H OTO G R A P H C O U R T E SY T H E C I N C I N N AT I R E D S

y l n o I can hat w l o r cont ntrol, o c n a Ic s ’ t a h and t ut o g n i go g n i y a l p d n a e m a g the ry e v e d r ha . y a d single

OFF AND RUNNING NICK SENZEL (LEFT AND PREVIOUS SPREAD) PHOTOGRAPHED IN DECEMBER 2019. HE MADE HIS MAJOR LEAGUE DEBUT FOR THE REDS (ABOVE) ON MAY 3, 2019.

Young Nick had just returned from two years away from the game. His father, Jeff, was an engineer for an international firm, and his job required him to relocate to Kesgrave, England, a couple of hours northeast of London. His family, including Nick and younger sister Madison, followed. “It was a little bump in the road, because when my family moved to England, obviously there was no baseball there, so I didn’t play during my sixthand seventh-grade years,” says Senzel. “A couple of important years leading up to high school ball, knowing the type of program Farragut had.” Later, he would come to see his time in England as a blessing in disguise because he got to try new sports, including rugby, and experience a different culture. But when he returned to the U.S., it was clear he’d lost time in terms of developing skills that would help him catch the attention of the high school baseball coaches. And so, in the fall of 2009, Senzel— all of 5-foot-5 and maybe 120 pounds— walked timidly to the gym door, where Farragut’s coach had just posted the list of players who’d made the cut. Jeff watched his son scan the list, then turn slowly back to him. “Dad, what are we going to do?” he remembers Nick asking. “My name isn’t there.”

M

Y DAD ALWAYS TOLD ME I’d get bigger and I’d get taller and stronger,” Senzel says, remembering his father’s advice. “Just keep your head down and keep working. That it would all kinda work itself out.” Jeff had reason to believe that this freshman year setback was just a temporary hiccup. He remembers signing up 5-year-old Nick for tee-ball when the family lived in California. At the tryout, the coach approached Jeff. “I actually thought [the coach] was going to tell me that he needed more practice,” he says, “and that Nick could try again at the next tryouts.” Instead, the coach told him that his son was already too advanced for tee-ball. Young Nick had always been a competitor, too, demanding to race his father everywhere, when they stepped out of a car or walked out of the house. Jeff, a former all-conference basketball player at Knox College in Illinois, was happy to oblige. “And I never let him win,” he says. “That’s why I won’t race him today. I’d get a whipping I’d never hear the end of.” After getting cut from the high school team and staring at the prospect of yet another year without baseball, Nick resolved to work harder than anyone else. C O N T I N U E D O N P A G E 1 0 4

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We took our adopted daughter back to visit her birth country, her orphanage, and her foster mother. It’s amazing how far we’ve come. By Elliot Grossman / ćOOXVſDWLRŦE\Ran Zheng

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D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 3 C I N C I N N AT I M A G A Z I N E . C O M 7 1


DANI ACTED AS IF NOTHING UNusual had happened. Minutes after our plane took off, a flight attendant asked our 11-year-old daughter in Chinese if she wanted a beverage. But the only language Dani speaks is English. We were headed to China last summer, the first time we would return to the nation where Dani was born. My wife, Lynda, and I, Loveland area residents, adopted her when she was 21 months old. On this flight leaving Detroit for Beijing, Dani was sitting between us. The flight attendant, who appeared to be Chinese, asked us in English about our beverage preferences. But when she addressed Dani, she switched to Chinese. Dani replied, “Sprite, please.” Our daughter spent the first 21 months of her life in the city of Datong, a few hundred miles from Beijing, alternating between an orphanage and foster care. She was one of the millions of Chinese babies given up by their birth parents during the 35-year period when China limited couples to one child, a state effort to control the population and boost the economy. Most of the babies available for adoption were girls, because Chinese culture places

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a higher value on boys. Many had disabilities. Dani, born with a cleft lip, was doubly challenged in that society’s eyes. As we traveled in China again for two weeks, I thought about how far Dani had come—not only on this 7,000-mile journey but also in her 11 years of life. She’s an A student at Loveland Intermediate School and one of the tallest girls in her class, plays in a highly competitive soccer league, and has lots of friends. Despite being born in the humblest of circumstances, Dani has thrived. As clichéd as it might sound, the African proverb It takes a village helps explain why. We’ve been blessed to live in an area with strong schools, a top-notch pediatric hospital, a supportive congregation, and dedicated volunteer soccer coaches. And the local chapter of Families with Children from China helped us figure out how one family can straddle two cultures.

OUR ROUTE TO BUILDING A FAMILY BEGAN IN 2005, WHEN WE SUBmitted our application to adopt a child from China. Americans adopted nearly 8,000 Chinese children that year, but by 2009 the number had dropped to 3,000, largely because the availability of children had decreased and the waiting period to be matched with a child increased. Lynda and I became impatient and frustrated, so we decided to place ourselves on a list to adopt a child with special needs, knowing we’d be matched sooner. It was a harrowing decision, because we had to place checkmarks on a list of special needs we would consider acceptable. Within months, our Pennsylvania-based adoption agency, Welcome House, told us that a tiny girl with a cleft lip was available. We saw photos of her and fell in love. In October 2009, after indicating that we intended to adopt her, we headed to Beijing. Paul and Laurie van Genderen of New Jersey were also using Welcome House to adopt a Chinese girl. This would be their second daughter. Hanna, then 4, had been adopted three years earlier from Guangdong Province in southeast China. This time, the family was headed to the same place as us, Shanxi Province, where they planned to adopt a girl about the same age as the one we were. These adoption trips last a couple of weeks, with sightseeing built in to allow families to learn something about their child’s birth country and heritage. There’s also a lot of time-consuming red tape required by the Chinese and U.S. governments. In Beijing, our explorations featured traditional attractions: the Great Wall, Tiananmen Square, the Forbidden City, and more. We noticed that Chinese often stared at Hanna and her parents, looking at her Chinese face, then at her white parents, then back at Hanna. We prepared ourselves for the same reaction with our daughter. The next stop was Taiyuan, the capital of Shanxi Province, where Datong is located. We had heard that couples often meet their new children in groups of a halfdozen or more, leading to a chaotic scene, with children crying and some briefly being handed to the wrong parents. Our experience thankfully would be different. That morning, the van Genderens met their new family member in a government office where adoptions and marriages are handled. Hanna wore a shirt that said “Big Sister.” Two orphanage workers brought in a 20-month-old girl with tears on her cheeks, who’d be known as Ella. As soon as she entered the room, she began crying and continued to cry the entire time we were in the office. Hanna, a usually calm girl, began crying as well, demanding to be held. It was our turn that afternoon. As we headed back to the government build-

The hotel dining room was filled with dozens of American families, each with a Chinese child.


ing, we spotted a child in the arms of a woman exiting a taxi. Some adoptive parents have trouble recognizing their new children—they’d changed since their last photo—but Lynda and I knew our daughter-to-be in an instant. Her hair was slightly longer than we remembered, but she had the same beautiful smile. For a moment, we were confused about what to do. China has rules about its adoption procedures. Could we approach our child outside the building? We did, of course. In fact, we walked into the building with her and her two caregivers, accompanied them in the elevator, and followed them down the hallway to the same office where Laurie, Paul, and Hanna had met Ella several hours earlier. The baby smiled at us. Inside the office, one of the orphanage workers immediately handed her to Lynda, rather than waiting for the official paperwork. She handed me a red jacket with the word “boy” on it, shoes, and a soft bun in a wrapper. Our daughter-to-be ate the bun as well as Cheerios we’d brought. She remained quiet and contented in Lynda’s arms. She did the same thing a few minutes later when I held her. Back in our hotel room, we got to know our new daughter, whom we decided to call Dani after my father, Daniel. She remained contented, calm, and happy. I fed her Goldfish crackers one by one. When I thought she’d eaten enough, she reached for more. It was difficult to believe a tiny 20-pound girl could eat so many. She didn’t walk, she struggled to stand, and she didn’t make many sounds. But we knew to expect developmental delays, a common occurrence for orphanage children. We put her to bed, and she slept through the night. Our Cincinnati pediatrician, the mother of three adopted Chinese girls, had warned us that the experience would be like a blind date. There’s no way to know how a child will react to her new parents or even whether the reports we’d received about her were accurate. So we prepared for the worst and hoped for the best. Before we left our hotel the next day, Lynda already seemed like she’d been a mother for years when it came to dressing and feeding Dani. I accidentally poured milk down Dani’s shirt three minutes after we’d dressed her. Dani didn’t complain. It was time to drive to Datong, a city of more than 3.3 million people, to visit Dani’s orphanage and take care of more paperwork. The facility was located on a campus of clean, modern-looking buildings called social welfare institutes. Inexplicably, we saw only one child in the RAISING A FAMILY (CLOCKWISE FROM TOP RIGHT) ELLIOT 15 minutes we spent there, a toddler AND LYNDA GROSSMAN MEET THEIR DAUGHTER DANI FOR THE FIRST TIME IN 2009; DANI IN LOVELAND'S NISBET PARK who sprinted out of a room before an AT AGE 2; THE GROSSMANS VISIT THE HANGING TEMPLE OF employee caught up to him. HENGSHAN NEAR DATONG, WHERE DANI WAS BORN, IN 2019.

P H OTO G R A P H S BY ( C H I N A ) L AU R I E VA N G E N D E R E N A N D ( LOV E L A N D ) C R A I G R U T T L E

Dani had lived on the second floor of one of the buildings. The orphanage director escorted us to her floor but didn’t allow us to walk down the hallway to visit the room she’d shared with other children. I gave our camcorder to an employee, who shot video showing 18 empty cribs in the room, some decorated with Mickey Mouse pictures. The next day we boarded a flight for Guangzhou, a city of more than 10 million people in southeast China that’s home to a major Procter & Gamble facility. All American families adopting Chinese children are required to go there; its U.S. Consulate is the only one in the country that handles documents for American families adopting Chinese children. The next morning, in this foreign land with its amazing Great Wall, we saw yet another spectacular sight: A hotel dining room with several dozen American families, each with a Chinese child. Most were girls, 1 or 2 years old, in high chairs. Some had older brothers and sisters who came along for the trip. A few couples brought grandparents. Dani continued her quest to break the world record for eating. She ate food from the buffet, including French toast with syrup, bananas, and apples. That night we finally found a food she didn’t like: broccoli. The day’s major activity was a medical exam required by U.S. law. A series of doctors examined Dani, and she cried at times. A doctor distracted her with a tambourine with a Chinese drawing on it. As we left his exam room, we accidentally walked out with the tambourine. When we tried to return it to the doctor, he motioned that we should let C O N T I N U E D O N P A G E 1 0 8

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E XC E P T I O N A L D E S I G N

INTERIOR DESIGN | FINE FURNITURE & ACCESSORIES 859.441.2378 •

BestFurnitureGaller y.com • 1123 S. Ft. Thomas Ave. • For t Thomas, KY

MONDAY 10AM–8PM | TUESDAY, THURSDAY, FRIDAY 10AM–6PM | WEDNESDAY by appointment only | SATURDAY 10AM–5PM | SUNDAY closed


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

C I NC I N NATI DESIGN

Contractor NEAL’S DESIGN REMODEL, Designer CHRISTINA TEMPLE

THE BEST IN LOCAL DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION

A P R I L 2 0 2 0 C I N C I N N AT I M A G A Z I N E . C O M 7 5


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ISL AND LIFEST YLE M A K I N G T H E M O S T O F A L A RG E K I TC H E N Location: Indian Hill

Contractor NEAL’S DESIGN REMODEL Project Consultant FRANK KUHLMEIER Designer CHRISTINA TEMPLE

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B

efore its renovation, this kitchen was anchored by dark cabinets, and an oddly shaped island cut off the working area of the kitchen.

Dated lighting, countertops, and a bland tile floor all combined to form an uninspired space. The homeowners wanted a more modern style, and Christina Temple, designer for Neal’s Design Remodel, was able to deliver. The fresh palette of white, blue, and gray in the cabinetry is offset by Scandinavian-style flooring, white oak with a slightly grayed natural finish. This choice, along with marble-like quartz countertops with creamy-gray

DOUBLE VISION

According to designers at Neal’s, the double island is becoming a popular feature in luxury kitchen design. It adds storage as well as another element of style—here, Benjamin Moore’s Newburyport Blue delivers a pop of color.

veining, the homeowners’ leather seating, and warm gray paint selected for the walls, adds coziness and a sense of casual, almost cottage-like charm. Playful blue on the working island expands the color palette and creates a complementary element in the center of this welcoming, highly functional room.

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HIDE AND SEEK

Using a drawer microwave frees up counter space (above); cabinet-style panels on the refrigerator (bottom far right) allow it to blend in, and there’s also a convenient, garage-style home for small appliances. Traditional elements—layered crown molding, brushed satin nickel hardware, stylish glass pendant lighting, and even the shapely curve of the seating island (right)—ensure that the relaxed style of the space matches the character of the Indian Hill home.

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SOURCES

Appliance Hardware – Neo in brushed satin nickel, Top Knobs, topknobs.com Appliances – Thermador, Custom Distributors, Fairfield Artwork – Homeowner’s collection Backsplash (Field Tile) – VS Soho gloss white 4 x 16 tile, Hamilton Parker, Sharonville Bar Backsplash – Nola Layfayette 8 x 8 tile, Hamilton Parker, Sharonville Bar Sink – Como hand-hammered nickel bar prep sink, Thompson Traders, thompsontraders.com Barn Door – Custom by homeowner Barn Door Hardware – Artisan Hardware, artisanhard ware.com Cabinetry – Brookhaven Custom Cabinetry, Colony door style in maple with bright white paint (Baltic Sea on shelves opposite bar), Wood-Mode, woodmode.com Faucets – Trinsic single handle pull-down in Arctic Stainless, Delta, deltafaucet.com Finishing Touches – Sacksteder’s Interior Designs, Montgomery Floating Shelves Above Bar – Walnut shelves, WoodMode, wood-mode.com Flooring – French White Oak 3/4 x 7, Mansion Hill Custom Floors, Newport Hardware – Brushed satin nickel pulls and knobs, Wood-Mode, wood-mode.com Pendant Lights – Machinist glass cloche pendant, Restoration Hardware, restorationhardware.com Plates/China (Blue and White) – Vintage Johnson Brothers Indies, Crate & Barrel, crateandbarrel.com Plates/China (White) – Louvre/Limoges, Bernardaud, bernardaud.com Pull-Out Organizer – Rev-a-Shelf, rev-a-shelf.com Seating Island Countertop (also around Stove and as Stove Backsplash) – Brittanicca Warm, Cambria, cambriausa.com Stools – Slope leather stools, West Elm, westelm.com Wall Paint – Repose Gray, Sherwin-Williams, sher win-williams.com Working Island Countertop (also Bar, Refrigerator Wall, and Open Shelf on Seating Island) – Clareanne, Cambria, cambriausa.com STORE SOME MORE

Well-considered storage is the foundation of this kitchen. Open shelves in the bar area add interest and make it easy to grab a glass (left). The same kind of detail on the seating island (above left) allows easy access to often-used items, and a tiered interior system maximizes space in drawers below. A pullout next to the range top (above right) keeps knives and utensils organized and close at hand.

Working Island Paint – Newburyport Blue, Benjamin Moore, benjaminmoore.com Working Island Sink – Stages single bowl kitchen sink with wet area, Kohler, us.kohler.com

BORN IN A BARN

A farmhouse-style chalkboard barn door—built by the homeowner—near the kitchen’s back entrance (above) adds a note of playful charm to the room. A P R I L 2 0 2 0 C I N C I N N AT I M A G A Z I N E . C O M 7 9


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RETOOLED JEWEL A H I S TO R I C CO N D O G E T S A M O D E R N R E F R E S H. Location: Hyde Park

Owner/Designer AMY YOUNGBLOOD, AMY YOUNGBLOOD INTERIORS

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PHOTOGRAPHS BY JOSH BEEMAN


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he Grasmoor in Hyde Park, originally an apartment building, was designed in Italian renaissance style by renowned New York architec-

ture firm Emery Roth and Sons for Albert E. Heekin of the Heekin Can Co., who built it as an investment. Named for the family home of book publisher Edward Bartow Sargent, which originally occupied the site, it was completed in 1940 and became a fashionable address. James Moore Smith converted the building to condos in 1976, maintaining original details like high ceilings and classic wood parquet floors. Interior designer Amy Youngblood and her husband loved the look and history of the building, so when the three-bedroom, three-and-a-half-bath condo went on the market, they jumped at the opportunity. At the time, it was furnished very

WELCOME HOME

Every room and ceiling was repainted in very neutral tones— in the living room (above), it’s Summer Suede from PPG Paints. Youngblood worked with an electrician to replace and add lighting throughout. Furniture, window treatments, rugs, and contemporary artwork combine to create an elegant yet modern and eclectic feel.

traditionally, but Youngblood used her skills to create a more sophisticated, modern look. It worked so well that Youngblood’s firm is now working on upgrading the building’s common areas. A P R I L 2 0 2 0 C I N C I N N AT I M A G A Z I N E . C O M 8 1


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LOUNGING AROUND

Formerly a dark library, the family room (above) now invites lounging, with a long gray sectional, an oversized orangey-red chair, and a large Picasso-style painting to complete the look. The master bedroom (bottom far right) boasts a cozy upholstered bed with custom bedding. To create a calm, soothing space, Youngblood used a light color palette with pops of dark and purple accents.

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION SOURCES DINING ROOM

Buffet – Century Furniture, centuryfurniture.com Chandelier and Lamps – Arteriors, arteriorshome.com Dining Head Chairs – Vanguard Furniture, vanguard furniture.com Dining Side Chairs – Fairfield Chair, fairfieldchair.com Dining Side Chairs Upholstery – Osborne and Little, osborneandlittle.com Mark Chagall Lithograph – Salon D’Art, whatsthedog doing.com Paint – Summer Suede, PPG Paints, ppgpaints.com Vintage Mid-Century Modern Table – Designer’s collection Window Treatments – Fabric by Duralee, duralee.com Window Treatments Fabrication – A Place Inspired, Lockland ENTRYWAY

Bench, Mirror – Arteriors, arteriorshome.com Candlesticks – Michael Aram, michaelaram.com Lamp – Currey & Company, curreyandcompany.com Paint – Phoenix Fossil, PPG Paints, ppgpaints.com Pottery Dish – Gift of designer Jackie Roberto Rug – Loloi Rugs, loloirugs.com Storage Console – Belle Meade Signature, bellemeade signature.com Original Artwork – Designer’s collection FAMILY ROOM

Accent Table – Arteriors, arteriorshome.com Artwork – Joshua Jenkins, Caza Sikes Gallery, Oakley Bookcase Paint – Gypsum, PPG Paints, ppgpaints.com Cocktail Table – Interlude Home, interludehome.com Console, Lamp Table, Sectional – Vanguard Furniture, vanguardfurniture.com Paint – Wheat Sheaf, PPG Paints, ppgpaints.com Rug – Loloi Rugs, loloirugs.com LIVING ROOM

Accessories – Designer’s collection Bookcase Paint – Gypsum, PPG Paints, ppgpaints.com Cocktail Table, Lamps – Arteriors, arteriorshome.com Left Sofa – Thayer Coggin, thayercoggin.com Lucite Stool – Noir Furniture, noirfurniturela.com Mirror, Right Sofa – Vanguard Furniture, vanguardfur niture.com Paint – Summer Suede, PPG Paints, ppgpaints.com Round Ottomans – Orange Chair, West End Rug – Loloi Rugs, loloirugs.com Vintage Barcelona Chairs – MainlyArt, Oakley Window Treatments – Fabric and trim by Fabricut, fabricut.com Window Treatments Fabrication – A Place Inspired, Lockland MASTER BEDROOM

Carpet – JP Flooring Design Center, West Chester, jpflooring.com Chandelier – Currey & Company, curreyandcompany. com Furniture – Vanguard Furniture, vanguardfurniture.com Lamps – Arteriors, arteriorshome.com Paint – Ashen, PPG Paint, ppgpaints.com Window Shades – Hunter Douglas, hunterdouglas.com MOOD LIGHTING

Chippendale-style chairs with metallic leather seats pull up to a vintage mid-century white parson’s table in the eclectic dining room (bottom left). The serving console, faced with iridescent abalone discs, and a contemporary glass chime chandelier, add elegance. An original Marc Chagall lithograph adorns the wall. The pottery dish on the entryway’s console (above and left) was a gift from designer Jackie Roberto. The oversized living room accommodates a desk area, since Youngblood’s husband runs his business out of the home, as well as inviting seating (above left).

OFFICE AREA

Chippendale-Style Chair – Century Furniture, century furniture.com Desk and Desk Chair, Lounge Chair and Ottoman, Sofa – Vanguard Furniture, vanguardfurniture.com Paint – Summer Suede, PPG Paints, ppgpaints.com Painting – Alexa McNeil, Art Design Consultants, Hyde Park Rug – Loloi Rugs, loloirugs.com Side Tables, Wall Sconces – Arteriors, arteriorshome. com Window Treatments – Fabric and trim by Fabricut, fabricut.com Window Treatments Fabrication – A Place Inspired, Lockland

A P R I L 2 0 2 0 C I N C I N N AT I M A G A Z I N E . C O M 8 3


AN EXHIBITION O F M OTO R S PO R T E XC E L L E N C E JUNE 12–14, 2020 ohioconcours.com benefiting juvenile arthritis

Above, one of only 6 remaining Lotus 38 Fords. Raced to 2nd place by Jim Clark at the 1966 Indy 500. IMAGE COURTESY OF GARY KESSLER.

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TOP DENTISTS 2019

TOP DENTISTS

2020

I L L U S T R AT I O N S B Y ( T O O T H ) O L E G A N D P O L LY/ S H U T T E R S T O C K I M A G E S / ( C R O W N ) M A R T I A L R E D / S H U T T E R S T O C K I M A G E S / ( B U R S T ) 2 1KO M P O T/ S H U T T E R S T O C K I M A G E S

Our annual list of the top dentists in the Cincinnati region, 295 professionals in seven specialties who are making smiles brighter.

Photography by Ryan Back

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TOP DENTISTS 2020 Searching for a new dentist? Whether you need routine care or a complete smile makeover, our list of top dentists is the place to start. This carefully researched list was compiled by Professional Research Services (PRS) of Troy, Michigan. The firm conducted peer-review surveys of professionals in Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky to determine the top dentists around our region. Those who made the list have been screened carefully to ensure the legitimacy of their licenses and their status with the State of Ohio and the Kentucky Board of Dentistry.

