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TRI-COUNTY PRESS

Your Community Press newspaper serving Evendale, Glendale, Sharonville, Springdale, Wyoming

75¢

WEDNESDAY, MAY 22, 2013

BECAUSE COMMUNITY MATTERS

Tri-County Mall in foreclosure

‘Unconventional’ ideas sought for center By Kelly McBride kmcbride@communitypress.com

Foreclosure has left the future of Tri-County Mall uncertain. The shopping center will be sold at a sheriff’s sale July 11, more than $204 million in debt. “In all likelihood, not a great deal will change for now,” Springdale Economic

Director Jeff Tulloch said. “But the city’s position is that we’d like to see a revitalization.” Tri-County is a conventional mall, and Tulloch said it would benefit from more entertainment and restaurants. Even a hotel or office space. Currently, Tri-County has just a couple of restaurants and a food court among the retail inside the mall.

Another option could be an open-air center, Tulloch said, which is less expensive to maintain. “In a conventional mall, you have open space to clean, heat, cool, provide security, lighting,” he said. “It’s huge.” Those are the options that the new owner, who remains unnamed, will weigh after the July 11 sale of the shopping center, which opened in 1960. Shillito’s and H&S Pogue were the anchors, and Tri-

County Center opened as an open air mall of 52 stores. It was enclosed by 1968, Sears moved in as a third anchor store, and it was renamed Tri-County Mall. McAlpin’s became the fourth anchor in the early 1990s, when the mall added a second level of retail stores. Now, the 1.3 million square-foot mall could return to an open-air retail center, as one option. “The mall, since about 2005, with the recession, lost

tenants and the owners gave rent concessions, though operating expenses continued to grow,” Tulloch said of a possible contributor to the demise of the mall owned by Coventry Realty Advisers. “Tri-County Mall’s time has come,” Tulloch said, “and I hope the new owner will see the strength and be willing to reinvest.” For more about your community, visit www.Cincinnati.com/Springdale.

3 students win Memorial Day essay contest By Kelly McBride kmcbride@communitypress.com

Wyoming Middle School students clean up graffiti along a walkway as a gesture of thanks for community support throughout the school year. THANKS TO JAMIE HAYNER

Graffiti cleanup sends message of service

WMS students help paint boulevard By Kelly McBride kmcbride@communitypress.com

Members of Wyoming Middle School’s student council are ending the academic year with a community project to thank local residents for their

HOODIES UNITE B1 Sharonville’s annual Classic Car Show brought about 325 cars to downtown.

support. About a dozen students gathered May 15 at the boulevard, which runs parallel to Burns Avenue. It’s a path often used by students who walk to and from the school. Graffiti covered a portion of the fencing along the sidewalk, and the students covered it with red paint. They also pulled weeds and cleaned

Memorial Day is a time to give thanks to those who have fought in war. It’s a day to remember all those people who died for our country. It’s even a day that resembles a taco, a shell with meat and cheese, but inside there is much more. That’s how three students summed up the patriotic holiday that will bring community members to their local memorials on May 27. The essay contest, sponsored by the Sharonville VFW Ladies Auxiliary, brought a prize of $25 and a chance to read their essays before City Council and again during the city’s Memorial Day celebration at Patriot Pointe. Most people think Memorial Day is just a day of school,” Will See ESSAY, Page A2

up debris along the path. “This year, the Wyoming community showed their generosity through several fund raisers that the WMS Student Council held,” Wyoming Middle School teacher Jamie Hayner said. The projects included a December fundraiser for a local

Local Memorial Day celebrations include a parade, music, speeches and the laying of a wreath. » Glendale: A parade kicks off at 8:30 a.m. Monday at Erie and Congress avenues and winds through the historical district and ends at the Town Hall, 80 E. Sharon Ave. » Sharonville: An observance Monday, May 27, begins at 8 a.m. at Patriot Pointe, 10980 Thornview Drive. » Springdale: Mayor Doyle Webster will lay a wreath at 2 p.m. Friday, May 24, at Veteran’s Memorial near the Municipal Building, 11700 Springfield Pike. » Wyoming: Wyoming has no citywide plan to celebrate Memorial Day.

Will Sunderman, left, and Madelyn Meder, right, along with Joselin Rameriz Lopez, won the Sharonville VFW Ladies Auxiliary Memorial Day Essay contest. KELLY MCBRIDE/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

See GRAFFITI, Page A2

KETTLE METTLE Glendale writer careful to cross her teas. See Evelyn Perkins column, A3

Contact The Press

News ..........................248-8600 Retail advertising ..............768-8357 Classified advertising .........242-4000 Delivery ........................576-8240 See page A2 for additional information

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Vol. 29 No. 38 © 2013 The Community Press ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


NEWS

A2 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • MAY 22, 2013

Essay

Graffiti

Continued from Page A1

Continued from Page A1

family in need, in which nearly $2,000 was collected. This enabled the school to provide holiday gifts and meals for the family and provided additional money that can be used next year if there is another family in need. In January, Student Council paired with Make It Happen, raising $971. A third fundraiser, Pennies for Patients, raised more than $3,000 for the Leukemia Lymphoma Society. “As the WMS Student Council reflected on their success this year, they decided that they wanted to give back to the community to say thank you for their generosity,” Hayner said. “The students decided that they would show their appreciation by painting over the graffiti found on the boulevard that runs through the community.” The group also pulled weeds and cleaned up debris. “We decided to do this project to give back to the community of Wyo-

Wyoming Middle School students pull weeds and clean up debris along the boulevard pedestrian path. THANKS TO JAMIE HAYNER

ming,” Student Council President Emily Boster said. “We wanted to cover up the graffiti and make it better than it was before,” Student Council Vice President Charlie Donnelly said. “It’s a more pleasant way to walk to and from school.” “I think it is really important for kids to learn about service learning at this age,” Hayner said. “Hopefully if they start community service in middle school or even

earlier, it will become something they want to do in their everyday lives. Hayner said she’s impressed with the students. “It shows that they are leaders among their peers and I think they set a good example for those around them. “I think this was the perfect project to end our year together.” For more about your community, visit Cincinnati.com/Wyoming.

Sunderman, of Sharonville Elementary wrote. “Memorial Day is like a taco. “It just looks like a shell with meat and cheese, but if you look inside, there is much more than just meat and cheese. “Memorial Day is a day to thank and remember veterans and soldiers for their work,” he wrote. “It is also a day to remember the people who have died from World War I and all the other wars for us. “I think Memorial Day is a time to give thanks to your loved ones, or those who have fought in war, that were in the Marines, U.S. Army, Air Force, or in the U.S. Navy,” Madelyn Meder of St. Michael’s School wrote. “My dad is a veteran and I will always remember that. “My dad was in the Marines for six years and loved it,” she wrote. “He loved it then and loves it now. “‘Once a Marine always a Marine,’ my father says.” “It’s a day to thank the people who died for our country,” Yoselin Ramirez

Index Calendar .................B2 Classifieds ................C Food ......................B3 Life ........................B1 Police ................... B11 Schools ..................A9 Sports ..................A10 Viewpoints ............A12

Lopex, of Sharonville Elementary, wrote. “A day to thank the people who kept us safe. “For me, it’s a day to salute America and c elaborate the freedom these people are giving us. “A day to say ‘Hey America, there is people out there giving their lives for us, not because they have to, but because they want to. “So let’s put up our American flags, and say “Thank you for all you’ve done for us.” Annette Armacost, president of the Sharonville VFW Ladies Auxiliary, presented the awards

to Madelyn and Will. Yoselin was unable to attend the City Council meeting on May 14. “I was impressed that a lot of kids think Memorial Day is a day the swimming pool opens, and they have picnics. “For me, Memorial Day was a parade with my dad, a World War II veteran,” Armacost said. “I knew the value of patriotism. “It’s important to instill it in these kids now,” she said. “I think they captured that.” For more about your community, visit Cincinnati.com/Sharonville.

TRI-COUNTY PRESS

Find news and information from your community on the Web Evendale • cincinnati.com/evendale Glendale • cincinnati.com/glendale Sharonville • cincinnati.com/sharonville Springdale • cincinnati.com/springdale Wyoming • cincinnati.com/wyoming Hamilton County • cincinnati.com/hamiltoncounty

News

Dick Maloney Editor ......................248-7134, rmaloney@communitypress.com Kelly McBride Reporter ...................576-8246, kmcbride@communitypress.com Leah Fightmaster Reporter ..............248-7577, lfightmaster@communitypress.com Melanie Laughman Sports Editor .......248-7573, mlaughman@communitypress.com Nick Dudukovich Sports Reporter .......248-7570, ndudukovich@communitypress.com Scott Springer Sports Reporter ..........576-8255, sspringer@communitypress.com

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NEWS

MAY 22, 2013 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • A3

Glendale writer careful to cross her teas cinnati Women’s ExOnce again Cynthia change where gentile, Beischel is employing non-professional women her love for nostalgia. embroidered, knotted, She says her latest crocheted and sewed endeavor is a new book hand-crafted items. You that is a “bit more of an could go there to purarcheological dig” than chase these items and was her book, “The Virhave a typical laginia Bakery dy’s luncheon in the Remembered.” tea room. Just as before, Cynthia wants to this Glendale get the feel of the resident is tea room atmossearching for phere. Actually, she first-hand memois open to hearing ries. about any restauShe began rants in the downwriting about two Evelyn town department months ago. Perkins stores. Were the While Cynthia is COLUMNIST same meals served reaching out to as in the downstairs restaumany people as possible rants? And, if you have who remember Cincinsome memory to add nati’s downtown tea about going to the city to rooms and department shop in the era before store restaurants from malls, tell her about that, the 1920s, ’30s, ’40s, ’50s and ’60s, Nora, the beagle too. That was when we used to dress up to go and Knight, the Lab/ shopping, and had better pinscher lend their supmind our manners. Cynport by being adorable at thia is visiting retirement home. Those were the communities to talk with days of linen, silverware those who recall the days and china place settings; not a smidge of plastic or when quality was king. Do you remember styrofoam to be found. what was on the menus? What an elegant experiWhat changes did you ence. observe over the years, Let’s see, there was such as to the menus or The Tea Room at Shillithe décor? Do you reto’s, The Camargo Room member Johnny Marzetti at Pogue’s, McAlpin’s casserole and then later Copper Kettle, dining at quiche being served? Do Mabley and Carew, Rollyou remember the wallman’s, and Hathaway’s. paper, murals, tableDo you have personal cloths, or flower arrangememories of dining or ments? Did the tea rooms working there? Do you know someone who does? close before the stores closed or later when the Some who have albridge opened in The ready responded to CynArcade area? thia mentioned the Cin-

One woman remembers the child’s menu and how the children’s food would be brought out in an oven and served. What special way was your food served? Did you eat off Peter Rabbit china? Do you recall a restaurant having a “food identity” that made it stand out from the others? Cynthia has many more questions to stir your recollections, so contact her by telephone at 771-0745; by email at BygoneTeaRooms@ gmail.com, or write her at Bygone Tea Rooms, P.O. Box 46452, Cincinnati, OH 45246-0452. The more details people share, the more a new window opens for more research. For instance, the sugar cubes that were served came to one lady’s mind. That got Cynthia thinking about sugar tongs and silverware. It’s like one giant jigsaw puzzle. Here is a treat. All who contact Cynthia will be acknowledged in the book. She is looking for a tea room’s little recipe book. If you have one to share, and she gets enough information about your favorite menu items, she will print the recipes. How about that!?

Cynthia Beischel enjoys a cup of tea as she awaits your memories of Cincinnati's tea rooms. EVELYN PERKINS/FOR THE COMMUNITY PRESS

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Evelyn Perkins writes a regular column about people and events in the Tri-County Press area. Send items for her column to 10127 Chester Road, Woodlawn, 45215, or call her directly at 772-7379.

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NEWS

A4 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • MAY 22, 2013

Sharonville photographer shares view of nature By Kelly McBride kmcbride@communitypress.com

The outdoors has come indoors at the Westheimer Gallery of the Sharonville Fine Arts Center. A collection of photos by Sharonville resident Mike Simpson will be on display through May at the gallery, 11165 Reading

Road. Simpson has gathered some of his favorite shots, taken mainly in Florida and in his own Sharonville back yard. The exhibit includes local wildlife, landscapes and birds. Lots of birds. Simpson enjoys taking pictures of birds more than anything.

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This little bird flitted around, catching the attention of Mike Simpson, who stayed with the jewel-colored guy until he setttled long enough for a photo. THANKS TO MIKE SIMPSON

It’s the challenge that intrigues him. “You have to be patient, and they move so fast,” he said. “There is some luck involved, but you have to be in the right place at the right time.” His photos aren’t just about taking a picture of an unusual, beautiful, large or small bird in its natural habitat. He strives to capture the bird’s personality. “It’s the eyes,” Simpson said. “If you take the photo when they’re looking at you, you can capture the personality.” The collection includes a photo of a white egret, poised as if in thought, on a branch. Another, of a jewel-colored bird at Butterfly World in Florida, went unidentified, but intrigued Simpson with its coloring and the way it hopped around the branches. “It was very small and would not stay still for me so I kept firing away until I got something worthwhile,” he said. “It was very cool to watch as it

Slow and steady wins the race as Mike Simpson's patience pays off with this photo of three turtles sunning themselves. That, and some good luck. THANKS TO MIKE SIMPSON

Mike Simpson found this egret in a rookery, with a variety of other birds nesting near each other. THANKS TO MIKE SIMPSON

flitted around.” A trio of turtles was found sunning themselves on a fallen log in Florida. “One would climb up on the log,” Simpson said. “Then the next would come out of the water and the first one would move up. Then the third.”

Shots like that require patience he said, and a little bit of luck to be in the right place at the right time. Simpson’s prints, which are also for sale, can be viewed at the Westheimer Gallery on Wednesdays through Fridays from 10 a.m. to 5

p.m., and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. For more about your community, visit Cincinnati.com/Sharonville. Get regular Sharonville updates by signing up for our email newsletter. Visit Cincinnati.com/Sharonville.

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NEWS

MAY 22, 2013 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • A5

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NEWS

A6 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • MAY 22, 2013

BRIEFLY Fill the Square with food June 8

First Presbyterian Church of Glendale is sponsoring its Fill The Glendale Village Square with food drive, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, June 8. Bring cans of vegetables, fruits, soups, and other non perishable canned or boxed foods, personal care products such as tooth paste, tooth brushes, soaps, shampoo and household cleaning products and drop them off at the Glendale Village Square next to the train depot. There will also be a drive-through dropoff. The collection will be given to The Valley Interfaith Food and Clothing Center in Lockland.

Mobile heart screening

The Heart Institute of Mercy Health has teamed with HealthFair to deliver mobile heart screenings. HealthFair offers several screening packages to test people for their risk of heart attack, stroke, aneurysm and other major diseases. Both Basic and Advanced Packages are available depending on amount of testing patients request. While insurance does not cover the tests, they are potentially reimbursable from a health savings account, depending on the insurance coverage. Check with your provider if you have questions. Individuals with abnormal results will receive follow-up directly from Mercy Health, ensuring they receive the right care from the right physician at the right time. For the most up-to-date list of screenings, locations and times, visit www.MercyHealthFair.com or call 1-866-819-0127. Space is limited. Call or go online to schedule AN appointment. Local screenings are scheduled for: » Wyoming Kroger, 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, May 24, 10595 Springfield Pike.

