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★2018 VOTER GUIDE★

NONPARTISAN VOTER INFORMATION COVERING HAMILTON COUNTY, OHIO CANDIDATES

• Ohio State Offices............................. 02 • State Senators/Representative......... 08 • State Board of Education................... 12 • U.S. Senators.................................... 06 • U.S. Congressional Reps.................... 07 • Hamilton County Offices.................... 11 • Ohio Supreme Court.......................... 12 • Ohio Court of Appeals........................ 14 • Court of Common Pleas..................... 16 • How to Find Out About Judicial Candidates........................................ 17

★THREE WAYS TO VOTE★ ELECTION DAY NOVEMBER 6

VOTE BY MAIL (ABSENTEE)

EARLY AT BOARD OF ELECTIONS

POLLS OPEN 6:30 AM - 7:30 PM

BALLOTS ACCEPTED OCTOBER 10 - NOVEMBER 5

SPECIAL HOURS OCTOBER 10 - NOVEMBER 5

FIND YOUR POLLING PLACE PAGE 23

GET YOUR MAIL-IN BALLOT PAGE 17

EARLY ADDRESSS AND HOURS PAGE 13

BALLOT ISSUES

IDENTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS

• State Amendments............................ 18 • Hamilton County Issues..................... 19 • City of Cincinnati Issues.................... 19 • School & Suburban Issues........... 18, 21

ID CHOICES PAGE 23

Sponsors:

THE MURRAY & AGNES SEASONGOOD Good Government Foundation

Extended Voter Information including additional questions and information from the candidates, as well as a customized ballot and polling place locator, can be found on our voter guide website:

League of Women Voters of the Cincinnati Area 103 Wm. Howard Taft Rd, Cincinnati, OH 45219 513-281-VOTE (8683)


★GOVERNOR★

ABOUT THIS GUIDE

4-YEAR TERM. SALARY: $148,304

This guide for voters was prepared by the League of Women Voters of the Cincinnati Area (LWVCA) to provide a forum for candidates and information on the ballot issues.

RESPONSIBILITIES: Governor - Ensures that all laws are executed, reports the condition of the state, and presents a proposed budget to the legislature.

The candidate materials in this guide were assembled in the following manner: The information for the judicial candidates is provided by JudicialVotesCount. org, a partnership of the League of Women Voters, Ohio Supreme Court, the Bliss Institute of Applied Politics at the University of Akron, Ohio State Bar Association, Ohio Newspaper Association, and Ohio Association of Broadcasters. The LWVCA has printed that material as it was received from this source as of midnight, September 9, 2018. The information for the Hamilton County candidates is solicited and compiled by the League of Women Voters of the Cincinnati Area (LWVCA). LWVCA uses the following criteria: The questions selected by LWVCA were advertised to the candidates, who were informed that each response would be printed as received and that all candidates would be solely responsible for the content of their replies. Because of the nonpartisan nature of the guide, candidates were informed any reference to other candidates is prohibited. Because of space limitations, candidates were informed of the word limit requirements and were advised that any reply over the word limit would be cut off at the correct number. In making this information available to the public, the LWVCA neither endorses nor rejects the views of any candidate or political party. The League does not and cannot assume responsibility for any candidate’s reply, or for the candidate’s motive in making it. The information for the U.S. Congressional and Ohio state candidates and State ballot issues is solicited and compiled by the League of Women Voters of Ohio (LWVO) volunteers. 9 The summaries and background for the Hamilton County and City of Cincinnati ballot issues were prepared by the League of Women Voters of the Cincinnati Area volunteers. Descriptions of other ballot issues come from the Hamilton County Board of Elections. The information in this guide is current as of September 9, 2018. LWVCA’s online voter guide at VOTE411.org includes additional candidate information not included in this guide as well as any updates candidates may have made to their profile information after our publication deadline as stated above.

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QUESTIONS: Each candidate was asked: 1. What is the role of the governor’s office and executive agencies in addressing the opioid crisis in Ohio? What measures would you pursue in office? 2. Under what circumstances is it appropriate for the state to support or to restrain local governments? 3. What is the role of the governor’s office and executive agencies in overseeing online and brick-and-mortar community schools? How will you ensure adequate funding for k-12 public schools?

1 TO BE ELECTED – 4 YEAR TERM

Photo not provided

Rebecca Ayres and Anthony Durgans (Write-in) Nonparty

No response by print date

Richard Cordray and Betty Sutton Democrat

OCCUPATION: Candidate EDUCATION: Grove City High School (1977) Michigan State University, BA in Legal & Political Theory (1981) Oxford University, MA in Economics on Marshall Scholarship (1983) The University of Chicago Law School, JD (1986)

for prevention and treatment; 4) provide support and resources for families and improve foster and adoptive services; and 5) replace economic despair with broader economic opportunity. ANSWER 2: As I campaign across the state, I see many heads nod from the rural areas and small and mid-sized towns around Ohio when I detail the relentless war on local governments that the Republican State Legislature has been waging for years now. This must change. It’s wrong, and it will not be our approach to governing. We must support the devoted local public servants I know all over Ohio. I am running for Governor in part because I believe that our local governments deserve more. Having served at the local level, I know firsthand the resources required to address the issues our cities and towns are facing. Issues like decent jobs, a strong public education system, and broadband access for all Ohioans. As Governor, I would support restoration of local funds to the state budget. Betty and I will end the war on local government. ANSWER 3: We will hold charter schools accountable for their performance and for the effective use of public funds—including moving to close failing charters. We believe that charter schools should have to meet the same civil rights, health and safety, and teacher quality standards as traditional public schools. The online “Electronic Classroom Of Tomorrow” (ECOT) is a grotesque scandal, which plundered our public schools and left too many children without the education they deserve. Because of the shameful influence of moneyed interests, ECOT wasted as much as a billion tax dollars and still owes the taxpayers at least an $80 million refund for its fraudulent use of taxpayer money. Vast resources were siphoned away from our schools and our kids and funneled to cronies and special interests protected by the Ohio Legislature, Ohio Auditor, and Ohio Attorney General. This scandal demands accountability.

TRAINING AND EXPERIENCE: Director, Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (2011 – 2017) Ohio Attorney General (elected in 2008 - 2010) Ohio Treasurer (elected in 2006 – 2008) Franklin County Treasurer (elected in 2002 and 2004 – 2006) Solicitor General (appointed 1993 – 1994) WEBSITE: WWW.CORDRAYFOROHIO.COM ANSWER 1: Republicans have failed to respond effectively to this epidemic that is ravaging our families and our communities; it now kills about 14 Ohioans every day and costs taxpayers as much as $8.8 billion each year. My running mate, Betty Sutton, and I have proposed a comprehensive plan to address this crisis, the details of which are described at CordrayforOhio. com. We will start by taking the following steps: 1) immediately declare a “state of emergency” requiring the strategic coordination of federal, state, and local government resources and community-based efforts; 2) protect Ohio’s Medicaid expansion, which supports treatment, and increases capacity for local enforcement and first responders; 3) expand access and funding

Mike DeWine and Jon Husted Republican

OCCUPATION: Ohio Attorney General EDUCATION: Miami University, 1969, Bachelor of Science in Education (Social Studies) and Ohio Northern University Claude W. Pettit College of Law, 1972, Juris Doctorate TRAINING AND EXPERIENCE: I have served as Ohio Attorney General, U.S. Senator, Ohio Lieutenant Governor, U.S. Congressman for the 7th District, Ohio State Senator for the 10th District, and Greene County Prosecutor.

Additionally, I am very proud of what we have already done in the Attorney General’s office. We have shut down pill mills, putting crooked doctors in jail and taking away licenses from over 100 doctors and pharmacists. We sued the drug companies who played a huge role in creating this epidemic. We started a heroin unit with dedicated and compassionate people who have worked with every county in Ohio to activate local government, the faith-based community, and businesses to fight back against this epidemic. And, we have cracked down on the Mexican drug cartels by seizing $155 million worth of drugs, 1,200 illegal guns, $30 million in cash, and enough fentanyl and heroin to kill every man, woman, and child in Ohio 3.5 times! ANSWER 2: While we are a state built on local control, Ohio’s Constitution clearly provides that the state, and not local governments, may regulate issues that affect the entire state broadly. For example, our Constitution specifies that the state government is responsible for setting felony criminal penalties, gun regulations, and the minimum wage. For all of these issues, Ohio has a strong interest in a single set of comprehensive regulations. Allowing hundreds of local governments to set their own, differing regulations on these and some other statewide issues would confuse and lead to many problems around the state. ANSWER 3: The Governor plays a key role in education by providing vision, setting priorities, and creating a budget that advances those priorities. We must do a better job with early childhood education. We need more kids who are Kindergarten-ready, and as kids continue through school, they need quality teachers and wrap-around services that include mental health counselors and school nurses. And then, we need to ensure that every kid who graduates from high school is job- or college-ready. State funding should ensure that every classroom in Ohio is ready to prepare our kids for the real world, and we must hold every school accountable for quality. Today, we have some very high-performing charter schools. But sadly, there are also some that are seriously underperforming. We need to get rid of the ones that aren’t performing and provide incentives to replicate the ones that are. Parents and families deserve a choice, especially when kids are trapped in a failing school system.

Photo not provided

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Nonparty

No response by print date

WEBSITE: WWW.MIKEDEWINE.COM ANSWER 1: I have a 12-point action plan that includes K-12 prevention education in every school, more drug courts, more resources for law enforcement, and incentives to get the business community involved to help people in recovery get back to work and on with their lives.

Richard Duncan And Dennis Artino (Write-In)

Photo not provided

Constance GadellNewton and Brett R. Joseph Green Party

No response by print date


★ATTORNEY GENERAL★

★GOVERNOR★

Photo not provided

Travis M. Irvine and J. Todd Grayson Libertarian

No response by print date

Renea Turner and Keith Colton (Write-in)

OCCUPATION: Entrepreneur TRAINING AND EXPERIENCE: I’m a business entrepreneur I have over 20 years experience in building and creating businesses and selling them turn key. I gave testimony on the House side the Senate side and JACARR for the House Bill 523 . WEBSITE: OHIOTURNER.COM ANSWER 1: The Ohio Board of Pharmacy is there a state-regulated entity. They should be held responsible along with the pharmaceutical companies concerning our opioid addiction crisis we have currently. I will hold them all accountable and make them pay to fix the problem they created. The Board of Pharmacy knows every single prescription every doctor and every pill that had crossed the counter and how much money was made now they can also fix this problem they will be responsible to fix the problem. Our attorney general was aware of these issues for the last decade along with the pharmaceutical Board of Pharmacy. ANSWER 2: They are Ohio government should support all of the local governing entities. The job of the Ohio governing entity such as Governor attorney general all others are to protect all Ohioans no matter what area they live in. Example when DP&L requested to raise the utilities in Dayton their reason being so they could donate more money to the local parks in upgrading her community. Most people are on a budget or Social Security they cannot afford to have their utility bills increased. It’s a local community wants to enhance their Community they can do fundraisers or try and get other funding. I also am going to decrease the age before they are allowed to get Social Security back to 62. ANSWER 3: I support brick and mortar there is funding we can get from the lottery by increasing their amount that they supposedly donate to the school systems in the state of Ohio I will more than double it to facilitate brick-and-mortar for K through 12 to allow smaller classes and more teachers. There is other funding that can be directed to the brick and mortar to educate our next Generations.

4-YEAR TERM. SALARY: $109,565 RESPONSIBILITIES: Represents the state in all legal cases in which the state is a party or has a significant interest. QUESTIONS: Each candidate was asked: 1. What divisions (e.g. consumer protection, environment, civil rights, immigration) would you prioritize and why? 2. What is the role of the attorney general’s office in addressing the opioid crisis in Ohio? What measures would you pursue in office? 3. How will you execute your authority as Attorney General to hold accountable online and brick-and-mortar community schools?

ANSWER 3: The fact that ECOT executives were allowed to defraud the State of Ohio to the tune of nearly $200 million is both inexcusable and a case study of the corruption that has become characteristic in Ohio. This all happened under the watch of our current Statehouse leadership, including my opponent, who was supposed to be auditing them. Make no mistake -- the attempts of politicians to cover their political tracks on ECOT now is not fooling anyone. They failed Ohio children, families, and taxpayers, and continue to do so. As AG, I will work to hold each and every person or entity accountable. I will fight for transparency and accountability throughout state government and without regard for who might be a powerful political donor.

Dave Yost

1 TO BE ELECTED – 4 YEAR TERM

Republican

OCCUPATION: Auditor of State

Steve Dettelbach Democrat

OCCUPATION: Attorney; Prosecutor EDUCATION: Dartmouth College Harvard Law School TRAINING AND EXPERIENCE: 2009-2016: U.S. Attorney - Northern District of Ohio 2008-2009: Commissioner - Ohio Ethics Commission 20062009; 2016-Present: Partner - Baker Hostetler, LLP 2003-2006: Prosecutor - U.S. Attorney’s Office, Organized Crime and Corruption Strike Force WEBSITE: STEVEFOROHIO.COM ANSWER 1: The job of the Attorney General is to enforce the Rule of Law and to protect Ohio’s citizens. Right now, our political system is broken. We have corrupt politicians -- both Democrats and Republicans -- who are allowed to play by a different set of rules than everyone else. That is wrong. As AG, on day one, I will conduct a top-tobottom review of Ohio’s corruption laws to put a stop to the pay-to-play culture running rampant in our Statehouse. It’s time to put Ohioans first, and stop letting special interest donors call the shots in our government. ANSWER 2: If we want to really combat the problem, we need a comprehensive approach -- what I call a ‘three-legged stool’ approach -- of enforcement, prevention, and treatment. As U.S. Attorney of the Northern District of Ohio, I was on the front lines of the crisis; this is a fight I know well. I’ve prosecuted drug traffickers that flooded the streets with opioids, including a case that resulted in one of the largest heroin seizures in Ohio history. I’ve aggressively gone after corrupt doctors and drug companies who pushed pills into our communities. I also established an award-winning task force, the Northeast Ohio Heroin and Opioid Task Force, to prevent and treat addiction, which has become a national model used in other U.S. cities. As AG, I will continue this fight. I will make pharmaceutical companies pay for treatment, and aggressively take on those who perpetuate a crisis that has plagued our communities for far too long.

EDUCATION: B.A. OSU 1984; JD Capital Law 1991 TRAINING AND EXPERIENCE: Former Prosecuting Attorney, lawyer, newspaper reporter WEBSITE: DAVEYOST.COM ANSWER 1: I will prioritize the rule of law and pound this message: The client is the State of Ohio and its people, not the politicians or the bureaucrats. ANSWER 2: The attorney general has to lead on many fronts--through the courts, through law enforcement, through collaboration and education. We need to get tougher on dealers that are flooding our streets with drugs and poisoning our communities, while investing in results-driven treatment, and rethinking how we address prevention. ANSWER 3: As Auditor of State, I have long been an advocate for stronger charter school accountability and increased transparency to guarantee our kids receive the quality education they deserve, and our tax dollars are used responsibly. I was a proponent of House Bill 2, which brought increased accountability to Ohio’s charter school system. I also led efforts to prevent systemic over-payments to charter schools by working to close loopholes in Ohio law. As attorney general, I will continue my oversight, and hold bad actors accountable, while rewarding the quality schools that support our kids.

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Thanks to all the volunteers putting Guide together. League of Women Voters of the Cincinnati Area Voter Guide Credits League of Women Voters of the Cincinnati Area Co-Presidents: Elizabeth Brown Voter Service Vice President: Desirae Futel Voter Guide Editor: Nancy Dawley Vote411.org: Liz Shockey LWVCA Staff: Lisa WilliamsNelson LWVCA volunteers who assisted with this publication: Elizabeth Brown, Barbara Chamberlin, Mary Kate Genis Sherri Heyse, Caroline Meyer-Hughes, Pinky Kocoshis, Carolyn Miller, Marlene Muse, Anna Reising, Burt Roehr, Dee Shaffer, Janet Smith, Peggy Somoza, Janet Steiner, Judy Stober and our dedicated office volunteer. This publication would not be possible without the cooperation and assistance of the Hamilton County Board of Elections: Director of Elections and Deputy Director of Elections, Sherry Poland and Sally J. Krisel and their staffs.

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★STATE AUDITOR★ 4-YEAR TERM. SALARY: $109,565 RESPONSIBILITIES: Audits all financial records of public offices in Ohio. Maintains deed records of state. QUESTIONS: Each candidate was asked: 1. What would you do to ensure that public funds are not misused by government officials and those in a position of public trust? 2. What is the auditor’s role in the oversight of online and brick-and-mortar community schools? 3. How will you faithfully execute redistricting reforms overwhelmingly passed by voters for statehouse and congressional map making?

1 TO BE ELECTED – 4 YEAR TERM

Robert C. Coogan Libertarian

OCCUPATION: Accountant – semi-retired EDUCATION: Princeton University – 1969 to 1973 – Bachelor’s degree; Xavier University – 1973 to 1978 – Master of Business Administration TRAINING AND EXPERIENCE: CPA-Ohio, Certified Internal Auditor (inactive), Retired from Cincinnati Bell - served as VP-Accounting at Cincinnati Bell Telephone and VP-Internal Audit at Cincinnati Bell Inc, Retired from The Health Collaborative Director-Grant Accounting WEBSITE: WWW.COOGAN4LIBERTY.ORG ANSWER 1: The assurance of appropriate expenditures of public funds by individuals will be incorporated into all audits, as is done in audits of private companies. All audits will include an internal controls assessment, which

includes assures proper authorization and recording of expenditures, documentation of the appropriateness of the expenditure for the individual and position, and the review and disclosure of any external funding sources or gifts. A comparison of expenditures to the detail of an approved budget will highlight unusual, extraordinary or unplanned items. An analysis of these exception items is a means to uncover fraud and the misuse of funds. Scrutiny of nonhealthcare benefits and perks can also reveal abuses and fraud by officials in charge of public funds. ANSWER 2: The Auditor of State has a critical role in the oversight of community schools. This monitoring of the granting of public funds for a specific purpose (education) parallels the close examination by government and other funding organizations of the use of their funds. All grants that I have managed have required that the recipient of the funds allow complete and open access to auditing how the funds are used. The Auditor’s office must review and evaluate all aspects from the procedures to ensure fair admissions, validating the tracking and reporting results, confirming the achievement of performance criteria per statutes and contracts (e.g., attendance, instruction time), and examining the billing/documentation for accurate and proper invoicing/requests for funds expenditures. ANSWER 3: My non-partisan approach as the Auditor of State will bring independence and objectivity to redistricting process for Congressional and State legislative districts. I will apply the criteria defined in the constitutional amendment to achieve community-centric voting districts that are not based on historic partisan voting results and tendencies. Population and location information will be used to develop the district maps. Voting results data (e.g., precinct level results by party designation) will not be a

criterion for determining the district boundaries, in order to eliminate gerrymandering and its impact on future election results. Legislators must not select their voters. The voters should select their legislators.

Keith Faber Republican Photo not provided

No response by print date

Zack Space Democrat

OCCUPATION: Consultant

of Law, J.D.

EDUCATION: Kenyon College, B.A. Political Science; Ohio State University Moritz College

TRAINING AND EXPERIENCE: Practicing attorney, private practice and public defense, 1986-2006; Law Director, City of Dover, OH, 2001-2006; United States Congressman, Ohio’s 18th District, 2007-2011 WEBSITE: WWW.ZACKSPACEFOROHIO.COM ANSWER 1: I commend Auditor Yost for creating the Public Integrity Assurance Team (“PIAT”). The PIAT is well known for investigating theft of public dollars. Just as important, if not more so, are PIAT’s trainings for local government officials on fraud prevention and combating cybercrime. I will continue to investigate those suspected of stealing public money and expand the training program, so our local governments have the tools they need to avoid becoming victims of crime. ANSWER 2: The Auditor of State has the authority to audit any entity that uses public monies, including educational institutions. The

Auditor must hold online schools and traditional community schools to the same standards. This oversight responsibility has lapsed significantly in recent years, as for-profit online charter schools such as the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow have scammed taxpayers out of hundreds of millions of dollars by tampering with attendance records. I find it wholly unacceptable that the management firms who operate such for-profit schools could receive millions of dollars that would otherwise have gone to public education, without any transparency or oversight whatsoever. As these firms are taking public monies, they could -- and would -- be declared “unauditable” under my administration, and public funding would then stop. Any entity that receives public money must justify its actions and verify that it is not being wasteful. This is especially true for schools. ANSWER 3: If elected Auditor, I will serve on the Redistricting Commission. I have pledged to wield that power not on behalf of the Democratic or Republican Party, but on behalf of ordinary Ohioans, who have been shut out of that partisan process for over a generation. Members of the Redistricting Commission have a duty to the people of Ohio to only approve legislative (and possibly Congressional) districts that are fair and competitive. In furtherance of this goal, I pledge that I will ensure the Redistricting Commission complies with the Open Meetings Act, bringing a new level of transparency to proceedings. Robust public debate on the best way to combat gerrymandering is still underway, and given the Supreme Court’s expected landmark ruling on gerrymandering cases this summer it may be too soon to declare explicit tools (such as the efficiency gap) that will be useful in preventing gerrymandering. I believe that drawing competitive districts should be the Commission’s top priority.

