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WESTERN HILLS PRESS

Your Community Press newspaper serving Addyston, Bridgetown, Cheviot, Cleves, Covedale, Dent, Green Township, Mack, Miami Township, North Bend, Westwood 75¢

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2012

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BECAUSE COMMUNITY MATTERS

Station’s tree holds special meaning In memory of girl killed in house fire By Kurt Backscheider kbackscheider@communitypress.com

Nevaeh Owens, right, a second-grader at Cheviot School, promises Santa Claus she’s been good this year. Dater High School students involved in student council and the National Honor Society visited Cheviot School on Wednesday, Dec. 19, to deliver gifts to young students. Dater senior Dominic Flynn dressed as Santa. KURT BACKSCHEIDER/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Students bring Santa to Cheviot

By Kurt Backscheider kbackscheider@communitypress.com

Santa Claus made a special visit to students at Cheviot School before they left for the holiday break. Cheviot students in grades pre-kindergarten through third grade received gifts from the jolly old elf on Wednesday, Dec.

19.

Santa’s visit was part of a Breakfast with Santa program, which was a collaboration between Cheviot School and Dater High School. Anne Bailey, a resource coordinator at Dater, said about 30 Dater students took part in the program, going room to room and delivering toys Cheviot

School received from Toys for Tots. “The older students are having fun,” Bailey said. She said the Dater students who helped Santa deliver the gifts are members of the school’s student council or National Honor Society. The stuSee SANTA, Page A2

West Siders may have noticed the decorated Christmas tree in front of the Green Township fire station at Bridgetown and Eyrich roads. They may have appreciated the beauty of its simple white lights and red holiday bows. But what they likely don’t know is the touching story behind the tree. The evergreen was donated to the fire department about seven or eight years ago by Bob and Terry Luchsinger, in memory of their daughter, Katie. “Our daughter, Katie, died in a house fire in 1999,” Bob Luchsinger said. “We had a horrible loss, and after meeting a lot of the great firefighters we learned they took it personally too.” Katie was 11 years old when she died in the fire in her family’s home on Gallia Drive in Miami Township. The Green Township Department of Fire & EMS responded to the call as part of mutual aid, and the engine from the township’s Bridgetown station was the first to arrive. Although firefighters weren’t able to rescue Katie, Mr. Luchsinger said he and his family have become close with many fire-

Day care, gymnastics center planned for Filview Circle By Kurt Backscheider kbackscheider@communitypress.com

A day care center and gymnastics facility could be coming to Filview Circle in Green Township. Township trustees recently recommended Hamilton County zoning officials approve a revision to a planned retail district to allow for construction of a 10,000-square-feet day care center and 10,500-square-feet gymnastics building at 5779 Filview Circle. The 3.5-acre property upon

ART PROGRAM St. Martin enriching its curriculum. See story, A5

which the buildings would be constructed was re-zoned for retail several years ago when the Legacy Place shopping center Goetzman was planned for the area. The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency ruled a stream running through the site of the proposed shopping center could not be disturbed, so Legacy Place was never built. The proposed All About Kids

In the next few days your Community Press carrier will be stopping by to collect $3.50 for delivery of this month’s Western Hills Press. Your carrier retains half of this amount as payment for his or her work. If Kenkel you wish to add a tip to reward the carrier’s good service, both the carrier and The Community Press appreciate your generosity. This month we’re featuring

See FILVIEW, Page A2

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News .........................923-3111 Retail advertising ............768-8357 Classified advertising ........242-4000 Delivery ......................853-6263

A friendly recipe you can share See story, B3

RUSS RUBERG

fighters and support the fire departments on the West Side. “We’re going to save a child some day,” he said. Green Township Fire Lt. Russ Ruberg said Bob Luchsinger has done so much for the department that they made him an honorary member of their union. “It amazes me what Bob and his family do for us,” Ruberg said. “We are honored to have him as a See SPECIAL, Page A2

COLLECTION TIME

Childcare and Learning Center and the Westside Academy of Gymnastics buildings would not impact the stream, as they Linnenberg would sit closer to Filview Circle than Legacy Place would have. “The day care will be the primary building on the site, and the gymnastics center will be located behind the day care,” said

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A view of the Green Township fire station’s Christmas tree illuminated at night. See the stroy behind the tree on A3. THANKS TO

Brian Kenkel, a fifth-grader at Our Lady of Lourdes. Kenkel likes to play with his friends at school, home or at sports. His favorite sports are basketball, soccer and baseball. The best part of school, he says, is gym because students get to play fun games like dodge ball or section soccer. If you have questions about delivery, or if your child is interested in becoming part of our junior carrier program, please call 853-6263 or 8536277, or e-mail circulation manager Sharon Schachleiter at sschachleiter@communitypress.com.

Vol. 85 No. 6 © 2012 The Community Press ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

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NEWS

A2 • WESTERN HILLS PRESS • DECEMBER 26, 2012

Filview Continued from Page A1

Adam Goetzman, Green

Township’s assistant administrator and director of planning and development. “This is a relatively low intense use.” He said All About Kids

WESTERN HILLS PRESS

Find news and information from your community on the Web Addyston • cincinnati.com/addyston Bridgetown • cincinnati.com/bridgetown Cheviot • cincinnati.com/cheviot Cleves • cincinnati.com/cleves Dent • cincinnati.com/dent Green Township • cincinnati.com/greentownship Hamilton County • cincinnati.com/hamiltoncounty Mack • cincinnati.com/mack North Bend • cincinnati.com/northbend Westwood • cincinnati.com/westwood

News

Marc Emral Senior Editor ...............853-6264, memral@communitypress.com Kurt Backscheider Reporter ............853-6260, kbackscheider@communitypress.com Monica Boylson Reporter ..............853-6265, mboylson@communitypress.com Melanie Laughman Sports Editor ......248-7573, mlaughman@communitypress.com Tom Skeen Sports Reporter .............576-8250, tskeen@communitypress.com Nick Dudukovich Sports Reporter .....248-7570, ndudukovich@communitypress.com

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To place an ad in Community Classified, call 242-4000.

is proposing to build a replica of the day care center it currently operates on West Fork Road in Monfort Heights. Westside Academy of Gymnastics has outgrown its building at the corner of Harrison and Wesselman avenues, and requires a bigger space. Green Township Trustee Chairman David Linnenberg said the board endorsed the project because it serves as a nice buffer between residential prop-

erty on Filview near Hutchinson Road and any future shopping or retail developments on the southern end of Filview. “I think it’s a good use,” he said. Although nothing is planned right now, Linnenberg said the township does hope to bring some shopping and dining options to the retail-zoned southern end of Filview Circle, near Harrison Avenue. “We have a strong need

for more shopping and restaurants on the West Side,” he said. Filview Circle resident Joy Mihuta, who opposed the construction of Legacy Place, said she supports the day care center. “The proposed use could be beneficial to our neighborhood,” she said. Greg Davis, managing partner of All About Kids, said the day care center serves children from the ages of 6 months old to 12 years old. All of the cen-

Special

they placed a live Christmas tree at her grave in St. Joseph Cemetery, and used batteries to power its lights. After the holidays they planted the tree in their yard in Katie’s memory. Every year since then, he said they’ve decorated a Christmas tree at her grave, and then donated it to a family member or friend after the holidays. The Green Township fire station was the recipient of a tree seven or eight years ago. “It’s become such a popular tradition that now we put two trees at the cemetery,” he said. “And I use a generator to power the lights.” Ruberg said the fire department planted its tree near the corner of Bridgetown and Eyrich for every-

one to see. He said every year after Thanksgiving the Luchsinger family shows up with lights and ornaments to decorate it. This year the firefighters bought a plaque dedicating the tree to Katie and placed it at the base of the tree. “We’re proud as can be that they even thought to give us a tree,” Ruberg said. “It’s like our baby. We may not always take care of the other plants at the firehouse, but we make sure to care for the tree.” Luchsinger said he’s grateful the firefighters and paramedics have taken great care of the tree. He said it started out at about 2feet tall, and now it’s probably 12- to 15-feet tall. “We enjoy decorating it every year,” he said. “It brings back a lot of good memories of Katie.”

Continued from Page A1

friend.” The friendship between the Green Township firefighters and the Luchsingers was forged with the donation of the Christmas tree. Luchsinger said the first Christmas after Katie died

Index Calendar .................B2 Classifieds ................C Deaths ...................B4 Food ......................B3 Police .................... B5 Schools ..................A5 Sports ....................A8 Viewpoints ............A10

Santa Continued from Page A1

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dents raised money to buy a Santa outfit and rent a bus to get to Cheviot School, she said. “The students are earning service hours, and it’s just a fun treat for the students who go above and beyond in school,” Bailey said. Imari Dubose, a Dater senior from Westwood, said he enjoyed handing gifts to the young Cheviot School students and interacting with them. “I have a little brother, so I like being a role model for them to look up to,” said Dubose, who is president of his senior class. He said it was great to

ter’s teachers and instructors are college educated, and he said its state-of-theart centers are built with the environment in mind to meet certified “green” standards. “We’re a very high-end day care,” Davis said. “We feel we’re top notch and the best in the business.” The day care on Filview would be able to serve a maximum of 184 children, he said.

The evergreen tree at the Green Township fire station at Bridgetown and Eyrich roads was donated to the fire department by Miami Township residents Bob and Terry Luchsinger in memory of their daughter, Katie. Each year the Luchsinger family decorates the tree for Christmas. THANKS TO RUSS RUBERG

be able to help brighten the students’ day and share some holiday spirit with them. “It makes me feel like I’m actually doing something to make a difference,” he said. “It’s nice to give back in a positive way.” Christy Long, the PTO president at Cheviot School, said it was a good experience for the elementary school students to receive a visit from older students who work hard academically and are active in their school. She said this was the first year for the breakfast with Santa program. “I think it means a lot to our kids,” Long said. “The kids are just so excited about it. I like seeing all their faces light up.”

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NEWS

DECEMBER 26, 2012 • WESTERN HILLS PRESS • A3

Art collective opens in Cheviot By Kurt Backscheider kbackscheider@communitypress.com

Cheviot resident Tracy Iliff, an artist who is one of the core members of the Broadhope Art Collective, shows some of the pottery works she and her husband, Jaime, have crafted. The Broadhope is a collaborative art space in which several area artists create, show and sell their art. KURT BACKSCHEIDER/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

A group of artists have come together to enrich the West Side and cultivate the community’s appreciation of the visual arts. The Broadhope Art Collective, 3651 Harrison Ave., at the corner of Harrison and Glenmore avenues in Cheviot, is up and running as a collaborative art space. “Broadhope is an art gallery, but it is a non-commission, functional gallery,” said Tracy Iliff, a Cheviot resident and one of the core artists of the collective. “We have a very diverse group of artists.” Iliff, who makes artistic pottery pieces with her husband, Jaime, said the collective is a place where artists can work, host workshops, exhibit and sell their pieces in the

shared gallery space. About a dozen artists are members of the collective, pitching in to run the space and pay the rent, she said. The artists who are involved with Broadhope work in a variety of mediums, she said. In addition to the pottery she and her husband create, there are painters, photographers, fabric artists, welders, mixed media artists and jewelers. Iliff said she and her husband typically took part in about 60 art shows each year, and they decided about a year ago to make pottery their fulltime profession. They were looking for a place where they could have both a studio and a space for open houses, when she said Cheviot City Councilman Jeff Baker helped them find the vacant corner storefront. Baker owns the Higher

kbackscheider@communitypress.com

Seton High School may have missed out on a free Taylor Swift concert at its campus, but students and teachers aren’t too disappointed about it. The school still earned a $10,000 grant for its effort to win the free concert. “We’re still very happy,” said Maribeth Samoya, chairwoman of Seton’s fine arts department. “We won’t complain.” Seton placed second in an online contest sponsored by Chegg and country music star Taylor Swift this past fall. Colleges and high schools throughout the country were invited to compete in the contest, which awarded a free Taylor Swift concert to the school that collected the most online votes. Schools that placed in the top five were each awarded a $10,000 grant. “We brought the whole

From left, Seton High School seniors Shelby Ashcraft and Grace Laiveling, Seton Fine Arts Department Chairwoman Maribeth Samoya and senior Kelsey Murphy sit on the music department’s new stage risers. Seton won $10,000 in a grant competition sponsored by Chegg and Taylor Swift, and used the money to buy nine new risers. KURT

are used by all the different choral groups and ensembles Seton has, and they are also used by the Archdiocese of Cincinnati for its choral fest and by the Cincinnati Metropolitan Orchestra when it performs with a choir. The new risers are simple and safe to set up, which she said will make scene changes and group changes during concerts and shows much easier.

school bought nine new stage risers for the Seton Performance Hall. She said prior to even winning the grant she’d planned to list the school’s 25-year-old risers as one of the fine arts department’s long-term needs. “The risers are something we’ve needed to update for a long time,” she said. Samoya said the risers

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school and community together and voted like crazy,” said Seton senior Grace Laiveling. Senior Kelsey Murphy added, “What I thought was cool was the fact that it wasn’t just students who voted. We had alumni, teachers and friends of the school voting as well.” Samoya said the $10,000 grant had to be used for music purposes, so the

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said she no longer has to travel around to the different art shows to display and sell her pieces. She said she enjoys being able to stop in the space at her convenience to make jewelry and replenish the inventory she sells. “It’s exciting when people like your work and want to buy it,” Montavon said. Iliff said West Siders are welcome to stop in the Broadhope to browse the shelves, buy some great art and learn about the collective’s workshops and demonstrations. “We’ve received wonderful support from the community,” she said. Broadhope is open 4-8 p.m. Thursdays and Fridays; noon to 8 p.m. Saturdays; and noon to 4 p.m. Sundays. For more information, visit broadhopeart collective.com.

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Ground Coffee House less than a block away from the Broadhope. Several other artists, many of whom are also West Siders, came on board with the idea, and Iliff said the collective opened this past October. “It worked out really well,” she said. “Everyone who comes in says they’re glad to see something good opened in this building.” Westwood resident Sharon Montavon, who makes jewelry, said she was lucky to become part of the artist collective. “I’m very happy,” she said. “It’s a very good group of people here.” She said she started making jewelry about two years ago while she was on medical leave from her full-time job. “What started as a hobby became profitable,” Montavon said. The collective is perfect for her because she

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NEWS

A4 • WESTERN HILLS PRESS • DECEMBER 26, 2012

BRIEFLY Elder supports Panthers in military

ages. Elder graduate Matt Brannon (2008) helped coordinate the club’s efforts. Brannon and classmate Ben Combs started the club during their senior year.

Members of Elder High School’s Support the Troops Club sent care packages to 26 Elder alumni serving in the military this holiday season. Each care package contained Elder gear, snacks and powdered drink mixes, a letter from a student, a greeting card from the faculty and staff and a special Christmas gift for each to unwrap. Club members helped collect names and addresses of alumni, wrote notes to each one, hosted a theme day to raise money for the project, shopped for items and packed the care pack-

Highlander stag

The Oak Hills Sports Stag this year will feature Reds broadcaster Marty Brennaman Monday, Jan. 21, at the Woodlands, 9680 Ciley Road. Tickets are $75 and include dinner, beer, wine and a silent auction. VIP tickets are $125 and includes a private reception with Brennaman and an autograph item. Only 100 VIP tickets are being

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sold. Tickets are available online at www.oakhillsathletics.org or in the Oak Hills High School athletic office. The stag is expected to sell out early.

Mercy inducting two into hall

Mother of Mercy High School has announced its 2013 Hall of Fame Inductees. Angie Heintz Hummeldorf (2001) and Angela Scarlato Hawley (2002) will be inducted following Mercy’s Homecoming basketball game against McAuley High School at 6 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 5, at Mercy. New this year, the induction ceremony will also include the inaugural Bobcat Spirit Award. Mercy’s Athletic Director Denise Harvey will unveil the details of this honor recognizing individuals or organizations who have given outstanding service or continue to show outstanding support to Mercy athletics. The Wegman family, longtime supporters of Mercy, will be honored. Homecoming game times are freshman at 3 p.m., junior varsity at 4:30 p.m. and varsity at 6 p.m. Inductions will begin immediately following the varsity game and a reception will follow. General admission to the game is $6 and alumnae will be admitted free. More details, RSVP form and a message board for the honorees can be found at www.motherofmercy.org/ HallofFame.

Ggrant to help maintain park

Cheviot received a $750 Let’s Play Improvement Grant from KaBOOM! and Dr. Pepper-Snapple Group. The grant funding will be used toward maintenance of the city’s park at the Cheviot Memorial Fieldhouse. The grant is part of the Let’s Play initiative to get children and families active nationwide. Dr. Pepper-Snapple Group and KaBOOM! will help build or fix 2,000 playgrounds throughout the country by the end of 2013.

Cornhole tourney

St. Lawrence Cornhole Tournament and Monte Carlo will be 6:30 p.m.- midnight, Saturday, Jan. 5, in the school’s gym, 3680 Warsaw Ave. Proceeds will benefit the fifth-grade trip to Camp Campbell Gard. There will be cornhole, a split-the-pot raffle, games, poker, drinks, food and basket raffles. You must be 21 years old to attend. There will be first, second and third place prize money for the two-and-out cornhole tournament. There is a limit one ACP -ranked pro per team. Pre-registration cost to play is $30 per team from 6:309-7 p.m.; $40 at the door. To pre-register, send money to: Make checks payable to: St. Lawrence School and send to Bill Aufermann PGK, 966 Kirbert Ave. Cincinnati, Oh 45205; or drop off at parish rectory or school office.

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will hold open auditions for its spring musical “Once on this Island” form 5-6 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 17, in the McAuley Performing Arts Center. These auditions are open to eighth-grade girls and boys. They will be cast for roles in the ensemble, with a chance to perform in a state-of-the art facility, McAuley’s Performing Arts Center. The play is about an island full of beautiful and engaging songs and dances, and tells the story of a young girl who will do everything in her power to be with the one she loves. Students should arrive at the audition wearing comfortable clothes and be prepared to act and dance a little. If any eighth-grade girls would like the chance for a small singing role, they should come with a short simple song prepared. The dates of the show are March 22, 23, and 24, 2013. To RSVP for the auditions or for further information, contact Emily Lafferty, director, at laffertye@live.mcauleyhs.net.

Historic house program

The Delhi Historical Society will host a free program titled Historic Houses of Riverside, Sedamsville and Sayler Park at 7 p.m. Monday, Jan. 14, at the Delhi Park lodge. The program will show the history and styles of historic homes that line River Road. For more information, call the historical society at 451-4313 or email delhi.history@fuse.net.