Gorman Heritage Farm’s Harness Club got some Cincinnati-style love April 1 when members rode and marched to a clapping crowd through downtown in the Opening Day parade. LEAH FIGHTMASTER/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Gorman Farm looks ahead to rest of 2013 By Leah Fightmaster lfightmaster@communitypress.com

Those at Gorman Heritage Farm are looking at where they can expand and improve in 2013. Christine Schuermann, executive director of the farm at 10052 Reading Road, said they’re focusing on attracting new members. About 800 people were members on average during 2012, which is about 300 more than the year before, according to the farm’s annual report. About half of those memberships are for Evendale residents.

‘Little Mermaid’ performances

Cincinnati Black Theatre Children’s Company is performing “The Little Mermaid Jr.” at Woodlawn Community Center, 10050 Woodlawn Blvd. May 23-25. Performances are 7:30 p.m. Thursday, May 23; 7:30 p.m. Friday, May 24, and noon, 3 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Saturday, May 25. Tickets are $15 each. For ticket information, call 241-6060, or visit www.cincinnatiblacktheatre.org.

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The farm is also a popular site for school field trips. About 2,800 students visited the farm last year on a school field trip. While field trips bring in students and helps get the farm’s name out, Schuermann said bringing more students in is a “doubleedged sword” — while they want to bring more students in, there’s not enough classroom space. That can limit the Gorman farm in its advertising. Schuermann said to hopefully encourage more people to sign up for memberships, they had a drive through April 15, where a pass is $40 per year. This was a drop from the normal $50, and those with a Gorman membership are also able to visit Association of Nature Center Administrators, or ANCA, nature centers for free across the country. The focus isn’t just to raise membership levels, though. Schuermann said she hopes to bring in visitors who stop in to explore the grounds, then potentially consider joining or volunteering. “We hope we have

use for their various cooking classes. Although the farm didn’t receive the major grant last year, Schuermann said they’ve reapplied for this year’s award. Gorman Heritage Farm finds ways to save costs in its $507,000 budget for 2013 and each year. Volunteer labor saves the farm thousands of dollars each year, which will come in handy especially this year, when about $54,000 worth of improvements and repairs will be made on the historic buildings. In August of last year, those buildings helped the farm become eligible to be placed on the National Register of Historic Places. Schuermann said it’s that history and ties to the area that give it the charm that many people come to the farm for. Grandparents can bring their grandchildren and talk about life in the past, children can learn about agriculture and can see the farm animals. “(Visiting) is a step back in time for a lot of people,” she said.

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more visitors that just come in, take a walk and get familiar,” she said. “... We want people who come to have a positive experience.” To keep Gorman Heritage Farm running, funding and volunteers are vital to that success. Although the village of Evendale owns the land the farm is on and designates about $300,000 annually for it, the other half of the budget is made up of funding from other sources. Schuermann said that in March alone, she’s submitted grant applications for about $250,000. She said they’ve also created a corporate partners program, where companies sponsor some of the programs the farm offers. “As a non-profit, you always have to be raising money,” she said. Last year, the farm was a finalist for the Impact 100 grant, which, if won, would resulted in a donation from the organization for more than $100,000. Those funds were earmarked for plans to build additional class space and a commercial kitchen to

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NEWS

MAY 22, 2013 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • A7

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NEWS

A8 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • MAY 22, 2013

Princeton music program earns national nod

The Princeton High School Symphonic Orchestra. PROVIDED By Kelly McBride kmcbride@communitypress.com

Princeton City Schools has received an award that sings the praises of the district’s music program. “Music education is a key component to the Princeton Advantage,” orchestra director Trista Emmons said. “The NAMM Foundation has recognized the district’s commitment to quality music education for every child by designating Princeton as one of the nation’s ‘Best Communities for Music Education.’” NAMM, or National Association of Music Merchants, chose 307 school districts across the country based on surveys about funding, graduation requirements, music class participation, instruction time, facilities, support for the music program and other relevant factors to the community’s music education program. Data are analyzed statistically and verified through a follow-up audit. Princeton Associate Superintendent Amy Crouse noted the district’s community strength. “The reason Princeton is one of the best communities for music education is that the community is part of the success,” Crouse said.

Sixth-grade orchestra students demonstrate sight-reading skills, a benchmark for instrumental performance students at Princeton Community Middle School. THANKS TO TRISTA EMMONS

Princeton High School Symphonic Orchestra students rehearse for an upcoming performance. THANKS TO TRISTA EMMONS

“Our music families stay connected to the program long past the graduation of their children. “Our musicians perform regularly throughout the area and attract audiences of community members that are not otherwise connected to the school,” she said. “It’s the music programs that draw the

new families into the school, providing the opportunity to build lasting relationships between the school and family.” Music education starts in kindergarten, with a standards-based curriculum throughout elementary school. Middle school provides an opportunity to learn instru-

mental music, with participation of more than 50 percent of sixth-grade students in band, orchestra, choral or jazz performance ensembles. High school opportunities include marching band, three concert bands, two orchestras, four choirs and two jazz ensembles. Extracurricular options include pep band and chamber orchestra. In addition, non-performance music classes in middle school and high school include general music, piano lab, guitar and International Baccalaureate music.

“Even during these trying economic times, the Princeton Board of Education, recognizing the positive impact on students, continues to shield the performing arts from excessive cuts for as long as they can,” Crouse said. Emmons has seen the effort and dedication pay off. “ Repeatedly, we’ve seen the impact music education has on student achievement and the equalizing force it is in a district with vast diversity,” she said. “It is one of our greatest assets, and one we must preserve for our kids.”

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SCHOOLS

MAY 22, 2013 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • A9

TRI-COUNTY

PRESS

Editor: Dick Maloney, rmaloney@communitypress.com, 248-7134

ACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | ACTIVITIES | HONORS

CommunityPress.com

Wyoming students present waste project As part of National Engineers Week, seven students from the Wyoming Middle School, representing the Norway delegation to the Junior Ohio Model UN, presented their resolution and the supporting technical basis to the Cincinnati Post of the Society of American Military Engineers. The students, along with their faculty sponsor, Nick Allen, spoke at the monthly SAME meeting Feb.19 in the J.W. Peck Federal Building in downtown Cincinnati. The students presented a resolution promoting pyrolysis as a viable method of reducing municipal waste, as well as a process for producing energy from the waste while

recovering valuable materials. Allen provided a synopsis of the Model UN program, explaining that the students would participate in a threeday conference in March in Columbus, where they would simulate a session from the actual United Nations. The participants prepare for months in order to represent a member nation of the UN. They explore the culture of that nation and research global issues that are affecting that nation. In Columbus, the participants present and defend a resolution that they have prepared and debate other global issues. For more information on the Ohio Model UN, see www.ohioleader.com. The Society of American

Military Engineers is a professional society that promotes national security through an enhanced relationship between the private sector engineers and related professionals and the public sector. As part of this mission, SAME supports Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) outreach in the schools. For more information on SAME, see www.SAME.org To see the PowerPoint presentation prepared by the Wyoming Middle School students, go to http://bit.ly/13zj1vi. Glenn Showers and Drew Linck, along with sustaining member firm FFE Inc., acted as technical advisors for the students.

The Wyoming Middle School team that made a presentation to the Cincinnati Post of the Society of American Military Engineers includes, from left: Maia Johnson, Nick Allen (faculty sponsor), Walker Weekley, Will Jordan, Christian Robles, Hannah Stoppenhagen, Gabrielle Blade and Isabelle Jones. THANKS TO CLINT WEEKLY

Culinary arts students win scholarships Evendale Elementary fourth-grade students who attended the academic all star luncheon, from left: front, Ian Allen, Jake Senter, Lauren Hettinger, Preston Farwell, Julia Ramsey, Alie Lindblad, Josh Kinney, Kyle McDaniel and Nolan Gardner; back, Principal Tonya Wright. THANKS TO MARJORIE MILLENNOR

Evendale students meet challenge Evendale Elementary Academic All Star Challenge was given by Principal Tonya Wright. Students had to complete 100 percent of Read and Respond homework and participate in Xtra math and earn blue ribbons in Study Island during the academic All Star Challenge. The top10 students enjoyed a luncheon with Wright. Recognition was given to all students who participated in the challenge.

Three juniors in the culinary arts program at Scarlet Oaks Career Campus won $3,500 each in scholarships at the Ohio ProStart Invitational in Columbus. Arandhy Meza of Milford, Shianne Coomer of Norwood and Hope Pollard of Winton Woods placed third in the state in the culinary management team competition. Each member of the team received scholarships in the amount of $2,000 from Sullivan University, $1,000 from

the Culinary Institute of America and $500 from Johnson and Wales. Members of the senior culinary arts team also participated in the ProStart Invitational. Competing were Manuel Avila of Mason, Jamila Dawson of Winton Woods, Raquel Gillen of Princeton, Ethan Jakres of Madeira and Zoe Lambert of Harrison. ProStart is a culinary curriculum which leads to certification and careers in the food industry.

CELEBRATING CATHOLIC SCHOOLS

Evendale Elementary second-grade students from Mandy Pence and Robin GuentherÕs class with their principal, Tonya Wright and Chris Applequist. From left: front, Brittany Gause, Rebecca Seibert, Braden Gause, Melanie Kessler and Jack McDaniel; back, Madison Tolbert, Carson McDaniel, Emanuel Harris and Yun Park. THANKS TO MARJORIE MILLENNOR

Evendale students who participated in the Academic Challenge from fifth-grade, from left: front, Nathan Chen, Ben Rupard and Devin Morris; second row, Hannah Runyan, Ambriyana Watkins, Sal Giolando, Carly Petersman, James Price and Clay Kessler; back row, Shamari Bonner, Israel Ball and Zach Lichtenberg; standing, Chris Applecrisp, assistant manager at the Evendale Commons Wal-Mart. THANKS TO MARJORIE MILLENNOR These Evendale Elementary third-graders participated in the lunch celebration. From left: front, students Reese Hettinger, Bryn Good, Alex Hinsey, Jack Betz and Nicki Caracci; second row, Aidan Shatto, Jamal Booker, Breasia Diggs, Nathan Orf, Justin Williams and Molly McDonough; back row, Emma Mason, Wal-Mart assistant manager Chris Applequist and Principal Tonya Wright. THANKS TO MARJORIE MILLENNOR

Saint Gabriel Consolidated School participated in the annual Archdiocese of Cincinnati's Catholic Schools Week Mass. This Mass included student representatives from the Greater Cincinnati area's Catholic schools and was held at St. Peter-in-Chains Cathedral. Saint Gabriel was represented by, from left: seventh-grader Abby Brickner of West Chester Township, sixth-grader Sam Fehrenbach of Glendale and eighth-grader Tyrice Walker of Liberty Township, as well as Principal Joe Epplen. THANKS TO LAURA HENDY

COLLEGE CORNER Dean’s list

Sharonville residents Michelle M. Johnson and Aaron R. Kaufman were named to the dean’s list for the fall semester at Boston University.

XU grad Weigel commissioned

Seventeen seniors in Xavier University’s All For One ROTC battalion were commissioned as second lieutenants in the United States Army. Robert Weigel will graduate from Xavier with a bachelor of arts in liberal arts and a

minor in computer science. He is the son of Timothy and MiSuk Weigel. Robert’s brother, 2nd Lt. David Weigel, is serving in the Army. While in ROTC, Robert Weigel was active in the Pershing Rifle Fraternity, the Bold Warrior Challenge team, and spent a month at Fort Carson in the Troop Leader Training program. Weigel was branched Quartermaster in the Army Reserves and will attend Basic Officer Leader Course at Fort Lee in Virginia.


SPORTS

A10 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • MAY 22, 2013

Editor: Melanie Laughman, mlaughman@communitypress.com, 513-248-7573

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | RECREATIONAL

TRI- COUNTY

PRESS

CommunityPress.com Princeton’s 4x100 relay team finished third at the GMC preliminaries May 15 at Mason. They are, from left: Sophomore Allen Clay, senior Evan Grant, sophomore Anthony Stewart and sophomore Marcus Placke.

TOURNMENT BRIEFS By Mark D. Motz and Scott Springer mmotz@communitypress.com sspringer@communitypress.com

MELANIE LAUGHMAN/COMMUNITY PRESS

VIKINGS’ FURY

Princeton’s girls track team finished fourth in the Greater Miami Conference tournament May 15-17 at Mason, while the boys finished finished sixth.

Tucker Marty scores the winning run in the bottom of the sixth of Wyoming’s 4-3 victory over Bethel-Tate at Crosley Field May 16. Earlier in the inning, Marty hustled to turn a blooper into short left field into a double. Hayden Sharp then laid down a sacrifice bunt to move him to third and Marty scored on Connor Eldredge’s base hit. ROD APFELBECK/FOR THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Baseball

» Princeton High School lost 12-2 to Talawanda in the opening round of the Division I sectional baseball tournament. » Wyoming won 4-3 in Division II tourney action at Crosley Field in Blue Ash over Bethel-Tate on May 16. Junior Michael Kelley got the win and sophomore Parker Chalmers was 3-4 with a triple. The win put the Cowboys in a game with Clermont Northeastern May 23 in Lebanon.

Princeton’s Lindsay Myers takes part in the 4x800 meter relay at the 2013 Greater Miami Conference preliminary meet May 15 at Mason.

Princeton’s Secoria Royal is slightly ahead of Lakota East's Celeste Bronson in their heat of the 300-meter hurdles May 15 at Mason High School for the Greater Miami Conference preliminary track meet. MELANIE LAUGHMAN/COMMUNITY PRESS

Softball

» St. Ursula Academy beat Princeton 13-6 May 13 in the Division I sectional tournament. Sophomore Megan Chapman notched the win for SUA as Theresa Callahan went 2-for-3 with a pair of RBI and Sydney Priest was 2-for-4 with three RBI.

Girls lacrosse

» Wyoming came back to defeat Bishop Hartley 11-8 on May 13 in tournament play. The Cowboys season ended on May 16 with a 10-7 loss at Indian Hill. Wyoming finished the year 12-5. M.J. Fischer had three goals for the Cowboys in the loss.

Princeton High School’s Josh Jasper hands off the baton to Montez Irvin in the 4x800 meter relay at the Greater Miami Conference preliminary meet May 15 at Mason.

Princeton’s Samia Bell of Princeton, far right, wins her heat in the 200-meter dash at the 2013 GMC preliminary track meet May 15 at Mason. Behind her are Mason’s Chemetria Wilson and Lakota West’s Julia Huston. MELANIE LAUGHMAN/COMMUNITY PRESS

May days competitive at Wyoming for Cowboys lacrosse teams

By Scott Springer

sspringer@communitypress.com

WYOMING — Bob Lewis Stadium has been graced with competitive lacrosse this spring as both boys and girls programs at Wyoming enjoyed success The Wyoming girls sported their first-ever winning record. Coach Kristen Gilwee’s girls finished the regular season at 12-3 and won a memorable tournament game against Bishop Hartley on May 13. “We were down 8-5 with about 13 minutes left and were able to come back and win by three,” Gilwee said. “Six unanswered goals is pretty awesome.”

