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C O N T E M P O R A R Y A R T S C E N T E R M AG A Z I N E • S P R I N G / S U M M E R 2 0 1 8

Uncharted Territories with Alison Crocetta Summer Exhibitions Heat Things Up Black Box Year-in-Review


POV Within the works in A Circus of One it can be hard to tell which came first, my body or the object? Did a sculpture beckon for a performance action or did a certain gesture require a specific form of support? In the studio, I allow myself to address both possibilities as I create sculptures that serve and expand the potential of my body in performance. Within my performance works, I am often inspired to respond to particular sites in the built environment. I see this as a game of call and response. At times, I feel almost dared into action by some of these places. In other situations, a site will offer up its potential to me in a gentler way and become a welcoming context for my fleeting presence. When working in any space, I want my actions to reanimate the setting and offer it new possibilities. This practice of finding the right gesture for a specific place has lead me on an amazing adventure into uncharted territories and unexpected situations. Over the years, I have found myself at the bottom of an empty diving pool, dancing on a glass floor above the remains of an old city and walking precariously along the handrail of a bridge. These sites allow the scale of my body to be located within another architecture. Through this juxtaposition, I am able to underscore the power and vulnerability of our human form. My body may be the primary instrument of my work but I believe that my being extends beyond the confines of my physical frame. Whether I am using my breath to support sculptural form or singing in a performance, it is the boundary between the material and immaterial aspects of life that often propels me to make work. In my durational performances, I rely on repetition and endurance to open myself up to new thresholds within my body and psyche. I trust that these expanded experiences can be recorded on film or conveyed to others in live performances because of our human capacity for empathy. My work is often politically motivated because I think that part of becoming a liberated artist is exercising the power of your agency; political or otherwise. When I need to say something, I often choose to sing it instead. I believe that the sounding of my body in performance is the most nuanced way for me to express myself. The unique combination of the actions of my body and the quality of my voice can register and telegraph the complexity of my ideas in a way that can never be expressed through sculptural form alone. Alison Crocetta


Alison Crocetta, Shed, 2006, part of the Super 8mm film trilogy, Gather / Shed / Lift in collaboration with composer Barbara White. Medium format production photo. Photo credit: Bradley Olson


THE

STORY THAT A HOUSE CAN TELL by Kate Hanley

Have you ever thought about the houses you pass when driving to work or while walking your dog? Have you ever thought about the different families that have lived there and the different histories left behind on the walls and interior? These are the questions that Dutch-born and Cincinnati-based artist, Mark deJong, would like to address in his new exhibition Swing House. What influences you as an artist? I’ve always been influenced by the concepts of time, relationships and self-reflection/self-awareness in relation to the use of language and the home. Buildings have always seduced me even as a young teen, and so to be able to work this closely with the houses, like Circle and Swing House, have been amazing. Can you expand on your process and how it’s changed over time? I approach my projects as both a builder and an artist. As an artist, I think of myself as more traditional/formal in that my decisions often happen within the process. For example, I first came up with the idea of putting a swing in a house 30 years ago, but I had no idea that I would turn the house into an entire experience for people to rent out for the night, which was a decision I made while creating it. I think as I’ve acquired more skills, like construction and home-building, I’ve been able to really expand my initial ideas more fully.

Swing House & Stair House Open House Dates: May 19th: 12–4PM For more details, please visit: contemporaryartscenter.org/calendar

Can you talk a little bit about the materials you use in your work? For my housing projects, all the materials used originate from within the house. For example, I’ve taken parts of the wall out and put them somewhere else or made sculptures with them, some of my pieces are found objects that were hidden in a layer of the ceiling or a drawing underneath the wallpaper. I like to process parts of the house in new ways to make them a sculpture. But that leads to a conflict where I am confined to the materials of the house, but I also get to experiment with them and push the limits of my creativity. I believe all pieces are in flux, choreographed and curated from the materials of the house and vision of the artist. The way that the artist makes art with the given material is his language of telling that story. In that way, the pieces sometimes become more universal than the house itself. What if, anything, are you hoping to convey to visitors? For those that see the show, I want them to be enamored by the story that a house can tell. Each piece I’m showing tells the story of the Swing House in some way, but I also hope that it will show the potential in any house.