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The Delhi Township Branch Library, 5095 Foley Road, will host a presentation on the history of brewing in Cincinnati at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 8. Jim Bruckmann of the Bruckmann Brewery family will give a visual tour of Cincinnati’s “golden age of breweries.” For more information, call the library at 369-6019 or visit http://www.cincinnatilibrary.org.

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NEWS

DECEMBER 26, 2012 • WESTERN HILLS PRESS • A5

Students benefits from new art program By Kurt Backscheider kbackscheider@communitypress.com

Amirah Wright looks forward to going to art class each week. “It’s fun,” said the firstgrader at St. Martin of Tours School. “I like when we paint and when we draw.” Contemplating what her favorite subject is to draw or paint, Wright said, “rainbows.” “They are really colorful,” she said. St. Martin enriched its curriculum this year by adding an art education program. Two days each week, art teacher Abby Ceja, who also teaches art at St. Mary School in Alexandria, Ky., sets up shop in a classroom at St. Martin and instructs students in grades kindergarten through eight.

Morgan Sickman, left, and Mariyah Miller, who are both first-graders at St. Martin of Tours School in Cheviot, paint snowmen while working on a holiday project in art class. St. Martin added an art curriculum this school year. KURT BACKSCHEIDER/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

“I think it’s important for schools to have art programs because it can help students excel and bring out their creative side,” she said.

St. Martin Principal Carolyn Murphy said the fine arts are much more than fun, special classes for children. “Research shows there

are many benefits from having an art education program in a school, aside from making the child and their education well-rounded,” Murphy said. “These benefits improve students’ overall academic performance, allows students to express themselves, bolsters their selfconfidence and teaches children to be more tolerant and open.” She said art programs also help students develop lifelong skills like critical thinking, creative problem solving, effective communication and teamwork. Ceja, who is in her sixth year of teaching, said she covers a variety of art mediums with St. Martin students – everything from painting and drawing, to printmaking and sculpture. “We also try to blend art history into a lot of what

Two attend young leaders conference The summer of 2012 was quite exciting for two Rapid Run Middle School eighthgraders, Loren Pfeiffer and William Oyler. Both attended the Junior National Young Leaders Conference, hosted by the Congressional Youth Leadership Council in Washington, D.C. They were two of 10 students nominated to attend by Rapid Run’s National Junior Honor Society co-advisor, Veronica Diaz. This week-long event gives high-achieving middle school students the opportunity to learn about leadership by studying the

leaders of the past and by gaining insight as to what it takes to become an effective leader. It is a challenging and interactive leadership program. Pfeiffer and Olyer were able to attend numerous national memorials and daily leadership focus groups dealing with character, communication, goal setting, problem solving, respect and teamwork. “It was a once in a lifetime experience,” Pfeiffer said. Both she and Olyer mentioned the highlight of the experience was developing

relationships with peers from all over the United States. “I met people from Hawaii,” Oyler said. Pfeiffer is still keeping close ties with friends she met from California. Both were thrilled to have the opportunity to visit Harpers Ferry and reenact scenes from the Civil War. Oyler and Pfeiffer chose to be soldiers during that time period. Oyler also enjoyed his visit to the White House. They have the chance to attend the event in Boston and also the inauguration camp in January.

they are doing,” she said. “We’ve talked about artists like Vincent Van Gogh and Alexander Calder.” She said she teaches projects using open-ended lesson plans, giving students who may not be as creative as others the opportunity to do just as well as those whose ideas go beyond the minimum requirements. She said it allows every student to feel successful in what they do and feel proud of their accomplishments. “I believe that we all have talent, but our talents may not always be the same,” Ceja said. Outside of the classroom, she’s taken students

on a field trip to Brazee Street Studios so they could see glass sculpture artists, and second- and thirdgrade students worked with artists from Happen Inc. to create a community mural at St. Martin. Ceja said she appreciates the support the art program has received from the school and parents, and she thinks the students recognize what a privilege it is to have art classes. “I think the students enjoy coming in here. We’re always working on something new and they’re excited to find out what they’ll be doing,” she said.

Hospice of Cincinnati, Western Hills is seeking volunteers to provide care and companionship for patients in our Western Hills inpatient care center (located on the 5th floor of the Mercy Hospital Western Hills) as well as in homecare settings and long term care facilities. A special training is scheduled for Saturday, January 26th at the Mercy Western Hills Hospital 6th Floor Auditorium located at 3131 Queen City Avenue Cincinnati, Ohio 45238. Pre-registration is required by January 7th. If you can help please contact Judy Russell, Volunteer Services at 246-9168 or email judy_russell@trihealth.com as soon as possible.

Rapid Run Middle School students William Oyler and Loren Pfeiffer attended the Junior National Young Leaders Conference, hosted by the Congressional Youth Leadership Council in Washington, D.C. PROVIDED CE-0000538766

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NEWS

A6 • WESTERN HILLS PRESS • DECEMBER 26, 2012

PIG GIG

HONOR ROLLS WESTERN HILLS UNIVERSITY HIGH SCHOOL

A Average Honors: Pearl Hunter and Scott Ingle. B Average Honors: Xzavier Bobbitt, Porscha Dowell, Shania Hampton, Christien Helgenberger, Alex Jensen, Elexus Merritt, Isiah Waynick, X-Xavier Weathersby and Larnell Williams.

B Average Honors: Tamar Acoff, Ashlie Alicie, Dominique Arnold, Keanu Barnes, Brandon Bauer, Thailan Beavers, Elmer Bowers, Latasha Butte, Shayheeda Carney, Lanaysha Chatman, Rackelle Coates, Elisha Cole, Charles Craig, Sylatia Daniel, Alicia Davis, Tytus Gaines, Luis Jennings, Quanisha Miller, Dawnnise Odoms, Ashlei Parson, Norriah Plummer, Shanyce Richardson, Shiloe Turner, Charles Venison, Donneisha Webster and Tyaira Williams.

Eighth grade

Sophomores

The following students earned honors for the first quarter of the 2012-2013 school year.

Seventh grade

A Average Honors: Kyle Burton, Devon Cromer and Mark Jeffers. B Average Honors: Jessica Braun, Shylo Brunner, Al-Nisa Gilbert, Zamiah Matthews, Jordan Reed, Na’Saijah Still, Demeshayla Strattman, Soufiane Tibtani, Parris Weathersby, Tre’von Webb and Jaline Wilson.

Freshmen A Honors: Meghan Colwell, Melissa Hunter and Hieu Lieu. A Average Honors: Arian Burton, Diamond Cox, Regina Faulkner, Miracle Flowers, Eric Gee, Winnie Ingle, Stephen LeBlanc, Hanna Quillin, De’asia Reed, Breir Sims, Tivona Smith, SieCaria Stuckey, Ryan Taylor, Starr Valines, Ashleigh Winans and Kyra Wrentz.

This past May, 40 St. Jude students and their art teacher Julia Lane designed and painted a pig for the 2012 Big Pig Gig. The pig was inspired by the schools motto “Driven By Faith, Inspired To Learn.” The pig was divided in sections, each highlighting a different educational aspect of the school. The areas were separated by each student and staff fingerprints. The St. Jude students were excited to be able to participate in creating a piece of art that will remain in the school lobby forever. The St. Jude pig was named Jude Swinestein and he was placed at the downtown library this summer. THANKS TO JULIA LANE

A Honors: Kayla Eaton, Nyla Slaughter, Cameron Stewart and Kiasia Waters. A Average Honors: Kelvion Bush, Jasmine Butler, Donovan Daniels, Isabella Goodlander, Jamiel Haynes, Wisdom Hill, Haley Quillin, Tiare Sims and Nastahja Williams. B Average Honors: Kathryn Benson, James Bolen, Denzel Brown, Renee Conners, Destiney Cromer, Laurene Darby, Jacob Darling, Akeem Duncan, Dennis Harper, Je’Lynn Harris, Megan Horn, Orlando Howard, Diamond King, Kayla Lee, Destany Livingston, Savion Longino, Jay’eisha McCrary, Anastasia Moore, Sharnae Newman, Candice Ousley, Madaison Owens, Duke Ragan, Curtiss Scott, NajwaTibtani, Jasmine White and Malik Wilks.

Juniors A Average Honors: Josephine Miller, Josalynn Smith, Shannon Thomas and J’onae Wright. B Average Honors: Markia Brock, Chico Chappell, Mariah Clark, Fatumata Diallo, Shayla Edwards, Jaysin Grothaus, Antwan Henderson, Samuel Hicks, Lawren Jones, Kemuel Jordan, Devonta Mimes, Darius Myrick, Tyler Reese and Kamya Thomas.

Seniors A Honors: RayQel Bradley, Sarah Melford and Iesha Stover. A Average Honors: Lamont Coulter, Michaela Daniels, Dionte Howard, Belinda Kemetse, Hannah Kestermann, Tamara Lebron, Davaisha Mitchell, Stephanie Niemer and Rodney Portis. B Average Honors: Jaelyn Barfield, DeNesha Bell, Caleb Booker, Carrissa Clay, Ashley Cooper, Andre Crumpton, Zipporah Fant, I’shay Frazier, Janisha Gray, Erica Hollingsworth, Danielle Huffaker, Antonio Kirby, Asiana KnoxAllen, Destiny Maclin, Onadeja Matthews, Jacob Mills, Christiana Mitchell, Siara Myrick, Austin Padilla, Rkasia Ramsey, Santana Saleem, Kayla Scott, Zaire Sims, Adrienne Smith, Dametra Vance, Chanikka Welch, Kesha Wellborn and Leon White.

Great Oaks Police Academy honors graduates The graduates wore uniforms instead of robes, some of them in the uniforms of their new employers. The Great Oaks Police Academy recently graduated 24 students. After months of physical training and class work and dozens of hours on the firing range and driving course, the 23 men and one woman lined up in the community room at Scarlet Oaks Career Campus to receive their certificates and get last-minute advice from their instructors and other professionals. “Friends are crucial,” Montgomery Police Chief Don Simpson told academy graduates. “This job is demanding, but we can’t let it interfere with important people like friends and family.” Class president Thomas Portaleos reflected on the rigorous training and

how it affected the group. “These months have been an opportunity for us to teach each other and learn from each other,” Portaleos said. “Each individual sitting here is now ready and dedicated to becoming a police officer and representing the communities that we are chosen to serve.” State Rep. Lou Terhar did double duty, reading a proclamation from the Ohio House of Representatives and as a father watching his son Marc graduate. The proclamation, passed in honor of the academy’s 30th anniversary, read in part “Since its establishment, this fine institution has supplied excellent officer candidates to local and state law enforcement agencies by successfully graduating 94 percent of the candidates who enter.” When the time came for

each graduate to be called forward, Great Oaks Police Academy Commander Alan Jones stepped to the microphone. “We always ask families to hold their applause until all names are read,” Jones told the crowd. “But we know you’re proud of them and you can’t wait so go ahead and cheer whenever you want.” The 24 new graduates are Marcus Callahan, Terry Chastain, Christopher Climer, Jeffrey Davidson, Brandon Farrier, Steven Garren, Josh Hail, Robert Hawk, Lauren Helgeson, Corey Lewis, Donald Lewis, Andrew Linnig, Christopher McMillan, Cody Meyer, Andrew Mueller, Nicholas Niemeyer, Brent O’Connor, Michael Pennington, Austin Poe, Thomas Portaleos Jr., Tyler Simspon, Jacob Steinkoenig, Marc Terhar and Michael Williamson.

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SCHOOLS

DECEMBER 26, 2012 • WESTERN HILLS PRESS • A7

WESTERN HILLS

PRESS

Editor: Marc Emral, memral@communitypress.com, 578-1053

ACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | ACTIVITIES | HONORS

CommunityPress.com

HONOR ROLLS

BIRTHDAY PRESENTS

RAPID RUN MIDDLE SCHOOL

The following students earned honors for the first quarter of the 20122013 school year.

Sixth grade

Katie Koch and Erika Schmitt, from Mother of Mercy High School, had a 16th birthday party on Oct. 5 where they ask their guests to donate toys and cash for Children’s Hospital Medical Center. PROVIDED

St. Ignatius had Christmas sounds The St. Ignatius School Bands and Choir performed a christmas concert for family and friends in the St. I Community Center. Parents, grandparents, and other audience members enjoyed a wide range of talent from beginners to seasoned veterans who played instruments and sang. The school’s music instructor Tasha Grismayer is the director of Advanced Band and the Voice of St. Ignatius Choir. Chris Gemperline is the director for the Beginning Band. The music was a variety of both classical Christmas and Contemporary. The Beginning Band showed growth since September, improving significantly and performing well this week. The Advanced Band demonstrated their ability to execute more challenging pieces. “Mr. Gemperline and I wanted them to grow and learn through dedication and perseverance in both practices and performances,” said Grismayer. “Tim Reilly, our principal, agreed to help us develop a strong music program,” said Grismayer. “It was his idea to start the school choir, in addition to the church choirs.” Since last year, the choir which has featured the

Nicole Makaras and Gabi Wolf sing at the St. Ignatius’ Christmas concert. PROVIDED singing talents of the fifth through eighth grade has doubled in size. “In January, we are opening up the choir program to include fourth graders as well,” said Grismayer. “Mr. Reilly and our pastor, the Rev. Peter St. George, have supported our efforts and our growing success is the result.”

PINK RIBBON

HONOR ROLLS ST. TERESA OF AVILA

The following students earned honors for the first quarter of the 2012-2013 school year.

Fourth grade First honors: Jaiden Knecht, Lauren Pfeiffer, Braeden Price, Logan Schneider and Linus Sinnard. Second honors: Mariah Briggs, Brendan Brogan, Molly Collins, Jordan Darnell, Sarah Goins, Paige Paschka, Josie Timmers, Libby Vale and Aidan Williams.

Fifth grade First honors: Eli Darnell, Julia Lindenschmidt and Vincent Nicolaci. Second honors: Avery Aull, Megan Bihl, Jessica Brumfield, Lily Bryant, Mary Cavanaugh, Cassie James, Mailie Morgan, Caleb Price, Abby Simon and Adam Wilcher.

Sixth grade First honors: Alyssa Feldkamp, Lucy Knight and Jarod Timmers. Second honors: Catherine Brogan, Ben Dudley, Madison Flickinger, Alexa Ramstetter and Nina Williams.

Seventh grade First honors: Emily Schmitz, Kara Siemer and Morgan Weast. Second honors: Sophie Barsan, Quinn James, Olivia Ryan and Gabby Zaccaria.

Eighth grade The Leadership Council at St. Martin of Tours School organized a day for students to wear pink to school – for a price. They raised $283.72 for the American Cancer Society. PROVIDED.

First honors: Sophia Dahlquist, Charles Eichelberger, Stephanie Lohbeck, Duncan Rackers and Anthony Timmers. Second honors: Connor Bareswilt, Briana Brumfield, David Dattilo and Natalie Lambers.

Highest honors: Michael Appiarius, Grace Aug, Jessica Berra, Garrett Bledsoe, Grace Bollinger, Brody Boone, Megan Byrd, Erin Egan, Olivia Faillace, Ariana Fox, Jacob Gorman, Brian Henke, Samuel Herzog, Jody Hetzel, Hannah Hoover, Taylor Iori, Jessica Johnson, Brandon Jones, Sydney Jones, Elisabeth Kuebel, Parker Niehaus, Olivia Quinlan, Courtney Ross, May Schmitt, Alekzander Srode, Hunter Stoy, Mitchell Thornton, Patrick Tiernan, Christian Wall and Lauren Watkins. High honors: Lucas Abel, Madelyn Allen, Kaley Amlin, Devin Angelo, Tyler Backscheider, Matthew Bechtel, Maurice Bibent, Sydney Bledsoe, Cassandra Bruning, Tristan Byrne, Kevin Campbell, Athena Caneris, Abraham Coogan, Justin Crofoot, Donna Derrenkamp, Samantha Doll, Abigail Dollries, Taylor Dorrington, Kylie Duggins, Mattison Fisher, Gaven Florimonte, Kelsey Francis, Ciera Franke, Brandon Gaddis, Thalia Georges, Ally Graff, Sydney Greve, Margaret Grote, Austin Gundrum, Kerry Healey, Jessica Heinrich, Samantha Hesse, Elle Hirlinger, Breanne Hodapp, Dylan Hoy, Abigail Hulsman, Kayla Javorsky, Erin Kallmeyer, Jade Keith, Madeline Knox, Carson Lewis, Sarah Lowry, Molly Luegering, Anthony Marcum, Jeremy Moll, Chloe Motz, Tyler Noell, Madelyn Otten, Kelcie Phillips, Savanna Radcliff, Elizabeth Reddington, Sarah Reddington, Devon Reynolds, Mostafa Sabeh-Ayoun, Aaron Schraffenberger, Sarah Schultz, Lydia Scott, Karlee Shay, Caitlin Sheridan, Brennan Spaulding, Elysia Sturm, Maxwell Theuerling, Brandon Tirey, Alec Torbeck, Jarred Uran, James Vanwinkle, Zachary Vasko, Dalton Wall, Shelby Wall, Zachary Ward, Noah Weidner, Ashley White, Jacob Willett, Andrew Wisnicky, Benjamin Young, Madelyn Young and Gabrielle Zahneis. Honors: Alexander Bertke, Hailey Bettis, Amy Bettner, Brooke Boehm, Andrew Braun, Hunter Buchanan, Kevin Callahan, Kayla Cole, Logan Colson, Hannah Cox, Ki’va Dior, Adam Doran, Kyle Ellis, Blake Enderle, Nash Gibbs, Dominic Goodin, Tyler Greene, Mya Gressler, Melanie Habig, Nicholas Hais, Emily Hart, Karessa Herzner-Pierce, Bryce Hodapp, Brittany Hodapp, Alexander Hughes, Jessica Jacobsen-Witt, Benjamin Krieg, Audrey Lindemann, Karli Lippert, Tyler Lipps, Mahalle Long, Abigail Malsbary, Nicolas Moore, Jilan Munjed, Kaley Nash, Kyla Owens, Collin Phillips, Noah Rebennack, Grant Rembold, Keegan Riesenbeck, Mitchell Rizzo, Ariel Rodgers, Hunter Rollinger, Jacob Rupe, Madeline Schwoeppe, Kari Sexton, Malia Shackelford, John Shirer, Madalynn Shy, Skylar Simpson, James Sisson, Sophia Squeri, Karina Stock, Emma Supe, Kirsten Taylor, Trevor Torbeck, Owen Triplett, Tyler Turner, Sander Vest, Austin Von Hoene, Carly Warman, Joseph Weikel, Ty Wetterich and Corteny Williams.