That moved the Cowboys to a game against Indian Hill, whom they had previously defeated. Unfortunately, the Wyoming season came to a close against the Lady Braves with a10-7 loss. This year’s win total doubled any previous high by Wyoming and was accomplished with just two seniors - captains M.J. Fischer and Carly Levick. “I think we’ve come a long way since last year,” Gilwee said. “We changed the mentality of the team and they know they have the potential to have a winning record. The girls are starting to realize they can do a lot more if they put their mind to it. I’m very proud.” Wyoming’s regular season

losses were to established programs like Summit Country Day, Cincinnati Country Day and Anderson. They lost that trio of games by a combined six goals. “We lost, but played our heart out and they could have gone either way,” Gilwee said. For the future, freshman Haley Stewart and Reilly Simmons were key players this season and among the nine high school newcomers on the roster. Sophomore Addie Smith will be another player to watch. “She has an opportunity to go really far,” Gilwee said. “She can play high DI lacrosse if she

See COWBOYS, Page A11

Seniors Conner Hughes and Evan Rajbhandari were recognized before Wyoming’s boys lacrosse game on May 17 against Lebanon. The Cowboys lost 12-5 despite getting goals from David Moody, Peter McGrath and John Hughes. THANKS TO ROD APFELBECK

Junior Jalen Fox approaches the finish line to anchor the Wyoming boys 4 x 100 relay team to victory at the CHL Championships at Reading on May 17. Fox also won the 100 and 200 meter dashes to lead Wyoming to its second-straight Cincinnati Hills League title. THANKS TO ROD APFELBECK

Boys track and field

» Wyoming won the Cincinnati Hills League championship May 17 at Reading. Travis Glendenning was

See BRIEFS, Page A11


SPORTS & RECREATION

MAY 22, 2013 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • A11

Eight at MND commit to play college sports Eight Mount Notre Dame High School seniors have recently signed commitments to continue their athletic careers at the collegiate level. •Nyssa Garrison (Columbia Township), soccer – Tusculum College •Sarah Huster (West Chester), soccer – Ohio Northern University •Laura Jansing (Sharonville), field hockey – Wittenberg University •Hannah Kohne (Reading), basketball – Heidelberg University •Sydney Landers (Loveland), tennis – Bellarmine University •Rose Lavelle (Kenwood), soccer – University of Wisconsin •Maddie Rapp (Reading), swimming – Florida International University •Samantha Shoemaker (Reading), soccer – Notre Dame College of Ohio “We are very proud of these students and wish them the best as they continue their athletic endeavors,” MND Athletic Director Mark Schenkel

Cowboys Continued from Page A10

THANKS TO JIM KAPP

Mount Notre Dame High School seniors, from left, Nyssa Garrison, Sarah Huster, Rose Lavelle and Samantha Shoemaker celebrate committing to play college sports. THANKS TO JIM KAPP

SUMMER SPORTS CAMPS Coerver soccer camp

Coerver Summer Soccer camp for ages 5 to 14 is coming this summer to Rivers Edge indoor sports, Ohio 128, Cleves, The Coerver Method of teaching soccer is based on a dissection of the moves of the

greatest players of the game and then retaught to students in an easy, fun format. The camp is 9-10:30 a.m., for ages 5 to 8 and 10:30 a.m. to noon for ages 9 to 14, June 3-6; or July 22-25. Go to coerver.com/ohio to sign up or call Joe Talley, camp director, with any questions at 937-207-9003.

Underwater hockey

The Roger Bacon High School Underwater Hockey Team is

Continued from Page A10

keeps going.” The only downside of the season is Gilwee will move shortly after getting married. Whomever takes over, inherits a pretty solid cast. Wyoming’s boys coached by Keith Hughes started the season off sluggish by losing the first five games. “We had a lot of injuries at the beginning,” Hughes said. “It’s a young team with a lot of freshmen starting. We started getting guys back and started to play better.” The return of players like John Hughes, James McAlister and Nicholas Robles helped the Cowboys reel off sevenstraight wins. “I think we’re as healthy as we’ve been all year and playing as well as we have,” Hughes said prior to the tournament draw. Like the girls team, the Cowboys were very young with just two seniors in Conner Hughes and Evan Rajbhandari. “(The) thing about Wyoming is it kind of comes in clusters,”

Celebrating signing commitments to play college sports are Mount Notre Dame seniors, from left, Maddie Rapp, Hannah Kohne, Sydney Landers and Laura Jansing.

said. “In addition, we are confident that the skills they have learned as members of their sports

BRIEFS

teams will help sustain their academic success as well.”

having its seventh-annual Roger Bacon underwater hockey summer camp for incoming (or rising) sixth-, seventh- and eighth-grade students. The camp will be from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Monday, June 24, through Friday, June 28, at Xavier University in the O’Connor Sports Center pool. The cost is $50, and checks should be made payable to “Roger Bacon High School.” Contact coach Paul “Doc” Wittekind at underwaterhock-

named Coach of the Year. Winning for the Cowboys were Jalen Fox in the 100 and 200 meters and the 4x100 and 4x800 relays.

Girls track and field

» Wyoming was second at the CHL meet May 17. Kayla Livingston won the 100 and 300 hurdles and the long jump.

Wyoming senior co-captains M.J. Fischer (8) and Carly Levick (18) led the Cowboys to a 12-3 regular-season record. THANKS TO ROD APFELBECK

Hughes said. “Certain years you have more kids playing and other years you don’t.” Accordingly, some of Wyoming’s players are youngsters with familiar last names for those that follow athletic activities along Pendery Avenue. “Oliver Reinecke has really turned it up this year,” Hughes said. “He’s really fast and is kind of our MVP. Jack Crider’s probably our top freshman at attack and Cooper O’Gara is another good freshman.”

ey@ rogerbacon.org for more information and a registration brochure. The deadline to register is June 10. The schedule for the OSYSA/ Soccer Unlimited Soccer Camps run by Jack Hermans and Ohio South is now available at http:// tinyurl.com/cmtr3t5. Included in the schedule are camps in Hyde Park, College Hill, Anderson, Deer Park, Milford,

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VIEWPOINTS

A12 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • MAY 22, 2013

Editor: Dick Maloney, rmaloney@communitypress.com, 248-7134

EDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM

TRI-COUNTY

PRESS

CommunityPress.com

When emotion rules, we all lose There is no reason to excuse being highly emotional when heinous crimes are committed on children and athletic parents who are determined to set a good example. I love children and they sense it. In just the last week I elicited a shy smile and a wave from a Muslim child and interacted with some cute boys who were sitting with their Sikh father. Race, religion or nationality are not important to me. I evaluate all people by their humanity. And, quite rightly or wrongly, I disrespect people for their lack of humanity or civility. As a former competitive athlete, I appreciate what Mr. Richard did to train for a marathon and to also provide for

began long ago. I saw his loving family. That the effects of the lack his son was brutally of tolerance during taken away from him World War II. My shortly after his mounderstanding of the ment of glory, his failures of mankind in daughter was maimed relationship to humanand his loving wife seity became a serious verely injured is the quest. height of inhumanity. Edward Levy Getting to know To accept this as an COMMUNITY PRESS people who were “difact of religious piety is GUEST COLUMNIST ferent” from me not only insane, but in proved more interesting the direct contradiction of the more exposed I got. Respect Quran. I have read the Quran can come naturally when you (Pickthall translation) and let curiosity and tolerance have been impressed that evguide your thoughts. Over the ery Surah (chapter) but one years, travel to exotic places begins, “In the name of Allah, increased my knowledge and the Beneficent, the Merciful.” acceptance. It is hard to hate Where is the beneficence and someone when you are sharing mercy in acts of terrorism and a meal and thoughts with them senseless murder? in their home. My interest in humanity

The coming end of tyranny in America Yes, the IRS is a funcYou may be blinded by tion of the U.S. government thinking tyranny can not – it is not an independent happen here, however, I am agency – as the White old enough to have heard House spokesman, Jay first-hand reports of how Carney, has claimed last “free “ Germany was conweek. verted, almost overnight to As you have read about a totalitarian State. First the political targeting of the National Socialist Party conservative groups by the of Germany found victims IRS during the last three to blame – just like the years, you may want to find years of blaming George out how we the W. Bush and then people, who were blaming the Tea targeted for harassParty by the Demoment by the IRS, crat Party leaderreacted during the ship in this country. last three years. Then the German Any organization legislature was that applied for a neutered by passing 501-4C non profit laws they did not classification that read. Next, uniTed Day included in their versal background COMMUNITY PRESS name – Tea Party, checks for gun ownGUEST COLUMNIST Patriot, Freedom, ership were impleLiberty, 912 Promented. These ject, government spending background checks and or Constitution – was targun owner identification geted as an organization. allowed the planned conGroups sympathetic with fiscation of all guns from the president’s agenda all law abiding citizens. were not targeted. The public was disarmed. After seeing the lack of Then came the internment prosecution and seeing the and concentration camps. government cover up of Then came World Ward ll the Black Panther voter and the devastation of intimidation case in PhilaEurope including the near delphia, and seeing the lack total destruction of Germaof resolve by the Federal ny. government to stop terrorYes, government tyranist attacks on Americans, ny starts with a series of and the lack of resolve to planned steps – seemingly properly prosecute Islamic innocuous at first and then terrorists such as the Fort stark realization to all. Hood mass killer, and the Citizens of “free Germany” observation of the comwere duped and now we plete denial and cover up of see in America that many the existence of Islamic of our oblivious friends and terrorism by Attorney neighbors have also been General Eric Holder and duped – not once –in the President Barack Hussein election of 2008, but again Obama as a real threat to in the election for 2012. our security, I had to find a Evil was allowed to grow plan of protection from the in Germany in the 1930s government. and now we see lies and My response and the deceit growing in Washingresponse of thousands of ton, D.C. Yes, it took knowlPatriots was to buy fireedge of the stand-down arms. There were long order , for some people lines at gun shops and still within the Federal governare. I took classes for conment as well as citizens cealed carry along with like you and me – to stand thousands of others to obup and say enough is tain authorization to carry enough. a gun. Yes government tyranny – or suppression of Ted Day is a resident of Montgoconstitutional rights is real. mery.

TRI-COUNTY

PRESS

A publication of

An important advance in my search for the understanding of humanity came when I enrolled in the humanities program at Xavier. Going to college at night while being involved in business for a living is true test of your interest, especially when you are middle-aged. The comments of my friends and family not only heightened my enthusiasm, but proved hilarious. A better understanding of the lives, thoughts, philosophy, history, politics and entertainment of the past was the dawn of my serious evaluation. Sadly, we have not learned or changed. Recent events clearly prove that. Greed is a belittling term

that is used on opponents to enhance ones power and/or prestige. That has not changed. While it is normally used about wealth, we should consider the other factors. Politics immediately comes to mind. As it was in the past, it is still true. The sad event in Boston will likely be politicized for political purposes. It will only take time for another election to see that happen. The political uproar over the mishandling of Benghazi proves my point. If we don’t reclaim our humanity, we will simply become another failed society in future history books. Edward Levy is a resident of Montgomery and former college instructor.

CH@TROOM May 15 question Should Ohio’s legislature pass a right-to-work law? Why or why not?

“Yes, Ohio should be a right to work state as it already is in at least one school district I used to work for. “My current employer offered me a job at $4.50 an hour, plus tips, plus excellent benefits to which I graciuosly accepted their offer without the union’s involvement. Now the union wants to come into my place of employment and cannot guarantee anything to which I don’t already have, but if they are successful in infiltrating then I have no choice but to join and fork over a portion of my check for dues. “This choice should be mine to make if I want to join as well as other hard working people who choose to perform and have timely attendance instead of having to be protected because they are lazy or dont want to show up. If public sector employees, such as the classified employees of Finneytown School District, have the choice of not belonging to the union, then private sector employees should have the same choice?”

Vernon Etler

“’Right to work’ is the pseudonym for right to impede – unions. “Those who say ‘who cares, I’m not in union,’ do not realize that every ‘right’ employees possess has been vigorously fought. The 10hour work day, the six-day work week followed by the five-day week, overtime, safety issues, workers comp, paid vacation time, health care benefits, plain old better wages – all were fought for and won, by unions. Sometimes fought to the death, literally, of striking workers. “It may surprise some that most so-called employee rights can be rescinded at will by employers. Those that cannot, because of law? Well, those laws were and are being fought. “A current example is health care insurance, which

NEXT QUESTION Do you think IRS officials targeting of conservative groups is a one-time mistake or does a culture of abusing its power exist within the organization? Why or why not? Every week we ask readers a question they can reply to via e-mail. Send your answers to tricountypress@communitypress.com with Chatroom in the subject line.

by the will of the American public (no national health care!) is financially the foundation of our health care system. Guess what? It can be withdrawn. A law (Obama Care), to require it is being bitterly fought. “Unions brought health care benefits into existence, just like the other above mentioned items. Right to work, meaning the right not to join a union in a union business, is indeed a right individuals might want to use. It is not in their best interests to exercise that right. “Unions overstepping? Can and should be addressed. Right here we are talking about business overstepping.”

F.N.

“Absolutely! We are at a big disadvantage to most states in the South and now to Indiana and Michigan. That loud sucking sound that you hear is the sound of all those Ohio jobs going south, west, and north. “Where are the Republican office-holders on this? Where is there backbone? It was for issues like right-towork that they were elected and now you can’t find them with a search party.”

T.H.

“I think Ohio needs to make sure they can get the labor market down so that everyone not in a white collar job is considered an at-will employee and can be let go or fired at anytime with no protection of a union or access to affordable legal counsel. “This protects the business owners, helps the shareholders and will ensure a supply of cheap labor. If a worker feels they’re being treated too harshly or the conditions aren’t good, then as an owner I can just get rid

394 Wards Corner Road Loveland, Ohio 45140 phone: 248-8600 email: tricountypress@communitypress.com web site: www.communitypress.com

of that bad seed and quickly bring in a replacement. “Labor isn’t scarce, but there is always room for maximizing profits and breaking up unions is one way to ensure that profits can be maximized and wages kept very low.”

I.P.

“Odd how we citizens seem to think that these folks we elected should pass so many hundreds of laws ... it’s just nuts how intrusive government (which is necessary) has become. “Seems like our American society swings back and forth every 40 years or so, though. I bet our America becomes much more libertarian over the next 10 years, as times do change, and this right-to-work stuff looks very much like a good place to start.”

K.P.

“If I am correct in my thinking, ‘right to work’ laws forbid companies from forcing employees to join a union in order to get a job. If Ohio workers do not have that protection then yes, we need such a law.”

R.V.

“Absolutely. Individuals should have the freedom to work for whatever rate their skills can demand without being forced to join a union or give them dues. This is especially the case where union leadership gives the dues to political entities that the employee doesn’t support.”

P.C.

“Yes. Yes. A thousand times yes. This is not SB 5. This is not an attack on the unions. This is simply giving people the choice of whether or not they want to belong to a union.”

Tri-County Press Editor Dick Maloney rmaloney@communitypress.com, 248-7134 Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday See page A2 for additional contact information.

J.G.