ENDODONTICS

DONALD DAVIES

DAVID A. LEACH

ROBERT S. SCHNEIDER

VAISHALI AGARWALA

Davies Endodontics, 10751 Montgomery Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45242, (513) 469-1121

David A. Leach, D.D.S., 7533 State Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45255, (513) 232-6660

Schneider Endodontics, 5420 N. Bend Rd., Suite 100, Cincinnati, OH 45247, (513) 661-7668

MICHAEL D. FULLER

Erndt Yonchak and Agarwala, D.D.S., Inc., 5180 Winton Rd., FairďŹ eld, OH 45014, (513) 829-1935

ERIC M. BRAMY Eric M. Bramy, D.D.S., 6900 Tylersville Rd., Suite C, Mason, OH 45040, (513) 754-0900

RICHARD P. BROERING Richard P. Broering Jr., D.M.D., 3005 Dixie Hwy., Suite 100, Edgewood, KY 41017, (859) 344-8000

ERIC D. BROWN Eric Brown Endodontics, 810 Plum St., Cincinnati, OH 45202, (513) 322-2462

ALEX K. MIHAILOFF

PAUL F. SIEGEL

University Pointe Endodontics, 7760 W. VOA Park Dr., Suite A, West Chester, OH 45069, (513) 759-2700

Alex K. Mihailoff, D.D.S., 9200 Montgomery Rd., Bldg. F, Suite 22A, Cincinnati, OH 45242, (513) 793-6500

Paul Siegel, D.D.S., Inc., 9403 Kenwood Rd., Suite B205, Cincinnati, OH 45242, (513) 821-2668

CAREY M. HEIN

HEATHER T. MORRIS

CLAIRE F. SIEGEL GERHARD

Dr. Carey M. Hein, D.D.S., 4030 Smith Rd., Suite 450, Cincinnati, OH 45209, (513) 321-5353

Imperial Endodontics, 10597 Montgomery Rd., Montgomery, OH 45242, (513) 583-5700

Paul Siegel, D.D.S., Inc., 9403 Kenwood Rd., Suite B205, Cincinnati, OH 45242, (513) 821-2668

G. ROBERT LAWLEY

RICHARD MULLINS

J. ERIC WALDEN

Lawley Endodontics, Inc., 748 State Route 28, Suite C, Milford, OH 45150, (513) 456-4144

Dr. Richard Mullins, 7205 Dixie Hwy., Suite 3, Florence, KY 41042, (859) 371-8686

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Northern Kentucky Endodontics, 8729 US 42, Suite A, Florence, KY 41042, (859) 647-0006


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TOP DENTISTS 2020 THOMAS A. YONCHAK

EMILY BOEHM

THOMAS M. COX

CHRISTINE L. ELFERS

Erndt Yonchak and Agarwala, D.D.S., Inc., 5180 Winton Rd., Fairfield, OH 45014, (513) 829-1935

Wyoming Family Dentistry, 411 Wyoming Ave., Wyoming, OH 45215, (513) 821-0659

Cox and Manegold Dentistry, 9215 Cincinnati-Columbus Rd., Suite C, West Chester, OH 45069, (513) 777-5513

Dr. Christine L. Elfers, D.D.S., 2758 Erie Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45208, (513) 321-7076

GENERAL DENTISTRY MALLORY ADLER Wolf + Adler Family Dentistry, 10475 Reading Rd., Suite 408, Cincinnati, OH 45241, (513) 563-8188

ABDALLAH AL-ZUBI Cosmetic & Implant Dental Center of Cincinnati, 910 Barry Ln., Cincinnati, OH 45229, (513) 370-2400

BARRY APPLEGATE Applegate Dentistry, 324 Greenup St., Covington, KY 41011, (859) 291-8600

ANGELA J. ARLINGHAUS DentalBLU Aesthetic & General Dentistry, 2600 Alexandria Pike, Highland Heights, KY 41076, (859) 442-8200

ANNE G. BANTA Anne G. Banta, D.D.S., Inc., 5680 Bridgetown Rd., Suite B, Cincinnati, OH 45248, (513) 574-2444

RICHARD T. BAUDENDISTEL Richard T. Baudendistel, D.D.S. & Chris B. Uhlenbrock, D.D.S., 3860 Race Rd., Suite 101, Cincinnati, OH 45211, (513) 661-8509

KATHERINE BEITING Beiting Family Dentistry, 2617 Legends Way, Suite 200, Crestview Hills, KY 41017, (859) 341-2234

CHUCK BELL Bell Dental Group, 2767 Erie Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45208, (513) 449-6068

CHRIS H. BOERGER Chris H. Boerger, D.D.S., 2842 Mack Rd., Fairfield, OH 45014, (513) 860-3000

JEREMY J. BORSKY Jeremy J. Borsky, D.D.S., 7521 State Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45255, (513) 494-7126

RACHELLE BOUDREAU Boudreau Dental Studio, 11333 Springfield Pike, Cincinnati, OH 45246, (513) 772-0722

LEE BROWN Brown & Kupper, D.D.S., 8191 Beckett Park Dr., West Chester, OH 45069, (513) 854-8562

TIFFANY BULLER-SCHUSSLER Tri-State Family Dentistry, 2161 N. Bend Rd., Suite A, Hebron, KY 41048, (859) 689-1105

ANGELA BURLESON-OTT Cornerstone Dental Group, 4030 Smith Rd., Suite 110, Cincinnati, OH 45209, (513) 631-8920

ELEANOR ENDRES JEFFREY CRAWFORD Mortenson Family Dental, 3116 W. US 22 & 3, Suite I, Landen, OH 45039, (513) 334-4060

BRADLEY ERBECK

JEFF CRONLEY Lowitz & Meier, 8712 Winton Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45231, (513) 521-8900

Mt. Lookout Dentistry, 3197 Linwood Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45208, (513) 871-2852

MAGGIE ERNST

SARA ELIZABETH CROUCH YOCHUM

PATRICK FLANNERY

Wyoming Smile Center, 423 Worthington Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45215, (513) 761-1900

MICHAEL D. CUMMINGS Cummings Dentistry, 2465 Dixie Hwy., Ft. Mitchell, KY 41017, (859) 341-5300

Dr. David P. DeMaria, D.M.D., 2523 Dixie Hwy., Ft. Mitchell, KY 41017, (859) 331-8868

DentalBLU Aesthetic & General Dentistry, 2600 Alexandria Pike, Highland Heights, KY 41076, (859) 442-8200

SANDRA DERRINGER Derringer Dental Care & Rejuvenation, 8667 US Hwy. 42, Suite 100, Union, KY 41091, (859) 384-0393

DAVID BELL

JOHN A. CLEMENTS

SHAWN DORNHECKER

Bell Dental Group, 2767 Erie Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45208, (513) 449-6068

Clements Family Dentistry, 25 N. F St., Hamilton, OH 45013, (513) 8877027, clementsfamilydentistry.com

Patel and Dornhecker Dentistry, 5520 Harrison Ave., Suite A, Cincinnati, OH 45248, (513) 815-3188

Bennet Family Dental, 5606 Bridgetown Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45248, (513) 662-2000

JONATHAN D. CONOVER Conover Family Dental, 9312 Winton Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45231, (513) 931-7542

R. TODD BLINCOE Blincoe Dentistry, 12 Orphanage Rd., Ft. Mitchell, KY 41017, (859) 331-1960

HEWITT J. COOPER Dr. Hewitt Cooper, D.D.S., 1305 William Howard Taft Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45206, (513) 751-3384

Dr. Patrick Flannery, D.D.S., 8250 Beckett Park Dr., Suite A, West Chester, OH 45069, (513) 715-0101

ANTHONY E. FORTE Anthony E. Forte, D.D.S., 3475 N. Bend Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45239, (513) 661-6100

Fox Dental Excellence, 6410 Thornberry Ct., Suite D, Mason, OH 45040, (513) 398-3322

DAVID J. FRANZ

Seven Star Dental, 7 W. 7th St., Suite 1, Cincinnati, OH 45202, (513) 241-7827, sevenstar dental.com

JOHN BENNET

Bell Dental Group, 2767 Erie Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45208, (513) 449-6068

ROBERT B. FOX

DAVID P. DEMARIA

ANSLEY H. DEPP

Gates Family Dentistry, 3249 W. US 22 & 3, Loveland, OH 45140, (513) 683-3838

Erbeck Family Dental, 300 3rd Ave., Mason, OH 45040, (513) 3987051, erbeckdental.com

DAVID N. CROOP

MARIA I. BUSTAMANTE

ROBERT CAPOZZA

Endres Gateway Dentistry, 9380 Montgomery Rd., Suite 204, Cincinnati, OH 45242, (513) 322-3501

ANDREW DORR Andrew Dorr, D.D.S., 3473 N. Bend Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45239, (513) 661-6800

DENNIS R. DOTSON Dennis R. Dotson, D.D.S., 19 Garfield Pl., Suite 215, Cincinnati, OH 45202, (513) 241-2467

David J. Franz, D.D.S., 8333 Montgomery Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45236, (513) 771-2230

GREGORY C. FRESE Family Cosmetic & Implant Dentistry, 1149 Fehl Ln., Cincinnati, OH 45230, (513) 231-9300

GREGORY GATES Gates Family Dentistry, 3249 W. US 22 & 3, Loveland, OH 45140, (513) 683-3838

CONNIE G. GAWRYCH Cincinnati Dental Services Fairfield, 2760 Mack Rd., Fairfield, OH 45014, (513) 874-2444

WALTER E. GAY Walter E. Gay Jr., D.D.S., 602 Main St., Suite 315, Cincinnati, OH 45202, (513) 381-7900

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TOP DENTISTS 2020 MARK GEROME

LAWRENCE W. HAGEN

ERIC HENIZE

LAURA KINLAW JACKSON

Gerome & Patrice Family Dentistry, 6378 Branch Hill-Guinea Pike, Loveland, OH 45140, (513) 677-1349

Hagen Dental Practice, 4998 Glenway Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45238, (513) 854-8588

Complete Health Dentistry of Cincinnati, 4723 Cornell Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45241, (513) 489-0607

Madeira Dentistry, 7113 Miami Ave., Madeira, OH 45243, (513) 561-5318

BARRY P. GIBBERMAN Montgomery Dentistry, 9157 Montgomery Rd., Suite 105, Cincinnati, OH 45242, (513) 793-2611

MARK GLOCKNER Glockner Family Dentistry, 2011 Dixie Hwy., Ft. Mitchell, KY 41011, (859) 331-6677

BEN T. GOSNELL Mt. Lookout Dentistry, 3197 Linwood Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45208, (513) 871-2852

STEPHEN GREINER Beck Pearce Dental, 5112 Cedar Village Dr., Mason, OH 45040, (513) 204-0054

RONALD GRYCKO Grycko Dentistry of Blue Ash, 9050 Plainfield Rd., Blue Ash, OH 45236, (513) 791-3138

PATRICIA HANNAHAN Advance Dentistry, 5823 Wooster Pike, Cincinnati, OH 45227, (513) 2729009, nofeardentist.com

ANDREW J. HARRIS Fountain Square Dental Care, 525 Vine St., Suite 1020, Cincinnati, OH 45202, (513) 621-2483

FREDERICK A. HEISELMAN Frederick A. Heiselman, D.D.S., 7140 Miami Ave., Suite 201, Cincinnati, OH 45243, (513) 561-8600

MASOUD HEKMATYAR Fort Thomas Family Dentistry, 40 N. Grand Ave., Suite 202, Ft. Thomas, KY 41075, (859) 581-7678

M. JOSEPH HERALD Herald Family Dentistry, 725 Alexandria Pike, Suite 100, Ft. Thomas, KY 41075, (859) 405-0561

PATRICK HOBAN

RICHARD L. JACKSON Richard L. Jackson, D.D.S., 3650 Erie Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45208, (513) 3213037, rljackson@gmail.com

Hoban Dentistry, D.D.S., 5184 Winton Rd., Fairfield, OH 45014, (513) 858-1600

ANDREW JORDAN

CHARLES HORNING

Vita Dental, 5841 Snider Rd., Mason, OH 45040, (513) 777-9117

Charles Horning, D.D.S., 8172 Mall Rd., Suite 201, Florence, KY 41042, (859) 525-7775

JOSEPH W. JACKSON Jackson Family Dental Wellness Center, 322 N. Elm St., Oxford, OH 45056, (513) 523-6267

KEITH D. JACKSON

MARVIN N. KAPLAN Marvin N. Kaplan, D.M.D., 3406 Ormond Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45220, (513) 342-2644

DANIEL KELLEY Eastgate Dental Excellence, 3241 Mount Carmel Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45244, (513) 443-8561

Madeira Dentistry, 7113 Miami Ave., Madeira, OH 45243, (513) 561-5318

Advance Dentistry “Bring comfortable dentistry to everyone.” That’s the mission. Most folks out there just don’t like visiting the dentist. No news there. Actually creating a solution that meets these patients “where they are” (and delivers the experience they didn’t even know they were waiting for)? Now, that’s news. By fully integrating I.V. sedation and anesthesia options into the core of our practice (while also leveraging the latest technologies and techniques), the Advance Dentistry team is able to create new paths to oral health for patients whose fear has kept them away from treatment. We are committed to delivering a next-level, patientcentered, no-fear dental experience and are proud to be unlocking dentistry for folks throughout the Tri-State. Wooster Pike Office: 5823 Wooster Pike, Cincinnati, OH 45227, (513) 272-9009 Anderson Township Office: 7655 Five Mile Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45230, (513) 231-1973 West Chester Office (coming soon): Tylersville Rd., West Chester Township, OH 45069, (513) 272-5850; nofeardentist.com

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

TOP DENTISTS 2020 RUCHIKA KHETARPAL

STEVE A. LANG

Colerain Family Dentistry, 7074 Harrison Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45247, (513) 923-1215

Great Miami Family and Cosmetic Dental, 130 N. Breiel Blvd., Middletown, OH 45042, (513) 4348239

JULIA KINLAW Wyoming Family Dentistry, 411 Wyoming Ave., Wyoming, OH 45215, (513) 821-0659

CHRISTOPHER P. LEARY Christopher P. Leary, D.D.S., 7852 Camargo Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45243, (513) 271-6611

JOEL R. KOCH Joel R. Koch, D.D.S., 9655 Cincinnati-Columbus Rd., West Chester, OH 45241, (513) 779-2200

ERICH D. LENZ Peters and Lenz, D.D.S., Inc., 6431 Bridgetown Rd., Suite 1, Cincinnati, OH 45248, (513) 574-1477

TROY J. KRAMER Kramer Family Dentistry, 14 N. Ft. Thomas Ave., Ft. Thomas, KY 41075, (859) 441-1696

AMANDA LEVINSOHN Anderson Ferry Dental, 411 Anderson Ferry Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45238, (513) 922-8500

DAVID A. KREYLING

TERRY LOWITZ

JANE R. MAYS

Lowitz & Meier, 8712 Winton Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45231, (513) 5218900, westchesterpediatric dentist.com

Jane R. Mays, D.M.D., 2631 Erie Ave., Suite 14, Cincinnati, OH 45208, (513) 216-5169, janemays dmd.com

JOHN LUBER John Luber, D.D.S., 11867 Mason-Montgomery Rd., Suite B, Cincinnati, OH 45249, (513) 677-0383

KARL I. LUTES Karl I. Lutes, D.M.D., 225 Thomas More Pkwy., Crestview Hills, KY 41017, (859) 426-9700

CHRISTOPHER MADDOX Bridgetown Dentistry, 5630 Bridgetown Rd., Suite 3, Cincinnati, OH 45248, (513) 574-7511

STUART J. LEVY

ANDREW J. MARCK

Merit Dental, 9608 Kenwood Rd., Blue Ash, OH 45242, (513) 795-1615

DERRICK KRUGER

Andrew J. Marck, D.D.S., 6911 Main St., Newtown, OH 45244, (513) 272-2792

MARK A. LOGEMAN Mark A. Logeman, D.D.S., Inc., 2761 Erie Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45208, (513) 321-0886

McCauley Dental, 7581 Alexandria Pike, Alexandria, KY 41001, (859) 635-7471

JEROME E. MCMAHON UC Health Dental Center, 234 Goodman St., Level 3, Cincinnati, OH 45219, (513) 584-6650

MELISSA MEIER Lowitz & Meier, 8712 Winton Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45231, (513) 521-8900

BENJAMIN J. MESSMER

Marlette Family Dentistry, 7303 US Hwy. 42, Florence, KY 41042, (859) 283-0033

Sirkin, Kruger & Associates, 4157 Hunt Rd., Blue Ash, OH 45236, (513) 791-6154

SEAN T. MCCAULEY

Dr. Benjamin J. Messmer, D.D.S., 23 E. 8th St., Newport, KY 41071, (859) 431-5234

MARC L. MARLETTE Marlette Family Dentistry, 7303 US Hwy. 42, Florence, KY 41042, (859) 283-0033

Lowitz & Meier The dental office of Terry K. Lowitz, D.D.S., Melissa S. Meier, D.M.D., and Jeffrey Cronley, D.D.S. offers a unique dental experience for our patients. From the minute they walk into our warm, friendly environment, our patients know they are not just at the dental office, they are at home. Located centrally in Cincinnati, we have been serving our community for over 40 years. From a regular checkup to a complete smile makeover, our doctors’ top priority is the comfort and health of our patients. Drs. Lowitz, Meier, and Cronley pride themselves in offering our patients the most state-of-the art dental procedures available. We have incorporated the latest technologies in digital dentistry to make our practice one of the most technologically advanced offices in Cincinnati. From digital X-rays and impressions to fully-guided dental implant surgeries and same-day CEREC crowns, we give our patients the best, and they definitely know it. Our patient reviews speak for themselves. Our doctors and dental team are committed to giving our patients the most professional, compassionate care for a lifetime of dental health. Drs. Lowitz, Meier & Cronley, 8712 Winton Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45231, (513) 521-8900, cincinnati dentists.com

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TOP DENTISTS 2020 DONN METTENS

K. MICHAEL PALMER

JERRY ROTELLA

MICHELLE E. STORY

Donn Mettens, D.M.D., 1807 Alexandria Pike, Highland Heights, KY 41076, (859) 781-7200

Palmer Dentistry, 6895 Burlington Pike, Florence, KY 41042, (859) 344-1185

Chad Bierbaum, D.D.S., LLC, 8974 Columbia Rd., Loveland, OH 45140, (513) 683-5405

Michelle E. Story, D.M.D., 1227 S. Ft. Thomas Ave., Ft. Thomas, KY 41075, (859) 572-6700

ROBERT SCOTT MEUSELBACH

JESAL PATEL

LAURA M. SCHILLER

Robert Scott Meuselbach, D.D.S., 7200 Tylersville Rd., West Chester, OH 45069, (513) 342-8162

Schiller Dental, Inc., 5330 Glenway Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45238, (513) 922-7111

JULIANNE SWAYNE

Patel and Dornhecker Dentistry, 3500 Siaron Way, Fairfield Township, OH 45011, (513) 815-3166

JERRY PAUL

LAURA S. SCHILLER

RYAN STEVEN SWISHER

Southwood, Paul & Pope, 5601 Cheviot Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45247, (513) 741-0900

Schiller Dental, Inc., 5330 Glenway Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45238, (513) 922-7111

Swisher & Associates, 736 Columbus Ave., Lebanon, OH 45036, (513) 932-1370

ANDREA SCHMERLER

LARRY TEPE

Beckham Square Family Dental, 12500 Reed Hartman Hwy., Suite 110, Cincinnati, OH 45241, (513) 489-7800

Tepe Family Dentistry, 3427 Glenmore Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45211, (513) 662-4555

DREW MEYERS Advance Dentistry, 7655 Five Mile Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45230, (513) 231-1973, nofeardentist.com

FRED H. PECK PATRICK D. MICHEL Patrick D. Michel, D.D.S., 1100 Bonnell St., Cincinnati, OH 45215, (513) 563-6936

DESIREE MOORE Lakota Dental Group, 6962 Tylersville Rd., West Chester, OH 45069, (513) 342-2540

STEVEN MOORE Lakota Dental Group, 6962 Tylersville Rd., West Chester, OH 45069, (513) 342-2540

Fred H. Peck, D.D.S., 8251 Cornell Rd., Suite 130, Cincinnati, OH 45249, (513) 621-7666, peckdds.com

RACHEL TEPE JORDAN PELCHOVITZ

JAMES M. SEIBERT

Kenwood Complete Dentistry, 5050 E. Galbraith Rd., Suite C, Cincinnati, OH 45236, (513) 531-5050

Family Cosmetic & Implant Dentistry, 1149 Fehl Ln., Cincinnati, OH 45230, (513) 231-9300

THOMAS J. PERRINO

AARON SHAFTEL

Tepe Dentistry, 3507 Glenmore Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45211, (513) 481-5885

Perrino Family Dentistry, 7565 Kenwood Rd., Suite 201, Cincinnati, OH 45236, (513) 791-9092

Vita Dental, 5841 Snider Rd., Mason, OH 45040, (513) 777-9117

GREGG TESTERMAN

SHELLEY SHEARER JEFFREY D. PETER

ASHLEY J. MOSER NKY Family & Cosmetic Dentistry, 2047 Centennial Blvd., Independence, KY 41051, (859) 356-5100

THOMAS B. MUELLER Mueller Family Dentistry, 1862 Ashwood Cir., Ft. Wright, KY 41011, (859) 331-2202

JASON MULZER Pinnacle Family Dentistry, 1495 Cavalry Dr., Florence, KY 41042, (859) 647-7760

DENNIS M. MURPHY Dennis M. Murphy, D.D.S., 310 Terrace Ave., Suite 102, Cincinnati, OH 45220, (513) 221-1550

MARK R. ONADY Dr. Mark R. Onady, D.D.S., 333 W. Kemper Rd., Springdale, OH 45246, (513) 771-5084

ELIZABETH L. OSTERDAY Osterday Family Dentistry, 7655 Five Mile Rd., Suite 121, Cincinnati, OH 45230, (513) 233-0001

Julianne Swayne, D.D.S., 410 W. Loveland Ave., Loveland, OH 45140, (513) 683-4500

Peter Family Dentistry, 2025 Declaration Dr., Independence, KY 41051, (859) 429-1327

Shearer Family and Cosmetic Dentistry, 1335 Hansel Dr., Florence, KY 41042, (859) 647-7068

GREG SHERMAN RICHARD PLOTNICK Drs. Franklin, Plotnick & Carl, 6204 Ridge Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45213, (513) 731-1106

Kenwood Complete Dentistry, 5050 E. Galbraith Rd., Suite C, Cincinnati, OH 45236, (513) 531-5050

Dr. Timothy L. Pohlman, D.D.S., 2761 Erie Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45208, (513) 871-2989

Rick M. Singel, D.D.S., 2752 Erie Ave., Suite 8, Cincinnati, OH 45208, (513) 871-4200

Southwood, Paul & Pope, 5601 Cheviot Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45247, (513) 741-0900

ROB REINECK Milford Dental Excellence, 1188 OH-131, Milford, OH 45150, (513) 831-1446

MICHAEL D. ROLFES Michael D. Rolfes, D.D.S. & Euna C. Koo, D.D.S., 7729 Montgomery Rd., Suite A, Cincinnati, OH 45236, (513) 793-1241

SUNNY PAHOUJA Lifetime Smiles, 5205 N. Bend Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45247, (513) 661-8586 9 0 C I N C I N N AT I M A G A Z I N E . C O M A P R I L 2 0 2 0

Testerman Dental, 767 Columbus Ave., Lebanon, OH 45036, (513) 854-1811

PHUOC M. TRAN West Chester Family Dentistry, 9000 Cincinnati-Dayton Rd., Suite 200, West Chester, OH 45069, (513) 755-2118

Shearer Family and Cosmetic Dentistry, 1335 Hansel Dr., Florence, KY 41042, (859) 647-7068

JANE WALKER MARC SIRKIN

BRIAN POPE

COLLEEN TEPE HOFSTETTER

PAM WALDEN RICK M. SINGEL

TIMOTHY L. POHLMAN

Tepe Dentistry, 3507 Glenmore Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45211, (513) 481-5885

Sirkin, Kruger & Associates, 4157 Hunt Rd., Blue Ash, OH 45236, (513) 791-6154

Dr. Jane Walker, D.D.S., 27 Water St., Suite 1, Milford, OH 45150, (513) 831-4133

ALAN R. WEINSTEIN THOMAS R. SMITH Smith and Elliott Dental Associates, 265 Main St., Florence, KY 41042, (859) 371-4620

RON SOLOMON Cornerstone Dental Group, 4030 Smith Rd., Suite 110, Cincinnati, OH 45209, (513) 631-8920

Alan R. Weinstein, D.D.S., 7835 Remington Rd., Suite 1, Cincinnati, OH 45242, (513) 793-1977

MEGAN WEISENBERGER Weisenberger Dental, 1017 Delta Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45208, (513) 321-7300

TODD E. WILLIAMS STEVEN SOUTHWOOD Southwood, Paul & Pope, 5601 Cheviot Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45247, (513) 741-0900

Todd E. Williams, D.D.S., 11325 Springfield Pike, Cincinnati, OH 45246, (513) 7729100, toddwilliamsdds.com


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

TOP DENTISTS 2020 VINCENT P. WILLIAMS

DEEPAK G. KRISHNAN

MICHAEL L. ROBINSON

ORTHODONTICS

Dr. Vincent P. Williams, Inc., 441 Vine St., Suite 1021, Cincinnati, OH 45202, (513) 241-6938