Seventh grade Highest honors: Jordan Asman, Ethan Brogan, Grace Brogan, Annmarie Bushman, Valeri Butler, Stefani Callabro, Tessa Cliffe, Megan Conn, Kayla Cybulski, Evander Frisch, Leah Funk, Ashley Goddard, Emily Good, Carlee Gourley, Adam Green, Nicholas Holland, Lauren Hurley, Lilian Jerow, Justin Kappen, Kiley Keehan, Kevin Lagrange, Mitchell Luken, Mackenzie Mueller, Madeline Nemeth, Jason Preston, Neil Robertson, Madeline Scheckel, Kathryn Schneider, Emily Shad, Penelope Sheehan, Nathan Shelby, Anna Stoeckle, Anna Swafford, Haley Thompson, William Thompson, Anastasia Turner, Charles Visconti, Valerie Waggal, Grace Wagner, Brittney Westerbeck, Madelyn Wilke and Benjamin Zahneis. High honors: Anthony Abate, Anne Aichele, Kyle Allen, Kayce Bassman, Tobias Boehringer, Olivia Brown, Michael Buchert, Jacob Bush, Ashley Clark-Fink, Ashleigh Cronin, Sarah Cushing, Nicholas Deifel, Luke Digiacomo, Stephanie Dirr, Sarah Dollenmayer, Abigail Dye, Jakob Eichhorn, Alexis Elliott, Emma Ernst,

David Gilardi, Morgan Godfrey, Adam Goldfuss, Joseph Gourley, Sydni Griffith, Bridgette Grote, Ellis Hamilton, Collin Hater, Kara Heckmuller, John Hetzel, Taylor Holtman, Patrick Illing, Alexa Kelley, Ethan King, Allyson Little, Ian Martin, Abigail McElwee, Trent McGinnis, Szerena Meyer, Corey Miley, Haley Miller, Molly Morand, Tyler Murphy, Hailey Parker, Lucas Pecora, Jacob Peters, Macy Pitchford, Jordan Renken, Dayana Roman, Chase Sauer, Stephen Schmidt, Matthew Schmitt, Olivia Schunk, Abigail Schutte, Jared Shepherd, Kaitlyn Shirer, Dominico Smith, Maximus Stoddard, Marissa Tendam, Lucille Thornton, Marina Triantafilou, Hannah Vaive, Zachary Voigt, Jason Wagner, Andrew Wetterich, Baylie Wieck, Krista-Lee Willwerth, Christopher Zillich and Russell Zimmer. Honors: John Bryan, Hali Cantwell, Edward Cliffe, Jack Colston, Renee Conover, Brittany Davis, Olivia Diehl, David Duwel, Darya Ferguson, Carl Fisher, Abby Freeman, Samantha Gall, Cole Gilfilen, Sydni Haney, Christopher Happe, Sophia Hater, Evan Haynes, Brandon Hill, Gwendolyn Hilvert, Grace Hissett, Zachary Jansen, Emma Jones, Joshua Kappen, Michael Klumb, Emma Kuerze, Jacob Lachtrupp, Leah Lindemann, Sydney Miler, Jacob Mouser, Calvin Norman, Kayla Pottinger, Sydney Richmond, Jaeden Risch, Layla Sackett, Allison Schonberg, Ashlee Schrand, Kelsey Schwegman, Samuel Scott, Mollie Showell, Hunter Sternickle, Brandon Suesz and Megan Williams.

Eighth grade Highest honors: Louisa Anderson, Jenna Bertke, Allison Braun, Matthew Budde, Bailee Conway, Abigail Coogan, Jared Cox, Andrew Ebrahimpour, Jonathan Finn, Shannon Healey, Dominick Hinton, Daniel Hodges, Bryndon Hollingsworth, Hannah Hughes, Riley Jerow, Jalynn Johnson, Rachelle Kuebel, Mimi Marcheschi, Andrew Marsh, Emily Marshall, Marie McClurg, Daniel Murphy, William Oyler, Loren Pfeiffer, Libbey Ryland, Casey Schablein, Joseph Schapker, Rachel Schiller, Andrea Schwab, Katherine Slattery, Alexandra Stevens, Michael Triantafilou and Austin Von Hoene. High honors: Johnathon Adelhardt, John Baltzersen, Rheanna Barry, Hannah Basil, Sara Bloemker, Emma Boettcher, Meredith Brass, Austin Brown, Kayla Bunke, Leah Bushman, Tessa Calvert, Brooke Chesney, Hanna Dase, Maggen Dean, Dominic Deutsch, Paige Dornheggen, Allicia Drennen, Jarrett Eads, Maxwell Faust, Drew Fitzgibbon, Sophia Georges, Nicholas Goldfuss, Jacob Grayson, Jenna Gressler, Brian Groeschen, Laura Grothaus, Daniel Helsel, Elizabeth Henline, Taylar Herbers, Ryan Holthaus, Nathaniel Horning, Meara Huheey, James Ingle, Jordan Iori, Kaitlyn Kellard, Marissa Kempf, Nicklaus Krauser, Abby Krauser, Brett Kron, Ian Lewis, Rachel Lincoln, Madeleine Lindemann, Jailah Long, Kylie Lonneman, Jenna Makin, Alexus McAfee, Ethan McCarthy, Autumn McMillian, Rakan Munjed, Dylan Noble, Jesse Noell, Nevek Parnell, Robert Record, Emily Reichling, Kamryn Ripperger, Cara Roche, Bryce Sauer, Elizabeth Scarlato, Benjamin Schapker, Sophia Schmackers, Zachary Schmidt, William Smith, Jason Smith, Michael Stamper, Wade Stenger, Alexander Weikel and Brandon Wieck. Honors: Corey Allen, Alex Anderson, Kaylin Applegate, Kevin Ayers, Kari Barnett, Samuel Bepler, Christopher Blasek, Alexis Bouchard, Aaron Broering, Ross Campbell, Taylor Cherry, Sarah Colwell, Justin Donovan, Derek Ellis, Jacob Fox, Julia Glenn, Zachary Gross, Joshua Gulla, Olivia Gundrum, Samuel Gunther, Joshua Harrison, Gloria Hartman, Jaimee Hebert, Michael Hillesheim, Matthew James, Carter Johnson, Eric Kaiser, Jennifer Keyser, McKenzey Kleinholz, Joshua Knott, Jacob Leugers, Maria Lowry, Daniel McCarthy, Madison Meltebrink, Hailey Mitchell, Allison Nemann, Samantha Oakes, Olivia Ogden, Samantha Royer, Cameron Sanchez, Matthew Schapker, Destani Sears, Nicholas Sferrazza, Andrew Shirer, Michael Siciliano, Carley Snell, Jacob Spohr, Sydney Stedam, Tyler Sweeney, Connor Vest, Jacob Ward, Joshua Ward, Lindsey Watters, Austin Watts, Joshua Whalen, Corey Wilhoite, Evan Willwerth and Anthony Zillich.


SPORTS

A8 • WESTERN HILLS PRESS • DECEMBER 26, 2012

CommunityPress.com

Gindling ends college career with a bang

Seton grad named DIII All-American for Thomas More

CATCHING UP WITH COLLEGE ATHLETES The following are submissions on student-athletes in the Western Hills Press coverage area who have recently participated in college athletics.

Erich Vogelsang

Elder High School graduate and Centre College junior Erich Vogelsang was named firstteam All-Southern Athletic Association after leading the league in solo tackles and ranking third in interceptions for football. Last season as a sophomore, the Colonels reached the Division III Sweet 16, in which Vogelsang was the teams leading tackler in each of the playoff games. Joining Vogelsang on the Colonels roster was fellow Elder grad Michael Del Prince, who was a team captain in 2012. Del Prince broke his hand early in the season, which ended his time at wide receiver, but he was a key special teams member and played with a padded cast on his hand for the remainder of the season. Submitted by Andy Vogelsang

By Tom Skeen tskeen@communitypress.com

Seton High School graduate Abby Gindling earned All-American honors from D3Soccer.com and helped guide Thomas More College to the Division III NCAA tournament this fall. THANKS TO CORY BLACKSON each other played… Right away I knew we were going to be alright.” For a defender, 24 career goals is a lot, but Gindling was more than just a defender. She stared her collegiate career playing outside midfielder, moved to forward as a sophomore and didn’t move to defender until the end of her junior year. “It was kind of my idea because we needed help,” Gindling said about moving to defender. “Then we needed help up front at

forward, so I’ve played pretty much every position.” Now that soccer is over, the nursing major will graduate in May and head off to St. Elizabeth Medical Center, where she will work for two years. However, soccer is still on her mind when she thinks of the future. “I think this is the end of my (playing) career,” she said. “I’m playing indoor once a week and eventually I would like to coach somewhere, but nursing is my focus right now.”

Korb steps up to Ivy League challenges at Pennsylvania By Tom Skeen tskeen@communitypress.com

Many people couldn’t handle the academic side of an Ivy League school, much less being a student-athlete at one of the elite institutions. The key for Elder High School graduate and University of Pennsylvania sophomore Ian Korb, is taking it for what it is and doing what you must do to be successful. “It’s hard your freshmen year,” Korb said. “We still had challenging classes (at Elder) but nothing close (to Penn). It’s more just being a man about it. You have to realize you aren’t going to have as much free time anymore.” After going 16-17 as a freshman, his sophomore campaign is off to a 9-6 start. “It’s going all right, I guess,” he said about this season. “I started off pretty strong… I’m having some confidence issues, but my coaches and I have been working on that.” Of his nine victories, two have been pretty special. In the season-opener at the Binghamton Open, Korb notched a third-place finish that included a victory over Cornell’s Marshall Peppelman, whom Korb lost to last season. On his back and trailing 7-1 to

PRESS

Editor: Melanie Laughman, mlaughman@communitypress.com, 513-248-7573

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | RECREATIONAL

DELHI — As a senior in high school or college, you want to end your sports career with a bang. That is exactly what Thomas More College senior and Seton High School graduate Abby Gindling has done. The soccer player earned All-American honors from D3Soccer.com and helped guide her team to the Division III NCAA tournament this fall. “It means a lot,” Gindling said about the All-American honors. “Before the season my dad and I were talking how it would be awesome if I could get the award. I just kept working at it and with the team doing so well, I think that helped a lot.” The Saints ended the season at 20-2-1 and Gindling totaled eight goals, four assists and 20 points, which earned her the Presidents’ Athletic Conference Player of the Year award. “It’s exciting,” she said. “It’s hard to take in because you are the best player in your conference… If (the team) wasn’t doing so well, I would not have (received) the recognition. It was a lot of hard work and it paid off.” Coming into the season, Gindling was the only returning starter on the defense and the Saints were running out a freshmen goalie. It didn’t take long for things to come together as the defense allowed just 10 goals on the season and racked up 15 shutouts. “Just getting the freshmen back there and getting on the same page allowed us to bond quickly,” the senior said. “We called ourselves the defensive family because we had such a strong bond and just knew how

WESTERN HILLS

Elder High School graduate and University of Pennsylvania wrestler Ian Korb takes down his opponent in the Keystone Classic last year. THANKS TO HUNTER MARTIN/PENN ATHLETICS

Giussepi Lanzi of Brown at the Keystone Classic Nov. 18 on the Penn campus, Korb pulled off the comeback for an 11-10 victory. “… I was to the point of where I wanted to quit,” the former Panther said. “I looked at my coaches and teammates and they told me ‘you can beat this kid.’ I got up and was like ‘all right.’ The whole team was in my corner. I just started rallying. The Palestra just kept getting louder. I got huge boost of adrenaline and I slowly crept back for the win.” While Korb admits he struggled getting used to the competi-

tion at the college level, the biggest difference between high school and college is the mental game. “A lot of people talk about wrestling being 90 percent mental and 10 percent physical,” the 174-pound sophomore said. “That definitely applies in college. The first (wrestler) to give up or take a break is going to get scored on. You have to be going 100 percent all the time.” Going into the Christmas break on a three-match losing streak, Korb believes this break will help him regroup .

Stephanie Vorherr, a 2009 Mother of Mercy grad, finished her Xavier University career as the all-time school and Atlantic 10 leader with 2,152 digs. THANKS TO ROGER AND TRICIA VORHERR

Stephanie Vorherr

Stephanie Vorherr just completed her volleyball career for Xavier University. The four-year starter was a three-time Atlantic 10 Libero of the Year and a two-time Division I American Volleyball Coaches Association All-America Honorable Mention. Vorherr holds both the alltime Xavier digs record and Atlantic 10 record with 2,152. She achieved both feats during her senior season as a Musketeer. She set the single-match record for digs with 46 earlier this year against the University of Mississippi. The 2009 Mother of Mercy grad had eight matches of 20plus digs as a senior. Stephanie is the daughter of Roger and Tricia Vorherr.

As a red-shirt sophomore at Ohio Dominican University, Mark Miller threw for 2,099 and 21 touchdowns, while completing 61 percent of his passes. The Elder graduate finished the season 19th in Division II with a 153.15 passer rating. THANKS TO GEORGE MILLER

Mark Miller

The Elder High School graduate concluded a successful 2012 season, as he led the Ohio Dominican University Panthers to an 8-3 season. The redshirted sophomore threw for 2,099 yards and totaled 27 touchdowns (21 passing, six rushing), while completing 61 percent of his passes. He was chosen Great Lakes Intercollegiate Athletic Conference Player of the Week after the Panthers defeated Findley 63-31. In that contest, he threw for 230 yards, 4 touchdowns and ran for another. Miller finished the season 19th in the nation in Division II for passing efficiency with a 153.15 rating and was chosen as the Offensive Skill Player of the Year at the recent ODU annual banquet. The quarterback was a GLIAC Academic Excellence award winner in 2011 and 2012. He is the son of George and Jan Miller of Delhi. Submitted by George Miller

Jeffrey Vorherr, a 2012 Elder graduate, just completed his freshman season on the DePauw University football team. THANKS TO ROGER AND TRICIA VORHERR

Jeffrey Vorherr

2012 Elder graduate Jeffrey Vorherr recently completed his freshman season with the DePauw University football team where he played wide receiver and was on special teams. Jeffrey is the son of Roger and Tricia Vorherr.

Molly Arnold

Seton graduate Molly Arnold completed her first fall season as a member of the Northern Kentucky University women’s See CATCH UP, Page A9

Danielle Duesing

Danielle Duesing of Delhi Township (St. Ursula) completed her 2012 fall golf season at Maryville University as the No. 2 player on the women’s golf team with a scoring average of 85.43. Her low round of the season came at the Screaming Eagle Golf Classic Sept. 16 when she shot a nine-over par 81. Maryville University will start the spring 2013 season with a tournament in Las Vegas. Submitted by Gregory Duesing

Molly Arnold just completed her first fall season on the NKU women’s golf team. The Seton grad competed in six tournaments and shot a season-low 84 at the University of Dayton tournament. THANKS TO LOU ARNOLD


SPORTS & RECREATION

DECEMBER 26, 2012 • WESTERN HILLS PRESS • A9

PRESS PREPS HIGHLIGHTS By Tom Skeen

Kevin Bracy-Davis.

tskeen@communitypress.com

Girls basketball

Boys basketball

» Western Hills lost a close one to CMAC rival Hughes 66-63, Dec. 15 despite 19 points from senior

Catch up Continued from Page A8

golf team. The season was the Norse’s first as a Division I program, as a member of the Atlantic Sun Conference. As a freshman, Molly competed in all six tournaments for NKU and had her best round of 84 at the University of Dayton tournament in Dayton, OH. It was a busy fall as the team competed in tournaments in Alabama, Florida, Ohio and Indiana. The NKU Norse will begin their spring season

Seton grad Bailey Arnold is currently a junior on the Bowling Green State University women’s golf team. This past fall, she had four top-six finishes and a scoring average of 76.7. THANKS TO LOU ARNOLD

» Mercy trailed Mount Notre Dame by six at the half, but came back to win 47-35, Dec. 15. Senior Kelley Wiegman scored 16 points. with tournaments in Arizona, Tennessee, Kentucky and Georgia. Molly is the daughter of Lou and Michelle Arnold. Submitted by Lou Arnold

Bailey Arnold

Bailey Arnold, sister of Molly, is a junior on the Bowling Green State University women’s golf team. This fall, the team played five tournaments, won two and finished second in two others. Individually, Bailey had four top-six finishes (two 3rd’s, 4th and 6th) and a scoring average of 76.7, which currently stands as a BGSU school record. The university is calling this fall season “arguably BG’s finest fall season in school history.” The women’s golf team had their best conference tournament showing at the Mid-American Conference Preview tournament held at the Longaberger Golf Club in Nashport, Ohio. With a 12-team field, the Falcons tied for second, only 3 strokes off the lead. Bailey tied for third individually, two shots off the medalist. Play continues for the Falcons in Arizona, Kentucky and Ohio this spring. Bailey is the daughter of Lou and Michelle Arnold. Submitted by Lou Ar-

» Oak Hills was outscored 22-13 in the second half of its 44-27 loss to Sycamore Dec. 15. Senior Lindsey Eckstein led with seven points. » Seton lost 62-38 to McAuley Dec. 15. Marisa Meyer was the only Saints

player to score in double digits with 10 points. Seton held on for a 53-49 victory over St. Ursula Dec. 17. » Taylor edged out Northwest 50-48 in overtime Dec. 17. Hannah Meckstroth scored 13 points.