WEDNESDAY, MAY 22, 2013

Rain can’t drive away annual

LIFE

TRI-COUNTY PRESS

PEOPLE | IDEAS | RECIPES

CAR

SHOW By Kelly McBride kmcbride@communitypress.com

Car owners were vigilant, drying their classics between bursts of rain, but visitors to Sharonville’s 36th annual Classic Car Show simply popped open their umbrellas, not to be deterred. The show brought about 325 cars to downtown Sharonville, where they were arranged in several categories. “Weather certainly had some effect on the attendance, but many realized it would be intermittent showers, and were anxious to show their cars,” Sharonville Chamber President Rich Arnold said, adding that good weather typically brings about 500 cars. Brad Franks of Liberty Township showed his 1956 Chevy 210. The Sharonville show marked a first for the 57-yearold car. “This is the first time it’s ever been wet,” Franks said of the customized vehicle. “This is the first time the windshield wipers have ever been used.” Marc Alexander was also busy drying off his two classic cars. His 1929 Chrysler DeSoto is one of only six in existence, he said. The Colerain Township man said his wife named the car Chitty, after the movie “Chitty Chitty Bang Bang.” He also showed a 1970 Plymouth GTX 440 Super Commando, one of only 11 ever produced, Alexander said. Cars ranged from 1929 models to 2013 versions, in styles that included Camaro, Firebird, Mustang, Corvette, Mopar, Miata, trucks, hot rods, foreign cars and motorcycles, among others. “As we As we got near noon and the threat of rain was vanishing, the crowds of people (families viewing the cars) coming to the show swelled. The hoods of the cars were proudly raised as they invited the crowds to look at the cars which lined the streets all over downtown Sharonville. The food vendors selling metts, brats, pizza, goetta sliders, gumbo, beverages, etc. were busy all day. All in all, everyone had a fun and exciting day. The smile on the faces of the winners in each of the 18 classes help make the day a success.”

Chris Bork showed this 1955 Chevrolet Bel Air. KELLY MCBRIDE/THE

Marc Alexander cares for his 1929 Chrysler Desoto, one of only six in existence. KELLY MCBRIDE/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

COMMUNITY PRESS

AWARD WINNERS » Best in Show went to Mike and Ann Combs for their 2006 Ford Mustang GT. » Chambers Choice went to Christ Bork for his 1955 Chevy Bel Air. » Oldest Car award went to Leon Howell for his 1929 Ford Touring. » Show and Shine Award went to Paul Krimmer for his 2011 Chevy Camaro. The winners of the class categories and their cars were: » Pre 1960s, Kim Clark, 1959 Buick Invicta; » 1960-1965, Robert Langan, 1963 Ford Galaxy; » 1966-1969, Dick Beatty, 1967 Chevelle; » 1970-1974, Fred Akers, 1971 Ford Torino GT; » 1975-1988, Dave Simmons, 1976 Chevy Nova Concours; » 1989-Present, Mike and Ann Combs, 2006 Mustang GT; » Chevrolet 1955-1959, David Brichacek, 1955 Chevy Bel Air Convertible; » Camaro-Firebird through 1988, James Voss, 1969 Chevy Camaro; » Corvette through 1988, Jack Schwein, 1962 Chevy Corvette; » Mustangs through 1988, Steve Chaney, 1967 Ford Mustang; » Thunderbirds through 1988, Doug Johnston, 1961 Ford Thunderbird; » Mopar through 1988, Lance Langdon, 1964 Plymouth Fury; » Miata all years, Kirk Hodulik, 1992 Mazda Miata; » Truck and Utility all years, Kyle Wren, 1951 Ford F1; » Hot Rods all years, Jim Tyner, 1931 Ford Victoria; » Foreign all years, Jim Wright, 1965 Volkswagen Beetle; » Tuner, Travis Cline, 2001 Dodge Neon/SRT Swap; » Motorcycles all years, Jerry Ball, 1955 Ariell-Wastonian Motorcycle.

Brad Franks of Liberty Township tends to his 1956 Chevy 210. The Sharonville Classic Car Show was the first time the car had ever been rained on, Franks said. KELLY MCBRIDE/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Josh Hawk of Springfield shows Brian Coney of South Lebanon his 1999 Dodge Viper. KELLY

Dean Watson, 5, of West Chester Township, checks out this 2013 Corvette with Lambo doors, owned by Mike Noschang of Eastgate. KELLY MCBRIDE/THE

MCBRIDE/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

COMMUNITY PRESS

Owen Hicks, 5, of Finneytown gives a thumbs up to this 1957 Chevy sedan owned by Greg Martindale, as well as his favorite soda, Orange Crush. KELLY

Car owners were vigilant, drying their classics between bursts of rain, but visitors to Sharonville’s 36th annual Classic Car Show simply popped open their umbrellas, not to be deterred. The show brought about 325 cars to downtown Sharonville, where they were arranged in several categories. Bill Curtis of Dent, right, shows Bob Masters of Fairfield his 1957 Ford Thunderbird. KELLY

MCBRIDE/THE

MCBRIDE/THE COMMUNITY

COMMUNITY PRESS

PRESS

For more about your community, visit www.Cincinnati.com/Sharonville.

CHITTY, CHITTY ONLINE

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Click here to learn about “Chitty,” one of the cars at the show.


B2 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • MAY 22, 2013

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD THURSDAY, MAY 23

Sycamore Junior High, 5757 Cooper Road. Free. 549-2197; www.bamso.org. Blue Ash.

Clubs & Organizations Cincinnati 2020: From Vision to Reality, 7 p.m., Mayerson JCC, 8485 Ridge Road, Amberley Room. Jewish Federation of Cincinnati annual meeting. Learn about Cincinnati 2020 and how you can help. Dessert reception to follow. Ages 18 and up. Registration recommended. 985-1500; www.jewishcincinnati.org. Amberley Village.

TUESDAY, MAY 28 Cooking Classes Cheesecakes and Cinnamon Rolls with Karen Harmon, 6:30-9 p.m., Cooks’ Wares, 11344 Montgomery Road, Step-bystep through cheesecakemaking and baking process. $45. Reservations required. 489-6400. Symmes Township.

Cooking Classes

Benefits A Russian Summer’s Night, 4-11:30 p.m., Peterloon Estate, 8605 Hopewell Road, Gourmet Russian dinner in gardens, music by Fotina Naumenko, vodka tasting and live auction. Ages 21 and up. Benefits St. George Russian Orthodox Church. $200. Reservations required. 633-5361; www.stgeorgeroc.org. Indian Hill.

Cincinnati International Travel Club Meeting, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Evendale Community Church, 3270 Glendale-Milford Road, Topic: The USA, By Car and Rail. 385-8302. Evendale.

Wellness Myths and Misunderstandings, 7-8 p.m., FIT Montgomery, 9030 Montgomery Road, Suite 18, Topic: Fat Headed People Rule. Coordinated discussion group to explore health and wellness discoveries found in latest peer-reviewed medical journals. Ages 18 and up. $5. 823-2025; wellnessmyths2013.eventbrite.com. Sycamore Township. OPTIFAST Weight Loss Program Information Session, 7-8 p.m., Weight Management Solutions, Free. Registration required. 956-3729; www.emercy.com. Sycamore Township.

Cooking Classes

Senior Citizens

Health / Wellness

Fitness BootCamp, 6-7 p.m., Glendale New Church, 845 Congress Ave., $10. Registration required. Presented by Concrete & Iron. 772-4565; concreteandiron.com. Glendale. Pilates Playground, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Fitness Physiques by Nico G, 9681 Kenwood Road, Works entire body through series of movements performed with control and intention. $15. Registration required. 290-8217; www.fitnessphysiques.net. Blue Ash. MELT Method, 10:30-11:30 a.m., Fitness Physiques by Nico G, 9681 Kenwood Road, Unique hands-off bodywork approach that helps prevent pain, heal injury and erase negative effects of aging and active living. $10-$15. Registration required. 290-8217; www.fitnessphysiques.net. Blue Ash. Yoga/Pilates Infusion, 5-6 p.m., Fitness Physiques by Nico G, 9681 Kenwood Road, Contemporary blend of flowing yoga movements and core-centric Pilates sequences. $10-$15. 290-8217; www.fitnessphysiques.net. Blue Ash. Step N2, 5-6 p.m., Springdale Community Center, 11999 Lawnview Ave., Step aerobics class consists of choreographed step patterns set to motivating R&B music. $5. 346-3910. Springdale.

Mobile Mammography Unit, 7 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Walgreens Evendale, 3105 Glendale Milford Road, Fifteen-minute screening. Cost varies per insurance plan. Financial assistance available for qualified applicants. Appointment required. 686-3300; www.e-mercy.com. Evendale.

Health / Wellness OPTIFAST Weight Loss Program Information Session, 7-8 p.m., Weight Management Solutions, 8001 Kenwood Road, Free. Registration required. Presented by Mercy Health Partners. 956-3729; www.emercy.com. Sycamore Township.

On Stage - Children’s Theater The Little Mermaid Jr., The Musical, 7:30 p.m., Woodlawn Community Center, 10050 Woodlawn Blvd., Musical introduces us to Ariel. Ariel discovers so much more than what’s Under the Sea. Ariel and Prince Eric must find a way to find each other and bring their worlds together amongst the evil plans of Ursula the Sea Witch and against Ariel father’s wishes. $15. Registration required. 241-6060; www.cincinnatiblacktheatre.org. Woodlawn.

Senior Citizens Open House, 2-4 p.m., Maple Knoll Village, 11100 Springfield Pike, Free refreshments and tours. For seniors. Free. 7822488. Springdale.

Support Groups Codependents Anonymous, 7-8 p.m., The Community of the Good Shepherd, 8815 E. Kemper Road, Room 31. Literature discussion group. Free, donations accepted. Presented by Codependents Anonymous Inc. 800-0164. Montgomery. Codependents Anonymous, Noon-1 p.m., Blue Ash Presbyterian Church, 4309 Cooper Road, Youth room. Big book/ discussion meeting. Brown bag lunch optional. Open to everyone who desires healthy loving relationships. Donations accepted. 673-0174; www.coda.org. Blue Ash.

FRIDAY, MAY 24 Exercise Classes Fitness BootCamp, 6-7 p.m., Glendale New Church, $10. Registration required. 772-4565; concreteandiron.com. Glendale.

Health / Wellness Mobile Heart Screenings, 1-5 p.m., Kroger Woodlawn, 10595 Springfield Pike, Several screening packages available to test risk of heart attack, stroke, aneurysm and other major diseases. Appointment required. 866-819-0127; www.mercyhealthfair.com. Woodlawn.

Museums James Whitcomb Riley: The Hoosier Poet, 7-9 p.m., Heritage Village Museum, 11450 Lebanon Road, First-person program portraying James Whitcomb Riley, American poet and best-selling author. Famous literary works include “Little Orphan Annie” and “The Raggedy Man.” Dessert, donated by Grand Finale Restaurant, included. $20. Reservations required by May 21. 563-9484; www.heritagevillagecincinnati.org. Sharonville.

On Stage - Children’s Theater The Little Mermaid Jr., The Musical, 7:30 p.m., Woodlawn Community Center, $15. Registration required. 241-6060; www.cincinnatiblacktheatre.org. Woodlawn.

Recreation Mount Notre Dame High School Golf Outing, 10:30 a.m., Sharon Woods Golf Course and Stonewood Banquet Center, 11355 Swing Road, Registration and warm-up 10:30-11:45 a.m. Silent auction 5 p.m. and dinner 7 p.m. at Stonewood Lodge. With drinks and music. Four-person scramble with shotgun start at noon. Prizes, games, trips, cars and spit-thepot available. Benefits Mount Notre Dame High School’s athletic department. 769-4325; www.mndhs.org/athletics/mndgolf-outing. Sharonville.

SATURDAY, MAY 25 Exercise Classes Fitness BootCamp, 8-9 a.m., Glendale New Church, $10. Registration required. 772-4565; concreteandiron.com. Glendale.

Farmers Market Montgomery Farmers Market, 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Montgomery

Elementary School, 9609 Montgomery Road, Vendors grow/ produce what they sell. More than 20 vendors offering vegetables, fruits, herbs, meat, eggs, honey, goat’s milk products, coffee, olive oil, hummus, cheese and baked goods. 9844865; www.montgomeryfarmersmarket.org. Montgomery.

Nature CSI Naturally, 2 p.m., Sharon Woods, 11450 Lebanon Road, Sharon Centre. Join Det. Jane Doe to examine clues, round up suspects and help solve the case. For Ages 8 and older. Free, vehicle permit required. 5217275; www.greatparks.org. Sharonville.

On Stage - Children’s Theater The Little Mermaid Jr., The Musical, Noon, 3 p.m. and 7:30 p.m., Woodlawn Community Center, $15. Registration required. 241-6060; www.cincinnatiblacktheatre.org. Woodlawn.

SUNDAY, MAY 26 Nature Bucks & Buckeyes, 2 p.m., Sharon Woods, 11450 Lebanon Road, Sharon Centre. Look for signs of trees and look for signs of deer and buckeye trees along the trail. There also will be football trivia for Ohio State fans. Free, vehicle permit required. 521-7275; www.greatparks.org. Sharonville.

MONDAY, MAY 27 Clubs & Organizations Cincinnati Toastmasters Club No. 472 Meeting, 7-8:30 p.m., St. Paul Community United Methodist Church, 8221 Miami Road, Public speaking and leadership skills meeting. Family friendly. Free. 351-5005; cincinnati.toastmastersclubs.org. Madeira.

Exercise Classes Fitness BootCamp, 6-7 p.m., Glendale New Church, $10. Registration required. 772-4565; concreteandiron.com. Glendale.

Music - Classical Memorial Day Concert, 6-8 p.m., Blue Ash Towne Square, Cooper and Hunt roads, Blue Ash/Montgomery Symphony Orchestra. Tribute to Neil Armstrong and NASA’s space program. Cincinnati Youth Symphony Concert Orchestra, directed by Dale Swisher, performs during second half. Rain site:

Exercise Classes

Free Firsts Appreciation Days, 7 a.m.-8 p.m., Sharon Woods, 11450 Lebanon Road, Residents can enjoy any park without the need for a motor vehicle permit, while enjoying a host of other free and discounted activities. Dress for weather. Family friendly. Free, no vehicle permit required. 521-7275; www.greatparks.org/freefirsts. Sharonville.

SUNDAY, JUNE 2

Exercise Classes Whether on land or Under the Sea, Cincinnati Black Theatre Company Children's Theatre whisks you away in the enchanting story of Ariel and Prince Eric in “The Little Mermaid Jr.” Ariel sneaks to the surface but it comes with a price when confronted by her father, King Triton. CBTC Children's Theatre sings melodies such as "Kiss the Girl," "Under the Sea" and "Poor Unfortunate Soul." Sit back and wait as Ariel renders her version of "Part of Your World." Ariel must also use her voice to convince an evil sea witch named Ursula, that she is the girl for Prince Eric. Performances are 7:30 p.m. Thursday and Friday, May 23 and 24, and noon and 3 p.m. Saturday, May 25, at Woodlawn Community Center, 10050 Woodlawn Blvd. For more ticket information, contact 241-6060, or visit www.cincinnatiblacktheatre.org. THANKS TO VALERIE WILLIAMS

Ash.

Health / Wellness

Line Dancing, 6-7 p.m., Fitness Physiques by Nico G, 9681 Kenwood Road, Music from variety of genres. $10-$15. Registration required. 290-8217; www.fitnessphysiques.net. Blue Ash.

Core Adrenaline, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Fitness Physiques by Nico G, 9681 Kenwood Road, Blend functional strength training movements with Pilates sequences. $10-$15. Registration required. 290-8217; www.fitnessphysiques.net. Blue Ash. Hatha Yoga, 5-6 p.m., Fitness Physiques by Nico G, 9681 Kenwood Road, Gentle introductory journey into the world of yoga. $10-$15. Registration required. 290-8217; www.fitnessphysiques.net. Blue Ash. Step N2, 5-6 p.m., Springdale Community Center, $5. 3463910. Springdale.