★SECRETARY OF STATE★ 4-YEAR TERM. SALARY: $109,565 RESPONSIBILITIES: Oversees the election process in each of Ohio’s 88 counties. Maintains records of corporations. QUESTIONS: Each candidate was asked: 1. How would you promote equitable, ample ballot access and registration for all eligible voters? 2. How will you champion voter roll maintenance procedures that proactively include vulnerable and historically underrepresented populations? 3. How will you faithfully execute redistricting reforms overwhelmingly passed by voters for statehouse and congressional map making?

1 TO BE ELECTED – 4 YEAR TERM

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Kathleen Clyde Democrat

OCCUPATION: Ohio State Representative EDUCATION: BA from Wesleyan University JD from The Ohio State University Moritz College of Law TRAINING AND EXPERIENCE: Currently serving fourth term in the Ohio House of Representatives. Served as an election official with the Franklin County Board of Elections. Served as a law clerk for the Ohio Secretary of State and the Ohio Senate. WEBSITE: KATHLEENCLYDE.COM ANSWER 1: Ensuring access to the ballot box is critical to the health of our democracy. The best way to do this is by modernizing our outdated registration process. That’s why I

introduced Automatic Voter Registration, a plan to automatically register and update the info of every eligible Ohio voter when they do the things they already do every day, like renew a driver’s license or apply for benefits. In fact, more than half of Americans live in states with AVR. It’s efficient, saves money and has actually proven to increase turnout. ANSWER 2: While it’s important to keep our voter rolls up-to-date, it’s also imperative that we do what we can to ensure our vulnerable, underrepresented and less politically active populations have the tools they need to exercise their most fundamental right. I’ll continue removing voters ineligible under Ohio law, but act to reverse Ohio’s aggressive supplemental purge process that cancels the rights of eligible Ohio voters. With automatic registration, we’ll be able to update our rolls in real time, saving money on costly, inefficient mailings and, most importantly,

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keeping eligible Ohioans up-to-date and on the rolls. ANSWER 3: Better representation begins with fair districts. I’ve been pushing for redistricting reform throughout my time in office, working with the League and other advocates behind the scenes and publicly in recent years to fight for fair districts. I’ll continue that important work as Secretary of State. Ohio is a diverse state, and our districts should reflect that. It’s critically important that we keep the process open to the public so that they have a voice in their representation. In the end, we need a process that, for the first time in a long time, truly puts Ohioans before partisanship.


★STATE TREASURER ★

★SECRETARY OF STATE★

Frank LaRose Republican

OCCUPATION: State Senator EDUCATION: Graduate of Copley High School in Summit County and The Ohio State University with a Bachelor of Science in Consumer Affairs and a Minor in Business Administration. TRAINING AND EXPERIENCE: United States Army Veteran (10 years), State Senator (7 years), Eagle Scout.

party, but I knew it was time for change. Ohio agreed. I was proud to team-up with the League of Women Voters and thousands of dedicated Ohioans to help pass Issue 1. Now it will be my commitment to faithfully carry out that process in a fair and non-partisan manner on the redistricting commission. The system we now have is a major step forward, but it is still going to depend on people faithfully executing their duty. I have a history of working across party lines, and I’ve been a champion of reform for far longer than I’ve been running for higher office. Voters can trust that I’ll work to do what is best for Ohio -- not a party.

Dustin R. Nanna

WEBSITE: WWW.FRANKLAROSE.COM ANSWER 1: Ohio has among the most generous early and absentee voting in the country. That’s a good thing, and we must maintain our position as a national leader. I’ve championed several pieces of legislation that make it easier for citizens to register and vote. Those bills include online voter registration which allows Ohioans to securely register using a computer or smartphone, and legislation that will allow people to request absentee ballots online. I have opposed efforts by some to make it harder for Ohioans to vote, and have supported maintaining convenient weekend options for early in-person voting. Additionally, I’m working to create “automated voter registration,” so that people can automatically register to vote when they interact with state agencies, such as the BMV. As Secretary of State, I’ll continue working in a bipartisan fashion to get automated voter registration passed, and to move the ball forward in other areas in order to ensure we continue to be a voter-friendly state. ANSWER 2: Ohio law requires the Secretary of State to maintain accurate voter rolls. We also have a responsibility to ensure we aren’t removing eligible voters. Every Secretary of State for the last twenty years has followed nearly the same process for maintaining the rolls, but I believe we can improve our process. First, we should encourage participation so voters don’t go years without voting. Competitive elections are one of the clearest ways to increase participation, which is why I’m passionate about redistricting reform. We can also do more to educate voters, especially young voters, so they understand the importance of participating. Finally, we should make it easier for eligible citizens to get and stay registered, and keep their registration up-to-date. My online voter registration bill does this. I’m also working on a bill to implement “automated voter registration” so people who interact with state government are automatically registered and stay updated, unless they opt-out. ANSWER 3: I’ve been a proponent of redistricting reform from the beginning, and introduced bipartisan legislation on the issue every year. Issue 1, which has now been overwhelmingly passed by voters, was crafted from language I proposed last March. When I came out as a leading voice for reform during my first months in office it wasn’t popular with some in my own

LIBERARIAN

4-YEAR TERM. SALARY: $109,565 RESPONSIBILITIES: Collects and safeguards most state taxes and fees, and manages Ohio’s investment portfolio. QUESTIONS: Each candidate was asked: 1. What are the most important functions of the state treasurer and why? 2. What recommendations do you have to improve operations in the treasurer’s office? 3. How can the treasurer’s office influence state fiscal policy?

1 TO BE ELECTED – 4 YEAR TERM

Rob Richardson

OCCUPATION: Homemaker/ Personal Care Professional

Democrat

OCCUPATION: Attorney

EDUCATION: Graduate of Rutherford B. Hayes High Sch TRAINING AND EXPERIENCE: I have spearheaded multiple petition drives here in Ohio and am well versed and familiar with the Ohio Revised Code, specifically when it has to with the electoral process. WEBSITE: WWW.NANNAFOROHIO.COM ANSWER 1: Part of my platform is an automatic voter registration system. I would like to see the State automatically register you to vote/update your voting information anytime you give the State enough information to do so. I believe this will add tens if not hundreds of thousands of new eligible voters to the rolls. ANSWER 2: As mentioned I want automatic voter registration in Ohio. I believe a system like this can keep the rolls clean without having to purge them of potential future voters. Voting is a right for any taxpaying citizen of Ohio and we should be doing our best to add folks to the rolls, not find ways to disqualify them that disproportionately affect minorities. ANSWER 3: Gerrymandering is a serious issue in Ohio. All one has to do is look at the district maps to see that. Since the Secretary of State sits on the newly created Redistricting Commission, should the legislature fail to provide a suitable District map, I would work tirelessly to make sure that any map recommended by the Committee was fair, and balanced. I have no dog in the Republican vs Democrat fight and I will be a strong independent voice in Columbus.

Photo not provided

Michael W. Bradley (Write-in)

Doctor, UC Law

EDUCATION: Bachelor’s in Electrical Engineering, University of Cincinnati Juris

TRAINING AND EXPERIENCE: I believe my most relevant experience is my nine years on the University of Cincinnati’s Board of Trustees, where I capped my tenure as Chair. Over that time we saw record financial growth and enrollment. WEBSITE: WWW.ROBFOROHIO.COM ANSWER 1: The state treasurer is essentially the state’s banker, responsible for overseeing all financial transactions of the state government. In 2017 the Treasurer’s office managed more than $224 billion in financial assets, including more than $21.5 billion in state investments. This has tremendous influence on the economy and overall health of Ohio, and it affects everyone regardless of political affiliation. These are essential, baseline functions the treasurer must perform to maintain stability, but I believe the state treasurer can do more than just the bare minimum. ANSWER 3: Contrary to popular belief, the treasurer does not create or control the state’s budget. As treasurer I wouldn’t have discretion over state spending and couldn’t affect taxes. However, I would administer the State Treasury Asset Reserve of Ohio (STAR Ohio), an investment fund that allows government subdivisions—from municipalities to school districts—to invest funds in a highly rated public investment pool. STAR Ohio has a AAA S&P rating and a record of high returns, and if elected I will encourage counties, schools, municipalities, et. al. to invest.

Robert Sprague Republican

No response by print date

OCCUPATION: State

Representative

EDUCATION: Duke University, BSA Mechanical Engineering MBA University of North Carolina, emphasis in finance

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TRAINING AND EXPERIENCE: State Representative - appointed 2011, elected 2012, 2014 and 2016 Auditor, City of Findlay - elected 2008 Treasurer, City of Findlay - elected 2004 Principal, Vasa Capital, Findlay Ohio 2005 Owner, Talus Technology, Atlanta GA 1998 Ernst and Young WEBSITE: SPRAGUEFOROHIO.COM ANSWER 1: The Treasurer’s power to issue debt is extremely important because it is the intersection between private capital markets and the government. I have a plan to unlock creativity in the private market to help fight the opiate epidemic, infant mortality and other societal ills through the standardization of Social Impact Bonds (SIBs). SIBs foster partnerships between the public and private sectors, where the private market develops new programs, but the public sector only pays if the new programs can be proven to deliver results. This innovative financial tool will bring the private sector to the table in a meaningful way and introduce a new funding stream to the effort to tackle Ohio’s most pressing problems. I encourage readers to visit SpragueForOhio.com/vision to find a more detailed overview of how I plan to use the Treasurer’s office to make a positive and meaningful difference in the lives of Ohioans. ANSWER 2: As an international business consultant for Ernst & Young, I was trained to evaluate companies’ operations, find efficiencies and improve their internal processes. Once I am elected, I plan to use this experience to do an in-depth evaluation of the office and the programs the Treasurer manages to ensure we are achieving the highest quality outcomes at the most effective cost for taxpayers. Ohio’s Online Checkbook and STABLE Account Program are two areas where I believe we can achieve greater fiscal efficiencies and drive down administrative costs by actively working to expand participation in the programs to individuals and entities both in and out of state. As Treasurer, I will also use the knowledge gained in both the private sector and as a member of the Ohio House Finance Committee to keep our office operating costs incheck through regular internal budget evaluations. ANSWER 3: As a member of the House Finance Committee during the last three state budget negotiations, I have a keen understanding of state fiscal policy and the often difficult financial decisions we face. As Treasurer, I believe that I can have an impact by promoting innovative financial tools designed to deliver cost savings. For example, applying the Social Impact Bonds model described above to the heroin epidemic would mean investments in programs that produce better recovery rates than the programs the state is currently funding. Increasing our recovery rates means healthier Ohioans and could in turn help reduce spending for Medicaid, Child & Protective Services and Corrections, all areas that have been put under increasing pressure as a result of this crisis. By forming strategic partnerships with the private sector, we can improve government efficiency from the outside in and have a lasting, positive effect on how we approach state fiscal policy.

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★U.S. SENATOR★ 4-YEAR TERM. SALARY: $174,000 RESPONSIBILITIES: Represents the people of Ohio and the U.S. in dealing with matters of national and international importance. The general welfare should be a prime concern. QUESTIONS: Each candidate was asked: 1. What is the most pressing problem facing the federal government in 2018? What solutions will you offer? 2. What would you do to enact a fair and equitable immigration policy in Congress? 3. What are your legislative priorities to effectively respond to our changing climate and related challenges for environmental, agricultural, and human health?

1 TO BE ELECTED – 6 YEAR TERM

Sherrod Brown Democrat

OCCUPATION: U.S. Senator for Ohio

from Yale

EDUCATION: Masters from The Ohio State University, BA

TRAINING AND EXPERIENCE: U.S. Senator for Ohio WEBSITE: SHERRODBROWN.COM ANSWER 1: Ohioans are working harder and harder with less and less to show for their hard work. I want to restore the value of work to everyone working hard but struggling -- whether you earn a salary, punch a timesheet or make tips. Everyone deserves the opportunity to get ahead. That is why I have unveiled a plan to make work pay off again. We can do so by raising the minimum wage, giving workers the ability to earn paid sick days and family leave, and expanding overtime pay. ANSWER 2: Earlier this year, I supported a pair of bipartisan bills that would have provided certainty to Dreamers while boosting security on our borders. Unfortunately those efforts failed, but I will continue to work with my Republican and Democratic colleagues until we reach a bipartisan solution to fix our broken immigration system that protects those brought here as children who are working and contributing to their communities. ANSWER 3: From the Great Lakes to small ponds, I have been a leader in defending Ohio’s lakes and waterways. I partnered with senators throughout the region to champion the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, to clean up and revitalize these vital water resources, and, together with Senator Portman, vocally opposed the Trump Administration’s efforts to drastically reduce support for the project. The health of our environment has a direct impact on the health of Ohioans. I worked to protect our drinking water and am a strong proponent of increasing funding to prevent, monitor, and eliminate lead poisoning.

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I also worked with Senator Portman to protect our water from microcystin, the byproduct of the algal blooms that created the 2014 water crisis in the Toledo area. Furthermore, I’ve spoken out against dangerous cuts to the federal budget that would make it nearly impossible to enforce clean air and water laws. I grew up in Mansfield, Ohio and I’ve seen first-hand what America’s disastrous trade policy has done to Ohio workers. Whether it’s cheating through currency manipulation, illegal dumping, or Republican tax breaks that reward companies for moving to Wuhan, China or Reynosa, Mexico, U.S. trade and domestic policy must take aggressive steps going forward to combat these factors that have cost Ohio too many jobs. Three days after the election, I wrote President-Elect Trump a letter, where I asked him not to play off agriculture against industry, farmers against steel workers. I support the President’s tariffs -- but they need to be focused on the serial cheaters and not our friends and allies. Using every tool at our disposal, including targeted tariffs, will help create a level playing field for all Ohioans.

Stephen Faris (Write-in) Nonparty

OCCUPATION: Electrical Engineer; U.S. Military Officer EDUCATION: Master’s degrees in Electrical Engineering and Business Administration; studied at the Air Force Institute of Technology, Oklahoma City University, University of Akron, and Kent State University. TRAINING AND EXPERIENCE: Privately employed (2014-present); U.S. military officer (2005-present); Leadership; Management; Electrical engineering; Scientific and technical intelligence; R&D; Logistics; WEBSITE: WWW.WRITEINFARIS.COM ANSWER 1: The most pressing problem facing the Federal Government in 2018 is whether or not it will address long standing issues or leave them to worsen with age. The primary example of this is the continued deprivation of life and the continued denial of equal protection of law to unborn persons since 1973. The Constitution is clear in the 5th and 14th Amendments that no person shall be deprived of life without due process of law and that States shall not deny to any person in their jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws. Science has proven that a person’s life begins at conception, yet the Federal Government struggles to challenge the longstanding expectation that some of us can be arbitrarily denied life and equal protection by the choices of others of us. For this, I am a singleissue candidate. I bring definition and protection to unborn persons, as well as prosecution or preservation to institutions that would harm or help them, to resolve this issue before it worsens beyond repair. ANSWER 2: I would lead Congress to establish and maintain uniform rules of naturalization as directed in the Constitution and I would provide

for up-to-date defense measures at our borders. I would love to expound further on this issue and give it more attention, but it is currently a lower priority of mine relative to preserving the right to life and the right to equal protection to all persons in America, notably, unborn persons. Once the right to life and the right to equal protection is guaranteed to all, without exceptions, I can give my full faith and attention to immigration policy. As a single-issue candidate, other rights, issues, and conversations are less urgent. ANSWER 3: It is a priority of mine to lead Congress to provide for the general welfare of the United States, and that includes considering response measures to a changing climate and related challenges. I would love to expound further on this issue and give it more attention, but it is currently a lower priority of mine relative to preserving the right to life and the right to equal protection to all persons in America, notably, unborn persons. Once the right to life and the right to equal protection is guaranteed to all, without exceptions, I can give my full faith and attention to climate change policy. As a single-issue candidate, other rights, issues, and conversations are less urgent. Tariffs cause working people to face higher prices on imported goods relative to domestic goods and tariffs essentially attempt to promote domestic purchases. I would lead Congress to lay and collect such taxes, as allowed in the Constitution, and as necessary, provided they are uniform through the United States. I would love to expound further on this issue and give it more attention, but it is currently a lower priority of mine relative to preserving the right to life and the right to equal protection to all persons in America, notably, unborn persons. Once the right to life and the right to equal protection is guaranteed to all, without exceptions, I can give my full faith and attention to foreign trade policy. As a single-issue candidate, other rights, issues, and conversations are less urgent.

Jim Renacci Republican Photo not provided

EDUCATION: Bachelor’s Degree from Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Certified Public Accountant (CPA)

TRAINING AND EXPERIENCE: My breadth of experience in the private sector, in which I created over 1,500 jobs and employed over 3,000 people across Ohio, has rendered me uniquely qualified to effectively serve our state in the United States Senate and to advance the values of hardworking Ohioans—not Washington special interests and career politicians. WEBSITE: JIMRENACCI.COM ANSWER 1: Sustaining Long-Term Economic Growth, Addressing Our Debt Crisis and Tackling the Opioid Epidemic are our top three challenges. While we’ve seen tremendous progress and growth in our national economy over the past year, many Ohio families continue to struggle and our state has one of the highest unemployment

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rates in the nation. Advancing a pro-growth, common sense agenda that fosters job creation and decreases our nation’s debt will be a top priority of mine. ANSWER 2: Our immigration system is in desperate need of reforms. I will support a merit-based immigration system so we bring in the best and brightest from around the world that have the skills we need to strengthen our country in a 21st Century economy. It’s vital that we uphold our responsibility to our citizens to protect our borders and hold sanctuary cities accountable for failing to cooperate with federal law enforcement officials. We are a nation of laws and it is imperative that they are faithfully and effectively enforced. ANSWER 3: As the largest industry in Ohio, agriculture is vital to the Ohio economy. We have more than 75,000 farms in Ohio, & the agriculture industry adds more than $100 billion to our state’s economy each year. I’ve fought to make sure Ohio farmers have a voice in D.C. & am proud to have been endorsed in 2012, 2014 and 2016 by the Ohio Farm Bureau. But in recent years, career politicians in D.C. have caused some major problems for our Ohio farmers. I can’t tell you how many farmers I’ve talked to who have told me how the EPA and Washington Bureaucrats have harassed them, driven up the cost of doing business, and forcing them to lay off workers.Let me give you just one example. The EPA dramatically expanded the definition of the Waters of the US, or WOTUS, to give them authority over a low spot where rainwater collects no matter how small. This created confusion & costly bureaucratic hoops for Ohio’s family farms. That’s why I supported legislation that would’ve reversed the WOTUS regulation. I support trade that is fair and reciprocal and that protects Ohio workers. We need to make it easier for Ohio businesses to sell products and services overseas. But trade agreements need to be fair and we need to make sure they’re in our best interest. Each trade deal is different and should be evaluated on their merits. And trade deals should never stand indefinitely – they should be reevaluated to make sure they are being followed and that they remain beneficial to American workers and American consumers. I would support re-evaluating South Korea, Panama and Colombia free trade agreements. I also strongly support Trade Adjustment Assistance which provides training and other benefits to any workers who are who might be affected badly by trade.

See Vote411.org for information Candidates may have added after print deadline.


★U.S. REPRESENTATIVE★ 2-YEAR TERM. SALARY: $174,000 RESPONSIBILITIES: To represent the people of Ohio, their district, and the United States in dealing with matters of national and international importance. The general welfare should be a prime concern. QUESTIONS: Each candidate was asked: 1. What are your qualifications for office? (250 character limit) 2. What is the most pressing problem facing the federal government in 2018? What solutions will you offer? (500 character limit) 3. How would you address immigration policy in the current political climate? (500 character limit) 4. What steps should Congress take to reduce gun violence? (500 character limit)

16 TO BE ELECTED, (ONE FROM EACH DISTRICT) – 2 YEAR TERM 1ST CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT

accomplish this goal, we need a military that is both strong and flexible enough to combat the complex threats we face abroad.

with the respect they deserve by offering a living wage and paid family leave. And we’ve saved taxpayers nearly $1 million.

ANSWER 3: We can all agree that our immigration system is broken and needs to be reformed. First, we need to get control of our borders. It’s irrelevant what our immigration laws say if the rules are simply ignored. Right now, our borders are so porous, it’s nearly impossible to enforce our laws. Next, we should focus on streamlining the legal immigration process. It’s important that we, as a nation, continue to attract the best and brightest. Our immigration policies should reflect that basic principle.

ANSWER 2: The American people at large, and especially the people in my district, are sick and tired of the dysfunction and partisanship that has defined our government in Washington. If elected, I plan to work with members of both parties to restore civility and promote a culture of bipartisanship in the House of Representatives.

ANSWER 4: I don’t think that additional gun control laws will prevent gun violence. The only people impacted by such laws are law-abiding citizens, who don’t commit gun crimes. Instead, we need to better protect soft targets, like schools, and take steps to prevent the causes of violence. To that end, I introduced several proposals, which became law this spring, to help local schools and police bolster security, by installing metal detectors and identifying and treating students with mental health issues.