UC Health Physicians Office, 222 Piedmont Ave., Suite 7300, Cincinnati, OH 45219, (513) 475-8783

Northern Kentucky Oral and Maxillofacial Surgical Associates, 20 Medical Village Dr., Suite 196, Edgewood, KY 41017, (859) 331-2100

MICHAEL K. AGENTER

GREGORY WNEK

RICHARD LAMPING

Caring Family Dentistry, 11497 Springfield Pike, Suite 3, Cincinnati, OH 45246, (513) 771-0844

Cincinnati Oral Surgeons, Inc., 11438 Lebanon Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45241, (513) 769-5545

THOMAS F. YASH

MICHAEL B. LEE

Thomas F. Yash, D.D.S., 1056 Delta Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45208, (513) 321-6044

ORAL & MAXILLOFACIAL SURGERY V. RUSSELL BOUDREAU Thatcher & Boudreau, D.D.S., Inc., 800 Compton Rd., Suite 20, Cincinnati, OH 45231, (513) 521-0110

C. MICHAEL BRINKER Dr. C. Michael Brinker, D.M.D., 8172 Mall Rd., Suite 214, Florence, KY 41042, (859) 525-2257

JAMES P. CASSIDY Cincinnati Oral, Maxillofacial & Dental Implant Surgery, 7140 Miami Ave., Suite 202, Cincinnati, OH 45243, (513) 271-5900

TIMOTHY W. CONLEY Affiliates in Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, 5188 Winton Rd., Fairfield, OH 45014, (513) 829-8080

BABAK EMAMI Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery of Ohio, 7462 Jager Ct., Cincinnati, OH 45230, (513) 232-4600

Cincinnati Center for Corrective Jaw Surgery, 7523 State Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45255, (513) 232-8989

ROBERT LUCAS Cincinnati Oral Surgeons, Inc., 11438 Lebanon Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45241, (513) 769-5545

Cincinnati Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, Inc., 2852 Boudinot Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45238, (513) 451-7300

MICHAEL J. GRAU Michael J. Grau, D.M.D., 3805 Edwards Rd., Suite 160, Cincinnati, OH 45209, (513) 321-9627

JIMMIE L. HARPER Cincinnati Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, Inc., 2852 Boudinot Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45238, (513) 451-7300

MARK A. KNIBBE Oral Facial Surgery Associates, 1481 Cavalry Dr., Suite 200, Florence, KY 41042, (859) 371-0123

Ohio Oral & Maxillofacial Surgeons, Inc., 3006 Glenmore Ave., Suite C, Cincinnati, OH 45238, (513) 661-7410

JAMES SCHIRMER

Affiliates in Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, 5188 Winton Rd., Fairfield, OH 45014, (513) 829-8080

JAMES D. MORRISON Oral & Facial Surgery Associates, Inc., 10506 Montgomery Rd., Suite 203, Cincinnati, OH 45242, (513) 791-0550

MATTHEW F. PAGNOTTO Tri-State Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, 2300 Conner Rd., Hebron, KY 41048, (859) 586-4825

STEVEN P. PIEPER Cincinnati Oral, Maxillofacial & Dental Implant Surgery, 7140 Miami Ave., Suite 202, Cincinnati, OH 45243, (513) 271-5900

Dr. Gary G. Pies, 3020 Banning Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45239, (513) 923-1500

MICHAEL J. POLLOCK Michael J. Pollock, D.D.S., 3721 Roosevelt Blvd., Middletown, OH 45044, (513) 423-9471

JOHN PRATHER Prather Oral-Facial Surgery, 7268 Liberty Way, West Chester, OH 45069, (513) 777-9555

STEVEN J. REUBEL Steven J. Reubel, D.M.D., 7729 Montgomery Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45236, (513) 891-2992

ROBIN BAKER Cassinelli, Shanker & Baker, 4881 Cooper Rd., Blue Ash, OH 45242, (513) 549-6982

The Center for Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery at Countryside, 1726 Deerfield Rd., Lebanon, OH 45036, (513) 932-9991

SPENCER BOLEY

GARRETT SEGHI

DARCIE R. BRADLEY

Cincinnati Oral Surgeons, Inc., 11438 Lebanon Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45241, (513) 769-5545

CHRISTOPHER A. MCDANIEL

GARY G. PIES MELISSA H. FISHER

TIMOTHY W. SCHILLER

Shine Orthodontics, 670 N. Broadway St., Lebanon, OH 45036, (513) 409-5052

HANK W. SLEET Northern Kentucky Oral and Maxillofacial Surgical Associates, 20 Medical Village Dr., Suite 196, Edgewood, KY 41017, (859) 331-2100

RANDALL D. STASTNY Blue Ash Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, Inc., 4350 Malsbary Rd., Suite 201, Cincinnati, OH 45242, (513) 984-2100

FREDERICK L. STEINBECK F. L. Steinbeck, D.D.S., 627 Highland Ave., Ft. Thomas, KY 41075, (859) 781-0500

SCOTT L. THATCHER Thatcher & Boudreau, D.D.S., Inc., 800 Compton Rd., Suite 20, Cincinnati, OH 45231, (513) 521-0110

DOUGLAS W. WALLACE Affiliates in Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, 5188 Winton Rd., Fairfield, OH 45014, (513) 829-8080

Boley Braces, 5530 Muddy Creek Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45238, (513) 347-9222

Dr. Darcie R. Bradley, 5947 Cheviot Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45247, (513) 385-2161

ALEX CASSINELLI Cassinelli, Shanker & Baker, 4881 Cooper Rd., Blue Ash, OH 45242, (513) 549-6982

JERROD DEMPSEY Gruelle Dempsey Orthodontics, 9675 Montgomery Rd., Suite 100, Cincinnati, OH 45242, (513) 891-2369

NELSON R. DIERS Nelson R. Diers, D.D.S., 7218 Towne Center Dr., West Chester, OH 45069, (513) 777-9040

MARK D. FARLEY Smile Doctors Braces by Farley Orthodontics, 7963 Alexandria Pike, Alexandria, KY 41001, (859) 441-7900

BART GIRDWOOD Girdwood Orthodontics, 600 Columbus Ave., Lebanon, OH 45036, (513) 932-7675

TERRY GRUELLE GLENN S. WATERS Oral & Facial Surgery Associates, Inc., 10506 Montgomery Rd., Suite 203, Cincinnati, OH 45242, (513) 791-0550

GARY H. WILCOX Cincinnati Oral, Maxillofacial & Dental Implant Surgery, 7140 Miami Ave., Suite 202, Cincinnati, OH 45243, (513) 271-5900

Gruelle Dempsey Orthodontics, 9675 Montgomery Rd., Suite 100, Cincinnati, OH 45242, (513) 891-2369

ERIC W. HICKMAN Hickman Orthodontics, 3116-L Montgomery Rd., Maineville, OH 45039, (513) 697-9772

KEVIN ISON Orthodontic Specialists, 8050 Hosbrook Rd., Suite 310, Cincinnati, OH 45236, (513) 772-6500

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TOP DENTISTS 2020 LAMONT B. JACOBS

FERNANDO MARTINEZ

TIMOTHY M. REDDY

JACOB STADIEM

Lamont Jacobs Orthodontics, 1242 Nilles Rd., Fairfield, OH 45014, (513) 829-7045

Martinez Orthodontics, 6381 Bridgetown Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45248, (513) 598-9800

Timothy M. Reddy, D.D.S., Orthodontist, 5754 Bridgetown Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45248, (513) 481-8000

Northeast Orthodontic Specialists, 9380 Kenwood Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45242, (513) 793-4770

GERALD F. JOHNSON

KENT MORRIS

ANTHONY RINALDI

JANICE STRUCKHOFF

Johnson Orthodontics, 6499 Mason Montgomery Rd., Mason, OH 45040, (513) 336-6200

Kent Morris Orthodontics, 9573 Montgomery Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45242, (513) 683-3900

Rinaldi Orthodontics, 5987 Meijer Dr., Milford, OH 45150, (513) 8316160

Struckhoff Orthodontics, 1944 Declaration Dr., Independence, KY 41051, (859) 356-6630

GRACE KERR

DONALD R. MURDOCK

MANISHA (MONA) RINALDI

JERI L. STULL

Grace Kerr Orthodontics, 2706 Observatory Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45208, (513) 533-4200

Murdock Orthodontics, 5420 N. Bend Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45247, (513) 662-2100

Rinaldi Orthodontics, 6406 Thornberry Ct., Suite 210, Mason, OH 45040, (513) 234-7890

Jeri L. Stull Orthodontics, 637 Highland Ave., Ft. Thomas, KY 41075, (859) 781-2662

WILLIAM LANGE

MONICA L. NEWBY

BRIAN ROMICK

PETER SUFFIELD

Lange Orthodontics, 9157 Montgomery Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45242, (513) 791-0777

Monica L. Newby, D.D.S., 5050 Oaklawn Dr., Cincinnati, OH 45227, (513) 531-7566

Romick Orthodontics, 7655 Five Mile Rd., Suite 207, Cincinnati, OH 45230, (513) 232-4110

Precision Orthodontics, 8154 Montgomery Rd., Suite 102, Cincinnati, OH 45236, (513) 891-4324

JAMES W. LOGEMAN

DANIEL NOLL

ROBERT D. RUST James W. Logeman, D.D.S., 5240 E. Galbraith Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45236, (513) 791-0260

Orthodontic Specialists, 7559 Mall Rd., Suite A, Florence, KY 41042, (513) 772-6500

CHARLES MANILLA

DAVID C. QUAST

Rust Orthodontics, 7655 Five Mile Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45230, (513) 232-6050

JAMES N. THACKER Thacker Orthodontics, 1057 Nimitzview Dr., Cincinnati, OH 45230, (513) 802-9360

SHIVA SHANKER Manilla Orthodontics, 347 Park Ave., Hamilton, OH 45013, (513) 434-8296

Quast Orthodontics, 320 Thomas More Pkwy., Suite 102, Crestview Hills, KY 41017, (859) 341-9400

Cassinelli, Shanker & Baker, 4881 Cooper Rd., Blue Ash, OH 45242, (513) 549-6982

MARYEVAN THACKER Thacker Orthodontics, 1057 Nimitzview Dr., Cincinnati, OH 45230, (513) 802-9360

Dr. Fred Peck Dr. Fred Peck, D.D.S., FAACD, is a third-generation dentist practicing in Cincinnati for more than 30 years. He is the first Accredited Fellow of the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry in Ohio, a process that involved rigorous training in cosmetic dentistry and required passing an extensive AACD Accreditation Board Examination. A graduate of The Ohio State University College of Dentistry, Dr. Peck went on to complete the curriculum at the Kois Center in Seattle, regarded by many as the leading advanced continuing education center for dentists in the United States. Being accomplished in cosmetic dental techniques, Dr. Peck has published numerous articles in a variety of dental journals and presents lectures and hands-on techniques to share his skills to dental professionals across the United States and Canada. 8251 Cornell Rd., Suite 130, Cincinnati, OH 45249, (513) 621-7666, peckdds.com

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TOP DENTISTS 2020 SHELLEY A. TRETTER

STEVEN M. ZETTLER

MURRAY DOCK

KAITLIN JENNISON

Tretter Orthodontics, 11831 Mason Montgomery Rd., Suite A, Cincinnati, OH 45249, (513) 612-9807

Zettler Orthodontics, 417 Park Ave., Hamilton, OH 45013, (513) 863-1984

Montgomery Pediatric Dentistry, 4881 Cooper Rd., Blue Ash, OH 45242, (513) 891-0660

Union Pediatric Dentistry, 2012 Callie Way, Suite 202, Union, KY 41091, (513) 979-6998

LAURA DOSS

STEPHEN R. KEES

Bert Bathiany, D.M.D., 18 N. Ft. Thomas Ave., Ft. Thomas, KY 41075, (859) 781-4100

Elizabeth Mueller, D.D.S. & Associates, 9200 Montgomery Rd., Suite 4B, Cincinnati, OH 45242, (513) 791-3660

Stephen R. Kees, D.M.D., 2370 Grandview Dr., Ft. Mitchell, KY 41017, (859) 331-4449

KATIE BLOMER

SOPHIE DUVAL-AUSTIN

Hyde Park Pediatric Dentistry, 3870 Paxton Ave., Suite G, Cincinnati, OH 45209, (513) 979-6998

Pediatric Dental Garden, 25 Town Center Blvd., Suite 202, Crestview Hills, KY 41017, (859) 344-6200

DOUGLAS BROCKMAN

JOHN A. GENNANTONIO

Noonan, Brockman & Pollock, D.D.S., Inc., 210 S. Breiel Blvd., Middletown, OH 45044, (513) 4239239

Sea of Smiles Pediatric Dentistry, 1319 Nagel Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45255, (513) 474-6777

PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY ALAN R. WEBER Northeast Orthodontic Specialists, 9403 Kenwood Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45242, (513) 793-4770

BERT BATHIANY

BRYAN R. WIRTZ Bryan R. Wirtz, D.D.S., 11329 Springfield Pike, Cincinnati, OH 45246, (513) 772-1671

EDWARD J. WNEK Wnek Orthodontics, 2712 Erie Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45208, (513) 871-0324

JAMES J. ZETTLER Zettler Orthodontics, 417 Park Ave., Hamilton, OH 45013, (513) 863-1984

MARIE CALLEN JAMES R. ZETTLER Zettler Orthodontics, 417 Park Ave., Hamilton, OH 45013, (513) 863-1984

Marie Callen, D.M.D., 11306 Montgomery Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45249, (513) 376-8200

RICHARD KENNEDY Fairfield Pediatric Dentistry, 1246 Nilles Rd., Suite 3, Fairfield, OH 45014, (513) 858-6575

DENNIS LAMBERT Dennis Lambert Pediatric Dentistry, 8205 Corporate Way, Mason, OH 45040, (513) 754-8900

WILLIAM A. GREENHILL

TRISHA MCNAMARA

Union Pediatric Dentistry, 2012 Callie Way, Suite 202, Union, KY 41091, (859) 384-6050

The Pediatric Dentist, 5177 N. Bend Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45211, (513) 662-5203

SARAH HUSTED Sea of Smiles Pediatric Dentistry, 1319 Nagel Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45255, (513) 474-6777

Seven Star Dental Experience cutting-edge dental technology in a beautiful spa-like environment. Conveniently located downtown on Seventh Street, Seven Star Dental’s main focus is in general and cosmetic dentistry, from simple cleanings to complete smile makeovers. Dr. Maria Bustamante offers stateof-the-art cosmetic dentistry including Invisalign, Zoom Whitening, porcelain veneers, and same-day crowns. She has received intensive training in areas ranging from restorative and cosmetic dentistry to oral surgery, sedation, and full-mouth rehabilitation. Patients love our private treatment and consultation rooms and relaxing touches like heated massage chairs, Wi-Fi and tablets, Netflix, and refreshments. Thanks to Dr. Bustamante’s dedication to dentistry, along with an experienced, friendly team and comfortable atmosphere, every Seven Star patient can expect a seven-star experience! 7 W. Seventh St., Suite 1, Cincinnati, OH 45202, (513) 241-7827, sevenstardental.com

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TOP DENTISTS 2020 ELIZABETH MUELLER

LISA RUDOLPH

DAISY THOMAS

STACEY BLUME

Elizabeth Mueller, D.D.S. & Associates, 9200 Montgomery Rd., Suite 4B, Cincinnati, OH 45242, (513) 791-3660

Montgomery Pediatric Dentistry, 4881 Cooper Rd., Blue Ash, OH 45242, (513) 891-0660

Elizabeth Mueller, D.D.S. & Associates, 9200 Montgomery Rd., Suite 4B, Cincinnati, OH 45242, (513) 791-3660

Stacey Blume, D.M.D., 4030 Smith Rd., Suite 225, Cincinnati, OH 45209, (513) 871-8488

NANNETTE R. SHERMAN MATTHEW POLLOCK Noonan, Brockman & Pollock, D.D.S., Inc., 210 S. Breiel Blvd., Middletown, OH 45044, (513) 4239239

CINDY R. PONG Smiles4Kids Pediatric Dentistry, 11350 Springfield Pike, Cincinnati, OH 45246, (513) 771-5231

RONALD L. POULOS Pediatric Dentistry of Anderson, 7655 Five Mile Rd., Suite 214, Cincinnati, OH 45230, (513) 232-0550

DAVID RIDER David Rider, D.M.D., 1809 Alexandria Pike, Suite A, Highland Heights, KY 41076, (859) 781-1500

RAYMOND BONOMO

Nannette R. Sherman, D.D.S., 7908 Cincinnati-Dayton Rd., Suite R, West Chester, OH 45069, (513) 755-7220

BRACKEN WEBB

KATHRYN L. STEWART

JODY L. WRIGHT

Sea of Smiles Pediatric Dentistry, 1319 Nagel Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45255, (513) 474-6777

DAVID SULLIVAN The Pediatric Dentist, 5177 N. Bend Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45211, (513) 662-5203

ADEL M. TAWADROS Adel M. Tawadros, D.D.S., 420 Ray Norrish Dr., Cincinnati, OH 45246, (513) 671-1666

West Chester Pediatric Dentistry, 9215 Cincinnati-Columbus Rd., West Chester, OH 45069, (513) 777-2313

Wright Smiles Pediatric Dentistry, 50 Remick Blvd., Springboro, OH 45066, (937) 885-2222

Bonomo Periodontics, 6208 Muhlhauser Rd., West Chester, OH 45069, (513) 671-0222

RYAN P. ESTES Periodontology and Dental Implant Specialists, 8136 Mall Rd., Florence, KY 41042, (859) 3716543, perioimplantcare.com

PERIODONTICS ANDREW BAKER Shapiro and Baker Periodontics & Dental Implants, 8350 E. Kemper Rd., Unit C, Cincinnati, OH 45249, (513) 984-4867

CHRISTOPHER W. BECKNER Christopher W. Beckner, D.D.S., 5850 Boymel Dr., Unit 2, Fairfield, OH 45014, (513) 856-8253

MARY ANN HANLON Mary Ann Hanlon, D.D.S., 7074 Harrison Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45247, (513) 662-4867

RYAN HARRIS Harris Periodontics & Implant Dentistry, 5138 Cedar Village Dr., Mason, OH 45040, (513) 336-8100

Ryan P. Estes, D.M.D., M.S. Allison K. Marlow, D.D.S., M.S.D. Periodontology and Dental Implant Specialists

John A. Clements, D.M.D. For 29 years, our patients have become comfortable seeing familiar faces and establishing long-term relationships. Proud to once again be named as a Cincinnati Magazine Top Dentist, Dr. Clements is also honored to be the dentist of choice for many of his medical and dental colleagues and their family members. Utilizing the latest technology to offer advanced, comprehensive care, patient comfort is at the core of his well-established practice. Æ 25 N. F. St., Hamilton, OH 45013, (513) 887-7027, clementsfamilydentistry.com

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Dr. Ryan Estes and Dr. Allison Marlow both share the same vision and commitment: to bring the highest standard of care to their patients. Our periodontal practice has been providing Greater Cincinnati patients with exceptional, comprehensive periodontal care that utilizes the most current knowledge and technology. In collaboration with the local dental community, we develop options for our patients to be treated in a caring, friendly, and nonjudgmental environment leading to optimal outcomes. We strive to make you feel like a welcome guest in our office! Æ 8136 Mall Rd., Florence, KY 41042, (859) 371-6543, perioimplantcare.com


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TOP DENTISTS 2020 TIFFANY HARRIS Harris Periodontics & Implant Dentistry, 5138 Cedar Village Dr., Mason, OH 45040, (513) 336-8100

GLENN JIVIDEN Dr. Glenn Jividen Jr., D.D.S, Inc., 4300 Linden Ave., Dayton, OH 45432, (937) 259-0072

DAVID B. KRILL Wessel Periodontics, LLC, 8221 Cornell Rd., Suite 430, Cincinnati, OH 45249, (513) 891-3933

NEAL LEMMERMAN Lemmerman Periodontics, 6950 E. Kemper Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45249, (513) 851-9292

ROBERT J. LIMARDI Periodontal Visions, Inc., 6507 Harrison Ave., Suite U, Cincinnati, OH 45247, (513) 598-9555

ALLISON K. MARLOW Periodontology and Dental Implant Specialists, 8136 Mall Rd., Florence, KY 41042, (859) 3716543, perioimplantcare.com

VLADIMIR SHAPIRO

JEFFREY WESSEL

Shapiro and Baker Periodontics & Dental Implants, 8350 E. Kemper Rd., Unit C, Cincinnati, OH 45249, (513) 984-4867

Wessel Periodontics, LLC, 8221 Cornell Rd., Suite 430, Cincinnati, OH 45249, (513) 891-3933

PROSTHODONTICS MARK SILVERS

LARRY S. MARTIN Martin Periodontics, 1211 Nilles Rd., Fairfield, OH 45014, (513) 829-8999

MATTHEW M. PARKER Parker Periodontics & Implant Dentistry, 8000 Five Mile Rd., Suite 350, Cincinnati, OH 45230, (513) 474-4486

Mark Silvers, D.D.S., 7710 Shawnee Run Rd., Suite G1, Cincinnati, OH 45243, (513) 271-1101

David D. Carrier, D.D.S., Ltd., 121 William Howard Taft Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45219, (513) 961-8113

SCOTT SILVERSTEIN Ohio Valley Center for Periodontics & Implants, 748 State Route 28, Suite A, Milford, OH 45150, (513) 248-2626

GREGORY C. SUTTON THOMAS PARTRIDGE

DAVID D. CARRIER

Partridge Periodontics, 7168 Beechmont Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45230, (513) 231-2733

Northern Kentucky Periodontal & Implant Dentistry, 234 Thomas More Pkwy., Crestview Hills, KY 41017, (859) 331-4700

MICHAEL POTH

MICHAEL C. TOMS

Harris Periodontics & Implant Dentistry, 5138 Cedar Village Dr., Mason, OH 45040, (513) 336-8100

Michael C. Toms, D.D.S., 5532 Muddy Creek Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45238, (513) 922-7300

MANNY CHOPRA Center for Dental Health, 2752 Erie Ave., Suite 1, Cincinnati, OH 45208, (513) 871-4411

ROBERT F. FAULKNER Robert F. Faulkner, D.D.S., Inc., 6355 E. Kemper Rd., Suite 150, Cincinnati, OH 45241, (513) 489-8070

GORDON HUNTRESS Gordon Huntress, D.D.S., 222 Piedmont Ave., Suite 8300, Cincinnati, OH 45219, (513) 475-7991ʄ

Dr. Jane Mays The office of Dr. Jane Mays sets itself apart from other dental practitioners by actively working with patients on whole-body well-being through the practice of Oral-Systemic Health. The correlations between oral diseases and systemic conditions are broadly accepted. Inflammation and/or bacteria in the oral cavity can be connected to seven of the 10 leading causes of death. The experienced staff at Mays Dentistry utilizes patient education, has implemented screening protocols and tools, and collaborates with local medical professionals to effectively manage the oral manifestations of systemic diseases. OralDNA Labs’ MyPerioPath saliva testing is one tool utilized in Dr. Mays’ office to diagnose the specific underlying oral pathogens causing periodontal disease and inflammation and leading to a higher incidence of chronic systemic diseases. This allows you to effectively manage your health, well-being, and longevity as our office guides you to the goal of a longer and more active life. 2631 Erie Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45208, (513) 3211102, janemaysdmd.com

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COMMUNITIES

Giving families peace of mind for more than 50 years We’re dedicated to helping older adults enjoy a well-rounded, fulfilling and active lifestyle in a faith-filled environment. Visit a Christian Village Community today to learn more.