Dance Classes

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Fitness BootCamp, 6-7 p.m., Glendale New Church, $10. Registration required. 772-4565; concreteandiron.com. Glendale. Pilates Playground, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Fitness Physiques by Nico G, $15. Registration required. 290-8217; www.fitnessphysiques.net. Blue Ash. MELT Method, 10:30-11:30 a.m., Fitness Physiques by Nico G, $10-$15. Registration required. 290-8217; www.fitnessphysiques.net. Blue Ash. Yoga/Pilates Infusion, 5-6 p.m., Fitness Physiques by Nico G, $10-$15. 290-8217; www.fitnessphysiques.net. Blue Ash. Step N2, 5-6 p.m., Springdale Community Center, $5. 3463910. Springdale.

Exercise Classes

Couples Home Cooking with Andrew and Courtney Rathweg, 6:30-9 p.m., Cooks’ Wares, 11344 Montgomery Road, Andrew and Courtney demonstrate that two can spend romantic evening together in the kitchen. $45. Reservations required. 489-6400. Symmes Township.

ABOUT CALENDAR

WEDNESDAY, MAY 29 Clubs & Organizations

Some Chocolate for Dinner with Haute Chocolate’s Lisa Cooper-Holmes, 6:30-9 p.m., Cooks’ Wares, 11344 Montgomery Road, Lisa shows how to create a delicious, romantic dinner with chocolate in each course. $50. Reservations required. 489-6400. Symmes Township.

Dance Classes

Open House, 2-4 p.m., Maple Knoll Village, Free. 782-2488. Springdale.

Support Groups Codependents Anonymous, 7-8 p.m., The Community of the Good Shepherd, Free, donations accepted. 800-0164. Montgomery. Codependents Anonymous, Noon-1 p.m., Blue Ash Presbyterian Church, Donations accepted. 673-0174; www.coda.org. Blue Ash. Everyone Needs Support: The Need to Talk, 7-8:30 p.m., St. Michael Church of Sharonville, 11144 Spinner Ave., Learn true value of caregiver support groups. 929-4483. Sharonville.

Zumba, 6-7 p.m., Fitness Physiques by Nico G, 9681 Kenwood Road, $15. Registration required. 290-8217; www.fitnessphysiques.net. Blue Ash. Zumba, 9:30 a.m., Fitness Physiques by Nico G, 9681 Kenwood Road, Latin-based cardio workout. $10-$15. Registration required. 290-8217; www.fitnessphysiques.net. Blue Ash.

FRIDAY, MAY 31

Dining Events

Exercise Classes

International Dinner, 5-7 p.m., Manor House Restaurant, 600 Maple Trace Drive, Full buffet featuring food from Peru. $12. 782-4300; www.dineatmanorhouse.com. Springdale.

Literary - Libraries Teen Board Gaming, 2:30-4 p.m., Deer Park Branch Library, 3970 E. Galbraith Road, Teens and tweens play board games of their choice. Games played most often are Apples to Apples, Scrabble, Forbidden Island, Zombie Fluxx, Uno and Skip-Bo. Ages 11-18. Free. 369-4450. Deer Park.

Fitness BootCamp, 6-7 p.m., Glendale New Church, $10. Registration required. 772-4565; concreteandiron.com. Glendale.

Senior Citizens I Only Have Eyes For You, 6:30-8 p.m., Sycamore Senior Center, 4455 Carver Woods Drive, Music by Nelson Henning. Dancing and entertainment. Cash bar available and light refreshments provided. Benefits Sycamore Senior Center. Couple: $20, $15 advance; single: $15, $10 advance. Reservations required. 984-1234; www.sycamoreseniorcenter.org. Blue Ash.

THURSDAY, MAY 30

SATURDAY, JUNE 1

Business Seminars

Exercise Classes

Blogging 101 for Business, 10-11:30 a.m., Dimalanta Design Group, 4555 Lake Forest Drive, No. 650, With Ernie Dimalanta, founder of Out-&-Out Marketing and owner of Dimalanta Design Group, and Wendy Hacker, PR and social media consultant of Dimalanta Design Group. Learn about blogging and how it can help you grow your business. $10. Reservations required. 588-2802. Blue Ash.

Fitness BootCamp, 8-9 a.m., Glendale New Church, $10. Registration required. 772-4565; concreteandiron.com. Glendale.

Cooking Classes

Music at Ascension, 7:30 p.m., Ascension Lutheran Church, 7333 Pfeiffer Road, Sanctuary. Stars of Tomorrow Concert. Free, donations accepted. 793-3288. Montgomery.

Asian Fusion Tapas with Yen Hsieh, 6:30-9 p.m., Cooks’ Wares, 11344 Montgomery Road, Linking many distinct flavors of Orient together while highlighting individual aspects of each. $45. Reservations required. 489-6400. Symmes Township.

Dance Classes Line Dancing, 6-7 p.m., Fitness Physiques by Nico G, $10-$15. Registration required. 290-8217; www.fitnessphysiques.net. Blue

Farmers Market Montgomery Farmers Market, 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Montgomery Elementary School, 984-4865; www.montgomeryfarmersmarket.org. Montgomery.

Music - Concerts

Music - Country Summer Concerts on the Green: OK Ramblers, 6-9 p.m., Harry Whiting Brown Community House, 205 E. Sharon Ave., Traditional country music. Bring picnic food and beverages. Free. 771-0333. Glendale.

Nature

Recreation Montgomery Kiwanis Fishing Contest, 9-11 a.m., Swaim Park, Zig Zag and Cooper roads, Fishing contest for ages 1-15. Cash prizes for first fish caught each half hour in each age group. Bring rod and bait. Free. 910-7068. Montgomery.

MONDAY, JUNE 3 Cooking Classes Bones Burgers: a Mobile Monday Class with Bones Bonekemper, 6:30-9 p.m., Cooks’ Wares, 11344 Montgomery Road, All sandwiches made-to-order with focus on grass-fed angus beef hamburgers. $40. Reservations required. 489-6400; www.cookswaresonline.com. Symmes Township.

Exercise Classes Fitness BootCamp, 6-7 p.m., Glendale New Church, $10. Registration required. 772-4565; concreteandiron.com. Glendale. Pilates Plus, 7-8 p.m., Springdale Community Center, 11999 Lawnview Ave., Unique program of strengthening and stretching exercises through slow, mindful and purposeful movements. $5. 346-3910. Springdale.

Summer Camps - Arts Summer Modern Dance Workshop, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Otto M. Budig Academy -- Blue Ash, 11444 Deerfield Road, Daily through June 7. Adult dancers buff up training for five straight days with four classes per day. Ages 18 and up. $48-$395. Registration required. 494-6526; www.mamluftcodance.com/ summer. Blue Ash.

Summer Camps - Nature Gorman Heritage Farm Camps, 9:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m., Gorman Heritage Farm, 10052 Reading Road, Seedlings Camp. Session 1. Daily through June 7. Ages 5-7. Campers discover workings of family farm, work with animals and explore the garden. Drop off campers 9:15 a.m., and pick up campers 2:30 p.m. Family farm tour on Fridays only 2 p.m. Dress for weather. $215, $175 members. Registration required. 563-6663; www.gormanfarm.org/ camp. Evendale.

TUESDAY, JUNE 4 Education Excel Basics, 6 p.m., Deer Park Branch Library, 3970 E. Galbraith Road, Learn and practice using basic functions of Microsoft Excel 2007. Cover basic formatting and working with simple functions. Knowledge of keyboard and mouse is required before taking class. Ages 18 and up. Free. Registration required. 369-4450. Deer Park.

Exercise Classes Step N2, 5-6 p.m., Springdale Community Center, $5. 3463910. Springdale.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 5 Literary - Libraries Teen Board Gaming, 2:30-4 p.m., Deer Park Branch Library, Free. 369-4450. Deer Park.


LIFE

MAY 22, 2013 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • B3

‘Restaurant’ column with two cloned recipes Talk about multi-tasking. I was writing this column when my husband, Frank, called out from the garden to inspect the rows of corn. “It’s coming up spotty,” he said, and blamed the robins for plucking Rita seedlings Heikenfeld out of the RITA’S KITCHEN ground. While I was out, I decided to pot up some of Mom’s peppermint to plant around her and my Dad’s graves for Memorial Day. Then I went back in to finish my column. Ten minutes later I got called out again, this time to plant another row of potatoes. So it has been one busy morning. I’m not complaining because I know the little bit of planting we’re doing now will morph into an abundant harvest. Today’s column could be called “the restaurant issue,” since the recipes shared are from famous eateries.

rant in Kentucky. “So close you won’t be able to tell the difference,” she said. Christine V. is just the latest of readers who continue to request the recipe, so I finally made it myself. After tasting it, I wondered why I waited so long! I made a few changes dependent upon what ingredients I had. Those are in parentheses. You choose which ingredients appeal to you. Don’t be put off by the list of instructions, the cake comes together easily and would be perfect to tote to that Memorial Day picnic. Because it’s baked in a jelly roll pan, it isn’t a real high riser, and is very moist. The browned butter icing elevates it into the kind of cake that begs for “one more bite.” How many does it serve? I got 16 servings and could have gotten more. Cake Whisk together and set aside:

Bring to boil:

A few years ago, a Western Hills reader shared her version for this customer favorite from Knotty Pine Restau-

Then beat in: 2 large eggs ⁄2 cup sour cream (plus 1 teaspoon vanilla) 1 teaspoon baking soda 1

Batter will be thin. Pour into sprayed jellyroll pan and bake in preheated 400 degree oven 20 minutes. Icing: Boil until golden: 11⁄2 sticks butter (I used unsalted)

2 cups sugar 2 cups all-purpose flour 1 ⁄2 teaspoon salt

Opera cream cake “like” Knotty Pine on the Bayou

This reader-submitted recipe for opera cream cake tastes just like the cake at Knotty Pine on the Bayou. THANKS TO RITA HEIKENFELD.

2 sticks margarine (I used unsalted butter) 1 cup water 4 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder

Cool, then add sugar, flour and salt mixture, and blend well.

This is what I call browned butter: Cook in pan over medium heat until butter boils and begins to turn golden. It will foam up a bit. Be careful as it can burn easily. It’s done when butter turns tan color and you see specks of light golden brown on bottom.

Kayla Dunlap’s Carrabba’s dipping oil/sauce

This takes a few minutes. Remove from heat right away, stir browned bits in and pour into bowl to cool. To cooled browned butter, add and beat until fluffy (it will look lumpy at first):

Kayla, a Fort Thomas reader, shares a good recipe for this dipping oil. She said: “Bonnie asked for help finding a recipe similar to Carrabba’s. Here’s one I have used.”

1 pound powdered sugar 2 teaspoons vanilla 6-8 tablespoons whipping cream (I used evaporated milk)

1 tablespoon minced basil 1 tablespoon chopped parsley (Italian is best) 1 tablespoon minced garlic 1 teaspoon dried thyme 1 teaspoon dried oregano 1 teaspoon ground black pepper 1 ⁄2 teaspoon kosher salt or 1⁄2 teaspoon ground sea salt 1 ⁄2 teaspoon chopped rosemary 1 ⁄4 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes

Spread on cooled cake right in pan. Store in refrigerator.

Tip from Rita’s Kitchen

A jelly roll pan (about 10 inches by 15 inches) is bigger than a cookie sheet and has sides.

D E S U Y T I L A U D Q E C I R CARS P HT! RIG

⁄2 teaspoon olive oil (Plus additional 3-4 tablespoons) 1 ⁄8 teaspoon fresh lemon juice 1

Combine all of the ingredients, except oil and lemon. Put in a small food processor. Chop briefly until all ingredients are about the same. Stir in oil and lemon juice. To serve: Combine about 11⁄2 teaspoons spice blend to 3 to 4 tablespoons additional olive oil on a small dish. Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator and author. Find her blog online at Cincinnati.Com/blogs. Email her at columns@communitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-248-7130, ext. 356.

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LIFE

B4 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • MAY 22, 2013

RELIGION Church by the Woods The church building is the home of four different ministries. Church By the Woods is a multicultural and multiethnic church whose mission is to love and serve God, each other and our neighbors. Sunday worship service is traditional in English and begins at 10 a.m. From 10 a.m. to noon on Saturdays, classes in English as a Second Language are offered for ages 14 to 94. Taiwanese Presbyterian Ministry has Sunday traditional worship at 2 p.m. in their language of Taiwanese. On Saturdays they offer a ministry on the UC campus. Freedom Church has its contemporary worship service at 10:30 a.m. in English. “It’s Not About Religion; It’s About Relationships;” tinyurl.com/a7yroqe. Seventh Day Adventist Church, has worship on Saturdays at 10 a.m. in Span-

ABOUT RELIGION Religion news is published at no charge on a spaceavailable basis. Items must be to our office no later than 4 p.m. Wednesday, for possible consideration in the following edition. » E-mail announcements to tricountypress@community press.com, with “Religion” in the subject line. » Fax to 248-1938. Call 248-8600. » Mail to: Tri-County Press, Attention: Andrea Reeves, Religion news, 394 Wards Corner Road, Suite 170, Loveland, Ohio 45140.

ish. “Loving, Caring, Sharing God’s Word” Nursery School is provided at each church’s worship services. Bible studies are offered by all churches. The church is at 3755 Cornell Road, Sharonville.

Congregations B’nai Tzedek and Beit Chaverim Nava Tehila Ensemble will perform “Every Day is Shab-

bos:” A Musical Journey into Prayer at 3 p.m. Monday, May 27, at Congregations B’nai Tzedek and Beit Chaverim. The ensemble is an off-shoot of the Nava Tehila Congregation in Jerusalem, a liberal, egalitarian religious community that has gained a reputation for its uplifting music. Rooted in Middle Eastern, Hasidic, contemporary Israeli, and other “world” musics, Nava Tehila’s original composi-

INDEPENDENT BAPTIST

UNITED METHODIST

EVANGELICAL PRESBYTERIAN

FRIENDSHIP BAPTIST CHURCH 8580 Cheviot Rd., Colerain Twp 741-7017 www.ourfbc.com Gary Jackson, Senior Pastor Sunday School (all ages) 9:30am 10:30am Sunday Morning Service Sunday Evening Service 6:30pm Wedn. Service/Awana 7:00pm RUI Addiction Recovery (Fri.) 7:00pm

Christ, the Prince of Peace

At CHURCH BY THE WOODS

BAPTIST SHARON BAPTIST CHURCH 4451 Fields Ertel Road Cincinnati, OH 45241 (513) 769-4849 gstep77507@aol.com

Services

Sunday School - 10:00 am Sunday Morning - 11:00 am Sunday Evening - 6:00 pm Wednesday - 7:00 pm Evening Prayer and Bible Study VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL June 25 through June 29 Ages 3 to 15 Theme: Amazing Adventures Wyoming Baptist Church

(A Church For All Seasons) Burns and Waverly Avenues Cincinnati OH 45215 821.8430

Steve Cummins, Senior Pastor Sunday School..............................9:00 am Coffee & Fellowship...................10:00 am Praise & Worship........................10:30 am www.wyomingbc.homestead.com Visitors Welcome!