» Gamble Montessori was outscored 41-25 in the second half of its 69-46 loss to Batavia Dec. 17. Senior Ra’keia Johnson led with 16 points.

nold

lege and I am honored to have such a quality athlete on my roster,” coach Todd McDaniel said. “She puts her team first and always does what is asked of her. She is always positive and helps to motivate others around her.” She will be competing in outdoor track in the spring. Submitted by Todd McDaniel

As a sophomore, she moved to the libero position and had a team-high 441digs, which was the seventh most in a single season in GSU history. The 2010 Seton High School grad averaged 4.12 digs per set the same season, which ranked seventh in the Colonial Athletic Association and sixth in school history. She ended her junior year ranked 37th in the nation in digs per set with 5.26 and 3rd in the CAA. She passed the 1,000 career dig mark and was co-captain of her team. Emily is the daughter of Terri and Steve Averbeck Submitted by Terri Averbeck

Tayler Godar

Tayler Godar, a 2012 Taylor High School graduate, is in her freshman year at Georgetown College in Georgetown, KY. From the first meet she was the No. 1 runner for the Tigers cross country squad. Coming into college she had a personal best time of 20:33. That was lowered to 20:31in her first meet at the University of Cincinnati where she led the team to a seventh-place finish behind five NCAA D-I schools. In her second meet she lowered her personal-best time by over a minute to 19:27 at the Friendship Meet hosted by Cedarville University. In October, Godar led the women’s team to a perfect score of 15 at Kentucky State University’s Thoroughbred Classic, where she led from beginning to end as the women’s team took seven of the top six spots. She ended the season earning Georgetown College’s Most Valuable Runner honor as well as being named Freshman of the Year. The freshman missed qualifying for NAIA Nationals by only one spot. “She has a very bright future at Georgetown Col-

FINA World

» Taylor High School

Emily Averbeck

As a freshman, Emily Averbeck was a defensive specialist for the Georgia State University volleyball team. She had 29 services aces, which was second on the team, and compiled 230 digs.

Rachel Krabacher

Krabacher is a senior at the University of Dayton, where she started on the Division I volleyball team the past four years. During each of those four years, UD came in first place in the Atlantic 10 conference, won the end-of-season A-10 tournament and advanced to the NCAA tournament. In 2012, the McAuley High School graduate had 505 kills and ranked ninth in the nation with 4.63 kills per set. The 6-foot-4 outside hitter was named A-10 Player of the Year in both 2011 and 2012. In both seasons she led the conference

Emily Averbeck, a Seton High School grad, finished her junior season ranked 37th in the nation in digs with 5.26 per set while at Georgia State University. THANKS TO TERRI AVERBECK

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VIEWPOINTS A10 • WESTERN HILLS PRESS • DECEMBER 26, 2012

Editor: Marc Emral, memral@communitypress.com, 853-6264

EDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM

Every week when I open my Press to the Letters to the Editor section, there seems to be a letter from Al Ostendorf. I kept wondering, why does the Press continue to print his letters when they are full of negatives and his open hatred for anyone who does not agree with him. Finally the letter “Something they did not do” dated Dec.

ABOUT LETTERS AND COLUMNS We welcome your comments on editorials, columns, stories or other topics important to you in The Western Hills Press. Include your name, address and phone number(s) so we may verify your letter. Letters of 200 or fewer words and columns of 500 or fewer words have the best chance of being published. All submissions may be edited for length, accuracy and clarity. Deadline: Noon Friday E-mail: westernhills@ communitypress.com Fax: 853-6220 U.S. mail: See box below Letters, columns and articles submitted to The Western Hills Press may be published or distributed in print, electronic or other forms.

19 gave me my answers. “I thought saints were given a direct link to God, by God. I now know saints are ordinary people who talk to God every day.” Now, not only is God talking to Al every day , Al is claiming to be a saint. Al goes on to claim that God revealed “three things about salvation” to him. However, Al will only “share one in this letter.” We will all wait for Al’s next letter and what God has told him to teach us next.

nounced later this month). We look forward to the success of our students and our school this spring. It takes a village to raise a child and there is no doubt that the entire Mercy community is behind every student who walks the halls of Mother of Mercy – supporting their education, enabling their services to the community and allowing them to thrive at their fullest potential. Thank you.

A Mercy thank you

It’s 2012, Mr. Chabot

Jenny Kroner Jackson ‘00 Communications & PR Specialist Mother of Mercy High School

Jerry Fatora Green Township

While much of the success at Mother of Mercy High School is due to our hard working students, dedicated faculty and staff and supportive parents, we also have an extended community of alumnae and friends of Mercy who help us shine as that “gem on the West Side.” So I would like to offer a big thank you to everyone within the walls of Mercy, around the West Side, across the city and beyond. Thanks to so many of you we had a record canned good drive this fall, a generous toy drive this winter and we made quite a run in the Clorox Power a Bright Future Contest, due in large part to all the votes we received from our supporters (results will be an-

Re: Congress’ hypocrisy ... overwhelming, Dec. 19. What’s overwhelming is the fact that Rep. (Steve) Chabot is living in the past and doesn’t understand what negotiating is all about. He takes every opportunity to discredit Democrats and call them liars, when, in fact, it is he that should be shamed for not working for a 2012/13 balanced tax/spend plan. His new analysis of the debt and the economy is stuck in the past; flawed and outdated. The real hypocrites are the voters who rate congress at 14 percent and then proceed to reelect the same old congressmen. Ann Thompson Green Township

Cora Dow was ahead of her time Cora Dow, against all odds became a retail giant in Cincinnati in the late 1800s. She started life in 1868 as Cora Cornelius Dow in Patterson, N.J. Her father, Edward Dow, was a druggist, who traveled all over Ohio selling his patent medicines and cures. In 1885, he moved the family to Cincinnati and opened a drugstore at 545 W. Fifth St. Teenage Cora helped out in the store, but she also wanted to be a pharmacist. So in 1887, she hired a clerk to take her place and enrolled in a twoyear course at the Cincinnati College of Pharmacy. Two years later she finished school second in a class of 90. However, she couldn’t fill prescriptions, because she was only 19. She continued working with her father as his health started failing. He gave the store to her and died eight years later. The 25-year-old had a vision for the future – she would do what no one else was doing. She charged discounted prices, and catered to women. Her inventory included high quality products from manufacturers and 150 Dow trademarks. The ice cream she sold didn’t meet her standards, so she purchased an ice cream factory and pro-

duced her own brand. Cora prized her employees and credited them with her success. She hired women Betty in her stores Kamuf and paid them COMMUNITY PRESS the same GUEST COLUMNIST wages as men received. She never let them lose salary or vacation time because of business reversals. She loved her animals. Cats found her house. She pleaded with her drivers to allow their horses rest, and a took twoweek vacation every year. Twenty-five years later she had 200 employees, owned 11 stores and three warehouses. During those years she had been hounded, harassed, followed by a detective and sentenced to jail, because her competitors wanted her out of business. Cora Dow married William W. Goode, a certified accountant, in 1897, but the marriage ended in divorce in 1904. For the remainder of her life she took care of her mother. By 1915, her health was failing. She believed that the

head of a company should remain active and she could no longer do that. Cora decided to sell her business, and had many offers. She sold her company for $1 million to a syndicate of capitalists from Cincinnati and Cleveland. A note went to her employees explaining her decision. And she asked them to do their best work because she thought they had a bright future. Cora Dow died Oct. 17, 1915, at age 47. She wanted a small private funeral. The service began at 2 p.m. and three carriages carried the mourners to the cemetery where she was laid to rest by 3:30 p.m. In her will she provided for her mother, business manager and left between $50 and $300 for each employee, her chauffer and maid. She left $500 to the “colored asylum” and $500 to the Humane Society. Her 3,000-volume library was donated to MacDowell Memorial Association. She was a woman ahead of her time. Betty Kamuf is a winner of Griffin Yeatman Award for Historical Preservation. She lives in Sayler Park. You can email her at westnews@communitypress.com.

MEETINGS Here is a list of government meetings in the Western Hills Press area: » Village of Addyston Council members meet at 7 p.m. on the first and third Monday of the month at the Addyston Municipal Building, 235 Main St. Phone: 941-1313. Mayor: Dan Pillow. » Cheviot City Council members meet at 7:30 p.m. the first and third Tuesday of the month at city hall, 3814 Harrison Ave. Phone: 661-2700. Mayor: Samuel Keller. President of Council: Deborah M. Slaughter. » Cincinnati City Council meets at 2 p.m. every Wednesday in room 300 at Cincinnati City Hall, 801 Plum St. When there is a Monday holiday, all meet-

ings including committee meetings are pushed back a day. City Manager: Milton Dohoney Jr. Mayor: Mark Mallory. » Village of Cleves Council meets at 7 p.m. on the second and fourth Wednesday of each month at the Cleves Municipal Building, 101 North Miami Ave. Phone: 941-5127 for information. Mayor: Danny Stacy. » Green Township Trustees meet at 5:30 p.m. the second and fourth Mondays of the month at the administration building, 6303 Harrison Ave. Phone: 574-4848. Administrator: Kevin Celarek. Trustee Chairman: David Linnenberg.

WESTERN HILLS

PRESS

» Miami Township Board of Trustees at 7:30 p.m. on the fourth Wednesday of the month at the Miami Township Hall, 122 South Miami Ave. in Cleves. Phone: 941-2466. Board president: Paul Beck. » Village of North Bend Council meets at 7 p.m. on the last Monday of each month at the North Bend Municipal Building, 21 Taylor Ave. Phone: 9410610. Mayor: Doug Sammons.

A publication of

PRESS

CommunityPress.com

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Now I understand

WESTERN HILLS

Waste collection fee starts Jan. 1

As I’m sure you are well aware of, our city government, like many other cities, villages, and townships, is in deep financial short fall due to many different reasons. Federal, state, and county cuts as well as declining income tax base and home valuations combined with an ever increasing cost to operate, just to name a few. The city of Cheviot has been working hard over the past five to six years to ensure we remain a full-service city while keeping our costs down to a bare bone minimum. Our police, fire, public works, and waste collection departments are some of the best in the business and I as mayor am doing everything I can to keep all of our city services. After a failed tax levy last month in the November general election the city of Cheviot was forced to make yet more tough decisions. What city services do we cut? As we are already down to skeleton crews, we are under staffed in every department. Our equipment is so far off replacement schedule now I’m not sure if we will ever be able to catch up or even fix up our current equipment. Our continuing education and training budgets are virtually nonexistent; I could go on and on. At the urging of this administration on this past Tuesday a waste collection service fee was passed on the third reading by City Council and will go into effect on Jan. 1. This fee, along with some of the cuts that we made in 2012, and in addition to cuts that will be made in the 2013 budget, should allow the city to continue to operate with all our city services intact, albeit not at the level they have been in the past. I firmly believe this is the best method of evenly distributing the cost of operating the waste collection department

across the entire city and not just on those that own property. This fee will be billed to businesses as well as resiSamuel Keller dents. I have heard COMMUNITY PRESS from many, GUEST COLUMNIST many residents and property owners over the years about this fee and the overwhelming majority believes as I do that they love their waste collection service and want to keep it. Our waste collection service is run very efficiently and at a lower cost than our residents could achieve in the private sector. Having said that, make no mistake if there is in fact a service that has to be cut in the city of Cheviot it will be the waste collection Department and residents will be forced to contract with a private collection service Of our four major departments in the city, waste collection is the least essential service. Our current proposed fee will cost a single family homeowner $12 per month billed quarterly on your water bill. There is a small group of individuals that I’m sure will try to circulate a referendum petition to have this issue placed on the November 2013 ballot. If there is enough signatures collected and a collection stay is issued the city will be forced to stop waste collection and the businesses and homeowners will be forced to use a private waste collection service. I urge you not to sign this petition if asked. In the long run we will all have to pay more for less service if the referendum is successful. Think about it? Samuel D. Keller is mayor of the city of Cheviot.

Air quality agency handles complaints

Information from the public is an important way to keep track of potential air quality issues in our community. To handle odors, smoke, dust or other air quality concerns, the Southwest Ohio Air Quality Agency has an air complaint program. Megan This program Hummel focuses on COMMUNITY PRESS outreach activGUEST COLUMNIST ities and operating the air quality hotline to provide prompt service to air quality concerns of residents in Butler, Clermont, Hamilton and Warren counties. If you notice an unusual odor, smoke, dust or other air quality concerns, please call the 24-hour hotline at 513-946-7777 or fill out the online form at SouthwestOhioAir.org/ complaints. When making a complaint, you will be asked for general information relating to the situa-

5556 Cheviot Road Cincinnati, Ohio 45247 phone: 923-3111 fax: 853-6220 email: westernhills@communitypress.com web site: www.communitypress.com

tion, your name (you may remain anonymous if you wish), address and phone number. An investigator from the agency will make arrangements to meet with you at your home to verify the air quality problem. We will contact you in a few days to give you the results of your complaint. The agency responds to air quality complaints 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 52 weeks per year (excluding major holidays). This is one important tool to help achieve and maintain healthy air quality. The Southwest Ohio Air Quality Agency is a division of the Hamilton County Department of Environmental Services which also encompasses the Hamilton County Recycling and Solid Waste District. For more information, visit the Southwest Ohio Air Quality Agency online at http://bit.ly/vWT5s6 or interact with us on Facebook and Twitter. Megan Hummel is the public relations coordinator for the Southwest Ohio Air Quality Agency.

Western Hills Press Editor Marc Emral memral@communitypress.com, 853-6264 Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday See page A2 for additional contact information.


LIFE West Side fashions WESTERN HILLS

PRESS

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2012

Mother of Mercy High School had its second Fashion Show & Champagne Brunch Nov.18 at the Western Hills Country Club. The show is a pre-party in support of Mercy Gala, the school’s largest fundraising event. The sold-out crowd enjoyed shopping from a variety of vendors including fashion, jewelry, make-up and health experts. Julie Leis Raleigh ‘82, Mercy FUNdraiser, and members of Mercy’s Dance Team, The Sapphire Girls, welcomed the crowd and President Kirsten MacDougal led prayer before a brunch. Guests were entertained by Steve Raleigh, chief meteorologist of WCPO-TV Channel 9 News, who emceed the fashion portion of the event. Models walked the runway in some of today’s latest fashions in dress wear and winter coats. Hair and make-up was done by Mary Williams, Rebecca Starret, Whitney Bonapfel and Nikki Hoffman of Shagz-a-salon and Colleen Herman ‘03 of Arbonne Cosmetics. Fashions were provided by Lou Lou’s Simply Fashion, Nordstrom, Edie’s Vintage and Donna Salyer’s Fabulous Furs. Two lucky ladies also left with a new piece of jewelry as Judi Yunger Heile ‘64 and Josette Binder won the jewelry raffle and Nancy Conway Jamison ‘85 won splitthe-pot. The afternoon concluded with Mercy’s Principal Dave Mueller escorting Sister Marjorie Rudemiller ‘61 to the stage to kick-off donations for Mercy’s Angel Fund, a tuition assistance program. Decked in their finest cowboy and cowgirl attire, they helped Julie announce the theme for Mercy’s annual gala, Mercywest – A Night Of Denim, Diamonds And donations – on Feb.16. For more details on Mercywest, visit www.motherofmercy.org/Mercywest.

Gabby Discepoli ‘13 strikes a pose in a dress by Edie’s Vintage. THANKS TO JENNY JACKSON

PEOPLE | IDEAS | RECIPES

Courney Kurzhals ‘13 models an outfit by Edie’s Vintage. THANKS TO JENNY JACKSON

Kayla Corbett ‘15 models a dress by Edie’s Vintage. THANKS TO JENNY JACKSON

Mercy Sapphire Girls, Casey Tegenkamp and Kerri Davis, Ashley Sullivan and Andrea Smith, Angela Mauraer and Panny Reynolds and Tara Vogelpohl, welcomed guests to Mother of Mercy’s Fashion Show & Champagne Brunch. THANKS TO JENNY JACKSON Liz Kenkel ‘13 twirls in a dress by Edie’s Vintage. THANKS TO JENNY JACKSON

Hannah Schibi ‘15 models a dress by Lou Lou’s Simply Fashion and a fur coat by Donna Salyer’s Fabulous Furs. THANKS TO JENNY JACKSON

Julie Leis Raleigh, right, stops for a photo with Edie of Edie’s Vintage. THANKS TO JENNY JACKSON

Debbie Riehle Brodbeck ‘76, shows Silpada jewelry to Jennifer Quatman ‘89 as daughters Katie ‘16 and Kelly ‘14 look on. THANKS TO JENNY JACKSON

Mother of Mercy Principal Dave Mueller escorted Sister Marjorie Rudimiller ‘61 to kick-off donations for Mercy’s Angel Fund, a tuition assistance program. THANKS TO JENNY JACKSON

Sydney Hering, Samantha Smith and Grace Dearing, eighth-graders at Visitation Grade School, attended Mother of Mercy’s second Fashion Show & Champagne Brunch. THANKS TO JENNY JACKSON


B2 • WESTERN HILLS PRESS • DECEMBER 26, 2012

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD THURSDAY, DEC. 27

ry.org. Green Township.

Health / Wellness

Music - Blues

Yoga Back Therapy, 6-6:45 p.m., EarthConnection, 370 Neeb Road, East Sports Complex Parking. Gentle yoga postures to soothe the back. $30 for fiveclass pass or $7 drop-in. Presented by Yoga by Marietta. 6752725; www.yogabymarietta.com. Delhi Township.

Chuck Brisbin & the Tuna Project, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Jim & Jack’s on the River, 3456 River Road, $4. 251-7977. Riverside.

Music - Blues Ralph and the Rhythm Hounds, 8-11 p.m., Legends, 3801 Harrison Ave., Featuring Noah Cave. Ages 18 and up. $4. 378-2961. Cheviot.

Nature Young Naturalist Camp, 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m., Imago Earth Center, 700 Enright Ave., Designed to cultivate interest in environmental awareness and develop scientist in all of us. Explore natural cycles and earth’s patterns. Investigate topics such as animal, insect, plant and fungi kingdoms through hikes and hands-on activities. Ages 5-11. $40, $35 members. Registration required. 921-5124; www.imagoearth.org. East Price Hill.

Senior Citizens Exercise to Music, 10-11 a.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, $1. 385-3780. Green Township. Open Bridge, 12:15-3:15 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Free. 385-3780. Green Township.

FRIDAY, DEC. 28 Community Dance Butler Squares, 7:30-10 p.m., Miami Whitewater Township Firehouse, 6736 Ohio 128, Plus-level square dance club open to all experienced dancers. $5. Presented by Southwestern Ohio/Northern Kentucky Square Dancers Federation. 929-2427. Miamitown.

Exercise Classes FitChixx, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Sayler Park Community Center, 6720 Home City Ave., Full-body workout consisting of weights, cardio and core work. All ages and abilities welcome. $45 per month. Presented by FitChixx. 205-9772; www.fitchixx.com. Sayler Park.

Farmers Market Lettuce Eat Well Winter Farmers Market, 3-7 p.m., Cheviot United Methodist Church, 3820 Westwood Northern Blvd., Locally produced food items. Free. Presented by Lettuce Eat Well. 661-1792; www.lewfm.org. Cheviot.