Vibrant and Caring Life Plan Communities at MASON

411 Western Row Rd., Mason, OH 45040 (513) 398-1486

www.christianvillages.org

at MT. HEALTHY

8097 Hamilton Ave. Cincinnati, OH 45231 (513) 931-5000


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SENIOR LIV ING Staying Active While Giving Back Volunteering can provide a social outlet for seniors that’s beneficial both mentally and physically. —Kayla Gross

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Photographs by wavebreakmedia/Shutterstock.com

OLUNTEERING AFTER retirement has proven to be mentally, and sometimes even physically, beneficial. Getting out and participating gives retirees a sense of purpose and the ability to give back to their communities in a meaningful way, says Gerontologist Suzanne Norman, PhD, of Geropsychology Consultants, Inc. “The social aspect of helping out in the community can decrease anxiety and depression,” says Norman, as well as introduce seniors to new social groups, all while making a positive contribution. Helping out within the community doesn’t have to be a grand act. Even small gestures such as helping schoolkids with homework or socializing kittens can make an impact. Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center is always looking for weekly volunteers to assist in easing the stress of patient children by playing or reading with them, helping them finish school assignments, or by bringing toys to outpatient clinics. Animal shelters, such as the Animal Adoption Fund in Hamilton, need volunteers to socialize cats, walk

dogs, or work the front desk, among other tasks. Working at events is a great way to stay physically active. The Cincinnati Reds offer volunteer opportunities selling raffle tickets at games for Split the Pot, during which volunteers are expected to work up until the seventh inning but are then dismissed to enjoy the game. If the arts are more your speed, Cincinnati Ballet and the Cincinnati Arts Association hire volunteers to usher and greet patrons at each performance. For the outdoorsy types, Gorman Heritage Farm offers an array of unique volunteer opportunities available to anyone willing: Tend to the farm’s bees as a beekeeper, share your knowledge as an educator with elementary-aged students visiting the grounds, or garden with other like-minded gardening buffs. Krohn Conservatory has opportunities allowing volunteers to monitor the

doors to the butterfly garden (including catching butterflies when they escape). The vast number of volunteer opportunities in Cincinnati means it’s easy to accommodate seniors’ availability. Many organizations offer both full- and part-time positions, including the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County, which seeks both at almost every branch. Seniors can help with children’s events or work behind the scenes, placing returned books back on shelves and processing book returns and holds. Volunteering in retirement can be incredibly beneficial to a person’s mental and physical well-being. Becoming a retiree can be a difficult transition for some people, but volunteering can help ease that stress, Norman says. In the Cincinnati area alone, there are a wide variety of opportunities to meet anyone’s area of interest. So what are you waiting for? A P R I L 2 0 2 0 C I N C I N N AT I M A G A Z I N E . C O M 9 7


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Recreation for All

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H E C I N C I N N AT I R E C reation Commission (CRC) has been keeping locals of all ages engaged in the community since 1927, offering a variety of activities, including art classes, health and well-

ness programs, and athletics. CRC has 23 locations across Hamilton County, most of which also have swimming pools available during the summer months. Each location offers a range of activity options for varying levels of abilities. From pottery to yoga to pickleball, there is something for everyone. “It is our job as [the] recreation commission to provide programming and keep seniors active and healthy and independent as long as they can,” says Dina Hanks, service area coordinator for the seniors division at CRC. “It’s all about providing that social enrichment and outlet for them.” Along with its regular activities, CRC also hosts the regional Senior Olympics competition each year, where participants can compete to qualify for the state

competition, held in Columbus. The 2020 games will take place March 28–May 22 and consist of more than 60 events, including swimming, cycling, 8 ball pool, bowling, golf, pickleball, and more. Among its activities, pickleball is a hybrid sport that combines tennis, table tennis, and badminton and has become very popular at senior communities across the country. The Senior Olympics will have three separate pickleball categories for men’s, women’s, and mixed doubles teams. To qualify for the Southwest Ohio Senior Olympics, athletes must be at least 50 years old by the end of the year, but there is no age limit for those who would like to compete. Online and mail-in registration is open and will close a few days before the event. The cost is $40 per participant. —Shannon Smith

New England Club is unlike any other Senior Living Community in Cincinnati. We are a more affordable lifestyle because we offer Independent Apartment Living with multiple on-site assisted care options for our residents and their families to be able to choose. Our residents schedule care “as needed,” so they can “age in place” and maintain their independence and financial freedom all in the comfort of their apartment home.

Our “all-inclusive, month to month” rent includes the following: - 3 Nutritious Chef-Prepared Meals Daily – Restaurant Style Dining - Emergency Response System Monitored 24/7 – GPS Technology - Complimentary Scheduled Transportation – Unlimited Per Year - Weekly Housekeeping and Linen Service – Complimentary Washers and Dryers - Full Calendar of Life-Enriching Activities, Events and Weekly Outings - Total Brain Health Weekly Program for the Mind, Body and Spirit! - Travel & Stay Program - FREE and Unlimited to any of our 262 properties throughout the US - Pets Warmly Welcomed

We look forward to your visit! 8135 Beechmont Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45255

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513-474-2582

Amenities Private Dining Room & Lounge / Weekly Classes - Painting, Creative Writing, Poetry, and more / Beauty Salon, Barber Shop and Nail Salon / Resident Operated Store / Fitness Center / Putting Green / Greenhouse

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SENIOR LIV ING COMMU NIT Y DIRECTORY Review the listings below for senior living communities that meet your level-of-care needs. You’ll find campuses that offer independent living, assisted living, continuing care, skilled nursing facilities, rehabilitation units, adult day programs, and more. With contact information at your fingertips, we make it easy to request more information or to schedule a visit.

CEDAR VILLAGE SENIOR LIVING COMMUNITY 5467 CEDAR VILLAGE DR., MASON, OH 45040, (513) 754-3100, CEDAR VILLAGE.ORG Type of Facility: Retirement Community Total Units: 105 Independent/Assisted Living Apts.; 162 Total Health Care Beds: Short-term and Long-term Care, 28 Memory Support Average Age: 85 Total Staff: 275 At Cedar Village, we live life to the fullest every day. With gourmet menu selections in our Garden Dining Room, casual dining options in the deli, a robust life enrichment schedule including both on and off-campus activities, a library, resident computers, a pool, and beautiful grounds, you’ll wonder why you didn’t move here sooner. It’s the best way to help your loved one stay as active and interested in life as possible.

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THE COURTYARD AT SEASONS 7100 DEARWESTER DR., CINCINNATI, OH 45236, (513) 437-3948, SENIORLIFESTYLE.COM Type of Facility: Continuum of Care Total Units: 128; 83 Assisted Living, 45 Nursing Beds Average Age: 80 Total Staff: 270 (including Seasons) This continuum of care retirement community is located on campus with Seasons in Kenwood. Choose from a wide array of lifestyle options. Designed for those who want companionship and amenities with a hospitality-centered staff and a stimulating environment.

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SEASONS RETIREMENT COMMUNITY 7300 DEARWESTER DR., CINCINNATI, OH 45236, (513) 984-9400, SENIORLIFESTYLE.COM Type of Facility: Independent Living, Continuum of Care on campus at Courtyard Total Units: 343; 216 Independent Living, 83 Assisted Living, 45 Nursing Average Age: 80 Total Staff: 250 (including Courtyard) Offers studios and one- and two-bedroom apartments on a campus surrounded by lush greenery in the heart of Kenwood. Amenities include award-winning dining, live music, a fitness center and outdoor pool, a beauty salon and barbershop, a library, fitness classes, and more.

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ARTIS SENIOR LIVING OF MASON 6200 SNIDER RD., MASON, OH 45040, CONTACT JERRY CRAFT: (513) 2297450, ARTISSL.COM Type of Facility: Assisted Living for Dementia and Memory Care Total Units: 64-bed Assisted Living Average Age: NP Total Staff: 100+ Provides memory care, comfort, and security for ages 50 and over. The 64-bed dementia and memory care assisted-living community is designed with attention to the cognitive and physical limitations associated with memory loss and dementia. Creates a nurturing environment specifically tailored for residents’ unique needs.

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BROOKWOOD RETIREMENT COMMUNITY 12100 REED HARTMAN HIGHWAY, CINCINNATI, OH 45241, (513) 605-2000, HCMG.COM Type of Facility: Continuing Care Retirement Community Total Units: 225; 40 Independent Living, 54 Assisted Living, 131 Nursing Beds Average Age: NP Total Staff: 200 This full-service continuing care facility offers nursing, assisted living, and independent living services, and features indoor/outdoor pool, tennis court, walking path, and an elegant dining room.

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CHESTERWOOD VILLAGE 8073 TYLERSVILLE RD., WEST CHESTER, OH 45069, (513) 777-1400, HILLANDALE.COM Type of Facility: Continuing Care Retirement Community, Patio Homes, Independent Living Apts., Assisted Living, Memory Assisted Living, Outpatient Rehabilitation, and Long-Term Skilled Nursing Care Total Units: 257 Average Age: NP Total Staff: NP Chesterwood is a Hillandale Continuous Care Retirement Community that’s more than a new place for your loved one to call home—it’s a new hometown. We’re home to The Advanced Therapy Center, designed to change the way people heal and help them get home faster.

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THE CHRISTIAN VILLAGE AT MASON 411 WESTERN ROW RD., MASON, OH 45040, (513) 398-1486, CHRISTIAN VILLAGES.ORG Type of Facility: Life Plan Community Independent Living, Assisted Living, Short-term Rehabilitation, Memory Support, Long-term Nursing Total Units: 379; 189 Garden Homes, 76 Assisted Living Garden Apts., 41 Memory Support Apts., 73 Skilled Nursing Beds Average Age: NP Total The staff is dedicated to Staff: 185 helping residents enjoy a fulfilling, joyful lifestyle in a relaxed, faith-filled community. The 85-acre lakeside campus fea-

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tures independent living Garden Homes and private rehabilitation suites. The staff’s approach to care is grounded in compassionate service and is built upon a multidimensional approach that we call “Service From the Heart.” DEERFIELD SPRINGS RETIREMENT RESORT 3664 W. U.S. 22, LOVELAND, OH 45140, (513) 453-0017, DEERFIELD SPRINGSRETIREMENT.COM Type of Facility: Independent Living Total Units: 128 Apts., studio, one, two, and three bedrooms Average Age: 55+ Total Staff: 40+ With all-included services and amenities, Deerfield Springs provides a wonderful lifestyle so residents can relax and thoroughly enjoy their retirement years in a luxurious, elegantly decorated community. Their prices represent a tremendous value.

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HILLSPRING OF SPRINGBORO HEALTH CARE CENTER AND REHABILITATION 325 E. CENTRAL AVE., SPRINGBORO, OH 45066, (937) 748-1100, CARE SPRING.COM Type of Facility: Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation Total Units: 140 Skilled Nursing Beds Average Age: Varies based on level of care Total Staff: 220 An in-house team of licensed therapists, nurses, and caregivers offer care and services. The facility encompasses a residential area for patients with longerterm needs and a separate rehab center for individuals requiring short-term services. Features a Montessori school, recreational therapy room, chapel, and family guest room.

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THE LODGE NURSING AND REHAB CENTER 9370 UNION CEMETERY RD., LOVELAND, OH 45140, (513) 677-4900, LODGECARECENTER.COM Type of Facility: Skilled Nursing Facility, Hospice Care, Rehabilitation, Intermediate Care, Secured Dementia Unit Total Units: 120 Skilled Beds, 36 Alzheimer’s Units Average Age: 84 Total Staff: 156 Provides stateof-the-art rehabilitation for short- and long-term care and Alzheimer’s care. Newly renovated building features

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private rooms with private bath and showers. Rated Four Stars by CMS and Top 100 by U.S. News & World Report. Preferred provider for most all major hospitals in Cincinnati. Accepts Medicare, Medicaid, and most major insurances.

20-plus years from the Administrator, DON, nurses, and aids. All rooms are private rooms with private bath and showers. Rated Five Stars by CMS and Top 100 by U.S. News & World Report. Accepts Medicare, Medicaid, and most major insurances.

THE LODGE RETIREMENT COMMUNITY 12050 MONTGOMERY RD., CINCINNATI, OH 45249, (513) 683-9966, LODGERETIREMENTCOMMUNITY .COM Type of Facility: Independent Living, Assisted Living Total Units: 213; 24 Cottages, 61 Independent Living Apts., 60 Assisted Living Apts. Average Age: 82 Total Staff: 135 Offers efficiency, studio, one- and two-bedroom apartments. Cottages are separate two-bedroom apartments located next door. No move-in fee. Beautiful rustic charm and courtyard with pond, gazebo, and walking paths. Rated Five Stars by CMS and Top 100 by U.S. News & World Report.

OHIO LIVING MOUNT PLEASANT 225 BRITTON LANE, MONROE, OH 45050, (513) 539-7391, OHIOLIVING. ORG Type of Facility: Continuing Care Retirement Community with independent ranch homes, condominiums, and apartments. Assisted Living, Alzheimer’s Care, Rehab Studios, and Long-term Nursing Care Total Units: 408; 246 Independent Living, 53 Assisted Living, 89 Nursing Beds, 20 Private Rehab Suites Average Age: 76 Total Staff: More than 350 Located in a beautiful setting close to shopping and medical services, this nonprofit, full continuum of care community offers more than 145 unique ranch homes with entrance fee and straight rental plans to meet almost any budget.

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MEADOWBROOK CARE CENTER 8211 WELLER RD., CINCINNATI, OH 45242, (513) 489-2444, MEADOW BROOKCARE.ORG Type of Facility: Skilled Nursing, Rehabilitation, Long-Term Care, Memory Care Total Units: 156; 12 Private Rooms; 144 Semi-Private Beds Average Age: 79 Total Staff: 200 We offer 24-hour skilled nursing care for short-term rehabilitation, long-term residential care, and memory care. We also offer a secured dementia management unit.

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MERCY COMMUNITY AT WINTON WOODS 10290 MILL RD., CINCINNATI, OH 45231, (513) 825-9300, MERCY.COM Type of Facility: Independent Living Apts. for income-qualifying seniors, ages 62+ Total Units: 73 Average Age: 75 Total Staff: 2 On beautiful grounds in a former seminary, residents enjoy a peaceful community surrounded by stained-glass windows, tree-filled views, and friends.

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OAK CREEK TERRACE 2316 SPRINGMILL RD., KETTERING, OH 45440, (937) 439-1454, OAKCREEKTERRACE.NET Type of Facility: Skilled Nursing, Assisted Living, Hospice Care, Rehabilitation, Intermediate Care Total Units: 69 Skilled Nursing Beds, 15 Assisted Living One-Bedroom Apts.; 23 Secured Dementia Units Average Age: 84 Total Staff: 100 Offers state-ofthe-art rehabilitation. Many of the staff have been employed for 10- to

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OTTERBEIN LEBANON SENIOR LIFESTYLE COMMUNITY 585 N. STATE ROUTE 741, LEBANON, OH 45036, (513) 933-5471, OTTER BEIN.ORG/LEBANON Type of Facility: Full-service Continuing Care Retirement Community Total Units: 784; 490 Independent Living, 38 Assisted Living, 256 Nursing Beds Average Age: NA Total Staff: 540 Nonprofit and faith-based since 1912. Offers a wide variety of apartments, patio homes, and ranch homes with many on-site services and amenities, including on-campus security, an emergency call system, an extensive programs department, transportation, and a life enrichment center for fitness.

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OTTERBEIN SKILLED NURSING & REHAB NEIGHBORHOOD–MIDDLETOWN 105 ATRIUM DR., MIDDLETOWN, OH 45005, (513) 260-7690, OTTERBEIN. ORG Type of Facility: Nonprofit, Faith-based, Skilled Nursing, Rehabilitation Total Units: 50 private suites in five one-story homes with 10 elders/ rehab guests each Average Age: NA Total Staff: NP Private suites, a spacious great room with a hearth area, an open and airy space with large windows, a patio, a residential kitchen, a family dining area, a salon/spa, and a den. The people living in each house make their own decisions about daily living and schedules.

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OTTERBEIN SKILLED NURSING & REHAB NEIGHBORHOOD–SPRINGBORO 9320 AVALON CIRCLE, CENTERVILLE, OH 45458, (513) 260-7690, OT TERBEIN.ORG Type of Facility: Nonprofit, Faith-based, Skilled Nursing, Rehabilitation Total Units: 50 private suites in five one-story homes with 10 elders/rehab guests each Average Age: NA Total Staff: NP Private suites, a spacious great room with a hearth area, an open and airy space with large windows, a patio, a residential kitchen, a family dining area, a salon/spa, and a den. The people living in each house make their own decisions about daily living and schedules.

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THE SHERIDAN AT MASON 5373 MERTEN DR., MASON, OH 45040, (513) 466-8400, SENIORLIFE STYLE.COM/PROPERTY/SHERIDANMASON/ Type of Facility: Assisted Living and Memory Care Total Units: 65 Assisted Living, 33 Memory Care Average Age: 79 Total Staff: NP Welcome to The Sheridan at Mason, the new, modern approach to senior living and care. In our Mason community we provide Assisted Living and Memory Care in Mason, Ohio, with best-in-class care customized to meet the needs of each of our residents.

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STONEBRIDGE AT WINTON WOODS 10290 MILL RD., CINCINNATI, OH 45231, (513) 825-0460, STONE BRIDGEATWINTONWOODS.COM, MERCY.COM Type of Facility: Maintenance-free cottage living for ages 55+ Total Units: 76 Average Age: 74 Total Staff: 4 Step outside for a walk along the nearly 2,500-acre wooded, park-like setting. Offers two- and three-bedroom cottage styles with one- or two-car attached garage. Ideal pastoral retreat that’s minutes away from shopping, entertainment, golfing, health facilities, and other community resources. Mass is held five days a week in the historic chapel at Mercy Community.

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TWIN LAKES AT MONTGOMERY 9840 MONTGOMERY RD., MONTGOMERY, OH 45242, (513) 247-1300, LEC.ORG Type of Facility: Senior Living Communities Total Units: 354; 137 Villas, 6 Manor Homes, 140 Apts., 28 Assisted Living, 43 Nursing Beds Average Age: 78–88 Total Staff: 209 This Life Enriching Communities campus offers villa and apartment accommodations for independent

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lifestyles, assisted living, short-term rehab, and long-term nursing services with a commitment to whole-person well-being, all conveniently located in the heart of Montgomery.

E A ST THE ATLANTES 776-B OLD STATE ROUTE 74, CINCINNATI, OH 45245, (513) 399-6225, THEATLANTES.COM Type of Facility: Short-term Care Resort Total Units: 30 Private Suites Average Age: 50+ Total Staff: 72 Offers innovative post-acute care. Awarded Five Star CMS rating, deficiency-free health survey, more than 97 percent satisfaction survey results per Ohio Department of Aging. Evidence-based practice and experienced staff provide care for orthopedic recovery, heart failure, stroke, debility, pneumonia, and other major illnesses.

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BARRINGTON OF OAKLEY INDEPENDENT/ASSISTED LIVING, MEMORY CARE, ADULT DAY 4855 BABSON PLACE, CINCINNATI, OH 45227, (513) 561-9100, SENIOR LIFESTYLE.COM Type of Facility: Independent Living, Assisted Living, Adult Day Care, and Memory Care Total Units: 105; 77 Independent and Assisted Living Apts., 28 Memory Care Average Age: 84 Total Staff: NP Spacious one- and two-bedroom apartments are available with fully equipped kitchens, washers, dryers, and more. Many amenities provided, including fitness center, cocktail bar, and movie theater. Adult day services offered in memory care.

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DEUPREE HOUSE 3939 ERIE AVE., CINCINNATI, OH 45208, CONTACT GINI TARR, (513) 561-4200, DEUPREEHOUSE.COM Type of Facility: Continuous Care Total Units: 145; 24 Private Rooms at Deupree Cottages Nursing Care Center Average Age: 80+ Total Staff: 125 Offers first-class amenities and services. Monthly rental apartments and entrance fee plans are available, along with Enriched Living options for those requiring some daily living assistance. Highly rated by the Centers of Medicare and Medicaid Services. Accreditation from CARF and CCAC.

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EASTGATE VILLAGE 776 OLD STATE ROUTE 74, CINCINNATI, OH 45245, (513) 753-4400, EASTGATEVILLAGE.COM Type of Facility: Independent Living with assistance Total Units: 153 Average

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Age: 85 Total Staff: 45 Enjoy private apartments, maintenance-free. Offers full kitchen, plus community rooms such as lounges, game rooms, a library, and a dining room. Social, recreational, and other activities daily. Services such as housekeeping and flat laundry are included in the monthly rent; additional services are available. Home health services can be provided. HYDE PARK HEALTH CENTER 4001 ROSSLYN DR., CINCINNATI, OH 45209, (513) 272-0600, HYDEPARKHEALTHCENTER. COM Type of Facility: Senior Care Retirement Community Total Units: 232; 42 Assisted Living, 190 Nursing Beds Average Age: NP Total Staff: NP Offers skilled rehabilitation, physical, speech, and occupational therapy; private rooms; one- and two-bedroom assistedliving apartments; specialized dementia/Alzheimer’s assisted-living apartments and nursing care; assisted-living respite suite; executive chef–prepared dining; library; Abundant Activities program; chapel and chaplain; beauty salons; wellness spa, massage therapy, and acupuncture; transportation; pets allowed.

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INDIANSPRING OF OAKLEY HEALTH CARE CENTER AND REHABILITATION 4900 BABSON PLACE, CINCINNATI, OH 45227, (513) 561-2600, CARESPRING.COM Type of Facility: Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation Total Units: 144; 75 Private Rooms Average Age: Varies based on level of care Total Staff: 220 An in-house team of licensed therapists, nurses, and caregivers offer care and services. The facility encompasses a residential area for patients with longer-term needs and a separate rehab center for individuals requiring short-term services. Features a Montessori school, recreational therapy room, chapel, family guest room, and patios with fireplaces. Retail space on lower level houses nearby medical practitioners.

share a hug. Catch the CarDon Spirit of Compassion.

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THE KENWOOD BY SENIOR STAR 5435 KENWOOD RD., CINCINNATI, OH 45227, (513) 561-9300, KENWOODBYSENIORSTAR.COM Type of Facility: Active Living, Independent Living, Assisted Living, Memory Care, Nursing Care Total Units: 309; 24 Active Living, 183 Independent Living, 47 Assisted Living, 41 Memory Care, 14 Nursing Care Average Age: 55+ Total Staff: 200 Offers condo-like rentals, plus monthly leases on apartments, featuring city views in a world-class atmosphere. Amenities include 24/7 maintenance and security, six dining venues, an indoor pool, climate-controlled underground parking, laundry rooms, a spa and salon, a wellness center, transportation, individually inspired programs, and optional add-on services.

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FA M I LY- F I R S T S E N I O R L I V I N G F R O M C A R D O N

CALL US TODAY AT 513-754-3100 TO SCHEDULE A TOUR. Catch our spirit - it is palpable. You can feel it in each team member as they interact with each other, with you and your loved ones. Sure, we provide great senior living options, but it’s the &DU'RQVSLULW\RXFDQRQO\ĆQGDW&HGDU9LOODJH

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MARJORIE P. LEE RETIREMENT COMMUNITY 3550 SHAW AVE., CINCINNATI, OH 45208, CONTACT KAREN CHRISTOPHER: (513) 533-5000, MARJORIEPLEE.COM Type of Facility: Continuous Care Total Units: 160 Average Age: 80+ Total Staff: 257 Offers all levels of care,

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CedarVillage.org INDEPENDENT LIVING • ASSISTED LIVING REHABILITATION • LONG TERM CARE MEMORY SUPPORT

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including independent and assisted living, skilled nursing for short-stay rehab and long-term care, and Alzheimer’s and dementia support. Welcomes older adults of all faiths. Apartments offered on a monthly rental basis with no entrance fees or long-term contracts. Highly rated by the Centers of Medicare and Medicaid Services. Accreditation CARF and CCAC. NEW ENGLAND CLUB 8135 BEECHMONT AVE., CINCINNATI, OH 45255, (513) 474-2582, NEWENG LANDCLUB.COM Type of Facility: Independent Living with 24/7 on-site Assisted Living Services Total Units: 253 Average Age: 85 Total Staff: 60 New England Club is unlike any other Senior Living Community in Cincinnati. We are a more affordable lifestyle because we offer Independent Apartment Living with multiple on-site assisted care options for our residents and their families to be able to choose. Our residents schedule care “as needed,â€? so they can “age in placeâ€? and maintain their independence and ďŹ nancial freedom all in the comfort of their apartment home.