EPISCOPAL Christ Church Glendale Episcopal Church 965 Forest Ave - 771-1544 christchurch1@fuse.net www.christchurchglendale.org The Reverend Roger L Foote 8am Holy Eucharist I 9am Holy Eucharist II 11am Holy Eucharist II Child Care 9-12

“Small enough to know you, Big enough to care”

CHURCH OF THE SAVIOUR 8005 Pfeiffer Rd. Montgomery 791-3142 www.cos-umc.org "Going All In: My Soul" Traditional Worship 8:20am & 11:00am Contemporary Worship 9:40am Sunday School (All ages) 9:40 & 11am Nursery Care Provided

Dr. Cathy Johns, Senior Pastor Rev. Doug Johns, Senior Pastor

Monfort Heights United Methodist Church

3682 West Fork Rd , west of North Bend Traditional Worship 8:30 & 11:00am Contemporary Worhip 9:45am

Nursery Available * Sunday School 513-481-8699 * www. mhumc.org Spiritual Checkpoint ... Bearing the Love of Christ...for you!

Corner of Compton and Perry Streets 513-931-5827 Sunday School 8:45 - 9:45am Traditional Worship 10:00 - 11:00am Contemporary Gathering: Bible & Conversation 11:30 - 12:30 Nursery Available Handicap Access "Come as a guest. Leave as a friend".

Sharonville United Methodist

8:15 & 11amTraditional Service & Kingdom Kids 9:30am Adult & Children’s Sunday School 7:00pm Wednesday, Small Groups for all ages Infant care available for all services

3751 Creek Rd.

513-563-0117

www.sharonville-umc.org

NON-DENOMINATIONAL

Faith Lutheran LCMC

HIGHVIEW CHRISTIAN CHURCH “Life on Purpose in Community” 2651 Adams Rd. (near Pippin) Worship Assembly-Sunday 10:45am Phone 825-9553 www.highviewchristianchurch.com

Sunday School 10:15

Trinity Lutheran Church (ELCA) “Growing Closer to God, Growing Closer to Neighbor”

www. trinitymthealthy.org 513-522-3026

1553 Kinney Ave, Mt. Healthy

Worship: 8:30 am traditional - 10:45 am contemporary Sunday School: 9:45 am Nursery provided

Pastor Todd A. Cutter

Trinity Lutheran Church, LCMS 5921 Springdale Rd

Rev. Richard Davenport, Pastor Worship & Sunday School 10:30 a.m, Bible Study 9:15 a.m. Sundays

Classic Service and Hymnbook

www.trinitylutherancincinnati.com

385-7024

EVANGELICAL COMMUNITY CHURCH

Mt Healthy United Methodist Church

LUTHERAN 8265 Winton Rd., Finneytown www.faithcinci.org Pastor Robert Curry Contemporary Service 9am Traditional Service 11:00am

www.churchbythewoods.org 3755 Cornell Rd., Sharonville , Ohio 45241 You have a choice of Ministry: 1. Traditional Sunday Worship at 10:00 AM. Language: English Multi-cultural, multi-generational, and multi-ethnic. 2. Contemporary Sunday Worship with Freedom Church at 10:30 AM. Language: English It’s not about Religion; it’s about relationships! www.freedomchurchcincinnati.com 3. Taiwanese Traditional Sunday Worship st 2:00 PM. Language: Taiwanese, UC Campus Fellowship on Saturdays, www.cincinnatitaiwanese.org Saturday 4. Seventh Day Adventist Worship at 10:00 AM. Language: Spanish Loving - Caring - and Sharing God’s Word Notes: Nursery School is provided at each Worship time English as a Second Language (ESL) is taught on Saturday 10-12 AM. Various Bible Studies are available.

VINEYARD CHURCH NORTHWEST Colerain Township Three Weekend Services Saturday - 5:30 pm Sunday - 9:30 & 11:15 am 9165 Round Top Road 1/4 mile south of Northgate Mall 513-385-4888 µ www.vcnw.org

Sunday School Hour (for all ages) 9:15 - 10:15am Worship Service - 10:30 to 11:45am (Childcare provided for infants/ toddlers) Pastor: Rich Lanning Church: 2191 Struble Rd Office: 2192 Springdale Rd

542-9025

Visitors Welcome www.eccfellowship.org

PRESBYTERIAN Northminster Presbyterian Church 703 Compton Rd., Finneytown 931-0243 Growing Faith, Sharing Hope, Showing Love Sunday Worship Schedule Traditional Services: 8:00 & 10:15am Contemporary Services: 9:00 & 11:30am Student Cafe: 10:15am Childcare Available Jeff Hosmer, Rich Jones & Nancy Ross- Zimmerman - Pastors

Northwest Community Church 8735 Cheviot Rd, by Colerain HS Rev. Kevin Murphy, Pastor 513-385-8973 Worship and Sunday School 10AM Handicap Accessible/Nursery Available

Salem White Oak Presbyterian

UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST FLEMING ROAD United Church of Christ 691 Fleming Rd 522-2780 Rev Pat McKinney

Sunday School - All Ages - 9:15am Sunday Worship - 10:30am

Nursery Provided

St. Paul United Church of Christ 5312 Old Blue Rock Rd., off Springdale

Phone: 385-9077 Rev. Michelle Torigian Sunday Worship: 10:30am Sunday School: 9:15am Nursery Available/Handicap Access www.stpaulucccolerain.org www.facebook.com/StPaulUCC

&(#"))"'!%"$%#)"

Active Youth, College, Senior Groups Exciting Music Dept, Deaf Ministry, Nursery

United Methodist Church 10507 “Old” Colerain Ave (513) 385-7883 Rev. Mark Reuter Sunday School 9:15am Worship 10:30am - Nursery Available www.cpopumc.org

tions – alternately celebratory, meditative, joyful and reflective are designed to be participatory with congregation or concert audience alike, with the end helping the spirit to soar. General admission is $15; Seniors and students can pay $10. Online ticket purchase through our website’s home page (please scroll down). More information about the Nava Tehila Ensemble: http://bit.ly/YsZrfk The congregations are located at 6280 Kugler Mill Road; www.btzbc.com.

Sharonville United Methodist Church At 8:15 a.m. there is a traditional service; at 11 a.m. there is a blended service, with contemporary and traditional styles of worship; at 9:30 a.m. there are Sunday School classes and short term study groups. At 9:30 a.m. Sunday, May 26, there will l be a sit down Spirit Breakfast to as a kickoff for a new study, “The Forgotten God” On Wednesday, May 22, the Hanton’s hot dog will be at the church from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. This will be the end of several group activities and a chance to buy supper. Plans are being made for Vacation BIble School June 16-20. Registrations should be made by May 31. The Bereavement Support Group meets for lunch on the first Thursday of every month. The Serendipity seniors meet for lunch on the fourth Thursday of every month. The church is at 1751 Creek Road, Sharonville; 563-0117.

‘Celebrate Excellence’ honors top K-12 educators Teachers of music, English, art, government, foreign language, special education and primary grades, as well as counselors, principals, and intervention specialists are among the 22 educators who will be honored at the seventh “Celebrate Excellence” breakfast, 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. Friday, May 24, at the Sharonville Convention Center. Presented by the Hamilton County Education Foundation, the 2013 “Educators of the Year” have been selected by their school districts for their outstanding efforts on behalf of students. In addition, scholarships to two K-12 educators who are pursuing their masters degree in special education will be presented. D. Mark Meyers, dean of the College of Social Sciences, Health and Education at Xavier University, will present the keynote address. Bengals legend, Pro Football Hall of Fame member and youth advocate Anthony Munoz serves as emcee for the seventh consecutive year. The “Celebrate Excellence” breakfast is open to the public; tickets are $50. For information about table sponsorships, donations, and individual tickets, contact HCEF president Karen Muse at karen.muse@hcesc.org, 513-674-4224, or visit HCEF.us. This year’s participating public school districts are Cincinnati Public, Deer Park, Finneytown, Forest Hills, Great Oaks, Hamilton County ESC, In-

dian Hill, Lockland, Loveland, Mason, Mt. Healthy, North College Hill, Norwood, Oak Hills, Princeton, Reading, Southwest, St. Bernard-Elmwood Place, Sycamore, Three Rivers, Winton Woods and Wyoming. “We have been looking forward to having Dr. Meyers address our educators of the year ever since Xavier became one of our scholarship partners in 2010,” Muse said. “He is a compelling speaker with an inspirational message for our honorees and scholarship recipients.” Meyers is an award winning teacher, author, and consultant, who has been active in the education profession for 25 years. He is presidentelect of the Ohio Association of Private Colleges of Education, serves on the National Board for the AJCU Education Deans Conference, and serves on the boards of the Cincinnati Association for the Blind and Visually Impaired, the Ascend Institute and Episcopal Retirement Homes. He is also a member of the Board of Examiners for the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education. Before coming to Xavier in 2007, Meyers served as the associate dean of the College of Education at Rowan University in Glassboro, NJ. Visit HCEF.us to learn more about the Foundation, the scholarship program and to view the “Celebrate Excellence” video.


LIFE

MAY 22, 2013 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • B5

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Who Gets Free TV: Listed below are the Cincinnati area zip codes that can get Free over the air TV channels. If you find the first two digits of your zip code immediately call: 1-888-752-7147 OHIO - Today’s announcement by CompTek has the Free TV Hotlines ringing off the hook. That’s because Cincinnati area residents who find their zip code listed in today’s publication are getting Free TV channels thanks to an amazing razor-thin invention called Clear-Cast™. Cincinnati area residents who call the Toll Free Hotlines before the 48-hour order deadline to get Clear-Cast can pull in Free TV channels with crystal clear digital picture and no monthly bills. This announcement is being so widely advertised because a U.S. Federal law makes TV broadcasters transmit their signals in digital format, which allows everyone to receive these over-theair digital signals for free with no monthly bills. Here’s how it works. Clear-Cast, the sleek micro antenna device with advanced technology links up directly to pull in the Free TV signals being broadcast in your area with crystal clear digital picture and no monthly bills. Clear-Cast was invented by a renowned NASA Space Technology Hall of Fame scientist who currently holds 23 U.S. Gov’t issued patents. For the past 20 years, he has specialized in developing antenna systems for NASA, Motorola, XM Satellite Radio and companies around the world. His latest patent-pending invention, ClearCast, is a sleek micro antenna device engineered to pull in the Free TV signals through advanced technology with no cable, satellite or internet connection and no monthly bills. “Clear-Cast is being released to the general public because we just don’t think people should keep paying for TV when they can get it for free,” said Conrad Miller, Manager of Operations at CompTek. “There’s never a monthly bill to pay and all the channels you get with Clear-Cast are absolutely free. So you see, Clear-Cast is not like cable or satellite. It was engineered to access solely the over-the-air signals that include all the top rated national and regional networks, like ABC, NBC, CBS, FOX, PBS, CW and about 90% of the most watched TV shows like America’s Got Talent, NCIS, 60 Minutes, American Idol, The Big Bang Theory, The Bachelorette, Person of Interest, CSI, The Mentalist, Two and a Half Men, Sunday Night Football plus news, weather and more all for free with no monthly bills,” Miller said. “That’s why Clear-Cast is such a great alternative for everyone who is sick and tired of paying expensive cable and satellite bills every month,” he said. “People who get Clear-Cast will say it feels like getting an extra paycheck every month. You see, with Clear-Cast you’ll receive free over-the-air broadcast channels with crystal clear digital picture, not the cable or satellite only channels. So being able to eliminate those channels puts all the money you were spending back in your pocket every month,” Miller said. And here’s the best part. The sleek micro antenna device called Clear-Cast is so technically advanced it pulls in even more of the channels being broadcast in your area for Free with no monthly bills. That way you can channel surf through the favorite TV shows. The number of shows and channels you’ll get depends on where you live. People living in large metropolitan areas may get up to 53 static-free channels, while people in outlying areas will get less. That means even if you’re in a rural area that just pulls in NBC, ABC, CBS, FOX and PBS broadcasts there’s hundreds of shows each year to watch for free. Consumers report that the crystal clear picture quality with Clear-Cast is the best they’ve ever seen. That’s because you get virtually all pure uncompressed signals direct from the broadcasters for free. Clear-Cast was engineered to link up directly like a huge outdoor directional antenna but in a lightweight, slim-line package. Its sturdy copper alloy and polymer construction will most likely far outlast your TV. It just couldn’t be any easier to get Free overthe-air digital TV shows with Clear-Cast. Simply plug it into your TV, place Clear-Cast on a window pane and run autoscan. It works on virtually any model TV and is easily hidden out of sight behind a curtain or window treatment. Thousands of Cincinnati area residents are expected to call to get Clear-Cast because it just doesn’t make any sense to keep paying for TV when you can get hundreds of shows absolutely free. So, Cincinnati area residents lucky enough to find their zip code listed in today’s publication need to immediately call the Free TV Hotline before the 48-hour deadline to get Clear-Cast that pulls in Free TV with crystal clear digital picture. If lines are busy keep trying, all calls will be answered. !

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Alabama 35, 36

Colorado 80, 81

Hawaii 96

Kansas 66, 67

Massachusetts 01, 02, 05

Alaska 99

Connecticut 06

Idaho 83

Kentucky 40, 41, 42

Michigan 48, 49

Arizona 85, 86

Delaware 19

Illinois 60, 61, 62

Louisiana 70, 71

Minnesota 55, 56

Arkansas 71, 72

Florida 32, 33, 34

Indiana 46, 47

Maine 03, 04

Mississippi 38, 39

California 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96

Georgia 30, 31, 39

Iowa 50, 51, 52

Maryland 20, 21

Missouri 63, 64, 65

Virginia Oklahoma South Dakota New Mexico 20, 22, 23, 24 73, 74 57 87, 88 Washington New York Oregon Tennessee Nebraska 98, 99 10, 11, 12 00, 97 38 37, 68, 69 13, 14 West Virginia Pennsylvania Texas Nevada 24, 25, 26 North Carolina 15, 16, 17, 75, 76, 77 88, 89 Wisconsin 27, 28 18, 19 78, 79, 88 53, 54 New Hampshire North Dakota Rhode Island Utah Wyoming 03 58 02 84 82, 83 Ohio New Jersey Vermont South Carolina Washington DC 41, 43, 44, 45 07, 08 05 29 20 Montana 59

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LIFE

B6 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • MAY 22, 2013

Look out for fake debt collectors It can be scary getThen Brondaver was ting calls from bill coltold he could call Marlectors. But it can be tin and Associates in even scarier if the calls California for more are coming from fake specifics on the debt, bill collectors. which is allegedly owed Many make it by his son. sound as if you’re “They want me going to be arrestto make a payed unless you pay ment, and they them now. But if want it for him. you know what to It’s for a bill he expect, you can supposedly handle it without a owes to U.S. problem. Bank,” he said. Larry BrondhaBrondhaver Howard ver of Anderson then did someAin Township said he thing everyone HEY HOWARD! received such a should do. He call recently. asked for proof “I was told there’s of the debt, allegedly going to be papers deowed by his son. Soon, livered to me by the he received a letter in sheriff. They tried the mail. “It says they twice to deliver the want to settle with you papers and nobody was for less than what you here they said. ‘Will owe, of course. For my there be someone there son they want $352 in the next 48 hours to processing fee now, receive these papers? right now. That fee will I’ve got to deliver carry over for another them.’ He said we have month,” he said. to make an appearance Brondhaver talked if we don’t. I said, ‘An with his son about this appearance? Where?’ and said, “What really He said, ‘In court’,” got my son was they Brondhaver said. knew the last four num-

bers of his Social Security number. They knew the last four numbers, and they have his U.S. Bank account number.” A close look at that letter shows it’s not from a real debt collector. Under federal law debt collectors must use specific language in these letters saying, “This is an attempt to collect a debt.” In addition, they must state you have 30 days to send a written statement disputing the debt. That language wasn’t in the letter send to Brondhaver. “Luckily there was no money sent, but my concerns are people that will. These guys are very, very dramatic. Everybody in the office is very dramatic. They say, ‘You’ve got to do this now, or else’,” Brondhaver said. A U.S. Bank spokeswoman tells me the bank doesn’t know anything about Martin and Associates, adding this firm was not hired by the bank to collect its debts. So I called Martin and Associates and asked who they are working for, but they wouldn’t answer that. There are lots of complaints about this company on the Internet. All say the company claims to be collecting on behalf of U.S. Bank. The Federal Trade Commission says you should never confirm or give a caller your personal or financial information. Brondhaver has reported this incident to the Ohio Attorney General.