EXHIBITIONS

MARK DEJONG

CHRIS LARSON

Swing House

Function is Redundant

APR 20 – SEP 2, 2018

APR 20 – SEP 2, 2018

Cincinnati’s architectural and artistic landscape has been forever changed by the groundbreaking work of Dutchborn, Cincinnati-based artist Mark deJong. With the launch of the Swing House he welcomes visitors into a three-story structure where all the floors and walls have been removed to allow the flight of a house-spanning swing. In concert with previous projects such as the Circle House in Camp Washington and the Square House in Northside, deJong pushes renovation, restoration and carpentry into a transformative art. With this exhibition the CAC will celebrate his most ambitious venture to date – showcasing the reconstructed staircase from the Swing House as an archaeological marvel. It will be surrounded by related sculptural pieces deJong has crafted from the materials gathered from this and other renovations, turning surplus into the fodder for minimalist objects that float in space.

Seemingly ordinary buildings slide between sculpture, set and stage via the surreal carpentry of Minneapolis-based artist Chris Larson. From scale effigies of iconic structures that he builds and subsequently levels, to hallucinatory studio spaces that he pierces and spins to create drawings, prints and videos, little in his practice remains rooted. Incorporating his parallel practice as a musician, Larson transforms built environments into quizzical instruments that open new paths of perception and orientation. Using humble materials and pioneer techniques to fabricate unexpectedly fantastical worlds, Larson is simultaneously spartan and psychedelic – employing a workman’s approach to archaic looking machines that recast their surroundings, and inhabitants, in a newfound light. This exhibition features four of Larson’s most memorable video works, accompanied by some of the prints and drawings produced in the finely orchestrated fray.

Mark deJong: Swing House is curated by Steven Matijcio generously supported by Stewart Turnbull and Artswave Corporate Sponsor: Macy’s.

Chris Larson: Function is Redundant is curated by Steven Matijcio and generously supported by Emersion Design and Artswave Corporate Sponsor: Macy’s.


FIRELEI BAEZ

ALISON CROCETTA

MAY 18, 2018 – AUG 19, 2018

MAY 18, 2018 – AUG 19, 2018

To celebrate the beautiful complexity of being AfroLatina in a country where racial categories blunt the richness of color, Caribbean-born, Brooklyn-based artist Firelei Baez creates ornate paintings that brim with vibrant patterns and political unrest. Aiming to re-open our perceptual landscape via mythical worlds of colorful avatars, Baez explains, “I try to disrupt the current system of social categorization through the creation of characters that refuse definition. As more people become multiracial, skin tone is no longer a sufficient signifier.” She also draws upon the cultural histories and evolving legacies of decoration, anthropology, folklore, and science fiction to weave a fantastical vision of increasingly fluid societies. This exhibition is the artist’s first in Ohio, and explores the evolution of her portraiture of women as it pushes increasingly into apotheosis and abstraction.

Crocetta is a New York-born, Columbus-based artist and professor at Ohio State University who works in an interdisciplinary fashion merging objects and forms with film, song, and delicate but enduring actions. This is her first solo museum exhibition, surveying her performance-driven work and debuting A Circus of One (Act II), a collection of seven performance pieces that run the gamut from the absurd to the trance-inducing as she interacts with a large, shape-shifting wooden horse. The exhibition will also feature a projection of her film A Circus of One and related sculptures that were used in the piece’s actions. In concert with this subdued circus Crocetta will premiere RESONATOR – a durational performance work featuring her a cappella singing – and the performance video A Passage, which records a somewhat perilous walking meditation in Norway.

Firelei Baez: To See Beyond is curated by Steven Matijico and is generously supported by ArtsWave Corporate Partner: Great Amercian Insurance Group

Alison Crocetta: A Circus of One is curated by Steven Matijcio and is generously supported by Stephen and Sandra Joffe, Jimmy and Lauren Miller, The WOMXN, Linda and Jim Miller, Maria Kalomenidou and Yannis Skoufalos, Sue Friedlander, ArtsWave Corporate Partner: The Kroger Co.