Films Teen Holiday Movie Night, 6:30 p.m., Green Township Branch Library, 6525 Bridgetown Road, After-hours holiday movie premier. Popcorn and pizza provided. Ages 12-18. Free. Presented by Public Library of Cincinnati & Hamilton County. 369-6095; www.cincinnatilibra-

Landscaping and Rumpke Sanitary Landfill. Family friendly. Free. Presented by Hamilton County Recycling and Solid Waste District. 946-7766; hamiltoncountyrecycles.org/index.php?page=free-yardwastedrop-off-sites. Green Township.

Nature

Exercise Classes

Winter Wilderness Survival Camp, 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m., Imago Earth Center, 700 Enright Ave., Covers essential life skills during winter: tracking, fire building, shelter making, solar and water systems, archaeological search techniques and map making. Ages 5-11. $40, $35 members. Registration required. 921-5124; www.imagoearth.org. East Price Hill.

Beginners Ashtanga Class, 10-11 a.m., EarthConnection, $30 for five-class pass. 675-2725; www.yogabymarietta.com. Delhi Township.

SUNDAY, JAN. 6 Nature Winter Bird Feeding, 2 p.m., Fernbank Park, 60 Thornton Ave., Fernbank Lodge. Learn about the tools and techniques to draw colorful feathered friends to any yard this winter. Free, vehicle permit required. Presented by Hamilton County Park District. 521-7275; www.greatparks.org. Sayler Park.

Senior Citizens Pinochle, Noon-4 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, 385-3780. Green Township. Arthritis Exercise, Noon-12:45 p.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Workout to videos geared to help lessen arthritis symptoms. For seniors. Free. 385-3780. Green Township. Taking Off Pounds Sensibly, 10-11 a.m., Green Township Senior Center, 3620 Epley Road, Weight loss support and accountability. For seniors. $28 annual fee. 385-3780. Green Township.

SATURDAY, DEC. 29 Exercise Classes Beginners Ashtanga Class, 10-11 a.m., EarthConnection, 370 Neeb Road, Practice gentle progression of postures to ease into a fulfilling Ashtanga practice. $30 for five-class pass. Presented by Yoga by Marietta. 675-2725; www.yogabymarietta.com. Delhi Township. Gymbo’s Boot Camp, 10-11 a.m., Gymbo’s Personal Training and Fitness Center, 6037 Harrison Ave., Aerobic, resistance and plyometric training. All ages and fitness levels welcome. 5058283. Green Township.

Music - Blues Chuck Brisbin & the Tuna Project, 10 p.m.-2 a.m., J’s Sports Bar, 4862 Delhi Ave., Free. 244-6111. Delhi Township.

SUNDAY, DEC. 30 MONDAY, DEC. 31 Exercise Classes Strengthening, Flexibility and Core Class, 1:30-2:30 p.m., Guenthner Physical Therapy, 5557 Cheviot Road, Enter at rear of building. Enhance flexibility and strengthen all major muscle groups and core using bands, balls and weights. $7. 923-1700; www.guenthnerpt.com. Monfort Heights.

Holiday - New Year’s BYOB New Year’s Bash, 8 p.m., Riverfront West Pavilion, 7958 Harrison Ave., With Marty Scars. Small bottle and beer permitted. Ages 21 and up. $10 advance. Miamitown.

MONDAY, JAN. 7 Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park’s annual production of “A Christmas Carol” continues through Dec. 30. Remaining show times are 7 p.m. Dec. 26-30 and 2 p.m. Dec. 29 and Dec. 30. Tickets start at $30. For more information, call 421-3888 or visit www.cincyplay.com. Pictured are Avery Clark as the Ghost of Christmas Future and Bruce Cromer as Ebenezer Scrooge. PROVIDED. Music - Blues Chuck Brisbin & the Tuna Project, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Poppy’s Tavern, 5510 Rybolt Road, New Year’s Eve celebration. Free. 574-6333. Green Township.

Music - Rock Christian Rock Fest, 7:30 p.m., Faith Fellowship Church, 6734 Bridgetown Road, Music by Ashes Remain. With DANYA, Josiah Freebourne, K-Drama, David Lessing & the Great Exchange and Lamps & Voids. $15, $12 advance. 800-965-9324; www.itickets.com. Green Township.

TUESDAY, JAN. 1 Exercise Classes Faith-Based Yoga, 6:45-7:45 p.m., Vineyard Westside Church, 3420 Glenmore Ave., Second Floor Green Room. Faith-based yoga class open to all levels. Free, donations requested. 295-5226; www.tailoredfitonline.com. Cheviot.

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 2 Dance Classes Dance Class, 4:30-8:30 p.m., Douce Dance Studio, 3772 Shady Lane, Dance instructions. Ages 2 1/2-adult. Tap, ballet, jazz/hiphop, gymnastics, baton twirling. $25 monthly. Registration required. 941-0202. North Bend.

Exercise Classes Beginners Ashtanga Class, 7-8 p.m., EarthConnection, $30 for five-class pass. 675-2725; www.yogabymarietta.com. Delhi Township. FitChixx, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Sayler Park Community Center, $45 per month. 205-9772; www.fitch-

ABOUT CALENDAR To submit calendar items, go to www.cincinnati.com and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to life@communitypress.com along with event information. Items are printed on a spaceavailable basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to www.cincinnati.com and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page. ixx.com. Sayler Park.

Music - Acoustic Chuck Brisbin, 7-10 p.m., Tom & Jerry’s Sports Bar, 5060 Crookshank Road, Free. 451-1763; www.thetunaproject.com. West Price Hill.

Support Groups Western Hills Job Search Satellite Group, 9-11 a.m., Westwood First Presbyterian Church, 3011 Harrison Ave., Diane Kinsella will speak on keeping an emotional balance through the job search. Community members welcome to learn from and support each other in job-seeking process. Speakers present valuable content about latest in electronic resumes, LinkedIn, effective networking, interview skills, available funding and community resources. Group members provide support and accountability to one another during this stressful time. Free. 662-1244. Westwood.

THURSDAY, JAN. 3 Health / Wellness Yoga Back Therapy, 6-6:45 p.m., EarthConnection, $30 for five-class pass or $7 drop-in. 675-2725; www.yogabymarietta.com. Delhi Township.

Parenting Classes

Growing Up Again, 7-9:30 p.m., Mercy Hospital Western Hills, 3131 Queen City Ave., Fitness Room A. Learn variety of ways to reach your children, balance love with limits and gain confidence as a parent in today’s complicated world. Four-week course held on Thursdays in January. Book and materials provided. $60. Presented by Catholic Charities SouthWestern Ohio. 241-7745. Westwood.

FRIDAY, JAN. 4 Exercise Classes FitChixx, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Sayler Park Community Center, $45 per month. 205-9772; www.fitchixx.com. Sayler Park.

Farmers Market Lettuce Eat Well Winter Farmers Market, 3-7 p.m., Cheviot United Methodist Church, Free. 661-1792; www.lewfm.org. Cheviot.

SATURDAY, JAN. 5 Civic Christmas Tree Recycling Drop Off, Noon-3 p.m., Kuliga Park, 6717 Bridgetown Road, Hamilton County residents can recycle their Christmas trees at no cost with proof of residency. Remove ornaments, tinsel, tree bags, etc. Drop offs also available at Bzak

Exercise Classes Introduction to Ashtanga Yoga Class, 6-7 p.m., EarthConnection, 370 Neeb Road, Rookie introduction of a progression of Pranayanma (Breathing Tech), focus of gaze (Drishti) and Asanas (postures) leading to a unique practice for each participant. $30 for five-class pass. Presented by Yoga by Marietta. 675-2725; www.yogabymarietta.com. Delhi Township. FitChixx, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Sayler Park Community Center, $45 per month. 205-9772; www.fitchixx.com. Sayler Park.

TUESDAY, JAN. 8

Faith-Based Yoga, 6:45-7:45 p.m., Vineyard Westside Church, Free, donations requested. 295-5226; www.tailoredfitonline.com. Cheviot.

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 9 Dance Classes Dance Class, 4:30-8:30 p.m., Douce Dance Studio, $25 monthly. Registration required. 941-0202. North Bend.

Exercise Classes Beginners Ashtanga Class, 7-8 p.m., EarthConnection, $30 for five-class pass. 675-2725; www.yogabymarietta.com. Delhi Township. FitChixx, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Sayler Park Community Center, $45 per month. 205-9772; www.fitchixx.com. Sayler Park.

Music - Acoustic Chuck Brisbin, 7-10 p.m., Tom & Jerry’s Sports Bar, Free. 451-1763; www.thetunaproject.com. West Price Hill.

Support Groups Western Hills Job Search Satellite Group, 9-11 a.m., Westwood First Presbyterian Church, Free. 662-1244. Westwood.

The Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden’s annual PNC Festival of Lights continues through Jan. 1. Hours are 5-9 p.m. Sunday through Thursday, and 5-10 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Zoo admission is $15, $10 children 2-12. For more information, call 281-4700 or visit www.cincinnatizoo.org. AMANDA DAVIDSON/THE COMMUNITY PRESS


LIFE

DECEMBER 26, 2012 • WESTERN HILLS PRESS • B3

Begin a batch of friendship bread start, then share

Leave on counter, don’t refrigerate. Put in large bowl or container, covered lightly with wrap. You can use plastic, stainless steel or glass. Or put in large

Pretzel “turtles” on my blog.

sealed baggie, in which case you’d squeeze baggie instead of stirring with a spoon as indicated below. You may have to open baggie occasionally to let the gasses, which form from the yeast, escape. You’ll know if you have to do this if the bag puffs up a lot. Regarding yeast, use regular dry yeast, not rapid or fast rise. I will tell you that I have forgotten about the 10-day timing and the bread still turned out nicely anywhere from 9 to 11 days. If you go over the time limit, just give it a stir each day. Freeze the starter? One of my readers freezes the starter for up to a month if she has extra. Now I haven’t done this myself, but she says it works just fine. Day 1: Stir together 1 cup flour, 1 cup sugar and 1 cup milk plus 1 envelope (0.25 oz. or 21⁄4 teaspoons) dry yeast. Days 2 through 5: Stir with spoon. Day 6: Add 1 cup flour, 1 cup sugar, 1 cup milk. Days 7 through 9: Stir with spoon. Day 10: Add 1 cup flour, 1 cup sugar, 1 cup milk. Stir and put 1 cup mixture into three separate containers. Give two away, use the last cup as your new starter and use what’s

These friendship breads are sweet and cake-like. THANKS TO RITA HEIKENFELD. left in the bowl to make bread. Mark date on starters. Between the two cakes given below, it seems like the one with the pudding mix is the most popular. I can’t decide which I like better!

Friendship bread No. 1, without pudding With what’s left in the bowl, beat in the following: ⁄3 cup oil 3 eggs 1 cup sugar 2 teaspoons cinnamon, apple pie or pumpkin pie spice 2

Professor’s latest science book for teens wins award Beth Murray, Ph.D., professor of biology at the College of Mount St. Joseph and internationally known forensic anthropologist, recently wrote her second science book for teens, “Forensic Identification: PutMurray ting a Name and Face on Death,” (Twenty-First Century Books, 2012) which was selected by the National Science Teachers Association as one of their Outstanding Science Trade Books K-12: 2013. Murray’s book is geared for students in grades seven-12 and uses a case-based approach for readers to understand forensics. Each chapter opens with two case studies, then later discusses the specific steps taken by specialists to show how each case was solved.

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“The examples are based largely on actual cases I worked on,” Murray said. “I sneak the science in there by telling readers about different ways victims are identified in forensic settings.” Murray, whose fascination for science was fostered by reading books about science when she was young, said middle school is the prime age to capture students’ interest in science, a foundation that is crucial to doing well in science in college. “The students today, especially in those important middle school years before high school, are in the most formative years to developing a love and understanding of science,” said Murray. “I hope that by writing more books geared toward middle school students, I can help more kids to develop a passion for science, and that just might better prepare them for future science studies at the college level. A good,

strong background in a science education can lead to many different career paths.” Murray has been a forensic anthropologist since 1986 and has consulted with local and national law enforcement departments, as well as the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System, to help identify human remains and resolve missing person cases. “Forensic Identification,” as well as Murray’s first science trade book, “Death: Corpses, Cadavers, and Other Grave Matters” (Twenty-First Century Books, 2010), which was named one of the top 10 young adult science books in the summer of 2011 by the American Association for the Advancement of Science, are available through the publisher’s website at www.lernerbooks.com, through Amazon.com or in a local bookstore.

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11⁄4 teaspoon baking powder 1 ⁄2 teaspoon salt 1 ⁄2 teaspoon baking soda 2 cups all-purpose flour

If you want, you can throw in a handful of raisins, chopped fresh or dried fruit, nuts, chocolate chips, etc. Pour into two sprayed and sugared loaf pans (before pouring batter in, sprinkle some sugar in the pans on the bottoms and sides, and dump out excess if you like). Or mix in a bit of cinnamon with the sugar. Bake at 350 degrees for 50-55 minutes. Cool 10 minutes before removing from pan.

Friendship bread No. 2, with pudding Because of the pudding in the batter, this is sweeter. With what’s left in the bowl, beat in the following: 3 eggs 1 cup oil 1 ⁄2 cup milk 1 teaspoon vanilla

In a separate bowl, stir together and then beat with egg mixture: 2 cups all-purpose flour 11⁄2 teaspoons baking powder 1 ⁄2 teaspoon baking soda 1 ⁄2 teaspoon salt 1 cup chopped nuts

(optional) 1 large box instant vanilla pudding (5 oz. approximately) 1 cup sugar 2 teaspoons cinnamon, apple pie or pumpkin pie spice or more to taste (optional, but very good)

Follow directions above for preparing pans. Bake at 325 degrees for 50-60 minutes. Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator and author. Email her at columns@communitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-248-7130, ext. 356. Go to her blog at cincinnati.com/blogs.

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Friendship bread yeast starter

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Last week I mentioned a friendship bread recipe on my blog. But I had a request from a reader who doesn’t blog and wanted to “send a huge batch to my grandson and his unit in Afghanistan.” Well, that did it. Some of us have family in the armed forces or know of those who are keeping our nation safe, so I’ve decided if it’s that special to Rita our troops, Heikenfeld it deserves RITA’S KITCHEN space here. It’s a fun project in food chemistry to make with the kids during holiday break. Friendship bread is so-called because the starter is meant to be shared. Since vintage recipes are “hot” right now, you’ll be oh so trendy! These particular friendship “breads” are sweet and taste like a quick bread. If you want them even more cake-like, sprinkle top of batter with mixture of sugar and cinnamon. One reader uses butterscotch pudding instead of vanilla in the second recipe.

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LIFE

B4 • WESTERN HILLS PRESS • DECEMBER 26, 2012

DEATHS Stanley Abel

45239.

Stanley E. Abel Jr., Addyston, died Dec. 11. Survived by siblings Christopher (Melissa), Richard, Chris (Larry); many nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by wife Jan Greer, sister Ann Hopkins. ArrangeAbel ments by Vitt, Stermer & Anderson Funeral Home.

Jeannie Chetwood

Jeanne Albers

Mary “Jeannie” McDonald Chetwood, 47, died Dec. 9. Survived by husband Mark Chetwood; stepdaughters Heather, Jennifer Chetwood; grandchildren Kylie, Connor; father Albert McDonald; grandmother Grace McDonald; friend Judy. Preceded in death by mother Genevie “Jane” Thomas. Services were Dec. 14 at Radel Funeral Home. Memorials to: Hospice of Cincinnati, P.O. Box 633597, Cincinnati, OH 452633597.

Jeanne Freeman Albers, 84, died Dec. 12. She was a homemaker. Survived by husband Louis Albers; children Barbara (Michael) Polson, Janet, Ann, Mark (Ann) Albers; grandchildren Chris, Nick Albers, Katie, Kendra Polson; siblings Marian (the late Frank) Camardo, Richard (Karen) Freeman. Preceded in death by siblings Joanne (George) Spille, Jack Freeman. Services were Dec. 14 at Our Lady of Victory. Arrangements by Radel Funeral Home. Memorials to: Right to Life, 1802 W. Galbraith Road, Cincinnati, OH

Margene Grigsby Colegate, 61, Cleves, died Dec. 17. She worked for Duke Energy as an office supervisor. Survived by companion Michael Prack; children Tina (Zachary) McRill, Gregory Gray, Colegate Eddie (Lisa) Kayser, Derek (Sophatra) Colegate; mother Olive “Annie” Grigsby; grandchildren Desti-

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Liberty Missionary Baptist Church "Where Everybody is Somebody" 1009 Overlook Ave. 513-921-2502 Rev. Kendell Hopper Sunday School 10:00 am Sunday Morning Worship-11:00 am Sunday Evening 6:00 pm Wednesday Bible Study - 7:00 pm

Margene Colegate

123 Symmes Ave. North Bend, OH 45202 One block off Route 50, Phone 941-3061 Small, friendly, casual, blended music, Bible based messages that connect with real life. Sunday School 9:30am Worship 10:30am

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ABOUT OBITUARIES Basic obituary information and a color photograph of your loved one is published without charge by The Community Press. Please call us at 853-6262 for a submission form. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 242-4000 or pricing details.

nee, Amanda, Andrea, Cody, Alayna, Layloni; great-granddaughter Scarlett; siblings Ann (Bob) Oser, Bonnie (Tom) Pearson, Gene Grigsby Jr., Mindy (Bobby) Lewis; friend Adam Shauntee III. preceded in death by father Roy E. “Gene” Grigsby, sister Lisa Marie Grigsby. Arrangements by Dennis George Funeral Home. Memorials to: American Lung Association, c/o Dennis George Funeral Home, 44 S. Miami, Cleves, OH 45002.

Mary Edwards Mary L. Edwards, 83, died Dec. 17. She was an apartment manager. Survived by husband Charles Edwards; children Shari, James Sexton, Richard, Dale Edwards; grandchildren Melissa Martin, Cynthia Egloff, Charlie, Michael Edwards; greatgrandchildren Lydia, Robert Egloff; sister Edwards Lorena Lyons. Services were Dec. 21 at Delhi Hills Baptist Church. Arrangements by Vitt, Stermer & Anderson Funeral Home. Memorials to: Alzheimer’s Association, 644 Linn St., Suite 1026, Cincinnati, OH 45203 or American Diabetes Association, 4555 Lake Forest Drive, Suite 396, Cincinnati, OH 45242.

Howard Fox Howard A. Fox, 82, Miami Heights, died Dec. 6. He worked as a State Farm Insurance agent for 35 years. He was an Army veteran of Korea, and a member of Zion United Methodist Church and the Fairfield Gun Club.