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CARNIVAL Festival is on FRIDAY, SATURDAY & SUNDAY!!! FRIDAY, MAY 24 – 6-11PM SATURDAY, MAY 25 – 6PM-12AM SUNDAY, MAY 26 – 3-11PM Amazing Portable Circus Sunday 3:00-6:00 for the kids

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Sharon Woods is offering nature day camps designed to keep kids moving, learning and having fun. Several will be offered throughout the summer: “Creepy, Crawly, Scaly, Slimy” will be held June 25-28, from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. For $150 per child, kids ages 8-11 can explore the world of animals that are not so soft and fluffy. Campers will learn about the different homes and habits of the animals, and even meet a few up close. Crafts, games and the “science of slime” will round out the activities. “Creekin’ and Muddin’” will be July 30 through Aug. 2, from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. For $170

per child, kids ages 10-13 can catch crayfish, investigate insects and learn how animals tell us about the health of the streams at Sharon Woods. Campers will also get basic canoe instruction at Winton Woods in preparation for a canoe trip on the Little Miami River. “Habitat Explorers” will be held Aug. 6-9, from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. For $150 per child, kids ages 6-9 can discover the creatures that call Sharon Woods home. With magnifying glasses, bug boxes and nets, campers will wind through forests and splash through creeks in search of wildlife. Crafts, games and meeting live animals will also keep campers en-

The next installment of the popular “Frankly Speaking About Cancer” national cancer education series will return to Greater Cincinnati Thursday, May 30, with a Gholz free educational workshop for cancer patients and their caregivers on the topic of cancer treatment and side effects. “Frankly Speaking

VILLAGE OF EVENDALE ADOPTED ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS

About Cancer Treatment: Taking Control of Side Effects” will be presented at Cancer Support Community by oncology clinical nurse specialist Ruth Gholz. The program is designed to help people understand and manage the physical side effects of cancer treatment, as well as the emotional challenges. The event is free of charge and is scheduled for 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at Cancer Support Community’s Lynn Stern Center at 4918 Cooper Road in Blue

The following ordinances and resolutions were adopted by the Council of the Village of Evendale at its Regular Council Meeting on May 14th, 2013.

How’s Your

Howard Ain answers consumer complaints weekdays on WKRC-TV Local 12. Write to him at 12 WKRC-TV, 1906 Highland Ave., Cincinnati 45219.

gaged all day. The four-day camps are organized by age, and space is limited. registration is required two weeks prior to the camp start date. For more information or to register, go to http://bit.ly/113lHft. Sharon Woods is at 11450 Lebanon Road, Sharonville, Ohio 45241. A valid Hamilton County Park District motor vehicle permit ($10 annual; $3 daily) is required to enter the park. For more about your community, visit Cincinnati.com/Sharonville. Get regular Sharonville updates by signing up for our email newsletter. Visit Cincinnati.com/Sharonville.

Workshop helps cancer patients with treatment, side effects

Ord. #13-17 ORDINANCE APPOINTING ANDREW AHLERT AS FIRE FIGHTER/PARAMEDIC FOR THE VILLAGE OF EVENDALE AND DECLARING AN EMERGENCY

Bath Tub? E... BEFOR

ORD. #13-18 ORDINANCE AUTHORIZING MAYOR TO HIRE SEASONAL EMPLOYEES AND SETTING PAY RATES AND DECLARING AN EMERGENCY

ORD. #13-20 ORDINANCE ESTALISHING THE POSITION OF POLICE DEPARTMENT ADMINISTRATIVE CLERK CURRENTLY OCCUPIED BY LYNNE THOMAS AS FULL-TIME AND DECLARING AN EMERGEN CY. ORD. #13-21 ORDINANCE AUTHORIZING THE MAYOR TO EXECUTE AN AGREEMENT WITH THE EVENDALE COMMUNITY IMPROVE MENT CORPORATION FOR THE PURPOSE OF ENCOURAGING THE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT OF THE VILLAGE OF EVENDALE BY MAKING AVAILABLE FOR SALE CERTAIN VILLAGE OWNED PROPERTIES AND DECLARING AN EMERGENCY. ORD. # 13-22 ORDINANCE AUTHORIZING MAYOR TO HIRE PART-TIME EMPLOYEE AND SETTING PAY RATES AND DECLARING AN EMERGENCY 1001762626

Ash. A light meal will be served and a patient education booklet will be available for each participant, along with other tools and resources. Advance registration is requested for planning purposes. For registration or more information, please call Cancer Support Community at 513-791-4060. Today, more than10 million Americans have survived a cancer diagnosis, with many of them continuing to regularly receive a range of cancer-related treatments. “It is wonderful to know that people are living longer with cancer,” CSC program director Kelly Schoen said, “but that means it is more important than ever for people to have the tools and information needed to effectively manage the side effects of cancer treatment so that they can optimize their quality of life.”

& AFTER!

ORD. #13-19 ORDINANCE AUTHORIZING MAYOR TO ENTER INTO CONTRACT WITH THE LOWEST AND BEST BIDDER FOR THE 2013 STREET IMPROVEMENT PROJECT AND DECLARING AN EMERGENCY

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LIFE

MAY 22, 2013 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • B7

Sycamore Senior Center plans busy summer Upcoming programs at Sycamore Senior Center, 4455 Carver Woods Drive, Blue Ash. For more information, call 686-1010 or visit http://bit.ly/11MLxMf

Silver Sneakers fitness program

Members of the Sycamore Senior Center have engaged in the Silver Sneakers Fitness Program featured three mornings a week. All Silver Sneakers participants are encouraged to join this group. This program helps older adults take greater control of their health by providing physical activity and offering social events. Interested parties are encouraged to check with their Medicare providers for eligibility to participate at no charge or non-qualifiers may check with Kathy Timm, Sycamore Senior Center activities director, at 513686-1010, to inquire of our budget program for any private pay fees.

Spring Dance FUNdraiser

In celebration of Sycamore Senior Center’s Annual FUNdraiser activities, the Cincinnati Eye Institute is co-sponsoring “I Only Have Eyes for You” Dances on two Friday nights, May 31 and June 28. The dances will be held from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., with doors opening at 5:30 p.m. Nelson Henning is the featured one-man band playing along to his own pre-recorded tracks and will fill the Center with

dance music, social interaction and singles mixing. A cash bar and light refreshments will be provided. Tickets are $10 per person or $15 for a couple in advance or $15/$20 at the door. Tickets are limited, so take advantage of the early bird savings by picking up your tickets in person at the Sycamore Senior Center, 4455 Carver Woods Drive in Blue Ash. Please call 513-9841234 for more information.

Senior Day @ Hollywood Casino

In keeping with Sycamore’s series of local casino visits, the next trip will be to the Hollywood Casino in Lawrenceburg Tuesday, June 4. The casino is providing $15 per person in slot play and a buffet bonus will be announced. Please call Kathy Timm at 513-686-1010 to make a reservation and join your friends for a winning day at the Hollywood Casino. Bus transportation will be provided and will depart at 9 a.m. and return to the Center at approximately 5 p.m. Center members will pay $35 and non-member guests are $42.

Day trips with Provident Travel

Land of Lincoln, Springfield, IL, June 17-June 19: A historical journey to learn about the life and times of Abraham Lincoln, 16th president of the United States. Visit the Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum. Lincoln’s Tomb and the four-block Histor-

ic District where Lincoln practiced law. Battle of Gettysburg, Gettysburg, PA, July 5-July 8: A comprehensive tour of the Gettysburg National Military Park and Museum and visit where Lincoln wrote and delivered the Gettysburg Address. In a Civil War Camp, hundreds of costumed actors will stage a re-enactment of the duties of the day during the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg. Colorado Rockies and Three World Class Train Trips, July 30-Aug. 6: This trip will circle Colorado, the Rocky Mountains National Park, Vail, and several other National Parks, Garden of the Gods and more. Enjoy three rail excursions: The Durango & Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad, Royal Gorge Railroad and Pikes Peak Cog Railway. These trips and many more are provided through the auspices of Provident Travel and information on other trips is available at the Sycamore Senior Center. Reservations and more details on trips leaving from the center are available from Provident Travel sales representative Joe Ramos at 513-7633080 or 800-989-8900.

Art show

The Sycamore Senior Center Artists will present its annual art show at the Blue Ash Recreation Center, 4433 Cooper Road, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, June 8. All works on display are for sale and have been created by the mem-

ber of the Sycamore Senior Center Artists Group at 4455 Carver Woods Drive in Blue Ash. For more information call Gayle Newman at 7912121 or Kathy Timm at 686-1010.

Rob Braun to speak at monthly veterans luncheon WKRC anchorman Rob Braun is the featured speaker at the May 31Sycamore Senior Center’s monthly veterans luncheon. Community veterans, their widows and families continue to assemble for fun, fellowship, food and sharing. To assure the mess staff has enough chow on hand, please call Sgt. Homer Wilson at 7450617 by May 24. The June 28 luncheon will honor the service of veterans with a special recognition program by Crossroads Hospice. Their Chaplain and approximately 20 Choral National Guard members in full uniform will be singing. Also at this luncheon, there will be a special Flag Retirement ceremony. Members of the community are invited to bring their old torn, tattered, faded and frayed flags to the attention of Kathy Timm at the Sycamore Senior Center, where a local Boy Scout troop will burn them in a ceremony of respect, reverence, remembrance and renewal.

Red, White and Blue Ash gift basket and overnight

Raffle tickets are available at the Sycamore Senior Center for a gift basket filled with treats and notions and a gift certificate for an overnight stay and complimentary breakfast at the Wingate

We Gladly Accept Food Stamps

by Wyndham providing a “front row seat” for the July 4 fireworks show: Red, White and Blue Ash. Visit the welcome desk at the Sycamore Senior Center, 4455 Carver Woods Drive to buy a block of raffle tickets: $1 each or 6 for $5. Drawing will be June 14.

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LIFE

B8 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • MAY 22, 2013

Teens celebrate Israeli independence On April 16, about 100 teens – from various youth groups, congregations and schools throughout the community – gathered to celebrate Israel Independence Day (Yom HaAtzmaut) with a picnic and party at the Mayerson JCC. Along with the Chaverim m’Israel (Friends

from Israel), Tomer Flischer and Mor Ninio, they enjoyed a traditional “mangal” cookout with Israeli activities, games, music and sports. The event also gave students who will travel to Israel this summer a chance to connect with those who did so last summer and who then participated in

Do You Have Ulcerative Colitis?

Is it hard to control your symptoms using your current medication? What

This study will evaluate whether the study medication, budesonide MMX®, is safe and effective in people with ulcerative colitis that is not well controlled using anti-inflammatory medications known as 5-aminosalicylic acids (5ASAs). Budesonide MMX®, is approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA). This study is looking to see whether budesonide MMX® (given by mouth as tablet) and 5-ASA medication used together can better control the symptoms of ulcerative colitis.

Who

Adults 18-75 years old who have been diagnosed with mild or moderate ulcerative colitis (UC) and continue to have symptoms even when taking a 5-ASA medication (such as Asacol® and Lialda®) to treat UC.

Pay

Participants will be compensated for time and travel. All medication will be provided at no cost to participants.

Details

For more information, contact Lauren Plageman at 513-558-5529 or lauren.plageman@uchealth.com

CE-0000557265

Travel Grant recipients, along with Yair Cohen, Tomer Flischer, Mor Ninio, Sharon Spiegel and Jewish Foundation Executive Director Brian Jaffee. PROVIDED

the first year of Israel HERE, a pre- and post-trip enrichment program for recipients of Israel Travel Grants funded by The Jewish Foundation of Cincinnati. Through Israel HERE, students process their experiences in Israel, strengthen their personal Jewish identity and explore and expand their relationships with the local Jewish community. The program grew out of a desire to maximize the value of the Foundation’s investment in the community by increasing recipients’ engagement and thereby encouraging them to eventually become the next generation of leaders and philanthropists. Sam Levitt and Elise Spiegel, Israel HERE “graduates,” spoke at the Independence Day celebration about their experiences in Israel. Levitt lives in Sycamore Township and attends Sycamore High School.

Spiegel lives in Madeira and attends Indian Hill High School. Levitt traveled to Israel on a two-month Alexander Muss High School trip. He said, “I had the most amazing experience on this program. I really fell in love with Israel and came to the conclusion that I would give my life for the country. I gained a newfound sense of nationalism and pride for the state of Israel and the Jewish people…I truly discovered how important it is for all of us to remain strong and stay together because of all that we have suffered and, quite possibly, will suffer.” Levitt continued, “I am so happy the Foundation gave me this opportunity to travel to Israel and so grateful, because I will remember this for the rest of my life. I would highly encourage any teen to take advantage of the very generous opportunity we have in Cincinnati to travel to Israel.”

Since 2000, more than 1,400 Jewish young people from Cincinnati have traveled to Israel to develop stronger, more personal connections with Israel and their Jewish heritage. Cincinnati holds the distinction of sending more Jewish youth, per capita, on these Israel programs than any other Jewish community in North America. “During my trip to Israel, I connected not only with my Jewish identity more, but with my identity as a whole,” said Elise Spiegel, who traveled to Israel on the Jewish Federation’s JQuest trip. “The fact that I was even given a chance to go means a lot to me, and there are no words to thank the Foundation except for ‘thank you.’” This is the first year for Israel HERE, but, going forward, it will be an ongoing component of the Foundation’s Israel Travel Grant Program. In order to make sure future grant recipients will get the

most out of their trips, they will all be expected to contribute 25 hours of community service to the Jewish community and attend two pre-trip and six post-trip sessions. Community Shaliach (emissary from Israel) Yair Cohen, who co-developed the Israel HERE program with Sharon Spiegel, Director of Youth Israel Experiences at the Jewish Federation, said, “This is just as important as the trip to Israel itself. It is a way for participants to invest the passion and understanding they gained in Israel back into their own community. It’s a musthave component of any travel to Israel.” “The Israel HERE initiative is a supremely important program,” said Dr. Gary P. Zola, executive director of The Jacob Marcus Rader Center of the American Jewish Archives, who led the participants on a bus tour of Jewish Cincinnati in December.