To See Beyond

A Circus of One


To coincide with the closing of The Canyon: 1999–2017, Swoon’s momentous retrospective exhibition, we’ve created a zine that gives fans an exclusive behind-the-scenes look at what it took to make such an immersive experience come to life. Completing the zine is an in-depth essay by CAC curator Steven Matijcio that details both how personal and communal this undertaking was for Swoon. Check out an excerpt from the essay below:

When meeting the many avatars of Callie’s exhibition and the phases of her life and career they reflect, one’s awareness of the identity they collectively constitute (and complicate) grows ever more tangible. Along the way there are multiple representations of her mother, father, sister, grandparents and other familial relatives alongside friends, partners, muses, colleagues, acquaintances and strangers whose relationship spanned the short, if enduring terrain of a shared glance. Within this holistic archive, many of these portraits are intersections unto themselves–sharing their bodies with cityscapes, buildings, animals, deities, fellow figures and iconographies from a variety of world cultures. Each is thus a kaleidoscope of associations for the artist, spanning the conscious and subconscious, multiplied by the interpretation of every additional viewer who enters this arena. And while it can be argued that every artist’s body of work constitutes an overarching biography... there is something greater, more unwieldy here, where the entity known as “Swoon” transcends individual assignment to circulate in the plural. That is to say, Callie is simultaneously all of these portraits and none of them at all, congregating an evolving tapestry where the many people that cumulatively shape her identity gather and seek to recruit more.

“...Callie is simultaneously all of these portraits and none of them at all...” As I watched and participated in the installation of this exhibition at the CAC, a distinct community coalesced in the process–bringing [people together to collectively realize a project that required the proverbial village. [S]pending time in such an environment makes clear how Callie inspires people to participate in causes that regularly exceed caution and convention. Each one is an opportunity to do something beyond the capacity of an individual; to live beyond your skin, and overcome doubt, skepticism, baggage, trauma and what norms necessitate. This is swelling agency that surpasses the capacity of the self-portrait as we know it... [t]he self that Callie practices here is a porous venture–distributed and disseminated– orbiting as pieces that have risen from fracture into the collective might of swarms.

ailable now oon zine, av exclusive Sw e th in e or e at See m ore and onlin in the C AC st oonzine w /s rg .o er ryar tscent contempora


BEHIND THE SCENES 2

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4 3


1.

“We were at the American Sign Museum getting everything ready to move (Swoon’s) work to the CAC. This was the roof section of Medea, and we’re getting placement to make sure everything would fit when we brought it over.” –Tyler Hamilton, Preparator “Let’s talk about Ben! He was a part of Swoon’s crew and so cool to work with. I remember one time going up to him and asking if he was using the hammer in front him, and he quietly said ‘No, man, that’s the people’s hammer.” – Justin West, Preparator

2.

“So Meredith and I were assisting Noel to stretch his huge tapestries over the canvases. It took at least three to four of us to move them. He (Noel) was fun to work with. I had him as a professor and he intimidated me. He would always call me out in class and ask me philosophical questions. So it was interesting to see how things would develop, but he was actually really fun to work with.” – Claire Talbot, Preparator

3.

“So right here I’m working on the Swing House live audio streaming [from the actual Swing House in Camp Washington] for Mark de Jong. I was only helping with the installation for three days because I was in Austin, TX for most of this period, so I had to work pretty fast. Somehow got it done. To be honest, it’s probably because I just pose like this most of the time and let everyone else do all of the work for me.” – Justin West, Preparator

4.

“We’re actually de-installing this piece right now. It’s pretty tedious and took us around three days to install. Meredith (left) and I really got to know each other during that time. When you’re doing a task so specific over and over, you start to talk and conversations get deeper, you share music and things like that. I feel like we learned a lot about each other.” – Claire Talbot, Preparator

5.