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Come and worship in a small casual church that emphasizes the fellowship and mission in the community and globally.

Survived by wife Helen Ernst Fox; children Melissa Meier, Robert (Debra) Fox; grandchildren Danielle Meier, Elliott Fox; sister Ruth (Donald) Solsman. Preceded in death by parents ArFox thur, Josephine Fox. Services were Dec. 11 at Zion United Methodist Church. Arrangements by Dennis George Funeral Home. Memorials to: Lindner Research Center, Christ Hospital Foundation Fund, 2123 Auburn Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45219 or a charity of the donor’s choice.

Diane Gill Diane Wurster Gill, 64, died Dec. 14. She worked for Walgreens. She was a member of the Red Hat Society. Survived by husband John Gill; children Daniel (Karen) Lane, Mike (Gail), Jeffrey, Joel (Candy) Gill, Joyce (Ken) Branam, Amy (Andy) Iseral, Julie (Gregg) Goebel; grandchildren Kyle Lane, Kenny, Bobby, Alex Branam, Scott, Nora, Hailee, Lance Gill, Allie, Adelaide, Ashton Iseral; great-granddaughter Natalie Lane; mother Dolores Wurster; sister Donna (Jim) Wilson; several cousins. Preceded in death by father William Wurster, brother Raymond (Elaine) Wurster. Arrangements by Dennis George Funeral Home. Memorials to: Dearborn County Hospital Home Health & Hospice, 370 Bielby Road, Lawrenceburg, IN 47025.

Freda LaValle Freda Harnish LaValle, 81, died Dec. 18. She was a librarian at La Salle High School and St. Catharine of Siena School. Survived by husband Luigi LaValle; sons Lou (Mary), Jim (Laura) LaValle; grandchildren Luigi LaValle IV, Tony, Christian LaValle; sister Fran Gregory. Preceded in death by sister Clara Campbell. Services were Dec. 22 at St. Catharine of Siena. Arrange-

ments by Neidhard-Minges Funeral Home. Memorials to: Hospice of Cincinnati, P.O. Box 633597, Cincinnati, OH 45263.

Alan Larkins Alan L. Larkins, 72, died Dec. 12. He was an accountant for PNC Bank. He was a Navy veteran of Vietnam. Survived by brothers Larry (Judy), David (Rebecca) Larkins; several nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by parents Herman, Evelyn Larkins. Services were Dec. 17 Larkins at Bayley Place. Arrangements by Ralph Meyer & Deters Funeral Home. Memorials to: Hospice of Cincinnati, Inc., P.O. Box 633597, Cincinnati, OH 45263-3597.

Survived by fiancee Donna Scott; son Shaun O’Malley. Preceded in death by parents Patricia, Phillip O’Malley. Services were Dec. 14 at Elizabethtown Cemetery. Arrangements by Dennis George Funeral Home.

Ella Mae Privett Ella Mae Jones Privett, 74, died Dec. 16. She was a waitress. Survived by children Debra, Michael (Barbara), Teresa, Karen, Paul Privett; siblings Cloa, Lillie, Hurstle, Kay; many grandchildren and greatgrandchildren. Preceded in death by husband Floyd Privett, children Clarence, Jerry, Rosemary Privett, parents Willie, Vina Jones. Services were Dec. 19 at Dennis George Funeral Home. Memorials to: Vitas Hospice, c/o Dennis George Funeral Home, 44 S. Miami, Cleves, OH 45002.

Marianne Meyer

Jonathon Smith

Marianne Soose Meyer, 85, Cleves, died Dec. 5. She was a bookkeeper. She was a member of the Dachshund Club of Southwest Ohio. Survived by daughter Patricia (Nick) Litchfield; grandsons Brian (Nina), Jeffrey (Andrea) LitchMeyer field; greatgrandson Logan Litchfield. Preceded in death by parents Adolph, Martha Soose. Arrangements by Dennis George Funeral Home. Memorials to: Logan Litchfield College Fund, c/o Dennis George Funeral Home, 44 S. Miami, Cleves, OH 45002.

Jonathon W. Smith, 38, formerly of Cleves, died Dec. 15. He was a mechanic. Survived by wife Veronica Smith; children Collin, Riley Smith; parents Connie Smith Sr., Freda Lloyd Stewart; Connie Smith Jr.; stepfather Jeff Stewart; step-siblings Leon Gabbard, Smith Nina Reynolds; paternal grandmother. Services were Dec. 21 at Dennis George Funeral Home. Memorials may be directed to the family in care of Dennis George Funeral Home.

Robert Muench Robert E. Muench, 72, Miami Township, died Dec. 18. Survived by wife Nancy Muench; sons Donald (Barbara), Jason (Christina) Muench; five grandchildren; two sister-inlaws; one cousin. Services were Dec. 22 at Dalbert, Woodruff & Isenogle Funeral Home. Memorials to: Muench American Cancer Society, 2808 Reading Road, Cincinnati, OH 45206 or Julie Benken Memorial Drum Major Scholarship, UC Foundation, P.O. Box 19970, Cincinnati, OH 45219.

Scott O’Malley Scott Michael O’Malley, 54, died Dec. 7. He was an automobile mechanic.

Katie Ultsch Catherine “Katie” Genkinger Ultsch, 87, formerly of Bridgetown, died Dec. 17. Survived by husband William Ultsch; daughter Linda Andrews; son-in-law Ronald L. Andrews; grandchildren Ronald W., Mallory Andrews. Arrangements by Dennis George Funeral Home.

Anna Mae Young Anna Mae Walton Young, 87, Addyston, died Dec. 13. She was a cook. Survived by children James Hancock, Arnold, Ronnie, Ricky Young, Bev Aulidge, Rosemary Getz; 31 grandchildren; 64 great-grandchildren; 20 greatgreat-grandchildren. Preceded in death by husband Paul Young, children Sally Carroll, Wesley Young, Nancy Landers, parents John, Mary Walton, siblings Laura Getz, John, Robert Walton. Services were Dec. 18 at Dennis George Funeral Home.

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LIFE

DECEMBER 26, 2012 • WESTERN HILLS PRESS • B5

POLICE REPORTS CHEVIOT Arrests/citations Juvenile, 16, curfew violation and underage possession of alcohol at 4057 St. Martin’s Place, Dec. 5. Juvenile, 15, curfew violation and underage possession of alcohol at 4057 St. Martin’s Place, Dec. 5. Juvenile, 13, inducing panic at 4040 Harrison Ave., Dec. 6. Shaun Macke, 26, 3520 Cheviot Ave. No. 2, warrant at 3814 Harrison Ave., Dec. 6. Erin Martin, 26, 4050 Hutchinson Road, driving under suspension at Herbert Avenue, Dec. 6. Aryn Fox, 26, 1410 Vienna Woods, warrant at North Bend Road, Dec. 7. Justin Herbert, 21, 9704 Carolina Trace, possessing drug abuse instruments at 4109 North Bend Road, Dec. 7. Juvenile, 16, underage possession of alcohol at 3809 North Bend Road, Dec. 7. Joshua Kuhl, 26, 3642 Glenmore Ave. No. 1, disorderly conduct at 3642 Glenmore Ave., Dec. 8. Dawnelle Bailey, 26, 3642 Glenmore Ave. No. 1, disorderly conduct at 3642 Glenmore Ave., Dec. 8. Kevin Sims, 22, 1735 Iliff Ave., driving under suspension at Harrison Avenue, Dec. 8. Shane Goodpaster, 31, 90911 Shaker Pointe Way No. 5, warrant at 1000 Sycamore St., Dec. 10. Skylar Mueller, 19, 118 Western Ridge, warrant at 3814 Harrison Ave., Dec. 10. Roger Hidlebrand, 41, no address listed, criminal trespass and warrant at 3746 Glenmore Ave., Dec. 11. Jordon Wells, 20, 178 Citation Circle, warrant at Queen City Avenue, Dec. 12.

Incidents/reports Burglary Money, several pieces of jewelry, drill, saw, silverware set, laptop computer, video game system, Apple iPad, Kindle e-reader and digital camera stolen from home at 4245 Alex Ave., Dec. 3. Criminal damaging

Windshield broken on vehicle at 3626 Harrison Ave., Dec. 3. Misuse of credit card Victim had their debit card number used to make unauthorized purchases at 3325 Camvic Terrace, Dec. 3. Theft Video game system and four video games stolen from home at 3701 Lovell Ave., Dec. 5. Wallet and contents stolen from victim’s purse at Goodwill at 3980 Goodwill Ave., Dec. 8.

CLEVES Arrests/citations Sarah King, 26, 612 Hooven Road, theft at 1000 Sycamore St., Dec. 8. Jessie L. Collins, 24, 426 Three Rivers Pkwy., theft and criminal trespass at Cooper Road and Finley, Dec. 8. Rebecca L. Barton, 34, 426 Three Rivers Pkwy., theft and criminal trespass at Cooper Road and Finley, Dec. 8. Joseph Michels, 41, no address listed, child endangering at 250 E. State Road No. 4, Dec. 9.

The Community Press publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. The information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence. To contact your local police department: » Cheviot: Chief Joseph Lally, 661-2700 (days), 825-2280 (evenings) » Cleves: Chief Bill Renner, 941-1212 » Cincinnati District 3: Capt. Russell A. Neville, 263-8300 » Green Township: Chief Bart West, 574-0007; vandalism hotline, 574-5323 » North Bend and Miami Township are patrolled by the Hamilton County: Sheriff Simon Leis, 825-1500

Lakeman No. 2, open container at North Bend Road and Westwood Northern Boulevard, Nov. 21. Teresa Mayer, 41, 6236 Cheviot Road No. 6, theft at 6580 Harrison Ave., Nov. 24. Juvenile, 15, receiving stolen property at 374 Brookforest, Nov. 24. Juvenile, 15, receiving stolen property at 374 Brookforest, Nov. 24. Michael A. Ronan, 22, 4753 Rapid Run Road, theft and possession of drug abuse instruments at 5071 Glencrossing Way, Nov. 24. Juvenile, 15, theft at 6550 Harrison Ave., Nov. 24. Travis Haehaile, 25, 1043 Tahoe Terrace, criminal damaging at 7386 Southpoint Drive, Nov. 25. Gregory D. Faulk, 23, 518 Hale Ave., theft at 2777 Blue Rock Road, Nov. 25. Christina Fox, 36, 10751 Harrison Ave. No. 2, theft at 6580 Harrison Ave., Nov. 25. Ralph Collins III, 36, 10751 Harrison Ave. No. 2, theft at 6580 Harrison Ave., Nov. 25. Derrick Morgan, 21, 1259 Iliff Ave., failure to comply and possession of marijuana at Dunham and Guerley Road, Nov. 26. Maxwell Barnes, 32, 5544 Surrey Ave., open container at Glenway Avenue and Lawrence Road, Nov. 26. Floyd Barker, 35, 1092 St. Moritz, theft at 6550 Harrison Ave.,

Incidents/reports Theft Door frame and scrap metal stolen from Three Rivers school construction site at 56 Cooper Road, Dec. 8. Victim had an agreement to pay suspect money for a video game system, but the suspect never gave victim the system at 250 E. State Road, Nov. 17.

GREEN TOWNSHIP Arrests/citations Anna M. Ford, 20, 7731 Zion Hill Road, underage consumption of alcohol and possession of controlled substance at 6590 Harrison Ave., Nov. 21. Samantha Russo, 19, 424 Hawthorne Ave., theft at 5750 Harrison Ave., Nov. 23. David Bonnett, 20, 424 Hawthorne Ave., theft at 5750 Harrison Ave., Nov. 23. Juvenile, 16, receiving stolen property at 5985 Childs Ave., Nov. 20. Amy L. Kreidenweis, 26, 4155

Aggravated robbery Suspect armed with a knife stole money from cash register at Ameristop at 3670 Muddy Creek, Nov. 25. Breaking and entering Air conditioning coil, copper piping and assorted tools stolen from home at 5557 Surrey Ave., Dec. 1. Tablet computer, two computers, assorted toys and miscellaneous clothing items stolen from apartment storage unit at 3598 Robroy Drive, Nov. 24. Two tool trays containing assorted tools and scrap metal stolen from Dissinger’s Automotive at 4290 Harrison Ave., Nov. 22. Burglary Fire-proof box and two rings stolen from home at 5745 Cedaridge Drive, Nov. 28. Four laptop computers, Apple iPad, television, video game system, purse and contents, bottle of wine, bottle of gin and a vehicle stolen from home at 3572 Centurion Drive, Nov. 20. Handgun, prescription medicine, television, video game system, two video games, ethernet cable and a chainsaw stolen from home at 6222 Charity Drive, Nov. 30. Laptop computer stolen from home at 2240 Devils Backbone, Dec. 1. Purse and contents stolen from home at 4052 Westwood Northern Blvd., Nov. 27. Criminal damaging Front window broken on home at 3776 Meadowview Lane, Dec. 1. Golf balls thrown at home, causing damage to siding at 4554 Rybolt Road, Nov. 21. Graffiti spray-painted on garage door and basketball hoop at home at 2938 Topichills, Nov. 24. Graffiti spray-painted on wall at Hair Forum Salon at 5801 Cheviot Road, Nov. 23. Outside light fixture broken at Hair Management Salon at 5541 Bridgetown Road, Dec. 1. Two outside mirrors, front windshield and rear window broken on vehicle at 3843 Chatwood Court, Nov. 24.

ABOUT POLICE REPORTS

Nov. 26. Sydney E. Boesken, 37, 4163 Harrison Ave. No. 8, drug possession at Glenway Avenue and Lawrence Road, Nov. 26. Juvenile, 17, criminal trespass and assault at 3200 Ebenezer Road, Nov. 26. Juvenile, 15, criminal trespass and disorderly conduct at 3200 Ebenezer Road, Nov. 26. Juvenile, 15, criminal trespass and disorderly conduct at 3200 Ebenezer Road, Nov. 27. Amanda Moore, 33, 6976 Bluebird Drive, possession of drug abuse instruments at 3300 Parkcrest, Nov. 28. Chrystal Morris, 30, 1705 Sundale Ave., theft at Interstate 74 and North Bend Road, Nov. 28. Jerry Johnson, 37, 418 Elberon Ave., open container at 3876 Greenway, Nov. 30. Juvenile, 16, aggravated possession of drugs at 3200 Ebenezer Road, Nov. 30. Juvenile, 16, assault at 3200 Ebenezer Road, Nov. 29. George A. Owens, 30, 3072 Bracken Woods Lane, drug possession at 5800 Harrison Ave., Dec. 1. Thomas Mohr, 45, 6420 Brierly Creek, possession of drugs at 6420 Brierly Creek, Dec. 2. Corey Ramsey, 24, 3760 Lakewood Drive, possession of marijuana and drug paraphernalia at 3760 Lakewood Drive, Dec. 2.

Incidents/reports

Window broken and two tires slashed on vehicle at 5737 Windview, Nov. 24. Window broken on vehicle at 3505 Moonridge, Nov. 24. Windows broken on two vehicles at 5522 Sprucewood Drive, Nov. 23. Wooden fence rails, signs and light fixtures damaged, and chairs and yard waste thrown into bumper boat pool at General Custer’s at 3325 Westbourne Drive, Nov. 26. Domestic dispute Argument between man and woman at Bridgepoint Drive, Nov. 23. Argument between spouses at Ebenezer Road, Nov. 29. Argument between spouses at Muddy Creek Road, Dec. 2. Felonious assault Victim was shot once inside home at 6420 Brierly Creek Road, Dec. 2. Forgery Suspect attempted to cash a forged check at Checksmart at 6582 Glenway Ave., Nov. 23. Menacing Suspect threatened to harm victim at 6607 Hearne Road, Nov. 29. Misuse of credit card Victim had their credit card number used to make unauthorized purchases at 5861 West Fork Road, Nov. 28. Victim had their debit card used to make an unauthorized money withdrawal at 5542 Biscayne Ave., Nov. 28. Tampering with coin machine Coin dryer at Bridgeport Apartments damaged during attempted theft from its cash box at 5574 Bridgetown Road, Nov. 30. Theft Air conditioning unit stolen from office building at 4342 Harrison Ave. No. 4, Nov. 27. Camera, camera flash, cooler, vase, decorative ladder and a lock stolen from storage unit in apartment complex at 5355 Lee’s Crossing Drive, Dec. 2. Cellphone stolen from vehicle at 6765 Towering Ridge Way No. 213, Nov. 29.

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LIFE

B6 • WESTERN HILLS PRESS • DECEMBER 26, 2012

POLICE REPORTS Continued from Page B5 Four rolls of copper tubing and 125 brass fittings stolen from vehicle at Wardway Fuels at 4555 Bridgetown Road, Nov. 28. Gasoline stolen from United Dairy Farmers at 6075 Harrison Ave., Dec. 2. GPS and pair of glasses stolen from vehicle at 6869 Hearne Road, Nov. 21. GPS stolen from vehicle at 6644

Hearne Road No. 201, Nov. 27. GPS, money, carton of cigarettes and six CDs stolen from vehicle at 5593 Leumas Road, Dec. 1. Hair dye stolen from Dollar General at 5700 Harrison Ave., Nov. 23. Handgun stolen from vehicle at 6380 Glenway Ave., Nov. 27. Hole punctured below lock on vehicle door during attempted theft, but entry was not gained at 2413 Sylmar Court, Nov. 23. Library card stolen from victim

and used to check out numerous items without permission at 6542 Hearne Road No. 711, Nov. 28. Miscellaneous grocery items stolen from Family Dollar at 5449 North Bend Road, Nov. 28. Money stolen from cash drawer at The Book Rack at 5087 Glencrossing Way, Nov. 25. Money stolen from home at 2865 Fairhill Drive, Nov. 27. Money stolen from vehicle at 5409 Leumas Drive, Nov. 27. Money stolen from vehicle at 6217 Eagles Lake, Nov. 28. Pack of toilet paper and pack of paper towels stolen from Dollar General at 5700 Harrison Ave., Nov. 25. Pair of coveralls, ring, five coats and money stolen from vehicle at 6353 Terra Court, Nov. 26. Portable video game system stolen from vehicle at 6567 Chesapeake Run, Nov. 27. Prescription medicine and a credit/debit card stolen from home at 4852 Wellington Chase, Nov. 25. Purse and contents stolen from vehicle at 5490 Muddy Creek, Nov. 23. Purse and contents stolen from vehicle at 5796 Oakhaven Court, Nov. 29. Radar detector and 75 CDs stolen from vehicle at 6755 Towering Ridge Way, Nov. 29. Ring stolen from home at 6740 Towering Ridge No. 196, Nov. 23. Roll of sheet metal, T square, level, tool bag with assorted tools and a drill stolen from vehicle at 5547 Windridge Drive, Nov. 25. Subwoofer and amplifier stolen from vehicle at 5402 Northpoint Drive, Nov. 26. Suspect failed to pay for taxi fare at 3495 Fiddlers Green Road, Nov. 30. Trailer stolen from A&R Trailers at 5580 Cheviot Road, Nov. 27. Trailer stolen from home’s driveway at 6511 Taylor Road, Nov. 27. Two ceramic yard statues, candle, water can and gardening shovel stolen from home’s patio at 5215 South Eaglesnest Drive No. 167, Nov. 28.