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ST. THERESA– A DIVERSICARE TRANSITIONAL CARE COMMUNITY 7010 ROWAN HILL DR., CINCINNATI, OH 45227, (513) 271-7010, DIVERSI CARESTTHERESA.COM Type of Facility: Continuum of Care— Residential Care, Skilled Nursing, Rehabilitation, Dementia Unit Total Units: 169; 32 Independent Living, 38 Assisted Living, 99 Nursing Beds Average Age: 83 Total Staff: 120 Located off of Miami Road in Mariemont with views of the city. Provides apartments and rehabilitation services in a peaceful environment, as well as daily Mass, trips to stores, movies, and restaurants. Offers an in-house beauty shop and boutique. Activities are available seven days a week.

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W EST ALOIS ALZHEIMER CENTER 70 DAMON RD., CINCINNATI, OH 45218, (513) 605-1000, ALOIS.COM Type of Facility: Specialized Care: Assisted Living, Nursing Care, Respite, Adult Day Enrich-

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ment Program Total Units: 113; 20 Assisted Living, 93 Nursing Beds Average Age: NP Total Staff: NP As experts in Alzheimer’s disease, the care team partners with highly credentialed physicians, pharmacists, and psychiatrists to provide the best care possible. Alois offers ďŹ ve distinct levels of care.

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BAYLEY 990 BAYLEY DR., CINCINNATI, OH 45233, (513) 347-5500, BAYLEYLIFE. ORG Type of Facility: Continuing Care Retirement Community Total Units: 295; 78 Independent Cottages, 80 Assisted Living, 27 Assisted Living Memory Support, 110 Skilled Nursing Beds Average Age: Health Care: 83.7; Assisted Living: 87; Independent Living: 82.6 Total Staff: 380 Provides services for seniors through both residential and community programs. Inpatient and outpatient speech, occupational, and physical rehab services available. Now offers nonmedical home services for seniors living on campus and in the community, promoting independence and healthy lifestyles.

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BIRCHWOOD CARE CENTER 4070 HAMILTON-MASON RD., FAIRFIELD TOWNSHIP, OH 45011, (513) 868-3300, HILLANDALE.COM Type of Facility: Skilled Nursing Care Total Units: 75 Average Age:NP Total Staff: NP As part of Hillandale, Birchwood puts family ďŹ rst, treating every resident as our own. Our private, shared-private, and semi-private nursing suites are ďŹ lled with meaningful touches—like a personalized memory case for your prized, familiar possessions. From charming, colorful outdoor courtyards to salon services and an amazing array of social activities, every part of life at Birchwood embraces you with warm hospitality.

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BRADFORD PLACE—A DIVERSICARE TRANSITIONAL CARE COMMUNITY 1302 MILLVILLE AVE., HAMILTON, OH 45013, (513) 867-4100, DIVERSI CAREBRADFORDPLACE.COM Type of Facility: Continuum of Care—Residential Care (Independent and Assisted Living), Nursing Care, Skilled, Rehabilitation Care,

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for independent lifestyles, assisted living, memory-support assisted living, short-term rehab, and long-term nursing services with a commitment to wholeperson well-being. WESTERN HILLS RETIREMENT VILLAGE & NURSING/REHAB CENTER 6210 CLEVES WARSAW PIKE, CINCINNATI, OH 45233, (513) 941-0099, WESTERNHILLSRV.COM Type of Facility: Full Continuum of Care: Independent Living, Independent Living Plus, Short-term Rehab featuring private rooms, Assisted Living, Short-term Rehab (Skilled Nursing), Long-term (Intermediate Care), Respite, Alzheimer’s Unit, Hospice Care Total Units: 212; 110 Dually Certified Beds, 13 Assisted Living Apts., 79 Independent Living Apts. Average Age: 80–85 Total Staff: 268 Rated Five Stars by CMS and Top 100 by U.S. News & World Report since 2011.

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Respite Care, Outpatient Therapy Total Units: 127; 42 Assisted Living, 85 Nursing Beds Average Age: 83 Total Staff: 100 full-time employees, 30 part-time Provides skilled care in a comfortable setting. Offers three meals daily, weekly housekeeping, flat linen/personal laundry services, paid utilities (except phone), weekly nondenominational church service, access to social services and registered dietitian, room maintenance, daily activities, monthly wellness checks, and beauty/barbershop access.

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BRIDGEWAY POINTE ASSISTED LIVING 165 W. GALBRAITH RD., CINCINNATI, OH 45216, (513) 418-4370, BRIDGEWAYPOINTE.COM Type of Facility: Assisted Living, Memory Care Total Units: 102 Average Age: 84 Total Staff: NA A smaller yet vibrant home-like community that features restaurant-style dining and lifeenrichment activities, as well as an onsite physician and wellness clinics. Very stable and experienced staff. In central location to most of Greater Cincinnati.

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Photographs by Monkey Business Images/Shutterstock.com

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THE CHRISTIAN VILLAGE AT MT. HEALTHY 8097 HAMILTON AVE., CINCINNATI, OH 45231, (513) 931-5000, CHRIST IANVILLAGES.ORG Type of Facility: Independent Living, Assisted Living, Assisted Living Memory Care, Skilled Nursing, and Rehabilitation Total Units: 102 Residential Living, 75 Nursing Beds Average Age: Varies Total Staff: 180 Provides integrated health services for older adults and offers a full range of social, cultural, spiritual, and creative opportunities. Nonprofit, faith-based community provides a full continuum of care and features private rehabilitation suites for short-term skilled nursing.

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MERCY HEALTH–WEST PARK 2950 W. PARK DR., CINCINNATI, OH 45238, (513) 451-8900, MERCY.COM Type of Facility: Continuum of Care, Rehabilitation, Short-term and Long-term Care Nursing, Residential Care Total Units: 302; 3 Independent Apts., 174 Assisted Living, 125 Nursing Beds Average Age: 84 Total Staff: 180+ Serving the west side for more than 40 years, this community provides distinct short-term nursing and a rehabilitation unit with 30 private rooms. Offers 24-hour nursing care, daily Catholic Mass, recreational and medical transportation, and a beauty/ barbershop on site.

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SHAWNEESPRING OF HARRISON HEALTH CARE CENTER AND REHABILITATION 10111 SIMONSON RD., HARRISON, OH 45030, (513) 367-7780, CARE SPRING.COM Type of Facility: Skilled and Intermediate Nursing, Rehabilitation Total Units: 140 Nursing Beds Average Age: Varies based on level of care Total Staff: 220 An in-house team of licensed therapists, nurses, and caregivers offer care and services. The facility encompasses a residential area for patients with longer-term needs and a separate rehab center for individuals requiring short-term services. Features a Montessori school, a recreation therapy room, chapel, and family guest room.

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TWIN TOWERS SENIOR LIVING COMMUNITY 5343 HAMILTON AVE., CINCINNATI, OH 45224, (513) 853-2000, LEC.ORG Type of Facility: Senior Living Communities Total Units: 456; 120 Apts., 128 Patio Homes, 77 Assisted Living, 30 Memory Support, 101 Nursing Beds Average Age: 78–84 Total Staff: 220 This Life Enriching Communities campus offers patio homes and apartments

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NO DOUBT

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s been nzel ha rs Nick Se the doubte g provin his entire wrong reer. Will ll ca ds baseba innati Re nc the Ci fans make eir and th me mistake? the sa

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resolved to work harder than anyone else. He also got a bit of good luck when a new coach, Matt Buckner, took over the Farragut baseball program. Buckner allowed Senzel to work out with the team throughout the following summer and fall, and by the time February rolled around he’d earned the opportunity to play with the junior varsity. Senzel ended up starting at shortstop for the JV, and a year later he was the second baseman and leadoff hitter for the varsity. He batted .360 as Farragut won yet another state title. Still, scouts weren’t beating down his door to see him, and he wasn’t drafted. “I wasn’t good enough,” he says. Though Senzel wasn’t aware of it at the time, the Cincinnati Reds had noticed him. Chris Buckley was the team’s scouting director then, and in an interview with The Athletic he recalled going with Joe Katuska, currently the Reds’ assistant scouting director, to see another player at Farragut. “For us, I remember walking into a high school game, [and] Joe says, ‘Chris, that third baseman’s going to be a heck of a player, but he needs to go to college.’ ” They didn’t speak with Senzel that day but placed him on their scouting radar, planning to follow his college career. Senzel wasn’t overrun with college scholarship offers either.“It really wasn’t as if they were coming to look at me,” he says.“I had to contact them and get them interested. It was never the opposite way around.” His best friend in high school was the son of Dave Serrano, the University of Tennessee’s head coach at the time. Serrano was interested in Senzel but didn’t offer much in the way of scholarship money. Nick was born in Atlanta, so he reached out to the University of Georgia, which ultimately made a partial scholarship offer that he accepted. Before he could enroll at Georgia, however, the Bulldogs fired their coach. Senzel

re-opened his recruitment, and not long after he was sitting in Coach Serrano’s office at Tennessee. Serrano was still interested, and Senzel decided to commit to the Vols even though he’d have to walk on to the team and pay tuition for the first year. It wasn’t entirely a baseball-related decision. “At the time, there was some stuff going on that I felt like it was the right decision for myself and my family if I stayed close to home,” he says. “Especially being close to my sister, who is younger. My parents were going through a divorce. I just really didn’t have my head on straight and didn’t really know how far I wanted this to go and how far I wanted baseball to take me. So it wasn’t really a baseball decision.” Once he arrived on campus, Senzel found himself struggling with the divorce and other personal issues.“I saw a counselor and a therapist, and they really changed my views of how I should view my life and the people in it,” he says.“The disadvantages of doing not-so-good stuff off the field, whether it be alcohol, other things like that.” In retrospect, Senzel recognizes that he had come to a crossroads, not just in baseball but in his life. “I really had to choose whether to take baseball seriously or whether I needed to go a different way. I chose to be very disciplined and do the things right off the field to become successful on the field.” His work ethic had gotten him to a Division I program, but Senzel then kicked things into another gear. He became consumed with nutrition and increased his work in the weight room and in the batting cage. “I felt like I was on a freight train and it couldn’t be stopped,” he says. “It was almost like an obsession to me to be the best person I could be, which ultimately helped me be the best I could be on the field.” Senzel hit .315 in his freshman year at UT, and followed that up with another strong season. Once again, however, he flew under the radar. Professional baseball didn’t seem to be a real option. “I would see a lot of my other teammates getting draft looks and having agents and all of this, and I never really had any of that,” he says. “At least, I didn’t hear about any of it.” Then came his summer on Cape Cod. After his sophomore year, Senzel played for the Brewster White Caps in the presti-

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gious Cape Cod summer league, where he forced himself into the conversation. In no time at all, he had won over his coach, Jamie Shevchik. “He had unbelievable work ethic,” Shevchik told The Knoxville NewsSentinel. “He understood where he was, and he obviously wasn’t going to take that opportunity for granted. He was in the weight room every morning. He took early work every day at the field. He constantly wanted to take ground balls. He was a workout machine.” And he blossomed physically to 6-foot-1 and 205 pounds. Senzel was named Cape Cod MVP, the league’s best professional prospect, and Summer Collegiate Baseball Player of the Year. For the first time, he was being taken seriously as a potential major leaguer. “I probably would have gotten drafted just alone off my three years at Tennessee, but obviously not where I was picked [by the Reds],” he says. “That summer kinda changed the outlook on where I realistically could go and play baseball as a profession.” BACK AT TENNESSEE FOR HIS JUNIOR year, Senzel was a semifinalist for the 2016 Golden Spikes Award, given annually to the country’s best amateur baseball player, and cemented himself as perhaps the best hitter available in the draft. Still, he was surprised when the Reds selected him with the No. 2 overall pick, the club’s highest selection since taking shortstop Kurt Stillwell in that same slot all the way back in 1983. Senzel made his professional debut in rookie ball on June 17, 2016, and went 2-for3 with a run scored, two RBI, and a stolen base. It was the beginning of a remarkable ascent. Later that year, he was promoted to Class-A Dayton, where he promptly set franchise records for slugging percentage and ratio of extra-base hits per game. The following season, Senzel was named the Reds’ Minor League Player of the Year, the Florida State League’s best batting prospect, and the league’s best defensive third baseman. He also participated in the All-Star Futures Game during MLB festivities in Miami. In 2018, the Reds asked Senzel to shift over to second base. He willingly complied, and by the end of that season he was named the International League’s best defensive second baseman. “Wherever they told me


NO DOUBT to play, I feel like I tried to learn every day,” he says.“I know I did everything they asked of me during that time. I never complained, I never pouted. Wherever they asked me to be, I was going to do it, because my ultimate goal was to make the big leagues and help the Cincinnati Reds win games.” There was little question that Senzel was ready for the major leagues. In fact, he had demonstrated no weaknesses in his game, other than a nagging inability to stay healthy. Senzel suffered a scary bout with vertigo, and then sustained a fluke injury to his right index finger that required surgery. Last spring, the Reds sent Senzel back to the minors after spring training, a move that most observers credited to the franchise’s desire to manipulate his service time (giving the Reds a full extra year of team control before he could become a free agent). His agent at the time called the decision to leave Senzel off the Reds’ Opening Day roster “a simply egregious case of service time manipulation.”

For his part, Senzel never once demonstrated public frustration over his delayed debut in the big leagues. “I can only control what I can control, and that’s going out and playing the game hard every single day,” he says. “I had no control over whether they thought I was ready or whether they thought this time was the right time. I only knew that, when I was in Louisville [in AAA], I was helping the Louisville Bats win games. When I got called up to Cincinnati, I was helping the Cincinnati Reds win games.” The big moment finally came last May. By this time, the Reds had asked him to move to yet another position, center field, the fourth spot he’d played since turning pro, if you include his work at shortstop during spring training in 2018. From day one, Senzel felt like his Reds teammates accepted him not as a rookie but as a player who could help the team win games. “It had been a long time coming,” he says. “Obviously, there are some injuries that had kinda derailed me, but I already had some re-

lationships with these guys. I felt like they knew how I played the game and knew what I’d be able to bring. I felt like when I came up, we needed to start winning games.” For three months, Senzel was almost exactly as advertised. By early August, he was hitting .285 with a .345 on-base percentage, good numbers for a rookie getting his first taste of the big leagues. But he had just eight homers to that point, and the Reds approached him with a plan to tweak his stance in hopes of finding more power. As with everything else in his professional career, he was open to whatever the club wanted. It didn’t work. “I was open to trying,” he says. “I really was confident, and it was something that I experimented with.” From that point forward, though, he hit just .181 before his season ended prematurely with a shoulder injury that would ultimately require surgery. By that time, he’d decided to abandon the swing changes. “It came to a point where I was tired of not helping my team. So I said,

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Screw it, I can’t do it anymore. [But] there was a lot I learned.” Much of what he learned came from Reds legend Joey Votto. “Ever since I got drafted,” Senzel says, “he was kind of a mainstay when it came to someone I could talk to and communicate with. Always positive. Even when I was rehabbing the injuries in Arizona, he always reached out.” Senzel and Votto bonded over one shared trait: Both want to be the hardest working player in the room. “[Votto is] a Hall of Famer in my book. He’s the epitome of never seeing a guy work as hard as he works. The things that he’s accomplished, I want to accomplish or be better than him at. That’s out of pure respect.” AFTER AN ACTIVE OFF-SEASON, THE Reds have raised expectations for the 2020 season. Among the new acquisitions are two outfielders, Nick Castellanos and Shogo Akiyama, prompting questions about where Senzel fits into the Reds’ line-

up equation. After rehabbing his shoulder over the winter in Arizona, Senzel has resumed all baseball activities and says he’s good to go health-wise. Reds President of Baseball Operations Dick Williams is quick to reassure fans that Senzel is in Cincinnati’s long-term plans. “We saw a really good performance from him last year,” Williams told MLB Network. “We think he’s a really exciting young player. He plays with an edge, he runs, he does the intangible things well, good baseball instincts. Our preference is to keep guys like that in the organization.” Still, Senzel’s name continues to be mentioned as a possible trade chip with the Reds looking to contend for a playoff spot this season. For his part, Senzel is trying to tune out everything he can’t control. “Obviously, the people that make the decisions on who to add, the front office adding players, trying to put the best team out on the field, I think they’ve done a good job with that,” he says. Cincinnati has long demonstrated an

affection for hard-working baseball players. Pete Rose, who would know something about the topic, once said, “When you play hard every day, don’t mind getting dirty, and don’t walk around like a big shot, this bluecollar town will like you.” That description fits Senzel. He goes all-out on every play, and fans have noticed the way he hustles down the line on ground balls or sprints into the gap to track down fly balls. “[Reds fans] have been the best,” says Senzel. “I think the people who actually care and are true fans see the effort I give on a nightly basis, and they really respect that and enjoy watching it. I don’t do that for people to like me or for people to cheer for me. I just don’t know any other way to play.” After a rookie campaign featuring yet another injury and a performance that didn’t live up to his high expectations, people are doubting Nick Senzel once again— possibly including his Reds bosses. That’s a place where he’s always thrived, and he has a long history of proving doubters wrong.

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FROM CHINA, WITH LOVE CONTINUED FROM PAGE 73

2009.” No trumpets blared, no champagne bottled popped, no cameras flashed, but our daughter was now a U.S. citizen. And she had slept through it all.

Dani keep it. We still have it. In a nondescript office building, we cleared another hurdle: Getting final approval from the U.S. government to bring Dani home. We entered a waiting room, with about 100 chairs, in front of a halfdozen windows with thick glass. A banner hung from the ceiling: “The U.S. Consulate in Guangzhou joins your family in celebrating your adoption. Congratulations!!” When it was our turn, Lynda held Dani on a metal shelf in front of a clerk. The clerk compared Dani’s face to the photo in her red Chinese passport. Her U.S. visa was inside. In the meeting room, a State Depart-

THE U.S. HAS MORE THAN 1.5 MILLION adopted children under the age of 18, including 57,000 in Ohio, according to the 2010 Census. We know the common joys and challenges of those families, especially the families who have adopted from China. Before last summer’s return trip, for example, I was asked by family and friends whether we’d be seeing Dani’s parents on the trip. We’re her parents, I reminded them as calmly as possible. In China, we suspect people are surprised to see white parents with Chinese children because many Chinese don’t know that thousands of Chinese children have been adopted by foreign families. On a street in Datong, a woman began to stare at us as we passed her. She turned around and continued to stare after we were 20 feet beyond her. Even in restaurants, the staff stared at

WE VISITED DANI’S ORPHANAGE IN DATONG, WHERE AN EMPLOYEE REMEMBERED HER AS AN ACTIVE CHILD WHO WAS SOMETIMES A LITTLE NAUGHTY. THAT’S THE GIRL WE KNEW TOO. ment employee acknowledged three November birthdays of the adopted children, and the families cheered. He then asked the parents to raise their right hands. Paul, Laurie, and Hanna stood to our left. Ella, who was in Laurie’s arms, raised her right hand too. Lynda cradled Dani in her left arm. Together we recited an oath affirming that the information we provided to the U.S. government on behalf of our adopted children was true and correct to the best of our knowledge. The next day, we awoke before dawn and headed to the Guangzhou airport for the first of three flights. Before each one, we had to pass through security screening and re-check our bags with a 21-month-old girl in our arms. We finally had a smooth landing at Newark airport and headed for the immigration line. An officer stamped Dani’s passport: “Admitted, November 5,

us as we ate—and not just those serving us. On the plus side, though, Dani learned at an early age that she could enjoy the rich traditions of being Chinese and American, meaning that she probably celebrates more holidays than most of her friends. And in addition to her birthday, she gets to celebrate “Dani Day,” her adoption anniversary. Several weeks after arriving home in 2009, we took Dani to Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, where her cleft lip was repaired. As it healed, she retained a crooked nose and imperfect upper lip for a while. But I didn’t see those features—just an adorable little girl who made our lives more meaningful. Dani accumulated what seemed like a small library of children’s books, but there was no question which was her favorite: A Mother for Choco. It’s about a bird who was searching for his mother but couldn’t

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find anyone who looked like him. Instead, a bear—whose other children were an alligator, pig, and hippo—became his mother. What mattered most was the love that Mrs. Bear gave her children. Throughout the years, we’ve exposed Dani to Chinese culture, most notably by participating in the Greater Cincinnati Chapter of Families with Children from China, which ran educational, cultural, and social events. We often attended the chapter’s Chinese New Year celebrations and Autumn Moon Festival, featuring the lion dance and lantern lighting. Even before our match with Dani, we benefitted from our chapter’s Waiting Families group, which oriented prospective parents to the complexities of Chinese adoption. As Chinese adoption grew, so too did the chapter, which had an estimated 100 families at one point. Hundreds of people attended its New Year’s celebrations at times, but as the adoption rate declined, the chapter shrunk to about 20 families. It became inactive last year, though unofficial gatherings still occur. Dani has been friends with a girl in Mason since our first official event a decade ago. WE ALWAYS KNEW WE’D TAKE DANI BACK to China to see the nation where she was born, often referred to as a heritage tour. The only question was when. So when the van Genderens invited us to join them on their return trip last summer, it was the nudge we needed. Dani expressed anxiety about the trip at first, but not about what we might have expected, such as a visit to her orphanage. Instead, she wondered whether she’d like the food. We got her involved in the preparation. Dani helped Lynda gather gifts to take to the orphanage, including school supplies. One day, she rushed up to my home office to show me the baby clothing they’d bought. And Dani started to keep a journal about the trip. We also showed her photos and videos from the 2009 trip, hung a map of China in our kitchen with our route outlined, and watched a documentary of families on a heritage tour. As we checked into our Beijing hotel last June, the van Genderens were relaxing in a distant spot in the lobby. Ella spotted us first, rushed up to us, and gave us hugs.