“So this was right after Swoon [installation]. We were so exhausted from that exhibition, so it was nice to sit and draw on walls for 2 weeks. We had to mimic Sandra [Cinto]’s drawing style, so Meredith and I took turns switching places on the wall we were drawing, which allowed us to blend our drawing styles. Through working on this project, Sandra invited the two of us on a summer residency in Sao Paulo, Brazil.” – Claire Talbot, Preparator

5

“It’s probably not good to say when you work in a museum, but Sandra was by far one of the most pleasant artists to work with. She was so grateful for everything–all you’d have to do is grab her a pen and she’d give you the biggest thank you…that makes our job really easy.” – Joe Civitello, Chief Preparator


By Shawnee Turner


While many educators and administrators feel instinctively that there is value to a museum field trip, they may struggle to articulate exactly what that value is, resulting in fewer out-of-class experiences. Research has demonstrated, however, that even a single field trip can increase students’ ability to think critically, as well as their ability to appreciate and understand perspectives other than their own. The Contemporary Arts Center has engaged with schools for nearly 35 years. During the 2016–2017 school year, the CAC hosted approximately 4500 students and that number continues to grow annually.

CAC School Outreach Programming has multiple facets. In the spirit of our mission which states that ‘art and the creative process belongs to all people,’ all school tours are free of charge. We believe all students should have the ability to engage with our exhibitions and bring those experiences into the classroom. Through our single-visit program, we offer approximately 10–15 free buses every year to schools that demonstrate economic need. Our multi-visit program provides 10 schools with a year-long arts experience that offers programming that aligns with curricula, enriches students’ exposure to the arts and opens their minds to new perspectives and possibilities. Schools choose a 2nd to 12th grade classroom to participate in five encounters. CAC Docents work with the same class throughout the year, guiding students through an in-class orientation, two CAC tours, an in-class artist visit and an artist’s studio visit. Students who participate in the single and multi-visit programs are invited to take part in an annual art show, which will be on display at the CAC this year from May 7–11. The Performance in the Classroom program has two iterations that give students the chance to learn about a genre of art not typically discussed in the classroom. This year, Black Box series artists Shasta Geaux Pop visited Dater High School and the Cincinnati College Preparatory Academy to perform and discuss their process and career. Docents also took Kate McIntosh’s In Many Hands into the classrooms of 5 different schools. They showed students a portion of the performance and engaged the students in a discussion of performance art, analysis of the work and writing activities.

This year, we have partnered with ArtsWave and Erpenbeck Elementary for the school’s science night and passion projects. Students visited the CAC to learn about STEAM connections to artists Swoon and Glenn Kaino. To assist with the Star Wars theme that the students chose for their May 4th science night, the CAC brought in five mentors and a UC art education graduate student to support the students with their STEAM projects. Each session focused on career development, artistic techniques and choice-based learning. This year the CAC also worked with Our Lady of Perpetual Help in Grove City, Ohio on a long-term project centered on Swoon’s community-driven work. Students learned about different countries around the world, their culture and the challenges those countries face. Inspired by Swoon and her practice, students used art to convey important messages and discover how art can be activism. Perhaps one of the most important aspects of CAC school programming is the support we offer teachers. Our Education staff creates Educator Guides and lesson plans for all CAC exhibitions, and our Educator Workshops focus not just on lesson plans, but the challenges that teachers face. This year we have focused on arts integration, gender and identity to promote inclusivity and STEAM learning. We feel that offering support to educators in this way allows the CAC to extend its mission beyond our walls. We stand firmly committed to fostering education and curiosity, and we believe that giving students and educators the ability to engage with art in the classroom or within the museum will have lasting impact on student’s education for years to come.


ARTIST IN PRECEDENCE

The Contemporary Arts Center has long been a laboratory for established and emerging artists, offering unique opportunities to explore new techniques within our gallery walls and the city at large. In this tradition, we’ve rolled out a new pilot program to meet the needs of growing attendance in our evening hours. Each Wednesday and Friday from 5-9PM, contemporary artist Harry Sanchez, Jr. sets up studio in our 6th floor Art Lab, where he explores the techniques and topics that inspire his own practice, and shares how they relate to the CAC’s ever-changing exhibitions. Originally from El Paso, Texas, Sanchez is a multimedia artist using printmaking, installation, sculpture and pastry tips to create his work. Deeply interested in the concepts of borders–both real and psychological, he questions the polarity of the world we live in today. His work explores notions of prisoner torture, whistleblowers, police brutality and deportation. Although he is a recent graduate from the MFA program at UC DAAP, Sanchez is quick to point out his path to becoming an artist isn’t what you might expect. Over the years he has had a variety of manual labor jobs and was a football player in college, but it was the confectionery business he started with his mother that cemented his passion for art. The techniques he learned decorating cakes and cupcakes eventually became methods he would employ as an artist, substituting oil paint for frosting and canvas for sheet cake. Today, Sanchez’s work has been exhibited in Cincinnati, Seattle, Dallas and Paris, France at the Louvre and he has recently completed a curatorial residency. Don’t miss the chance this summer to visit our first artist-in-residence, Harry Sanchez, Jr., and create something unique–no tickets required!