LIFE

MAY 22, 2013 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • B9

EdenPURE Heater closeout and super sale

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LIFE

B10 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • MAY 22, 2013

Counseling can be life changing

May is Mental Health Awareness Month Each May the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services reminds Americans that, when faced with life’s inevitable difficulties, help is available. Talking to a counselor can be life changing. Delaying or failing to do so can have serious consequences. Carthage resident Pat Jones is an example of counseling’s healing powers. He sought counseling at Catholic Charities of Southwestern Ohio, an agency of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati, after

losing his will to live. He was already feeling depressed when two of his siblings died unexpectedly. Then he was diagnosed with a debilitating neurological disorder. “I knew I better talk to someone before it got too far,” he said. Jones Now, almost every Friday, Jones meets with Sharon Sowders at Catholic Charities’ Montgomery office. Counseling is also available in Delhi, Eastgate, Hamil-

ton, Springfield, Urbana and downtown Cincinnati. “Sharon is a great listener,” Jones said. “I talk to her about things I can’t talk to my friends about.” Sowders and her colleagues, all licensed by the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker, and Marriage and Family Therapist Board, counsel clients with a variety of problems. They include anxiety, depression, relationship conflicts, parenting issues, ADHD, childhood sexual

abuse, substance abuse and low self-esteem. “Our overall goals,” she said, “are to help reduce their symptoms, improve their coping skills, and improve their functioning in their daily lives.” Although reluctant at first, Jones now is a believer in counseling’s ability to heal. He readily admits that counseling relieves his symptoms of depression and helps him cope with his disability. “Sharon kept nudging me to stay active outside of work,” Jones said. He began attending weekly presentations at University of Cincinnati Blue

Ash about a topic he loves – classic movies of the ’30s and ’40s. Today, Pat moderates these presentations, sharing his knowledge with likeminded movie enthusiasts. “I really enjoy it,” he said. Counseling is generally recommended for individuals, couples, or families if: » their symptoms cause significant distress; » their problems are affecting major areas of their life, or » their problems are putting them at risk of divorce, job loss, school ex-

pulsion or other potential losses. If you or a loved one thinks counseling may be helpful, make an appointment with a licensed professional counselor. Counseling is covered by Medicaid and many private insurance plans. Through funding from United Way, Catholic Charities offers a sliding fee scale for non-insured clients. Spanish-speaking counselors, and in-home services for older adults and disabled individuals are available. For more information, call 513-385-9600 or visit ccswoh.org.

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point of contact for The University students, interactof Cincinnati Blue ing with them daily Ash College has apto build on their acpointed Greg Metz ademic success at as the new assisUC Blue Ash. Metz tant dean of acais also leading efdemic affairs and forts to weave the Marc Watson as the student affairs and new director of Metz academic affairs business affairs. offerings of the Metz, of Wyocollege together ming, comes to UC seamlessly for Blue Ash from the students. University of CinWatson, who cinnati main camlives in Union, pus in Clifton after Ky., also comes serving the past the from the UC main past seven years as campus where he assistant director of Watson was an internal the Center for First Year Experience and auditor for the university Learning Communities. In over the past seven years. his new role, he is the key In his new role, Watson will oversee all financial activities, develop fiscal strategy, and manage the overall budget for the college. UC Blue Ash College is the largest regional campus in Ohio and one of the fastest growing colleges in the University of Cincinnati. It provides more than 60 programs and degrees, including bachelor degrees in applied administration and radiation science technology. To learn more, go to www.ucblueash.edu.

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Friends of the Visiting Nurse Association Mark and Valerie Zummo of Kenwood, honorary event chair Frances Schloss of Hyde Park, and Dr. Greer Glazer, Dean of UC College of Nursing enjoy the 2013 Caring Awards. PROVIDED

Visiting Nurse Association honors stars in community health care The 14th annual Caring Award Dinner and Celebration took place Wednesday, May 1, at the Hilton Netherland Plaza in Downtown Cincinnati. This year’s event helped raise more than $141,000 for the Visiting Nurse Association, thereby providing much-needed home health and personal care services for people in Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky who cannot afford to pay. Awards are presented at the annual dinner to an organization and individuals who impact the lives and health of our community through their outcomes and quality of care. This year’s honorees: » Dr. John and Susan

Tew (Hyde Park) received the VNA Today Award. » Dr. Doug Smucker (Wyoming) received the VNA Heart and Hands Award. » ProScan Imaging and Dr. Stephen and Penny Pomeranz (Indian Hill) received the VNA Outstanding Community Healthcare Partner Award. » VNA Nurse Brandi Kramer (Dayton, KY) received the VNA Outstanding Caregiver of the Year Award. » Jack Hyde received the first VNA Spirit of Hope Award. Proceeds from the annual Caring Award event help provide these vital health care services to community members in need.


LIFE

MAY 22, 2013 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • B11

POLICE REPORTS GLENDALE Arrests/citations Juan Mendoza-Solis, 29, 975 Dewdrop Circle, Cincinnati, operating a motor vehicle without a valid license; May 9. Jasmaine Smith, 19, 595 Dewdrop Circle, Cincinnati, warrant from the Hamilton County Juvenile Court; May 11. Montreasa Miller,45, 1872 Lotushill Drive, Cincinnati, operating a motor vehicle while under suspension; May 11. Sarah Edison, 23, 1819 Provincial Court, Cincinnati, warrant from the Hamilton County Juvenile Court; May 14.

Incidents/investigations Burglary 700 block of Kingfisher; copper taken from two air conditioning units at the rear of the residence; residence was forcibly entered and an attempt was made to remove the water heater and copper pipes from basement; scene was processed; evidence gathered has been sent to crime lab for processing; unknown when the burglary occurred, possibly Friday, May 10, and Monday, May 13.

SHARONVILLE Arrests/citations Gyeorge Jeon, 50, 3553 Concerto, domestic violence at 3553 Concerto, May 5. Dustin Remar, 30, 190 Babbitt Road, drug possession at 11670 Chester, May 5. James Ford Jr., 52, 1474 Biloxi Drive, possession at Sharon and 75, May 4. Michelle Buckley, 44, 7281 Blackstone, operating vehicle intoxicated at Kemper and Lippelman, May 4. Gene Seary, 25, 666 Park, theft at 10900 Reading Road, May 1. Charles Washington, 32, 10857 Sharondale Woods, disorderly conduct at Sharondale Woods, May 1. Tiffany Smith, no age given, 3918 Trevor Ave., drug abuse at 17900 Reading Road, May 1. Micah Polincey, 18, 11066 Grand Ave., complicity to aggravated robbery at 11623 Timber Ridge, April 29. Robert Weber, 20, 9425 Bluewind Terrace, aggravated robbery at

Timber Ridge, April 29. Vickie Jones, 41, 11629 Timbe Ridge, assault at 10900 Reading Road, April 29.

Incidents/investigations Domestic violence Reported at Concerto, May 5. Theft Suitcase and contents of unknown value removed at 3900 Hauck Road, May 5. Checkbook of unknown value removed at 12164 Lebanon Road, May 3. Computer valued at $580 removed at 11561 Chester Road, May 2. Gas valued at $8 not paid for at 2225 E Sharon Road, May 2.

SPRINGDALE Arrests/citations Juvenile male, 15, vandalism, burglary at 12105 Lawnview, May 1. Juvenile female, 17, criminal trespassing at 12105 Lawnview, May 1. Jewell Damyka, 24, 5033 Winneste Ave., theft at 11700 Princeton Pike, May 1. Isain Lopez-Perez, 27, 124 Chesterdale, aggravated menacing at 1124 Chesterdale, May 2. Adrienne Terrell, 33, 6455 Home City Ave., theft at 1000 Sycamore, May 2. Darren Barnett, 28, 712 Northland, theft at 900 Kemper Road, May 4. Juan Alvarez, 33, 66 Princeton Square Circle, obstructing official business, May 4. Juvenile female, 14, drug abuse, drug paraphernalia at 11999 Lawnview, May 5. Juvenile male, 15, drug abuse at 11999 Lawnview, May 5. Nelvin Gomez-Gonzalez, 30, 204 Dean Drive, assault at 11975 Northwest Blvd., May 6. Jason Molden, 30, 982 Kemper Road, drug abuse at 400 Kemper Road, May 7. Darin Edwards, 41, 4111 Sherwood, receiving stolen property at 12105 Lawnview, May 7.

Incidents/investigations Assault Reported at 11619 Rose Lane, May 6. Reported at 2108 Galion Lane, May 6. Counterfeit

Counterfeit bills passed at 133 Kemper Road, May 7. Criminal damaging Window of building broken at 11999 Lawnview, May 6. Criminal mischief Portatoilet tipped over at 1 Lawnview, May 5. Nails underneath vehicle at 576 Grandin, May 3. Domestic Reported at Dean, May 7. Reported at Princeton Pike, May 2. Gross sexual imposition Reported at 11700 Princeton Pike, May 4. Theft Merchandise valued at $1,681 removed at 11700 Princeton Pike, May 7. Cell phone valued at $600 removed at 11711 Princeton Pike, May 6. Gas of unknown value not paid for at 11620 Springfield Pike, May 6. $25 in gas pumped and not paid for at 11620 Springfield Pike, May 6. Credit cards of unknown value removed at 11580 Olde Gate Drive, May 6. Briefcase valued at $150 removed at 11755 Commons Circle, May 4. Reported at 11620 Springfield Pike, May 4. Compressor valued at $900 removed at 316 Northland Blvd., May 3. Merchandise valued at $1192 removed at 11700 Princeton Pike, May 2. $66 in gas pumped and not paid for at Kenn Road, May 2. $27 removed at 12105 Lawnview, May 1.

Boone, NC 28607.

Nancy R. Gear died May 12. She was an active member for more than 40 years of Sharonville United Methodist Church. Survived by children Robert L. (Lisa), Thomas R. (Susan), Ronald J. Gear and Laura (Michael) Netherton; grandchildren Ben, John, Paige, Tyler and Brooks Gear and Haley and Matthew Netheron; siblings Don Bell and Janet McElroy. Preceded in death by husband, Richard J. Gear. Services were May 16 at Sharonville United Methodist Church. Memorials to: Sharonville United Methodist Church, 3751 Creek Road, Sharonville OH 45241; or Samaritan’s Purse, P.O. Box 3000,

Ron Hilvers

Ronald A. Hilvers died at 77. He taught at Roger Bacon, Reading, Xavier and UC and was curriculum director for Reading Schools. Survived by wife, Dottie; children Rick (Sallie), Suzn, Carla (Terry); grandchildren Mike, Lauren, Jack and Andrew. Services were May 3 at St. Lawrence Church. Memorials to: Epilepsy Foundation, 8301 Professional Place, Suite 200, Landover, MD 20785; or St. Lawrence Education Fund, 3680 Warsaw Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45205.

Glendale 17 Matthews Court: Losey Jeffrey D. to Dages Jacqueline O. & Ryan A.; $320,000. 52 Creekwood Square: Kautzman Mary C. Tr to Lauter Elizabeth A.; $101,400. 90 Coral Ave.: Gomez Alberto P. & Ana R. to Halter Cara F. & Karl Ryan; $490,000. 90 Coral Ave.: Gomez Alberto P. & Ana R. to Halter Cara F. & Karl Ryan; $490,000.

Sharonville 10723 Sharondale Road: Federal National Mortgage Association to Lohmiller Real Estate LLC; $51,400. 10933 Thornview Drive: Schroeck Steven to Caudill Jeffrey O.; $120,000. 1491 Continental Drive: Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. to Skorobogat Mikhail & Olga; $55,000. 3984 Cottingham Drive: Myers Joyce J. to Dumont Dustin R.;

Arrests/citations

Incidents/investigations

$132,000. 4031 Haverstraw Drive: Union Savings Bank to Dalonzo Dominic; $65,000. 4089 Oakleaf Court: Hickman Daniel F. to Scheiding Jonathan M.; $264,000. 4089 Oakleaf Court: Hickman Daniel F. to Scheiding Jonathan M.; $264,000. 5436 Dickens Drive: Gildenblatt Kristin Hannan Tr & Daryl L. Tr to Deyoung Mary & Michael; $145,000.

Springdale 11815 Van Cleve Ave.: Tribbey Lena B. to J.D. Smith Holdings LLC; $50,000. 11815 Van Cleve Ave.: Tribbey Lena B. to J. D. Smith Holdings LLC; $50,000. 12179 Kenn Road: Reed Rector E. to Ruiz Ysabel; $92,500.

Wyoming 211 Hillcrest Drive: Goodall John P. & Sharon L. to Kirk Christiaan Robert & Robin Marie Prazak; $316,000. 276 Compton Ridge Drive: Orourke Homes And Remodelling LLC to Heldman Christopher M. & Kristin; $290,000. 328 Compton Hills Drive: Grannan Kurt A. & Brenda S. to Blancher Guillaume & Luan N.; $314,500. 338 Shoshone Court: NA Elizabeth I. to Robinson Steven Carl & Christine G.; $393,000. 338 Shoshone Court: NA Elizabeth I. to Robinson Steven Carl & Christine G.; $393,000.

U15-U18

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661 W N Bend Rd 45224

Boys: Mon & Tue, June 3-4 Girls: Wed & Thu, June 5-6 6:30-8:00 PM @Hummer Park (across from St X HS)

STAR SC serves the central suburbs of Cincinnati, providing outstanding training and development and is a proud partner of the Cincy Saints and member club of the Saints Development Academy

All participants must register online prior to tryout sessions. CE-0000556471

Robert H. Ruck

Robert H. Ruck, 92, died May 14. He was a US Army veteran of World War II. Survived by children Robin (Joe) Del Ciello and Nancy (Dale) Frietch; grandchildren Angie (Jeremy) McAfee, Lindsey (Brad) Callahan and Darren (Melissa) Schneider; great-grandchildren Jonah, Ava, Riley, Mia, Easten and Reid; and little brother, Russ Turner. Preceded in death by wife, Millie C. (nee Rieth) Ruck. Services were May 18 at Mihovk-Rosenacker Funeral Home, Evendale. Memorials to: Hospice of Cincinnati, P.O. Box 633597, Cincinnati, OH 45263.

NOTICE

GERACI FINE JEWELRY NOW BUYING COSTUME JEWELRY

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Also buying silverplated, flatware, trays and tea sets. We also buy fine jewelry, diamonds, sterling silver and coins. Call for information FREE VERBAL APPRAISAL

Geraci Fine Jewelry

9212 Colerain Ave. • 513-385-4653 www.GeraciFineJewelry.com CE-0000556565

Information is provided as a public service by the office of Hamilton County Auditor Dusty Rhodes. Neighborhood designations are approximate.

Sun., June 2 Girls 5-6:30 PM Boys 6:30-8:00 PM @ Winton Woods HS

Joey Hollingsworth, 43, 548 Roebling Road, Cincinnati, operating vehicle impaired, Springfield Pike, May 12. Theft Vehicle’s passenger side window was broken out and a cash box containing $400 was taken, Pendery Avenue, May 7. Two unknown subjects left LaRosa’s without paying their bill, Springfield Pike, May 8. Bicycle taken from the victim’s side yard, Wentworth Avenue, May 12. Several items were taken from the victim’s unlocked vehicle, Elm Avenue, May 12.

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LIFE

B12 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • MAY 22, 2013

MITSUBISHI

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2011 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY GOLD, V6, ALUM

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2012 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN V6, STOWING, PW, PC, CD #C8132 ...................... WAS $22,995 NOW

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tri-county-press-052213