Steve Chabot Republican

OCCUPATION: Represent Ohio’s First Congressional District in Congress; former school teacher, practicing attorney, Cincinnati City Councilman, and Hamilton County Commissioner EDUCATION: Graduated from LaSalle High School, the College of William and Mary, and received a law degree from Northern Kentucky University’s Chase College of Law POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY: I am a common-sense conservative. I believe the federal government has grown far too large and become far too intrusive in our daily lives. That’s why I’ve fought for regulatory reform and to eliminate wasteful spending in Washington. There should be a safety net for those truly in need, but federal programs shouldn’t become a way of life for ablebodied adults. Unrestrained spending jeopardizes programs like Social Security, which is why we need to protect the money in the Soc. Sec. trust fund. WEBSITE: STEVECHABOT.COM ANSWER 1: It’s been my privilege to represent this district for nearly 22 years. I’ve always worked for my constituents, fighting against wasteful spending and excessive regulations. And I will continue to strive for an economy that works for all Americans. ANSWER 2: Domestically, Congress must pursue policies that encourage continued economic growth and job creation. Recently, we’ve made significant strides by reining in the regulatory state and reforming the tax code, so that families and small businesses can plan for the future. Internationally, the principal duty of the federal government is to keep Americans safe. To

Photo not provided

Kiumars Kiani (Write-in) No response by print date

ANSWER 4: Congress should expand background checks, close the loopholes that exist in the current background check system, limit assault weapons and high capacity magazines, and fund research into gun violence and its causes.

Libertarian

No response by print date

David Baker (Write-in)

Green Party Democrat

OCCUPATION: Hamilton County Clerk of Courts EDUCATION: I have a B.A. from The Ohio State University where I served as student body president. I also have a law degree from the University of Cincinnati College of Law. POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY: I’m optimistic about the role of government. I believe it can be a place where people come together and no one gets left behind. I believe that we are all connected to each other and what happens to one of us impacts us all. And I believe that government can be fiscally responsible while never losing site of the people it serves. Finally, I think it’s critical that our government reflects the diversity of our community and that it is open and inclusive to all. WEBSITE: AFTABFOROHIO.COM ANSWER 1: I currently serve as the Hamilton County Clerk of Courts. We’ve invested in technology, cut waste, and treated our employees

ANSWER 4: The first step to a meaningful discussion on gun violence must be for all of Congress to acknowledge there is a problem, and that common sense gun reform is the only way to keep our families, communities, and students safe without infringing on the tradition or rights of law abiding gun owners.

No response by print date

Jill Schiller Democrat

OCCUPATION: Candidate EDUCATION: J.D. I am a mother, a former attorney, a founder of a successful nonprofit that focuses on children’s literacy, and a former Obama Administration staffer. I care deeply about the future of our country and the Ohio 2nd Congressional District, where I am raising my two precious children. I am running for Congress because families in Southern Ohio deserve someone who champions their values. The game is rigged against working Ohioans. I will fight for real solutions for our families.” WEBSITE: VOTESCHILLER.COM ANSWER 1: I am a mother, a former attorney, a founder of a successful nonprofit that focuses on children’s literacy, and a former Obama Administration staffer.

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Brad Wenstrup Republican Photo not provided

No response by print date

No response by print date

James J. Condit, Jr. Photo not provided

Aftab Pureval

ANSWER 3: The United States of America must continue to be the Shining City upon a Hill. We are a nation of immigrants. Our generations past came here for a better life. Those who look to America as a land of opportunity should have the same chance our ancestors did as long as they come legally and play by the rules. We should pass legislation that provides a pathway to citizenship for DREAMers and increases funding for border security.

2ND CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT

Photo not provided

Dirk Kubala Photo not provided

ANSWER 3: When it comes to immigration Washington has failed us for 20 years. There is no question that our immigration system is broken and needs to be fixed. We need to protect our boarders and keep dangerous people out. But America is a country of immigrants, like my parents, who came here looking for a better life. And there has to be a pathway to citizenship to people who play by the rules. We must also ensure Dreamers, who embody the American dream, are allowed a path to citizenship.

ANSWER 2: Our federal government spends too much time wrapped up in self creating national narratives and not focusing on the needs of real people in real districts. Right here at home too many people come home at night worrying about the stability of their jobs, whether their healthcare premiums are about to rise and if their children are going to be able to afford a quality education. These are the things that matter and I will work every day to make sure these needs are my top priority.

TRU 2018 They Represent Us (TRU)is an annual directoryof public officials LWVCA Education Fund 103 William Howard Taft Road Cincinnati, OH 45219 Phone: 513.281.8683 www.lwvcincinnati.org The League of Women Voters of the Cincinnati Area encourages everyone to stay engaged in our community by keeping in touch with your elected officials. Our members make a commitment to our community as we volunteer our time to research, edit and publish, in the spring of each year, They Represent Us (TRU): A Public Officials Guide for Hamilton County, Ohio. Online it can be found at http://lwvcincinnati. org/publicofficialsguide.html. Or you can call 513-281-8683 for printed copies.

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★STATE SENATOR★ 4-YEAR TERM. SALARY: $174,000 RESPONSIBILITIES: Represents the people of Ohio and the U.S. in dealing with matters of national and international importance. The general welfare should be a prime concern. QUESTIONS: Each candidate was asked: 1. What are your qualifications for office? (250 character limit) 2. What steps should the state take to reduce gun violence? (500 character limit) 3. Under what circumstances is it appropriate for the state to restrain or check local government decisions? (500 character limit)

17 TO BE ELECTED (1 FROM EACH ODD-NUMBERED DISTRICT) – 4 YEAR TERM 7TH DISTRICT – FILE IN WARREN COUNTY

Sara Bitter

all of us in Ohio. I will use my background, education and experience as a mom, lawyer and advocate to fight for all families and will bring new voices to Columbus.

ANSWER 2: Provide mental health services. Do a quick background checks. But as far as more anti gun legislation it would be a waste of time and money and does little to stop gun violence.

ANSWER 2: We must find a balance and work together in bi-partisan way to end gun violence in Ohio. Firearms are the second leading cause of death in children and teens. Nearly two thirds of gun deaths are by suicide. In Ohio, according to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), there has been a 33% increase in suicides since 1999. I would look at statewide data in a bi-partisan way to see what the root causes are of gun violence and deaths in order to address these issues.

ANSWER 3: I don’t see it as the General Assembley’s job to interfere with local government decisions unless it violates the Ohio Constitution, which I can’t see local governments doing at least not intentional. But if by chance a local government had a very unreasonable ordianance approved then the Genaral Assembley would have to address the issue.

ANSWER 3: I know and respect the role that state and local governments play in our state. Our local governments play a key role in keeping our towns safe, our communities engaged and in looking out for our families at the local level. I respect home rule and I believe the state law should do more to help local governments succeed. In the circumstance that a state law is considered a “general” law, then the state law would take precedence over a local ordinance.

Steve Wilson

Democrat

OCCUPATION: Outreach Associate at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital and the University of Cincinnati University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (UCCEDD)

Republican Photo not provided

WEBSITE: SARABITTER.COM ANSWER 1: Laws and policies coming out of our state legislature in Columbus directly impact

No response by print date

9TH DISTRICT

Tom Chandler

EDUCATION: BA in Political Science from the University of Cincinnati, Juris Doctor from Case Western Reserve University School of Law, and Law Trainee graduate Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental Disabilities (LEND) program POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY: As a mother of two children living with a developmental disability, I understand that caregivers’ voices need to be heard in Columbus. I will use my legal training and experience as a disability rights advocate to fight for all families. Healthcare, education and workforce are my top priorities. I will also work to create a bi-partisan “Disability, Mental Health and Addiction Caucus” in the Ohio legislature to promote public policies that help protect all families. “Bitter for Better”

★STATE REPRESENTATIVE★

Republican

2015 part time.

OCCUPATION: Retired from UCHealth in 2016 after 42 years. In Material Management. Have worked for the Kroger Company since

EDUCATION: 1973 Grad. New Richmond High School Attended University of Cincinnati POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY: Consider myself a fiscal conservative but a Moderate on social issues. Believe in limited government involvement in peoples lives unless a wrong needs to be righted and made better. ANSWER 1: I believe my almost 64 years of life has prepared me for the Ohio Senate. I have a long work history and a life of community involvement. I was active in my hometown years ago and active in my community council of California in Cincinnati.

Cecil Thomas Democrat

OCCUPATION: State Senator EDUCATION: Bachelors Degree Criminal Justice Management Associate Science Law Enforcement Techology

RESPONSIBILITIES: To represent the people of the district and the State of Ohio in dealing with matters not allocated to the federal government. *Base salary QUESTIONS: Each candidate was asked: 1. What are your qualifications for office? (250 character limit) 2. What steps should the state take to reduce gun violence? (500 character limit) 3. Under what circumstances is it appropriate for the state to restrain or check local government decisions? (500 character limit)

99 TO BE ELECTED (1 FROM EACH DISTRICT) – 2 YEAR TERM 27TH DISTRICT

Tom Brinkman

POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY: Progressive who believes in bipartisanship.

Republican

OCCUPATION: Life Insurance Sales

WEBSITE: WWW.CECILTHOMAS.NET ANSWER 1: 44 years of Service: 27 years with Cincinnati Police Officer, 5 years Executive Director Cincinnati Human Relations Commission 8 years Cincinnati City Councilman 4 Ohio State Senator BS Degree Criminal Justice Management Law Enforcement Tech. ANSWER 2: I’ve introduced legislation to: Create universal background checks requiring ALL firearms transactions be processed by NICS at point of transfer; raise minimum age to purchase firearm to 21; create a statewide registry requiring all firearms acquired through purchase from licensed dealer, private seller, transfer, or gift to be registered with local law enforcement;ban bump stocks, and regulate gun shows, and other bills. Co-sponsor on red flag law and restriction on domestic violence offenders. ANSWER 3: Local governments should do what’s best for their individual community. That being said, it is appropriate for the state to get involved on issues of statewide concern for the purpose of uniformity. For example, if Cincinnati bans the sale of bump stocks for guns, but Norwood doesn’t, then an individual can go to Norwood to purchase, making Cincinnati’s law irrelevant. Certain issues require uniformity among local governments in the state.

WHY SHOULD I VOTE?

DEMOCRACY IS NOT A SPECTATOR SPORT 08

2-YEAR TERM. SALARY: $60,584*

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in Washington DC

EDUCATION: BA from The George Washington University

POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY: Lower taxes and Limited Government WEBSITE: WWW.GOBRINKMAN.COM Candidate did not respond to questions

Christine Fisher Democrat

OCCUPATION: Candidate for State Representative, OH 27 EDUCATION: B.A. Computer Engineering, Queen’s University POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY: It’s time for a fresh perspective and responsible leadership to help the families of our community. We need common sense legislation, sound fiscal policy, and strong schools for our children. WEBSITE: WWW.VOTECHRISTINEFISHER.COM ANSWER 1: I spent 13 years at P&G providing financial leadership across the Company. In college, I was elected student body president where I represented students to all levels of government and oversaw student run businesses. I am a mother of 2 young boys. ANSWER 2: We need common sense gun safety laws at the State level that come with resources to aid local governments with enforcement. We need to support universal background checks and red flag laws which will enable the law enforcement community to keep guns out of the wrong hands. We also need to recognize that putting guns in schools will not curb the epidemic of gun violence in the Country or keep our children safe at school.


★STATE REPRESENTATIVE★ ANSWER 3: The state’s focus should be on making sure that local governments have the resources they need to be successful. What we have seen in recent months is the state attempting to restrain its own irresponsible fiscal policy by restricting local governments and cutting critical local government funds. We need representatives who will be a check against irresponsible politicians passing the burden onto our communities.

28TH DISTRICT

Regina A. Collins (Write-in) Nonparty

OCCUPATION: Forest Park City Councilwoman EDUCATION: St Joseph Catholic School, Seton High School, University of Mt St Joseph, Mount Holyoke College, and Ohio State College of Law POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY: Whatsoever you do to the least of my brothers, that you do unto Me: Jesus ANSWER 1: Law Degree: Served the Ohio Attorneys General Office in Business, Corporations, Taxation, Bankruptcy, Real Estate, Decedent’s Estate, Employment, Civil, and Criminal Laws, Practiced law as a Sole Practitioner for 14 years. Forest Park Council 2015-19 ANSWER 2: Ohio, we must stop the madness! We need stronger gun control regulations to ensure that guns are not so easily falling into the hands of people with ill intent. We need to work towards a system of universal background checks to close the loopholes often used to get around what otherwise successful measures we have in place. There is no reason to allow guns to fall into the hands of individuals with known mental issues and anger management problems. We need to increase access to mental healthcare ANSWER 3: When local government decisions violate the health and safety of its citizens and when it impedes on a citizens state or federal constitutional rights, I believe the State of Ohio has a duty to restrain or check local government decisions.

Jonathan Dever Republican

OCCUPATION: Attorney and small business owner EDUCATION: Culver Military Academy; Undergraduate degree from the University of Cincinnati; Master’s Degree in Industrial Labor Relations from Indiana University of Pennsylvania; Juris Doctorate from Capital University in Columbus, OH WEBSITE: WWW.JONATHANDEVER.COM

ANSWER 1: Beyond my current role as State Representative, I have a deep understanding of how the law works and the impact laws have on our communities. With this understanding and my ability to bring people together, I am qualified for this office. ANSWER 2: No response to question

Buckeye Firearms. Economically, I believe in lower taxes, reduced spending, and common sense regulations that do not adversely harm our economy. I have always taken the approach that it’s easier to work out differences with the opposing party, as I’ve found that they want the same things, but have a different approach. WEBSITE: WWW.CITIZENSFORBLESSING.COM

ANSWER 3: No response to question

Jessica E. Miranda Democrat

OCCUPATION: Business Owner EDUCATION: Graduate of Talawanda High School, Property & Casualty Insurance Broker, Numerous IRS certifications, Notary Public in & for the State of Ohio POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY: Leadership and learning are indispensable to each other. John F. Kennedy WEBSITE: WWW.JESSICAFOROHIO.COM ANSWER 1: As a mom, business owner, local School Board President, and community volunteer I am able to see policy through a multi-faceted lense. This allows me to make clear & practical decisions for my community and its residents. ANSWER 2: I think it is extremely important for the Legislature to focus on passing common sense gun reform. I support background checks and I oppose the current push to enhance stand your ground laws here in Ohio. As a School Board President, one of my biggest fears is imaging the possibility of an active shooter in our school buildings. To ensure our citizens and children are protected is of utmost priority to me and will be an issue I champion when elected to the Ohio Statehouse. ANSWER 3: A city or county should not be able to restrict constitutional rights. This would definitely be an instance where the state should be able to restrict the local government. I believe that cities, counties and municipalities often know the best for what their citizens need. I firmly believe that local municipalities including School Boards should have more local control so that they can make the best decisions for their respective entities. I would reverse the cuts to the local government fund.

29TH DISTRICT

Louis W. Blessing, III Republican

OCCUPATION: State Representative and Professional Engineer EDUCATION: BA Mathematics and BS Electrical Engineering, University of Cincinnati POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY: I am a supporter of the Right to Life movement as well as pro2nd amendment groups such as the NRA and

ANSWER 1: I have served as the State Representative for the 29th District since 2013. I am a licensed, professional engineer with strong ties to the business community, particularly small business, who are the largest job creators. ANSWER 2: Many of the tragedies that have occurred throughout the country would not have been prevented through strict gun control measures, many of which run into Constitutional problems. In order to have a meaningful impact, we need to understand the source of these attacks: mental illness. More than half of the firearms related deaths in this country are actually suicides. Bolstering our state and local mental health agencies will go a long way towards reducing gun related death. ANSWER 3: The first thought that comes to mind is with regards to the use of red light traffic cameras and traffic fine abuse in mayor’s court (see New Rome for an egregious example). Incentives are in place to increase revenue without necessarily increasing public safety. Generally speaking, if I’m thinking of introducing legislation that impacts local governments, I generally run it by the Ohio Municipal League and Ohio Township Association before proceeding. This usually leads to good compromises.

Carrie R. Davis Democrat

OCCUPATION: Small business owner; commercial cleaning services. Director of non-profit, Child Advocacy for Rights & Equity, Inc. EDUCATION: Bachelor’s Degree in Legal Studies (Paralegal), University of Cincinnati, Summa Cum Laude College of Mount Saint Joseph - liberal arts POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY: Consent and advice of the governed is the prerequisite of all elected offices. With a duty to inform, engage and respect all those represented. To act in the best interests of their constituents without regard to party, donors and self interests. To act aggressively on their behalf in a reasoned, ethical manner. To effectuate progress that benefits the whole of the communities, the state and country in a fair and forthright manner consistent with fiscal responsibilities and quality of life, WEBSITE: WWW.VOTECARRIEDAVIS.ORG ANSWER 1: While my studies in law have prepared me well for the task of legislating, it is my service experience that most qualifies me to represent the people. My innate call to serve

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and empower others, and record thereof. is my greatest asset to the public ANSWER 2: The USSC court, as written by Scalia provides that 1) citizens have the constitutional right to self protection absent disallowing conditions, and 2) that the general public has a right to be protected from harm caused by failure to itemize the means to protect in law and policy. Per the USSC decision, the government has the duty to weigh these factors and enact legislation that respects both elements. The duty is clear common sense, responsible gun legislation that respects both. ANSWER 3: Accountability is a duty specified by law. The state and local government must demand, of each other, accountability, as well as, of offices within each political jurisdiction. Checks and balances ( crossing over various departments and levels of government) are the foundation of democracy. Systemic indifference is often the cause of waste and abuse of public monies and a denial of services and benefits to citizens. Failure to exercise, even discretionary, oversight / powers is malfeasance.

30TH DISTRICT

Clayton Adams Democrat

OCCUPATION: In 2013, Clayton initially found employment at Hillcrest Academy, teaching Social Studies to adjudicated minors from Hamilton County. In 2014, Clayton became employed at Aiken High School where he currently teaches students with Autism. EDUCATION: - Elder High School (2008) University of Cincinnati - Bachelor’s Degree in Education (2012) - I hold two teaching certifications Integrated Social Studies (7-12) and Special Education (K-12) POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY: Clayton considers himself a progressive Democrat who will fight for working class families. Clayton wants to make government more accessible to voters and end pay-to-play politics that have become the norm in American politics. Clayton is passionate about improving public education as well as making our schools safer. Clayton rejects the charter school movement sweeping across Ohio and believes our tax dollars could be better spent investing in our established public school districts. WEBSITE: WWW.VOTECLAYTONADAMS.COM ANSWER 1: I’ve worked in public education for approximately six years. Additionally, I am very active within the West Price Hill community. I’m a life-long West Sider who is concerned about the lack of investment and poor infrastructure on the west side. ANSWER 2: I am a supporter of the 2nd amendment and the right for Americans to bear arms. However, I am concerned about our country’s extremely high rates of gun violence, particularly school shootings. Things that can

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★STATE REPRESENTATIVE★ help reduce gun violence include universal background checks for all gun sales, mandatory waiting periods, as well as mandatory licensing and training for gun owners. In addition to that, establishing a culture of gun safety in our state would help reduce gun violence immensely. ANSWER 3: States grant cities and counties the power to exist and the power to govern local affairs. In addition to that, states also give local governments the ability to create charters and their own powers. The only reason states should restrain or check local governments is if the local governments interfere with the state’s ability to govern. I actually want to empower local governments instead of micromanaging them which has not been the norm here in Ohio for the past several years.

William J. Seitz Republican

EDUCATION: University of Cincinnati, B.A., 1975; J.D., 1978. POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY: Pragmatic conservative ANSWER 1: In a 2016 Columbus Monthly poll of my legislative colleagues, staff, the press, and legislative agents, I was voted the most knowledgeable, the best orator, the savviest, and the funniest of all 132 members of the Ohio legislature.

ANSWER 2: The state should be taking more action to reduce gun violence and promote gun safety. At the least, the Ohio House should be advancing HB 585, which creates more restrictions on who may possess a firearm, prohibits third party sales, and strengthens relevant databases (among other provisions). I support other gun safety measures, including a ban on bump stocks, red flag laws, firearm registration, limiting the size of magazines, and stronger background checks. ANSWER 3: Ohio is a “home rule” state, which allows local elected officials to represent people at the county and municipal level. Unless policies by these entities violate state or federal law, it is their prerogative to develop policies that reflect the needs of the people they serve. Neighboring municipalities may create contradictory policies and the State legislature may need to set uniform legislation for continuity.

32ND DISTRICT

Catherine Ingram Democrat

OCCUPATION: Licensed Ohio Realtor, Certified Notary Public, Ohio Legislator

ANSWER 2: No response to question

EDUCATION: undergrad; Knoxville College, Knoxville TN B.S., University of Cincinnati MBA, UC College of Business

ANSWER 3: To plagiarize a colleague, I am for local control and against local out-of-control. Local laws that conflict with state laws of general applicability must not be permitted to stand, as local governments are ultimately subordinate to state government and some (counties, townships, and school boards, for example) only enjoy such powers as we legislatively confer upon them. When we have decided to pre-empt the field of local government decision making, it is generally for good reason.

POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY: That our nation was established as a democracy to create opportunities for individuals and families to pursue a good life. That those opportunities, though we forgot at times, would be for all Americans regardless of race or other physical characteristics, class, or religious beliefs. That justice would be for all, to all Americans and guest without prejudice or discrimination. That God created us all. Life is too short to worry about the truly little things.

31ST DISTRICT

WEBSITE: WWW.INGRAMFORTHEPEOPLE.COM

Brigid Kelly Democrat

OCCUPATION: State Representative; Communications Director, UFCW Local 700 EDUCATION: MA, University of Cincinnati (Human Resources); BSBA, Xavier University (Marketing, Entrepreneurial Studies) POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY: Putting families first and politics last. WEBSITE: WWW.BRIGIDKELLY.COM ANSWER 1: I’ve delivered on my promises: continuing to fight for investment in public schools and students; protecting Ohio’s workers and holding corporations accountable; fighting for

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Marilyn Tunnat

policies promoting equality; and making safety of our families a priority.