Mark your calendar!

Price Hill Creative Community Festival Aug. 3–4, 2018

for more information, visit: creativecommunityfestival.org


As the culmination of their yearlong experience, the members of our Contemporary Young Adults (C-YA) program at the CAC organize an event for other teens in the community. Working as a team and drawing on the inspiration and experiences of the year, they are empowered to create an event of their choosing to foster community in celebration. We asked C-YA Teen Council members, Rosie Bentley and Megan Schroeder, for their take on this year’s event – Art Prom.

Where did the idea for an Art Prom come from?

Check out photos from the festivities on C-YA’s instagram feed @cincycacteens

RB: People creating cool art and having an awesome time!

For more info on the C-YA program, visit contemporaryartscenter.org/c-ya

MS: Happiness and dancing and teens having fun through expressing themselves! It’s a come-as-you-are or dress-up event – meaning you can express yourself in any which way you see fit! All we really want is a good outlet for teens to come and have fun in a safe space with their creative sides. It will be amazing.

RB: It was inspired by the Met’s intern prom! MS: The reason we chose an art prom, as opposed to all the other ideas of events we came up with, was because these ideas were coming from a panel of teens. People look forward to prom as high schoolers and we wanted to share it with not only the people at our school but the whole community and anyone else who wants to come! What does Art Prom offer that a traditional prom does not? RB: It offers a safe space for people who may not feel comfortable being themselves at a traditional prom. MS: It’s all in the name–ART! Not only do you get to enjoy a night out with friends and enjoy a “prom” but we added in opportunities to get creative and show your artsy side, which is something we take pride in at the CAC.

What does a successful Art Prom look like to you?


Y E A R - I N - R E V I E W Performance at the CAC reached new heights this year with a lineup of groundbreaking artists from all over the globe. Our inclusive programming encountered the real world impact of the travel ban on the arts and demonstrated the power of performance to persevere and transcend. The breadth of work we had the privilege to host in our Black Box theatre and at partnering organizations in the city in our 2017-18 season truly engaged every single human sense in stunning ways. If you joined us this year, then you know what we mean. And if you didn’t, you truly do not know what you’re missing!

Mithkal Alzghair, Displacement January 11, 2018

Corbeaux September 16, 2017 © Compagnie O Mylène Gaillon


Cornell Alston, JACK & Febuary 15, 2018 © Amani Nichae

JACK & Febuary 15, 2018 © Amani Nichae

Corbeaux September 17, 2017 © Compagnie O Mylène Gaillon

We’re exploring some powerful new ways to immerse you in the world of performance next year. Keep your eyes peeled for our announcement of the 2018-19 season this summer at contemporaryartscenter.org/bb