Within minutes, Ella and Dani, who hadn’t seen each other in a year, were off exploring the hotel’s first floor. Within an hour, these two daughters of Shanxi Province were in the hotel pool together. After sightseeing in Beijing, we flew to Datong. From the air, we could see lots of farm fields as we descended. It appeared to be a beautiful region, much nicer than the dense city I remembered from a decade earlier when we arrived by highway. We walked to a small storefront restaurant for dinner. The staff didn’t speak English. We guessed at what we were ordering based on the illuminated photos behind the counter. The girls ordered soup with noodles and meat. It was amusing to see Dani and Ella try to eat with chopsticks, having never gotten competent instruction from us. The girls repeatedly picked up single strands of noodles between their chopsticks, only to see them fall back into their bowls. Lynda and I had agreed that if Dani felt uncomfortable on her visit to her orphanage, she should politely and discreetly let us know. We were concerned about the emotional trauma it might cause. I also worried about the greeting we might get there, since the staff hadn’t been very welcoming 10 years earlier. My fears were allayed, though, when several staff members greeted us at the entrance, including the assistant orphanage director and someone with a camera. They escorted us to a reception room, where we talked about Dani’s life in China and the U.S., using our guide as a translator. An employee said she remembered Dani as an active child who was sometimes a little naughty. That’s the same girl we knew too. We gave them a photo album of Dani throughout the years. Our guide and the employees laughed at the photo of Dani wearing a “Made in China” T-shirt when she was 5. School was in session, and we were escorted from room to room, where children of various ages were seated around tables. This was the same floor we had seen 10 years earlier, but this time we were invited to tour it. We were fairly sure that the room where Dani had slept in a crib was now a classroom. We saw children with disabilities, including cleft lips, visual impairments, and

Down syndrome. We saw familiar sights, including the backdrop to the first photos we received of Dani in a play area. Dani later told us that she expected a dirty, rundown place, but it was clean, well-lit, and modern. When we returned to the reception room, Dani’s foster mother, Xue Li, was waiting. We’d never met or communicated with her. We gave her the same album of photos of Dani and asked her what she remembered about Dani, and she told us that Dani liked to play with the family’s dog and dance to the ringtones of her cell phone. Lynda and I laughed, and Dani managed an awkward smile. At one point, Xue Li asked Dani to stand. She put a beautiful silver-colored bracelet on Dani’s wrist, and we all hugged. As Xue Li connected the ends of the bracelet, Lynda told me later, she thought about how symbolically that act represented the connections our family had made with a community far from our home. Xue Li lived in a village of a few hundred people on the outskirts of Datong, and for years its residents have served as foster families for children. We were unaware of any other place in China where an entire town had that role. According to various Chinese news reports, foster mothers had raised more than 1,000 children there since the 1960s. We expressed interest in seeing the town, to at least drive through it. We were pleasantly surprised when Xue Li invited us to visit her home later that afternoon. Dani later told us she didn’t want to visit the home because of how uncomfortable she’d been feeling. We promised her that we’d stay only briefly. The town didn’t have street names or house numbers, so our driver had trouble finding Xue Li’s home. She greeted us outside the walled courtyard of her onebedroom house. It had a kitchen with an additional bed. It also had a bathroom with a modern shower but no indoor toilet. Her home was spotless and orderly, with shoes neatly lined up just inside the door. Not far from the door, a table held a religious shrine with a figurine of Buddha and an incense burner. She served us hot water in glass teacups. Xue Li took us into the bedroom to meet a boy who was laying on a bed. This was her

foster son. She had been caring for him for more than a decade, meaning that she had cared for him and Dani at the same time. It was obvious he had multiple disabilities. He appeared unable to walk or even fully sit up, or talk. We eventually walked back to the van, where there were more hugs. As we left, Xue Li wiped tears from her eyes. Her home was the only one we visited in China, and it left an impression on Dani. “Their homes are as small as toothpicks,” she said. If they would come to visit us, they’d think we live in a “mansion,” she said, referring to our four-bedroom house. I pointed out that there are millions of millionaires in China who live in larger homes than Xue Li. Meanwhile, the van Genderens had their own emotional visits to their daughters’ birth places. They told us later that when they arrived at the home of Ella’s foster mother they were greeted by several generations of the foster mother’s family as well as neighbors. The foster mother, now 80 years old, cried, and one of her granddaughters, who had played with Ella a decade earlier, held hands with Ella during the reunion. “Ella was treated like a celebrity,” Laurie said. The foster mother asked the van Genderens to call her grandmother, and Ella hesitated because she felt like a stranger. “I was in a room with a bunch of Chinese people who didn’t speak my language,” Ella recalled later. She called the experience “overwhelming” and, like Dani, asked to end the visit early. When the family arrived at Hanna’s orphanage in Yangchun, Guangdong Province, Hanna said she felt like a “foreigner” even though some of them had helped to care for her. “Chinese culture and American culture are so different,” she said, “even though I look like them.” We’ve spoken with the van Genderens about returning once again to this nation that gave us the most precious gifts we’d ever received. And because some of us are sports enthusiasts, we’re considering a trip in 2022, when the Winter Olympics will be held only a few hundred miles from Datong. “I felt at home here,” Laurie van Genderen said last summer. “I feel like I’m Chinese by adoption.” A P R I L 2 0 2 0 C I N C I N N AT I M A G A Z I N E . C O M 1 0 9


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RESTAURANT CERAMICS P. 114

THE LITTLEFIELD’S TONKATSU P. 115

20 BRIX HAS STAYING POWER P. 116

SITWELL’S SECOND ACT P. 118

BIG MOUTH Great Tang’s whole white bass with pine nuts, peas, and carrots in a sweet and sour sauce. PHOTOGRAPH BY JEREMY KRAMER

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DINING OUT



PURE LIGHT

GREAT TANG is a revelation of authentic Chinese flavor. — A K S H A Y A H U J A

S

EVERAL YEARS AGO, MY WIFE AND I WERE IN STATE COLLEGE, PENNSYLVANIA, for a friend’s wedding. Tired after the long drive, we stumbled into a Chinese restaurant mainly frequented by Penn State students. I ordered the mapo tofu, which I had been getting for years from takeout joints. It came out, floating delicately in a ring of bright red chile oil, and I took one unsettling bite. What is this? I wondered. Although recognizable as the old dish, there were strange new dimensions: the deep funk of fermented black beans, the faintly citrusy aroma, and even more mysteriously, the tingling numbing quality that spread across my mouth and throat. What I was having, it turned out, was the dish as it is actually supposed to be prepared. It was bizarre and intoxicating, and after I moved past my initial confusion, it was completely, addictively delicious. We had just taken our first bite of real Chinese food— specifically, a classic Sichuanese-style dish. Sichuanese, one of the four great culinary styles of China, is generally marked by its love of spice, including the distinctively numbing Sichuan peppercorn. One taste left me utterly captivated, but I had no idea how to experience it again. Little by little, though, authentic Chinese food has begun to arrive in Cincinnati. There are a number of places where you can eat extraordinarily well for very little money and broaden your sense of what Chinese food actually is. If you can get to West Chester, I would begin your explorations with Great Tang. Although the menu features classic dishes in every style, the specialty at Great Tang is the refined coastal cuisine of Zhejiang. In Land of Fish and Rice, author Fuchsia Dunlop describes cooks from this area as favoring “gentle tastes, which are described in Chinese by the beautiful term qing dan.... The word combines 1 1 2 C I N C I N N AT I M A G A Z I N E . C O M A P R I L 2 0 2 0

FYI

Great Tang 7340 Kingsgate Way, West Chester, (513) 847-6097, greattangohio.com Hours Lunch and dinner 11 am–9:30 pm Mon, Wed, Thurs; 11 am–10 pm Fri; 10:30 am–10 pm Sat; 10 am–9:30 pm Sun. Prices $4.45 (pan-fried pork bun)–$29.95 (whole tilapia in any style) Credit Cards All major The Takeaway An endless delight for adventurous eaters.

PHOTOGRAPHS BY JEREMY KRAMER


FAR EAST (From left) The dining room at Great Tang; braised beef noodle soup and dandelion tea; dim sum Shanghai soup dumplings and shrimp dumplings; Chef John Shi.

the two characters for ‘pure’ and ‘light’ and expresses a mildness of taste that refreshes and comforts, restoring equanimity to mind and body.” In short, Great Tang is likely to appeal to most American palates while still revealing the breadth of Chinese culinary tradition. And if you like spice, you can get still the Sichuanese and Hunanese classics. The gentler side of Great Tang is best enjoyed in its weekend dim sum, where carts circulate with stacks of bamboo steamers filled mostly with dumplings: opaque, glutinous, or lightly translucent, with a focus on flavor of the fillings themselves. The main condiment is black vinegar, a rich and malty-sour brew placed in old empty sriracha bottles, a few drips adequate to wake up each piece, with a bit of chile oil if you like. My favorite piece of dim sum had the unglamorous name “pan fried turnip cake,” which had a magically firm-onthe-outside, soft-on-the-inside, polenta-like consistency with a crispy sear and the mingled flavors of pork and shrimp. The lovely and unusual mixture of meaty undertone and fishy roundness is a mark of many of the best dishes in Great Tang’s dim sum. On weekdays, the regular menu is an astonishing 24 pages long, with the American Chinese dishes at the back. Even after several meals, I am still just beginning to explore the authentic section. Although Great Tang has its specialties—from Zhejiang and Sichuan, mainly—our server kindly pointed out that one dish of noodles was characteristically Cantonese, another from Hunan, and so on. All I can say is that they were all totally wonderful. One dish will hint at the surprises in store for people who, like

me, are mainly used to Chinese takeout: the lovely Xian cold noodle. The dish is exquisitely layered: the creamy and nutty undertone of what I think is sesame paste, mixed with notes of tang and spice, topped with the bright pop of cilantro. The combination of textures is also delightful, with crunches of cucumber and sprouted mung and the softness of the flat noodles. And that tofu! It was wonderfully meaty, with dense layers, substantial and satisfying as a counterpart to the noodles, utterly unlike the firm or silken varieties available for sale in America. Almost every dish showed me some dimension of Chinese cuisine that I’ve never encountered before, from the intensely briny sourness of the fish fillet in a pickled cabbage soup to the tangyspicy sauce on the cartilaginous pig’s ear, with its numbing Sichuanese quality. Be as brave as you are in the mood to be. You don’t have to order the bullfrog or the pig’s ear (this wasn’t my wife’s first choice), but ask for some suggestions and prepare to be astonished. Great Tang is, in some ways, clearly focused on its Chinese clientele, so for example, specials at the door are only in Chinese, and going for dim sum can frankly be overwhelming. Still, the staff was always patient and accommodating, giving suggestions and attempting to decipher my fumbling questions about Hangzhou versus Yangzhou (I am still working on distinguishing between the various tones of Mandarin). The scope and strangeness of this tradition is dizzying for newcomers; there’s just so much to understand. But from the echoes that reach me in English translations of the ancient Chinese poets, or the mysterious tingling symphony in that bite of mapo tofu, I know that there is something here too deep and wonderful to miss. Go at your own pace, but make sure you go. This is probably the best Chinese food in Cincinnati. A P R I L 2 0 2 0 C I N C I N N AT I M A G A Z I N E . C O M 1 1 3


TRADE SECRETS

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CLAY CITY Custom ceramics enhance the local dining experience.

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HY DO RESTAURATEURS REcruit potters to create custom ceramics? “It changes the whole [dining] experience,” says Bethany Kramer, who launched Melbourne, Kentucky’s Bethany Rose Pottery in 2012. “You’re going to pay more attention to what’s on your plate.” In 2013, chef Jose Salazar tapped Kramer to create pieces for his namesake restaurant, then she went on to collaborate with Nada, Mita’s, Frida 602, and The Baker’s Table, plus a few other eateries across the U.S. Her restaurant collections, which typically include hundreds of pieces and take months to complete, are fired in her 31-cubic-foot gas kiln, giving each piece a warm undertone, earthy characteristics, and a handmade touch. Besides functionality, Kramer’s biggest design consideration is how each collection will enhance the presentation of food, so she creates custom glazes and dimensions to fulfill each client’s vision. And while she eats off her plates “all the time at home,” she says seeing diners do so in public is “a special feeling.”

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CGCERAMICS: PLEASE

Since 2013, Christie Goodfellow has made more than 500 colorful plates, bowls, cups, and ramekins for Please, based on chef-owner Ryan Santos’s vision, adding vibrancy to the restaurant’s minimal interior and creating a focal point on the table. cg-ceramics.com

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BETHANY ROSE POTTERY: SALAZAR

To satisfy chef-owner Jose Salazar’s desire for an earthy “wood-fired look,” Bethany Kramer experimented with layering glazes, which created a crater-like texture for the 135 plates, bowls, mugs, and saucers she made for his first eatery. bethanyrosepot tery.com

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BREAKFRONT POTTERY: FAUSTO

Owners Austin and Tony Ferrari enlisted Lauren Thomeczek and James Manning to make 200 pieces featuring custom pink, blue, and neutral matte glazes that match the CAC’s modern aesthetic, including plates that are intentionally chipped on the rims. breakfrontpottery.com

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JOYFUL DIRT CREATIONS: KIKI

Collaborating with chef-owners Hideki and Yuko Harada, Amanda Hollinger created 450 plates and bowls with tan-and-black-speckled unglazed bottoms to complement Kiki’s wood tables and white-and-blackspeckled glazed tops to showcase the food. facebook.com/joyfuldirt

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TRY THIS

COMFORT ZONE

nternational cuisine can sometimes sound more exotic than it really is. Case in point: tonkatsu. Literally “pig cutlet” in Japanese, it’s not a far cry from the pork schnitzel we denizens of Porkopolis practically consider a domestic dish. Variations have popped up around town, but the smoked pork katsu on The Littlefield’s dinner menu is one you should run out and try. Chef Joe Stalf makes it the hard way, generously seasoning a whole loin with togarashi, a Japanese chile pepper–based spice blend, smoking it, then slicing it into individual cutlets before breading with panko and pan The Littlefield, 3934 Spring Grove Ave., frying. Each super-crispy chop is drizzled with a barbecue-like tonkatsu sauce and a coolNorthside, (513) 386ing kewpie mayo, made sweeter than the American version with rice vinegar. — K A I L E I G H P E Y T O N 7570, littlefieldns.com I

PHOTOGR APH BY DUSTIN SPARKS

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DERRICK BRAZIEL

HOT PLATE

AFTER FIVE YEARS OF HELPing others start their own businesses, MORTAR cofounder Derrick Braziel thought it was time he pursue his own dream. This month his Pata Roja Taqueria returns to Forty Thieves for a month-long popup on Sundays. What inspired you to get into food? I’ve had dreams of opening a taco concept for a really long time. The thing that [convinced me] was a trip to Mexico City when I ate al pastor tacos for the first time . . . I came back to Cincinnati to try to find [them] and I couldn’t. . . . So I went back to Mexico and took a cooking class, and I came back and bought the taco cart.

Sticking Around 20 BRIX ISN’T NEW TO MILFORD’S MAIN STREET. THE INTIMATE EATERY, HELMED BY chef Paul Barraco, opened nearly 13 years ago. What 20 Brix is, though, is good. On top of its cozy, warm atmosphere and expertly executed eclectic menu, its wine selection is impressive. As suggested by its moniker, a reference to a German winemaking technique, and its omnipresent themed decor, wine is not an afterthought; it’s central. The restaurant carries 300 wines (they sell retail, too), with 100 available by the glass in 2- and 5-ounce pours. I ordered a 2016 Coast and Barrel Cabernet Sauvignon, while my wife, joining me for an anniversary dinner, ordered The Perfect Gin and Tonic, made with Hendrick’s gin and Karrakin’s Hoptonic sparkling spirit. For an appetizer, we chose the lamb meatballs, served with romesco, melted onions, goat cheese fonduta, and sliced ciabatta. My entrée was the ricotta gnocchi, a rich, robust seasonal dish made with locally sourced ingredients, topped with delicata squash and apple butter. My wife jumped at the crispy fried chicken with braised spinach, bacon, and buttered chickpea bread. Dinner was divine (she called it “the best meal in recent memory”), and we didn’t 20 Brix, 101 Main need dessert to seal the deal—but the Chocolate Hampton, layers of St., Milford, (513) dark chocolate cake and mousse, finished with dark chocolate ganache 831-2749, 20brix.com. Lunch and dinner and topped with strawberries and whipped cream, was the perfect end Mon–Sat. to a memorable dining experience. — R O D N E Y W I L S O N 1 1 6 C I N C I N N AT I M A G A Z I N E . C O M A P R I L 2 0 2 0

What are tacos al pastor, exactly, and why this for Pata Roja? [They] originated in central Mexico from Middle Eastern immigrants. [Pork] is marinated in different chiles and spices. [The meat] is sliced off a vertical spit, and it’s combined with pineapple. Al pastor in some ways is the soul food of Mexican cuisine.... [Sharing it with Cincinnati] is a really interesting cultural exchange. What are your plans after the popup? My initial plans are to do street food around Over-the-Rhine. I started that in March, so people can find me on the street selling tacos al pastor and my other tacos. [After the residency,] I’ll continue doing pop-ups across the city focusing on lunchtime and late-night tacos.

—KAILEIGH

PEYTON

Pata Roja Taqueria, instagram.com/ patarojatacos Read a longer conversation with Derrick at cincinnatimagazine.com

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11430 GONDOLA ST., • SHARONVILLE (513) 206-8945 • JUNK-KING.COM

RECLAIM YOUR SPACE THIS SPRING WITH LOCALLY OWNED JUNK KING. “Our ultimate goal is to repurpose as many items as is viable, to give back to local charities, and keep waste out of the landfill. We look first to donate and then recycle whatever we can after.” – JACK BRENDAMOUR, CEO


FINE DIVING

Diplomatic Vegetarian O TWO VEGETARIANS AGREE ON WHAT A VEGetarian is. Some just eat plants. Others add eggs and dairy. Polls even show some who eat chicken identify as vegetarian. Heck, I saw one guy grilling a steak claim he was a vegetarian because the cow was grain-fed. How does the Sitwell’s coffeehouse reboot fit into this picture? Since vegans and vegetarians are only about 5 percent of the population, it caters to all of the above. Sitwell’s Act II recently added some meatier items to the menu, such as pork belly buns and bottarga (that’s fish eggs to you and me) pappardelle. These additions don’t appall vegetarians, because in Cincinnati, they don’t have the luxury of being appalled. They’re just delighted any restaurant here takes them seriously. For that other 95 percent, I advise you try the vegetarian options so you can taste just how good vegetarian can be. The menu is full of basics like soups, salads, pasta, and sandwiches, all with gourmet twists. The vegan chili is excellent, as is the Greek gyro, made with roasted, shaved seitan. Sei what? That’s pure gluten, spiced and cooked into a tasty roast. Speaking of gluten, the menu has a large selection of gluten-, soy-, and diary-free options joining the meat-free (and meat-full) ones. As before, the place is as bohemian as Cincinnati gets. Below the vintage pressedtin ceiling, you’ll find tasty food, hot espresso, and warm conversation—no matter which side of the plant-based debate you’re on. — J . K E V I N W O L F E

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Sitwell’s Act II, 324 Ludlow Ave., Clifton, (513) 281-7487. Breakfast, lunch, and dinner Tues–Sun.

FIELD NOTES

WEEKNIGHT WARRIOR Simple food with just enough flair. —KAILEIGH PEYTON

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The recipes in local chef Gail Lennig’s debut cookbook, Fabulous Food Made Easy (Cincinnati Book Publishing), are what most—if not all—home cooks aspire to put on the table every day. That is, mostly healthy dishes made in a reasonable amount of time with a handful of easy-to-find ingredients and no special equipment. Generally, the 79 recipes are her takes on popular classic entrées, sides, soups, salads, and desserts, but with adjustments. You won’t find any exotic fusion flavors here. Lennig’s background as a former professional beekeeper and cooking class instructor at Turner Farms comes through in her savvy tips—but I was yearning for more honey-based recipes (there are five). The “Of This and That” section of the book was a standout, full of recipes adapted from family and friends, including her mother-in-law’s authentic Italian meatballs, a Dorsel’s-adapted slow-cooker goetta, and her family’s favorite “heart attack potatoes” (still pretty healthy, actually). While her dishes may not be revolutionary, they’re a welcome reminder that straightforward food doesn’t have to be boring. Available at cincybooks.com and gaillennig.com

PHOTOGRAPHS BY (FOOD) CHRIS VON HOLLE / (BOOK) CARLIE BURTON


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DINING GUIDE CINCINNATI MAGAZINE’S

dining guide is compiled by our editors as a service to our readers. The magazine accepts no advertising or other consideration in exchange for a restaurant listing. The editors may add or delete restaurants based on their judgment. Because of space limitations, all

of the guide’s restaurants may not be included. Many restaurants have changing seasonal menus; dishes listed here are examples of the type of cuisine available and may not be on the menu when you visit. To update listings, e-mail: cmletters@cincinnati magazine.com

KEY: No checks unless specified. AE American Express, DC Diners Club DS Discover, MC MasterCard, V Visa MCC Major credit cards: AE, MC, V $ = Under $15 $$$ = Up to $49 $$ = Up to $30 $$$$ = $50 and up Top 10

Named a Best Restaurant March 2020

121 AMERICAN 121 ECLECTIC 124 FRENCH 125 INDIAN 125 ITALIAN 126 JAPANESE 126 KOREAN 126 MEDITERRANEAN 127 MEXICAN 127 SEAFOOD 127 STEAKS 127 THAI 127 VIETNAMESE

green beans, and great northerns (not limas) in the succotash, and the crock of mac and cheese has the perfect proportion of sauce, noodle, and crumb topping. The Eagle OTR seems deceptively simple on the surface, but behind that simplicity is a secret recipe built on deep thought, skill, and love. 1342 Vine St., Over-the-Rhine, (513) 802-

AMERICAN COZY’S CAFÉ & PUB

On a visit to England, Jan Collins discovered the “cozy” atmosphere of London restaurants built in historic houses. She brought that warm, comfortable feeling back to the United States in opening Cozy’s. Though the atmosphere in the restaurant is reminiscent of Collins’s London travels, the food remains proudly American. The produce in virtually every dish is fresh, seasonal, and flavorful. The 12-hour pork shank stands out with its buttery grits and root vegetable hash, along with a portion of tender meat. And when it comes down to the classics, from the biscuits that open the meal to carrot cake at the end, Cozy’s does it right. 6440 Cincinnati Dayton Rd., Liberty Twp., (513) 644-9364, cozyscafeandpub.com. Dinner Tues–Sat, brunch Sat & Sun. $$$

CWC THE RESTAURANT

Founded by the sister duo behind the culinary multimedia platform Cooking with Caitlin, this eatery makes comfort food feel a notch more au courant, imbuing a true family-friendly philosophy. Its burgers are topped with a generous ladle of gooey house-made cheddar sauce and served with hand-cut French fries that many a mother will filch from her offspring’s plate. Portions—and flavors—are generous, eliciting that feeling of being royally indulged. Similarly, every item on the Sunday brunch menu virtually dares you to go big or go home. Make a reservation for parties of more than four and plan to be spoiled rotten. Then plan to take a lengthy nap. 1517 Springfield Pke., Wyoming, (513) 407-3947, cwctherestaurant.com. Dinner Fri & Sat, brunch Sun. MCC. $

THE EAGLE OTR

The revamped post office at 13th and Vine feels cozy but not claustrophobic, and it has distinguished itself with its stellar fried chicken. Even the white meat was pull-apart steamy, with just enough peppery batter to pack a piquant punch. Diners can order by the quarter, half, or whole bird—but whatever you do, don’t skimp on the sides. Bacon adds savory mystery to crisp corn,

5007. Lunch and dinner seven days. MCC. $

GOOSE & ELDER

PHO, NO! Beloved downtown eatery Le’s Pho and Sandwiches closed its doors on Court Street in February. Opened in 2012, it was best known for the Bui family’s Vietnamese cuisine—namely banh mi sandwiches and massive bowls of pho—and connections they made with Cincinnatians in their 30 years of owning restaurants in the city.