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Two packs of cigarettes stolen from Speedway at 6537 Glenway Ave., Nov. 30. Two purses stolen from victims when left unattended on a table at Pirate’s Den at 3670 Werk Road, Nov. 24. Two suspects stole an Apple iPod from cab driver and fled without paying for fare at Rybolt Road and Wesselman Road, Nov. 22. Two vacuum cleaners stolen from Kohl’s at 6580 Harrison Ave., Nov. 26. Unknown merchandise stolen from Kohl’s at 6580 Harrison Ave., Nov. 29. Vehicle stolen from apartment complex parking lot at 6311 Cheviot Road, Nov. 23. Vehicle stolen from home at 3871 Maywood Court, Dec. 1. Wallet and contents stolen from victim’s purse at 5432 Edger Drive, Nov. 28.

NORTH BEND Arrests/citations Brandon Sears, 18, 154 Miami Ave., domestic violence at 154 Miami Ave., Nov. 28.

Incidents/reports Theft Copper lightning rods of unknown value removed at 25 E. Harrison Ave., Nov. 26. MP3 player, GPS unit and laptop of unknown value removed at 7715 Jandar Acres, Nov. 30.

CINCINNATI DISTRICT 3 Arrests/citations Mallorie Herron, born 1986, drug abuse, possession of a dangerous drug, 3426 Hazelwood Ave., Nov. 28. Mark S. Echler, born 1984, burglary, criminal damaging or endangering, 3000 Veazey Ave., Nov. 26. Marterrioole Gowdy, born 1990, aggravated robbery, robbery, 3200 Harrison Ave., Nov. 26. Martez J. Brown, born 1989, drug abuse, misdemeanor drug possession, possession of drug paraphernalia, trafficking, 6000 Glenway Ave., Nov. 30. Matthew Stiver, born 1989, theft

under $300, 2322 Ferguson Road, Dec. 2. Melissa Marshall, born 1972, domestic violence, 3904 Boudinot Ave., Nov. 30. Nadja Klein, born 1992, theft under $300, 6140 Glenway Ave., Nov. 27. Nieshia Sullivan, born 1985, possession of drug abuse instruments, 4023 St Lawrence Ave., Nov. 28. Nieshia Sullivan, born 1985, theft under $300, 4026 Glenway Ave., Nov. 28. Rene Humberto Navarro-Zacarias, born 1979, disorderly conduct, 1271 Manss Ave., Nov. 26. Rickey Johnson, born 1956, possession of an open flask, 2200 Harrison Ave., Nov. 27. Robert D. Hocker, born 1954, falsification, 3951 W. Eighth St., Nov. 28. Rolando Rayshawn Thomas, born 1982, criminal trespassing, 2400 Harrison Ave., Nov. 19. Rolando Rayshawn Thomas, born 1982, possession of drugs, 2900 Harrison Ave., Nov. 19. Sarah Elza, born 1988, possession of drug abuse instruments, 3223 Day Court, Nov. 28. Sherie Wilson, born 1977, forgery, 6165 Glenway Ave., Dec. 1. Stephen Shifflet, born 1983, theft $300 to $5000, 2322 Ferguson Road, Nov. 28. Tyrone Dumas, born 1989, trafficking, 6000 Glenway Ave., Nov. 30. Weigelia Wallace, born 1956, domestic violence, 3097 McHenry Ave., Nov. 29. Akeem Watson, born 1992, criminal trespassing, drug abuse, misdemeanor drug possession, 1921 Westmont Lane, Dec. 5. Allison M. Grubbs, born 1978, safecracking, 1249 Dewey Ave., Dec. 4. Angela White, born 1990, domestic violence, 3818 St Lawrence Ave., Dec. 3. Anthony Thompson, born 1988, possession of drugs, 2744 Erlene Drive, Dec. 3. Ashley E. Holt, born 1983, theft under $300, 4220 Glenway Ave., Dec. 4. Brian Kahny, born 1986, assault,

domestic violence, misdemeanor drug possession, obstructing official business, 3741 Westmont Drive, Dec. 3. David Harrison, born 1992, misdemeanor drug possession, 1162 Coronado Ave., Dec. 4. David Hillman, born 1986, obstructing official business, 1240 Gilsey Ave., Dec. 3. Felton Shamel, born 1970, criminal damaging or endangering, 2880 Harrison Ave., Dec. 3. James Oldham, born 1993, aggravated menacing, 1735 Wyoming Ave., Dec. 6. Kayahna Woods, born 1992, theft under $300, 6000 Glenway Ave., Dec. 3. Kayla M. Black, born 1987, obstructing official business, 1210 Manss Ave., Dec. 5. Kris Patrick, born 1981, assault, menacing, 3159 Mozart St., Dec. 5. Margaret Morales, born 1977, theft under $300, 6000 Glenway Ave., Dec. 3. Ramece Mann, born 1990, begging, 5800 Glenway Ave., Dec. 3. Timothy B. Cohen, born 1972, trafficking, 1308 Beech Ave., Dec. 4. William Gordon, born 1994, criminal trespassing, drug abuse, 1921 Westmont Lane, Dec. 5. Yolanda R. Chapman, born 1992, theft under $300, 6000 Glenway Ave., Dec. 3.

Incidents/reports Aggravated menacing 2400 Harrison Ave., Nov. 25. 3211 Midway Ave., Nov. 30. 4199 Glenway Ave., Nov. 30. 4753 Prosperity Place, Dec. 3. Aggravated robbery 2435 Harrison Ave., Nov. 30. 2580 Queen City Ave., Nov. 26. 2844 Shaffer Ave., Nov. 27. 2896 Harrison Ave., Nov. 23. 3106 Glenmore Ave., Nov. 26. 3523 Boudinot Ave., Nov. 26. 3731 Westmont Drive, Nov. 23. 3917 Folsom Ave., Nov. 29. 4241 Glenway Ave., Nov. 23. 1600 Wyoming Ave., Dec. 5. 1638 Wyoming Ave., Dec. 5. 2146 Ferguson Road, Dec. 5. 2280 Harrison Ave., Dec. 1.

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LIFE

DECEMBER 26, 2012 • WESTERN HILLS PRESS • B7

Duke gives to library for reducing energy Duke Energy presented the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County with a check for $111,000 on Dec. 11 as a rebate for reducing energy consumption at the Main Library downtown. These savings resulted from the library’s participation in Duke Energy’s SmartBuilding Advantage program. This program used building energy usage interval data and on-site assessments to identify and

analyze energy efficiency opportunities at the Main Library. Following program recommendations, the library replaced T12 lights with T8 lights and implemented improvements to its boiler plant in order to generate the highest energy savings in the shortest amount of time for the lowest cost. “We are delighted with the energy efficiency and cost reduction that has resulted from completion of

the first phase of the SmartBuilding Advantage program,” said Kim Fender, the director of the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County. “Duke Energy’s partnership has been instrumental in ensuring the initial success of this project and we are confident that we will see even greater savings and reduced energy consumption as we move forward with the next phase of this program.”

Duke Energy’s Ken Muth, left, business development manager, SmartBuilding Advantage, Maryanne McGowan, segment manager, and Marvin Blade, right, Director/Government and Community Relations, presented a check for $111,000 to Robert G. Hendon, board president of the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County, as a rebate for reducing energy consumption at the Main Library. PROVIDED

Grant will help Mount professor study birds Jill Russell, Ph.D., associate professor of biology at the College of Mount St. Joseph, is co-recipient of a $500,000, three-year grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) which will provide an opportunity for Mount undergraduate students to gain significant research experience. Russell, and her colleagues from Miami University and the City of Hope National Medical Center in California, received the grant to study changes in bird metabolism during migration. Russell, is co-PI (principal investigator) on the study which Miami University will oversee. She will lead Mount students as they study lipid storage and use in migrating birds. Just prior to fall migration, birds in Ohio will triple or quadruple their body weight in the form of fat storage in order to have enough energy to make it to overwintering

Jill Russell, Ph.D., associate professor of biology at the College of Mount St. Joseph, wona National Science Foundation grant which will provide an opportunity for Mount undergraduate students to gain significant research experience. PROVIDED grounds in Central and South America. The metabolic adaptation in birds is key to their survival. If birds cannot gain enough fat from the local berries they eat prior to migration, they will not survive the long trek to their overwintering grounds in the fall or back to their breeding grounds in Ohio in the spring.

“Not only is this a tremendous opportunity for biologists to learn more about birds’ metabolism, but also for undergraduate students to play a valuable, hands-on role that will greatly benefit their postgraduate success,” Russell said. “Both the Mount and Miami are committed to a learning environment where students can gain

valuable experience in lab and field work, while playing an instrumental role in the research.” The NSF grant will incorporate several broader impact projects that Russell and the other co-PIs facilitate. Russell is the director of the Birds of a Feather program, a collaboration between teachers at the Seven Hills Middle School, students, professors, and local nonprofit organizations that promotes inquirybased science in the classroom. Along with her husband, David Russell, Ph.D., instructor of introductory

and environmental biology at Miami University, Russell teleconferences with middle school students regularly from her bird banding stations at Hueston Woods State Park in Butler County, and the Clifford Bird Observatory at the Sisters of Charity Mother-

house at Mount St. Joseph, as a way of introducing the students to field research. She then visits the middle school and works collaboratively with the teachers and students in designing and conducting inquiry projects on the birds that visit the school’s bird garden.

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LIFE

B8 • WESTERN HILLS PRESS • DECEMBER 26, 2012

REAL ESTATE Cheviot

3638 Herbert Ave.: Tristate Holdings LLC to First Title Agency Inc.; $39,900. 3735 Frances Ave.: McMichael, Andrew J. and Amanda R. to Schmidt, Eric G.; $58,000. 3453 Robb Ave.: Watson, Ricky to Bank of America NA; $60,000. 3971 Delmar Ave.: Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation to Jones-Watt, Janeczka J.; $62,000. 3621 Puhlman Ave.: Cipollone, Sandra M. to That, Wathara and Lim Chanroth; $15,000. 3858 Davis Ave.: Weber, Katherine to Federal National Mortgage Association; $40,000.

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Edgefield Drive: The Drees Company to Jorvath, Brian J. and Elizabeth S.; $331,550. 318 State Road: Grote, Ashley to Hess, Patsy L.; $78,000. 330 State Road: McCann, Kelly to Aichele, Jonathan R.; $86,000. 128 Cleves Ave.: Taylor, Steven W. and Debbie to Sause, Timothy Royal; $70,000. 214 Skidmore Ave.: Wells Fargo Bank NA Tr. to Pierce, Donald; $26,500.

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Beverly J. to Rickett, Joan F.; $128,000. 5425 Michelles Oak Court: Park, John M. to Geiler, Emilie M.; $80,000. 6845 Rackview Road: Fannie Mae to Spitznagel, Michele; $126,000. 5386 North Bend Road: Speedway Superamerica LLC to Slate Ridge Holdings LLC; $400,000. 2319 South Road: Equity Trust Co. to Edwards, Anthony T. and Jillian M.; $180,000. 5374 North Bend Road: Speedway Superamerica LLC to Slate Ridge Holdings LLC; $400,000. 4654 Summit Oak Lane: Land, Larry M. and Teri B. to Koch, Edwad and Jill; $490,000. 5172 Shoreview Run : Mueller, Hilda M. to Baird, Marylin L. Tr; $110,000. 5584 Fairwood Road: Schleutker, Wayne S. to Kellerman, Rachel A.; $98,000. 4440 School Section Road: Dornette, Nancy J. to Findley, Brian D. and Dornette Kaylene; $135,000. 3863 Maywood Court: Hargis, Erin to Riecke, Amberlee and Frank W. Mount; $93,000. 3223 Harmony Lane: Cole, Wilbert W. III and Kathleen M. to Napa Investments Inc; $62,222. 4605 Hutchinson Glen Drive: Malsbary, James R. and Barbara H. to Patton, Thomas J. and Patricia E.; $265,000. 2930 Blue Rock Road: Allen, Betty to Deutsche Bank Nationaltrust Company Tr.; $68,000. 3373 Keywest Drive: Putz, Ann to Keller, Louis H.; $62,000.

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ABOUT REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS Information is provided as a public service by the office of Hamilton County Auditor Dusty Rhodes. Neighborhood designations are approximate. 2755 Mount Airy Ave.: Keys, Irene F. to Neumann, Nathan N.; $87,000. 2989 Chardale Court: Duwel, William L. and Patricia M. to Kelley, David P. and Carol J. Kelley; $155,000. 3137 Lancer Lane: Runck, Alfred J. and Deborah S. to Ausere, Alicia and Aurelio Ausere Abarca; $178,000. 4331 Regency Ridge Court: Terheiden, Connie S. to Edwards, David A. and Griselda B.; $101,900. Hickory Place Drive: Schneller Homes Inc. to Kissell, J. Eugene Tr. and Sheila M. Tr.; $382,745. 3280 Alpine Place: Citibank NA Tr. to Dalton, Dennis; $14,800. 5561 Clearview Ave.: Lewis, William B. to Stern, Brandon; $90,000. 3378 Palmhill Lane: Ghohestani, Jennifer D. to Yates, Roosevelt and Ebony; $179,000. 3 Beechurst Woods Lane: Becker, Mary George to Forrester, Jonathan M.; $275,000. 5209 Relluk Drive:The Bank of New York Mellon to Great Danube LLP; $35,000. 5914 Bridgetown Road: Heyob, Virginia A. to Grause, Ronald A.; $116,500. 3440 Eyrich Road: Wilder, Fred L. Jr. and Amy B. to Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation; $52,000. 5129 Sidney Road: Lally, Ann C. and Carolyn A. to Louderback, Gary A. and Jan C.; $27,000. 3684 Crestnoll Drive: Holtel, Mark J. and Anne Lorraine to Burns, Sara; $120,000. 3609 Krierview Drive: Nuss, Anthony M. to Doran, Stephen M.; $157,900. 5914 Bridgetown Road: Heyob, Virginia A. to Grause, Ronald A.; $116,500. Valley Way Court: Fox Ridge of Cincy LLC to Ficker, Jeffrey P. and Kathleen A.; $70,000. Valley Way Court: Fox Ridge of

Cincy LLC to Ficker, Jeffrey P. and Kathleen A.; $70,000. 5191 North Bend Crossing : Kates, Linda M. to Harris, Robert A. and Betty J.; $107,500. 6584 Hearne Road: Hatter, Saleh A. to PNC Bank NA; $20,000. 6710 Kelsey’s Oak Court: Henderson, Mary Ann to Hinds, Hugh R. Jr. and Linda S.; $102,000. 4460 Harrison Ave.: Cinfed Employees Federal Credit Union to Gibbs, Hubert H.; $69,900. 4510 Clearwater Place: Barlage, Mary L. to Fannie Mae; $68,000. 4510 Clearwater Place: Barlage, Mary L. to Fannie Mae; $68,000. 4292 West Fork Road: Scigliulo, Lina R. to Hendeson, Mary Ann; $142,000. 5039 Casa Loma Blvd.: The Bank of New York Mellon to Muddy River Homes LLC; $37,500. 3531 Sandal Lane: Fahnle, Lillian to Cappell, Mary Cecilia Tr.; $28,250. 6366 Melissaview Court: McCormick, Beverly L. to Williams, Dennis W. Jr. and Jessica P.; $234,000. 6577 Greenoak Drive: Larsen, Nick J. and Kelly L. to Niemeyer, Gregory B.; $373,200. 6267 Eagles Lake Drive: Green, Glenn J. and Mary A. to Wirthlin, Michael and Janet; $57,000. 7654 Bridge Point Drive: Lasita, Helen M. to Griffith, Lowell F. and Sue Nettie M. Laughlin; $125,000. 3522 Locust Lane: Fessel, Beverly A. @4 to Fessel, Julie A.; $40,000. 5542 Green Acres Court: Ferrara, Camille J. and Geraldine A. Schneider to Ohmer, Robert; $117,000. 3506 Ebenezer Road: Menkhaus, Mary C. to Gambrell, James; $116,000. 4495 Homelawn Ave.: Neiheisel, James W. to Inman, Douglas C.; $138,000.