CALENDAR

SPRING • SUMMER 2018

MAY MAY 16 • 11:00AM–12:30PM $ HOMESCHOOL WEDNESDAY: CHRIS LARSON TOUR

JUNE 14 • 4:00–6:00PM YOUNG ADULT LAB: SUMINAGASHI INK

MAY 17 • 10:30–11:30AM $ THURSDAY ART PLAY: PIGMENT PORTRAITS

JUNE 16 • 1:00–3:00PM MAKERSPACE: BUILD IT AND THEY WILL COME

MAY 17 • 4:00–6:00PM YOUNG ADULT LAB: TOOTHPASTE PAINTING

JUNE 20 • 11:00AM–12:30PM $ HOMESCHOOL WEDNESDAY: FIRELEI BÁEZ TOUR

MAY 19 • 3:00–4:00PM (RESERVATION REQUIRED) CIRCUS OF ONE PERFORMANCE: ALISON CROCETTA

JUNE 20 • 4:00–5:00PM ARTBRARY: PORTRAITS AND POETRY

MAY 24 • 10:30–11:30AM $ THURSDAY ART PLAY: A NEW PERSPECTIVE MAY 24 • 4:00–6:00PM YOUNG ADULT LAB: STRING ART MAY 26 • 12:00–3:00PM FAMILY FESTIVAL: TINY CIRCUS MAY 31 • 10:30–11:30AM $ THURSDAY ART PLAY: DONUT PARTY! MAY 31 • 4:00–6:00PM YOUNG ADULT LAB: NEWSPAPER ART

JUNE 21 • 10:30–11:30AM $ THURSDAY ART PLAY: HELLO SUMMER JUNE 21 • 4:00–6:00PM $ YOUNG ADULT LAB: THE ART OF SLIME JUNE 23 • 12:00–3:00PM FAMILY FESTIVAL: BE THE RAINBOW JUNE 27 • 6:00–8:00PM $ ONE NIGHT ONE CRAFT: HAND LETTERING JUNE 28 • 10:30–11:30AM $ THURSDAY ART PLAY: WEARABLE ART JUNE 28 • 4:00AM–6:00PM YOUNG ADULT LAB: T-SHIRT EXPLOSION

JULY JULY 5 • 10:30–11:30AM $ THURSDAY ART PLAY: HAPPY FOURTH-ISH JULY 5 • 4:00–6:00PM YOUNG ADULT LAB: GLOW ART JULY 8 • 1:00–2:00PM BILINGUAL TOUR: CHRIS LARSON

JUNE JUNE 7 • 10:30–11:30AM $ THURSDAY ART PLAY: ALL OF THE LIGHTS JUNE 7 • 4:00–6:00PM YOUNG ADULT LAB: CONTOUR LINE WATERCOLORS JUNE 7 • 6:00–8:00PM DRINK & DRAW: QUEER ART JUNE 10 • 1:00–2:00PM BILINGUAL TOUR: CROCETTA AND BAEZ JUNE 14 • 10:30–11:30AM $ THURSDAY ART PLAY: FATHER’S DAY ON FLEEK

JULY 11 • 6:00–8:00PM $ ONE NIGHT ONE CRAFT: FLUID IDENTITY–WATERCOLOR PORTRAITS JULY 12 • 10:30–11:30AM $ THURSDAY ART PLAY: ICE CREAM PARTY! JULY 12 • 4:00–6:00PM YOUNG ADULT LAB: BODY PAINTING JULY 12 • 6:00–8:00PM DRINK & DRAW: OLD SCHOOL SELFIE JULY 19 • 10:30–11:30AM $ THURSDAY ART PLAY: COLOR BLAST


JULY 19 • 4:00–6:00PM YOUNG ADULT LAB: NOTEBOOK COLLAGE

AUGUST 12 • 1:00–2:00PM BILINGUAL TOUR: CAC ARCHITECTURE

JULY 19 • 4:00–6:00PM CINEMA AT THE CENTER: HOUSE AND HOME: A SERIES OF SHORT FILMS ABOUT ARCHITECTURE AND PLACE

AUGUST 15 • 4:00–5:00 PM ARTBRARY: BOOKMAKING

JULY 25 • 6:00–8:00PM $ ONE NIGHT ONE CRAFT: CONTEMPORARY JEWELRY JULY 25 • 7:00–8:00PM (RESERVATION REQUIRED) CIRCUS OF ONE PERFORMANCE: ALISON CROCETTA JULY 26 • 10:30–11:30AM $ THURSDAY ART PLAY: NIGHT SKY CAMPOUT JULY 26 • 4:00–6:00PM YOUNG ADULT LAB: PIECE OF CAKE JULY 28 • 12:00–3:00PM FAMILY FESTIVAL: UNMUSEUM BLOCK PARTY