The third restaurant from chef Jose Salazar, Goose & Elder is a more everyday kind of joint compared to his others. The prices are lower, and most of the dishes, from burgers to grits, are familiar. Salazar’s menus have always hinted that the chef had a fondness for, well, junk food. But junk food is only junk if it is made thoughtlessly. Everything here is made with little twists, like the cumin-spiced potato chips and delicate ribbons of housemade cucumber pickles with a sweet rice wine vinegar. Even the fries, crinkle cut and served with “goose sauce,” a mildly spiced mayonnaise, are wonderfully addictive. The restaurant demonstrates that what we now consider “fast food” can be awfully good if someone makes it the old-fashioned, slow way. 1800 Race St., Over-the-Rhine, (513) 579-8400, goose andelder.com. Lunch Tues–Fri, dinner Tues–Sun, brunch Sat & Sun. MCC. $$

RED FEATHER KITCHEN

Historically peasant-grade cuts of meat get the full Pygmalion treatment at Red Feather in Oakley, where there’s deep respect for the time and tending necessary to bring a short rib, pork chop, or hanger steak to its full potential. After a quick sear to lock in juices, the steak takes a turn in the wood-fired oven. While primal cuts play a leading role, the supporting cast is just as captivating. The hot snap of fresh ginger in the carrot soup was especially warming on a winter evening and the crispy skin on the Verlasso salmon acts as the foil to the plump, rich flesh. Service here only improves the experience. 3200 Madison Rd., Oakley, (513) 407-3631, redfeatherkitchen.com. Dinner Tues–Sun, brunch Sun. MCC. $$

THE WILDFLOWER CAFÉ

Wildflower Café is not the sort of place that tries to wow anyone with feats of inventiveness. Its formula is simple but satisfying: lots of mostly

local meat and produce, a menu that continuously changes with available ingredients, a nice selection of wine and beer, and well-made, homey food. The small, focused menu has a classic American quality (salads, steaks, burgers) with enough surprises to keep things interesting. Many of the dishes are designed with open spaces to be filled with whatever is available in the kitchen that day, an advantage of an unfussy style. You don’t go to Wildflower expecting a certain kind of perfection; you accept that your favorite dish from last time might be made differently tonight, or no longer available. Like the farmhouse that Wildflower occupies, the imperfections are part of the charm. 207 E. Main St., Mason, (513) 492-7514, wildflowergourmetcafe. com. Lunch and dinner Tues–Sat. MCC. $$$

ECLECTIC ABIGAIL STREET

Most people who’ve eaten at Abigail Street have favorite dishes that they order every visit: the Moroccan spiced broccoli, for example, or the mussels charmoula, with its perfect balance of saffron, creaminess, and tomatoey acidity. Many of the new items on the menu have the same perfected feeling as these classics. Working within a loose framework of Middle Eastern and North African flavors, Abigail Street has never fallen into a routine that would sap its energy. New offerings like the duck leg confit, with spicy-sour harissa flavors, firm-tender butternut squash, and perfectly made couscous, feel just as accomplished as old favorites like the falafel, beautifully moist and crumbly with a bright parsley interior. The restaurant is always watching for what works and what will truly satisfy, ready to sacrifice the superficially interesting in favor of the essential. 1214 Vine Top 10

St., Over-the-Rhine, (513) 421-4040, abigailstreet. com. Dinner Tues–Sat. MCC, DS. $$

BOCA

With its grand staircase, chandelier, and floor-to-ceiling draperies, Boca has an atmosphere of grandeur and refinement. There is a sense of drama not only in the decor but Top 10

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in everything it serves. In some dishes, there is a painterly sense of contrast and surprise, like violet-derived purple sugar beside the pain de Gênes (French almond cake). In others, there is a dramatic suspense, like the whole egg yolk quivering in the center of the Fassone tartare waiting to be broken. While staying mostly grounded in the fundamentals of Italian and French cuisine, Boca has an air of international sophistication that sets its food apart. The hamachi crudo, an old standby on the menu, takes Japanese flavors and gives them new dimensions with grapefruit suprêmes and slivers of shishito pepper. This is food of extraordinary creativity and flair. 114 E. Sixth St., downtown, (513) 542-2022, bocacincin nati.com. Dinner Mon–Sat. MCC, DS. $$$ Top 10

BOUQUET RESTAURANT AND WINE BAR

Normally diners aren’t pleased when a restaurant runs out of something. At Bouquet, though, surprise changes to the menu are simply a sign of integrity. Chef-owner Stephen Williams is serious about using seasonal ingredients, and if the figs have run out or there is no more chicken from a local farm, so be it. The flavors at Bouquet are about doing justice to what’s available. Preparations are unfussy, complexity coming from within the vegetables and proteins themselves. A tomato salad—wonderfully fresh and vibrant, so you know the tomatoes have just come off a nearby vine—is dressed with chopped shiso, a crimson herb that tastes like a mysterious com-

bination of mint and cilantro. This determination to make something delicious out of what’s on hand, to embrace limitations, gives the food at Bouquet a rustic, soulful quality. 519 Main St., Covington, (859) 491-7777, bouquetrestaurant. com. Dinner Mon–Sat. MCC, DS. $$

COMMONWEALTH BISTRO Everything from the old jukebox by the entrance to the sepia-toned rabbit-and-pheasant wallpaper exudes an appreciation for the antique. But rather than duplicating old recipes, Covington’s Commonwealth uses history as a springboard to create something elegant and original. Two dishes get at what makes this place special: biscuits and fried rabbit. Their biscuit, served with tart quince butter, is perfection—moist and flaky, without being coat-your-throat buttery or crumble-to-ash dry. The rabbit is crisp, light, and not at all greasy, with just the right touch of seasoning and a bright biz baz sauce, a cilantro and garlic sauce of Somali origin that tastes like a creamy salsa verde. Brunch offers the same sort of mashup, including salsa verde pork with pickled jalapeño grits made creamy with the yolk of a 75-degree egg and a smoky, spicy, not too salty Bloody Mary. 621 Main St., Covington, (859) 916-6719, commonwealthbistro. com. Dinner Tues–Sun, Brunch Sat & Sun. MCC. $$

CROWN REPUBLIC GASTROPUB What makes Crown Republic special isn’t its handful of outstanding dishes. It’s the place’s sheer consistency. No single dish is absolutely mind-blowing or completely original, but when almost everything that comes out is genuinely tasty, the service is always friendly and attentive, and (stop the presses!) the bill is quite a

bit less than you expected, you sit up and pay attention. The crab and avocado toast, served on grilled bread with lime juice and slivers of pickled Fresno chiles, is a prime example of what makes Crown Republic tick. The cocktails are equally unfussy and good, like the Tipsy Beet, made with vodka, housemade beet shrub, cucumber, mint, and citrus peel. Crown Republic has a mysterious quality that I can only describe as “good energy.” 720 Sycamore St., downtown, (513) 246-4272, crgcincy.com. Lunch and dinner Tues–Sat. MCC. $$

MAPLEWOOD KITCHEN The latest effort from local restaurant juggernaut Thunderdome, owner of the Currito franchise. Order at the counter, then find your own table, and a server will deliver what you’ve selected. There’s no cohesive cuisine, rather, the menu takes its cue from all corners of the globe: chicken tinga, spaghetti pomodoro, a New York Strip steak, guajillo chicken are all represented, along with a satisfying pappardelle with housemade sausage. Brunch is available all day; try the light lemon ricotta pancakes or the satisfying avocado benedict. 525 Race St., downtown, (513) 421-2100, maplewoodkitchenandbar.com. Breakfast, lunch, and dinner seven days. MCC. $$

THE MERCER This Vine Street spot is the brainchild of Jon Zipperstein, owner of the steak and sushi mainstay Embers in Kenwood. The Mercer proves admirably that comforting staples—when prepared with precision and served with warmth—can send even the most curmudgeonly diner off fat and happy. Take the short ribs. Many places do a great short rib, but these are lovely, dutifully seared, braised slow and low until tender, and not overwhelmed by fatty gravy. It’s the polenta

CLEAN EATS Amid a renaissance in Westwood, two prominent neighborhood investors are adding to the growing entertainment scene with a modern American restaurant with farm-fresh, healthy foods. Ivory House, named after historic Westwood resident James Gamble’s Ivory soap, plans to open this month at 2998 Harrison Ave. The former bank features ’60s-inspired decor, a bar, and a grand piano.

facebook.com/ ivoryhousecincy

4/30/2020

an 8” or 10” decorated cake Mason 9540 Mason Montgomery Rd; Suite D Mason, OH 45040 (513) 492-8115 mason@nothingbundtcakes.com

Expires 4/30/20. Limit one (1) coupon per guest. Coupon must be presented at time of purchase. Valid only at the bakery(ies) listed. Valid only on baked goods; not valid on retail items. No cash value. Coupon may not be reproduced, transferred, or sold. Internet distribution strictly prohibited. Must be claimed in bakery during normal business hours. Not valid for online orders. Not valid with any other offer.

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that really launches this dish into high orbit, the quicksand texture that ever-so-slowly absorbed the braising liquid, still suggestive of root vegetable sweetness. For dessert, try the savory cheesecake. It’s criminally rich, and worth saving room for the unique mix of four cheeses: blue, goat, cream, and ricotta. The slice relies on compressed grapes, crumbs of rosemary-infused walnut cookie crust and drops of a port and pear reduction to offer just a hint of sweet. 1324 Vine St., Over-the-Rhine, (513) 421-5111, themercerotr. com. Dinner Tues–Sun. MCC. $$

METROPOLE

Metropole has been remarkably stable since it opened in 2012. Even when chefs have left, the organization has promoted from within, kept popular dishes on the menu, and maintained a certain vibe. Its new chef, David Kelsey, has been with the business since 2016, and his menu will feel familiar, with a balance between sophistication and rusticity. Its vegetarian fare contains many of its most inventive and delightful creations. The chilled cantaloupe soup has a creamy note from coconut milk and a hint of spice floating in at the end of every bite to balance the subtle, melon-y sweetness. The fancy “candy bar,” with its light and crispy peanut filling and ring of cacao nibs and caramel, encapsulates Metropole at its best: fun and whimsical, but rooted in careful execution of deep and satisfying flavors. 609 Walnut St., downtown, (513) 578-6660, metropoleonwalnut. com. Breakfast and dinner seven days, lunch Mon–Fri, brunch Sat & Sun. MCC. $$

MITA’S

It’s fitting that chef Jose Salazar named this restaurant after his grandmother, because there is something deeply homey about the food at Mita’s. With a focus on Spanish tapas, it always feels, in the best possible way, like elevated home cooking. Its sophistication is modestly concealed. The flavors are bold and direct, whether the smoky depths of the chimichurri rojo on skewers of grilled chicken or the intensely bright sourness of Top 10

the pozole verde. In dishes like the mushroom soup, the chef hits every register: the acid of red piquillo peppers to balance the earthy mushrooms, the crisp fried leeks against the delicately creamy soup. But what mainly comes through is the warm-hearted affection a grandmother might have put into a meal for a beloved grandson. It’s the kind of big hug everyone needs from time to time. 501 Race St., downtown, (513) 421-6482, mitas.co. Dinner Mon–Sat. MCC. $$$

MUSE

its green curry paste, adobo, and peanut brittle, shows how Zappas can break out of the restaurant’s traditionally European comfort zone. Aside from the food, part of the pleasure is simply being in the space, enjoying the jazz band, and watching the grace and assurance of the staff as they present the meal. 35 W. Fifth St., downtown, (513) 564-6465, orchidsatpalmcourt.com. Dinner seven days. MCC. $$$$

PLEASANTRY

Muse fills such a needed niche. Very few establishments offer a decent selection of vegan and gluten-free options; Muse not only has these dishes but they’re some of the strongest items on the menu. The restaurant’s philosophy is a version of Hippocrates’s famous remark that you should let food be your medicine and medicine be your food. In practice this means that Muse sources from local farms, serves mostly grass-fed beef, has several vegan options, and puts lots of fresh veggies on the side (and sometimes the center) of the plate. In vegan dishes, flavor and depth are developed in creative ways, like in the stuffed charred leeks, where the tube of the leek is hollowed out and filled with a sweet and savory mix of raisins and cashew cream, combining beautifully with the smoky char of the leeks and a vegan Worcestershire foam. 1000

With only 40 seats inside, Daniel Souder and Joanna Kirkendall’s snug but spare OTR gem—they serve breakfast, lunch, and dinner like a true neighborhood spot—features an engaging wine program aimed at broadening your palate alongside small plates that are equally ambitious. Classic technique and fresh produce anchor an approachable menu—“everything” biscuits with cured salmon, burgers, and chicken salad sandwiches are available at lunch, and the cauliflower with sambal is a comforting mash-up of a rich cauliflower-and-coconut-cream schmear topped with a head of sambal-roasted cauliflower, grapefruit segments, toasted cashews, and cilantro. This is not to say that the proteins aren’t something special. Traditionally a much less expensive cut, the small hanger steak was decidedly tender, served with braised cippolini onions and sauteed mushrooms. 118 W. 15th St., Over-the-Rhine,

Delta Ave., Mt. Lookout, (513) 620-8777, musemtlookout. com. Lunch and Dinner Wed–Sat brunch Sun. MCC. $$

(513) 381-1969, pleasantryotr.com. Dinner Tues–Sat, brunch Fri–Sun. MCC. $

ORCHIDS AT PALM COURT

Executive chef George Zappas is maintaining the proud traditions of Orchids with food that is wonderfully complex, diverse, and surprising. A dish of parsnip soup has a quinoa chip and apple butter, along with salty duck prosciutto, notes of smoke and spice from the espelette pepper at the base of the bowl, and a touch of acid that crept in on the roasted parsnip. In a few dazzling bites it all comes together like a highly technical piece of music. A Southeast Asian–inspired halibut dish, with Top 10

PLEASE

It’s hard to describe the food at Please to a person who hasn’t been there, except that it’s like nothing else in Cincinnati. Some of chef-owner Ryan Santos’s culinary experiments have been bizarre, some fascinating, and some simply delicious—and all of it emerges from a dining room–centered kitchen that seems like it belongs in a small apartment. Almost all of his risks hit their marks, from the frothy bay leaf–grapefruit mignonette on the oysters to the cedar-rosemary custard. What has made Top 10

Elevate your next business dinner with our contemporary Italian menu and unique dining spaces.

Dinner: Monday–Thursday 5:00–9:30pm; Friday–Saturday 5:00–10:30pm; Closed Sunday 1420 Sycamore Street, Cincinnati, OH 45202 nicolasotr.com . (513)721-6200

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Please increasingly wonderful is a willingness, at times, to deliver something straightforward, like an outstanding course of rye gnocchi or a spicy green kale sauce with a lemony zing. That this weird and wonderful restaurant exists at all, and is actually thriving, is a compliment not just to Santos and his staff but to the city as a whole. 1405 Clay St., Over-the-Rhine, (513) 405-8859, pleasecin cinnati.com. Dinner Wed–Sat. MCC. $$$

SACRED BEAST Sacred Beast advertises itself as a kind of upscale diner, but the real gems are the oddball dishes that don’t quite fit the diner mold. The menu can be disorienting in its eclecticism: foie gras torchon is next to shrimp fries, and a haute cuisine watermelon salad with piped puffs of avocado mousse is next to a diner breakfast and deviled eggs. Winners are scattered throughout the menu in every category. On the cocktail list, the Covington Iced Tea, a lemon and coffee concoction made with cold brew, San Pellegrino, and vodka is oddly satisfying. The service is good, and there is some flair about the place—including vintage touches, from the facsimile reel-to-reel audio system to the mostly classic cocktails—even within its rather chilly industrial design. In short, go for the late night grub; stay for the elegant, shareable twists on classic snacks. 1437 Vine St., Over-the-Rhine, (513) 213-2864, sacredbeastdiner.com. Lunch, dinner, and late night seven days. MCC. $$

THE VIEW AT SHIRES’ GARDEN The name of this restaurant demands that one question be answered first: So, how’s that view? Well, it’s impressive. Especially if the weather cooperates and you can get a seat outside. The cocktail list tells you a lot about

The View at Shires’ Garden. Some restaurants create a whole list of original drinks. Here, it’s the classics: things like the Sazerac and the old fashioned. The menu is full of genuinely seasonal dishes, like the spaghetti squash with a creamy pecorino Alfredo sauce. The Asian-inspired skin-on black cod in dashi broth gently flaked apart in a subtle, flavorful miso broth and was served with wontons of minced fish, each with a magical citrusy quality (from lemongrass) that elevated the whole dish and made it special. 309 Vine St., 10th Floor, downtown, (513) 407-7501, theviewatshiresgarden.com. Lunch Mon–Fri, dinner seven days, brunch Sat & Sun. MCC. $$$

ZULA For a restaurant whose name loosely derives from an Israeli slang term for “hidden treasure,” it seems apt that a dish or two might sneak in and stun—like the mussels Marseilles, with its bouillabaisse-style broth, rich with saffron, tomato, and fennel. But Zula is no one-trick pony. With a wood-fired oven on the premises, it’s incumbent on you to try the flatbreads. One zula is the eggplant option, where caramelized onions and marinated red bell peppers pair well with subtly sweet fontina. Not every bite at Zula is a game-changer, but one is all you need. 1400 Race St., Over-the-Rhine, (513) 744-9852, zulabistro. com. Dinner Tues–Sat. MCC. $$

FRENCH CHEZ RENÉE FRENCH BISTROT Based on American stereotypes of French food—that it’s elaborate, elitist, and expensive—one might expect Chez Renee to fall on the chichi side. Instead, it’s elegant in an everyday way, operating on the principle that it is better to excel at simplicity than to badly execute something complicated. The formula is not complex: Simple ingredients,

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generally fresh and from nearby, prepared without much fuss. Asparagus is beautifully roasted and perfectly salted, and the quiche Lorraine (yes, the old standby) has a nice, firm texture, and a fine balance of bacon, mushrooms, and oignons (to quote the menu, which is a charming hodgepodge of French and English). This is solid, tasty food, both approachable and well executed. It’s well on its way to becoming, as a good bistrot should be, a neighborhood institution. 233 Main St., Milford, (513) 428-0454, chez reneefrenchbistrot.com. Lunch and dinner Tues–Sat. MCC. $$

LE BAR A BOEUF Jean-Robert de Cavel’s upscale alterna-burger-shack features bifteck haché, ground beef patties that are a mainstay of French family dinners, according to de Cavel. His “Les Ground Meat” is available in beef, Wagyu beef, bison, lamb, and fish (a blend of albacore tuna and salmon). Portions are eight ounces, taller than a typical burger, and seared on the kitchen’s iron griddle. It’s easy to turn many of the generously portioned appetizers into dinner. Pair the open-faced beef tongue “French Dip” sandwich with a spinach salad and you’ll have one of the best choices in the house. Or go for mac-and-cheese. The lobster mac always sounds lush, but do consider the humble beef cheek version, enlivened by a touch of truffle oil, instead. 2200 Victory Pkwy., East Walnut Hills, (513) 751-2333, barboeuf. com. Dinner Tues–Sat. MCC. $$

Top 10

RESTAURANT L

Restaurant L embodies a lost era of elegant formality, from the jars of flowers hanging from the curving glass tree in the center of the dining room to the extraordinary attention given even to diners’ purses and briefcases (each receives its own little ottoman on which to rest). All of this seriousness, though, is counterbalanced by chef-owner Jean-Robert de Cavel’s sense of playfulness and humor, reflective of a lifetime’s mastery of the fundamentals of la grande cuisine. In one opening bite of duck confit, delicate discs of sunchoke, and tender


Israeli couscous covered with a mustard crema, there was more depth and dimension than in some entire meals. And through it all was de Cavel, making the rounds and greeting diners who are now, after his three decades cooking in Cincinnati, old friends. 301 E. Fourth St., downtown, (513) 760-5525, lcincinnati.com. Lunch Fri, dinner Tues–Sat. MCC. $$$$

INDIAN AMMA’S KITCHEN Muthu “Kumar” Muthiah serves traditional southern Indian and Indo-Chinese vegetarian cuisine, but with a sizable Orthodox Jewish community nearby, Muthia saw an opportunity: If he was going to cook vegetarian, why not also make it kosher? Muthiah prepares every item— from the addictively crunchy gobhi Manchurian, a spicy Chinese cauliflower dish, to the lemon pickle, tamarind, and mint sauces—entirely from scratch under the careful eye of Rabbi Michoel Stern. Always 80 percent vegan, the daily lunch buffet is 100 percent animal-product-free on Wednesdays. Tuck into a warm and savory channa masala (spiced chickpeas) or malai kofta (vegetable dumplings in tomato sauce) from the curry menu. Or tear into a crispy, two-foot diameter dosa (chickpea flour crepe) stuffed with spiced onions and potatoes. 7633 Reading Rd., Roselawn, (513) 821-2021, ammaskitchen.com. Lunch buffet seven days (all-vegan on Wed), dinner seven days. MC, V, DS. $

BOMBAY BRAZIER Indian food in America is hard to judge, because whether coming from the kitchen of a takeout joint or from a nicer establishment, the food will rarely taste all that different. It will generally be some twist on Punjabi cuisine. Bombay Brazier does it just right. Chef Rip Sidhu could serve his tadka dal in India, along with several other ex-

traordinary dishes, and still do a roaring business—and this is not something that can be said of most Indian establishments in America. Try the papdi chaat, a common Indian street food rarely found on American menus, and you will see what sets this place apart. They do everything the way it is supposed to be done, from the dusting of kala namak (a pungent black rock salt) on the fried crisps to the mixture of tamarind and mint chutneys on the chopped onion, tomatoes, and chickpeas—having this dish properly made is balm to the soul of a homesick immigrant, and fresh treasure for any American lover of this cuisine. 7791 Cooper Rd., #5, Montgomery, (513) 794-0000, bombay braziercincy.com. Dinner Mon–Sat. MCC. $$$

BRIJ MOHAN Order at the counter the way you might at a fast food joint, except the shakes come in mango and there’s no supersizing your mint lassi. The saag, full of cream in most northern Indian restaurants, is as intensely flavored as collard greens in the Deep South—real Punjabi soul food. Tarka dal is spectacular here, the black lentils smoky from charred tomatoes and onions, and the pani puri, hollow fried shells into which you spoon a peppery cold broth, burst with tart cool crunch. Follow the spice with soothing ras malai, freshly made cheese simmered in thick almond-flavored milk, cooled and sprinkled with crushed pistachios. 11259 Reading Rd., Sharonville, (513) 769-4549, brijmohancincin nati.com. Lunch and dinner Tues–Sun. MC, V, DC. $

I TA L I A N ADRIATICO’S Everything about this place says it’s about the pizza: the herbed sauce, the assault of the cheese, the toppings. It’s all evenly distributed, so you get a taste in every bite. Adriatico’s still delivers the tastiest pizza in Clifton. On

any given night the aroma wafts through every dorm on campus. It’s that popular because it’s that good. Being inexpensive doesn’t hurt either. 113 W. McMillan St., Clifton Heights, (513) 281-4344, adriaticosuc.com. Lunch and dinner seven days. MCC. $ Top 10

NICOLA’S

Nicola’s has entered a new era of exuberant creativity under the leadership of chef Jack Hemmer. You can still get the old Italian classics, and they’ll be as good as ever, but the rest of the menu has blossomed into a freewheeling tour of modern American cuisine. Any establishment paying this level of attention to detail— from the candied slice of blood orange on the mascarpone cheesecake to the staff’s wine knowledge—is going to put out special meals. Rarely have humble insalate been so intricately delicious, between the perfectly nested ribbons of beets in the pickled beet salad or the balance of bitterness, funkiness, and creaminess in the endive and Gorgonzola salad. Order an old favorite, by all means, but make sure you try something new, too. 1420 Sycamore St., Pendleton, (513) 721-6200, nicolasotr.com. Dinner Mon– Sat. MCC, DC, DS. $$$

PADRINO This sister restaurant to 20 Brix is also owned and operated by the Thomas family and their superstar Executive Chef Paul Barraco, who brings his passion for the slow food movement to the Padrino menu. Billed as “Italian comfort food,” Padrino offers the classics (like lasagna and chicken carbonara) plus hoagies and meatball sliders, an impressive wine list, seasonal martinis, and a decadent signature appetizer—garlic rolls, doughy buns smothered in olive oil and garlic. Best of all, Barraco’s pizza sauce, which is comprised of roasted tomatoes and basil, is so garden-fresh that one can’t help but wonder: If this is real pizza, what have we been eating all these years? 111 Main St., Milford, (513) 965-0100, padrinoitalian.com. Lunch and dinner seven days. MCC, DS. $$

ONE FAMILY. CONNECTED BY BLOOD. DRIVEN TO FIND CURES. Man & Woman of the Year is philanthropic competition to support blood cancer research among a group of motivated and dedicated individuals in communities across the United States. Candidates form powerful fundraising teams and compete in honor of two local children who are blood cancer survivors. The man and woman who have raised the most funds during the ten-week campaign are awarded the prestigious title of Man or Woman of the Year in their community. This year’s Grand Finale Gala is May 30th at the Sharonville Convention Center INTRODUCING OUR CLASS OF 2020 MAN & WOMAN OF THE YEAR CANDIDATES! Megan Macejko Registered Nurse, TriHealth Cancer & Blood Institute. Renee Collins Account Executive, Gannett. Jennifer “Jenna” DeFrancesco System Director of Clinical Engineering, Compass One at UC Health. Kristen Bailey Co-Founder/ CEO, Sweets & Meats BBQ. Aaron Sharpe Restaurateur, Lucius Q. Drew Homan Realtor, Coldwell Banker West Shell. Tamara Scull Attorney, KY Department of Public Advocacy. Garrett Pringle Private Client Advisor, First Financial Bank. Bre Sambuchino Teaching Professions Academy Teacher, Loveland High School. Gregory F Ahrens Partner/ Intellectual Property Attorney, Wood, Herron & Evans. Kim Beach Owner/Agent, Village Insurance.