ANSWER 1: Current OH Rep district 32; Forty plus years of corporate, professional, and civic engagement experience. Former educator; post secondary - full time lecturer undergraduate, graduate adjunct; MBE Mentoring exec. director Cincy chamber; pres OSBA ANSWER 3: Local control is important, but there are those who like to control the revenue and therefore keep hands on! The ability to allow local governments to function as needed in their particular jurisdiction is so important to fostering good counties, cities, villages, and neighborhoods. Local government decisions should only be restrained if the actions are detrimental to the livelihoods of the people who dwell in those areas. The people should be allowed to vote. The state may call for that

Republican

OCCUPATION: Retired Teacher & Guest Teacher Educational Consultant EDUCATION: MEd. Emergent Literacy Miami U. 1990 BS Elementary Ed. Miami U. 1976 Fairfield High School 1972 POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY: An elected official must always remember to listen well to his or her constituency, consider all the opinons and options and communicate effectively when moving forward in decisions effecting all. Conservative ideology and fiscal responsibility are the bedrock of my beliefs, remembering we are a Constitutional Republic . WEBSITE: WWW.TUNNATFOROHIOHOUSE32. COM ANSWER 1: As a educator, I have worked in many diverse leadership roles. One might be: lobbied, by children or adults, to “see things their way”; make decisions regarding methodology; serve as a team member on committee; and communicate effectively. ANSWER 2: The state’s roll in reducing any threat to public safety entails a thoughtful analysis of data, science, and theory. Knee-jerk reactions are rarely effective. Education, well done education, of issues has proven to be an effective strategy with not only young children, but adults as well. Taking another look at how we deal with families in crisis, emotional issues which can affect mental stability, and other mental health issues also is a critical component, as is due process. ANSWER 3: I’m a big proponent of local control. Communities are often able to maintain safety and community standards. State and federal government provides a framework of laws, not meant to over regulate, but provide a quality standard of living, strong public safety, and outstanding education. Local communities can hopefully work effectively within these frameworks. However, state and federal tax dollars enhance and fund these programs. When communities face crisis levels, intervention may be necessary

33RD DISTRICT

Judith Boyce Republican

OCCUPATION: Retired City Clerk

qualification is my ability to listen to issues important to citizens. ANSWER 2: Close loopholes in gun laws with stronger background checks for gun purchases. Have local Police Departments hire and retain School Resource Officers inside each school building. Purchase Kevlar blankets for each classroom and teach children to gather under them during the school training sessions. Purchase Specialized Door Locks to be placed underneath classroom doors during lock downs so active shooters cannot get inside class. These are all worth the costs for the protection of our children ANSWER 3: Ohio is a home rule state, which means legally that municipalities can determine their own laws within their city or village boundaries. I believe that under circumstances when the public health; safety; and well being of all citizens are at stake that is when the State of Ohio laws should check local decisions. An example of that would be the state-wide ban on indoor smoking because second-hand smoke was scientifically proven to be dangerous.

Sedrick Denson Democrat

OCCUPATION: Southwest Ohio Director for Ohio Environmental Council EDUCATION: University of Cincinnati, School for Creative and Performing Arts POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY: Liberal WEBSITE: VOTEDENSON.COM/ ANSWER 1: Sedrick Denson is a native of Cincinnati who has dedicated his entire career to empowering, leading and serving the city of Cincinnati. ANSWER 2: I believe in universal background checks because they ensure that guns are not sold to individuals that are not qualified or trained to use them. I’m against Stand Your Ground laws and feel that they cause tension and unwarranted violence in our communities. ANSWER 3: Local cities, townships, and villages are important to building strong communities and help drive the states economy. The state budget has cut local government funds when instead they should support local government rather than hinder them.

EDUCATION: Certified Municipal Clerk Some College POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY: conservative WEBSITE: BOYCEJUDITH0.WIXSITE.COM/ WEBSITE ANSWER 1: I achieved certification with a combination of training and experience in the field of public service. I worked with Mayors, City Council, press and the public. My most important

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See Vote411.org for information Candidates may have added after print deadline.


★HAMILTON COUNTY COMMISSIONER★ 4-YEAR TERM. SALARY: $87,075 RESPONSIBILITIES: To exercise financial control of County expenditures; to authorize public works; to purchase land and buildings; to let contracts; to plan and administer welfare. The Board of County Commissioners also appoints other officials to operate various departments. QUESTIONS: Each candidate was asked: 1. What are your qualifications for office? (250 character limit) 2. Hamilton County includes 49 townships, villages, and cities. What is the role of the Commissioners in promoting cooperation among those governments? (500 character limit) 3. Please discuss how you value public hearings, and what weight you place on citizen participation in government as you carry out your office? (500 character limit)

1 TO BE ELECTED – 4 YEAR TERM

Chris Monzel Republican

OCCUPATION: County Commissioner EDUCATION: Purdue University, B.S. Aeronautical & Astronautical Engineering; University of Cincinnati, M.S.Aerospace Engineering; Harvard University Kennedy School of Government, Masters of Public Policy POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY: The best form of government is the one closest to the people. WEBSITE: WWW.MONZEL.COM ANSWER 1: As an engineer, a father, and a community leader with an extensive background in both the public and private sector, I have a proven record of success finding real-world solutions to the issues facing our county. ANSWER 2: The role of the Commissioners’ office is to work collaboratively with all 49 jurisdictions in Hamilton County, to help provide shared services for residents. Sharing services allow for local governments to work with the county in providing cost-effective and efficient delivery of these services, some of which include 911 communications center, sheriff patrols, building inspections, fire hydrant maintenance, bulk fuel, and road salt purchasing. ANSWER 3: Public hearings are an essential part of our county government and a driving force behind its success. In our system of government, having an open dialogue with citizens is vital for transparency and accountability. It is a platform for citizens to voice their concerns on issues impacting their lives. I highly value citizen input and the diversity of perspectives in public hearings. I have been elected to represent all of the people of Hamilton County, so their input is very important to me.

★HAMILTON COUNTY AUDITOR★

Stephanie Summerow Dumas Democrat

OCCUPATION: President/CEO Strategic Consulting EDUCATION: University of Cincinnati, graduated in 1977. Bachelor of Science in Social Work. State of Ohio Licensed Social Worker since 1995.Certified Mental Health Administrator. Certified Healthy Relationship Facilitator. POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY: The people need to be heard and know that their opinions count. Fiscal responsibility is essential to improve spending of county dollars. Be pro-active not reactive. A vision for the county that is inclusive and develop strategic methods to achieve that vision. Evaluate what has worked and fine tune what has not. Inclusion of all community partners is important to maintain the buy in of all. A character of honesty, ethics, integrity, openness, flexibility and a team player is essential.

4-YEAR TERM. SALARY: $94,248 RESPONSIBILITIES: Audits all financial records of public offices in Hamilton County. Maintains county deed records. QUESTIONS: Each candidate was asked: 1. What are your qualifications for office? (250 character limit) 2. What recommendations do you have for making the auditor’s office more efficient? (500 character limit) 3. What could be done to assure property owners understand the appraisal process and how to appeal? (500 character limit)

1 TO BE ELECTED – 4 YEAR TERM

Nancy Aichholz Republican

OCCUPATION: President/CEO Aviatra Accelerators, Inc.

WEBSITE: WWW.CROWDPAC.COM ANSWER 1: Former Mayor of Forest Park, Former Village Manager of Lincoln Heights, Former Mental Health Administrator, Licensed Social Worker, Former Hamilton County Commissioner Candidate, Federal Grant Writer and Reviewer, Non-Profit Senior Leadership ANSWER 2: Every entity has their own unique issues and successes. We can learn things from each other which generate great ideas and solutions. Each area no matter the size of the government or level of influence or affluence need to be convinced that they are important. All entities need to be included at the start of the process not after decisions have been made. Everyone has a voice and they deserve to be heard. Outreach is important to pull in governments in and make them feel part of the process. ANSWER 3: I seek this position and everyone that I’ve achieved to make a difference in the lives of people. We work for the people and you can’t do that if you don’t know the desires of the people. The decisions that are made should definitely include the people that are being directly impacted. I can’t make an informed decision without the voice of the people. The point is that public opinion is extremely important and that all elements of the discussion were heard to make the best decisions.

University

EDUCATION: B.S. Business Administration The Ohio State

POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY: Less government; lower taxes. Fiscally conservative. WEBSITE: AICHHOLZFORAUDITOR.COM ANSWER 1: Serve as President Indian Hill School Board; political fundraising; experience as Ass’t Treasurer Ohio’s Future PAC; worked on multiple local and federal campaigns; Hamilton County Commission on Women & Girls; Substantial business background. ANSWER 2: The office needs major updated in innovation and technology to provide transparency and save the taxpayers money. I believe property owners should be involved in the appraisal process and that any need for appeal should be convenient and inexepensive. The Auditor’s office is still using 20th century technology and not using some very basic software solutions that can and will bring efficiencies, transparency, lower costs. I also have experience is maximizing human capital. ANSWER 3: Communication and interaction with property owners prior to the appraisal process will help to alleviate the overwhelming number of appeals each appraisal cycle. I am adamant that the Auditor’s office should be communicating with the property owner to obtain information from them about their property. The owner knows

their property far better than anyone else. We should monitor any extreme changes or where an appraisal comes in high or low compared to the area & research before finalizing.

Dusty Rhodes Democrat

OCCUPATION: Hamilton County Auditor EDUCATION: Syracuse University, B.S. degree various post grad courses, state proscribed continuing education courses POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY: Efficiency, economy and common sense. “Ask not what your country can do for you. Ask what you can do for your country”. WEBSITE: WWW.HAMILTONCOUNTYAUDITOR. ORG ANSWER 1: Service as Hamilton County Auditor, Delhi Township Trustee, state retirement board (OPERS), and in the private sector in the financial services and broadcasting industry. Fiduciary responsibilities in successfully protecting other people’s money. ANSWER 2: We will continue to use the newest technology, training & emphasize citizen service. We were among the first with a property website and one of the first to post expenditures on line. New phone app and E-filing property transfers. Named “Public Official of the Year” by the Hamilton County Township Assn & the American Subcontractors Assn of Cincinnati and received Public Information Awards from the International Association of Assessing Officers and the Ohio Society of Professional Journalists. ANSWER 3: The mass appraisal process is complicated and completely controlled by state law. We inform owners of their tentative new values and invite informal comments before finalizing the reappraisal. Our website provides instructions for those who chose to formally appeal their values. A County Auditor does not have the authority to make radical changes in the state’s appraisal or appeal processes. Anyone suggesting otherwise is either purposely or inadvertently misleading the voters.

KNOW HAMILTON COUNTY For information on the organization of Hamilton County government and who provides what services see KNOW HAMILTON COUNTY, an online publication of the League of Women Voters. http://www.lwvcincinnati.org/knowhamiltoncounty.html

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★STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION★ 4-YEAR TERM. NO SALARY RESPONSIBILITIES: The 19-member board is responsible for overseeing the Ohio Department of Education and creates policy and makes recommendations for K-12 education in Ohio. QUESTIONS: Each candidate was asked: 1. What would be your priorities if elected to the State Board of Education? (250 character limit) 2. How can the State Board of Education ensure a quality education for all Ohio students regardless of whether they attend traditional public schools, charter or online schools, have vouchers for attending private schools, or are home-schooled? (500 character limit) 3. What can the State Board of Education do to ensure that all community schools and nonpublic schools that accept state financial support (including vouchers) are accountable to the public for the tax support? (500 character limit)

1 TO BE ELECTED FROM EACH OF 11 DISTRICTS (PLUS 8 APPOINTED BY THE GOVERNOR) – 4 YEAR TERM DISTRICT 4

Pat Bruns

OCCUPATION: Elected Member/State Board of Education (District 4-Hamilton & Warren Counties) EDUCATION: 1985- Masters in Art Education-Miami University, Oxford, Ohio; 1973- Bachelor of Art in EducationUniversity of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky; 1969- Graduate-Oak Hills High School, Cincinnati, Ohio POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY: Being elected to a public office is an honor and a privilege I do not take lightly. As a state board member, my decisions are based on listening to my constituents, being well-informed, and honoring all students as unique individuals. I believe deeply that access to a high-quality education is a right of all students, regardless of their zip code. Education is a sacred trust the public must provide because educated citizens are critical for our shared success in a democracy. WEBSITE: WWW.FRIENDSOFPATBRUNS.COM ANSWER 1: Equitable/adequate funding for all districts; Attract/retain high quality teachers; Reduce/eliminate state testing; Expand career/ technical programs, graduation options, and the arts for all students; Transparency/accountability of charter schools ANSWER 2: We limit our future leaders’ education, no matter the educational choices they make or their zip code, if we do not put in place expectations that ensure that all students will graduate prepared to successfully

pursue their chosen future path. Create a state education system that provides an evidencebased framework for all education entities serving children. Promote well-rounded learning experiences provided by high-quality teachers that give students real-world experiences.

Importance 1. Safe learning environments, 2. Fiscal responsibility, 3. Stakeholder (community & parent) participation; local control, & 4, Accountability & choice: quality opportunity for all students: preparation for post-graduation endeavors.

ANSWER 3: To stop diverting state tax dollars from public schools, create a separate line item in the budget so that the state legislature has a real stake in overseeing their operations. In the spirit of fiscal responsibility to our public taxpayers, all schools that receive public tax dollars should be held to the same accountability, transparency, and standards as traditional public schools. Local levy taxes and school state-funding formulas should not be diverted to community and nonpublic schools.

ANSWER 1: Issues of Importance 1.Safe learning environments, 2.Fiscal responsibility, 3.Stakeholder (community & parent) participation; local control, 4,Accountability & choice: quality opportunity for students: preparation for post-graduation endeavors.

Jenny Kilgore

OCCUPATION: University instructor EDUCATION: I am a lifelong resident of SW Ohio. I graduated from Deer Park High School, Xavier University with a M.Ed., and Miami University with a Ph.D. in Educational Leadership; I am extremely knowledgeable of the needs of our local school districts. POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY: My goals as a member of Ohio Board of Education are to support our districts’ students by providing our teachers with the tools and supports that they need to be effective and provide the supports that our students need to be active learners. Issues of

ANSWER 2: Presence & over-sight holding schools accountable, esp. underperforming schools that drain resources from local public schools > high standards of fiscal responsibility to our tax payers. Policies that ensure competent, well-educated teachers in classrooms to teach & engage students. Curriculum policy that emphasizes high standards of education and expectations for citizenship, not to include arbitrarily political agendas. Being cognizant that the Board represents 2,000,000 Ohio students. ANSWER 3: Presence & over-sight holding schools accountable, esp. underperforming schools that drain resources from local public schools > high standards of fiscal responsibility to our tax payers. Policies that ensure competent, well-educated teachers in classrooms to teach & engage students. Curriculum policy that emphasizes high standards of education and expectations for citizenship, not to include arbitrarily political agendas. Being cognizant that the Board represents 2,000,000 Ohio students.

★JUSTICE OHIO SUPREME COURT★ 6-YEAR TERM. SALARY: $164,000 RESPONSIBILITIES: Hears all cases involving questions arising under the Ohio Constitution or statutes; hears appeals from Courts of Appeals decisions. The Supreme Court’s decisions are final except in cases involving the U.S. Constitution, statutes, or treaties. QUESTIONS: Each candidate was asked: 1. Why are you running for this particular court seat?

2 TO BE ELECTED – 6 YEAR TERM FULL TERM COMMENCING JANUARY 1, 2019

Craig Baldwin

OCCUPATION: Judge, Ohio Fifth District Court of Appeals EDUCATION: J.D. Capital University Law School. B.A. Ohio University TRAINING AND EXPERIENCE: Judge, Fifth District Court of Appeals, 2013 to present. Judge, Licking County Common Pleas Court, Domestic Relations Division, 2005-2013.

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Michael P. Donnelly

Director, Licking County Child Support Enforcement Agency, 2001-2005. Partner in the Law Firm of Jones, Norpell

OCCUPATION: Judge, Cuyahoga County Court of Common Pleas, 2005-Present

WEBSITE: BALDWINFOROHIO.COM ANSWER 1: I believe in our democracy and in our constitution. I have great respect for our legal system. During my time on the bench I have considered it my privilege to participate in our system as a Judge. I hope to be elected as an Ohio Supreme Court Justice so I can work to ensure the system works for all according to our constitutional principles. Further I have strong feelings about the way all participants in the system should be treated. Every person who enters a courthouse, no matter what their role, should be treated with dignity and respect, in short as a citizen in their courthouse. I believe that Judges at every level should be fair, timely and only rule on the specific issues in front of them. Judges should interpret the law and then be humble enough to stop, refraining from legislating from the bench. These are the values and principles I lived by as a Common Pleas Judge, as an Appellate Court Judge and these are the values and principles I will live by as an Ohio Supreme Court Justice.

EDUCATION: J.D., Cleveland State University ClevelandMarshall College of Law; B.A., John Carroll University; St. Ignatius High School TRAINING AND EXPERIENCE: Assistant Cuyahoga County Prosecutor, 1992-1997; Attorney in Private Practice, 1997-2004 WEBSITE: WWW.DONNELLYFORJUSTICE.COM ANSWER 1: In the broadest terms, the Ohio Supreme Court is responsible for ensuring: 1.That Ohio’s justice system runs fairly, effectively, and efficiently. 2. That Ohio’s laws are justly applied. When these jobs aren’t done well, the public’s faith in our courts begins to erode and I believe that’s what has been happening in Ohio. People fear that our courts are focused less on the fair application of the law and more on serving the interests of those who can afford to access them and those who help fund judicial election campaigns. Maintaining public confidence in our court system should

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be a priority for everyone. Our justice system is the backbone of our society because it provides the means for parties to resolve their disputes. Without our courts, these disputes would tear apart families, businesses, and communities. To operate as designed, however, our courts must earn the public’s trust. People must be confident their court system will treat them fairly and that its decisions will be just. I believe our courts can and must do better at earning society’s trust. The most important element in accomplishing this is greater transparency because the public’s ability to discern that our courts are functioning properly and efficiently resolving disputes depends upon it. I also strongly believe that Ohioans suffer from a huge justice gap. Citizens with lower income face significant barriers to justice. This is not a matter of opinion or debate; it is a matter of established fact. I have worked hard in my court room and in the other settings to advance policies that would reform our court system. But, inevitably, there is a limit to how much a single trial court judge can do; building greater trust in our court system requires advocating for systemic criminal and civil justice reform. I’m running for Associate Justice of the Ohio Supreme Court for the opportunity to help rebuild


★JUSTICE OHIO SUPREME COURT★ the public’s trust in its courts and prove to Ohioans that justice is for ALL of us. FULL TERM COMMENCING JANUARY 2, 2019

Mary DeGenaro

EDUCATION: 1986 JD Cleveland State University; 1983 BA Youngstown State University TRAINING AND EXPERIENCE: January, 2018-date Justice Supreme Court of Ohio; 2001-January, 2018 Judge 7th District Court of Appeals; 1986-2001 Appellate/General Practice Attorney Youngstown Ohio; 2011-2013 Adjunct Faculty Youngstown State University Political Science Dept. WEBSITE: DEGENAROFORJUSTICE.COM/ ANSWER 1: In addition to deciding cases, I believe a justice on the Ohio Supreme Court has additional responsibilities: 1) improve access to and the administration of justice on the Supreme Court and statewide; 2) educate the public about the work of judges and lawyers; and 3) public service to improve the lives of Ohioans. I have a passion for literacy, civic education and civility, and as a justice I have a platform to bring attention to these issues and the opportunity to promote programs that will make a difference. To successfully improve the efficiency and effectiveness of our courts and the practice of law, relationships with judges, lawyers and the public across the Ohio is important. I have built those relationships over 17 years as an active member of the Ohio Judicial Conference, the Ohio Civility Consortium, the Ohio State and Women’s Bar Associations. For example, I helped put together a panel of health professionals and women in recovery for an OWBA seminar on substance abuse. I encourage the creation of, as well as promote and educate the public about specialty courts which address drug abuse, human trafficking and other criminal and juvenile/family issues. This is a creative tool for judges to address the opioid/drug/mental health crisis and to stop the revolving court/jail door. Finally, the Supreme Court decides what cases it will hear; hundreds of requests are filed but less than 10% are accepted. Since I’ve joined the Court, we have tested and implemented a new process to review the requests, and we still thoughtfully but more efficiently make that decision. I also believe as a justice it’s important for me to be accessible to the public and dispel the myths popular culture and TV have created about the legal system, so they understand the work that lawyers and judges really do every day in Ohio\’s courts to help people: start a business, guide them through a divorce, help them with an adoption, and protect their civil rights. There are still countries around the world which don’t have the independent legal system we do. I am honored to be serving as a Justice, and am proud to be a part of a team of over 200 professional, dedicated people at the Court who work every day to make the Judicial System in Ohio the best it can be.