New 2012 Cadillac

$36,545 MSRP WYLER DISCOUNT $6,546

Ashworth, Brandon T.; $107,500. 3694 Sandal Lane: Schlesselman, Dorothy J. to Conners, Michael A. and Sharon A.; $106,000. 5429 Sidney Road: Bartley, Ruth M. to Beaver, Martin M.; $72,000. 4039 Wildcherry Court: Cincinnati Federal Savings and Loan Association to Cliffe, Allen T. and Carol A.; $108,000. 5221 Eaglesnest Drive: Self Help Venture Fund to Jiang, Da Shu and Shu Ying Yang; $24,500. 5452 Leumas Drive: Johansing, Charles J. and Elizabeth M. to Boyden, Ricarla R.; $148,000. 5741 Windview Drive: Harkness, James R. Tr. to Hodges, Harry J. Jr. and Maia; $117,500. 2814 Preble Court: Patton, Thomas J. and Patricia E. to Titschinger, Criss B. and Casey A.; $175,000. 7154 Bridgetown Road: Jacobs, Frederick Marshall to Traut, Edward Scott; $90,000. 1332 Mimosa Lane: Diekman, David Tr. to Fry, Linda M.; $88,000. 4654 Summit Oak Lane: Land, Larry M. and Teri B. to Koch, Edwad and Jill; $490,000. 5172 Shoreview Run : Mueller, Hilda M. to Baird, Marylin L. Tr.; $110,000. 5584 Fairwood Road: Schleutker, Wayne S. to Kellerman, Rachel A.; $98,000. 5161 North Bend Crossing : Stiegler, Lucy M. @2 to Topits, Harvetta Susan Tr. and John R. Tr.; $103,000. 6112 West Fork Road: Long, Dennis J. Tr. and Christine Tr. to Seyfried, Patrick M.; $249,000. 4440 School Section Road: Dornette, Nancy J. @3 to Findley, Brian D. and Dornette, Kaylene; $135,000. 3417 Ebenezer Road: Steinmetz, Jack W. and Jean L. to First Financial Collateral Inc.; $154,141. 3863 Maywood Court: Hargis, Erin to Riecke, Amberlee and Frank W. Mount; $93,000. 3223 Harmony Lane: Cole, Wilbert W. III and Kathleen M. to Napa Investments Inc.;

See REAL ESTATE, Page B9

513-931-4441 • 513-931-0259

5815 DIXIE HWY (RT 4), FAIRFIELD 7 AT THIS PRICE

7654 Bridge Point Drive: Lasita, Helen M. to Griffith, Lowell F. and Sue Nettie M. Laughlin; $125,000. 3312 North Bend Road: Russell, William M. and Selma M. to Kunkel, George C. Jr.; $80,000. 2930 Blue Rock Road: Allen, Betty to Deutsche Bank National Trust Company Tr.; $68,000. 3373 Keywest Drive: Putz, Ann to Keller, Louis H.; $62,000. 2755 Mount Airy Ave.: Keys, Irene F. to Neumann, Nathan N.; $87,000. 3403 Aurora Ave.: Vasilou, Pete to Stanley Sr., David W. and Truman Stanley, Kimi A.; $119,000. 6423 Bridgetown Road: Ruwan, Beverly J. @3 to Rickett, Joan F.; $128,000. 7047 Summit Lake Drive: Stephens, Donna L. and Edward E. to Dowling, Jerome M. and Carol B.; $225,000. 5425 Michelle’s Oak Court: Park, John M. to Geiler, Emilie M.; $80,000. 4504 Clearwater Place: CWX Holdings LLC to CWX Holdings LLC; $104,900. 5223 Eaglesnest Drive: Moening, Scott A. Tr. to Bechar, Laura Tr.; $45,000. 5473 Michelle’s Oak Court: Fay, Donna M. and Joseph P. Barvincak to Rothert, Amber L. and Robert J. Heidi; $68,000. 5490 Michelle’s Oak Court: Meer, Odetta M. to Spitler, James and Barbara; $81,500. 5960 Colerain Ave.: HCR00511W LLC to Abu-Nafa, Ayman; $21,700. 4504 Clearwater Place: CWX Holdings LLC to CWX Holdings LLC; $104,900. 4504 Clearwater Place: CWX Holdings LLC to Mahon, Michael B.; $104,900. 5137 Sidney Road: White, Terri S. and John L. to Johnson, Kirby A.; $78,000. 6845 Rackview Road: Fannie Mae to Spitznagel, Michele; $126,000. 3341 Jessup Road: Pierani, Steven E. and Marisa A. to Sweet-Bramstedt, Mary; $95,000. 5415 Robert Ave.: Bertke, Mary M. and Cathy L. Schutte to

SRX

29,999

$

INTRODUCING THE NEW STANDARD OF LUXURY OWNERSHIP. Premium Care Maintenance Standard on all 2011 and newer Cadillac vehicles, Premium Care Maintenance is a fully transferable maintenance program that covers select required maintenance services during the first 4 years or 50,000 miles.[1]

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New 2012 Cadillac

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Warranty Protection Cadillac Powertrain Warranty[2] is 30K miles more than Lexus and 50K more than BMW and Mercedes-Benz. The 4-year/50,000mile[1] Bumper-To-Bumper Limited Warranty covers repairs on your entire vehicle, including parts and labor, to correct problems in materials or workmanship.

CTS

Diagnostics by OnStar With best-in-class diagnostics from OnStar[3], maintaining your Cadillac can be as simple as checking your email or your OnStar MyLink mobile app. Every month you can receive an email with the status of key operating systems. All Cadillac models come with 1 year of OnStar service. STK# M42516 MODEL#6NG26

New 2013 Cadillac

LEASE FOR

299

$

MO

ATS 2.5L STANDARD

36 MO LEASE $2159 DUE AT SIGNING INCL. $350 REF. SEC. DEPOSIT

Connections by OnStar Hands Free Calling capability from OnStar[3] allows you to safely make and receive calls from your Cadillac. With MyCadillac and OnStar MyLink[4] mobile apps, you can access and control your Cadillac from anywhere you have cell phone service. All Cadillac models come with 1 year of OnStar service. Emergency by OnStar In a crash, built-in sensors can automatically alert an OnStar[3] Advisor who is immediately connected into your Cadillac to see if you need help sent to your exact location. Other OnStar emergency services include Injury Severity Predictor and First Assist. All Cadillac models come with 1 year of OnStar service. Security by OnStar If you’ve reported your Cadillac stolen, OnStar[3] can use GPS technology to help authorities quickly locate and recover it. On most Cadillac models, an Advisor can send a Stolen Vehicle Slowdown® or Remote Ignition Block signal to help authorities safely recover it. All Cadillac models come with 1 year of OnStar service. Navigation by OnStar Just push the OnStar[3] button and ask the Advisor to download directions to your Cadillac, and a voice will call out every turn. You can also plan routes from Google Maps™ or MapQuest.com® to your Cadillac. All Cadillac models come with 1 year of OnStar service.

STK# M42595 MODEL# 6AB69

(1) model 6AB69 2013 ATS closed end lease 24 months/10k per year lease $329 mo. $3549 due at signing, including $350 refundable security deposit required with highly qualified approved credit. Total of payments $7896. $.25 cents per mile penalty for excess miles. Purchase option at termination. All offers are plus tax license and fees. Not available with some other offers. See dealer for details. Vehicle / equipment may vary from photo. In stock units only, while supplies last. Expires 12/31/2012

Roadside Assistance Among leading automotive luxury brands, Cadillac is the only brand to offer standard 5-year Roadside Assistance that provides lock-out service, a tow, fuel, Dealer Technician Roadside Service and more. Courtesy Transportation During the warranty coverage period, this Cadillac program provides alternate transportation and/or reimbursement of certain transportation expenses if your Cadillac requires warranty repairs.

STK #M42602 MODEL# 6DM69

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LIFE

DECEMBER 26, 2012 • WESTERN HILLS PRESS • B9

REAL ESTATE Continued from Page B8 $62,222. 5386 North Bend Road: Speedway Superamerica LLC to Slate Ridge Holdings LLC; $400,000. 4605 Hutchinson Glen Drive: Malsbary, James R. and Barbara H. to Patton, Thomas J. and Patricia E.; $265,000. 3312 Greenway Ave.: Wilson, Michael C. to Condit, Chris and Nicole; $116,500. 2319 South Road: Equity Trust Co. to Edwards Anthony T. and Jillian M.; $180,000. 5374 North Bend Road: Speedway Superamerica LLC to Slate Ridge Holdings LLC; $400,000.

Miami Township At the presentation were, from left, Carri Van Peltl OneSight Foundation; Joan Ausdenmoore, Cincinnati Eye Association; Lauren Thamann-Raines, Cincinnati Health Department; Beth Munzel, O.D.; Don Holmes, vice president at Cincinnati Eye Institute, CEI Foundation; Sara Alley, Cincinnati Woman’s Club; Dr. Marilyn Crumpton, Cincinnati Health Department; Dr. Rick Schwen, Cincinnati Board of Health; Mary Ronan, superintendant Cincinnati Public Schools; Craig Hockenberry, principal Oyler School; and Marianne Beard, Cincinnati Woman’s Club. THANKS TO HEATHER MERCER

Women’s club donation helps Oyler‘s vision needs The Cincinnati Woman’s Club recently presented OneSight Vision Center at Oyler School a contribution of $54,794.68 from their membership to help provide prescription eyeglasses to all Cincinnati Public School children who need vision correction through the Oyler School-based health center. Dr. Marilyn Crumpton, of Growing Well Cincinnati, accepted the check on behalf of OneSight Vision Center. Through the combined efforts of school district administrators, the city’s

health department and community leaders, including Growing Well Cincinnati and the Cincinnati Woman’s Club, Oyler will be the first school in the region to have an eye clinic that provides vision exams and glasses. “Through the Eyes of a Child” was the CWC President’s Project for 2012, spearheaded by Immediate Past President Marianne Beard. CWC contributions will assist with the building’s renovation and to purchase equipment to be installed at Oyler’s School-Based Health Center.

There are currently no primary eye and vision care services offered in Cincinnati School-Based Health Centers. Last year’s eyesight screenings revealed that one in three children at Oyler needed corrective lenses, but by year’s end fewer than half actually had received glasses. The Cincinnati Woman’s Club wants to ensure that all children at Oyler who need eyeglasses will get them. The Cincinnati Woman’s Club’s tradition of volunteerism and philanthropy in our community that dates back to 1897.

4549 Zion Road: Thornton, Robert P. and Retha Kaye to Haarmeyer, Daniel T. and Maria L.; $212,000. 8776 Bridgetown Road: Bruce, Douglas M. and Kaylin A. McMahan to Halpin, James M.; $89,000. 4246 St. Cloud Way: Scheid, Joseph J. and Mary E. to Kimball, Robert and Donna; $295,000. 7761 Southernwood Drive: Siry, Susan C to Federal Home Loan Mortgage Association; $80,000. 4350 St. Cloud Way: Home Restart I LLC to Dugan, Richard J. and Sandra L.; $280,000. 8140 Jordan Ridge Drive: Fullam, Barbara S. to Pi Partners LLC; $190,000. 3654 Aston Woods Drive: Welage, Albert R. and Susan C. to Duwel, William L. and Patricia M.; $303,500. 5067 Miami River Road: Harrison Building and Loan Association to Galbraith, John W. and Angela S.; $7,500. 3602 Chestnut Park Lane: Buchert, Sarah to Zenni, Kari; $109,000. 3270 Triplecrown Drive: Cincinnati Federal Savings and Loan Association to Infinity Ventures LLC; $74,000. 5086 Deerview Woods Drive: Sabato, Joseph M. and Staci A. to Berns, Joseph P.; $432,000. 7761 Southernwood Drive: Siry, Susan C. to Federal Home Loan

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BUSINESS OWNERS BIG CHANGE IN TAX CODE 179

ENJOY THE TAX BENEFITS ON OUR ENTIRE FORD LINEUP. Expense up to 100% Expense up to $25,000 TAX TREATMENT of the purchase cost (plus up to 60% depreciation) in the first year. in the first year. (up to $139,000 aggregate limit)

(50% Bonus, plus 20% MACRS on vehicle’s remaining basis, if any)

APPLIES TO Trucks and Cargo Vans Passenger Trucks/Vans and over 6,000 lbs. GVWR

SUVs over 6,000 lbs. GVWR

Expense up to $11,360 in the first year.

Expense up to $11,160 in the first year.

(plus any remaining basis using MACRS method)

(plus any remaining basis using MACRS method)

Trucks and Vans under Passenger automobiles 6,000 lbs. GVWR under 6,000 lbs. GVWR

Transit Connect ELIGIBLE F-150 (6-ft. or 8-ft. bed) Expedition NEW FORD F-250/F-350 Super Duty E-Series Wagon E-Series Cargo Van F-150 SuperCrew (5.5-ft. bed) VEHICLE

Fiesta Taurus Edge Focus Explorer Flex Fusion Escape

*See tax advisor for questions.

IS THERE A CATCH? The qualifying vehicle must be purchased and placed into service between January 1, 2012 and December 31, 2012. It must be used at least 50% for business, based on mileage, in the first year it is placed in service. So if you choose to use it for both personal and business use, the cost eligible for deduction would be the percentage used for business. WHAT’S THE URGENCY? For 2013, all indications are that the Section 179 deduction limitation will be reduced to only $25,000 and any bonus depreciation deduction will be eliminated. So the December 31, 2012, deadline is approaching quickly.

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Mortgage Association; $80,000. 4350 St. Cloud Way: Home Restart I. LLC to Dugan, Richard J. and Sandra L.; $280,000. 4549 Zion Road: Thornton, Robert P. and Retha Kaye to Haarmeyer, Daniel T. and Maria L.; $212,000. 4246 St. Cloud Way: Scheid, Joseph J. and Mary E. to Kimball, Robert and Donna; $295,000. 8776 Bridgetown Road: Bruce, Douglas M. and Kaylin A. McMahan to Halpin, James M.; $89,000.

North Bend

182 Miami Ave.: Oldfield, Ronald to Federal National Mortgage Association; $52,000. 182 Miami Ave.: Federal National Mortgage Association to Upchurch, David G.; $68,000. 22 Stonehaven Drive: Anderson, Claudette R. Tr. to Soudrette, Donald and Mary L.; $225,000. 182 Miami Ave.: Oldfield, Ronald to Federal National Mortgage Association; $52,000.

West Price Hill

5019 Relleum Ave.: Hetzer, James A. and Laura to US Bank NA; $60,000. 551 Virgil Road: Troy Capital LLC to Keifer, Wade M. and Danielle S.; $55,000. 4766 Rapid Run Road: Deutsche Bank National Trust Company Tr. to Brine, Donald R.; $6,500. Liberty Street: Gabbard, Larry J. and Tonya to Musick, Jesse; $13,000. 4004 Liberty St.: Gabbard, Larry J. and Tonya to Musick, Jesse; $13,000. 1266 Rutledge Ave.: Howard, Elizabeth to Rohe, John E.; $15,000. 576 Panorama Court: AKA1 Holdings LLC to Bayview Loan Servicing; $48,000. 4686 Rapid Run Road: Watson, Keitha to U.S. Bank NA Tr.; $16,000. 4025 Liberty St.: Cherry, Walter to Caldwell, Amantu; $12,000. 1666 Dewey Ave.: CPIT Ltd. to Ciccarone, George Tr.; $22,000. 5227 Highview Drive: Denny, Dorothy to VBOH Annex LLC;

$44,000. 1003 Fisk Ave.: Price Hill Will to Hawkins, Monika L.; $85,000. 4142 Jamestown St.: Andrews, Cynthia H. and Jeffery S. Wissman to Federal National Mortgage Association; $100,870. 555 Delridge Drive: Wernke, Marian to Bender, Patricia J.; $58,900. 4142 Jamestown St.: Andrews, Cynthia H. and Jeffery S. Wissman to Federal National Mortgage Association; $100,870. 4664 Linda Drive: Luca, Rosa to Schleibaum, Daniel A. and Patricia R.; $60,000. 1245 McKeone Ave.: Watson, Angela to Browne, Lyndon and Michelle; $13,300. 4954 Relleum Ave.: Cincinnatus Savings and Loan Co. to T. Properties-Budmar LLC; $54,900. 1222 Gilsey Ave.: Dennis, Larry J. to Mitchell, Derrick L.; $22,300. 1224 Gilsey Ave.: Dennis, Larry J. to Mitchell, Derrick L.; $22,300. 1220 Gilsey Ave.: Dennis, Larry J. to Mitchell, Derrick L.; $8,160. 4316 Eighth St.: Timedstockpicks.Com LLC to Corporate Savings Solutions LLC; $14,089. 5067 Sidney Road: Real Estate Management Holdings LLC to Gray, Joseph; $30,000. 1611 First Ave.: Harbour High Yield Fund LLC to Eh Pooled 612 LP; $6,500. 616 Trenton Ave.: Timedstockpicks.Com LLC to Corporate Saving Solutions LLC; $13,692. 4318 Eighth St.: Timedstockpicks.Com LLC to Corporate Savings Solutions LLC; $13,637. 1139 Wendover Court: Drinkuth, Joseph M. and Jeanne M. to Mapp, Micah; $69,900. 4526 Clearview Ave.: Davis, Felicia and Sheena Davis to Fannie Mae; $50,000. 1226 Gilsey Ave.: Dennis, Larry J. to Mitchell, Derrick L.; $22,300. 1226 Sunset Ave.: Timedstockpicks.Com LLC to Corporate Savings Solutions LLC; $14,198. 1170 Nancy Lee Lane: Story, Donna @4 to Story, Donna; $37,080. 1846 Ashbrook Drive: Self Help Ventures Fund to Muddy River Homes LLC; $32,000.


LIFE

B10 • WESTERN HILLS PRESS • DECEMBER 26, 2012

Oak Hills students study human brains in class Oak Hills High School Advanced Placement psychology students recently welcomed Dr. Tracy Reed, an associate professor in the College of Mount St. Joseph’s Department of Biology. The hands-on neuroscience presentation tied into the materials they are taught by their teacher, Mandy Rice. Reed, along with some of her students from the Mount, brought human brains with them. The high school students were able to physically see and handle the brain, which is what they are learning about. “Each year Dr. Reed brings a great presentation to our AP psychology students,” Rice said. “They get to experience hands on, exactly what they’ve been learning about for weeks, and then apply that information. Not very often does anyone get to say they’ve held a human brain in their hands.” “I was kind of nervous at

Ben Voight holds up the brain he studied in class. PROVIDED. first about being in the same room as human brains, but I learned new information and it sur-

prised me. The brain is actually smaller than I thought,” said junior Sabrina Peters.

Tyler Chavarria, Mariah Childs, Brittany Dixon, Shelby Rolfes and Erin Grace study a human brain in Advanced Placement psychology. PROVIDED.

McAuley donates meals to Christ’s Community Food Pantry In November, the McAuley High School community collected food and money to support the Christ’s Community Food Pantry. All year, each family homeroom, every Wednesday, collects money for different causes and organizations. For example, during October, McAuleyans raised $1,555.20 for breast cancer research. In November, the collections includ-

ed not just cash, but food items as well to provide Thanksgiving meals to needy families in College Hill. The school as a whole collected enough food and money through the McAuley Emergency Relief Fund meals collection to put together 34 Thanksgiving dinner baskets, each complete with money for a turkey and all the trimmings. The meals, plus $223. in cash, were

donated to Christ’s Community Food Pantry. Christ’s Community’s Food Pantry is sponsored by College Hill Presbyterian Church, College Hill Christian Church, First United Church of Christ, Good News Church of God in Christ, Grace Episcopal Church, Hilltop United Methodist Church, House of Joy, St. Clare Roman Catholic Church and New Life Missionary Baptist Church.

Putting together meal baskets are, from left, Andrea Trach, Abby Chaulk, Judy Pearce, Cara Walden and Gabby Stepaniak. PROVIDED.

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