AUGUST 16 • 10:30–11:30AM $ THURSDAY ART PLAY: BUILD IT AUGUST 19 • 3:00–4:00PM (RESERVATION REQUIRED) RESONATOR PERFORMANCE: ALISON CROCETTA AUGUST 16 • 4:00–6:00PM YOUNG ADULT LAB: EDIBLE ART AUGUST 23 • 10:30–11:30AM $ THURSDAY ART PLAY: CAC CIRCUS AUGUST 23 • 4:00–6:00PM YOUNG ADULT LAB: BLUE TAPE MURAL AUGUST 25 • 10:00AM–1:00PM $ Educator Workshop: BRINGING MINDFULNESS TO THE CLASSROOM AUGUST 30 • 10:30–11:30AM $ THURSDAY ART PLAY: PLAY POSSE AUGUST 30 • 4:00–6:00PM YOUNG ADULT LAB: BUTTON MAKING

KEY FAMILY PROGRAMS STUFF FOR GROWN UPS

AUGUST AUGUST 1 • 10:00AM–12:00PM MEMORIES IN THE MUSEUM: SKIN DEEP AUGUST 1 • 6:00–8:00PM KITCHEN CHEMIST: LABORATORY STYLE HOME COOKING

STUFF FOR TEENS EVERYONE IS WELCOME $ TICKETED

WEEKLIES

AUGUST 2 • 10:30–11:30AM $ THURSDAY ART PLAY: WEARABLE ART

THE ART OF YOGA TUESDAYS • 12:00-1:00PM $

AUGUST 2 • 4:00–6:00PM YOUNG ADULT LAB: ZINES

CAC @ 21C (Meets at 21C) SATURDAYS • 1:00-2:00PM

AUGUST 9 • 10:30–11:30AM $ THURSDAY ART PLAY: FIRELEI BÁEZ ART

ART LAB NIGHTS SATURDAYS • 6:00-9:00PM

AUGUST 9 • 4:00–6:00PM YOUNG ADULT LAB: WIRE PORTRAITS


THE FRIDA

THE CALLIE

TIC ECLEC

CAFE

SPECIAL OFFERS THURSDAY ART PLAY

THE ANDY

1/2 price

Kid’s Meal w/ purchase of any entrée

ART OF YOGA

NOW SERVING BREAKFAST! 8AM - 11AM MONDAY - FRIDAY

10% off

Lunch for all attendees

FAMILY FESTIVAL Complimentary (nonalcoholic) beverage with purchase of $5 or more


BOOK YOUR NEXT EVENT WITH THE CAC For more information, contact the Facility Rentals Manager at 513-345-8415 or events@contemporaryartscenter.org

MARK YOUR CALENDAR CONTEMPORARY ARTS CENTER BOARD OF TRUSTEES Ron Bates, Chair Rosemary Schlachter, President John Benevides, Treasurer Stewart Turnbull, Secretary Kevin Ott, Vice President Jerry Kathman, At-Large

OCTOBER 4 – 7, 2018

Jeff Ahrnsen William Applegate William Baumann Gale Beckett John Benevides Steven F. Bloomfield James Y. Cheng Lauren Chesley Miller Susan Cutler Harris Harry J. Finke IV Amy Gath Brian Gibson Amy Goodwin Susan C. Harris, MSW LISW Mark T. Hayden Stephen N. Joffe Maria Kalomenidou Eric Kearney Kelly Kolar Kim Krause Paul Lechleiter Jason McCaw

Jayne Menke Linda Miller Rick Michelman John Mocker Jeffrey Nerad, MD Elizabeth T. Olson Denise Osterhues Robert Probst Aftab Pureval Yvette Simpson Jim Stapleton Albert Vontz III Richard S. Wayne Emeritus Trustees Jennie Rosenthal Berliant Dean Jay Chatterjee Dianne Dunkelman Jim Fitzgerald, Sr. Lynne Meyers Gordon Alfred A. Moore Thomas R. Schiff Stuart A. Schloss, Jr. Carl Solway Lifetime Trustees James A. Miller Richard Rosenthal Alice Weston


Contemporary Arts Center Lois & Richard Rosenthal Center for Contemporary Art 44 E 6th Street, Cincinnati, Ohio 45202

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Epicenter Spring/Summer 2018  
Epicenter Spring/Summer 2018