Melody J. Stewart

EDUCATION: B.Mus. ~ CollegeConservatory of Music, Univ. Photo not of Cincinnati; J.D. ~ Clevelandprovided Marshall College of Law, Cleveland State Univ.; Ph.D. ~ Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences, Case Western Reserve Univ.; Honorary Doctor of Laws ~ Cleveland State Univ TRAINING AND EXPERIENCE: Ohio Court of Appeals Judge; Supreme Court of Ohio sitting judge by assignment of the Chief Justice; University of Toledo College of Law ~ law professor; Cleveland-Marshall College of Law ~ law professor, assistant dean, lecturer; Case Western Reserve School of Law ~ director; Ursuline College ~ Adjunct Instructor; City of Euclid ~ Board of Planning and Zoning chair & vice-chair; City of Cleveland and City of East Cleveland ~ Assistant Director of Law; Annashae Corporation ~ Office Manager. WEBSITE: WWW. STEWARTFOROHIOSUPREMECOURT.COM ANSWER 1: I am running for the Ohio Supreme Court for several reasons. My diverse educational and professional experiences make me the stronger and better candidate for the Court. In addition to the perspective which I bring that is currently missing on the Supreme Court, I will work to help reform our judicial system to make it more efficient, more effective, more accountable, and more responsive to the people it serves. I also want to provide to the citizens of the state the same good service that I have provided to the citizens of my county over the past three decades. Finally, the Supreme Court is currently comprised of justices who all belong to the same political party. That is not a good composition for our state, particularly since, with rare exception, the Court gets to decide which cases it will hear. I think it is naive at best and insulting at worst to think that the citizens of a state as diverse as Ohio is can have confidence in the highest level of our judiciary being made up of justices who all belong to the same political party – regardless of the party. As a nominee different from the current make up of the court, my election improves the court from day one. Finally, I have had the privilege of being educated by some of the best colleges and universities our state has to offer (and our state has a lot of great colleges and universities). I was taught at a very young age that you always leave a place better off than it was when you got there and that, if you have the credentials and the ability to be part of the solution to any problem and you don’t make the effort to be part of that solution, then you are – or you become – part of the problem. I hope voters see fit to make me part of the solution.

MAKE DEMOCRACY WORK®! When you give to the League of Women Voters of the Cincinnati Area Education Fund, you make democracy work for our community. With your help, we can continue to offer this trusted source free to the public. Support the League today with your tax-deductible gift!

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Vote early in-person Registered voters may vote early beginning on October 10 for the November 6, 2018, election. Location for early voting in Hamilton County: Hamilton County Board of Elections 4700 Smith Rd. Norwood, OH 45212 513-632-7000 www.votehamiltoncounty.org (for information; there is no online voting)

Early voting days and hours are as follows: Weekdays: 8am-5pm Oct. 10-12, 15-19, 22-26 8am-7pm Oct. 29-Nov 2

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8am-2pm Nov. 5 Weekends: Saturday Nov. 3, 8am-4pm Sunday Nov. 4, 1-5 pm

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★JUDGE – OHIO COURT OF APPEALS★ 6-YEAR TERM. SALARY: $152,850 RESPONSIBILITIES: Hears all cases involving questions arising under the Ohio Constitution or statutes; hears appeals from Courts of Appeals decisions. The Supreme Court’s decisions are final except in cases involving the U.S. Constitution, statutes, or treaties. QUESTIONS: Each candidate was asked: 1. Why are you running for this particular court seat?

1 TO BE ELECTED FROM EACH OF 12 DISTRICTS – 6 YEAR TERM FULL TERM COMMENCING FEBRUARY 9, 2019

Pierre Bergeron

OCCUPATION: Attorney EDUCATION: B.A., Centre College; J.D., University of Virginia School of Law AFFILILATIONS: Episcopal WEBSITE: WWW.VOTEPIERRE.COM ANSWER 1: I have practiced nearly 20 years in appellate courts across the country, including Ohio’s First District Court of Appeals. This experience has shown me what works and what doesn’t in appellate courts. I am running for this seat because I believe that I can help bring positive change in the First District, making the court both more transparent and responsive to the citizens of Hamilton County. Specifically, there are two changes that will help render the appellate process fairer to the parties appearing before the Court. First, the First District has a long-standing rule (not present in any other Ohio appellate district) that places restrictions on the briefs that parties submit. Changing this rule will enable the parties to fully develop the arguments that they wish the Court to consider–in other words, their voices should be heard. More developed briefings will assist the judges in reaching the correct decision by allowing a full consideration of the matter before court. We should therefore bring the First District’s rules in line with what all of the other appellate districts in the State do. Second, a substantial percentage of the Court’s decisions have historically been rendered with 2-3 page judgment entries. These entries often do not provide much analysis of the issues on appeal, often leaving the parties in the dark as to why the Court reached its decision. Win or lose, a party deserves a complete explanation for the Court’s decision so that it knows that the Court seriously considered its case. Providing a more thorough analysis will also help lawyers and their future clients to understand the law governing this district, and this increased transparency will help instill a greater confidence in our judiciary. Nearly all the clients I’ve represented over the years believe that their case is the most important matter before the Court. And they are uniformly disappointed if the Court does not show them that respect. The First District is effectively the

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Supreme Court for Hamilton County (because so few cases can be appealed further), and its rulings greatly affect the lives and businesses of Hamilton County residents. If elected, I will work to ensure that every case, no matter how large or small, is treated the way that I would want my own case treated.

Charles Miller

OCCUPATION: Court of Appeals Judge (incumbent) EDUCATION: J.D., Boston University; B.A., The Ohio State University AFFILILATIONS: Ohio Court of Appeals Judges Association; The Ohio Judicial Conference; Federalist Society; American Enterprise Institute Leadership Network, Ohio Bar Association; Cincinnati Bar Association; St. Gertrude Parish; Hamilton County Public Defender Commission (Past Commissioner); Mt. Auburn International Academy (Past Board President); Groveport Madison School Board (past member); Leadership Council (past Scholarship Chair); United Way Emerging Leaders (past member) WEBSITE: WWW.JUDGECHARLESMILLER.COM ANSWER 1: I am passionate about my work. During oral arguments, I engage with counsel to make sure the legal issues are framed in the clearest way possible. In my written decisions, I strive to fully articulate and address the strengths of each party’s case–particularly that of the losing party. I do this so the parties understand that their arguments have been heard and to help the lower courts best understand exactly what our court says the law is on a given topic. I am honored that the Ohio State Bar Association has selected several of my opinions for publication as being worthy of being read across the state. I am also honored to have been selected by the Chief Justice to sit on the Ohio Supreme Court. This honor is bestowed only on those Court of Appeals judges the Chief Justice finds to be suited to fill in for a recused justice. I believe our courts should be accessible. Accordingly, I have spearheaded and participated in efforts to take our court to the community and bring community members to us, so that the public can understand what happens at the court of appeals, which I sometimes compare to a sports “replay booth.” I have also engaged with local attorneys to commission a review of our court rules to recommend ways that our court might improve its service to its customers. Finally, and more substantively, I have written opinions stating that parties must be afforded meaningful rights to appeal to our court to correct errors from the trial courts. I am a judge who enjoys being a judge. I will never be an activist in a robe. I humbly ask for your vote.

FULL TERM COMMENCING FEBRUARY 10, 2019

Dale Stalf

OCCUPATION: Attorney EDUCATION: B.S.B.A (Accounting) from Xavier University (Distinguished Military Graduate; summa cum laude); J.D. from the University of Cincinnati College of Law (Law Review; Order of the Coif); Basic Course Graduate, The Judge Advocate General’s School AFFILILATIONS: Cincinnati Bar Foundation (Board of Trustees 2012-present; Secretary (2014-2016; Treasurer (2016-present); Annual Advocate); Hamilton County Public Defender Commission (2012-2016); Beyond Civility Initiative (Steering Committee); Military Officers Association of America (MOAA), Greater Cincinnati Chapter; Volunteer Lawyers Project (pro bono volunteer attorney and financial contributor); Supreme Court of Ohio’s Lawyer to Lawyer Mentoring Program; Xavier University’s Williams College of Business Executive Mentor Program; 30-year member of Santa’s Goody Bag Band, which raises money for local children’s charities (www.santasband.com); Cincinnati Bar Association (Board of Trustees 20082012; Chair of the Professionalism Committee (2008-2012); Chair of the Veterans & Military Law Committee (2014-2016); Ohio State Bar Association; Kentucky Bar Association; Federal Bar Association; Roman Catholic WEBSITE: DALESTALFFORJUDGE.COM ANSWER 1: Judges are the ultimate guardians of our personal and property rights, and of our civil liberties, under the Ohio and U.S. Constitutions. Because so few cases are accepted for review by the Supreme Court of Ohio, the First District Court of Appeals is effectively the court of last resort for the vast majority of cases, both civil and criminal, that are brought in Hamilton County. I am running for this seat to ensure that the rights and liberties of the people I will be serving are vigilantly protected. As a trial lawyer representing both plaintiffs and defendants in a wide variety of civil cases for over 30 years, I believe that all litigants are entitled to a fair trial before a tribunal that is not biased for or against one side or the other merely because of their status as a “plaintiff”, “defendant”, injured party or tortfeasor. I believe that I have the judicial temperament and discipline to hear all sides of every case and to render a fair and just opinion based on the evidence presented to the trial court and the law. As a former Army JAG prosecutor, and more recently as an advocate for the Hamilton County Public Defender’s Office, I believe that all criminal defendants in Hamilton County deserve fair trials and, if convicted, should receive fair and appropriate sentences for their crimes. One of the purposes of a sentence is to punish the offender for the harm caused to the victim of the crime. But a fair sentence also must take into account any relevant mitigating circumstances that may justify a sentence other than a long period of incarceration. As a veteran

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I strongly support the Veterans Treatment Courts, and I also view the Hamilton County Drug Court, as critical to promoting the fair administration of justice via alternative sentencing dispositions. Finally, I appreciated the Commercial Docket of the Hamilton County Court of Common Pleas that was managed so effectively for many years by Judges Beth Myers and Steven Martin. The quality and timeliness of their written decisions greatly contributed to Ohio’s jurisprudence and promoted a healthy appreciation and respect for our judicial system and the notion that Hamilton County is a good place to set up and operate a business. I believe that I can and I will bring that same level of competence and diligence to the Court of Appeals.

Marilyn Zayas

OCCUPATION: JUDGE EDUCATION: J.D. University of Cincinnati College of Law AFFILILATIONS: Board Member of Beech Acres Parenting Center and Cincinnati Memorial Hall; Ohio Bar Association; Cincinnati Bar Association WEBSITE: ANSWER 1: I am running because I realize that today we face difficult challenges, and we need judges with the life experiences that allow them to best address them. My background allows me to take an independent approach to each case, with a focus on maintaining integrity and impartiality, and I am very proud of the work I have done as an appellate judge. Since my election, I have created and implemented the “Students to Court of Appeals Program,” a partnership with local high schools to bring High School students to our Court of Appeals. I am committed to providing students with the opportunity to learn about the court system, observe the court system in action, and interact with judges and attorneys. My goal is to inspire and mentor the next generation and encourage them to pursue their dreams regardless of the obstacles they face. As an attorney, I returned to my Alma Mater, U.C. Law School, to teach as an adjunct professor. Now, I speak to attorneys at continuing legal education classes, and share with them the best practices in effectively representing clients at Hamilton County’s Court of Appeals. The cases that have come before me have ranged from home foreclosure cases, serious criminal convictions, to high dollar civil cases. I have been told that my reputation is that, “When Judge Zayas is on the bench, make sure you are prepared to present your case.” I am grateful and privileged that the Hamilton County voters elected me to serve as Judge. I was humbled to learn that I am the first Latina judge elected to an Ohio Court of Appeals, and that after my election our Court of Appeals held its first all-female, three judge panel. It would be an honor to continue to serve our community and ensure that justice is administered with integrity, independence, and impartiality.


★JUDGE – OHIO COURT OF APPEALS★ FULL TERM COMMENCING FEBRUARY 11, 2019

Candace Crouse OCCUPATION: Attorney

EDUCATION: West Virginia University (B.A., International Studies, German); The Ohio State University Moritz College of Law (J.D.) AFFILILATIONS: Member of the Board of Directors of the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers (NACDL), Sixth Circuit ViceChair of the NACDL Amicus Committee, 2012-13 President of the Greater Cincinnati Criminal Defense Lawyers Association, Member Cincinnati Bar Association, Fellow of the Cincinnati Academy of Leadership for Lawyers, Adjunct Professor of Law at the University of Cincinnati College of Law, Faculty at the National Criminal Defense College WEBSITE: CANDACEFORJUDGE.COM ANSWER 1: I am running for a seat on Ohio’s First District Court of Appeals because I believe that our courts can strive to better serve the people of Hamilton County. My years of practice have made clear to me how the system works and what often happens when it fails. It is my goal to make the First District the gold standard for how an appellate court can operate and serve those in Hamilton County. My time clerking for Judge Stamp shaped my outlook on law and how justice should be done. If elected, I will model my approach to law after his approach: diligent preparation, courteous handling of cases, and purposeful impartiality. It is my goal to make the First District Court of Appeals a more receptive, transparent, and informative court. No matter how large or small the matter is, every case coming before the court is seen as the most critical case in the eyes of the parties involved. I will work hard to ensure that the court is seen as fair and attentive to the litigants who appear before it. I will do this by working to modify restrictive rules that the current First District Court has placed upon itself. Unlike other appellate courts in Ohio, the First District places unrealistic page limits on the briefs filed by the parties and often does not permit reply briefs. Historically, the Court has been known for issuing short judgment entries in lieu of full opinions explaining why the court ruled as it did. As a result, litigants can be left unsure of why they lost their case and end up feeling like they have not had an opportunity to be heard. Public trust in our courts is vital to democracy. People coming before the courts expect a fair, just, impartial process where everyone is seen as equal. I am running to ensure that our local courts and judicial system live up to the high expectations people place on them. If elected, I will make sure our court prioritizes impartiality, diligent preparation, and thoughtful, compassionate decisions.

Dennis Deters

OCCUPATION: Judge EDUCATION: B.A. University of Notre Dame, Government and English; J.D. University of Cincinnati College of Law AFFILILATIONS: Member, St. James White Oak Catholic Church; Ohio Bar Association; Cincinnati Bar Association WEBSITE: WWW.DENNISDETERS.COM ANSWER 1: I became a lawyer because I promised myself that my career choice would be one of service to others. I was taught and believe that a life well led is one of service. I fulfilled that promise in many ways by being able to help many people throughout my career through some of their most difficult times. Now, as a Court of Appeals Judge, I am able to continue to serve our community by protecting and defending the rule of law, the Constitution of the United States, and the Ohio Constitution. I recognize that Judges need to understand their role in government as a member of the Judicial Branch. We are to be guardians of liberty by giving the law, as enacted and codified by the people–through their directly elected representatives–absolute respect and deference under the Constitution. I believe that we are a government of the people, and I’m running to keep my seat on Ohio’s Court of Appeals because I believe I am well suited to honor that principle. FULL TERM COMMENCING FEBRUARY 12, 2019

Ginger Bock

OCCUPATION: Attorney EDUCATION: J.D., University of Cincinnati College of Law, Summa Cum Laude; B.A., Miami University, Cum Laude AFFILILATIONS: Presbyterian WEBSITE: WWW.GINGERFORJUDGE.COM ANSWER 1: My legal career has been focused on appellate advocacy. Through my work in various courts, I believe that some improvements will make the First District Court of Appeals an exemplary court. I want to work with my colleagues to achieve that level of excellence. First, I want to increase the Court’s transparency. In recent years, the Court has taken steps to make it less mysterious, such as holding community courts and inviting in students. But there are still numerous opportunities for improvement. For example, many decisions from the Court are two- or three-page journal entries that do not adequately inform parties why they have won or lost. Not only is it good practice to issue a full decision with clear legal reasoning, but also it helps increase trust in the system when people understand why a court rules in a particular way. Second, I want to expand access to the Court. The First District Court of Appeals, unlike other Ohio appellate courts, has rules in place that restrict attorneys and parties from fully arguing their issues. For example, the number of

pages and types of briefs permitted are limited. I want to work with my colleagues to ensure that parties and their attorneys are granted the opportunity to fully argue their cases. Third, my work ethic makes me an ideal candidate for an appellate court judge. Working hard energizes me and I enjoy reading, writing, and researching. I never want a party or an attorney to experience the disappointment of appearing before a judge who is not prepared or who has not taken the time to understand the nuanced issues. Being a judge means being a public servant. If I were elected to serve as a judge, I would take that responsibility very seriously. Whether it takes 40 hours per week or 80, I would be thoroughly prepared for every single case that appears before me. If I were elected, all parties could feel certain that I would carefully read their briefs and research all of the issues in their cases. All parties should feel confident that win or lose, at least the judges hearing their appeals listened, paid attention, understood their issues, and provided an explanation for the decision.

respect for the law and justice. I have taken my responsibilities and duties as a judge very seriously. I am honored that the citizens of Hamilton County have elected to invest their trust and confidence in me to serve as a trial court judge for over 16 years. I look forward to bringing my experience, commitment, and dedication to the First District Court of Appeals.

IS THIS YOU?

Robert C. Winkler

• I like to know what’s happening in my community, in my state and country.

EDUCATION: J.D. Chase College of Law, 1987

• I want all elections to be conducted fairly.

OCCUPATION: Judge

AFFILILATIONS: Member of Common Pleas Judges Association, Cincinnati Bar Association, and Ohio State Bar Association; Moot Court Judge; Youth Athletics Coach.

• I want voters to have unbiased information about candidates and issues.

WEBSITE: JUDGEWINKLER.COM

• I am interested in discussions of public policy.

ANSWER 1: I am running for the First District Court of Appeals because I am uniquely and particularly qualified to serve. As an intermediate appellate court, the primary function of a court of appeals is to hear appeals from the common pleas court and the county municipal court. Having served the citizens of Hamilton County for over sixteen years as a trial court judge on both the Hamilton County Municipal Court and the Court of Common Pleas, I possess the judicial experience, training, and knowledge to competently and professionally execute the responsibilities required of a judge serving of the First District Court of Appeals. After 15 years of experience as a prosecuting attorney, defense attorney, and civil attorney, I was elected to the Hamilton County Municipal Court in 2001. I served on the Municipal Court until I became a judge on the Hamilton County Court of Common Pleas. I was elected to the Court of Common Pleas in 2006, 2008, and 2014. In 2015, I was elected by my colleagues on the Court of Common Pleas to lead the Court as the Presiding and Administrative Judge. During my tenure as a trial judge, I have presided over more than 32,000 civil and criminal cases including cases that range from traffic and employment law cases to death penalty cases. In my 30 years of experience, I have tried countless bench and jury trial cases as a lawyer and as a judge and I will bring that informed perspective and knowledge of the law to the First District Court of Appeals. I have a long-standing and demonstrated

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• I like to have new ways to network with people. If this sounds like you, then we welcome you to check out the League of Women Voters of the Cincinnati Area. We’re a grassroots organization that includes women and men who value good government and fair elections. Join us! Contact us and let’s talk about your interests! 513-281-VOTE (8683) INFO@LWVCINCINNATI.ORG WWW.LWVCINCINNATI.ORG WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/ LWVCINCINNATI

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★JUDGE - COURT OF COMMON PLEAS★ 6-YEAR TERM. SALARY: $140,550 RESPONSIBILITIES: To preside at trials of both civil and criminal cases; to supervise the jury commission, grand jury, and other departments of the court. QUESTION: Each candidate was asked: 1. Why are you running for this particular court seat?

1 TO BE ELECTED – 6 YEAR TERM FULL TERM COMMENCING JANUARY 1, 2019

Steven Martin

Photo not provided

OCCUPATION: Common Pleas Judge EDUCATION: B.S. Indiana University 1979, J.D. Indiana University 1982

AFFILILATIONS: Common Pleas Judge, Ohio State Bar Association, Cincinnati Bar Association, Volunteer Chaplain at The Christ Hospital, Methodist WEBSITE: JUDGESTEVENMARTIN.COM ANSWER 1: I believe in and have fought for the principle that our court system must be completely open and transparent. I intend to continue that effort. My extensive experience handling both civil and criminal cases helps ensure that all who come before me will receive a fair trial. The citizens of Hamilton County are entitled to no less. I have also fought for merit hiring on our court and will continue to do so. I enjoy being a trial judge. It is the best opportunity to make sure all of the citizens of Hamilton County receive justice. It has been a privilege to be able to do this work. I am proud to have been elected/re-elected by the voters of Hamilton County in 1998, 2000, 2006 and 2012. For criminal and civil cases, both sides are equally entitled to a fair trial. My experience helps make this happen in case after case. Knowledge of the Rules of Procedure and Rules of Evidence is critical to making sure all sides receive the fair trial to which they are entitled. In criminal cases, once there is a conviction, the victims of that crime are entitled to have input as to the defendant’s sentence. Sometimes justice is best served by a prison sentence while at other times drug treatment or other programs are in the best interest of society. My experience helps when determining which resources will work best to protect society. My goal with non-violent criminal defendants is to work to get them out of the criminal justice system and working. I am proud our court has a Drug Court, a Mental Health Court and a Veterans Court to work with the people who come before us and I utilize those resources whenever possible. I have worked for our court to have neighborhood probation substations to supervise probationers and help people succeed and find out quickly when they are not succeeding. For the violent predators that come before me, prison is the best and frequently the only solution to protect society. Both civil and criminal cases need to be resolved

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as quickly and fairly as possible. There is no reason for a case that should be completed in 2 months to take 2 years. I work hard to make sure those cases that can be resolved quickly are resolved quickly. Delays cost everyone and needless delays are not acceptable.