Visit mwoy.org/cincy to learn more

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PRIMAVISTA Besides offering the old world flavors of Italy, Primavista also serves up a specialty no other restaurant can match: a bird’s eye view of Cincinnati from the west side. The kitchen is equally comfortable with northern and southern regional specialties: a Venetian carpaccio of paper thin raw beef sparked by fruity olive oil; house-made fresh mozzarella stuffed with pesto and mushrooms; or artichoke hearts with snails and mushrooms in a creamy Gorgonzola sauce from Lombardy. Among the classics, nothing is more restorative than the pasta e fagioli, a hearty soup of cannellini, ditali pasta, and bacon. Most of the pastas are cooked just a degree more mellow than al dente so that they soak up the fragrant tomato basil or satiny cream sauces. The fork-tender osso buco Milanese, with its marrowfilled center bone and salty-sweet brown sauce (marinara and lemon juice), is simply superb. Desserts present further problems; you’ll be hard-pressed to decide between the house-made tiramisu or bread pudding with caramel sauce, marsala soaked raisins, and cream. 810 Matson Pl., Price Hill, (513) 251-6467, pvista.com. Dinner Tues–Sun. MCC, DC, DS. $$ Top 10

LONG-AWAITED SEQUEL Since first announcing a second location of Pendleton beer and burger joint Nation Kitchen & Bar in May 2018, ownership group Hickory Wald has been seeking zoning approval for the site in a former Westwood firehouse on Epworth Avenue. At long last, their path has cleared, and demolition and construction began in February. The location will open by July, they say.

nationkitchenand bar.com

SOTTO

There are certain books and movies that you can read or watch over and over. Eating at Sotto is a similar experience: familiar, but so profound and satisfying that there is no reason to ever stop. Unlike other restaurants, where the techniques are often elaborate and unfamiliar, the magic at Sotto happens right in front of you, using ordinary elements and methods. When you taste the results, though, you realize that some mysterious transmutation has taken place. Penne with rapini and sausage comes in a buttery, lightly starchy broth with a kick of spice that you could go on eating forever. From the texture of the chicken liver mousse to the tart cherry sauce on the panna cotta, most of the food has some added element of soulfulness. 118 E. Sixth St., downtown, (513) 977-6886,

but what makes this restaurant truly special is the revelation of the true panorama of Japanese cuisine. From ochazuke (tea soup) with umeboshi (a salty-sour pickled plum) to shime saba, marinated mackerel in a delicately pickle-y broth of cucumber and vinegar, there are a dozen items not seen elsewhere. Anyone who enjoys sushi or miso broth has built the foundation to appreciate the rest of this cuisine. Cha soba, green tea noodles with shredded seaweed, chopped scallions, and a sweet and soupy broth, has a satisfying umami note, even served cold, and a pleasing bite with wasabi mixed in. The kinoko itame, sauteed shiitake and enoki mushrooms, is surprisingly buttery and sweet, showing a voluptuous quality rarely associated with this tradition, but a perfect counterpoint to the more austere offerings. 8660 Bankers St., Florence, (859) 525-6564, miyoshirestaurant.com. Lunch and dinner Mon–Sat. MCC. $$$

ZUNDO RAMEN & DONBURI A stark contrast to Styrofoam cup soup, chef Han Lin’s ramens are a deep and exciting branch of cuisine, capable of subtlety, variation, and depth. The simplicity of the dish’s name hides a world of complexity. Zundo uses the traditional Japanese building blocks of flavor—soy sauce, miso, sake, mirin—to create something freewheeling and time-tested. Bowls of ramen come with a marinated soft-boiled egg half, roast pork, green onion, and a healthy serving of noodles. Each has a distinct identity, like the milky richness of the tonkotsu, the rich and buttery miso, or the light and faintly sweet shoyu ramen. A transformative add-in is the mayu, or black garlic oil. Dripped on top of one of the subtler broths, it adds a deep, mushroom-y richness, with the hint of burned flavor that makes barbecue so good. W. 12th St., Over-the-Rhine, (513) 975-0706, zundootr.com. Lunch Tues–Sun. MCC. $$

KOREAN

sottocincinnati.com. Lunch Mon–Fri, dinner seven days. MCC, DS. $$$

HARU

J A PA N E S E MEI Mei’s menu is meant to represent traditional Japanese cuisine, appealing to the novice as well as the sushi maven. It is divided into sections that encourage a progressive meal of small dishes: One each for hot and cold appetizers, noodles, sushi and sashimi, special rolls, soups and salads, sushi dinners (with miso soup), and combinations (such as tempura paired with sashimi). Deep-fried soft shell crab comes with ponzu sauce—a dipping sauce made of rice vinegar, soy sauce, mirin, and citrus juice—and the kind of yakitori that you can find on the streets of New York. Bento boxes—lacquered wooden boxes divided into compartments—offer the neophyte a sampling of several small dishes. Mei’s are lovely: deep red and stocked with tempura, cooked salmon, sashimi, stewed vegetables, and a fabulous egg custard with shrimp and gingko nut. Mei’s sushi—nigiri, maki, and handrolls—is exceptionally good with quality cuts of fresh seafood. The staff is knowledgeable, extremely efficient, respectful, and attentive, even when it’s at peak capacity. 8608 Market Place Lane, Montgomery, (513) 891-6880, meijapaneserestaurant. com. Lunch and dinner seven days. MCC, DS. $$

MIYOSHI For too long, Japanese cuisine in America has meant miso soup, sushi and sashimi, and various grilled meats with teriyaki sauce. Yes, you can get excellent versions of all of these at Miyoshi,

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After the closing of Sung Korean Bistro, Haru is a welcome addition to the downtown scene. Dishes are served along with the usual Korean accompaniment of pickles, kimchi, fish cakes, and other mysteriously delicious dainties. A favorite is the japchae, a traditional dish sporting silky sweet potato noodles with sesame-and-garlic sauce, matchsticks of assorted crisp vegetables, and behind it all a wonderful smokiness that pervades the whole meal. The accompanying pot of gochujang, a fermented Korean chili paste, adds its own sweet and spicy note. The result is a homey, soulful, and satisfying taste that appeals even to those who’ve never eaten a bite of Korean food before. 628 Vine St., downtown, (513) 381-0947, harucincy.com. Lunch and dinner Mon–Sat. MCC. $$

RIVERSIDE KOREAN RESTAURANT

Come for the jo gi mae un tang—a bowl of sizzling, happy hellbroth pungent with red pepper, garlic, and ginger, crowded with nuggets of fish, tofu, and vegetables. Come for the restorative power of sam gae tang, a chicken soup for the Seoul—a whole Cornish hen submerged in its own juices and plumped with sticky rice and ginseng, dried red dates, and pine nuts. Revered for their medicinal properties, both dinner-sized soups will leave your eyes glistening and your brow beaded with sweat. They’re a detox for your overindulgence, rejuvenation for when you’re feeling under the weather. Expect crowds on weekends that come for dolsot bibimbap, the hot stone pots filled with layers of rice, vegetables, meat or tofu, egg, and chili paste. 512 Madison Ave.,

Covington, (859) 291-1484, riversidekoreanres taurant.com. Lunch Mon–Fri, dinner seven days. MCC, DS. $$

SURA This traditional Korean oasis has been flying well beneath the radar since 2010. Don’t let the pepper count on the menu deter you. Each entrée arrives with purple rice and assorted small bites aimed at cutting the heat—steamed broccoli, pickled radishes, soy-sauce-marinated tofu, panfried fish cake, and housemade kimchi. Korean barbecue staple osam bulgogi—one of only two items meriting a three pepper rating—swiftly clears sinuses with a flavorful duo of pork belly and squid lashed with Korean red pepper paste and served on a sizzling skillet. The two-pepper kimchi jjigae stew marries fermented Korean cabbage with hunks of tofu and shards of pork in a bubbling tomato-based broth. Make sure to order a bowl of the bone noodle soup for the table—a comforting combination of thick noodles and bits of flank steak floating in a umami-rich marrow broth that magically soothes the burn. 7876 Mason-Montgomery Rd., Mason, (513) 2043456, surakorean.com. Lunch and dinner Mon–Sat. MCC. $$

MEDITERRANEAN Top 10

PHOENICIAN TAVERNA

No matter how much restraint you go in with, meals at Phoenician Taverna quickly become feasts. There is just too much that’s good, and everything is meant to be shared. With fresh pita bread continuously arriving from the ovens, and a table of quickly multiplying meze (hummus, falafel, muhammara), there is a warmth and depth to the cooking that envelops you. With such traditional cuisine, you may think there isn’t much left to discover beyond simply executed classics prepared according to time-tested methods. But there are always new discoveries as the flavors mingle from plate to plate: the tabbouleh with the hummus, mixed with a touch of harissa, or the smoky baba ghanoush spooned onto falafel. Phoenician Taverna keeps taking these classics a little further. 7944 Mason Montgomery Rd., Mason, (513) 770-0027, phoeniciantaverna.com. Lunch Tues–Fri, dinner Tues–Sun. MCC. $$

SANTORINI Steak, eggs, and home fries. Jumbo haddock sandwich with Greek fries. Chocolate chip hot cakes with bacon. Notice something wrong with this menu? Chicken Philly cheese steak sandwich with Olympic onion rings. Yep, it’s obvious: What’s wrong with this menu is that there’s nothing wrong with this menu. Greek feta cheese omelette with a side of ham. It’s been owned by the same family for more than 30 years. Santorini has diner standards, like cheeseburgers, chili five ways, and breakfast anytime, but they also make some Greek pastries in house, like spanakopita and baklava. 3414 Harrison Ave., Cheviot, (513) 662-8080. Breakfast, lunch, and dinner Mon– Sat, breakfast and lunch Sun. Cash. $

SEBASTIAN’S When the wind is just right, you can smell the garlicky meat roasting from a mile away. Watch owner Alex Sebastian tend to the rotating wheels of beef and lamb, and you understand how Greek food has escaped the American tendency to appropriate foreign cuisines. Sebastian’s specializes in gyros, shaved off the stick, wrapped in thick griddle pita with onions and tomatoes, and served with cool tzatziki sauce. Alex’s wife and daughter run the counter with efficient speed,


and whether you’re having a crisp Greek salad with housemade dressing, triangles of spanikopita, or simply the best walnut and honey baklava this side of the Atlantic (often made by the Mrs.), they never miss a beat, turning more covers in their tiny deli on one Saturday afternoon than some restaurants do in an entire weekend. 5209 Glenway Ave., Price Hill, (513) 471-2100, sebastiansgyros. com. Lunch and dinner Mon–Sat. Cash. $

MEXICAN EL VALLE VERDE

Guests with dietary issues, high anxiety, and no Spanish may take a pass, but for hardy souls, this taqueria delivers a memorable evening. Seafood dishes are the star here—ceviche tostadas, crisp corn tortillas piled high with pico de gallo, avocado, and lime-tastic bits of white fish, squid, and crab; the oversized goblet of cocktel campechano, with ample poached shrimp crammed into a Clamato-heavy gazpacho; and simmering sopa de marisco came with langoustines, mussels, crab legs, and an entire fish—enough to feed three. 6717 Vine St., Carthage, (513) 821-5400. Lunch and dinner seven days. $

MAZUNTE

Mazunte runs a culinary full court press, switching up specials to keep both regulars and staff engaged. Tamales arrive swaddled in a banana leaf, the shredded pork filling steeped in a sauce fiery with guajillo and ancho chilies yet foiled by the calming sweetness of raisins. The fried mahi-mahi tacos are finished with a citrusy red and white cabbage slaw that complements the accompanying mango-habañero salsa. With this level of authentic yet fast-paced execution, a slightly greasy pozole can be easily forgiven. Don’t miss the Mexican Coke and self-serve sangria (try the blanco), or the cans of Rhinegeist and MadTree on ice. 5207 Madison Rd., Madisonville, (513) 785-0000, mazuntetacos.com. Lunch and dinner Mon–Sat, brunch Sun. MCC. $

MONTOYA’S

Mexican places seem to change hands in this town so often that you can’t get the same meal twice. Montoya’s is the exception. They’ve been hidden in a tiny strip mall off the main drag in Ft. Mitchell for years. It’s unpretentious and seemingly not interested in success, which means success has never gone to their head here. At a place where you can get Huracan Fajitas with steak, chicken, and chorizo or Tilapia Asada, the tacos are still a big item. 2507 Chelsea Dr., Ft. Mitchell, (859) 341-0707. Lunch and dinner Tues–Sun. MC, V, DS. $

SEAFOOD

piping hot oysters tucked into a buttered and toasted po’ boy bun with housemade slaw, and tart-sweet key lime pie. And of course, the damn good New England style chowder. 7261 Beechmont Ave., Anderson Twp., (513) 232-2526, the pelicansreef.com. Lunch and dinner Mon–Sat. MCC, DS. $$

STEAKS CARLO & JOHNNY

The stars of the menu are 11 delectable steaks that could sway the vegi-curious to recommit. Not sure which to choose? If you prefer brawny flavor over buttery texture, go for one of the three bone-in rib cuts. Or if it’s that meltin-your-mouth experience that raises your serotonin levels, C&J features several tenderloin cuts, including the hard to find bone-in filet. There are the usual suspects of seafood, pork chops, et al, if you’re interested in non-beef alternatives. 9769 Montgomery Rd., Montgomery, (513) 936-8600, jeffruby.com. Dinner seven days. MCC. $$$$

JAG’S STEAK AND SEAFOOD

Chef Michelle Brown’s food is deeply flavored, if occasionally a bit busy, her steaks of the buttery-mild variety, with not too much salty char crust. All seven cuts are served with veal demi-glace and fried onion straws. According to my steak-centric dining partner, his cowboy rib eye is “too tender and uniform” (as if that’s a crime). “I like to wrestle with the bone,” he adds, though that’s a scenario that, thankfully, doesn’t get played out in this subdued dining room. 5980 West Chester Rd., West Chester, (513) 860-5353, jags.com. Dinner Mon–Sat. MCC, DC. $$$

MORTON’S THE STEAKHOUSE

No one has replicated the concept of an expensive boys’ club better than Morton’s. Amid the dark polished woods and white linen, the Riedel stemware and stupendous flower arrangements, assorted suits grapple with double cut filet mignons, 24 ounces of porterhouse, pink shiny slabs of prime rib, overflowing plates of salty Lyonnaise potatoes, or mammoth iceberg wedges frosted with thick blue cheese dressing. Jumbo is Morton’s decree: Oversized martini and wine glasses, ethereal towering lemon soufflés, roomy chairs, and tables large enough for a plate and a laptop. Even steaks billed as “slightly smaller” weigh in at 8 to 10 ounces. 441 Vine St., downtown, (513) 621-3111, mortons.com. Dinner seven days. MCC. $$$

THAI

gingery, herbaceous galangal, all yielding to the taunting sweetness of coconut. Even the simple skewers of chicken satay with Thai barbecue sauce are rough and honest, dulcified by honey and dirtied up by a smoky grill. 5461 North Bend Rd., Monfort Heights, (513) 481-3360, thai namtip.com. Lunch and dinner Mon-Sat, dinner Sun. MC, V. $

WILD GINGER

Wild Ginger Asian Bistro’s ability to satisfy a deep desire for Vietnamese and Thai fusion cuisine is evidenced by their signature Hee Ma roll—a fortress of seaweed-wrapped rolls filled with shrimp tempura, asparagus, avocado, and topped with red tuna, pulled crab stick, tempura flakes, a bit of masago, scallions, and of course, spicy mayo. It’s tasty, even though the sweet fried floodwall of tempura and spicy mayo overpowered the tuna completely. The spicy pad char entrée was a solid seven out of 10: broccoli, carrots, cabbage, succulent red bell peppers, green beans, and beef, accented with basil and lime leaves in a peppercorn-and-chili brown sauce. 3655 Edwards Rd., Hyde Park, (513) 533-9500, wildgingercincy.com. Lunch and dinner Mon–Sun. MCC, DS. $$

VI ETNAM E S E PHO LANG THANG

Owners Duy and Bao Nguyen and David Le have created a greatest hits playlist of Vietnamese cuisine: elegant, brothy pho made from poultry, beef, or vegan stocks poured over rice noodles and adrift with slices of onions, meats, or vegetables (the vegan pho chay is by far the most flavorful); fresh julienned vegetables, crunchy sprouts, and herbs served over vermicelli rice noodles (again, the vegan version, bun chay, is the standout); and bánh mì. Be sure to end with a cup of Vietnamese coffee, a devilish jolt of dark roast and sweetened condensed milk that should make canned energy drinks obsolete. 1828 Race St., Over-the-Rhine, (513) 376-9177, pholangthang.com. Lunch and dinner seven days. MCC, DS, DC. $

QUAN HAPA

The Nguyen brothers, Duy and Bao, along with partner David Le, have followed up on Pho Lang Thang’s success at Findlay Market by bursting onto the OTR scene with some of the boldest flavors in the city. A tuna ceviche makes use of the fiery sweetness of Malaysian sambal oelek and a banh mi steakburger gains crunch from pickled daikon and a side of Indonesian shrimp chips. Or try the okonomiyaki, a traditional Japanese pancake topped with a choice of bacon, prawns, or vegetables. 1331 Vine St., Over-theRhine, (513) 421-7826, quanhapa.com. Lunch and dinner seven days. MCC, DS. $

SONG LONG GREEN PAPAYA

The menu does have a substantial Chinese section, but make no mistake, the reason there’s a line at the door on weekend nights is the fine Vietnamese specialties cooked and served by the Le family. Begin with the goi cuon, the cold rolls of moistened rice paper wrapped around vermicelli noodles, julienned cucumbers, lettuce, cilantro, and mung bean sprouts. Or try the banh xeo, a platter-sized pan-fried rice crepe folded over substantial nuggets of chicken and shrimp, mushrooms, and wilted mung sprouts. The phos, meal-sized soups eaten for breakfast, are good, but the pho dac biet is Song Long’s best. Crisp-tender vegetables, slices of beef, herbs, and scallions glide through the noodle-streaked broth. 1737 Section Rd., Roselawn,

(513) 721-9339, mccormickandschmicks.com. Lunch and dinner seven days. MCC, DC, DS. $$

son Rd., Oakley, (513) 731-0107, greenpapayacincinnati.com. Lunch Mon–Sat, dinner seven days. MCC. $$

(513) 351-7631, songlong.net. Lunch and dinner Mon–Sat. MCC, DC, DS. $

PELICAN’S REEF

THAI NAMTIP

CINCINNATI MAGAZINE, (ISSN 0746-8 210), April 2020, Volume 53, Number 7. Published monthly ($14.95 for 12 issues annually) at Carew Tower, 441 Vine St., Suite 200, Cincinnati, OH 45202-2039. (513) 421-4300. Copyright © 2020 by Cincinnati Magazine LLC, a subsidiary of Hour Media Group, 5750 New King Dr, Ste 100, Troy, MI 48098. All rights reserved. No part of this magazine may be reproduced or reprinted without permission. Unsolicited manuscripts, photographs and artwork should be accompanied by SASE for return. The magazine cannot be held responsible for loss. For subscription orders, address changes or renewals, write to CINCINNATI MAGAZINE, 1965 E. Avis Dr., Madison Heights, MI 48071, or call 1-866-660-6247. Periodicals postage paid at Cincinnati, Ohio, and additional mailing offices. Postmaster: Please send forms 3579 to CINCINNATI MAGAZINE, 1965 E. Avis Dr., Madison Heights, MI 48071. If the Postal Service alerts us that your magazine is undeliverable, we have no further obligation unless we receive a corrected address within one year.

McCORMICK & SCHMICK’S

The daily rotation here reads like a fisherman’s wish list: fresh lobsters from the coast of Maine, ahi tuna from Hawaii, North Carolina catfish, Massachusetts cod. But high-quality ingredients are only half the equation; preparation is the other. Flaky Parmesan-crusted tilapia, with a squeeze of lemon, makes the taste buds dance. The spacious digs and attentive waitstaff bring a touch of class to Fountain Square, and make it a sophisticated destination. It’s likely to remain a favorite. After all, it’s right in the middle of things. 21 E. Fifth St., downtown,

Over the years Chef John Broshar has developed his niche, inspired by the seasonal availability of fish obtained daily from one or more of the purveyors he uses. Malabar snapper and swordfish from Hawaii, Australian triple tail, wild Alaskan salmon, wreckfish from South Carolina, Florida yellow tail, rainbow trout, and wild striped bass are just some of the varieties that rotate through the extensive features listed on a 10-foot by 2-foot chalkboard. The regular offerings are no slouch: Grilled grouper sandwich with chipotle tartar sauce, chubby fish tacos, perfectly fried

Inside this simple dining room, replete with soothing browns and greens and handsome, dark wood furniture, it takes time to sort through the many curries and chef’s specialties, not to mention the wide variety of sushi on the something-for-everyone menu. Have the staff—friendly, attentive, and knowledgeable—help you. When the food arrives, you’ll need only a deep inhale to know you made the right choice. The Green Papaya sushi rolls are as delicious as they look, with a manic swirl of spicy mayo and bits of crabstick and crispy tempura batter scattered atop the spicy tuna, mango, cream cheese, and shrimp tempura sushi—all rolled in a vivid green soybean wrap. 2942 Was-

Classic Thai comfort food on the west side from chef/ owner Tussanee Leach, who grew up with galangal on her tongue and sriracha sauce in her veins. Her curries reign: pale yellow sweetened with coconut milk and poured over tender chicken breast and chunks of boiled pineapple; red curry the color of new brick, tasting of earth at first bite, then the sharply verdant Thai basil leaves, followed by a distant heat. Tom Kha Gai soup defines the complex interplay of flavors in Thai food: astringent lemongrass gives way to pepper, then Makrut lime, shot through with the

A P R I L 2 0 2 0 C I N C I N N AT I M A G A Z I N E . C O M 1 2 7


CINCY OBSCURA



Book Keepers WHAT HAPPENS WHEN A LIBRARY BOOK is damaged? If it belongs to the Public Library of

Cincinnati and Hamilton County or University of Cincinnati Libraries, it’s sent to the Preservation Lab located on the third floor of UC’s Langsam Library. Jointly managed, staffed, and funded by both institutions, the lab specializes in preserving parchment- and paperbased artifacts. “We’re making sure they’re available for years to come,” says Holly Prochaska, the lab’s preservation librarian and co-manager. Depending on the condition and material, an object can take 15 minutes to 100 hours to treat, as co-manager Ashleigh Schieszer demonstrates on the volume above. Anyone can view the lab and learn about the preservation process during its free annual open house on May 1 from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m., which coincides with the American Library Association’s national Preservation Week. Although the lab offers its services to other cultural heritage organizations, it doesn’t have the capacity to take on individual requests. Plus, they don’t want to take business away from local conservators. “We’re not trying to compete with anybody,” Prochaska says. “We’re just trying to be good stewards.” — K A T I E C O B U R N 1 2 8 C I N C I N N AT I M A G A Z I N E . C O M A P R I L 2 0 2 0

PHOTOGRAPH BY JEREMY KRAMER


HEALTHY KIDS DAY Saturday, April 25 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. Families spend time together to prepare for an active healthy summer. Free to the Community: Includes climbing wall, bounce houses, obstacle course, fitness classes, face painting, visits with farm animals, wagon rides and more!

Parky’s Farm 10073 Daly Road Cincinnati, OH 45231

Presenting Sponsors:


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Profile for Cincinnati Magazine

Cincinnati Magazine - April 2020 Edition  

Cincinnati Magazine - April 2020 Edition