Terry Nestor

2 TO BE ELECTED – 6 YEAR TERM FULL TERM COMMENCING APRIL 1, 2019

Lisa Allen Photo not provided

OCCUPATION: Deputy City Solicitor EDUCATION: B.A. Miami University; J.D. University of Cincinnati

AFFILILATIONS: University of Cincinnati adjunct professor of law; Cincinnati Bar Association; Catholic WEBSITE: WWW.TERRYNESTOR.COM ANSWER 1: I am running for judge to increase the legitimacy of justice in Hamilton County. As a former law clerk and current trial practitioner, I have unique insight into the quality of justice in Hamilton County. I propose three reforms that will increase the quality of justice for our citizens. First, the court should adopt reforms that increase the depth of the jury pool in criminal and civil trials. Currently, the court only uses registered voters as its source for the jury roll. I believe the court should use both the registered voter list and the registered driver’s license list to increase the number of people who serve on juries. Fundamentally, the courts should be about preserving the constitutional right to a jury trial and assuring that all people have access to a jury of their peers. Second, the court, in cooperation with the clerk’s office, should aggregate and make available sentencing and other court statistics to make the decisions in each courtroom more transparent. The public should have access to simple and usable sets of data that allows people to understand sentencing fairness for both defendants and victims of crime. On the civil side, people should have easy access to court statistics that demonstrate the likelihood of summary dismissal, bench or jury trial, and how long their case will take. Third, the court and the Hamilton County jail are currently ill-equipped to deal with the opioid crisis that is a daily challenge for our local governments and first responders. Rather than repeat the current system of “catch and release,” I believe our common pleas court has a role to play in transforming Hamilton County into a “catch and cure” jurisdiction. By partnering with existing community control models and treatment facilities, our courts should be a place to help solve the drug crisis in both our urban and suburban neighborhoods. Finally, I think competition is good for our elected officials. No elected official should be unopposed on the ballot when democracy depends on different ideas to get different results.

OCCUPATION: Common Pleas Judge EDUCATION: B.A. Ohio Northern University 1980, J.D. Ohio Northern Claude Pettit College Of Law 1983

AFFILILATIONS: Ohio State Bar Association, Cincinnati Bar Association, Ohio Judicial Conference WEBSITE: LISAALLENFORJUDGE.COM/ ANSWER 1: I have been proud to have served the citizens of Hamilton County for the last 15 years as a Judge first on the Municipal Court bench and now as a Common Pleas Judge. I like the work and the challenge of fashioning appropriate sentences for criminal offenders, and the challenge of determining appropriate decisions in civil matters. It’s important in this day and age that we have Judges who are experienced in determining alternative sentences for non-violent offenders. It’s important to fashion sentences that both protect the public, and reduce the likelihood of re-offending. It is also important to know when a prison sentence is in order. After 34 years of being first a trial lawyer and then Judge, I have developed skills that help me in determining when prison is required or when probation should be granted. I also know how important it is to give victims of crime a voice in sentencing. Judges must ensure that victims know that they are being heard and that their wishes and fears are being addressed by the Court. My extensive experience as both a litigator and trial Judge has impressed upon me the importance of listening to all sides of an argument before making a decision. I strive to do that every day that I take the bench. It is important that the parties to a law suit, and the parties in a criminal prosecution know that the Judge deciding their case takes the job seriously with an eye toward fairness and justice within the law.

Leslie Ghiz

OCCUPATION: Judge, Hamilton County Court of Common Pleas EDUCATION: J.D. Capital University AFFILILATIONS: Greek Orthodox WEBSITE: WWW.LESLIEGHIZ.COM ANSWER 1: I am running for re-election because I have the best job in the world. Every day is a new challenge: different cases, different people, different styles. I have learned to acclimate to new situations on a daily basis. Additionally, there are a number of different criminal and civil cases I very much want to see through. I love being able to learn new areas of law each day, and to still “study” even when I’m not in school. I

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take pride in being able to help my community by keeping criminals off the streets, but also giving defendants fair and impartial trials. There is no greater feeling than when a jury comes back with a resolution. I have full faith in the jury system, and feel blessed I get to see it in action on a day to day basis.

Pavan V. Parikh

OCCUPATION: Attorney EDUCATION: B.A. Xavier University; J.D. St. Louis University School of Law AFFILILATIONS: River City Correctional Facility (Facilities Governing Board); American Constitution Society – Cincinnati Lawyers Chapter (Co-Chair); Potter Stewart American Inn of Court (Barrister); ArtsWave – Catalyzing Impact Committee (Member); Xavier University Mentorship Program (Mentor); Cincinnati Bar Association – Veterans & Military Law Committee (Vice-Chair); Truman National Security Project (Partner); Asian Pacific American Bar Association of Southwest Ohio (Board Member); Xavier University State Politics Internship (Co-founder and Advisor); Ohio Center for Law Related Education (Volunteer Competition Judge); Cincinnati Chamber of Commerce C-Change Class 11 (Member); Venue Magazine – Great Leaders Under 40 (Award Recipient); Cincinnati Business Courier Forty Under 40 (Award Recipient) WEBSITE: WWW.PAVANFORJUDGE.COM ANSWER 1: We need to do better. Like too many of our institutions, our faith in our courts has suffered unnecessary, undeserved, and unfortunate degradation in our recent past. We must be able to ensure greater access to the courts, greater transparency in the courts, and greater empathy from the courts. We need to guarantee that justice in our county is being served in such a way that we maximize safety while minimizing taxpayer expense. In my court we will not waste anyone’s time. We will ensure that court starts on time and that everyone is only there for the amount of time that they need to be there. We will strive to run an efficient courtroom that does not waste the time of police officers, witnesses, prosecutors, defendants, and defense attorneys. In my court we will guarantee transparency. Lawyers who practice before our court will understand why rulings occur and will be able to rectify their concerns in the future. We will find ways to engage the community in justice. Everyone in the county must have faith in our court system and we will engage with community members and leaders to ensure that faith in the justice system has been restored. Finally, in my court we will ensure that empathy is a guiding principle of our criminal justice ethos. In general, few people set out to be outlaws – most people make terrible mistakes trying to survive. Our court will not be hesitant to impose punishment when warranted, but our court will not be lax to impose punishment when also warranted. In our courtroom, nobody will be given punishment or quarter because of their race, religion, sexual


★JUDGE - COURT OF COMMON PLEAS★ identity or orientation, wealth or lack thereof, veterans’ status, or any other characteristic. Justice served will be blind but just. We can do better; we must do better; and we will do better when I am our next judge of the Hamilton County Court of Common Pleas.

Arica L. Underwood

OCCUPATION: Felony Trial Counsel with the Hamilton County Public Defender’s Office

EDUCATION: Walnut Hills High School c/o of 1988; Tuskegee University – B.A.; University of Cincinnati College of Law – J.D. AFFILILATIONS: Greater Cincinnati Criminal Defense Lawyer’s Association; Ohio Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers ANSWER 1: As a Common Pleas Court Judge, I will bring a balanced and committed sense of judicial service to the citizens of Hamilton County. I am hard working and will work every day to ensure that all citizens have an equal and fair voice. I believe that our Justice System although not perfect, is the best in the world. I understand that Judges are uniquely qualified to deal with issues such as mental health, addiction, overcrowded prisons, and overcrowded jails. Because of my diverse background, I can offer unique solutions to address these issues. I am polite, professional, patient and prepared. Additionally, I will be present and approachable, so that I can answer questions about Court proceedings and address issues as necessary.

1 TO BE ELECTED – 6 YEAR TERM Unexpired term ending 2-10-21

Thomas O. Beridon

OCCUPATION: Chief Hearing Examiner for the City of Cincinnati

EDUCATION: J.D. from the University of Cincinnati College of Law. Bachelor of Science from Ohio University. AFFILILATIONS: Talbert House Board of Trustees member / Parish Council president for Nativity Parish / Former chair of the Legal Advisory Board for Cincinnati Works / Former member of the Hamilton County Criminal Justice Commission / Cub Scout Den leader / SAY soccer coach WEBSITE: WWW.ELECTBERIDON.COM ANSWER 1: The Court of Common Pleas is the part of our judicial system with which most people are likely to interact. The complexity of the cases and the human toll of their outcomes require a judge with experience on both sides of criminal and civil cases. I have that experience and I know that we need judges who will respect the rights of every party appearing before them. If I am elected I will bring to the bench a thorough understanding of law and a respect for the parties appearing before me.

Curt C. Hartman

OCCUPATION: Judge, Hamilton County Common EDUCATION: B.S., United States Naval Academy; M.A., Georgetown University; J.D., Vanderbilt Law School AFFILILATIONS: N/A ANSWER 1: I want to continue to serve the people of Hamilton County in ensuring the predictability, stability and accountability provided by the law. Through my broad and extensive background, I bring the experience and insight necessary to ensure the fair and impartial administration of justice, while also recognizing and appreciating that matters that come before the courts are not simply theoretical exercises. Instead, the cases, both criminal and civil, involve real individuals for whom the decisions that I make have a direct personal impact upon them, their families and others, as well as effecting society as a whole. Attorneys from across the political spectrum who practice before me and support keeping me on the bench recognize and acknowledge the fairness, respectfulness and commitment I have to doing the right thing in each case before me. I have proven myself worthy of this high office and wish to continue my commitment to the law and to the people of Hamilton County.

How do I vote by mail? For 2018, absentee ballot application were automatically mail to people registered by August. You can request an absentee application by calling your Board of Elections or download and print one at bit.ly/OhAbsentee The absentee application deadline is Saturday, November 3 at 12 noon, but it is best to send it in early so you have time to receive your ballot in the mail. Your county Board of Elections (BOE) will process your application and send you and absentee ballot. If you sent in your application but have not yet received a ballot, call your BOE to make sure they received your application. Complete absentee ballots must be postmarked by Monday, November 5 if mailed or can be dropped off at the Board of Elections (but NOT at local polling places) by Tuesday, November 6 at 7:30pm.

How to Find out About Judicial Candidates Voters often don’t have much information about judicial candidates. Because most citizens do not routinely interact with judges in their communities, they tend to know very little about how judges conduct themselves in the course of doing their jobs. In addition, state rules do not allow judicial candidates to discuss their views on controversial issues because judges must be impartial on the bench. It is important for voters to understand the role of the courts and the important qualities to consider when evaluating judicial candidates. To learn about candidates for judge in your area consider reading candidates’ campaign literature, visiting campaign websites, and talking with people who know the candidates, including practicing attorneys. The League of Women Voters of Ohio again this year joins the Ohio State Bar Association, the Bliss Institute for Applied Politics at the University of Akron, the Ohio Newspaper Association and Ohio Broadcasters Association in a statewide, nonpartisan, online judicial voter's guide at www.judicialvotescount.org. In order to make a decision, when voting on judicial candidates, consider the answers to the following questions:

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To what extent has the candidate practiced in the area(s) of law the court handles? What work or other experience has the candidate had that will particularly qualify the candidate to perform the duties of a judge on this court? What is the candidate’s legal philosophy? Political philosophy? Consider the candidate’s integrity, judicial temperament, and level of commitment to public service and the administration of justice. Also, consider who is paying for any advertising about any particular judicial election. For our democracy to function, judges must carry out their tasks impartially and independently. Judges’ decisions should not follow public opinion or promote special interests or even reflect their personal beliefs. Judges’ decisions should be based on facts and law. This judicial impartiality protects fair trials and upholds the rule of law.

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★BALLOT ISSUES★

DEFINITIONS OF BALLOT TERMS TAX LEVY: Taxes that are assessed to homeowners and businesses based on their property values. These monies are used to fund government functions as well as special programs or activities determined to be of significant benefit to the citizens. Tax levies may be placed on the ballot for public vote by a government entity (County Commissioners, City Council, and Township Trustees) or taxing authority (School Board, Vocational District, Park Board, Library Board) RENEWAL LEVY: A Renewal Levy is the CONTINUANCE OF AN EXISTING LEVY with the collection rate at the same dollar amount as when the levy was originally approved. REPLACEMENT LEVY: A replacement levy is a NEW LEVY FOR THE SAME PURPOSE AS THE EXISTING LEVY but with a different collection rate than the levy it replaces. The collection rate uses the assessed value of the property at the time of the replacement levy. SUBSTITUTE LEVY: As distinct from the most common kinds of operating levies, substitute levies are designed to raise a specified amount of revenue each year regardless of changes in property valuation over time; the tax rate is changed each year to offset valuation changes. Replaces an existing emergency levy. CE: Current Expenses COE: Current Operating Expenses CPT: Continued Period of Time EMS: Emergency Medical Services JEDZ: Joint Economic Development Zone MILL: The property tax is measured in mills; a mill is one tenth of a cent. This translates to $1 for each $1,000 taxable value of the property. MARKET VALUE: The market value of property is determined by the County Auditor. The valuation considers regional and neighborhood economic conditions, building improvements and land value. By state law, there is a full reassessment of each parcel every six years, followed by a computerized update three years later. The last full reappraisal in Hamilton County was in 2017 for taxes to be paid starting in 2018. ASSESSED VALUE: Assessed Value is 35% of the Market Value of a property. In Ohio, property taxes are determined by the Assessed Value. TAX RATE (MILLS): The Full Tax Rate is the total millage for the year, most of which is approved by voters in the taxing district. The Effective Tax Rate is the annual total millage adjusted to the year it was passed and also reduced by state mandated reductions such as the rollback and the homestead exemption. This is stated in mills, not dollars. SPECIAL DISTRICT: State law authorizes the creation of a special district to serve a specific governmental purpose in response to a need not offered already within the boundaries of an existing governmental unit. A separate law authorizes each special district which is established by a resolution of the local government(s) which delineates its powers and responsibilities. A special district operates under an independent Board, separate from local Government, and has its own budget and means of financing.

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ISSUE 1

ARGUMENTS FOR THE AMENDMENT:

TO REDUCE PENALTIES FOR CRIMES OF OBTAINING, POSSESSING, AND USING ILLEGAL DRUGS

1. It would make the possession, obtainment and use of drugs no more than a misdemeanor.

PROPOSED BY INITIATIVE PETITION

2. It would create a sentence reduction credits program for inmates’ participation in rehabilitative, work, or educational programs.

To add a new Section 12 to Article XV of the Constitution of the State of Ohio

3. It would reduce the number of people in state prisons for low-level crimes.

A MAJORITY yes vote is necessary for the amendment to pass.

4. It would save tens of millions of dollars annually in prison spending and direct the savings to addiction treatment and victims of crime.

PROPOSED CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT

IF ADOPTED, THE AMENDMENT WOULD: Require sentence reductions of incarcerated individuals, except individuals incarcerated for murder, rape, or child molestation, by up to 25% if the individual participates in rehabilitative, work, or educational programming. Mandate that criminal offenses of obtaining, possessing, or using any drug such as fentanyl, heroin, methamphetamine, cocaine, LSD, and other controlled substances cannot be classified as a felony, but only a misdemeanor. Prohibit jail time as a sentence for obtaining, possessing, or using such drugs until an individual’s third offense within 24 months. Allow an individual convicted of obtaining, possessing, or using any such drug prior to the effective date of the amendment to ask a court to reduce the conviction to a misdemeanor, regardless of whether the individual has completed the sentence. Require any available funding, based on projected savings, to be applied to state administered rehabilitation programs and crime victim funds. Require a graduated series of responses, such as community service, drug treatment, or jail time, for minor, non-criminal probation violations. SHALL THE AMENDMENT BE APPROVED?  YES  NO LEAGUE EXPLANATION: Issue 1, also known as The Amendment to Reduce Penalties for Crimes of Obtaining, Possessing, and Using Illegal Drugs, would add a new section 12 to Article XV of the Ohio Constitution. The amendment is designed to reduce the number of people in state prisons for low-level, nonviolent drug possession; drug use offenses; or for noncriminal probation violations. In addition, it would provide sentence credits for participation in rehabilitative programs; and is intended to direct the savings achieved by such reductions in incarceration to substance abuse treatment programs, crime victim programs, probation programs, graduated responses programs, and rehabilitation programs. THE AMENDMENT WOULD: • Reclassify drug offenses from felony to misdemeanor for both accused and convicted drug users. • Require the state to spend savings due to a reduction of the number of prison inmates on drug treatment and rehabilitation programs.

ARGUMENTS AGAINST THE AMENDMENT: 1. The amendment would make it more difficult to prosecute drug traffickers. 2. This belongs in the Ohio Revised code. The constitution should contain fundamental principles and organization of government. Appropriation directives should not be added to the constitution. 3. This takes away available resources from the court for rehabilitating people and doesn’t give judges the ability to use incarceration when it’s necessary. 4. This proposed constitutional amendment does not provide adequate funding for treatment infrastructure nor treatment itself.

ISSUE 2 PROPOSED TAX LEVY (ADDITIONAL) MARIEMONT CITY SCHOOL DISTRICT A MAJORITY affirmative vote is necessary for passage. An additional tax for the benefit of the Mariemont City School District, County of Hamilton, Ohio, for the purpose of PROVIDING FOR CURRENT OPERATING EXPENSES at a rate not exceeding two and five-tenths (2.5) mills, and for GENERAL PERMANENT IMPROVEMENTS at a rate not exceeding five and seventy-five hundredths (5.75) mills, to constitute a combined rate not exceeding eight and twenty-five hundredths (8.25) mills for each one dollar of valuation, which amounts to eighty-two and five-tenths cents ($0.825) for each one hundred dollars of valuation, for a continuing period of time, commencing in 2018, first due in calendar year 2019. FOR THE TAX LEVY AGAINST THE TAX LEVY

ISSUE 3 PROPOSED TAX LEVY (SUBSTITUTE) READING COMMUNITY CITY SCHOOL DISTRICT A MAJORITY affirmative vote is necessary for passage. Shall a tax levy substituting for an existing levy be imposed by the Reading Community City School District, County of Hamilton, Ohio, for the purpose of PROVIDING FOR THE NECESSARY REQUIREMENTS OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT in

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the initial sum of $1,170,000, and a levy of taxes be made outside of the ten-mill limitation estimated by the county auditor to require six and forty-three hundredths (6.43) mills for each one dollar of valuation, which amounts to sixty-four and three tenths cents ($0.643) for each one hundred dollars of valuation for the initial year of the tax, for a continuing period, commencing in 2018, first due in calendar year 2019, with the sum of such tax to increase only if and as new land or real property improvements not previously taxed by the school district are added to its tax list? FOR THE TAX LEVY AGAINST THE TAX LEVY

ISSUE 4 PROPOSED TAX LEVY (RENEWAL AND DECREASE) ST. BERNARD-ELMWOOD PLACE CITY SCHOOL DISTRICT A MAJORITY affirmative vote is necessary for passage. Shall a levy renewing part of an existing levy, being a reduction of four hundred eighteen thousand seven hundred fifty dollars ($418,750) be imposed by the St. BernardElmwood Place City School District for the purpose of PROVIDING FOR THE EMERGENCY REQUIREMENTS OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT in the sum of one million two hundred fifty-six thousand two hundred fifty dollars ($1,256,250) and a levy of taxes to be made outside of the ten-mill limitation estimated by the county auditor to average 10.66 mills for each one dollar of valuation, which amounts to $1.066 cents for each one hundred dollars of valuation for a period of 10 years, commencing in 2019, first due in calendar year 2020? FOR THE TAX LEVY AGAINST THE TAX LEVY

ISSUE 5 PROPOSED TAX LEVY (SUBSTITUTE) WINTON WOODS CITY SCHOOL DISTRICT A MAJORITY affirmative vote is necessary for passage. Shall a tax levy substituting for an existing levy be imposed by the Winton Woods City School District, County of Hamilton, Ohio, for the purpose of PROVIDING FOR THE NECESSARY REQUIREMENTS OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT in the initial sum of $4,200,000, and a levy of taxes be made outside of the ten-mill limitation estimated by the county auditor to require nine and eighteen one-hundredths (9.18) mills for each one dollar of valuation, which amounts to ninety-one and eight tenths cents ($0.918) for each one hundred dollars of valuation for the initial year of the tax, for a continuing period, commencing in 2018, first due in calendar year 2019, with the sum of such tax to increase only if and as new land or real property improvements not previously taxed by the school district are added to its tax list? FOR THE TAX LEVY AGAINST THE TAX LEVY


★BALLOT ISSUES★

ISSUE 6

ISSUE 9

PROPOSED TAX LEVY (RENEWAL) GREAT OAKS CAREER CAMPUSES

PROPOSED TAX LEVY (ADDITIONAL)

A MAJORITY affirmative vote is necessary for passage.

A MAJORITY affirmative vote is necessary for passage.

A renewal of a tax for the benefit of the Great Oaks Career Campuses (Including Diamond Oaks, Laurel Oaks, Live Oaks and Scarlet Oaks), a joint vocational school district, Counties of Brown, Butler, Clermont, Clinton, Fayette, Greene, Hamilton, Highland, Madison, Pickaway, Ross, and Warren, Ohio, for the purpose of CURRENT OPERATING EXPENSES at a rate not exceeding two and seven-tenths (2.7) mills for each one dollar of valuation, which amounts to twentyseven cents ($0.27) for each one hundred dollars of valuation, for a continuing period of time, commencing in 2019 first due in calendar year 2020. FOR THE TAX LEVY AGAINST THE TAX LEVY

ISSUE 7 PROPOSED TAX LEVY (RENEWAL) COLUMBIA TOWNSHIP WASTE DISPOSAL DISTRICT A MAJORITY affirmative vote is necessary for passage. A renewal of a tax for the benefit of Columbia Township, County of Hamilton, Ohio, for the purpose of COLLECTION AND DISPOSAL OF GARBAGE OR REFUSE, INCLUDING YARD WASTE at a rate not exceeding five and onetenth (5.1) mills for each one dollar of valuation, which amounts to fifty-one cents ($0.51) for each one hundred dollars of valuation, for three (3) years, commencing in 2018, first due in calendar year 2019. FOR THE TAX LEVY AGAINST THE TAX LEVY

ISSUE 8 PROPOSED TAX LEVY (RENEWAL) MIAMI TOWNSHIP WASTE DISTRICT A MAJORITY affirmative vote is necessary for passage. A renewal of a tax for the benefit of Miami Township, County of Hamilton, Ohio, for the purpose of WASTE COLLECTION AND DISPOSAL at a rate not exceeding two and twenty-five hundredths (2.25) mills for each one dollar of valuation, which amounts to twenty-two and five-tenths cents ($0.225) for each one hundred dollars of valuation, for five (5) years, commencing in 2018, first due in calendar year 2019. FOR THE TAX LEVY AGAINST THE TAX LEVY

general fund. The reality is there continues to be an increase in complex situations and caseloads for those individuals working with Hamilton County’s children and families.

HAMILTON COUNTY

An additional tax for the benefit of the County of Hamilton, Ohio, for the purpose of SUPPLEMENTING THE GENERAL FUND TO PROVIDE SUPPORT FOR CHILDREN SERVICES AND THE CARE AND PLACEMENT OF CHILDREN at a rate not exceeding one and ninety-eight hundredths (1.98) mills for each one dollar of valuation, which amounts to nineteen and eight-tenths cents ($0.198) for each one hundred dollars of valuation, for three (3) years, commencing in 2018, first due in calendar year 2019. FOR THE TAX LEVY AGAINST THE TAX LEVY LEAGUE EXPLANATION: This proposed three-year property tax levy of 1.98 mills is an additional tax to benefit Children’s Services. If approved, the owner of $100,000 home would pay about $69 per year, an increase of what is currently being paid. The proposed levy would bring an additional $37 million annually to protect abused and neglected children in Hamilton County. This proposed levy if passed would run through 2021. Hamilton County’s current 5-year 2.77 mill property tax levy (through 2021) provides about $47 million. Millage has not increased since 1996. The Board of County Commissioners placed the levy on the ballot after a review by the Tax Levy Review Committee. WHAT THE LEVY WILL DO: This proposed levy will provide approximately $37 million of additional annual funding for Federal and State mandated services to children through Hamilton County Children’s Services, a division of Hamilton County Jobs and Family Services (JFS). It is leveraged to bring approximately $30 million in matching state and federal funds. Children’s Services is the local organization legally responsible for taking reports of child abuse, neglect and dependency. A key service is operating of 241-KIDS (Hamilton County’s 24-hour telephone line for reporting suspected abuse), investigating of these reports, and providing services with other community partners to help support families. Children who cannot be safe in their homes are placed in temporary care of relatives, foster parents or institutional settings. The agency may seek protective, temporary or permanent custody of children through Juvenile Court and promotes recruitment of foster and adoptive families. BACKGROUND: In 2017, 20,204 children were helped by JFS (Jobs and Family Services) versus 15,780 in 2015. That is 1 in every 9 children in Hamilton County. More children are in JFS custody due to multiple adverse factors stemming from poverty, increased numbers of drug addiction and complex cases with higher levels of care for children. Services are mandated by the state and federal government, anything not funded by the levy would have to be paid for by another source, most likely the

A reserve fund from the state settlement for use by the County, will be exhausted by the end of 2019. Ohio is last among all 50 states in funding these services. Generally states pay an average of 43% of the cost of children’s services. In Ohio, the State pays only 10%. TAX LEVY REVIEW COMMITTEE: The Tax Levy Review Committee recommended for placement on the November 2018 ballot, a new 3-year levy, to generate $37 million of additional funding per year, allowing JFS to enhance its service level to the recommended best practices level and continued workforce hiring. They concluded that with higher service needs, more children in care, more complex needs; JFS resources cannot keep up, let alone improve; further additional revenue is necessary. ARGUMENTS FOR THE LEVY: The levy provides needed funding to investigate child abuse and support contracting services and programs for families and children. These services have been significantly reduced because there has been no increase since 1996 and increased workloads that threaten the quality of service. Without new funding, JFS will face a severe budget crisis by 2020. The County is legally mandated to provide funding for services for child abuse, neglect and dependent children. ARGUMENTS AGAINST THE LEVY: County property owners already face high tax burdens and should not be expected to pay new levies. The state should step up and increase its funding support for Children’s Services. If that fails, it can be readdressed again in two years when the renewal levy needs to be addressed.

ISSUE 10 PROPOSED CHARTER AMENDMENT ORDINANCE 226-2018 CITY OF CINCINNATI A MAJORITY affirmative vote is necessary for passage. Shall Sections 4 and 5a of Article II, “Legislative Power”, existing Section 3 of Article III, “Mayor”, existing Sections 2a and 2b of Article IX, “Nominations and Elections” of the Charter of the City of Cincinnati be amended to provide that the members of City Council shall be elected at-large for two-year terms?  YES  NO LEAGUE EXPLANATION: The proposed amendment would change the term of office for City Council members to two years starting with the municipal election in November 2021. Currently City Council members are elected at-large for four-year terms. Council members would continue to be elected at-large. Term limits

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of four successive two-year terms on council would apply, consistent with term limits currently in place. The terms of the Vice Mayor and the President Pro Tem would be changed from four years to two years in keeping with two-year Council terms. The Mayor will continue to be elected for a four-year term. This issue was placed on the ballot by a vote of Cincinnati City Council. BACKGROUND: From 1927 through 2011 City Council members were elected at-large for twoyear terms. In 2012 voters passed a Charter Amendment changing the term of Council members to four years and keeping the at-large election. In the 2013 and 2017 elections Council members were elected at-large to four-year terms. ARGUMENTS FOR THE PROPOSED AMENDMENT: City Council should be elected every two years to increase responsiveness and accountability of Council members to voters. Four years is too long to wait for voters to have a say in who is on Council, especially if they perceive that Council or a particular Council member is not doing a good job. City residents wanting to run for Council will have more opportunities to get on the ballot without having to wait for four years until the next Council election. ARGUMENTS AGAINST THE PROPOSED AMENDMENT: Voters changed the term of City Council members to four years in 2012. It is too early to change back to two-year terms until we have time to assess the full impact of the longer terms on city governance. Having Council elections every two years will increase campaign and election costs. Two-year terms are too short for Council members to develop council collaboration and long-term strategic planning. The current four-year terms allow Council members to spend more time governing and less time on politics NOTE TO VOTERS ON COUNCIL TERM ISSUES #10 & #11 There are two different City of Cincinnati Charter Amendments on the ballot proposing changes to City Council terms. If a voter wants Council terms to change back to two years, then the voter should vote YES on Issue 10. If a voter wants Council terms to change to staggered four-year terms, then the voter should vote YES on Issue 11. If a voter likes both amendments better than the current system, then the voter may want to vote YES on both proposals. Should both Issue 10 and Issue 11 receive a majority YES vote then the Issue with the most votes will prevail. If a voter wants to keep the present four-year terms with Council members all elected in the same year, then the voter should vote NO on both Issue 10 and Issue 11.

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★BALLOT ISSUES★

ISSUE 11 PROPOSED CHARTER AMENDMENT ORDINANCE 227-2018 CITY OF CINCINNATI A MAJORITY affirmative vote is necessary for passage. Shall Sections 4 and 5a of Article II, “Legislative Power”, existing Section 3 of Article III, “Mayor”, existing Sections 1, 2a, 2b, 3, 5a, and 8 of Article IX, “Nominations and Elections” of the Charter of the City of Cincinnati be amended to provide that the members of City Council shall be elected at-large for staggered four-year terms, which shall commence as of the January 2022 Council term with five members of Council serving four-year terms and four members of Council serving two-year terms, with four-year terms for all council elections thereafter?  YES  NO LEAGUE EXPLANATION: The proposed amendment would change the term of office for City Council members to staggered four-year terms starting with the municipal election in November 2021 (Council term starting January 2022). Currently City Council members are elected all at the same time for four-year terms. Council members would continue to be elected at-large. In order to achieve staggered terms, at the November 2021 election, five members of Council would be elected to serve for four-year terms and four members of Council would be elected to serve for two-year terms. Of the nine candidates elected to Council in 2021, the five candidates receiving the highest number of votes would serve four-year terms and the remaining four candidates would serve two-year terms. Following the election of November 2021, there would be elections for members of Council every two years, with four members of Council elected in 2023 for four-year terms, and five members of Council elected in 2025 for four-year terms. Term limits of two successive four-year terms on council would continue to apply except that council members elected to the two-year terms in the 2021 election could serve a maximum of 10 successive years. Due to the staggered nature of Council terms, the terms of the Vice Mayor and the President Pro Tem would be changed to two years. The Mayor will continue to be elected for a four-year term. This issue was placed on the ballot by a vote of Cincinnati City Council. BACKGROUND: From 1927 through 2011 City Council members were elected at-large for twoyear terms. In 2012 voters passed a Charter Amendment changing the term of Council members to four years and keeping the at-large election. In the 2013 and 2017 elections Council members were elected to four-year terms. This amendment proposes to stagger those fouryear terms, with elections for either four or five Council positions being held every two years. ARGUMENTS FOR THE PROPOSED AMENDMENT:

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Election of members of Council to staggered terms of four years will increase the accountability of Councilmembers to the residents of the City because voters will be able to elect some Council members every two years.

are to be considered at the executive session. Any formal action would have to be adopted in an open meeting of City Council.

clarifying language; and to add definitions of key terms?

City residents wanting to run for Council will have more frequent opportunities to get on the ballot and run for Council.

This issue was placed on the ballot by a vote of Cincinnati City Council. BACKGROUND: Prior to the year 2000, City Council held executive sessions for certain purposes. Based on a court decision in 2000 (citing wording in the current City Charter that “The proceedings of the council shall be public.”), City Council is currently prohibited from conferring as needed in executive sessions. Executive sessions are permitted for other public bodies in Ohio pursuant to criteria established in the Ohio Revised Code.

LEAGUE EXPLANATION: The proposed Charter amendment would specifically prohibit partnerships and other unincorporated businesses (including limited liability companies - LLCs) from making unlimited and anonymous contributions to a candidate for Mayor or City Council. Under current interpretation of the Campaign Finance article of the Charter, contributions to city candidates are being made in the name of an LLC without identifying the owner(s) of the LLC. Also, contributions being made through an LLC are not being allocated to the individual owner(s) and so are not being counted towards the per person maximum contribution limit of $1,100 per election cycle specified in the Charter. This amendment would bring Cincinnati’s Charter in line with state law regarding contributions to candidates from partnerships or other unincorporated businesses (including LLCs) and require that such contributions be attributed and allocated to the owner(s) and count towards that person’s maximum allowable contribution to a candidate.

Staggering the terms of office would add continuity to Council. Members wouldn’t all be new to office at the same time. ARGUMENTS AGAINST THE PROPOSED AMENDMENT: Staggered terms will have fewer council seats (four or five) up for election every two years and may disadvantage independent candidates and those supported by minority parties who typically don’t score in the top four or five Council places. Having Council elections every two years will increase campaign and election costs. Council elections for some members every two years would cause disruption in Council business and defeat the advantages of four-year terms.

ISSUE 12 PROPOSED CHARTER AMENDMENT ORDINANCE 228-2018 CITY OF CINCINNATI A MAJORITY affirmative vote is necessary for passage. Shall Section 5 of Article II, “Legislative Power”, of the Charter of the City of Cincinnati be repealed and replaced to require all meetings of Council and its committees be held in accordance with the requirements of the Ohio Open Meetings Act, codified in Ohio Revised Code Section 121.22 or its successors?  YES  NO LEAGUE EXPLANATION: The amendment would require the meetings of City Council and its committees to be conducted in compliance with all provisions of the Ohio Open Meetings Act and would allow City Council to conduct executive sessions for certain limited purposes as authorized by state law. The amendment would delete the wording: “The proceedings of the council shall be public.” Ohio law recognizes that certain situations require public bodies to confer in executive sessions in order to best serve the public interest, including situations related to matters of imminent or pending litigation, personnel matters, security arrangements and emergency response protocols, and certain sales or purchases of property if premature disclosure of information would give an unfair bargaining advantage to other parties. If the amendment passes, City Council could hold an executive session only after a majority roll call affirmative vote of a quorum present at a regular or special meeting. The motion and vote to hold the executive session would state which one or more of the approved matters listed in state law

The Cincinnati Charter Review Task Force recommended in 2015 that a charter amendment to permit City Council to hold executive sessions be submitted to the voters. ARGUMENTS FOR THE PROPOSED AMENDMENT: This amendment would allow City Council to conduct executive sessions for the limited purposes permitted under state law, a practice long exercised by council itself (until 2000) and a practice consistent with that of subordinate bodies within the City, and most other local governments around the State of Ohio (including Hamilton County and other municipalities in the area). This amendment would allow City Council to conduct performance reviews of the City Manager in executive session. If sensitive personnel discussions and reviews cannot occur in closed sessions, city councils often choose not to conduct them at all to the detriment of the city and its efficient and effective operation. Development incentive proposals could have more oversight by City Council if the proposals could be vetted with some assurance of confidentiality. This would give City Council more time to scrutinize complicated proposals and agreements before voting on them in public session. ARGUMENTS AGAINST THE PROPOSED AMENDMENT: City Council and its committees should continue to conduct all of the City’s business in full view of the public in order to maximize transparency and accountability.

ISSUE 13 PROPOSED CHARTER AMENDMENT ORDINANCE 229-2018 CITY OF CINCINNATI A MAJORITY affirmative vote is necessary for passage. Shall Article XIII, “Campaign Finance”, Sections 1, 2, 4 and 7 of the Charter of the City of Cincinnati be amended to prohibit unlimited and anonymous contributions made through limited liability companies to a candidate for municipal election; to remove inconsistencies and add

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 YES  NO

Under the proposed amendment, contributions to candidates could still be made by these partnerships and other unincorporated businesses but the contribution or a portion of the contribution would have to be allocated to the person, owner, member, and/or partner making the contribution. The contribution allocation would have to be included in the $1,100 individual contribution limit for that person, owner, member, and/or partner. Contributions made through LLCs to candidates for municipal office could no longer be unlimited and anonymous. This amendment would also remove inconsistencies and vague language and add definitions of key terms to Article XIII (“Campaign Finance”) of the City Charter. This issue was placed on the ballot by a vote of Cincinnati City Council. BACKGROUND: In 2001 Cincinnati voters adopted Article XIII (“Campaign Finance”) of the Cincinnati Charter with a provision to limit campaign contributions to Mayor and Council candidates. The charter provides “a person may not contribute more than $1000…” (subsequently adjusted for inflation to $1,100) to any one candidate for mayor or council within a particular election cycle. The motivation for this campaign finance reform was to limit dominance of Mayor and Council campaigns by big donors. In 2005 the Cincinnati Elections Commission issued an opinion that Limited Liability Companies (LLCs) were “persons” independent of their owners, with their own $1,100 donation limit. In contrast, Ohio law provides that, while LLC money can be used to make contributions, the amount donated is counted as a donation from the LLC owner(s).


★BALLOT ISSUES★ ARGUMENTS FOR THE PROPOSED AMENDMENT: This amendment requires LLCs to be transparent and accountable in their campaign donations by requiring them to disclose the persons/ owners making the contributions and requiring the contributions to count towards the persons’/ owners’ contribution limit. The City Charter would then be consistent with Ohio law. LLCs should not be able to make unlimited and anonymous contributions to candidates because such contributions gut the intent of the 2001 Campaign Finance Charter Amendment to limit big donor money from dominating the races for Mayor and Council. The use of multiple LLCs to enhance the ability to contribute to Mayoral and Council candidates in excess of the limits intended by the Campaign Finance article of the Charter should be curtailed. This practice can be especially problematic if used by real estate developers seeking to benefit from City tax abatements and other development incentives. ARGUMENTS AGAINST THE PROPOSED AMENDMENT: Partnerships and other unincorporated businesses, including LLCs, should not be limited in their ability to make contributions to a candidate for municipal office.

to qualified veterans who are Ohio residents. In order to be eligible for the five point credit a veteran must have been honorably discharged from military service or transferred to reserve duty. Currently veterans are required to be honorably discharged or transferred to reserve duty at the time they take a civil service examination. The amendment would adjust the date by which such veterans must provide the City with proof of their discharge so that they would not have to produce proof of their honorable discharge until just before an eligibility list is to be provided to the Civil Service Commission.

program conducted at a public safety academy (PSA) to be established by Cincinnati Public Schools (CPS) in collaboration with the City of Cincinnati. The public safety curriculum of the academy would have to be approved by the City of Cincinnati administration and its fire and police administration. A person would be limited to a maximum of ten (10) points on an entry level examination for civil service positions through a combination of military service credit and public safety academy graduate credit. These examination credits would apply only to entry level examinations and not to any promotional examinations.

This issue was placed on the ballot by a vote of Cincinnati City Council.

This issue was placed on the ballot by a vote of Cincinnati City Council.

ARGUMENTS FOR THE PROPOSED AMENDMENT:

BACKGROUND: If this amendment passes, Cincinnati Public Schools (CPS), in collaboration with the City of Cincinnati, would proceed to implement plans which are already underway to develop a public safety academy including fire and police training programs. CPS would build out the curriculum of the academy to align with state standards and with certification and training standards to be approved by the Police and Fire administration of the City. To those supporting the public safety academy, the examination credit would provide a meaningful incentive for CPS students to choose to enter the public safety academy programs and to choose careers in the City’s Fire and Police departments. If all the qualifications of the amendment are met in the new public safety academy, then successful graduates of the academy would qualify for the five point credit when they take an entry level examination for a job in the City’s Fire or Police departments.

Allowing all qualified veterans, including those who are not Ohio residents, the benefit of the five-point credit will increase the pool of possible City employees and will provide more veterans with employment opportunities with the City. Certain veterans could take civil service examinations at any reasonable point in their military service without having to be honorably discharged at the time they take an exam. ARGUMENTS AGAINST THE PROPOSED AMENDMENT

Partnerships and other unincorporated businesses, including LLCs, should not be required to disclose who is making the contribution to a candidate for municipal office.

Veterans’ preference points should continue to be reserved for Ohio residents only. Out-of-state veterans could take up residency in Ohio in order to qualify for the preference points.

ISSUE 14

Veterans should have to be honorably discharged by the time they take an exam so that they are ready to take a city job if they end up on an eligibility list.

PROPOSED CHARTER AMENDMENT ORDINANCE 230-2018 CITY OF CINCINNATI

ISSUE 15

A MAJORITY affirmative vote is necessary for passage.

PROPOSED CHARTER AMENDMENT

Shall Section 3 of Article V, “Civil Service” of the Charter of the City of Cincinnati be amended to delete the provision that only Ohio residents may receive the five-point preference given to qualified veterans who achieve a passing score on the City of Cincinnati’s entry level civil service examinations and to provide that qualified veterans must produce proof of their honorable discharge no earlier than the day before an eligibility list is to be provided to the Civil Service Commission for approval so that all qualified veterans may receive the five-point preference?  YES  NO LEAGUE EXPLANATION: The proposed amendment would remove the Ohio residency requirement for veterans to be eligible for veteran’s preference points in civil service exams in the City of Cincinnati. The amendment would permit ALL qualified veterans to receive a credit of five points (ten points for disabled veterans) added to a passing score on entry level examinations for the classified service of the City of Cincinnati. Under current provisions in the Charter, these credits are available only

ARGUMENTS FOR THE PROPOSED AMENDMENT: This examination credit would promote more diversity in the City’s public safety services by encouraging individuals from the diverse CPS student body to attend and graduate from a public safety academy in preparation for applying for fire and police jobs in the City.

ORDINANCE 252-2018 CITY OF CINCINNATI A MAJORITY affirmative vote is necessary for passage. Shall Section 3 of Article V, “Civil Service” of the Charter of the City of Cincinnati be amended to provide that graduates of a public safety academy established by Cincinnati Public Schools in collaboration with the City of Cincinnati be provided an incentive to serve the City in the fire and police departments through an award of five (5) points in examination credit, on departmental entry level examinations?  YES  NO LEAGUE EXPLANATION: The amendment would create an incentive for graduates of a public safety academy to pursue their public safety careers in the City of Cincinnati by awarding an examination credit of five (5) points in entry level examinations for classified jobs in the City’s Fire or Police departments. In order to be eligible for the credit, individuals would have to successfully graduate from a fire or police

This examination credit would be an incentive for CPS to establish a public safety academy with a rigorous focused curriculum that would attract CPS high school students to enroll and prepare for careers in the City’s Fire and Police departments. ARGUMENTS AGAINST THE PROPOSED AMENDMENT: Voters are being asked to approve this examination credit incentive before CPS has even established its public safety academy. This credit would not be fair because it would only be available to graduates of CPS’s public safety academy and not those of other high school public safety programs in the greater Cincinnati area.

W W W. LW V C I N C I N N AT I . O R G

ISSUE 16 PROPOSED INCOME TAX (INCREASE) CITY OF MADEIRA A MAJORITY affirmative vote is necessary for passage. Shall the Ordinance providing for a one quarter per cent (0.25%) levy increase on income for the purpose of INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT AND MAINTENANCE for the City of Madeira effective January 1, 2019 be passed? FOR THE INCOME TAX AGAINST THE INCOME TAX

ISSUE 17 PROPOSED TAX LEVY (RENEWAL) CITY OF NORTH COLLEGE HILL A MAJORITY affirmative vote is necessary for passage. A renewal of tax for the benefit of the City of North College Hill, County of Hamilton, Ohio, for the purpose of PROVIDING AND MAINTAINING MOTOR VEHICLES, COMMUNICATIONS, OTHER EQUIPMENT, BUILDINGS, AND SITES FOR SUCH BUILDINGS USED DIRECTLY IN THE OPERATION OF A POLICE DEPARTMENT, FOR THE PAYMENT OF SALARIES OF PERMANENT OR PART-TIME POLICE, COMMUNICATIONS, OR ADMINISTRATIVE PERSONNEL TO OPERATE THE SAME, INCLUDING THE PAYMENT OF ANY EMPLOYER CONTRIBUTIONS REQUIRED FOR SUCH PERSONNEL UNDER SECTION 145.48 OR 742.33 OF THE REVISED CODE, FOR THE PAYMENT OF THE COSTS INCURRED BY TOWNSHIPS AS A RESULT OF CONTRACTS MADE WITH OTHER POLITICAL SUBDIVISIONS IN ORDER TO OBTAIN POLICE PROTECTION, FOR THE PROVISION OF AMBULANCE OR EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES OPERATED BY A POLICE DEPARTMENT, OR FOR THE PAYMENT OF OTHER RELATED COSTS at a rate not exceeding four and nine-tenths (4.9) mills for each one dollar of valuation, which amounts to forty-nine cents ($0.49) for each one hundred dollars of valuation, for five (5) years, commencing in 2018, first due in calendar year 2019. FOR THE TAX LEVY AGAINST THE TAX LEVY

ISSUE 18 PROPOSED ORDINANCE BY PETITION CITY OF NORWOOD A MAJORITY affirmative vote is necessary for passage. Shall the proposed ordinance adding Section 513.15 Marijuana Laws and Penalties to the City of Norwood Municipal Code, which would lower the penalty for misdemeanor marijuana offenses to the lowest penalty allowed by state law, be adopted?  YES  NO

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★BALLOT ISSUES★

ISSUE 19 SPECIAL ELECTION BY PETITION LOCAL OPTION ELECTION ON SUNDAY SALE OF LIQUOR PRECINCT NORWOOD 2-C A MAJORITY affirmative vote is necessary for passage. Shall the sale of wine and mixed beverages be permitted for sale on Sunday between the hours of ten a.m. and midnight by W.F.M. W.O., Inc., dba Whole Foods Market, a holder of a D-6 liquor permit who is engaged in the business of operating a grocery store at 2693 Edmondson Drive, Norwood, Ohio 45209?  YES  NO

ISSUE 20 PROPOSED TAX LEVY (RENEWAL) VILLAGE OF GLENDALE A MAJORITY affirmative vote is necessary for passage. A renewal of a tax for the benefit of the Village of Glendale, County of Hamilton, Ohio, for the purpose of CURRENT OPERATING EXPENSES at a rate not exceeding eight and five-tenths (8.5) mills for each one dollar of valuation, which amounts to eighty-five cents ($0.85) for each one hundred dollars of valuation, for four (4) years, commencing in 2018, first due in calendar year 2019. FOR THE TAX LEVY AGAINST THE TAX LEVY

ISSUE 21 PROPOSED TAX LEVY (ADDITIONAL) VILLAGE OF GLENDALE A MAJORITY affirmative vote is necessary for passage. An additional tax for the benefit of the Village of Glendale, County of Hamilton, Ohio, for the purpose of CURRENT OPERATING EXPENSES at a rate not exceeding two and five-tenths (2.5) mills for each one dollar of valuation, which amounts to twenty-five cents ($0.25) for each one hundred dollars of valuation, for four (4) years, commencing in 2018, first due in calendar year 2019. FOR THE TAX LEVY AGAINST THE TAX LEVY

ISSUE 22 PROPOSED TAX LEVY (RENEWAL) VILLAGE OF GOLF MANOR A MAJORITY affirmative vote is necessary for passage. A renewal of a tax for the benefit of the Village of Golf Manor, County of Hamilton, Ohio, for the purpose of CURRENT OPERATING EXPENSES at a rate not exceeding two (2) mills for each one dollar of valuation, which amounts to twenty cents ($0.20) for each one hundred dollars of

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valuation, for five (5) years, commencing in 2018, first due in calendar year 2019.

Tuesday, November 6, 2018, the Amended Charter will take effect January 1, 2019.

ISSUE 27

FOR THE TAX LEVY AGAINST THE TAX LEVY

SHALL THE PROPOSED AMENDED CHARTER, AS REPORTED BY THE CHARTER COMMITTEE OF THE VILLAGE OF GOLF MANOR, BE ADOPTED?

VILLAGE OF MARIEMONT

ISSUE 23 PROPOSED CHARTER AMENDMENT VILLAGE OF GOLF MANOR A MAJORITY affirmative vote is necessary for passage. The proposed Amended Charter is a comprehensive update to the Charter of the Village of Golf Manor, Ohio. Throughout the proposed Amended Charter the text was updated to include gender inclusive language such as him/her or Council Member. Additional changes include: A) Transitioning from an elected Clerk/Treasurer to a Village Fiscal Officer model of governance as permitted by R.C. §733.262. The Village Fiscal Officer would be appointed by the Mayor with a consent of Council. With the transition, Council may also appoint a Clerk of Council to administer the record of proceedings; B) Recognizing the position of Village Administrator which position also is to be appointed by the Mayor with consent of Council; C) Updating the procedure to remove a Council Member by requiring more advance notice unless it is an emergency. Similarly, Article XI is updated to recognize the procedure for a Recall Petition; D) Requiring that, if possible, when a Council Member appoints another Council Member to designate his or her successor in the event of a vacancy, the designee should be an elected Council Member. A similar provision applies to the appointment of the Vice Mayor by Council; E) Requiring a minimum of one Council meeting per month with a calendar of meetings set the first meeting in January of each year; F) Merging the responsibilities of the Board of Zoning Appeals with the Planning Commission and clarifying the terms and appointment process for Planning Commission Members; G) Clarifying that it is not a conflict for a Council Member or the Mayor to serve on a County or State Central Committee; H) Recognizing the Solicitor must be licensed to practice law in Ohio, but not necessarily a resident of Hamilton County; I) Removing updated sections of the Charter such as the requirement to appoint a Plumbing Inspector, Building Inspector or Engineer as these services typically are provided by professionals under contract to the Village; J) Aligning the deadlines and legal requirements for Council candidate petitions, budgeting and tax levies with State law; and K) Clarifying the petition requirements for the Initiative Referendum or Recall. If the Amended Charter is approved by a majority of those electors voting at the general election,

 YES  NO

ISSUE 24 PROPOSED TAX LEVY (ADDITIONAL) VILLAGE OF GREENHILLS A MAJORITY affirmative vote is necessary for passage. An additional tax for the benefit of the Village of Greenhills, County of Hamilton, Ohio, for the purpose of PROVIDING AND MAINTAINING MOTOR VEHICLES, COMMUNICATIONS, OTHER EQUIPMENT, BUILDINGS, AND SITES FOR SUCH BUILDINGS USED DIRECTLY IN THE OPERATION OF A POLICE DEPARTMENT, FOR THE PAYMENT OF SALARIES OF PERMANENT OR PART-TIME POLICE, COMMUNICATIONS, OR ADMINISTRATIVE PERSONNEL TO OPERATE THE SAME, INCLUDING THE PAYMENT OF ANY EMPLOYER CONTRIBUTIONS REQUIRED FOR SUCH PERSONNEL UNDER SECTION 145.48 OR 742.33 OF THE REVISED CODE, OR FOR THE PAYMENT OF OTHER RELATED COSTS at a rate not exceeding three and five-tenths (3.5) mills for each one dollar of valuation, which amounts to thirty-five cents ($0.35) for each one hundred dollars of valuation, for a continuing period of time, commencing in 2018, first due in calendar year 2019.

PROPOSED TAX LEVY (RENEWAL) A MAJORITY affirmative vote is necessary for passage. A renewal of a tax for the benefit of the Village of Mariemont, County of Hamilton, Ohio, for the purpose of CURRENT OPERATING EXPENSES at a rate not exceeding three and eight-hundredths (3.08) mills for each one dollar of valuation, which amounts to thirty and eight-tenths cents ($0.308) for each one hundred dollars of valuation, for five (5) years, commencing in 2018, first due in calendar year 2019. FOR THE TAX LEVY AGAINST THE TAX LEVY

ISSUE 28 PROPOSED TAX LEVY (RENEWAL) VILLAGE OF MARIEMONT A MAJORITY affirmative vote is necessary for passage. A renewal of a tax for the benefit of the Village of Mariemont, County of Hamilton, Ohio, for the purpose of PROVIDING FUNDS FOR RECREATIONAL PURPOSES OF THE MARIELDERS, INC. at a rate not exceeding one (1) mill for each one dollar of valuation, which amounts to ten cents ($0.10) for each one hundred dollars of valuation, for five (5) years, commencing in 2018, first due in calendar year 2019.

FOR THE TAX LEVY AGAINST THE TAX LEVY

FOR THE TAX LEVY AGAINST THE TAX LEVY

ISSUE 25

ISSUE 29

PROPOSED CHARTER AMENDMENT

PROPOSED TAX LEVY (RENEWAL)

VILLAGE OF LINCOLN HEIGHTS

VILLAGE OF TERRACE PARK

A MAJORITY affirmative vote is necessary for passage.

A MAJORITY affirmative vote is necessary for passage.

Shall Section 5.03 NOMINATIONS of the Charter of the Village of Lincoln Heights be amended for the purpose of requiring candidates for the office of Council Member to submit their nominating petitions to the Board of Elections at least ninety (90) days before the day of election as opposed to seventy-five (75) days?

A renewal of a tax for the benefit of the Village of Terrace Park, County of Hamilton, Ohio, for the purpose of CURRENT OPERATING EXPENSES at a rate not exceeding two and five-tenths (2.5) mills for each one dollar of valuation, which amounts to twenty-five cents ($0.25) for each one hundred dollars of valuation, for five (5) years, commencing in 2018, first due in calendar year 2019.

 YES  NO

ISSUE 26 PROPOSED CHARTER AMENDMENT VILLAGE OF LINCOLN HEIGHTS A MAJORITY affirmative vote is necessary for passage. Shall Section 2.02 QUALIFICATIONS of the Charter of the Village of Lincoln Heights be amended for the purpose of requiring candidates for the office of Council Member to be current on all their tax filings with the Village?  YES  NO

W W W. LW V C I N C I N N AT I . O R G

FOR THE TAX LEVY AGAINST THE TAX LEVY

ISSUE 30 PROPOSED MUNICIPAL INCOME TAX (INCREASE) VILLAGE OF WOODLAWN A MAJORITY affirmative vote is necessary for passage. Shall the Ordinance providing for a three tenths of one percent (0.3%) levy increase on income TO BE USED SOLELY FOR CONSTRUCTION, REPAIR, IMPROVEMENT, AND MAINTENANCE OF STREETS AND ROADS in the Village of


★BALLOT ISSUES★ Woodlawn, and appurtenances thereto including principal and interest on bonds or notes issued for any of those purposes for a period of five (5) years effective January 1, 2019, be passed?  FOR THE INCOME TAX  AGAINST THE INCOME TAX

ISSUE 31 PROPOSED TAX LEVY (ADDITIONAL) DELHI TOWNSHIP A MAJORITY affirmative vote is necessary for passage. An additional tax for the benefit of Delhi Township, County of Hamilton, Ohio, for the purpose of FIRE PROTECTION AND EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES at a rate not exceeding three and forty-five hundredths (3.45) mills for each one dollar of valuation, which amounts to thirty-four and five-tenths cents ($0.345) for each one hundred dollars of valuation, for a continuing period of time, commencing in 2018, first due in calendar year 2019. FOR THE TAX LEVY AGAINST THE TAX LEVY

ISSUE 32 PROPOSED ZONING PLAN MIAMI TOWNSHIP A MAJORITY affirmative vote is necessary for passage. Shall the plan for repeal of precinct-based county rural zoning and adoption of townshipwide county rural zoning in Miami Township, including the unzoned portions of Precincts B and C, submitted by the Hamilton County Rural Zoning Commission and adopted by the Board of County Commissioners of Hamilton County, Ohio, on August 1, 2018, be approved?  YES  NO

ISSUE 33 PROPOSED TAX LEVY (ADDITIONAL) SYMMES TOWNSHIP A MAJORITY affirmative vote is necessary for passage. An additional tax for the benefit of Symmes Township, County of Hamilton, Ohio, for the purpose of GENERAL MAINTENANCE OF STREETS, ROADS, AND BRIDGES WITHIN THE TOWNSHIP AND FOR GENERAL MAINTENANCE OF SIDEWALKS, WALKWAYS, TRAILS, BICYCLE PATHWAYS, OR SIMILAR IMPROVEMENTS, at a rate not exceeding four-tenths (0.4) mill for each one dollar of valuation, which amounts to four cents ($0.04) for each one hundred dollars of valuation, for seven (7) years, commencing in 2018, first due in calendar year 2019. FOR THE TAX LEVY AGAINST THE TAX LEVY

What ID to Bring When You Vote Ohio law requires that every voter, upon appearing at the polling place to vote on Election Day, must announce his or her full name and current address and provide proof of identity. The forms of identification that may be used by a voter who appears at a polling place to vote on Election Day include • An unexpired Ohio driver’s license or state identification card with present or former address so long as the voter’s present residential address is printed in the official list of registered voters for that precinct; • A military identification; • A photo identification that was issued by the United States government or the State of Ohio, that contains the voter’s name and current address and that has an expiration date that has not passed; • An original or copy of a current utility bill with the voter’s name and present address; • An original or copy of a current bank statement with the voter’s name and present address; • An original or copy of a current government check with the voter’s name and present address; • An original or copy of a current paycheck with the voter’s name and present address; or • An original or copy of a current other government document (other than a notice of voter registration mailed by a board of elections) that shows the voter’s name and present address. For utility bills, bank statements, government checks, paychecks, and other government documents, “current” is defined as within the last 12 months. “Utility bill” includes a cell phone bill. “Other government document” includes license renewal and other notices, fishing and marine equipment operator’s license, court papers, or grade reports or transcripts. “Government office” includes any local (including county, city, township, school district and village), state or federal (United States) government office, branch, agency, commission, public college or university or public community college, whether or not in Ohio. Provisional ballots: If you do not have any of the above forms of identification, you may provide either your Ohio driver’s license or state identification number (which begins with two letters followed by six numbers) or the last four digits of your Social Security number and cast a provisional ballot. Once the information is reviewed and verified by the board of elections, your ballot will be counted.

Vote at your polling place on Election Day Election Day is Tuesday, November 6, 2018. Polls are open from 6:30 am until 7:30 pm. By law, if you are in line at 7:30 pm, the polls must stay open to allow you to vote. Contact your county Board of Elections (call 513-632-7000 or visit www.votehamiltoncounty.org ) or visit www.VOTE411.org to check your voter registration and to find out your polling place and precinct. Sometimes several precincts share the same polling place. To assure that your vote is counted, verify that you are voting in the correct precinct! Above all, if you are sure you are at the correct polling precinct and voting a regular ballot is not an option for whatever reason, don’t leave the polls without voting a provisional ballot.

Above all, if you are sure you are at the correct polling precinct and voting a regular ballot is not an option for whatever reason, don’t leave the polls without voting a provisional ballot. W W W. LW V C I N C I N N AT I . O R G

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★ ★ ★ ★ ★ VOTER CHECKLIST ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ GOVERNOR-LT. GOVERNOR

OHIO STATE SENATOR

(1 team to be elected) ……Richard Cordray & Betty Sutton (D) ……Mike DeWine & Jon Husted (R) ……Constance Gadell-Newton & Brett R. Joseph (G) ……Travis M. Irvine & J. Todd Grayson (L) ……Write-in Certified Write-in Candidates • Rebecca Ayres & Anthony Durgans (Write-in) • Richard Duncan & Dennis A. Artino (Write-in) • Renea Turner & Keith Colton (Write-in)

(1 per District to be elected) (7TH District- filed in Warren County) ……Sara Bitter (D) ……Steve Wilson (R) (9TH District) ……Tom Chandler (R) ……Cecil Thomas (D) (27TH District) ……Tom Brinkman (R) ……Christine Fisher (D) (28TH District) ……Jonathan Dever (R) ……Jessica E. Miranda (D) ……Write-in Certified Write-in Candidate • Regina A. Collins (Write-in)

ATTORNEY GENERAL

(1 per District to be elected) (29TH District) ……Louis W. Blessing III (R) ……Carrie R. Davis (D) (30TH District) ……Clayton Adams (D) ……William J. Seitz (R) (31ST District) ……Brigid Kelly (D) (32ND District) ……Catherine Ingram (D) ……Marilyn Tunnat (R) (33RD District) ……Judith Boyce (R) ……Sedrick Denson (D)

……Steve Dettelbach (D) ……Dave Yost (R)

AUDITOR OF STATE ……Robert C. Coogan (L) ……Keith Faber (R) ……Zach Space (D)

SECRETARY OF STATE ……Kathleen Clyde (D) ……Frank LaRose (R) ……Dustin R. Nanna (L) ……Write-in Certified Write-in Candidate • Michael W. Bradley (Write-in)

TREASURER OF STATE ……Rob Richardson (D) ……Robert Sprague (R)

U. S. SENATOR ……Sherrod Brown (D) ……Jim Renacci (R) ……Write-in Certified Write-in Candidate • Stephen Faris (Write-in)

U. S. REPRESENTATIVE TO CONGRESS (1 PER DISTRICT) (1ST Congressional District) ……Steve Chabot (R) ……Dirk Kubala (L) ……Aftab Pureval (D) ……Write-in Certified Write-in Candidate • Kiumars Kiani (Write-in) (2ND Congressional District) ……James J. Condit, Jr. (G) ……Jill Schiller (D) ……Brad Wenstrup (R) ……Write-in Certified Write-in Candidate • David Baker (Write-in)

OHIO REPRESENTATIVE

COUNTY COMMISSIONER Commencing 1-1-2019 ……Stephanie Summerow Dumas (D) ……Chris Monzel (R)

COUNTY AUDITOR ……Nancy Aichholz (R) ……Dusty Rhodes (D)

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION – 4TH DISTRICT ……Pat Bruns ……Jenny Kilgore

JUSTICE OF THE SUPREME COURT Commencing 1-1-19 ……Craig Baldwin ……Michael P. Donnelly Commencing 1-2-2019 ……Mary DeGenaro ……Melody J. Stewart

JUDGE OHIO COURT OF APPEALS, FIRST DISTRICT Commencing 2-9-2019 ……Pierre Bergeron ……Charles Miller Commencing 2-10-2019 ……Dale Stalf ……Marilyn Zayas

Commencing 2-11-2019 ……Candace Crouse ……Dennis Deters Commencing 2-12-2019 ……Ginger Bock ……Robert C. Winkler

JUDGE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS Commencing 1-1-2019 ……Steven Martin ……Terry Nestor Commencing 4-1-2019 (2 to be elected) ……Lisa Allen ……Leslie Ghiz ……Pavan V. Parikh ……Arica L. Underwood Unexpired term ending 2-10-2021 ……Thomas O. Beridon ……Curt C. Hartman

BALLOT ISSUES: A majority affirmative vote is necessary for passage.

STATE ISSUE 1 - PROPOSED STATE AMENDMENT.  YES  NO

HAMILTON COUNTY ISSUE 9 TAX LEVY (ADDITIONAL) FOR CHILDREN SERVICES.  FOR  AGAINST

CITY OF CINCINNATI ISSUES: ISSUE 10 – PROPOSED CHARTER AMENDMENT.  YES  NO

ISSUE 11 – PROPOSED CHARTER AMENDMENT.  YES  NO

ISSUE 12 – PROPOSED CHARTER AMENDMENT.  YES  NO

ISSUE 13 – PROPOSED CHARTER AMENDMENT.  YES  NO

ISSUE 14 – PROPOSED CHARTER AMENDMENT.  YES  NO

ISSUE 15 – PROPOSED CHARTER AMENDMENT.  YES  NO

OTHER LOCAL ISSUES Fill in number and for/against or yes/no

Information on Voting for Write-In Candidates This Voter Guide identifies write-in candidates by placing (Write-in) next to their name. You can also get a write-in list from your Precinct Election Official (PEO). To vote for a write-in candidate, completely darken the box to the left of the blank line and write in the candidate’s name as it appears on the write-in list. Ask your PEO for help if you have questions.

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LWVCA 2018 VOTER GUIDE  

LWVCA 2018 VOTER GUIDE  

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